Sample records for design cad models

  1. Creation of Anatomically Accurate Computer-Aided Design (CAD) Solid Models from Medical Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, John E.; Graham, R. Scott; Samareh, Jamshid A.; Oberlander, Eric J.; Broaddus, William C.

    1999-01-01

    Most surgical instrumentation and implants used in the world today are designed with sophisticated Computer-Aided Design (CAD)/Computer-Aided Manufacturing (CAM) software. This software automates the mechanical development of a product from its conceptual design through manufacturing. CAD software also provides a means of manipulating solid models prior to Finite Element Modeling (FEM). Few surgical products are designed in conjunction with accurate CAD models of human anatomy because of the difficulty with which these models are created. We have developed a novel technique that creates anatomically accurate, patient specific CAD solids from medical images in a matter of minutes.

  2. Digital Sketch Modelling: Integrating Digital Sketching as a Transition between Sketching and CAD in Industrial Design Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranscombe, Charlie; Bissett-Johnson, Katherine

    2017-01-01

    Literature on the use of design tools in educational settings notes an uneasy relationship between student use of traditional hand sketching and digital modelling tools (CAD) during the industrial design process. This is often manifested in the transition from sketching to CAD and exacerbated by a preference of current students to use CAD. In this…

  3. Creation of the Driver Fixed Heel Point (FHP) CAD Accommodation Model for Military Ground Vehicle Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-04

    interior surfaces and direct field of view have been added per MIL-STD- 1472G. This CAD model can be applied early in the vehicle design process to ensure... interior surfaces and direct field of view have been added per MIL-STD-1472G. This CAD model can be applied early in the vehicle design process to ensure...Accommodation Model for Military Ground Vehicle Design Paper presented at 2016 NDIA/GVSETS Conference, Aug 4, 2016 4 August 2016 UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED

  4. Cam Design Projects in an Advanced CAD Course for Mechanical Engineers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ault, H. K.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to present applications of solid modeling aimed at modeling of complex geometries such as splines and blended surfaces in advanced CAD courses. These projects, in CAD-based Mechanical Engineering courses, are focused on the use of the CAD system to solve design problems for applications in machine design, namely the…

  5. Using the Continuum of Design Modelling Techniques to Aid the Development of CAD Modeling Skills in First Year Industrial Design Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storer, I. J.; Campbell, R. I.

    2012-01-01

    Industrial Designers need to understand and command a number of modelling techniques to communicate their ideas to themselves and others. Verbal explanations, sketches, engineering drawings, computer aided design (CAD) models and physical prototypes are the most commonly used communication techniques. Within design, unlike some disciplines,…

  6. CAD: Designs on Business.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milburn, Ken

    1988-01-01

    Provides a general review of the field of Computer-Aided Design Software including specific reviews of "Autosketch,""Generic CADD,""Drafix 1 Plus,""FastCAD," and "Autocad Release 9." Brief articles include "Blueprint for Generation,""CAD for Every Department,""Ideas…

  7. CAD-model-based vision for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, Linda G.

    1988-01-01

    A pose acquisition system operating in space must be able to perform well in a variety of different applications including automated guidance and inspections tasks with many different, but known objects. Since the space station is being designed with automation in mind, there will be CAD models of all the objects, including the station itself. The construction of vision models and procedures directly from the CAD models is the goal of this project. The system that is being designed and implementing must convert CAD models to vision models, predict visible features from a given view point from the vision models, construct view classes representing views of the objects, and use the view class model thus derived to rapidly determine the pose of the object from single images and/or stereo pairs.

  8. CAD tools for detector design

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Womersley, J.; DiGiacomo, N.; Killian, K.

    1990-04-01

    Detailed detector design has traditionally been divided between engineering optimization for structural integrity and subsequent physicist evaluation. The availability of CAD systems for engineering design enables the tasks to be integrated by providing tools for particle simulation within the CAD system. We believe this will speed up detector design and avoid problems due to the late discovery of shortcomings in the detector. This could occur because of the slowness of traditional verification techniques (such as detailed simulation with GEANT). One such new particle simulation tool is described. It is being used with the I-DEAS CAD package for SSC detector designmore » at Martin-Marietta Astronautics and is to be released through the SSC Laboratory.« less

  9. Wind Turbine Blade CAD Models Used as Scaffolding Technique to Teach Design Engineers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irwin, John

    2013-01-01

    The Siemens PLM CAD software NX is commonly used for designing mechanical systems, and in complex systems such as the emerging area of wind power, the ability to have a model controlled by design parameters is a certain advantage. Formula driven expressions based on the amount of available wind in an area can drive the amount of effective surface…

  10. CAD-based Automatic Modeling Method for Geant4 geometry model Through MCAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong; Nie, Fanzhi; Wang, Guozhong; Long, Pengcheng; LV, Zhongliang; LV, Zhongliang

    2014-06-01

    Geant4 is a widely used Monte Carlo transport simulation package. Before calculating using Geant4, the calculation model need be established which could be described by using Geometry Description Markup Language (GDML) or C++ language. However, it is time-consuming and error-prone to manually describe the models by GDML. Automatic modeling methods have been developed recently, but there are some problem existed in most of present modeling programs, specially some of them were not accurate or adapted to specifically CAD format. To convert the GDML format models to CAD format accurately, a Geant4 Computer Aided Design (CAD) based modeling method was developed for automatically converting complex CAD geometry model into GDML geometry model. The essence of this method was dealing with CAD model represented with boundary representation (B-REP) and GDML model represented with constructive solid geometry (CSG). At first, CAD model was decomposed to several simple solids which had only one close shell. And then the simple solid was decomposed to convex shell set. Then corresponding GDML convex basic solids were generated by the boundary surfaces getting from the topological characteristic of a convex shell. After the generation of these solids, GDML model was accomplished with series boolean operations. This method was adopted in CAD/Image-based Automatic Modeling Program for Neutronics & Radiation Transport (MCAM), and tested with several models including the examples in Geant4 install package. The results showed that this method could convert standard CAD model accurately, and can be used for Geant4 automatic modeling.

  11. Design of Complete Dentures by Adopting CAD Developed for Fixed Prostheses.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanfeng; Han, Weili; Cao, Jing; Iv, Yuan; Zhang, Yue; Han, Yishi; Shen, Yi; Ma, Zheng; Liu, Huanyue

    2018-02-01

    The demand for complete dentures is expected to increase worldwide, but complete dentures are mainly designed and fabricated manually involving a broad series of clinical and laboratory procedures. Therefore, the quality of complete dentures largely depends on the skills of the dentist and technician, leading to difficulty in quality control. Computer-aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) has been used to design and fabricate various dental restorations including dental inlays, veneers, crowns, partial crowns, and fixed partial dentures (FPDs). It has been envisioned that the application of CAD/CAM technology could reduce intensive clinical/laboratory work for the fabrication of complete dentures; however, CAD/CAM is seldom used to fabricate complete dentures due to the lack of suitable CAD software to design virtual complete dentures although the CAM techniques are in a much advanced stage. Here we report the successful design of virtual complete dentures using CAD software of 3Shape Dental System 2012, which was developed for designing fixed prostheses instead of complete dentures. Our results demonstrated that complete dentures could be successfully designed by the combination of two modeling processes, single coping and full anatomical FPD, available in the 3Shape Dental System 2012. © 2016 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  12. CAD Integration : new optical design possibilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haumonte, Jean-Baptiste; Venturino, Jean-Claude

    2005-09-01

    The development of optical design and analysis tools in a CAD software can help to optimise the design, size and performance of tomorrow's consumer products. While optics was still held back by software limitations, CAD programs were moving forward in leaps and bounds, improving manufacturing technologies and making it possible to design and produce highly innovative and sophisticated products. The problem was that in the past, 'traditional' optical design programs were only able to simulate spherical and aspherical lenses, meaning that the optical designers were limited to designing systems which were a series of imperfect lenses, each one correcting the last. That is why OPTIS has created the first optical design program to be fully integrated into a CAD program. The technology is available from OPTIS in an integrated SOLIDWORKS or CATIA V5 version. Users of this software can reduce the number of lenses needed in a system. Designers will now have access to complex surfaces such as NURBS meaning they will now be able to define free shape progressive lenses and even improve on optical performances using fewer lenses. This revolutionary technology will allow mechanical designers to work on optical systems and to share information with optical designers for the first time. Previously not possible in a CAD program you may now determine all the optical performances of any optical system, providing first order and third order performances, sequential and non-sequential ray-tracing, wavefront surfaces, point spread function, MTF, spot-diagram, using real optical surfaces and guaranteeing the mechanical precision necessary for an optical system.

  13. Utilization of CAD/CAE for concurrent design of structural aircraft components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, William C.

    1993-01-01

    The feasibility of installing the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy telescope (named SOFIA) into an aircraft for NASA astronomy studies is investigated using CAD/CAE equipment to either design or supply data for every facet of design engineering. The aircraft selected for the platform was a Boeing 747, chosen on the basis of its ability to meet the flight profiles required for the given mission and payload. CAD models of the fuselage of two of the aircraft models studied (747-200 and 747 SP) were developed, and models for the component parts of the telescope and subsystems were developed by the various concurrent engineering groups of the SOFIA program, to determine the requirements for the cavity opening and for design configuration. It is noted that, by developing a plan to use CAD/CAE for concurrent engineering at the beginning of the study, it was possible to produce results in about two-thirds of the time required using traditional methods.

  14. CAD Skills Increased through Multicultural Design Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemons, Stephanie

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses how students in a college-entry-level CAD course researched four generations of their family histories and documented cultural and symbolic influences within their family backgrounds. AutoCAD software was then used to manipulate those cultural and symbolic images to create the design for a multicultural area rug. AutoCAD was…

  15. TARDEC FIXED HEEL POINT (FHP): DRIVER CAD ACCOMMODATION MODEL VERIFICATION REPORT

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-11-09

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES N/A 14. ABSTRACT Easy-to-use Computer-Aided Design (CAD) tools, known as accommodation models, are needed by the ground vehicle... designers when developing the interior workspace for the occupant. The TARDEC Fixed Heel Point (FHP): Driver CAD Accommodation Model described in this...is intended to provide the composite boundaries representing the body of the defined target design population, including posture prediction

  16. Automated CAD design for sculptured airfoil surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, S. D.; Yeagley, S. R.

    1990-11-01

    The design of tightly tolerated sculptured surfaces such as those for airfoils requires a significant design effort in order to machine the tools to create these surfaces. Because of the quantity of numerical data required to describe the airfoil surfaces, a CAD approach is required. Although this approach will result in productivity gains, much larger gains can be achieved by automating the design process. This paper discusses an application which resulted in an eightfold improvement in productivity by automating the design process on the CAD system.

  17. TGeoCad: an Interface between ROOT and CAD Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luzzi, C.; Carminati, F.

    2014-06-01

    In the simulation of High Energy Physics experiment a very high precision in the description of the detector geometry is essential to achieve the required performances. The physicists in charge of Monte Carlo Simulation of the detector need to collaborate efficiently with the engineers working at the mechanical design of the detector. Often, this collaboration is made hard by the usage of different and incompatible software. ROOT is an object-oriented C++ framework used by physicists for storing, analyzing and simulating data produced by the high-energy physics experiments while CAD (Computer-Aided Design) software is used for mechanical design in the engineering field. The necessity to improve the level of communication between physicists and engineers led to the implementation of an interface between the ROOT geometrical modeler used by the virtual Monte Carlo simulation software and the CAD systems. In this paper we describe the design and implementation of the TGeoCad Interface that has been developed to enable the use of ROOT geometrical models in several CAD systems. To achieve this goal, the ROOT geometry description is converted into STEP file format (ISO 10303), which can be imported and used by many CAD systems.

  18. On the Use of Parmetric-CAD Systems and Cartesian Methods for Aerodynamic Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemec, Marian; Aftosmis, Michael J.; Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2004-01-01

    Automated, high-fidelity tools for aerodynamic design face critical issues in attempting to optimize real-life geometry arid in permitting radical design changes. Success in these areas promises not only significantly shorter design- cycle times, but also superior and unconventional designs. To address these issues, we investigate the use of a parmetric-CAD system in conjunction with an embedded-boundary Cartesian method. Our goal is to combine the modeling capabilities of feature-based CAD with the robustness and flexibility of component-based Cartesian volume-mesh generation for complex geometry problems. We present the development of an automated optimization frame-work with a focus on the deployment of such a CAD-based design approach in a heterogeneous parallel computing environment.

  19. A visual LISP program for voxelizing AutoCAD solid models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marschallinger, Robert; Jandrisevits, Carmen; Zobl, Fritz

    2015-01-01

    AutoCAD solid models are increasingly recognized in geological and geotechnical 3D modeling. In order to bridge the currently existing gap between AutoCAD solid models and the grid modeling realm, a Visual LISP program is presented that converts AutoCAD solid models into voxel arrays. Acad2Vox voxelizer works on a 3D-model that is made up of arbitrary non-overlapping 3D-solids. After definition of the target voxel array geometry, 3D-solids are scanned at grid positions and properties are streamed to an ASCII output file. Acad2Vox has a novel voxelization strategy that combines a hierarchical reduction of sampling dimensionality with an innovative use of AutoCAD-specific methods for a fast and memory-saving operation. Acad2Vox provides georeferenced, voxelized analogs of 3D design data that can act as regions-of-interest in later geostatistical modeling and simulation. The Supplement includes sample geological solid models with instructions for practical work with Acad2Vox.

  20. Design Automation Using Script Languages. High-Level CAD Templates in Non-Parametric Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, R.; Bazán, A. M.

    2017-10-01

    The main purpose of this work is to study the advantages offered by the application of traditional techniques of technical drawing in processes for automation of the design, with non-parametric CAD programs, provided with scripting languages. Given that an example drawing can be solved with traditional step-by-step detailed procedures, is possible to do the same with CAD applications and to generalize it later, incorporating references. In today’s modern CAD applications, there are striking absences of solutions for building engineering: oblique projections (military and cavalier), 3D modelling of complex stairs, roofs, furniture, and so on. The use of geometric references (using variables in script languages) and their incorporation into high-level CAD templates allows the automation of processes. Instead of repeatedly creating similar designs or modifying their data, users should be able to use these templates to generate future variations of the same design. This paper presents the automation process of several complex drawing examples based on CAD script files aided with parametric geometry calculation tools. The proposed method allows us to solve complex geometry designs not currently incorporated in the current CAD applications and to subsequently create other new derivatives without user intervention. Automation in the generation of complex designs not only saves time but also increases the quality of the presentations and reduces the possibility of human errors.

  1. A SINDA thermal model using CAD/CAE technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, Jose A.; Spencer, Steve

    1992-01-01

    The approach to thermal analysis described by this paper is a technique that incorporates Computer Aided Design (CAD) and Computer Aided Engineering (CAE) to develop a thermal model that has the advantages of Finite Element Methods (FEM) without abandoning the unique advantages of Finite Difference Methods (FDM) in the analysis of thermal systems. The incorporation of existing CAD geometry, the powerful use of a pre and post processor and the ability to do interdisciplinary analysis, will be described.

  2. CAD/CAM interface design of excimer laser micro-processing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Liang; Chen, Tao; Zuo, Tiechuan

    2005-12-01

    Recently CAD/CAM technology has been gradually used in the field of laser processing. The excimer laser micro-processing system just identified G instruction before CAD/CAM interface was designed. However the course of designing a part with G instruction for users is too hard. The efficiency is low and probability of making errors is high. By secondary development technology of AutoCAD with Visual Basic, an application was developed to pick-up each entity's information in graph and convert them to each entity's processing parameters. Also an additional function was added into former controlling software to identify these processing parameters of each entity and realize continue processing of graphic. Based on the above CAD/CAM interface, Users can design a part in AutoCAD instead of using G instruction. The period of designing a part is sharply shortened. This new way of design greatly guarantees the processing parameters of the part is right and exclusive. The processing of complex novel bio-chip has been realized by this new function.

  3. CAD-Based Aerodynamic Design of Complex Configurations using a Cartesian Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemec, Marian; Aftosmis, Michael J.; Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2003-01-01

    A modular framework for aerodynamic optimization of complex geometries is developed. By working directly with a parametric CAD system, complex-geometry models are modified nnd tessellated in an automatic fashion. The use of a component-based Cartesian method significantly reduces the demands on the CAD system, and also provides for robust and efficient flowfield analysis. The optimization is controlled using either a genetic or quasi-Newton algorithm. Parallel efficiency of the framework is maintained even when subject to limited CAD resources by dynamically re-allocating the processors of the flow solver. Overall, the resulting framework can explore designs incorporating large shape modifications and changes in topology.

  4. Generation and use of human 3D-CAD models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grotepass, Juergen; Speyer, Hartmut; Kaiser, Ralf

    2002-05-01

    Individualized Products are one of the ten mega trends of the 21st Century with human modeling as the key issue for tomorrow's design and product development. The use of human modeling software for computer based ergonomic simulations within the production process increases quality while reducing costs by 30- 50 percent and shortening production time. This presentation focuses on the use of human 3D-CAD models for both, the ergonomic design of working environments and made to measure garment production. Today, the entire production chain can be designed, individualized models generated and analyzed in 3D computer environments. Anthropometric design for ergonomics is matched to human needs, thus preserving health. Ergonomic simulation includes topics as human vision, reachability, kinematics, force and comfort analysis and international design capabilities. In German more than 17 billions of Mark are moved to other industries, because clothes do not fit. Individual clothing tailored to the customer's preference means surplus value, pleasure and perfect fit. The body scanning technology is the key to generation and use of human 3D-CAD models for both, the ergonomic design of working environments and made to measure garment production.

  5. A tool to convert CAD models for importation into Geant4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuosalo, C.; Carlsmith, D.; Dasu, S.; Palladino, K.; LUX-ZEPLIN Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    The engineering design of a particle detector is usually performed in a Computer Aided Design (CAD) program, and simulation of the detector’s performance can be done with a Geant4-based program. However, transferring the detector design from the CAD program to Geant4 can be laborious and error-prone. SW2GDML is a tool that reads a design in the popular SOLIDWORKS CAD program and outputs Geometry Description Markup Language (GDML), used by Geant4 for importing and exporting detector geometries. Other methods for outputting CAD designs are available, such as the STEP format, and tools exist to convert these formats into GDML. However, these conversion methods produce very large and unwieldy designs composed of tessellated solids that can reduce Geant4 performance. In contrast, SW2GDML produces compact, human-readable GDML that employs standard geometric shapes rather than tessellated solids. This paper will describe the development and current capabilities of SW2GDML and plans for its enhancement. The aim of this tool is to automate importation of detector engineering models into Geant4-based simulation programs to support rapid, iterative cycles of detector design, simulation, and optimization.

  6. Design and fabrication of complete dentures using CAD/CAM technology

    PubMed Central

    Han, Weili; Li, Yanfeng; Zhang, Yue; lv, Yuan; Zhang, Ying; Hu, Ping; Liu, Huanyue; Ma, Zheng; Shen, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to test the feasibility of using commercially available computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology including 3Shape Dental System 2013 trial version, WIELAND V2.0.049 and WIELAND ZENOTEC T1 milling machine to design and fabricate complete dentures. The modeling process of full denture available in the trial version of 3Shape Dental System 2013 was used to design virtual complete dentures on the basis of 3-dimensional (3D) digital edentulous models generated from the physical models. The virtual complete dentures designed were exported to CAM software of WIELAND V2.0.049. A WIELAND ZENOTEC T1 milling machine controlled by the CAM software was used to fabricate physical dentitions and baseplates by milling acrylic resin composite plates. The physical dentitions were bonded to the corresponding baseplates to form the maxillary and mandibular complete dentures. Virtual complete dentures were successfully designed using the software through several steps including generation of 3D digital edentulous models, model analysis, arrangement of artificial teeth, trimming relief area, and occlusal adjustment. Physical dentitions and baseplates were successfully fabricated according to the designed virtual complete dentures using milling machine controlled by a CAM software. Bonding physical dentitions to the corresponding baseplates generated the final physical complete dentures. Our study demonstrated that complete dentures could be successfully designed and fabricated by using CAD/CAM. PMID:28072686

  7. A CAD (Classroom Assessment Design) of a Computer Programming Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawi, Nazir S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a CAD (classroom assessment design) of an entry-level undergraduate computer programming course "Computer Programming I". CAD has been the product of a long experience in teaching computer programming courses including teaching "Computer Programming I" 22 times. Each semester, CAD is evaluated and modified…

  8. Teaching for CAD Expertise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chester, Ivan

    2007-01-01

    CAD (Computer Aided Design) has now become an integral part of Technology Education. The recent introduction of highly sophisticated, low-cost CAD software and CAM hardware capable of running on desktop computers has accelerated this trend. There is now quite widespread introduction of solid modeling CAD software into secondary schools but how…

  9. User productivity as a function of AutoCAD interface design.

    PubMed

    Mitta, D A; Flores, P L

    1995-12-01

    Increased operator productivity is a desired outcome of user-CAD interaction scenarios. Two objectives of this research were to (1) define a measure of operator productivity and (2) empirically investigate the potential effects of CAD interface design on operator productivity, where productivity is defined as the percentage of a drawing session correctly completed per unit time. Here, AutoCAD provides the CAD environment of interest. Productivity with respect to two AutoCAD interface designs (menu, template) and three task types (draw, dimension, display) was investigated. Analysis of user productivity data revealed significantly higher productivity under the menu interface condition than under the template interface condition. A significant effect of task type was also discovered, where user productivity under display tasks was higher than productivity under the draw and dimension tasks. Implications of these results are presented.

  10. Dental students' preferences and performance in crown design: conventional wax-added versus CAD.

    PubMed

    Douglas, R Duane; Hopp, Christa D; Augustin, Marcus A

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate dental students' perceptions of traditional waxing vs. computer-aided crown design and to determine the effectiveness of either technique through comparative grading of the final products. On one of twoidentical tooth preparations, second-year students at one dental school fabricated a wax pattern for a full contour crown; on the second tooth preparation, the same students designed and fabricated an all-ceramic crown using computer-aided design (CAD) and computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) technology. Projects were graded for occlusion and anatomic form by three faculty members. On completion of the projects, 100 percent of the students (n=50) completed an eight-question, five-point Likert scalesurvey, designed to assess their perceptions of and learning associated with the two design techniques. The average grades for the crown design projects were 78.3 (CAD) and 79.1 (wax design). The mean numbers of occlusal contacts were 3.8 (CAD) and 2.9(wax design), which was significantly higher for CAD (p=0.02). The survey results indicated that students enjoyed designing afull contour crown using CAD as compared to using conventional wax techniques and spent less time designing the crown using CAD. From a learning perspective, students felt that they learned more about position and the size/strength of occlusal contacts using CAD. However, students recognized that CAD technology has limits in terms of representing anatomic contours and excursive occlusion compared to conventional wax techniques. The results suggest that crown design using CAD could be considered as an adjunct to conventional wax-added techniques in preclinical fixed prosthodontic curricula.

  11. PromoterCAD: data-driven design of plant regulatory DNA

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Robert Sidney; Nishikata, Koro; Shimoyama, Sayoko; Yoshida, Yuko; Matsui, Minami; Makita, Yuko; Toyoda, Tetsuro

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic promoters can control the timing, location and amount of gene expression for any organism. PromoterCAD is a web application for designing synthetic promoters with altered transcriptional regulation. We use a data-first approach, using published high-throughput expression and motif data from for Arabidopsis thaliana to guide DNA design. We demonstrate data mining tools for finding motifs related to circadian oscillations and tissue-specific expression patterns. PromoterCAD is built on the LinkData open platform for data publication and rapid web application development, allowing new data to be easily added, and the source code modified to add new functionality. PromoterCAD URL: http://promotercad.org. LinkData URL: http://linkdata.org. PMID:23766287

  12. CATO: a CAD tool for intelligent design of optical networks and interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chlamtac, Imrich; Ciesielski, Maciej; Fumagalli, Andrea F.; Ruszczyk, Chester; Wedzinga, Gosse

    1997-10-01

    Increasing communication speed requirements have created a great interest in very high speed optical and all-optical networks and interconnects. The design of these optical systems is a highly complex task, requiring the simultaneous optimization of various parts of the system, ranging from optical components' characteristics to access protocol techniques. Currently there are no computer aided design (CAD) tools on the market to support the interrelated design of all parts of optical communication systems, thus the designer has to rely on costly and time consuming testbed evaluations. The objective of the CATO (CAD tool for optical networks and interconnects) project is to develop a prototype of an intelligent CAD tool for the specification, design, simulation and optimization of optical communication networks. CATO allows the user to build an abstract, possible incomplete, model of the system, and determine its expected performance. Based on design constraints provided by the user, CATO will automatically complete an optimum design, using mathematical programming techniques, intelligent search methods and artificial intelligence (AI). Initial design and testing of a CATO prototype (CATO-1) has been completed recently. The objective was to prove the feasibility of combining AI techniques, simulation techniques, an optical device library and a graphical user interface into a flexible CAD tool for obtaining optimal communication network designs in terms of system cost and performance. CATO-1 is an experimental tool for designing packet-switching wavelength division multiplexing all-optical communication systems using a LAN/MAN ring topology as the underlying network. The two specific AI algorithms incorporated are simulated annealing and a genetic algorithm. CATO-1 finds the optimal number of transceivers for each network node, using an objective function that includes the cost of the devices and the overall system performance.

  13. Viewing CAD Drawings on the Internet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwendau, Mark

    2004-01-01

    Computer aided design (CAD) has been producing 3-D models for years. AutoCAD software is frequently used to create sophisticated 3-D models. These CAD files can be exported as 3DS files for import into Autodesk's 3-D Studio Viz. In this program, the user can render and modify the 3-D model before exporting it out as a WRL (world file hyperlinked)…

  14. RESEARCH AND DESIGN ABOUT VERSATILE 3D-CAD ENGINE FOR CONSTRUCTION

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Shigenori; Kubota, Satoshi; Kitagawa, Etsuji; Monobe, Kantaro; Nakamura, Kenji

    In the construction field of Japan, it is an important subject to build the environment where 3D-CAD data is used for CALS/EC, information construction, and an improvement in productivity. However, in the construction field, 3D-CAD software does not exist under the present circumstances. Then, in order to support development of domestic 3D-CAD software, it is required to develop a 3D-CAD engine. In this research, in order to familiarize the 3D-CAD software at low cost and quickly and build the environment where the 3D-CAD software is utilizable, investigation for designing a 3D-CAD engine is proposed. The target for investigation are the use scene of 3D-CAD, the seeds which accompany 3D-CAD, a standardization trend, existing products, IT component engineering. Based on results of the investigation, the functional requirements for the 3D-CAD engine for the construction field were concluded.

  15. Rule-Based Design of Plant Expression Vectors Using GenoCAD.

    PubMed

    Coll, Anna; Wilson, Mandy L; Gruden, Kristina; Peccoud, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Plant synthetic biology requires software tools to assist on the design of complex multi-genic expression plasmids. Here a vector design strategy to express genes in plants is formalized and implemented as a grammar in GenoCAD, a Computer-Aided Design software for synthetic biology. It includes a library of plant biological parts organized in structural categories and a set of rules describing how to assemble these parts into large constructs. Rules developed here are organized and divided into three main subsections according to the aim of the final construct: protein localization studies, promoter analysis and protein-protein interaction experiments. The GenoCAD plant grammar guides the user through the design while allowing users to customize vectors according to their needs. Therefore the plant grammar implemented in GenoCAD will help plant biologists take advantage of methods from synthetic biology to design expression vectors supporting their research projects.

  16. True Concurrent Thermal Engineering Integrating CAD Model Building with Finite Element and Finite Difference Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panczak, Tim; Ring, Steve; Welch, Mark

    1999-01-01

    Thermal engineering has long been left out of the concurrent engineering environment dominated by CAD (computer aided design) and FEM (finite element method) software. Current tools attempt to force the thermal design process into an environment primarily created to support structural analysis, which results in inappropriate thermal models. As a result, many thermal engineers either build models "by hand" or use geometric user interfaces that are separate from and have little useful connection, if any, to CAD and FEM systems. This paper describes the development of a new thermal design environment called the Thermal Desktop. This system, while fully integrated into a neutral, low cost CAD system, and which utilizes both FEM and FD methods, does not compromise the needs of the thermal engineer. Rather, the features needed for concurrent thermal analysis are specifically addressed by combining traditional parametric surface based radiation and FD based conduction modeling with CAD and FEM methods. The use of flexible and familiar temperature solvers such as SINDA/FLUINT (Systems Improved Numerical Differencing Analyzer/Fluid Integrator) is retained.

  17. A Case Study in CAD Design Automation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowe, Andrew G.; Hartman, Nathan W.

    2011-01-01

    Computer-aided design (CAD) software and other product life-cycle management (PLM) tools have become ubiquitous in industry during the past 20 years. Over this time they have continuously evolved, becoming programs with enormous capabilities, but the companies that use them have not evolved their design practices at the same rate. Due to the…

  18. An Educational Exercise Examining the Role of Model Attributes on the Creation and Alteration of CAD Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Michael D.; Diwakaran, Ram Prasad

    2011-01-01

    Computer-aided design (CAD) is a ubiquitous tool that today's students will be expected to use proficiently for numerous engineering purposes. Taking full advantage of the features available in modern CAD programs requires that models are created in a manner that allows others to easily understand how they are organized and alter them in an…

  19. BioNetCAD: design, simulation and experimental validation of synthetic biochemical networks

    PubMed Central

    Rialle, Stéphanie; Felicori, Liza; Dias-Lopes, Camila; Pérès, Sabine; El Atia, Sanaâ; Thierry, Alain R.; Amar, Patrick; Molina, Franck

    2010-01-01

    Motivation: Synthetic biology studies how to design and construct biological systems with functions that do not exist in nature. Biochemical networks, although easier to control, have been used less frequently than genetic networks as a base to build a synthetic system. To date, no clear engineering principles exist to design such cell-free biochemical networks. Results: We describe a methodology for the construction of synthetic biochemical networks based on three main steps: design, simulation and experimental validation. We developed BioNetCAD to help users to go through these steps. BioNetCAD allows designing abstract networks that can be implemented thanks to CompuBioTicDB, a database of parts for synthetic biology. BioNetCAD enables also simulations with the HSim software and the classical Ordinary Differential Equations (ODE). We demonstrate with a case study that BioNetCAD can rationalize and reduce further experimental validation during the construction of a biochemical network. Availability and implementation: BioNetCAD is freely available at http://www.sysdiag.cnrs.fr/BioNetCAD. It is implemented in Java and supported on MS Windows. CompuBioTicDB is freely accessible at http://compubiotic.sysdiag.cnrs.fr/ Contact: stephanie.rialle@sysdiag.cnrs.fr; franck.molina@sysdiag.cnrs.fr Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:20628073

  20. Learning CAD at University through Summaries of the Rules of Design Intent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbero, Basilio Ramos; Pedrosa, Carlos Melgosa; Samperio, Raúl Zamora

    2017-01-01

    The ease with which 3D CAD models may be modified and reused are two key aspects that improve the design-intent variable and that can significantly shorten the development timelines of a product. A set of rules are gathered from various authors that take different 3D modelling strategies into account. These rules are then applied to CAD…

  1. Classroom Experiences in an Engineering Design Graphics Course with a CAD/CAM Extension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barr, Ronald E.; Juricic, Davor

    1997-01-01

    Reports on the development of a new CAD/CAM laboratory experience for an Engineering Design Graphics (EDG) course. The EDG curriculum included freehand sketching, introduction to Computer-Aided Design and Drafting (CADD), and emphasized 3-D solid modeling. Reviews the project and reports on the testing of the new laboratory components which were…

  2. A CAD approach to magnetic bearing design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeyaseelan, M.; Anand, D. K.; Kirk, J. A.

    1988-01-01

    A design methodology has been developed at the Magnetic Bearing Research Laboratory for designing magnetic bearings using a CAD approach. This is used in the algorithm of an interactive design software package. The package is a design tool developed to enable the designer to simulate the entire process of design and analysis of the system. Its capabilities include interactive input/modification of geometry, finding any possible saturation at critical sections of the system, and the design and analysis of a control system that stabilizes and maintains magnetic suspension.

  3. A step-by-step introduction to rule-based design of synthetic genetic constructs using GenoCAD.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Mandy L; Hertzberg, Russell; Adam, Laura; Peccoud, Jean

    2011-01-01

    GenoCAD is an open source web-based system that provides a streamlined, rule-driven process for designing genetic sequences. GenoCAD provides a graphical interface that allows users to design sequences consistent with formalized design strategies specific to a domain, organization, or project. Design strategies include limited sets of user-defined parts and rules indicating how these parts are to be combined in genetic constructs. In addition to reducing design time to minutes, GenoCAD improves the quality and reliability of the finished sequence by ensuring that the designs follow established rules of sequence construction. GenoCAD.org is a publicly available instance of GenoCAD that can be found at www.genocad.org. The source code and latest build are available from SourceForge to allow advanced users to install and customize GenoCAD for their unique needs. This chapter focuses primarily on how the GenoCAD tools can be used to organize genetic parts into customized personal libraries, then how these libraries can be used to design sequences. In addition, GenoCAD's parts management system and search capabilities are described in detail. Instructions are provided for installing a local instance of GenoCAD on a server. Some of the future enhancements of this rapidly evolving suite of applications are briefly described. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Effectiveness of braces designed using computer-aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) and finite element simulation compared to CAD/CAM only for the conservative treatment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: a prospective randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Cobetto, N; Aubin, C E; Parent, S; Clin, J; Barchi, S; Turgeon, I; Labelle, Hubert

    2016-10-01

    Clinical assessment of immediate in-brace effect of braces designed using CAD/CAM and FEM vs. only CAD/CAM for conservative treatment of AIS, using a randomized blinded and controlled study design. Forty AIS patients were prospectively recruited and randomized into two groups. For 19 patients (control group), the brace was designed using a scan of patient's torso and a conventional CAD/CAM approach (CtrlBrace). For the 21 other patients (test group), the brace was additionally designed using finite element modeling (FEM) and 3D reconstructions of spine, rib cage and pelvis (NewBrace). The NewBrace design was simulated and iteratively optimized to maximize the correction and minimize the contact surface and material. Both groups had comparable age, sex, weight, height, curve type and severity. Scoliosis Research Society standardized criteria for bracing were followed. Average Cobb angle prior to bracing was 27° and 28° for main thoracic (MT) and lumbar (L) curves, respectively, for the control group, while it was 33° and 28° for the test group. CtrlBraces reduced MT and L curves by 8° (29 %) and 10° (40 %), respectively, compared to 14° (43 %) and 13° (46 %) for NewBraces, which were simulated with a difference inferior to 5°. NewBraces were 50 % thinner and had 20 % less covering surface than CtrlBraces. Braces designed with CAD/CAM and 3D FEM simulation were more efficient and lighter than standard CAD/CAM TLSO's at first immediate in-brace evaluation. These results suggest that long-term effect of bracing in AIS may be improved using this new platform for brace fabrication. NCT02285621.

  5. An application protocol for CAD to CAD transfer of electronic information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azu, Charles C., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The exchange of Computer Aided Design (CAD) information between dissimilar CAD systems is a problem. This is especially true for transferring electronics CAD information such as multi-chip module (MCM), hybrid microcircuit assembly (HMA), and printed circuit board (PCB) designs. Currently, there exists several neutral data formats for transferring electronics CAD information. These include IGES, EDIF, and DXF formats. All these formats have limitations for use in exchanging electronic data. In an attempt to overcome these limitations, the Navy's MicroCIM program implemented a project to transfer hybrid microcircuit design information between dissimilar CAD systems. The IGES (Initial Graphics Exchange Specification) format is used since it is well established within the CAD industry. The goal of the project is to have a complete transfer of microelectronic CAD information, using IGES, without any data loss. An Application Protocol (AP) is being developed to specify how hybrid microcircuit CAD information will be represented by IGES entity constructs. The AP defines which IGES data items are appropriate for describing HMA geometry, connectivity, and processing as well as HMA material characteristics.

  6. CAD for small hydro projects

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Bishop, N.A. Jr.

    1994-04-01

    Over the past decade, computer-aided design (CAD) has become a practical and economical design tool. Today, specifying CAD hardware and software is relatively easy once you know what the design requirements are. But finding experienced CAD professionals is often more difficult. Most CAD users have only two or three years of design experience; more experienced design personnel are frequently not CAD literate. However, effective use of CAD can be the key to lowering design costs and improving design quality--a quest familiar to every manager and designer. By emphasizing computer-aided design literacy at all levels of the firm, a Canadian joint-venturemore » company that specializes in engineering small hydroelectric projects has cut costs, become more productive and improved design quality. This article describes how they did it.« less

  7. Development of a CAD Model Simplification Framework for Finite Element Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    A. Senthil Kumar , and KH Lee. Automatic solid decomposition and reduction for non-manifold geometric model generation. Computer-Aided Design, 36(13...CAD/CAM: concepts, techniques, and applications. Wiley-interscience, 1995. [38] Avneesh Sud, Mark Foskey, and Dinesh Manocha. Homotopy-preserving

  8. An Evaluation of Internet-Based CAD Collaboration Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Shana Shiang-Fong

    2004-01-01

    Due to the now widespread use of the Internet, most companies now require computer aided design (CAD) tools that support distributed collaborative design on the Internet. Such CAD tools should enable designers to share product models, as well as related data, from geographically distant locations. However, integrated collaborative design…

  9. Writing DNA with GenoCAD.

    PubMed

    Czar, Michael J; Cai, Yizhi; Peccoud, Jean

    2009-07-01

    Chemical synthesis of custom DNA made to order calls for software streamlining the design of synthetic DNA sequences. GenoCAD (www.genocad.org) is a free web-based application to design protein expression vectors, artificial gene networks and other genetic constructs composed of multiple functional blocks called genetic parts. By capturing design strategies in grammatical models of DNA sequences, GenoCAD guides the user through the design process. By successively clicking on icons representing structural features or actual genetic parts, complex constructs composed of dozens of functional blocks can be designed in a matter of minutes. GenoCAD automatically derives the construct sequence from its comprehensive libraries of genetic parts. Upon completion of the design process, users can download the sequence for synthesis or further analysis. Users who elect to create a personal account on the system can customize their workspace by creating their own parts libraries, adding new parts to the libraries, or reusing designs to quickly generate sets of related constructs.

  10. Computing Mass Properties From AutoCAD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, A.

    1990-01-01

    Mass properties of structures computed from data in drawings. AutoCAD to Mass Properties (ACTOMP) computer program developed to facilitate quick calculations of mass properties of structures containing many simple elements in such complex configurations as trusses or sheet-metal containers. Mathematically modeled in AutoCAD or compatible computer-aided design (CAD) system in minutes by use of three-dimensional elements. Written in Microsoft Quick-Basic (Version 2.0).

  11. Challenges facing developers of CAD/CAM models that seek to predict human working postures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiker, Steven F.

    2005-11-01

    This paper outlines the need for development of human posture prediction models for Computer Aided Design (CAD) and Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAM) design applications in product, facility and work design. Challenges facing developers of posture prediction algorithms are presented and discussed.

  12. Marginal adaptation of CAD-CAM onlays: Influence of preparation design and impression technique.

    PubMed

    Lima, Fernanda Ferruzzi; Neto, Constantino Fernandes; Rubo, José H; Santos, Gildo Coelho; Moraes Coelho Santos, Maria Jacinta

    2018-03-15

    Factors that may affect the marginal adaptation of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) restorations include preparation design, impression technique, and CAD-CAM system. The influence of impression technique and preparation design on CAD-CAM partial coverage restorations has not been fully addressed. The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate the influence of direct and indirect digital impression techniques and 2 preparation designs on the marginal adaptation of CAD-CAM onlays. Two mesio-occlusal buccal onlay preparations with reduction of the mesiobuccal cusp were made: conventional preparation (CP) with a 1.2-mm modified shoulder margin and modified preparation (MP) flat cuspal reduction without shoulder. Virtual models were generated from each preparation by using a digital scanner (BlueCam; Dentsply Sirona) from the plastic teeth (direct digital impression) or from the stone dies (indirect digital impression). Onlays were designed using a CAD-CAM system (CEREC 4.0; Dentsply Sirona), and nanoceramic resin blocks (Lava Ultimate Restorative; 3M ESPE) were milled using the CEREC MCX milling machine. Marginal discrepancy was evaluated using an optical stereomicroscope at ×25 magnification in 18 locations distributed along the margins of the preparation. The data were analyzed by using 3-way ANOVA followed by the Tukey HSD test (α=.05). CP presented a statistically significant reduced average marginal adaptation (59 ±50 μm) than did MP (69 ±58 μm) (P<.001). The Tukey HSD test showed the presence of a significantly larger marginal discrepancy in the mesial and buccal locations of MP when compared with CP. Regarding impression techniques, the buccal location presented the smallest average marginal discrepancy in restorations fabricated with indirect impression when compared with direct impression (42 ±33 μm and 60 ±39 μm) (P<.001). The results showed that conventional preparation with a modified shoulder margin

  13. CONSOLE: A CAD tandem for optimization-based design interacting with user-supplied simulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, Michael K. H.; Wang, Li-Sheng; Koninckx, Jan; Tits, Andre L.

    1989-01-01

    CONSOLE employs a recently developed design methodology (International Journal of Control 43:1693-1721) which provides the designer with a congenial environment to express his problem as a multiple ojective constrained optimization problem and allows him to refine his characterization of optimality when a suboptimal design is approached. To this end, in CONSOLE, the designed formulates the design problem using a high-level language and performs design task and explores tradeoff through a few short and clearly defined commands. The range of problems that can be solved efficiently using a CAD tools depends very much on the ability of this tool to be interfaced with user-supplied simulators. For instance, when designing a control system one makes use of the characteristics of the plant, and therefore, a model of the plant under study has to be made available to the CAD tool. CONSOLE allows for an easy interfacing of almost any simulator the user has available. To date CONSOLE has already been used successfully in many applications, including the design of controllers for a flexible arm and for a robotic manipulator and the solution of a parameter selection problem for a neural network.

  14. An Instructional Method for the AutoCAD Modeling Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohler, James L.

    1997-01-01

    Presents a command organizer for AutoCAD to aid new uses in operating within the 3-D modeling environment. Addresses analyzing the problem, visualization skills, nonlinear tools, a static view of a dynamic model, the AutoCAD organizer, environment attributes, and control of the environment. Contains 11 references. (JRH)

  15. ClusterCAD: a computational platform for type I modular polyketide synthase design

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Eng, Clara H.; Backman, Tyler W H; Bailey, Constance B.

    Here, we present ClusterCAD, a web-based toolkit designed to leverage the collinear structure and deterministic logic of type I modular polyketide synthases (PKSs) for synthetic biology applications. The unique organization of these megasynthases, combined with the diversity of their catalytic domain building blocks, has fueled an interest in harnessing the biosynthetic potential of PKSs for the microbial production of both novel natural product analogs and industrially relevant small molecules. However, a limited theoretical understanding of the determinants of PKS fold and function poses a substantial barrier to the design of active variants, and identifying strategies to reliably construct functional PKSmore » chimeras remains an active area of research. In this work, we formalize a paradigm for the design of PKS chimeras and introduce ClusterCAD as a computational platform to streamline and simplify the process of designing experiments to test strategies for engineering PKS variants. ClusterCAD provides chemical structures with stereochemistry for the intermediates generated by each PKS module, as well as sequence- and structure-based search tools that allow users to identify modules based either on amino acid sequence or on the chemical structure of the cognate polyketide intermediate. ClusterCAD can be accessed at https://clustercad.jbei.org and at http://clustercad.igb.uci.edu.« less

  16. ClusterCAD: a computational platform for type I modular polyketide synthase design

    DOE PAGES

    Eng, Clara H.; Backman, Tyler W H; Bailey, Constance B.; ...

    2017-10-11

    Here, we present ClusterCAD, a web-based toolkit designed to leverage the collinear structure and deterministic logic of type I modular polyketide synthases (PKSs) for synthetic biology applications. The unique organization of these megasynthases, combined with the diversity of their catalytic domain building blocks, has fueled an interest in harnessing the biosynthetic potential of PKSs for the microbial production of both novel natural product analogs and industrially relevant small molecules. However, a limited theoretical understanding of the determinants of PKS fold and function poses a substantial barrier to the design of active variants, and identifying strategies to reliably construct functional PKSmore » chimeras remains an active area of research. In this work, we formalize a paradigm for the design of PKS chimeras and introduce ClusterCAD as a computational platform to streamline and simplify the process of designing experiments to test strategies for engineering PKS variants. ClusterCAD provides chemical structures with stereochemistry for the intermediates generated by each PKS module, as well as sequence- and structure-based search tools that allow users to identify modules based either on amino acid sequence or on the chemical structure of the cognate polyketide intermediate. ClusterCAD can be accessed at https://clustercad.jbei.org and at http://clustercad.igb.uci.edu.« less

  17. The design and construction of the CAD-1 airship

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleiner, H. J.; Schneider, R.; Duncan, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    The background history, design philosophy and Computer application as related to the design of the envelope shape, stress calculations and flight trajectories of the CAD-1 airship, now under construction by Canadian Airship Development Corporation are reported. A three-phase proposal for future development of larger cargo carrying airships is included.

  18. Accuracy evaluation of dental models manufactured by CAD/CAM milling method and 3D printing method.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Yoo-Geum; Lee, Wan-Sun; Lee, Kyu-Bok

    2018-06-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of a model made using the computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacture (CAD/CAM) milling method and 3D printing method and to confirm its applicability as a work model for dental prosthesis production. First, a natural tooth model (ANA-4, Frasaco, Germany) was scanned using an oral scanner. The obtained scan data were then used as a CAD reference model (CRM), to produce a total of 10 models each, either using the milling method or the 3D printing method. The 20 models were then scanned using a desktop scanner and the CAD test model was formed. The accuracy of the two groups was compared using dedicated software to calculate the root mean square (RMS) value after superimposing CRM and CAD test model (CTM). The RMS value (152±52 µm) of the model manufactured by the milling method was significantly higher than the RMS value (52±9 µm) of the model produced by the 3D printing method. The accuracy of the 3D printing method is superior to that of the milling method, but at present, both methods are limited in their application as a work model for prosthesis manufacture.

  19. Ergonomics Perspective in Agricultural Research: A User-Centred Approach Using CAD and Digital Human Modeling (DHM) Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Thaneswer; Sanjog, J.; Karmakar, Sougata

    2016-09-01

    Computer-aided Design (CAD) and Digital Human Modeling (DHM) (specialized CAD software for virtual human representation) technologies endow unique opportunities to incorporate human factors pro-actively in design development. Challenges of enhancing agricultural productivity through improvement of agricultural tools/machineries and better human-machine compatibility can be ensured by adoption of these modern technologies. Objectives of present work are to provide the detailed scenario of CAD and DHM applications in agricultural sector; and finding out means for wide adoption of these technologies for design and development of cost-effective, user-friendly, efficient and safe agricultural tools/equipment and operator's workplace. Extensive literature review has been conducted for systematic segregation and representation of available information towards drawing inferences. Although applications of various CAD software have momentum in agricultural research particularly for design and manufacturing of agricultural equipment/machinery, use of DHM is still at its infancy in this sector. Current review discusses about reasons of less adoption of these technologies in agricultural sector and steps to be taken for their wide adoption. It also suggests possible future research directions to come up with better ergonomic design strategies for improvement of agricultural equipment/machines and workstations through application of CAD and DHM.

  20. Database construction for PromoterCAD: synthetic promoter design for mammals and plants.

    PubMed

    Nishikata, Koro; Cox, Robert Sidney; Shimoyama, Sayoko; Yoshida, Yuko; Matsui, Minami; Makita, Yuko; Toyoda, Tetsuro

    2014-03-21

    Synthetic promoters can control a gene's timing, location, and expression level. The PromoterCAD web server ( http://promotercad.org ) allows the design of synthetic promoters to control plant gene expression, by novel arrangement of cis-regulatory elements. Recently, we have expanded PromoterCAD's scope with additional plant and animal data: (1) PLACE (Plant Cis-acting Regulatory DNA Elements), including various sized sequence motifs; (2) PEDB (Mammalian Promoter/Enhancer Database), including gene expression data for mammalian tissues. The plant PromoterCAD data now contains 22 000 Arabidopsis thaliana genes, 2 200 000 microarray measurements in 20 growth conditions and 79 tissue organs and developmental stages, while the new mammalian PromoterCAD data contains 679 Mus musculus genes and 65 000 microarray measurements in 96 tissue organs and cell types ( http://promotercad.org/mammal/ ). This work presents step-by-step instructions for adding both regulatory motif and gene expression data to PromoterCAD, to illustrate how users can expand PromoterCAD functionality for their own applications and organisms.

  1. Aerodynamic Design of Complex Configurations Using Cartesian Methods and CAD Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemec, Marian; Aftosmis, Michael J.; Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2003-01-01

    The objective for this paper is to present the development of an optimization capability for the Cartesian inviscid-flow analysis package of Aftosmis et al. We evaluate and characterize the following modules within the new optimization framework: (1) A component-based geometry parameterization approach using a CAD solid representation and the CAPRI interface. (2) The use of Cartesian methods in the development Optimization techniques using a genetic algorithm. The discussion and investigations focus on several real world problems of the optimization process. We examine the architectural issues associated with the deployment of a CAD-based design approach in a heterogeneous parallel computing environment that contains both CAD workstations and dedicated compute nodes. In addition, we study the influence of noise on the performance of optimization techniques, and the overall efficiency of the optimization process for aerodynamic design of complex three-dimensional configurations. of automated optimization tools. rithm and a gradient-based algorithm.

  2. CAD Services: an Industry Standard Interface for Mechanical CAD Interoperability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claus, Russell; Weitzer, Ilan

    2002-01-01

    Most organizations seek to design and develop new products in increasingly shorter time periods. At the same time, increased performance demands require a team-based multidisciplinary design process that may span several organizations. One approach to meet these demands is to use 'Geometry Centric' design. In this approach, design engineers team their efforts through one united representation of the design that is usually captured in a CAD system. Standards-based interfaces are critical to provide uniform, simple, distributed services that enable the 'Geometry Centric' design approach. This paper describes an industry-wide effort, under the Object Management Group's (OMG) Manufacturing Domain Task Force, to define interfaces that enable the interoperability of CAD, Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAM), and Computer Aided Engineering (CAE) tools. This critical link to enable 'Geometry Centric' design is called: Cad Services V1.0. This paper discusses the features of this standard and proposed application.

  3. CAD/CAE Integration Enhanced by New CAD Services Standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claus, Russell W.

    2002-01-01

    A Government-industry team led by the NASA Glenn Research Center has developed a computer interface standard for accessing data from computer-aided design (CAD) systems. The Object Management Group, an international computer standards organization, has adopted this CAD services standard. The new standard allows software (e.g., computer-aided engineering (CAE) and computer-aided manufacturing software to access multiple CAD systems through one programming interface. The interface is built on top of a distributed computing system called the Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA). CORBA allows the CAD services software to operate in a distributed, heterogeneous computing environment.

  4. THE MAN&RSQUO;S JACKET DESIGN FOR DISASSEMBLY: AN IMPLEMENTATION OF C2CAD FRAMEWORK

    EPA Science Inventory

    The C2CAD model served as the basis in the man’s jacket design and production. In man’s jackets, both natural and synthetic materials are commonly used for fabrics, threads, and buttons. To promote disassembly and value retention, we minimized material diversity an...

  5. Evolution of Geometric Sensitivity Derivatives from Computer Aided Design Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, William T.; Lazzara, David; Haimes, Robert

    2010-01-01

    The generation of design parameter sensitivity derivatives is required for gradient-based optimization. Such sensitivity derivatives are elusive at best when working with geometry defined within the solid modeling context of Computer-Aided Design (CAD) systems. Solid modeling CAD systems are often proprietary and always complex, thereby necessitating ad hoc procedures to infer parameter sensitivity. A new perspective is presented that makes direct use of the hierarchical associativity of CAD features to trace their evolution and thereby track design parameter sensitivity. In contrast to ad hoc methods, this method provides a more concise procedure following the model design intent and determining the sensitivity of CAD geometry directly to its respective defining parameters.

  6. 3D-CAD Effects on Creative Design Performance of Different Spatial Abilities Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Students' creativity is an important focus globally and is interrelated with students' spatial abilities. Additionally, three-dimensional computer-assisted drawing (3D-CAD) overcomes barriers to spatial expression during the creative design process. Does 3D-CAD affect students' creative abilities? The purpose of this study was to explore the…

  7. 3D correction of AIS in braces designed using CAD/CAM and FEM: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Cobetto, Nikita; Aubin, Carl-Éric; Parent, Stefan; Barchi, Soraya; Turgeon, Isabelle; Labelle, Hubert

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies showed that finite element model (FEM) combined to CAD/CAM improves the design of braces for the conservative treatment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS), using 2D measurements from in-brace radiographs. We aim to assess the immediate effectiveness on curve correction in all three planes of braces designed using CAD/CAM and numerical simulation compared to braces designed with CAD/CAM only. SRS standardized criteria for bracing were followed to recruit 48 AIS patients who were randomized into two groups. For both groups, 3D reconstructions of the spine and patient's torso, respectively built from bi-planar radiographs and surface topography, were obtained and braces were designed using the CAD/CAM approach. For the test group, 3D reconstructions of the spine and patient's torso were additionally used to generate a personalized FEM to simulate and iteratively improve the brace design with the objective of curve correction maximization in three planes and brace material minimization. For the control group (CtrlBraces), average Cobb angle prior to bracing was 29° (thoracic, T) and 25° (lumbar, L) with the planes of maximal curvature (PMC) respectively oriented at 63° and 57° on average with respect to the sagittal plane. Average apical axial rotation prior to bracing was 7° (T) and 9° (L). For the test group (FEMBraces), initial Cobb angles were 33° (T) and 28° (L) with the PMC at 68° (T) and 56° (L) and average apical axial rotation prior to bracing at 9° (T and L). On average, FEMBraces were 50% thinner and had 20% less covering surface than CtrlBraces while reducing T and L curves by 47 and 48%, respectively, compared to 25 and 26% for CtrlBraces. FEMBraces corrected apical axial rotation by 46% compared to 30% for CtrlBraces. The combination of numerical simulation and CAD/CAM approach allowed designing more efficient braces in all three planes, with the advantages of being lighter than standard CAD/CAM braces. Bracing in AIS may

  8. ProperCAD: A portable object-oriented parallel environment for VLSI CAD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramkumar, Balkrishna; Banerjee, Prithviraj

    1993-01-01

    Most parallel algorithms for VLSI CAD proposed to date have one important drawback: they work efficiently only on machines that they were designed for. As a result, algorithms designed to date are dependent on the architecture for which they are developed and do not port easily to other parallel architectures. A new project under way to address this problem is described. A Portable object-oriented parallel environment for CAD algorithms (ProperCAD) is being developed. The objectives of this research are (1) to develop new parallel algorithms that run in a portable object-oriented environment (CAD algorithms using a general purpose platform for portable parallel programming called CARM is being developed and a C++ environment that is truly object-oriented and specialized for CAD applications is also being developed); and (2) to design the parallel algorithms around a good sequential algorithm with a well-defined parallel-sequential interface (permitting the parallel algorithm to benefit from future developments in sequential algorithms). One CAD application that has been implemented as part of the ProperCAD project, flat VLSI circuit extraction, is described. The algorithm, its implementation, and its performance on a range of parallel machines are discussed in detail. It currently runs on an Encore Multimax, a Sequent Symmetry, Intel iPSC/2 and i860 hypercubes, a NCUBE 2 hypercube, and a network of Sun Sparc workstations. Performance data for other applications that were developed are provided: namely test pattern generation for sequential circuits, parallel logic synthesis, and standard cell placement.

  9. Shape optimization and CAD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasmussen, John

    1990-01-01

    Structural optimization has attracted the attention since the days of Galileo. Olhoff and Taylor have produced an excellent overview of the classical research within this field. However, the interest in structural optimization has increased greatly during the last decade due to the advent of reliable general numerical analysis methods and the computer power necessary to use them efficiently. This has created the possibility of developing general numerical systems for shape optimization. Several authors, eg., Esping; Braibant & Fleury; Bennet & Botkin; Botkin, Yang, and Bennet; and Stanton have published practical and successful applications of general optimization systems. Ding and Homlein have produced extensive overviews of available systems. Furthermore, a number of commercial optimization systems based on well-established finite element codes have been introduced. Systems like ANSYS, IDEAS, OASIS, and NISAOPT are widely known examples. In parallel to this development, the technology of computer aided design (CAD) has gained a large influence on the design process of mechanical engineering. The CAD technology has already lived through a rapid development driven by the drastically growing capabilities of digital computers. However, the systems of today are still considered as being only the first generation of a long row of computer integrated manufacturing (CIM) systems. These systems to come will offer an integrated environment for design, analysis, and fabrication of products of almost any character. Thus, the CAD system could be regarded as simply a database for geometrical information equipped with a number of tools with the purpose of helping the user in the design process. Among these tools are facilities for structural analysis and optimization as well as present standard CAD features like drawing, modeling, and visualization tools. The state of the art of structural optimization is that a large amount of mathematical and mechanical techniques are

  10. A method for using solid modeling CAD software to create an implant library for the fabrication of a custom abutment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Rimei; Ren, Guanghui; Zhang, Xiaojie

    2017-02-01

    This article describes a method that incorporates the solid modeling CAD software Solidworks with a dental milling machine to fabricate individual abutments in house. This process involves creating an implant library with 3-dimensional (3D) models and manufacturing a base, scan element, abutment, and crown anatomy. The 3D models can be imported into any dental computer-aided design and computer-aided (CAD-CAM) manufacturing system. This platform increases abutment design flexibility, as the base and scan elements can be designed to fit several shapes as needed to meet clinical requirements. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. GPU-accelerated depth map generation for X-ray simulations of complex CAD geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grandin, Robert J.; Young, Gavin; Holland, Stephen D.; Krishnamurthy, Adarsh

    2018-04-01

    Interactive x-ray simulations of complex computer-aided design (CAD) models can provide valuable insights for better interpretation of the defect signatures such as porosity from x-ray CT images. Generating the depth map along a particular direction for the given CAD geometry is the most compute-intensive step in x-ray simulations. We have developed a GPU-accelerated method for real-time generation of depth maps of complex CAD geometries. We preprocess complex components designed using commercial CAD systems using a custom CAD module and convert them into a fine user-defined surface tessellation. Our CAD module can be used by different simulators as well as handle complex geometries, including those that arise from complex castings and composite structures. We then make use of a parallel algorithm that runs on a graphics processing unit (GPU) to convert the finely-tessellated CAD model to a voxelized representation. The voxelized representation can enable heterogeneous modeling of the volume enclosed by the CAD model by assigning heterogeneous material properties in specific regions. The depth maps are generated from this voxelized representation with the help of a GPU-accelerated ray-casting algorithm. The GPU-accelerated ray-casting method enables interactive (> 60 frames-per-second) generation of the depth maps of complex CAD geometries. This enables arbitrarily rotation and slicing of the CAD model, leading to better interpretation of the x-ray images by the user. In addition, the depth maps can be used to aid directly in CT reconstruction algorithms.

  12. Investigating the Impact of Using a CAD Simulation Tool on Students' Learning of Design Thinking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taleyarkhan, Manaz; Dasgupta, Chandan; Garcia, John Mendoza; Magana, Alejandra J.

    2018-02-01

    Engineering design thinking is hard to teach and still harder to learn by novices primarily due to the undetermined nature of engineering problems that often results in multiple solutions. In this paper, we investigate the effect of teaching engineering design thinking to freshmen students by using a computer-aided Design (CAD) simulation software. We present a framework for characterizing different levels of engineering design thinking displayed by students who interacted with the CAD simulation software in the context of a collaborative assignment. This framework describes the presence of four levels of engineering design thinking—beginning designer, adept beginning designer, informed designer, adept informed designer. We present the characteristics associated with each of these four levels as they pertain to four engineering design strategies that students pursued in this study—understanding the design challenge, building knowledge, weighing options and making tradeoffs, and reflecting on the process. Students demonstrated significant improvements in two strategies—understanding the design challenge and building knowledge. We discuss the affordances of the CAD simulation tool along with the learning environment that potentially helped students move towards Adept informed designers while pursuing these design strategies.

  13. Using a 3D CAD plant model to simplify process hazard reviews

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Tolpa, G.

    A Hazard and Operability (HAZOP) review is a formal predictive procedure used to identify potential hazard and operability problems associated with certain processes and facilities. The HAZOP procedure takes place several times during the life cycle of the facility. Replacing plastic models, layout and detail drawings with a 3D CAD electronic model, provides access to process safety information and a detailed level of plant topology that approaches the visualization capability of the imagination. This paper describes the process that is used for adding the use of a 3D CAD model to flowsheets and proven computer programs for the conduct ofmore » hazard and operability reviews. Using flowsheets and study nodes as a road map for the review the need for layout and other detail drawings is all but eliminated. Using the 3D CAD model again for a post-P and ID HAZOP supports conformance to layout and safety requirements, provides superior visualization of the plant configuration and preserves the owners equity in the design. The response from the review teams are overwhelmingly in favor of this type of review over a review that uses only drawings. Over the long term the plant model serves more than just process hazards analysis. Ongoing use of the model can satisfy the required access to process safety information, OHSA documentation and other legal requirements. In this paper extensive instructions address the logic for the process hazards analysis and the preparation required to assist anyone who wishes to add the use of a 3D model to their review.« less

  14. Individualized Human CAD Models: Anthropmetric Morphing and Body Tissue Layering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-31

    Part Flow Chart of the Interaction among VBA Macros, Excel® Spreadsheet, and SolidWorks Front View of the Male and Female Soldier CAD Model...yellow highlighting. The spreadsheet is linked to the CAD model by macros created with the Visual Basic for Application ( VBA ) editor in Microsoft Excel...basically three working parts to the anthropometric morphing that are all interconnected ( VBA macros, Excel spreadsheet, and SolidWorks). The flow

  15. Designers Workbench: Towards Real-Time Immersive Modeling

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Kuester, F; Duchaineau, M A; Hamann, B

    2001-10-03

    This paper introduces the DesignersWorkbench, a semi-immersive virtual environment for two-handed modeling, sculpting and analysis tasks. The paper outlines the fundamental tools, design metaphors and hardware components required for an intuitive real-time modeling system. As companies focus on streamlining productivity to cope with global competition, the migration to computer-aided design (CAD), computer-aided manufacturing (CAM), and computer-aided engineering (CAE) systems has established a new backbone of modern industrial product development. However, traditionally a product design frequently originates from a clay model that, after digitization, forms the basis for the numerical description of CAD primitives. The DesignersWorkbench aims at closing this technologymore » or ''digital gap'' experienced by design and CAD engineers by transforming the classical design paradigm into its filly integrated digital and virtual analog allowing collaborative development in a semi-immersive virtual environment. This project emphasizes two key components from the classical product design cycle: freeform modeling and analysis. In the freeform modeling stage, content creation in the form of two-handed sculpting of arbitrary objects using polygonal, volumetric or mathematically defined primitives is emphasized, whereas the analysis component provides the tools required for pre- and post-processing steps for finite element analysis tasks applied to the created models.« less

  16. Designers workbench: toward real-time immersive modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuester, Falko; Duchaineau, Mark A.; Hamann, Bernd; Joy, Kenneth I.; Ma, Kwan-Liu

    2000-05-01

    This paper introduces the Designers Workbench, a semi- immersive virtual environment for two-handed modeling, sculpting and analysis tasks. The paper outlines the fundamental tools, design metaphors and hardware components required for an intuitive real-time modeling system. As companies focus on streamlining productivity to cope with global competition, the migration to computer-aided design (CAD), computer-aided manufacturing, and computer-aided engineering systems has established a new backbone of modern industrial product development. However, traditionally a product design frequently originates form a clay model that, after digitization, forms the basis for the numerical description of CAD primitives. The Designers Workbench aims at closing this technology or 'digital gap' experienced by design and CAD engineers by transforming the classical design paradigm into its fully integrate digital and virtual analog allowing collaborative development in a semi- immersive virtual environment. This project emphasizes two key components form the classical product design cycle: freeform modeling and analysis. In the freedom modeling stage, content creation in the form of two-handed sculpting of arbitrary objects using polygonal, volumetric or mathematically defined primitives is emphasized, whereas the analysis component provides the tools required for pre- and post-processing steps for finite element analysis tasks applied to the created models.

  17. A CAD System for Hemorrhagic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Nowinski, Wieslaw L; Qian, Guoyu; Hanley, Daniel F

    2014-09-01

    Computer-aided detection/diagnosis (CAD) is a key component of routine clinical practice, increasingly used for detection, interpretation, quantification and decision support. Despite a critical need, there is no clinically accepted CAD system for stroke yet. Here we introduce a CAD system for hemorrhagic stroke. This CAD system segments, quantifies, and displays hematoma in 2D/3D, and supports evacuation of hemorrhage by thrombolytic treatment monitoring progression and quantifying clot removal. It supports seven-step workflow: select patient, add a new study, process patient's scans, show segmentation results, plot hematoma volumes, show 3D synchronized time series hematomas, and generate report. The system architecture contains four components: library, tools, application with user interface, and hematoma segmentation algorithm. The tools include a contour editor, 3D surface modeler, 3D volume measure, histogramming, hematoma volume plot, and 3D synchronized time-series hematoma display. The CAD system has been designed and implemented in C++. It has also been employed in the CLEAR and MISTIE phase-III, multicenter clinical trials. This stroke CAD system is potentially useful in research and clinical applications, particularly for clinical trials.

  18. Evaluation of Five Microcomputer CAD Packages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leach, James A.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the similarities, differences, advanced features, applications and number of users of five microcomputer computer-aided design (CAD) packages. Included are: "AutoCAD (V.2.17)"; "CADKEY (V.2.0)"; "CADVANCE (V.1.0)"; "Super MicroCAD"; and "VersaCAD Advanced (V.4.00)." Describes the…

  19. An Analysis of Computer Aided Design (CAD) Packages Used at MSFC for the Recent Initiative to Integrate Engineering Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Leigh M.; Parker, Nelson C. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper analyzes the use of Computer Aided Design (CAD) packages at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). It examines the effectiveness of recent efforts to standardize CAD practices across MSFC engineering activities. An assessment of the roles played by management, designers, analysts, and manufacturers in this initiative will be explored. Finally, solutions are presented for better integration of CAD across MSFC in the future.

  20. Mobile Technology and CAD Technology Integration in Teaching Architectural Design Process for Producing Creative Product

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bin Hassan, Isham Shah; Ismail, Mohd Arif; Mustafa, Ramlee

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to examine the effect of integrating the mobile and CAD technology on teaching architectural design process for Malaysian polytechnic architectural students in producing a creative product. The website is set up based on Caroll's minimal theory, while mobile and CAD technology integration is based on Brown and…

  1. 21 CFR 872.3661 - Optical Impression Systems for CAD/CAM.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3661 Optical Impression Systems for CAD... (CAD/CAM) is a device used to record the topographical characteristics of teeth, dental impressions, or stone models by analog or digital methods for use in the computer-assisted design and manufacturing of...

  2. Cool-and Unusual-CAD Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calhoun, Ken

    2004-01-01

    This article describes several very useful applications of AutoCAD that may lie outside the normal scope of application. AutoCAD commands used in this article are based on AutoCAD 2000I. The author and his students used a Hewlett Packard 750C DesignJet plotter for plotting. (Contains 5 figures and 5 photos.)

  3. Ares Upper Stage Processes to Implement Model Based Design - Going Paperless

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Melanie

    2012-01-01

    Computer-Aided Design (CAD) has all but replaced the drafting board for design work. Increased productivity and accuracy should be natural outcomes of using CAD. Going from paper drawings only to paper drawings based on CAD models to CAD models and no drawings, or Model Based Design (MBD), is a natural progression in today?s world. There are many advantages to MBD over traditional design methods. To make the most of those advantages, standards should be in place and the proper foundation should be laid prior to transitioning to MBD. However, without a full understanding of the implications of MBD and the proper control of the data, the advantages are greatly diminished. Transitioning from a paper design world to an electronic design world means re-thinking how information gets controlled at its origin and distributed from one point to another. It means design methodology is critical, especially for large projects. It means preparation of standardized parts and processes as well as strong communication between all parties in order to maximize the benefits of MBD.

  4. The Use of a Parametric Feature Based CAD System to Teach Introductory Engineering Graphics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, Steven K.

    1995-01-01

    Describes the use of a parametric-feature-based computer-aided design (CAD) System, AutoCAD Designer, in teaching concepts of three dimensional geometrical modeling and design. Allows engineering graphics to go beyond the role of documentation and communication and allows an engineer to actually build a virtual prototype of a design idea and…

  5. TinkerCell: modular CAD tool for synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Deepak; Bergmann, Frank T; Sauro, Herbert M

    2009-10-29

    Synthetic biology brings together concepts and techniques from engineering and biology. In this field, computer-aided design (CAD) is necessary in order to bridge the gap between computational modeling and biological data. Using a CAD application, it would be possible to construct models using available biological "parts" and directly generate the DNA sequence that represents the model, thus increasing the efficiency of design and construction of synthetic networks. An application named TinkerCell has been developed in order to serve as a CAD tool for synthetic biology. TinkerCell is a visual modeling tool that supports a hierarchy of biological parts. Each part in this hierarchy consists of a set of attributes that define the part, such as sequence or rate constants. Models that are constructed using these parts can be analyzed using various third-party C and Python programs that are hosted by TinkerCell via an extensive C and Python application programming interface (API). TinkerCell supports the notion of a module, which are networks with interfaces. Such modules can be connected to each other, forming larger modular networks. TinkerCell is a free and open-source project under the Berkeley Software Distribution license. Downloads, documentation, and tutorials are available at http://www.tinkercell.com. An ideal CAD application for engineering biological systems would provide features such as: building and simulating networks, analyzing robustness of networks, and searching databases for components that meet the design criteria. At the current state of synthetic biology, there are no established methods for measuring robustness or identifying components that fit a design. The same is true for databases of biological parts. TinkerCell's flexible modeling framework allows it to cope with changes in the field. Such changes may involve the way parts are characterized or the way synthetic networks are modeled and analyzed computationally. TinkerCell can readily accept

  6. TinkerCell: modular CAD tool for synthetic biology

    PubMed Central

    Chandran, Deepak; Bergmann, Frank T; Sauro, Herbert M

    2009-01-01

    Background Synthetic biology brings together concepts and techniques from engineering and biology. In this field, computer-aided design (CAD) is necessary in order to bridge the gap between computational modeling and biological data. Using a CAD application, it would be possible to construct models using available biological "parts" and directly generate the DNA sequence that represents the model, thus increasing the efficiency of design and construction of synthetic networks. Results An application named TinkerCell has been developed in order to serve as a CAD tool for synthetic biology. TinkerCell is a visual modeling tool that supports a hierarchy of biological parts. Each part in this hierarchy consists of a set of attributes that define the part, such as sequence or rate constants. Models that are constructed using these parts can be analyzed using various third-party C and Python programs that are hosted by TinkerCell via an extensive C and Python application programming interface (API). TinkerCell supports the notion of a module, which are networks with interfaces. Such modules can be connected to each other, forming larger modular networks. TinkerCell is a free and open-source project under the Berkeley Software Distribution license. Downloads, documentation, and tutorials are available at . Conclusion An ideal CAD application for engineering biological systems would provide features such as: building and simulating networks, analyzing robustness of networks, and searching databases for components that meet the design criteria. At the current state of synthetic biology, there are no established methods for measuring robustness or identifying components that fit a design. The same is true for databases of biological parts. TinkerCell's flexible modeling framework allows it to cope with changes in the field. Such changes may involve the way parts are characterized or the way synthetic networks are modeled and analyzed computationally. TinkerCell can readily

  7. Extending Engineering Design Graphics Laboratories to Have a CAD/CAM Component: Implementation Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juricic, Davor; Barr, Ronald E.

    1996-01-01

    Reports on a project that extended the Engineering Design Graphics curriculum to include instruction and laboratory experience in computer-aided design, analysis, and manufacturing (CAD/CAM). Discusses issues in project implementation, including introduction of finite element analysis to lower-division students, feasibility of classroom prototype…

  8. CAD-Based Shielding Analysis for ITER Port Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serikov, Arkady; Fischer, Ulrich; Anthoine, David; Bertalot, Luciano; De Bock, Maartin; O'Connor, Richard; Juarez, Rafael; Krasilnikov, Vitaly

    2017-09-01

    Radiation shielding analysis conducted in support of design development of the contemporary diagnostic systems integrated inside the ITER ports is relied on the use of CAD models. This paper presents the CAD-based MCNP Monte Carlo radiation transport and activation analyses for the Diagnostic Upper and Equatorial Port Plugs (UPP #3 and EPP #8, #17). The creation process of the complicated 3D MCNP models of the diagnostics systems was substantially accelerated by application of the CAD-to-MCNP converter programs MCAM and McCad. High performance computing resources of the Helios supercomputer allowed to speed-up the MCNP parallel transport calculations with the MPI/OpenMP interface. The found shielding solutions could be universal, reducing ports R&D costs. The shield block behind the Tritium and Deposit Monitor (TDM) optical box was added to study its influence on Shut-Down Dose Rate (SDDR) in Port Interspace (PI) of EPP#17. Influence of neutron streaming along the Lost Alpha Monitor (LAM) on the neutron energy spectra calculated in the Tangential Neutron Spectrometer (TNS) of EPP#8. For the UPP#3 with Charge eXchange Recombination Spectroscopy (CXRS-core), an excessive neutron streaming along the CXRS shutter, which should be prevented in further design iteration.

  9. Investigation of IGES for CAD/CAE data transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zobrist, George W.

    1989-01-01

    In a CAD/CAE facility there is always the possibility that one may want to transfer the design graphics database from the native system to a non-native system. This may occur because of dissimilar systems within an organization or a new CAD/CAE system is to be purchased. The Initial Graphics Exchange Specification (IGES) was developed in an attempt to solve this scenario. IGES is a neutral database format into which the CAD/CAE native database format can be translated to and from. Translating the native design database format to IGES requires a pre-processor and transling from IGES to the native database format requires a post-processor. IGES is an artifice to represent CAD/CAE product data in a neutral environment to allow interfacing applications, archive the database, interchange of product data between dissimilar CAD/CAE systems, and other applications. The intent here is to present test data on translating design product data from a CAD/CAE system to itself and to translate data initially prepared in IGES format to various native design formats. This information can be utilized in planning potential procurement and developing a design discipline within the CAD/CAE community.

  10. Use of Existing CAD Models for Radiation Shielding Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, K. T.; Barzilla, J. E.; Wilson, P.; Davis, A.; Zachman, J.

    2015-01-01

    The utility of a radiation exposure analysis depends not only on the accuracy of the underlying particle transport code, but also on the accuracy of the geometric representations of both the vehicle used as radiation shielding mass and the phantom representation of the human form. The current NASA/Space Radiation Analysis Group (SRAG) process to determine crew radiation exposure in a vehicle design incorporates both output from an analytic High Z and Energy Particle Transport (HZETRN) code and the properties (i.e., material thicknesses) of a previously processed drawing. This geometry pre-process can be time-consuming, and the results are less accurate than those determined using a Monte Carlo-based particle transport code. The current work aims to improve this process. Although several Monte Carlo programs (FLUKA, Geant4) are readily available, most use an internal geometry engine. The lack of an interface with the standard CAD formats used by the vehicle designers limits the ability of the user to communicate complex geometries. Translation of native CAD drawings into a format readable by these transport programs is time consuming and prone to error. The Direct Accelerated Geometry -United (DAGU) project is intended to provide an interface between the native vehicle or phantom CAD geometry and multiple particle transport codes to minimize problem setup, computing time and analysis error.

  11. GenoCAD Plant Grammar to Design Plant Expression Vectors for Promoter Analysis.

    PubMed

    Coll, Anna; Wilson, Mandy L; Gruden, Kristina; Peccoud, Jean

    2016-01-01

    With the rapid advances in prediction tools for discovery of new promoters and their cis-elements, there is a need to improve plant expression methodologies in order to facilitate a high-throughput functional validation of these promoters in planta. The promoter-reporter analysis is an indispensible approach for characterization of plant promoters. It requires the design of complex plant expression vectors, which can be challenging. Here, we describe the use of a plant grammar implemented in GenoCAD that will allow the users to quickly design constructs for promoter analysis experiments but also for other in planta functional studies. The GenoCAD plant grammar includes a library of plant biological parts organized in structural categories to facilitate their use and management and a set of rules that guides the process of assembling these biological parts into large constructs.

  12. Use of CAD Geometry in MDO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samareh, Jamshid A.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the use of Computer-Aided Design (CAD) geometry in a Multi-Disciplinary Design Optimization (MDO) environment. Two techniques are presented to facilitate the use of CAD geometry by different disciplines, such as Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and Computational Structural Mechanics (CSM). One method is to transfer the load from a CFD grid to a CSM grid. The second method is to update the CAD geometry for CSM deflection.

  13. Development of an integrated CAD-FEA system for patient-specific design of spinal cages.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingzheng; Pu, Fang; Xu, Liqiang; Zhang, Linlin; Liang, Hang; Li, Deyu; Wang, Yu; Fan, Yubo

    2017-03-01

    Spinal cages are used to create a suitable mechanical environment for interbody fusion in cases of degenerative spinal instability. Due to individual variations in bone structures and pathological conditions, patient-specific cages can provide optimal biomechanical conditions for fusion, strengthening patient recovery. Finite element analysis (FEA) is a valuable tool in the biomechanical evaluation of patient-specific cage designs, but the time- and labor-intensive process of modeling limits its clinical application. In an effort to facilitate the design and analysis of patient-specific spinal cages, an integrated CAD-FEA system (CASCaDeS, comprehensive analytical spinal cage design system) was developed. This system produces a biomechanical-based patient-specific design of spinal cages and is capable of rapid implementation of finite element modeling. By comparison with commercial software, this system was validated and proven to be both accurate and efficient. CASCaDeS can be used to design patient-specific cages with a superior biomechanical performance to commercial spinal cages.

  14. Incorporation of composite defects from ultrasonic NDE into CAD and FE models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingol, Onur Rauf; Schiefelbein, Bryan; Grandin, Robert J.; Holland, Stephen D.; Krishnamurthy, Adarsh

    2017-02-01

    Fiber-reinforced composites are widely used in aerospace industry due to their combined properties of high strength and low weight. However, owing to their complex structure, it is difficult to assess the impact of manufacturing defects and service damage on their residual life. While, ultrasonic testing (UT) is the preferred NDE method to identify the presence of defects in composites, there are no reasonable ways to model the damage and evaluate the structural integrity of composites. We have developed an automated framework to incorporate flaws and known composite damage automatically into a finite element analysis (FEA) model of composites, ultimately aiding in accessing the residual life of composites and make informed decisions regarding repairs. The framework can be used to generate a layer-by-layer 3D structural CAD model of the composite laminates replicating their manufacturing process. Outlines of structural defects, such as delaminations, are automatically detected from UT of the laminate and are incorporated into the CAD model between the appropriate layers. In addition, the framework allows for direct structural analysis of the resulting 3D CAD models with defects by automatically applying the appropriate boundary conditions. In this paper, we show a working proof-of-concept for the composite model builder with capabilities of incorporating delaminations between laminate layers and automatically preparing the CAD model for structural analysis using a FEA software.

  15. On the Use of CAD and Cartesian Methods for Aerodynamic Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemec, M.; Aftosmis, M. J.; Pulliam, T. H.

    2004-01-01

    The objective for this paper is to present the development of an optimization capability for Curt3D, a Cartesian inviscid-flow analysis package. We present the construction of a new optimization framework and we focus on the following issues: 1) Component-based geometry parameterization approach using parametric-CAD models and CAPRI. A novel geometry server is introduced that addresses the issue of parallel efficiency while only sparingly consuming CAD resources; 2) The use of genetic and gradient-based algorithms for three-dimensional aerodynamic design problems. The influence of noise on the optimization methods is studied. Our goal is to create a responsive and automated framework that efficiently identifies design modifications that result in substantial performance improvements. In addition, we examine the architectural issues associated with the deployment of a CAD-based approach in a heterogeneous parallel computing environment that contains both CAD workstations and dedicated compute engines. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the framework for a design problem that features topology changes and complex geometry.

  16. CAD/CAM. High-Technology Training Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuleger, Robert

    This high technology training module is an advanced course on computer-assisted design/computer-assisted manufacturing (CAD/CAM) for grades 11 and 12. This unit, to be used with students in advanced drafting courses, introduces the concept of CAD/CAM. The content outline includes the following seven sections: (1) CAD/CAM software; (2) computer…

  17. DeviceEditor visual biological CAD canvas

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Biological Computer Aided Design (bioCAD) assists the de novo design and selection of existing genetic components to achieve a desired biological activity, as part of an integrated design-build-test cycle. To meet the emerging needs of Synthetic Biology, bioCAD tools must address the increasing prevalence of combinatorial library design, design rule specification, and scar-less multi-part DNA assembly. Results We report the development and deployment of web-based bioCAD software, DeviceEditor, which provides a graphical design environment that mimics the intuitive visual whiteboard design process practiced in biological laboratories. The key innovations of DeviceEditor include visual combinatorial library design, direct integration with scar-less multi-part DNA assembly design automation, and a graphical user interface for the creation and modification of design specification rules. We demonstrate how biological designs are rendered on the DeviceEditor canvas, and we present effective visualizations of genetic component ordering and combinatorial variations within complex designs. Conclusions DeviceEditor liberates researchers from DNA base-pair manipulation, and enables users to create successful prototypes using standardized, functional, and visual abstractions. Open and documented software interfaces support further integration of DeviceEditor with other bioCAD tools and software platforms. DeviceEditor saves researcher time and institutional resources through correct-by-construction design, the automation of tedious tasks, design reuse, and the minimization of DNA assembly costs. PMID:22373390

  18. Use of CAD systems in design of Space Station and space robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwivedi, Suren N.; Yadav, P.; Jones, Gary; Travis, Elmer W.

    1988-01-01

    The evolution of CAD systems is traced. State-of-the-art CAD systems are reviewed and various advanced CAD facilities and supplementing systems being used at NASA-Goddard are described. CAD hardware, computer software, and protocols are detailed.

  19. Project CAD as of July 1978: CAD support project, situation in July 1978

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boesch, L.; Lang-Lendorff, G.; Rothenberg, R.; Stelzer, V.

    1979-01-01

    The structure of Computer Aided Design (CAD) and the requirements for program developments in past and future are described. The actual standard and the future aims of CAD programs are presented. The developed programs in: (1) civil engineering; (2) mechanical engineering; (3) chemical engineering/shipbuilding; (4) electrical engineering; and (5) general programs are discussed.

  20. On the Design of a CADS for Shoulder Pain Pathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ipiña, K. López; Hernández, M. C.; Martínez, E.; Vaquero, C.

    A musculoskeletal disorder is a condition of the musculoskeletal system, which consists in part of it being injured continuously over time. Shoulder disorders are one of the most common musculoskeletal cases attended in primary health care services. Shoulder disorders cause pain and limit the ability to perform many routine activities, affecting about 15-25 % of the general population. Several clinical tests have been described to aid diagnosis of shoulder disorders. However, the current literature acknowledges a lack of concordance in clinical assessment, even among musculoskeletal specialists. We are working on the design of a Computer-Aided Decision Support (CADS) system for Shoulder Pain Pathology. The paper presents the results of our efforts to build a CADS system testing several classical classification paradigms, feature reduction methods (PCA) and K-means unsupervised clustering. The small database size imposes the use of robust covariance matrix estimation methods to improve the system performance. Finally, the system was evaluated by a medical specialist.

  1. Evaluation of biogeneric design techniques with CEREC CAD/CAM system

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to evaluate occlusal contacts generated by 3 different biogeneric design modes (individual (BI), copy (BC), reference (BR)) of CEREC software and to assess the designs subjectively. MATERIALS AND METHODS Ten pairs of maxillary and mandibular casts were obtained from full dentate individuals. Gypsum cast contacts were quantified with articulating paper and digital impressions were taken. Then, all ceramic crown preparation was performed on the left first molar teeth and digital impressions of prepared teeth were made. BI, BC, and BR crowns were designed. Occlusal images of designs including occlusal contacts were superimposed on the gypsum cast images and corresponding contacts were determined. Three designs were evaluated by the students. RESULTS The results of the study revealed that there was significant difference among the number of contacts of gypsum cast and digital models (P<.05). The comparison of the percentage of virtual contacts of three crown designs which were identical to the contacts of original gypsum cast revealed that BI and BR designs showed significantly higher percentages of identical contacts compared with BC design (P<.05). Subjective assessment revealed that students generally found BI designs and BR designs natural regarding naturalness of fissure morphology and cusp shape and cusp tip position. For general occlusal morphology, student groups generally found BI design "too strong" or "perfect", BC design "too weak", and BR design "perfect". CONCLUSION On a prepared tooth, three different biogeneric design modes of a CAD/CAM software reveals different crown designs regarding occlusal contacts and morphology. PMID:26816572

  2. Computer Aided Design in FE. Some Suggestions on the Inclusion of CAD Topics in Mechanical Engineering Courses. An Occasional Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingham, P. C.

    This report investigates the feasibility of including computer aided design (CAD) materials in engineering courses. Section 1 briefly discusses the inevitability of CAD being adopted widely by British industry and the consequent need for its inclusion in engineering syllabi at all levels. A short description of what is meant by CAD follows in…

  3. Surface Modeling, Solid Modeling and Finite Element Modeling. Analysis Capabilities of Computer-Assisted Design and Manufacturing Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nee, John G.; Kare, Audhut P.

    1987-01-01

    Explores several concepts in computer assisted design/computer assisted manufacturing (CAD/CAM). Defines, evaluates, reviews and compares advanced computer-aided geometric modeling and analysis techniques. Presents the results of a survey to establish the capabilities of minicomputer based-systems with the CAD/CAM packages evaluated. (CW)

  4. Can Tooth Preparation Design Affect the Fit of CAD/CAM Restorations?

    PubMed

    Roperto, Renato Cassio; Oliveira, Marina Piolli; Porto, Thiago Soares; Ferreira, Lais Alaberti; Melo, Lucas Simino; Akkus, Anna

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate if the marginal fit of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) restorations manufactured with CAD/CAM systems can be affected by different tooth preparation designs. Twenty-six typodont (plastic) teeth were divided into two groups (n = 13) according to the occlusal curvature of the tooth preparation. These were the group 1 (control group) (flat occlusal design) and group 2 (curved occlusal design). Scanning of the preparations was performed, and crowns were milled using ceramic blocks. Blocks were cemented using epoxy glue on the pulpal floor only, and finger pressure was applied for 1 minute. On completion of the cementation step, poor fits between the restoration and abutment were measured by microphotography and the silicone replica technique using light-body silicon material on mesial, distal, buccal, and lingual surfaces. Two-way ANOVA analysis did not reveal a statistical difference between flat (83.61 ± 50.72) and curved (79.04 ± 30.97) preparation designs. Buccal, mesial, lingual, and distal sites on the curved design preparation showed less of a gap when compared with flat design. No difference was found on flat preparations among mesial, buccal, and distal sites (P < .05). The lingual aspect had no difference from the distal side but showed a statistically significant difference from mesial and buccal (P < .05). Difference in occlusal design did not significantly impact the marginal fit. Marginal fit was significantly affected by the location of the margin; lingual and distal locations exhibited greater margin gap values compared with buccal and mesial sites regardless of the preparation design.

  5. The accuracy of the CAD system using intraoral and extraoral scanners for designing of fixed dental prostheses.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Sakura; Shinya, Akikazu; Kuroda, Soichi; Gomi, Harunori

    2017-07-26

    The accuracy of prostheses affects clinical success and is, in turn, affected by the accuracy of the scanner and CAD programs. Thus, their accuracy is important. The first aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of an intraoral scanner with active triangulation (Cerec Omnicam), an intraoral scanner with a confocal laser (3Shape Trios), and an extraoral scanner with active triangulation (D810). The second aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of the digital crowns designed with two different scanner/CAD combinations. The accuracy of the intraoral scanners and extraoral scanner was clinically acceptable. Marginal and internal fit of the digital crowns fabricated using the intraoral scanner and CAD programs were inferior to those fabricated using the extraoral scanner and CAD programs.

  6. The application of CAD / CAM technology in Dentistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susic, I.; Travar, M.; Susic, M.

    2017-05-01

    Information and communication technologies have found their application in the healthcare sector, including the frameworks of modern dentistry. CAD / CAM application in dentistry is the process by which is attained finished dental restoration through fine milling process of ready ceramic blocks. CAD / CAM is an acronym of english words Computer-Aided-Design (CAD) / Computer-Aided-Manufacture (CAM), respectively dental computer aided design and computer aided manufacture of inlays, onlays, crowns and bridges. CAD / CAM technology essentially allows you to create a two-dimensional and three-dimensional models and their materialization by numerical controlled machines. In order to operate more efficiently, reduce costs, increase user/patient satisfaction and ultimately achieve profits, many dental offices in the world have their attention focused on implementation of modern IT solutions in everyday practice. In addition to the specialized clinic management software, inventory control, etc., or hardware such as the use of lasers in cosmetic dentistry or intraoral scanning, recently the importance is given to the application of CAD / CAM technology in the field of prosthetic. After the removal of pathologically altered tooth structure, it is necessary to achieve restoration that will be most similar to the anatomy of a natural tooth. Applying CAD / CAM technology on applicable ceramic blocks it can be obtained very quick, but also very accurate restoration, in the forms of inlays, onlays, bridges and crowns. The paper presents the advantages of using this technology as well as satisfaction of the patients and dentists by using systems as: Cercon, Celay, Cerec, Lava, Everest, which represent imperative of modern dentistry in creating fixed dental restorations.

  7. Defeaturing CAD models using a geometry-based size field and facet-based reduction operators.

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Quadros, William Roshan; Owen, Steven James

    2010-04-01

    We propose a method to automatically defeature a CAD model by detecting irrelevant features using a geometry-based size field and a method to remove the irrelevant features via facet-based operations on a discrete representation. A discrete B-Rep model is first created by obtaining a faceted representation of the CAD entities. The candidate facet entities are then marked for reduction by using a geometry-based size field. This is accomplished by estimating local mesh sizes based on geometric criteria. If the field value at a facet entity goes below a user specified threshold value then it is identified as an irrelevant featuremore » and is marked for reduction. The reduction of marked facet entities is primarily performed using an edge collapse operator. Care is taken to retain a valid geometry and topology of the discrete model throughout the procedure. The original model is not altered as the defeaturing is performed on a separate discrete model. Associativity between the entities of the discrete model and that of original CAD model is maintained in order to decode the attributes and boundary conditions applied on the original CAD entities onto the mesh via the entities of the discrete model. Example models are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.« less

  8. Making a Case for CAD in the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Threlfall, K. Denise

    1995-01-01

    Computer-assisted design (CAD) technology is transforming the apparel industry. Students of fashion merchandising and clothing design must be prepared on state-of-the-art equipment. ApparelCAD software is one example of courseware for instruction in pattern design and production. (SK)

  9. Design Through Manufacturing: The Solid Model-Finite Element Analysis Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, Carol

    2002-01-01

    State-of-the-art computer aided design (CAD) presently affords engineers the opportunity to create solid models of machine parts reflecting every detail of the finished product. Ideally, in the aerospace industry, these models should fulfill two very important functions: (1) provide numerical. control information for automated manufacturing of precision parts, and (2) enable analysts to easily evaluate the stress levels (using finite element analysis - FEA) for all structurally significant parts used in aircraft and space vehicles. Today's state-of-the-art CAD programs perform function (1) very well, providing an excellent model for precision manufacturing. But they do not provide a straightforward and simple means of automating the translation from CAD to FEA models, especially for aircraft-type structures. Presently, the process of preparing CAD models for FEA consumes a great deal of the analyst's time.

  10. Role of CadC and CadD in the 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid oxygenase system of Sphingomonas agrestis 58-1.

    PubMed

    Kijima, Kumiko; Mita, Hajime; Kawakami, Mitsuyasu; Amada, Kei

    2018-02-02

    In the present study, we confirm that 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) oxygenase from Sphingomonas agrestis 58-1 belongs to the family of Rieske non-heme iron aromatic ring-hydroxylating oxygenases, which comprise a core enzyme (oxygenase), ferredoxin, and oxidoreductase. It has previously been shown that cadAB genes are necessary for the conversion of 2,4-D to 2,4-dichlorophenol; however, the respective roles of ferredoxin and oxidoreductase in the 2,4-D oxygenase system from S. agrestis 58-1 remain unknown. Using nucleotide sequence analysis of the plasmid pCADAB1 from Sphingomonas sp. ERG5, which degrades 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid and 2,4-D, Nielsen et al. identified orf95, upstream of cadA, and orf98, downstream of cadB, which were predicted and designated as cadD (oxidoreductase) and cadC (ferredoxin), respectively (Nielsen et al., PLoS One, 8, 1-9, 2013). These designations were the result of sequence analysis; therefore, we constructed an expression system of CadABC and CadABCD in Escherichia coli and assayed their enzyme activities. Our findings indicate that CadC is essential for the activity of 2,4-D oxygenase and CadD promotes CadABC activity in recombinant E. coli cells. Copyright © 2018 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Design and modeling balloon-expandable coronary stent for manufacturability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryawan, D.; Suyitno

    2017-02-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a disease that caused by narrowing of the coronary artery. The narrowing coronary artery is usually caused by cholesterol-containing deposit (plaque) which can cause a heart attack. CAD is the most common cause mortality in Indonesia. The commonly CAD treatment use the stent to opens or alleviate the narrowing coronary artery. In this study, the stent design is optimized for the manufacturability. Modeling is used to determine the free stent expansion due to applied pressure in the inner surface of the stent. The stress distribution, outer diameter change, and dogboning phenomena are investigated in the simulation. The result of modeling and simulating was analyzed and used to optimize the stent design before it is manufactured using EDM (Electric Discharge Machine) in the next research.

  12. CAD/CAM approach to improving industry productivity gathers momentum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fulton, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    Recent results and planning for the NASA/industry Integrated Programs for Aerospace-Vehicle Design (IPAD) program for improving productivity with CAD/CAM methods are outlined. The industrial group work is being mainly done by Boeing, and progress has been made in defining the designer work environment, developing requirements and a preliminary design for a future CAD/CAM system, and developing CAD/CAM technology. The work environment was defined by conducting a detailed study of a reference design process, and key software elements for a CAD/CAM system have been defined, specifically for interactive design or experiment control processes. Further work is proceeding on executive, data management, geometry and graphics, and general utility software, and dynamic aspects of the programs being developed are outlined

  13. Incorporating CAD Instruction into the Drafting Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuen, Steve Chi-Yin

    1990-01-01

    If education is to meet the challenged posed by the U.S. productivity crisis and the large number of computer-assisted design (CAD) workstations forecast as necessary in the future, schools must integrate CAD into the drafting curriculum and become aggressive in providing CAD training. Teachers need to maintain close contact with local industries…

  14. Education and Training Packages for CAD/CAM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, I. C.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses educational efforts in the fields of Computer Assisted Design and Manufacturing (CAD/CAM). Describes two educational training initiatives underway in the United Kingdom, one of which is a resource materials package for teachers of CAD/CAM at the undergraduate level, and the other a training course for managers of CAD/CAM systems. (TW)

  15. Integrating CAD modules in a PACS environment using a wide computing infrastructure.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Cuenca, Jorge J; Tilve, Amara; López, Ricardo; Ferro, Gonzalo; Quiles, Javier; Souto, Miguel

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe a project designed to achieve a total integration of different CAD algorithms into the PACS environment by using a wide computing infrastructure. The aim is to build a system for the entire region of Galicia, Spain, to make CAD accessible to multiple hospitals by employing different PACSs and clinical workstations. The new CAD model seeks to connect different devices (CAD systems, acquisition modalities, workstations and PACS) by means of networking based on a platform that will offer different CAD services. This paper describes some aspects related to the health services of the region where the project was developed, CAD algorithms that were either employed or selected for inclusion in the project, and several technical aspects and results. We have built a standard-based platform with which users can request a CAD service and receive the results in their local PACS. The process runs through a web interface that allows sending data to the different CAD services. A DICOM SR object is received with the results of the algorithms stored inside the original study in the proper folder with the original images. As a result, a homogeneous service to the different hospitals of the region will be offered. End users will benefit from a homogeneous workflow and a standardised integration model to request and obtain results from CAD systems in any modality, not dependant on commercial integration models. This new solution will foster the deployment of these technologies in the entire region of Galicia.

  16. 3-D Human body models in C.A.D. : Anthropometric Aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renaud, C.; Steck, R.; Pineau, J. C.

    1986-07-01

    Modeling and simulation methods of man-machine systems are developed at the laboratory by interactive infography and C.A.D. technics. In order to better apprehend the morphological variability of populations we have enriched the 3-D model with a parametric function using classical anthropometric dimensions. We have selected reference, associate and complementary dimensions : lengths, breadths, circumferences and depths, which depend on operator's tasks and characteristics of workplaces. All anthropometric values come from the International Data Bank of Human Biometry of ERGODATA System. The utilization of the parametric function brings a quick and accurate description of morphology for theoretic subjects and can be used in C.A.D. analysis.

  17. Integration of a CAD System Into an MDO Framework

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, J. C.; Samareh, J. A.; Weston, R. P.; Zorumski, W. E.

    1998-01-01

    NASA Langley has developed a heterogeneous distributed computing environment, called the Framework for Inter-disciplinary Design Optimization, or FIDO. Its purpose has been to demonstrate framework technical feasibility and usefulness for optimizing the preliminary design of complex systems and to provide a working environment for testing optimization schemes. Its initial implementation has been for a simplified model of preliminary design of a high-speed civil transport. Upgrades being considered for the FIDO system include a more complete geometry description, required by high-fidelity aerodynamics and structures codes and based on a commercial Computer Aided Design (CAD) system. This report presents the philosophy behind some of the decisions that have shaped the FIDO system and gives a brief case study of the problems and successes encountered in integrating a CAD system into the FEDO framework.

  18. Defect modelling in an interactive 3-D CAD environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reilly, D.; Potts, A.; McNab, A.; Toft, M.; Chapman, R. K.

    2000-05-01

    This paper describes enhancement of the NDT Workbench, as presented at QNDE '98, to include theoretical models for the ultrasonic inspection of smooth planar defects, developed by British Energy and BNFL-Magnox Generation. The Workbench is a PC-based software package for the reconstruction, visualization and analysis of 3-D ultrasonic NDT data in an interactive CAD environment. This extension of the Workbeach now provides the user with a well established modelling approach, coupled with a graphical user interface for: a) configuring the model for flaw size, shape, orientation and location; b) flexible specification of probe parameters; c) selection of scanning surface and scan pattern on the CAD component model; d) presentation of the output as a simulated ultrasound image within the component, or as graphical or tabular displays. The defect modelling facilities of the Workbench can be used for inspection procedure assessment and confirmation of data interpretation, by comparison of overlay images generated from real and simulated data. The modelling technique currently implemented is based on the Geometrical Theory of Diffraction, for simulation of strip-like, circular or elliptical crack responses in the time harmonic or time dependent cases. Eventually, the Workbench will also allow modelling using elastodynamic Kirchhoff theory.

  19. Analysis on the workspace of palletizing robot based on AutoCAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jin-quan; Zhang, Rui; Guan, Qi; Cui, Fang; Chen, Kuan

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, a four-degree-of-freedom articulated palletizing robot is used as the object of research. Based on the analysis of the overall configuration of the robot, the kinematic mathematical model is established by D-H method to figure out the workspace of the robot. In order to meet the needs of design and analysis, using AutoCAD secondary development technology and AutoLisp language to develop AutoCAD-based 2D and 3D workspace simulation interface program of palletizing robot. At last, using AutoCAD plugin, the influence of structural parameters on the shape and position of the working space is analyzed when the structure parameters of the robot are changed separately. This study laid the foundation for the design, control and planning of palletizing robots.

  20. Next Generation CAD/CAM/CAE Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K. (Compiler); Malone, John B. (Compiler)

    1997-01-01

    This document contains presentations from the joint UVA/NASA Workshop on Next Generation CAD/CAM/CAE Systems held at NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia on March 18-19, 1997. The presentations focused on current capabilities and future directions of CAD/CAM/CAE systems, aerospace industry projects, and university activities related to simulation-based design. Workshop attendees represented NASA, commercial software developers, the aerospace industry, government labs, and academia. The workshop objectives were to assess the potential of emerging CAD/CAM/CAE technology for use in intelligent simulation-based design and to provide guidelines for focused future research leading to effective use of CAE systems for simulating the entire life cycle of aerospace systems.

  1. From Oss CAD to Bim for Cultural Heritage Digital Representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logothetis, S.; Karachaliou, E.; Stylianidis, E.

    2017-02-01

    The paper illustrates the use of open source Computer-aided design (CAD) environments in order to develop Building Information Modelling (BIM) tools able to manage 3D models in the field of cultural heritage. Nowadays, the development of Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) has been rapidly growing and their use tends to be consolidated. Although BIM technology is widely known and used, there is a lack of integrated open source platforms able to support all stages of Historic Building Information Modelling (HBIM) processes. The present research aims to use a FOSS CAD environment in order to develop BIM plug-ins which will be able to import and edit digital representations of cultural heritage models derived by photogrammetric methods.

  2. Comprehensive BRL-CAD Primitive Database

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    are not to be construed as an official Department of the Army position unless so designated by other authorized documents. Citation of...database provides the target describers of BRL–CAD with a representative example of each primitive’s shape and its properties. In addition to the...database was completed, a tool was created to generate primitive shapes automatically. This provides target describers—CAD experts who generate

  3. Distortion of CAD-CAM-fabricated implant-fixed titanium and zirconia complete dental prosthesis frameworks.

    PubMed

    Al-Meraikhi, Hadi; Yilmaz, Burak; McGlumphy, Edwin; Brantley, William A; Johnston, William M

    2018-01-01

    Computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM)-fabricated titanium and zirconia implant-supported fixed dental prostheses have become increasingly popular for restoring patients with complete edentulism. However, the distortion level of these frameworks is not well known. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the 3-dimensional (3D) distortion of CAD-CAM zirconia and titanium implant-fixed screw-retained complete dental prostheses. A master edentulous model with 4 implants at the positions of the maxillary first molars and canines was used. Multiunit abutments (Nobel Biocare) secured to the model were digitally scanned using scan bodies and a laboratory scanner (S600 ARTI; Zirkonzahn). Titanium (n=5) and zirconia (n=5) frameworks were milled using a CAD-CAM system (Zirkonzahn M1; Zirkonzahn). All frameworks were scanned using an industrial computed tomography (CT) scanner (Nikon/X-Tek XT H 225kV MCT Micro-Focus). The direct CT scans were reconstructed to generate standard tessellation language (STL) files. To calculate the 3D distortion of the frameworks, STL files of the CT scans were aligned to the CAD model using a sum of the least squares best-fit algorithm. Surface comparison points were placed on the CAD model on the midfacial aspect of all teeth. The 3D distortion of each direct scan to the CAD model was calculated. In addition, color maps of the scan-to-CAD comparison were constructed using a ±0.500 mm color scale range. Both materials exhibited distortion; however, no significant difference was found in the amount of distortion from the CAD model between the materials (P=.747). Absolute values of deviations from the CAD model were evident in the x and y plane and less so in the z direction. Zirconia and titanium frameworks showed similar 3D distortion compared with the CAD model for the tested CAD-CAM and implant systems. The distortion was more pronounced in the horizontal and sagittal plane than in the vertical plane

  4. MHDL CAD tool with fault circuit handling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinosa Flores-Verdad, Guillermo; Altamirano Robles, Leopoldo; Osorio Roque, Leticia

    2003-04-01

    Behavioral modeling and simulation, with Analog Hardware and Mixed Signal Description High Level Languages (MHDLs), have generated the development of diverse simulation tools that allow handling the requirements of the modern designs. These systems have million of transistors embedded and they are radically diverse between them. This tendency of simulation tools is exemplified by the development of languages for modeling and simulation, whose applications are the re-use of complete systems, construction of virtual prototypes, realization of test and synthesis. This paper presents the general architecture of a Mixed Hardware Description Language, based on the standard 1076.1-1999 IEEE VHDL Analog and Mixed-Signal Extensions known as VHDL-AMS. This architecture is novel by consider the modeling and simulation of faults. The main modules of the CAD tool are briefly described in order to establish the information flow and its transformations, starting from the description of a circuit model, going throw the lexical analysis, mathematical models generation and the simulation core, ending at the collection of the circuit behavior as simulation"s data. In addition, the incorporated mechanisms to the simulation core are explained in order to realize the handling of faults into the circuit models. Currently, the CAD tool works with algebraic and differential descriptions for the circuit models, nevertheless the language design is open to be able to handle different model types: Fuzzy Models, Differentials Equations, Transfer Functions and Tables. This applies for fault models too, in this sense the CAD tool considers the inclusion of mutants and saboteurs. To exemplified the results obtained until now, the simulated behavior of a circuit is shown when it is fault free and when it has been modified by the inclusion of a fault as a mutant or a saboteur. The obtained results allow the realization of a virtual diagnosis for mixed circuits. This language works in a UNIX system

  5. Reconstruction of Consistent 3d CAD Models from Point Cloud Data Using a Priori CAD Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bey, A.; Chaine, R.; Marc, R.; Thibault, G.; Akkouche, S.

    2011-09-01

    We address the reconstruction of 3D CAD models from point cloud data acquired in industrial environments, using a pre-existing 3D model as an initial estimate of the scene to be processed. Indeed, this prior knowledge can be used to drive the reconstruction so as to generate an accurate 3D model matching the point cloud. We more particularly focus our work on the cylindrical parts of the 3D models. We propose to state the problem in a probabilistic framework: we have to search for the 3D model which maximizes some probability taking several constraints into account, such as the relevancy with respect to the point cloud and the a priori 3D model, and the consistency of the reconstructed model. The resulting optimization problem can then be handled using a stochastic exploration of the solution space, based on the random insertion of elements in the configuration under construction, coupled with a greedy management of the conflicts which efficiently improves the configuration at each step. We show that this approach provides reliable reconstructed 3D models by presenting some results on industrial data sets.

  6. Correlating Trainee Attributes to Performance in 3D CAD Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamade, Ramsey F.; Artail, Hassan A.; Sikstrom, Sverker

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this exploratory study is to identify trainee attributes relevant for development of skills in 3D computer-aided design (CAD). Design/methodology/approach: Participants were trained to perform cognitive tasks of comparable complexity over time. Performance data were collected on the time needed to construct test models, and…

  7. AutoCAD-To-NASTRAN Translator Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, A.

    1989-01-01

    Program facilitates creation of finite-element mathematical models from geometric entities. AutoCAD to NASTRAN translator (ACTON) computer program developed to facilitate quick generation of small finite-element mathematical models for use with NASTRAN finite-element modeling program. Reads geometric data of drawing from Data Exchange File (DXF) used in AutoCAD and other PC-based drafting programs. Written in Microsoft Quick-Basic (Version 2.0).

  8. A Comparison of the Marginal and Internal Fit of Cobalt- Chromium Copings Fabricated by Two Different CAD/CAM Systems (CAD/ Milling, CAD/ Ceramill Sintron).

    PubMed

    Vojdani, Mahroo; Torabi, Kianoosh; Atashkar, Berivan; Heidari, Hossein; Torabi Ardakani, Mahshid

    2016-12-01

    Marginal fitness is the most important criteria for evaluation of the clinical acceptability of a cast restoration. Marginal gap which is due to cement solubility and plaque retention is potentially detrimental to both tooth and periodontal tissues. This in vitro study aimed to evaluate the marginal and internal fit of cobalt- chromium (Co-Cr) copings fabricated by two different CAD/CAM systems: (CAD/ milling and CAD/ Ceramill Sintron). We prepared one machined standard stainless steel master model with following dimensions: 7 mm height, 5mm diameter, 90˚ shoulder marginal finish line with 1 mm width, 10˚ convergence angle and anti-rotational surface on the buccal aspect of the die. There were 10 copings produced from hard presintered Co-Cr blocks according to CAD/ Milling technique and ten copings from soft non- presintered Co-Cr blocks according to CAD/ Ceramill Sintron technique. Marginal and internal accuracies of copings were documented by the replica technique. Replicas were examined at ten reference points under a digital microscope (230X). The Student's t-test was used for statistical analysis. p < 0.001 was considered significant. Statistically significant differences existed between the groups ( p < 0.001). The CAD/milling group (hard copings) had a mean marginal discrepancy (MD) of 104 µm, axial discrepancy (AD) of 23 µm and occlusal discrepancy of 130 µm. For CAD/ Ceramill Sintron group, these values were 195 µm (MD), 46 µm (AD), and 232 µm (OD). Internal total discrepancy (ITD) for the CAD/milling group was 77 µm, whereas for the CAD/Ceramill Sintron group was 143 µm. Hard presintered Co-Cr copings had significantly higher marginal and internal accuracies compared to the soft non-presintered copings.

  9. Incorporation of CAD/CAM Restoration Into Navy Dentistry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-09-26

    CAD/CAM Computer-aided design /Computer-assisted manufacturing CDT Common Dental Terminology DENCAS Dental Common Access System DTF Dental...to reduce avoidable dental emergencies for deployed sailors and marines. Dental Computer-aided design /Computer-assisted manufacturing (CAD/CAM...report will review and evaluate the placement rate by Navy dentists of digitally fabricated in-office ceramic restorations compared to traditional direct

  10. Design and development of a quad copter (UMAASK) using CAD/CAM/CAE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manarvi, Irfan Anjum; Aqib, Muhammad; Ajmal, Muhammad; Usman, Muhammad; Khurshid, Saqib; Sikandar, Usman

    Micro flying vehicles1 (MFV) have become a popular area of research due to economy of production, flexibility of launch and variety of applications. A large number of techniques from pencil sketching to computer based software are being used for designing specific geometries and selection of materials to arrive at novel designs for specific requirements. Present research was focused on development of suitable design configuration using CAD/CAM/CAE tools and techniques. A number of designs were reviewed for this purpose. Finally, rotary wing Quadcopter flying vehicle design was considered appropriate for this research. Performance requirements were planned as approximately 10 meters ceiling, weight less than 500grams and ability to take videos and pictures. Parts were designed using Finite Element Analysis, manufactured using CNC machines and assembled to arrive at final design named as UMAASK. Flight tests were carried out which confirmed the design requirements.

  11. Design of a miniature implantable left ventricular assist device using CAD/CAM technology.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Eiji; Hashimoto, Takuya; Mitamura, Yoshinori

    2003-01-01

    In this study, we developed a new miniature motor-driven pulsatile left ventricular assist device (LVAD) for implantation into a Japanese patient of average build by means of computer-aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology. A specially designed miniature ball-screw and a high-performance brushless DC motor were used in an artificial heart actuator to allow miniaturization. A blood pump chamber (stroke volume 55 ml) and an inflow and outflow port were designed by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. The geometry of the blood pump was evaluated using the value of index of pump geometry (IPG) = (Reynolds shear stress) x (occupied volume) as a quantitative index for optimization. The calculated value of IPG varied from 20.6 Nm to 49.1 Nm, depending on small variations in pump geometry. We determined the optimum pump geometry based on the results of quantitative evaluation using IPG and qualitative evaluation using the flow velocity distribution with blood flow tracking. The geometry of the blood pump that gave lower shear stress had more optimum spiral flow around the diaphragm-housing (D-H) junction. The volume and weight of the new LVAD, made of epoxy resin, is 309 ml and 378 g, but further miniaturization will be possible by improving the geometry of both the blood pump and the back casing. Our results show that our new design method for an implantable LVAD using CAD/CAM promises to improve blood compatibility with greater miniaturization.

  12. A Comparison of the Marginal and Internal Fit of Cobalt- Chromium Copings Fabricated by Two Different CAD/CAM Systems (CAD/ Milling, CAD/ Ceramill Sintron)

    PubMed Central

    Vojdani, Mahroo; Torabi, Kianoosh; Atashkar, Berivan; Heidari, Hossein; Torabi Ardakani, Mahshid

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem: Marginal fitness is the most important criteria for evaluation of the clinical acceptability of a cast restoration. Marginal gap which is due to cement solubility and plaque retention is potentially detrimental to both tooth and periodontal tissues. Purpose: This in vitro study aimed to evaluate the marginal and internal fit of cobalt- chromium (Co-Cr) copings fabricated by two different CAD/CAM systems: (CAD/ milling and CAD/ Ceramill Sintron). Materials and Method: We prepared one machined standard stainless steel master model with following dimensions: 7 mm height, 5mm diameter, 90˚ shoulder marginal finish line with 1 mm width, 10˚ convergence angle and anti-rotational surface on the buccal aspect of the die. There were 10 copings produced from hard presintered Co-Cr blocks according to CAD/ Milling technique and ten copings from soft non- presintered Co-Cr blocks according to CAD/ Ceramill Sintron technique. Marginal and internal accuracies of copings were documented by the replica technique. Replicas were examined at ten reference points under a digital microscope (230X). The Student's t-test was used for statistical analysis. p< 0.001 was considered significant. Results: Statistically significant differences existed between the groups (p< 0.001). The CAD/milling group (hard copings) had a mean marginal discrepancy (MD) of 104 µm, axial discrepancy (AD) of 23 µm and occlusal discrepancy of 130 µm. For CAD/ Ceramill Sintron group, these values were 195 µm (MD), 46 µm (AD), and 232 µm (OD). Internal total discrepancy (ITD) for the CAD/milling group was 77 µm, whereas for the CAD/Ceramill Sintron group was 143 µm. Conclusion: Hard presintered Co-Cr copings had significantly higher marginal and internal accuracies compared to the soft non-presintered copings. PMID:27942545

  13. CAD-centric Computation Management System for a Virtual TBM

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Ramakanth Munipalli; K.Y. Szema; P.Y. Huang

    HyPerComp Inc. in research collaboration with TEXCEL has set out to build a Virtual Test Blanket Module (VTBM) computational system to address the need in contemporary fusion research for simulating the integrated behavior of the blanket, divertor and plasma facing components in a fusion environment. Physical phenomena to be considered in a VTBM will include fluid flow, heat transfer, mass transfer, neutronics, structural mechanics and electromagnetics. We seek to integrate well established (third-party) simulation software in various disciplines mentioned above. The integrated modeling process will enable user groups to interoperate using a common modeling platform at various stages of themore » analysis. Since CAD is at the core of the simulation (as opposed to computational meshes which are different for each problem,) VTBM will have a well developed CAD interface, governing CAD model editing, cleanup, parameter extraction, model deformation (based on simulation,) CAD-based data interpolation. In Phase-I, we built the CAD-hub of the proposed VTBM and demonstrated its use in modeling a liquid breeder blanket module with coupled MHD and structural mechanics using HIMAG and ANSYS. A complete graphical user interface of the VTBM was created, which will form the foundation of any future development. Conservative data interpolation via CAD (as opposed to mesh-based transfer), the regeneration of CAD models based upon computed deflections, are among the other highlights of phase-I activity.« less

  14. The Effects of Integrating Mobile and CAD Technology in Teaching Design Process for Malaysian Polytechnic Architecture Student in Producing Creative Product

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassan, Isham Shah; Ismail, Mohd Arif; Mustapha, Ramlee

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to examine the effect of integrating the digital media such as mobile and CAD technology on designing process of Malaysian polytechnic architecture students in producing a creative product. A website is developed based on Caroll's minimal theory, while mobile and CAD technology integration is based on Brown and…

  15. Optical CAD Utilization for the Design and Testing of a LED Streetlamp.

    PubMed

    Jafrancesco, David; Mercatelli, Luca; Fontani, Daniela; Sansoni, Paola

    2017-08-24

    The design and testing of LED lamps are vital steps toward broader use of LED lighting for outdoor illumination and traffic signalling. The characteristics of LED sources, in combination with the need to limit light pollution and power consumption, require a precise optical design. In particular, in every step of the process, it is important to closely compare theoretical or simulated results with measured data (obtained from a prototype). This work examines the various possibilities for using an optical CAD (Lambda Research TracePro ) to design and check a LED lamp for outdoor use. This analysis includes the simulations and testing on a prototype as an example; data acquired by measurement are inserted into the same simulation software, making it easy to compare theoretical and actual results.

  16. Management of CAD/CAM information: Key to improved manufacturing productivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fulton, R. E.; Brainin, J.

    1984-01-01

    A key element to improved industry productivity is effective management of CAD/CAM information. To stimulate advancements in this area, a joint NASA/Navy/Industry project designated Integrated Programs for Aerospace-Vehicle Design (IPAD) is underway with the goal of raising aerospace industry productivity through advancement of technology to integrate and manage information involved in the design and manufacturing process. The project complements traditional NASA/DOD research to develop aerospace design technology and the Air Force's Integrated Computer-Aided Manufacturing (ICAM) program to advance CAM technology. IPAD research is guided by an Industry Technical Advisory Board (ITAB) composed of over 100 repesentatives from aerospace and computer companies. The IPAD accomplishments to date in development of requirements and prototype software for various levels of company-wide CAD/CAM data management are summarized and plans for development of technology for management of distributed CAD/CAM data and information required to control future knowledge-based CAD/CAM systems are discussed.

  17. 21 CFR 872.3661 - Optical Impression Systems for CAD/CAM.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Optical Impression Systems for CAD/CAM. 872.3661... (CAD/CAM) is a device used to record the topographical characteristics of teeth, dental impressions, or... Design and Manufacturing (CAD/CAM) of Dental Restorations; Guidance for Industry and FDA.” For the...

  18. 21 CFR 872.3661 - Optical Impression Systems for CAD/CAM.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Optical Impression Systems for CAD/CAM. 872.3661... (CAD/CAM) is a device used to record the topographical characteristics of teeth, dental impressions, or... Design and Manufacturing (CAD/CAM) of Dental Restorations; Guidance for Industry and FDA.” For the...

  19. 21 CFR 872.3661 - Optical Impression Systems for CAD/CAM.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Optical Impression Systems for CAD/CAM. 872.3661... (CAD/CAM) is a device used to record the topographical characteristics of teeth, dental impressions, or... Design and Manufacturing (CAD/CAM) of Dental Restorations; Guidance for Industry and FDA.” For the...

  20. How to Quickly Import CAD Geometry into Thermal Desktop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Shonte; Beltran, Emilio

    2002-01-01

    There are several groups at JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory) that are committed to concurrent design efforts, two are featured here. Center for Space Mission Architecture and Design (CSMAD) enables the practical application of advanced process technologies in JPL's mission architecture process. Team I functions as an incubator for projects that are in the Discovery, and even pre-Discovery proposal stages. JPL's concurrent design environment is to a large extent centered on the CAD (Computer Aided Design) file. During concurrent design sessions CAD geometry is ported to other more specialized engineering design packages.

  1. Workflow of CAD / CAM Scoliosis Brace Adjustment in Preparation Using 3D Printing.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Hans-Rudolf; Tournavitis, Nicos; Nan, Xiaofeng; Borysov, Maksym; Paul, Lothar

    2017-01-01

    High correction bracing is the most effective conservative treatment for patients with scoliosis during growth. Still today braces for the treatment of scoliosis are made by casting patients while computer aided design (CAD) and computer aided manufacturing (CAM) is available with all possibilities to standardize pattern specific brace treatment and improve wearing comfort. CAD / CAM brace production mainly relies on carving a polyurethane foam model which is the basis for vacuuming a polyethylene (PE) or polypropylene (PP) brace. Purpose of this short communication is to describe the workflow currently used and to outline future requirements with respect to 3D printing technology. Description of the steps of virtual brace adjustment as available today are content of this paper as well as an outline of the great potential there is for the future 3D printing technology. For 3D printing of scoliosis braces it is necessary to establish easy to use software plug-ins in order to allow adding 3D printing technology to the current workflow of virtual CAD / CAM brace adjustment. Textures and structures can be added to the brace models at certain well defined locations offering the potential of more wearing comfort without losing in-brace correction. Advances have to be made in the field of CAD / CAM software tools with respect to design and generation of individually structured brace models based on currently well established and standardized scoliosis brace libraries.

  2. Rationale for the Use of CAD/CAM Technology in Implant Prosthodontics

    PubMed Central

    Abduo, Jaafar; Lyons, Karl

    2013-01-01

    Despite the predictable longevity of implant prosthesis, there is an ongoing interest to continue to improve implant prosthodontic treatment and outcomes. One of the developments is the application of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) to produce implant abutments and frameworks from metal or ceramic materials. The aim of this narrative review is to critically evaluate the rationale of CAD/CAM utilization for implant prosthodontics. To date, CAD/CAM allows simplified production of precise and durable implant components. The precision of fit has been proven in several laboratory experiments and has been attributed to the design of implants. Milling also facilitates component fabrication from durable and aesthetic materials. With further development, it is expected that the CAD/CAM protocol will be further simplified. Although compelling clinical evidence supporting the superiority of CAD/CAM implant restorations is still lacking, it is envisioned that CAD/CAM may become the main stream for implant component fabrication. PMID:23690778

  3. Effect of Endocrown Restorations with Different CAD/CAM Materials: 3D Finite Element and Weibull Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Ulusoy, Nuran

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of two endocrown designs and computer aided design/manufacturing (CAD/CAM) materials on stress distribution and failure probability of restorations applied to severely damaged endodontically treated maxillary first premolar tooth (MFP). Two types of designs without and with 3 mm intraradicular extensions, endocrown (E) and modified endocrown (ME), were modeled on a 3D Finite element (FE) model of the MFP. Vitablocks Mark II (VMII), Vita Enamic (VE), and Lava Ultimate (LU) CAD/CAM materials were used for each type of design. von Mises and maximum principle values were evaluated and the Weibull function was incorporated with FE analysis to calculate the long term failure probability. Regarding the stresses that occurred in enamel, for each group of material, ME restoration design transmitted less stress than endocrown. During normal occlusal function, the overall failure probability was minimum for ME with VMII. ME restoration design with VE was the best restorative option for premolar teeth with extensive loss of coronal structure under high occlusal loads. Therefore, ME design could be a favorable treatment option for MFPs with missing palatal cusp. Among the CAD/CAM materials tested, VMII and VE were found to be more tooth-friendly than LU. PMID:29119108

  4. High-frequency CAD-based scattering model: SERMAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goupil, D.; Boutillier, M.

    1991-09-01

    Specifications for an industrial radar cross section (RCS) calculation code are given: it must be able to exchange data with many computer aided design (CAD) systems, it must be fast, and it must have powerful graphic tools. Classical physical optics (PO) and equivalent currents (EC) techniques have proven their efficiency on simple objects for a long time. Difficult geometric problems occur when objects with very complex shapes have to be computed. Only a specific geometric code can solve these problems. We have established that, once these problems have been solved: (1) PO and EC give good results on complex objects of large size compared to wavelength; and (2) the implementation of these objects in a software package (SERMAT) allows fast and sufficiently precise domain RCS calculations to meet industry requirements in the domain of stealth.

  5. Design Through Manufacturing: The Solid Model - Finite Element Analysis Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, Carol

    2003-01-01

    State-of-the-art computer aided design (CAD) presently affords engineers the opportunity to create solid models of machine parts which reflect every detail of the finished product. Ideally, these models should fulfill two very important functions: (1) they must provide numerical control information for automated manufacturing of precision parts, and (2) they must enable analysts to easily evaluate the stress levels (using finite element analysis - FEA) for all structurally significant parts used in space missions. Today's state-of-the-art CAD programs perform function (1) very well, providing an excellent model for precision manufacturing. But they do not provide a straightforward and simple means of automating the translation from CAD to FEA models, especially for aircraft-type structures. The research performed during the fellowship period investigated the transition process from the solid CAD model to the FEA stress analysis model with the final goal of creating an automatic interface between the two. During the period of the fellowship a detailed multi-year program for the development of such an interface was created. The ultimate goal of this program will be the development of a fully parameterized automatic ProE/FEA translator for parts and assemblies, with the incorporation of data base management into the solution, and ultimately including computational fluid dynamics and thermal modeling in the interface.

  6. CAD system for footwear design based on whole real 3D data of last surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Wanzhong; Su, Xianyu

    2000-10-01

    Two major parts of application of CAD in footwear design are studied: the development of last surface; computer-aided design of planar shoe-template. A new quasi-experiential development algorithm of last surface based on triangulation approximation is presented. This development algorithm consumes less time and does not need any interactive operation for precisely development compared with other development algorithm of last surface. Based on this algorithm, a software, SHOEMAKERTM, which contains computer aided automatic measurement, automatic development of last surface and computer aide design of shoe-template has been developed.

  7. 1st Order Modeling of a SAW Delay Line using MathCAD(Registered)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, William C.; Atkinson, Gary M.

    2007-01-01

    To aid in the development of SAW sensors for Integrated Vehicle Health Monitoring applications, a first order model of a SAW Delay line has been created using MathCadA. The model implements the Impulse Response method to calculate the frequency response, impedance, and insertion loss. This paper presents the model and the results from the model for a SAW delay line design. Integrated Vehicle Health Monitoring (IVHM) of aerospace vehicles requires rugged sensors having reduced volume, mass, and power that can be used to measure a variety of phenomena. Wireless systems are preferred when retro-fitting sensors onto existing vehicles [1]. Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) devices are capable of sensing: temperature, pressure, strain, chemical species, mass loading, acceleration, and shear stress. SAW technology is low cost, rugged, lightweight, and extremely low power. Passive wireless sensors have been developed using SAW technology. For these reasons new SAW sensors are being investigated for aerospace applications.

  8. Turnkey CAD/CAM systems' integration with IPAD systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blauth, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    Today's commercially available turnkey CAD/CAM systems provide a highly interactive environment, and support many specialized application functions for the design/drafting/manufacturing process. This paper presents an overview of several aerospace companies which have successfully integrated turnkey CAD/CAM systems with their own company wide engineering and manufacturing systems. It also includes a vendor's view of the benefits as well as the disadvantages of such integration efforts. Specific emphasis is placed upon the selection of standards for representing geometric engineering data and for communicating such information between different CAD/CAM systems.

  9. Astronaut EVA exposure estimates from CAD model spacesuit geometry.

    PubMed

    De Angelis, Giovanni; Anderson, Brooke M; Atwell, William; Nealy, John E; Qualls, Garry D; Wilson, John W

    2004-03-01

    Ongoing assembly and maintenance activities at the International Space Station (ISS) require much more extravehicular activity (EVA) than did the earlier U.S. Space Shuttle missions. It is thus desirable to determine and analyze, and possibly foresee, as accurately as possible what radiation exposures crew members involved in EVAs will experience in order to minimize risks and to establish exposure limits that must not to be exceeded. A detailed CAD model of the U.S. Space Shuttle EVA Spacesuit, developed at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC), is used to represent the directional shielding of an astronaut; it has detailed helmet and backpack structures, hard upper torso, and multilayer space suit fabric material. The NASA Computerized Anatomical Male and Female (CAM and CAF) models are used in conjunction with the space suit CAD model for dose evaluation within the human body. The particle environments are taken from the orbit-averaged NASA AP8 and AE8 models at solar cycle maxima and minima. The transport of energetic particles through space suit materials and body tissue is calculated by using the NASA LaRC HZETRN code for hadrons and a recently developed deterministic transport code, ELTRN, for electrons. The doses within the CAM and CAF models are determined from energy deposition at given target points along 968 directional rays convergent on the points and are evaluated for several points on the skin and within the body. Dosimetric quantities include contributions from primary protons, light ions, and electrons, as well as from secondary brehmsstrahlung and target fragments. Directional dose patterns are displayed as rays and on spherical surfaces by the use of a color relative intensity representation.

  10. Revision of Electro-Mechanical Drafting Program to Include CAD/D (Computer-Aided Drafting/Design). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Nancy V.

    North Seattle Community College decided to integrate computer-aided design/drafting (CAD/D) into its Electro-Mechanical Drafting Program. This choice necessitated a redefinition of the program through new curriculum and course development. To initiate the project, a new industrial advisory council was formed. Major electronic and recruiting firms…

  11. CAD/CAM: Practical and Persuasive in Canadian Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willms, Ed

    2007-01-01

    Chances are that many high school students would not know how to use drafting instruments, but some might want to gain competence in computer-assisted design (CAD) and possibly computer-assisted manufacturing (CAM). These students are often attracted to tech courses by the availability of CAD/CAM instructions, and many go on to impress employers…

  12. ACCELERATING FUSION REACTOR NEUTRONICS MODELING BY AUTOMATIC COUPLING OF HYBRID MONTE CARLO/DETERMINISTIC TRANSPORT ON CAD GEOMETRY

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Biondo, Elliott D; Ibrahim, Ahmad M; Mosher, Scott W

    2015-01-01

    Detailed radiation transport calculations are necessary for many aspects of the design of fusion energy systems (FES) such as ensuring occupational safety, assessing the activation of system components for waste disposal, and maintaining cryogenic temperatures within superconducting magnets. Hybrid Monte Carlo (MC)/deterministic techniques are necessary for this analysis because FES are large, heavily shielded, and contain streaming paths that can only be resolved with MC. The tremendous complexity of FES necessitates the use of CAD geometry for design and analysis. Previous ITER analysis has required the translation of CAD geometry to MCNP5 form in order to use the AutomateD VAriaNcemore » reducTion Generator (ADVANTG) for hybrid MC/deterministic transport. In this work, ADVANTG was modified to support CAD geometry, allowing hybrid (MC)/deterministic transport to be done automatically and eliminating the need for this translation step. This was done by adding a new ray tracing routine to ADVANTG for CAD geometries using the Direct Accelerated Geometry Monte Carlo (DAGMC) software library. This new capability is demonstrated with a prompt dose rate calculation for an ITER computational benchmark problem using both the Consistent Adjoint Driven Importance Sampling (CADIS) method an the Forward Weighted (FW)-CADIS method. The variance reduction parameters produced by ADVANTG are shown to be the same using CAD geometry and standard MCNP5 geometry. Significant speedups were observed for both neutrons (as high as a factor of 7.1) and photons (as high as a factor of 59.6).« less

  13. Real-time slicing algorithm for Stereolithography (STL) CAD model applied in additive manufacturing industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adnan, F. A.; Romlay, F. R. M.; Shafiq, M.

    2018-04-01

    Owing to the advent of the industrial revolution 4.0, the need for further evaluating processes applied in the additive manufacturing application particularly the computational process for slicing is non-trivial. This paper evaluates a real-time slicing algorithm for slicing an STL formatted computer-aided design (CAD). A line-plane intersection equation was applied to perform the slicing procedure at any given height. The application of this algorithm has found to provide a better computational time regardless the number of facet in the STL model. The performance of this algorithm is evaluated by comparing the results of the computational time for different geometry.

  14. Simplified microstrip discontinuity modeling using the transmission line matrix method interfaced to microwave CAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, James H.; Apel, Thomas R.

    1990-07-01

    A technique for modeling microstrip discontinuities is presented which is derived from the transmission line matrix method of solving three-dimensional electromagnetic problems. In this technique the microstrip patch under investigation is divided into an integer number of square and half-square (triangle) subsections. An equivalent lumped-element model is calculated for each subsection. These individual models are then interconnected as dictated by the geometry of the patch. The matrix of lumped elements is then solved using either of two microwave CAD software interfaces with each port properly defined. Closed-form expressions for the lumped-element representation of the individual subsections is presented and experimentally verified through the X-band frequency range. A model demonstrating the use of symmetry and block construction of a circuit element is discussed, along with computer program development and CAD software interface.

  15. 3D Displays And User Interface Design For A Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning CAD Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosher, Charles E.; Sherouse, George W.; Chaney, Edward L.; Rosenman, Julian G.

    1988-06-01

    The long term goal of the project described in this paper is to improve local tumor control through the use of computer-aided treatment design methods that can result in selection of better treatment plans compared with conventional planning methods. To this end, a CAD tool for the design of radiation treatment beams is described. Crucial to the effectiveness of this tool are high quality 3D display techniques. We have found that 2D and 3D display methods dramatically improve the comprehension of the complex spatial relationships between patient anatomy, radiation beams, and dose distributions. In order to take full advantage of these displays, an intuitive and highly interactive user interface was created. If the system is to be used by physicians unfamiliar with computer systems, it is essential that a user interface is incorporated that allows the user to navigate through each step of the design process in a manner similar to what they are used to. Compared with conventional systems, we believe our display and CAD tools will allow the radiotherapist to achieve more accurate beam targetting leading to a better radiation dose configuration to the tumor volume. This would result in a reduction of the dose to normal tissue.

  16. The Role of Flow Experience and CAD Tools in Facilitating Creative Behaviours for Architecture Design Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawoud, Husameddin M.; Al-Samarraie, Hosam; Zaqout, Fahed

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the role of flow experience in intellectual activity with an emphasis on the relationship between flow experience and creative behaviour in design using CAD. The study used confluence and psychometric approaches because of their unique abilities to depict a clear image of creative behaviour. A cross-sectional study…

  17. The Enzyme Activity and Substrate Specificity of Two Major Cinnamyl Alcohol Dehydrogenases in Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), SbCAD2 and SbCAD4.

    PubMed

    Jun, Se-Young; Walker, Alexander M; Kim, Hoon; Ralph, John; Vermerris, Wilfred; Sattler, Scott E; Kang, ChulHee

    2017-08-01

    Cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) catalyzes the final step in monolignol biosynthesis, reducing sinapaldehyde, coniferaldehyde, and p -coumaraldehyde to their corresponding alcohols in an NADPH-dependent manner. Because of its terminal location in monolignol biosynthesis, the variation in substrate specificity and activity of CAD can result in significant changes in overall composition and amount of lignin. Our in-depth characterization of two major CAD isoforms, SbCAD2 (Brown midrib 6 [bmr6]) and SbCAD4, in lignifying tissues of sorghum ( Sorghum bicolor ), a strategic plant for generating renewable chemicals and fuels, indicates their similarity in both structure and activity to Arabidopsis ( Arabidopsis thaliana ) CAD5 and Populus tremuloides sinapyl alcohol dehydrogenase, respectively. This first crystal structure of a monocot CAD combined with enzyme kinetic data and a catalytic model supported by site-directed mutagenesis allows full comparison with dicot CADs and elucidates the potential signature sequence for their substrate specificity and activity. The L119W/G301F-SbCAD4 double mutant displayed its substrate preference in the order coniferaldehyde > p -coumaraldehyde > sinapaldehyde, with higher catalytic efficiency than that of both wild-type SbCAD4 and SbCAD2. As SbCAD4 is the only major CAD isoform in bmr6 mutants, replacing SbCAD4 with L119W/G301F-SbCAD4 in bmr6 plants could produce a phenotype that is more amenable to biomass processing. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  18. A/E/C CAD Standard, Release 4.0

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    Insulating (Transformer) Oil System Lubrication Oil Hot Water Heating System Machine Design Appendix A Model File Level/Layer Assignment Tables A51...of the A /E/C CAD Standard are:  “Uniform Drawing System ” The Construction Specifications Institute 99 Canal Center Plaza, Suite 300 Alexandria, VA...FM – Facility Management  GIS – Geographic Information System  IAI – International Alliance for Interoperability  IFC – Industry Foundation

  19. Gaps Analysis of Integrating Product Design, Manufacturing, and Quality Data in The Supply Chain Using Model-Based Definition

    PubMed Central

    Trainer, Asa; Hedberg, Thomas; Feeney, Allison Barnard; Fischer, Kevin; Rosche, Phil

    2017-01-01

    Advances in information technology triggered a digital revolution that holds promise of reduced costs, improved productivity, and higher quality. To ride this wave of innovation, manufacturing enterprises are changing how product definitions are communicated – from paper to models. To achieve industry's vision of the Model-Based Enterprise (MBE), the MBE strategy must include model-based data interoperability from design to manufacturing and quality in the supply chain. The Model-Based Definition (MBD) is created by the original equipment manufacturer (OEM) using Computer-Aided Design (CAD) tools. This information is then shared with the supplier so that they can manufacture and inspect the physical parts. Today, suppliers predominantly use Computer-Aided Manufacturing (CAM) and Coordinate Measuring Machine (CMM) models for these tasks. Traditionally, the OEM has provided design data to the supplier in the form of two-dimensional (2D) drawings, but may also include a three-dimensional (3D)-shape-geometry model, often in a standards-based format such as ISO 10303-203:2011 (STEP AP203). The supplier then creates the respective CAM and CMM models and machine programs to produce and inspect the parts. In the MBE vision for model-based data exchange, the CAD model must include product-and-manufacturing information (PMI) in addition to the shape geometry. Today's CAD tools can generate models with embedded PMI. And, with the emergence of STEP AP242, a standards-based model with embedded PMI can now be shared downstream. The on-going research detailed in this paper seeks to investigate three concepts. First, that the ability to utilize a STEP AP242 model with embedded PMI for CAD-to-CAM and CAD-to-CMM data exchange is possible and valuable to the overall goal of a more efficient process. Second, the research identifies gaps in tools, standards, and processes that inhibit industry's ability to cost-effectively achieve model-based-data interoperability in the pursuit of

  20. Gaps Analysis of Integrating Product Design, Manufacturing, and Quality Data in The Supply Chain Using Model-Based Definition.

    PubMed

    Trainer, Asa; Hedberg, Thomas; Feeney, Allison Barnard; Fischer, Kevin; Rosche, Phil

    2016-01-01

    Advances in information technology triggered a digital revolution that holds promise of reduced costs, improved productivity, and higher quality. To ride this wave of innovation, manufacturing enterprises are changing how product definitions are communicated - from paper to models. To achieve industry's vision of the Model-Based Enterprise (MBE), the MBE strategy must include model-based data interoperability from design to manufacturing and quality in the supply chain. The Model-Based Definition (MBD) is created by the original equipment manufacturer (OEM) using Computer-Aided Design (CAD) tools. This information is then shared with the supplier so that they can manufacture and inspect the physical parts. Today, suppliers predominantly use Computer-Aided Manufacturing (CAM) and Coordinate Measuring Machine (CMM) models for these tasks. Traditionally, the OEM has provided design data to the supplier in the form of two-dimensional (2D) drawings, but may also include a three-dimensional (3D)-shape-geometry model, often in a standards-based format such as ISO 10303-203:2011 (STEP AP203). The supplier then creates the respective CAM and CMM models and machine programs to produce and inspect the parts. In the MBE vision for model-based data exchange, the CAD model must include product-and-manufacturing information (PMI) in addition to the shape geometry. Today's CAD tools can generate models with embedded PMI. And, with the emergence of STEP AP242, a standards-based model with embedded PMI can now be shared downstream. The on-going research detailed in this paper seeks to investigate three concepts. First, that the ability to utilize a STEP AP242 model with embedded PMI for CAD-to-CAM and CAD-to-CMM data exchange is possible and valuable to the overall goal of a more efficient process. Second, the research identifies gaps in tools, standards, and processes that inhibit industry's ability to cost-effectively achieve model-based-data interoperability in the pursuit of the

  1. Pitfalls and solutions in virtual design of nasoalveolar molding plates by using CAD/CAM technology--A preliminary clinical study.

    PubMed

    Ritschl, Lucas M; Rau, Andrea; Güll, Florian D; diBora, Benjamin; Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich; Schönberger, Markus; Bauer, Franz X; Wintermantel, Erich; Loeffelbein, Denys J

    2016-04-01

    Computer-assisted design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology in nasoalveolar molding (NAM) should save time and manpower and reduce family input in cases of cleft lip and palate. Intraoral casts from 12 infants with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate were taken immediately after birth (T1) and after (T2) NAM treatment, digitalized, and transformed into STL data. The infants were randomized into Group 1 (n = 6) receiving conventional NAM treatment or Group 2 receiving CAD/CAM NAM (n = 6). We analyzed the following variables by using Geomagic software: intersegmental alveolar distance (ISAD); intersegmental lip distance (ISLD); nostril height cleft/noncleft (NHc/nc); nasal width cleft/noncleft (NWn/nc); and columella deviation angle (CDA). In both groups, all variables except NHnc and NWnc were changed significantly between T1 and T2. The analysis of the mean differences of the variables in Group 1 and 2 showed no significant differences, with a comparable incidence of clinical alterations such as skin or mucosal irritations. NAM plates can be produced virtually by using CAD/CAM technology. The CAD/CAM NAM results show no significant differences from the conventional technique. We present our clinically usable virtual CAD/CAM workflow for producing a basic NAM plate. Copyright © 2016 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Resin-composite blocks for dental CAD/CAM applications.

    PubMed

    Ruse, N D; Sadoun, M J

    2014-12-01

    Advances in digital impression technology and manufacturing processes have led to a dramatic paradigm shift in dentistry and to the widespread use of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) in the fabrication of indirect dental restorations. Research and development in materials suitable for CAD/CAM applications are currently the most active field in dental materials. Two classes of materials are used in the production of CAD/CAM restorations: glass-ceramics/ceramics and resin composites. While glass-ceramics/ceramics have overall superior mechanical and esthetic properties, resin-composite materials may offer significant advantages related to their machinability and intra-oral reparability. This review summarizes recent developments in resin-composite materials for CAD/CAM applications, focusing on both commercial and experimental materials. © International & American Associations for Dental Research.

  3. Design of the new couplers for C-ADS RFQ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Ai-Min; Sun, Lie-Peng; Zhang, Zhou-Li; Xu, Xian-Bo; Shi, Long-Bo; Li, Chen-Xing; Wang, Wen-Bin

    2015-04-01

    A new special coupler with a kind of bowl-shaped ceramic window for a proton linear accelerator named the Chinese Accelerator Driven System (C-ADS) at the Institute of Modern Physics (IMP) has been simulated and constructed and a continuous wave (CW) beam commissioning through a four-meter long radio frequency quadruple (RFQ) was completed by the end of July 2014. In the experiments of conditioning and beam, some problems were promoted gradually such as sparking and thermal issues. Finally, two new couplers were passed with almost 110 kW CW power and 120 kW pulsed mode, respectively. The 10 mA intensity beam experiments have now been completed, and the couplers during the operation had no thermal or electro-magnetic problems. The detailed design and results are presented in the paper. Supported by Strategic Priority Research Program of Chinese Academy of Sciences (XDA03020500)

  4. Space crew radiation exposure analysis system based on a commercial stand-alone CAD system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appleby, Matthew H.; Golightly, Michael J.; Hardy, Alva C.

    1992-01-01

    Major improvements have recently been completed in the approach to spacecraft shielding analysis. A Computer-Aided Design (CAD)-based system has been developed for determining the shielding provided to any point within or external to the spacecraft. Shielding analysis is performed using a commercially available stand-alone CAD system and a customized ray-tracing subroutine contained within a standard engineering modeling software package. This improved shielding analysis technique has been used in several vehicle design projects such as a Mars transfer habitat, pressurized lunar rover, and the redesigned Space Station. Results of these analyses are provided to demonstrate the applicability and versatility of the system.

  5. Incorporating Solid Modeling and Team-Based Design into Freshman Engineering Graphics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchal, Ralph O.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the integration of these topics through a major team-based design and computer aided design (CAD) modeling project in freshman engineering graphics at the University of Western Ontario. Involves n=250 students working in teams of four to design and document an original Lego toy. Includes 12 references. (Author/YDS)

  6. An automation of design and modelling tasks in NX Siemens environment with original software - generator module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zbiciak, M.; Grabowik, C.; Janik, W.

    2015-11-01

    Nowadays the design constructional process is almost exclusively aided with CAD/CAE/CAM systems. It is evaluated that nearly 80% of design activities have a routine nature. These design routine tasks are highly susceptible to automation. Design automation is usually made with API tools which allow building original software responsible for adding different engineering activities. In this paper the original software worked out in order to automate engineering tasks at the stage of a product geometrical shape design is presented. The elaborated software works exclusively in NX Siemens CAD/CAM/CAE environment and was prepared in Microsoft Visual Studio with application of the .NET technology and NX SNAP library. The software functionality allows designing and modelling of spur and helicoidal involute gears. Moreover, it is possible to estimate relative manufacturing costs. With the Generator module it is possible to design and model both standard and non-standard gear wheels. The main advantage of the model generated in such a way is its better representation of an involute curve in comparison to those which are drawn in specialized standard CAD systems tools. It comes from fact that usually in CAD systems an involute curve is drawn by 3 points that respond to points located on the addendum circle, the reference diameter of a gear and the base circle respectively. In the Generator module the involute curve is drawn by 11 involute points which are located on and upper the base and the addendum circles therefore 3D gear wheels models are highly accurate. Application of the Generator module makes the modelling process very rapid so that the gear wheel modelling time is reduced to several seconds. During the conducted research the analysis of differences between standard 3 points and 11 points involutes was made. The results and conclusions drawn upon analysis are shown in details.

  7. Advancements in CAD/CAM technology: Options for practical implementation.

    PubMed

    Alghazzawi, Tariq F

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this review is to present a comprehensive review of the current published literature investigating the various methods and techniques for scanning, designing, and fabrication of CAD/CAM generated restorations along with detailing the new classifications of CAD/CAM technology. I performed a review of a PubMed using the following search terms "CAD/CAM, 3D printing, scanner, digital impression, and zirconia". The articles were screened for further relevant investigations. The search was limited to articles written in English, published from 2001 to 2015. In addition, a manual search was also conducted through articles and reference lists retrieved from the electronic search and peer-reviewed journals. CAD/CAM technology has advantages including digital impressions and models, and use of virtual articulators. However, the implementation of this technology is still considered expensive and requires highly trained personnel. Currently, the design software has more applications including complete dentures and removable partial denture frameworks. The accuracy of restoration fabrication can be best attained with 5 axes milling units. The 3D printing technology has been incorporated into dentistry, but does not include ceramics and is limited to polymers. In the future, optical impressions will be replaced with ultrasound impressions using ultrasonic waves, which have the capability to penetrate the gingiva non-invasively without retraction cords and not be affected by fluids. The coming trend for most practitioners will be the use of an acquisition camera attached to a computer with the appropriate software and the capability of forwarding the image to the laboratory. Copyright © 2016 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The use of computer-aided design/manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology to aid in the reconstruction of congenitally deficient pediatric mandibles: A case series.

    PubMed

    Gougoutas, Alexander J; Bastidas, Nicholas; Bartlett, Scott P; Jackson, Oksana

    2015-12-01

    Microvascular reconstruction of the pediatric mandible, particularly when necessitated by severe, congenital hypoplasia, presents a formidable challenge. Complex cases, however, may be simplified by computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) assisted surgical planning. This series represents the senior authors' preliminary experiences with CAD/CAM assisted, microvascular reconstruction of the pediatric mandible. Presented are two patients with hemifacial/bifacial microsomia, both with profound mandibular hypoplasia, who underwent CAD/CAM assisted reconstruction of their mandibles with vascularized fibula flaps. Surgical techniques, CAD/CAM routines employed, complications, and long-term outcomes are reported. Successful mandibular reconstructions were achieved in both patients with centralization of their native mandibles and augmentation of deficient mandibular subunits. No long-term complications were observed. CAD/CAM technology can be utilized in pediatric mandibular reconstruction, and is particularly beneficial in cases of profound, congenital hypoplasia requiring extensive, multi-planar, bony reconstructions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The application of CAD, CAE & CAM in development of butterfly valve’s disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asiff Razif Shah Ranjit, Muhammad; Hanie Abdullah, Nazlin

    2017-06-01

    The improved design of a butterfly valve disc is based on the concept of sandwich theory. Butterfly valves are mostly used in various industries such as oil and gas plant. The primary failure modes for valves are indented disc, keyways and shaft failure and the cavitation damage. Emphasis on the application of CAD, a new model of the butterfly valve’s disc structure was designed. The structure analysis was analysed using the finite element analysis. Butterfly valve performance factors can be obtained is by using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software to simulate the physics of fluid flow in a piping system around a butterfly valve. A comparison analysis was done using the finite element to justify the performance of the structure. The second application of CAE is the computational fluid flow analysis. The upstream pressure and the downstream pressure was analysed to calculate the cavitation index and determine the performance throughout each opening position of the valve. The CAM process was done using 3D printer to produce a prototype and analysed the structure in form of prototype. The structure was downscale fabricated based on the model designed initially through the application of CAD. This study is utilized the application of CAD, CAE and CAM for a better improvement of the butterfly valve’s disc components.

  10. AutoCAD-To-GIFTS Translator Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Andrew

    1989-01-01

    AutoCAD-to-GIFTS translator program, ACTOG, developed to facilitate quick generation of small finite-element models using CASA/GIFTS finite-element modeling program. Reads geometric data of drawing from Data Exchange File (DXF) used in AutoCAD and other PC-based drafting programs. Geometric entities recognized by ACTOG include points, lines, arcs, solids, three-dimensional lines, and three-dimensional faces. From this information, ACTOG creates GIFTS SRC file, which then reads into GIFTS preprocessor BULKM or modified and reads into EDITM to create finite-element model. SRC file used as is or edited for any number of uses. Written in Microsoft Quick-Basic (Version 2.0).

  11. CFD-ACE+: a CAD system for simulation and modeling of MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stout, Phillip J.; Yang, H. Q.; Dionne, Paul; Leonard, Andy; Tan, Zhiqiang; Przekwas, Andrzej J.; Krishnan, Anantha

    1999-03-01

    Computer aided design (CAD) systems are a key to designing and manufacturing MEMS with higher performance/reliability, reduced costs, shorter prototyping cycles and improved time- to-market. One such system is CFD-ACE+MEMS, a modeling and simulation environment for MEMS which includes grid generation, data visualization, graphical problem setup, and coupled fluidic, thermal, mechanical, electrostatic, and magnetic physical models. The fluid model is a 3D multi- block, structured/unstructured/hybrid, pressure-based, implicit Navier-Stokes code with capabilities for multi- component diffusion, multi-species transport, multi-step gas phase chemical reactions, surface reactions, and multi-media conjugate heat transfer. The thermal model solves the total enthalpy from of the energy equation. The energy equation includes unsteady, convective, conductive, species energy, viscous dissipation, work, and radiation terms. The electrostatic model solves Poisson's equation. Both the finite volume method and the boundary element method (BEM) are available for solving Poisson's equation. The BEM method is useful for unbounded problems. The magnetic model solves for the vector magnetic potential from Maxwell's equations including eddy currents but neglecting displacement currents. The mechanical model is a finite element stress/deformation solver which has been coupled to the flow, heat, electrostatic, and magnetic calculations to study flow, thermal electrostatically, and magnetically included deformations of structures. The mechanical or structural model can accommodate elastic and plastic materials, can handle large non-linear displacements, and can model isotropic and anisotropic materials. The thermal- mechanical coupling involves the solution of the steady state Navier equation with thermoelastic deformation. The electrostatic-mechanical coupling is a calculation of the pressure force due to surface charge on the mechanical structure. Results of CFD-ACE+MEMS modeling of MEMS

  12. Improving comfort of shoe sole through experiments based on CAD-FEM modeling.

    PubMed

    Franciosa, Pasquale; Gerbino, Salvatore; Lanzotti, Antonio; Silvestri, Luca

    2013-01-01

    It was reported that next to style, comfort is the second key aspect in purchasing footwear. One of the most important components of footwear is the shoe sole, whose design is based on many factors such as foot shape/size, perceived comfort and materials. The present paper focuses on the parametric analysis of a shoe sole to improve the perceived comfort. The sensitivity of geometric and material design factors on comfort degree was investigated by combining real experimental tests and CAD-FEM simulations. The correlation between perceived comfort and physical responses, such as plantar pressures, was estimated by conducting real tests. Four different conditions were analyzed: subjects wearing three commercially available shoes and in a barefoot condition. For each condition, subjects expressed their perceived comfort score. By adopting plantar sensors, the plantar pressures were also monitored. Once given such a correlation, a parametric FEM model of the footwear was developed. In order to better simulate contact at the plantar surface, a detailed FEM model of the foot was also generated from CT scan images. Lastly, a fractional factorial design array was applied to study the sensitivity of different sets of design factors on comfort degree. The findings of this research showed that the sole thickness and its material highly influence perceived comfort. In particular, softer materials and thicker soles contribute to increasing the degree of comfort. Copyright © 2012 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Understanding dental CAD/CAM for restorations--accuracy from a mechanical engineering viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Tapie, Laurent; Lebon, Nicolas; Mawussi, Bernardin; Fron-Chabouis, Hélène; Duret, Francois; Attal, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    As is the case in the field of medicine, as well as in most areas of daily life, digital technology is increasingly being introduced into dental practice. Computer-aided design/ computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) solutions are available not only for chairside practice but also for creating inlays, crowns, fixed partial dentures (FPDs), implant abutments, and other dental prostheses. CAD/CAM dental practice can be considered as the handling of devices and software processing for the almost automatic design and creation of dental restorations. However, dentists who want to use dental CAD/CAM systems often do not have enough information to understand the variations offered by such technology practice. Knowledge of the random and systematic errors in accuracy with CAD/CAM systems can help to achieve successful restorations with this technology, and help with the purchasing of a CAD/CAM system that meets the clinical needs of restoration. This article provides a mechanical engineering viewpoint of the accuracy of CAD/ CAM systems, to help dentists understand the impact of this technology on restoration accuracy.

  14. Is computer aided detection (CAD) cost effective in screening mammography? A model based on the CADET II study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    provides updated estimates of CAD costs in a full-field digital system and assessment cost for women who are re-called after initial screening. However, the model is highly sensitive to various parameters e.g. reading time, reader qualification, and equipment cost. PMID:21241473

  15. The use of high fidelity CAD models as the basis for training on complex systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Kellie; Tanner, Steve

    1993-01-01

    During the design phases of large and complex systems such as NASA's Space Station Freedom (SSF), there are few, if any physical prototypes built. This is often due to their expense and the realization that the design is likely to change. This poses a problem for training, maintainability, and operations groups who are tasked to lay the foundation of plans for using these systems. The Virtual Reality and Visualization Laboratory at the Boeing Advanced Computing Group's Huntsville facility is supporting the use of high fidelity, detailed design models that are generated during the initial design phases, for use in training, maintainability and operations exercises. This capability was used in its non-immersive form to great effect at the SSF Critical Design Review (CDR) during February, 1993. Allowing the user to move about within a CAD design supports many efforts, including training and scenario study. We will demonstrate via a video of the Maintainability SSF CDR how this type of approach can be used and why it is so effective in conveying large amounts of information quickly and concisely. We will also demonstrate why high fidelity models are so important for this type of training system and how it's immersive aspects may be exploited as well.

  16. Rethinking Design Process: Using 3D Digital Models as an Interface in Collaborative Session

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ding, Suining

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a pilot study for an alternative design process by integrating a designer-user collaborative session with digital models. The collaborative session took place in a 3D AutoCAD class for a real world project. The 3D models served as an interface for designer-user collaboration during the design process. Students not only learned…

  17. CAD in der Praxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labisch, Susanna

    Konstruktion und Fertigung erfolgen in der Praxis fast ausschließlich rechnerunterstützt. Mit diesem Rechnereinsatz beim Konstruieren (CAD, Computer Aided Design) und Fertigen CAM (Computer Aided Manufacturing) scheint die technische Zeichnung an Bedeutung zu verlieren, da die Verständigung zwischen Konstruktions- und Fertigungsabteilung primär durch den Austausch digitaler Daten erfolgen kann.

  18. Automation in the Teaching of Descriptive Geometry and CAD. High-Level CAD Templates Using Script Languages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, R.; Bazán, A. M.

    2017-10-01

    The main purpose of this work is to study improvements to the learning method of technical drawing and descriptive geometry through exercises with traditional techniques that are usually solved manually by applying automated processes assisted by high-level CAD templates (HLCts). Given that an exercise with traditional procedures can be solved, detailed step by step in technical drawing and descriptive geometry manuals, CAD applications allow us to do the same and generalize it later, incorporating references. Traditional teachings have become obsolete and current curricula have been relegated. However, they can be applied in certain automation processes. The use of geometric references (using variables in script languages) and their incorporation into HLCts allows the automation of drawing processes. Instead of repeatedly creating similar exercises or modifying data in the same exercises, users should be able to use HLCts to generate future modifications of these exercises. This paper introduces the automation process when generating exercises based on CAD script files, aided by parametric geometry calculation tools. The proposed method allows us to design new exercises without user intervention. The integration of CAD, mathematics, and descriptive geometry facilitates their joint learning. Automation in the generation of exercises not only saves time but also increases the quality of the statements and reduces the possibility of human error.

  19. Innovative approach for the in vitro research on biomedical scaffolds designed and customized with CAD-CAM technology.

    PubMed

    Marrelli, Massimo; Pujia, Antonella; Palmieri, Francesca; Gatto, Roberto; Falisi, Giovanni; Gargari, Marco; Caruso, Silvia; Apicella, Davide; Rastelli, Claudio; Nardi, Gianna Maria; Paduano, Francesco; Tatullo, Marco

    2016-12-01

    Studies on biomaterials involve assays aimed to assess the interactions between the biomaterial and the cells seeded on its surface. However, the morphology of biomaterials is heterogeneous and it could be tricky to standardize the results among different biomaterials and the classic plastic plates. In this light, we decided to create, by means of computer-aided design (CAD) technology, a standardized sample model, with equal shape and sizes, able to fit into a classic shape of a 96-wells tissue culture plate (TCP). The design of this sample consists of a hole in the top in order to allow the injected cells to settle without them being able to slip from the sides of the sample to the bottom of the TCP wells. This CAD project is made using the software Pro-Engineer. The sample will totally fill the wells of the 96-well TCP. Dental pulp stem cells have been used to assess the ability of the different sample to support and promote the cell proliferation. Twelve titanium, 12 gold-palladium, and 12 zirconium oxide customized samples were designed by means of the software cam powermill, by importing the .stl file created in Pro-Engineer software. The proliferation rate of the tested scaffolds showed to be similar to the control in the group with the customized shape. We think that our method can be useful to test different types of scaffolds when a greater accuracy of the measurements is desirable in order to verify the cell behavior of these scaffolds. Our innovative method can improve the standardization process in the evaluation of cell behavior on different biomaterials to open the way to more reliable tests on biomatrices functionalized with drugs or growth factors applied to the future regenerative medicine. © The Author(s) 2016.

  20. Machinability of CAD-CAM materials.

    PubMed

    Chavali, Ramakiran; Nejat, Amir H; Lawson, Nathaniel C

    2017-08-01

    Although new materials are available for computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) fabrication, limited information is available regarding their machinability. The depth of penetration of a milling tool into a material during a timed milling cycle may indicate its machinability. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the tool penetration rate for 2 polymer-containing CAD-CAM materials (Lava Ultimate and Enamic) and 2 ceramic-based CAD-CAM materials (e.max CAD and Celtra Duo). The materials were sectioned into 4-mm-thick specimens (n=5/material) and polished with 320-grit SiC paper. Each specimen was loaded into a custom milling apparatus. The apparatus pushed the specimens against a milling tool (E4D Tapered 2016000) rotating at 40 000 RPM with a constant force of 0.98 N. After a 6-minute timed milling cycle, the length of each milling cut was measured with image analysis software under a digital light microscope. Representative specimens and milling tools were examined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. The penetration rate of Lava Ultimate (3.21 ±0.46 mm/min) and Enamic (2.53 ±0.57 mm/min) was significantly greater than that of e.max CAD (1.12 ±0.32 mm/min) or Celtra Duo (0.80 ±0.21 mm/min) materials. SEM observations showed little tool damage, regardless of material type. Residual material was found on the tools used with polymer-containing materials, and wear of the embedding medium was seen on the tools used with the ceramic-based materials. Edge chipping was noted on cuts made in the ceramic-based materials. Lava Ultimate and Enamic have greater machinability and less edge chipping than e.max CAD and Celtra Duo. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Integrated computer-aided design using minicomputers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storaasli, O. O.

    1980-01-01

    Computer-Aided Design/Computer-Aided Manufacturing (CAD/CAM), a highly interactive software, has been implemented on minicomputers at the NASA Langley Research Center. CAD/CAM software integrates many formerly fragmented programs and procedures into one cohesive system; it also includes finite element modeling and analysis, and has been interfaced via a computer network to a relational data base management system and offline plotting devices on mainframe computers. The CAD/CAM software system requires interactive graphics terminals operating at a minimum of 4800 bits/sec transfer rate to a computer. The system is portable and introduces 'interactive graphics', which permits the creation and modification of models interactively. The CAD/CAM system has already produced designs for a large area space platform, a national transonic facility fan blade, and a laminar flow control wind tunnel model. Besides the design/drafting element analysis capability, CAD/CAM provides options to produce an automatic program tooling code to drive a numerically controlled (N/C) machine. Reductions in time for design, engineering, drawing, finite element modeling, and N/C machining will benefit productivity through reduced costs, fewer errors, and a wider range of configuration.

  2. Modelling, simulation and computer-aided design (CAD) of gyrotrons for novel applications in the high-power terahertz science and technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabchevski, S.; Idehara, T.; Damyanova, M.; Zhelyazkov, I.; Balabanova, E.; Vasileva, E.

    2018-03-01

    Gyrotrons are the most powerful sources of CW coherent radiation in the sub-THz and THz frequency bands. In recent years, they have demonstrated a remarkable potential for bridging the so-called THz-gap in the electromagnetic spectrum and opened the road to many novel applications of the terahertz waves. Among them are various advanced spectroscopic techniques (e.g., ESR and DNP-NMR), plasma physics and fusion research, materials processing and characterization, imaging and inspection, new medical technologies and biological studies. In this paper, we review briefly the current status of the research in this broad field and present our problem-oriented software packages developed recently for numerical analysis, computer-aided design (CAD) and optimization of gyrotrons.

  3. 21 CFR 872.3661 - Optical Impression Systems for CAD/CAM.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Optical Impression Systems for CAD/CAM. 872.3661 Section 872.3661 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Design and Manufacturing (CAD/CAM) of Dental Restorations; Guidance for Industry and FDA.” For the...

  4. Theoretical Design of Multilayer Dental Posts Using CAD-Based Approach and Sol-Gel Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Maietta, Saverio; De Santis, Roberto; Catauro, Michelina; Martorelli, Massimo; Gloria, Antonio

    2018-05-07

    A computer-aided design (CAD)-based approach and sol-gel chemistry were used to design a multilayer dental post with a compositional gradient and a Young’s modulus varying from 12.4 to 2.3 GPa in the coronal-apical direction. Specifically, we propose a theoretical multilayer post design, consisting of titanium dioxide (TiO₂) and TiO₂/poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) hybrid materials containing PCL up to 24% by weight obtained using the sol-gel method. The current study aimed to analyze the effect of the designed multilayer dental post in endodontically treated anterior teeth. Stress distribution was investigated along and between the post and the surrounding structures. In comparison to a metal post, the most uniform distributions with lower stress values and no significant stress concentration were found when using the multilayer post.

  5. Research on AutoCAD secondary development and function expansion based on VBA technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Runmei; Gu, Yehuan

    2017-06-01

    AutoCAD is the most widely used drawing tool among the similar design drawing products. In the process of drawing different types of design drawings of the same product, there are a lot of repetitive and single work contents. The traditional manual method uses a drawing software AutoCAD drawing graphics with low efficiency, high error rate and high input cost shortcomings and many more. In order to solve these problems, the design of the parametric drawing system of the hot-rolled I-beam (steel beam) cross-section is completed by using the VBA secondary development tool and the Access database software with large-capacity storage data, and the analysis of the functional extension of the plane drawing and the parametric drawing design in this paper. For the secondary development of AutoCAD functions, the system drawing work will be simplified and work efficiency also has been greatly improved. This introduction of parametric design of AutoCAD drawing system to promote the industrial mass production and related industries economic growth rate similar to the standard I-beam hot-rolled products.

  6. An Integrated Unix-based CAD System for the Design and Testing of Custom VLSI Chips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deutsch, L. J.

    1985-01-01

    A computer aided design (CAD) system that is being used at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for the design of custom and semicustom very large scale integrated (VLSI) chips is described. The system consists of a Digital Equipment Corporation VAX computer with the UNIX operating system and a collection of software tools for the layout, simulation, and verification of microcircuits. Most of these tools were written by the academic community and are, therefore, available to JPL at little or no cost. Some small pieces of software have been written in-house in order to make all the tools interact with each other with a minimal amount of effort on the part of the designer.

  7. CAD-design, stress analysis and in vitro evaluation of three leaflet blood-pump valves.

    PubMed

    Knierbein, B; Rosarius, N; Unger, A; Reul, H; Rau, G

    1992-07-01

    The computer-supported development of valves for cardiac-assist devices or artificial hearts is shown in relation to plastic technology. A CAD-system is used for the design development, whereas the dimensioning of the critical and highly stressed membranes is examined by FEM-analyses. Economic manufacture is permitted by the combined thermoforming-dip moulding technique; the blood-side components are made from biocompatible polyurethane to minimize blood damage. The first long-term results in the test set-up are compared to the FEM results.

  8. CAD-CAE in Electrical Machines and Drives Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belmans, R.; Geysen, W.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the use of computer-aided design (CAD) techniques in teaching the design of electrical motors. Approaches described include three technical viewpoints, such as electromagnetics, thermal, and mechanical aspects. Provides three diagrams, a table, and conclusions. (YP)

  9. Computer Graphic Design Using Auto-CAD and Plug Nozzle Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Rayna C.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of creating computer generated images varies widely. They can be use for computational fluid dynamics (CFD), or as a blueprint for designing parts. The schematic that I will be working on the summer will be used to create nozzles that are a part of a larger system. At this phase in the project, the nozzles needed for the systems have been fabricated. One part of my mission is to create both three dimensional and two dimensional models on Auto-CAD 2002 of the nozzles. The research on plug nozzles will allow me to have a better understanding of how they assist in the thrust need for a missile to take off. NASA and the United States military are working together to develop a new design concept. On most missiles a convergent-divergent nozzle is used to create thrust. However, the two are looking into different concepts for the nozzle. The standard convergent-divergent nozzle forces a mixture of combustible fluids and air through a smaller area in comparison to where the combination was mixed. Once it passes through the smaller area known as A8 it comes out the end of the nozzle which is larger the first or area A9. This creates enough thrust for the mechanism whether it is an F-18 fighter jet or a missile. The A9 section of the convergent-divergent nozzle has a mechanism that controls how large A9 can be. This is needed because the pressure of the air coming out nozzle must be equal to that of the ambient pressure other wise there will be a loss of performance in the machine. The plug nozzle however does not need to have an A9 that can vary. When the air flow comes out it can automatically sense what the ambient pressure is and will adjust accordingly. The objective of this design is to create a plug nozzle that is not as complicated mechanically as it counterpart the convergent-divergent nozzle.

  10. Bonding Effectiveness of Luting Composites to Different CAD/CAM Materials.

    PubMed

    Peumans, Marleen; Valjakova, Emilija Bajraktarova; De Munck, Jan; Mishevska, Cece Bajraktarova; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    To evaluate the influence of different surface treatments of six novel CAD/CAM materials on the bonding effectiveness of two luting composites. Six different CAD/CAM materials were tested: four ceramics - Vita Mark II; IPS Empress CAD and IPS e.max CAD; Celtra Duo - one hybrid ceramic, Vita Enamic, and one composite CAD/CAM block, Lava Ultimate. A total of 60 blocks (10 per material) received various mechanical surface treatments: 1. 600-grit SiC paper; 2. sandblasting with 30-μm Al2O3; 3. tribochemical silica coating (CoJet). Subsequent chemical surface treatments involved either no further treatment (control), HF acid etching (HF), silanization (S, or HF acid etching followed by silanization (HF+S). Two specimens with the same surface treatment were bonded together using two dual-curing luting composites: Clearfil Esthetic Cement (self-etching) or Panavia SA Cement (self-adhesive). After 1 week of water storage, the microtensile bond strength of the sectioned microspecimens was measured and the failure mode was evaluated. The bonding performance of the six CAD/CAM materials was significantly influenced by surface treatment (linear mixed models, p < 0.05). The luting cement had a significant influence on bond strength for Celtra Duo and Lava Ultimate (linear mixed models, p < 0.05). Mechanical surface treatment significantly influenced the bond strength for Celtra Duo (p = 0.0117), IPS e.max CAD (p = 0.0115), and Lava Ultimate (p < 0.0001). Different chemical surface treatments resulted in the highest bond strengths for the six CAD/CAM materials: Vita Mark II and IPS Empress CAD: S, HF+S; Celtra Duo: HF, HF+S; IPS e.max CAD: HF+S; Vita Enamic: HF+S, S. For Lava Ultimate, the highest bond strengths were obtained with HF, S, HF+S. Failure analysis showed a relation between bond strength and failure type: more mixed failures were observed with higher bond strengths. Mainly adhesive failures were noticed if no further surface treatment was done. The percentage of

  11. [The CAD-S, an instrument for the assessment of adaptation to divorce - separation].

    PubMed

    Yárnoz Yaben, Sagrario; Comino González, Priscila

    2010-02-01

    The CAD-S, an Instrument for the Assessment of Adaptation to Divorce - Separation. This paper presents an instrument for the evaluation of the adaptation to divorce-separation. The CAD-S is a questionnaire created in Spanish, made up of 20 items whose aim is the evaluation of the family's adaptation to divorce-separation, using one of the parents as informant. Data were collected in four different samples of divorced persons and their children from different autonomous comunities from the Spanish state. 223 parents and 160 children from divorced families took part in this study. Four factors emerged, accounting for 52.39 percent of the total variance: psychological and emotional difficulties, conflict with the ex-partner, disposition to co-parentality, and negative outcomes of separation for children. The results suggest that CAD-S appears to be a reliable and valid instrument, with high internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha) and adequate construct validity supported by its relations with measures of satisfaction with life (SWLS), in the case of parents, and conduct problems (CBCL) for children.

  12. Automatic image database generation from CAD for 3D object recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sardana, Harish K.; Daemi, Mohammad F.; Ibrahim, Mohammad K.

    1993-06-01

    The development and evaluation of Multiple-View 3-D object recognition systems is based on a large set of model images. Due to the various advantages of using CAD, it is becoming more and more practical to use existing CAD data in computer vision systems. Current PC- level CAD systems are capable of providing physical image modelling and rendering involving positional variations in cameras, light sources etc. We have formulated a modular scheme for automatic generation of various aspects (views) of the objects in a model based 3-D object recognition system. These views are generated at desired orientations on the unit Gaussian sphere. With a suitable network file sharing system (NFS), the images can directly be stored on a database located on a file server. This paper presents the image modelling solutions using CAD in relation to multiple-view approach. Our modular scheme for data conversion and automatic image database storage for such a system is discussed. We have used this approach in 3-D polyhedron recognition. An overview of the results, advantages and limitations of using CAD data and conclusions using such as scheme are also presented.

  13. The design and integration of retinal CAD-SR to diabetes patient ePR system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Huiqun; Wei, Yufang; Liu, Brent J.; Shang, Yujuan; Shi, Lili; Jiang, Kui; Dong, Jiancheng

    2017-03-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is one of the serious complications of diabetes that could lead to blindness. Digital fundus camera is often used to detect retinal changes but the diagnosis relies too much on ophthalmologist's experience. Based on our previously developed algorithms for quantifying retinal vessels and lesions, we developed a computer aided detection-structured report (CAD-SR) template and implemented it into picture archiving and communication system (PACS). Furthermore, we mapped our CAD-SR into HL7 CDA to integrate CAD findings into diabetes patient electronic patient record (ePR) system. Such integration could provide more quantitative features from fundus image into ePR system, which is valuable for further data mining researches.

  14. Characteristics study of the gears by the CAD/CAE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P. Y.; Chang, S. L.; Lee, B. Y.; Nguyen, D. H.; Cao, C. W.

    2017-09-01

    Gears are the most important transmission component in machines. The rapid development of the machines in industry requires a shorter time of the analysis process. In traditional, the gears are analyzed by setting up the complete mathematical model firstly, considering the profile of cutter and coordinate systems relationship between the machine and the cutter. It is a really complex and time-consuming process. Recently, the CAD/CAE software is well developed and useful in the mechanical design. In this paper, the Autodesk Inventor® software is introduced to model the spherical gears firstly, and then the models can also be transferred into ANSYS Workbench for the finite element analysis. The proposed process in this paper is helpful to the engineers to speed up the analyzing process of gears in the design stage.

  15. Two-body wear rate of CAD/CAM resin blocks and their enamel antagonists.

    PubMed

    Stawarczyk, Bogna; Özcan, Mutlu; Trottmann, Albert; Schmutz, Felix; Roos, Malgorzata; Hämmerle, Christoph

    2013-05-01

    Computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) resins exhibit good mechanical properties and can be used as long-term restorations. The wear rate of such resins and their enamel antagonists is unknown. The purpose of this study was to test and compare the 2-body wear rate of CAD/CAM resin blocks. Wear specimens (N=42, n=6) were made from 5 CAD/CAM resins: ZENO PMMA (ZP), artBloc Temp (AT), Telio CAD (TC), Blanc High-class (HC), CAD-Temp (CT); 1 manually polymerized resin: Integral esthetic press (negative control group, IEP); and 1 glass-ceramic: VITA Mark II (positive control group, VM2). The specimens for the wear resistance were aged in a thermomechanical loading machine (49 N, 1.67 Hz, 5/50°C) with human enamel antagonists. The material loss of all specimens before, during, and after aging was evaluated with a 3DS profilometer. The measured material loss data of all tested groups were statistically evaluated with linear mixed model analysis (a=.05). Manually polymerized resin showed significantly higher material wear (P<.001) than all other tested groups. Glass-ceramic showed significantly lower wear values (P<.001) than CAD/CAM resins ZP, AT, HC, CT, and IES. CAD/CAM resin TC was not significantly different from the positive control group. Glass-ceramic showed the highest enamel wear values (P<.001) of all tested resins. No differences were found in the enamel wear among all resins. The glass-ceramic group showed damage in the form of cracks on the worn enamel surface in 50% of specimens. CAD/CAM resins showed lower wear rates than those conventionally polymerized. Only one CAD/CAM resin, TC, presented material wear values comparable with glass-ceramic. The tested glass-ceramic developed cracks in the enamel antagonist and showed the highest enamel wear values of all other tested groups. Copyright © 2013 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Overview of NASA MSFC IEC Multi-CAD Collaboration Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moushon, Brian; McDuffee, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides an overview of a Design and Data Management System (DDMS) for Computer Aided Design (CAD) collaboration in order to support the Integrated Engineering Capability (IEC) at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  17. Fracture strength testing of crowns made of CAD/CAM composite resins.

    PubMed

    Okada, Ryota; Asakura, Masaki; Ando, Akihiro; Kumano, Hirokazu; Ban, Seiji; Kawai, Tatsushi; Takebe, Jun

    2018-03-28

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain whether computer aided design/computer aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) composite resin crowns have sufficient strength to withstand the bite force of the molar teeth. The null hypothesis was that the fracture strength of CAD/CAM composite resin crowns is lower than the average maximum bite force of the molar tooth. The crowns, which shape is the right maxillary first molar, were fabricated using four CAD/CAM blanks made of composite resins (Block HC: HC, KZR-CAD HR: HR, KZR-CAD HR2: HR2, Avencia Block: AVE) and one CAD/CAM blank made of lithium disilicate glass-ceramic (IPS e.max CAD: IPS), which was used as a control. Fracture strength of fabricated crowns bonded to metal abutment and biaxial flexural strength of the materials were evaluated. The results of fracture strength test and biaxial flexural strength test showed different tendencies. The fracture strength of CAD/CAM composite resin crowns except HC ranged from 3.3kN to 3.9kN, and was similar to that of IPS (3.3kN). In contrast, biaxial flexural strength of CAD/CAM composite resins ranged from 175MPa to 247MPa, and was significantly lower than that of IPS (360MPa). All CAD/CAM composite resin crowns studied presented about 3-4 times higher fracture strength than the average maximum bite force of the molar tooth (700-900N), which result leads to the conclusion that CAD/CAM composite resin crowns would have sufficient strength to withstand the bite force of the molar teeth. Copyright © 2017 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Performance evaluation of the NASA/KSC CAD/CAE and office automation LAN's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zobrist, George W.

    1994-01-01

    This study's objective is the performance evaluation of the existing CAD/CAE (Computer Aided Design/Computer Aided Engineering) network at NASA/KSC. This evaluation also includes a similar study of the Office Automation network, since it is being planned to integrate this network into the CAD/CAE network. The Microsoft mail facility which is presently on the CAD/CAE network was monitored to determine its present usage. This performance evaluation of the various networks will aid the NASA/KSC network managers in planning for the integration of future workload requirements into the CAD/CAE network and determining the effectiveness of the planned FDDI (Fiber Distributed Data Interface) migration.

  19. Integrated multidisciplinary CAD/CAE environment for micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przekwas, Andrzej J.

    1999-03-01

    Computational design of MEMS involves several strongly coupled physical disciplines, including fluid mechanics, heat transfer, stress/deformation dynamics, electronics, electro/magneto statics, calorics, biochemistry and others. CFDRC is developing a new generation multi-disciplinary CAD systems for MEMS using high-fidelity field solvers on unstructured, solution-adaptive grids for a full range of disciplines. The software system, ACE + MEMS, includes all essential CAD tools; geometry/grid generation for multi- discipline, multi-equation solvers, GUI, tightly coupled configurable 3D field solvers for FVM, FEM and BEM and a 3D visualization/animation tool. The flow/heat transfer/calorics/chemistry equations are solved with unstructured adaptive FVM solver, stress/deformation are computed with a FEM STRESS solver and a FAST BEM solver is used to solve linear heat transfer, electro/magnetostatics and elastostatics equations on adaptive polygonal surface grids. Tight multidisciplinary coupling and automatic interoperability between the tools was achieved by designing a comprehensive database structure and APIs for complete model definition. The virtual model definition is implemented in data transfer facility, a publicly available tool described in this paper. The paper presents overall description of the software architecture and MEMS design flow in ACE + MEMS. It describes current status, ongoing effort and future plans for the software. The paper also discusses new concepts of mixed-level and mixed- dimensionality capability in which 1D microfluidic networks are simulated concurrently with 3D high-fidelity models of discrete components.

  20. Comparison of plantar pressure distribution in CAD-CAM and prefabricated foot orthoses in patients with flexible flatfeet.

    PubMed

    Khodaei, Banafsheh; Saeedi, Hassan; Jalali, Maryam; Farzadi, Maede; Norouzi, Ehsan

    2017-12-01

    The effect of foot orthoses on plantar pressure distribution has been proven by researchers but there are some controversies about advantages of custom-made foot orthoses to less expensive prefabricated foot orthoses. Nineteen flatfeet adults between 18 and 45 participated in this study. CAD-CAM foot orthoses were made for these patients according to their foot scan. Prefabricated foot orthoses were prepared according to their foot size. Plantar pressure, force and contact area were measured using pedar ® -x in-shoe system wearing shoe alone, wearing CAD-CAM foot orthoses and wearing prefabricated foot orthoses. Repeated measures ANOVA model with post-hoc, Bonferroni comparison were used to test differences. CAD-CAM and prefabricated foot orthoses both decreased pressure and force under 2nd, 3-5 metatarsal and heel regions comparing to shoe alone condition. CAD-CAM foot orthosis increased pressure under lateral toe region in comparison to shoe alone and prefabricated foot orthosis. Both foot orthoses increased pressure and contact area in medial midfoot region comparing to shoe alone condition. Increased forces were seen at hallux and lateral toes by prefabricated foot orthoses in comparison with CAD-CAM foot orthoses and control condition, respectively. According to the results, both foot orthoses could decrease the pressure under heel and metatarsal area. It seems that the special design of CAD-CAM foot orthoses could not make great differences in plantar pressure distribution in this sample. Further research is required to determine whether these results are associated with different scan systems or design software. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Pipe Drafting with CAD. Teacher Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smithson, Buddy

    This teacher's guide contains nine units of instruction for a course on computer-assisted pipe drafting. The course covers the following topics: introduction to pipe drafting with CAD (computer-assisted design); flow diagrams; pipe and pipe components; valves; piping plans and elevations; isometrics; equipment fabrication drawings; piping design…

  2. Development of an expert system for the simulation model for casting metal substructure of a metal-ceramic crown design.

    PubMed

    Matin, Ivan; Hadzistevic, Miodrag; Vukelic, Djordje; Potran, Michal; Brajlih, Tomaz

    2017-07-01

    Nowadays, the integrated CAD/CAE systems are favored solutions for the design of simulation models for casting metal substructures of metal-ceramic crowns. The worldwide authors have used different approaches to solve the problems using an expert system. Despite substantial research progress in the design of experts systems for the simulation model design and manufacturing have insufficiently considered the specifics of casting in dentistry, especially the need for further CAD, RE, CAE for the estimation of casting parameters and the control of the casting machine. The novel expert system performs the following: CAD modeling of the simulation model for casting, fast modeling of gate design, CAD eligibility and cast ability check of the model, estimation and running of the program code for the casting machine, as well as manufacturing time reduction of the metal substructure. The authors propose an integration method using common data model approach, blackboard architecture, rule-based reasoning and iterative redesign method. Arithmetic mean roughness values was determinated with constant Gauss low-pass filter (cut-off length of 2.5mm) according to ISO 4287 using Mahr MARSURF PS1. Dimensional deviation between the designed model and manufactured cast was determined using the coordinate measuring machine Zeiss Contura G2 and GOM Inspect software. The ES allows for obtaining the castings derived roughness grade number N7. The dimensional deviation between the simulation model of the metal substructure and the manufactured cast is 0.018mm. The arithmetic mean roughness values measured on the casting substructure are from 1.935µm to 2.778µm. The realized developed expert system with the integrated database is fully applicable for the observed hardware and software. Values of the arithmetic mean roughness and dimensional deviation indicate that casting substructures are surface quality, which is more than enough and useful for direct porcelain veneering. The

  3. Design and Implementation of 3D Model Data Management System Based on SQL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shitao; Zhang, Shixin; Zhang, Zhanling; Li, Shiming; Jia, Kun; Hu, Zhongxu; Ping, Liang; Hu, Youming; Li, Yanlei

    CAD/CAM technology plays an increasingly important role in the machinery manufacturing industry. As an important means of production, the accumulated three-dimensional models in many years of design work are valuable. Thus the management of these three-dimensional models is of great significance. This paper gives detailed explanation for a method to design three-dimensional model databases based on SQL and to implement the functions such as insertion, modification, inquiry, preview and so on.

  4. Deactivation of the E. coli pH stress sensor CadC by cadaverine.

    PubMed

    Haneburger, Ina; Fritz, Georg; Jurkschat, Nicole; Tetsch, Larissa; Eichinger, Andreas; Skerra, Arne; Gerland, Ulrich; Jung, Kirsten

    2012-11-23

    At acidic pH and in the presence of lysine, the pH sensor CadC activates transcription of the cadBA operon encoding the lysine/cadaverine antiporter CadB and the lysine decarboxylase CadA. In effect, these proteins contribute to acid stress adaptation in Escherichia coli. cadBA expression is feedback inhibited by cadaverine, and a cadaverine binding site is predicted within the central cavity of the periplasmic domain of CadC on the basis of its crystallographic analysis. Our present study demonstrates that this site only partially accounts for the cadaverine response in vivo. Instead, evidence for a second, pivotal binding site was collected, which overlaps with the pH-responsive patch of amino acids located at the dimer interface of the periplasmic domain. The temporal response of the E. coli Cad module upon acid shock was measured and modeled for two CadC variants with mutated cadaverine binding sites. These studies supported a cascade-like binding and deactivation model for the CadC dimer: binding of cadaverine within the pair of central cavities triggers a conformational transition that exposes two further binding sites at the dimer interface, and the occupation of those stabilizes the inactive conformation. Altogether, these data represent a striking example for the deactivation of a pH sensor. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. On the Use of CAD-Native Predicates and Geometry in Surface Meshing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aftosmis, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    Several paradigms for accessing computer-aided design (CAD) geometry during surface meshing for computational fluid dynamics are discussed. File translation, inconsistent geometry engines, and nonnative point construction are all identified as sources of nonrobustness. The paper argues in favor of accessing CAD parts and assemblies in their native format, without translation, and for the use of CAD-native predicates and constructors in surface mesh generation. The discussion also emphasizes the importance of examining the computational requirements for exact evaluation of triangulation predicates during surface meshing.

  6. Intelligent Embedded Instruction for Computer-Aided Design (CAD) systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-10-01

    difficulties were predicted and six lessons were prepared that were aimed at preventing error pattern formation. The lessons were programmed in AUTOLISP ...and arcs, angles of lines, layering (linetype and color), and block creation and insertion. A program written in AUTOLISP examined the values in the...One site had AutoCAD reference manuals nearby and others had no manuals . * Only one site set a schedule for the users. * The attitudes of managers

  7. Introduction to CAD/Computers. High-Technology Training Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockerby, Hugh

    This learning module for an eighth-grade introductory technology course is designed to help teachers introduce students to computer-assisted design (CAD) in a communications unit on graphics. The module contains a module objective and five specific objectives, a content outline, suggested instructor methodology, student activities, a list of six…

  8. Experimental CAD Course Uses Low-Cost Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wohlers, Terry

    1984-01-01

    Describes the outstanding results obtained when a department of industrial sciences used special software on microcomputers to teach computer-aided design (CAD) as an alternative to much more expensive equipment. The systems used and prospects for the future are also considered. (JN)

  9. Computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) for colonoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Jia; Poirson, Allen

    2007-03-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths, and ranks third for new cancer cases and cancer mortality for both men and women. However, its death rate can be dramatically reduced by appropriate treatment when early detection is available. The purpose of colonoscopy is to identify and assess the severity of lesions, which may be flat or protruding. Due to the subjective nature of the examination, colonoscopic proficiency is highly variable and dependent upon the colonoscopist's knowledge and experience. An automated image processing system providing an objective, rapid, and inexpensive analysis of video from a standard colonoscope could provide a valuable tool for screening and diagnosis. In this paper, we present the design, functionality and preliminary results of its Computer-Aided-Diagnosis (CAD) system for colonoscopy - ColonoCAD TM. ColonoCAD is a complex multi-sensor, multi-data and multi-algorithm image processing system, incorporating data management and visualization, video quality assessment and enhancement, calibration, multiple view based reconstruction, feature extraction and classification. As this is a new field in medical image processing, our hope is that this paper will provide the framework to encourage and facilitate collaboration and discussion between industry, academia, and medical practitioners.

  10. Productivity increase through implementation of CAD/CAE workstation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bromley, L. K.

    1985-01-01

    The tracking and communication division computer aided design/computer aided engineering system is now operational. The system is utilized in an effort to automate certain tasks that were previously performed manually. These tasks include detailed test configuration diagrams of systems under certification test in the ESTL, floorplan layouts of future planned laboratory reconfigurations, and other graphical documentation of division activities. The significant time savings achieved with this CAD/CAE system are examined: (1) input of drawings and diagrams; (2) editing of initial drawings; (3) accessibility of the data; and (4) added versatility. It is shown that the Applicon CAD/CAE system, with its ease of input and editing, the accessibility of data, and its added versatility, has made more efficient many of the necessary but often time-consuming tasks associated with engineering design and testing.

  11. Complete Dentures Fabricated with CAD/CAM Technology and a Traditional Clinical Recording Method.

    PubMed

    Janeva, Nadica; Kovacevska, Gordana; Janev, Edvard

    2017-10-15

    The introduction of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology into complete denture (CD) fabrication ushered in a new era in removable prosthodontics. Commercially available CAD/CAM denture systems are expected to improve upon the disadvantages associated with conventional fabrication. The purpose of this report is to present the workflow involved in fabricating a CD with a traditional clinical recording method and CAD/CAM technology and to summarize the advantages to the dental practitioner and the patient.

  12. An integrated CAD/CAM/robotic milling method for custom cementless femoral prostheses.

    PubMed

    Wen-ming, Xi; Ai-min, Wang; Qi, Wu; Chang-hua, Liu; Jian-fei, Zhu; Fang-fang, Xia

    2015-09-01

    Aseptic loosening is the primary cause of cementless femoral prosthesis failure and is related to the primary stability of the cementless femoral prosthesis in the femoral cavity. The primary stability affects both the osseointegration and the long-term stability of cementless femoral prostheses. A custom cementless femoral prosthesis can improve the fit and fill of the prosthesis in the femoral cavity and decrease the micromotion of the proximal prosthesis such that the primary stability of the custom prosthesis can be improved, and osseointegration of the proximal prosthesis is achieved. These results will help to achieve long-term stability in total hip arthroplasty (THA). In this paper, we introduce an integrated CAD/CAM/robotic method of milling custom cementless femoral prostheses. The 3D reconstruction model uses femoral CT images and 3D design software to design a CAD model of the custom prosthesis. After the transformation matrices between two units of the robotic system are calibrated, consistency between the CAM software and the robotic system can be achieved, and errors in the robotic milling can be limited. According to the CAD model of the custom prosthesis, the positions of the robotic tool points are produced by the CAM software of the CNC machine. The normal vector of the three adjacent robotic tool point positions determines the pose of the robotic tool point. In conclusion, the fit rate of custom pig femur stems in the femoral cavities was 90.84%. After custom femoral prostheses were inserted into the femoral cavities, the maximum gaps between the prostheses and the cavities measured less than 1 mm at the diaphysis and 1.3 mm at the metaphysis. Copyright © 2015 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. CAD-supported university course on photonics and fiber optic communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, David K. C.; Richter, Andre

    2002-05-01

    The highly competitive global photonics industry has created a significant demand for professional Photonic Design Automation (PDA) tools and personnel trained to use them effectively. In such a dynamic field, CAD-supported courses built around widely used industrial PDA tools provide many advantages, especially when offered through tertiary education institutions (which are ideally suited to producing the future workforce of the Photonics industry). An objective of VPIsystems' University program is to develop tertiary level courses based on VPIsystems' WDM transmission and component modeling software tools. Advantages offered by such courses include: visualizing and aiding the understanding of complex physical problems encountered in the design of fiber-optic communication systems; virtual laboratory exercises that can accurately reproduce the behavior of real systems and components without the prohibitive infrastructure and maintenance costs of real laboratories; flexibility in studying interrelated physical effects individually or in combination to facilitate learning; provide expertise and practical insights in areas, including industry-focused topics, that are not generally covered in traditional tertiary courses; provide exposure to, currently, the most widely used PDA tools in the industry. In this paper, details of VPIsystems' University program and its CAD-supported Photonics courses will be presented.

  14. Computer-aided-diagnosis (CAD) for colposcopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Holger; Ferris, Daron G.

    2005-04-01

    Uterine cervical cancer is the second most common cancer among women worldwide. Colposcopy is a diagnostic method, whereby a physician (colposcopist) visually inspects the lower genital tract (cervix, vulva and vagina), with special emphasis on the subjective appearance of metaplastic epithelium comprising the transformation zone on the cervix. Cervical cancer precursor lesions and invasive cancer exhibit certain distinctly abnormal morphologic features. Lesion characteristics such as margin; color or opacity; blood vessel caliber, intercapillary spacing and distribution; and contour are considered by colposcopists to derive a clinical diagnosis. Clinicians and academia have suggested and shown proof of concept that automated image analysis of cervical imagery can be used for cervical cancer screening and diagnosis, having the potential to have a direct impact on improving women"s health care and reducing associated costs. STI Medical Systems is developing a Computer-Aided-Diagnosis (CAD) system for colposcopy -- ColpoCAD. At the heart of ColpoCAD is a complex multi-sensor, multi-data and multi-feature image analysis system. A functional description is presented of the envisioned ColpoCAD system, broken down into: Modality Data Management System, Image Enhancement, Feature Extraction, Reference Database, and Diagnosis and directed Biopsies. The system design and development process of the image analysis system is outlined. The system design provides a modular and open architecture built on feature based processing. The core feature set includes the visual features used by colposcopists. This feature set can be extended to include new features introduced by new instrument technologies, like fluorescence and impedance, and any other plausible feature that can be extracted from the cervical data. Preliminary results of our research on detecting the three most important features: blood vessel structures, acetowhite regions and lesion margins are shown. As this is a new

  15. CAD and CAE Analysis for Siphon Jet Toilet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuhua; Xiu, Guoji; Tan, Haishu

    The high precision 3D laser scanner with the dual CCD technology was used to measure the original design sample of a siphon jet toilet. The digital toilet model was constructed from the cloud data measured with the curve and surface fitting technology and the CAD/CAE systems. The Realizable k - ɛ double equation model of the turbulence viscosity coefficient method and the VOF multiphase flow model were used to simulate the flushing flow in the toilet digital model. Through simulating and analyzing the distribution of the flushing flow's total pressure, the flow speed at the toilet-basin surface and the siphoning bent tube, the toilet performance can be evaluated efficiently and conveniently. The method of "establishing digital model, flushing flow simulating, performances evaluating, function shape modifying" would provide a high efficiency approach to develop new water-saving toilets.

  16. Microhardness evaluations of CAD/CAM ceramics irradiated with CO2 or Nd:YAP laser

    PubMed Central

    Rocca, Jean Paul; Fornaini, Carlo; Medioni, Etienne; Brulat-Bouchard, Nathalie

    2017-01-01

    Background and aims The aim of this study was to measure the microhardness values of irradiated computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) ceramics surfaces before and after thermal treatment. Materials and Methods Sixty CAD/CAM ceramic discs were prepared and grouped by material, i.e. lithium disilicate ceramic (Emax CAD) and zirconia ceramic (Emax ZirCAD). Laser irradiation at the material surface was performed with a carbon dioxide laser at 5 Watt (W) or 10 W power in continuous mode (CW mode), or with a neodymium:yttrium aluminum perovskite (Nd:YAP) laser at 10 W on graphite and non-graphite surfaces. Vickers hardness was tested at 0.3 kgf for lithium disilicate and 1 kgf for zirconia. Results Emax CAD irradiated with CO2 at 5 W increased microhardness by 6.32 GPa whereas Emax ZirCAD irradiated with Nd:YAP decreased microhardness by 17.46 GPa. Conclusion CO2 laser effectively increases the microhardness of lithium disilicate ceramics (Emax CAD). PMID:28740324

  17. A new data integration approach for AutoCAD and GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Hongmei; Li, Yuhong; Wang, Cheng; Li, Lijun

    2006-10-01

    GIS has its advantages both on spatial data analysis and management, particularly on the geometric and attributive information management, which has also attracted lots attentions among researchers around world. AutoCAD plays more and more important roles as one of the main data sources of GIS. Various work and achievements can be found in the related literature. However, the conventional data integration from AutoCAD to GIS is time-consuming, which also can cause the information loss both in the geometric aspects and the attributive aspects for a large system. It is necessary and urgent to sort out new approach and algorithm for the efficient high-quality data integration. In this paper, a novel data integration approach from AutoCAD to GIS will be introduced based on the spatial data mining technique through the data structure analysis both in the AutoCAD and GIS. A practicable algorithm for the data conversion from CAD to GIS will be given as well. By a designed evaluation scheme, the accuracy of the conversion both in the geometric and the attributive information will be demonstrated. Finally, the validity and feasibility of the new approach will be shown by an experimental analysis.

  18. Evaluation of internal fit of interim crown fabricated with CAD/CAM milling and 3D printing system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wan-Sun; Lee, Du-Hyeong; Lee, Kyu-Bok

    2017-08-01

    This study is to evaluate the internal fit of the crown manufactured by CAD/CAM milling method and 3D printing method. The master model was fabricated with stainless steel by using CNC machine and the work model was created from the vinyl-polysiloxane impression. After scanning the working model, the design software is used to design the crown. The saved STL file is used on the CAD/CAM milling method and two types of 3D printing method to produce 10 interim crowns per group. Internal discrepancy measurement uses the silicon replica method and the measured data are analyzed with One-way ANOVA to verify the statistic significance. The discrepancy means (standard deviation) of the 3 groups are 171.6 (97.4) µm for the crown manufactured by the milling system and 149.1 (65.9) and 91.1 (36.4) µm, respectively, for the crowns manufactured with the two types of 3D printing system. There was a statistically significant difference and the 3D printing system group showed more outstanding value than the milling system group. The marginal and internal fit of the interim restoration has more outstanding 3D printing method than the CAD/CAM milling method. Therefore, the 3D printing method is considered as applicable for not only the interim restoration production, but also in the dental prosthesis production with a higher level of completion.

  19. [Numerical finite element modeling of custom car seat using computer aided design].

    PubMed

    Huang, Xuqi; Singare, Sekou

    2014-02-01

    A good cushion can not only provide the sitter with a high comfort, but also control the distribution of the hip pressure to reduce the incidence of diseases. The purpose of this study is to introduce a computer-aided design (CAD) modeling method of the buttocks-cushion using numerical finite element (FE) simulation to predict the pressure distribution on the buttocks-cushion interface. The buttock and the cushion model geometrics were acquired from a laser scanner, and the CAD software was used to create the solid model. The FE model of a true seated individual was developed using ANSYS software (ANSYS Inc, Canonsburg, PA). The model is divided into two parts, i.e. the cushion model made of foam and the buttock model represented by the pelvis covered with a soft tissue layer. Loading simulations consisted of imposing a vertical force of 520N on the pelvis, corresponding to the weight of the user upper extremity, and then solving iteratively the system.

  20. An innovative method of ocular prosthesis fabrication by bio-CAD and rapid 3-D printing technology: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Alam, Md Shahid; Sugavaneswaran, M; Arumaikkannu, G; Mukherjee, Bipasha

    2017-08-01

    Ocular prosthesis is either a readymade stock shell or custom made prosthesis (CMP). Presently, there is no other technology available, which is either superior or even comparable to the conventional CMP. The present study was designed to fabricate ocular prosthesis using computer aided design (CAD) and rapid manufacturing (RM) technology and to compare it with custom made prosthesis (CMP). The ocular prosthesis prepared by CAD was compared with conventional CMP in terms of time taken for fabrication, weight, cosmesis, comfort, and motility. Two eyes of two patients were included. Computerized tomography scan of wax model of socket was converted into three dimensional format using Materialize Interactive Medical Image Control System (MIMICS)software and further refined. This was given as an input to rapid manufacturing machine (Polyjet 3-D printer). The final painting on prototype was done by an ocularist. The average effective time required for fabrication of CAD prosthesis was 2.5 hours; and weight 2.9 grams. The same for CMP were 10 hours; and 4.4 grams. CAD prosthesis was more comfortable for both the patients. The study demonstrates the first ever attempt of fabricating a complete ocular prosthesis using CAD and rapid manufacturing and comparing it with conventional CMP. This prosthesis takes lesser time for fabrication, and is more comfortable. Studies with larger sample size will be required to further validate this technique.

  1. Some Workplace Effects of CAD and CAM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebel, Karl-H.; Ulrich, Erhard

    1987-01-01

    Examines the impact of computer-aided design (CAD) and computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) on employment, work organization, working conditions, job content, training, and industrial relations in several countries. Finds little evidence of negative employment effects since productivity gains are offset by various compensatory factors. (Author/CH)

  2. CAD of control systems: Application of nonlinear programming to a linear quadratic formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, P.

    1983-01-01

    The familiar suboptimal regulator design approach is recast as a constrained optimization problem and incorporated in a Computer Aided Design (CAD) package where both design objective and constraints are quadratic cost functions. This formulation permits the separate consideration of, for example, model following errors, sensitivity measures and control energy as objectives to be minimized or limits to be observed. Efficient techniques for computing the interrelated cost functions and their gradients are utilized in conjunction with a nonlinear programming algorithm. The effectiveness of the approach and the degree of insight into the problem which it affords is illustrated in a helicopter regulation design example.

  3. Comparative fracture strength analysis of Lava and Digident CAD/CAM zirconia ceramic crowns

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Taek-Ka; Pak, Hyun-Soon; Han, Jung-Suk; Lee, Jai-Bong; Kim, Sung-Hun

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE All-ceramic crowns are subject to fracture during function. To minimize this common clinical complication, zirconium oxide has been used as the framework for all-ceramic crowns. The aim of this study was to compare the fracture strengths of two computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) zirconia crown systems: Lava and Digident. MATERIALS AND METHODS Twenty Lava CAD/CAM zirconia crowns and twenty Digident CAD/CAM zirconia crowns were fabricated. A metal die was also duplicated from the original prepared tooth for fracture testing. A universal testing machine was used to determine the fracture strength of the crowns. RESULTS The mean fracture strengths were as follows: 54.9 ± 15.6 N for the Lava CAD/CAM zirconia crowns and 87.0 ± 16.0 N for the Digident CAD/CAM zirconia crowns. The difference between the mean fracture strengths of the Lava and Digident crowns was statistically significant (P<.001). Lava CAD/CAM zirconia crowns showed a complete fracture of both the veneering porcelain and the core whereas the Digident CAD/CAM zirconia crowns showed fracture only of the veneering porcelain. CONCLUSION The fracture strengths of CAD/CAM zirconia crowns differ depending on the compatibility of the core material and the veneering porcelain. PMID:23755332

  4. Comparative fracture strength analysis of Lava and Digident CAD/CAM zirconia ceramic crowns.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Taek-Ka; Pak, Hyun-Soon; Yang, Jae-Ho; Han, Jung-Suk; Lee, Jai-Bong; Kim, Sung-Hun; Yeo, In-Sung

    2013-05-01

    All-ceramic crowns are subject to fracture during function. To minimize this common clinical complication, zirconium oxide has been used as the framework for all-ceramic crowns. The aim of this study was to compare the fracture strengths of two computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) zirconia crown systems: Lava and Digident. Twenty Lava CAD/CAM zirconia crowns and twenty Digident CAD/CAM zirconia crowns were fabricated. A metal die was also duplicated from the original prepared tooth for fracture testing. A universal testing machine was used to determine the fracture strength of the crowns. THE MEAN FRACTURE STRENGTHS WERE AS FOLLOWS: 54.9 ± 15.6 N for the Lava CAD/CAM zirconia crowns and 87.0 ± 16.0 N for the Digident CAD/CAM zirconia crowns. The difference between the mean fracture strengths of the Lava and Digident crowns was statistically significant (P<.001). Lava CAD/CAM zirconia crowns showed a complete fracture of both the veneering porcelain and the core whereas the Digident CAD/CAM zirconia crowns showed fracture only of the veneering porcelain. The fracture strengths of CAD/CAM zirconia crowns differ depending on the compatibility of the core material and the veneering porcelain.

  5. Understanding dental CAD/CAM for restorations--the digital workflow from a mechanical engineering viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Tapie, L; Lebon, N; Mawussi, B; Fron Chabouis, H; Duret, F; Attal, J-P

    2015-01-01

    As digital technology infiltrates every area of daily life, including the field of medicine, so it is increasingly being introduced into dental practice. Apart from chairside practice, computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) solutions are available for creating inlays, crowns, fixed partial dentures (FPDs), implant abutments, and other dental prostheses. CAD/CAM dental solutions can be considered a chain of digital devices and software for the almost automatic design and creation of dental restorations. However, dentists who want to use the technology often do not have the time or knowledge to understand it. A basic knowledge of the CAD/CAM digital workflow for dental restorations can help dentists to grasp the technology and purchase a CAM/CAM system that meets the needs of their office. This article provides a computer-science and mechanical-engineering approach to the CAD/CAM digital workflow to help dentists understand the technology.

  6. Spatial data software integration - Merging CAD/CAM/mapping with GIS and image processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, Thomas L.; Bryant, Nevin A.

    1987-01-01

    The integration of CAD/CAM/mapping with image processing using geographic information systems (GISs) as the interface is examined. Particular emphasis is given to the development of software interfaces between JPL's Video Image Communication and Retrieval (VICAR)/Imaged Based Information System (IBIS) raster-based GIS and the CAD/CAM/mapping system. The design and functions of the VICAR and IBIS are described. Vector data capture and editing are studied. Various software programs for interfacing between the VICAR/IBIS and CAD/CAM/mapping are presented and analyzed.

  7. Effects of tributylborane-activated adhesive and two silane agents on bonding computer-aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) resin composite.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Ayano; Taira, Yohsuke; Sawase, Takashi

    2017-10-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the effects of an experimental adhesive agent [methyl methacrylate-tributylborane liquid (MT)] and two adhesive agents containing silane on the bonding between a resin composite block of a computer-aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) system and a light-curing resin composite veneering material. The surfaces of CAD/CAM resin composite specimens were ground with silicon-carbide paper, treated with phosphoric acid, and then primed with either one of the two silane agents [Scotchbond Universal Adhesive (SC) and GC Ceramic Primer II (GC)], no adhesive control (Cont), or one of three combinations (MT/SC, MT/GC, and MT/Cont). A light-curing resin composite was veneered on the primed CAD/CAM resin composite surface. The veneered specimens were subjected to thermocycling between 4 and 60 °C for 10,000 cycles, and the shear bond strengths were determined. All data were analyzed using analysis of variance and a post hoc Tukey-Kramer HSD test (α = 0.05, n = 8). MT/SC (38.7 MPa) exhibited the highest mean bond strengths, followed by MT/GC (30.4 MPa), SC (27.9 MPa), and MT/Cont (25.7 MPa), while Cont (12.9 MPa) and GC (12.3 MPa) resulted in the lowest bond strengths. The use of MT in conjunction with a silane agent significantly improved the bond strength. Surface treatment with appropriate adhesive agents was confirmed as a prerequisite for veneering CAD/CAM resin composite restorations.

  8. Marginal fit of all-ceramic crowns fabricated using two extraoral CAD/CAM systems in comparison with the conventional technique

    PubMed Central

    Alqahtani, Fawaz

    2017-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of two extraoral computer-aided design (CAD) and computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) systems, in comparison with conventional techniques, on the marginal fit of monolithic CAD/CAM lithium disilicate ceramic crowns. Study design This is an in vitro interventional study. Place and duration of study The study was carried out at the Department of Prosthodontics, School of Dentistry, Prince Sattam Bin Abdul-Aziz University, Saudi Arabia, from December 2015 to April 2016. Methodology A marginal gap of 60 lithium disilicate crowns was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy. In total, 20 pressable lithium disilicate (IPS e.max Press [Ivoclar Vivadent]) ceramic crowns were fabricated using the conventional lost-wax technique as a control group. The experimental all-ceramic crowns were produced based on a scan stone model and milled using two extraoral CAD/CAM systems: the Cerec group was fabricated using the Cerec CAD/CAM system, and the Trios group was fabricated using Trios CAD and milled using Wieland Zenotec CAM. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Scheffe post hoc test were used for statistical comparison of the groups (α=0.05). Results The mean (±standard deviation) of the marginal gap of each group was as follows: the Control group was 91.15 (±15.35) µm, the Cerec group was 111.07 (±6.33) µm, and the Trios group was 60.17 (±11.09) µm. One-way ANOVA and the Scheffe post hoc test showed a statistically significant difference in the marginal gap between all groups. Conclusion It can be concluded from the current study that all-ceramic crowns, fabricated using the CAD/CAM system, show a marginal accuracy that is acceptable in clinical environments. The Trios CAD group displayed the smallest marginal gap. PMID:28352204

  9. Multi-scale analysis of the effect of nano-filler particle diameter on the physical properties of CAD/CAM composite resin blocks.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Inoue, Sayuri; Sakai, Takahiko; Abe, Tomohiro; Kitagawa, Haruaki; Imazato, Satoshi

    2017-05-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the effect of silica nano-filler particle diameters in a computer-aided design/manufacturing (CAD/CAM) composite resin (CR) block on physical properties at the multi-scale in silico. CAD/CAM CR blocks were modeled, consisting of silica nano-filler particles (20, 40, 60, 80, and 100 nm) and matrix (Bis-GMA/TEGDMA), with filler volume contents of 55.161%. Calculation of Young's moduli and Poisson's ratios for the block at macro-scale were analyzed by homogenization. Macro-scale CAD/CAM CR blocks (3 × 3 × 3 mm) were modeled and compressive strengths were defined when the fracture loads exceeded 6075 N. MPS values of the nano-scale models were compared by localization analysis. As the filler size decreased, Young's moduli and compressive strength increased, while Poisson's ratios and MPS decreased. All parameters were significantly correlated with the diameters of the filler particles (Pearson's correlation test, r = -0.949, 0.943, -0.951, 0.976, p < 0.05). The in silico multi-scale model established in this study demonstrates that the Young's moduli, Poisson's ratios, and compressive strengths of CAD/CAM CR blocks can be enhanced by loading silica nanofiller particles of smaller diameter. CAD/CAM CR blocks by using smaller silica nano-filler particles have a potential to increase fracture resistance.

  10. In Vitro Analysis of the Fracture Resistance of CAD/CAM Denture Base Resins.

    PubMed

    Steinmassl, Otto; Offermanns, Vincent; Stöckl, Wolfgang; Dumfahrt, Herbert; Grunert, Ingrid; Steinmassl, Patricia-Anca

    2018-03-08

    Computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) denture base manufacturers claim to produce their resin pucks under high heat and pressure. Therefore, CAD/CAM dentures are assumed to have enhanced mechanical properties and, as a result, are often produced with lower denture base thicknesses than conventional, manually fabricated dentures. The aim of this study was to investigate if commercially available CAD/CAM denture base resins have more favourable mechanical properties than conventionally processed denture base resins. For this purpose, a series of three-point bending tests conforming to ISO specifications were performed on a total of 80 standardised, rectangular CAD/CAM denture base resin specimens from five different manufacturers (AvaDent, Baltic Denture System, Vita VIONIC, Whole You Nexteeth, and Wieland Digital Dentures). A heat-polymerising resin and an autopolymerising resin served as the control groups. The breaking load, fracture toughness, and the elastic modulus were assessed. Additionally, the fracture surface roughness and texture were investigated. Only one CAD/CAM resin showed a significantly increased breaking load. Two CAD/CAM resins had a significantly higher fracture toughness than the control groups, and all CAD/CAM resins had higher elastic moduli than the controls. Our results indicate that CAD/CAM denture base resins do not generally have better mechanical properties than manually processed resins. Therefore, the lower minimum denture base thicknesses should be regarded with some caution.

  11. In Vitro Analysis of the Fracture Resistance of CAD/CAM Denture Base Resins

    PubMed Central

    Stöckl, Wolfgang; Dumfahrt, Herbert; Grunert, Ingrid

    2018-01-01

    Computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) denture base manufacturers claim to produce their resin pucks under high heat and pressure. Therefore, CAD/CAM dentures are assumed to have enhanced mechanical properties and, as a result, are often produced with lower denture base thicknesses than conventional, manually fabricated dentures. The aim of this study was to investigate if commercially available CAD/CAM denture base resins have more favourable mechanical properties than conventionally processed denture base resins. For this purpose, a series of three-point bending tests conforming to ISO specifications were performed on a total of 80 standardised, rectangular CAD/CAM denture base resin specimens from five different manufacturers (AvaDent, Baltic Denture System, Vita VIONIC, Whole You Nexteeth, and Wieland Digital Dentures). A heat-polymerising resin and an autopolymerising resin served as the control groups. The breaking load, fracture toughness, and the elastic modulus were assessed. Additionally, the fracture surface roughness and texture were investigated. Only one CAD/CAM resin showed a significantly increased breaking load. Two CAD/CAM resins had a significantly higher fracture toughness than the control groups, and all CAD/CAM resins had higher elastic moduli than the controls. Our results indicate that CAD/CAM denture base resins do not generally have better mechanical properties than manually processed resins. Therefore, the lower minimum denture base thicknesses should be regarded with some caution. PMID:29518022

  12. Integrating a facial scan, virtual smile design, and 3D virtual patient for treatment with CAD-CAM ceramic veneers: A clinical report.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei-Shao; Harris, Bryan T; Phasuk, Kamolphob; Llop, Daniel R; Morton, Dean

    2018-02-01

    This clinical report describes a digital workflow using the virtual smile design approach augmented with a static 3-dimensional (3D) virtual patient with photorealistic appearance to restore maxillary central incisors by using computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) monolithic lithium disilicate ceramic veneers. Copyright © 2017 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. CAD/CAM data management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bray, O. H.

    1984-01-01

    The role of data base management in CAD/CAM, particularly for geometric data is described. First, long term and short term objectives for CAD/CAM data management are identified. Second, the benefits of the data base management approach are explained. Third, some of the additional work needed in the data base area is discussed.

  14. Bridging CAGD knowledge into CAD/CG applications: Mathematical theories as stepping stones of innovations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobithaasan, R. U.; Miura, Kenjiro T.; Hassan, Mohamad Nor

    2014-07-01

    Computer Aided Geometric Design (CAGD) which surpasses the underlying theories of Computer Aided Design (CAD) and Computer Graphics (CG) has been taught in a number of Malaysian universities under the umbrella of Mathematical Sciences' faculty/department. On the other hand, CAD/CG is taught either under the Engineering or Computer Science Faculty. Even though CAGD researchers/educators/students (denoted as contributors) have been enriching this field of study by means of article/journal publication, many fail to convert the idea into constructive innovation due to the gap that occurs between CAGD contributors and practitioners (engineers/product/designers/architects/artists). This paper addresses this issue by advocating a number of technologies that can be used to transform CAGD contributors into innovators where immediate impact in terms of practical application can be experienced by the CAD/CG practitioners. The underlying principle of solving this issue is twofold. First would be to expose the CAGD contributors on ways to turn mathematical ideas into plug-ins and second is to impart relevant CAGD theories to CAD/CG to practitioners. Both cases are discussed in detail and the final section shows examples to illustrate the importance of turning mathematical knowledge into innovations.

  15. Program Evolves from Basic CAD to Total Manufacturing Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassola, Joel

    2011-01-01

    Close to a decade ago, John Hersey High School (JHHS) in Arlington Heights, Illinois, made a transition from a traditional classroom-based pre-engineering program. The new program is geared towards helping students understand the entire manufacturing process. Previously, a JHHS student would design a project in computer-aided design (CAD) software…

  16. Information fusion for diabetic retinopathy CAD in digital color fundus photographs.

    PubMed

    Niemeijer, Meindert; Abramoff, Michael D; van Ginneken, Bram

    2009-05-01

    The purpose of computer-aided detection or diagnosis (CAD) technology has so far been to serve as a second reader. If, however, all relevant lesions in an image can be detected by CAD algorithms, use of CAD for automatic reading or prescreening may become feasible. This work addresses the question how to fuse information from multiple CAD algorithms, operating on multiple images that comprise an exam, to determine a likelihood that the exam is normal and would not require further inspection by human operators. We focus on retinal image screening for diabetic retinopathy, a common complication of diabetes. Current CAD systems are not designed to automatically evaluate complete exams consisting of multiple images for which several detection algorithm output sets are available. Information fusion will potentially play a crucial role in enabling the application of CAD technology to the automatic screening problem. Several different fusion methods are proposed and their effect on the performance of a complete comprehensive automatic diabetic retinopathy screening system is evaluated. Experiments show that the choice of fusion method can have a large impact on system performance. The complete system was evaluated on a set of 15,000 exams (60,000 images). The best performing fusion method obtained an area under the receiver operator characteristic curve of 0.881. This indicates that automated prescreening could be applied in diabetic retinopathy screening programs.

  17. Vane Pump Casing Machining of Dumpling Machine Based on CAD/CAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yusen; Li, Shilong; Li, Chengcheng; Yang, Zhen

    Automatic dumpling forming machine is also called dumpling machine, which makes dumplings through mechanical motions. This paper adopts the stuffing delivery mechanism featuring the improved and specially-designed vane pump casing, which can contribute to the formation of dumplings. Its 3D modeling in Pro/E software, machining process planning, milling path optimization, simulation based on UG and compiling post program were introduced and verified. The results indicated that adoption of CAD/CAM offers firms the potential to pursue new innovative strategies.

  18. IPAD 2: Advances in Distributed Data Base Management for CAD/CAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bostic, S. W. (Compiler)

    1984-01-01

    The Integrated Programs for Aerospace-Vehicle Design (IPAD) Project objective is to improve engineering productivity through better use of computer-aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology. The focus is on development of technology and associated software for integrated company-wide management of engineering information. The objectives of this conference are as follows: to provide a greater awareness of the critical need by U.S. industry for advancements in distributed CAD/CAM data management capability; to present industry experiences and current and planned research in distributed data base management; and to summarize IPAD data management contributions and their impact on U.S. industry and computer hardware and software vendors.

  19. Effectiveness and efficiency of a CAD/CAM orthodontic bracket system.

    PubMed

    Brown, Matthew W; Koroluk, Lorne; Ko, Ching-Chang; Zhang, Kai; Chen, Mengqi; Nguyen, Tung

    2015-12-01

    The first straight-wire appliance was introduced over 40 years ago to increase the consistency and efficiency of orthodontic treatment. More recently, computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology has been used to create individualized orthodontic appliances. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical effectiveness and efficiency of CAD/CAM customized orthodontic appliances compared with direct and indirect bonded stock orthodontic brackets. This retrospective study included 3 treatment groups: group 1 patients were direct bonded with self-ligating appliances, group 2 patients were indirect bonded with self-ligating appliances, and group 3 patients were indirect bonded with CAD/CAM self-ligating appliances. Complete pretreatment and posttreatment records were obtained for all patients. The American Board of Orthodontics (ABO) Discrepancy Index was used to evaluate the pretreatment records, and the posttreatment outcomes were analyzed using the ABO Cast-Radiograph Evaluation. All data collection and analysis were completed by 1 evaluator. There were no statistically significant differences in the ABO Discrepancy Index or the ABO Cast-Radiograph Evaluation among the groups. Treatment times for the 3 groups were significantly different; the CAD/CAM group was the shortest at 13.8 ± 3.4 months, compared with 21.9 ± 5.0 and 16.9 ± 4.1 months for the direct bonded and indirect bonded groups, respectively. The number of treatment appointments for the CAD/CAM group was significantly fewer than for the direct bonded group. The CAD/CAM orthodontic bracket system evaluated in this study was as effective in treatment outcome measures as were standard brackets bonded both directly and indirectly. The CAD/CAM appliance was more efficient in regard to treatment duration, although the decrease in total archwire appointments was minimal. Further investigation is needed to better quantify the clinical benefits of CAD/CAM orthodontic

  20. Comparison of Flexural Strength of Different CAD/CAM PMMA-Based Polymers.

    PubMed

    Alp, Gülce; Murat, Sema; Yilmaz, Burak

    2018-01-28

    To compare the flexural strength of different computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) poly(methyl methacrylate)-based (PMMA) polymers and conventional interim resin materials after thermocycling. Rectangular-shaped specimens (n = 15, for each material) (25 × 2 × 2 mm 3 ) were fabricated from 3 CAD/CAM PMMA-based polymers (Telio CAD [T]; M-PM-Disc [M]; Polident-PMMA [P]), 1 bis-acrylate composite resin (Protemp 4 [PT]), and 1 conventional PMMA (ArtConcept Artegral Dentine [C]) according to ISO 10477:2004 Standards (Dentistry-Polymer-Based Crown and Bridge Materials). The specimens were subjected to 10,000 thermocycles (5 to 55°C). Three-point flexural strength of the specimens was tested in a universal testing machine at a 1.0 mm/min crosshead speed, and the flexural strength data (σ) were calculated (MPa). The flexural strength values were statistically analyzed using 1-way ANOVA, and Tukey HSD post-hoc test for multiple comparisons (α = 0.05). Flexural strength values ranged between 66.1 ± 13.1 and 131.9 ± 19.8 MPa. There were significant differences among the flexural strengths of tested materials, except for between T and P CAD/CAM PMMA-based polymers (p > 0.05). CAD/CAM PMMA-based polymer M had the highest flexural strength and conventional PMMA had the lowest (p < 0.05). CAD/CAM PMMA-based T and P polymers had significantly higher flexural strength than the bis-acrylate composite resin (p < 0.05), and conventional PMMA (p < 0.0001), and significantly lower flexural strength compared to CAD/CAM PMMA-based M (p < 0.05). The flexural strength of CAD/CAM PMMA-based polymers was greater than the flexural strength of bis-acrylate composite resin, which had a greater flexural strength compared to conventional PMMA resin. © 2018 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  1. Designing a combined casting mold for manufacture of a gasoline centrifugal pump body using CAD/CAM-systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galin, N. E.; Ogol, I. I.; Chervach, Yu B.; Dammer, V. Kh; Ru, Jia Hong

    2017-02-01

    The present paper examines designing of a combined casting mold for manufacture of a gasoline centrifugal pump body. The paper offers technological solutions for obtaining high quality castings at the testing stage of the finished mold. The paper is intended for practical use and prepared by order of JSC ‘Tomsk Electrical Engineering Plant’ using software and equipment of the department ‘Technologies of Computer-Aided Machinery Manufacturing’ of the Tomsk Polytechnic University (TPU) under the economic contract within state import substitution program. In preparing the paper, CAD/CAM-systems KOMPAS-3D and PowerMILL were used. In 2015, the designed casting mold was introduced into the production process at JSC ‘Tomsk Electrical Engineering Plant’.

  2. Improving aircraft conceptual design - A PHIGS interactive graphics interface for ACSYNT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wampler, S. G.; Myklebust, A.; Jayaram, S.; Gelhausen, P.

    1988-01-01

    A CAD interface has been created for the 'ACSYNT' aircraft conceptual design code that permits the execution and control of the design process via interactive graphics menus. This CAD interface was coded entirely with the new three-dimensional graphics standard, the Programmer's Hierarchical Interactive Graphics System. The CAD/ACSYNT system is designed for use by state-of-the-art high-speed imaging work stations. Attention is given to the approaches employed in modeling, data storage, and rendering.

  3. A Multidisciplinary Research Team Approach to Computer-Aided Drafting (CAD) System Selection. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franken, Ken; And Others

    A multidisciplinary research team was assembled to review existing computer-aided drafting (CAD) systems for the purpose of enabling staff in the Design Drafting Department at Linn Technical College (Missouri) to select the best system out of the many CAD systems in existence. During the initial stage of the evaluation project, researchers…

  4. Increasing productivity of the McAuto CAD/CAE system by user-specific applications programming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plotrowski, S. M.; Vu, T. H.

    1985-01-01

    Significant improvements in the productivity of the McAuto Computer-Aided Design/Computer-Aided Engineering (CAD/CAE) system were achieved by applications programming using the system's own Graphics Interactive Programming language (GRIP) and the interface capabilities with the main computer on which the system resides. The GRIP programs for creating springs, bar charts, finite element model representations and aiding management planning are presented as examples.

  5. rCAD: A Novel Database Schema for the Comparative Analysis of RNA.

    PubMed

    Ozer, Stuart; Doshi, Kishore J; Xu, Weijia; Gutell, Robin R

    2011-12-31

    Beyond its direct involvement in protein synthesis with mRNA, tRNA, and rRNA, RNA is now being appreciated for its significance in the overall metabolism and regulation of the cell. Comparative analysis has been very effective in the identification and characterization of RNA molecules, including the accurate prediction of their secondary structure. We are developing an integrative scalable data management and analysis system, the RNA Comparative Analysis Database (rCAD), implemented with SQL Server to support RNA comparative analysis. The platformagnostic database schema of rCAD captures the essential relationships between the different dimensions of information for RNA comparative analysis datasets. The rCAD implementation enables a variety of comparative analysis manipulations with multiple integrated data dimensions for advanced RNA comparative analysis workflows. In this paper, we describe details of the rCAD schema design and illustrate its usefulness with two usage scenarios.

  6. rCAD: A Novel Database Schema for the Comparative Analysis of RNA

    PubMed Central

    Ozer, Stuart; Doshi, Kishore J.; Xu, Weijia; Gutell, Robin R.

    2013-01-01

    Beyond its direct involvement in protein synthesis with mRNA, tRNA, and rRNA, RNA is now being appreciated for its significance in the overall metabolism and regulation of the cell. Comparative analysis has been very effective in the identification and characterization of RNA molecules, including the accurate prediction of their secondary structure. We are developing an integrative scalable data management and analysis system, the RNA Comparative Analysis Database (rCAD), implemented with SQL Server to support RNA comparative analysis. The platformagnostic database schema of rCAD captures the essential relationships between the different dimensions of information for RNA comparative analysis datasets. The rCAD implementation enables a variety of comparative analysis manipulations with multiple integrated data dimensions for advanced RNA comparative analysis workflows. In this paper, we describe details of the rCAD schema design and illustrate its usefulness with two usage scenarios. PMID:24772454

  7. WE-E-217A-02: Methodologies for Evaluation of Standalone CAD System Performance.

    PubMed

    Sahiner, B

    2012-06-01

    Standalone performance evaluation of a CAD system provides information about the abnormality detection or classification performance of the computerized system alone. Although the performance of the reader with CAD is the final step in CAD system assessment, standalone performance evaluation is an important component for several reasons: First, standalone evaluation informs the reader about the performance level of the CAD system and may have an impact on how the reader uses the system. Second, it provides essential information to the system designer for algorithm optimization during system development. Third, standalone evaluation can provide a detailed description of algorithm performance (e.g., on subgroups of the population) because a larger data set with more samples from different subgroups can be included in standalone studies compared to reader studies. Proper standalone evaluation of a CAD system involves a number of key components, some of which are shared with the assessment of reader performance with CAD. These include (1) selection of a test data set that allows performance assessment with little or no bias and acceptable uncertainty; (2) a reference standard that indicates disease status as well as the location and extent of disease; (3) a clearly defined method for labeling each CAD mark as a true-positive or false-positive; and (4) a properly selected set of metrics to summarize the accuracy of the computer marks and their corresponding scores. In this lecture, we will discuss various approaches for the key components of standalone CAD performance evaluation listed above, and present some of the recommendations and opinions from the AAPM CAD subcommittee on these issues. Learning Objectives 1. Identify basic components and metrics in the assessment of standalone CAD systems 2. Understand how each component may affect the assessed performance 3. Learn about AAPM CAD subcommittee's opinions and recommendations on factors and metrics related to the

  8. CAD/CAM/AM applications in the manufacture of dental appliances.

    PubMed

    Al Mortadi, Noor; Eggbeer, Dominic; Lewis, Jeffrey; Williams, Robert J

    2012-11-01

    The purposes of this study were to apply the latest developments in additive manufacturing (AM) construction and to evaluate the effectiveness of these computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) techniques in the production of dental appliances. In addition, a new method of incorporating wire into a single build was developed. A scanner was used to capture 3-dimensional images of Class II Division 1 dental models that were translated onto a 2-dimensional computer screen. Andresen and sleep-apnea devices were designed in 3 dimensions by using FreeForm software (version 11; Geo Magics SensAble Group, Wilmington, Mass) and a phantom arm. The design was then exported and transferred to an AM machine for building. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. TRAD or CAD? A Comparison.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Resetarits, Paul J.

    1989-01-01

    Studies whether traditional drafting equipment (TRAD) or computer aided drafting equipment (CAD) is more effective. Proposes that students using only CAD can learn principles of drafting as well as students using only TRAD. Reports no significant difference either on achievement or attitude. (MVL)

  10. Do CAD/CAM dentures really release less monomer than conventional dentures?

    PubMed

    Steinmassl, Patricia-Anca; Wiedemair, Verena; Huck, Christian; Klaunzer, Florian; Steinmassl, Otto; Grunert, Ingrid; Dumfahrt, Herbert

    2017-06-01

    Computer-aided design (CAD)/computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) dentures are assumed to have more favourable material properties than conventionally fabricated dentures, among them a lower methacrylate monomer release. The aim of this study was to test this hypothesis. CAD/CAM dentures were generated from ten different master casts by using four different CAD/CAM systems. Conventional, heat-polymerised dentures served as control group. Denture weight and volume were measured; the density was calculated, and the denture surface area was assessed digitally. The monomer release after 7 days of water storage was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. Whole You Nexteeth and Wieland Digital Dentures had significantly lower mean volume and weight than conventional dentures. Baltic Denture System and Whole You Nexteeth had a significantly increased density. Baltic Denture System had a significantly smaller surface area. None of the CAD/CAM dentures released significantly less monomer than the control group. All tested dentures released very low amounts of methacrylate monomer, but not significantly less than conventional dentures. A statistically significant difference might nevertheless exist in comparison to other, less recommendable denture base materials, such as the frequently used autopolymerising resins. CAD/CAM denture fabrication has numerous advantages. It enables the fabrication of dentures with lower resin volume and lower denture weight. Both could increase the patient comfort. Dentures with higher density might exhibit more favourable mechanical properties. The hypothesis that CAD/CAM dentures release less monomer than conventional dentures could, however, not be verified.

  11. Unique CAD/CAM three-quarter crown restoration of a central incisor: a case report.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Marvin B; Siegel, Sharon C; Rezakani, Niloufar

    2013-07-01

    Computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) dentistry has been in use for more than 2 decades. Recent improvements in this technology have made CAD/CAM restorations a viable alternative for routine dental care. This technology is being taught in dental schools to prepare students for contemporary dental practice and is particularly useful in unique restorative situations that allow conservation of tooth structure. This case report describes the restoration of a central incisor that was previously restored with an unesthetic three-quarter gold crown. The tooth exhibited recurrent caries and an unaffected labial wall of supported enamel. A CAD/CAM three-quarter crown was planned to conserve tooth structure. After preparation, the tooth was scanned for a CAD/CAM crown in order to fabricate a ceramic restoration, which was then milled and bonded, producing an esthetic result. Typically, in cases of esthetic enhancement, a labial laminate restoration is fabricated, but in this situation, a different approach was necessary to make a design for the lingual surface of an anterior tooth.

  12. CAD-CAM database management at Bendix Kansas City

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Witte, D.R.

    1985-05-01

    The Bendix Kansas City Division of Allied Corporation began integrating mechanical CAD-CAM capabilities into its operations in June 1980. The primary capabilities include a wireframe modeling application, a solid modeling application, and the Bendix Integrated Computer Aided Manufacturing (BICAM) System application, a set of software programs and procedures which provides user-friendly access to graphic applications and data, and user-friendly sharing of data between applications and users. BICAM also provides for enforcement of corporate/enterprise policies. Three access categories, private, local, and global, are realized through the implementation of data-management metaphors: the desk, reading rack, file cabinet, and library are for themore » storage, retrieval, and sharing of drawings and models. Access is provided through menu selections; searching for designs is done by a paging method or a search-by-attribute-value method. The sharing of designs between all users of Part Data is key. The BICAM System supports 375 unique users per quarter and manages over 7500 drawings and models. The BICAM System demonstrates the need for generalized models, a high-level system framework, prototyping, information-modeling methods, and an understanding of the entire enterprise. Future BICAM System implementations are planned to take advantage of this knowledge.« less

  13. From CAD to Digital Modeling: the Necessary Hybridization of Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massari, G. A.; Bernardi, F.; Cristofolini, A.

    2011-09-01

    The essay deals with the themes of digital representation of architecture starting from several years of teaching activity which is growing within the course of Automatic Design of the degree course in Engineering/Architecture in the University of Trento. With the development of CAD systems, architectural representation lies less in the tracking of a simple graph and drawn deeper into a series of acts of building a complex digital model, which can be used as a data base on which to report all the stages of project and interpretation work, and from which to derive final drawings and documents. The advent of digital technology has led to increasing difficulty in finding explicit connections between one type of operation and the subsequent outcome; thereby increasing need for guidelines, the need to understand in order to precede the changes, the desire not to be overwhelmed by uncontrollable influences brought by technological hardware and software systems to use only in accordance with the principle of maximum productivity. Formation occupies a crucial role because has the ability to direct the profession toward a thoughtful and selective use of specific applications; teaching must build logical routes in the fluid world of info-graphics and the only way to do so is to describe its contours through method indications: this will consist in understanding, studying and divulging what in its mobility does not change, as procedural issues, rather than what is transitory in its fixity, as manual questions.

  14. Fabricating CAD/CAM Implant-Retained Mandibular Bar Overdentures: A Clinical and Technical Overview.

    PubMed

    Goo, Chui Ling; Tan, Keson Beng Choon

    2017-01-01

    This report describes the clinical and technical aspects in the oral rehabilitation of an edentulous patient with knife-edge ridge at the mandibular anterior edentulous region, using implant-retained overdentures. The application of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) in the fabrication of the overdenture framework simplifies the laboratory process of the implant prostheses. The Nobel Procera CAD/CAM System was utilised to produce a lightweight titanium overdenture bar with locator attachments. It is proposed that the digital workflow of CAD/CAM milled implant overdenture bar allows us to avoid numerous technical steps and possibility of casting errors involved in the conventional casting of such bars.

  15. Structure, functional characterization, and evolution of the dihydroorotase domain of human CAD.

    PubMed

    Grande-García, Araceli; Lallous, Nada; Díaz-Tejada, Celsa; Ramón-Maiques, Santiago

    2014-02-04

    Upregulation of CAD, the multifunctional protein that initiates and controls the de novo biosynthesis of pyrimidines in animals, is essential for cell proliferation. Deciphering the architecture and functioning of CAD is of interest for its potential usage as an antitumoral target. However, there is no detailed structural information about CAD other than that it self-assembles into hexamers of ∼1.5 MDa. Here we report the crystal structure and functional characterization of the dihydroorotase domain of human CAD. Contradicting all assumptions, the structure reveals an active site enclosed by a flexible loop with two Zn²⁺ ions bridged by a carboxylated lysine and a third Zn coordinating a rare histidinate ion. Site-directed mutagenesis and functional assays prove the involvement of the Zn and flexible loop in catalysis. Comparison with homologous bacterial enzymes supports a reclassification of the DHOase family and provides strong evidence against current models of the architecture of CAD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Parameterized CAD techniques implementation for the fatigue behaviour optimization of a service chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, H. T.; Estrems, M.; Franco, P.; Faura, F.

    2009-11-01

    In recent years, the market of heat exchangers is increasingly demanding new products in short cycle time, which means that both the design and manufacturing stages must be extremely reduced. The design stage can be reduced by means of CAD-based parametric design techniques. The methodology presented in this proceeding is based on the optimized control of geometric parameters of a service chamber of a heat exchanger by means of the Application Programming Interface (API) provided by the Solidworks CAD package. Using this implementation, a set of different design configurations of the service chamber made of stainless steel AISI 316 are studied by means of the FE method. As a result of this study, a set of knowledge rules based on the fatigue behaviour are constructed and integrated into the design optimization process.

  17. CAD-CAM-generated hydroxyapatite scaffold to replace the mandibular condyle in sheep: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Ciocca, Leonardo; Donati, Davide; Fantini, Massimiliano; Landi, Elena; Piattelli, Adriano; Iezzi, Giovanna; Tampieri, Anna; Spadari, Alessandro; Romagnoli, Noemi; Scotti, Roberto

    2013-08-01

    In this study, rapid CAD-CAM prototyping of pure hydroxyapatite to replace temporomandibular joint condyles was tested in sheep. Three adult animals were implanted with CAD-CAM-designed porous hydroxyapatite scaffolds as condyle substitutes. The desired scaffold shape was achieved by subtractive automated milling machining (block reduction). Custom-made surgical guides were created by direct metal laser sintering and were used to export the virtual planning of the bone cut lines into the surgical environment. Using the same technique, fixation plates were created and applied to the scaffold pre-operatively to firmly secure the condyles to the bone and to assure primary stability of the hydroxyapatite scaffolds during masticatory function. Four months post-surgery, the sheep were sacrificed. The hydroxyapatite scaffolds were explanted, and histological specimens were prepared. Different histological tissues penetrating the scaffold macropores, the sequence of bone remodeling, new apposition of bone and/or cartilage as a consequence of the different functional anatomic role, and osseointegration at the interface between the scaffold and bone were documented. This animal model was found to be appropriate for testing CAD-CAM customization and the biomechanical properties of porous, pure hydroxyapatite scaffolds used as joint prostheses.

  18. Vagus-brain communication in atherosclerosis-related inflammation: a neuroimmunomodulation perspective of CAD.

    PubMed

    Gidron, Yori; Kupper, Nina; Kwaijtaal, Martijn; Winter, Jobst; Denollet, Johan

    2007-12-01

    The current understanding of the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis leading to coronary artery disease (CAD) emphasizes the role of inflammatory mediators. Given the bidirectional communication between the immune and central nervous systems, an important question is whether the brain can be "informed" about and modulate CAD-related inflammation. A candidate communicator and modulator is the vagus nerve. Until now, the vagus nerve has received attention in cardiology mainly due to its role in the parasympathetic cardiovascular response. However, the vagus nerve can also "inform" the brain about peripheral inflammation since its paraganglia have receptors for interleukin-1. Furthermore, its efferent branch has a local anti-inflammatory effect. These effects have not been considered in research on the vagus nerve in CAD or in vagus nerve stimulation trials in CAD. In addition, various behavioural interventions, including relaxation, may influence CAD prognosis by affecting vagal activity. Based on this converging evidence, we propose a neuroimmunomodulation approach to atherogenesis. In this model, the vagus nerve "informs" the brain about CAD-related cytokines; in turn, activation of the vagus (via vagus nerve stimulation, vagomimetic drugs or relaxation) induces an anti-inflammatory response that can slow down the chronic process of atherogenesis.

  19. Marginal discrepancy of CAD-CAM complete-arch fixed implant-supported frameworks.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Burak; Kale, Ediz; Johnston, William M

    2018-02-21

    Computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) high-density polymers (HDPs) have recently been marketed for the fabrication of long-term interim implant-supported fixed prostheses. However, information regarding the precision of fit of CAD-CAM HDP implant-supported complete-arch screw-retained prostheses is scarce. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the marginal discrepancy of CAD-CAM HDP complete-arch implant-supported screw-retained fixed prosthesis frameworks and compare them with conventional titanium (Ti) and zirconia (Zir) frameworks. A screw-retained complete-arch acrylic resin prototype with multiunit abutments was fabricated on a typodont model with 2 straight implants in the anterior region and 2 implants with a 30-degree distal tilt in the posterior region. A 3-dimensional (3D) laboratory laser scanner was used to digitize the typodont model with scan bodies and the resin prototype to generate a virtual 3D CAD framework. A CAM milling unit was used to fabricate 5 frameworks from HDP, Ti, and Zir blocks. The 1-screw test was performed by tightening the prosthetic screw in the maxillary left first molar abutment (terminal location) when the frameworks were on the typodont model, and the marginal discrepancy of frameworks was evaluated using an industrial computed tomographic scanner and a 3D volumetric software. The 3D marginal discrepancy at the abutment-framework interface of the maxillary left canine (L1), right canine (L2), and right first molar (L3) sites was measured. The mean values for 3D marginal discrepancy were calculated for each location in a group with 95% confidence limits. The results were analyzed by repeated-measures 2-way ANOVA using the restricted maximum likelihood estimation and the Satterthwaite degrees of freedom methods, which do not require normality and homoscedasticity in the data. The between-subjects factor was material, the within-subjects factor was location, and the interaction was

  20. Repairability of CAD/CAM high-density PMMA- and composite-based polymers.

    PubMed

    Wiegand, Annette; Stucki, Lukas; Hoffmann, Robin; Attin, Thomas; Stawarczyk, Bogna

    2015-11-01

    The study aimed to analyse the shear bond strength of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA)- and composite-based polymer materials repaired with a conventional methacrylate-based composite after different surface pretreatments. Each 48 specimens was prepared from six different CAD/CAM polymer materials (Ambarino high-class, artBloc Temp, CAD-Temp, Lava Ultimate, Telio CAD, Everest C-Temp) and a conventional dimethacrylate-based composite (Filtek Supreme XTE, control) and aged by thermal cycling (5000 cycles, 5-55 °C). The surfaces were left untreated or were pretreated by mechanical roughening, aluminium oxide air abrasion or silica coating/silanization (each subgroup n = 12). The surfaces were further conditioned with an etch&rinse adhesive (OptiBond FL) before the repair composite (Filtek Supreme XTE) was adhered to the surface. After further thermal cycling, shear bond strength was tested, and failure modes were assessed. Shear bond strength was statistically analysed by two- and one-way ANOVAs and Weibull statistics, failure mode by chi(2) test (p ≤ 0.05). Shear bond strength was highest for silica coating/silanization > aluminium oxide air abrasion = mechanical roughening > no surface pretreatment. Independently of the repair pretreatment, highest bond strength values were observed in the control group and for the composite-based Everest C-Temp and Ambarino high-class, while PMMA-based materials (artBloc Temp, CAD-Temp and Telio CAD) presented significantly lowest values. For all materials, repair without any surface pretreatment resulted in adhesive failures only, which mostly were reduced when surface pretreatment was performed. Repair of CAD/CAM high-density polymers requires surface pretreatment prior to adhesive and composite application. However, four out of six of the tested CAD/CAM materials did not achieve the repair bond strength of a conventional dimethacrylate

  1. Marginal adaptation and CAD-CAM technology: A systematic review of restorative material and fabrication techniques.

    PubMed

    Papadiochou, Sofia; Pissiotis, Argirios L

    2018-04-01

    The comparative assessment of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) technology and other fabrication techniques pertaining to marginal adaptation should be documented. Limited evidence exists on the effect of restorative material on the performance of a CAD-CAM system relative to marginal adaptation. The purpose of this systematic review was to investigate whether the marginal adaptation of CAD-CAM single crowns, fixed dental prostheses, and implant-retained fixed dental prostheses or their infrastructures differs from that obtained by other fabrication techniques using a similar restorative material and whether it depends on the type of restorative material. An electronic search of English-language literature published between January 1, 2000, and June 30, 2016, was conducted of the Medline/PubMed database. Of the 55 included comparative studies, 28 compared CAD-CAM technology with conventional fabrication techniques, 12 contrasted CAD-CAM technology and copy milling, 4 compared CAD-CAM milling with direct metal laser sintering (DMLS), and 22 investigated the performance of a CAD-CAM system regarding marginal adaptation in restorations/infrastructures produced with different restorative materials. Most of the CAD-CAM restorations/infrastructures were within the clinically acceptable marginal discrepancy (MD) range. The performance of a CAD-CAM system relative to marginal adaptation is influenced by the restorative material. Compared with CAD-CAM, most of the heat-pressed lithium disilicate crowns displayed equal or smaller MD values. Slip-casting crowns exhibited similar or better marginal accuracy than those fabricated with CAD-CAM. Cobalt-chromium and titanium implant infrastructures produced using a CAD-CAM system elicited smaller MD values than zirconia. The majority of cobalt-chromium restorations/infrastructures produced by DMLS displayed better marginal accuracy than those fabricated with the casting technique. Compared with copy

  2. Fatigue Resistance of CAD/CAM Resin Composite Molar Crowns

    PubMed Central

    Shembish, Fatma A.; Tong, Hui; Kaizer, Marina; Janal, Malvin N.; Thompson, Van P.; Opdam, Niek J.; Zhang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Objective To demonstrate the fatigue behavior of CAD/CAM resin composite molar crowns using a mouth-motion step-stress fatigue test. Monolithic leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic crowns were used as a reference. Methods Fully anatomically shaped monolithic resin composite molar crowns (Lava Ultimate, n = 24) and leucite reinforced glass-ceramic crowns (IPS Empress CAD, n = 24) were fabricated using CAD/CAM systems. Crowns were cemented on aged dentin-like resin composite tooth replicas (Filtek Z100) with resin-based cements (RelyX Ultimate for Lava Ultimate or Multilink Automix for IPS Empress). Three step-stress profiles (aggressive, moderate and mild) were employed for the accelerated sliding-contact mouth-motion fatigue test. Twenty one crowns from each group were randomly distributed among these three profiles (1:2:4). Failure was designated as chip-off or bulk fracture. Optical and electronic microscopes were used to examine the occlusal surface and subsurface damages, as well as the material microstructures. Results The resin composite crowns showed only minor occlusal damage during mouth-motion step-stress fatigue loading up to 1700 N. Cross-sectional views revealed contact-induced cone cracks in all specimens, and flexural radial cracks in 2 crowns. Both cone and radial cracks were relatively small compared to the crown thickness. Extending these cracks to the threshold for catastrophic failure would require much higher indentation loads or more loading cycles. In contrast, all of the glass-ceramic crowns fractured, starting at loads of approximately 450 N. Significance Monolithic CAD/CAM resin composite crowns endure, with only superficial damage, fatigue loads 3 – 4 times higher than those causing catastrophic failure in glass-ceramic CAD crowns. PMID:26777092

  3. Creation of system of computer-aided design for technological objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubkova, T. M.; Tokareva, M. A.; Sultanov, N. Z.

    2018-05-01

    Due to the competition in the market of process equipment, its production should be flexible, retuning to various product configurations, raw materials and productivity, depending on the current market needs. This process is not possible without CAD (computer-aided design). The formation of CAD begins with planning. Synthesizing, analyzing, evaluating, converting operations, as well as visualization and decision-making operations, can be automated. Based on formal description of the design procedures, the design route in the form of an oriented graph is constructed. The decomposition of the design process, represented by the formalized description of the design procedures, makes it possible to make an informed choice of the CAD component for the solution of the task. The object-oriented approach allows us to consider the CAD as an independent system whose properties are inherited from the components. The first step determines the range of tasks to be performed by the system, and a set of components for their implementation. The second one is the configuration of the selected components. The interaction between the selected components is carried out using the CALS standards. The chosen CAD / CAE-oriented approach allows creating a single model, which is stored in the database of the subject area. Each of the integration stages is implemented as a separate functional block. The transformation of the CAD model into the model of the internal representation is realized by the block of searching for the geometric parameters of the technological machine, in which the XML-model of the construction is obtained on the basis of the feature method from the theory of image recognition. The configuration of integrated components is divided into three consecutive steps: configuring tasks, components, interfaces. The configuration of the components is realized using the theory of "soft computations" using the Mamdani fuzzy inference algorithm.

  4. Discoloration of various CAD/CAM blocks after immersion in coffee.

    PubMed

    Lauvahutanon, Sasipin; Shiozawa, Maho; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Iwasaki, Naohiko; Oki, Meiko; Finger, Werner J; Arksornnukit, Mansuang

    2017-02-01

    This study evaluated color differences (Δ E s) and translucency parameter changes (Δ TP s) of various computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) blocks after immersion in coffee. Eight CAD/CAM blocks and four restorative composite resins were evaluated. The CIE L * a * b * values of 2.0 mm thick disk-shaped specimens were measured using the spectrophotometer on white and black backgrounds ( n = 6). The Δ E s and Δ TP s of one day, one week, and one month immersion in coffee or water were calculated. The values of each material were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's multiple comparisons (α = 0.05). The Δ E s after prophylaxis paste polishing of 1 month coffee immersion specimens, water sorption and solubility were also evaluated. After one month in coffee, Δ E s of CAD/CAM composite resin blocks and restorative composites ranged from 1.6 to 3.7 and from 2.1 to 7.9, respectively, and Δ TP s decreased. The ANOVA of Δ E s and Δ TP s revealed significant differences in two main factors, immersion periods and media, and their interaction except for Δ E s of TEL (Telio CAD, Ivoclar Vivadent). The Δ E s significantly decreased after prophylaxis polishing except GRA (Gradia Block, GC). There was no significant correlation between Δ E s and water sorption or solubility in water. The Δ E s of CAD/CAM blocks after immersion in coffee varied among products and were comparable to those of restorative composite resins. The discoloration of CAD/CAM composite resin blocks could be effectively removed with prophylaxis paste polishing, while that of some restorative composites could not be removed.

  5. Present State of CAD Teaching in Spanish Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Ramon Rubio; Santos, Ramon Gallego; Quiros, Javier Suarez; Penin, Pedro I. Alvarez

    2005-01-01

    During the 1990s, all Spanish Universities updated the syllabuses of their courses as a result of the entry into force of the new Organic Law of Universities ("Ley Organica de Universidades") and, for the first time, "Computer Assisted Design" (CAD) appears in the list of core subjects (compulsory teaching content set by the…

  6. CAD/CAM for development and fabrication of cosecant reflector antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petri, U.

    The application of CAD/CAM techniques to lower the cost of redesigning and manufacturing specialized cosecant reflector antennas for use in the mm-wave range is described and demonstrated. Consideration is given to the theoretical computation of reflector surfaces; the representation of a reflector surface in a CAD system; the numerically controlled milling of an Al, wood, or plastic model antenna; and the construction of the antenna (by spraying the 300-micron Sn-alloy conducting layer onto the coated model surface and then applying a 1-mm-thick epoxy-matrix GFRP layer, a 20-30-mm layer of flexible polyurethane foam, and a final GFRP layer). Diagrams and photographs are provided.

  7. Precision Fit of Screw-Retained Implant-Supported Fixed Dental Prostheses Fabricated by CAD/CAM, Copy-Milling, and Conventional Methods.

    PubMed

    de França, Danilo Gonzaga; Morais, Maria Helena; das Neves, Flávio D; Carreiro, Adriana Fonte; Barbosa, Gustavo As

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of fabrication methods (computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacture [CAD/CAM], copy-milling, and conventional casting) in the fit accuracy of three-unit, screw-retained fixed dental prostheses. Sixteen three-unit implant-supported screw-retained frameworks were fabricated to fit an in vitro model. Eight frameworks were fabricated using the CAD/CAM system, four in zirconia and four in cobalt-chromium. Four zirconia frameworks were fabricated using the copy-milled system, and four were cast in cobalt-chromium using conventional casting with premachined abutments. The vertical and horizontal misfit at the implant-framework interface was measured using scanning electron microscopy at ×250. The results for vertical misfit were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests. The horizontal misfits were categorized as underextended, equally extended, or overextended. Statistical analysis established differences between groups according to the chi-square test (α = .05). The mean vertical misfit was 5.9 ± 3.6 μm for CAD/CAM-fabricated zirconia, 1.2 ± 2.2 μm for CAD/CAM-fabricated cobalt-chromium frameworks, 7.6 ± 9.2 μm for copy-milling-fabricated zirconia frameworks, and 11.8 (9.8) μm for conventionally fabricated frameworks. The Mann-Whitney test revealed significant differences between all but the zirconia-fabricated frameworks. A significant association was observed between the horizontal misfits and the fabrication method. The percentage of horizontal misfits that were underextended and overextended was higher in milled zirconia (83.3%), CAD/CAM cobaltchromium (66.7%), cast cobalt-chromium (58.3%), and CAD/CAM zirconia (33.3%) frameworks. CAD/CAM-fabricated frameworks exhibit better vertical misfit and low variability compared with copy-milled and conventionally fabricated frameworks. The percentage of interfaces equally extended was higher when CAD/CAM and zirconia were used.

  8. A CAD Approach to Developing Mass Distribution and Composition Models for Spaceflight Radiation Risk Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapp, E.; Shelfer, T.; Semones, E.; Johnson, A.; Weyland, M.; Golightly, M.; Smith, G.; Dardano, C.

    For roughly the past three decades, combinatorial geometries have been the predominant mode for the development of mass distribution models associated with the estimation of radiological risk for manned space flight. Examples of these are the MEVDP (Modified Elemental Volume Dose Program) vehicle representation of Liley and Hamilton, and the quadratic functional representation of the CAM/CAF (Computerized Anatomical Male/Female) human body models as modified by Billings and Yucker. These geometries, have the advantageous characteristics of being simple for a familiarized user to maintain, and because of the relative lack of any operating system or run-time library dependence, they are also easy to transfer from one computing platform to another. Unfortunately they are also limited in the amount of modeling detail possible, owing to the abstract geometric representation. In addition, combinatorial representations are also known to be error-prone in practice, since there is no convenient method for error identification (i.e. overlap, etc.), and extensive calculation and/or manual comparison may is often necessary to demonstrate that the geometry is adequately represented. We present an alternate approach linking materials -specific, CAD-based mass models directly to geometric analysis tools requiring no approximation with respect to materials , nor any meshing (i.e. tessellation) of the representative geometry. A new approach to ray tracing is presented which makes use of the fundamentals of the CAD representation to perform geometric analysis directly on the NURBS (Non-Uniform Rational BSpline) surfaces themselves. In this way we achieve a framework for- the rapid, precise development and analysis of materials-specific mass distribution models.

  9. Using CAD software to simulate PV energy yield - The case of product integrated photovoltaic operated under indoor solar irradiation

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Reich, N.H.; van Sark, W.G.J.H.M.; Turkenburg, W.C.

    2010-08-15

    In this paper, we show that photovoltaic (PV) energy yields can be simulated using standard rendering and ray-tracing features of Computer Aided Design (CAD) software. To this end, three-dimensional (3-D) sceneries are ray-traced in CAD. The PV power output is then modeled by translating irradiance intensity data of rendered images back into numerical data. To ensure accurate results, the solar irradiation data used as input is compared to numerical data obtained from rendered images, showing excellent agreement. As expected, also ray-tracing precision in the CAD software proves to be very high. To demonstrate PV energy yield simulations using this innovativemore » concept, solar radiation time course data of a few days was modeled in 3-D to simulate distributions of irradiance incident on flat, single- and double-bend shapes and a PV powered computer mouse located on a window sill. Comparisons of measured to simulated PV output of the mouse show that also in practice, simulation accuracies can be very high. Theoretically, this concept has great potential, as it can be adapted to suit a wide range of solar energy applications, such as sun-tracking and concentrator systems, Building Integrated PV (BIPV) or Product Integrated PV (PIPV). However, graphical user interfaces of 'CAD-PV' software tools are not yet available. (author)« less

  10. Process Cost Modeling for Multi-Disciplinary Design Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bao, Han P.; Freeman, William (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    highlight their inappropriateness for what is really needed at the conceptual phase of the design process. The First-Order Process Velocity Cost Model (FOPV) is discussed at length in the next section. This is followed by an application of the FOPV cost model to a generic wing. For designs that have no precedence as far as acquisition costs are concerned, cost data derived from the FOPV cost model may not be accurate enough because of new requirements for shape complexity, material, equipment and precision/tolerance. The concept of Cost Modulus is introduced at this point to compensate for these new burdens on the basic processes. This is treated in section 5. The cost of a design must be conveniently linked to its CAD representation. The interfacing of CAD models and spreadsheets containing the cost equations is the subject of the next section, section 6. The last section of the report is a summary of the progress made so far, and the anticipated research work to be achieved in the future.

  11. Comparison of denture tooth movement between CAD-CAM and conventional fabrication techniques.

    PubMed

    Goodacre, Brian J; Goodacre, Charles J; Baba, Nadim Z; Kattadiyil, Mathew T

    2018-01-01

    Data comparing the denture tooth movement of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) and conventional denture processing techniques are lacking. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the denture tooth movement of pack-and-press, fluid resin, injection, CAD-CAM-bonded, and CAD-CAM monolithic techniques for fabricating dentures to determine which process produces the most accurate and reproducible prosthesis. A total of 50 dentures were evaluated, 10 for each of the 5 groups. A master denture was fabricated and milled from prepolymerized poly(methyl methacrylate). For the conventional processing techniques (pack-and-press, fluid resin, and injection) a polyvinyl siloxane putty mold of the master denture was made in which denture teeth were placed and molten wax injected. The cameo surface of each wax-festooned denture was laser scanned, resulting in a standard tessellation language (STL) format file. The CAD-CAM dentures included 2 subgroups: CAD-CAM-bonded teeth in which the denture teeth were bonded into the milled denture base and CAD-CAM monolithic teeth in which the denture teeth were milled as part of the denture base. After all specimens had been fabricated, they were hydrated for 24 hours, and the cameo surface laser scanned. The preprocessing and postprocessing scan files of each denture were superimposed using surface-matching software. Measurements were made at 64 locations, allowing evaluation of denture tooth movement in a buccal, lingual, mesial-distal, and occlusal direction. The use of median and interquartile range values was used to assess accuracy and reproducibility. Levene and Kruskal-Wallis analyses of variance were used to evaluate differences between processing techniques (α=.05). The CAD-CAM monolithic technique was the most accurate, followed by fluid resin, CAD-CAM-bonded, pack-and-press, and injection. CAD-CAM monolithic technique was the most reproducible, followed by pack-and-press, CAD

  12. Soft tissues stability of cad-cam and stock abutments in anterior regions: 2-year prospective multicentric cohort study.

    PubMed

    Lops, Diego; Bressan, Eriberto; Parpaiola, Andrea; Sbricoli, Luca; Cecchinato, Denis; Romeo, Eugenio

    2015-12-01

    Aim of this study was to verify if the type of implant abutment manufacturing, stock or cad-cam, could influence the maintenance of stable gingival margins around single restorations in anterior areas. After 16 weeks of healing, implants (Osseospeed, Astra Tech Dental Implant) were positioned. Depending on the different fixture inclination and the thickness of buccal peri-implant soft tissue, abutment selection resulted in four groups: Group 1 (patients with zirconia ZirDesign(®) stock abutments), Group 2 (titanium stock TiDesign(®) abutments), Group 3 (zirconia cad-cam abutments), and Group 4 (titanium cad-cam abutments). The following parameters were assessed: buccal gingival margin modification (BGM). The modification of the implant gingival margin was followed at 1 and 2 years of follow-up. A computerized analysis was performed for measurements. Differences between soft tissue margin at baseline and after 2 years measured the gingival margin recession. A general linear model was used to evaluate each group in relation to gingival recession after two years. Tukey's post hoc test was used to compare the mean REC indexes of each group of abutments. Seventy-two healthy patients (39 males and 33 females; mean age of 46 years) scheduled for single gap rehabilitation in anterior areas were enrolled. A 100% of implant survival rate was observed after 24 months of function. One failure occurred due to fracture of a Zirconia cad-cam abutment. Moreover, two abutment screw unscrewing were observed. Both for zirconia and titanium stock abutments (Group 1 and 2), the mean recession of implant buccal soft tissue was of 0.3 mm (SD of 0.3 and 0.4 mm, respectively). Soft tissue mean recession of zirconia and titanium cad-cam abutments (Group 3 and 4) was of 0.1 and -0.3 mm, respectively (SD of 0.3 and 0.4 mm, respectively). REC values of cad-cam titanium abutments (Group 4) were significantly lower than that of Group 1 (-0.57 mm), Group 2 (-0.61 mm), and Group 3 (-0.40 mm

  13. Structured reporting platform improves CAD-RADS assessment.

    PubMed

    Szilveszter, Bálint; Kolossváry, Márton; Karády, Júlia; Jermendy, Ádám L; Károlyi, Mihály; Panajotu, Alexisz; Bagyura, Zsolt; Vecsey-Nagy, Milán; Cury, Ricardo C; Leipsic, Jonathon A; Merkely, Béla; Maurovich-Horvat, Pál

    2017-11-01

    Structured reporting in cardiac imaging is strongly encouraged to improve quality through consistency. The Coronary Artery Disease - Reporting and Data System (CAD-RADS) was recently introduced to facilitate interdisciplinary communication of coronary CT angiography (CTA) results. We aimed to assess the agreement between manual and automated CAD-RADS classification using a structured reporting platform. Five readers prospectively interpreted 500 coronary CT angiographies using a structured reporting platform that automatically calculates the CAD-RADS score based on stenosis and plaque parameters manually entered by the reader. In addition, all readers manually assessed CAD-RADS blinded to the automatically derived results, which was used as the reference standard. We evaluated factors influencing reader performance including CAD-RADS training, clinical load, time of the day and level of expertise. Total agreement between manual and automated classification was 80.2%. Agreement in stenosis categories was 86.7%, whereas the agreement in modifiers was 95.8% for "N", 96.8% for "S", 95.6% for "V" and 99.4% for "G". Agreement for V improved after CAD-RADS training (p = 0.047). Time of the day and clinical load did not influence reader performance (p > 0.05 both). Less experienced readers had a higher total agreement as compared to more experienced readers (87.0% vs 78.0%, respectively; p = 0.011). Even though automated CAD-RADS classification uses data filled in by the readers, it outperforms manual classification by preventing human errors. Structured reporting platforms with automated calculation of the CAD-RADS score might improve data quality and support standardization of clinical decision making. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Evaluation of mechanical and optical behavior of current esthetic dental restorative CAD/CAM composites.

    PubMed

    Stawarczyk, Bogna; Liebermann, Anja; Eichberger, Marlis; Güth, Jan-Frederik

    2015-03-01

    To determine the mechanical and optical properties of CAD/CAM composites (LAVA Ultimate, Cerasmart, Shofu Block and two exp. CAD/CAM composites), a hybrid material (VITA Enamic), a leucite (IPS Empress CAD) and a lithium disilicate glass-ceramic (IPS e.max CAD). Three-point flexural strength (FS) was investigated according ISO 6872:2008 (N=240/n=30). Two-body wear (TBW) was analyzed in a chewing simulator (1,200,000 cycles, 50N, 5°/55°C) using human teeth as antagonists (N=120/n=15). Quantitative analysis of wear was carried out with a 3D-scanner and associated matching software. Discoloration rate (DR) after 14 days of storage in cress, curry, red wine, and distilled water (N=384/n=12), and translucency (T) (N=384/n=48) of CAD/CAM materials were measured in a spectrophotometer (400-700nm wavelength). Data were analyzed using two-/one-way ANOVA with Scheffé post-hoc test, Kruskal-Wallis-H test, and linear mixed models (α=0.05). IPS e.max CAD showed the highest FS (p<0.001), followed by LAVA Ultimate; however, not different from the remaining CAD/CAM composites (exception: Shofu Block). The lowest FS showed VITA Enamic and IPS Empress CAD (p<0.001). IPS Empress CAD, VITA Enamic, exp. CAD/CAM composite 2, followed by IPS e.max presented lower material TBW than the remaining CAD/CAM materials (p<0.001). The highest antagonist wear was observed for the tested glass-ceramics and the hybrid material (p<0.001). Storage medium (red wine>curry>cress>distilled water) exerted the highest influence on DR (p<0.001), closely followed by CAD/CAM material. Glass-ceramics showed lower DR than CAD/CAM composites (p<0.001). CAD/CAM composites presented moderate FS, high T and antagonist friendly behavior. Glass-ceramic demonstrated the most favorable DR and lowest TBW on the material side. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Digital model as an alternative to plaster model in assessment of space analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, A. Anand; Phillip, Abraham; Kumar, Sathesh; Rawat, Anuradha; Priya, Sakthi; Kumaran, V.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Digital three-dimensional models are widely used for orthodontic diagnosis. The purpose of this study was to appraise the accuracy of digital models obtained from computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) for tooth-width measurements and the Bolton analysis. Materials and Methods: Digital models (CAD/CAM, CBCT) and plaster model were made for each of 50 subjects. Tooth-width measurements on the digital models (CAD/CAM, CBCT) were compared with those on the corresponding plaster models. The anterior and overall Bolton ratios were calculated for each participant and for each method. The paired t-test was applied to determine the validity. Results: Tooth-width measurements, anterior, and overall Bolton ratio of digital models of CAD/CAM and CBCT did not differ significantly from those on the plaster models. Conclusion: Hence, both CBCT and CAD/CAM are trustable and promising technique that can replace plaster models due to its overwhelming advantages. PMID:26538899

  16. Alternatives for Saving and Viewing CAD Graphics for the Web.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, La Verne Abe; Sadowski, Mary A.

    2001-01-01

    Introduces some alternatives for preparing and viewing computer aided design (CAD) graphics for Internet output on a budget, without the fear of copyright infringement, and without having to go back to college to learn a complex graphic application. (Author/YDS)

  17. Internal fit of single crowns produced by CAD-CAM and lost-wax metal casting technique assessed by the triple-scan protocol.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Bjørn Einar; Rønold, Hans Jacob; Dahl, Jon E

    2017-03-01

    Whether single crowns produced by computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) have an internal fit comparable to crowns made by lost-wax metal casting technique is unknown. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the internal fit of single crowns produced with the lost-wax and metal casting technique with that of single crowns produced with the CAD-CAM technique. The internal fit of 5 groups of single crowns produced with the CAD-CAM technique was compared with that of single crowns produced in cobalt-chromium with the conventional lost-wax and metal casting technique. Comparison was performed using the triple-scan protocol; scans of the master model, the crown on the master model, and the intaglio of the crown were superimposed and analyzed with computer software. The 5 groups were milled presintered zirconia, milled hot isostatic pressed zirconia, milled lithium disilicate, milled cobalt-chromium, and laser-sintered cobalt-chromium. The cement space in both the mesiodistal and buccopalatal directions was statistically smaller (P<.05) for crowns made by the conventional lost-wax and metal casting technique compared with that of crowns produced by the CAD-CAM technique. Single crowns made using the conventional lost-wax and metal casting technique have better internal fit than crowns produced using the CAD-CAM technique. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Schools (Students) Exchanging CAD/CAM Files over the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahoney, Gary S.; Smallwood, James E.

    This document discusses how students and schools can benefit from exchanging computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) files over the Internet, explains how files are exchanged, and examines the problem of selected hardware/software incompatibility. Key terms associated with information search services are defined, and several…

  19. Project Integration Architecture (PIA) and Computational Analysis Programming Interface (CAPRI) for Accessing Geometry Data from CAD Files

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benyo, Theresa L.

    2002-01-01

    Integration of a supersonic inlet simulation with a computer aided design (CAD) system is demonstrated. The integration is performed using the Project Integration Architecture (PIA). PIA provides a common environment for wrapping many types of applications. Accessing geometry data from CAD files is accomplished by incorporating appropriate function calls from the Computational Analysis Programming Interface (CAPRI). CAPRI is a CAD vendor neutral programming interface that aids in acquiring geometry data directly from CAD files. The benefits of wrapping a supersonic inlet simulation into PIA using CAPRI are; direct access of geometry data, accurate capture of geometry data, automatic conversion of data units, CAD vendor neutral operation, and on-line interactive history capture. This paper describes the PIA and the CAPRI wrapper and details the supersonic inlet simulation demonstration.

  20. [An experimental research on the fabrication of the fused porcelain to CAD/CAM molar crown].

    PubMed

    Dai, Ning; Zhou, Yongyao; Liao, Wenhe; Yu, Qing; An, Tao; Jiao, Yiqun

    2007-02-01

    This paper introduced the fabrication process of the fused porcelain to molar crown with CAD/CAM technology. Firstly, preparation teeth data was retrieved by the 3D-optical measuring system. Then, we have reconstructed the inner surface designed the outer surface shape with the computer aided design software. Finally, the mini high-speed NC milling machine was used to produce the fused porcelain to CAD/CAM molar crown. The result has proved that the fabrication process is reliable and efficient. The dental restoration quality is steady and precise.

  1. Phylogeny and expression profiling of CAD and CAD-like genes in hybrid Populus (P. deltoides × P. nigra): evidence from herbivore damage for subfunctionalization and functional divergence

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cinnamyl Alcohol Dehydrogenase (CAD) proteins function in lignin biosynthesis and play a critical role in wood development and plant defense against stresses. Previous phylogenetic studies did not include genes from seedless plants and did not reflect the deep evolutionary history of this gene family. We reanalyzed the phylogeny of CAD and CAD-like genes using a representative dataset including lycophyte and bryophyte sequences. Many CAD/CAD-like genes do not seem to be associated with wood development under normal growth conditions. To gain insight into the functional evolution of CAD/CAD-like genes, we analyzed their expression in Populus plant tissues in response to feeding damage by gypsy moth larvae (Lymantria dispar L.). Expression of CAD/CAD-like genes in Populus tissues (xylem, leaves, and barks) was analyzed in herbivore-treated and non-treated plants by real time quantitative RT-PCR. Results CAD family genes were distributed in three classes based on sequence conservation. All the three classes are represented by seedless as well as seed plants, including the class of bona fide lignin pathway genes. The expression of some CAD/CAD-like genes that are not associated with xylem development were induced following herbivore damage in leaves, while other genes were induced in only bark or xylem tissues. Five of the CAD/CAD-like genes, however, showed a shift in expression from one tissue to another between non-treated and herbivore-treated plants. Systemic expression of the CAD/CAD-like genes was generally suppressed. Conclusions Our results indicated a correlation between the evolution of the CAD gene family and lignin and that the three classes of genes may have evolved in the ancestor of land plants. Our results also suggest that the CAD/CAD-like genes have evolved a diversity of expression profiles and potentially different functions, but that they are nonetheless co-regulated under stress conditions. PMID:20509918

  2. Developing Customized Dental Miniscrew Surgical Template from Thermoplastic Polymer Material Using Image Superimposition, CAD System, and 3D Printing

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jian-Hong; Lo, Lun-Jou; Hsu, Pin-Hsin

    2017-01-01

    This study integrates cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)/laser scan image superposition, computer-aided design (CAD), and 3D printing (3DP) to develop a technology for producing customized dental (orthodontic) miniscrew surgical templates using polymer material. Maxillary bone solid models with the bone and teeth reconstructed using CBCT images and teeth and mucosa outer profile acquired using laser scanning were superimposed to allow miniscrew visual insertion planning and permit surgical template fabrication. The customized surgical template CAD model was fabricated offset based on the teeth/mucosa/bracket contour profiles in the superimposition model and exported to duplicate the plastic template using the 3DP technique and polymer material. An anterior retraction and intrusion clinical test for the maxillary canines/incisors showed that two miniscrews were placed safely and did not produce inflammation or other discomfort symptoms one week after surgery. The fitness between the mucosa and template indicated that the average gap sizes were found smaller than 0.5 mm and confirmed that the surgical template presented good holding power and well-fitting adaption. This study addressed integrating CBCT and laser scan image superposition; CAD and 3DP techniques can be applied to fabricate an accurate customized surgical template for dental orthodontic miniscrews. PMID:28280726

  3. Different CAD/CAM-processing routes for zirconia restorations: influence on fitting accuracy.

    PubMed

    Kohorst, Philipp; Junghanns, Janet; Dittmer, Marc P; Borchers, Lothar; Stiesch, Meike

    2011-08-01

    The aim of the present in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of different processing routes on the fitting accuracy of four-unit zirconia fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) fabricated by computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM). Three groups of zirconia frameworks with ten specimens each were fabricated. Frameworks of one group (CerconCAM) were produced by means of a laboratory CAM-only system. The other frameworks were made with different CAD/CAM systems; on the one hand by in-laboratory production (CerconCAD/CAM) and on the other hand by centralized production in a milling center (Compartis) after forwarding geometrical data. Frameworks were then veneered with the recommended ceramics, and marginal accuracy was determined using a replica technique. Horizontal marginal discrepancy, vertical marginal discrepancy, absolute marginal discrepancy, and marginal gap were evaluated. Statistical analyses were performed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), with the level of significance chosen at 0.05. Mean horizontal discrepancies ranged between 22 μm (CerconCAM) and 58 μm (Compartis), vertical discrepancies ranged between 63 μm (CerconCAD/CAM) and 162 μm (CerconCAM), and absolute marginal discrepancies ranged between 94 μm (CerconCAD/CAM) and 181 μm (CerconCAM). The marginal gap varied between 72 μm (CerconCAD/CAM) and 112 μm (CerconCAM, Compartis). Statistical analysis revealed that, with all measurements, the marginal accuracy of the zirconia FDPs was significantly influenced by the processing route used (p < 0.05). Within the limitations of this study, all restorations showed a clinically acceptable marginal accuracy; however, the results suggest that the CAD/CAM systems are more precise than the CAM-only system for the manufacture of four-unit FDPs.

  4. Issues in assessing multi-institutional performance of BI-RADS-based CAD systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markey, Mia K.; Lo, Joseph Y.

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate factors that impact the generalization of breast cancer computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems that utilize the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS). Data sets from four institutions were analyzed: Duke University Medical Center, University of Pennsylvania Medical Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, and Wake Forest University. The latter two data sets are subsets of the Digital Database for Screening Mammography. Each data set consisted of descriptions of mammographic lesions according to the BI-RADS lexicon, patient age, and pathology status (benign/malignant). Models were developed to predict pathology status from the BI-RADS descriptors and the patient age. Comparisons between the models built on data from the different institutions were made in terms of empirical (non-parametric) receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Results suggest that BI-RADS-based CAD systems focused on specific classes of lesions may be more generally applicable than models that cover several lesion types. However, better generalization was seen in terms of the area under the ROC curve than in the partial area index (>90% sensitivity). Previous studies have illustrated the challenges in translating a BI-RADS-based CAD system from one institution to another. This study provides new insights into possible approaches to improve the generalization of BI-RADS-based CAD systems.

  5. Image-Based Macro-Micro Finite Element Models of a Canine Femur with Implant Design Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Somnath; Krishnan, Ganapathi; Dyce, Jonathan

    2006-06-01

    In this paper, a comprehensive model of a bone-cement-implant assembly is developed for a canine cemented femoral prosthesis system. Various steps in this development entail profiling the canine femur contours by computed tomography (CT) scanning, computer aided design (CAD) reconstruction of the canine femur from CT images, CAD modeling of the implant from implant blue prints and CAD modeling of the interface cement. Finite element analysis of the macroscopic assembly is conducted for stress analysis in individual components of the system, accounting for variation in density and material properties in the porous bone material. A sensitivity analysis is conducted with the macroscopic model to investigate the effect of implant design variables on the stress distribution in the assembly. Subsequently, rigorous microstructural analysis of the bone incorporating the morphological intricacies is conducted. Various steps in this development include acquisition of the bone microstructural data from histological serial sectioning, stacking of sections to obtain 3D renderings of void distributions, microstructural characterization and determination of properties and, finally, microstructural stress analysis using a 3D Voronoi cell finite element method. Generation of the simulated microstructure and analysis by the 3D Voronoi cell finite element model provides a new way of modeling complex microstructures and correlating to morphological characteristics. An inverse calculation of the material parameters of bone by combining macroscopic experiments with microstructural characterization and analysis provides a new approach to evaluating properties without having to do experiments at this scale. Finally, the microstructural stresses in the femur are computed using the 3D VCFEM to study the stress distribution at the scale of the bone porosity. Significant difference is observed between the macroscopic stresses and the peak microscopic stresses at different locations.

  6. Structural Insight into the Core of CAD, the Multifunctional Protein Leading De Novo Pyrimidine Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Morcillo, María; Grande-García, Araceli; Ruiz-Ramos, Alba; Del Caño-Ochoa, Francisco; Boskovic, Jasminka; Ramón-Maiques, Santiago

    2017-06-06

    CAD, the multifunctional protein initiating and controlling de novo biosynthesis of pyrimidines in animals, self-assembles into ∼1.5 MDa hexamers. The structures of the dihydroorotase (DHO) and aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATC) domains of human CAD have been previously determined, but we lack information on how these domains associate and interact with the rest of CAD forming a multienzymatic unit. Here, we prove that a construct covering human DHO and ATC oligomerizes as a dimer of trimers and that this arrangement is conserved in CAD-like from fungi, which holds an inactive DHO-like domain. The crystal structures of the ATC trimer and DHO-like dimer from the fungus Chaetomium thermophilum confirm the similarity with the human CAD homologs. These results demonstrate that, despite being inactive, the fungal DHO-like domain has a conserved structural function. We propose a model that sets the DHO and ATC complex as the central element in the architecture of CAD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Refining a brief decision aid in stable CAD: cognitive interviews.

    PubMed

    Kelly-Blake, Karen; Clark, Stacie; Dontje, Katherine; Olomu, Adesuwa; Henry, Rebecca C; Rovner, David R; Rothert, Marilyn L; Holmes-Rovner, Margaret

    2014-02-13

    We describe the results of cognitive interviews to refine the "Making Choices©" Decision Aid (DA) for shared decision-making (SDM) about stress testing in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD). We conducted a systematic development process to design a DA consistent with International Patient Decision Aid Standards (IPDAS) focused on Alpha testing criteria. Cognitive interviews were conducted with ten stable CAD patients using the "think aloud" interview technique to assess the clarity, usefulness, and design of each page of the DA. Participants identified three main messages: 1) patients have multiple options based on stress tests and they should be discussed with a physician, 2) take care of yourself, 3) the stress test is the gold standard for determining the severity of your heart disease. Revisions corrected the inaccurate assumption of item number three. Cognitive interviews proved critical for engaging patients in the development process and highlighted the necessity of clear message development and use of design principles that make decision materials easy to read and easy to use. Cognitive interviews appear to contribute critical information from the patient perspective to the overall systematic development process for designing decision aids.

  8. CAD-Based Modeling of Advanced Rotary Wing Structures for Integrated 3-D Aeromechanics Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staruk, William

    This dissertation describes the first comprehensive use of integrated 3-D aeromechanics modeling, defined as the coupling of 3-D solid finite element method (FEM) structural dynamics with 3-D computational fluid dynamics (CFD), for the analysis of a real helicopter rotor. The development of this new methodology (a departure from how rotor aeroelastic analysis has been performed for 40 years), its execution on a real rotor, and the fundamental understanding of aeromechanics gained from it, are the key contributions of this dissertation. This work also presents the first CFD/CSD analysis of a tiltrotor in edgewise flight, revealing many of its unique loading mechanisms. The use of 3-D FEM, integrated with a trim solver and aerodynamics modeling, has the potential to enhance the design of advanced rotors by overcoming fundamental limitations of current generation beam-based analysis tools and offering integrated internal dynamic stress and strain predictions for design. Two primary goals drove this research effort: 1) developing a methodology to create 3-D CAD-based brick finite element models of rotors including multibody joints, controls, and aerodynamic interfaces, and 2) refining X3D, the US Army's next generation rotor structural dynamics solver featuring 3-D FEM within a multibody formulation with integrated aerodynamics, to model a tiltrotor in the edgewise conversion flight regime, which drives critical proprotor structural loads. Prior tiltrotor analysis has primarily focused on hover aerodynamics with rigid blades or forward flight whirl-flutter stability with simplified aerodynamics. The first goal was met with the development of a detailed methodology for generating multibody 3-D structural models, starting from CAD geometry, continuing to higher-order hexahedral finite element meshing, to final assembly of the multibody model by creating joints, assigning material properties, and defining the aerodynamic interface. Several levels of verification and

  9. Reentry-Vehicle Shape Optimization Using a Cartesian Adjoint Method and CAD Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemec, Marian; Aftosmis, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    A DJOINT solutions of the governing flow equations are becoming increasingly important for the development of efficient analysis and optimization algorithms. A well-known use of the adjoint method is gradient-based shape. Given an objective function that defines some measure of performance, such as the lift and drag functionals, its gradient is computed at a cost that is essentially independent of the number of design variables (e.g., geometric parameters that control the shape). Classic aerodynamic applications of gradient-based optimization include the design of cruise configurations for transonic and supersonic flow, as well as the design of high-lift systems. are perhaps the most promising approach for addressing the issues of flow solution automation for aerodynamic design problems. In these methods, the discretization of the wetted surface is decoupled from that of the volume mesh. This not only enables fast and robust mesh generation for geometry of arbitrary complexity, but also facilitates access to geometry modeling and manipulation using parametric computer-aided design (CAD). In previous work on Cartesian adjoint solvers, Melvin et al. developed an adjoint formulation for the TRANAIR code, which is based on the full-potential equation with viscous corrections. More recently, Dadone and Grossman presented an adjoint formulation for the two-dimensional Euler equations using a ghost-cell method to enforce the wall boundary conditions. In Refs. 18 and 19, we presented an accurate and efficient algorithm for the solution of the adjoint Euler equations discretized on Cartesian meshes with embedded, cut-cell boundaries. Novel aspects of the algorithm were the computation of surface shape sensitivities for triangulations based on parametric-CAD models and the linearization of the coupling between the surface triangulation and the cut-cells. The accuracy of the gradient computation was verified using several three-dimensional test cases, which included design

  10. Design Models for the Development of Helium-Carbon Sorption Crycoolers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindensmith, C. A.; Ahart, M.; Bhandari, P.; Wade, L. A.; Paine, C. G.

    2000-01-01

    We have developed models for predicting the performance of helium-based Joule-Thomson continuous-flow cryocoolers using charcoal-pumped sorption compressors. The models take as inputs the number of compressors, desired heat-lift, cold tip temperature, and available precooling temperature and provide design parameters as outputs. Future laboratory development will be used to verify and improve the models. We will present a preliminary design for a two-stage vibration-free cryocooler that is being proposed as part of a mid-infrared camera on NASA's Next Generation Space Telescope. Model predictions show that a 10 mW helium-carbon cryocooler with a base temperature of 5.5 K will reject less than 650 mW at 18 K. The total input power to the helium-carbon stage is 650 mW. These models, which run in MathCad and Microsoft Excel, can be coupled to similar models for hydrogen sorption coolers to give designs for 2-stage vibration-free cryocoolers that provide cooling from approx. 50 K to 4 K.

  11. Design Models for the Development of Helium-Carbon Sorption Cryocoolers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindensmith, Chris A.; Ahart, M.; Bhandari, P.; Wade, L. A.; Paine, C. G.

    2000-01-01

    We have developed models for predicting the performance of helium-based Joule-Thomson continuous-flow cryocoolers using charcoal-pumped sorption compressors. The models take as inputs the number of compressors, desired heat-lift, cold tip temperature, and available precooling temperature and provide design parameters as outputs. Future laboratory development will be used to verify and improve the models. We will present a preliminary design for a two-stage vibration-free cryocooler that is being proposed as part of a mid-infrared camera on NASA's Next Generation Space Telescope. Model predictions show that a 10 mW helium-carbon cryocooler with a base temperature of 5.5 K will reject less than 650 mW at 18 K. The total input power to the helium-carbon stage is 650 mW. These models, which run in MathCad and Microsoft Excel, can be coupled to similar models for hydrogen sorption coolers to give designs for 2-stage vibration-free cryocoolers that provide cooling from approximately 50 K to 4 K.

  12. The Challenging Academic Development (CAD) Collective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peseta, Tai

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses the Challenging Academic Development (CAD) Collective and describes how it came out of a symposium called "Liminality, identity, and hybridity: On the promise of new conceptual frameworks for theorising academic/faculty development." The CAD Collective is and represents a space where people can open up their…

  13. A method of computer aided design with self-generative models in NX Siemens environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabowik, C.; Kalinowski, K.; Kempa, W.; Paprocka, I.

    2015-11-01

    Currently in CAD/CAE/CAM systems it is possible to create 3D design virtual models which are able to capture certain amount of knowledge. These models are especially useful in an automation of routine design tasks. These models are known as self-generative or auto generative and they can behave in an intelligent way. The main difference between the auto generative and fully parametric models consists in the auto generative models ability to self-organizing. In this case design model self-organizing means that aside from the possibility of making of automatic changes of model quantitative features these models possess knowledge how these changes should be made. Moreover they are able to change quality features according to specific knowledge. In spite of undoubted good points of self-generative models they are not so often used in design constructional process which is mainly caused by usually great complexity of these models. This complexity makes the process of self-generative time and labour consuming. It also needs a quite great investment outlays. The creation process of self-generative model consists of the three stages it is knowledge and information acquisition, model type selection and model implementation. In this paper methods of the computer aided design with self-generative models in NX Siemens CAD/CAE/CAM software are presented. There are the five methods of self-generative models preparation in NX with: parametric relations model, part families, GRIP language application, knowledge fusion and OPEN API mechanism. In the paper examples of each type of the self-generative model are presented. These methods make the constructional design process much faster. It is suggested to prepare this kind of self-generative models when there is a need of design variants creation. The conducted research on assessing the usefulness of elaborated models showed that they are highly recommended in case of routine tasks automation. But it is still difficult to distinguish

  14. Marginal fit of all-ceramic crowns fabricated using two extraoral CAD/CAM systems in comparison with the conventional technique.

    PubMed

    Alqahtani, Fawaz

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of two extraoral computer-aided design (CAD) and computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) systems, in comparison with conventional techniques, on the marginal fit of monolithic CAD/CAM lithium disilicate ceramic crowns. This is an in vitro interventional study. The study was carried out at the Department of Prosthodontics, School of Dentistry, Prince Sattam Bin Abdul-Aziz University, Saudi Arabia, from December 2015 to April 2016. A marginal gap of 60 lithium disilicate crowns was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy. In total, 20 pressable lithium disilicate (IPS e.max Press [Ivoclar Vivadent]) ceramic crowns were fabricated using the conventional lost-wax technique as a control group. The experimental all-ceramic crowns were produced based on a scan stone model and milled using two extraoral CAD/CAM systems: the Cerec group was fabricated using the Cerec CAD/CAM system, and the Trios group was fabricated using Trios CAD and milled using Wieland Zenotec CAM. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Scheffe post hoc test were used for statistical comparison of the groups (α=0.05). The mean (±standard deviation) of the marginal gap of each group was as follows: the Control group was 91.15 (±15.35) µm, the Cerec group was 111.07 (±6.33) µm, and the Trios group was 60.17 (±11.09) µm. One-way ANOVA and the Scheffe post hoc test showed a statistically significant difference in the marginal gap between all groups. It can be concluded from the current study that all-ceramic crowns, fabricated using the CAD/CAM system, show a marginal accuracy that is acceptable in clinical environments. The Trios CAD group displayed the smallest marginal gap.

  15. JAMSTEC Compact Arctic Drifter (J-CAD): A new Generation drifting buoy to observe the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatakeyama, Kiyoshi; Hosono, Masuo; Shimada, Koji; Kikuchi, Takashi; Nishino, Shigeto

    The Arctic Ocean is one of the most sensitive regions to the earth environment changes. Japan Marine Science and Technology Center developed a new drift buoy to observe the Arctic Ocean. The name of the buoy is J-CAD (JAMSTEC Compact Arctic Drifter). From 1991 to 1993, JAMSTEC developed Ice-Ocean Environmental Buoy (IOEB) as a buoy to observe the Arctic Ocean in cooperation with Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. The J-CAD is the buoy, which adopted the latest technology based on the knowledge and experience of IOEB development. The J-CAD was designed and developed by JAMSTEC and made by a Canadian Company MetOcean. JAMSTEC did design and development, and a Canadian company Met-Ocean made the J-CAD. It acquires meteorological and oceanographic data of the Arctic Ocean, and transmits the data that it measured via satellite. It dose also store the data inside its memory. An Inductive Modem system, which was developed by Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc. in the United States, was adopted in the underwater transmission system that data on each ocean sensor were collected. An ORBCOMM communication system was adopted for the satellite data transmission. J-CAD-1 was installed at 89°41'N 130°20'W on April 24, 2000, and the observation was started. August 1st was the day when 100 days have passed since the J-CAD-1 was installed on the North Pole. And now, the distance J-CAD-1 has covered exceeds 400 km, and it has transmitted data more than 500 k byte. A part of the data is introduced to the public in the homepage (http://w3.jamstec.go.jp: 8338) of the Arctic research group of JAMSTEC.

  16. Marginal Fit Comparison of CAD/CAM Crowns Milled from Two Different Materials.

    PubMed

    Azarbal, Atousa; Azarbal, Mohsen; Engelmeier, Robert L; Kunkel, Thomas C

    2018-06-01

    To evaluate the marginal fit of CAD/CAM copings milled from hybrid ceramic (Vita Enamic) blocks and lithium disilicate (IPS e.max CAD) blocks, and to evaluate the effect of crystallization firing on the marginal fit of lithium disilicate copings. A standardized metal die with a 1-mm-wide shoulder finish line was imaged using the CEREC AC Bluecam. The coping was designed using CEREC 3 software. The design was used to fabricate 15 lithium disilicate and 15 hybrid ceramic copings. Design and milling were accomplished by one operator. The copings were seated on the metal die using a pressure clamp with a uniform pressure of 5.5 lbs. A Macroview Microscope (14×) was used for direct viewing of the marginal gap. Four areas were imaged on each coping (buccal, distal, lingual, mesial). Image analysis software was used to measure the marginal gaps in μm at 15 randomly selected points on each of the four surfaces. A total of 60 measurements were made per specimen. For lithium disilicate copings the measurements for marginal gap were made before and after crystallization firing. Data were analyzed using paired t-test and Kruskal-Wallis test. The overall mean difference in marginal gap between the hybrid ceramic and crystallized lithium disilicate copings was statistically significant (p < 0.01). Greater mean marginal gaps were measured for crystallized lithium disilicate copings. The overall mean difference in marginal gap before and after firing (precrystallized and crystallized lithium disilicate copings) showed an average of 62 μm increase in marginal gap after firing. This difference was also significant (p < 0.01). A significant difference exists in the marginal gap discrepancy when comparing hybrid ceramic and lithium disilicate CAD/CAM crowns. Also crystallization firing can result in a significant increase in the marginal gap of lithium disilicate CAD/CAM crowns. © 2017 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  17. Digital impression and jaw relation record for the fabrication of CAD/CAM custom tray.

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Manabu; Iwaki, Maiko; Arakida, Toshio; Minakuchi, Shunsuke

    2018-03-16

    This article describes the protocol of a digital impression technique to make an impression and recording of the jaw relationship of edentulous patients for the fabrication of CAD/CAM custom tray using computer-aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology. Scan the maxillary and mandibular edentulous jaws using an intraoral scanner. Scan the silicone jig with the maxillary and mandibular jaws while keeping the jig between the jaws. Import the standard tessellation language data of the maxillary and mandibular jaws and jig to make a jaw relation record and fabricate custom trays (CAD/CAM trays) using a rapid prototyping system. Make a definitive impression of the maxillary and mandibular jaws using the CAD/CAM trays. Digitalization of the complete denture fabrication process can simplify the complicated treatment and laboratory process of conventional methods In addition, the proposed method enables quality control regardless of the operator's experience and technique. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. IFEMS, an Interactive Finite Element Modeling System Using a CAD/CAM System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckellip, S.; Schuman, T.; Lauer, S.

    1980-01-01

    A method of coupling a CAD/CAM system with a general purpose finite element mesh generator is described. The three computer programs which make up the interactive finite element graphics system are discussed.

  19. CAD/CAM produces dentures with improved fit.

    PubMed

    Steinmassl, Otto; Dumfahrt, Herbert; Grunert, Ingrid; Steinmassl, Patricia-Anca

    2018-02-22

    Resin polymerisation shrinkage reduces the congruence of the denture base with denture-bearing tissues and thereby decreases the retention of conventionally fabricated dentures. CAD/CAM denture manufacturing is a subtractive process, and polymerisation shrinkage is not an issue anymore. Therefore, CAD/CAM dentures are assumed to show a higher denture base congruence than conventionally fabricated dentures. It has been the aim of this study to test this hypothesis. CAD/CAM dentures provided by four different manufacturers (AvaDent, Merz Dental, Whole You, Wieland/Ivoclar) were generated from ten different master casts. Ten conventional dentures (pack and press, long-term heat polymerisation) made from the same master casts served as control group. The master casts and all denture bases were scanned and matched digitally. The absolute incongruences were measured using a 2-mm mesh. Conventionally fabricated dentures showed a mean deviation of 0.105 mm, SD = 0.019 from the master cast. All CAD/CAM dentures showed lower mean incongruences. From all CAD/CAM dentures, AvaDent Digital Dentures showed the highest congruence with the master cast surface with a mean deviation of 0.058 mm, SD = 0.005. Wieland Digital Dentures showed a mean deviation of 0.068 mm, SD = 0.005, Whole You Nexteeth prostheses showed a mean deviation of 0.074 mm, SD = 0.011 and Baltic Denture System prostheses showed a mean deviation of 0.086 mm, SD = 0.012. CAD/CAM produces dentures with better fit than conventional dentures. The present study explains the clinically observed enhanced retention and lower traumatic ulcer-frequency in CAD/CAM dentures.

  20. CAD/CAM at a Distance: Assessing the Effectiveness of Web-Based Instruction To Meet Workforce Development Needs. AIR 2000 Annual Forum Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkerson, Joyce A.; Elkins, Susan A.

    This qualitative case study assessed web-based instruction in a computer-aided design/computer-assisted manufacturing (CAD/CAM) course designed for workforce development. The study examined students' and instructors' experience in a CAD/CAM course delivered exclusively on the Internet, evaluating course content and delivery, clarity of…

  1. Accuracy of computer-aided design models of the jaws produced using ultra-low MDCT doses and ASIR and MBIR.

    PubMed

    Al-Ekrish, Asma'a A; Alfadda, Sara A; Ameen, Wadea; Hörmann, Romed; Puelacher, Wolfgang; Widmann, Gerlig

    2018-06-16

    To compare the surface of computer-aided design (CAD) models of the maxilla produced using ultra-low MDCT doses combined with filtered backprojection (FBP), adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) and model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) reconstruction techniques with that produced from a standard dose/FBP protocol. A cadaveric completely edentulous maxilla was imaged using a standard dose protocol (CTDIvol: 29.4 mGy) and FBP, in addition to 5 low dose test protocols (LD1-5) (CTDIvol: 4.19, 2.64, 0.99, 0.53, and 0.29 mGy) reconstructed with FBP, ASIR 50, ASIR 100, and MBIR. A CAD model from each test protocol was superimposed onto the reference model using the 'Best Fit Alignment' function. Differences between the test and reference models were analyzed as maximum and mean deviations, and root-mean-square of the deviations, and color-coded models were obtained which demonstrated the location, magnitude and direction of the deviations. Based upon the magnitude, size, and distribution of areas of deviations, CAD models from the following protocols were comparable to the reference model: FBP/LD1; ASIR 50/LD1 and LD2; ASIR 100/LD1, LD2, and LD3; MBIR/LD1. The following protocols demonstrated deviations mostly between 1-2 mm or under 1 mm but over large areas, and so their effect on surgical guide accuracy is questionable: FBP/LD2; MBIR/LD2, LD3, LD4, and LD5. The following protocols demonstrated large deviations over large areas and therefore were not comparable to the reference model: FBP/LD3, LD4, and LD5; ASIR 50/LD3, LD4, and LD5; ASIR 100/LD4, and LD5. When MDCT is used for CAD models of the jaws, dose reductions of 86% may be possible with FBP, 91% with ASIR 50, and 97% with ASIR 100. Analysis of the stability and accuracy of CAD/CAM surgical guides as directly related to the jaws is needed to confirm the results.

  2. An image database management system for conducting CAD research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruszauskas, Nicholas; Drukker, Karen; Giger, Maryellen L.

    2007-03-01

    The development of image databases for CAD research is not a trivial task. The collection and management of images and their related metadata from multiple sources is a time-consuming but necessary process. By standardizing and centralizing the methods in which these data are maintained, one can generate subsets of a larger database that match the specific criteria needed for a particular research project in a quick and efficient manner. A research-oriented management system of this type is highly desirable in a multi-modality CAD research environment. An online, webbased database system for the storage and management of research-specific medical image metadata was designed for use with four modalities of breast imaging: screen-film mammography, full-field digital mammography, breast ultrasound and breast MRI. The system was designed to consolidate data from multiple clinical sources and provide the user with the ability to anonymize the data. Input concerning the type of data to be stored as well as desired searchable parameters was solicited from researchers in each modality. The backbone of the database was created using MySQL. A robust and easy-to-use interface for entering, removing, modifying and searching information in the database was created using HTML and PHP. This standardized system can be accessed using any modern web-browsing software and is fundamental for our various research projects on computer-aided detection, diagnosis, cancer risk assessment, multimodality lesion assessment, and prognosis. Our CAD database system stores large amounts of research-related metadata and successfully generates subsets of cases that match the user's desired search criteria.

  3. Computer modeling of occlusal surfaces of posterior teeth with the CICERO CAD/CAM system.

    PubMed

    Olthoff, L W; Van Der Zel, J M; De Ruiter, W J; Vlaar, S T; Bosman, F

    2000-08-01

    Static and dynamic occlusal interference frequently needs to be corrected by selective grinding of the occlusal surface of conventional cast and ceramic-fused-to-metal restorations. CAD/CAM techniques allow control of the dimensional contours of these restorations. However, parameters responsible for the occlusal form need to be determined. In most articulators, these parameters are set as default values. Which technique is best for minimizing the introduction of occlusal interference in restorations has not been determined. This study investigated differences in crown structure of a crown designed in static occlusion (STA) with designs adapted for dynamic occlusal interferences. Therefore, values from an optoelectronic registration system (String-Condylocomp, KAVO), an occlusal generated path (OGP) technique and default settings (DEF) were used in the CICERO CAD/CAM system. Morphology of CON, DEF, and OGP crowns was compared with that of the STA crown with respect to differences in a buccolingual section and frequency of occlusal distances in an interocclusal range of 1 mm, measured from the occlusal surface of the crown. All crown types fulfilled the esthetic and morphologic criteria for restorations in clinical dentistry. Difference in the morphology of the OGP crown, compared with that of the STA crown, was greater than that for the CON and DEF crowns. These differences were seen especially in the distobuccal part of the occlusal surface; however, the number of occlusal contacts was considered sufficient to stabilize occlusion. Functional occlusion, adapted to dynamic occlusion in a CICERO crown for the first mandibular molar, can be obtained using data acquired with the String-Condylocomp registration system. The OGP technique was preferred to other techniques because of the simplicity of the technique for eliminating potential problems with opposing teeth during motion. However, this is achieved at the cost of fewer points of contact during occlusion than

  4. Geometry Modeling and Grid Generation for Design and Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samareh, Jamshid A.

    1998-01-01

    Geometry modeling and grid generation (GMGG) have played and will continue to play an important role in computational aerosciences. During the past two decades, tremendous progress has occurred in GMGG; however, GMGG is still the biggest bottleneck to routine applications for complicated Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and Computational Structures Mechanics (CSM) models for analysis, design, and optimization. We are still far from incorporating GMGG tools in a design and optimization environment for complicated configurations. It is still a challenging task to parameterize an existing model in today's Computer-Aided Design (CAD) systems, and the models created are not always good enough for automatic grid generation tools. Designers may believe their models are complete and accurate, but unseen imperfections (e.g., gaps, unwanted wiggles, free edges, slivers, and transition cracks) often cause problems in gridding for CSM and CFD. Despite many advances in grid generation, the process is still the most labor-intensive and time-consuming part of the computational aerosciences for analysis, design, and optimization. In an ideal design environment, a design engineer would use a parametric model to evaluate alternative designs effortlessly and optimize an existing design for a new set of design objectives and constraints. For this ideal environment to be realized, the GMGG tools must have the following characteristics: (1) be automated, (2) provide consistent geometry across all disciplines, (3) be parametric, and (4) provide sensitivity derivatives. This paper will review the status of GMGG for analysis, design, and optimization processes, and it will focus on some emerging ideas that will advance the GMGG toward the ideal design environment.

  5. Marginal fit and photoelastic stress analysis of CAD-CAM and overcast 3-unit implant-supported frameworks.

    PubMed

    Presotto, Anna Gabriella Camacho; Bhering, Cláudia Lopes Brilhante; Mesquita, Marcelo Ferraz; Barão, Valentim Adelino Ricardo

    2017-03-01

    Several studies have shown the superiority of computer-assisted design and computer-assisted manufacturing (CAD-CAM) technology compared with conventional casting. However, an advanced technology exists for casting procedures (the overcasting technique), which may serve as an acceptable and affordable alternative to CAD-CAM technology for fabricating 3-unit implant-supported fixed dental prostheses (FDPs). The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate, using quantitative photoelastic analysis, the effect of the prosthetic framework fabrication method (CAD-CAM and overcasting) on the marginal fit and stress transmitted to implants. The correlation between marginal fit and stress was also investigated. Three-unit implant-supported FDP frameworks were made using the CAD-CAM (n=10) and overcasting (n=10) methods. The frameworks were waxed to simulate a mandibular first premolar (PM region) to first molar (M region) FDP using overcast mini-abutment cylinders. The wax patterns were overcast (overcast experimental group) or scanned to obtain the frameworks (CAD-CAM control group). All frameworks were fabricated from cobalt-chromium (CoCr) alloy. The marginal fit was analyzed according to the single-screw test protocol, obtaining an average value for each region (M and PM) and each framework. The frameworks were tightened for the photoelastic model with standardized 10-Ncm torque. Stress was measured by quantitative photoelastic analysis. The results were submitted to the Student t test, 2-way ANOVA, and Pearson correlation test (α=.05). The framework fabrication method (FM) and evaluation site (ES; M and PM regions) did not affect the marginal fit values (P=.559 for FM and P=.065 for ES) and stress (P=.685 for FM and P=.468 for ES) in the implant-supported system. Positive correlations between marginal fit and stress were observed (CAD-CAM: r=0.922; P<.001; overcast: r=0.908; P<.001). CAD-CAM and overcasting methods present similar marginal fit and stress values

  6. Computer-aided design development transition for IPAD environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, H. G.; Mock, W. D.; Mitchell, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    The relationship of federally sponsored computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) programs to the aircraft life cycle design process, an overview of NAAD'S CAD development program, an evaluation of the CAD design process, a discussion of the current computing environment within which NAAD is developing its CAD system, some of the advantages/disadvantages of the NAAD-IPAD approach, and CAD developments during transition into the IPAD system are discussed.

  7. Industry Supplied CAD Curriculum: Case Study on Passing Certification Exams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, Rustin; Dues, Joseph; Ottway, Rudy

    2017-01-01

    Students who successfully pass professional certification exams while in school are often targeted first by industry for internships and entry level positions. Over the last decade, leading industry suppliers of computer-aided design (CAD) software have developed and launched certification exams for many of their product offerings. Some have also…

  8. CAD/CAM/CNC.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Domermuth, Dave; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Includes "Quick Start CNC (computer numerical control) with a Vacuum Filter and Laminated Plastic" (Domermuth); "School and Industry Cooperate for Mutual Benefit" (Buckler); and "CAD (computer-assisted drafting) Careers--What Professionals Have to Say" (Skinner). (JOW)

  9. MEMS 3-DoF gyroscope design, modeling and simulation through equivalent circuit lumped parameter model

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Mian, Muhammad Umer, E-mail: umermian@gmail.com; Khir, M. H. Md.; Tang, T. B.

    Pre-fabrication, behavioural and performance analysis with computer aided design (CAD) tools is a common and fabrication cost effective practice. In light of this we present a simulation methodology for a dual-mass oscillator based 3 Degree of Freedom (3-DoF) MEMS gyroscope. 3-DoF Gyroscope is modeled through lumped parameter models using equivalent circuit elements. These equivalent circuits consist of elementary components which are counterpart of their respective mechanical components, used to design and fabricate 3-DoF MEMS gyroscope. Complete designing of equivalent circuit model, mathematical modeling and simulation are being presented in this paper. Behaviors of the equivalent lumped models derived for themore » proposed device design are simulated in MEMSPRO T-SPICE software. Simulations are carried out with the design specifications following design rules of the MetalMUMPS fabrication process. Drive mass resonant frequencies simulated by this technique are 1.59 kHz and 2.05 kHz respectively, which are close to the resonant frequencies found by the analytical formulation of the gyroscope. The lumped equivalent circuit modeling technique proved to be a time efficient modeling technique for the analysis of complex MEMS devices like 3-DoF gyroscopes. The technique proves to be an alternative approach to the complex and time consuming couple field analysis Finite Element Analysis (FEA) previously used.« less

  10. Concerns of Hydrothermal Degradation in CAD/CAM Zirconia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, J.-W.; Covel, N.S.; Guess, P.C.; Rekow, E.D.; Zhang, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Zirconia-based restorations are widely used in prosthetic dentistry; however, their susceptibility to hydrothermal degradation remains elusive. We hypothesized that CAD/CAM machining and subsequent surface treatments, i.e., grinding and/or grit-blasting, have marked effects on the hydrothermal degradation behavior of Y-TZP. CAD/CAM-machined Y-TZP plates (0.5 mm thick), both with and without subsequent grinding with various grit sizes or grit-blasting with airborne alumina particles, were subjected to accelerated aging tests in a steam autoclave. Results showed that the CAD/CAM-machined surfaces initially exhibited superior hydrothermal degradation resistance, but deteriorated at a faster rate upon prolonged autoclave treatment compared with ground and grit-blasted surfaces. The accelerated hydrothermal degradation of CAD/CAM surfaces is attributed to the CAD/CAM machining damage and the absence of surface compressive stresses in the fully sintered material. Clinical relevance for surface treatments of zirconia frameworks in terms of hydrothermal and structural stabilities is addressed. PMID:19966039

  11. Effect of the Crystallization Process on the Marginal and Internal Gaps of Lithium Disilicate CAD/CAM Crowns.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Hong; Oh, Seunghan; Uhm, Soo-Hyuk

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to quantify the effect of the crystallization process on lithium disilicate ceramic crowns fabricated using a computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) system and to determine whether the effect of crystallization is clinically acceptable by comparing values of fit before and after the crystallization process. The mandibular right first molar was selected as the abutment for the experiments. Fifteen working models were prepared. Lithium disilicate crowns appropriate for each abutment were prepared using a commercial CAD/CAM system. Gaps in the marginal area and 4 internal areas of each crown were measured twice-before and after crystallization-using the silicone replica technique. The mean values of fit before and after crystallization were analyzed using a paired t-test to examine whether the conversion that occurred during crystallization affected marginal and internal gaps (α = 0.05). Gaps increased in the marginal area and decreased in the internal areas after crystallization. There were statistically significant differences in all of the investigated areas (P < 0.05). None of the values for marginal and internal fit of lithium disilicate CAD/CAM crowns after crystallization exceeded 120 μm, which is the clinically acceptable threshold.

  12. Incidence of undetected cement on CAD/CAM monolithic zirconia crowns and customized CAD/CAM implant abutments. A prospective case series.

    PubMed

    Wasiluk, Grzegorz; Chomik, Ewa; Gehrke, Peter; Pietruska, Małgorzata; Skurska, Anna; Pietruski, Jan

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the frequency of cement residues after cementation of CAD/CAM monolithic zirconia crowns on customized CAD/CAM titanium abutments. Sixty premolars and molars were restored on Astra Tech Osseospeed TX ™ implants using single monolithic zirconia crowns fixed on two types of custom-made abutments: Atlantis ™ titanium or Atlantis ™ Gold Hue. Occlusal openings providing access to the abutment screws were designed for retrievability of the crown/abutment connection. After fixation with glass ionomer cement, the crown/abutment units were unscrewed to evaluate the presence of residual cement. Dichotomous assessment of the presence or absence of cement at the crown/abutment unit and peri-implant tissues was performed. Clinically undetected cement excess was visible on 44 of 60 restorations (73.3%). There was no interdependency between residual cement presence and implant location or diameter. However, a dependency between the presence of residual cement and the aspect of the abutment/crown connection could be noted. The majority of the residues were observed on the distal (17.9%) and mesial (15%) aspects. While on the palatal/lingual aspect, the cement was visible in 8.8%; only 3.4% of all surfaces displayed cement residues. Within the limitations of the study, it can be concluded that the use of customized CAD/CAM abutments do not guarantee avoidance of subgingival cement residues after crown cementation. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. A voxel visualization and analysis system based on AutoCAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marschallinger, Robert

    1996-05-01

    A collection of AutoLISP programs is presented which enable the visualization and analysis of voxel models by AutoCAD rel. 12/rel. 13. The programs serve as an interactive, graphical front end for manipulating the results of three-dimensional modeling software producing block estimation data. ASCII data files describing geometry and attributes per estimation block are imported and stored as a voxel array. Each voxel may contain multiple attributes, therefore different parameters may be incorporated in one voxel array. Voxel classification is implemented on a layer basis providing flexible treatment of voxel classes such as recoloring, peeling, or volumetry. A versatile clipping tool enables slicing voxel arrays according to combinations of three perpendicular clipping planes. The programs feature an up-to-date, graphical user interface for user-friendly operation by non AutoCAD specialists.

  14. Performance and value of CAD-deficient pine- Final Report

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Bailian Li; Houmin Chang; Hasan Jameel

    2007-02-28

    The southern US produces 58% of the nation's timber, much of it grown in intensively managed plantations of genetically improved loblolly pine. One of the fastest-growing loblolly pine selections made by the NCSU-Industry Cooperative Tree Improvement Program, whose progeny are widely planted, is also the only known natural carrier of a rare gene, cadn1. This allele codes for deficiency in an enzyme, cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase, which catalyzes the last step in the biosynthesis of lignin precursors. This study is to characterize this candidate gene for marker-assisted selection and deployment in the breeding program. This research will enhance the sustainability ofmore » forest production in the South, where land-use pressures will limit the total area available in the future for intensively managed plantations. Furthermore, this research will provide information to establish higher-value plantation forests with more desirable wood/fiber quality traits. A rare mutant allele (cad-n1) of the cad gene in loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) causes a deficiency in the production of cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD). The effects of this allele were examined by comparing wood density and growth traits of cad-n1 heterozygous trees with those of wild-type trees in a 10-year-old open-pollinated family trial growing under two levels of fertilization in Scotland County, North Carolina. In all, 200 trees were sampled with 100 trees for each treatment. Wood density measurements were collected from wood cores at breast height using x-ray densitometry. We found that the substitution of cad-n1 for a wild-type allele (Cad) was associated with a significant effect on wood density. The cad-n1 heterozygotes had a significantly higher wood density (+2.6%) compared to wild-type trees. The higher density was apparently due to the higher percentage of latewood in the heterozygotes. The fertilization effect was highly significant for both growth and wood density traits. While no cad

  15. Color change of CAD-CAM materials and composite resin cements after thermocycling.

    PubMed

    Gürdal, Isil; Atay, Ayse; Eichberger, Marlis; Cal, Ebru; Üsümez, Aslihan; Stawarczyk, Bogna

    2018-04-24

    The color of resin cements and computer-aided-design and computer-aided-manufacturing (CAD-CAM) restorations may change with aging. The purpose of this in vitro study was to analyze the influence of thermocycling on the color of CAD-CAM materials with underlying resin cement. Seven different CAD-CAM materials, composite resins and glass-ceramics were cut into 0.7-mm and 1.2-mm thicknesses (n=10) and cemented with a dual-polymerizing resin cement, a light-polymerizing resin cement, and a preheated composite resin (N=420). Color values were measured by using spectrophotometry. Specimens were subjected to thermocycling (5°C and 55°C; 5000 cycles). The measured color difference (ΔE) data were analyzed by using descriptive statistics. Normality of data distribution was tested by using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Three-way and 1-way ANOVA followed by the Scheffé post-hoc test and unpaired 2-sample Student t test were computed to determine the significant differences among the tested parameters (α=.05). ΔE values were significantly influenced by the CAD-CAM material (η p 2 =0.85, P<.001) and the resin composite cement (η P 2 =0.03, P=.003) but were not influenced by thickness (P=.179). Significant interactions were present among thickness, cement, and CAD-CAM materials (P<.001). Vita Suprinity and GC Cerasmart showed significantly the lowest ΔE values (P<.001). The highest ΔE values were observed for IPS Empress CAD. The dual-polymerizing resin cement showed significantly lower ΔE values than the preheated composite resin (P=.003). Restoration materials and composite resin cement types used for cementation influence the amount of color change due to aging. Copyright © 2018 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Model building techniques for analysis.

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Walther, Howard P.; McDaniel, Karen Lynn; Keener, Donald

    2009-09-01

    The practice of mechanical engineering for product development has evolved into a complex activity that requires a team of specialists for success. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has product engineers, mechanical designers, design engineers, manufacturing engineers, mechanical analysts and experimentalists, qualification engineers, and others that contribute through product realization teams to develop new mechanical hardware. The goal of SNL's Design Group is to change product development by enabling design teams to collaborate within a virtual model-based environment whereby analysis is used to guide design decisions. Computer-aided design (CAD) models using PTC's Pro/ENGINEER software tools are heavily relied upon in the productmore » definition stage of parts and assemblies at SNL. The three-dimensional CAD solid model acts as the design solid model that is filled with all of the detailed design definition needed to manufacture the parts. Analysis is an important part of the product development process. The CAD design solid model (DSM) is the foundation for the creation of the analysis solid model (ASM). Creating an ASM from the DSM currently is a time-consuming effort; the turnaround time for results of a design needs to be decreased to have an impact on the overall product development. This effort can be decreased immensely through simple Pro/ENGINEER modeling techniques that summarize to the method features are created in a part model. This document contains recommended modeling techniques that increase the efficiency of the creation of the ASM from the DSM.« less

  17. Precision of a CAD/CAM technique for the production of zirconium dioxide copings.

    PubMed

    Coli, Pierluigi; Karlsson, Stig

    2004-01-01

    The precision of a computer-aided design/manufacturing (CAD/CAM) system to manufacture zirconium dioxide copings with a predetermined internal space was investigated. Two master models were produced in acrylic resin. One was directly scanned by the Decim Reader. The Decim Producer then manufactured 10 copings from prefabricated zirconium dioxide blocks. Five copings were prepared, aiming for an internal space to the master of 45 microm. The other five copings were prepared for an internal space of 90 microm. The second test model was used to try in the copings produced. The obtained internal space of the ceramic copings was evaluated by separate measurements of the master models and inner surfaces of the copings. The master models were measured at predetermined points with an optical instrument. The zirconium dioxide copings were measured with a contact instrument at the corresponding sites measured in the masters. The first group of copings had a mean internal space to the scanned master of 41 microm and of 53 microm to the try-in master. In general, the internal space along the axial walls of the masters was smaller than that along the occlusal walls. The second group had a mean internal space of 82 microm to the scanned master and of 90 microm to the try-in master. The aimed-for internal space of the copings was achieved by the manufacturer. The CAD/CAM technique tested provided high precision in the manufacture of zirconium dioxide copings.

  18. A comparison of marginal fit between press-fabricated and CAD/CAM lithium disilicate crowns.

    PubMed

    Carlile, Richard S; Owens, Wade H; Greenwood, William J; Guevara, Peter H

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the marginal fit of press-fabricated lithium disilicate crowns with that of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) lithium disilicate crowns to determine if the fabrication method has an influence on marginal fit. The marginal fit of 25 pressed and 25 CAD/CAM crowns was measured using the replica technique. The sites measured were the mesial, distal, facial, and lingual margins. A microscope at 10× magnification was used to obtain the measurements. Each site was measured 4 times, and intraclass correlation coefficients were used to assess measurement errors. An unpaired t test was used to evaluate the differences between the 2 groups. Mean marginal gap measurements were greater for CAD/CAM crowns than for pressed crowns at all sites. Only the difference in mean gap at the facial margin was statistically significant (P < 0.001). Press-fabricated lithium disilicate crowns provided a better marginal fit than those fabricated by CAD/CAM, but both fabrication methods provided crowns with a clinically acceptable marginal fit.

  19. A concurrent computer aided detection (CAD) tool for articular cartilage disease of the knee on MR imaging using active shape models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishna, Bharath; Saiprasad, Ganesh; Safdar, Nabile; Siddiqui, Khan; Chang, Chein-I.; Siegel, Eliot

    2008-03-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis and a major cause of morbidity affecting millions of adults in the US and world wide. In the knee, OA begins with the degeneration of joint articular cartilage, eventually resulting in the femur and tibia coming in contact, and leading to severe pain and stiffness. There has been extensive research examining 3D MR imaging sequences and automatic/semi-automatic techniques for 2D/3D articular cartilage extraction. However, in routine clinical practice the most popular technique still remain radiographic examination and qualitative assessment of the joint space. This may be in large part because of a lack of tools that can provide clinically relevant diagnosis in adjunct (in near real time fashion) with the radiologist and which can serve the needs of the radiologists and reduce inter-observer variation. Our work aims to fill this void by developing a CAD application that can generate clinically relevant diagnosis of the articular cartilage damage in near real time fashion. The algorithm features a 2D Active Shape Model (ASM) for modeling the bone-cartilage interface on all the slices of a Double Echo Steady State (DESS) MR sequence, followed by measurement of the cartilage thickness from the surface of the bone, and finally by the identification of regions of abnormal thinness and focal/degenerative lesions. A preliminary evaluation of CAD tool was carried out on 10 cases taken from the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI) database. When compared with 2 board-certified musculoskeletal radiologists, the automatic CAD application was able to get segmentation/thickness maps in little over 60 seconds for all of the cases. This observation poses interesting possibilities for increasing radiologist productivity and confidence, improving patient outcomes, and applying more sophisticated CAD algorithms to routine orthopedic imaging tasks.

  20. Comparison between five CAD/CAM systems for fit of zirconia copings.

    PubMed

    Habib, Syed Rashid; Al Otaibi, Asim Khaled; Al Anazi, Talal Ali; Al Anazi, Samer Mosleh

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this in-vitro study was to investigate the marginal and internal fit of zirconia copings fabricated by five CAD/CAM (computer-aided design/computer-assisted manufacture) systems. A typodont mandibular right first molar was prepared according to ideal parameters for a zirconia crown, scanned digitally, and 100 identical resin dies fabricated by 3D printing. Samples were randomly divided into five groups and sent to CAD/CAM systems for zirconia copings (A, Ceramill-Motion 2, Amann Girrbach; B, Weiland, Ivoclar Vivadent; C, Cerec, Ivoclar Vivadent; D, Prettau Zirconia, Zirkonzahn; E, Cad4dent). CAD of the copings included standardized cement space of 30 µm and CAM was carried out. Copings were tried/adjusted on the respective dies and embedded under a standardized load of 20 N in self-curing resin. Samples were sectioned mesiodistally into two halves. Marginal and internal gap values were measured with a digital microscope at 50 to 200 × magnification at nine sites. The lowest and highest mean gap values of 46.93 ± 13.50 and 101.65 ± 35.56 μm were found for Group A and Group D, respectively. ANOVA showed a statistically significant difference between the mean values of all the groups (P = .000). Multiple comparisons with post hoc Tukey test indicated a statistically significant difference (P < .05) between: Group A and all groups except B; B with D; C with A; D with A; and B and E with A. Mean buccal/lingual gap value was found to be 51.54 ± 58.54 μm. Of the nine sites, the least gap resulted at the buccal axial wall and the greatest at the central groove. The overall mean gap recorded for the copings was 72.43 ± 57.56 μm. Marginal and internal adaptations of CAD/CAM zirconia copings is influenced by manufacturing technique, and variations exist for different systems. Measurement sites showed different levels. CAD/CAM systems investigated showed a clinically acceptable level of gap values (< 120 µm).

  1. Utah optrode array customization using stereotactic brain atlases and 3-D CAD modeling for optogenetic neocortical interrogation in small rodents and nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Boutte, Ronald W; Merlin, Sam; Yona, Guy; Griffiths, Brandon; Angelucci, Alessandra; Kahn, Itamar; Shoham, Shy; Blair, Steve

    2017-10-01

    As the optogenetic field expands, the need for precise targeting of neocortical circuits only grows more crucial. This work demonstrates a technique for using Solidworks ® computer-aided design (CAD) and readily available stereotactic brain atlases to create a three-dimensional (3-D) model of the dorsal region of area visual cortex 4 (V4D) of the macaque monkey ( Macaca fascicularis ) visual cortex. The 3-D CAD model of the brain was used to customize an [Formula: see text] Utah optrode array (UOA) after it was determined that a high-density ([Formula: see text]) UOA caused extensive damage to marmoset ( Callithrix jacchus ) primary visual cortex as assessed by electrophysiological recording of spiking activity through a 1.5-mm-diameter through glass via. The [Formula: see text] UOA was customized for optrode length ([Formula: see text]), optrode width ([Formula: see text]), optrode pitch ([Formula: see text]), backplane thickness ([Formula: see text]), and overall form factor ([Formula: see text]). Two [Formula: see text] UOAs were inserted into layer VI of macaque V4D cortices with minimal damage as assessed in fixed tissue cytochrome oxidase staining in nonrecoverable surgeries. Additionally, two [Formula: see text] arrays were implanted in mice ( Mus musculus ) motor cortices, providing early evidence for long-term tolerability (over 6 months), and for the ability to integrate the UOA with a Holobundle light delivery system toward patterned optogenetic stimulation of cortical networks.

  2. Automated a complex computer aided design concept generated using macros programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizal Ramly, Mohammad; Asrokin, Azharrudin; Abd Rahman, Safura; Zulkifly, Nurul Ain Md

    2013-12-01

    Changing a complex Computer Aided design profile such as car and aircraft surfaces has always been difficult and challenging. The capability of CAD software such as AutoCAD and CATIA show that a simple configuration of a CAD design can be easily modified without hassle, but it is not the case with complex design configuration. Design changes help users to test and explore various configurations of the design concept before the production of a model. The purpose of this study is to look into macros programming as parametric method of the commercial aircraft design. Macros programming is a method where the configurations of the design are done by recording a script of commands, editing the data value and adding a certain new command line to create an element of parametric design. The steps and the procedure to create a macro programming are discussed, besides looking into some difficulties during the process of creation and advantage of its usage. Generally, the advantages of macros programming as a method of parametric design are; allowing flexibility for design exploration, increasing the usability of the design solution, allowing proper contained by the model while restricting others and real time feedback changes.

  3. Method of transition from 3D model to its ontological representation in aircraft design process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govorkov, A. S.; Zhilyaev, A. S.; Fokin, I. V.

    2018-05-01

    This paper proposes the method of transition from a 3D model to its ontological representation and describes its usage in the aircraft design process. The problems of design for manufacturability and design automation are also discussed. The introduced method is to aim to ease the process of data exchange between important aircraft design phases, namely engineering and design control. The method is also intended to increase design speed and 3D model customizability. This requires careful selection of the complex systems (CAD / CAM / CAE / PDM), providing the basis for the integration of design and technological preparation of production and more fully take into account the characteristics of products and processes for their manufacture. It is important to solve this problem, as investment in the automation define the company's competitiveness in the years ahead.

  4. Shear Bond Strength of Repair Systems to New CAD/CAM Restorative Materials.

    PubMed

    Üstün, Özlem; Büyükhatipoğlu, Işıl Keçik; Seçilmiş, Aslı

    2016-11-23

    To evaluate the bond strength of repair systems (Ceramic Repair, Clearfil Repair) to computer-aided design/computer-assisted machining (CAD/CAM) restorative materials (IPS e.max CAD, Vita Suprinity, Vita Enamic, Lava Ultimate). Thermally aged CAD/CAM restorative material specimens (5000 cycles between 5°C and 55°C) were randomly divided into two groups according to the repair system: Ceramic Repair (37% phosphoric acid + Monobond-S + Heliobond + Tetric N Ceram) or Clearfil Repair (40% phosphoric acid + mixture of Clearfil Porcelain Bond Activator and Clearfil SE Bond Primer + Clearfil SE Bond + Filtek Z250). The resin composite was light-cured on conditioned specimens. All specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours and then additionally aged for 5000 thermal cycles. The shear bond strength test was performed using a universal testing machine (0.5 mm/min). Two-way ANOVA was used to detect significance differences according to the CAD/CAM material and composite repair system factors. Subgroup analyses were conducted using the least significant difference post-hoc test. The results of two-way ANOVA indicated that bond strength values varied according to the restorative materials (p < 0.05). No significant differences were observed between the CAD/CAM restorative materials (p > 0.05), except in the Vita Suprinity group (p < 0.05). Moreover, no differences were observed between the repair systems. Both the Clearfil and Ceramic repair systems used in the study allow for successful repairs. © 2016 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  5. The impact of design-based modeling instruction on seventh graders' spatial abilities and model-based argumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnell, William J.

    Due to the call of current science education reform for the integration of engineering practices within science classrooms, design-based instruction is receiving much attention in science education literature. Although some aspect of modeling is often included in well-known design-based instructional methods, it is not always a primary focus. The purpose of this study was to better understand how design-based instruction with an emphasis on scientific modeling might impact students' spatial abilities and their model-based argumentation abilities. In the following mixed-method multiple case study, seven seventh grade students attending a secular private school in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States underwent an instructional intervention involving design-based instruction, modeling and argumentation. Through the course of a lesson involving students in exploring the interrelatedness of the environment and an animal's form and function, students created and used multiple forms of expressed models to assist them in model-based scientific argument. Pre/post data were collected through the use of The Purdue Spatial Visualization Test: Rotation, the Mental Rotation Test and interviews. Other data included a spatial activities survey, student artifacts in the form of models, notes, exit tickets, and video recordings of students throughout the intervention. Spatial abilities tests were analyzed using descriptive statistics while students' arguments were analyzed using the Instrument for the Analysis of Scientific Curricular Arguments and a behavior protocol. Models were analyzed using content analysis and interviews and all other data were coded and analyzed for emergent themes. Findings in the area of spatial abilities included increases in spatial reasoning for six out of seven participants, and an immense difference in the spatial challenges encountered by students when using CAD software instead of paper drawings to create models. Students perceived 3D printed

  6. Implant-supported fixed dental prostheses with CAD/CAM-fabricated porcelain crown and zirconia-based framework.

    PubMed

    Takaba, Masayuki; Tanaka, Shinpei; Ishiura, Yuichi; Baba, Kazuyoshi

    2013-07-01

    Recently, fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) with a hybrid structure of CAD/CAM porcelain crowns adhered to a CAD/CAM zirconia framework (PAZ) have been developed. The aim of this report was to describe the clinical application of a newly developed implant-supported FDP fabrication system, which uses PAZ, and to evaluate the outcome after a maximum application period of 36 months. Implants were placed in three patients with edentulous areas in either the maxilla or mandible. After the implant fixtures had successfully integrated with bone, gold-platinum alloy or zirconia custom abutments were first fabricated. Zirconia framework wax-up was performed on the custom abutments, and the CAD/CAM zirconia framework was prepared using the CAD/CAM system. Next, wax-up was performed on working models for porcelain crown fabrication, and CAD/CAM porcelain crowns were fabricated. The CAD/CAM zirconia frameworks and CAD/CAM porcelain crowns were bonded using adhesive resin cement, and the PAZ was cemented. Cementation of the implant superstructure improved the esthetics and masticatory efficiency in all patients. No undesirable outcomes, such as superstructure chipping, stomatognathic dysfunction, or periimplant bone resorption, were observed in any of the patients. PAZ may be a potential solution for ceramic-related clinical problems such as chipping and fracture and associated complicated repair procedures in implant-supported FDPs. © 2012 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  7. Development of personalized annuloplasty rings: combination of CT images and CAD-CAM tools.

    PubMed

    Díaz Lantada, Andrés; Valle-Fernández, Raquel Del; Morgado, Pilar Lafont; Muñoz-García, Julio; Muñoz Sanz, José Luis; Munoz-Guijosa, Juan Manuel; Otero, Javier Echávarri

    2010-02-01

    Although the use of personalized annuloplasty rings manufactured for each patient according to the size and morphology of their valve complex could be beneficial for the treatment of mitral insufficiency, this possibility has been limited for reasons of time-lines and costs as well as for design and manufacturing difficulties, as has been the case with other personalized implant and prosthetic developments. However, the present quality of medical image capture equipment together with the benefits to be had from computer-aided design and manufacturing technologies (CAD-CAM) and the capabilities furnished by rapid prototyping technologies, present new opportunities for a personalized response to the development of implants and prostheses, the social impact of which could turn out to be highly positive. This paper sets out a personalized development of an annuloplasty ring based on the combined use of information from medical imaging, from CAD-CAM design programs and prototype manufacture using rapid prototyping technologies.

  8. Comparative in vitro evaluation of CAD/CAM vs conventional provisional crowns.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Adil Othman; Tsitrou, Effrosyni A; Pollington, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the marginal gap, internal fit, fracture strength, and mode of fracture of CAD/CAM provisional crowns with that of direct provisional crowns. An upper right first premolar phantom tooth was prepared for full ceramic crown following tooth preparation guidelines. The materials tested were: VITA CAD-Temp®, Polyetheretherketone "PEEK", Telio CAD-Temp, and Protemp™4 (control group). The crowns were divided into four groups (n=10), Group1: VITA CAD-Temp®, Group 2: PEEK, Group 3: Telio CAD-Temp, and Group 4: Protemp™4. Each crown was investigated for marginal and internal fit, fracture strength, and mode of fracture. Statistical analysis was performed using GraphPad Prism software version 6.0. The average marginal gap was: VITA CAD-Temp® 60.61 (±9.99) µm, PEEK 46.75 (±8.26) µm, Telio CAD-Temp 56.10 (±5.65) µm, and Protemp™4 193.07(±35.96) µm (P<0.001). The average internal fit was: VITA CAD-Temp® 124.94 (±22.96) µm, PEEK 113.14 (±23.55) µm, Telio CAD-Temp 110.95 (±11.64) µm, and Protemp™4 143.48(±26.74) µm. The average fracture strength was: VITA CAD-Temp® 361.01 (±21.61) N, PEEK 802.23 (±111.29) N, Telio CAD-Temp 719.24 (±95.17) N, and Protemp™4 416.40 (±69.14) N. One-way ANOVA test showed a statistically significant difference for marginal gap, internal gap, and fracture strength between all groups (p<0.001). However, the mode of fracture showed no differences between the groups (p>0.05). CAD/CAM fabricated provisional crowns demonstrated superior fit and better strength than direct provisional crowns.

  9. Comparative in vitro evaluation of CAD/CAM vs conventional provisional crowns

    PubMed Central

    ABDULLAH, Adil Othman; TSITROU, Effrosyni A; POLLINGTON, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective This study compared the marginal gap, internal fit, fracture strength, and mode of fracture of CAD/CAM provisional crowns with that of direct provisional crowns. Material and Methods An upper right first premolar phantom tooth was prepared for full ceramic crown following tooth preparation guidelines. The materials tested were: VITA CAD-Temp®, Polyetheretherketone “PEEK”, Telio CAD-Temp, and Protemp™4 (control group). The crowns were divided into four groups (n=10), Group1: VITA CAD-Temp®, Group 2: PEEK, Group 3: Telio CAD-Temp, and Group 4: Protemp™4. Each crown was investigated for marginal and internal fit, fracture strength, and mode of fracture. Statistical analysis was performed using GraphPad Prism software version 6.0. Results The average marginal gap was: VITA CAD-Temp® 60.61 (±9.99) µm, PEEK 46.75 (±8.26) µm, Telio CAD-Temp 56.10 (±5.65) µm, and Protemp™4 193.07(±35.96) µm (P<0.001). The average internal fit was: VITA CAD-Temp® 124.94 (±22.96) µm, PEEK 113.14 (±23.55) µm, Telio CAD-Temp 110.95 (±11.64) µm, and Protemp™4 143.48(±26.74) µm. The average fracture strength was: VITA CAD-Temp® 361.01 (±21.61) N, PEEK 802.23 (±111.29) N, Telio CAD-Temp 719.24 (±95.17) N, and Protemp™4 416.40 (±69.14) N. One-way ANOVA test showed a statistically significant difference for marginal gap, internal gap, and fracture strength between all groups (p<0.001). However, the mode of fracture showed no differences between the groups (p>0.05). Conclusions CAD/CAM fabricated provisional crowns demonstrated superior fit and better strength than direct provisional crowns. PMID:27383707

  10. Web-based computer-aided-diagnosis (CAD) system for bone age assessment (BAA) of children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Aifeng; Uyeda, Joshua; Tsao, Sinchai; Ma, Kevin; Vachon, Linda A.; Liu, Brent J.; Huang, H. K.

    2008-03-01

    Bone age assessment (BAA) of children is a clinical procedure frequently performed in pediatric radiology to evaluate the stage of skeletal maturation based on a left hand and wrist radiograph. The most commonly used standard: Greulich and Pyle (G&P) Hand Atlas was developed 50 years ago and exclusively based on Caucasian population. Moreover, inter- & intra-observer discrepancies using this method create a need of an objective and automatic BAA method. A digital hand atlas (DHA) has been collected with 1,400 hand images of normal children from Asian, African American, Caucasian and Hispanic descends. Based on DHA, a fully automatic, objective computer-aided-diagnosis (CAD) method was developed and it was adapted to specific population. To bring DHA and CAD method to the clinical environment as a useful tool in assisting radiologist to achieve higher accuracy in BAA, a web-based system with direct connection to a clinical site is designed as a novel clinical implementation approach for online and real time BAA. The core of the system, a CAD server receives the image from clinical site, processes it by the CAD method and finally, generates report. A web service publishes the results and radiologists at the clinical site can review it online within minutes. This prototype can be easily extended to multiple clinical sites and will provide the foundation for broader use of the CAD system for BAA.

  11. From Artisanal to CAD-CAM Blocks: State of the Art of Indirect Composites.

    PubMed

    Mainjot, A K; Dupont, N M; Oudkerk, J C; Dewael, T Y; Sadoun, M J

    2016-05-01

    Indirect composites have been undergoing an impressive evolution over the last few years. Specifically, recent developments in computer-aided design-computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) blocks have been associated with new polymerization modes, innovative microstructures, and different compositions. All these recent breakthroughs have introduced important gaps among the properties of the different materials. This critical state-of-the-art review analyzes the strengths and weaknesses of the different varieties of CAD-CAM composite materials, especially as compared with direct and artisanal indirect composites. Indeed, new polymerization modes used for CAD-CAM blocks-especially high temperature (HT) and, most of all, high temperature-high pressure (HT-HP)-are shown to significantly increase the degree of conversion in comparison with light-cured composites. Industrial processes also allow for the augmentation of the filler content and for the realization of more homogeneous structures with fewer flaws. In addition, due to their increased degree of conversion and their different monomer composition, some CAD-CAM blocks are more advantageous in terms of toxicity and monomer release. Finally, materials with a polymer-infiltrated ceramic network (PICN) microstructure exhibit higher flexural strength and a more favorable elasticity modulus than materials with a dispersed filler microstructure. Consequently, some high-performance composite CAD-CAM blocks-particularly experimental PICNs-can now rival glass-ceramics, such as lithium-disilicate glass-ceramics, for use as bonded partial restorations and crowns on natural teeth and implants. Being able to be manufactured in very low thicknesses, they offer the possibility of developing innovative minimally invasive treatment strategies, such as "no prep" treatment of worn dentition. Current issues are related to the study of bonding and wear properties of the different varieties of CAD-CAM composites. There is also a crucial

  12. Light Curve Simulation Using Spacecraft CAD Models and Empirical Material Spectral BRDFS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willison, A.; Bedard, D.

    This paper presents a Matlab-based light curve simulation software package that uses computer-aided design (CAD) models of spacecraft and the spectral bidirectional reflectance distribution function (sBRDF) of their homogenous surface materials. It represents the overall optical reflectance of objects as a sBRDF, a spectrometric quantity, obtainable during an optical ground truth experiment. The broadband bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF), the basis of a broadband light curve, is produced by integrating the sBRDF over the optical wavelength range. Colour-filtered BRDFs, the basis of colour-filtered light curves, are produced by first multiplying the sBRDF by colour filters, and integrating the products. The software package's validity is established through comparison of simulated reflectance spectra and broadband light curves with those measured of the CanX-1 Engineering Model (EM) nanosatellite, collected during an optical ground truth experiment. It is currently being extended to simulate light curves of spacecraft in Earth orbit, using spacecraft Two-Line-Element (TLE) sets, yaw/pitch/roll angles, and observer coordinates. Measured light curves of the NEOSSat spacecraft will be used to validate simulated quantities. The sBRDF was chosen to represent material reflectance as it is spectrometric and a function of illumination and observation geometry. Homogeneous material sBRDFs were obtained using a goniospectrometer for a range of illumination and observation geometries, collected in a controlled environment. The materials analyzed include aluminum alloy, two types of triple-junction photovoltaic (TJPV) cell, white paint, and multi-layer insulation (MLI). Interpolation and extrapolation methods were used to determine the sBRDF for all possible illumination and observation geometries not measured in the laboratory, resulting in empirical look-up tables. These look-up tables are referenced when calculating the overall sBRDF of objects, where

  13. Development of a web-based DICOM-SR viewer for CAD data of multiple sclerosis lesions in an imaging informatics-based efolder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Kevin; Wong, Jonathan; Zhong, Mark; Zhang, Jeff; Liu, Brent

    2014-03-01

    In the past, we have presented an imaging-informatics based eFolder system for managing and analyzing imaging and lesion data of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, which allows for data storage, data analysis, and data mining in clinical and research settings. The system integrates the patient's clinical data with imaging studies and a computer-aided detection (CAD) algorithm for quantifying MS lesion volume, lesion contour, locations, and sizes in brain MRI studies. For compliance with IHE integration protocols, long-term storage in PACS, and data query and display in a DICOM compliant clinical setting, CAD results need to be converted into DICOM-Structured Report (SR) format. Open-source dcmtk and customized XML templates are used to convert quantitative MS CAD results from MATLAB to DICOM-SR format. A web-based GUI based on our existing web-accessible DICOM object (WADO) image viewer has been designed to display the CAD results from generated SR files. The GUI is able to parse DICOM-SR files and extract SR document data, then display lesion volume, location, and brain matter volume along with the referenced DICOM imaging study. In addition, the GUI supports lesion contour overlay, which matches a detected MS lesion with its corresponding DICOM-SR data when a user selects either the lesion or the data. The methodology of converting CAD data in native MATLAB format to DICOM-SR and displaying the tabulated DICOM-SR along with the patient's clinical information, and relevant study images in the GUI will be demonstrated. The developed SR conversion model and GUI support aim to further demonstrate how to incorporate CAD post-processing components in a PACS and imaging informatics-based environment.

  14. Assessment of reliability of CAD-CAM tooth-colored implant custom abutments.

    PubMed

    Guilherme, Nuno Marques; Chung, Kwok-Hung; Flinn, Brian D; Zheng, Cheng; Raigrodski, Ariel J

    2016-08-01

    Information is lacking about the fatigue resistance of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) tooth-colored implant custom abutment materials. The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate the reliability of different types of CAD-CAM tooth-colored implant custom abutments. Zirconia (Lava Plus), lithium disilicate (IPS e.max CAD), and resin-based composite (Lava Ultimate) abutments were fabricated using CAD-CAM technology and bonded to machined titanium-6 aluminum-4 vanadium (Ti-6Al-4V) alloy inserts for conical connection implants (NobelReplace Conical Connection RP 4.3×10 mm; Nobel Biocare). Three groups (n=19) were assessed: group ZR, CAD-CAM zirconia/Ti-6Al-4V bonded abutments; group RC, CAD-CAM resin-based composite/Ti-6Al-4V bonded abutments; and group LD, CAD-CAM lithium disilicate/Ti-6Al-4V bonded abutments. Fifty-seven implant abutments were secured to implants and embedded in autopolymerizing acrylic resin according to ISO standard 14801. Static failure load (n=5) and fatigue failure load (n=14) were tested. Weibull cumulative damage analysis was used to calculate step-stress reliability at 150-N and 200-N loads with 2-sided 90% confidence limits. Representative fractured specimens were examined using stereomicroscopy and scanning electron microscopy to observe fracture patterns. Weibull plots revealed β values of 2.59 for group ZR, 0.30 for group RC, and 0.58 for group LD, indicating a wear-out or cumulative fatigue pattern for group ZR and load as the failure accelerating factor for groups RC and LD. Fractographic observation disclosed that failures initiated in the interproximal area where the lingual tensile stresses meet the compressive facial stresses for the early failure specimens. Plastic deformation of titanium inserts with fracture was observed for zirconia abutments in fatigue resistance testing. Significantly higher reliability was found in group ZR, and no significant differences in reliability were

  15. Using CAD/CAM to improve productivity - The IPAD approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fulton, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    Progress in designing and implementing CAD/CAM systems as a result of the NASA Integrated Programs for Aerospace-Vehicle Design is discussed. Essential software packages have been identified as executive, data management, general user, and geometry and graphics software. Data communication, as a means to integrate data over a network of computers of different vendors, provides data management with the capability of meeting design and manufacturing requirements of the vendors. Geometry software is dependent on developmental success with solid geometry software, which is necessary for continual measurements of, for example, a block of metal while it is being machined. Applications in the aerospace industry, such as for design, analysis, tooling, testing, quality control, etc., are outlined.

  16. Automated CD-SEM recipe creation technology for mass production using CAD data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawahara, Toshikazu; Yoshida, Masamichi; Tanaka, Masashi; Ido, Sanyu; Nakano, Hiroyuki; Adachi, Naokaka; Abe, Yuichi; Nagatomo, Wataru

    2011-03-01

    Critical Dimension Scanning Electron Microscope (CD-SEM) recipe creation needs sample preparation necessary for matching pattern registration, and recipe creation on CD-SEM using the sample, which hinders the reduction in test production cost and time in semiconductor manufacturing factories. From the perspective of cost reduction and improvement of the test production efficiency, automated CD-SEM recipe creation without the sample preparation and the manual operation has been important in the production lines. For the automated CD-SEM recipe creation, we have introduced RecipeDirector (RD) that enables the recipe creation by using Computer-Aided Design (CAD) data and text data that includes measurement information. We have developed a system that automatically creates the CAD data and the text data necessary for the recipe creation on RD; and, for the elimination of the manual operation, we have enhanced RD so that all measurement information can be specified in the text data. As a result, we have established an automated CD-SEM recipe creation system without the sample preparation and the manual operation. For the introduction of the CD-SEM recipe creation system using RD to the production lines, the accuracy of the pattern matching was an issue. The shape of design templates for the matching created from the CAD data was different from that of SEM images in vision. Thus, a development of robust pattern matching algorithm that considers the shape difference was needed. The addition of image processing of the templates for the matching and shape processing of the CAD patterns in the lower layer has enabled the robust pattern matching. This paper describes the automated CD-SEM recipe creation technology for the production lines without the sample preparation and the manual operation using RD applied in Sony Semiconductor Kyusyu Corporation Kumamoto Technology Center (SCK Corporation Kumamoto TEC).

  17. Teaching Computer-Aided Design of Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer Engineering Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gosman, A. D.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Describes a teaching program for fluid mechanics and heat transfer which contains both computer aided learning (CAL) and computer aided design (CAD) components and argues that the understanding of the physical and numerical modeling taught in the CAL course is essential to the proper implementation of CAD. (Author/CMV)

  18. A citizen science approach to optimising computer aided detection (CAD) in mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionescu, Georgia V.; Harkness, Elaine F.; Hulleman, Johan; Astley, Susan M.

    2018-03-01

    Computer aided detection (CAD) systems assist medical experts during image interpretation. In mammography, CAD systems prompt suspicious regions which help medical experts to detect early signs of cancer. This is a challenging task and prompts may appear in regions that are actually normal, whilst genuine cancers may be missed. The effect prompting has on readers performance is not fully known. In order to explore the effects of prompting errors, we have created an online game (Bat Hunt), designed for non-experts, that mirrors mammographic CAD. This allows us to explore a wider parameter space. Users are required to detect bats in images of flocks of birds, with image difficulty matched to the proportions of screening mammograms in different BI-RADS density categories. Twelve prompted conditions were investigated, along with unprompted detection. On average, players achieved a sensitivity of 0.33 for unprompted detection, and sensitivities of 0.75, 0.83, and 0.92 respectively for 70%, 80%, and 90% of targets prompted, regardless of CAD specificity. False prompts distract players from finding unprompted targets if they appear in the same image. Player performance decreases when the number of false prompts increases, and increases proportionally with prompting sensitivity. Median lowest d' was for unprompted condition (1.08) and the highest for sensitivity 90% and 0.5 false prompts per image (d'=4.48).

  19. Engineering specification and system design for CAD/CAM of custom shoes. Phase 5: UMC involvement (January 1, 1989 - June 30, 1989)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bao, Han P.

    1989-01-01

    The CAD/CAM of custom shoes is discussed. The solid object for machining is represented by a wireframe model with its nodes or vertices specified systematically in a grid pattern covering its entire length (point-to-point configuration). Two sets of data from CENCIT and CYBERWARE were used for machining purposes. It was found that the indexing technique (turning the stock by a small angle then moving the tool on a longitudinal path along the foot) yields the best result in terms of ease of programming, savings in wear and tear of the machine and cutting tools, and resolution of fine surface details. The work done using the LASTMOD last design system results in a shoe last specified by a number of congruent surface patches of different sizes. This data format was converted into a form amenable to the machine tool. It involves a series of sorting algorithms and interpolation algorithms to provide the grid pattern that the machine tool needs as was the case in the point to point configuration discussed above. This report also contains an in-depth treatment of the design and production technique of an integrated sole to complement the task of design and manufacture of the shoe last. Clinical data and essential production parameters are discussed. Examples of soles made through this process are given.

  20. Coronary artery disease reporting and data system (CAD-RADSTM): Inter-observer agreement for assessment categories and modifiers.

    PubMed

    Maroules, Christopher D; Hamilton-Craig, Christian; Branch, Kelley; Lee, James; Cury, Roberto C; Maurovich-Horvat, Pál; Rubinshtein, Ronen; Thomas, Dustin; Williams, Michelle; Guo, Yanshu; Cury, Ricardo C

    The Coronary Artery Disease Reporting and Data System (CAD-RADS) provides a lexicon and standardized reporting system for coronary CT angiography. To evaluate inter-observer agreement of the CAD-RADS among an panel of early career and expert readers. Four early career and four expert cardiac imaging readers prospectively and independently evaluated 50 coronary CT angiography cases using the CAD-RADS lexicon. All readers assessed image quality using a five-point Likert scale, with mean Likert score ≥4 designating high image quality, and <4 designating moderate/low image quality. All readers were blinded to medical history and invasive coronary angiography findings. Inter-observer agreement for CAD-RADS assessment categories and modifiers were assessed using intra-class correlation (ICC) and Fleiss' Kappa (κ).The impact of reader experience and image quality on inter-observer agreement was also examined. Inter-observer agreement for CAD-RADS assessment categories was excellent (ICC 0.958, 95% CI 0.938-0.974, p < 0.0001). Agreement among expert readers (ICC 0.925, 95% CI 0.884-0.954) was marginally stronger than for early career readers (ICC 0.904, 95% CI 0.852-0.941), both p < 0.0001. High image quality was associated with stronger agreement than moderate image quality (ICC 0.944, 95% CI 0.886-0.974 vs. ICC 0.887, 95% CI 0.775-0.95, both p < 0.0001). While excellent inter-observer agreement was observed for modifiers S (stent) and G (bypass graft) (both κ = 1.0), only fair agreement (κ = 0.40) was observed for modifier V (high risk plaque). Inter-observer reproducibility of CAD-RADS assessment categories and modifiers is excellent, except for high-risk plaque (modifier V) which demonstrates fair agreement. These results suggest CAD-RADS is feasible for clinical implementation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Effect of the Crystallization Process on the Marginal and Internal Gaps of Lithium Disilicate CAD/CAM Crowns

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Hong; Oh, Seunghan; Uhm, Soo-Hyuk

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to quantify the effect of the crystallization process on lithium disilicate ceramic crowns fabricated using a computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) system and to determine whether the effect of crystallization is clinically acceptable by comparing values of fit before and after the crystallization process. The mandibular right first molar was selected as the abutment for the experiments. Fifteen working models were prepared. Lithium disilicate crowns appropriate for each abutment were prepared using a commercial CAD/CAM system. Gaps in the marginal area and 4 internal areas of each crown were measured twice—before and after crystallization—using the silicone replica technique. The mean values of fit before and after crystallization were analyzed using a paired t-test to examine whether the conversion that occurred during crystallization affected marginal and internal gaps (α = 0.05). Gaps increased in the marginal area and decreased in the internal areas after crystallization. There were statistically significant differences in all of the investigated areas (P < 0.05). None of the values for marginal and internal fit of lithium disilicate CAD/CAM crowns after crystallization exceeded 120 μm, which is the clinically acceptable threshold. PMID:27123453

  2. A new CAD approach for improving efficacy of cancer screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Bin; Qian, Wei; Li, Lihua; Pu, Jiantao; Kang, Yan; Lure, Fleming; Tan, Maxine; Qiu, Yuchen

    2015-03-01

    Since performance and clinical utility of current computer-aided detection (CAD) schemes of detecting and classifying soft tissue lesions (e.g., breast masses and lung nodules) is not satisfactory, many researchers in CAD field call for new CAD research ideas and approaches. The purpose of presenting this opinion paper is to share our vision and stimulate more discussions of how to overcome or compensate the limitation of current lesion-detection based CAD schemes in the CAD research community. Since based on our observation that analyzing global image information plays an important role in radiologists' decision making, we hypothesized that using the targeted quantitative image features computed from global images could also provide highly discriminatory power, which are supplementary to the lesion-based information. To test our hypothesis, we recently performed a number of independent studies. Based on our published preliminary study results, we demonstrated that global mammographic image features and background parenchymal enhancement of breast MR images carried useful information to (1) predict near-term breast cancer risk based on negative screening mammograms, (2) distinguish between true- and false-positive recalls in mammography screening examinations, and (3) classify between malignant and benign breast MR examinations. The global case-based CAD scheme only warns a risk level of the cases without cueing a large number of false-positive lesions. It can also be applied to guide lesion-based CAD cueing to reduce false-positives but enhance clinically relevant true-positive cueing. However, before such a new CAD approach is clinically acceptable, more work is needed to optimize not only the scheme performance but also how to integrate with lesion-based CAD schemes in the clinical practice.

  3. Chairside CAD/CAM materials. Part 2: Flexural strength testing.

    PubMed

    Wendler, Michael; Belli, Renan; Petschelt, Anselm; Mevec, Daniel; Harrer, Walter; Lube, Tanja; Danzer, Robert; Lohbauer, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    Strength is one of the preferred parameters used in dentistry for determining clinical indication of dental restoratives. However, small dimensions of CAD/CAM blocks limit reliable measurements with standardized uniaxial bending tests. The objective of this study was to introduce the ball-on-three-ball (B3B) biaxial strength test for dental for small CAD/CAM block in the context of the size effect on strength predicted by the Weibull theory. Eight representative chairside CAD/CAM materials ranging from polycrystalline zirconia (e.max ZirCAD, Ivoclar-Vivadent), reinforced glasses (Vitablocs Mark II, VITA; Empress CAD, Ivoclar-Vivadent) and glass-ceramics (e.max CAD, Ivoclar-Vivadent; Suprinity, VITA; Celtra Duo, Dentsply) to hybrid materials (Enamic, VITA; Lava Ultimate, 3M ESPE) have been selected. Specimens were prepared with highly polished surfaces in rectangular plate (12×12×1.2mm 3 ) or round disc (Ø=12mm, thickness=1.2mm) geometries. Specimens were tested using the B3B assembly and the biaxial strength was determined using calculations derived from finite element analyses of the respective stress fields. Size effects on strength were determined based on results from 4-point-bending specimens. A good agreement was found between the biaxial strength results for the different geometries (plates vs. discs) using the B3B test. Strength values ranged from 110.9MPa (Vitablocs Mark II) to 1303.21MPa (e.max ZirCAD). The strength dependency on specimen size was demonstrated through the calculated effective volume/surface. The B3B test has shown to be a reliable and simple method for determining the biaxial strength restorative materials supplied as small CAD/CAM blocks. A flexible solution was made available for the B3B test in the rectangular plate geometry. Copyright © 2016 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. CAD-RADS - a new clinical decision support tool for coronary computed tomography angiography.

    PubMed

    Foldyna, Borek; Szilveszter, Bálint; Scholtz, Jan-Erik; Banerji, Dahlia; Maurovich-Horvat, Pál; Hoffmann, Udo

    2018-04-01

    Coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) has been established as an accurate method to non-invasively assess coronary artery disease (CAD). The proposed 'Coronary Artery Disease Reporting and Data System' (CAD-RADS) may enable standardised reporting of the broad spectrum of coronary CTA findings related to the presence, extent and composition of coronary atherosclerosis. The CAD-RADS classification is a comprehensive tool for summarising findings on a per-patient-basis dependent on the highest-grade coronary artery lesion, ranging from CAD-RADS 0 (absence of CAD) to CAD-RADS 5 (total occlusion of a coronary artery). In addition, it provides suggestions for clinical management for each classification, including further testing and therapeutic options. Despite some limitations, CAD-RADS may facilitate improved communication between imagers and patient caregivers. As such, CAD-RADS may enable a more efficient use of coronary CTA leading to more accurate utilisation of invasive coronary angiograms. Furthermore, widespread use of CAD-RADS may facilitate registry-based research of diagnostic and prognostic aspects of CTA. • CAD-RADS is a tool for standardising coronary CTA reports. • CAD-RADS includes clinical treatment recommendations based on CTA findings. • CAD-RADS has the potential to reduce variability of CTA reports.

  5. Management of CAD/CAM information: Key to improved manufacturing productivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fulton, R. E.; Brainin, J.

    1984-01-01

    A key element to improved industry productivity is effective management of CAD/CAM information. To stimulate advancements in this area, a joint NASA/Navy/industry project designated Intergrated Programs for Aerospace-Vehicle Design (IPAD) is underway with the goal of raising aerospace industry productivity through advancement of technology to integrate and manage information involved in the design and manufacturing process. The project complements traditional NASA/DOD research to develop aerospace design technology and the Air Force's Integrated Computer-Aided Manufacturing (ICAM) program to advance CAM technology. IPAD research is guided by an Industry Technical Advisory Board (ITAB) composed of over 100 representatives from aerospace and computer companies.

  6. Automated knowledge base development from CAD/CAE databases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, R. Glenn; Blanchard, Mary

    1988-01-01

    Knowledge base development requires a substantial investment in time, money, and resources in order to capture the knowledge and information necessary for anything other than trivial applications. This paper addresses a means to integrate the design and knowledge base development process through automated knowledge base development from CAD/CAE databases and files. Benefits of this approach include the development of a more efficient means of knowledge engineering, resulting in the timely creation of large knowledge based systems that are inherently free of error.

  7. Simple and Inexpensive 3D Printed Filter Fluorometer Designs: User-Friendly Instrument Models for Laboratory Learning and Outreach Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Lon A., Jr.; Chapman, Cole A.; Alaniz, Jacob A.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, a versatile and user-friendly selection of stereolithography (STL) files and computer-aided design (CAD) models are shared to assist educators and students in the production of simple and inexpensive 3D printed filter fluorometer instruments. These devices are effective resources for supporting active learners in the exploration of…

  8. Computer-aided design of polymers and composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaelble, D. H.

    1985-01-01

    This book on computer-aided design of polymers and composites introduces and discusses the subject from the viewpoint of atomic and molecular models. Thus, the origins of stiffness, strength, extensibility, and fracture toughness in composite materials can be analyzed directly in terms of chemical composition and molecular structure. Aspects of polymer composite reliability are considered along with characterization techniques for composite reliability, relations between atomic and molecular properties, computer aided design and manufacture, polymer CAD/CAM models, and composite CAD/CAM models. Attention is given to multiphase structural adhesives, fibrous composite reliability, metal joint reliability, polymer physical states and transitions, chemical quality assurance, processability testing, cure monitoring and management, nondestructive evaluation (NDE), surface NDE, elementary properties, ionic-covalent bonding, molecular analysis, acid-base interactions, the manufacturing science, and peel mechanics.

  9. On the Use of CAD-Native Predicates and Geometry in Surface Meshing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aftosmis, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    Several paradigms for accessing CAD geometry during surface meshing for CFD are discussed. File translation, inconsistent geometry engines and non-native point construction are all identified as sources of non-robustness. The paper argues in favor of accessing CAD parts and assemblies in their native format, without translation, and for the use of CAD-native predicates and constructors in surface mesh generation. The discussion also emphasizes the importance of examining the computational requirements for exact evaluation of triangulation predicates during surface meshing. The native approach is demonstrated through an algorithm for the generation of closed manifold surface triangulations from CAD geometry. CAD parts and assemblies are used in their native format, and a part's native geometry engine is accessed through a modeler-independent application programming interface (API). In seeking a robust and fully automated procedure, the algorithm is based on a new physical space manifold triangulation technique specially developed to avoid robustness issues associated with poorly conditioned mappings. In addition, this approach avoids the usual ambiguities associated with floating-point predicate evaluation on constructed coordinate geometry in a mapped space. The technique is incremental, so that each new site improves the triangulation by some well defined quality measure. The algorithm terminates after achieving a prespecified measure of mesh quality and produces a triangulation such that no angle is less than a given angle bound, a or greater than pi - 2alpha. This result also sets bounds on the maximum vertex degree, triangle aspect-ratio and maximum stretching rate for the triangulation. In addition to the output triangulations for a variety of CAD parts, the discussion presents related theoretical results which assert the existence of such an angle bound, and demonstrate that maximum bounds of between 25 deg and 30 deg may be achieved in practice.

  10. Rationale and Design of Randomized Evaluation of Aggressive or Moderate Lipid Lowering Therapy with Pitavastatin in Coronary Artery Disease (REAL-CAD) Trial.

    PubMed

    Miyauchi, Katsumi; Kimura, Takeshi; Shimokawa, Hiroaki; Daida, Hiroyuki; Iimuro, Satoshi; Iwata, Hiroshi; Ozaki, Yukio; Sakuma, Ichiro; Nakagawa, Yoshihisa; Hibi, Kiyoshi; Hiro, Takafumi; Fukumoto, Yoshihiro; Hokimoto, Seiji; Ohashi, Yasuo; Ohtsu, Hiroshi; Saito, Yasushi; Matsuzaki, Masunori; Nagai, Ryozo

    2018-03-30

    Large-scale clinical trials in patients in Western countries with coronary artery disease (CAD) have found that aggressive lipid-lowering therapy using high-dose statins reduces cardiovascular (CV) events further than low-dose statins. However, such evidence has not yet been fully established in Asian populations, including in Japan. The Randomized Evaluation of Aggressive or Moderate Lipid-Lowering Therapy with Pitavastatin in Coronary Artery Disease (REAL-CAD) study addresses whether intensification of statin therapy improves clinical outcomes in Japanese patients with CAD.REAL-CAD is a prospective, multicenter, randomized, open-label, blinded-endpoint, physician-initiated phase 4 trial in Japan. The study will recruit up to 12,600 patients with stable CAD. Patients are assigned to receive either pitavastatin 1 mg/day or pitavastatin 4 mg/day. LDL-C levels are expected to reach approximate mean values of 100 mg/dL in the low-dose pitavastatin group and 80 mg/dL in the high-dose group. The primary endpoint is the time to occurrence of a major CV event, including CV death, non-fatal myocardial infarction, non-fatal ischemic stroke, and unstable angina requiring emergency hospitalization during an average of 5 years. The large number of patients and the long follow-up period in the REAL-CAD study should ensure that there is adequate power to definitively determine if reducing LDL-C levels to approximately 80 mg/dL by high-dose statin can provide additional clinical benefit.After the study is completed, we will have categorical evidence on the optimal statin dose and target LDL-C level for secondary prevention in Japanese patients.

  11. Kinematic optimization of upgrade to the Hobby-Eberly Telescope through novel use of commercially available three-dimensional CAD package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wedeking, Gregory A.; Zierer, Joseph J.; Jackson, John R.

    2010-07-01

    The University of Texas, Center for Electromechanics (UT-CEM) is making a major upgrade to the robotic tracking system on the Hobby Eberly Telescope (HET) as part of theWide Field Upgrade (WFU). The upgrade focuses on a seven-fold increase in payload and necessitated a complete redesign of all tracker supporting structure and motion control systems, including the tracker bridge, ten drive systems, carriage frames, a hexapod, and many other subsystems. The cost and sensitivity of the scientific payload, coupled with the tracker system mass increase, necessitated major upgrades to personnel and hardware safety systems. To optimize kinematic design of the entire tracker, UT-CEM developed novel uses of constraints and drivers to interface with a commercially available CAD package (SolidWorks). For example, to optimize volume usage and minimize obscuration, the CAD software was exercised to accurately determine tracker/hexapod operational space needed to meet science requirements. To verify hexapod controller models, actuator travel requirements were graphically measured and compared to well defined equations of motion for Stewart platforms. To ensure critical hardware safety during various failure modes, UT-CEM engineers developed Visual Basic drivers to interface with the CAD software and quickly tabulate distance measurements between critical pieces of optical hardware and adjacent components for thousands of possible hexapod configurations. These advances and techniques, applicable to any challenging robotic system design, are documented and describe new ways to use commercially available software tools to more clearly define hardware requirements and help insure safe operation.

  12. A Survey of CAD/CAM Technology Applications in the U.S. Shipbuilding Industry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    operation for drafting. Computer Aided Engineering (CAE) analysis is used primarily to determine the validity of design characteristics and produc- tion...include time standard generation, sea trial analysis , and group Systems integration While no systems surveyed Aided Design (CAD) is the technology... analysis . is the largest problem involving software packages. are truly integrated, many are interfaced. Computer most interfaced category with links

  13. The influence of polishing techniques on pre-polymerized CAD\\CAM acrylic resin denture bases

    PubMed Central

    Alammari, Manal Rahma

    2017-01-01

    Background Lately, computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) has broadly been successfully employed in dentistry. The CAD/CAM systems have recently become commercially available for fabrication of complete dentures, and are considered as an alternative technique to conventionally processed acrylic resin bases. However, they have not yet been fully investigated. Objective The purpose of this study was to inspect the effects of mechanical polishing and chemical polishing on the surface roughness (Ra) and contact angle (wettability) of heat-cured, auto-cured and CAD/CAM denture base acrylic resins. Methods This study was conducted at the Advanced Dental Research Laboratory Center of King Abdulaziz University from March to June 2017. Three denture base materials were selected: heat cure poly-methylmethacrylate resin, thermoplastic (polyamide resin) and (CAD\\CAM) denture base resin. Sixty specimens were prepared and divided into three groups, twenty in each. Each group was divided according to the polishing techniques into (Mech P) and (Chem P), ten specimens in each; surface roughness and wettability were investigated. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 22, using one-way ANOVA and Pearson coefficient. Results One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post hoc tests were used for comparing the surface roughness values between three groups which revealed a statistical significant difference between them (p1<0.001). Heat-cured denture base material of (Group I) in both methods, showed the highest mean surface roughness value (2.44±0.07, 2.72±0.09, Mech P and Chem P respectively); while CAD\\CAM denture base material (group III) showed the least mean values (1.08±0.23, 1.39±0.31, Mech P and Chem P respectively). CAD/CAM showed the least contact angle in both polishing methods, which were statistically significant at 5% level (p=0.034 and p<0.001). Conclusion Mechanical polishing produced lower surface roughness of CAD\\CAM denture base resin with

  14. The influence of polishing techniques on pre-polymerized CAD\\CAM acrylic resin denture bases.

    PubMed

    Alammari, Manal Rahma

    2017-10-01

    Lately, computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) has broadly been successfully employed in dentistry. The CAD/CAM systems have recently become commercially available for fabrication of complete dentures, and are considered as an alternative technique to conventionally processed acrylic resin bases. However, they have not yet been fully investigated. The purpose of this study was to inspect the effects of mechanical polishing and chemical polishing on the surface roughness (Ra) and contact angle (wettability) of heat-cured, auto-cured and CAD/CAM denture base acrylic resins. This study was conducted at the Advanced Dental Research Laboratory Center of King Abdulaziz University from March to June 2017. Three denture base materials were selected: heat cure poly-methylmethacrylate resin, thermoplastic (polyamide resin) and (CAD\\CAM) denture base resin. Sixty specimens were prepared and divided into three groups, twenty in each. Each group was divided according to the polishing techniques into (Mech P) and (Chem P), ten specimens in each; surface roughness and wettability were investigated. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 22, using one-way ANOVA and Pearson coefficient. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post hoc tests were used for comparing the surface roughness values between three groups which revealed a statistical significant difference between them (p 1 <0.001). Heat-cured denture base material of (Group I) in both methods, showed the highest mean surface roughness value (2.44±0.07, 2.72±0.09, Mech P and Chem P respectively); while CAD\\CAM denture base material (group III) showed the least mean values (1.08±0.23, 1.39±0.31, Mech P and Chem P respectively). CAD/CAM showed the least contact angle in both polishing methods, which were statistically significant at 5% level (p=0.034 and p<0.001). Mechanical polishing produced lower surface roughness of CAD\\CAM denture base resin with superior smooth surface compared to chemical

  15. Influence of CAD/CAM scanning method and tooth-preparation design on the vertical misfit of zirconia crown copings.

    PubMed

    Castillo Oyagüe, Raquel; Sánchez-Jorge, María Isabel; Sánchez Turrión, Andrés

    2010-12-01

    To evaluate the influence of scanning method, finish line type and occlusal convergence angle of the teeth preparations on the vertical misfit of zirconia crown copings. 20 standardized stainless-steel master dies were machined simulating full-crown preparations. The total convergence angle was 15 degrees or 20 degrees (n=10 each). Two of the finish line types: a chamfer (CH) and a shoulder (SH) were prepared around the contour of each abutment. Over these dies, 20 structures were made by CAD/CAM (Cercon, Dentsply). An optical laser digitized the wax patterns of 10 single-unit copings (WS), and 10 abutments were direct-scanned to design the cores by computer (DS). Zirconia milled caps were luted onto the models under constant seating pressure. Vertical discrepancy was assessed by SEM. Misfit data were analyzed using ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls (SNK) test for multiple comparisons at alpha = 0.05. Vertical gap measurements of WS copings were significantly higher than those of DS frames (P < 0.0001). SH exhibited statistically higher discrepancies than CH when combined with a 15-degree occlusal convergence angle regardless of the scanning method (P < 0.05). The taper angle of the preparation (15 degrees vs. 20 degrees) had no effect on the marginal adaptation of chamfered samples.

  16. Analog Computer-Aided Detection (CAD) information can be more effective than binary marks.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Corbin A; Drew, Trafton; Wolfe, Jeremy M

    2017-02-01

    In socially important visual search tasks, such as baggage screening and diagnostic radiology, experts miss more targets than is desirable. Computer-aided detection (CAD) programs have been developed specifically to improve performance in these professional search tasks. For example, in breast cancer screening, many CAD systems are capable of detecting approximately 90% of breast cancer, with approximately 0.5 false-positive detections per image. Nevertheless, benefits of CAD in clinical settings tend to be small (Birdwell, 2009) or even absent (Meziane et al., 2011; Philpotts, 2009). The marks made by a CAD system can be "binary," giving the same signal to any location where the signal is above some threshold. Alternatively, a CAD system presents an analog signal that reflects strength of the signal at a location. In the experiments reported, we compare analog and binary CAD presentations using nonexpert observers and artificial stimuli defined by two noisy signals: a visible color signal and an "invisible" signal that informed our simulated CAD system. We found that analog CAD generally yielded better overall performance than binary CAD. The analog benefit is similar at high and low target prevalence. Our data suggest that the form of the CAD signal can directly influence performance. Analog CAD may allow the computer to be more helpful to the searcher.

  17. Manipulating the Geometric Computer-aided Design of the Operational Requirements-based Casualty Assessment Model within BRL-CAD

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2018-03-30

    ARL-TR-8336 ● MAR 2018 US Army Research Laboratory Manipulating the Geometric Computer-aided Design of the Operational...so designated by other authorized documents. Citation of manufacturer’s or trade names does not constitute an official endorsement or approval of...Army Research Laboratory Manipulating the Geometric Computer-aided Design of the Operational Requirements-based Casualty Assessment Model within

  18. Prosthetic knee design by simulation

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Hollerbach, K; Hollister, A

    1999-07-30

    Although 150,000 total knee replacement surgeries are performed annually in North America, current designs of knee prostheses have mechanical problems that include a limited range of motion, abnormal gait patterns, patellofemoral joint dysfunction, implant loosening or subsidence, and excessive wear. These problems fall into three categories: failure to reproduce normal joint kinematics, which results in altered limb function; bone-implant interface failure; and material failure. Modern computer technology can be used to design, prototype, and test new total knee implants. The design team uses the full range of CAD-CAM to design and produce implant prototypes for mechanical and clinical testing. Closermore » approximation of natural knee kinematics and kinetics is essential for improved patient function and diminished implant loads. Current knee replacement designs are based on 19th Century theories that the knee moves about a variable axis of rotation. Recent research has shown, however, that knee motion occurs about two fixed, offset axes of rotation. These aces are not perpendicular to the long axes of the bones or to each other, and the axes do not intersect. Bearing surfaces of mechanisms that move about axes of rotation are surfaces of revolution of those axes which advanced CAD technology can produce. Solids with surfaces of revolution for the two axes of rotation for the knee have been made using an HP9000 workstation and Structural Ideas Master Series CAD software at ArthroMotion. The implant's CAD model should closely replicate movements of the normal knee. The knee model will have a range of flexion-extension (FE) from -5 to 120 degrees. Movements include varus, valgus, internal and external rotation, as well as flexion and extension. The patellofemoral joint is aligned perpendicular to the FE axis and replicates the natural joint more closely than those of existing prostheses. The bearing surfaces will be more congruent than current designs and should

  19. Computer Applications in the Design Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winchip, Susan

    Computer Assisted Design (CAD) and Computer Assisted Manufacturing (CAM) are emerging technologies now being used in home economics and interior design applications. A microcomputer in a computer network system is capable of executing computer graphic functions such as three-dimensional modeling, as well as utilizing office automation packages to…

  20. Using a commercial CAD system for simultaneous input to theoretical aerodynamic programs and wind-tunnel model construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Enomoto, F.; Keller, P.

    1984-01-01

    The Computer Aided Design (CAD) system's common geometry database was used to generate input for theoretical programs and numerically controlled (NC) tool paths for wind tunnel part fabrication. This eliminates the duplication of work in generating separate geometry databases for each type of analysis. Another advantage is that it reduces the uncertainty due to geometric differences when comparing theoretical aerodynamic data with wind tunnel data. The system was adapted to aerodynamic research by developing programs written in Design Analysis Language (DAL). These programs reduced the amount of time required to construct complex geometries and to generate input for theoretical programs. Certain shortcomings of the Design, Drafting, and Manufacturing (DDM) software limited the effectiveness of these programs and some of the Calma NC software. The complexity of aircraft configurations suggests that more types of surface and curve geometry should be added to the system. Some of these shortcomings may be eliminated as improved versions of DDM are made available.

  1. Front panel engineering with CAD simulation tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delacour, Jacques; Ungar, Serge; Mathieu, Gilles; Hasna, Guenther; Martinez, Pascal; Roche, Jean-Christophe

    1999-04-01

    THe progress made recently in display technology covers many fields of application. The specification of radiance, colorimetry and lighting efficiency creates some new challenges for designers. Photometric design is limited by the capability of correctly predicting the result of a lighting system, to save on the costs and time taken to build multiple prototypes or bread board benches. The second step of the research carried out by company OPTIS is to propose an optimization method to be applied to the lighting system, developed in the software SPEOS. The main features of the tool requires include the CAD interface, to enable fast and efficient transfer between mechanical and light design software, the source modeling, the light transfer model and an optimization tool. The CAD interface is mainly a prototype of transfer, which is not the subjects here. Photometric simulation is efficiently achieved by using the measured source encoding and a simulation by the Monte Carlo method. Today, the advantages and the limitations of the Monte Carlo method are well known. The noise reduction requires a long calculation time, which increases with the complexity of the display panel. A successful optimization is difficult to achieve, due to the long calculation time required for each optimization pass including a Monte Carlo simulation. The problem was initially defined as an engineering method of study. The experience shows that good understanding and mastering of the phenomenon of light transfer is limited by the complexity of non sequential propagation. The engineer must call for the help of a simulation and optimization tool. The main point needed to be able to perform an efficient optimization is a quick method for simulating light transfer. Much work has been done in this area and some interesting results can be observed. It must be said that the Monte Carlo method wastes time calculating some results and information which are not required for the needs of the simulation

  2. Custom CAD-CAM healing abutment and impression coping milled from a poly(methyl methacrylate) block and bonded to a titanium insert.

    PubMed

    Proussaefs, Periklis

    2016-11-01

    This article describes a technique in which a custom-made computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) healing abutment milled from a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) block is fabricated and bonded to a titanium metal insert. An impression is made during dental implant surgery, and the CAD-CAM custom-made healing abutment is fabricated before second-stage surgery while appropriate healing time is allowed for the dental implant to osseointegrate. The contours of the healing abutment are based on the contours of a tentatively designed definitive prosthesis. The healing tissue obtains contours that will be compatible with the contours of the definitive prosthesis. After the milling process is complete, a titanium metal insert is bonded to the healing abutment. Placement of the custom-made CAD-CAM healing abutment at second-stage surgery allows the tissue to obtain contours similar to those of the definitive prosthesis. A custom-made CAD-CAM impression coping milled from a PMMA block and with a titanium insert is used for the definitive impression after the soft tissue has healed. This technique allows guided soft tissue healing by using a custom-made CAD-CAM healing abutment and impression coping. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of cement space on the marginal fit of CAD-CAM-fabricated monolithic zirconia crowns.

    PubMed

    Kale, Ediz; Seker, Emre; Yilmaz, Burak; Özcelik, Tuncer Burak

    2016-12-01

    Monolithic zirconia crowns fabricated with computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) have recently become a common practice for the restoration of posterior teeth. The marginal fit of monolithic zirconia crowns may be affected by different cement space parameters set in the CAD software. Information is scarce regarding the effect of cement space on the marginal fit of monolithic zirconia crowns fabricated with CAD-CAM technology. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of cement space on the marginal fit of CAD-CAM-fabricated monolithic zirconia crowns before cementation. Fifteen right maxillary first molar typodont teeth with standardized anatomic preparations for complete-coverage ceramic crowns were scanned with a 3-dimensional laboratory scanner. Crowns were designed 3-dimensionally using software and then milled from presintered monolithic zirconia blocks in a computer numerical control dental milling machine. The cement space was set at 25 μm around the margins for all groups, and additional cement space starting 1 mm above the finish lines of the teeth was set at 30 μm for group 25-30, 40 μm for group 25-40, and 50 μm for group 25-50 in the CAD software. A total of 120 images (3 groups, 5 crowns per group, 8 sites per crown) were measured for vertical marginal discrepancy under a stereoscopic zoom microscope and the data were statistically analyzed with 1-way analysis of variance, followed by the Tukey honestly significant difference test (α=.05). The results showed that different cement space values had statistically significant effect on the mean vertical marginal discrepancy value of tested crowns (P<.001). The mean marginal discrepancy was 85 μm for group 25-30, 68 μm for group 25-40, and 53 μm for group 25-50. Within the limitations of this in vitro study, it was concluded that the cement space had a significant effect on the marginal fit of CAD-CAM-fabricated monolithic zirconia crowns. The

  4. Analog Computer-Aided Detection (CAD) information can be more effective than binary marks

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Corbin A.; Drew, Trafton; Wolfe, Jeremy M.

    2017-01-01

    In socially important visual search tasks such as baggage screening and diagnostic radiology, experts miss more targets than is desirable. Computer Aided Detection (CAD) programs have been developed specifically to help improve performance in these professional search tasks. For example, in breast cancer screening, many CAD systems are capable of detecting approximately 90% of breast cancer, with approximately 0.5 false positive detections per image. Nevertheless, benefits of CAD in clinical settings tend to be small (Birdwell, 2009) or even absent (Meziane et al., 2011; Philpotts, 2009). The marks made by a CAD system can be “Binary”, giving the same signal to any location where the signal is above some threshold. Alternatively, a CAD system present an Analog signal that reflected strength of the signal at a location. In the experiments reported here, we compare analog and binary CAD presentations using non-expert observers and artificial stimuli defined by two noisy signals: a visible color signal and an "invisible" signal that informed our simulated CAD system. We found that analog CAD generally yielded better overall performance than binary CAD. The analog benefit is similar at high and low target prevalence. Our data suggest that the form of the CAD signal can directly influence performance. Analog CAD may allow the computer to be more helpful to the searcher. PMID:27928658

  5. 3D-WOVEN FIBER-REINFORCED COMPOSITE FOR CAD/CAM DENTAL APPLICATION

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Richard; Liu, Perng-Ru

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D)-woven noncrimp fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) was tested for mechanical properties in the two principal directions of the main XY plane and compared to different Computer-Aided-Design/Computer-Aided-Machining (CAD/CAM) Dental Materials. The Dental Materials included ceramic with Vitablock Mark II®, ProCAD®, InCeram® Spinel, InCeram® Alumina and InCeram® Zirconia in addition to a resin-based 3M Corp. Paradigm® particulate-filled composite. Alternate material controls included Coors 300 Alumina Ceramic and a tungsten carbide 22% cobalt cermet. The 3D-woven FRC was vacuum assisted resin transfer molding processed as a one-depth-thickness ~19-mm preform with a vinyl-ester resin and cut into blocks similar to the commercial CAD/CAM Dental Materials. Mechanical test samples prepared for a flexural three-point span length of 10.0 mm were sectioned for minimum-depth cuts to compare machinability and fracture resistance between groups. 3D-woven FRC improved mechanical properties with significant statistical differences over all CAD/CAM Dental Materials and Coors Alumina Ceramic for flexural strength (p<0.001), resilience (p<0.05), work of fracture (p<0.001), strain energy release (p<0.05), critical stress intensity factor (p<0.001) and strain (p<0.001). PMID:27642198

  6. 3D-WOVEN FIBER-REINFORCED COMPOSITE FOR CAD/CAM DENTAL APPLICATION.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Richard; Liu, Perng-Ru

    2016-05-01

    Three-dimensional (3D)-woven noncrimp fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) was tested for mechanical properties in the two principal directions of the main XY plane and compared to different Computer-Aided-Design/Computer-Aided-Machining (CAD/CAM) Dental Materials. The Dental Materials included ceramic with Vitablock Mark II®, ProCAD®, InCeram® Spinel, InCeram® Alumina and InCeram® Zirconia in addition to a resin-based 3M Corp. Paradigm® particulate-filled composite. Alternate material controls included Coors 300 Alumina Ceramic and a tungsten carbide 22% cobalt cermet. The 3D-woven FRC was vacuum assisted resin transfer molding processed as a one-depth-thickness ~19-mm preform with a vinyl-ester resin and cut into blocks similar to the commercial CAD/CAM Dental Materials. Mechanical test samples prepared for a flexural three-point span length of 10.0 mm were sectioned for minimum-depth cuts to compare machinability and fracture resistance between groups. 3D-woven FRC improved mechanical properties with significant statistical differences over all CAD/CAM Dental Materials and Coors Alumina Ceramic for flexural strength (p<0.001), resilience (p<0.05), work of fracture (p<0.001), strain energy release (p<0.05), critical stress intensity factor (p<0.001) and strain (p<0.001).

  7. CAPRI (Computational Analysis PRogramming Interface): A Solid Modeling Based Infra-Structure for Engineering Analysis and Design Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haimes, Robert; Follen, Gregory J.

    1998-01-01

    CAPRI is a CAD-vendor neutral application programming interface designed for the construction of analysis and design systems. By allowing access to the geometry from within all modules (grid generators, solvers and post-processors) such tasks as meshing on the actual surfaces, node enrichment by solvers and defining which mesh faces are boundaries (for the solver and visualization system) become simpler. The overall reliance on file 'standards' is minimized. This 'Geometry Centric' approach makes multi-physics (multi-disciplinary) analysis codes much easier to build. By using the shared (coupled) surface as the foundation, CAPRI provides a single call to interpolate grid-node based data from the surface discretization in one volume to another. Finally, design systems are possible where the results can be brought back into the CAD system (and therefore manufactured) because all geometry construction and modification are performed using the CAD system's geometry kernel.

  8. Estimation of the risk of failure for an endodontically treated maxillary premolar with MODP preparation and CAD/CAM ceramic restorations.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chun-Li; Chang, Yen-Hsiang; Pa, Che-An

    2009-10-01

    This study evaluated the risk of failure for an endodontically treated premolar with mesio occlusodistal palatal (MODP) preparation and 3 different computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) ceramic restoration configurations. Three 3-dimensional finite element (FE) models designed with CAD/CAM ceramic onlay, endocrown, and conventional crown restorations were constructed to perform simulations. The Weibull function was incorporated with FE analysis to calculate the long-term failure probability relative to different load conditions. The results indicated that the stress values on the enamel, dentin, and luting cement for endocrown restoration were the lowest values relative to the other 2 restorations. Weibull analysis revealed that the individual failure probability in the endocrown enamel, dentin, and luting cement obviously diminished more than those for onlay and conventional crown restorations. The overall failure probabilities were 27.5%, 1%, and 1% for onlay, endocrown, and conventional crown restorations, respectively, in normal occlusal condition. This numeric investigation suggests that endocrown and conventional crown restorations for endodontically treated premolars with MODP preparation present similar longevity.

  9. Teach CAD and Measuring Skills through Reverse Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Board, Keith

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a reverse engineering activity that gives students hands-on, minds-on experience with measuring tools, machine parts, and CAD. The author developed this activity to give students an abundance of practical experience with measuring tools. Equally important, it provides a good interface between the virtual world of CAD 3D…

  10. Evaluating the Learning Process of Mechanical CAD Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamade, R. F.; Artail, H. A.; Jaber, M. Y.

    2007-01-01

    There is little theoretical or experimental research on how beginner-level trainees learn CAD skills in formal training sessions. This work presents findings on how trainees develop their skills in utilizing a solid mechanical CAD tool (Pro/Engineer version 2000i[squared] and later version Wildfire). Exercises at the beginner and intermediate…

  11. Preparing for High Technology: CAD/CAM Programs. Research & Development Series No. 234.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abram, Robert; And Others

    This guide is one of three developed to provide information and resources to assist in planning and developing postsecondary technican training programs in high technology areas. It is specifically intended for vocational-technical educators and planners in the initial stages of planning a specialized training option in computer-aided design (CAD)…

  12. Comparison of Fit of Dentures Fabricated by Traditional Techniques Versus CAD/CAM Technology.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, J Bryan; Ramos, Van; Dickinson, Douglas P

    2017-11-14

    To compare the shrinkage of denture bases fabricated by three methods: CAD/CAM, compression molding, and injection molding. The effect of arch form and palate depth was also tested. Nine titanium casts, representing combinations of tapered, ovoid, and square arch forms and shallow, medium, and deep palate depths, were fabricated using electron beam melting (EBM) technology. For each base fabrication method, three poly(vinyl siloxane) impressions were made from each cast, 27 dentures for each method. Compression-molded dentures were fabricated using Lucitone 199 poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA), and injection molded dentures with Ivobase's Hybrid Pink PMMA. For CAD/CAM, denture bases were designed and milled by Avadent using their Light PMMA. To quantify the space between the denture and the master cast, silicone duplicating material was placed in the intaglio of the dentures, the titanium master cast was seated under pressure, and the silicone was then trimmed and recovered. Three silicone measurements per denture were recorded, for a total of 243 measurements. Each silicone measurement was weighed and adjusted to the surface area of the respective arch, giving an average and standard deviation for each denture. Comparison of manufacturing methods showed a statistically significant difference (p = 0.0001). Using a ratio of the means, compression molding had on average 41% to 47% more space than injection molding and CAD/CAM. Comparison of arch/palate forms showed a statistically significant difference (p = 0.023), with shallow palate forms having more space with compression molding. The ovoid shallow form showed CAD/CAM and compression molding had more space than injection molding. Overall, injection molding and CAD/CAM fabrication methods produced equally well-fitting dentures, with both having a better fit than compression molding. Shallow palates appear to be more affected by shrinkage than medium or deep palates. Shallow ovoid arch forms appear to benefit from

  13. Effect of professional dental prophylaxis on the surface gloss and roughness of CAD/CAM restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Toshiko; Kameyama, Atsushi; Enokuchi, Tomoka; Haruyama, Akiko; Chiba, Aoi; Sugiyama, Setsuko; Hosaka, Makoto; Takahashi, Toshiyuki

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of dental prophylaxis on the surface gloss and roughness of different indirect restorative materials for computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM): two types of CAD/CAM composite resin blocks (Shofu Block HC and Estelite Block) and two types of CAD/CAM ceramic blocks (IPS Empress CAD and Celtra DUO). After polishing the CAD/CAM blocks and applying prophylaxis pastes, professional dental prophylaxis was performed using four different experimental protocols (n = 5 each): mechanical cleaning with Merssage Regular for 10 s four times (Group 1); four cycles of mechanical cleaning with Merssage Regular for 10 s and Merssage Fine for 10 s (Group 2); four cycles of mechanical cleaning with Merssage Regular for 10 s and Merssage Fine for 30 s (Group 3); and mechanical cleaning with Merssage Fine for 10 s four times (Group 4). A glossmeter was used to measure surface gloss before and after mechanical cleaning, and a contact stylus profilometer was used to measure surface roughness (Ra). Polishing with prophylactic paste led to a significant reduction in surface gloss and increase in surface roughness among resin composite blocks, whereas the polishing-related change in surface gloss or roughness was smaller in Celtra DUO, a zirconia-reinforced lithium silicate block. Changes in surface gloss and roughness due to polishing with a prophylactic paste containing large particles were not improved by subsequent polishing with a prophylactic paste containing fine particles. Key words: CAD/CAM, professional dental prophylaxis, prophylactic paste, surface gloss, surface roughness.

  14. Effect of professional dental prophylaxis on the surface gloss and roughness of CAD/CAM restorative materials

    PubMed Central

    Sugiyama, Toshiko; Enokuchi, Tomoka; Haruyama, Akiko; Chiba, Aoi; Sugiyama, Setsuko; Hosaka, Makoto; Takahashi, Toshiyuki

    2017-01-01

    Background This study aimed to evaluate the effect of dental prophylaxis on the surface gloss and roughness of different indirect restorative materials for computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM): two types of CAD/CAM composite resin blocks (Shofu Block HC and Estelite Block) and two types of CAD/CAM ceramic blocks (IPS Empress CAD and Celtra DUO). Material and Methods After polishing the CAD/CAM blocks and applying prophylaxis pastes, professional dental prophylaxis was performed using four different experimental protocols (n = 5 each): mechanical cleaning with Merssage Regular for 10 s four times (Group 1); four cycles of mechanical cleaning with Merssage Regular for 10 s and Merssage Fine for 10 s (Group 2); four cycles of mechanical cleaning with Merssage Regular for 10 s and Merssage Fine for 30 s (Group 3); and mechanical cleaning with Merssage Fine for 10 s four times (Group 4). A glossmeter was used to measure surface gloss before and after mechanical cleaning, and a contact stylus profilometer was used to measure surface roughness (Ra). Results Polishing with prophylactic paste led to a significant reduction in surface gloss and increase in surface roughness among resin composite blocks, whereas the polishing-related change in surface gloss or roughness was smaller in Celtra DUO, a zirconia-reinforced lithium silicate block. Conclusions Changes in surface gloss and roughness due to polishing with a prophylactic paste containing large particles were not improved by subsequent polishing with a prophylactic paste containing fine particles. Key words:CAD/CAM, professional dental prophylaxis, prophylactic paste, surface gloss, surface roughness. PMID:28638554

  15. Computed-aided diagnosis (CAD) in the detection of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Dromain, C; Boyer, B; Ferré, R; Canale, S; Delaloge, S; Balleyguier, C

    2013-03-01

    Computer-aided detection (CAD) systems have been developed for interpretation to improve mammographic detection of breast cancer at screening by reducing the number of false-negative interpretation that can be caused by subtle findings, radiologist distraction and complex architecture. They use a digitized mammographic image that can be obtained from both screen-film mammography and full field digital mammography. Its performance in breast cancer detection is dependent on the performance of the CAD itself, the population to which it is applied and the radiologists who use it. There is a clear benefit to the use of CAD in less experienced radiologist and in detecting breast carcinomas presenting as microcalcifications. This review gives a detailed description CAD systems used in mammography and their performance in assistance of reading in screening mammography and as an alternative to double reading. Other CAD systems developed for MRI and ultrasound are also presented and discussed. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  16. Use of three-dimensional, CAD/CAM-assisted, virtual surgical simulation and planning in the pediatric craniofacial population.

    PubMed

    Gray, Rachel; Gougoutas, Alexander; Nguyen, Vinh; Taylor, Jesse; Bastidas, Nicholas

    2017-06-01

    Virtual Surgical Planning (VSP) and computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) have recently helped improve efficiency and accuracy in many different craniofacial surgeries. Research has mainly focused on the use in the adult population with the exception of the use for mandibular distractions and cranial vault remodeling in the pediatric population. This study aims to elucidate the role of VSP and CAD/CAM in complex pediatric craniofacial cases by exploring its use in the correction of midface hypoplasia, orbital dystopia, mandibular reconstruction, and posterior cranial vault expansion. A retrospective analysis of thirteen patients who underwent 3d, CAD/CAM- assisted preoperative surgical planning between 2012 and 2016 was performed. All CAD/CAM assisted surgical planning was done in conjunction with a third party vendor (either 3D Systems or Materialise). Cutting and positioning guides as well as models were produced based on the virtual plan. Surgeries included free fibula mandible reconstruction (n = 4), lefort I osteotomy and distraction (n = 2), lefort II osteotomy with monobloc distraction (n = 1), expansion of the posterior vault for correction of chiari malformation (n = 3), and secondary orbital and midface reconstruction for facial trauma (n = 3). The patient's age, diagnosis, previous surgeries, length of operating time, complications, and post-surgery satisfaction were determined. In all cases we found presurgical planning was helpful to improve accuracy and significantly decrease intra-operative time. In cases where distraction was used, the planned and actual vectors were found to be accurate with excellent clinical outcomes. There were no complications except for one patient who experienced a wound infection post-operatively which did not alter the ultimate reconstruction. All patients experienced high satisfaction with their outcomes and excellent subjective aesthetic results were achieved. Preoperative planning using

  17. Parametric bicubic spline and CAD tools for complex targets shape modelling in physical optics radar cross section prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delogu, A.; Furini, F.

    1991-09-01

    Increasing interest in radar cross section (RCS) reduction is placing new demands on theoretical, computation, and graphic techniques for calculating scattering properties of complex targets. In particular, computer codes capable of predicting the RCS of an entire aircraft at high frequency and of achieving RCS control with modest structural changes, are becoming of paramount importance in stealth design. A computer code, evaluating the RCS of arbitrary shaped metallic objects that are computer aided design (CAD) generated, and its validation with measurements carried out using ALENIA RCS test facilities are presented. The code, based on the physical optics method, is characterized by an efficient integration algorithm with error control, in order to contain the computer time within acceptable limits, and by an accurate parametric representation of the target surface in terms of bicubic splines.

  18. In vitro evaluation of marginal discrepancy of monolithic zirconia restorations fabricated with different CAD-CAM systems.

    PubMed

    Hamza, Tamer A; Sherif, Rana M

    2017-06-01

    Dental laboratories use different computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) systems to fabricate fixed prostheses; however, limited evidence is available concerning which system provides the best marginal discrepancy. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the marginal fit of 5 different monolithic zirconia restorations milled with different CAD-CAM systems. Thirty monolithic zirconia crowns were fabricated on a custom-designed stainless steel die and were divided into 5 groups according to the type of monolithic zirconia crown and the CAD-CAM system used: group TZ, milled with an MCXL milling machine; group CZ, translucent zirconia milled with a motion milling machine; group ZZ, zirconia milled with a dental milling unit; group PZ, translucent zirconia milled with a zirconia milling unit; and group BZ, solid zirconia milled using an S1 VHF milling machine. The marginal fit was measured with a binocular microscope at an original magnification of ×100. The results were tabulated and statistically analyzed with 1-way ANOVA and post hoc surface range test, and pairwise multiple comparisons were made using Bonferroni correction (α=.05). The type of CAD-CAM used affected the marginal fit of the monolithic restoration. The mean (±SD) highest marginal discrepancy was recorded in group TZI at 39.3 ±2.3 μm, while the least mean marginal discrepancy was recorded in group IZ (22.8 ±8.9 μm). The Bonferroni post hoc test showed that group TZI was significantly different from all other groups tested (P<.05). Within the limitation of this in vitro study, all tested CAD-CAM systems produced monolithic zirconia restorations with clinically acceptable marginal discrepancies; however, the CAD-CAM system with the 5-axis milling unit produced the best marginal fit. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. [Coloration of mica glass ceramic for use in dental CAD/CAM system].

    PubMed

    Sun, Ying; Wang, Zhong-yi; Tian, Jie-mo; Cao, Xiao-gang

    2003-03-01

    An intrinsically colored machinable glass-ceramic containing tetrasilicic fluormica as the predominant crystal phase was studied, which was used in molar crown in dental CAD/CAM system. Orthogonal design analysis was used to select appropriate base formula, coloration and heat treatment process. Factors influencing the color appearance of mica glass ceramic were nucleation agent and the ratio of Mg(2+) to K(+) in base formula; Cerium oxide (CeO(2)) was used as the main coloration; The preferred heat treatment was 650 degrees C for 1 h and 1,000 degrees C or 1,050 degrees C for 3 h - 4 h. This mica glass-ceramic could provide 4 to 5 color appearance for dental use, it showed excellent machinability which was eminently suitable for use in dental CAD/CAM system.

  20. Transcriptome-wide identification and characterization of CAD isoforms specific for podophyllotoxin biosynthesis from Podophyllum hexandrum.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Dipto; Hazra, Saptarshi; Banerjee, Anindyajit; Datta, Riddhi; Kumar, Deepak; Chakrabarti, Saikat; Chattopadhyay, Sharmila

    2016-09-01

    Podophyllotoxin (ptox) is a therapeutically important lignan derived from Podophyllum hexandrum and is used as a precursor for the synthesis of anticancer drugs etoposide, teniposide and etopophose. In spite of its enormous economic significance, genomic information on this endangered medicinal herb is scarce. We have performed de novo transcriptome analysis of methyl jasmonate (MeJA)-treated P. hexandrum cell cultures exhibiting enhanced ptox accumulation. The results revealed the maximum up-regulation of several isoforms of cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD). CAD catalyzes the synthesis of coniferyl alcohol and sinapyl alcohol from coniferaldehyde (CAld) and sinapaldehyde respectively. Coniferyl alcohol can produce both lignin and lignan while sinapyl alcohol produces only lignin. To isolate the CAD isoforms favoring ptox, we deduced full length cDNA sequences of four CAD isoforms: PhCAD1, PhCAD2, PhCAD3 and PhCAD4 from the contigs of the transcriptome data. In vitro enzyme assays indicated a higher affinity for CAld over sinapaldehyde for each isoform. In silico molecular docking analyses also suggested that PhCAD3 has a higher binding preference with CAld over sinapaldehyde, followed by PhCAD4, PhCAD2, and PhCAD1, respectively. The transgenic cell cultures overexpressing these isoforms independently revealed that PhCAD3 favored the maximum accumulation of ptox as compared to lignin followed by PhCAD4 and PhCAD2, whereas, PhCAD1 favored both equally. Together, our study reveals transcriptome-wide identification and characterization of ptox specific CAD isoforms from P. hexandrum. It provides a useful resource for future research not only on the ptox biosynthetic pathway but on overall P. hexandrum, an endangered medicinal herb with immense therapeutic importance.

  1. Verifying Three-Dimensional Skull Model Reconstruction Using Cranial Index of Symmetry

    PubMed Central

    Kung, Woon-Man; Chen, Shuo-Tsung; Lin, Chung-Hsiang; Lu, Yu-Mei; Chen, Tzu-Hsuan; Lin, Muh-Shi

    2013-01-01

    Background Difficulty exists in scalp adaptation for cranioplasty with customized computer-assisted design/manufacturing (CAD/CAM) implant in situations of excessive wound tension and sub-cranioplasty dead space. To solve this clinical problem, the CAD/CAM technique should include algorithms to reconstruct a depressed contour to cover the skull defect. Satisfactory CAM-derived alloplastic implants are based on highly accurate three-dimensional (3-D) CAD modeling. Thus, it is quite important to establish a symmetrically regular CAD/CAM reconstruction prior to depressing the contour. The purpose of this study is to verify the aesthetic outcomes of CAD models with regular contours using cranial index of symmetry (CIS). Materials and methods From January 2011 to June 2012, decompressive craniectomy (DC) was performed for 15 consecutive patients in our institute. 3-D CAD models of skull defects were reconstructed using commercial software. These models were checked in terms of symmetry by CIS scores. Results CIS scores of CAD reconstructions were 99.24±0.004% (range 98.47–99.84). CIS scores of these CAD models were statistically significantly greater than 95%, identical to 99.5%, but lower than 99.6% (p<0.001, p = 0.064, p = 0.021 respectively, Wilcoxon matched pairs signed rank test). These data evidenced the highly accurate symmetry of these CAD models with regular contours. Conclusions CIS calculation is beneficial to assess aesthetic outcomes of CAD-reconstructed skulls in terms of cranial symmetry. This enables further accurate CAD models and CAM cranial implants with depressed contours, which are essential in patients with difficult scalp adaptation. PMID:24204566

  2. Simulation-Driven Design Approach for Design and Optimization of Blankholder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sravan, Tatipala; Suddapalli, Nikshep R.; Johan, Pilthammar; Mats, Sigvant; Christian, Johansson

    2017-09-01

    Reliable design of stamping dies is desired for efficient and safe production. The design of stamping dies are today mostly based on casting feasibility, although it can also be based on criteria for fatigue, stiffness, safety, economy. Current work presents an approach that is built on Simulation Driven Design, enabling Design Optimization to address this issue. A structural finite element model of a stamping die, used to produce doors for Volvo V70/S80 car models, is studied. This die had developed cracks during its usage. To understand the behaviour of stress distribution in the stamping die, structural analysis of the die is conducted and critical regions with high stresses are identified. The results from structural FE-models are compared with analytical calculations pertaining to fatigue properties of the material. To arrive at an optimum design with increased stiffness and lifetime, topology and free-shape optimization are performed. In the optimization routine, identified critical regions of the die are set as design variables. Other optimization variables are set to maintain manufacturability of the resultant stamping die. Thereafter a CAD model is built based on geometrical results from topology and free-shape optimizations. Then the CAD model is subjected to structural analysis to visualize the new stress distribution. This process is iterated until a satisfactory result is obtained. The final results show reduction in stress levels by 70% with a more homogeneous distribution. Even though mass of the die is increased by 17 %, overall, a stiffer die with better lifetime is obtained. Finally, by reflecting on the entire process, a coordinated approach to handle such situations efficiently is presented.

  3. Studying the Relation of Postprandial Triglyceride with Coronary Artery Disease (CAD).

    PubMed

    Manochehri, Mohammad; Moghadam, Adel Johari

    2016-07-27

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most common cause of mortality worldwide and determination of contributing factors is essential. This study was conducted to study the relation of postprandial triglyceride as a risk of coronary artery disease in patients with proven CAD by angiography, referred to 502 Hospital of Army in 2015. This observational study conducted as a case-control and contained 80 male participants referred to 502 Hospital of Army. Half of these participants had proven CAD by angiography test and the other ones were healthy as a control group. Fasting serum triglyceride was evaluated in all participants and postprandial TG was checked 4 hours after a standard meal. Obtained data were analyzed by SPSS ver. 13. The results indicated that fasting TG and postprandial TG level were significantly higher in CAD patients (P-value=0.001). It was also shown evaluation of postprandial TG is more sensitive test than fasting TG in case of CAD patients. Our obtained results shown, evaluation of high level of postprandial TG is more reliable than fasting TG for patients whom suffer from CAD.

  4. Fracture analysis of CAD-CAM high-density polymers used for interim implant-supported fixed, cantilevered prostheses.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Burak; Alp, Gülce; Seidt, Jeremy; Johnston, William M; Vitter, Roger; McGlumphy, Edwin A

    2018-01-06

    The load-to-fracture performance of computer-assisted design and computer-assisted manufacturing (CAD-CAM) high-density polymer (HDP) materials in cantilevers is unknown. The purposes of this in vitro study were to evaluate the load-to-fracture performance of CAD-CAM-fabricated HDPs and to compare that with performance of autopolymerized and injection-molded acrylic resins. Specimens from 8 different brands of CAD-CAM HDPs, including Brylic Solid (BS); Brylic Gradient (BG); AnaxCAD Temp EZ (AE); AnaxCAD Temp Plus (AP); Zirkonzahn Temp Basic (Z); GDS Tempo-CAD (GD); Polident (Po); Merz M-PM-Disc (MAT); an autopolymerized acrylic resin, Imident (Conv) and an injection-molded acrylic resin, SR-IvoBase High Impact (Inj) were evaluated for load-to-fracture analysis (n=5). CAD-CAM specimens were milled from poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) blocks measuring 7 mm in buccolingual width, 8 mm in occlusocervical thickness, and 30 mm in length. A wax pattern was prepared in the same dimensions used for CAD-CAM specimens, flasked, and boiled out. Autopolymerizing acrylic resin was packed and polymerized in a pressure container for 30 minutes. An identical wax pattern was flasked and boiled out, and premeasured capsules were injected (SR-IvoBase) and polymerized under hydraulic pressure for 35 minutes for the injection-molded PMMA. Specimens were thermocycled 5000 times (5°C to 55°C) and fixed to a universal testing machine to receive static loads on the 10-mm cantilever, vertically at a 1 mm/min crosshead speed until fracture occurred. Maximum load-to-fracture values were recorded. ANOVA was used to analyze the maximum force values. Significant differences among materials were analyzed by using the Ryan-Einot-Gabriel-Welsch multiple range test (α=.05). Statistically significant differences were found among load-to-fracture values of different HDPs (P<.001). GD and Po materials had significantly higher load-to-fracture values than other materials (P<.001), and no

  5. Optimized FPGA Implementation of the Thyroid Hormone Secretion Mechanism Using CAD Tools.

    PubMed

    Alghazo, Jaafar M

    2017-02-01

    The goal of this paper is to implement the secretion mechanism of the Thyroid Hormone (TH) based on bio-mathematical differential eqs. (DE) on an FPGA chip. Hardware Descriptive Language (HDL) is used to develop a behavioral model of the mechanism derived from the DE. The Thyroid Hormone secretion mechanism is simulated with the interaction of the related stimulating and inhibiting hormones. Synthesis of the simulation is done with the aid of CAD tools and downloaded on a Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) Chip. The chip output shows identical behavior to that of the designed algorithm through simulation. It is concluded that the chip mimics the Thyroid Hormone secretion mechanism. The chip, operating in real-time, is computer-independent stand-alone system.

  6. Biaxial flexural strength of CAD/CAM ceramics.

    PubMed

    Buso, L; Oliveira-Júnior, O B; Hiroshi Fujiy, F; Leão Lombardo, G H; Ramalho Sarmento, H; Campos, F; Assunção Souza, R O

    2011-06-01

    Aim of the study was to evaluate the biaxial flexural strength of ceramics processed using the Cerec inLab system. The hypothesis was that the flexural strength would be influenced by the type of ceramic. Ten samples (ISO 6872) of each ceramic (N.=50/n.=10) were made using Cerec inLab (software Cerec 3D) (Ø:15 mm, thickness: 1.2 mm). Three silica-based ceramics (Vita Mark II [VM], ProCad [PC] and e-max CAD ECAD]) and two yttria-stabilized tetragonal-zirconia-polycrystalline ceramics (Y-TZP) (e-max ZirCad [ZrCAD] and Vita In-Ceram 2000 YZ Cubes [VYZ]) were tested. The samples were finished with wet silicone carbide papers up to 1 200-grit and polished in a polishing machine with diamond paste (3 µm). The samples were then submitted to biaxial flexural strength testing in a universal testing machine (EMIC), 1 mm/min. The data (MPa) were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn (5%) tests. Scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) was performed on a representative sample from each group. The values (median, mean±sd) obtained for the experimental groups were: VM (101.7, 102.1±13.65 MPa), PC (165.2, 160±34.7 MPa), ECAD (437.2, 416.1±50.1 MPa), ZrCAD (804.2, 800.8±64.47 MPa) and VYZ (792.7, 807±100.7 MPa). The type of ceramic influenced the flexural strength values (P=0.0001). The ceramics ECADa, e-max ZrCADa and VYZa presented similar flexural strength values which were significantly higher than the other groups (PCb and VM IIb), which were similar statistically between them (Dunn's test). The hypothesis was accepted. The polycrystalline ceramics (Y-TZP) should be material chosen for make FPDs because of their higher flexural strength values.

  7. Optical properties of CAD-CAM ceramic systems.

    PubMed

    Della Bona, Alvaro; Nogueira, Audrea D; Pecho, Oscar E

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the direct transmittance (T%), translucency, opacity and opalescence of CAD-CAM ceramic systems and the correlation between the translucency parameter (TP) and the contrast ratio (CR). Specimens of shades A1, A2 and A3 (n=5) were fabricated from CAD-CAM ceramic blocks (IPS e.max(®) CAD HT and LT, IPS Empress(®) CAD HT and LT, Paradigm™ C, and VITABLOCS(®) Mark II) and polished to 1.0±0.01mm in thickness. A spectrophotometer (Lambda 20) was used to measure T% on the wavelength range of 400-780nm. Another spectrophotometer (VITA Easyshade(®) Advance) was used to measure the CIE L(*)a(*)b(*) coordinates and the reflectance value (Y) of samples on white and black backgrounds. TP, CR and the opalescence parameter (OP) were calculated. Data were statistically analysed using VAF (variance accounting for) coefficient with Cauchy-Schwarz inequality, one-way ANOVA, Tukey's test, Bonferroni correction and Pearson's correlation. T% of some ceramic systems is dependent on the wavelength. The spectral behaviour showed a slight and constant increase in T% up to approximately 550nm, then some ceramics changed the behaviour as the wavelength gets longer. TP and CR values ranged, respectively, from 16.79 to 21.69 and from 0.52 to 0.64 (r(2)=-0.97). OP values ranged from 3.01 to 7.64. The microstructure of CAD-CAM ceramic systems influenced the optical properties. TP and CR showed a strong correlation for all ceramic systems evaluated. Yet, all ceramics showed some degree of light transmittance. In addition to shade, this study showed that other optical properties influence on the natural appearance of dental ceramics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Automated extraction of knowledge for model-based diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, Avelino J.; Myler, Harley R.; Towhidnejad, Massood; Mckenzie, Frederic D.; Kladke, Robin R.

    1990-01-01

    The concept of accessing computer aided design (CAD) design databases and extracting a process model automatically is investigated as a possible source for the generation of knowledge bases for model-based reasoning systems. The resulting system, referred to as automated knowledge generation (AKG), uses an object-oriented programming structure and constraint techniques as well as internal database of component descriptions to generate a frame-based structure that describes the model. The procedure has been designed to be general enough to be easily coupled to CAD systems that feature a database capable of providing label and connectivity data from the drawn system. The AKG system is capable of defining knowledge bases in formats required by various model-based reasoning tools.

  9. CAD-CAM plates versus conventional fixation plates for primary mandibular reconstruction: A biomechanical in vitro analysis.

    PubMed

    Rendenbach, Carsten; Sellenschloh, Kay; Gerbig, Lucca; Morlock, Michael M; Beck-Broichsitter, Benedicta; Smeets, Ralf; Heiland, Max; Huber, Gerd; Hanken, Henning

    2017-11-01

    CAD/CAM reconstruction plates have become a viable option for mandible reconstruction. The aim of this study was to determine whether CAD/CAM plates provide higher fatigue strength compared with conventional fixation systems. 1.0 mm miniplates, 2.0 mm conventional locking plates (DePuy Synthes, Umkirch, Germany), and 2.0 mm CAD/CAM plates (Materialise, Leuven, Belgium/DePuy Synthes) were used to reconstruct a polyurethane mandible model (Synbone, Malans, CH) with cortical and cancellous bone equivalents. Mastication was simulated via cyclic dynamic testing using a universal testing machine (MTS, Bionix, Eden Prairie, MN, USA) until material failure reached a rate of 1 Hz with increasing loads on the left side. No significant difference was found between the groups until a load of 300 N. At higher loads, vertical displacement differed increasingly, with a poorer performance of miniplates (p = 0.04). Plate breakage occurred in miniplates and conventional locking plates. Screw breakage was recorded as the primary failure mechanism in CAD/CAM plates. Stiffness was significantly higher with the CAD/CAM plates (p = 0.04). CAD/CAM plates and reconstruction plates provide higher fatigue strength than miniplates, and stiffness is highest in CAD/CAM systems. All tested fixation methods seem sufficiently stable for mandible reconstruction. Copyright © 2017 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of surface treatments on the bond strength of CAD/CAM fiberglass posts.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Paula-Pontes; da Costa, Rogério-Goulart; Garcia, André-Vivan; Gonzaga, Carla-Castiglia; da Cunha, Leonardo-Fernandes; Rezende, Carlos-Eduardo-Edwards; Correr, Gisele-Maria

    2018-06-01

    There is no ideal protocol for the surface treatment of fiber posts, especially when using a computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) experimental fiberglass block. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of a CAD/CAM customized glass fiber post and core after applying different surface treatment techniques. Forty premolars were prepared to receive a customized CAD/CAM glass-fiber post and core obtained from an experimental block of glass fiber and epoxy resin. The specimens were randomly distributed in 4 groups (n=10) according to the post and core surface treatment: ETH - 70% ethanol; HP - 24% hydrogen peroxide for 1 minute; ETH/S - 70% ethanol + silane; HP/S - 24% hydrogen peroxide + silane. The universal adhesive containing silane was applied on the posts and prepared post spaces in all groups. The posts were cemented using dual cure resin cement. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 h, cut (two slices of 1 mm for each root third - coronal, middle, and apical) and subjected to push-out test (0.5 mm/min). Data was subjected to two-way ANOVA (surface treatment and root third) and Tukey's test (α=0,05). There was no significant difference of bond strength values among groups, regardless the surface treatment ( p >0.05). There was significant difference on bond strength values for the different root thirds ( p <0.05) (coronal>middle=apical). The different surface treatment and application of additional silane in the CAD/CAM customized glass-fiber post and core does not interfere on bond strength values. The root dentin third interfered on the bond strength, with higher values for the coronal third. Key words: Post and core technique, cad/cam, shear strength, hydrogen peroxide.

  11. Effect of surface treatments on the bond strength of CAD/CAM fiberglass posts

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Paula-Pontes; da Costa, Rogério-Goulart; Garcia, André-Vivan; Gonzaga, Carla-Castiglia; da Cunha, Leonardo-Fernandes; Rezende, Carlos-Eduardo-Edwards

    2018-01-01

    Background There is no ideal protocol for the surface treatment of fiber posts, especially when using a computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) experimental fiberglass block. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of a CAD/CAM customized glass fiber post and core after applying different surface treatment techniques. Material and Methods Forty premolars were prepared to receive a customized CAD/CAM glass-fiber post and core obtained from an experimental block of glass fiber and epoxy resin. The specimens were randomly distributed in 4 groups (n=10) according to the post and core surface treatment: ETH - 70% ethanol; HP - 24% hydrogen peroxide for 1 minute; ETH/S - 70% ethanol + silane; HP/S - 24% hydrogen peroxide + silane. The universal adhesive containing silane was applied on the posts and prepared post spaces in all groups. The posts were cemented using dual cure resin cement. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 h, cut (two slices of 1 mm for each root third - coronal, middle, and apical) and subjected to push-out test (0.5 mm/min). Data was subjected to two-way ANOVA (surface treatment and root third) and Tukey’s test (α=0,05). Results There was no significant difference of bond strength values among groups, regardless the surface treatment (p >0.05). There was significant difference on bond strength values for the different root thirds (p<0.05) (coronal>middle=apical). Conclusions The different surface treatment and application of additional silane in the CAD/CAM customized glass-fiber post and core does not interfere on bond strength values. The root dentin third interfered on the bond strength, with higher values for the coronal third. Key words:Post and core technique, cad/cam, shear strength, hydrogen peroxide. PMID:29930778

  12. ISS-CREAM Thermal and Fluid System Design and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorpe, Rosemary S.

    2015-01-01

    Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop (TFAWS), Silver Spring MD NCTS 21070-15. The ISS-CREAM (Cosmic Ray Energetics And Mass for the International Space Station) payload is being developed by an international team and will provide significant cosmic ray characterization over a long time frame. Cold fluid provided by the ISS Exposed Facility (EF) is the primary means of cooling for 5 science instruments and over 7 electronics boxes. Thermal fluid integrated design and analysis was performed for CREAM using a Thermal Desktop model. This presentation will provide some specific design and modeling examples from the fluid cooling system, complex SCD (Silicon Charge Detector) and calorimeter hardware, and integrated payload and ISS level modeling. Features of Thermal Desktop such as CAD simplification, meshing of complex hardware, External References (Xrefs), and FloCAD modeling will be discussed.

  13. Performance evaluation of NASA/KSC CAD/CAE graphics local area network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zobrist, George

    1988-01-01

    This study had as an objective the performance evaluation of the existing CAD/CAE graphics network at NASA/KSC. This evaluation will also aid in projecting planned expansions, such as the Space Station project on the existing CAD/CAE network. The objectives were achieved by collecting packet traffic on the various integrated sub-networks. This included items, such as total number of packets on the various subnetworks, source/destination of packets, percent utilization of network capacity, peak traffic rates, and packet size distribution. The NASA/KSC LAN was stressed to determine the useable bandwidth of the Ethernet network and an average design station workload was used to project the increased traffic on the existing network and the planned T1 link. This performance evaluation of the network will aid the NASA/KSC network managers in planning for the integration of future workload requirements into the existing network.

  14. Association of rs662799 in APOA5 with CAD in Chinese Han population.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hua; Ding, Shifang; Zhou, Mi; Wu, Xiayin; Liu, Xi; Wu, Yun; Liu, Dechao

    2018-01-08

    CAD (Coronary Artery Disease) is a complex disease that influenced by various environmental and genetic factors. Previous studies have found many single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with the risk of CAD occurrence. However, the results are inconsistent. In this study, we aim to investigate genetic etiology in Chinese Han population by analysis of 7 SNPs in lipid metabolism pathway that previously has been reported to be associated with CAD. A total of 631 samples were used in this study, including 435 CAD cases and 196 normal healthy controls. SNP genotyping were conducted via multiplex PCR amplifying followed by NGS (next-generation sequencing). Rs662799 in APOA5 (Apolipoprotein A5) gene was associated with CAD in Chinese Han population (Odds-ratio = 1.374, P-value = 0.03). No significant association was observed between the rest of SNPs and CAD. Stratified association analysis revealed rs5882 was associated with CAD in non-hypertension group (Odds-ratio = 1.593, P-value = 0.023). Rs1800588 was associated with CAD in smoking group (Odds-ratio = 1.603, P-value = 0.035). The minor allele of rs662799 was the risk factor of CAD occurrences in Chinese Han population.

  15. Longitudinal Study of Factors Impacting the Implementation of Notebook Computer Based CAD Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goosen, Richard F.

    2009-01-01

    This study provides information for higher education leaders that have or are considering conducting Computer Aided Design (CAD) instruction using student owned notebook computers. Survey data were collected during the first 8 years of a pilot program requiring engineering technology students at a four year public university to acquire a notebook…

  16. Indirect zirconia-reinforced lithium silicate ceramic CAD/CAM restorations: Preliminary clinical results after 12 months.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Moritz; Koller, Christina; Mehl, Albert; Hickel, Reinhard

    2017-01-01

    No clinical data are available for the new computer-aided design/computer-assisted manufacture (CAD/CAM) material zirconia-reinforced lithium silicate (ZLS) ceramic. This study describes preliminary clinical results for indirect ZLS CAD/CAM restorations after 12 months. Indirect restorations were fabricated, using the CEREC method and intraoral scanning (CEREC Omnicam, CEREC MCXL). Sixty-seven restorations were seated adhesively (baseline). Sixty restorations were evaluated after 12 months (follow-up), using modified FDI criteria. Two groups were established, according to ZLS restorations' post-processing procedure prior to adhesive seating: group I (three-step polishing, n = 32) and group II (fire glazing, n = 28). Statistical analysis was performed with Mann-Whitney U test and Wilcoxon test (P < .05). The success rate of indirect ZLS CAD/CAM restorations after 12 months was 96.7%. Two restorations clinically failed as a result of bulk fracture (failure rate 3.3%). No statistically significant differences were found for baseline and follow-up criteria (Wilcoxon test, P > .05). Statistically significant differences were found for criteria surface gloss for group I and group II (Mann-Whitney U test, P < .05). This study demonstrates ZLS CAD/CAM restorations have a high clinical success rate after 12 months. A longer clinical evaluation period is necessary to draw further conclusions.

  17. The Use of Pro/Engineer CAD Software and Fishbowl Tool Kit in Ray-tracing Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nounu, Hatem N.; Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Ponomarev, Artem L.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2009-01-01

    This document is designed as a manual for a user who wants to operate the Pro/ENGINEER (ProE) Wildfire 3.0 with the NASA Space Radiation Program's (SRP) custom-designed Toolkit, called 'Fishbowl', for the ray tracing of complex spacecraft geometries given by a ProE CAD model. The analysis of spacecraft geometry through ray tracing is a vital part in the calculation of health risks from space radiation. Space radiation poses severe risks of cancer, degenerative diseases and acute radiation sickness during long-term exploration missions, and shielding optimization is an important component in the application of radiation risk models. Ray tracing is a technique in which 3-dimensional (3D) vehicle geometry can be represented as the input for the space radiation transport code and subsequent risk calculations. In ray tracing a certain number of rays (on the order of 1000) are used to calculate the equivalent thickness, say of aluminum, of the spacecraft geometry seen at a point of interest called the dose point. The rays originate at the dose point and terminate at a homogenously distributed set of points lying on a sphere that circumscribes the spacecraft and that has its center at the dose point. The distance a ray traverses in each material is converted to aluminum or other user-selected equivalent thickness. Then all equivalent thicknesses are summed up for each ray. Since each ray points to a direction, the aluminum equivalent of each ray represents the shielding that the geometry provides to the dose point from that particular direction. This manual will first list for the user the contact information for help in installing ProE and Fishbowl in addition to notes on the platform support and system requirements information. Second, the document will show the user how to use the software to ray trace a Pro/E-designed 3-D assembly and will serve later as a reference for troubleshooting. The user is assumed to have previous knowledge of ProE and CAD modeling.

  18. Adjoint Algorithm for CAD-Based Shape Optimization Using a Cartesian Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemec, Marian; Aftosmis, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    Adjoint solutions of the governing flow equations are becoming increasingly important for the development of efficient analysis and optimization algorithms. A well-known use of the adjoint method is gradient-based shape optimization. Given an objective function that defines some measure of performance, such as the lift and drag functionals, its gradient is computed at a cost that is essentially independent of the number of design variables (geometric parameters that control the shape). More recently, emerging adjoint applications focus on the analysis problem, where the adjoint solution is used to drive mesh adaptation, as well as to provide estimates of functional error bounds and corrections. The attractive feature of this approach is that the mesh-adaptation procedure targets a specific functional, thereby localizing the mesh refinement and reducing computational cost. Our focus is on the development of adjoint-based optimization techniques for a Cartesian method with embedded boundaries.12 In contrast t o implementations on structured and unstructured grids, Cartesian methods decouple the surface discretization from the volume mesh. This feature makes Cartesian methods well suited for the automated analysis of complex geometry problems, and consequently a promising approach to aerodynamic optimization. Melvin et developed an adjoint formulation for the TRANAIR code, which is based on the full-potential equation with viscous corrections. More recently, Dadone and Grossman presented an adjoint formulation for the Euler equations. In both approaches, a boundary condition is introduced to approximate the effects of the evolving surface shape that results in accurate gradient computation. Central to automated shape optimization algorithms is the issue of geometry modeling and control. The need to optimize complex, "real-life" geometry provides a strong incentive for the use of parametric-CAD systems within the optimization procedure. In previous work, we presented

  19. Computer-aided design of biological circuits using TinkerCell.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Deepak; Bergmann, Frank T; Sauro, Herbert M

    2010-01-01

    Synthetic biology is an engineering discipline that builds on modeling practices from systems biology and wet-lab techniques from genetic engineering. As synthetic biology advances, efficient procedures will be developed that will allow a synthetic biologist to design, analyze, and build biological networks. In this idealized pipeline, computer-aided design (CAD) is a necessary component. The role of a CAD application would be to allow efficient transition from a general design to a final product. TinkerCell is a design tool for serving this purpose in synthetic biology. In TinkerCell, users build biological networks using biological parts and modules. The network can be analyzed using one of several functions provided by TinkerCell or custom programs from third-party sources. Since best practices for modeling and constructing synthetic biology networks have not yet been established, TinkerCell is designed as a flexible and extensible application that can adjust itself to changes in the field. © 2010 Landes Bioscience

  20. Computer-aided design of biological circuits using TinkerCell

    PubMed Central

    Bergmann, Frank T; Sauro, Herbert M

    2010-01-01

    Synthetic biology is an engineering discipline that builds on modeling practices from systems biology and wet-lab techniques from genetic engineering. As synthetic biology advances, efficient procedures will be developed that will allow a synthetic biologist to design, analyze and build biological networks. In this idealized pipeline, computer-aided design (CAD) is a necessary component. The role of a CAD application would be to allow efficient transition from a general design to a final product. TinkerCell is a design tool for serving this purpose in synthetic biology. In TinkerCell, users build biological networks using biological parts and modules. The network can be analyzed using one of several functions provided by TinkerCell or custom programs from third-party sources. Since best practices for modeling and constructing synthetic biology networks have not yet been established, TinkerCell is designed as a flexible and extensible application that can adjust itself to changes in the field. PMID:21327060

  1. Adjoint Sensitivity Computations for an Embedded-Boundary Cartesian Mesh Method and CAD Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemec, Marian; Aftosmis,Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    Cartesian-mesh methods are perhaps the most promising approach for addressing the issues of flow solution automation for aerodynamic design problems. In these methods, the discretization of the wetted surface is decoupled from that of the volume mesh. This not only enables fast and robust mesh generation for geometry of arbitrary complexity, but also facilitates access to geometry modeling and manipulation using parametric Computer-Aided Design (CAD) tools. Our goal is to combine the automation capabilities of Cartesian methods with an eficient computation of design sensitivities. We address this issue using the adjoint method, where the computational cost of the design sensitivities, or objective function gradients, is esseutially indepeudent of the number of design variables. In previous work, we presented an accurate and efficient algorithm for the solution of the adjoint Euler equations discretized on Cartesian meshes with embedded, cut-cell boundaries. Novel aspects of the algorithm included the computation of surface shape sensitivities for triangulations based on parametric-CAD models and the linearization of the coupling between the surface triangulation and the cut-cells. The objective of the present work is to extend our adjoint formulation to problems involving general shape changes. Central to this development is the computation of volume-mesh sensitivities to obtain a reliable approximation of the objective finction gradient. Motivated by the success of mesh-perturbation schemes commonly used in body-fitted unstructured formulations, we propose an approach based on a local linearization of a mesh-perturbation scheme similar to the spring analogy. This approach circumvents most of the difficulties that arise due to non-smooth changes in the cut-cell layer as the boundary shape evolves and provides a consistent approximation tot he exact gradient of the discretized abjective function. A detailed gradient accurace study is presented to verify our approach

  2. Survey of UK dentists regarding the use of CAD/CAM technology.

    PubMed

    Tran, D; Nesbit, M; Petridis, H

    2016-11-18

    Statement of the problem Digital workflows (CAD/CAM) have been introduced in dentistry during recent years. No published information exists on dentists' use and reporting of this technology.Purpose The purpose of this survey was to identify the infiltration of CAD/CAM technology in UK dental practices and to investigate the relationship of various demographic factors to the answers regarding use or non-use of this technology.Materials and methods One thousand and thirty-one online surveys were sent to a sample of UK dentists composing of both users and non-users of CAD/CAM. It aimed to reveal information regarding type of usage, materials, perceived benefits, barriers to access, and disadvantages of CAD/CAM dentistry. Statistical analysis was undertaken to test the influence of various demographic variables such as country of work, dentist experience, level of training and type of work (NHS or private).Results The number of completed responses totalled 385. Most of the respondents did not use any part of a digital workflow, and the main barriers to CAD/CAM use were initial costs and a lack of perceived benefit over conventional methods. Dentists delivering mostly private work were most likely to have adopted CAD/CAM technology (P <0.001). Further training also correlated with a greater likelihood of CAD/CAM usage (P <0.001). Most users felt that the technology had led to a change in the use of dental materials, leading to increased use of, for example, zirconia and lithium disilicate. Most users were trained either by companies or self-trained, and a third felt that their training was insufficient. The majority of respondents (89%) felt that CAD/CAM had a big role to play in the future.Conclusion Most of the respondents did not use any part of a digital workflow. However, the majority of surveyed dentists were interested in incorporating CAD/CAM into their workflow, while most believed that it will have a big role in the future. There are still some concerns from

  3. Comparison of Marginal and Internal Adaptation of CAD/CAM and Conventional Cement Retained Implant-Supported Single Crowns.

    PubMed

    Nejatidanesh, Farahnaz; Shakibamehr, Amir Hossein; Savabi, Omid

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of marginal and internal adaptation of 2 computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) and 2 conventionally made cement retained implant-supported restorations. An abutment and its corresponding fixture analog (Astra Tech) were inserted in left central incisor area of a maxillary cast. Four types of implant-supported single restorations were fabricated on the abutment (n = 10): e.max CAD (Cerec AC system), zirconia-based (Cercon system), IPS e.max Press, and metal-ceramic restorations. The internal and marginal gaps of the studied groups were measured by replica method and stereomicroscope. Data were subjected to 1-way ANOVA and Scheffe post hoc tests (α = 0.05). Mean internal gaps of Cercon (59.48 ± 16.49 μm) and e.max Press (75.62 ± 26.92 μm) groups were significantly different from e.max CAD (120.29 ± 16.74 μm) group, but there was no significant difference between metal-ceramic restorations (89.65 ± 47.84 μm) and e.max CAD. The marginal gaps of e.max CAD (32.02 ± 10.38 μm) and Cercon restorations (34.26 ± 11.41 μm) were significantly superior from metal ceramics (59.19 ± 17.81 μm) and e.max press (74.99 ± 24.51 μm). Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that although the marginal and internal gaps of the studied implant-supported restorations were in the clinically acceptable range, single crowns made with CAD/CAM technology provide better marginal fit.

  4. Studying the Relation of Postprandial Triglyceride with Coronary Artery Disease (CAD)

    PubMed Central

    Manochehri, Mohammad; Moghadam, Adel Johari

    2016-01-01

    Background: Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most common cause of mortality worldwide and determination of contributing factors is essential. Aim: This study was conducted to study the relation of postprandial triglyceride as a risk of coronary artery disease in patients with proven CAD by angiography, referred to 502 Hospital of Army in 2015. Material and Methods: This observational study conducted as a case-control and contained 80 male participants referred to 502 Hospital of Army. Half of these participants had proven CAD by angiography test and the other ones were healthy as a control group. Fasting serum triglyceride was evaluated in all participants and postprandial TG was checked 4 hours after a standard meal. Obtained data were analyzed by SPSS ver. 13. Results: The results indicated that fasting TG and postprandial TG level were significantly higher in CAD patients (P-value=0.001). It was also shown evaluation of postprandial TG is more sensitive test than fasting TG in case of CAD patients. Conclusion: Our obtained results shown, evaluation of high level of postprandial TG is more reliable than fasting TG for patients whom suffer from CAD. PMID:27703285

  5. Mechanical properties and internal fit of 4 CAD-CAM block materials.

    PubMed

    Goujat, Alexis; Abouelleil, Hazem; Colon, Pierre; Jeannin, Christophe; Pradelle, Nelly; Seux, Dominique; Grosgogeat, Brigitte

    2018-03-01

    Recent polymer-based computer-assisted design and computer-assisted manufacturing (CAD-CAM) materials have been commercialized for inlay restorations, a polymer-infiltrated ceramic-network (PICN) and composite resin nanoceramics. Little independent evidence regarding their mechanical properties exists. Internal adaptation is an important factor for the clinical success and longevity of a restoration, and data concerning this parameter for inlays made with these blocks are scarce. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate and compare the mechanical properties (flexural strength, flexural modulus, Vickers hardness, fracture toughness) and the internal adaptation of these recent polymer-based blocks with a lithium disilicate glass-ceramic block. The materials tested in this study were a PICN material (Vita Enamic), 2 composite resin nanoceramics (Lava Ultimate; 3M ESPE and Cerasmart; GCDental Products), and a lithium disilicate glass-ceramic (IPS e.max CAD). Mechanical properties were evaluated according to ISO norm DIS 6872:2013. Bar-shaped specimens (18×3×3 mm) were prepared and submitted to a 3-point bend test using a universal testing machine at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min. In addition, identical cavities were prepared in 60 human mandibular extracted molars (n=15) and optically scanned to receive mesioocclusodistal inlays milled with the 4 materials tested in a CEREC Inlab milling machine. The replica technique and a stereomicroscope (×20) were used to measure the internal fit of the inlays at 9 preselected locations. All data were statistically analyzed using 1-way ANOVA and the post hoc Tukey multiple comparison or Games-Howell test (α=.05). The mean flexural strength of the tested blocks ranged from 148.7 ±9.5 MPa (Vita Enamic) to 216.5 ±28.3 MPa (Cerasmart). The mean flexural modulus ranged from 23.3 ±6.4 GPa (Vita Enamic) to 52.8 ±10.5 GPa (IPS e.max CAD). The mean Vickers hardness ranged from 0.66 ±0.02 GPa (Cerasmart) to 5.98 ±0

  6. The effect of CO2 and Nd:YAP lasers on CAD/CAM Ceramics: SEM, EDS and thermal studies.

    PubMed

    El Gamal, Ahmed; Fornaini, Carlo; Rocca, Jean Paul; Muhammad, Omid H; Medioni, Etienne; Cucinotta, Annamaria; Brulat-Bouchard, Nathalie

    2016-03-31

    The objective of this study was to investigate the interaction of infrared laser light on Computer Aided Design and Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAD/CAM) ceramic surfaces. Sixty CAD/CAM ceramic discs were prepared and divided into two different groups: lithiumdisilicate ceramic (IPSe.maxCADs) and Zirconia ceramic (IPSe.maxZirCADs). The laser irradiation was performed on graphite and non-graphite surfaces with a Carbon Dioxide laser at 5W and 10W power in continuous mode (CW mode) and with Neodymium Yttrium Aluminum Perovskite (Nd:YAP) laser at 10W. Surface textures and compositions were examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS). Thermal elevation was measured by thermocouple during laser irradiation. The SEM observation showed a rough surface plus cracks and fissures on CO2 10W samples and melting areas in Nd:YAP samples; moreover, with CO2 5W smooth and shallow surfaces were observed. EDS analysis revealed that laser irradiation does not result in modifications of the chemical composition even if minor changes in the atomic mass percentage of the components were registered. Thermocouple showed several thermal changes during laser irradiation. CO2 and Nd:YAP lasers modify CAD/CAM ceramic surface without chemical composition modifications.

  7. The effect of CO2 and Nd:YAP lasers on CAD/CAM Ceramics: SEM, EDS and thermal studies

    PubMed Central

    Fornaini, Carlo; Rocca, Jean Paul; Muhammad, Omid H; Medioni, Etienne; Cucinotta, Annamaria; Brulat-Bouchard, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims: The objective of this study was to investigate the interaction of infrared laser light on Computer Aided Design and Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAD/CAM) ceramic surfaces. Material and Methods: Sixty CAD/CAM ceramic discs were prepared and divided into two different groups: lithiumdisilicate ceramic (IPSe.maxCADs) and Zirconia ceramic (IPSe.maxZirCADs). The laser irradiation was performed on graphite and non-graphite surfaces with a Carbon Dioxide laser at 5W and 10W power in continuous mode (CW mode) and with Neodymium Yttrium Aluminum Perovskite (Nd:YAP) laser at 10W. Surface textures and compositions were examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS). Thermal elevation was measured by thermocouple during laser irradiation. Results: The SEM observation showed a rough surface plus cracks and fissures on CO2 10W samples and melting areas in Nd:YAP samples; moreover, with CO2 5W smooth and shallow surfaces were observed. EDS analysis revealed that laser irradiation does not result in modifications of the chemical composition even if minor changes in the atomic mass percentage of the components were registered. Thermocouple showed several thermal changes during laser irradiation. Conclusion: CO2 and Nd:YAP lasers modify CAD/CAM ceramic surface without chemical composition modifications. PMID:27141152

  8. Elaborate SMART MCNP Modelling Using ANSYS and Its Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jaehoon; Surh, Han-bum; Kim, Seung-jin; Koo, Bonsueng

    2017-09-01

    An MCNP 3-dimensional model can be widely used to evaluate various design parameters such as a core design or shielding design. Conventionally, a simplified 3-dimensional MCNP model is applied to calculate these parameters because of the cumbersomeness of modelling by hand. ANSYS has a function for converting the CAD `stp' format into an MCNP input in the geometry part. Using ANSYS and a 3- dimensional CAD file, a very detailed and sophisticated MCNP 3-dimensional model can be generated. The MCNP model is applied to evaluate the assembly weighting factor at the ex-core detector of SMART, and the result is compared with a simplified MCNP SMART model and assembly weighting factor calculated by DORT, which is a deterministic Sn code.

  9. Computer-Aided Apparel Design in University Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belleau, Bonnie D.; Bourgeois, Elva B.

    1991-01-01

    As computer-assisted design (CAD) become an integral part of the fashion industry, universities must integrate CAD into the apparel curriculum. Louisiana State University's curriculum enables students to collaborate in CAD problem solving with industry personnel. (SK)

  10. [Initial evolution research for design and process accuracy of one type of domestic computer aided design soft and computer aided manufacture].

    PubMed

    Song, Yang; Zhao, Yi-jiao; Sun, Yu-chun; Lü, Pei-jun; Wang, Yong

    2013-09-01

    To evaluate the design and manufacture accuracy of a domestic computer aided design (CAD) and computer aided manufacture (CAM) system, and to compare it with similar foreign products. Thirty models of posterior-teeth-single-crown preparations were collected, and STL data of these preparations was collected by Denmark 3Shape scanner. Three copings were made for each preparation, the one designed and manufactured using commercial CAD/CAM system (3Shape CAD software and Wieland T1 CAM equipment) was assigned into control group T0, the one designed and manufactured using domestic CAD software (developed by Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology and Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics) and Wieland T1 CAM equipment was assigned into experimental group TCAD for design accuracy evaluation, and the one designed and manufactured using 3Shape CAD software and domestic CAM equipment (developed by Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, Tsinghua University and ShanDong XinHua Incorporated Company of medical apparatus and instruments) was assigned into experimental group TCAM for manufacture accuracy evaluation. Finally, the marginal fitness were compared and evaluated by using 3D & Profile measurement microscope laser. The marginal fitness of TCAD was 27.98 (19.10, 46.57) µm in buccal, 32.67 (20.65, 50.82) µm in lingual, 27.38 (22.53, 52.61) µm in mesial, 29.50 (22.68, 53.65) µm in distal; of TCAM was 21.69 (15.87, 30.21) µm in buccal, 18.51 (13.50, 22.51) µm in lingual, 19.15 (15.42, 26.89) µm in mesial, 22.77 (18.58, 32.15) µm in distal; and there were no statistical differences compared with T0 [20.16 (17.16, 48.00) µm in buccal, 21.51 (17.05, 28.31) µm in lingual, 23.54 (17.89, 30.04) µm in mesial and 23.94 (17.93, 28.19) µm in distal] except lingual data of TCAD. The design and machining precision of this domestic CAD/CAM system is at the same level of those comparable foreign products.

  11. Numerical Simulation of the Francis Turbine and CAD used to Optimized the Runner Design (2nd).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutikno, Priyono

    2010-06-01

    Hydro Power is the most important renewable energy source on earth. The water is free of charge and with the generation of electric energy in a Hydroelectric Power station the production of green house gases (mainly CO2) is negligible. Hydro Power Generation Stations are long term installations and can be used for 50 years and more, care must be taken to guarantee a smooth and safe operation over the years. Maintenance is necessary and critical parts of the machines have to be replaced if necessary. Within modern engineering the numerical flow simulation plays an important role in order to optimize the hydraulic turbine in conjunction with connected components of the plant. Especially for rehabilitation and upgrading existing Power Plants important point of concern are to predict the power output of turbine, to achieve maximum hydraulic efficiency, to avoid or to minimize cavitations, to avoid or to minimized vibrations in whole range operation. Flow simulation can help to solve operational problems and to optimize the turbo machinery for hydro electric generating stations or their component through, intuitive optimization, mathematical optimization, parametric design, the reduction of cavitations through design, prediction of draft tube vortex, trouble shooting by using the simulation. The classic design through graphic-analytical method is cumbersome and can't give in evidence the positive or negative aspects of the designing options. So it was obvious to have imposed as necessity the classical design methods to an adequate design method using the CAD software. There are many option chose during design calculus in a specific step of designing may be verified in ensemble and detail form a point of view. The final graphic post processing would be realized only for the optimal solution, through a 3 D representation of the runner as a whole for the final approval geometric shape. In this article it was investigated the redesign of the hydraulic turbine's runner

  12. Research on remote sensing image pixel attribute data acquisition method in AutoCAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoyang; Sun, Guangtong; Liu, Jun; Liu, Hui

    2013-07-01

    The remote sensing image has been widely used in AutoCAD, but AutoCAD lack of the function of remote sensing image processing. In the paper, ObjectARX was used for the secondary development tool, combined with the Image Engine SDK to realize remote sensing image pixel attribute data acquisition in AutoCAD, which provides critical technical support for AutoCAD environment remote sensing image processing algorithms.

  13. Comparative characterization of a novel cad-cam polymer-infiltrated-ceramic-network

    PubMed Central

    Pascual, Agustín; Camps, Isabel; Grau-Benitez, María

    2015-01-01

    Background The field of dental ceramics for CAD-CAM is enriched with a new innovative material composition having a porous three-dimensional structure of feldspathic ceramic infiltrated with acrylic resins.The aim of this study is to determine the mechanical properties of Polymer-Infiltrated-Ceramic-Network (PICN) and compare its performance with other ceramics and a nano-ceramic resin available for CAD-CAM systems. Material and Methods In this study a total of five different materials for CAD-CAM were investigated. A polymer-infiltrated ceramic (Vita Enamic), a nano-ceramic resin (Lava Ultimate), a feldspathic ceramic (Mark II), a lithium disilicate ceramic (IPS-e max CAD) and finally a Leucite based ceramic (Empress - CAD). From CAD-CAM blocks, 120 bars (30 for each material cited above) were cut to measure the flexural strength with a three-point-bending test. Strain at failure, fracture stress and Weibull modulus was calculated. Vickers hardness of each material was also measured. Results IPS-EMAX presents mechanical properties significantly better from the other materials studied. Its strain at failure, flexural strength and hardness exhibited significantly higher values in comparison with the others. VITA ENAMIC and LAVA ULTIMATE stand out as the next most resistant materials. Conclusions The flexural strength, elastic modulus similar to a tooth as well as having less hardness than ceramics make PICN materials an option to consider as a restorative material. Key words:Ceramic infiltrated with resin, CAD-CAM, Weibull modulus, flexural strength, micro hardness. PMID:26535096

  14. Surface smoothing and template partitioning for cranial implant CAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Kyoung-june; Dean, David

    2005-04-01

    Employing patient-specific prefabricated implants can be an effective treatment for large cranial defects (i.e., > 25 cm2). We have previously demonstrated the use of Computer Aided Design (CAD) software that starts with the patient"s 3D head CT-scan. A template is accurately matched to the pre-detected skull defect margin. For unilateral cranial defects the template is derived from a left-to-right mirrored skull image. However, two problems arise: (1) slice edge artifacts generated during isosurface polygonalization are inherited by the final implant; and (2) partitioning (i.e., cookie-cutting) the implant surface from the mirrored skull image usually results in curvature discontinuities across the interface between the patient"s defect and the implant. To solve these problems, we introduce a novel space curve-to-surface partitioning algorithm following a ray-casting surface re-sampling and smoothing procedure. Specifically, the ray-cast re-sampling is followed by bilinear interpolation and low-pass filtering. The resulting surface has a highly regular grid-like topological structure of quadrilaterally arranged triangles. Then, we replace the regions to be partitioned with predefined sets of triangular elements thereby cutting the template surface to accurately fit the defect margin at high resolution and without surface curvature discontinuities. Comparisons of the CAD implants for five patients against the manually generated implant that the patient actually received show an average implant-patient gap of 0.45mm for the former and 2.96mm for the latter. Also, average maximum normalized curvature of interfacing surfaces was found to be smoother, 0.043, for the former than the latter, 0.097. This indicates that the CAD implants would provide a significantly better fit.

  15. Computer aided design environment for the analysis and design of multi-body flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramakrishnan, Jayant V.; Singh, Ramen P.

    1989-01-01

    A computer aided design environment consisting of the programs NASTRAN, TREETOPS and MATLAB is presented in this paper. With links for data transfer between these programs, the integrated design of multi-body flexible structures is significantly enhanced. The CAD environment is used to model the Space Shuttle/Pinhole Occulater Facility. Then a controller is designed and evaluated in the nonlinear time history sense. Recent enhancements and ongoing research to add more capabilities are also described.

  16. Wear, strength, modulus and hardness of CAD/CAM restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Nathaniel C; Bansal, Ritika; Burgess, John O

    2016-11-01

    To measure the mechanical properties of several CAD/CAM materials, including lithium disilicate (e.max CAD), lithium silicate/zirconia (Celtra Duo), 3 resin composites (Cerasmart, Lava Ultimate, Paradigm MZ100), and a polymer infiltrated ceramic (Enamic). CAD/CAM blocks were sectioned into 2.5mm×2.5mm×16mm bars for flexural strength and elastic modulus testing and 4mm thick blocks for hardness and wear testing. E.max CAD and half the Celtra Duo specimens were treated in a furnace. Flexural strength specimens (n=10) were tested in a three-point bending fixture. Vickers microhardness (n=2, 5 readings per specimen) was measured with a 1kg load and 15s dwell time. The CAD/CAM materials as well as labial surfaces of human incisors were mounted in the UAB wear device. Cusps of human premolars were mounted as antagonists. Specimens were tested for 400,000 cycles at 20N force, 2mm sliding distance, 1Hz frequency, 24°C, and 33% glycerin lubrication. Volumetric wear and opposing enamel wear were measured with non-contact profilometry. Data were analyzed with 1-way ANOVA and Tukey post-hoc analysis (alpha=0.05). Specimens were observed with SEM. Properties were different for each material (p<0.01). E.max CAD and Celtra Duo were generally stronger, stiffer, and harder than the other materials. E.max CAD, Celtra Duo, Enamic, and enamel demonstrated signs of abrasive wear, whereas Cerasmart, Lava Ultimate, Paradigm MZ100 demonstrated signs of fatigue. Resin composite and resin infiltrated ceramic materials have demonstrated adequate wear resistance for load bearing restorations, however, they will require at least similar material thickness as lithium disilicate restorations due to their strength. Copyright © 2016 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. CAD mutations and uridine-responsive epileptic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Koch, Johannes; Mayr, Johannes A; Alhaddad, Bader; Rauscher, Christian; Bierau, Jörgen; Kovacs-Nagy, Reka; Coene, Karlien L M; Bader, Ingrid; Holzhacker, Monika; Prokisch, Holger; Venselaar, Hanka; Wevers, Ron A; Distelmaier, Felix; Polster, Tilman; Leiz, Steffen; Betzler, Cornelia; Strom, Tim M; Sperl, Wolfgang; Meitinger, Thomas; Wortmann, Saskia B; Haack, Tobias B

    2017-02-01

    Unexplained global developmental delay and epilepsy in childhood pose a major socioeconomic burden. Progress in defining the molecular bases does not often translate into effective treatment. Notable exceptions include certain inborn errors of metabolism amenable to dietary intervention. CAD encodes a multifunctional enzyme involved in de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis. Alternatively, pyrimidines can be recycled from uridine. Exome sequencing in three families identified biallelic CAD mutations in four children with global developmental delay, epileptic encephalopathy, and anaemia with anisopoikilocytosis. Two died aged 4 and 5 years after a neurodegenerative disease course. Supplementation of the two surviving children with oral uridine led to immediate cessation of seizures in both. A 4-year-old female, previously in a minimally conscious state, began to communicate and walk with assistance after 9 weeks of treatment. A 3-year-old female likewise showed developmental progress. Blood smears normalized and anaemia resolved. We establish CAD as a gene confidently implicated in this neurometabolic disorder, characterized by co-occurrence of global developmental delay, dyserythropoietic anaemia and seizures. While the natural disease course can be lethal in early childhood, our findings support the efficacy of uridine supplementation, rendering CAD deficiency a treatable neurometabolic disorder and therefore a potential condition for future (genetic) newborn screening. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Ceramic dental biomaterials and CAD/CAM technology: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Li, Raymond Wai Kim; Chow, Tak Wah; Matinlinna, Jukka Pekka

    2014-10-01

    Ceramics are widely used as indirect restorative materials in dentistry because of their high biocompatibility and pleasing aesthetics. The objective is to review the state of the arts of CAD/CAM all-ceramic biomaterials. CAD/CAM all-ceramic biomaterials are highlighted and a subsequent literature search was conducted for the relevant subjects using PubMed followed by manual search. Developments in CAD/CAM technology have catalyzed researches in all-ceramic biomaterials and their applications. Feldspathic glass ceramic and glass infiltrated ceramic can be fabricated by traditional laboratory methods or CAD/CAM. The advent of polycrystalline ceramics is a direct result of CAD/CAM technology without which the fabrication would not have been possible. The clinical uses of these ceramics have met with variable clinical success. Multiple options are now available to the clinicians for the fabrication of aesthetic all ceramic restorations. Copyright © 2014 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Establishing CAD/CAM in Preclinical Dental Education: Evaluation of a Hands-On Module.

    PubMed

    Schwindling, Franz Sebastian; Deisenhofer, Ulrich Karl; Porsche, Monika; Rammelsberg, Peter; Kappel, Stefanie; Stober, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a hands-on computer-assisted design/computer-assisted manufacture (CAD/CAM) module in a preclinical dental course in restorative dentistry. A controlled trial was conducted by dividing a class of 56 third-year dental students in Germany into study and control groups; allocation to the two groups depended on student schedules. Prior information about CAD/CAM-based restorations was provided for all students by means of lectures, preparation exercises, and production of gypsum casts of prepared resin teeth. The study group (32 students) then participated in a hands-on CAD/CAM module in small groups, digitizing their casts and designing zirconia frameworks for single crowns. The digitization process was introduced to the control group (24 students) solely by means of a video-supported lecture. To assess the knowledge gained, a 20-question written examination was administered; 48 students took the exam. The results were analyzed with Student's t-tests at a significance level of 0.05. The results on the examination showed a significant difference between the two groups: the mean scores were 16.8 (SD 1.7, range 13-19) for the study group and 12.5 (SD 3, range 4-18) for the control group. After the control group had also experienced the hands-on module, a total of 48 students from both groups completed a questionnaire with 13 rating-scale and three open-ended questions evaluating the module. Those results showed that the module was highly regarded by the students. This study supports the idea that small-group hands-on courses are helpful for instruction in digital restoration design. These students' knowledge gained and satisfaction seemed to justify the time, effort, and equipment needed.

  20. Wind Turbine Blade Design System - Aerodynamic and Structural Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Soumitr

    2011-12-01

    The ever increasing need for energy and the depletion of non-renewable energy resources has led to more advancement in the "Green Energy" field, including wind energy. An improvement in performance of a Wind Turbine will enhance its economic viability, which can be achieved by better aerodynamic designs. In the present study, a design system that has been under development for gas turbine turbomachinery has been modified for designing wind turbine blades. This is a very different approach for wind turbine blade design, but will allow it to benefit from the features inherent in the geometry flexibility and broad design space of the presented system. It starts with key overall design parameters and a low-fidelity model that is used to create the initial geometry parameters. The low-fidelity system includes the axisymmetric solver with loss models, T-Axi (Turbomachinery-AXIsymmetric), MISES blade-to-blade solver and 2D wing analysis code XFLR5. The geometry parameters are used to define sections along the span of the blade and connected to the CAD model of the wind turbine blade through CAPRI (Computational Analysis PRogramming Interface), a CAD neutral API that facilitates the use of parametric geometry definition with CAD. Either the sections or the CAD geometry is then available for CFD and Finite Element Analysis. The GE 1.5sle MW wind turbine and NERL NASA Phase VI wind turbine have been used as test cases. Details of the design system application are described, and the resulting wind turbine geometry and conditions are compared to the published results of the GE and NREL wind turbines. A 2D wing analysis code XFLR5, is used for to compare results from 2D analysis to blade-to-blade analysis and the 3D CFD analysis. This kind of comparison concludes that, from hub to 25% of the span blade to blade effects or the cascade effect has to be considered, from 25% to 75%, the blade acts as a 2d wing and from 75% to the tip 3D and tip effects have to be taken into account

  1. Luting of CAD/CAM ceramic inlays: direct composite versus dual-cure luting cement.

    PubMed

    Kameyama, Atsushi; Bonroy, Kim; Elsen, Caroline; Lührs, Anne-Katrin; Suyama, Yuji; Peumans, Marleen; Van Meerbeek, Bart; De Munck, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate bonding effectiveness in direct restorations. A two-step self-etch adhesive and a light-cure resin composite was compared with luting with a conventional dual-cure resin cement and a two-step etch and rinse adhesive. Class-I box-type cavities were prepared. Identical ceramic inlays were designed and fabricated with a computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) device. The inlays were seated with Clearfil SE Bond/Clearfil AP-X (Kuraray Medical) or ExciTE F DSC/Variolink II (Ivoclar Vivadent), each by two operators (five teeth per group). The inlays were stored in water for one week at 37°C, whereafter micro-tensile bond strength testing was conducted. The micro-tensile bond strength of the direct composite was significantly higher than that from conventional luting, and was independent of the operator (P<0.0001). Pre-testing failures were only observed with the conventional method. High-power light-curing of a direct composite may be a viable alternative to luting lithium disilicate glass-ceramic CAD/CAM restorations.

  2. Concurrent Design used in the Design of Space Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oxnevad, Knut I.

    1998-01-01

    At the Project Design Center at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a concurrent design environment is under development for supporting development and analyses of space instruments in the early, conceptual design phases. This environment is being utilized by a Team I, a multidisciplinary group of experts. Team I is providing study and proposal support. To provide the required support, the Team I concurrent design environment features effectively interconnected high-end optics, CAD, and thermal design and analysis tools. Innovative approaches for linking tools, and for transferring files between applications have been implemented. These approaches together with effective sharing of geometry between the optics, CAD, and thermal tools are already showing significant timesavings.

  3. Stress-induced alteration of left ventricular eccentricity: An additional marker of multivessel CAD.

    PubMed

    Gimelli, Alessia; Liga, Riccardo; Giorgetti, Assuero; Casagranda, Mirta; Marzullo, Paolo

    2017-03-28

    Abnormal left ventricular (LV) eccentricity index (EI) is a marker of adverse cardiac remodeling. However, the interaction between stress-induced alterations of EI and major cardiac parameters has not been explored. We sought to evaluate the relationship between LV EI and coronary artery disease (CAD) burden in patients submitted to myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). Three-hundred and forty-three patients underwent MPI and coronary angiography. LV ejection fraction (EF) and EI were computed from gated stress images as measures of stress-induced functional impairment. One-hundred and thirty-six (40%), 122 (35%), and 85 (25%) patients had normal coronary arteries, single-vessel CAD, and multivessel CAD, respectively. Post-stress EI was lower in patients with multivessel CAD than in those with normal coronary arteries and single-vessel CAD (P = 0.001). This relationship was confirmed only in patients undergoing exercise stress test, where a lower post-stress EI predicted the presence of multivessel CAD (P = 0.039). Post-stress alterations of LV EI on MPI may unmask the presence of multivessel CAD.

  4. Format conversion between CAD data and GIS data based on ArcGIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Qingqing; Wei, Bo; Zhang, Kailin; Wang, Zhichao

    2015-12-01

    To make full use of the data resources and realize a sharing for the different types of data in different industries, a method of format conversion between CAD data and GIS data based on ArcGIS was proposed. To keep the integrity of the converted data, some key steps to process CAD data before conversion were made in AutoCAD. For examples, deleting unnecessary elements such as title, border and legend avoided the appearance of unnecessary elements after conversion, as layering data again by a national standard avoided the different types of elements to appear in a same layer after conversion. In ArcGIS, converting CAD data to GIS data was executed by the correspondence of graphic element classification between AutoCAD and ArcGIS. In addition, an empty geographic database and feature set was required to create in ArcGIS for storing the text data of CAD data. The experimental results show that the proposed method avoids a large amount of editing work in data conversion and maintains the integrity of spatial data and attribute data between before and after conversion.

  5. Effect of camera angulation on adaptation of CAD/CAM restorations.

    PubMed

    Parsell, D E; Anderson, B C; Livingston, H M; Rudd, J I; Tankersley, J D

    2000-01-01

    A significant concern with computer-assisted design/computer-assisted manufacturing (CAD/CAM)-produced prostheses is the accuracy of adaptation of the restoration to the preparation. The objective of this study is to determine the effect of operator-controlled camera misalignment on restoration adaptation. A CEREC 2 CAD/CAM unit (Sirona Dental Systems, Bensheim, Germany) was used to capture the optical impressions and machine the restorations. A Class I preparation was used as the standard preparation for optical impressions. Camera angles along the mesio-distal and buccolingual alignment were varied from the ideal orientation. Occlusal marginal gaps and sample height, width, and length were measured and compared to preparation dimensions. For clinical correlation, clinicians were asked to take optical impressions of mesio-occlusal preparations (Class II) on all four second molar sites, using a patient simulator. On the adjacent first molar occlusal surfaces, a preparation was machined such that camera angulation could be calculated from information taken from the optical impression. Degree of tilt and plane of tilt were compared to the optimum camera positions for those preparations. One-way analysis of variance and Dunnett C post hoc testing (alpha = 0.01) revealed little significant degradation in fit with camera angulation. Only the apical length fit was significantly degraded by excessive angulation. The CEREC 2 CAD/CAM system was found to be relatively insensitive to operator-induced errors attributable to camera misalignments of less than 5 degrees in either the buccolingual or the mesiodistal plane. The average camera tilt error generated by clinicians for all sites was 1.98 +/- 1.17 degrees.

  6. Effect of denture cleaning on abrasion resistance and surface topography of polymerized CAD CAM acrylic resin denture base.

    PubMed

    Shinawi, Lana Ahmed

    2017-05-01

    The application of computer-aided design computer-aided manufacturing (CAD CAM) technology in the fabrication of complete dentures, offers numerous advantages as it provides optimum fit and eliminates polymerization shrinkage of the acrylic base. Additionally, the porosity and surface roughness of CAD CAM resins is less compared to conventionally processed resins which leads to a decrease in the adhesion of bacteria on the denture base, which is associated with many conditions including halitosis and aspiration pneumonia in elderly denture wearers. To evaluate the influence of tooth brushing with dentifrices on CAD CAM resin blocks in terms of abrasion resistance, surface roughness and scanning electron photomicrography. This experimental study was carried out at the Faculty of Dentistry of King Abdulaziz University during 2016. A total of 40 rectangular shaped polymerized CAD CAM resin samples were subjected to 40.000 and 60.000 brushing strokes under a 200-gram vertical load simulating three years of tooth brushing strokes using commercially available denture cleaning dentifrice. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 20, using descriptive statistics and ANOVA. ANOVA test revealed a statistical significant weight loss of CAD CAM acrylic resin denture base specimens following 40.000 and 60.000 brushing strokes as well as a statistical significant change (p=0.0.5) in the surface roughness following brushing. The CAD CAM resin samples SEM baseline imaging revealed a relatively smooth homogenous surface, but following 40,000 and 60,000 brushing strokes, imaging displayed the presence of small scratches on the surface. CAD CAM resin displayed a homogenous surface initially with low surface roughness that was significantly affected following simulating three years of manual brushing, but despite the significant weight loss, the findings are within the clinically acceptable limits.

  7. Effect of denture cleaning on abrasion resistance and surface topography of polymerized CAD CAM acrylic resin denture base

    PubMed Central

    Shinawi, Lana Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Background The application of computer-aided design computer-aided manufacturing (CAD CAM) technology in the fabrication of complete dentures, offers numerous advantages as it provides optimum fit and eliminates polymerization shrinkage of the acrylic base. Additionally, the porosity and surface roughness of CAD CAM resins is less compared to conventionally processed resins which leads to a decrease in the adhesion of bacteria on the denture base, which is associated with many conditions including halitosis and aspiration pneumonia in elderly denture wearers. Aim To evaluate the influence of tooth brushing with dentifrices on CAD CAM resin blocks in terms of abrasion resistance, surface roughness and scanning electron photomicrography. Methods This experimental study was carried out at the Faculty of Dentistry of King Abdulaziz University during 2016. A total of 40 rectangular shaped polymerized CAD CAM resin samples were subjected to 40.000 and 60.000 brushing strokes under a 200-gram vertical load simulating three years of tooth brushing strokes using commercially available denture cleaning dentifrice. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 20, using descriptive statistics and ANOVA. Results ANOVA test revealed a statistical significant weight loss of CAD CAM acrylic resin denture base specimens following 40.000 and 60.000 brushing strokes as well as a statistical significant change (p=0.0.5) in the surface roughness following brushing. The CAD CAM resin samples SEM baseline imaging revealed a relatively smooth homogenous surface, but following 40,000 and 60,000 brushing strokes, imaging displayed the presence of small scratches on the surface. Conclusion CAD CAM resin displayed a homogenous surface initially with low surface roughness that was significantly affected following simulating three years of manual brushing, but despite the significant weight loss, the findings are within the clinically acceptable limits. PMID:28713496

  8. In Vitro Investigation of Wear of CAD/CAM Polymeric Materials Against Primary Teeth.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae-Won; Song, Eun-Ju; Shin, Jong-Hyun; Jeong, Tae-Sung; Huh, Jung-Bo

    2017-12-09

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of polymeric computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing CAD/CAM materials on antagonistic primary tooth wear. Five CAD/CAM polymeric materials were examined: Vipi Block Monocolor (VBM), Yamahachi polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) (YAP), Mazic Duro (MZD), Vita Enamic (ENA), and Pekkton (PEK). All of the specimens were tested in a thermomechanical loading machine with the primary canine as the antagonist (50 N, 1.2 × 10⁵ cycles, 1.7 Hz, 5/55 °C). The wear losses of the antagonist tooth and the restorative materials were calculated using reverse modelling software and an electronic scale. VBM and ENA showed significantly higher antagonist tooth wear than PEK ( p < 0.05), but there was no significant difference observed among VBM, YAP, MZD, and ENA ( p > 0.05). PEK showed the largest value in both material volumetric and weight losses. In terms of material volumetric losses, there was no significant difference between all of the groups ( p > 0.05). In terms of material weight losses, PEK was significantly larger than ENA ( p < 0.05), but there was no significant difference between VBM, YAP, MZD, and ENA ( p > 0.05). Volumetric and weight losses of materials showed similar wear behaviour. However, the wear patterns of antagonists and materials were different, especially in PEK.

  9. In Vitro Investigation of Wear of CAD/CAM Polymeric Materials Against Primary Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Song, Eun-Ju; Shin, Jong-Hyun; Jeong, Tae-Sung; Huh, Jung-Bo

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of polymeric computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing CAD/CAM materials on antagonistic primary tooth wear. Five CAD/CAM polymeric materials were examined: Vipi Block Monocolor (VBM), Yamahachi polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) (YAP), Mazic Duro (MZD), Vita Enamic (ENA), and Pekkton (PEK). All of the specimens were tested in a thermomechanical loading machine with the primary canine as the antagonist (50 N, 1.2 × 105 cycles, 1.7 Hz, 5/55 °C). The wear losses of the antagonist tooth and the restorative materials were calculated using reverse modelling software and an electronic scale. VBM and ENA showed significantly higher antagonist tooth wear than PEK (p < 0.05), but there was no significant difference observed among VBM, YAP, MZD, and ENA (p > 0.05). PEK showed the largest value in both material volumetric and weight losses. In terms of material volumetric losses, there was no significant difference between all of the groups (p > 0.05). In terms of material weight losses, PEK was significantly larger than ENA (p < 0.05), but there was no significant difference between VBM, YAP, MZD, and ENA (p > 0.05). Volumetric and weight losses of materials showed similar wear behaviour. However, the wear patterns of antagonists and materials were different, especially in PEK. PMID:29232849

  10. Marginal and internal adaptation of ceramic crown restorations fabricated with CAD/CAM technology and the heat-press technique.

    PubMed

    Mously, Hisham A; Finkelman, Matthew; Zandparsa, Roya; Hirayama, Hiroshi

    2014-08-01

    The accuracy of chairside computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) restorations is questionable, and the effect of the die spacer settings is not well stated in the literature. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the marginal and internal adaptation of E4D crowns fabricated with different spacer thicknesses and to compare these crowns with those fabricated with the heat-press technique. The E4D system was used to fabricate 30 crowns for the first 3 groups, with different spacer thickness settings: 30 μm, 60 μm, and 100 μm. In the fourth group, 10 lithium disilicate crowns were fabricated with the heat-press technique. The occlusal gap, axial gap, vertical marginal gap, and absolute marginal discrepancy were evaluated by x-ray microtomography. Statistical significance was assessed with the Kruskal-Wallis test (α=.05). For post hoc analyses, the Mann-Whitney U test was used alongside the Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons (α=.008). Within the CAD/CAM groups, the 30-μm spacer thickness resulted in the lowest median axial gap (90.04 μm), whereas the 60-μm spacer thickness resulted in the lowest median occlusal gap (152.39 μm). The median marginal gap values of the CAD/CAM-60 group (49.35 μm) and CAD/CAM-100 group (46.65 μm) were lower than those of the CAD/CAM-30 group (55.18 μm). No significant differences among the CAD/CAM groups were observed for absolute marginal discrepancy. The heat-press group had significantly different values than those of the CAD/CAM groups. The spacer thickness and fabrication technique affected the adaptation of ceramic crowns. The heat-press group yielded the best marginal and internal crown adaptation results. The 30- or 60-μm spacer settings are recommended for the E4D CAD/CAM system. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Reliability of a CAD/CAM Surgical Guide for Implant Placement: An In Vitro Comparison of Surgeons' Experience Levels and Implant Sites.

    PubMed

    Park, Su-Jung; Leesungbok, Richard; Cui, Taixing; Lee, Suk Won; Ahn, Su-Jin

    This in vitro study evaluated the reliability of a surgical guide with regard to different levels of operator surgical experience and implant site. A stereolithographic surgical guide for epoxy resin mandibles with three edentulous molar sites was produced using a computer-aided design/computer-assisted manufacture (CAD/CAM) system. Two surgeons with and two surgeons without implant surgery experience placed implants in a model either using or not using the CAD/CAM surgical guide. Four groups were created: inexperienced surgeon without the guide (group 1); experienced surgeon without the guide (group 2); inexperienced surgeon with the guide (group 3); and experienced surgeon with the guide (group 4). Planned implants and placed implants were superimposed using digital software, and deviation parameters were calculated. There were no significant differences in any of the deviation parameters between the groups when using the surgical guide. With respect to the implant sites, there were no significant differences among the groups in any parameter. Use of the CAD/CAM surgical guide reduced discrepancies among operators performing implant surgery regardless of their level of experience. Whether or not the guide was used, differences in the anterior-posterior implant site in the molar area did not affect the accuracy of implant placement.

  12. Probability Density Functions for the CALIPSO Lidar Version 4 Cloud-Aerosol Discrimination (CAD) Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z.; Kar, J.; Zeng, S.; Tackett, J. L.; Vaughan, M.; Trepte, C. R.; Omar, A. H.; Hu, Y.; Winker, D. M.

    2017-12-01

    In the CALIPSO retrieval algorithm, detection layers in the lidar measurements is followed by their classification as a "cloud" or "aerosol" using 5-dimensional probability density functions (PDFs). The five dimensions are the mean attenuated backscatter at 532 nm, the layer integrated total attenuated color ratio, the mid-layer altitude, integrated volume depolarization ratio and latitude. The new version 4 (V4) level 2 (L2) data products, released in November 2016, are the first major revision to the L2 product suite since May 2010. Significant calibration changes in the V4 level 1 data necessitated substantial revisions to the V4 L2 CAD algorithm. Accordingly, a new set of PDFs was generated to derive the V4 L2 data products. The V4 CAD algorithm is now applied to layers detected in the stratosphere, where volcanic layers and occasional cloud and smoke layers are observed. Previously, these layers were designated as `stratospheric', and not further classified. The V4 CAD algorithm is also applied to all layers detected at single shot (333 m) resolution. In prior data releases, single shot detections were uniformly classified as clouds. The CAD PDFs used in the earlier releases were generated using a full year (2008) of CALIPSO measurements. Because the CAD algorithm was not applied to stratospheric features, the properties of these layers were not incorporated into the PDFs. When building the V4 PDFs, the 2008 data were augmented with additional data from June 2011, and all stratospheric features were included. The Nabro and Puyehue-Cordon volcanos erupted in June 2011, and volcanic aerosol layers were observed in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere in both the northern and southern hemispheres. The June 2011 data thus provides the stratospheric aerosol properties needed for comprehensive PDF generation. In contrast to earlier versions of the PDFs, which were generated based solely on observed distributions, construction of the V4 PDFs considered the

  13. [Computer aided design for fixed partial denture framework based on reverse engineering technology].

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu-chun; Lü, Pei-jun; Wang, Yong

    2006-03-01

    To explore a computer aided design (CAD) route for the framework of domestic fixed partial denture (FPD) and confirm the suitable method of 3-D CAD. The working area of a dentition model was scanned with a 3-D mechanical scanner. Using the reverse engineering (RE) software, margin and border curves were extracted and several reference curves were created to ensure the dimension and location of pontic framework that was taken from the standard database. The shoulder parts of the retainers were created after axial surfaces constructed. The connecting areas, axial line and curving surface of the framework connector were finally created. The framework of a three-unit FPD was designed with RE technology, which showed smooth surfaces and continuous contours. The design route is practical. The result of this study is significant in theory and practice, which will provide a reference for establishing the computer aided design/computer aided manufacture (CAD/CAM) system of domestic FPD.

  14. Web-Based Architecture to Enable Compute-Intensive CAD Tools and Multi-user Synchronization in Teleradiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Neville; Kompalli, Suryaprakash; Chaudhary, Vipin

    Teleradiology is the electronic transmission of radiological patient images, such as x-rays, CT, or MR across multiple locations. The goal could be interpretation, consultation, or medical records keeping. Information technology solutions have enabled electronic records and their associated benefits are evident in health care today. However, salient aspects of collaborative interfaces, and computer assisted diagnostic (CAD) tools are yet to be integrated into workflow designs. The Computer Assisted Diagnostics and Interventions (CADI) group at the University at Buffalo has developed an architecture that facilitates web-enabled use of CAD tools, along with the novel concept of synchronized collaboration. The architecture can support multiple teleradiology applications and case studies are presented here.

  15. Assessing operating characteristics of CAD algorithms in the absence of a gold standard

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Roy Choudhury, Kingshuk; Paik, David S.; Yi, Chin A.

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: The authors examine potential bias when using a reference reader panel as ''gold standard'' for estimating operating characteristics of CAD algorithms for detecting lesions. As an alternative, the authors propose latent class analysis (LCA), which does not require an external gold standard to evaluate diagnostic accuracy. Methods: A binomial model for multiple reader detections using different diagnostic protocols was constructed, assuming conditional independence of readings given true lesion status. Operating characteristics of all protocols were estimated by maximum likelihood LCA. Reader panel and LCA based estimates were compared using data simulated from the binomial model for a range ofmore » operating characteristics. LCA was applied to 36 thin section thoracic computed tomography data sets from the Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC): Free search markings of four radiologists were compared to markings from four different CAD assisted radiologists. For real data, bootstrap-based resampling methods, which accommodate dependence in reader detections, are proposed to test of hypotheses of differences between detection protocols. Results: In simulation studies, reader panel based sensitivity estimates had an average relative bias (ARB) of -23% to -27%, significantly higher (p-value <0.0001) than LCA (ARB -2% to -6%). Specificity was well estimated by both reader panel (ARB -0.6% to -0.5%) and LCA (ARB 1.4%-0.5%). Among 1145 lesion candidates LIDC considered, LCA estimated sensitivity of reference readers (55%) was significantly lower (p-value 0.006) than CAD assisted readers' (68%). Average false positives per patient for reference readers (0.95) was not significantly lower (p-value 0.28) than CAD assisted readers' (1.27). Conclusions: Whereas a gold standard based on a consensus of readers may substantially bias sensitivity estimates, LCA may be a significantly more accurate and consistent means for evaluating diagnostic accuracy.« less

  16. 3-D Geometric Modeling for the 21st Century.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ault, Holly K.

    1999-01-01

    Describes new geometric computer models used in contemporary computer-aided design (CAD) software including wire frame, surface, solid, and parametric models. Reviews their use in engineering design and discusses the impact of these new technologies on the engineering design graphics curriculum. (Author/CCM)

  17. Color stainability of CAD/CAM and nanocomposite resin materials.

    PubMed

    Acar, Ozlem; Yilmaz, Burak; Altintas, Subutay Han; Chandrasekaran, Indumathi; Johnston, William M

    2016-01-01

    The color stainability of recently introduced computer-assisted design/computer-assisted manufacturing (CAD/CAM) hybrid ceramic and resin nanoceramic is unknown. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the effect of coffee staining on the color of 3 different CAD/CAM restorative materials and a nanocomposite resin. Specimens from a hybrid dental ceramic (VITA Enamic), a resin nanoceramic (Lava Ultimate), a lithium disilicate glass ceramic (IPS e.max CAD), and a nanocomposite resin (Filtek Supreme Ultra Universal) were evaluated for color change due to thermocycling in coffee (n=5). Specimens 0.5 to 0.7 mm and 1 to 1.2 mm in thickness were thermocycled for 5000 cycles. CIEDE2000 color differences (ΔE00) due to thermocycling in coffee were calculated using the color coordinates obtained from a spectroradiometer. ANCOVA was used to analyze the color differences among the materials with thickness as the covariate. Significant differences at average thickness were analyzed with the Tukey-Kramer test. For color difference due to staining, thickness was a significant covariate (P<.001). Regarding the analysis of color differences, every pair of the tested materials was significantly different (P<.001). Least squares means of color differences (ΔE00) at mean thickness were 4.34 for the nanohybrid composite resin, 3.66 for the resin nanoceramic, 1.35 for the hybrid ceramic, and 0.43 for the lithium disilicate ceramic. When exposed to hot and cold coffee, the color change was beyond clinical acceptability for the tested resin nanoceramic and nanocomposite resin materials. The average color change of the hybrid ceramic was clinically perceivable over the tested thickness values. The color change of lithium disilicate ceramic was not clinically perceivable at any tested thickness. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Design, Modeling, and Fabrication of Chemical Vapor Deposition Grown MoS2 Circuits with E-Mode FETs for Large-Area Electronics.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lili; El-Damak, Dina; Radhakrishna, Ujwal; Ling, Xi; Zubair, Ahmad; Lin, Yuxuan; Zhang, Yuhao; Chuang, Meng-Hsi; Lee, Yi-Hsien; Antoniadis, Dimitri; Kong, Jing; Chandrakasan, Anantha; Palacios, Tomas

    2016-10-12

    Two-dimensional electronics based on single-layer (SL) MoS 2 offers significant advantages for realizing large-scale flexible systems owing to its ultrathin nature, good transport properties, and stable crystalline structure. In this work, we utilize a gate first process technology for the fabrication of highly uniform enhancement mode FETs with large mobility and excellent subthreshold swing. To enable large-scale MoS 2 circuit, we also develop Verilog-A compact models that accurately predict the performance of the fabricated MoS 2 FETs as well as a parametrized layout cell for the FET to facilitate the design and layout process using computer-aided design (CAD) tools. Using this CAD flow, we designed combinational logic gates and sequential circuits (AND, OR, NAND, NOR, XNOR, latch, edge-triggered register) as well as switched capacitor dc-dc converter, which were then fabricated using the proposed flow showing excellent performance. The fabricated integrated circuits constitute the basis of a standard cell digital library that is crucial for electronic circuit design using hardware description languages. The proposed design flow provides a platform for the co-optimization of the device fabrication technology and circuits design for future ubiquitous flexible and transparent electronics using two-dimensional materials.

  19. Applying a CAD-generated imaging marker to assess short-term breast cancer risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirniaharikandehei, Seyedehnafiseh; Zarafshani, Ali; Heidari, Morteza; Wang, Yunzhi; Aghaei, Faranak; Zheng, Bin

    2018-02-01

    Although whether using computer-aided detection (CAD) helps improve radiologists' performance in reading and interpreting mammograms is controversy due to higher false-positive detection rates, objective of this study is to investigate and test a new hypothesis that CAD-generated false-positives, in particular, the bilateral summation of false-positives, is a potential imaging marker associated with short-term breast cancer risk. An image dataset involving negative screening mammograms acquired from 1,044 women was retrospectively assembled. Each case involves 4 images of craniocaudal (CC) and mediolateral oblique (MLO) view of the left and right breasts. In the next subsequent mammography screening, 402 cases were positive for cancer detected and 642 remained negative. A CAD scheme was applied to process all "prior" negative mammograms. Some features from CAD scheme were extracted, which include detection seeds, the total number of false-positive regions, an average of detection scores and the sum of detection scores in CC and MLO view images. Then the features computed from two bilateral images of left and right breasts from either CC or MLO view were combined. In order to predict the likelihood of each testing case being positive in the next subsequent screening, two logistic regression models were trained and tested using a leave-one-case-out based cross-validation method. Data analysis demonstrated the maximum prediction accuracy with an area under a ROC curve of AUC=0.65+/-0.017 and the maximum adjusted odds ratio of 4.49 with a 95% confidence interval of [2.95, 6.83]. The results also illustrated an increasing trend in the adjusted odds ratio and risk prediction scores (p<0.01). Thus, the study showed that CAD-generated false-positives might provide a new quantitative imaging marker to help assess short-term breast cancer risk.

  20. A distributed data base management facility for the CAD/CAM environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balza, R. M.; Beaudet, R. W.; Johnson, H. R.

    1984-01-01

    Current/PAD research in the area of distributed data base management considers facilities for supporting CAD/CAM data management in a heterogeneous network of computers encompassing multiple data base managers supporting a variety of data models. These facilities include coordinated execution of multiple DBMSs to provide for administration of and access to data distributed across them.

  1. A Design-Based Engineering Graphics Course for First-Year Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Shana Shiang-Fong

    2003-01-01

    Describes the first-year Introduction to Design course at Iowa State University which incorporates design for manufacturing and concurrent engineering principles into the curriculum. Autodesk Inventor was used as the primary CAD tool for parametric solid modeling. Test results show that student spatial visualization skills were dramatically…

  2. CaveCAD: a tool for architectural design in immersive virtual environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulze, Jürgen P.; Hughes, Cathleen E.; Zhang, Lelin; Edelstein, Eve; Macagno, Eduardo

    2014-02-01

    Existing 3D modeling tools were designed to run on desktop computers with monitor, keyboard and mouse. To make 3D modeling possible with mouse and keyboard, many 3D interactions, such as point placement or translations of geometry, had to be mapped to the 2D parameter space of the mouse, possibly supported by mouse buttons or keyboard keys. We hypothesize that had the designers of these existing systems had been able to assume immersive virtual reality systems as their target platforms, they would have been able to design 3D interactions much more intuitively. In collaboration with professional architects, we created a simple, but complete 3D modeling tool for virtual environments from the ground up and use direct 3D interaction wherever possible and adequate. In this publication, we present our approaches for interactions for typical 3D modeling functions, such as geometry creation, modification of existing geometry, and assignment of surface materials. We also discuss preliminary user experiences with this system.

  3. Automatic Generation of CFD-Ready Surface Triangulations from CAD Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aftosmis, M. J.; Delanaye, M.; Haimes, R.; Nixon, David (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents an approach for the generation of closed manifold surface triangulations from CAD geometry. CAD parts and assemblies are used in their native format, without translation, and a part's native geometry engine is accessed through a modeler-independent application programming interface (API). In seeking a robust and fully automated procedure, the algorithm is based on a new physical space manifold triangulation technique which was developed to avoid robustness issues associated with poorly conditioned mappings. In addition, this approach avoids the usual ambiguities associated with floating-point predicate evaluation on constructed coordinate geometry in a mapped space, The technique is incremental, so that each new site improves the triangulation by some well defined quality measure. Sites are inserted using a variety of priority queues to ensure that new insertions will address the worst triangles first, As a result of this strategy, the algorithm will return its 'best' mesh for a given (prespecified) number of sites. Alternatively, the algorithm may be allowed to terminate naturally after achieving a prespecified measure of mesh quality. The resulting triangulations are 'CFD-ready' in that: (1) Edges match the underlying part model to within a specified tolerance. (2) Triangles on disjoint surfaces in close proximity have matching length-scales. (3) The algorithm produces a triangulation such that no angle is less than a given angle bound, alpha, or greater than Pi - 2alpha This result also sets bounds on the maximum vertex degree, triangle aspect-ratio and maximum stretching rate for the triangulation. In addition to tile output triangulations for a variety of CAD parts, tile discussion presents related theoretical results which assert the existence of such all angle bound, and demonstrate that maximum bounds of between 25 deg and 30 deg may be achieved in practice.

  4. Design, analysis and verification of a knee joint oncological prosthesis finite element model.

    PubMed

    Zach, Lukáš; Kunčická, Lenka; Růžička, Pavel; Kocich, Radim

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this paper was to design a finite element model for a hinged PROSPON oncological knee endoprosthesis and to verify the model by comparison with ankle flexion angle using knee-bending experimental data obtained previously. Visible Human Project CT scans were used to create a general lower extremity bones model and to compose a 3D CAD knee joint model to which muscles and ligaments were added. Into the assembly the designed finite element PROSPON prosthesis model was integrated and an analysis focused on the PEEK-OPTIMA hinge pin bushing stress state was carried out. To confirm the stress state analysis results, contact pressure was investigated. The analysis was performed in the knee-bending position within 15.4-69.4° hip joint flexion range. The results showed that the maximum stress achieved during the analysis (46.6 MPa) did not exceed the yield strength of the material (90 MPa); the condition of plastic stability was therefore met. The stress state analysis results were confirmed by the distribution of contact pressure during knee-bending. The applicability of our designed finite element model for the real implant behaviour prediction was proven on the basis of good correlation of the analytical and experimental ankle flexion angle data. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Sandblasting may damage the surface of composite CAD-CAM blocks.

    PubMed

    Yoshihara, Kumiko; Nagaoka, Noriyuki; Maruo, Yukinori; Nishigawa, Goro; Irie, Masao; Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2017-03-01

    CAD-CAM blocks to fabricate semi-direct and indirect restorations are available in different sorts of ceramics as well as composite. In order to bond restorations prepared out of composite blocks into tooth cavities, it is recommended to gently sandblast the surface prior to the application of a primer/adhesive. Today, the effect of sandblasting composite block surfaces has not thoroughly been investigated. In this study, the ultra-structure of composite CAD-CAM blocks was investigated with special attention to the effect of sandblasting on the surface topography and of silanization on the bonding performance. Five different composite CAD-CAM blocks were involved. We correlatively investigated their structural and chemical composition using X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersion spectroscopy (EDS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and (scanning) transmission electron microscopy ((S)TEM). The effect of sandblasting was also imaged in cross-section and at the interface with composite cement. Finally, we measured the shear bond strength to the sandblasted block surface with and without silanization. All composite blocks revealed a different ultra-structure. Sandblasting increased surface roughness and resulted in an irregular surface with some filler exposure. Sandblasting also damaged the surface. When the sandblasted composite blocks were silanized, superior bonding receptiveness in terms of higher bond strength was achieved except for Shofu Block HC. Sandblasting followed by silanization improved the bond strength to composite CAD-CAM blocks. However, sandblasting may also damage the composite CAD-CAM block surface. For the composite CAD-CAM block Shofu Block HC, the damage was so severe that silanization did not improve bond strength. Copyright © 2016 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The Coronary Artery Disease-Reporting and Data System (CAD-RADS): Prognostic and Clinical Implications Associated With Standardized Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography Reporting.

    PubMed

    Xie, Joe X; Cury, Ricardo C; Leipsic, Jonathon; Crim, Matthew T; Berman, Daniel S; Gransar, Heidi; Budoff, Matthew J; Achenbach, Stephan; Ó Hartaigh, Bríain; Callister, Tracy Q; Marques, Hugo; Rubinshtein, Ronen; Al-Mallah, Mouaz H; Andreini, Daniele; Pontone, Gianluca; Cademartiri, Filippo; Maffei, Erica; Chinnaiyan, Kavitha; Raff, Gilbert; Hadamitzky, Martin; Hausleiter, Joerg; Feuchtner, Gudrun; Dunning, Allison; DeLago, Augustin; Kim, Yong-Jin; Kaufmann, Philipp A; Villines, Todd C; Chow, Benjamin J W; Hindoyan, Niree; Gomez, Millie; Lin, Fay Y; Jones, Erica; Min, James K; Shaw, Leslee J

    2018-01-01

    This study sought to assess clinical outcomes associated with the novel Coronary Artery Disease-Reporting and Data System (CAD-RADS) scores used to standardize coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) reporting and their potential utility in guiding post-coronary CTA care. Clinical decision support is a major focus of health care policies aimed at improving guideline-directed care. Recently, CAD-RADS was developed to standardize coronary CTA reporting and includes clinical recommendations to facilitate patient management after coronary CTA. In the multinational CONFIRM (COronary CT Angiography EvaluatioN For Clinical Outcomes: An InteRnational Multicenter) registry, 5,039 patients without known coronary artery disease (CAD) underwent coronary CTA and were stratified by CAD-RADS scores, which rank CAD stenosis severity as 0 (0%), 1 (1% to 24%), 2 (25% to 49%), 3 (50% to 69%), 4A (70% to 99% in 1 to 2 vessels), 4B (70% to 99% in 3 vessels or ≥50% left main), or 5 (100%). Kaplan-Meier and multivariable Cox models were used to estimate all-cause mortality or myocardial infarction (MI). Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to compare CAD-RADS to the Duke CAD Index and traditional CAD classification. Referrals to invasive coronary angiography (ICA) after coronary CTA were also assessed. Cumulative 5-year event-free survival ranged from 95.2% to 69.3% for CAD-RADS 0 to 5 (p < 0.0001). Higher scores were associated with elevations in event risk (hazard ratio: 2.46 to 6.09; p < 0.0001). The ROC curve for prediction of death or MI was 0.7052 for CAD-RADS, which was noninferior to the Duke Index (0.7073; p = 0.893) and traditional CAD classification (0.7095; p = 0.783). ICA rates were 13% for CAD-RADS 0 to 2, 66% for CAD-RADS 3, and 84% for CAD-RADS ≥4A. For CAD-RADS 3, 58% of all catheterizations occurred within the first 30 days of follow-up. In a patient subset with available medication data, 57% of CAD-RADS 3 patients who received 30

  7. Education & Training for CAD/CAM: Results of a National Probability Survey. Krannert Institute Paper Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Majchrzak, Ann

    A study was conducted of the training programs used by plants with Computer Automated Design/Computer Automated Manufacturing (CAD/CAM) to help their employees adapt to automated manufacturing. The study sought to determine the relative priorities of manufacturing establishments for training certain workers in certain skills; the status of…

  8. Marginal discrepancy dimensions of single unit metal crowns fabricated by using CAD-CAM-milled acrylate resin polymer blocks or a conventional waxing technique.

    PubMed

    Lalande, David; Hodd, Jeffrey A; Brousseau, John S; Ramos, Van; Dunham, Daniel; Rueggeberg, Frederick

    2017-10-14

    Because crowns with open margins are a well-known problem and can lead to complications, it is important to assess the accuracy of margins resulting from the use of a new technique. Currently, data regarding the marginal fit of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) technology to fabricate a complete gold crown (CGC) from a castable acrylate resin polymer block are lacking. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare marginal discrepancy widths of CGCs fabricated by using either conventional hand waxing or acrylate resin polymer blocks generated by using CAD-CAM technology. A plastic model of a first mandibular molar was prepared by using a 1-mm, rounded chamfer margin on the entire circumference of the tooth. The master die was duplicated 30 times, and 15 wax patterns were fabricated by using a manual waxing technique, and 15 were fabricated by using CAD-CAM technology. All patterns were invested and cast, and resulting CGCs were cemented on their respective die by using resin-modified glass ionomer cement. The specimens were then embedded in acrylic resin and sectioned buccolingually. The buccal and lingual marginal discrepancies of each sectioned portion were measured by using microscopy at ×50 magnification. Data were subjected to repeated measures 2-way ANOVA, by using the Tukey post hoc pairwise comparison test (α=.05). The factor of "technique" had no significant influence on marginal discrepancy measurement (P=.431), but a significant effect of "margin location" (P=.019) was noted. The confounding combination of factors was found to be significantly lower marginal discrepancy dimensions of the lingual margin discrepancy than on the buccal side by using CAD-CAM technology. The marginal discrepancy of CAD-CAM acrylate resin crowns was not significantly different from those made with a conventional manual method; however, lingual margin discrepancies present from CAD-CAM-prepared crowns were significantly less than those

  9. Preparing Students for Computer Aided Drafting (CAD). A Conceptual Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Putnam, A. R.; Duelm, Brian

    This presentation outlines guidelines for developing and implementing an introductory course in computer-aided drafting (CAD) that is geared toward secondary-level students. The first section of the paper, which deals with content identification and selection, includes lists of mechanical drawing and CAD competencies and a list of rationales for…

  10. Computer-Aided Design in Further Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingham, Peter, Ed.

    This publication updates the 1982 occasional paper that was intended to foster staff awareness and assist colleges in Great Britain considering the use of computer-aided design (CAD) material in engineering courses. The paper begins by defining CAD and its place in the Integrated Business System with a brief discussion of the effect of CAD on the…

  11. Utilization of design data on conventional system to building information modeling (BIM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbar, Boyke M.; Z. R., Dewi Larasati

    2017-11-01

    Nowadays infrastructure development becomes one of the main priorities in the developed country such as Indonesia. The use of conventional design system is considered no longer effectively support the infrastructure projects, especially for the high complexity building design, due to its fragmented system issues. BIM comes as one of the solutions in managing projects in an integrated manner. Despite of the all known BIM benefits, there are some obstacles on the migration process to BIM. The two main of the obstacles are; the BIM implementation unpreparedness of some project parties and a concerns to leave behind the existing database and create a new one on the BIM system. This paper discusses the utilization probabilities of the existing CAD data from the conventional design system for BIM system. The existing conventional CAD data's and BIM design system output was studied to examine compatibility issues between two subject and followed by an utilization scheme-strategy probabilities. The goal of this study is to add project parties' eagerness in migrating to BIM by maximizing the existing data utilization and hopefully could also increase BIM based project workflow quality.

  12. CAD/CAM complete dentures: a review of two commercial fabrication systems.

    PubMed

    Kattadiyil, Mathew T; Goodacre, Charles J; Baba, Nadim Z

    2013-06-01

    The use of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) has become available for complete dentures through the AvaDent and Dentca systems. AvaDent uses laser scanning and computer technology. Teeth are arranged and bases formed using proprietary software.The bases are milled from prepolymerized pucks of resin. Dentca uses computer software to produce virtual maxillary and mandibular edentulous ridges, arrange the teeth and form bases. The dentures are fabricated using a conventional processing technique.

  13. Three-Dimensional Static Articulation Accuracy of Virtual Models-Part II: Effect of Model Scanner-CAD Systems and Articulation Method.

    PubMed

    Yee, Sophia Hui Xin; Esguerra, Roxanna Jean; Chew, Amelia Anya Qin'An; Wong, Keng Mun; Tan, Keson Beng Choon

    2018-02-01

    Accurate maxillomandibular relationship transfer is important for CAD/CAM prostheses. This study compared the 3D-accuracy of virtual model static articulation in three laboratory scanner-CAD systems (Ceramill Map400 [AG], inEos X5 [SIR], Scanner S600 Arti [ZKN]) using two virtual articulation methods: mounted models (MO), interocclusal record (IR). The master model simulated a single crown opposing a 3-unit fixed partial denture. Reference values were obtained by measuring interarch and interocclusal reference features with a coordinate measuring machine (CMM). MO group stone casts were articulator-mounted with acrylic resin bite registrations while IR group casts were hand-articulated with poly(vinyl siloxane) bite registrations. Five test model sets were scanned and articulated virtually with each system (6 test groups, 15 data sets). STL files of the virtual models were measured with CMM software. dR R , dR C , and dR L , represented interarch global distortions at right, central, and left sides, respectively, while dR M , dX M , dY M , and dZ M represented interocclusal global and linear distortions between preparations. Mean interarch 3D distortion ranged from -348.7 to 192.2 μm for dR R , -86.3 to 44.1 μm for dR C , and -168.1 to 4.4 μm for dR L . Mean interocclusal distortion ranged from -257.2 to -85.2 μm for dR M , -285.7 to 183.9 μm for dX M , -100.5 to 114.8 μm for dY M , and -269.1 to -50.6 μm for dZ M . ANOVA showed that articulation method had significant effect on dR R and dX M , while system had a significant effect on dR R , dR C , dR L , dR M , and dZ M . There were significant differences between 6 test groups for dR R, dR L dX M , and dZ M . dR R and dX M were significantly greater in AG-IR, and this was significantly different from SIR-IR, ZKN-IR, and all MO groups. Interarch and interocclusal distances increased in MO groups, while they decreased in IR groups. AG-IR had the greatest interarch distortion as well as interocclusal superior

  14. Computer-aided design of microvasculature systems for use in vascular scaffold production.

    PubMed

    Mondy, William Lafayette; Cameron, Don; Timmermans, Jean-Pierre; De Clerck, Nora; Sasov, Alexander; Casteleyn, Christophe; Piegl, Les A

    2009-09-01

    In vitro biomedical engineering of intact, functional vascular networks, which include capillary structures, is a prerequisite for adequate vascular scaffold production. Capillary structures are necessary since they provide the elements and compounds for the growth, function and maintenance of 3D tissue structures. Computer-aided modeling of stereolithographic (STL) micro-computer tomographic (micro-CT) 3D models is a technique that enables us to mimic the design of vascular tree systems containing capillary beds, found in tissues. In our first paper (Mondy et al 2009 Tissue Eng. at press), using micro-CT, we studied the possibility of using vascular tissues to produce data capable of aiding the design of vascular tree scaffolding, which would help in the reverse engineering of a complete vascular tree system including capillary bed structures. In this paper, we used STL models of large datasets of computer-aided design (CAD) data of vascular structures which contained capillary structures that mimic those in the dermal layers of rabbit skin. Using CAD software we created from 3D STL models a bio-CAD design for the development of capillary-containing vascular tree scaffolding for skin. This method is designed to enhance a variety of therapeutic protocols including, but not limited to, organ and tissue repair, systemic disease mediation and cell/tissue transplantation therapy. Our successful approach to in vitro vasculogenesis will allow the bioengineering of various other types of 3D tissue structures, and as such greatly expands the potential applications of biomedical engineering technology into the fields of biomedical research and medicine.

  15. CAD Instructor Designs Eco-Friendly Shed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwendau, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Dissatisfied with the options offered by big box stores--and wanting to save some money and go as green as possible--the author puts his design and construction skills to good use. In this article, he shares how he designed and built an eco-friendly shed. He says he is very pleased with the results of working with his own design, reducing waste,…

  16. A systematic approach to parameter selection for CAD-virtual reality data translation using response surface methodology and MOGA-II.

    PubMed

    Abidi, Mustufa Haider; Al-Ahmari, Abdulrahman; Ahmad, Ali

    2018-01-01

    Advanced graphics capabilities have enabled the use of virtual reality as an efficient design technique. The integration of virtual reality in the design phase still faces impediment because of issues linked to the integration of CAD and virtual reality software. A set of empirical tests using the selected conversion parameters was found to yield properly represented virtual reality models. The reduced model yields an R-sq (pred) value of 72.71% and an R-sq (adjusted) value of 86.64%, indicating that 86.64% of the response variability can be explained by the model. The R-sq (pred) is 67.45%, which is not very high, indicating that the model should be further reduced by eliminating insignificant terms. The reduced model yields an R-sq (pred) value of 73.32% and an R-sq (adjusted) value of 79.49%, indicating that 79.49% of the response variability can be explained by the model. Using the optimization software MODE Frontier (Optimization, MOGA-II, 2014), four types of response surfaces for the three considered response variables were tested for the data of DOE. The parameter values obtained using the proposed experimental design methodology result in better graphics quality, and other necessary design attributes.

  17. [Veneer computer aided design based on reverse engineering technology].

    PubMed

    Liu, Ming-li; Chen, Xiao-dong; Wang, Yong

    2012-03-01

    To explore the computer aided design (CAD) method of veneer restoration, and to assess if the solution can help prosthesis meet morphology esthetics standard. A volunteer's upper right central incisor needed to be restored with veneer. Super hard stone models of patient's dentition (before and after tooth preparation) were scanned with the three-dimensional laser scanner. The veneer margin was designed as butt-to-butt type. The veneer was constructed using reverse engineering (RE) software. The technique guideline of veneers CAD was explore based on RE software, and the veneers was smooth, continuous and symmetrical, which met esthetics construction needs. It was a feasible method to reconstruct veneer restoration based on RE technology.

  18. Light irradiance through novel CAD-CAM block materials and degree of conversion of composite cements.

    PubMed

    Lise, Diogo Pedrollo; Van Ende, Annelies; De Munck, Jan; Yoshihara, Kumiko; Nagaoka, Noriyuki; Cardoso Vieira, Luiz Clovis; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2018-02-01

    To assess light irradiance (LI) delivered by two light-curing units (LCU's) and to measure the degree of conversion (DC) of three composite cements, when cured through different thicknesses of two novel CAD-CAM block materials. 100-μm-thick films of a dual-curable composite cement (G-CEM LinkAce, GC), a light-curable flowable resin-based composite (RBC) (G-ænial Universal Flo, GC) and a micro-hybrid RBC (G-ænial Posterior, GC) were investigated as luting agents. Two 'polymer-ceramic' CAD-CAM blocks (Cerasmart, GC; Enamic, Vita Zahnfabrik) were sectioned in slabs with different thicknesses (1, 3 and 5mm). LI at the bottom of the specimens was measured using a calibrated spectrometer, while being light-cured through the CAD-CAM block slabs for 40s with a low- (±500mW/cm 2 ) or high- (±1,600mW/cm 2 ) irradiance LCU (n=5). After light-curing, micro-Raman spectra of the composite films were acquired to determine DC at 5min, 10min, 1h and 24h. LI data were statistically analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis followed by post-hoc comparisons, while a linear mixed-effect model was applied for the DC analysis. In addition, the CAD-CAM blocks ultrastructure was characterized upon argon-ion slicing using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Finally, light transmission (LT) through each CAD-CAM block material was assessed using a spectrophotometer. Curing-light attenuation and DC were significantly influenced by thickness and type of the overlying material. LCU only had a significant effect on DC of the micro-hybrid RBC. DC significantly increased over time for all composite cements. CAD-CAM block structural analysis revealed a relatively small and homogenous filler configuration (mean filler size of 0.2-0.5μm) for Cerasmart, while Enamic contained ceramic grains varying in shape and size (1-10μm), which were interconnected by the polymer-based network. LT was much higher at a wavelength range of 300-800nm for Cerasmart than for Enamic. Light-curable composite cements

  19. CAD-based stand-alone spacecraft radiation exposure analysis system: An application of the early man-tended Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appleby, M. H.; Golightly, M. J.; Hardy, A. C.

    1993-01-01

    Major improvements have been completed in the approach to analyses and simulation of spacecraft radiation shielding and exposure. A computer-aided design (CAD)-based system has been developed for determining the amount of shielding provided by a spacecraft and simulating transmission of an incident radiation environment to any point within or external to the vehicle. Shielding analysis is performed using a customized ray-tracing subroutine contained within a standard engineering modeling software package. This improved shielding analysis technique has been used in several vehicle design programs such as a Mars transfer habitat, pressurized lunar rover, and the redesigned international Space Station. Results of analysis performed for the Space Station astronaut exposure assessment are provided to demonastrate the applicability and versatility of the system.

  20. Quantitative assessment of multiple sclerosis lesion load using CAD and expert input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gertych, Arkadiusz; Wong, Alexis; Sangnil, Alan; Liu, Brent J.

    2008-03-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a frequently encountered neurological disease with a progressive but variable course affecting the central nervous system. Outline-based lesion quantification in the assessment of lesion load (LL) performed on magnetic resonance (MR) images is clinically useful and provides information about the development and change reflecting overall disease burden. Methods of LL assessment that rely on human input are tedious, have higher intra- and inter-observer variability and are more time-consuming than computerized automatic (CAD) techniques. At present it seems that methods based on human lesion identification preceded by non-interactive outlining by CAD are the best LL quantification strategies. We have developed a CAD that automatically quantifies MS lesions, displays 3-D lesion map and appends radiological findings to original images according to current DICOM standard. CAD is also capable to display and track changes and make comparison between patient's separate MRI studies to determine disease progression. The findings are exported to a separate imaging tool for review and final approval by expert. Capturing and standardized archiving of manual contours is also implemented. Similarity coefficients calculated from quantities of LL in collected exams show a good correlation of CAD-derived results vs. those incorporated as expert's reading. Combining the CAD approach with an expert interaction may impact to the diagnostic work-up of MS patients because of improved reproducibility in LL assessment and reduced time for single MR or comparative exams reading. Inclusion of CAD-generated outlines as DICOM-compliant overlays into the image data can serve as a better reference in MS progression tracking.

  1. The Nucleotide Synthesis Enzyme CAD Inhibits NOD2 Antibacterial Function in Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Richmond, Amy L.; Kabi, Amrita; Homer, Craig R.; García, Noemí Marina; Nickerson, Kourtney P.; NesvizhskiI, Alexey I.; Sreekumar, Arun; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.; Nuñez, Gabriel; McDonald, Christine

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Polymorphisms that reduce the function of nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)2, a bacterial sensor, have been associated with Crohn’s disease (CD). No proteins that regulate NOD2 activity have been identified as selective pharmacologic targets. We sought to discover regulators of NOD2 that might be pharmacologic targets for CD therapies. METHODS Carbamoyl phosphate synthetase/ aspartate transcarbamylase/dihydroorotase (CAD) is an enzyme required for de novo pyrimidine nucleotide synthesis; it was identified as a NOD2-interacting protein by immunoprecipitation-coupled mass spectrometry. CAD expression was assessed in colon tissues from individuals with and without inflammatory bowel disease by immunohistochemistry. The interaction between CAD and NOD2 was assessed in human HCT116 intestinal epithelial cells by immunoprecipitation, immunoblot, reporter gene, and gentamicin protection assays. We also analyzed human cell lines that express variants of NOD2 and the effects of RNA interference, overexpression and CAD inhibitors. RESULTS CAD was identified as a NOD2-interacting protein expressed at increased levels in the intestinal epithelium of patients with CD compared with controls. Overexpression of CAD inhibited NOD2-dependent activation of nuclear factor κB and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, as well as intracellular killing of Salmonella. Reduction of CAD expression or administration of CAD inhibitors increased NOD2-dependent signaling and antibacterial functions of NOD2 variants that are and are not associated with CD. CONCLUSIONS The nucleotide synthesis enzyme CAD is a negative regulator of NOD2. The antibacterial function of NOD2 variants that have been associated with CD increased in response to pharmacologic inhibition of CAD. CAD is a potential therapeutic target for CD. PMID:22387394

  2. A supervised 'lesion-enhancement' filter by use of a massive-training artificial neural network (MTANN) in computer-aided diagnosis (CAD).

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kenji

    2009-09-21

    Computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) has been an active area of study in medical image analysis. A filter for the enhancement of lesions plays an important role for improving the sensitivity and specificity in CAD schemes. The filter enhances objects similar to a model employed in the filter; e.g. a blob-enhancement filter based on the Hessian matrix enhances sphere-like objects. Actual lesions, however, often differ from a simple model; e.g. a lung nodule is generally modeled as a solid sphere, but there are nodules of various shapes and with internal inhomogeneities such as a nodule with spiculations and ground-glass opacity. Thus, conventional filters often fail to enhance actual lesions. Our purpose in this study was to develop a supervised filter for the enhancement of actual lesions (as opposed to a lesion model) by use of a massive-training artificial neural network (MTANN) in a CAD scheme for detection of lung nodules in CT. The MTANN filter was trained with actual nodules in CT images to enhance actual patterns of nodules. By use of the MTANN filter, the sensitivity and specificity of our CAD scheme were improved substantially. With a database of 69 lung cancers, nodule candidate detection by the MTANN filter achieved a 97% sensitivity with 6.7 false positives (FPs) per section, whereas nodule candidate detection by a difference-image technique achieved a 96% sensitivity with 19.3 FPs per section. Classification-MTANNs were applied for further reduction of the FPs. The classification-MTANNs removed 60% of the FPs with a loss of one true positive; thus, it achieved a 96% sensitivity with 2.7 FPs per section. Overall, with our CAD scheme based on the MTANN filter and classification-MTANNs, an 84% sensitivity with 0.5 FPs per section was achieved.

  3. ACSYNT - A standards-based system for parametric, computer aided conceptual design of aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jayaram, S.; Myklebust, A.; Gelhausen, P.

    1992-01-01

    A group of eight US aerospace companies together with several NASA and NAVY centers, led by NASA Ames Systems Analysis Branch, and Virginia Tech's CAD Laboratory agreed, through the assistance of Americal Technology Initiative, in 1990 to form the ACSYNT (Aircraft Synthesis) Institute. The Institute is supported by a Joint Sponsored Research Agreement to continue the research and development in computer aided conceptual design of aircraft initiated by NASA Ames Research Center and Virginia Tech's CAD Laboratory. The result of this collaboration, a feature-based, parametric computer aided aircraft conceptual design code called ACSYNT, is described. The code is based on analysis routines begun at NASA Ames in the early 1970's. ACSYNT's CAD system is based entirely on the ISO standard Programmer's Hierarchical Interactive Graphics System and is graphics-device independent. The code includes a highly interactive graphical user interface, automatically generated Hermite and B-Spline surface models, and shaded image displays. Numerous features to enhance aircraft conceptual design are described.

  4. Macro- and microtopographical examination and quantification of CAD-CAM composite resin 2- and 3-body wear.

    PubMed

    Stöckl, Carolin; Hampe, Rüdiger; Stawarczyk, Bogna; Haerst, Miriam; Roos, Malgorzata

    2018-04-05

    The selection of an appropriate restorative material based on wear behavior is important for the long-term success of a dental restoration. For computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) composite resins, information about their wear resistance and wear mechanism is scarce. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the 2- and 3-body wear of CAD-CAM composite resins with that of lithium disilicate ceramic and to develop analysis software. Flat specimens were prepared from the following CAD-CAM composite resins: Cerasmart (CS), SHOFU Block HC (SH), Katana Avencia (KA), Brilliant Crios (BC), an experimental composite resin (EXP), and lithium disilicate ceramic IPS e.max CAD (REF). The specimens underwent 2-body wear (50 N, 5/55°C, 400 000 cycles) opposed by human enamel antagonists. Specimen wheels were prepared with each material on each wheel for 3-body wear with a millet slurry (15 N, 15% slip, 200 000 cycles). All specimens were digitized by using a dedicated laser scanner. Analysis software was developed to calculate macrotopographical examination of volume loss. The microtopography of the surfaces was examined by using scanning electron microscopy. For data analysis, the Kruskal-Wallis test with the Tukey-Kramer post hoc test and the 1-sample Wilcoxon test were used (α=.05). After 2-body wear simulation, SH and KA presented higher volume loss than the other CAD-CAM materials. For 3-body wear, REF had lower volume loss than CS, SH, or BC. In addition, BC led to higher volume loss than EXP. The patterns of 2- and 3-body wear were different. The ceramic showed good global wear resistance. The volume loss of the CAD-CAM composite resins differed and depended on the material. The 2- and 3-body wear test methods tended to differ with regard to volume loss. Examination of the worn surfaces revealed different mechanisms acting in 2- and 3-body wear test. Copyright © 2017 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry

  5. Evaluation of Shipbuilding CAD/CAM/CIM Systems - Phase II (Requirements for Future Systems)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-02-01

    INNOVATION MARINE INDUSTRY STANDARDS WELDING INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING EDUCATION AND TRAINING THE NATIONAL SHIPBUILDING RESEARCH PROGRAM February 1997 NSRP 0479...an analysis of CAD/CAM/CIM in shipyards, ship-design software firms, and alIied industries in Europe, Japan and the U.S. The purpose of the analysis...possible: Black and Veatch Hitachi Ariake Works Industrial Technology Institute Intergraph Corporation Kockums Computer Systems Mitsubishi Heavy Industries

  6. Microcomputer Simulated CAD for Engineering Graphics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huggins, David L.; Myers, Roy E.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a simulated computer-aided-graphics (CAD) program at The Pennsylvania State University. Rationale for the program, facilities, microcomputer equipment (Apple) used, and development of a software package for simulating applied engineering graphics are considered. (JN)

  7. [Evaluation of production and clinical working time of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) custom trays for complete denture].

    PubMed

    Wei, L; Chen, H; Zhou, Y S; Sun, Y C; Pan, S X

    2017-02-18

    To compare the technician fabrication time and clinical working time of custom trays fabricated using two different methods, the three-dimensional printing custom trays and the conventional custom trays, and to prove the feasibility of the computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) custom trays in clinical use from the perspective of clinical time cost. Twenty edentulous patients were recruited into this study, which was prospective, single blind, randomized self-control clinical trials. Two custom trays were fabricated for each participant. One of the custom trays was fabricated using functional suitable denture (FSD) system through CAD/CAM process, and the other was manually fabricated using conventional methods. Then the final impressions were taken using both the custom trays, followed by utilizing the final impression to fabricate complete dentures respectively. The technician production time of the custom trays and the clinical working time of taking the final impression was recorded. The average time spent on fabricating the three-dimensional printing custom trays using FSD system and fabricating the conventional custom trays manually were (28.6±2.9) min and (31.1±5.7) min, respectively. The average time spent on making the final impression with the three-dimensional printing custom trays using FSD system and the conventional custom trays fabricated manually were (23.4±11.5) min and (25.4±13.0) min, respectively. There was significant difference in the technician fabrication time and the clinical working time between the three-dimensional printing custom trays using FSD system and the conventional custom trays fabricated manually (P<0.05). The average time spent on fabricating three-dimensional printing custom trays using FSD system and making the final impression with the trays are less than those of the conventional custom trays fabricated manually, which reveals that the FSD three-dimensional printing custom trays is less time

  8. Aircraft Conceptual Design Using Vehicle Sketch Pad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fredericks, William J.; Antcliff, Kevin R.; Costa, Guillermo; Deshpande, Nachiket; Moore, Mark D.; Miguel, Edric A. San; Snyder, Alison N.

    2010-01-01

    Vehicle Sketch Pad (VSP) is a parametric geometry modeling tool that is intended for use in the conceptual design of aircraft. The intent of this software is to rapidly model aircraft configurations without expending the expertise and time that is typically required for modeling with traditional Computer Aided Design (CAD) packages. VSP accomplishes this by using parametrically defined components, such as a wing that is defined by span, area, sweep, taper ratio, thickness to cord, and so on. During this phase of frequent design builds, changes to the model can be rapidly visualized along with the internal volumetric layout. Using this geometry-based approach, parameters such as wetted areas and cord lengths can be easily extracted for rapid external performance analyses, such as a parasite drag buildup. At the completion of the conceptual design phase, VSP can export its geometry to higher fidelity tools. This geometry tool was developed by NASA and is freely available to U.S. companies and universities. It has become integral to conceptual design in the Aeronautics Systems Analysis Branch (ASAB) here at NASA Langley Research Center and is currently being used at over 100 universities, aerospace companies, and other government agencies. This paper focuses on the use of VSP in recent NASA conceptual design studies to facilitate geometry-centered design methodology. Such a process is shown to promote greater levels of creativity, more rapid assessment of critical design issues, and improved ability to quickly interact with higher order analyses. A number of VSP vehicle model examples are compared to CAD-based conceptual design, from a designer perspective; comparisons are also made of the time and expertise required to build the geometry representations as well.

  9. Interfacing WIPL-D with Mechanical CAD Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bliznyuk, Nataliya; Janic, Bojan

    2007-01-01

    of almost any popular CAD format, e.g. IGES, Parasolid, DXF, ACIS etc. The solid models are processed (simplified) and meshed in GiD(R), and then converted into WIPL-D Pro input file by simple Fortran or Matlab code. This algorithm allows the user to control the mesh of imported geometry, and to assign electric pperties to metalic and dielectric surfaces. Implementation of the algorithm is demonstrated by examples obtained from the NASA Discovery mission, Phoenix Lander 2008. Results for radiation pattern of Phoenix Lander UHF relay antenna with effect of Martian surface, both simulated in WIPL-D Pro and measured, are shown for comparison.

  10. Application programs written by using customizing tools of a computer-aided design system

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Li, X.; Huang, R.; Juricic, D.

    1995-12-31

    Customizing tools of Computer-Aided Design Systems have been developed to such a degree as to become equivalent to powerful higher-level programming languages that are especially suitable for graphics applications. Two examples of application programs written by using AutoCAD`s customizing tools are given in some detail to illustrate their power. One tool uses AutoLISP list-processing language to develop an application program that produces four views of a given solid model. The other uses AutoCAD Developmental System, based on program modules written in C, to produce an application program that renders a freehand sketch from a given CAD drawing.

  11. Effect of Crystallization Firing on Marginal Gap of CAD/CAM Fabricated Lithium Disilicate Crowns.

    PubMed

    Gold, Steven A; Ferracane, Jack L; da Costa, Juliana

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the marginal gaps of CAD/CAM (CEREC 3) produced crowns made from leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic (IPS Empress CAD) blocks (LG), and lithium-disilicate (IPS e.max CAD) blocks before (LD-B), and after (LD-A) crystallization firing. A human molar tooth (#19) was mounted with adjacent teeth on a typodont and prepared for a full-coverage ceramic crown. The typodont was assembled in the mannequin head to simulate clinical conditions. After tooth preparation 15 individual optical impressions were taken by the same operator using titanium dioxide powder and a CEREC 3 camera per manufacturer's instructions. One operator designed and machined the crowns in leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic blocks (n = 5) and lithium-disilicate blocks (n = 10) using the CEREC 3 system. The crowns were rigidly seated on the prepared tooth, and marginal gaps (μm) were measured with an optical microscope (500×) at 12 points, 3 on each of the M, B, D, and L surfaces of the leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic crowns and the lithium-disilicate crowns before and after crystallization firing. Results were analyzed by two-way ANOVA followed by a Tukey's post hoc multiple comparison test (α = 0.05). The overall mean marginal gaps (μm) for the crowns evaluated were: LG = 49.2 ± 5.5, LD-B = 42.9 ± 12.2, and LD-A = 57.2 ± 16.0. The marginal gaps for LG and LD-B were not significantly different, but both were significantly less than for LD-A. The type of ceramic material did not affect the marginal gap of CAD/CAM crowns. The crystallization firing process required for lithium-disilicate crowns resulted in a significant increase in marginal gap size, likely due to shrinkage of the ceramic during the crystallization process. The marginal gap of CAD/CAM-fabricated lithium disilicate crowns increases following crystallization firing. The marginal gap still remains within clinically acceptable parameters. © 2017 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  12. Enhancing image classification models with multi-modal biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caban, Jesus J.; Liao, David; Yao, Jianhua; Mollura, Daniel J.; Gochuico, Bernadette; Yoo, Terry

    2011-03-01

    Currently, most computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems rely on image analysis and statistical models to diagnose, quantify, and monitor the progression of a particular disease. In general, CAD systems have proven to be effective at providing quantitative measurements and assisting physicians during the decision-making process. As the need for more flexible and effective CADs continues to grow, questions about how to enhance their accuracy have surged. In this paper, we show how statistical image models can be augmented with multi-modal physiological values to create more robust, stable, and accurate CAD systems. In particular, this paper demonstrates how highly correlated blood and EKG features can be treated as biomarkers and used to enhance image classification models designed to automatically score subjects with pulmonary fibrosis. In our results, a 3-5% improvement was observed when comparing the accuracy of CADs that use multi-modal biomarkers with those that only used image features. Our results show that lab values such as Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate and Fibrinogen, as well as EKG measurements such as QRS and I:40, are statistically significant and can provide valuable insights about the severity of the pulmonary fibrosis disease.

  13. HDL subfractions and very early CAD: novel findings from untreated patients in a Chinese cohort.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Zhu, Cheng-Gang; Xu, Rui-Xia; Li, Sha; Li, Xiao-Lin; Guo, Yuan-Lin; Wu, Na-Qiong; Gao, Ying; Qing, Ping; Cui, Chuan-Jue; Sun, Jing; Li, Jian-Jun

    2016-08-04

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) in very young individuals is a rare disease associated with poor prognosis. However, the role of specific lipoprotein subfractions in very young CAD patients (≤45 years) is not established yet. A total of 734 consecutive CAD subjects were enrolled and were classified as very early (n = 81, ≤45), early (n = 304, male: 45-55; female: 45-65), and late (n = 349, male: >55; female: >65) groups. Meanwhile, a group of non-CAD subjects were also enrolled as controls (n = 56, ≤45). The lipoprotein separation was performed using Lipoprint System. As a result, the very early CAD patients have lower large high-density lipoprotein (HDL) subfraction and higher small low-density lipoprotein (LDL) subfraction (p < 0.05). Although body mass index was inversely related to large HDL subfraction, overweight did not influence its association with very early CAD. In the logistic regression analysis, large HDL was inversely [OR 95% CI: 0.872 (0.825-0.922)] while small LDL was positively [1.038 (1.008-1.069)] related to very early CAD. However, after adjusting potential confounders, the association was only significant for large HDL [0.899 (0.848-0.954)]. This study firstly demonstrated that large HDL subfraction was negatively related to very early CAD suggestive of its important role in very early CAD incidence.

  14. Computer-aided detection (CAD) of breast cancer on full field digital and screening film mammograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xuejun; Qian, Wei; Song, Xiaoshan; Qian, Yuyan; Song, Dansheng; Clark, Robert A.

    2003-05-01

    Full-field digital mammography (FFDM) as a new breast imaging modality has potential to detect more breast cancers or to detect them at smaller sizes and earlier stages compared with screening film mammography (SFM). However, its performance needs verification, and it would pose new problems for the development of CAD methods for breast cancer detection and diagnosis. Performance evaluation of CAD systems on FFDM and SFM has been conducted in this study, respectively. First, an adaptive CAD system employing a series of advanced modules has been developed on FFDM. Second, a standardization approach has been developed to make the CAD system independent of characteristics of digitizer or imaging modalities for mammography. CAD systems developed previously for SFM and developed in this study for FFDM have been evaluated on FFDM and SFM images without and with standardization, respectively, to examine the performance improvement of the CAD system developed in this study. Computerized free-response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) analysis has been adopted as performance evaluation method. Compared with previous one, the CAD system developed in this study demonstrated significantly performance improvements. However, the comparison results have shown that the performances of final CAD system in this study are not significantly different on FFDM and on SFM after standardization. It needs further study on the assessment of CAD system performance on FFDM and SFM modalities.

  15. A Step-by-Step Conservative Approach for CAD-CAM Laminate Veneers

    PubMed Central

    Henríquez Gutiérrez, Ismael; Guzmán Marusic, Álvaro; Báez Rosales, Abelardo; Tisi Lanchares, José Pablo

    2017-01-01

    The use of CAD/CAM technology has allowed the fabrication of ceramic restorations efficiently and with predictable results. Lithium disilicate is a type of glass ceramic material that can be used for the elaboration of laminate veneers, being monolithic restorations which require characterization through a covering ceramic in order to achieve acceptable esthetic results. The next case report shows a predictable clinical protocol for the rehabilitation of the anterior teeth through the preparation of CAD/CAM veneers (e.max CAD, Ivoclar Vivadent, Liechtenstein) which have been characterized by a nanofluorapatite ceramic (e.max Ceram, Ivoclar Vivadent, Liechtenstein) through the layering technique. PMID:28884029

  16. Improving performance of breast cancer risk prediction using a new CAD-based region segmentation scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidari, Morteza; Zargari Khuzani, Abolfazl; Danala, Gopichandh; Qiu, Yuchen; Zheng, Bin

    2018-02-01

    Objective of this study is to develop and test a new computer-aided detection (CAD) scheme with improved region of interest (ROI) segmentation combined with an image feature extraction framework to improve performance in predicting short-term breast cancer risk. A dataset involving 570 sets of "prior" negative mammography screening cases was retrospectively assembled. In the next sequential "current" screening, 285 cases were positive and 285 cases remained negative. A CAD scheme was applied to all 570 "prior" negative images to stratify cases into the high and low risk case group of having cancer detected in the "current" screening. First, a new ROI segmentation algorithm was used to automatically remove useless area of mammograms. Second, from the matched bilateral craniocaudal view images, a set of 43 image features related to frequency characteristics of ROIs were initially computed from the discrete cosine transform and spatial domain of the images. Third, a support vector machine model based machine learning classifier was used to optimally classify the selected optimal image features to build a CAD-based risk prediction model. The classifier was trained using a leave-one-case-out based cross-validation method. Applying this improved CAD scheme to the testing dataset, an area under ROC curve, AUC = 0.70+/-0.04, which was significantly higher than using the extracting features directly from the dataset without the improved ROI segmentation step (AUC = 0.63+/-0.04). This study demonstrated that the proposed approach could improve accuracy on predicting short-term breast cancer risk, which may play an important role in helping eventually establish an optimal personalized breast cancer paradigm.

  17. Computational Modeling as a Design Tool in Microelectronics Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyyappan, Meyya; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Plans to introduce pilot lines or fabs for 300 mm processing are in progress. The IC technology is simultaneously moving towards 0.25/0.18 micron. The convergence of these two trends places unprecedented stringent demands on processes and equipments. More than ever, computational modeling is called upon to play a complementary role in equipment and process design. The pace in hardware/process development needs a matching pace in software development: an aggressive move towards developing "virtual reactors" is desirable and essential to reduce design cycle and costs. This goal has three elements: reactor scale model, feature level model, and database of physical/chemical properties. With these elements coupled, the complete model should function as a design aid in a CAD environment. This talk would aim at the description of various elements. At the reactor level, continuum, DSMC(or particle) and hybrid models will be discussed and compared using examples of plasma and thermal process simulations. In microtopography evolution, approaches such as level set methods compete with conventional geometric models. Regardless of the approach, the reliance on empricism is to be eliminated through coupling to reactor model and computational surface science. This coupling poses challenging issues of orders of magnitude variation in length and time scales. Finally, database development has fallen behind; current situation is rapidly aggravated by the ever newer chemistries emerging to meet process metrics. The virtual reactor would be a useless concept without an accompanying reliable database that consists of: thermal reaction pathways and rate constants, electron-molecule cross sections, thermochemical properties, transport properties, and finally, surface data on the interaction of radicals, atoms and ions with various surfaces. Large scale computational chemistry efforts are critical as experiments alone cannot meet database needs due to the difficulties associated with such

  18. Automated Design Tools for Integrated Mixed-Signal Microsystems (NeoCAD)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-01

    method, Model Order Reduction (MOR) tools, system-level, mixed-signal circuit synthesis and optimization tools, and parsitic extraction tools. A unique...Mission Area: Command and Control mixed signal circuit simulation parasitic extraction time-domain simulation IC design flow model order reduction... Extraction 1.2 Overall Program Milestones CHAPTER 2 FAST TIME DOMAIN MIXED-SIGNAL CIRCUIT SIMULATION 2.1 HAARSPICE Algorithms 2.1.1 Mathematical Background

  19. Utilizing optical coherence tomography for CAD/CAM of indirect dental restorations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chityala, Ravishankar; Vidal, Carola; Jones, Robert

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) has seen broad application in dentistry including early carious lesion detection and imaging defects in resin composite restorations. This study investigates expanding the clinical usefulness by investigating methods to use OCT for obtaining three-dimensional (3D) digital impressions, which can be integrated to CAD/CAM manufacturing of indirect restorations. 3D surface topography `before' and `after' a cavity preparation was acquired by an intraoral cross polarization swept source OCT (CP-OCT) system with a Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) scanning mirror. Image registration and segmentation methods were used to digitally construct a replacement restoration that modeled the original surface morphology of a hydroxyapatite sample. After high resolution additive manufacturing (e.g. polymer 3D printing) of the replacement restoration, micro-CT imaging was performed to examine the marginal adaptation. This study establishes the protocol for further investigation of integrating OCT with CAD/CAM of indirect dental restorations.

  20. Excavator Design Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pholsiri, Chalongrath; English, James; Seberino, Charles; Lim, Yi-Je

    2010-01-01

    The Excavator Design Validation tool verifies excavator designs by automatically generating control systems and modeling their performance in an accurate simulation of their expected environment. Part of this software design includes interfacing with human operations that can be included in simulation-based studies and validation. This is essential for assessing productivity, versatility, and reliability. This software combines automatic control system generation from CAD (computer-aided design) models, rapid validation of complex mechanism designs, and detailed models of the environment including soil, dust, temperature, remote supervision, and communication latency to create a system of high value. Unique algorithms have been created for controlling and simulating complex robotic mechanisms automatically from just a CAD description. These algorithms are implemented as a commercial cross-platform C++ software toolkit that is configurable using the Extensible Markup Language (XML). The algorithms work with virtually any mobile robotic mechanisms using module descriptions that adhere to the XML standard. In addition, high-fidelity, real-time physics-based simulation algorithms have also been developed that include models of internal forces and the forces produced when a mechanism interacts with the outside world. This capability is combined with an innovative organization for simulation algorithms, new regolith simulation methods, and a unique control and study architecture to make powerful tools with the potential to transform the way NASA verifies and compares excavator designs. Energid's Actin software has been leveraged for this design validation. The architecture includes parametric and Monte Carlo studies tailored for validation of excavator designs and their control by remote human operators. It also includes the ability to interface with third-party software and human-input devices. Two types of simulation models have been adapted: high-fidelity discrete

  1. In vitro fatigue tests and in silico finite element analysis of dental implants with different fixture/abutment joint types using computer-aided design models.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Yamanishi, Yasufumi; Machado, Lucas S; Matsumoto, Shuji; Tovar, Nick; Coelho, Paulo G; Thompson, Van P; Imazato, Satoshi

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate fatigue resistance of dental fixtures with two different fixture-abutment connections by in vitro fatigue testing and in silico three-dimensional finite element analysis (3D FEA) using original computer-aided design (CAD) models. Dental implant fixtures with external connection (EX) or internal connection (IN) abutments were fabricated from original CAD models using grade IV titanium and step-stress accelerated life testing was performed. Fatigue cycles and loads were assessed by Weibull analysis, and fatigue cracking was observed by micro-computed tomography and a stereomicroscope with high dynamic range software. Using the same CAD models, displacement vectors of implant components were also analyzed by 3D FEA. Angles of the fractured line occurring at fixture platforms in vitro and of displacement vectors corresponding to the fractured line in silico were compared by two-way ANOVA. Fatigue testing showed significantly greater reliability for IN than EX (p<0.001). Fatigue crack initiation was primarily observed at implant fixture platforms. FEA demonstrated that crack lines of both implant systems in vitro were observed in the same direction as displacement vectors of the implant fixtures in silico. In silico displacement vectors in the implant fixture are insightful for geometric development of dental implants to reduce complex interactions leading to fatigue failure. Copyright © 2017 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. When and why might a Computer Aided Detection (CAD) system interfere with visual search? An eye-tracking study

    PubMed Central

    Drew, Trafton; Cunningham, Corbin; Wolfe, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Rational and Objectives Computer Aided Detection (CAD) systems are intended to improve performance. This study investigates how CAD might actually interfere with a visual search task. This is a laboratory study with implications for clinical use of CAD. Methods 47 naïve observers in two studies were asked to search for a target, embedded in 1/f2.4 noise while we monitored their eye-movements. For some observers, a CAD system marked 75% of targets and 10% of distractors while other observers completed the study without CAD. In Experiment 1, the CAD system’s primary function was to tell observers where the target might be. In Experiment 2, CAD provided information about target identity. Results In Experiment 1, there was a significant enhancement of observer sensitivity in the presence of CAD (t(22)=4.74, p<.001), but there was also a substantial cost. Targets that were not marked by the CAD system were missed more frequently than equivalent targets in No CAD blocks of the experiment (t(22)=7.02, p<.001). Experiment 2 showed no behavioral benefit from CAD, but also no significant cost on sensitivity to unmarked targets (t(22)=0.6, p=n.s.). Finally, in both experiments, CAD produced reliable changes in eye-movements: CAD observers examined a lower total percentage of the search area than the No CAD observers (Ex 1: t(48)=3.05, p<.005; Ex 2: t(50)=7.31, p<.001). Conclusions CAD signals do not combine with observers’ unaided performance in a straight-forward manner. CAD can engender a sense of certainty that can lead to incomplete search and elevated chances of missing unmarked stimuli. PMID:22958720

  3. Method of development of the program of forming of parametrical drawings of details in the AutoCAD software product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alshakova, E. L.

    2017-01-01

    The program in the AutoLISP language allows automatically to form parametrical drawings during the work in the AutoCAD software product. Students study development of programs on AutoLISP language with the use of the methodical complex containing methodical instructions in which real examples of creation of images and drawings are realized. Methodical instructions contain reference information necessary for the performance of the offered tasks. The method of step-by-step development of the program is the basis for training in programming on AutoLISP language: the program draws elements of the drawing of a detail by means of definitely created function which values of arguments register in that sequence in which AutoCAD gives out inquiries when performing the corresponding command in the editor. The process of the program design is reduced to the process of step-by-step formation of functions and sequence of their calls. The author considers the development of the AutoLISP program for the creation of parametrical drawings of details, the defined design, the user enters the dimensions of elements of details. These programs generate variants of tasks of the graphic works performed in educational process of "Engineering graphics", "Engineering and computer graphics" disciplines. Individual tasks allow to develop at students skills of independent work in reading and creation of drawings, as well as 3D modeling.

  4. A Comparison of Marginal Gaps of All-Ceramic Crowns Constructed from Scanned Impressions and Models.

    PubMed

    Tabesh, Raena; Dudley, James

    This study compared the marginal gaps of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacture (CAD/CAM)-fabricated all-ceramic crowns constructed from scanned impressions and models and with two different occlusal reduction designs. Two typodont mandibular first molars were prepared to receive CAD/CAM-fabricated all-ceramic crowns. Both molars were prepared to ideal crown reduction, the first with anatomical occlusal reduction (AOR) and the second with completely flat occlusal reduction (FOR). Nine polyvinyl siloxane impressions (PVS) were taken, and nine stone replicas fabricated for each preparation. All impressions and stone models were scanned using a laser scanner (Planmeca Planscan, E4D technologies), and 36 lithium disilicate (IPS e.max CAD) crowns were milled. The marginal gap was measured in four locations using a light stereomicroscope. Crowns constructed from preparations with both occlusal reduction designs demonstrated similar marginal gaps (FOR = 97.98; AOR = 89.12; P = .739). However, all crowns constructed from scanned impressions presented significantly larger marginal gaps than the crowns fabricated from scanned models (impressions = 109.26; models = 77.84; P = .002). Scanning stone models produced all-ceramic crowns with significantly smaller marginal gaps than scanning impressions, irrespective of the occlusal reduction design.

  5. Disrupting the cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase 1 gene (BdCAD1) leads to altered lignification and improved saccharification in Brachypodium distachyon.

    PubMed

    Bouvier d'Yvoire, Madeleine; Bouchabke-Coussa, Oumaya; Voorend, Wannes; Antelme, Sébastien; Cézard, Laurent; Legée, Frédéric; Lebris, Philippe; Legay, Sylvain; Whitehead, Caragh; McQueen-Mason, Simon J; Gomez, Leonardo D; Jouanin, Lise; Lapierre, Catherine; Sibout, Richard

    2013-02-01

    Brachypodium distachyon (Brachypodium) has been proposed as a model for grasses, but there is limited knowledge regarding its lignins and no data on lignin-related mutants. The cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) genes involved in lignification are promising targets to improve the cellulose-to-ethanol conversion process. Down-regulation of CAD often induces a reddish coloration of lignified tissues. Based on this observation, we screened a chemically induced population of Brachypodium mutants (Bd21-3 background) for red culm coloration. We identified two mutants (Bd4179 and Bd7591), with mutations in the BdCAD1 gene. The mature stems of these mutants displayed reduced CAD activity and lower lignin content. Their lignins were enriched in 8-O-4- and 4-O-5-coupled sinapaldehyde units, as well as resistant inter-unit bonds and free phenolic groups. By contrast, there was no increase in coniferaldehyde end groups. Moreover, the amount of sinapic acid ester-linked to cell walls was measured for the first time in a lignin-related CAD grass mutant. Functional complementation of the Bd4179 mutant with the wild-type BdCAD1 allele restored the wild-type phenotype and lignification. Saccharification assays revealed that Bd4179 and Bd7591 lines were more susceptible to enzymatic hydrolysis than wild-type plants. Here, we have demonstrated that BdCAD1 is involved in lignification of Brachypodium. We have shown that a single nucleotide change in BdCAD1 reduces the lignin level and increases the degree of branching of lignins through incorporation of sinapaldehyde. These changes make saccharification of cells walls pre-treated with alkaline easier without compromising plant growth. © 2012 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Marginal and internal fit of nano-composite CAD/CAM restorations.

    PubMed

    Park, So-Hyun; Yoo, Yeon-Jee; Shin, Yoo-Jin; Cho, Byeong-Hoon; Baek, Seung-Ho

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the marginal and internal fit of nano-composite CAD-CAM restorations. A full veneer crown and an mesio-occluso-distal (MOD) inlay cavity, which were prepared on extracted human molars, were used as templates of epoxy resin replicas. The prepared teeth were scanned and CAD-CAM restorations were milled using Lava Ultimate (LU) and experimental nano-composite CAD/CAM blocks (EB) under the same milling parameters. To assess the marginal and internal fit, the restorations were cemented to replicas and were embedded in an acrylic mold for sectioning at 0.5 mm intervals. The measured gap data were pooled according to the block types and measuring points for statistical analysis. Both the block type and measuring point significantly affected gap values, and their interaction was significant (p = 0.000). In crowns and inlays made from the two blocks, gap values were significantly larger in the occlusal area than in the axial area, while gap values in the marginal area were smallest (p < 0.001). Among the blocks, the restorations milled from EB had a significantly larger gap at all measuring points than those milled from LU (p = 0.000). The marginal and internal gaps of the two nano-composite CAD/CAM blocks differed according to the measuring points. Among the internal area of the two nano-composite CAD/CAM restorations, occlusal gap data were significantly larger than axial gap data. The EB crowns and inlays had significantly larger gaps than LU restorations.

  7. Marginal and internal fit of nano-composite CAD/CAM restorations

    PubMed Central

    Park, So-Hyun; Shin, Yoo-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to compare the marginal and internal fit of nano-composite CAD-CAM restorations. Materials and Methods A full veneer crown and an mesio-occluso-distal (MOD) inlay cavity, which were prepared on extracted human molars, were used as templates of epoxy resin replicas. The prepared teeth were scanned and CAD-CAM restorations were milled using Lava Ultimate (LU) and experimental nano-composite CAD/CAM blocks (EB) under the same milling parameters. To assess the marginal and internal fit, the restorations were cemented to replicas and were embedded in an acrylic mold for sectioning at 0.5 mm intervals. The measured gap data were pooled according to the block types and measuring points for statistical analysis. Results Both the block type and measuring point significantly affected gap values, and their interaction was significa