Science.gov

Sample records for design parameter calculations

  1. Calculation of Design Parameters for an Equilibrium LEU Core in the NBSR

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, A.L.; Diamond, D.

    2011-09-30

    A plan is being developed for the conversion of the NIST research reactor (NBSR) from high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. Previously, the design of the LEU fuel had been determined in order to provide the users of the NBSR with the same cycle length as exists for the current HEU fueled reactor. The fuel composition at different points within an equilibrium fuel cycle had also been determined. In the present study, neutronics parameters have been calculated for these times in the fuel cycle for both the existing HEU and the proposed LEU equilibrium cores. The results showed differences between the HEU and LEU cores that would not lead to any significant changes in the safety analysis for the converted core. In general the changes were reasonable except that the figure-of-merit for neutrons that can be used by experimentalists shows there will be a 10% reduction in performance. The calculations included kinetics parameters, reactivity coefficients, reactivity worths of control elements and abnormal configurations, and power distributions.

  2. Methods for combining payload parameter variations with input environment. [calculating design limit loads compatible with probabilistic structural design criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merchant, D. H.

    1976-01-01

    Methods are presented for calculating design limit loads compatible with probabilistic structural design criteria. The approach is based on the concept that the desired limit load, defined as the largest load occurring in a mission, is a random variable having a specific probability distribution which may be determined from extreme-value theory. The design limit load, defined as a particular of this random limit load, is the value conventionally used in structural design. Methods are presented for determining the limit load probability distributions from both time-domain and frequency-domain dynamic load simulations. Numerical demonstrations of the method are also presented.

  3. Loss parameter calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, J.M.

    1995-07-01

    Sands and Rees propose an electronic bench measurement of the impulse energy loss of a stored particle bunch to vacuum-chamber components. The components act as the outer conductor of a coaxial line with a thin wire as center conductor. Short pulses are then transmitted through this coaxial system to simulate relativistic particle bunches. Their proposal has since been implemented by several investigators and has become a well-known technique. They derive a first-order approximation to the loss parameter {kappa} for use in these measurements. The purpose of this note is to point out that exact expression for {kappa} is as simple as its first-order approximation and to recommend its use even when {kappa} is small.

  4. The influence of dynamic chamber design and operating parameters on calculated surface-to-air mercury fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckley, C. S.; Gustin, M.; Lin, C.-J.; Li, X.; Miller, M. B.

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic Flux Chambers (DFCs) are commonly applied for the measurement of non-point source mercury (Hg) emissions from a wide range of surfaces. A standard operating protocol and design for DFCs does not exist, and as a result there is a large diversity in methods described in the literature. Because natural and anthropogenic non-point sources are thought to contribute significantly to the atmosphere Hg pool, development of accurate fluxes during field campaigns is essential. The objective of this research was to determine how differences in chamber material, sample port placement, vertical cross sectional area/volume, and flushing flow rate influence the Hg flux from geologic materials. Hg fluxes measured with a Teflon chamber were higher than those obtained using a polycarbonate chamber, with differences related to light transmission and substrate type. Differences in sample port placement (side versus top) did not have an influence on Hg fluxes. When the same flushing flow rate was applied to two chambers of different volumes, higher fluxes were calculated for the chamber with the smaller volume. Conversely, when two chambers with different volumes were maintained at similar turnover times, the larger volume chamber yielded higher Hg fluxes. Overall, the flushing flow rate and associated chamber turnover time had the largest influence on Hg flux relative to the other parameters tested. Results from computational fluid dynamic (CFD) modeling inside a DFC confirm that the smaller diffusion resistance at higher flushing flows contributes to the higher measured flux. These results clearly illustrate that differences in chamber design and operation can significantly influence the resulting calculated Hg flux, and thus impact the comparability of results obtained using DFC designs and/or operating parameters. A protocol for determining a flushing flow rate that results in fluxes less affected by chamber operating conditions and design is proposed. Application of this

  5. Calculation of Design Parameters for an Equilibrium LEU Core in the NBSR using a U7Mo Dispersion Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson A. L.; Diamond D.

    2014-06-30

    A plan is being developed for the conversion of the NIST research reactor (NBSR) from high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The LEU fuel may be a monolithic foil (LEUm) of U10Mo (10% molybdenum by weight in an alloy with uranium) or a dispersion of U7Mo in aluminum (LEUd). A previous report provided neutronic calculations for the LEUm fuel and this report presents the neutronics parameters for the LEUd fuel. The neutronics parameters for the LEUd fuel are compared to those previously obtained for the present HEU fuel and the proposed LEUm fuel. The results show no significant differences between the LEUm and the LEUd other than the LEUd fuel requires slightly less uranium than the LEUm fuel due to less molybdenum being present. The calculations include kinetics parameters, reactivity coefficients, reactivity worths of control elements and abnormal configurations, and power distributions under normal operation and with misloaded fuel elements.

  6. A balance procedure for calculating the model fuel assemblies reflooding during design basis accident and its verification on PARAMETER test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazyuk, S. S.; Ignat'ev, D. N.; Parshin, N. Ya.; Popov, E. B.; Soldatkin, D. M.; Kuzma-Kichta, Yu. A.

    2013-05-01

    A balance procedure is proposed for estimating the main parameters characterizing the process of model fuel assemblies reflooding of a VVER reactor made on different scales under the conditions of a design basis accident by subjecting them to bottom reflooding1. The proposed procedure satisfactorily describes the experimental data obtained on PARAMETER test facility in the temperature range up to 1200°C. The times of fuel assemblies quenching by bottom reflooding calculated using the proposed procedure are in satisfactory agreement with the experimental data obtained on model fuel assemblies of VVER- and PWR-type reactors and can be used in developing measures aimed at enhancing the safety of nuclear power stations.

  7. Calculation of electromagnetic parameter based on interpolation algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenqiang; Yuan, Liming; Zhang, Deyuan

    2015-11-01

    Wave-absorbing material is an important functional material of electromagnetic protection. The wave-absorbing characteristics depend on the electromagnetic parameter of mixed media. In order to accurately predict the electromagnetic parameter of mixed media and facilitate the design of wave-absorbing material, based on the electromagnetic parameters of spherical and flaky carbonyl iron mixture of paraffin base, this paper studied two different interpolation methods: Lagrange interpolation and Hermite interpolation of electromagnetic parameters. The results showed that Hermite interpolation is more accurate than the Lagrange interpolation, and the reflectance calculated with the electromagnetic parameter obtained by interpolation is consistent with that obtained through experiment on the whole.

  8. Closure and Sealing Design Calculation

    SciTech Connect

    T. Lahnalampi; J. Case

    2005-08-26

    The purpose of the ''Closure and Sealing Design Calculation'' is to illustrate closure and sealing methods for sealing shafts, ramps, and identify boreholes that require sealing in order to limit the potential of water infiltration. In addition, this calculation will provide a description of the magma that can reduce the consequences of an igneous event intersecting the repository. This calculation will also include a listing of the project requirements related to closure and sealing. The scope of this calculation is to: summarize applicable project requirements and codes relating to backfilling nonemplacement openings, removal of uncommitted materials from the subsurface, installation of drip shields, and erecting monuments; compile an inventory of boreholes that are found in the area of the subsurface repository; describe the magma bulkhead feature and location; and include figures for the proposed shaft and ramp seals. The objective of this calculation is to: categorize the boreholes for sealing by depth and proximity to the subsurface repository; develop drawing figures which show the location and geometry for the magma bulkhead; include the shaft seal figures and a proposed construction sequence; and include the ramp seal figure and a proposed construction sequence. The intent of this closure and sealing calculation is to support the License Application by providing a description of the closure and sealing methods for the Safety Analysis Report. The closure and sealing calculation will also provide input for Post Closure Activities by describing the location of the magma bulkhead. This calculation is limited to describing the final configuration of the sealing and backfill systems for the underground area. The methods and procedures used to place the backfill and remove uncommitted materials (such as concrete) from the repository and detailed design of the magma bulkhead will be the subject of separate analyses or calculations. Post-closure monitoring will not

  9. Calculation of Kinetics Parameters for the NBSR

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson A. L.; Diamond D.

    2012-03-06

    The delayed neutron fraction and prompt neutron lifetime have been calculated at different times in the fuel cycle for the NBSR when fueled with both high-enriched uranium (HEU) and low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The best-estimate values for both the delayed neutron fraction and the prompt neutron lifetime are the result of calculations using MCNP5-1.60 with the most recent ENDFB-VII evaluations. The best-estimate values for the total delayed neutron fraction from fission products are 0.00665 and 0.00661 for the HEU fueled core at startup and end-of-cycle, respectively. For the LEU fuel the best estimate values are 0.00650 and 0.00648 at startup and end-of-cycle, respectively. The present recommendations for the delayed neutron fractions from fission products are smaller than the value reported previously of 0.00726 for the HEU fuel. The best-estimate values for the contribution from photoneutrons will remain as 0.000316, independent of the fuel or time in the cycle.The values of the prompt neutron lifetime as calculated with MCNP5-1.60 are compared to values calculated with two other independent methods and the results are in reasonable agreement with each other. The recommended, conservative values of the neutron lifetime for the HEU fuel are 650 {micro}s and 750 {micro}s for the startup and end-of-cycle conditions, respectively. For LEU fuel the recommended, conservative values are 600 {micro}s and 700 {micro}s for the startup and end-of-cycle conditions, respectively. In all three calculations, the prompt neutron lifetime was determined to be longer for the end-of-cycle equilibrium condition when compared to the startup condition. The results of the three analyses were in agreement that the LEU fuel will exhibit a shorter prompt neutron lifetime when compared to the HEU fuel.

  10. Design Calculations for NIF Convergent Ablator Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, R. E.; Callahan, D. A.; Hicks, D. G.; Landen, O. L.; Langer, S. H.; Meezan, N. B.; Spears, B. K.; Widmann, K.; Kline, J. L.; Wilson, D. C.; Petrasso, R. D.; Leeper, R. J.

    2010-11-01

    Design calculations for NIF convergent ablator experiments will be described. The convergent ablator experiments measure the implosion trajectory, velocity, and ablation rate of an x-ray driven capsule and are a important component of the U. S. National Ignition Campaign at NIF. The design calculations are post-processed to provide simulations of the key diagnostics -- 1) Dante measurements of hohlraum x-ray flux and spectrum, 2) streaked radiographs of the imploding ablator shell, 3) wedge range filter measurements of D-He3 proton output spectra, and 4) GXD measurements of the imploded core. The simulated diagnostics will be compared to the experimental measurements to provide an assessment of the accuracy of the design code predictions of hohlraum radiation temperature, capsule ablation rate, implosion velocity, shock flash areal density, and x-ray bang time. Post-shot versions of the design calculations are used to enhance the understanding of the experimental measurements and will assist in choosing parameters for subsequent shots and the path towards optimal ignition capsule tuning. *SNL, LLNL, and LANL are operated under US DOE contracts DE-AC04-94AL85000. DE-AC52-07NA27344, and DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  11. Design calculations for NIF convergent ablator experiments.

    SciTech Connect

    Callahan, Debra; Leeper, Ramon Joe; Spears, B. K.; Zylstra, A.; Seguin, F.; Landen, Otto L.; Petrasso, R. D.; Rinderknecht, H.; Kline, J. L.; Frenje, J.; Wilson, D. C.; Langer, S. H.; Widmann, K.; Meezan, Nathan B.; Hicks, Damien G.; Olson, Richard Edward

    2010-11-01

    Design calculations for NIF convergent ablator experiments will be described. The convergent ablator experiments measure the implosion trajectory, velocity, and ablation rate of an x-ray driven capsule and are a important component of the U. S. National Ignition Campaign at NIF. The design calculations are post-processed to provide simulations of the key diagnostics: (1) Dante measurements of hohlraum x-ray flux and spectrum, (2) streaked radiographs of the imploding ablator shell, (3) wedge range filter measurements of D-He3 proton output spectra, and (4) GXD measurements of the imploded core. The simulated diagnostics will be compared to the experimental measurements to provide an assessment of the accuracy of the design code predictions of hohlraum radiation temperature, capsule ablation rate, implosion velocity, shock flash areal density, and x-ray bang time. Post-shot versions of the design calculations are used to enhance the understanding of the experimental measurements and will assist in choosing parameters for subsequent shots and the path towards optimal ignition capsule tuning.

  12. Design Calculations for Thermoelectric Generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeldin, B.

    1983-01-01

    Nine simplified analytic models based on average properties accurately predict heat rates for silicon/germanium thermoelectric generators. Solutions from simplified models were compared with those obtained using sophisticated numerical analysis. Maximum errors in calculated heat rate range from about 4 percent to about 0.2 percent. Models also used to calculate power delivered to load and thermodynamic efficiency.

  13. The calculation of thin film parameters from spectroscopic ellipsometry data

    SciTech Connect

    Jellison, G.E. Jr.

    1996-02-01

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) has proven to be a very powerful diagnostic for thin film characterization, but the results of SE experiments must first be compared with calculations to determine thin film parameters such as film thickness and optical functions. This process requires 4 steps: (1) The quantities measured must be specified and the equivalent calculated parameters identified. (2) The film structure must be modeled, where the number of films is specified and certain characteristics of each layer specified, such as whether or not the film is isotropic or anisotropic, homogeneous or graded. (3) The optical functions of each layer must be specified or parameterized. (4) The data must be compared with the calculated spectra, where a quantifiable figure of merit is used for the comparison. The last step is particularly important because without it, no {open_quotes}goodness of fit{close_quotes} parameter is calculated and one does not know whether or not the calculated spectrum fits the data.

  14. The calculation of orbital positioning using standard orbital parameters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritchard, W.

    1999-08-01

    Practical difficulties arise solving the deceptively simple Kepler's equation. Kepler's equation can be solved easily using the method Newton developed for doing so. The authors recommend that this method be used in any general approach to orbital calculations. Another practical point to be reckoned with, is the variation in true orbital parameters. It is important to note that inclined orbits, eccentric orbits, and low orbits all suffer from rapid changes in their parameters. They can be ignored only for simple calculations for just a few orbits. Any calculation covering a longer period of time must take these changes into account.

  15. Microbial Communities Model Parameter Calculation for TSPA/SR

    SciTech Connect

    D. Jolley

    2001-07-16

    This calculation has several purposes. First the calculation reduces the information contained in ''Committed Materials in Repository Drifts'' (BSC 2001a) to useable parameters required as input to MING V1.O (CRWMS M&O 1998, CSCI 30018 V1.O) for calculation of the effects of potential in-drift microbial communities as part of the microbial communities model. The calculation is intended to replace the parameters found in Attachment II of the current In-Drift Microbial Communities Model revision (CRWMS M&O 2000c) with the exception of Section 11-5.3. Second, this calculation provides the information necessary to supercede the following DTN: M09909SPAMING1.003 and replace it with a new qualified dataset (see Table 6.2-1). The purpose of this calculation is to create the revised qualified parameter input for MING that will allow {Delta}G (Gibbs Free Energy) to be corrected for long-term changes to the temperature of the near-field environment. Calculated herein are the quadratic or second order regression relationships that are used in the energy limiting calculations to potential growth of microbial communities in the in-drift geochemical environment. Third, the calculation performs an impact review of a new DTN: M00012MAJIONIS.000 that is intended to replace the currently cited DTN: GS9809083 12322.008 for water chemistry data used in the current ''In-Drift Microbial Communities Model'' revision (CRWMS M&O 2000c). Finally, the calculation updates the material lifetimes reported on Table 32 in section 6.5.2.3 of the ''In-Drift Microbial Communities'' AMR (CRWMS M&O 2000c) based on the inputs reported in BSC (2001a). Changes include adding new specified materials and updating old materials information that has changed.

  16. Dissipative Particle Dynamics interaction parameters from ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepehr, Fatemeh; Paddison, Stephen J.

    2016-02-01

    Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) is a commonly employed coarse-grained method to model complex systems. Presented here is a pragmatic approach to connect atomic-scale information to the meso-scale interactions defined between the DPD particles or beads. Specifically, electronic structure calculations were utilized for the calculation of the DPD pair-wise interaction parameters. An implicit treatment of the electrostatic interactions for charged beads is introduced. The method is successfully applied to derive the parameters for a hydrated perfluorosulfonic acid ionomer with absorbed vanadium cations.

  17. Calculating isotope concentrations using different schemes of dispersion parameters.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Wahab, M; Essa, Khaled S M; Embaby, M; Elsaid, Sawsan E M

    2013-09-01

    The investigated work aims to calculate the concentration of different isotopes through short downwind distances. A theoretical model was designed to calculate the isotope concentration in the wind. The mathematical calculation depends on wind speed, decay distance and the dilution factor to get the concentration of isotopes ((131)I, (133)I, (135)I and (137)Cs) detected in wind at different distances from a nuclear power station. There is a good agreement between the calculated and observed concentrations of (131)I, (133)I, (135)I and (137)Cs.

  18. Calculator program speeds rod pump design

    SciTech Connect

    Engineer, R.; Davis, C.L.

    1984-02-01

    Matching sucker rod pump characteristics to a specific application is greatly simplified with this program, intended for use with an HP-41CV hand-held computer. The user inputs application data and the program calculates all necessary design criteria, including Mill's acceleration factor, peak and minimum polish rod loads and horsepower required. Sample calculations are provided, together with a thorough discussion of special design considerations involved in huff-and-puff applications.

  19. Sensitivity analysis of Stirling engine design parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Naso, V.; Dong, W.; Lucentini, M.; Capata, R.

    1998-07-01

    In the preliminary Stirling engine design process, the values of some design parameters (temperature ratio, swept volume ratio, phase angle and dead volume ratio) have to be assumed; as a matter of fact it can be difficult to determine the best values of these parameters for a particular engine design. In this paper, a mathematical model is developed to analyze the sensitivity of engine's performance variations corresponding to variations of these parameters.

  20. Heat Exchanger Support Bracket Design Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, Russ; /Fermilab

    1995-01-12

    This engineering note documents the design of the heat exchanger support brackets. The heat exchanger is roughly 40 feet long, 22 inches in diameter and weighs 6750 pounds. It will be mounted on two identical support brackets that are anchored to a concrete wall. The design calculations were done for one bracket supporting the full weight of the heat exchanger, rounded up to 6800 pounds. The design follows the American Institute of Steel Construction (AISC) Manual of steel construction, Eighth edition. All calculated stresses and loads on welds were below allowables.

  1. Rigorous calculation of nonlinear parameters in graphene-comprising waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatzidimitriou, Dimitrios; Pitilakis, Alexandros; Kriezis, Emmanouil E.

    2015-07-01

    We describe a rigorous formalism for the calculation of the nonlinear parameter of arbitrary three-dimensional nanophotonic graphene-comprising waveguides. Graphene is naturally implemented as a zero-thickness conductive sheet, modeled solely by complex linear and nonlinear surface conductivity tensors, whose values are extracted from theoretical models. This representation is compared to the more commonly employed equivalent bulk-medium representation and is found superior. We numerically calculate the nonlinear parameters of several optical waveguide archetypes overlaid with infinite graphene monolayers, including silicon-wire and plasmonic metal-slot and metal-stripe configurations. The metal-slot configuration offers the most promising performance for Kerr-type nonlinear applications. Finally, we apply the same formalism to probe the potential of graphene nanoribbon waveguide nonlinearity in the terahertz band.

  2. Program Calculates Power Demands Of Electronic Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Brian

    1995-01-01

    CURRENT computer program calculates power requirements of electronic designs. For given design, CURRENT reads in applicable parts-list file and file containing current required for each part. Program also calculates power required for circuit at supply potentials of 5.5, 5.0, and 4.5 volts. Written by use of AWK utility for Sun4-series computers running SunOS 4.x and IBM PC-series and compatible computers running MS-DOS. Sun version of program (NPO-19590). PC version of program (NPO-19111).

  3. Density functional calculations of Hubbard parameter in actinide series

    SciTech Connect

    Puri, A.; Sen, K.D.

    1993-05-01

    The calculations of Hubbard parameter, U, which defines the polar state formation energy of the reaction 2(5f{sup n} 6d{sup 1} 7d{sup 2}) {yields} 5f{sup n-1} 6d{sup 2}7s{sup 2} + 5f{sup n+1} 7s{sup 2} for the actinide atoms, Th-No, have been carried out using the self-interaction-corrected (SIC) quasi-relativistic local spin density (LSD) functional due to Perdew and Zunger. Based on the available bandwidth calculations for the 5f metals and its monotonically decreasing trend with increasing nuclear charge it is predicted that the 5f state is iterent in Th-Np beyond which it becomes localized. These calculations agree with the conclusions drawn earlier by Johansson using the semiempirical data.

  4. Calculator program aids sucker-rod systems design and optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Engineer, R.; Davis, C.; Knight, R.

    1983-08-01

    Given a few basic well parameters, the engineer may follow the step-by-step procedure for programming the design of sucker rod pumping systems for oil wells deeper than 2,000 ft using the HP-41 CV hand calculator.

  5. A three parameter analytic phase function for multiple scattering calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kattawar, G. W.

    1974-01-01

    A simple procedure was developed to fit the first three moments of an actual phase function with a three parameter analytic phase function. The exact Legendre Polynomial decomposition of this function is, suitable for multiple scattering calculations. The use of this function is expected to yield excellent flux values at all depths within a medium. Since it is capable of reproducing the glory, it can be used in synthetic spectra computations from planetary atmospheres. Accurate asymptotic radiance values can also be achieved as long as the single scattering albedo omega sub 0 is greater than or equal to 0.9.

  6. [Use of the EC 1010 computer to calculate dosimetric parameters for irradiation procedures in gamma teletherapy].

    PubMed

    Likhovetskaia, R B; Dvorova, E V

    1983-05-01

    An ever growing flow of patients requires a good deal of time for the planning of irradiation procedures of patients and causes errors during manual calculations. A small-size computer EC 1010 is proposed for the calculation of dosimetric parameters of irradiation procedures on gamma-beam therapeutic units. A specially designed program is intended for the calculation of dosimetric parameters for different methods of moving and static irradiation taking into account tissue heterogeneity: multifield static irradiation, multizone rotation irradiation, irradiation using dose field forming devices (V-shaped filters, edge blocks, a grid diaphragm). In addition to the main calculated values, the listing contains in a suitable form all necessary information: the patient's name, date of calculation, a unit type for irradiation, irradiation procedure parameters. The computation of output parameters according to each preset program of irradiation takes no more than 1 min. The use of the computer EC 1010 for the calculation of dosimetric parameters of irradiation procedures gives an opportunity to considerably reduce calculation time, to avoid possible errors and to simplify the drawing up of documents.

  7. Computer program for calculating flow parameters and power requirements for cryogenic wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dress, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    A computer program has been written that performs the flow parameter calculations for cryogenic wind tunnels which use nitrogen as a test gas. The flow parameters calculated include static pressure, static temperature, compressibility factor, ratio of specific heats, dynamic viscosity, total and static density, velocity, dynamic pressure, mass-flow rate, and Reynolds number. Simplifying assumptions have been made so that the calculations of Reynolds number, as well as the other flow parameters can be made on relatively small desktop digital computers. The program, which also includes various power calculations, has been developed to the point where it has become a very useful tool for the users and possible future designers of fan-driven continuous-flow cryogenic wind tunnels.

  8. WIPP shaft seal system parameters recommended to support compliance calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Hurtado, L.D.; Knowles, M.K.; Kelley, V.A.; Jones, T.L.; Ogintz, J.B.; Pfeifle, T.W.

    1997-12-01

    The US Department of Energy plans to dispose of transuranic waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), which is sited in southeastern New Mexico. The WIPP disposal facility is located approximately 2,150 feet (650 m) below surface in the bedded halite of the Salado Formation. Prior to initiation of disposal activities, the Department of Energy must demonstrate that the WIPP will comply with all regulatory requirements. Applicable regulations require that contaminant releases from the WIPP remain below specified levels for a period of 10,000 years. To demonstrate that the WIPP will comply with these regulations, the Department of Energy has requested that Sandia National Laboratories develop and implement a comprehensive performance assessment of the WIPP repository for the regulatory period. This document presents the conceptual model of the shaft sealing system to be implemented in performance assessment calculations conducted in support of the Compliance Certification Application for the WIPP. The model was developed for use in repository-scale calculations and includes the seal system geometry and materials to be used in grid development as well as all parameters needed to describe the seal materials. These calculations predict the hydrologic behavior of the system. Hence conceptual model development is limited to those processes that could impact the fluid flow through the seal system.

  9. Design parameters of toroidal and bobbin magnetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, W. T.

    1973-01-01

    The adoption by NASA of the metric system for dimensioning to replace the long-used English units imposes a requirement on the U.S. transformer designer to convert from the familiar units to the less familiar metric equivalents. Material is presented to assist in that transition in the field of transformer design and fabrication. The conversion data makes it possible for the designer to obtain a fast and close approximation of significant parameters such as size, weight, and temperature rise. Nomographs are included to provide a close approximation for breadboarding purposes. For greater convenience, derivations of some of the parameters are also presented.

  10. A Multi-Parameter Approach for Calculating Crack Instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zanganeh, M.; Forman, R. G.

    2014-01-01

    An accurate fracture control analysis of spacecraft pressure systems, boosters, rocket hardware and other critical low-cycle fatigue cases where the fracture toughness highly impacts cycles to failure requires accurate knowledge of the material fracture toughness. However, applicability of the measured fracture toughness values using standard specimens and transferability of the values to crack instability analysis of the realistically complex structures is refutable. The commonly used single parameter Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics (LEFM) approach which relies on the key assumption that the fracture toughness is a material property would result in inaccurate crack instability predictions. In the past years extensive studies have been conducted to improve the single parameter (K-controlled) LEFM by introducing parameters accounting for the geometry or in-plane constraint effects]. Despite the importance of the thickness (out-of-plane constraint) effects in fracture control problems, the literature is mainly limited to some empirical equations for scaling the fracture toughness data] and only few theoretically based developments can be found. In aerospace hardware where the structure might have only one life cycle and weight reduction is crucial, reducing the design margin of safety by decreasing the uncertainty involved in fracture toughness evaluations would result in lighter hardware. In such conditions LEFM would not suffice and an elastic-plastic analysis would be vital. Multi-parameter elastic plastic crack tip field quantifying developments combined with statistical methods] have been shown to have the potential to be used as a powerful tool for tackling such problems. However, these approaches have not been comprehensively scrutinized using experimental tests. Therefore, in this paper a multi-parameter elastic-plastic approach has been used to study the crack instability problem and the transferability issue by considering the effects of geometrical

  11. Design Parameters in Multimodal Games for Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Basteris, Angelo; Amirabdollahian, Farshid

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: The repetitive and sometimes mundane nature of conventional rehabilitation therapy provides an ideal opportunity for development of interactive and challenging therapeutic games that have the potential to engage and motivate the players. Certain game design parameters that may encourage patients to actively participate by making the games more enjoyable have been identified. In this article, we describe a formative study in which we designed and evaluated some of these parameters with healthy subjects. Materials and Methods: The “operant conditioning” and “scoring” design parameters were incorporated in a remake of a classic labyrinth game, “Marble Maze.” A group of participants (n=37) played the game twice: Once in the control condition without both modalities and then with either one of the parameters or with both. Measures of game duration and number of fails in the game were recorded along with survey questionnaires to measure player perceptions of intrinsic motivation on the game. Results: Longer playtimes, higher levels of interest/enjoyment, and effort to play the game were recorded with the introduction of these parameters. Conclusions: This study provides an understanding on how game design parameters can be used to motivate and encourage people to play longer. With these positive results, future aims are to test the parameters with stroke patients, providing much clearer insight as to what influences these parameters have on patients undergoing therapy. The ultimate goal is to utilize game design in order to maintain longer therapeutic interaction between a patient and his or her therapy medium. PMID:24761328

  12. Electronic structure calculations of ESR parameters of melanin units.

    PubMed

    Batagin-Neto, Augusto; Bronze-Uhle, Erika Soares; Graeff, Carlos Frederico de Oliveira

    2015-03-21

    Melanins represent an important class of natural pigments present in plants and animals that are currently considered to be promising materials for applications in optic and electronic devices. Despite their interesting properties, some of the basic features of melanins are not satisfactorily understood, including the origin of their intrinsic paramagnetism. A number of experiments have been performed to investigate the electron spin resonance (ESR) response of melanin derivatives, but until now, there has been no consensus regarding the real structure of the paramagnetic centers involved. In this work, we have employed electronic structure calculations to evaluate the ESR parameters of distinct melanin monomers and dimers in order to identify the possible structures associated with unpaired spins in this biopolymer. The g-factors and hyperfine constants of the cationic, anionic and radicalar structures were investigated. The results confirm the existence of at least two distinct paramagnetic centers in melanin structure, identifying the chemical species associated with them and their roles in electrical conductivity.

  13. Analytic Calculations of Certain Scattering Parameters from Mode Conversion Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Chung-Sang

    1994-01-01

    An analytical method is developed to calculate some scattering parameters from mode conversion equations which models the wave propagation in weakly inhomogeneous media near a back-to-back resonance-cutoff pair. The result is an analytic series expression. This method is applied to calculate the nonzero fast wave reflection coefficient from a fourth order equation which can model cases such as second ion cyclotron harmonic, second electron cyclotron harmonic, and some other situations. Numerical values from this series are compared to those calculated by the conventional method, namely, solving an integral equation iteratively. They agree with each other very well whenever both the series and the iteration converge. This result is based on a new method of evaluating integrals derived from the integral equation without having to solve the equation itself. Some empirical formulas based on the conventional method are shown to be good approximations but not exact identities. We also calculate the nonzero reflection coefficient for a sixth order equation which models cases like the third ion or electron harmonic. The general characteristic for this reflection coefficient is very similar to that of the fourth order equation and the convergence properties of the series of both cases are also very similar. The proof shows that some scattering parameters are independent of absorption in the fourth order equation, which represents coupling between three wave branches, is extended to a sixth order equation, which represents coupling between five wave branches. The previous proof was done by considering contours in the u-plane, but this extended proof is in the k-plane, where k = i tan u, because the u-plane is not convenient in this five branch problem. The analytic method is applied to this sixth order equation to calculate a nonzero mode conversion coefficient between the two fast wave branches that have different wavelengths but propagate in the same direction, and the

  14. The effect of calculated explosive energy output on blast design

    SciTech Connect

    Katsabanis, P.D.; Workman, L.

    1996-12-31

    The energy output of an explosive is typically calculated using an equation of state and computer applications. Results are reported as weight and bulk strength, either in absolute terms or relative to ANFO. The effect of the equation of state selected and the assumptions regarding the energy calculation are considered and interpreted for the purpose of blast design. It appears that variations in the heat of detonation which result from the selection of the equation of state and parameters associated with it are not sufficient to significantly affect blast patterns, explosive consumption and costs. However variations stemming from the use of available energy associated with a cut-off pressure are significant, suggesting in many cases large pattern expansions. The validity of the various approaches is discussed and blast design results based on the energy calculated by the different approaches are presented and evaluated.

  15. Brachytherapy dosimetry parameters calculated for a {sup 131}Cs source

    SciTech Connect

    Rivard, Mark J.

    2007-02-15

    A comprehensive analysis of the IsoRay Medical model CS-1 Rev2 {sup 131}Cs brachytherapy source was performed. Dose distributions were simulated using Monte Carlo methods (MCNP5) in liquid water, Solid{sup TM}, and Virtual Water{sup TM} spherical phantoms. From these results, the in-water brachytherapy dosimetry parameters have been determined, and were compared with those of Murphy et al. [Med. Phys. 31, 1529-1538 (2004)] using measurements and simulations. Our results suggest that calculations obtained using erroneous cross-section libraries should be discarded as recommended by the 2004 AAPM TG-43U1 report. Our {sub MC}{lambda} value of 1.046{+-}0.019 cGy h{sup -1} U{sup -1} is within 1.3% of that measured by Chen et al. [Med. Phys. 32, 3279-3285 (2005)] using TLDs and the calculated results of Wittman and Fisher [Med. Phys. 34, 49-54 (2007)] using MCNP5. Using the discretized energy approach of Rivard [Appl. Radiat. Isot. 55, 775-782 (2001)] to ascertain the impact of individual {sup 131}Cs photons on radial dose function and anisotropy functions, there was virtual equivalence of results for 29.461{<=}E{sub {gamma}}{<=}34.419 keV and for a mono-energetic 30.384 keV photon source. Comparisons of radial dose function and 2D anisotropy function data are also included, and an analysis of material composition and cross-section libraries was performed.

  16. Two space scatterer formalism calculation of bulk parameters of thunderclouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phanord, Dieudonne D.

    1994-01-01

    In a previous study, we used a modified two-space scatterer formalism of Twersky to establish for a cloud modeled as a statistically homogeneous distribution of spherical water droplets, the dispersion relations that determine its bulk propagation numbers and bulk indexes of refraction in terms of the vector equivalent scattering amplitude and the dyadic scattering amplitude of the single water droplet in isolation. The results were specialized to the forward direction of scattering while demanding that the scatterers preserve the incident polarization. We apply this approach to obtain specific numerical values for the macroscopic parameters of the cloud. We work with a cloud of density rho = 100 cm(exp -3), a wavelength lambda = 0.7774 microns, and with spherical water droplets of common radius alpha = 10 microns. In addition, the scattering medium is divided into three parts, the medium outside the cloud, moist air (the medium inside the cloud but outside the droplets), and the medium inside the spherical water droplets. The results of this report are applicable to a cloud of any geometry since the boundary does not interfere with the calculations. Also, it is important to notice the plane wave nature of the incidence wave in the moist atmosphere.

  17. Bedside calculation of hemodynamic parameters with a hand held programmable calculator. Part II: Programs for hemodynamic and oxygen transport parameters computation.

    PubMed

    Laurent, M

    1980-01-01

    Two programs calculating oxygen transport parameters and hemodynamic values respectively are described. They may be used indifferently with HP 67 or HP 97 Hewlett Packard calculators. (Acta anaesth. belg., 1980, 31, 53-59).

  18. Simulation of Electromagnetic and Thermal Processes in Fastcycling Magnets for Calculation Parameters of Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubko, V.; Kozub, S.; Tkachenko, L.

    SIS300 fast-cycling superconducting quadrupole magnet is developed at IHEP. Temperature margin and minimum quench energy are main parameters of stability of superconducting magnets. These parameters are important for the design and safe operation of superconducting magnets. But additional understanding for fast-cycling superconducting magnets is needed. To calculate the temperature margin one needs coupled numerical transient simulation of electromagnetic and thermal processes in the coil because critical temperature, operating temperature and AC losses are nonuniform over turns and their magnitudes vary in time during accelerator cycles. For calculation of the minimum quench energy the combination of the network model with thermal analysis is necessary, which allows one to model quench dynamics, including the effects of a current redistribution between strands of cable and spatial inhomogeneity of cable. Results for the temperature margin and the minimum quench energy for the magnet are presented and theirs dependence on various parameters is discussed.

  19. Code System to Calculate Integral Parameters with Reaction Rates from WIMS Output.

    1994-10-25

    Version 00 REACTION calculates different integral parameters related to neutron reactions on reactor lattices, from reaction rates calculated with WIMSD4 code, and comparisons with experimental values.

  20. Calculation of Geometrical Parameters of Geokhod Transmission With Hydraulic Cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaschuk, M. Yu; Dronov, A. A.; Ganovichev, S. S.

    2016-08-01

    Developed analytical expressions for determining parameters of transmission hydraulic cylinders' arrangement are considered, as well as the conditions for internal arrangement of a required number of hydraulic cylinders.

  1. Seismic design parameters - A user guide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leyendecker, E.V.; Frankel, A.D.; Rukstales, K.S.

    2001-01-01

    The 1997 NEHRP Recommended Provisions for Seismic Regulations for New Buildings (1997 NEHRP Provisions) introduced seismic design procedure that is based on the explicit use of spectral response acceleration rather than the traditional peak ground acceleration and/or peak ground velocity or zone factors. The spectral response accelerations are obtained from spectral response acceleration maps accompanying the report. Maps are available for the United States and a number of U.S. territories. Since 1997 additional codes and standards have also adopted seismic design approaches based on the same procedure used in the NEHRP Provisions and the accompanying maps. The design documents using the 1997 NEHRP Provisions procedure may be divided into three categories -(1) Design of New Construction, (2) Design and Evaluation of Existing Construction, and (3) Design of Residential Construction. A CD-ROM has been prepared for use in conjunction with the design documents in each of these three categories. The spectral accelerations obtained using the software on the CD are the same as those that would be obtained by using the maps accompanying the design documents. The software has been prepared to operate on a personal computer using a Windows (Microsoft Corporation) operating environment and a point and click type of interface. The user can obtain the spectral acceleration values that would be obtained by use of the maps accompanying the design documents, include site factors appropriate for the Site Class provided by the user, calculate a response spectrum that includes the site factor, and plot a response spectrum. Sites may be located by providing the latitude-longitude or zip code for all areas covered by the maps. All of the maps used in the various documents are also included on the CDROM

  2. Design parameters for rotating cylindrical filtration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwille, John A.; Mitra, Deepanjan; Lueptow, Richard M.

    2002-01-01

    Rotating cylindrical filtration displays significantly reduced plugging of filter pores and build-up of a cake layer, but the number and range of parameters that can be adjusted complicates the design of these devices. Twelve individual parameters were investigated experimentally by measuring the build-up of particles on the rotating cylindrical filter after a fixed time of operation. The build-up of particles on the filter depends on the rotational speed, the radial filtrate flow, the particle size and the gap width. Other parameters, such as suspension concentration and total flow rate are less important. Of the four mechanisms present in rotating filters to reduce pore plugging and cake build-up, axial shear, rotational shear, centrifugal sedimentation and vortical motion, the evidence suggests rotational shear is the dominant mechanism, although the other mechanisms still play minor roles. The ratio of the shear force acting parallel to the filter surface on a particle to the Stokes drag acting normal to the filter surface on the particle due to the difference between particle motion and filtrate flow can be used as a non-dimensional parameter that predicts the degree of particle build-up on the filter surface for a wide variety of filtration conditions. c2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Design parameters for rotating cylindrical filtration.

    PubMed

    Schwille, John A; Mitra, Deepanjan; Lueptow, Richard M

    2002-07-15

    Rotating cylindrical filtration displays significantly reduced plugging of filter pores and build-up of a cake layer, but the number and range of parameters that can be adjusted complicates the design of these devices. Twelve individual parameters were investigated experimentally by measuring the build-up of particles on the rotating cylindrical filter after a fixed time of operation. The build-up of particles on the filter depends on the rotational speed, the radial filtrate flow, the particle size and the gap width. Other parameters, such as suspension concentration and total flow rate are less important. Of the four mechanisms present in rotating filters to reduce pore plugging and cake build-up, axial shear, rotational shear, centrifugal sedimentation and vortical motion, the evidence suggests rotational shear is the dominant mechanism, although the other mechanisms still play minor roles. The ratio of the shear force acting parallel to the filter surface on a particle to the Stokes drag acting normal to the filter surface on the particle due to the difference between particle motion and filtrate flow can be used as a non-dimensional parameter that predicts the degree of particle build-up on the filter surface for a wide variety of filtration conditions. PMID:12238523

  4. Design parameters for rotating cylindrical filtration.

    PubMed

    Schwille, John A; Mitra, Deepanjan; Lueptow, Richard M

    2002-07-15

    Rotating cylindrical filtration displays significantly reduced plugging of filter pores and build-up of a cake layer, but the number and range of parameters that can be adjusted complicates the design of these devices. Twelve individual parameters were investigated experimentally by measuring the build-up of particles on the rotating cylindrical filter after a fixed time of operation. The build-up of particles on the filter depends on the rotational speed, the radial filtrate flow, the particle size and the gap width. Other parameters, such as suspension concentration and total flow rate are less important. Of the four mechanisms present in rotating filters to reduce pore plugging and cake build-up, axial shear, rotational shear, centrifugal sedimentation and vortical motion, the evidence suggests rotational shear is the dominant mechanism, although the other mechanisms still play minor roles. The ratio of the shear force acting parallel to the filter surface on a particle to the Stokes drag acting normal to the filter surface on the particle due to the difference between particle motion and filtrate flow can be used as a non-dimensional parameter that predicts the degree of particle build-up on the filter surface for a wide variety of filtration conditions.

  5. Continuous damage parameter calculation under thermo-mechanical random loading

    PubMed Central

    Nagode, Marko

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents a method on how the mean stress effect on fatigue damage can be taken into account under an arbitrary low cycle thermo-mechanical loading. From known stress, elastoplastic strain and temperature histories the cycle amplitudes and cycle mean values are extracted and the damage parameter is computed. In contrast to the existing methods the proposed method enables continuous damage parameter computation without the need of waiting for the cycles to close. The limitations of the standardized damage parameters are thus surpassed. The damage parameters derived initially for closed and isothermal cycles assuming that the elastoplastic stress–strain response follows the Masing and memory rules can now be used to take the mean stress effect into account under an arbitrary low cycle thermo-mechanical loading. The method includes:•stress and elastoplastic strain history transformation into the corresponding amplitude and mean values;•stress and elastoplastic strain amplitude and mean value transformation into the damage parameter amplitude history;•damage parameter amplitude history transformation into the damage parameter history. PMID:26150939

  6. CMBFIT: Rapid WMAP likelihood calculations with normal parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandvik, Håvard B.; Tegmark, Max; Wang, Xiaomin; Zaldarriaga, Matias

    2004-03-01

    We present a method for ultrafast confrontation of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) cosmic microwave background observations with theoretical models, implemented as a publicly available software package called CMBFIT, useful for anyone wishing to measure cosmological parameters by combining WMAP with other observations. The method takes advantage of the underlying physics by transforming into a set of parameters where the WMAP likelihood surface is accurately fit by the exponential of a quartic or sextic polynomial. Building on previous physics based approximations by Hu et al., Kosowsky et al., and Chu et al., it combines their speed with precision cosmology grade accuracy. A FORTRAN code for computing the WMAP likelihood for a given set of parameters is provided, precalibrated against CMBFAST, accurate to Δ ln L˜0.05 over the entire 2σ region of the parameter space for 6 parameter “vanilla” ΛCDM models. We also provide 7-parameter fits including spatial curvature, gravitational waves and a running spectral index.

  7. An investigation of using an RQP based method to calculate parameter sensitivity derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beltracchi, Todd J.; Gabriele, Gary A.

    1989-01-01

    Estimation of the sensitivity of problem functions with respect to problem variables forms the basis for many of our modern day algorithms for engineering optimization. The most common application of problem sensitivities has been in the calculation of objective function and constraint partial derivatives for determining search directions and optimality conditions. A second form of sensitivity analysis, parameter sensitivity, has also become an important topic in recent years. By parameter sensitivity, researchers refer to the estimation of changes in the modeling functions and current design point due to small changes in the fixed parameters of the formulation. Methods for calculating these derivatives have been proposed by several authors (Armacost and Fiacco 1974, Sobieski et al 1981, Schmit and Chang 1984, and Vanderplaats and Yoshida 1985). Two drawbacks to estimating parameter sensitivities by current methods have been: (1) the need for second order information about the Lagrangian at the current point, and (2) the estimates assume no change in the active set of constraints. The first of these two problems is addressed here and a new algorithm is proposed that does not require explicit calculation of second order information.

  8. Design parameters and source terms: Volume 1, Design parameters: Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-10-01

    The Design Parameters and Source Terms Document was prepared in accordance with DOE request and to provide data for the environmental impact study to be performed in the future for the Deaf Smith County, Texas site for a nuclear waste repository in salt. This document updates a previous unpublished report by Stearns Catalytic Corporation (SCC), entitled ''Design Parameters and Source Terms for a Two-Phase Repository in Salt,'' 1985, to the level of the Site Characterization Plan - Conceptual Design Report. The previous unpublished SCC Study identifies the data needs for the Environmental Assessment effort for seven possible Salt Repository sites.

  9. Design sensitivity analysis using EAL. Part 1: Conventional design parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dopker, B.; Choi, Kyung K.; Lee, J.

    1986-01-01

    A numerical implementation of design sensitivity analysis of builtup structures is presented, using the versatility and convenience of an existing finite element structural analysis code and its database management system. The finite element code used in the implemenatation presented is the Engineering Analysis Language (EAL), which is based on a hybrid method of analysis. It was shown that design sensitivity computations can be carried out using the database management system of EAL, without writing a separate program and a separate database. Conventional (sizing) design parameters such as cross-sectional area of beams or thickness of plates and plane elastic solid components are considered. Compliance, displacement, and stress functionals are considered as performance criteria. The method presented is being extended to implement shape design sensitivity analysis using a domain method and a design component method.

  10. Atomic Calculations with a One-Parameter, Single Integral Method.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baretty, Reinaldo; Garcia, Carmelo

    1989-01-01

    Presents an energy function E(p) containing a single integral and one variational parameter, alpha. Represents all two-electron integrals within the local density approximation as a single integral. Identifies this as a simple treatment for use in an introductory quantum mechanics course. (MVL)

  11. An effective field theory calculation of the ϱ parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Andrew; Georgi, Howard; Grinstein, Benjamin

    1984-01-01

    The effective field theory formalism is reviewed. A general algorithm for constructing an effective lagrangian involving only light particles out of a renormalizable theory of light and heavy particles is stated. Strong interaction corrections are easily integrated into the formalism. As an example of its use, corrections Δϱ to the weak interactions ϱ parameter due to heavy particles are studied and the Einhorn-Jones-Veltman conjecture on the positivity of Δϱ is revisited.

  12. Machine learning of parameters for accurate semiempirical quantum chemical calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Dral, Pavlo O.; von Lilienfeld, O. Anatole; Thiel, Walter

    2015-04-14

    We investigate possible improvements in the accuracy of semiempirical quantum chemistry (SQC) methods through the use of machine learning (ML) models for the parameters. For a given class of compounds, ML techniques require sufficiently large training sets to develop ML models that can be used for adapting SQC parameters to reflect changes in molecular composition and geometry. The ML-SQC approach allows the automatic tuning of SQC parameters for individual molecules, thereby improving the accuracy without deteriorating transferability to molecules with molecular descriptors very different from those in the training set. The performance of this approach is demonstrated for the semiempirical OM2 method using a set of 6095 constitutional isomers C7H10O2, for which accurate ab initio atomization enthalpies are available. The ML-OM2 results show improved average accuracy and a much reduced error range compared with those of standard OM2 results, with mean absolute errors in atomization enthalpies dropping from 6.3 to 1.7 kcal/mol. They are also found to be superior to the results from specific OM2 reparameterizations (rOM2) for the same set of isomers. The ML-SQC approach thus holds promise for fast and reasonably accurate high-throughput screening of materials and molecules.

  13. Machine learning of parameters for accurate semiempirical quantum chemical calculations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dral, Pavlo O.; von Lilienfeld, O. Anatole; Thiel, Walter

    2015-04-14

    We investigate possible improvements in the accuracy of semiempirical quantum chemistry (SQC) methods through the use of machine learning (ML) models for the parameters. For a given class of compounds, ML techniques require sufficiently large training sets to develop ML models that can be used for adapting SQC parameters to reflect changes in molecular composition and geometry. The ML-SQC approach allows the automatic tuning of SQC parameters for individual molecules, thereby improving the accuracy without deteriorating transferability to molecules with molecular descriptors very different from those in the training set. The performance of this approach is demonstrated for the semiempiricalmore » OM2 method using a set of 6095 constitutional isomers C7H10O2, for which accurate ab initio atomization enthalpies are available. The ML-OM2 results show improved average accuracy and a much reduced error range compared with those of standard OM2 results, with mean absolute errors in atomization enthalpies dropping from 6.3 to 1.7 kcal/mol. They are also found to be superior to the results from specific OM2 reparameterizations (rOM2) for the same set of isomers. The ML-SQC approach thus holds promise for fast and reasonably accurate high-throughput screening of materials and molecules.« less

  14. Cryogenic masers. [frequency stability and design parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berlinsky, A. J.; Hardy, W. N.

    1982-01-01

    Various factors affecting the frequency stability of hydrogen masers are described and related to maser design parameters. The long-term frequency stability of a hydrogen maser is limited by the mechanical stability of the cavity, and the magnitudes of the wall relaxation, spin exchange, and recombination rates which affect the Q of the line. Magnetic resonance studies of hydrogen atoms at temperatures below 1 K and in containers coated with liquid helium films demonstrated that cryogenic masers may allow substantial improvements in all of these parameters. In particular the thermal expansion coefficients of most materials are negligible at 1 K. Spin exchange broadening is three orders of magnitude smaller at 1 K than at room temperature, and the recombination and wall relaxation rates are negligible at 0.52 K where the frequency shift due to the 4 He-coated walls of the container has a broad minimum as a function of temperature. Other advantages of the helium-cooled maser result from the high purity, homogeneity, and resilence of helium-film-coated walls and the natural compatibility of the apparatus with helium-cooled amplifiers.

  15. First-principles calculations of zero-field splitting parameters.

    PubMed

    Ganyushin, Dmitry; Neese, Frank

    2006-07-14

    In this work, an implementation of an approach to calculate the zero-field splitting (ZFS) constants in the framework of ab initio methods such as complete active space self-consistent field, multireference configuration interaction, or spectroscopy oriented configuration interaction is reported. The spin-orbit coupling (SOC) contribution to ZFSs is computed using an accurate multicenter mean-field approximation for the Breit-Pauli Hamiltonian. The SOC parts of ZFS constants are obtained directly after diagonalization of the SOC operator in the basis of a preselected number of roots of the spin-free Hamiltonian. This corresponds to an infinite order treatment of the SOC in terms of perturbation theory. The spin-spin (SS) part is presently estimated in a mean-field fashion and appears to yield results close to the more complete treatments available in the literature. Test calculations for the first- and second-row atoms as well as first-row transition metal atoms and a set of diatomic molecules show accurate results for the SOC part of ZFSs. SS contributions have been found to be relatively small but not negligible (exceeding 1 cm(-1) for oxygen molecule). At least for the systems studied in this work, it is demonstrated that the presented method provides much more accurate estimations for the SOC part of ZFS constants than the emerging density functional theory approaches.

  16. Analytic calculation of physiological acid-base parameters in plasma.

    PubMed

    Wooten, E W

    1999-01-01

    Analytic expressions for plasma total titratable base, base excess (DeltaCB), strong-ion difference, change in strong-ion difference (DeltaSID), change in Van Slyke standard bicarbonate (DeltaVSSB), anion gap, and change in anion gap are derived as a function of pH, total buffer ion concentration, and conditional molar equilibrium constants. The behavior of these various parameters under respiratory and metabolic acid-base disturbances for constant and variable buffer ion concentrations is considered. For constant noncarbonate buffer concentrations, DeltaSID = DeltaCB = DeltaVSSB, whereas these equalities no longer hold under changes in noncarbonate buffer concentration. The equivalence is restored if the reference state is changed to include the new buffer concentrations.

  17. Recommended environmental dose calculation methods and Hanford-specific parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Schreckhise, R.G.; Rhoads, K.; Napier, B.A.; Ramsdell, J.V. ); Davis, J.S. )

    1993-03-01

    This document was developed to support the Hanford Environmental Dose overview Panel (HEDOP). The Panel is responsible for reviewing all assessments of potential doses received by humans and other biota resulting from the actual or possible environmental releases of radioactive and other hazardous materials from facilities and/or operations belonging to the US Department of Energy on the Hanford Site in south-central Washington. This document serves as a guide to be used for developing estimates of potential radiation doses, or other measures of risk or health impacts, to people and other biota in the environs on and around the Hanford Site. It provides information to develop technically sound estimates of exposure (i.e., potential or actual) to humans or other biotic receptors that could result from the environmental transport of potentially harmful materials that have been, or could be, released from Hanford operations or facilities. Parameter values and information that are specific to the Hanford environs as well as other supporting material are included in this document.

  18. TCO optimization during design phase - assessment of bearing concepts by calculation and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudziak, Mark; Krome, Andreas

    2015-08-01

    Energy efficiency has been a key issue for screw machines for many years. This article describes a new analytical procedure for determining rolling bearing friction and the use of the procedure for designing compressor bearing supports. Further analytical options for a calculative assessment of the overall efficiency of bearing support alternatives are presented in the design phase based on parameter analyses performed by the BearinX® calculation software, which includes the new friction calculation by means of a mechanical, tribological model.

  19. Computing tools for accelerator design calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Fischler, M.; Nash, T.

    1984-01-01

    This note is intended as a brief, summary guide for accelerator designers to the new generation of commercial and special processors that allow great increases in computing cost effectiveness. New thinking is required to take best advantage of these computing opportunities, in particular, when moving from analytical approaches to tracking simulations. In this paper, we outline the relevant considerations.

  20. Design Calculations For NIF Convergent Ablator Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, R E; Hicks, D G; Meezan, N B; Callahan, D A; Landen, O L; Jones, O S; Langer, S H; Kline, J L; Wilson, D C; Rinderknecht, H; Zylstra, A; Petrasso, R D

    2011-10-25

    The NIF convergent ablation tuning effort is underway. In the early experiments, we have discovered that the design code simulations over-predict the capsule implosion velocity and shock flash rhor, but under-predict the hohlraum x-ray flux measurements. The apparent inconsistency between the x-ray flux and radiography data implies that there are important unexplained aspects of the hohlraum and/or capsule behavior.

  1. Design calculations for NIF convergent ablator experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, R. E.; Hicks, D. G.; Meezan, N. B.; Callahan, D. A.; Landen, O. L.; Jones, O. S.; Langer, S. H.; Kline, J. L.; Wilson, D. C.; Rinderknecht, H.; Zylstra, A.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2013-11-01

    The NIF convergent ablation tuning effort is underway. In the early experiments, we have discovered that the design code simulations over-predict the capsule implosion velocity and shock flash ρr, but under-predict the hohlraum x-ray flux measurements. The apparent inconsistency between the x-ray flux and radiography data implies that there are important unexplained aspects of the hohlraum and/or capsule behavior.

  2. Design parameters and source terms: Volume 1, Design parameters: Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-09-01

    The Design Parameters and Source Terms Document was prepared in accordance with DOE request and to provide data for the environmental impact study to be performed in the future for the Deaf Smith County, Texas site for a nuclear waste repository in salt. This document updates a previous unpublished report to the level of the Site Characterization Plan - Conceptual Design Report, SCP-CDR. The previous unpublished SCC Study identified the data needs for the Environmental Assessment effort for seven possible salt repository sites.

  3. Calculating background levels for ecological risk parameters in toxic harbor sediment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leadon, C.J.; McDonnell, T.R.; Lear, J.; Barclift, D.

    2007-01-01

    Establishing background levels for biological parameters is necessary in assessing the ecological risks from harbor sediment contaminated with toxic chemicals. For chemicals in sediment, the term contaminated is defined as having concentrations above background and significant human health or ecological risk levels. For biological parameters, a site could be considered contaminated if levels of the parameter are either more or less than the background level, depending on the specific parameter. Biological parameters can include tissue chemical concentrations in ecological receptors, bioassay responses, bioaccumulation levels, and benthic community metrics. Chemical parameters can include sediment concentrations of a variety of potentially toxic chemicals. Indirectly, contaminated harbor sediment can impact shellfish, fish, birds, and marine mammals, and human populations. This paper summarizes the methods used to define background levels for chemical and biological parameters from a survey of ecological risk investigations of marine harbor sediment at California Navy bases. Background levels for regional biological indices used to quantify ecological risks for benthic communities are also described. Generally, background stations are positioned in relatively clean areas exhibiting the same physical and general chemical characteristics as nearby areas with contaminated harbor sediment. The number of background stations and the number of sample replicates per background station depend on the statistical design of the sediment ecological risk investigation, developed through the data quality objective (DQO) process. Biological data from the background stations can be compared to data from a contaminated site by using minimum or maximum background levels or comparative statistics. In Navy ecological risk assessments (ERA's), calculated background levels and appropriate ecological risk screening criteria are used to identify sampling stations and sites with contaminated

  4. Net thrust calculation sensitivity of an afterburning turbofan engine to variations in input parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, D. L.; Ray, R. J.; Walton, J. T.

    1985-01-01

    The calculated value of net thrust of an aircraft powered by a General Electric F404-GE-400 afterburning turbofan engine was evaluated for its sensitivity to various input parameters. The effects of a 1.0-percent change in each input parameter on the calculated value of net thrust with two calculation methods are compared. This paper presents the results of these comparisons and also gives the estimated accuracy of the overall net thrust calculation as determined from the influence coefficients and estimated parameter measurement accuracies.

  5. Phase equilibrium calculations of ternary liquid mixtures with binary interaction parameters and molecular size parameters determined from molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Oh, Suk Yung; Bae, Young Chan

    2010-07-15

    The method presented in this paper was developed to predict liquid-liquid equilibria in ternary liquid mixtures by using a combination of a thermodynamic model and molecular dynamics simulations. In general, common classical thermodynamic models have many parameters which are determined by fitting a model with experimental data. This proposed method, however, provides a simple procedure for calculating liquid-liquid equilibria utilizing binary interaction parameters and molecular size parameters determined from molecular dynamics simulations. This method was applied to mixtures containing water, hydrocarbons, alcohols, chlorides, ketones, acids, and other organic liquids over various temperature ranges. The predicted results agree well with the experimental data without the use of adjustable parameters.

  6. Sampling of Stochastic Input Parameters for Rockfall Calculations and for Structural Response Calculations Under Vibratory Ground Motion

    SciTech Connect

    M. Gross

    2004-09-01

    The purpose of this scientific analysis is to define the sampled values of stochastic (random) input parameters for (1) rockfall calculations in the lithophysal and nonlithophysal zones under vibratory ground motions, and (2) structural response calculations for the drip shield and waste package under vibratory ground motions. This analysis supplies: (1) Sampled values of ground motion time history and synthetic fracture pattern for analysis of rockfall in emplacement drifts in nonlithophysal rock (Section 6.3 of ''Drift Degradation Analysis'', BSC 2004 [DIRS 166107]); (2) Sampled values of ground motion time history and rock mechanical properties category for analysis of rockfall in emplacement drifts in lithophysal rock (Section 6.4 of ''Drift Degradation Analysis'', BSC 2004 [DIRS 166107]); (3) Sampled values of ground motion time history and metal to metal and metal to rock friction coefficient for analysis of waste package and drip shield damage to vibratory motion in ''Structural Calculations of Waste Package Exposed to Vibratory Ground Motion'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167083]) and in ''Structural Calculations of Drip Shield Exposed to Vibratory Ground Motion'' (BSC 2003 [DIRS 163425]). The sampled values are indices representing the number of ground motion time histories, number of fracture patterns and rock mass properties categories. These indices are translated into actual values within the respective analysis and model reports or calculations. This report identifies the uncertain parameters and documents the sampled values for these parameters. The sampled values are determined by GoldSim V6.04.007 [DIRS 151202] calculations using appropriate distribution types and parameter ranges. No software development or model development was required for these calculations. The calculation of the sampled values allows parameter uncertainty to be incorporated into the rockfall and structural response calculations that support development of the seismic scenario for the

  7. An evaluation of calculation parameters in the EGSnrc/BEAMnrc Monte Carlo codes and their effect on surface dose calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jung-Ha; Hill, Robin; Kuncic, Zdenka

    2012-07-01

    The Monte Carlo (MC) method has proven invaluable for radiation transport simulations to accurately determine radiation doses and is widely considered a reliable computational measure that can substitute a physical experiment where direct measurements are not possible or feasible. In the EGSnrc/BEAMnrc MC codes, there are several user-specified parameters and customized transport algorithms, which may affect the calculation results. In order to fully utilize the MC methods available in these codes, it is essential to understand all these options and to use them appropriately. In this study, the effects of the electron transport algorithms in EGSnrc/BEAMnrc, which are often a trade-off between calculation accuracy and efficiency, were investigated in the buildup region of a homogeneous water phantom and also in a heterogeneous phantom using the DOSRZnrc user code. The algorithms and parameters investigated include: boundary crossing algorithm (BCA), skin depth, electron step algorithm (ESA), global electron cutoff energy (ECUT) and electron production cutoff energy (AE). The variations in calculated buildup doses were found to be larger than 10% for different user-specified transport parameters. We found that using BCA = EXACT gave the best results in terms of accuracy and efficiency in calculating buildup doses using DOSRZnrc. In addition, using the ESA = PRESTA-I option was found to be the best way of reducing the total calculation time without losing accuracy in the results at high energies (few keV ∼ MeV). We also found that although choosing a higher ECUT/AE value in the beam modelling can dramatically improve computation efficiency, there is a significant trade-off in surface dose uncertainty. Our study demonstrates that a careful choice of user-specified transport parameters is required when conducting similar MC calculations.

  8. Calculation of track and vertex errors for detector design studies

    SciTech Connect

    Harr, R.

    1995-06-01

    The Kalman Filter technique has come into wide use for charged track reconstruction in high-energy physics experiments. It is also well suited for detector design studies, allowing for the efficient estimation of optimal track covariance matrices without the need of a hit level Monte Carlo simulation. Although much has been published about the Kalman filter equations, there is a lack of previous literature explaining how to implement the equations. In this paper, the operators necessary to implement the Kalman filter equations for two common detector configurations are worked out: a central detector in a uniform solenoidal magnetic field, and a fixed-target detector with no magnetic field in the region of the interactions. With the track covariance matrices in hand, vertex and invariant mass errors are readily calculable. These quantities are particularly interesting for evaluating experiments designed to study weakly decaying particles which give rise to displaced vertices. The optimal vertex errors are obtained via a constrained vertex fit. Solutions are presented to the constrained vertex problem with and without kinematic constraints. Invariant mass errors are obtained via propagation of errors; the use of vertex constrained track parameters is discussed. Many of the derivations are new or previously unpublished.

  9. Validation of HFCS-I on Calculation of High-Frequency Parameters of Helical Slow-Wave Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiaofang; Yang, Zhonghai; Li, Bin; Li, Jianqing; Xu, Li

    2010-02-01

    To validate HFCS-I, a newly developed design tool for high frequency circuits of microwave tubes, the high-frequency parameters (including dispersion, interaction impedance and attenuation constant) of a typical helical slow-wave structure (SWS) for millimetre wave travelling-wave tube are calculated by HFCS-I and MAFIA. Both the direct calculation method and the Non-Resonant Perturbation (NRP) technique are adopted to get the interaction impedance. The obtained high-frequency parameters from HFCS-I and MAFIA are compared in detail and the consistency has proved the reliability and validity of HFCS-I.

  10. Calculation of shock-wave parameters far from origination by combined numerical-analytical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potapkin, A. V.; Moskvichev, D. Yu.

    2011-03-01

    An algorithm is proposed for calculating the parameters of weak shock waves at large distances from their origination. In chosen meridional planes, the parameters of the near field of the three-dimensional flow are used to determine the streamwise coordinates of "phantom bodies" by linear relations. When the initial body is replaced by a system of "phantom bodies" for which discrete values of the Whitham function are found, the far-field parameters are calculated by the Whitham theory, independently in each meridional plane. Results calculated for a body with axial symmetry and for bodies with spatial symmetry are presented.

  11. An EGSnrc Monte Carlo-calculated database of TG-43 parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, R. E. P.; Rogers, D. W. O.

    2008-09-15

    Monte Carlo methods are used to calculate a complete TG-43 dosimetry parameter data set for 27 low-energy photon emitting brachytherapy sources (18 {sup 125}I and 9 {sup 103}Pd). All Monte Carlo calculations are performed using the EGSnrc user-code BrachyDose. TG-43 dosimetry parameters, including dose rate constants, radial dose functions (with functional fitting parameters), and anisotropy data, are calculated with finer spatial resolution, greater range of distances, and smaller uncertainties than data currently available in the literature for many of these sources. In particular, for most of the seeds, this is the first time that anisotropy data have been tabulated at distances less than 0.5 cm from the source. These calculations employ the state-of-the-art XCOM photon cross sections, and detailed source geometries are modeled using Yegin's multigeometry package. This data set serves as a completely independent verification of the currently available dosimetry parameters calculated using other Monte Carlo codes, including MCNP and PTRAN. This report also describes the Carleton Laboratory for Radiotherapy Physics TG-43 Parameter Database, a publicly accessible web site (at http://www.physics.carleton.ca/clrp/seed{sub d}atabase/) through which all of the data calculated for this study can be accessed. Also available on the web site are descriptions of the methods and Monte Carlo models used in this study and comparisons of data calculated in this study with data calculated by other authors.

  12. Aberration analysis calculations for synchrotron radiation beamline design

    SciTech Connect

    McKinney, W.R.; Howells, M.; Padmore, H.A.

    1997-09-01

    The application of ray deviation calculations based on aberration coefficients for a single optical surface for the design of beamline optical systems is reviewed. A systematic development is presented which allows insight into which aberration may be causing the rays to deviate from perfect focus. A new development allowing analytical calculation of line shape is presented.

  13. Using Rotational Averaging to Calculate the Bulk Response of Isotropic and Anisotropic Samples from Molecular Parameters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Steven S.

    2004-01-01

    The mathematics behind the average absorption cross-section is exactly one third of the maximum value described. The goal is to calculate experimental observables, or other properties of bulk sample, in terms of microscopic molecular parameters.

  14. Auxiliary subprograms for calculating the navigational parameters of artificial Earth satellites. FORTRAN IV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prokhorenko, V. I.

    1981-01-01

    Subprograms for transforming coordinates and time, for determining the position of the Moon and Sun, and for calculating the atmosphere and disturbances, which are specified by anomalies of the Earth's gravitational field are described. The subprograms are written in FORTRAN IV and form a major part of the package of applied programs for calculating the navigational parameters of artificial Earth satellites.

  15. Design and minimum reflux calculations for multicomponent reactive distillation columns

    SciTech Connect

    Barbosa, D.; Doherty, M.F.

    1987-01-01

    A new set of transformed composition variables is introduced to simplify the design equations for single-feed, multicomponent reactive distillation columns. Based on these equations, a general method of calculating minimum reflux ratios for reactive distillation columns is presented. The new composition variables are also used to derive simple relationships between the dependent design variables, which are not evident when the design equations are written in terms of mole fractions.

  16. Simultaneous optimal experimental design for in vitro binding parameter estimation.

    PubMed

    Ernest, C Steven; Karlsson, Mats O; Hooker, Andrew C

    2013-10-01

    Simultaneous optimization of in vitro ligand binding studies using an optimal design software package that can incorporate multiple design variables through non-linear mixed effect models and provide a general optimized design regardless of the binding site capacity and relative binding rates for a two binding system. Experimental design optimization was employed with D- and ED-optimality using PopED 2.8 including commonly encountered factors during experimentation (residual error, between experiment variability and non-specific binding) for in vitro ligand binding experiments: association, dissociation, equilibrium and non-specific binding experiments. Moreover, a method for optimizing several design parameters (ligand concentrations, measurement times and total number of samples) was examined. With changes in relative binding site density and relative binding rates, different measurement times and ligand concentrations were needed to provide precise estimation of binding parameters. However, using optimized design variables, significant reductions in number of samples provided as good or better precision of the parameter estimates compared to the original extensive sampling design. Employing ED-optimality led to a general experimental design regardless of the relative binding site density and relative binding rates. Precision of the parameter estimates were as good as the extensive sampling design for most parameters and better for the poorly estimated parameters. Optimized designs for in vitro ligand binding studies provided robust parameter estimation while allowing more efficient and cost effective experimentation by reducing the measurement times and separate ligand concentrations required and in some cases, the total number of samples. PMID:23943088

  17. Propagation of Uncertainty in System Parameters of a LWR Model by Sampling MCNPX Calculations - Burnup Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campolina, Daniel de A. M.; Lima, Claubia P. B.; Veloso, Maria Auxiliadora F.

    2014-06-01

    For all the physical components that comprise a nuclear system there is an uncertainty. Assessing the impact of uncertainties in the simulation of fissionable material systems is essential for a best estimate calculation that has been replacing the conservative model calculations as the computational power increases. The propagation of uncertainty in a simulation using a Monte Carlo code by sampling the input parameters is recent because of the huge computational effort required. In this work a sample space of MCNPX calculations was used to propagate the uncertainty. The sample size was optimized using the Wilks formula for a 95th percentile and a two-sided statistical tolerance interval of 95%. Uncertainties in input parameters of the reactor considered included geometry dimensions and densities. It was showed the capacity of the sampling-based method for burnup when the calculations sample size is optimized and many parameter uncertainties are investigated together, in the same input.

  18. Robust design of configurations and parameters of adaptable products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Chen, Yongliang; Xue, Deyi; Gu, Peihua

    2014-03-01

    An adaptable product can satisfy different customer requirements by changing its configuration and parameter values during the operation stage. Design of adaptable products aims at reducing the environment impact through replacement of multiple different products with single adaptable ones. Due to the complex architecture, multiple functional requirements, and changes of product configurations and parameter values in operation, impact of uncertainties to the functional performance measures needs to be considered in design of adaptable products. In this paper, a robust design approach is introduced to identify the optimal design configuration and parameters of an adaptable product whose functional performance measures are the least sensitive to uncertainties. An adaptable product in this paper is modeled by both configurations and parameters. At the configuration level, methods to model different product configuration candidates in design and different product configuration states in operation to satisfy design requirements are introduced. At the parameter level, four types of product/operating parameters and relations among these parameters are discussed. A two-level optimization approach is developed to identify the optimal design configuration and its parameter values of the adaptable product. A case study is implemented to illustrate the effectiveness of the newly developed robust adaptable design method.

  19. Multiobjective insensitive design of airplane control systems with uncertain parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schy, A. A.; Giesy, D. P.

    1981-01-01

    A multiobjective computer-aided design algorithm has been developed which minimizes the sensitivity of the design objectives to uncertainties in system parameters. The more important uncertain parameters are described by a gaussian random vector with known covariance matrix, and a vector sensitivity objective function is defined as the probabilities that the design objectives will violate specified requirements constraints. Control system parameters are found which minimize the sensitivity vector in a Pareto-optimal sense, using constrained minimization algorithms. Example results are shown for lateral stability augmentation system (SAS) design for three Shuttle flight conditions.

  20. Spreadsheets cut calculation time for piping system design

    SciTech Connect

    Bornt, B. )

    1993-03-01

    Engineers must calculate fluid system pressure drops when designing new piping systems, evaluating system modifications, and/or checking the performance of existing systems. The tedious process of calculating pressure drop can be made easier by using spreadsheet software such as Lotus 1-2-3, Symphony, or Excel. This article describes the use of a spreadsheet for sizing steam system piping. The spreadsheet model assumes the following: the pipe is well insulated and thus essentially at constant temperature. The steam specific volume and viscosity are calculated as functions of steam pressure and temperature. The Churchill Friction Factor, valid for both laminar and turbulent flow, is used.

  1. Experimental Design and Power Calculation for RNA-seq Experiments.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhijin; Wu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Power calculation is a critical component of RNA-seq experimental design. The flexibility of RNA-seq experiment and the wide dynamic range of transcription it measures make it an attractive technology for whole transcriptome analysis. These features, in addition to the high dimensionality of RNA-seq data, bring complexity in experimental design, making an analytical power calculation no longer realistic. In this chapter we review the major factors that influence the statistical power of detecting differential expression, and give examples of power assessment using the R package PROPER. PMID:27008024

  2. Tuning Parameters in Heuristics by Using Design of Experiments Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arin, Arif; Rabadi, Ghaith; Unal, Resit

    2010-01-01

    With the growing complexity of today's large scale problems, it has become more difficult to find optimal solutions by using exact mathematical methods. The need to find near-optimal solutions in an acceptable time frame requires heuristic approaches. In many cases, however, most heuristics have several parameters that need to be "tuned" before they can reach good results. The problem then turns into "finding best parameter setting" for the heuristics to solve the problems efficiently and timely. One-Factor-At-a-Time (OFAT) approach for parameter tuning neglects the interactions between parameters. Design of Experiments (DOE) tools can be instead employed to tune the parameters more effectively. In this paper, we seek the best parameter setting for a Genetic Algorithm (GA) to solve the single machine total weighted tardiness problem in which n jobs must be scheduled on a single machine without preemption, and the objective is to minimize the total weighted tardiness. Benchmark instances for the problem are available in the literature. To fine tune the GA parameters in the most efficient way, we compare multiple DOE models including 2-level (2k ) full factorial design, orthogonal array design, central composite design, D-optimal design and signal-to-noise (SIN) ratios. In each DOE method, a mathematical model is created using regression analysis, and solved to obtain the best parameter setting. After verification runs using the tuned parameter setting, the preliminary results for optimal solutions of multiple instances were found efficiently.

  3. Novel parameter-based flexure bearing design method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoedo, Simon; Thebaud, Edouard; Gschwendtner, Michael; White, David

    2016-06-01

    A parameter study was carried out on the design variables of a flexure bearing to be used in a Stirling engine with a fixed axial displacement and a fixed outer diameter. A design method was developed in order to assist identification of the optimum bearing configuration. This was achieved through a parameter study of the bearing carried out with ANSYS®. The parameters varied were the number and the width of the arms, the thickness of the bearing, the eccentricity, the size of the starting and ending holes, and the turn angle of the spiral. Comparison was made between the different designs in terms of axial and radial stiffness, the natural frequency, and the maximum induced stresses. Moreover, the Finite Element Analysis (FEA) was compared to theoretical results for a given design. The results led to a graphical design method which assists the selection of flexure bearing geometrical parameters based on pre-determined geometric and material constraints.

  4. Method for calculating the parameters of formation of hydrates from multicomponent gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaporozhets, E. P.; Shostak, N. A.

    2016-09-01

    A model of hydrate formation in multicomponent gas-liquid water or ice systems including the exo- and endothermic processes has been suggested. Based on this model, a method for calculating the molecular and energy parameters such as the hydration number, amount of moles of hydrate, amount of gas and water in it, its density and molar mass, and the energy and rate of hydrate formation was developed. A comparison of the calculated and experimental values of the parameters revealed that the difference between them varied from 0 to 5.46%.

  5. Effect of different inertial parameter sets on joint moment calculation during stair ascending and descending.

    PubMed

    Fantozzi, Silvia; Stagni, Rita; Cappello, Angelo; Leardini, Alberto

    2005-07-01

    The reliability of internal joint moment calculation in gait analysis during daily living activities is fundamental for clinical decisions based on joint function. This calculation, obtained by means of the inverse dynamics, depends on several modelling factors, such as assumptions on the segments and on the relevant joints constituting the kinematic chain. In this study, the effect of five different sets of inertial parameters on three-dimensional calculation of lower limb joint moments was investigated during the stair ascending and descending of 10 young subjects. The lower limb was represented as a chain of three rigid segments: foot, shank and thigh. The inertial parameters sets were taken from the literature. The root mean square value over the step cycle of the difference between joint moments calculated at the lower limb with different inertial parameter sets expressed in percentage of their corresponding range was computed. The results showed small differences between ex vivo and in vivo data, between data from different populations and among different modality of inertial parameters acquisition. The root mean square value was negligible at the ankle and increased as moving proximally among the joints: the maximum was 21.8% in the internal/external rotation moment at the hip. In order to achieve accurate estimate of lower limb joint moments other factors should be investigated rather than optimal inertial parameter set. PMID:15990070

  6. Simultaneous calculation of aircraft design loads and structural member sizes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, G. L.; Mccullers, L. A.

    1975-01-01

    A design process which accounts for the interaction between aerodynamic loads and changes in member sizes during sizing of aircraft structures is described. A simultaneous iteration procedure is used wherein both design loads and member sizes are updated during each cycle yielding converged, compatible loads and member sizes. A description is also given of a system of programs which incorporates this process using lifting surface theory to calculate aerodynamic pressure distributions, using a finite-element method for structural analysis, and using a fully stressed design technique to size structural members. This system is tailored to perform the entire process with computational efficiency in a single computer run so that it can be used effectively during preliminary design. Selected results, considering maneuver, taxi, and fatigue design conditions, are presented to illustrate convergence characteristics of this iterative procedure.

  7. Large break LOCA calculations for the AP600 design

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, J.E.

    1992-08-01

    This paper presents the application of RELAP5 to the calculation of a Large Break (200% doubled-ended rupture) Loss-of-Colant-Accident (LBLOCA) at the reactor vessel inlet for the proposed Westinghouse AP600 design. A parametric calculation was also performed to determine effects of loss of a complete Emergency Core Cooling system (ECCS) train. These calculations were performed over the core blowdown, refill, and reflood phases of the LBLOCA and did not address long term cooling. RELAP5 was shown to be adequate for system response calculation over the period of interest. The passive safety systems were predicted to effectively mitigate the consequences of LBLOCAs; the calculations showed less severe thermal responses than for a current generation Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) plant. The two primary differences between the AP600 design and a current generation plant that affect LBLOCA response are the lower core thermal power, which results in lower temperatures during the blowdown phase, and the long duration accumulator injection, which provides ample core inventory makeup for final quenching.

  8. Relativistic calculations of magnetic resonance parameters: background and some recent developments.

    PubMed

    Autschbach, Jochen

    2014-03-13

    This article outlines some basic concepts of relativistic quantum chemistry and recent developments of relativistic methods for the calculation of the molecular properties that define the basic parameters of magnetic resonance spectroscopic techniques, i.e. nuclear magnetic resonance shielding, indirect nuclear spin-spin coupling and electric field gradients (nuclear quadrupole coupling), as well as with electron paramagnetic resonance g-factors and electron-nucleus hyperfine coupling. Density functional theory (DFT) has been very successful in molecular property calculations, despite a number of problems related to approximations in the functionals. In particular, for heavy-element systems, the large electron count and the need for a relativistic treatment often render the application of correlated wave function ab initio methods impracticable. Selected applications of DFT in relativistic calculation of magnetic resonance parameters are reviewed.

  9. Calculated cross sections for neutron induced reactions on sup 19 F and uncertainties of parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Z.X. . Inst. of Atomic Energy); Fu, C.Y.; Larson, D.C. )

    1990-09-01

    Nuclear model codes were used to calculate cross sections for neutron-induced reactions on {sup 19}F for incident energies from 2 to 20 MeV. The model parameters in the codes were adjusted to best reproduce experimental data and are given in this report. The calculated results are compared to measured data and the evaluated values of ENDF/B-V. The covariance matrix for several of the most sensitive model parameters is given based on the scatter of measured data around the theoretical curves and the long-range correlation error of measured data. The results of these calculations form the basis for the new ENDF/B-VI fluorine evaluation. 44 refs., 64 figs., 14 tabs.

  10. Procedure of Calculating the Parameters of the Inter-Pulse Period in Pulsed Arc Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krampit, A. G.; Krampit, M. A.

    2016-08-01

    The procedure of calculating the parameters of the inter-pulse period such as current strength, electrode supply speed and time length is presented in the paper. Their importance for the stable arc burning is demonstrated. The authors address to the inter-pulse period parameters, influencing on the temperature of the electrode in the device, where the inter-pulse current is used for heating the electrode. The data of calculations are confirmed in the process of experiments. The appropriate parameters of pulsed arc welding with preheated electrode extension are identified; the stability of the process is tested experimentally: impulse frequency, inter-pulse period, arc voltage during the inter-pulse period, speed of electrode supply, current of the inter-pulse period.

  11. RIPL - Reference Input Parameter Library for Calculation of Nuclear Reactions and Nuclear Data Evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Capote, R. , E-Mail: r.capotenoy@iaea.org; Herman, M.; Oblozinsky, P.; Young, P.G.; Goriely, S.; Belgya, T.; Ignatyuk, A.V.; Koning, A.J.; Hilaire, S.; Plujko, V.A.; Avrigeanu, M.; Bersillon, O.; Chadwick, M.B.; Fukahori, T.; Ge, Zhigang; Han, Yinlu; Kailas, S.; Kopecky, J.; Maslov, V.M.; Reffo, G.

    2009-12-15

    We describe the physics and data included in the Reference Input Parameter Library, which is devoted to input parameters needed in calculations of nuclear reactions and nuclear data evaluations. Advanced modelling codes require substantial numerical input, therefore the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has worked extensively since 1993 on a library of validated nuclear-model input parameters, referred to as the Reference Input Parameter Library (RIPL). A final RIPL coordinated research project (RIPL-3) was brought to a successful conclusion in December 2008, after 15 years of challenging work carried out through three consecutive IAEA projects. The RIPL-3 library was released in January 2009, and is available on the Web through (http://www-nds.iaea.org/RIPL-3/). This work and the resulting database are extremely important to theoreticians involved in the development and use of nuclear reaction modelling (ALICE, EMPIRE, GNASH, UNF, TALYS) both for theoretical research and nuclear data evaluations. The numerical data and computer codes included in RIPL-3 are arranged in seven segments: MASSES contains ground-state properties of nuclei for about 9000 nuclei, including three theoretical predictions of masses and the evaluated experimental masses of Audi et al. (2003). DISCRETE LEVELS contains 117 datasets (one for each element) with all known level schemes, electromagnetic and {gamma}-ray decay probabilities available from ENSDF in October 2007. NEUTRON RESONANCES contains average resonance parameters prepared on the basis of the evaluations performed by Ignatyuk and Mughabghab. OPTICAL MODEL contains 495 sets of phenomenological optical model parameters defined in a wide energy range. When there are insufficient experimental data, the evaluator has to resort to either global parameterizations or microscopic approaches. Radial density distributions to be used as input for microscopic calculations are stored in the MASSES segment. LEVEL DENSITIES contains

  12. RIPL-Reference Input Parameter Library for Calculation of Nuclear Reactions and Nuclear Data Evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Capote, R.; Herman, M.; Capote,R.; Herman,M.; Oblozinsky,P.; Young,P.G.; Goriely,S.; Belgy,T.; Ignatyuk,A.V.; Koning,A.J.; Hilaire,S.; Pljko,V.A.; Avrigeanu,M.; Bersillon,O.; Chadwick,M.B.; Fukahori,T.; Ge, Zhigang; Han,Yinl,; Kailas,S.; Kopecky,J.; Maslov,V.M.; Reffo,G.; Sin,M.; Soukhovitskii,E.Sh.; Talou,P

    2009-12-01

    We describe the physics and data included in the Reference Input Parameter Library, which is devoted to input parameters needed in calculations of nuclear reactions and nuclear data evaluations. Advanced modelling codes require substantial numerical input, therefore the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has worked extensively since 1993 on a library of validated nuclear-model input parameters, referred to as the Reference Input Parameter Library (RIPL). A final RIPL coordinated research project (RIPL-3) was brought to a successful conclusion in December 2008, after 15 years of challenging work carried out through three consecutive IAEA projects. The RIPL-3 library was released in January 2009, and is available on the Web through http://www-nds.iaea.org/RIPL-3/. This work and the resulting database are extremely important to theoreticians involved in the development and use of nuclear reaction modelling (ALICE, EMPIRE, GNASH, UNF, TALYS) both for theoretical research and nuclear data evaluations. The numerical data and computer codes included in RIPL-3 are arranged in seven segments: MASSES contains ground-state properties of nuclei for about 9000 nuclei, including three theoretical predictions of masses and the evaluated experimental masses of Audi et al. (2003). DISCRETE LEVELS contains 117 datasets (one for each element) with all known level schemes, electromagnetic and {gamma}-ray decay probabilities available from ENSDF in October 2007. NEUTRON RESONANCES contains average resonance parameters prepared on the basis of the evaluations performed by Ignatyuk and Mughabghab. OPTICAL MODEL contains 495 sets of phenomenological optical model parameters defined in a wide energy range. When there are insufficient experimental data, the evaluator has to resort to either global parameterizations or microscopic approaches. Radial density distributions to be used as input for microscopic calculations are stored in the MASSES segment. LEVEL DENSITIES contains

  13. RIPL - Reference Input Parameter Library for Calculation of Nuclear Reactions and Nuclear Data Evaluations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capote, R.; Herman, M.; Obložinský, P.; Young, P. G.; Goriely, S.; Belgya, T.; Ignatyuk, A. V.; Koning, A. J.; Hilaire, S.; Plujko, V. A.; Avrigeanu, M.; Bersillon, O.; Chadwick, M. B.; Fukahori, T.; Ge, Zhigang; Han, Yinlu; Kailas, S.; Kopecky, J.; Maslov, V. M.; Reffo, G.; Sin, M.; Soukhovitskii, E. Sh.; Talou, P.

    2009-12-01

    We describe the physics and data included in the Reference Input Parameter Library, which is devoted to input parameters needed in calculations of nuclear reactions and nuclear data evaluations. Advanced modelling codes require substantial numerical input, therefore the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has worked extensively since 1993 on a library of validated nuclear-model input parameters, referred to as the Reference Input Parameter Library (RIPL). A final RIPL coordinated research project (RIPL-3) was brought to a successful conclusion in December 2008, after 15 years of challenging work carried out through three consecutive IAEA projects. The RIPL-3 library was released in January 2009, and is available on the Web through http://www-nds.iaea.org/RIPL-3/. This work and the resulting database are extremely important to theoreticians involved in the development and use of nuclear reaction modelling (ALICE, EMPIRE, GNASH, UNF, TALYS) both for theoretical research and nuclear data evaluations. The numerical data and computer codes included in RIPL-3 are arranged in seven segments: MASSES contains ground-state properties of nuclei for about 9000 nuclei, including three theoretical predictions of masses and the evaluated experimental masses of Audi et al. (2003). DISCRETE LEVELS contains 117 datasets (one for each element) with all known level schemes, electromagnetic and γ-ray decay probabilities available from ENSDF in October 2007. NEUTRON RESONANCES contains average resonance parameters prepared on the basis of the evaluations performed by Ignatyuk and Mughabghab. OPTICAL MODEL contains 495 sets of phenomenological optical model parameters defined in a wide energy range. When there are insufficient experimental data, the evaluator has to resort to either global parameterizations or microscopic approaches. Radial density distributions to be used as input for microscopic calculations are stored in the MASSES segment. LEVEL DENSITIES contains

  14. A comparison of the calculated and experimental off-design performance of a radial flow turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tirres, Lizet

    1992-01-01

    Off design aerodynamic performance of the solid version of a cooled radial inflow turbine is analyzed. Rotor surface static pressure data and other performance parameters were obtained experimentally. Overall stage performance and turbine blade surface static to inlet total pressure ratios were calculated by using a quasi-three dimensional inviscid code. The off design prediction capability of this code for radial inflow turbines shows accurate static pressure prediction. Solutions show a difference of 3 to 5 points between the experimentally obtained efficiencies and the calculated values.

  15. A comparison of the calculated and experimental off-design performance of a radial flow turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tirres, Lizet

    1991-01-01

    Off design aerodynamic performance of the solid version of a cooled radial inflow turbine is analyzed. Rotor surface static pressure data and other performance parameters were obtained experimentally. Overall stage performance and turbine blade surface static to inlet total pressure ratios were calculated by using a quasi-three dimensional inviscid code. The off design prediction capability of this code for radial inflow turbines shows accurate static pressure prediction. Solutions show a difference of 3 to 5 points between the experimentally obtained efficiencies and the calculated values.

  16. High-Order Homogenization Method in Diffusion Theory for Reactor Core Simulation and Design Calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Farzad Rahnema

    2003-09-30

    Most modern nodal methods in use by the reactor vendors and utilities are based on the generalized equivalence theory (GET) that uses homogenized cross sections and flux discontinuity factors. These homogenized parameters, referred to as infinite medium parameters, are precomputed by performing single bundle fine-mesh calculations with zero current boundary conditions. It is known that for configurations in which the node-to-node leakage (e.g., surface current-to-flux ratio) is large the use of the infinite medium parameters could lead to large errors in the nodal solution. This would be the case for highly heterogeneous core configurations, typical of modern reactor core designs.

  17. Calculation of utmost parameters of active vision system based on nonscanning thermal imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sviridov, A. N.

    2003-09-01

    An active vision system (AVS) based on a non scanning thermal imager (TI) and CO2 - quantum amplifier of the image is offered. AVS mathematical model within which investigation of utmost signal / noise values and other system parameters depending on the distances to the scene - the area of observation (AO), an illumination impulse energy (W), an amplification factor (K) of a quantum amplifier, objective lens characteristics, spectral band width of a cooled filter of the thermal imager as well as object and scene characteristics is developed. Calculations were carried out for the following possible operating modes of a discussed vision system: - an active mode of a thermal imager with a cooled wideband filter; an active mode of a thermal imager with a cooled narrowband filter; - passive mode (W = 0, K = 1) of a thermal imager with a cooled wideband filter. As a result of carried out researches the opportunity and expediency of designing AVS, having a nonscanning thermal imager, impulse CO2 - quantum image amplifier and impulse CO2 - illumination laser are shown. It is shown that AVS have advantages over thermal imaging at observation of objects, temperature and reflection factors of which differ slightly from similar parameters of the scene. AVS depending on the W-K product can detect at a distance of up to 3000..5000m practically any local changes (you are interested in ) of a reflection factor. AVS not replacing the thermal imaging allow to receive additional information about observation objects. The images obtained with the help of AVS are more natural and more easy identified than thermal images received at the expense of the object own radiation. For quantitative determination of utmost values of AVS sensitivity it is offered to introduce a new parameter - NERD - 'radiation nose equivalent reflection factors difference'. IR active vision systems of vision, as well as a human vision and vision systems in the near IR - range on the basis image intensifiers

  18. [Specific parameters for the calculation of dose after aerosol inhalation of transuranium elements].

    PubMed

    Ramounet-Le Gall, B; Fritsch, P; Abram, M C; Rateau, G; Grillon, G; Guillet, K; Baude, S; Bérard, P; Ansoborlo, E; Delforge, J

    2002-07-01

    A review on specific parameter measurements to calculate doses per unit of incorporation according to recommendations of the International Commission of Radiological Protection has been performed for inhaled actinide oxides. Alpha activity distribution of the particles can be obtained by autoradiography analysis using aerosol sampling filters at the work places. This allows us to characterize granulometric parameters of "pure" actinide oxides, but complementary analysis by scanning electron microscopy is needed for complex aerosols. Dissolution parameters with their standard deviation are obtained after rat inhalation exposure, taking into account both mechanical lung clearance and actinide transfer to the blood estimated from bone retention. In vitro experiments suggest that the slow dissolution rate might decrease as a function of time following exposure. Dose calculation software packages have been developed to take into account granulometry and dissolution parameters as well as specific physiological parameters of exposed individuals. In the case of poorly soluble actinide oxides, granulometry and physiology appear as the main parameters controlling dose value, whereas dissolution only alters dose distribution. Validation of these software packages are in progress.

  19. CALOR89 calorimeter simulations, benchmarking, and design calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Handler, T. ); Panakkal, J.K.; Proudfoot, J. ); Cremaldi, L.; Moore, B.; Reidy, J.J. ); Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.; Fu, P.; Gabriel, T.A. )

    1990-01-01

    Results on CALOR89 benchmarking and design calculations utilizing the CALOR89 programs are presented. The benchmarking is done with respect to the ZEUS and DO calorimeters. The design calculations were done for a variety of absorbers (depleted uranium, lead, and iron) of various thickness for a given scintillator thickness and for a fixed absorber thickness using various thickness for the scintillator. These studies indicate that a compensating calorimeter can be built using lead as the absorber, whereas a purely iron calorimeter would be non-compensating. A depleted uranium calorimeter would possibly be unsuitable if used in a large configuration and a high luminosity machine because of the delayed energy release from capture gammas. 11 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Design parameters and source terms: Volume 3, Source terms

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-10-01

    The Design Parameters and Source Terms Document was prepared in accordance with DOE request and to provide data for the environmental impact study to be performed in the future for the Deaf Smith County, Texas site for a nuclear waste repository in salt. This document updates a previous unpublished report by Stearns Catalytic Corporation (SCC), entitled ''Design Parameters and Source Terms for a Two-Phase Repository in Salt,'' 1985, to the level of the Site Characterization Plan - Conceptual Design Report. The previous unpublished SCC Study identifies the data needs for the Environmental Assessment effort for seven possible Salt Repository sites. 11 refs., 9 tabs.

  1. Determination of representative dimension parameter values of Korean knee joints for knee joint implant design.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Dai Soon; Tao, Quang Bang; Todo, Mitsugu; Jeon, Insu

    2012-05-01

    Knee joint implants developed by western companies have been imported to Korea and used for Korean patients. However, many clinical problems occur in knee joints of Korean patients after total knee joint replacement owing to the geometric mismatch between the western implants and Korean knee joint structures. To solve these problems, a method to determine the representative dimension parameter values of Korean knee joints is introduced to aid in the design of knee joint implants appropriate for Korean patients. Measurements of the dimension parameters of 88 male Korean knee joint subjects were carried out. The distribution of the subjects versus each measured parameter value was investigated. The measured dimension parameter values of each parameter were grouped by suitable intervals called the "size group," and average values of the size groups were calculated. The knee joint subjects were grouped as the "patient group" based on "size group numbers" of each parameter. From the iterative calculations to decrease the errors between the average dimension parameter values of each "patient group" and the dimension parameter values of the subjects, the average dimension parameter values that give less than the error criterion were determined to be the representative dimension parameter values for designing knee joint implants for Korean patients.

  2. Inrush Current Simulation of Two Windings Power Transformer using Machine Parameters Estimated by Design Procedure of Winding Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokunaga, Yoshitaka; Kubota, Kunihiro

    This paper presents estimation techniques of machine parameters for two windings power transformer using design procedure of winding structure. Especially, it is very difficult to obtain machine parameters for transformers in customers' facilities. Using estimation techniques, machine parameters could be calculated from the only nameplate data of these transformers. Subsequently, EMTP-ATP simulation of the inrush current was carried out using machine parameters estimated by design procedure of winding structure and simulation results were reproduced measured waveforms.

  3. Using a microcomputer to perform design calculations for a sucker rod pumping system

    SciTech Connect

    Parcupile, J.C.; Nicol, T.H.

    1985-03-01

    Sucker rod computations are both tedious and time consuming. Each time a pumping parameter is changed, such as rod designation, pumping speed, the calculation must be repeated. Three programs to handle these calculations have been written for the Hewlett Packard HP 87 XM microcomputer. The first program is a dynamic analysis program for either an API Class I or Class III pump. The second program performs the detailed calculations in accordance with Ref. 1 and prints a form that is essentially the same as the form No. 11L-1 of Ref. 1. The third program performs the ''RP 11L calculation'' a number of rod designations printing out: total rod weight, pump displacement, peak polish rod load, minimum polish rod load, peak torque, polish rod horsepower, maximum stress, and the ratio of daily production to polish rod horsepower for each API rod number in the range of API rod numbers being considered.

  4. The effect of perturbing body segment parameters on calculated joint moments and muscle forces during gait.

    PubMed

    Wesseling, Mariska; de Groote, Friedl; Jonkers, Ilse

    2014-01-22

    This study examined the effect of body segment parameter (BSP) perturbations on joint moments calculated using an inverse dynamics procedure and muscle forces calculated using computed muscle control (CMC) during gait. BSP (i.e. segment mass, center of mass location (com) and inertia tensor) of the left thigh, shank and foot of a scaled musculoskeletal model were perturbed. These perturbations started from their nominal value and were adjusted to ±40% in steps of 10%, for both individual as well as combined perturbations in BSP. For all perturbations, an inverse dynamics procedure calculated the ankle, knee and hip moments based on an identical inverse kinematics solution. Furthermore, the effect of applying a residual reduction algorithm (RRA) was investigated. Muscle excitations and resulting muscle forces were calculated using CMC. The results show only a limited effect of an individual parameter perturbation on the calculated moments, where the largest effect is found when perturbing the shank com (MS(com,shank), the ratio of absolute difference in torque and relative parameter perturbation, is maximally -7.81 N m for hip flexion moment). The additional influence of perturbing two parameters simultaneously is small (MS(mass+com,thigh) is maximally 15.2 N m for hip flexion moment). RRA made small changes to the model to increase the dynamic consistency of the simulation (after RRA MS(com,shank) is maximally 5.01 N m). CMC results show large differences in muscle forces when BSP are perturbed. These result from the underlying forward integration of the dynamic equations. PMID:24332615

  5. The effect of perturbing body segment parameters on calculated joint moments and muscle forces during gait.

    PubMed

    Wesseling, Mariska; de Groote, Friedl; Jonkers, Ilse

    2014-01-22

    This study examined the effect of body segment parameter (BSP) perturbations on joint moments calculated using an inverse dynamics procedure and muscle forces calculated using computed muscle control (CMC) during gait. BSP (i.e. segment mass, center of mass location (com) and inertia tensor) of the left thigh, shank and foot of a scaled musculoskeletal model were perturbed. These perturbations started from their nominal value and were adjusted to ±40% in steps of 10%, for both individual as well as combined perturbations in BSP. For all perturbations, an inverse dynamics procedure calculated the ankle, knee and hip moments based on an identical inverse kinematics solution. Furthermore, the effect of applying a residual reduction algorithm (RRA) was investigated. Muscle excitations and resulting muscle forces were calculated using CMC. The results show only a limited effect of an individual parameter perturbation on the calculated moments, where the largest effect is found when perturbing the shank com (MS(com,shank), the ratio of absolute difference in torque and relative parameter perturbation, is maximally -7.81 N m for hip flexion moment). The additional influence of perturbing two parameters simultaneously is small (MS(mass+com,thigh) is maximally 15.2 N m for hip flexion moment). RRA made small changes to the model to increase the dynamic consistency of the simulation (after RRA MS(com,shank) is maximally 5.01 N m). CMC results show large differences in muscle forces when BSP are perturbed. These result from the underlying forward integration of the dynamic equations.

  6. k.p Parameters with Accuracy Control from Preexistent First-Principles Band Structure Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sipahi, Guilherme; Bastos, Carlos M. O.; Sabino, Fernando P.; Faria Junior, Paulo E.; de Campos, Tiago; da Silva, Juarez L. F.

    The k.p method is a successful approach to obtain band structure, optical and transport properties of semiconductors. It overtakes the ab initio methods in confined systems due to its low computational cost since it is a continuum method that does not require all the atoms' orbital information. From an effective one-electron Hamiltonian, the k.p matrix representation can be calculated using perturbation theory and the parameters identified by symmetry arguments. The parameters determination, however, needs a complementary approach. In this paper, we developed a general method to extract the k.p parameters from preexistent band structures of bulk materials that is not limited by the crystal symmetry or by the model. To demonstrate our approach, we applied it to zinc blende GaAs band structure calculated by hybrid density functional theory within the Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof functional (DFT-HSE), for the usual 8 ×8 k.p Hamiltonian. Our parameters reproduced the DFT-HSE band structure with great accuracy up to 20% of the first Brillouin zone (FBZ). Furthermore, for fitting regions ranging from 7-20% of FBZ, the parameters lie inside the range of values reported by the most reliable studies in the literature. The authors acknowledge financial support from the Brazilian agencies CNPq (Grant #246549/2012-2) and FAPESP (Grants #2011/19333-4, #2012/05618-0 and #2013/23393-8).

  7. Thermodynamics calculation of protein-ligand interactions by QM/MM polarizable charge parameters.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinan; Shao, Qiang; Cossins, Benjamin P; Shi, Jiye; Chen, Kaixian; Zhu, Weiliang

    2016-01-01

    The calculation of protein-ligand binding free energy (ΔG) is of great importance for virtual screening and drug design. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation has been an attractive tool to investigate this scientific problem. However, the reliability of such approach is affected by many factors including electrostatic interaction calculation. Here, we present a practical protocol using quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations to generate polarizable QM protein charge (QMPC). The calculated QMPC of some atoms in binding pockets was obviously different from that calculated by AMBER ff03, which might significantly affect the calculated ΔG. To evaluate the effect, the MD simulations and MM/GBSA calculation with QMPC for 10 protein-ligand complexes, and the simulation results were then compared to those with the AMBER ff03 force field and experimental results. The correlation coefficient between the calculated ΔΔG using MM/GBSA under QMPC and the experimental data is .92, while that with AMBER ff03 force field is .47 for the complexes formed by streptavidin or its mutants and biotin. Moreover, the calculated ΔΔG with QMPC for the complexes formed by ERβ and five ligands is positively related to experimental result with correlation coefficient of .61, while that with AMBER ff03 charge is negatively related to experimental data with correlation coefficient of .42. The detailed analysis shows that the electrostatic polarization introduced by QMPC affects the electrostatic contribution to the binding affinity and thus, leads to better correlation with experimental data. Therefore, this approach should be useful to virtual screening and drug design.

  8. Accuracy of theoretical calculations of the main parameters of the F2-layer of the daytime ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, A. V.; Sitnov, Iu. S.

    1985-10-01

    Pavlov's (1984) method is used to determine the relative errors (due to errors in measuring the input parameters of the model) in theoretical calculations of the main parameters of the daytime F2-layer under quiet conditions. The parameters calculated are the height of the F2-layer maximum and the electron density.

  9. Stereolithographic Bone Scaffold Design Parameters: Osteogenic Differentiation and Signal Expression

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyobum; Yeatts, Andrew; Dean, David

    2010-01-01

    Scaffold design parameters including porosity, pore size, interconnectivity, and mechanical properties have a significant influence on osteogenic signal expression and differentiation. This review evaluates the influence of each of these parameters and then discusses the ability of stereolithography (SLA) to be used to tailor scaffold design to optimize these parameters. Scaffold porosity and pore size affect osteogenic cell signaling and ultimately in vivo bone tissue growth. Alternatively, scaffold interconnectivity has a great influence on in vivo bone growth but little work has been done to determine if interconnectivity causes changes in signaling levels. Osteogenic cell signaling could be also influenced by scaffold mechanical properties such as scaffold rigidity and dynamic relationships between the cells and their extracellular matrix. With knowledge of the effects of these parameters on cellular functions, an optimal tissue engineering scaffold can be designed, but a proper technology must exist to produce this design to specification in a repeatable manner. SLA has been shown to be capable of fabricating scaffolds with controlled architecture and micrometer-level resolution. Surgical implantation of these scaffolds is a promising clinical treatment for successful bone regeneration. By applying knowledge of how scaffold parameters influence osteogenic cell signaling to scaffold manufacturing using SLA, tissue engineers may move closer to creating the optimal tissue engineering scaffold. PMID:20504065

  10. Control design for a class of nonlinear parameter varying systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Xiushan; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Wei

    2015-07-01

    Stabilisation for a class of one-sided Lipschitz nonlinear parameter varying systems is dealt with in this paper. First, the nonlinear parameter varying system is represented as a subsystem of a differential inclusion. Sufficient conditions for exponential stabilisation for the differential inclusion are given by solving linear matrix inequalities. Then a continuous control law is designed to stabilise the differential inclusion. It leads to stabilising the nonlinear parameter varying system. Finally, a simulation example is presented to show the validity and advantages of the proposed method.

  11. Monte Carlo Method for Determining Earthquake Recurrence Parameters from Short Paleoseismic Catalogs: Example Calculations for California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, Tom

    2008-01-01

    Paleoearthquake observations often lack enough events at a given site to directly define a probability density function (PDF) for earthquake recurrence. Sites with fewer than 10-15 intervals do not provide enough information to reliably determine the shape of the PDF using standard maximum-likelihood techniques [e.g., Ellsworth et al., 1999]. In this paper I present a method that attempts to fit wide ranges of distribution parameters to short paleoseismic series. From repeated Monte Carlo draws, it becomes possible to quantitatively estimate most likely recurrence PDF parameters, and a ranked distribution of parameters is returned that can be used to assess uncertainties in hazard calculations. In tests on short synthetic earthquake series, the method gives results that cluster around the mean of the input distribution, whereas maximum likelihood methods return the sample means [e.g., NIST/SEMATECH, 2006]. For short series (fewer than 10 intervals), sample means tend to reflect the median of an asymmetric recurrence distribution, possibly leading to an overestimate of the hazard should they be used in probability calculations. Therefore a Monte Carlo approach may be useful for assessing recurrence from limited paleoearthquake records. Further, the degree of functional dependence among parameters like mean recurrence interval and coefficient of variation can be established. The method is described for use with time-independent and time-dependent PDF?s, and results from 19 paleoseismic sequences on strike-slip faults throughout the state of California are given.

  12. Monte Carlo method for determining earthquake recurrence parameters from short paleoseismic catalogs: Example calculations for California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, T.

    2008-01-01

    Paleoearthquake observations often lack enough events at a given site to directly define a probability density function (PDF) for earthquake recurrence. Sites with fewer than 10-15 intervals do not provide enough information to reliably determine the shape of the PDF using standard maximum-likelihood techniques (e.g., Ellsworth et al., 1999). In this paper I present a method that attempts to fit wide ranges of distribution parameters to short paleoseismic series. From repeated Monte Carlo draws, it becomes possible to quantitatively estimate most likely recurrence PDF parameters, and a ranked distribution of parameters is returned that can be used to assess uncertainties in hazard calculations. In tests on short synthetic earthquake series, the method gives results that cluster around the mean of the input distribution, whereas maximum likelihood methods return the sample means (e.g., NIST/SEMATECH, 2006). For short series (fewer than 10 intervals), sample means tend to reflect the median of an asymmetric recurrence distribution, possibly leading to an overestimate of the hazard should they be used in probability calculations. Therefore a Monte Carlo approach may be useful for assessing recurrence from limited paleoearthquake records. Further, the degree of functional dependence among parameters like mean recurrence interval and coefficient of variation can be established. The method is described for use with time-independent and time-dependent PDFs, and results from 19 paleoseismic sequences on strike-slip faults throughout the state of California are given.

  13. THERMAL: A routine designed to calculate neutron thermal scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, D.E.

    1995-02-24

    THERMAL is designed to calculate neutron thermal scattering that is isotropic in the center of mass system. At low energy thermal motion will be included. At high energies the target nuclei are assumed to be stationary. The point of transition between low and high energies has been defined to insure a smooth transition. It is assumed that at low energy the elastic cross section is constant in the center of mass system. At high energy the cross section can be of any form. You can use this routine for all energies where the elastic scattering is isotropic in the center of mass system. In most materials this will be a fairly high energy.

  14. Estimating parameters with pre-specified accuracies in distributed parameter systems using optimal experiment design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potters, M. G.; Bombois, X.; Mansoori, M.; Van den Hof, Paul M. J.

    2016-08-01

    Estimation of physical parameters in dynamical systems driven by linear partial differential equations is an important problem. In this paper, we introduce the least costly experiment design framework for these systems. It enables parameter estimation with an accuracy that is specified by the experimenter prior to the identification experiment, while at the same time minimising the cost of the experiment. We show how to adapt the classical framework for these systems and take into account scaling and stability issues. We also introduce a progressive subdivision algorithm that further generalises the experiment design framework in the sense that it returns the lowest cost by finding the optimal input signal, and optimal sensor and actuator locations. Our methodology is then applied to a relevant problem in heat transfer studies: estimation of conductivity and diffusivity parameters in front-face experiments. We find good correspondence between numerical and theoretical results.

  15. Calculation of Weibull strength parameters and Batdorf flow-density constants for volume- and surface-flaw-induced fracture in ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shantaram, S. Pai; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1989-01-01

    The calculation of shape and scale parametes of the two-parameter Weibull distribution is described using the least-squares analysis and maximum likelihood methods for volume- and surface-flaw-induced fracture in ceramics with complete and censored samples. Detailed procedures are given for evaluating 90 percent confidence intervals for maximum likelihood estimates of shape and scale parameters, the unbiased estimates of the shape parameters, and the Weibull mean values and corresponding standard deviations. Furthermore, the necessary steps are described for detecting outliers and for calculating the Kolmogorov-Smirnov and the Anderson-Darling goodness-of-fit statistics and 90 percent confidence bands about the Weibull distribution. It also shows how to calculate the Batdorf flaw-density constants by using the Weibull distribution statistical parameters. The techniques described were verified with several example problems, from the open literature, and were coded in the Structural Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation (SCARE) design program.

  16. Identification of vehicle suspension parameters by design optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tey, J. Y.; Ramli, R.; Kheng, C. W.; Chong, S. Y.; Abidin, M. A. Z.

    2014-05-01

    The design of a vehicle suspension system through simulation requires accurate representation of the design parameters. These parameters are usually difficult to measure or sometimes unavailable. This article proposes an efficient approach to identify the unknown parameters through optimization based on experimental results, where the covariance matrix adaptation-evolutionary strategy (CMA-es) is utilized to improve the simulation and experimental results against the kinematic and compliance tests. This speeds up the design and development cycle by recovering all the unknown data with respect to a set of kinematic measurements through a single optimization process. A case study employing a McPherson strut suspension system is modelled in a multi-body dynamic system. Three kinematic and compliance tests are examined, namely, vertical parallel wheel travel, opposite wheel travel and single wheel travel. The problem is formulated as a multi-objective optimization problem with 40 objectives and 49 design parameters. A hierarchical clustering method based on global sensitivity analysis is used to reduce the number of objectives to 30 by grouping correlated objectives together. Then, a dynamic summation of rank value is used as pseudo-objective functions to reformulate the multi-objective optimization to a single-objective optimization problem. The optimized results show a significant improvement in the correlation between the simulated model and the experimental model. Once accurate representation of the vehicle suspension model is achieved, further analysis, such as ride and handling performances, can be implemented for further optimization.

  17. A computer-based matrix for rapid calculation of pulmonary hemodynamic parameters in congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Antonio Augusto; dos Anjos Miranda, Rogério; Gonçalves, Rilvani Cavalcante; Thomaz, Ana Maria

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In patients with congenital heart disease undergoing cardiac catheterization for hemodynamic purposes, parameter estimation by the indirect Fick method using a single predicted value of oxygen consumption has been a matter of criticism. OBJECTIVE: We developed a computer-based routine for rapid estimation of replicate hemodynamic parameters using multiple predicted values of oxygen consumption. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Using Microsoft® Excel facilities, we constructed a matrix containing 5 models (equations) for prediction of oxygen consumption, and all additional formulas needed to obtain replicate estimates of hemodynamic parameters. RESULTS: By entering data from 65 patients with ventricular septal defects, aged 1 month to 8 years, it was possible to obtain multiple predictions for oxygen consumption, with clear between-age groups (P <.001) and between-methods (P <.001) differences. Using these predictions in the individual patient, it was possible to obtain the upper and lower limits of a likely range for any given parameter, which made estimation more realistic. CONCLUSION: The organized matrix allows for rapid obtainment of replicate parameter estimates, without error due to exhaustive calculations. PMID:19641642

  18. Real-time digital processing of Doppler ultrasound signals and calculation of flow parameters.

    PubMed

    Schlindwein, F S; Vieira, M H; Vasconcelos, C F; Simpson, D M

    1994-01-01

    Vascular diseases and their complications are responsible for around 27% of deaths in Brazil. Doppler ultrasound is a non-invasive technique that has been used to study blood flow in intact blood vessels since Satomura first reported the potential of the technique in 1959. Because it is non-invasive it makes sequential studies and those in normals feasible. Whereas in contrast angiography only vessel anatomy is displayed, Doppler ultrasound produces dynamic information on blood-flow. It may be used to estimate flow-rates, to image regions of blood flow (colour Doppler), and to help in locating sites of arterial disease, thus complementing X-ray examinations. This paper describes a system based on a Digital Signal Processor for real-time spectrum analysis of Doppler ultrasound signals, real-time display of sonograms, and calculation and analysis of three parameters of clinical interest derived from the Doppler signal. The system comprises a TMS320C25 development board, which acquires the signal and performs spectrum analysis, and a microcomputer, which reads the spectral estimates, displays them as a sonogram in real-time and calculates a set of spectral parameters proposed in the literature. The system permits a maximum sampling frequency of 40.96 kHz, and in the sonogram, 80 power spectra per second (each with 128 frequency bins) are displayed. In a preliminary study, the stability of the haemodynamic parameters and their dependence on a user-defined threshold value is investigated.

  19. Parameter Screening and Optimisation for ILP Using Designed Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Ashwin; Ramakrishnan, Ganesh

    Reports of experiments conducted with an Inductive Logic Programming system rarely describe how specific values of parameters of the system are arrived at when constructing models. Usually, no attempt is made to identify sensitive parameters, and those that are used are often given "factory-supplied" default values, or values obtained from some non-systematic exploratory analysis. The immediate consequence of this is, of course, that it is not clear if better models could have been obtained if some form of parameter selection and optimisation had been performed. Questions follow inevitably on the experiments themselves: specifically, are all algorithms being treated fairly, and is the exploratory phase sufficiently well-defined to allow the experiments to be replicated? In this paper, we investigate the use of parameter selection and optimisation techniques grouped under the study of experimental design. Screening and "response surface" methods determine, in turn, sensitive parameters and good values for these parameters. This combined use of parameter selection and response surface-driven optimisation has a long history of application in industrial engineering, and its role in ILP is investigated using two well-known benchmarks. The results suggest that computational overheads from this preliminary phase are not substantial, and that much can be gained, both on improving system performance and on enabling controlled experimentation, by adopting well-established procedures such as the ones proposed here.

  20. Robust integrated autopilot/autothrottle design using constrained parameter optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ly, Uy-Loi; Voth, Christopher; Sanjay, Swamy

    1990-01-01

    A multivariable control design method based on constrained parameter optimization was applied to the design of a multiloop aircraft flight control system. Specifically, the design method is applied to the following: (1) direct synthesis of a multivariable 'inner-loop' feedback control system based on total energy control principles; (2) synthesis of speed/altitude-hold designs as 'outer-loop' feedback/feedforward control systems around the above inner loop; and (3) direct synthesis of a combined 'inner-loop' and 'outer-loop' multivariable control system. The design procedure offers a direct and structured approach for the determination of a set of controller gains that meet design specifications in closed-loop stability, command tracking performance, disturbance rejection, and limits on control activities. The presented approach may be applied to a broader class of multiloop flight control systems. Direct tradeoffs between many real design goals are rendered systematic by this method following careful problem formulation of the design objectives and constraints. Performance characteristics of the optimization design were improved over the current autopilot design on the B737-100 Transport Research Vehicle (TSRV) at the landing approach and cruise flight conditions; particularly in the areas of closed-loop damping, command responses, and control activity in the presence of turbulence.

  1. A row-by-row off-design performance calculation method for turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schobeiri, T.; Abouelkheir, M.

    1991-01-01

    The turbine component of a gas turbine engine is frequently subjected to extreme operation conditions associated with significant changes in mass flow, turbine inlet temperature, pressure and rotational speed. These off-design operation conditions significantly affect the flow deflection within the turbine stage, which consists of individual stator and rotor rows. As a result, the stage parameters representing the velocity diagram will change and affect the efficiency and performance of the stage and, thus, the turbine. A row-by-row calculation method is presented for predicting the performance behavior of turbines under extreme off-design conditions. The method is applied to a multistage turbine for which the off-design performance is calculated and compared with the measurement.

  2. Accuracy assessment and automation of free energy calculations for drug design.

    PubMed

    Christ, Clara D; Fox, Thomas

    2014-01-27

    As the free energy of binding of a ligand to its target is one of the crucial optimization parameters in drug design, its accurate prediction is highly desirable. In the present study we have assessed the average accuracy of free energy calculations for a total of 92 ligands binding to five different targets. To make this study and future larger scale applications possible we automated the setup procedure. Starting from user defined binding modes, the procedure decides which ligands to connect via a perturbation based on maximum common substructure criteria and produces all necessary parameter files for free energy calculations in AMBER 11. For the systems investigated, errors due to insufficient sampling were found to be substantial in some cases whereas differences in estimators (thermodynamic integration (TI) versus multistate Bennett acceptance ratio (MBAR)) were found to be negligible. Analytical uncertainty estimates calculated from a single free energy calculation were found to be much smaller than the sample standard deviation obtained from two independent free energy calculations. Agreement with experiment was found to be system dependent ranging from excellent to mediocre (RMSE = [0.9, 8.2, 4.7, 5.7, 8.7] kJ/mol). When restricting analyses to free energy calculations with sample standard deviations below 1 kJ/mol agreement with experiment improved (RMSE = [0.8, 6.9, 1.8, 3.9, 5.6] kJ/mol).

  3. Application of GRS method to evaluation of uncertainties of calculation parameters of perspective sodium-cooled fast reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Peregudov, A.; Andrianova, O.; Raskach, K.; Tsibulya, A.

    2012-07-01

    A number of recent studies have been devoted to the estimation of errors of reactor calculation parameters by the GRS (Generation Random Sampled) method. This method is based on direct sampling input data resulting in formation of random sets of input parameters which are used for multiple calculations. Once these calculations are performed, statistical processing of the calculation results is carried out to determine the mean value and the variance of each calculation parameter of interest. In our study this method is used for estimation of errors of calculation parameters (K{sub eff}, power density, dose rate) of a perspective sodium-cooled fast reactor. Neutron transport calculations were performed by the nodal diffusion code TRIGEX and Monte Carlo code MMK. (authors)

  4. Calculation of parameters for inspection planning and evaluation: mixed-oxide fuel fabrication facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Reardon, P.T.; Mullen, M.F.

    1982-08-01

    As part of Task C.35 (Calculation of Parameters for Inspection Planning and Evaluation) of the US Program of Technical Assistance to IAEA Safeguards, Pacific Northwest Laboratory has performed some quantitative analyses of IAEA inspection activities for mixed-oxide fuel fabrication facilities. There were four distinct efforts involved in this task. These were as follows: show the effect on a material balance verification of using two variables measurement methods in some strata; perform additional calculations for the reference facility described in STR-89; modify the INSPECT computer programs to be used as an after-inspection analysis tool, as well as a preinspection planning tool; provide written comments and explantations of text and graphs of the first draft of STR-89, Safeguards Considerations for Mixed-Oxide Fuel Element Fabrication Facilities, by W. Bahm, T. Shea, and D. Tolchenkov, System Studies Section, IAEA.

  5. Calculation of optimal parameters of an NH{sub 3}-CO{sub 2} lidar

    SciTech Connect

    Vasil'ev, B I; Mannoun, Oussama

    2005-06-30

    The basic parameters (range, signal-to-noise ratio, and sensitivity) of a lidar using NH{sub 3} and CO{sub 2} lasers are calculated. The principle of lidar operation is based on the differential absorption recording. Absorption spectra of all known Freons are considered in the spectral range 9-13.5 {mu}m and optimal wavelengths suitable for sensing them are determined. It is shown that the NH{sub 3}-CO{sub 2} lidar can sense Freons at distances up to 10 km at a signal-to-noise ratio exceeding 10. Sensitivities of the lidar for sensing Freon-11 using various lines of the ammonia laser are calculated. It is shown that remote sensing of Freon-11 at concentrations of the order of 5x10{sup -6}% is possible at distances up to 8.5 km. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  6. Calculation of the wetting parameter from a cluster model in the framework of nanothermodynamics.

    PubMed

    García-Morales, V; Cervera, J; Pellicer, J

    2003-06-01

    The critical wetting parameter omega(c) determines the strength of interfacial fluctuations in critical wetting transitions. In this Brief Report, we calculate omega(c) from considerations on critical liquid clusters inside a vapor phase. The starting point is a cluster model developed by Hill and Chamberlin in the framework of nanothermodynamics [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 95, 12779 (1998)]. Our calculations yield results for omega(c) between 0.52 and 1.00, depending on the degrees of freedom considered. The findings are in agreement with previous experimental results and give an idea of the universal dynamical behavior of the clusters when approaching criticality. We suggest that this behavior is a combination of translation and vortex rotational motion (omega(c)=0.84). PMID:16241275

  7. Calculation of parameters for inspection planning and evaluation: low enriched uranium conversion and fuel fabrication facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Reardon, P.T.; Mullen, M.F.; Harms, N.L.

    1981-02-01

    As part of Task C.35 (Calculation of Parameters for Inspection Planning and Evaluation) of the US Program of Technical Assistance to IAEA Safeguards, Pacific Northwest Laboratory has performed some quantitative analyses of IAEA inspection activities at low-enriched uranium (LEU) conversion and fuel fabrication facilities. This report presents the results and conclusions of those analyses. Implementation of IAEA safeguards at LEU conversion and fuel fabrication facilities must take into account a variety of practical problems and constraints. One of the key concerns is the problem of flow verification, especially product verification. The objective of this report is to help put the problem of flow verification in perspective by presenting the results of some specific calculations of inspection effort and probability of detection for various product measurement strategies. In order to provide quantitative information about the advantages and disadvantages of the various strategies, eight specific cases were examined.

  8. Calculation of the wetting parameter from a cluster model in the framework of nanothermodynamics.

    PubMed

    García-Morales, V; Cervera, J; Pellicer, J

    2003-06-01

    The critical wetting parameter omega(c) determines the strength of interfacial fluctuations in critical wetting transitions. In this Brief Report, we calculate omega(c) from considerations on critical liquid clusters inside a vapor phase. The starting point is a cluster model developed by Hill and Chamberlin in the framework of nanothermodynamics [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 95, 12779 (1998)]. Our calculations yield results for omega(c) between 0.52 and 1.00, depending on the degrees of freedom considered. The findings are in agreement with previous experimental results and give an idea of the universal dynamical behavior of the clusters when approaching criticality. We suggest that this behavior is a combination of translation and vortex rotational motion (omega(c)=0.84).

  9. Structure simulation with calculated NMR parameters - integrating COSMOS into the CCPN framework.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Olaf; Fogh, Rasmus H; Sternberg, Ulrich; Klenin, Konstantin; Kondov, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    The Collaborative Computing Project for NMR (CCPN) has build a software framework consisting of the CCPN data model (with APIs) for NMR related data, the CcpNmr Analysis program and additional tools like CcpNmr FormatConverter. The open architecture allows for the integration of external software to extend the abilities of the CCPN framework with additional calculation methods. Recently, we have carried out the first steps for integrating our software Computer Simulation of Molecular Structures (COSMOS) into the CCPN framework. The COSMOS-NMR force field unites quantum chemical routines for the calculation of molecular properties with a molecular mechanics force field yielding the relative molecular energies. COSMOS-NMR allows introducing NMR parameters as constraints into molecular mechanics calculations. The resulting infrastructure will be made available for the NMR community. As a first application we have tested the evaluation of calculated protein structures using COSMOS-derived 13C Cα and Cβ chemical shifts. In this paper we give an overview of the methodology and a roadmap for future developments and applications. PMID:22942007

  10. Structure simulation with calculated NMR parameters - integrating COSMOS into the CCPN framework.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Olaf; Fogh, Rasmus H; Sternberg, Ulrich; Klenin, Konstantin; Kondov, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    The Collaborative Computing Project for NMR (CCPN) has build a software framework consisting of the CCPN data model (with APIs) for NMR related data, the CcpNmr Analysis program and additional tools like CcpNmr FormatConverter. The open architecture allows for the integration of external software to extend the abilities of the CCPN framework with additional calculation methods. Recently, we have carried out the first steps for integrating our software Computer Simulation of Molecular Structures (COSMOS) into the CCPN framework. The COSMOS-NMR force field unites quantum chemical routines for the calculation of molecular properties with a molecular mechanics force field yielding the relative molecular energies. COSMOS-NMR allows introducing NMR parameters as constraints into molecular mechanics calculations. The resulting infrastructure will be made available for the NMR community. As a first application we have tested the evaluation of calculated protein structures using COSMOS-derived 13C Cα and Cβ chemical shifts. In this paper we give an overview of the methodology and a roadmap for future developments and applications.

  11. Calculation of the paramagnetism of large carbon nanotubes, using a parameter-independent molecular orbital model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collado, J. R. Alvarez

    A previous self-consistent field molecular orbital method, able to describe systems having a large number of unpaired electrons, n, is reviewed and improved. This method is applied to the study of paramagnetism in large (1,000-16,000 atoms) zigzag carbon nanotubes, represented by their n values. The computational scheme is based on the Hückel neglect differential overlap approach. It is shown that dependence of n on the semiempirical parameters is very small, and so they can be removed from the calculation. Enhancement of the paramagnetism (increase of n), by use of a strong external magnetic field, is also studied. Finally, the dependence of the Fermi one-electron potential energies and the spin atomic densities on both the parameters and the shape of the nanotubes is analyzed.0

  12. Analytical calculation of intrinsic shielding effectiveness for isotropic and anisotropic materials based on measured electrical parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühn, M.; John, W.; Weigel, R.

    2014-11-01

    This contribution contains the mechanisms for calculation of magnetic shielding effectiveness from material samples, based on measured electrical parameters. For this, measurement systems for the electrical conductivity of high and low conductive material samples with respect to the direction of current flow are presented and discussed. Also a definition of isotropic and anisotropic materials with electrical circuit diagrams is given. For prediction of shielding effectiveness for isotropic and anisotropic materials, several analytical models are presented. Also adaptions to gain a near field solution are part of this contribution. All analytical models will also be validated with an adequate measurement system.

  13. A three-parameter analytic phase function for multiple scattering calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kattawar, G. W.

    1975-01-01

    A very simple procedure has been developed to fit the first three moments of an actual phase function with a three-parameter analytic phase function. The exact Legendre polynomial decomposition of this function is known which makes it quite suitable for multiple scattering calculations. The use of this function can be expected to yield excellent flux values at all depths within a medium. Since it is capable of reproducing the glory, it can be used in synthetic spectra computations from planetary atmospheres. Accurate asymptotic radiance values can also be achieved as long as the single scattering albedo is not less than 0.9.

  14. Determination of Structural and Electronic Parameters of Antimony Complex, from Theoretical Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catikkas, Berna; Kosar, Ismail

    2016-06-01

    In this study, ground states of antimony (Sbv) with organic ligands complexes were studied by using density functional theory hybrid methods in order to obtain structural, electronic and vibrational spectral parameters. The mapping molecular electrostatic potential surface of the molecules computed to information about the charge density distribution of the molecules and its chemical reactivity. Frontier molecule orbital properties, HOMO and LUMO energies, global descriptors, and the total density of state diagram analysis were performed by using the time-dependent density functional theory. For the learning nonlinear optical properties, polarizability and hyperpolarizability tensors of the molecule were calculated.

  15. Semiconductor measurement technology: A FORTRAN program for calculating the electrical parameters of extrinsic silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larrabee, R. D.; Thurber, W. R.; Bullis, W. M.

    1980-10-01

    A FORTRAN program is presented that solves the charge balance equation to determine the position of the Fermi level and then calculates some of the often used electrical parameters of silicon as a function of temperature. Results obtained from this program are useful in interpreting Hall effect data, determining the degree of ionization of the separate dopant states as a function of temperature, predicting the behavior of specimens when the dopant picture is intentionally (or conceptually) changed, and understanding the variations in the relative roles of the different scattering mechanisms on carrier mobility as the temperature is changed.

  16. Lattice QCD Calculation of the Kaon B Parameter with the Wilson Quark Action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, S.; Fukugita, M.; Hashimoto, S.; Ishizuka, N.; Iwasaki, Y.; Kanaya, K.; Kuramashi, Y.; Okawa, M.; Ukawa, A.; Yoshie, T.; Jlqcd Collaboration

    1998-08-01

    The kaon B parameter is calculated in quenched lattice QCD with the Wilson quark action. The mixing problem of the Δs = 2 four-quark operators is solved nonperturbatively with full use of chiral Ward identities, and this method enables us to construct the weak four-quark operators exhibiting good chiral behavior. We find BK\\(NDR,2 GeV\\) = 0.69\\(7\\) (where NDR denotes naive dimensional regularization) at the lattice cutoff scale of a-1 = 2.7-4.3 GeV.

  17. Microscopic calculation of interacting boson model parameters by potential-energy surface mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Bentley, I.; Frauendorf, S.

    2011-06-15

    A coherent state technique is used to generate an interacting boson model (IBM) Hamiltonian energy surface which is adjusted to match a mean-field energy surface. This technique allows the calculation of IBM Hamiltonian parameters, prediction of properties of low-lying collective states, as well as the generation of probability distributions of various shapes in the ground state of transitional nuclei, the last two of which are of astrophysical interest. The results for krypton, molybdenum, palladium, cadmium, gadolinium, dysprosium, and erbium nuclei are compared with experiment.

  18. Impact of differences in line parameter databases on methane retrieval through radiative transfer calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, A.; Saitoh, N.; Shiomi, K.; Kuze, A.

    2015-12-01

    The thermal infrared (TIR) band of Thermal and Near-infrared Sensor for Carbon Observation Fourier Transform Spectrometer (TANSO-FTS) onboard Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT) observes CH4 profile at wavenumber range from 1210 cm-1 to 1360 cm-1 including CH4 ν4 band. The current retrieval algorithm (V1.0) uses LBLRTM v12.1 with AER v3.1 line database to calculate optical depth. The purpose of this study is to compare several line parameter databases to assess their impact on CH4 retrieval: HITRAN2004 database, HITRAN2008 database, AER v3.2 database, and HITRAN2012 database (Rothman et al. 2005, 2009, and 2013. Clough et al., 2005). The CH4 line parameters of AER v3.1 and v3.2 databases are based on HITRAN2008 and it updates until May 2009 with line mixing parameters. The line strengths are almost the same between HITRAN2008 and HITRAN2012 in the CH4 ν4 band, although their line centers are shifted about 0.002 cm-1 (Brown et al., 2013). We used LBLRTM v12.2 to calculate optical depth of each layer with wavenumber resolution of 0.0034 cm-1 (Clough et al., 2005). Then we calculated forward radiance spectra and convoluted them with sinc function. At 1247.8 cm-1 where there exist three relatively strong CH4 absorption lines (1247.705 cm-1, 1247.823 cm-1, and 1247.842 cm-1), no H2O interference, and small N2O interference, the differences in calculated brightness temperatures between HITRAN2008 and HITRAN2004, between HITRAN2008 and AER v3.2, and between HITRAN2012 and HITRAN2008 were 0.002 K, 0.4 K, and 0.06 K, respectively. These differences may affect CH4 retrieval. In wavenumber range from 1210 cm-1 to 1360 cm-1, several H2O line parameters were updated from HITRAN2008 to HITRAN2012. These updates could also affect on CH4 retrieval through simultaneous retrieval with H2O at CH4 ν4 band.

  19. Considerations for design parameters for a dedicated medical accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, J.R.

    1980-10-01

    There are only a very few critical parameters which determine the size, performance and cost of a heavy ion accelerator. These are the mass of the heaviest ion desired, the maximum range of this heaviest ion in tissue, and the highest intensity desired. Other parameters, such as beam emittance, beam delivery flexibility, reliability and experimental facility configurations are important, but are not primary driving factors in the design effort. The various clinical applications for a heavy ion accelerator are evaluated, detailing the most desirable beams for each application.

  20. Designing of discrete mechatronic vibrating systems with negative value parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchacz, Andrzej; Gałęziowski, Damian

    2016-10-01

    In the paper, the known problem of vibration control, authors expanded for designing of mechatronic discrete systems that contains single or multiply piezoelectric elements connected to external electric networks. Main focus has been given for investigations in relation to damping performance and parameters study, in case of potential practical application. By different configurations of considered mechatronic discrete branched structures with two degrees of freedom, key negative parameters have been identified and investigated in case of vibration control effectiveness. Results have been presented in graphical form of amplitudes and dynamical flexibility functions.

  1. Inrush Current Simulation of Power Transformer using Machine Parameters Estimated by Design Procedure of Winding Structure and Genetic Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokunaga, Yoshitaka

    This paper presents estimation techniques of machine parameters for power transformer using design procedure of transformer and genetic algorithm with real coding. Especially, it is very difficult to obtain machine parameters for transformers in customers' facilities. Using estimation techniques, machine parameters could be calculated from the only nameplate data of these transformers. Subsequently, EMTP-ATP simulation of the inrush current was carried out using machine parameters estimated by techniques developed in this study and simulation results were reproduced measured waveforms.

  2. A Modified Rodrigues Parameter-based Nonlinear Observer Design for Spacecraft Gyroscope Parameters Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, Kilyuk; Jo, Sujang; Bang, Hyochoong

    This paper presents a modified Rodrigues parameter (MRP)-based nonlinear observer design to estimate bias, scale factor and misalignment of gyroscope measurements. A Lyapunov stability analysis is carried out for the nonlinear observer. Simulation is performed and results are presented illustrating the performance of the proposed nonlinear observer under the condition of persistent excitation maneuver. In addition, a comparison between the nonlinear observer and alignment Kalman filter (AKF) is made to highlight favorable features of the nonlinear observer.

  3. Investigation of design parameters in ultrasound reactors with confined channels.

    PubMed

    Jordens, Jeroen; Honings, Aurélie; Degrève, Jan; Braeken, Leen; Van Gerven, Tom

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents a three-dimensional numercial simulation of sonochemical degradation upon cavitational activity. The model relates the simulation of the acoustic pressure distribution to the sonochemical reaction rate. As a case study, the thermal degradation of carbon tetrachloride during sonication is studied in a tubular milliscale reactor. The model is used to optimize the reactor diameter, ultrasound frequency and power dissipated to the ultrasound transducers. The results indicate that multiple transducers at a moderate power level are more efficient than one transducer with high power level. Furthermore, the average cavity volume fraction is proposed as a reaction independent parameter to estimate the optimal reactor design. Within the results obtained in this paper, it appears possible to optimise reactor design based on this parameter.

  4. Design parameters of a miniaturized piezoelectric underwater acoustic transmitter.

    PubMed

    Li, Huidong; Deng, Zhiqun Daniel; Yuan, Yong; Carlson, Thomas J

    2012-01-01

    PZT ceramics have been widely used in underwater acoustic transducers. However, literature available discussing the design parameters of a miniaturized PZT-based low-duty-cycle transmitter is very limited. This paper discusses some of the design parameters--the backing material, driving voltage, PZT material type, power consumption and the transducer length of a miniaturized acoustic fish tag using a PZT tube. Four different types of PZT were evaluated with respect to the source level, energy consumption and bandwidth of the transducer. The effect of the tube length on the source level is discussed. The results demonstrate that ultralow-density closed-cell foam is the best backing material for the PZT tube. The Navy Type VI PZTs provide the best source level with relatively low energy consumption and that a low transducer capacitance is preferred for high efficiency. A 35% reduction in the transducer length results in 2 dB decrease in source level. PMID:23012534

  5. Robust parameter design for automatically controlled systems and nanostructure synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, Tirthankar

    2007-12-01

    This research focuses on developing comprehensive frameworks for developing robust parameter design methodology for dynamic systems with automatic control and for synthesis of nanostructures. In many automatically controlled dynamic processes, the optimal feedback control law depends on the parameter design solution and vice versa and therefore an integrated approach is necessary. A parameter design methodology in the presence of feedback control is developed for processes of long duration under the assumption that experimental noise factors are uncorrelated over time. Systems that follow a pure-gain dynamic model are considered and the best proportional-integral and minimum mean squared error control strategies are developed by using robust parameter design. The proposed method is illustrated using a simulated example and a case study in a urea packing plant. This idea is also extended to cases with on-line noise factors. The possibility of integrating feedforward control with a minimum mean squared error feedback control scheme is explored. To meet the needs of large scale synthesis of nanostructures, it is critical to systematically find experimental conditions under which the desired nanostructures are synthesized reproducibly, at large quantity and with controlled morphology. The first part of the research in this area focuses on modeling and optimization of existing experimental data. Through a rigorous statistical analysis of experimental data, models linking the probabilities of obtaining specific morphologies to the process variables are developed. A new iterative algorithm for fitting a Multinomial GLM is proposed and used. The optimum process conditions, which maximize the above probabilities and make the synthesis process less sensitive to variations of process variables around set values, are derived from the fitted models using Monte-Carlo simulations. The second part of the research deals with development of an experimental design methodology, tailor

  6. Rational design of electrolyte components by ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Patrik; Jacobsson, Per

    This paper is a small review of the use of computer simulations and especially the use of standard quantum-mechanical ab initio electronic structure calculations to rationally design and investigate different choices of chemicals/systems for lithium battery electrolytes. Covered systems and strategies to enhance the performance of electrolytes will range from assisting the interpretation of vibrational spectroscopy experiments over development of potentials for molecular dynamics simulations, to the design of new lithium salts and the lithium ion coordination in liquid, polymer, and gel polymer electrolytes. Examples of studied properties include the vibrational spectra of anions and ion pairs to characterize the nature and extent of the interactions present, the lithium ion affinities of anions, important for the salt solvation and the ability to provide a high concentration of charge carriers, the HOMO energies of the anions to estimate the stability versus oxidation, the anion volumes that correlate to the anion mobility, the lithium ion coordination and dynamics to reveal the limiting steps of lithium ion transport, etc.

  7. Calculating wave-generated bottom orbital velocities from surface-wave parameters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiberg, P.L.; Sherwood, C.R.

    2008-01-01

    Near-bed wave orbital velocities and shear stresses are important parameters in many sediment-transport and hydrodynamic models of the coastal ocean, estuaries, and lakes. Simple methods for estimating bottom orbital velocities from surface-wave statistics such as significant wave height and peak period often are inaccurate except in very shallow water. This paper briefly reviews approaches for estimating wave-generated bottom orbital velocities from near-bed velocity data, surface-wave spectra, and surface-wave parameters; MATLAB code for each approach is provided. Aspects of this problem have been discussed elsewhere. We add to this work by providing a method for using a general form of the parametric surface-wave spectrum to estimate bottom orbital velocity from significant wave height and peak period, investigating effects of spectral shape on bottom orbital velocity, comparing methods for calculating bottom orbital velocity against values determined from near-bed velocity measurements at two sites on the US east and west coasts, and considering the optimal representation of bottom orbital velocity for calculations of near-bed processes. Bottom orbital velocities calculated using near-bed velocity data, measured wave spectra, and parametric spectra for a site on the northern California shelf and one in the mid-Atlantic Bight compare quite well and are relatively insensitive to spectral shape except when bimodal waves are present with maximum energy at the higher-frequency peak. These conditions, which are most likely to occur at times when bottom orbital velocities are small, can be identified with our method as cases where the measured wave statistics are inconsistent with Donelan's modified form of the Joint North Sea Wave Project (JONSWAP) spectrum. We define the 'effective' forcing for wave-driven, near-bed processes as the product of the magnitude of forcing times its probability of occurrence, and conclude that different bottom orbital velocity statistics

  8. A design methodology for nonlinear systems containing parameter uncertainty: Application to nonlinear controller design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, G.

    1982-01-01

    A design methodology capable of dealing with nonlinear systems, such as a controlled ecological life support system (CELSS), containing parameter uncertainty is discussed. The methodology was applied to the design of discrete time nonlinear controllers. The nonlinear controllers can be used to control either linear or nonlinear systems. Several controller strategies are presented to illustrate the design procedure.

  9. DFT calculations of magnetic parameters for molybdenum complexes and hydroxymethyl intermediates trapped on silica surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sojka, Zbigniew; Pietrzyk, Piotr

    2006-03-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations of EPR parameters and their structure sensitivity for selected surface paramagnetic species involved in oxidative dehydrogenation of methanol over silica grafted molybdenum catalyst were investigated. Two surface complexes, Mo 4 c/SiO 2 and {O -sbnd Mo 4 c}/SiO 2, as well as rad CH 2OH radical trapped on the SiO 2 matrix were taken as the examples. The spin-restricted zeroth order regular approximation (ZORA) implemented in the Amsterdam Density Functional suite was used to calculate the electronic g tensor for those species. The predicted values were in satisfactory agreement with experimental EPR results. Five different coordination modes of the rad CH 2OH radical on the silica surface were considered and the isotropic 13C, 17O, and 1H hyperfine coupling constants (HFCC) of the resultant surface complexes were calculated. Structure sensitivity of the HFCC values was discussed in terms of the angular deformations caused by hydrogen bonding with the silica surface.

  10. DFT calculations of magnetic parameters for molybdenum complexes and hydroxymethyl intermediates trapped on silica surface.

    PubMed

    Sojka, Zbigniew; Pietrzyk, Piotr

    2006-03-13

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations of EPR parameters and their structure sensitivity for selected surface paramagnetic species involved in oxidative dehydrogenation of methanol over silica grafted molybdenum catalyst were investigated. Two surface complexes, Mo(4c)/SiO2 and {O(-)-Mo(4c)}/SiO2, as well as *CH2OH radical trapped on the SiO2 matrix were taken as the examples. The spin-restricted zeroth order regular approximation (ZORA) implemented in the Amsterdam Density Functional suite was used to calculate the electronic g tensor for those species. The predicted values were in satisfactory agreement with experimental EPR results. Five different coordination modes of the *CH2OH radical on the silica surface were considered and the isotropic 13C, 17O, and 1H hyperfine coupling constants (HFCC) of the resultant surface complexes were calculated. Structure sensitivity of the HFCC values was discussed in terms of the angular deformations caused by hydrogen bonding with the silica surface.

  11. Launch Vehicle Propulsion Parameter Design Multiple Selection Criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelton, Joey Dewayne

    2004-01-01

    The optimization tool described herein addresses and emphasizes the use of computer tools to model a system and focuses on a concept development approach for a liquid hydrogen/liquid oxygen single-stage-to-orbit system, but more particularly the development of the optimized system using new techniques. This methodology uses new and innovative tools to run Monte Carlo simulations, genetic algorithm solvers, and statistical models in order to optimize a design concept. The concept launch vehicle and propulsion system were modeled and optimized to determine the best design for weight and cost by varying design and technology parameters. Uncertainty levels were applied using Monte Carlo Simulations and the model output was compared to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space Shuttle Main Engine. Several key conclusions are summarized here for the model results. First, the Gross Liftoff Weight and Dry Weight were 67% higher for the design case for minimization of Design, Development, Test and Evaluation cost when compared to the weights determined by the minimization of Gross Liftoff Weight case. In turn, the Design, Development, Test and Evaluation cost was 53% higher for optimized Gross Liftoff Weight case when compared to the cost determined by case for minimization of Design, Development, Test and Evaluation cost. Therefore, a 53% increase in Design, Development, Test and Evaluation cost results in a 67% reduction in Gross Liftoff Weight. Secondly, the tool outputs define the sensitivity of propulsion parameters, technology and cost factors and how these parameters differ when cost and weight are optimized separately. A key finding was that for a Space Shuttle Main Engine thrust level the oxidizer/fuel ratio of 6.6 resulted in the lowest Gross Liftoff Weight rather than at 5.2 for the maximum specific impulse, demonstrating the relationships between specific impulse, engine weight, tank volume and tank weight. Lastly, the optimum chamber pressure for

  12. Launch vehicle propulsion parameter design multiple selection criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelton, Joey Dewayne

    The optimization tool described herein addresses and emphasizes the use of computer tools to model a system and focuses on a concept development approach for a liquid hydrogen/liquid oxygen single-stage-to-orbit system, but more particularly the development of the optimized system using new techniques. This methodology uses new and innovative tools to run Monte Carlo simulations, genetic algorithm solvers, and statistical models in order to optimize a design concept. The concept launch vehicle and propulsion system were modeled and optimized to determine the best design for weight and cost by varying design and technology parameters. Uncertainty levels were applied using Monte Carlo Simulations and the model output was compared to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space Shuttle Main Engine. Several key conclusions are summarized here for the model results. First, the Gross Liftoff Weight and Dry Weight were 67% higher for the design case for minimization of Design, Development, Test and Evaluation cost when compared to the weights determined by the minimization of Gross Liftoff Weight case. In turn, the Design, Development, Test and Evaluation cost was 53% higher for optimized Gross Liftoff Weight case when compared to the cost determined by case for minimization of Design, Development, Test and Evaluation cost. Therefore, a 53% increase in Design, Development, Test and Evaluation cost results in a 67% reduction in Gross Liftoff Weight. Secondly, the tool outputs define the sensitivity of propulsion parameters, technology and cost factors and how these parameters differ when cost and weight are optimized separately. A key finding was that for a Space Shuttle Main Engine thrust level the oxidizer/fuel ratio of 6.6 resulted in the lowest Gross Liftoff Weight rather than at 5.2 for the maximum specific impulse, demonstrating the relationships between specific impulse, engine weight, tank volume and tank weight. Lastly, the optimum chamber pressure for

  13. Calculated dielectric parameters of barium titanate-lead zirconate composites as a function of composition and frequency

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, S.K. )

    1990-03-01

    Some dielectric parameters e.g., dielectric constant, resistivity, dielectric strength, saturation polarization, loss tangent and coercive field of barium titanate-lead zirconate composites have been calculated as a function of composition and frequency. Most of the dielectric parameters have been found to vary linearly with composition and frequency. A 3-0 connectivity pattern of the composites has been assumed in calculating the dielectric parameters.

  14. Drop Accidents in the Canister Storage Building (CSB) Addressed by Design Features and or Design Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    SEXTON, R.A.

    2000-01-06

    A variety of drop shear or impact scenarios have been identified for the Canister Storage Building. Some of these are being addressed by new calculations or require no specific action. This document describes five of them which are addressed by design features and/or existing design calculations. For each of the five a position is stated indicating the reason for assurance that the safety functions of the MCO will not be jeopardized by the accident. Following the position is a description of the basis for that position.

  15. Calculating dosimetry parameters in brachytherapy using the continuous beta spectrum of Sm-153 in the Monte Carlo simulation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahrabi, Mohammad; Tavakoli-Anbaran, Hossien

    2015-02-01

    Calculation of dosimetry parameters by TG-60 approach for beta sources and TG-43 approach for gamma sources can help to design brachytherapy sources. In this work, TG-60 dosimetry parameters are calculated for the Sm-153 brachytherapy seed using the Monte Carlo simulation approach. The continuous beta spectrum of Sm-153 and probability density are applied to simulate the Sm-153 source. Sm-153 is produced by neutron capture during the 152Sm( n,)153Sm reaction in reactors. The Sm-153 radionuclide decays by beta rays followed by gamma-ray emissions with half-life of 1.928 days. Sm-153 source is simulated in a spherical water phantom to calculate the deposited energy and geometry function in the intended points. The Sm-153 seed consists of 20% samarium, 30% calcium and 50% silicon, in cylindrical shape with density 1.76gr/cm^3. The anisotropy function and radial dose function were calculated at 0-4mm radial distances relative to the seed center and polar angles of 0-90 degrees. The results of this research are compared with the results of Taghdiri et al. (Iran. J. Radiat. Res. 9, 103 (2011)). The final beta spectrum of Sm-153 is not considered in their work. Results show significant relative differences even up to 5 times for anisotropy functions at 0.6, 1 and 2mm distances and some angles. MCNP4C Monte Carlo code is applied in both in the present paper and in the above-mentioned one.

  16. Test verification and design of the bicycle frame parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Long; Xiang, Zhongxia; Luo, Huan; Tian, Guan

    2015-07-01

    Research on design of bicycles is concentrated on mechanism and auto appearance design, however few on matches between the bike and the rider. Since unreasonable human-bike relationship leads to both riders' worn-out joints and muscle injuries, the design of bicycles should focus on the matching. In order to find the best position of human-bike system, simulation experiments on riding comfort under different riding postures are done with the lifemode software employed to facilitate the cycling process as well as to obtain the best position and the size function of it. With BP neural network and GA, analyzing simulation data, conducting regression analysis of parameters on different heights and bike frames, the equation of best position of human-bike system is gained at last. In addition, after selecting testers, customized bikes based on testers' height dimensions are produced according to the size function. By analyzing and comparing the experimental data that are collected from testers when riding common bicycles and customized bicycles, it is concluded that customized bicycles are four times even six times as comfortable as common ones. The equation of best position of human-bike system is applied to improve bikes' function, and the new direction on future design of bicycle frame parameters is presented.

  17. Selection and calculation of overall parameters of laser communicator applied for vehicle mobile target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongtao; Yin, FuChang; Shi, Jiangtian

    2002-09-01

    The model of laser communication system using in vehicle mobile target was built. Optimal design and calculation was analyzed for system performance, such as laser transmission, photoelectric reception and speech information processing and image stabilization. Algorithm of MELP (Mixed Excitation Line Predication) compressed speech scrambling was received in processing voice message, which reached 2.4 kbps digital speech code stream, and realized digitization of laser communication. It was also analyzed carefully about the principle theory of MELP algorithm encoding and decoding as well as algorithm realization used in DSP. Image stabilization and tracking were realized by process signal errors which acquired at quadrant error sensors.

  18. Design of Life Extending Controls Using Nonlinear Parameter Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzo, Carl F.; Holmes, Michael S.; Ray, Asok

    1998-01-01

    This report presents the conceptual development of a life extending control system where the objective is to achieve high performance and structural durability of the plant. A life extending controller is designed for a reusable rocket engine via damage mitigation in both the fuel and oxidizer turbines while achieving high performance for transient responses of the combustion chamber pressure and the O2/H2 mixture ratio. This design approach makes use of a combination of linear and nonlinear controller synthesis techniques and also allows adaptation of the life extending controller module to augment a conventional performance controller of a rocket engine. The nonlinear aspect of the design is achieved using nonlinear parameter optimization of a prescribed control structure.

  19. H{sub 2}-He vibrational line-shape parameters: Measurement and semiclassical calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Forsman, J.W.; Bonamy, J.; Robert, D.; Berger, J.P.; Saint-Loup, R.; Berger, H.

    1995-10-01

    High-resolution inverse Raman spectroscopy has been used to obtain the line shifting and line broadening coefficients of H{sub 2} perturbed by He. Measurements have been made for the {ital Q}-branch transitions ({ital J}=0{r_arrow}5) in a density range of 10 to 20 amagat and from 296 to 995 K. Up to 795 K we have directly deduced from the experimental broadening coefficients the inelastic rotational state-to-state and vibrational dephasing rates. At higher temperatures, owing to the larger number of channels of relaxation which occur, the results have been analyzed using a scaling law. The line shift and broadening coefficients exhibit a square root and a linear dependence on temperature, respectively, and a significant {ital J} dependence. Semiclassical calculations based on an accurate {ital ab} {ital initio} potential lead to line-shape parameters consistent with experiment. They allow a clear understanding of their observed temperature dependence.

  20. A new efficient method for calculation of Frenkel exciton parameters in molecular aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plötz, Per-Arno; Niehaus, Thomas; Kühn, Oliver

    2014-05-01

    The Frenkel exciton Hamiltonian is at the heart of many simulations of excitation energy transfer in molecular aggregates. It separates the aggregate into Coulomb-coupled monomers. Here it is shown that the respective parameters, i.e., monomeric excitation energies and Coulomb couplings between transition densities can be efficiently calculated using time-dependent tight-binding-based density functional theory (TD-DFTB). Specifically, Coulomb couplings are expressed in terms of self-consistently determined Mulliken transition charges. The approach is applied to two dimer systems. First, formaldehyde oxime for which a detailed comparison with standard DFT using the B3LYP and the PBE functionals as well as with SCS-CC2 is provided. Second, the Coulomb coupling is explored in dependence on the intermolecular coordinates for a perylene bisimide dimer. This provides structural evidence for the previously observed biphasic aggregation behavior of this dye.

  1. Calculation of the clinical parameters to effect removal of port wine stains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Michael J.; Miller, Iain D.; Veitch, A. R.; Paul, J. P.; Reid, William H.

    1990-06-01

    Effective removal of Port Wine Stain vasculature requires two mechanisms: coagulation of the blood and denaturation of the vessel wall and the surrounding dermis. In this way recanalisation of the old vascular network is prevented and substitution by a normal vessel matrix can occur. A theoretical model was developed to calculate the optiirtuin laser parameters to achieve this. A Monte-Carlo based optical niodel describes the distribution of the laser energy after scattering processes. This distribution is then used by a twodimensional thernial model to predict the temperatures achieved both within the vessel and in the peri-vascular dernds. The predicted effects of various power densities and pulsewidths for 577nit and 585nm will be presented.

  2. Calculation of Reactor Kinetics Parameters βeff and Λ with Monte Carlo Differential Operator Sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaya, Yasunobu

    2014-06-01

    The methods to calculate the kinetics parameters of βeff and Λ with the differential operator sampling have been reviewed. The comparison of the results obtained with the differential operator sampling and iterated fission probability approaches has been performed. It is shown that the differential operator sampling approach gives the same results as the iterated fission probability approach within the statistical uncertainty. In addition, the prediction accuracy of the evaluated nuclear data library JENDL-4.0 for the measured βeff/Λ and βeff values is also examined. It is shown that JENDL-4.0 gives a good prediction except for the uranium-233 systems. The present results imply the need for revisiting the uranium-233 nuclear data evaluation and performing the detailed sensitivity analysis.

  3. Lens design based on lens form parameters using Gaussian brackets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xiangyu; Cheng, Xuemin

    2014-11-01

    The optical power distribution and the symmetry of the lens components are two important attributes that decide the ultimate lens performance and characteristics. Lens form parameters W and S are the key criteria describing the two attributes mentioned above. Lens components with smaller W and S will have a good nature of aberration balance and perform well in providing good image quality. Applying the Gaussian brackets, the two lens form parameters and the Seidel Aberration Coefficients are reconstructed. An initial lens structure can be analytically described by simultaneous equations of Seidel Aberration Coefficients and third-order aberration theory. Adding the constraints of parameters W and S in the solving process, a solution with a proper image quality and aberration distribution is achieved. The optical properties and image quality of the system based on the parameters W and S are also analyzed in this article. In the method, the aberration distribution can be controlled to some extent in the beginning of design, so that we can reduce some workload of optimization later.

  4. Aerodynamic optimization by simultaneously updating flow variables and design parameters with application to advanced propeller designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizk, Magdi H.

    1988-01-01

    A scheme is developed for solving constrained optimization problems in which the objective function and the constraint function are dependent on the solution of the nonlinear flow equations. The scheme updates the design parameter iterative solutions and the flow variable iterative solutions simultaneously. It is applied to an advanced propeller design problem with the Euler equations used as the flow governing equations. The scheme's accuracy, efficiency and sensitivity to the computational parameters are tested.

  5. Design Parameters Influencing Reliability of CCGA Assembly: A Sensitivity Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tasooji, Amaneh; Ghaffarian, Reza; Rinaldi, Antonio

    2006-01-01

    Area Array microelectronic packages with small pitch and large I/O counts are now widely used in microelectronics packaging. The impact of various package design and materials/process parameters on reliability has been studied through extensive literature review. Reliability of Ceramic Column Grid Array (CCGA) package assemblies has been evaluated using JPL thermal cycle test results (-50(deg)/75(deg)C, -55(deg)/100(deg)C, and -55(deg)/125(deg)C), as well as those reported by other investigators. A sensitivity analysis has been performed using the literature da to study the impact of design parameters and global/local stress conditions on assembly reliability. The applicability of various life-prediction models for CCGA design has been investigated by comparing model's predictions with the experimental thermal cycling data. Finite Element Method (FEM) analysis has been conducted to assess the state of the stress/strain in CCGA assembly under different thermal cycling, and to explain the different failure modes and locations observed in JPL test assemblies.

  6. Methodological aspects in the calculation of parity-violating effects in nuclear magnetic resonance parameters.

    PubMed

    Weijo, Ville; Bast, Radovan; Manninen, Pekka; Saue, Trond; Vaara, Juha

    2007-02-21

    We examine the quantum chemical calculation of parity-violating (PV) electroweak contributions to the spectral parameters of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) from a methodological point of view. Nuclear magnetic shielding and indirect spin-spin coupling constants are considered and evaluated for three chiral molecules, H2O2, H2S2, and H2Se2. The effects of the choice of a one-particle basis set and the treatment of electron correlation, as well as the effects of special relativity, are studied. All of them are found to be relevant. The basis-set dependence is very pronounced, especially at the electron correlated ab initio levels of theory. Coupled-cluster and density-functional theory (DFT) results for PV contributions differ significantly from the Hartree-Fock data. DFT overestimates the PV effects, particularly with nonhybrid exchange-correlation functionals. Beginning from third-row elements, special relativity is of importance for the PV NMR properties, shown here by comparing perturbational one-component and various four-component calculations. In contrast to what is found for nuclear magnetic shielding, the choice of the model for nuclear charge distribution--point charge or extended (Gaussian)--has a significant impact on the PV contribution to the spin-spin coupling constants. PMID:17328593

  7. GENENG: A program for calculating design and off-design performance for turbojet and turbofan engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, R. W.; Fishbach, L. H.

    1972-01-01

    A computer program entitled GENENG employs component performance maps to perform analytical, steady state, engine cycle calculations. Through a scaling procedure, each of the component maps can be used to represent a family of maps (different design values of pressure ratios, efficiency, weight flow, etc.) Either convergent or convergent-divergent nozzles may be used. Included is a complete FORTRAN 4 listing of the program. Sample results and input explanations are shown for one-spool and two-spool turbojets and two-spool separate- and mixed-flow turbofans operating at design and off-design conditions.

  8. MCDHF calculations and study of plasma parameters for Li-like ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatri, Indu; Goyal, Arun; Aggarwal, Sunny; Singh, A. K.; Man Mohan

    2016-06-01

    Extensive configuration interaction calculations for several Li-like ions (Z=32, 36, 42, 46, 50, 54 and 56) are performed using the code GRASP2K based on the multiconfiguration Dirac-Hartree-Fock (MCDHF) method. Breit interaction and leading quantum electrodynamical (QED) effects are also included by applying active-space techniques to enlarge the configuration set. Results for fine-structure energy levels for 1s22p, 1s23s, 1s23p and 1s23d configurations with relative to ground states 1s22s are presented. The wavelengths, transition rates and oscillator strengths for the 1s22s 2S1/2-1s22p 1/2,3/2,0 2P, 1s22p 1/2,3/2,0,2P - -1s23s 2S1/2, 1s22p calculated results are in good agreement with previous theoretical results and compiled values of the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST). We have also provided the line intensity ratios and plasma parameters for optically thin plasma. Our calculated data may be useful for experimentalists in identifying the fine-structure levels, for plasma modeling, astrophysical research applications.

  9. Calculation of radiation reaction effect on orbital parameters in Kerr spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sago, Norichika; Fujita, Ryuichi

    2015-07-01

    We calculate the secular changes of the orbital parameters of a point particle orbiting a Kerr black hole, due to the gravitational radiation reaction. For this purpose, we use the post-Newtonian (PN) approximation in the first-order black hole perturbation theory, with the expansion with respect to the orbital eccentricity. In this work, the calculation is done up to the fourth post-Newtonian (4PN) order and to the sixth order of the eccentricity, including the effect of the absorption of gravitational waves by the black hole. We confirm that, in the Kerr case, the effect of the absorption appears at the 2.5PN order beyond the leading order in the secular change of the particle's energy and may induce a superradiance, as known previously for circular orbits. In addition, we find that the superradiance may be suppressed when the orbital plane inclines with respect to the equatorial plane of the central black hole. We also investigate the accuracy of the 4PN formulae by comparing to numerical results. If we require that the relative errors in the 4PN formulae are less than 10^{-5}, the parameter region to satisfy the condition will be p≳ 50 for e=0.1, p≳ 80 for e=0.4, and p≳ 120 for e = 0.7 almost irrespective of the inclination angle or the spin of the black hole, where p and e are the semi-latus rectum and the eccentricity of the orbit. The region can further be extended using an exponential resummation method to p≳ 40 for e=0.1, p≳ 60 for e=0.4, and p≳ 100 for e=0.7. Although we still need the higher-order calculations of the PN approximation and the expansion with respect to the orbital eccentricity to apply for data analysis of gravitational waves, the results in this paper would be an important improvement from the previous work at the 2.5PN order, especially for large-p regions.

  10. Design Parameters of a Miniaturized Piezoelectric Underwater Acoustic Transmitter

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huidong; Deng, Zhiqun Daniel; Yuan, Yong; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    PZT ceramics have been widely used in underwater acoustic transducers. However, literature available discussing the design parameters of a miniaturized PZT-based low-duty-cycle transmitter is very limited. This paper discusses some of the design parameters—the backing material, driving voltage, PZT material type, power consumption and the transducer length of a miniaturized acoustic fish tag using a PZT tube. Four different types of PZT were evaluated with respect to the source level, energy consumption and bandwidth of the transducer. The effect of the tube length on the source level is discussed. The results demonstrate that ultralow-density closed-cell foam is the best backing material for the PZT tube. The Navy Type VI PZTs provide the best source level with relatively low energy consumption and that a low transducer capacitance is preferred for high efficiency. A 35% reduction in the transducer length results in 2 dB decrease in source level. PMID:23012534

  11. Design and parameter optimization of flip-chip bonder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Hyoungsub; Kang, Heuiseok; Jeong, Hoon; Cho, Youngjune; Kim, Wansoo; Kang, Shinill

    2005-12-01

    Bare-chip packaging becomes more popular along with the miniaturization of IT components. In this paper, we have studied flip-chip process, and developed automated bonding system. Among the several bonding method, NCP bonding is chosen and batch-type equipment is manufactured. The dual optics and vision system aligns the chip with the substrate. The bonding head equipped with temperature and force controllers bonds the chip. The system can be easily modified for other bonding methods such as ACF. In bonding process, the bonding force and temperature are known as the most dominant bonding parameters. A parametric study is performed for these two parameters. For the test sample, we used standard flip-chip test kit which consists of FR4 boards and dummy flip-chips. The bonding temperatures are chosen between 25°C to 300°C. The bonding forces are chosen between 5N and 300N. To test the bonding strength, a bonding strength tester was designed and constructed. After the bonding strength test, the samples are examined by microscope to determine the failure mode. The relations between the bonding strength and the bonding parameters are analyzed and compared with bonding models. Finally, the most suitable bonding condition is suggested in terms of temperature and force.

  12. Spiral profile design and parameter analysis of flexure spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, N.; Chen, X.; Wu, Y. N.; Yang, C. G.; Xu, L.

    2006-06-01

    Universal design method of spiral flexure spring has been generalized firstly. Through adjusting the space location of spiral arms together with parameters of individual spiral profile including base radius, involute pitch, involute angle, start angle of involute, width of slot, various spiral flexure springs with different performances can be obtained respectively. Then the finite element program, whose validity has been verified by experimental data, is used to analyze the performance of the flexure spring. Furthermore experimental study of the spring assembly reveals the superimposed effect of stiffness and the antitorque characteristic of spring stack, which had been ignored previously. Finally, in order to get the general relation between the axial stiffness, natural frequency of flexure spring and its geometry parameters, the theoretical model, which is based on the mechanics of material and vibration, has been set up and subsequently solved. The validity of derived expressions has been proved by finite element program and published experiment data respectively. Those induced expressions are more convenient and direct than finite element method and can be served as the guide to designation of flexure spring.

  13. Cold-Crucible Design Parameters for Next Generation HLW Melters

    SciTech Connect

    Gombert, D.; Richardson, J.; Aloy, A.; Day, D.

    2002-02-26

    The cold-crucible induction melter (CCIM) design eliminates many materials and operating constraints inherent in joule-heated melter (JHM) technology, which is the standard for vitrification of high-activity wastes worldwide. The cold-crucible design is smaller, less expensive, and generates much less waste for ultimate disposal. It should also allow a much more flexible operating envelope, which will be crucial if the heterogeneous wastes at the DOE reprocessing sites are to be vitrified. A joule-heated melter operates by passing current between water-cooled electrodes through a molten pool in a refractory-lined chamber. This design is inherently limited by susceptibility of materials to corrosion and melting. In addition, redox conditions and free metal content have exacerbated materials problems or lead to electrical short-circuiting causing failures in DOE melters. In contrast, the CCIM design is based on inductive coupling of a water-cooled high-frequency electrical coil with the glass, causing eddycurrents that produce heat and mixing. A critical difference is that inductance coupling transfers energy through a nonconductive solid layer of slag coating the metal container inside the coil, whereas the jouleheated design relies on passing current through conductive molten glass in direct contact with the metal electrodes and ceramic refractories. The frozen slag in the CCIM design protects the containment and eliminates the need for refractory, while the corrosive molten glass can be the limiting factor in the JH melter design. The CCIM design also eliminates the need for electrodes that typically limit operating temperature to below 1200 degrees C. While significant marketing claims have been made by French and Russian technology suppliers and developers, little data is available for engineering and economic evaluation of the technology, and no facilities are available in the US to support testing. A currently funded project at the Idaho National Engineering

  14. 40 CFR Table S-1 to Subpart S of... - Basic Parameters for the Calculation of Emission Factors for Lime Production

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Basic Parameters for the Calculation of Emission Factors for Lime Production S Table S-1 to Subpart S of Part 98 Protection of Environment... Manufacturing Pt. 98, Subpt. S, Table S-1 Table S-1 to Subpart S of Part 98—Basic Parameters for the...

  15. 40 CFR Table S-1 to Subpart S of... - Basic Parameters for the Calculation of Emission Factors for Lime Production

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Basic Parameters for the Calculation of Emission Factors for Lime Production S Table S-1 to Subpart S of Part 98 Protection of Environment... Manufacturing Pt. 98, Subpt. S, Table S-1 Table S-1 to Subpart S of Part 98—Basic Parameters for the...

  16. 40 CFR Table S-1 to Subpart S of... - Basic Parameters for the Calculation of Emission Factors for Lime Production

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Basic Parameters for the Calculation of Emission Factors for Lime Production S Table S-1 to Subpart S of Part 98 Protection of Environment... Manufacturing Pt. 98, Subpt. S, Table S-1 Table S-1 to Subpart S of Part 98—Basic Parameters for the...

  17. 40 CFR Table S-1 to Subpart S of... - Basic Parameters for the Calculation of Emission Factors for Lime Production

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Basic Parameters for the Calculation of Emission Factors for Lime Production S Table S-1 to Subpart S of Part 98 Protection of Environment... Manufacturing Pt. 98, Subpt. S, Table S-1 Table S-1 to Subpart S of Part 98—Basic Parameters for the...

  18. Criteria for calculating the efficiency of HEPA filters during and after design basis accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.; First, M.W.; Anderson, W.L.; Gilbert, H.; Jacox, J.W.

    1994-12-01

    We have reviewed the literature on the performance of high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters under normal and abnormal conditions to establish criteria for calculating the efficiency of HEPA filters in a DOE nonreactor nuclear facility during and after a Design Basis Accident (DBA). The literature review included the performance of new filters and parameters that may cause deterioration in the filter performance such as filter age, radiation, corrosive chemicals, seismic and rough handling, high temperature, moisture, particle clogging, high air flow and pressure pulses. The deterioration of the filter efficiency depends on the exposure parameters; in severe exposure conditions the filter will be structurally damaged and have a residual efficiency of 0%. Despite the many studies on HEPA filter performance under adverse conditions, there are large gaps and limitations in the data that introduce significant error in the estimates of HEPA filter efficiencies under DBA conditions. Because of this limitation, conservative values of filter efficiency were chosen when there was insufficient data.

  19. Line Shape Parameters for CO_2 Transitions: Accurate Predictions from Complex Robert-Bonamy Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamouroux, Julien; Gamache, Robert R.

    2013-06-01

    A model for the prediction of the vibrational dependence of CO_2 half-widths and line shifts for several broadeners, based on a modification of the model proposed by Gamache and Hartmann, is presented. This model allows the half-widths and line shifts for a ro-vibrational transition to be expressed in terms of the number of vibrational quanta exchanged in the transition raised to a power p and a reference ro-vibrational transition. Complex Robert-Bonamy calculations were made for 24 bands for lower rotational quantum numbers J'' from 0 to 160 for N_2-, O_2-, air-, and self-collisions with CO_2. In the model a Quantum Coordinate is defined by (c_1 Δν_1 + c_2 Δν_2 + c_3 Δν_3)^p where a linear least-squares fit to the data by the model expression is made. The model allows the determination of the slope and intercept as a function of rotational transition, broadening gas, and temperature. From these fit data, the half-width, line shift, and the temperature dependence of the half-width can be estimated for any ro-vibrational transition, allowing spectroscopic CO_2 databases to have complete information for the line shape parameters. R. R. Gamache, J.-M. Hartmann, J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transfer. {{83}} (2004), 119. R. R. Gamache, J. Lamouroux, J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transfer. {{117}} (2013), 93.

  20. Tulip-poplar leaf diffusion resistance calculated from stomatal dimensions and varying environmental parameters

    SciTech Connect

    McConathy, R.K.

    1983-03-01

    The study describes the gradients of stomatal size and density in the crown of a mature forest-grown tulip-poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera L.) in eastern Tennessee. These data are used to predict leaf resistance to vapor diffusion in relation to stomatal width and boundary layer resistance. Stomatal density on individual leaves did not vary, but density increased with increasing crown height. Stomatal size decreased with increasing height of leaves within the crown. Stomatal size and density variations interacted to result in a constant number of stomata per leaf at all crown heights. Stomatal diffusive resistance values calculated from stomatal measurements and varying environmental parameters indicated that stomatal resistance controlled transpiration water losses only at small apertures (<0.6 ..mu..m). Boundary layer resistance was controlling at large stomatal apertures (>0.6 ..mu..m) and at low wind speeds (approx.100 cm/s). Under normal forest conditions tulip-poplar stomatal resistance exercised more control over transpiration than did boundary layer resistance.

  1. Lattice NRQCD calculation of the B0-B¯0 mixing parameter BB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, S.; Ishikawa, K.-I.; Matsufuru, H.; Onogi, T.; Yamada, N.

    1999-11-01

    We present a lattice calculation of the B meson B parameter BB using the NRQCD action. The heavy quark mass dependence is explicitly studied over a mass range between mb and 4mb with the O(1/mQ) and O(1/m2Q) actions. We find that the ratios of lattice matrix elements /2 and /2, which contribute to BB through mixing, have significant 1/mQ dependence while that of the leading operator /2 has little 1/mQ effect. The combined result for BB(mb) has small but nonzero mass dependence, and the BB(mb) becomes smaller by 10% with the 1/mQ correction compared to the static result. Our result in the quenched approximation at β=5.9 is BBd(5 GeV) = 0.75(3)(12), where the first error is statistical and the second is a systematic uncertainty.

  2. Spacecraft design impacts on the post-Newtonian parameter estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, Anja Katharina; et al.

    2015-08-01

    The ESA mission BepiColombo, reaching out to explore the elusive planet Mercury, features unprecedented tracking techniques. The highly precise orbit determination around Mercury is a compelling opportunity for a modern test of General Relativity (GR). Using the software tool GRETCHEN incorporating the Square Root Information Filter (SRIF), MPO's orbit is simulated and the post-Newtonian parameters (PNP) are estimated. In this work, the influence of a specific constraint of the Mercury Orbiter Radio science Experiment (MORE) on the achievable accuracy of the PNP estimates is investigated. The power system design of the spacecraft requires that ±35° around perihelion the Ka transponder needs to be switched off, thus radiometric data is only gathered via X band. This analysis shows the impact of this constraint on the achievable accuracy of PNP estimates. On a bigger scale, if GR shows some violation at a detectable level it inevitably leads to its invalidation.

  3. Performance studies of bulk Micromegas of different design parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, P.; Bhattacharya, S.; Majumdar, N.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Sarkar, S.; Colas, P.; Attie, D.

    2014-04-01

    The present work involves the comparison of various bulk Micromegas detectors having different design parameters. Six detectors with amplification gaps of 64,128,192,220μm and mesh hole pitch of 63,78μm were tested at room temperature and normal gas pressure. Two setups were built to evaluate the effect of the variation of the amplification gap and mesh hole pitch on different detector characteristics. The gain, energy resolution and electron transmission of these Micromegas detectors were measured in Argon-Isobutane (90:10) gas mixture while the measurements of the ion backflow were carried out in P10 gas. These measured characteristics have been compared in detail to numerical simulations using the Garfield framework that combines packages such as neBEM, Magboltz and Heed.

  4. Linear numerical calculation method for obtaining critical point, pore fluid, and framework parameters of gas-bearing media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Binhua; Sun, Chunyan; Yan, Guoying; Yang, Wei; Liu, Chang

    2009-12-01

    Up to now, the primary method for studying critical porosity and porous media are experimental measurements and data analysis. There are few references on how to numerically calculate porosity at the critical point, pore fluid-related parameters, or framework-related parameters. So in this article, we provide a method for calculating these elastic parameters and use this method to analyze gas-bearing samples. We first derive three linear equations for numerical calculations. They are the equation of density ρ versus porosity ϕ, density times the square of compressional wave velocity ρV p 2 versus porosity, and density times the square of shear wave velocity ρV S 2 versus porosity. Here porosity is viewed as an independent variable and the other parameters are dependent variables. We elaborate on the calculation steps and provide some notes. Then we use our method to analyze gas-bearing sandstone samples. In the calculations, density and P- and S-velocities are input data and we calculate eleven relative parameters for porous fluid, framework, and critical point. In the end, by comparing our results with experiment measurements, we prove the viability of the method.

  5. PBFA-2 vacuum system design using a lumped parameter computer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cap, J. S.; Schneider, L. X.; Boyes, J. D.

    The PBFA-2 vacuum vessel which houses the power flow lines and ion diode presented a difficult engineering problem in analyzing the pressure distribution throughout the chamber. The vessel utilizes a typical construction of stacked lucite and aluminum rings with their associated high outgassing loads. The transmission lines are a series of stacked cones and toroids that form an inter-connected network of annular pathways. Calculating the steady state pressure distribution required solving 30 simultaneous equations, and any transient solution was virtually impossible by hand. This paper describes a computer model developed using the direct analogy between fluid flow parameters and electrical parameters. This model can then be solved as a lumped parameter electrical circuit using the differential network analysis program, SCEPTRE. The overall design of the vacuum system, including the choice of helium cryopumps and water vapor cryopumps to handle the anticipated heavy water vapor load, is also discussed.

  6. The ORP basis set designed for optical rotation calculations.

    PubMed

    Baranowska-Łączkowska, Angelika; Łączkowski, Krzysztof Z

    2013-09-01

    Details of generation of the optical rotation prediction (ORP) basis set developed for accurate optical rotation (OR) calculations are presented. Specific rotation calculations carried out at the density functional theory (DFT) level for model chiral methane molecule, fluorooxirane, methyloxirane, and dimethylmethylenecyclopropane reveal that the ORP set outperforms larger basis sets, among them the aug-cc-pVTZ basis set of Dunning (J. Chem. Phys. 1989, 90, 1007) and the aug-pc-2 basis set of Jensen (J. Chem. Phys. 2002, 117, 9234; J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2008, 4, 719). It is shown to be an attractive choice also in the case of larger systems, namely norbornanone, β-pinene, trans-pinane, and nopinone. The ORP basis set is further used in OR calculations for 24 other systems, and the results are compared to the aug-cc-pVDZ values. Whenever large discrepancies of results are observed, the ORP values are in an excellent agreement with the aug-cc-pVTZ results. The ORP basis set enables accurate specific rotation calculations at a reduced cost and thus can be recommended for routine DFT OR calculations, also for large and conformationally flexible molecules.

  7. An integral equation solution for multistage turbomachinery design calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfarland, Eric R.

    1993-01-01

    A method was developed to calculate flows in multistage turbomachinery. The method is an extension of quasi-three-dimensional blade-to-blade solution methods. Governing equations for steady compressible inviscid flow are linearized by introducing approximations. The linearized flow equations are solved using integral equation techniques. The flows through both stationary and rotating blade rows are determined in a single calculation. Multiple bodies can be modelled for each blade row, so that arbitrary blade counts can be analyzed. The method's benefits are its speed and versatility.

  8. Calculated Parameters of Thyroid Homeostasis: Emerging Tools for Differential Diagnosis and Clinical Research.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Johannes W; Landgrafe-Mende, Gabi; Wiora, Evelin; Chatzitomaris, Apostolos; Klein, Harald H; Midgley, John E M; Hoermann, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Although technical problems of thyroid testing have largely been resolved by modern assay technology, biological variation remains a challenge. This applies to subclinical thyroid disease, non-thyroidal illness syndrome, and those 10% of hypothyroid patients, who report impaired quality of life, despite normal thyrotropin (TSH) concentrations under levothyroxine (L-T4) replacement. Among multiple explanations for this condition, inadequate treatment dosage and monotherapy with L-T4 in subjects with impaired deiodination have received major attention. Translation to clinical practice is difficult, however, since univariate reference ranges for TSH and thyroid hormones fail to deliver robust decision algorithms for therapeutic interventions in patients with more subtle thyroid dysfunctions. Advances in mathematical and simulative modeling of pituitary-thyroid feedback control have improved our understanding of physiological mechanisms governing the homeostatic behavior. From multiple cybernetic models developed since 1956, four examples have also been translated to applications in medical decision-making and clinical trials. Structure parameters representing fundamental properties of the processing structure include the calculated secretory capacity of the thyroid gland (SPINA-GT), sum activity of peripheral deiodinases (SPINA-GD) and Jostel's TSH index for assessment of thyrotropic pituitary function, supplemented by a recently published algorithm for reconstructing the personal set point of thyroid homeostasis. In addition, a family of integrated models (University of California-Los Angeles platform) provides advanced methods for bioequivalence studies. This perspective article delivers an overview of current clinical research on the basis of mathematical thyroid models. In addition to a summary of large clinical trials, it provides previously unpublished results of validation studies based on simulation and clinical samples. PMID:27375554

  9. Calculated Parameters of Thyroid Homeostasis: Emerging Tools for Differential Diagnosis and Clinical Research

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Johannes W.; Landgrafe-Mende, Gabi; Wiora, Evelin; Chatzitomaris, Apostolos; Klein, Harald H.; Midgley, John E. M.; Hoermann, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Although technical problems of thyroid testing have largely been resolved by modern assay technology, biological variation remains a challenge. This applies to subclinical thyroid disease, non-thyroidal illness syndrome, and those 10% of hypothyroid patients, who report impaired quality of life, despite normal thyrotropin (TSH) concentrations under levothyroxine (L-T4) replacement. Among multiple explanations for this condition, inadequate treatment dosage and monotherapy with L-T4 in subjects with impaired deiodination have received major attention. Translation to clinical practice is difficult, however, since univariate reference ranges for TSH and thyroid hormones fail to deliver robust decision algorithms for therapeutic interventions in patients with more subtle thyroid dysfunctions. Advances in mathematical and simulative modeling of pituitary–thyroid feedback control have improved our understanding of physiological mechanisms governing the homeostatic behavior. From multiple cybernetic models developed since 1956, four examples have also been translated to applications in medical decision-making and clinical trials. Structure parameters representing fundamental properties of the processing structure include the calculated secretory capacity of the thyroid gland (SPINA-GT), sum activity of peripheral deiodinases (SPINA-GD) and Jostel’s TSH index for assessment of thyrotropic pituitary function, supplemented by a recently published algorithm for reconstructing the personal set point of thyroid homeostasis. In addition, a family of integrated models (University of California-Los Angeles platform) provides advanced methods for bioequivalence studies. This perspective article delivers an overview of current clinical research on the basis of mathematical thyroid models. In addition to a summary of large clinical trials, it provides previously unpublished results of validation studies based on simulation and clinical samples. PMID:27375554

  10. MFTF: a computer program for calculating the MARS mode operating parameters for the axicell MFTF-B

    SciTech Connect

    Jong, R.A.

    1983-01-13

    We describe the models used to calculate the equilibrium operating point for the MARS mode of the axicell MFTF-B, and present the model equations necessary to calculate the plasma and potential parameters in the central-cell, axicell, and anchor regions. In addition, we calculate the neutral beam, rf power, and gas inputs required to sustain the plasma and maintain the ion and electron-particle energy balance. After a brief description of the MFTF code, we present the results of a sample calculation using MFTF.

  11. Pre-drilling calculation of geomechanical parameters for safe geothermal wells based on outcrop analogue samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyer, Dorothea; Philipp, Sonja

    2014-05-01

    It is desirable to enlarge the profit margin of geothermal projects by reducing the total drilling costs considerably. Substantiated assumptions on uniaxial compressive strengths and failure criteria are important to avoid borehole instabilities and adapt the drilling plan to rock mechanical conditions to minimise non-productive time. Because core material is rare we aim at predicting in situ rock properties from outcrop analogue samples which are easy and cheap to provide. The comparability of properties determined from analogue samples with samples from depths is analysed by performing physical characterisation (P-wave velocities, densities), conventional triaxial tests, and uniaxial compressive strength tests of both quarry and equivalent core samples. "Equivalent" means that the quarry sample is of the same stratigraphic age and of comparable sedimentary facies and composition as the correspondent core sample. We determined the parameters uniaxial compressive strength (UCS) and Young's modulus for 35 rock samples from quarries and 14 equivalent core samples from the North German Basin. A subgroup of these samples was used for triaxial tests. For UCS versus Young's modulus, density and P-wave velocity, linear- and non-linear regression analyses were performed. We repeated regression separately for clastic rock samples or carbonate rock samples only as well as for quarry samples or core samples only. Empirical relations were used to calculate UCS values from existing logs of sampled wellbore. Calculated UCS values were then compared with measured UCS of core samples of the same wellbore. With triaxial tests we determined linearized Mohr-Coulomb failure criteria, expressed in both principal stresses and shear and normal stresses, for quarry samples. Comparison with samples from larger depths shows that it is possible to apply the obtained principal stress failure criteria to clastic and volcanic rocks, but less so for carbonates. Carbonate core samples have higher

  12. Determination of dose distributions and parameter sensitivity. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project; dose code recovery activities; Calculation 005

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, B.A.; Farris, W.T.; Simpson, J.C.

    1992-12-01

    A series of scoping calculations has been undertaken to evaluate the absolute and relative contribution of different radionuclides and exposure pathways to doses that may have been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford site. This scoping calculation (Calculation 005) examined the contributions of numerous parameters to the uncertainty distribution of doses calculated for environmental exposures and accumulation in foods. This study builds on the work initiated in the first scoping study of iodine in cow`s milk and the third scoping study, which added additional pathways. Addressed in this calculation were the contributions to thyroid dose of infants from (1) air submersion and groundshine external dose, (2) inhalation, (3) ingestion of soil by humans, (4) ingestion of leafy vegetables, (5) ingestion of other vegetables and fruits, (6) ingestion of meat, (7) ingestion of eggs, and (8) ingestion of cows` milk from Feeding Regime 1 as described in Calculation 001.

  13. Isotope Production Facility Conceptual Thermal-Hydraulic Design Review and Scoping Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Pasamehmetoglu, K.O.; Shelton, J.D.

    1998-08-01

    The thermal-hydraulic design of the target for the Isotope Production Facility (IPF) is reviewed. In support of the technical review, scoping calculations are performed. The results of the review and scoping calculations are presented in this report.

  14. Probabilistic seismic hazard characterization and design parameters for the Pantex Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Bernreuter, D. L.; Foxall, W.; Savy, J. B.

    1998-10-19

    The Hazards Mitigation Center at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) updated the seismic hazard and design parameters at the Pantex Plant. The probabilistic seismic hazard (PSH) estimates were first updated using the latest available data and knowledge from LLNL (1993, 1998), Frankel et al. (1996), and other relevant recent studies from several consulting companies. Special attention was given to account for the local seismicity and for the system of potentially active faults associated with the Amarillo-Wichita uplift. Aleatory (random) uncertainty was estimated from the available data and the epistemic (knowledge) uncertainty was taken from results of similar studies. Special attention was given to soil amplification factors for the site. Horizontal Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA) and 5% damped uniform hazard spectra were calculated for six return periods (100 yr., 500 yr., 1000 yr., 2000 yr., 10,000 yr., and 100,000 yr.). The design parameters were calculated following DOE standards (DOE-STD-1022 to 1024). Response spectra for design or evaluation of Performance Category 1 through 4 structures, systems, and components are presented.

  15. Control system design using frequency domain models and parameter optimization, with application to supersonic inlet controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidel, R. C.; Lehtinen, B.

    1974-01-01

    A technique is described for designing feedback control systems using frequency domain models, a quadratic cost function, and a parameter optimization computer program. FORTRAN listings for the computer program are included. The approach is applied to the design of shock position controllers for a supersonic inlet. Deterministic or random system disturbances, and the presence of random measurement noise are considered. The cost function minimization is formulated in the time domain, but the problem solution is obtained using a frequency domain system description. A scaled and constrained conjugate gradient algorithm is used for the minimization. The approach to a supersonic inlet included the calculations of the optimal proportional-plus integral (PI) and proportional-plus-integral-plus-derivative controllers. A single-loop PI controller was the most desirable of the designs considered.

  16. Frequency response and design parameters for differential microbarometers.

    PubMed

    Mentink, Johan H; Evers, Läslo G

    2011-07-01

    The study of infrasound is experiencing a renaissance since it was chosen as a verification technique for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty. Source identification is one of the main topics of research which involves detailed knowledge on the source time function, the atmosphere as medium of propagation, and the measurement system. Applications are also foreseen in using infrasound as passive probe for the upper atmosphere, taking the field beyond its monitoring application. Infrasound can be conveniently measured with differential microbarometers. An accurate description of the instrument response is an essential need to be able to attribute the recorded infrasound to a certain source or atmospheric properties. In this article, a detailed treatment is given of the response of a differential microbarometer to acoustic signals. After an historical introduction, a basic model for the frequency response is derived with its corresponding poles and zeros. The results are explained using electric analogs. In addition, thermal conduction is added to the model in order to capture the transition between adiabatic and isothermal behavior. Also discussed are high-frequency effects and the effect of external temperature variations. Eventually, the design parameters for differential microbarometers are derived. PMID:21786875

  17. Frequency response and design parameters for differential microbarometers.

    PubMed

    Mentink, Johan H; Evers, Läslo G

    2011-07-01

    The study of infrasound is experiencing a renaissance since it was chosen as a verification technique for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty. Source identification is one of the main topics of research which involves detailed knowledge on the source time function, the atmosphere as medium of propagation, and the measurement system. Applications are also foreseen in using infrasound as passive probe for the upper atmosphere, taking the field beyond its monitoring application. Infrasound can be conveniently measured with differential microbarometers. An accurate description of the instrument response is an essential need to be able to attribute the recorded infrasound to a certain source or atmospheric properties. In this article, a detailed treatment is given of the response of a differential microbarometer to acoustic signals. After an historical introduction, a basic model for the frequency response is derived with its corresponding poles and zeros. The results are explained using electric analogs. In addition, thermal conduction is added to the model in order to capture the transition between adiabatic and isothermal behavior. Also discussed are high-frequency effects and the effect of external temperature variations. Eventually, the design parameters for differential microbarometers are derived.

  18. Irradiation Experiment Conceptual Design Parameters for NBSR Fuel Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, N. R.; Brown, N. R.; Baek, J. S; Hanson, A. L.; Cuadra, A.; Cheng, L. Y.; Diamond, D. J.

    2014-04-30

    It has been proposed to convert the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) research reactor, known as the NBSR, from high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low-Enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The motivation to convert the NBSR to LEU fuel is to reduce the risk of proliferation of special nuclear material. This report is a compilation of relevant information from recent studies related to the proposed conversion using a metal alloy of LEU with 10 w/o molybdenum. The objective is to inform the design of the mini-plate and full-size-Plate irradiation experiments that are being planned. This report provides relevant dimensions of the fuel elements, and the following parameters at steady state: average and maximum fission rate density and fission density, fuel temperature distribution for the plate with maximum local temperature, and two-dimensional heat flux profiles of fuel plates with high power densities. The latter profiles are given for plates in both the inner and outer core zones and for cores with both fresh and depleted shim arms (reactivity control devices). A summary of the methodology to obtain these results is presented. Fuel element tolerance assumptions and hot channel factors used in the safety analysis are also given.

  19. Irradiation Experiment Conceptual Design Parameters for NBSR Fuel Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Brown N. R.; Brown,N.R.; Baek,J.S; Hanson, A.L.; Cuadra,A.; Cheng,L.Y.; Diamond, D.J.

    2013-03-31

    It has been proposed to convert the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) research reactor, known as the NBSR, from high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The motivation to convert the NBSR to LEU fuel is to reduce the risk of proliferation of special nuclear material. This report is a compilation of relevant information from recent studies related to the proposed conversion using a metal alloy of LEU with 10 w/o molybdenum. The objective is to inform the design of the mini-plate and full-size plate irradiation experiments that are being planned. This report provides relevant dimensions of the fuel elements, and the following parameters at steady state: average and maximum fission rate density and fission density, fuel temperature distribution for the plate with maximum local temperature, and two-dimensional heat flux profiles of fuel plates with high power densities. . The latter profiles are given for plates in both the inner and outer core zones and for cores with both fresh and depleted shim arms (reactivity control devices). In addition, a summary of the methodology to obtain these results is presented.

  20. Design Parameters of a Miniaturized Piezoelectric Underwater Acoustic Transmitter

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Huidong; Deng, Zhiqun; Yuan, Yong; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2012-07-02

    The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) project supported by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, has yielded the smallest acoustic fish tag transmitter commercially available to date. In order to study even smaller fish populations and make the transmitter injectable by needles, the JSATS acoustic micro transmitter needs to be further downsized. As part of the transmitter downsizing effort some of the design parameters of the lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramic tube transducer in the transmitter were studied, including the type of PZT, the backing material, the necessary drive voltage, the transmitting bandwidth and the length of the transducer. It was found that, to satisfy the 156-dB source level requirement of JSATS, a square wave with a 10-volt amplitude is required to drive 'soft' PZT transducers. PZT-5H demonstrated the best source level performance. For Navy types I and II, 16 volts or 18 volts were needed. Ethylene-propylene-diene monomer (EPDM) closed-cell foam was found to be the backing material providing the highest source level. The effect of tube length on the source level is also demonstrated in this paper, providing quantitative information for downsizing of small piezoelectric transmitters.

  1. Technique for Calculating Solution Derivatives With Respect to Geometry Parameters in a CFD Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathur, Sanjay

    2011-01-01

    A solution has been developed to the challenges of computation of derivatives with respect to geometry, which is not straightforward because these are not typically direct inputs to the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solver. To overcome these issues, a procedure has been devised that can be used without having access to the mesh generator, while still being applicable to all types of meshes. The basic approach is inspired by the mesh motion algorithms used to deform the interior mesh nodes in a smooth manner when the surface nodes, for example, are in a fluid structure interaction problem. The general idea is to model the mesh edges and nodes as constituting a spring-mass system. Changes to boundary node locations are propagated to interior nodes by allowing them to assume their new equilibrium positions, for instance, one where the forces on each node are in balance. The main advantage of the technique is that it is independent of the volumetric mesh generator, and can be applied to structured, unstructured, single- and multi-block meshes. It essentially reduces the problem down to defining the surface mesh node derivatives with respect to the geometry parameters of interest. For analytical geometries, this is quite straightforward. In the more general case, one would need to be able to interrogate the underlying parametric CAD (computer aided design) model and to evaluate the derivatives either analytically, or by a finite difference technique. Because the technique is based on a partial differential equation (PDE), it is applicable not only to forward mode problems (where derivatives of all the output quantities are computed with respect to a single input), but it could also be extended to the adjoint problem, either by using an analytical adjoint of the PDE or a discrete analog.

  2. Calculation of Weibull strength parameters and Batdorf flow-density constants for volume- and surface-flaw-induced fracture in ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pai, Shantaram S.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1988-01-01

    The calculation of shape and scale parameters of the two-parameter Weibull distribution is described using the least-squares analysis and maximum likelihood methods for volume- and surface-flaw-induced fracture in ceramics with complete and censored samples. Detailed procedures are given for evaluating 90 percent confidence intervals for maximum likelihood estimates of shape and scale parameters, the unbiased estimates of the shape parameters, and the Weibull mean values and corresponding standard deviations. Furthermore, the necessary steps are described for detecting outliers and for calculating the Kolmogorov-Smirnov and the Anderson-Darling goodness-of-fit statistics and 90 percent confidence bands about the Weibull distribution. It also shows how to calculate the Batdorf flaw-density constants by uing the Weibull distribution statistical parameters. The techniques described were verified with several example problems, from the open literature, and were coded. The techniques described were verified with several example problems from the open literature, and were coded in the Structural Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation (SCARE) design program.

  3. Jet pumps for thermoacoustic applications: Design guidelines based on a numerical parameter study.

    PubMed

    Oosterhuis, Joris P; Bühler, Simon; Wilcox, Douglas; van der Meer, Theo H

    2015-10-01

    The oscillatory flow through tapered cylindrical tube sections (jet pumps) is characterized by a numerical parameter study. The shape of a jet pump results in asymmetric hydrodynamic end effects which cause a time-averaged pressure drop to occur under oscillatory flow conditions. Hence, jet pumps are used as streaming suppressors in closed-loop thermoacoustic devices. A two-dimensional axisymmetric computational fluid dynamics model is used to calculate the performance of a large number of conical jet pump geometries in terms of time-averaged pressure drop and acoustic power dissipation. The investigated geometrical parameters include the jet pump length, taper angle, waist diameter, and waist curvature. In correspondence with previous work, four flow regimes are observed which characterize the jet pump performance and dimensionless parameters are introduced to scale the performance of the various jet pump geometries. The simulation results are compared to an existing quasi-steady theory and it is shown that this theory is only applicable in a small operation region. Based on the scaling parameters, an optimum operation region is defined and design guidelines are proposed which can be directly used for future jet pump design. PMID:26520283

  4. Jet pumps for thermoacoustic applications: Design guidelines based on a numerical parameter study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oosterhuis, Joris P.; Bühler, Simon; Wilcox, Douglas; van der Meer, Theo H.

    2015-10-01

    The oscillatory flow through tapered cylindrical tube sections (jet pumps) is characterized by a numerical parameter study. The shape of a jet pump results in asymmetric hydrodynamic end effects which cause a time-averaged pressure drop to occur under oscillatory flow conditions. Hence, jet pumps are used as streaming suppressors in closed-loop thermoacoustic devices. A two-dimensional axisymmetric computational fluid dynamics model is used to calculate the performance of a large number of conical jet pump geometries in terms of time-averaged pressure drop and acoustic power dissipation. The investigated geometrical parameters include the jet pump length, taper angle, waist diameter and waist curvature. In correspondence with previous work, four flow regimes are observed which characterize the jet pump performance and dimensionless parameters are introduced to scale the performance of the various jet pump geometries. The simulation results are compared to an existing quasi-steady theory and it is shown that this theory is only applicable in a small operation region. Based on the scaling parameters, an optimum operation region is defined and design guidelines are proposed which can be directly used for future jet pump design.

  5. Numerical Procedures for the Calculations of Inorganic Solubility and Cohesive Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, D.

    1996-01-01

    The entire history of chemistry bears witness to the extraorinary importance of the phenomena of solubility. It is necessary to emphasize that the Hildebrand parameter (solubility parameter) is fundamentally a liquid state property. When gases are considered they are treated as hypothetical.

  6. 10 CFR 63.132 - Confirmation of geotechnical and design parameters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... and design parameters to be measured or observed, including any interactions between natural and... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Confirmation of geotechnical and design parameters. 63.132... Confirmation of geotechnical and design parameters. (a) During repository construction and operation,...

  7. 10 CFR 63.132 - Confirmation of geotechnical and design parameters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... and design parameters to be measured or observed, including any interactions between natural and... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Confirmation of geotechnical and design parameters. 63.132... Confirmation of geotechnical and design parameters. (a) During repository construction and operation,...

  8. Design parameters for sludge reduction in an aquatic worm reactor.

    PubMed

    Hendrickx, T L G; Temmink, H; Elissen, H J H; Buisman, C J N

    2010-02-01

    Reduction and compaction of biological waste sludge from waste water treatment plants (WWTPs) can be achieved with the aquatic worm Lumbriculus variegatus. In our reactor concept for a worm reactor, the worms are immobilised in a carrier material. The size of a worm reactor will therefore mainly be determined by the sludge consumption rate per unit of surface area. This design parameter was determined in sequencing batch experiments using sludge from a municipal WWTP. Long-term experiments using carrier materials with 300 and 350 microm mesh sizes showed surface specific consumption rates of 45 and 58 g TSS/(m(2)d), respectively. Using a 350 microm mesh will therefore result in a 29% smaller reactor compared to using a 300 microm mesh. Large differences in consumption rates were found between different sludge types, although it was not clear what caused these differences. Worm biomass growth and decay rate were determined in sequencing batch experiments. The decay rate of 0.023 d(-1) for worms in a carrier material was considerably higher than the decay rate of 0.018 d(-1) for free worms. As a result, the net worm biomass growth rate for free worms of 0.026 d(-1) was much higher than the 0.009-0.011 d(-1) for immobilised worms. Finally, the specific oxygen uptake rate of the worms was determined at 4.9 mg O(2)/(gwwd), which needs to be supplied to the worms by aeration of the water compartment in the worm reactor.

  9. A few ways of calculating the similarity parameter kappa* for real gases. [increase Reynolds number in cryogenic wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenz-Meyer, W.

    1977-01-01

    In connection with the question on the applicability of test results obtained from cryogenic wind tunnels to the large-scale model the similarity parameter is referred to. A simple method is given for calculating the similarity parameter. From the numerical values obtained it can be deduced that nitrogen behaves practically like an ideal gas when it is close to the saturation point and in a pressure range up to 4 bar. The influence of this parameter on the pressure distribution of a supercritical profile confirms this finding.

  10. Relativistic Calculating the Spectral Lines Hyperfine Structure Parameters for Heavy Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Khetselius, O. Yu.

    2008-10-22

    The energies and constants of the hyperfine structure, derivatives of the one-electron characteristics on nuclear radius, nuclear electric quadrupole, magnetic dipole moments for some Li-like multicharged ions are calculated.

  11. Strategy and calculations for the design of baffles for Wolter Type II telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mangus, John D.

    1988-01-01

    Spaceflight, stellar pointing telescopes require baffle systems to define the field of view and protect this observational area from stray and scattered light. In the case of near normal incidence telescope systems, the problem consists in controlling the stray/scattered radiation reaching the image plane when circular plates, the primary and secondary mirrors, are the imaging elements. The case addressed in this paper is quite different in that it involves baffling two conical surfaces, i.e., the primary and secondary mirrors of a Wolter Type II telescope. A strategy is described for systematically moving through the telescope system and establishing criteria for placement of baffles. Calculations are given which determine the size and number of permitted baffles as a function of practical physical parameters. Clear options are given for the design of minimum baffle lengths to meet packaging constraints.

  12. Strategy and calculations for the design of baffles for Wolter Type II telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangus, John D.

    Spaceflight, stellar pointing telescopes require baffle systems to define the field of view and protect this observational area from stray and scattered light. In the case of near normal incidence telescope systems, the problem consists in controlling the stray/scattered radiation reaching the image plane when circular plates, the primary and secondary mirrors, are the imaging elements. The case addressed in this paper is quite different in that it involves baffling two conical surfaces, i.e., the primary and secondary mirrors of a Wolter Type II telescope. A strategy is described for systematically moving through the telescope system and establishing criteria for placement of baffles. Calculations are given which determine the size and number of permitted baffles as a function of practical physical parameters. Clear options are given for the design of minimum baffle lengths to meet packaging constraints.

  13. Designing substrates for silicene and germanene: First-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, M. X.; Zhong, Z.; Weinert, M.

    2016-08-01

    We propose a guideline for exploring substrates that stabilize the monolayer honeycomb structure of silicene and germanene while simultaneously preserving the Dirac states: in addition to having a strong binding energy to the monolayer, a suitable substrate should be a large-gap semiconductor with a proper work function such that the Dirac point lies in the gap and far from the substrate states when their bands align. We illustrate our idea by performing first-principles calculations for silicene and germanene on the Al-terminated (0001) surface of Al2O3 . The overlaid monolayers on Al-terminated Al2O3 (0001) retain the main structural profile of the low-buckled honeycomb structure via a binding energy comparable to the one between silicene and Ag(111). An unfolded band structure derived from the k -projection method reveals that a gapped Dirac cone is formed at the K point due to the structural distortion and the interaction with the substrate. The gaps of 0.4 and 0.3 eV, respectively, for the supported silicene and germanene suggest that they may have potential applications in nanoelectronics.

  14. Information Extraction of High Resolution Remote Sensing Images Based on the Calculation of Optimal Segmentation Parameters.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongchun; Cai, Lijie; Liu, Haiying; Huang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Multi-scale image segmentation and the selection of optimal segmentation parameters are the key processes in the object-oriented information extraction of high-resolution remote sensing images. The accuracy of remote sensing special subject information depends on this extraction. On the basis of WorldView-2 high-resolution data, the optimal segmentation parameters methodof object-oriented image segmentation and high-resolution image information extraction, the following processes were conducted in this study. Firstly, the best combination of the bands and weights was determined for the information extraction of high-resolution remote sensing image. An improved weighted mean-variance method was proposed andused to calculatethe optimal segmentation scale. Thereafter, the best shape factor parameter and compact factor parameters were computed with the use of the control variables and the combination of the heterogeneity and homogeneity indexes. Different types of image segmentation parameters were obtained according to the surface features. The high-resolution remote sensing images were multi-scale segmented with the optimal segmentation parameters. Ahierarchical network structure was established by setting the information extraction rules to achieve object-oriented information extraction. This study presents an effective and practical method that can explain expert input judgment by reproducible quantitative measurements. Furthermore the results of this procedure may be incorporated into a classification scheme.

  15. Information Extraction of High Resolution Remote Sensing Images Based on the Calculation of Optimal Segmentation Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hongchun; Cai, Lijie; Liu, Haiying; Huang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Multi-scale image segmentation and the selection of optimal segmentation parameters are the key processes in the object-oriented information extraction of high-resolution remote sensing images. The accuracy of remote sensing special subject information depends on this extraction. On the basis of WorldView-2 high-resolution data, the optimal segmentation parameters methodof object-oriented image segmentation and high-resolution image information extraction, the following processes were conducted in this study. Firstly, the best combination of the bands and weights was determined for the information extraction of high-resolution remote sensing image. An improved weighted mean-variance method was proposed andused to calculatethe optimal segmentation scale. Thereafter, the best shape factor parameter and compact factor parameters were computed with the use of the control variables and the combination of the heterogeneity and homogeneity indexes. Different types of image segmentation parameters were obtained according to the surface features. The high-resolution remote sensing images were multi-scale segmented with the optimal segmentation parameters. Ahierarchical network structure was established by setting the information extraction rules to achieve object-oriented information extraction. This study presents an effective and practical method that can explain expert input judgment by reproducible quantitative measurements. Furthermore the results of this procedure may be incorporated into a classification scheme. PMID:27362762

  16. Sensitivity analysis of a dry-processed Candu fuel pellet's design parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Hangbok; Ryu, Ho Jin

    2007-07-01

    Sensitivity analysis was carried out in order to investigate the effect of a fuel pellet's design parameters on the performance of a dry-processed Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) fuel and to suggest the optimum design modifications. Under a normal operating condition, a dry-processed fuel has a higher internal pressure and plastic strain due to a higher fuel centerline temperature when compared with a standard natural uranium CANDU fuel. Under a condition that the fuel bundle dimensions do not change, sensitivity calculations were performed on a fuel's design parameters such as the axial gap, dish depth, gap clearance and plenum volume. The results showed that the internal pressure and plastic strain of the cladding were most effectively reduced if a fuel's element plenum volume was increased. More specifically, the internal pressure and plastic strain of the dry-processed fuel satisfied the design limits of a standard CANDU fuel when the plenum volume was increased by one half a pellet, 0.5 mm{sup 3}/K. (authors)

  17. Design and Study of the Instrument to Assess Students' Attitude toward Graphing Calculator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reznichenko, Nataliya

    2007-01-01

    Assumptions: In mathematics learning, one of the considerations in the graphing calculator (GC) use is to understand students' attitude toward calculators. Rationale: This presentation describes design of an assessment instrument of students' attitude toward graphing calculator. Objectives: A pilot study that assessed the effectiveness of the…

  18. On the Methodology to Calculate the Covariance of Estimated Resonance Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, B.; Kopecky, S.; Schillebeeckx, P.

    2015-01-15

    Principles to determine resonance parameters and their covariance from experimental data are discussed. Different methods to propagate the covariance of experimental parameters are compared. A full Bayesian statistical analysis reveals that the level to which the initial uncertainty of the experimental parameters propagates, strongly depends on the experimental conditions. For high precision data the initial uncertainties of experimental parameters, like a normalization factor, has almost no impact on the covariance of the parameters in case of thick sample measurements and conventional uncertainty propagation or full Bayesian analysis. The covariances derived from a full Bayesian analysis and least-squares fit are derived under the condition that the model describing the experimental observables is perfect. When the quality of the model can not be verified a more conservative method based on a renormalization of the covariance matrix is recommended to propagate fully the uncertainty of experimental systematic effects. Finally, neutron resonance transmission analysis is proposed as an accurate method to validate evaluated data libraries in the resolved resonance region.

  19. Universal algorithms and programs for calculating the motion parameters in the two-body problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakhshiyan, B. T.; Sukhanov, A. A.

    1979-01-01

    The algorithms and FORTRAN programs for computing positions and velocities, orbital elements and first and second partial derivatives in the two-body problem are presented. The algorithms are applicable for any value of eccentricity and are convenient for computing various navigation parameters.

  20. Methods and new approaches to the calculation of physiological parameters by videodensitometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kedem, D.; Londstrom, D. P.; Rhea, T. C., Jr.; Nelson, J. H.; Price, R. R.; Smith, C. W.; Graham, T. P., Jr.; Brill, A. B.; Kedem, D.

    1976-01-01

    A complex system featuring a video-camera connected to a video disk, cine (medical motion picture) camera and PDP-9 computer with various input/output facilities has been developed. This system enables the performance of quantitative analysis of various functions recorded in clinical studies. Several studies are described, such as heart chamber volume calculations, left ventricle ejection fraction, blood flow through the lungs and also the possibility of obtaining information about blood flow and constrictions in small cross-section vessels

  1. Comparison of ionospheric parameters calculated with UAM and measured at Voeykovo observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybakov, M. V.; Namgaladze, A. A.; Karpov, M. I.

    2016-09-01

    The measurements of the critical frequencies of the ionospheric F2 layer based on vertical radiosounding, which was performed with a CADI digital ionosonde at the Voeykovo magnetic-ionospheric observatory in February 2013, have been considered. The observations have been compared with the upper atmosphere numerical model (UAM) data for three days that differ in the amplitude and the character of solar and magnetic activity and correspond to quiet and moderately disturbed states of the ionosphere. The work was performed in order to improve the methods for determining the ionospheric state by vertical sounding ionograms. The time variations in the F2 layer critical frequency, electric field vector zonal component, and thermospheric wind velocity meridional component have been analyzed. Calculations were performed with three UAM variants. The UAM version providing the best agreement with the CADI ionosonde data was the version in which the neutral temperature, neutral composition, and pressure gradients are calculated according to the MSIS empirical model and the horizontal neutral wind velocity is determined by the equation of motion with pressure gradients from MSIS. The calculated values corresponded to the measurements, except those for the evening, because the electron density at the ionospheric F2 layer maximum depends more strongly on electric fields and thermospheric wind velocities during this period. Thus, the indicated UAM version with the above limitations can be used to determine the state of the subauroral ionosphere.

  2. Ocean color spectrum calculations. [theoretical models relating oceanographic parameters to upwelling radiances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccluney, W. R.

    1974-01-01

    The development is considered of procedures for measuring a number of subsurface oceanographic parameters using remotely sensed ocean color data. It is proposed that the first step in this effort should be the development of adequate theoretical models relating the desired oceanographic parameters to the upwelling radiances to be observed. A portion of a contributory theoretical model is shown to be described by a modified single scattering approach based upon a simple treatment of multiple scattering. The resulting quasi-single scattering model can be used to predict the upwelling distribution of spectral radiance emerging from the sea. The shape of the radiance spectrum predicted by this model for clear ocean water shows encouraging agreement with measurments made at the edge of the Sargasso Sea off Cape Hatteras.

  3. Analysis of JSI TRIGA MARK II reactor physical parameters calculated with TRIPOLI and MCNP.

    PubMed

    Henry, R; Tiselj, I; Snoj, L

    2015-03-01

    New computational model of the JSI TRIGA Mark II research reactor was built for TRIPOLI computer code and compared with existing MCNP code model. The same modelling assumptions were used in order to check the differences of the mathematical models of both Monte Carlo codes. Differences between the TRIPOLI and MCNP predictions of keff were up to 100pcm. Further validation was performed with analyses of the normalized reaction rates and computations of kinetic parameters for various core configurations. PMID:25576735

  4. A summary of the sources of input parameter values for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant final porosity surface calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Butcher, B.M.

    1997-08-01

    A summary of the input parameter values used in final predictions of closure and waste densification in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant disposal room is presented, along with supporting references. These predictions are referred to as the final porosity surface data and will be used for WIPP performance calculations supporting the Compliance Certification Application to be submitted to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The report includes tables and list all of the input parameter values, references citing their source, and in some cases references to more complete descriptions of considerations leading to the selection of values.

  5. Calculation and measurement of the influence of flow parameters on rotordynamic coefficients in labyrinth seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwanka, K.; Ortinger, W.; Steckel, J.

    1994-01-01

    First experimental investigations performed on a new test rig are presented. For a staggered labyrinth seal with fourteen cavities the stiffness coefficient and the leakage flow are measured. The experimental results are compared to calculated results which are obtained by a one-volume bulk-flow theory. A perturbation analysis is made for seven terms. It is found out that the friction factors have great impact on the dynamic coefficients. They are obtained by turbulent flow computation by a finite-volume model with the Reynolds equations used as basic equations.

  6. Calculation of supersonic stream parameters of a real gas from measurable quantities using FORTRAN 4 routines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    Sets of routines are presented that calculate such real-gas supersonic stream properties as velocity, density, enthalpy, entropy, and isentropic exponent. Two alternative sets of measurements are assumed: (1) stagnation pressure, stagnation temperature, and the pressure on the surface of a static-pressure wedge; or (2) pressure and temperature in a plenum upstream of a supersonic nozzle and the stagnation pressure at the exit of this nozzle. The routines are applicable to any gas whose properties are known. Explicit routines are presented for determining these properties for air, nitrogen, oxygen, normal hydrogen, para-hydrogen, helium, argon, steam, methane, and natural gas.

  7. WaveAR: A software tool for calculating parameters for water waves with incident and reflected components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, Blake J.; Hancock, Matthew J.; Mei, Chiang C.; García, Marcelo H.

    2012-09-01

    The ability to determine wave heights and phases along a spatial domain is vital to understanding a wide range of littoral processes. The software tool presented here employs established Stokes wave theory and sampling methods to calculate parameters for the incident and reflected components of a field of weakly nonlinear waves, monochromatic at first order in wave slope and propagating in one horizontal dimension. The software calculates wave parameters over an entire wave tank and accounts for reflection, weak nonlinearity, and a free second harmonic. Currently, no publicly available program has such functionality. The included MATLAB®-based open source code has also been compiled for Windows®, Mac® and Linux® operating systems. An additional companion program, VirtualWave, is included to generate virtual wave fields for WaveAR. Together, the programs serve as ideal analysis and teaching tools for laboratory water wave systems.

  8. Two Approaches to the Calculation of Approximate Symmetry of Ostrovsky Equation with Small Parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdavi, Abolhassan; Nadjafikhah, Mehdi; Toomanian, Megerdich

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, two methods of approximate symmetries for partial differential equations with a small parameter are applied to a perturbed nonlinear Ostrovsky equation. To compute the first-order approximate symmetry, we have applied two methods which one of them was proposed by Baikov et al. in which the infinitesimal generator is expanded in a perturbation series; whereas the other method by Fushchich and Shtelen [3] is based on the expansion of the dependent variables in perturbation series. Especially, an optimal system of one dimensional subalgebras is constructed and some invariant solutions corresponding to the resulted symmetries are obtained.

  9. Calculating the parameters of full lightning impulses using model-based curve fitting

    SciTech Connect

    McComb, T.R.; Lagnese, J.E. )

    1991-10-01

    In this paper a brief review is presented of the techniques used for the evaluation of the parameters of high voltage impulses and the problems encountered. The determination of the best smooth curve through oscillations on a high voltage impulse is the major problem limiting the automatic processing of digital records of impulses. Non-linear regression, based on simple models, is applied to the analysis of simulated and experimental data of full lightning impulses. Results of model fitting to four different groups of impulses are presented and compared with some other methods. Plans for the extension of this work are outlined.

  10. Influence of Gear Design Parameters on Gearbox Radiated Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oswald, Fred B.; Townsend, Dennis P.; Valco, Mark J.; Spencer, Robert H.; Drago, Raymond J.; Lenski, Joseph W., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Spur and helical gears were tested in the NASA gear-noise rig to compare the noise produced by different gear designs. Sound power measurements were performed under controlled conditions for a matrix of operating conditions. Sound power was computed from near-field acoustic intensity scans taken just above the top surface of the gearbox. Test gears included four spur and five helical gear designs. The gears were designed to be as nearly identical as possible except for deliberate differences in tooth geometry and contact ratio. Test results are presented as a function of the gear design and operating conditions in the form of sound power charts and as narrow-band spectra.

  11. Calculated and measured brachytherapy dosimetry parameters in water for the Xoft Axxent X-Ray Source: An electronic brachytherapy source

    SciTech Connect

    Rivard, Mark J.; Davis, Stephen D.; DeWerd, Larry A.; Rusch, Thomas W.; Axelrod, Steve

    2006-11-15

    A new x-ray source, the model S700 Axxent trade mark sign X-Ray Source (Source), has been developed by Xoft Inc. for electronic brachytherapy. Unlike brachytherapy sources containing radionuclides, this Source may be turned on and off at will and may be operated at variable currents and voltages to change the dose rate and penetration properties. The in-water dosimetry parameters for this electronic brachytherapy source have been determined from measurements and calculations at 40, 45, and 50 kV settings. Monte Carlo simulations of radiation transport utilized the MCNP5 code and the EPDL97-based mcplib04 cross-section library. Inter-tube consistency was assessed for 20 different Sources, measured with a PTW 34013 ionization chamber. As the Source is intended to be used for a maximum of ten treatment fractions, tube stability was also assessed. Photon spectra were measured using a high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector, and calculated using MCNP. Parameters used in the two-dimensional (2D) brachytherapy dosimetry formalism were determined. While the Source was characterized as a point due to the small anode size, <1 mm, use of the one-dimensional (1D) brachytherapy dosimetry formalism is not recommended due to polar anisotropy. Consequently, 1D brachytherapy dosimetry parameters were not sought. Calculated point-source model radial dose functions at g{sub P}(5) were 0.20, 0.24, and 0.29 for the 40, 45, and 50 kV voltage settings, respectively. For 1calculated results. Calculated values for F(r,{theta}) for all operating voltages were within 15% of unity along the distal end ({theta}=0 deg. ), and ranged from F(1 cm,160 deg. )=0.2 to F(15 cm,175 deg. )=0.4 towards the catheter proximal end. For all three operating voltages using the PTW chamber, measured dependence of output as a function of azimuthal angle, {psi}, was typically on average {+-}3% for 0 deg. {<=}{psi}{<=}360 deg

  12. Designing genetic algorithm for efficient calculation of value encoding in time-lapse gravity inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahyudi, Eko Januari

    2013-09-01

    As advancing application of soft computation technique in oil and gas industry, Genetic Algorithm (GA) also shows contribution in geophysical inverse problems in order to achieve better results and efficiency in computational process. In this paper, I would like to show the progress of my work in inverse modeling of time-lapse gravity data uses value encoding with alphabet formulation. The alphabet formulation designed to provide solution of characterization positive density change (+Δρ) and negative density change (-Δρ) respect to reference value (0 gr/cc). The inversion that utilize discrete model parameter, computed with GA as optimization algorithm. The challenge working with GA is take long time computational process, so the step in designing GA in this paper described through evaluation on GA operators performance test. The performances of several combinations of GA operators (selection, crossover, mutation, and replacement) tested with synthetic model in single-layer reservoir. Analysis on sufficient number of samples shows combination of SUS-MPCO-QSA/G-ND as the most promising results. Quantitative solution with more confidence level to characterize sharp boundary of density change zones was conducted with average calculation of sufficient model samples.

  13. Calculation of Weibull strength parameters, Batdorf flaw density constants and related statistical quantities using PC-CARES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szatmary, Steven A.; Gyekenyesi, John P.; Nemeth, Noel N.

    1990-01-01

    This manual describes the operation and theory of the PC-CARES (Personal Computer-Ceramic Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures) computer program for the IBM PC and compatibles running PC-DOS/MS-DOR OR IBM/MS-OS/2 (version 1.1 or higher) operating systems. The primary purpose of this code is to estimate Weibull material strength parameters, the Batdorf crack density coefficient, and other related statistical quantities. Included in the manual is the description of the calculation of shape and scale parameters of the two-parameter Weibull distribution using the least-squares analysis and maximum likelihood methods for volume- and surface-flaw-induced fracture in ceramics with complete and censored samples. The methods for detecting outliers and for calculating the Kolmogorov-Smirnov and the Anderson-Darling goodness-of-fit statistics and 90 percent confidence bands about the Weibull line, as well as the techniques for calculating the Batdorf flaw-density constants are also described.

  14. Determination of critical anthropometric parameters for design of respirators

    SciTech Connect

    You-Hin Liau

    1982-12-01

    Anthropometric data were collected from 243 workers in a respirator fit-test programme, and an attempt was made to determine a correlation between these data and the Protection Factor obtained from quantitative fit-testing for half-mask respirators. Data were collected for two direct and five indirect facial measurements from front- and side-view slides of test subjects. For analysis, the data were normalized with relevant respirators dimensions (4 brands and 10 sizes). Results of linear regression analysis indicated that correlation coefficients between Protection Factor and anthropometric data (face length, mouth width, face width, nasal root breadth) were, respectively, 0.04, 0.22, 0.30 and 0.04. These correlation coefficients are for white males without facial hair. The analysis showed the 'critical' parameters to be mouth width and face width; however, a person with certain combinations of anthropometric parameters may provide a better correlation with Protection Factor.

  15. Effective Parameters on Seismic Design of Rectangular Underground Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Amiri, G. Ghodrati; Maddah, N.; Mohebi, B.

    2008-07-08

    Underground structures are a significant part of the transportation in the modern society and in the seismic zones should withstand against both seismic and static loadings. Embedded structures should conform to ground deformations during the earthquake but almost exact evaluation of structure to ground distortion is critical. Several two-dimensional finite difference models are used to find effective parameters on racking ratio (structure to ground distortion) including flexibility ratio, various cross sections, embedment depth, and Poisson's ratio of soil. Results show that influence of different cross sections, by themselves is negligible but embedment depth in addition to flexibility ratio and Poisson's ratio is known as a consequential parameter. A comparison with pseudo-static method (simplified frame analysis) is also performed. The results show that for a stiffer structure than soil, racking ratio decreases as the depth of burial decreases; on the other hand, shallow and flexible structures can suffer greater distortion than deeper ones up to 30 percents.

  16. Parameter-free calculation of charge-changing cross sections at high energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Y.; Horiuchi, W.; Terashima, S.; Kanungo, R.; Ameil, F.; Atkinson, J.; Ayyad, Y.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Dillmann, I.; Estradé, A.; Evdokimov, A.; Farinon, F.; Geissel, H.; Guastalla, G.; Janik, R.; Knoebel, R.; Kurcewicz, J.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Marta, M.; Mostazo, M.; Mukha, I.; Nociforo, C.; Ong, H. J.; Pietri, S.; Prochazka, A.; Scheidenberger, C.; Sitar, B.; Strmen, P.; Takechi, M.; Tanaka, J.; Tanihata, I.; Vargas, J.; Weick, H.; Winfield, J. S.

    2016-07-01

    Charge-changing cross sections at high energies are expected to provide useful information on nuclear charge radii. No reliable theory to calculate the cross section has yet been available. We develop a formula using Glauber and eikonal approximations and test its validity with recent new data on carbon isotopes measured at around 900 A MeV. We first confirm that our theory reproduces the cross sections of 12,13,14C+12C consistently with the known charge radii. Next we show that the cross sections of C-1912 on a proton target are all well reproduced provided the role of neutrons is accounted for. We also discuss the energy dependence of the charge-changing cross sections.

  17. Structural investigations of {beta}-CaAlF{sub 5} by coupling powder XRD, NMR, EPR and spectroscopic parameter calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Body, M. . E-mail: monique.body@univ-lemans.fr; Silly, G.; Legein, C.; Buzare, J.-Y.; Calvayrac, F.; Blaha, P.

    2005-12-15

    {beta}-CaAlF{sub 5} was synthesized by solid-state reaction. The precise structure was refined from X-ray powder diffraction data in the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}/c with lattice constants a=5.3361A, b=9.8298A, c=7.3271A, and {beta}=109.91{sup o} (Z=4). The structure exhibits isolated chains of AlF{sub 6}{sup 3-} octahedra sharing opposite corners.{sup 19}F and {sup 27}Al solid state NMR spectra were recorded using MAS and SATRAS techniques. An EPR spectrum was recorded for {beta}-CaAlF{sub 5}:Cr{sup 3+}. The experimental spectra were simulated in order to extract the NMR and EPR parameter values. Five fluorine sites and one low symmetry aluminium site were found in agreement with the refined structure. These parameters were calculated using empirical and ab-initio methods. The agreement obtained between the calculated {sup 19}F chemical shift values, {sup 27}Al quadrupolar parameters, Cr{sup 3+} EPR fine structure parameters and the experimental results demonstrates the complementarity of XRD, magnetic resonance experiments and theoretical methodologies.

  18. The calculation of meteor motion parameters based on the single station TV observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagrov, A. V.; Leonov, V. A.

    2010-08-01

    Recently, television observations of meteors have steadily replaced photographic observations. Television recording with short exposures is a close analog of a photographic survey with a rotary shutter in the form of a system of set time marks on the meteor track. Each meteoric event is a series of recordings of separate phases of the motion of a meteor. This allows for the use of the geometric method for the determination of the motion parameters of meteors. In this work, a critique is given regarding the concept proposed by K.P. Stanyukovich in 1932-1939, and a mathematical justification of the geometric method of the analysis of the television images of meteors is given.

  19. Application of Model Based Parameter Estimation for RCS Frequency Response Calculations Using Method of Moments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, C. J.

    1998-01-01

    An implementation of the Model Based Parameter Estimation (MBPE) technique is presented for obtaining the frequency response of the Radar Cross Section (RCS) of arbitrarily shaped, three-dimensional perfect electric conductor (PEC) bodies. An Electric Field Integral Equation (EFTE) is solved using the Method of Moments (MoM) to compute the RCS. The electric current is expanded in a rational function and the coefficients of the rational function are obtained using the frequency derivatives of the EFIE. Using the rational function, the electric current on the PEC body is obtained over a frequency band. Using the electric current at different frequencies, RCS of the PEC body is obtained over a wide frequency band. Numerical results for a square plate, a cube, and a sphere are presented over a bandwidth. Good agreement between MBPE and the exact solution over the bandwidth is observed.

  20. CALCULATIONS OF SHAPE CHANGE AND FRAGMENTATION PARAMETERS USING VERY PRECISE BOLIDE DATA.

    SciTech Connect

    ReVelle, D. O.; Ceplecha, Zdeněk

    2001-01-01

    Using the theoretical formalism of ReVelle (2001d), we have analyzed 22 European (EN) and US Prairie Network fireballs (PN) with the most precise trajectory information available for shape change and fragmentation effects. For 14 bolides the shape change parameter, {mu}, was always > 0 and for the other 8 cases there were instances of {mu} < 0, but with large oscillations in its sign with height or time. When the shape change parameter, {mu}, was < 0, the fragmentation scale height was > 0 and in a few instances was briefly even smaller than the pressure scale height. This is the necessary condition in addition to the sufficient condition of {mu} < 0 for the onset of the catastrophic fragmentation process ('pancake' break-up). A histogram of all computed {mu} values indicates that an average value was <{mu} > {approx} 0.10, indicating that substantial shape change has taken place during entry for these bolides. This is fully consistent with the recent analyses of ReVelle and Ceplecha (2001g) of the changes in the shape-density coefficient, K, with time as well. Thus, the use of the {mu} = 2/3 (self-similar solution with no shape change) is not recommended for bolide modeling efforts. From our results we can conclude that most of the US DoD bolides can be successfully modeled using single-body theory without resorting to the 'pancake' catastrophic fragmentation model that was 'rediscovered' in the early 1990's by a number of workers. These researchers included Hills and Goda, Chyba, Thomas and Zahnle, etc. who specifically developed this break-up model for studying he impact into Jupiter of the huge Shoemaker Levy-9 comet.

  1. Using a hybrid approach to optimize experimental network design for aquifer parameter identification.

    PubMed

    Chang, Liang-Cheng; Chu, Hone-Jay; Lin, Yu-Pin; Chen, Yu-Wen

    2010-10-01

    This research develops an optimum design model of groundwater network using genetic algorithm (GA) and modified Newton approach, based on the experimental design conception. The goal of experiment design is to minimize parameter uncertainty, represented by the covariance matrix determinant of estimated parameters. The design problem is constrained by a specified cost and solved by GA and a parameter identification model. The latter estimates optimum parameter value and its associated sensitivity matrices. The general problem is simplified into two classes of network design problems: an observation network design problem and a pumping network design problem. Results explore the relationship between the experimental design and the physical processes. The proposed model provides an alternative to solve optimization problems for groundwater experimental design. PMID:19757116

  2. High accuracy modeling for advanced nuclear reactor core designs using Monte Carlo based coupled calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espel, Federico Puente

    The main objective of this PhD research is to develop a high accuracy modeling tool using a Monte Carlo based coupled system. The presented research comprises the development of models to include the thermal-hydraulic feedback to the Monte Carlo method and speed-up mechanisms to accelerate the Monte Carlo criticality calculation. Presently, deterministic codes based on the diffusion approximation of the Boltzmann transport equation, coupled with channel-based (or sub-channel based) thermal-hydraulic codes, carry out the three-dimensional (3-D) reactor core calculations of the Light Water Reactors (LWRs). These deterministic codes utilize nuclear homogenized data (normally over large spatial zones, consisting of fuel assembly or parts of fuel assembly, and in the best case, over small spatial zones, consisting of pin cell), which is functionalized in terms of thermal-hydraulic feedback parameters (in the form of off-line pre-generated cross-section libraries). High accuracy modeling is required for advanced nuclear reactor core designs that present increased geometry complexity and material heterogeneity. Such high-fidelity methods take advantage of the recent progress in computation technology and coupled neutron transport solutions with thermal-hydraulic feedback models on pin or even on sub-pin level (in terms of spatial scale). The continuous energy Monte Carlo method is well suited for solving such core environments with the detailed representation of the complicated 3-D problem. The major advantages of the Monte Carlo method over the deterministic methods are the continuous energy treatment and the exact 3-D geometry modeling. However, the Monte Carlo method involves vast computational time. The interest in Monte Carlo methods has increased thanks to the improvements of the capabilities of high performance computers. Coupled Monte-Carlo calculations can serve as reference solutions for verifying high-fidelity coupled deterministic neutron transport methods

  3. Rethinking design parameters in the search for optimal dynamic seating.

    PubMed

    Pynt, Jennifer

    2015-04-01

    Dynamic seating design purports to lessen damage incurred during sedentary occupations by increasing sitter movement while modifying muscle activity. Dynamic sitting is currently defined by O'Sullivan et al. ( 2013a) as relating to 'the increased motion in sitting which is facilitated by the use of specific chairs or equipment' (p. 628). Yet the evidence is conflicting that dynamic seating creates variation in the sitter's lumbar posture or muscle activity with the overall consensus being that current dynamic seating design fails to fulfill its goals. Research is needed to determine if a new generation of chairs requiring active sitter involvement fulfills the goals of dynamic seating and aids cardio/metabolic health. This paper summarises the pursuit of knowledge regarding optimal seated spinal posture and seating design. Four new forms of dynamic seating encouraging active sitting are discussed. These are 1) The Core-flex with a split seatpan to facilitate a walking action while seated 2) the Duo balans requiring body action to create rocking 3) the Back App and 4) Locus pedestal stools both using the sitter's legs to drive movement. Unsubstantiated claims made by the designers of these new forms of dynamic seating are outlined. Avenues of research are suggested to validate designer claims and investigate whether these designs fulfill the goals of dynamic seating and assist cardio/metabolic health. Should these claims be efficacious then a new definition of dynamic sitting is suggested; 'Sitting in which the action is provided by the sitter, while the dynamic mechanism of the chair accommodates that action'.

  4. Rethinking design parameters in the search for optimal dynamic seating.

    PubMed

    Pynt, Jennifer

    2015-04-01

    Dynamic seating design purports to lessen damage incurred during sedentary occupations by increasing sitter movement while modifying muscle activity. Dynamic sitting is currently defined by O'Sullivan et al. ( 2013a) as relating to 'the increased motion in sitting which is facilitated by the use of specific chairs or equipment' (p. 628). Yet the evidence is conflicting that dynamic seating creates variation in the sitter's lumbar posture or muscle activity with the overall consensus being that current dynamic seating design fails to fulfill its goals. Research is needed to determine if a new generation of chairs requiring active sitter involvement fulfills the goals of dynamic seating and aids cardio/metabolic health. This paper summarises the pursuit of knowledge regarding optimal seated spinal posture and seating design. Four new forms of dynamic seating encouraging active sitting are discussed. These are 1) The Core-flex with a split seatpan to facilitate a walking action while seated 2) the Duo balans requiring body action to create rocking 3) the Back App and 4) Locus pedestal stools both using the sitter's legs to drive movement. Unsubstantiated claims made by the designers of these new forms of dynamic seating are outlined. Avenues of research are suggested to validate designer claims and investigate whether these designs fulfill the goals of dynamic seating and assist cardio/metabolic health. Should these claims be efficacious then a new definition of dynamic sitting is suggested; 'Sitting in which the action is provided by the sitter, while the dynamic mechanism of the chair accommodates that action'. PMID:25892386

  5. Effects of stress rate and calculation method on subcritical crack growth parameters deduced from constant stress-rate flexural testing

    PubMed Central

    Griggs, Jason A.; Alaqeel, Samer M.; Zhang, Yunlong; Miller, Amp W.; Cai, Zhuo

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To more efficiently determine the subcritical crack growth (SCG) parameters of dental ceramics, the effects of stressing rate and choice of statistical regression model on estimates of SCG parameters were assessed. Methods Two dental ceramic materials, a veneering material having a single critical flaw population (S) and a framework material having partially concurrent flaw populations (PC), were analyzed using constant stress-rate testing, or “dynamic fatigue”, with a variety of testing protocols. For each material, 150 rectangular beam specimens were prepared and tested in four-point flexure according to ISO6872 and ASTM1368. A full-factorial study was conducted on the following factors: material, stress rate assumed vs. calculated, number of stress rates, and statistical regression method. Results The proportion of specimens for which the statistical models over-estimated reliability was not significantly different based on regression method for Material S (P = 0.96, power = 94%) and was significantly different based on regression method for Material PC (P < 0.001). The standard method resulted in SCG parameters, n and ln B, of 35.9 and -11.1 MPa2s for Material S and 12.4 and 9.61 MPa2s for Material PC. Significance The method of calculation that uses only the median strength value at each stress rate provided the most robust SCG parameter estimates. Using only two stress rates resulted in fatigue parameters comparable to those estimated using four stress rates having the same range. The stress rate of each specimen can be assumed to be the target stress rate with negligible difference in SCG parameter estimates. PMID:21167586

  6. Dose equivalent rate constants and barrier transmission data for nuclear medicine facility dose calculations and shielding design.

    PubMed

    Kusano, Maggie; Caldwell, Curtis B

    2014-07-01

    A primary goal of nuclear medicine facility design is to keep public and worker radiation doses As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA). To estimate dose and shielding requirements, one needs to know both the dose equivalent rate constants for soft tissue and barrier transmission factors (TFs) for all radionuclides of interest. Dose equivalent rate constants are most commonly calculated using published air kerma or exposure rate constants, while transmission factors are most commonly calculated using published tenth-value layers (TVLs). Values can be calculated more accurately using the radionuclide's photon emission spectrum and the physical properties of lead, concrete, and/or tissue at these energies. These calculations may be non-trivial due to the polyenergetic nature of the radionuclides used in nuclear medicine. In this paper, the effects of dose equivalent rate constant and transmission factor on nuclear medicine dose and shielding calculations are investigated, and new values based on up-to-date nuclear data and thresholds specific to nuclear medicine are proposed. To facilitate practical use, transmission curves were fitted to the three-parameter Archer equation. Finally, the results of this work were applied to the design of a sample nuclear medicine facility and compared to doses calculated using common methods to investigate the effects of these values on dose estimates and shielding decisions. Dose equivalent rate constants generally agreed well with those derived from the literature with the exception of those from NCRP 124. Depending on the situation, Archer fit TFs could be significantly more accurate than TVL-based TFs. These results were reflected in the sample shielding problem, with unshielded dose estimates agreeing well, with the exception of those based on NCRP 124, and Archer fit TFs providing a more accurate alternative to TVL TFs and a simpler alternative to full spectral-based calculations. The data provided by this paper should assist

  7. Dose equivalent rate constants and barrier transmission data for nuclear medicine facility dose calculations and shielding design.

    PubMed

    Kusano, Maggie; Caldwell, Curtis B

    2014-07-01

    A primary goal of nuclear medicine facility design is to keep public and worker radiation doses As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA). To estimate dose and shielding requirements, one needs to know both the dose equivalent rate constants for soft tissue and barrier transmission factors (TFs) for all radionuclides of interest. Dose equivalent rate constants are most commonly calculated using published air kerma or exposure rate constants, while transmission factors are most commonly calculated using published tenth-value layers (TVLs). Values can be calculated more accurately using the radionuclide's photon emission spectrum and the physical properties of lead, concrete, and/or tissue at these energies. These calculations may be non-trivial due to the polyenergetic nature of the radionuclides used in nuclear medicine. In this paper, the effects of dose equivalent rate constant and transmission factor on nuclear medicine dose and shielding calculations are investigated, and new values based on up-to-date nuclear data and thresholds specific to nuclear medicine are proposed. To facilitate practical use, transmission curves were fitted to the three-parameter Archer equation. Finally, the results of this work were applied to the design of a sample nuclear medicine facility and compared to doses calculated using common methods to investigate the effects of these values on dose estimates and shielding decisions. Dose equivalent rate constants generally agreed well with those derived from the literature with the exception of those from NCRP 124. Depending on the situation, Archer fit TFs could be significantly more accurate than TVL-based TFs. These results were reflected in the sample shielding problem, with unshielded dose estimates agreeing well, with the exception of those based on NCRP 124, and Archer fit TFs providing a more accurate alternative to TVL TFs and a simpler alternative to full spectral-based calculations. The data provided by this paper should assist

  8. A calculation of steady-state electrocoloration parameters of electrochromic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ushakov, O.A.; Shelepin, I.V.

    1986-01-01

    Electrochromic systems based on solutions of compounds whichchange their color reversibly when electrochemical reactions take place may find wide applications in the design of laser-light modulators, light filters with variable optical density, and means for visual information display. It is the aim of this work to find the limiting steady-state values of current density and electrically induced optical density for electrochromic systems and to discuss possibilities of eliminating solution convection during current flow in them. During prolonged electrocoloration, the convection of anolyte and catholyte in opposite directions can lead to ''glistering'' or separation of the solution layer.

  9. Improving the Design of Science Intervention Studies: An Empirical Investigation of Design Parameters for Planning Group Randomized Trials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westine, Carl; Spybrook, Jessaca

    2013-01-01

    The capacity of the field to conduct power analyses for group randomized trials (GRTs) of educational interventions has improved over the past decade (Authors, 2009). However, a power analysis depends on estimates of design parameters. Hence it is critical to build the empirical base of design parameters for GRTs across a variety of outcomes and…

  10. Percutaneous multiple electrode connector, design parameters and fabrication (biomedical)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, L. A.

    1977-01-01

    A percutaneous multielectrode connector was designed which utilizes an ultrapure carbon collar to provide an infection free biocompatible passage through the skin. The device provides reliable electrical continuity, mates and demates readily with the implant, and is fabricated with processes and materials oriented to commercial production.

  11. Data acquisition as a design parameter in the modern AEM

    SciTech Connect

    Zaluzec, N.J.

    1993-04-01

    The components of a modern analytical electron microscope (AEM) are not necessarily optimized. A pessimistic view is presented of an AEM system, particularly on the data acquisition end. The question of how to design the instrument to collect the data efficiently, is considered. Several points for doing this are outlined.

  12. Decoupling interrelated parameters for designing high performance thermoelectric materials.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Chong; Li, Zhou; Li, Kun; Huang, Pengcheng; Xie, Yi

    2014-04-15

    The world's supply of fossil fuels is quickly being exhausted, and the impact of their overuse is contributing to both climate change and global political unrest. In order to help solve these escalating problems, scientists must find a way to either replace combustion engines or reduce their use. Thermoelectric materials have attracted widespread research interest because of their potential applications as clean and renewable energy sources. They are reliable, lightweight, robust, and environmentally friendly and can reversibly convert between heat and electricity. However, after decades of development, the energy conversion efficiency of thermoelectric devices has been hovering around 10%. This is far below the theoretical predictions, mainly due to the interdependence and coupling between electrical and thermal parameters, which are strongly interrelated through the electronic structure of the materials. Therefore, any strategy that balances or decouples these parameters, in addition to optimizing the materials' intrinsic electronic structure, should be critical to the development of thermoelectric technology. In this Account, we discuss our recently developed strategies to decouple thermoelectric parameters for the synergistic optimization of electrical and thermal transport. We first highlight the phase transition, which is accompanied by an abrupt change of electrical transport, such as with a metal-insulator and semiconductor-superionic conductor transition. This should be a universal and effective strategy to optimize the thermoelectric performance, which takes advantage of modulated electronic structure and critical scattering across phase transitions to decouple the power factor and thermal conductivity. We propose that solid-solution homojunction nanoplates with disordered lattices are promising thermoelectric materials to meet the "phonon glass electron crystal" approach. The formation of a solid solution, coupled with homojunctions, allows for

  13. Design parameter analysis of hybrid optimal controlled structures

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, F.Y.; Tian, P.

    1994-12-31

    This paper presents a hybrid control system composed of an active hydraulic actuator and a passive liquid-mass damper. The system is built with structural bracing and can reduce structural dynamic response by providing passive inertia force, passive damping force and active control force. Fundamental equations governing the hybrid control system are derived and influence parameters are numerically analyzed. Numerical results show that in this hybrid control system the effective liquid-mass plays an important role in reducing structural dynamic response and requiring smaller control forces than either passive or active control system.

  14. Analytical calculation of sensing parameters on carbon nanotube based gas sensors.

    PubMed

    Akbari, Elnaz; Buntat, Zolkafle; Ahmad, Mohd Hafizi; Enzevaee, Aria; Yousof, Rubiyah; Iqbal, Syed Muhammad Zafar; Ahmadi, Mohammad Taghi; Sidik, Muhammad Abu Bakar; Karimi, Hediyeh

    2014-01-01

    Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) are generally nano-scale tubes comprising a network of carbon atoms in a cylindrical setting that compared with silicon counterparts present outstanding characteristics such as high mechanical strength, high sensing capability and large surface-to-volume ratio. These characteristics, in addition to the fact that CNTs experience changes in their electrical conductance when exposed to different gases, make them appropriate candidates for use in sensing/measuring applications such as gas detection devices. In this research, a model for a Field Effect Transistor (FET)-based structure has been developed as a platform for a gas detection sensor in which the CNT conductance change resulting from the chemical reaction between NH3 and CNT has been employed to model the sensing mechanism with proposed sensing parameters. The research implements the same FET-based structure as in the work of Peng et al. on nanotube-based NH3 gas detection. With respect to this conductance change, the I-V characteristic of the CNT is investigated. Finally, a comparative study shows satisfactory agreement between the proposed model and the experimental data from the mentioned research.

  15. Recommended environmental dose calculation methods and Hanford-specific parameters. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Schreckhise, R.G.; Rhoads, K.; Napier, B.A.; Ramsdell, J.V.; Davis, J.S.

    1993-03-01

    This document was developed to support the Hanford Environmental Dose overview Panel (HEDOP). The Panel is responsible for reviewing all assessments of potential doses received by humans and other biota resulting from the actual or possible environmental releases of radioactive and other hazardous materials from facilities and/or operations belonging to the US Department of Energy on the Hanford Site in south-central Washington. This document serves as a guide to be used for developing estimates of potential radiation doses, or other measures of risk or health impacts, to people and other biota in the environs on and around the Hanford Site. It provides information to develop technically sound estimates of exposure (i.e., potential or actual) to humans or other biotic receptors that could result from the environmental transport of potentially harmful materials that have been, or could be, released from Hanford operations or facilities. Parameter values and information that are specific to the Hanford environs as well as other supporting material are included in this document.

  16. Parameters of a Super-B-Factory Design

    SciTech Connect

    Seeman, J.; Cai, Y.; Ecklund, S.; Fox, J.D.; Heifets, S.A.; Li, N.; McIntosh, P.A.; Novokhatski, A.; Sullivan, M.K.; Teytelman, D.; Wienands, U.; Biagini, M.E.; /Frascati

    2006-03-03

    Parameters are being studied for a high luminosity e{sup +}e{sup -} collider operating at the Upsilon 4S that would deliver a luminosity in the range of 7 to 10 x 10{sup 35}/cm{sup 2}/s. Particle physics studies dictate that a much higher luminosity collider than the present B-Factory accelerators will be needed to answer future new key physics questions. The success of the present B-Factories, PEP-II and KEKB, in producing unprecedented luminosity with very short commissioning times has taught us about the accelerator physics of asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders in a new parameter regime. Such a collider could produce an integrated luminosity of 10,000 fb{sup -1} (10 ab{sup -1}) in a running year. A Super-B-Factory [1-8] with 30 to 50 times the performance of the present PEP-II accelerator would incorporate a higher frequency RF system, lower impedance vacuum chambers, higher power synchrotron radiation absorbers, and stronger bunch-by-bunch feedback systems. The present injector based on the SLAC linac needs no improvements and is ready for the Super-B-Factory.

  17. A DFT-based model for calculating solvolytic reactivity. The nucleofugality of aliphatic carboxylates in terms of Nf parameters.

    PubMed

    Denegri, Bernard; Matić, Mirela; Kronja, Olga

    2014-08-14

    The most comprehensive nucleofugality scale, based on the correlation and solvolytic rate constants of benzhydrylium derivatives, has recently been proposed by Mayr and co-workers (Acc. Chem. Res., 2010, 43, 1537-1549). In this work, the possibility of employing quantum chemical calculations in further determination of nucleofugality (Nf) parameters of leaving groups is explored. Whereas the heterolytic transition state of benzhydryl carboxylate cannot be optimized by quantum chemical calculations, the possibility of an alternative model reaction is examined in order to obtain nucleofugality parameters of various aliphatic carboxylates, which can properly be included in the current nucleofugality scale. For that purpose, ground and transition state structures have been optimized for the proposed model reaction, which includes anchimerically assisted heterolytic dissociation of cis-2,3-dihydroxycyclopropyl trans-carboxylates. The validity of the model reaction as well as of applied DFT methods in the presence of the IEFPCM solvation model is verified by correlating calculated free energies of activation of the model reaction with literature experimental data for solvolysis of reference dianisylmethyl carboxylates. For this purpose the ability of several functionals (including popular B3LYP) is examined, among which the M06-2X gives the best results. The very good correlation indicates acceptable accurate relative reactivities of aliphatic carboxylates, and enables the estimation of rate constants for solvolysis of other dianisylmethyl carboxylates in aqueous ethanol mixtures, from which the corresponding Nf parameters are determined using mentioned Mayr's equation. In addition, DFT calculations confirm the previous experimental observation that the abilities of aliphatic carboxylate leaving groups in solution are governed by the inductive effect of substituents attached to the carboxyl group. PMID:24964919

  18. 40 CFR 80.599 - How do I calculate volume balances for designation purposes?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... code (26 CFR part 48) shall be deemed to be MV15I or MV500I as appropriate for purposes of this... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How do I calculate volume balances for... § 80.599 How do I calculate volume balances for designation purposes? (a) Quarterly compliance...

  19. 40 CFR 80.599 - How do I calculate volume balances for designation purposes?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... code (26 CFR part 48) shall be deemed to be MV15I or MV500I as appropriate for purposes of this... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false How do I calculate volume balances for... § 80.599 How do I calculate volume balances for designation purposes? (a) Quarterly compliance...

  20. 40 CFR 80.599 - How do I calculate volume balances for designation purposes?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... code (26 CFR part 48) shall be deemed to be MV15I or MV500I as appropriate for purposes of this... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false How do I calculate volume balances for... § 80.599 How do I calculate volume balances for designation purposes? (a) Quarterly compliance...

  1. 40 CFR 80.599 - How do I calculate volume balances for designation purposes?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... code (26 CFR part 48) shall be deemed to be MV15I or MV500I as appropriate for purposes of this... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How do I calculate volume balances for... § 80.599 How do I calculate volume balances for designation purposes? (a) Quarterly compliance...

  2. 40 CFR 80.599 - How do I calculate volume balances for designation purposes?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... code (26 CFR part 48) shall be deemed to be MV15I or MV500I as appropriate for purposes of this... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false How do I calculate volume balances for... § 80.599 How do I calculate volume balances for designation purposes? (a) Quarterly compliance...

  3. Solubility of hot fuel particles from Chernobyl--influencing parameters for individual radiation dose calculations.

    PubMed

    Garger, Evgenii K; Meisenberg, Oliver; Odintsov, Oleksiy; Shynkarenko, Viktor; Tschiersch, Jochen

    2013-10-15

    Nuclear fuel particles of Chernobyl origin are carriers of increased radioactivity (hot particles) and are still present in the atmosphere of the Chernobyl exclusion zone. Workers in the zone may inhale these particles, which makes assessment necessary. The residence time in the lungs and the transfer in the blood of the inhaled radionuclides are crucial for inhalation dose assessment. Therefore, the dissolution of several kinds of nuclear fuel particles from air filters sampled in the Chernobyl exclusion zone was studied. For this purpose filter fragments with hot particles were submersed in simulated lung fluids (SLFs). The activities of the radionuclides (137)Cs, (90)Sr, (239+240)Pu and (241)Am were measured in the SLF and in the residuum of the fragments by radiometric methods after chemical treatment. Soluble fractions as well as dissolution rates of the nuclides were determined. The influence of the genesis of the hot particles, represented by the (137)Cs/(239+240)Pu ratio, on the availability of (137)Cs was demonstrated, whereas the dissolution of (90)Sr, (239+240)Pu and (241)Am proved to be independent of genesis. No difference in the dissolution of (137)Cs and (239+240)Pu was observed for the two applied types of SLF. Increased solubility was found for smaller hot particles. A two-component exponential model was used to describe the dissolution of the nuclides as a function of time. The results were applied for determining individual inhalation dose coefficients for the workers at the Chernobyl construction site. Greater dose coefficients for the respiratory tract and smaller coefficients for the other organs were calculated (compared to ICRP default values). The effective doses were in general lower for the considered radionuclides, for (241)Am even by one order of magnitude.

  4. Optical photon transport in powdered-phosphor scintillators. Part II. Calculation of single-scattering transport parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Poludniowski, Gavin G.; Evans, Philip M.

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: Monte Carlo methods based on the Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) have previously been used to model light transport in powdered-phosphor scintillator screens. Physically motivated guesses or, alternatively, the complexities of Mie theory have been used by some authors to provide the necessary inputs of transport parameters. The purpose of Part II of this work is to: (i) validate predictions of modulation transform function (MTF) using the BTE and calculated values of transport parameters, against experimental data published for two Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Tb screens; (ii) investigate the impact of size-distribution and emission spectrum on Mie predictions of transport parameters; (iii) suggest simpler and novel geometrical optics-based models for these parameters and compare to the predictions of Mie theory. A computer code package called phsphr is made available that allows the MTF predictions for the screens modeled to be reproduced and novel screens to be simulated. Methods: The transport parameters of interest are the scattering efficiency (Q{sub sct}), absorption efficiency (Q{sub abs}), and the scatter anisotropy (g). Calculations of these parameters are made using the analytic method of Mie theory, for spherical grains of radii 0.1-5.0 {mu}m. The sensitivity of the transport parameters to emission wavelength is investigated using an emission spectrum representative of that of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 2}S:Tb. The impact of a grain-size distribution in the screen on the parameters is investigated using a Gaussian size-distribution ({sigma}= 1%, 5%, or 10% of mean radius). Two simple and novel alternative models to Mie theory are suggested: a geometrical optics and diffraction model (GODM) and an extension of this (GODM+). Comparisons to measured MTF are made for two commercial screens: Lanex Fast Back and Lanex Fast Front (Eastman Kodak Company, Inc.). Results: The Mie theory predictions of transport parameters were shown to be highly sensitive to both grain size

  5. A Method for Designing CDO Conformed to Investment Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakae, Tatsuya; Moritsu, Toshiyuki; Komoda, Norihisa

    We propose a method for designing CDO (Collateralized Debt Obligation) that meets investor needs about attributes of CDO. It is demonstrated that adjusting attributes (that are credit capability and issue amount) of CDO to investors' preferences causes a capital loss risk that the agent takes. We formulate a CDO optimization problem by defining an objective function using the above risk and by setting constraints that arise from investor needs and a risk premium that is paid for the agent. Our prototype experiment, in which fictitious underlying obligations and investor needs are given, verifies that CDOs can be designed without opportunity loss and dead stock loss, and that the capital loss is not more than thousandth part of the amount of annual payment under guarantee for small and midium-sized enterprises by a general credit guarantee institution.

  6. NEUTRAL INTERSTELLAR HELIUM PARAMETERS BASED ON IBEX-Lo OBSERVATIONS AND TEST PARTICLE CALCULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Bzowski, M.; Kubiak, M. A.; Sokol, J. M.; Hlond, M.; Moebius, E.; Bochsler, P.; Leonard, T.; Heirtzler, D.; Kucharek, H.; Schwadron, N. A.; Crew, G. B.; Fuselier, S. A.; McComas, D. J.

    2012-02-01

    Because of its high ionization potential and weak interaction with hydrogen, neutral interstellar helium (NISHe) is almost unaffected at the heliospheric interface with the interstellar medium and freely enters the solar system. This second most abundant species provides some of the best information on the characteristics of the interstellar gas in the local interstellar cloud. The Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) is the second mission to directly detect NISHe. We present a comparison between recent IBEX NISHe observations and simulations carried out using a well-tested quantitative simulation code. Simulation and observation results compare well for times when measured fluxes are dominated by NISHe (and contributions from other species are small). Differences between simulations and observations indicate a previously undetected secondary population of neutral helium, likely produced by interaction of interstellar helium with plasma in the outer heliosheath. Interstellar neutral parameters are statistically different from previous in situ results obtained mostly from the GAS/Ulysses experiment, but they do agree with the local interstellar flow vector obtained from studies of interstellar absorption: the newly established flow direction is ecliptic longitude 79.{sup 0}2, latitude -5.{sup 0}1, the velocity is {approx}22.8 km s{sup -1}, and the temperature is 6200 K. These new results imply a markedly lower absolute velocity of the gas and thus significantly lower dynamic pressure on the boundaries of the heliosphere and different orientation of the Hydrogen Deflection Plane compared to prior results from Ulysses. A different orientation of this plane also suggests a new geometry of the interstellar magnetic field, and the lower dynamic pressure calls for a compensation by other components of the pressure balance, most likely a higher density of interstellar plasma and strength of interstellar magnetic field.

  7. Parameter Study of the LIFE Engine Nuclear Design

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, K J; Meier, W R; Latkowski, J F; Abbott, R P

    2009-07-10

    LLNL is developing the nuclear fusion based Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) power plant concept. The baseline design uses a depleted uranium (DU) fission fuel blanket with a flowing molten salt coolant (flibe) that also breeds the tritium needed to sustain the fusion energy source. Indirect drive targets, similar to those that will be demonstrated on the National Ignition Facility (NIF), are ignited at {approx}13 Hz providing a 500 MW fusion source. The DU is in the form of a uranium oxycarbide kernel in modified TRISO-like fuel particles distributed in a carbon matrix forming 2-cm-diameter pebbles. The thermal power is held at 2000 MW by continuously varying the 6Li enrichment in the coolants. There are many options to be considered in the engine design including target yield, U-to-C ratio in the fuel, fission blanket thickness, etc. Here we report results of design variations and compare them in terms of various figures of merit such as time to reach a desired burnup, full-power years of operation, time and maximum burnup at power ramp down and the overall balance of plant utilization.

  8. Telemonitoring of vital parameters with newly designed biomedical clothing.

    PubMed

    Weber, J-L; Blanc, D; Dittmar, A; Comet, B; Corroy, C; Noury, N; Baghai, R; Vaysse, S; Blinowska, A

    2004-01-01

    The paper describes the development of biomedical clothing for ambulatory telemonitoring of human vital parameters. VTAM (Vetement de Tele-Assistance Medicale) presents a T-shirt made from textile with woven wires and incorporating four smooth dry ECG electrodes, a breath rate sensor, a shock/fall detector and two temperature sensors. The garment is equipped for the signal pre-computing and transmission through a miniature GSM/GPRS module kept on a belt together with the power supply. Three VTAM prototypes have been tested on persons in a normal state of health using a medical protocol to assess the biomedical data that include an ECG reading, a pneumogram, temperature and fall detection in mobile situations.

  9. Inherent uncertainties in meteorological parameters for wind turbine design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doran, J. C.

    1982-01-01

    Major difficulties associated with meteorological measurments such as the inability to duplicate the experimental conditions from one day to the next are discussed. This lack of consistency is compounded by the stochastic nature of many of the meteorological variables of interest. Moreover, simple relationships derived in one location may be significantly altered by topographical or synoptic differences encountered at another. The effect of such factors is a degree of inherent uncertainty if an attempt is made to describe the atmosphere in terms of universal laws. Some of these uncertainties and their causes are examined, examples are presented and some implications for wind turbine design are suggested.

  10. Understanding facilities design parameters for a remanufacturing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topcu, Aysegul; Cullinane, Thomas

    2005-11-01

    Remanufacturing is rapidly becoming a very important element in the economies of the world. Products such as washing machines, clothes driers, automobile parts, cell phones and a wide range of consumer durable goods are being reclaimed and sent through processes that restore these products to levels of operating performance that are as good or better than their new product performance. The operations involved in the remanufacturing process add several new dimensions to the work that must be performed. Disassembly is an operation that rarely appears on the operations chart of a typical production facility. The inspection and test functions in remanufacturing most often involve several more tasks than those involved in the first time manufacturing cycle. A close evaluation of most any remanufacturing operation reveals several points in the process in which parts must be cleaned, tested and stored. Although several researchers have focused their work on optimizing the disassembly function and the inspection, test and store functions, very little research has been devoted to studying the impact of the facilities design on the effectiveness of the remanufacturing process. The purpose of this paper will be to delineate the differences between first time manufacturing operations and remanufacturing operations for durable goods and to identify the features of the facilities design that must be considered if the remanufacturing operations are to be effective.

  11. Correlation of optical reflectivity with numerical calculations for a two-dimensional photonic crystal designed in Ge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husanu, Marius Adrian; Popescu, Dana Georgeta; Ganea, Constantin Paul; Anghel, Iulia; Florica, Camelia

    2015-12-01

    A two dimensional photonic crystal (2DPhC) with triangular symmetry is investigated using optical reflectivity measurements and numerical calculations. The system has been obtained by direct laser writing, using a pulsed laser ( λ = 775 nm), perforating an In-doped Ge wafer. A lattice of holes with well-defined symmetry has been designed. Analyzing the spectral signature of PBGs recorded experimentaly with finite difference time domain theoretical calculations one was able to prove the relation between the geometric parameters (hole format, lattice constant) of the system and its ability to trap and guide the radiation in specific energy range. It was shown that at low frequency and telecommunication ranges of transvelsal electric modes photonic band gap occur. This structure may have potential aplications in designing photonic devices with applications in energy storage and conversion as potential alternative to Si-based technology.

  12. Design parameters for carbon nanobottles to absorb and store methane.

    PubMed

    Lee, Richard K F; Hill, James M

    2011-08-01

    We investigate the internal mechanics for methane storage in a nanobottle, which is assumed to comprise a metallofullerene located inside a carbon nanobottle, which is constructed from a half-fullerene as the base, and two nanotubes which are joined by a nanocone. The interaction potential energy for the metallofullerene is obtained from the 6-12 Lennard-Jones potential and the continuum approximation, which assumes that a discrete atomic structure can be replaced by an average atomic surface density. This potential energy shows that the metallofullerene has two minimum energy positions, which are located close to the neck of the bottle and at the base of the nanobottle, and therefore it may be used as a bottle-stopper to open or to close the nanobottle. At the neck of the bottle, the encapsulated metallofullerene closes the nanobottle, and by applying an external electrical force, the metallofullerene can overcome the energy barrier of the nanotube, and pass from the neck of the nanobottle to the base so that the nanobottle is open. For methane storage, the metallofullerene serves the dual purposes of opening and closing the nanobottle, as well as an attractor for the methane gas. The analytical formulation gives rise to a rapid computational capacity, and enables the direct determination of the optimal dimensions necessary to ensure the correct working function of the nanobottle, and specific ranges for the critical parameters are formulated. PMID:22103096

  13. Landing on Enceladus: Mission Design Parameters and Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spilker, T. R.

    2006-12-01

    Since Cassini/Huygens mission results revealed the intriguing nature of Enceladus, scientists have discussed various ways to obtain more detailed information about the south-polar geysers and subsurface conditions that produce them. This includes potential science instruments and investigations, and also the kinds of spacecraft platforms that could deliver and support the instruments. The three most commonly discussed platforms are Saturn orbiters that perform multiple close Enceladus flybys, Enceladus orbiters, and landers (soft or hard). Some high-value science investigations, such as producing an accurate description of the gravity field to infer internal structure, are best done from an orbiter. Some, such as seismic investigations, can be done only with a landed package. Unlike larger satellites such as Europa and Ganymede, Enceladus's low mass yields low surface gravity (~0.11 m/s2), low orbital speeds (<200 m/s), and other mission design characteristics that make it a manageable destination for a practical, high-value lander mission. The main mission design challenge is deceleration from Enceladus approach to a direct landing approach or orbit insertion. A Hohmann transfer from Titan approaches Enceladus with a V- infinity of >4 km/s, most of which would have to be decelerated away propulsively - a sizeable, multi-stage task for current propulsion systems - if no gravity-assist pump-down is used. Preliminary conclusions from JPL mission designers suggest that a pump-down tour could reduce that V-infinity to 2 km/s or less, possibly as little as 1 km/s if a lengthy pump-down is tolerable (Strange, Russell, and Lam, 2006). Once in orbit, landing from a moderately stable, 100-km circular orbit can be accomplished with as little as 210 m/s delta-V, a relatively simple task for a simple propulsion system. Temporary use of marginally stable orbits could reduce that figure. Low surface gravity allows use of small, light thrusters and provides ample reaction time

  14. The Design Parameters for the MICE Tracker Solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A.; Chen, C.Y.; Juang, Tiki; Lau, Wing W.; Taylor,Clyde; Virostek, Steve P.; Wahrer, Robert; Wang, S.T.; Witte, Holger; Yang, Stephanie Q.

    2006-08-20

    The first superconducting magnets to be installed in the muon ionization cooling experiment (MICE) will be the tracker solenoids. The tracker solenoid module is a five coil superconducting solenoid with a 400 mm diameter warm bore that is used to provide a 4 T magnetic field for the experiment tracker module. Three of the coils are used to produce a uniform field (up to 4 T with better than 1 percent uniformity) in a region that is 300 mm in diameter and 1000 mm long. The other two coils are used to match the muon beam into the MICE cooling channel. Two 2.94-meter long superconducting tracker solenoid modules have been ordered for MICE. The tracker solenoid will be cooled using two-coolers that produce 1.5 W each at 4.2 K. The magnet system is described. The decisions that drive the magnet design will be discussed in this report.

  15. Monte Carlo calculated TG-60 dosimetry parameters for the {beta}{sup -} emitter {sup 153}Sm brachytherapy source

    SciTech Connect

    Sadeghi, Mahdi; Taghdiri, Fatemeh; Hamed Hosseini, S.; Tenreiro, Claudio

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: The formalism recommended by Task Group 60 (TG-60) of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is applicable for {beta} sources. Radioactive biocompatible and biodegradable {sup 153}Sm glass seed without encapsulation is a {beta}{sup -} emitter radionuclide with a short half-life and delivers a high dose rate to the tumor in the millimeter range. This study presents the results of Monte Carlo calculations of the dosimetric parameters for the {sup 153}Sm brachytherapy source. Methods: Version 5 of the (MCNP) Monte Carlo radiation transport code was used to calculate two-dimensional dose distributions around the source. The dosimetric parameters of AAPM TG-60 recommendations including the reference dose rate, the radial dose function, the anisotropy function, and the one-dimensional anisotropy function were obtained. Results: The dose rate value at the reference point was estimated to be 9.21{+-}0.6 cGy h{sup -1} {mu}Ci{sup -1}. Due to the low energy beta emitted from {sup 153}Sm sources, the dose fall-off profile is sharper than the other beta emitter sources. The calculated dosimetric parameters in this study are compared to several beta and photon emitting seeds. Conclusions: The results show the advantage of the {sup 153}Sm source in comparison with the other sources because of the rapid dose fall-off of beta ray and high dose rate at the short distances of the seed. The results would be helpful in the development of the radioactive implants using {sup 153}Sm seeds for the brachytherapy treatment.

  16. Learning Effects in the Block Design Task: A Stimulus Parameter-Based Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Joseph C.; Ruthig, Joelle C.; Bradley, April R.; Wise, Richard A.; Pedersen, Heather A.; Ellison, Jo M.

    2009-01-01

    Learning effects were assessed for the block design (BD) task, on the basis of variation in 2 stimulus parameters: perceptual cohesiveness (PC) and set size uncertainty (U). Thirty-one nonclinical undergraduate students (19 female) each completed 3 designs for each of 4 varied sets of the stimulus parameters (high-PC/high-U, high-PC/low-U,…

  17. Design guide for calculating fluid damping for circular cylindrical structures. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.S.

    1983-06-01

    Fluid damping plays an important role for structures submerged in fluid, subjected to flow, or conveying fluid. This design guide presents a summary of calculational procedures and design data for fluid damping for circular cylinders vibrating in quiescent fluid, crossflow, and parallel flow.

  18. Preliminary safety calculations to improve the design of Molten Salt Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Brovchenko, M.; Heuer, D.; Merle-Lucotte, E.; Allibert, M.; Capellan, N.; Ghetta, V.; Laureau, A.

    2012-07-01

    Molten salt reactors are liquid fuel reactors so that they are flexible in operation but very different in the safety approach from solid fuel reactors. This study bears on the specific concept named Molten Salt Fast Reactor (MSFR). Since this new nuclear technology is in development, safety is an essential point to be considered all along the R and D studies. This paper presents the first step of the safety approach: the systematic description of the MSFR, limited here to the main systems surrounding the core. This systematic description is the basis on which we will be able to devise accidental scenarios. Thanks to the negative reactivity feedback coefficient, most accidental scenarios lead to reactor shut down. Because of the decay heat generated in the fuel salt, it must be cooled. After the description of the tools developed to calculate the residual heat, the different contributions are discussed in this study. The decay heat of fission products in the MSFR is evaluated to be low (3% of nominal power), mainly due to the reprocessing that transfers the fission products to the gas reprocessing unit. As a result, the contribution of the actinides is significant (0.5% of nominal power). The unprotected loss of heat sink transients are studied in this paper. It appears that slow transients are favorable (> 1 min) to minimize the temperature increase of the fuel salt. This work will be the basis of further safety studies as well as an essential parameter for the design of the draining system. (authors)

  19. Structural Design Parameters for Highly Birefringent Coordination Polymers.

    PubMed

    Thompson, John R; Katz, Michael J; Williams, Vance E; Leznoff, Daniel B

    2015-07-01

    A series of coordination polymer materials incorporating the highly anisotropic 2-(2-pyridyl)-1,10-phenanthroline (phenpy) building block have been synthesized and structurally characterized. M(phenpy)[Au(CN)2]2 (M = Cd, Mn) are isostructural and form a 1-D chain through bridging [Au(CN)2](-) units and extend into a 2-D sheet through aurophilic interactions. M(phenpy)(H2O)[Au(CN)2]2·2H2O (M = Cd, Mn, and Zn) are also isostructural but differ from the first set via the inclusion of a water molecule into the coordination sphere, resulting in a 1-D topology through aurophilic interactions. In(phenpy)(Cl)2[Au(CN)2]·0.5H2O forms a dimer through bridging chlorides and contains a free [Au(CN)2](-) unit. In the plane of the primary crystal growth direction, the birefringence values (Δn) of 0.37(2) (Cd(phenpy)[Au(CN)2]2), 0.50(3) (In(phenpy)(Cl)2[Au(CN)2]·0.5H2O), 0.56(3) and 0.59(6) (M(phenpy)(H2O)[Au(CN)2]2·2H2O M = Cd and Zn, respectively) were determined. β, a structural parameter defined by phenpy units rotated in the A-C plane relative to the light propagation (C) direction, was found to correlate to Δn magnitudes. The addition of a carbon-carbon double bond to terpy has increased the molecular polarizability anisotropy of the building block, and all structures have reduced deviation from planarity in comparison to terpy and terpy derivative structures, leading to these higher Δn values, which are among the highest reported for crystalline solids. PMID:26098267

  20. First-Principles Calculation of the Real-Space Order Parameter and Condensation Energy Density in Phonon-Mediated Superconductors.

    PubMed

    Linscheid, A; Sanna, A; Floris, A; Gross, E K U

    2015-08-28

    We show that the superconducting order parameter and condensation energy density of phonon-mediated superconductors can be calculated in real space from first principles density functional theory for superconductors. This method highlights the connection between the chemical bonding structure and the superconducting condensation and reveals new and interesting properties of superconducting materials. Understanding this connection is essential to describe nanostructured superconducting systems where the usual reciprocal space analysis hides the basic physical mechanism. In a first application we present results for MgB2, CaC6 and hole-doped graphane.

  1. Microwave, infrared and Raman spectra, r0 structural parameters, ab initio calculations and vibrational assignment of 1-fluoro-1-silacyclopentane.

    PubMed

    Durig, James R; Panikar, Savitha S; Obenchain, Daniel A; Bills, Brandon J; Lohan, Patrick M; Peebles, Rebecca A; Peebles, Sean A; Groner, Peter; Guirgis, Gamil A; Johnston, Michael D

    2012-01-28

    The microwave spectrum (6500-18 ,500 MHz) of 1-fluoro-1-silacyclopentane, c-C(4)H(8)SiHF has been recorded and 87 transitions for the (28)Si, (29)Si, (30)Si, and (13)C isotopomers have been assigned for a single conformer. Infrared spectra (3050-350 cm(-1)) of the gas and solid and Raman spectrum (3100-40 cm(-1)) of the liquid have also been recorded. The vibrational data indicate the presence of a single conformer with no symmetry which is consistent with the twist form. Ab initio calculations with a variety of basis sets up to MP2(full)/aug-cc-pVTZ predict the envelope-axial and envelope-equatorial conformers to be saddle points with nearly the same energies but much lower energy than the planar conformer. By utilizing the microwave rotational constants for seven isotopomers ((28)Si, (29)Si, (30)Si, and four (13)C) combined with the structural parameters predicted from the MP2(full)/6-311+G(d,p) calculations, adjusted r(0) structural parameters have been obtained for the twist conformer. The heavy atom distances in Å are: r(0)(SiC(2)) = 1.875(3); r(0)(SiC(3)) = 1.872(3); r(0)(C(2)C(4)) = 1.549(3); r(0)(C(3)C(5)) = 1.547(3); r(0)(C(4)C(5)) = 1.542(3); r(0)(SiF) = 1.598(3) and the angles in degrees are: [angle]CSiC = 96.7(5); [angle]SiC(2)C(4) = 103.6(5); [angle]SiC(3)C(5) = 102.9(5); [angle]C(2)C(4)C(5) = 108.4(5); [angle]C(3)C(5)C(4) = 108.1(5); [angle]F(6)Si(1)C(2) = 110.7(5); [angle]F(6)Si(1)C(3) = 111.6(5). The heavy atom ring parameters are compared to the corresponding r(s) parameters. Normal coordinate calculations with scaled force constants from MP2(full)/6-31G(d) calculations were carried out to predict the fundamental vibrational frequencies, infrared intensities, Raman activities, depolarization values, and infrared band contours. These experimental and theoretical results are compared to the corresponding quantities of some other five-membered rings.

  2. Thermoluminescence of nanocrystalline CaSO4: Dy for gamma dosimetry and calculation of trapping parameters using deconvolution method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandlik, Nandkumar; Patil, B. J.; Bhoraskar, V. N.; Sahare, P. D.; Dhole, S. D.

    2014-04-01

    Nanorods of CaSO4: Dy having diameter 20 nm and length 200 nm have been synthesized by the chemical coprecipitation method. These samples were irradiated with gamma radiation for the dose varying from 0.1 Gy to 50 kGy and their TL characteristics have been studied. TL dose response shows a linear behavior up to 5 kGy and further saturates with increase in the dose. A Computerized Glow Curve Deconvolution (CGCD) program was used for the analysis of TL glow curves. Trapping parameters for various peaks have been calculated by using CGCD program.

  3. First-Principles Calculation of the Real-Space Order Parameter and Condensation Energy Density in Phonon-Mediated Superconductors.

    PubMed

    Linscheid, A; Sanna, A; Floris, A; Gross, E K U

    2015-08-28

    We show that the superconducting order parameter and condensation energy density of phonon-mediated superconductors can be calculated in real space from first principles density functional theory for superconductors. This method highlights the connection between the chemical bonding structure and the superconducting condensation and reveals new and interesting properties of superconducting materials. Understanding this connection is essential to describe nanostructured superconducting systems where the usual reciprocal space analysis hides the basic physical mechanism. In a first application we present results for MgB2, CaC6 and hole-doped graphane. PMID:26371675

  4. Thermoluminescence of nanocrystalline CaSO{sub 4}: Dy for gamma dosimetry and calculation of trapping parameters using deconvolution method

    SciTech Connect

    Mandlik, Nandkumar; Patil, B. J.; Bhoraskar, V. N.; Dhole, S. D.; Sahare, P. D.

    2014-04-24

    Nanorods of CaSO{sub 4}: Dy having diameter 20 nm and length 200 nm have been synthesized by the chemical coprecipitation method. These samples were irradiated with gamma radiation for the dose varying from 0.1 Gy to 50 kGy and their TL characteristics have been studied. TL dose response shows a linear behavior up to 5 kGy and further saturates with increase in the dose. A Computerized Glow Curve Deconvolution (CGCD) program was used for the analysis of TL glow curves. Trapping parameters for various peaks have been calculated by using CGCD program.

  5. Ab initio calculation of the effective on-site Coulomb interaction parameters for half-metallic magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şaşıoğlu, Ersoy; Galanakis, Iosif; Friedrich, Christoph; Blügel, Stefan

    2013-10-01

    Correlation effects play an important role in the electronic structure of half-metallic (HM) magnets. In particular, they give rise to nonquasiparticle states above (or below) the Fermi energy at finite temperatures that reduce the spin polarization and, as a consequence, the efficiency of spintronics devices. Employing the constrained random-phase approximation (cRPA) within the full-potential linearized augmented-plane-wave (FLAPW) method using maximally localized Wannier functions, we calculate the strength of the effective on-site Coulomb interaction (Hubbard U and Hund exchange J) between localized electrons in different classes of HM magnets considering: (i) sp-electron ferromagnets in rock-salt structure, (ii) zinc-blende 3d binary ferromagnets, as well as (iii) ferromagnetic and ferrimagnetic semi- and full-Heusler compounds. For HM sp-electron ferromagnets, the calculated Hubbard U parameters are between 2.7 and 3.9 eV, while for transition-metal-based HM compounds, they lie between 1.7 and 3.8 eV, being smallest for MnAs (Mn-3d orbitals) and largest for Cr2CoGa (Co-3d orbitals). For the HM full-Heusler compounds, the Hubbard U parameters are comparable to the ones in elementary 3d transition metals, while for semi-Heusler compounds, they are slightly smaller. We show that the increase of the Hubbard U with structural complexity, i.e., from MnAs to Cr2CoGa, stems from the screening of the p electrons of the nonmagnetic sp atoms. The p-electron screening turns out to be more efficient for MnAs than for Cr2CoGa. The calculated Hubbard U parameters for CrAs, NiMnSb, and Co2MnSi are about two times smaller than previous estimates based on the constrained local-density approximation (cLDA) method. Furthermore, the width of the correlated d or p bands of the studied compounds is usually smaller than the calculated Hubbard U parameters. Thus these HM magnets should be classified as weakly correlated materials.

  6. Empirically Fitted Parameters for Calculating pKa Values with Small Deviations from Experiments Using a Simple Computational Strategy.

    PubMed

    Galano, Annia; Pérez-González, Adriana; Castañeda-Arriaga, Romina; Muñoz-Rugeles, Leonardo; Mendoza-Sarmiento, Gabriela; Romero-Silva, Antonio; Ibarra-Escutia, Agustin; Rebollar-Zepeda, Aida Mariana; León-Carmona, Jorge Rafael; Hernández-Olivares, Manuel Alejandro; Alvarez-Idaboy, Juan Raúl

    2016-09-26

    Two empirically fitted parameters have been derived for 74 levels of theory. They allow fast and reliable pKa calculations using only the Gibbs energy difference between an acid and its conjugated base in aqueous solution (ΔGs(BA)). The parameters were obtained by least-squares fits of ΔGs(BA) vs experimental pKa values for phenols, carboxylic acids, and amines using training sets of 20 molecules for each chemical family. Test sets of 10 molecules per family-completely independent from the training set-were used to verify the reliability of the fitting parameters method. It was found that, except for MP2, deviations from experiments are lower than 0.5 pKa units. Moreover, mean unsigned errors lower than 0.35 pKa units were found for the 98.6%, 98.6%, and 94.6% of the tested levels of theory for phenols, carboxylic acids and amines, respectively. The parameters estimated here are expected to facilitate computationally based estimations of pKa values of species for which this magnitude is still unknown, with uncertainties similar to the experimental ones. However, the present study deals only with molecules of modest complexity, thus the reliability of the FP method for more complex systems remains to be tested.

  7. Invisible cloak design with controlled constitutive parameters and arbitrary shaped boundaries through Helmholtz's equation: comment.

    PubMed

    Chang, Zheng; Zhou, Xiaoming; Hu, Jin; Hu, Gengkai

    2010-02-15

    In a recent paper, Chen et al. [Opt. Express 17, 3581 (2009)] develop an approach to design invisible cloaks with controllable constitutive parameters by adjusting the constant k in the Helmholtz's equation. In this comment, we discuss the limitation of the free parameter k in designing cloaks. It is found that the real constant k can be chosen only as limited values in order to avoid the singular material parameters. PMID:20389403

  8. Structural modelling and control design under incomplete parameter information: The maximum-entropy approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyland, D. C.

    1983-01-01

    A stochastic structural control model is described. In contrast to the customary deterministic model, the stochastic minimum data/maximum entropy model directly incorporates the least possible a priori parameter information. The approach is to adopt this model as the basic design model, thus incorporating the effects of parameter uncertainty at a fundamental level, and design mean-square optimal controls (that is, choose the control law to minimize the average of a quadratic performance index over the parameter ensemble).

  9. Accuracy in parameter estimation in cluster randomized designs.

    PubMed

    Pornprasertmanit, Sunthud; Schneider, W Joel

    2014-09-01

    When planning to conduct a study, not only is it important to select a sample size that will ensure adequate statistical power, often it is important to select a sample size that results in accurate effect size estimates. In cluster-randomized designs (CRD), such planning presents special challenges. In CRD studies, instead of assigning individual objects to treatment conditions, objects are grouped in clusters, and these clusters are then assigned to different treatment conditions. Sample size in CRD studies is a function of 2 components: the number of clusters and the cluster size. Planning to conduct a CRD study is difficult because 2 distinct sample size combinations might be associated with similar costs but can result in dramatically different levels of statistical power and accuracy in effect size estimation. Thus, we present a method that assists researchers in finding the least expensive sample size combination that still results in adequate accuracy in effect size estimation. Alternatively, if researchers have a fixed budget, they can select the sample size combination that results in the most precise estimate of effect size. A free computer program that automates these procedures is available. PMID:25046449

  10. Dynamic System Model of LS-VHTR to Estimate Design Parameter Impacts on Safety Margin and Reactor Economics

    SciTech Connect

    Qualls, A.L.; Wilson Jr, T.L.

    2006-07-01

    Early reactor analysis work for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Liquid Salt - Very High Temperature Reactor (LS-VHTR) concept has focused primarily on detailed analyses of the core. This paper discusses ongoing analyses of the balance of plant and how it impacts overall system design. A dynamic system model of the end-to-end LS-VHTR has been developed to investigate the impact of major design parameters on systems performance, safety margin, and plant economics. The core model uses simplified thermal-hydraulic analyses to calculate four characteristic radial coolant channel parameters during transients. The core model is coupled to a multi-reheat Brayton power conversion system model through an intermediate salt-coolant loop model. A passive, safety-related heat-removal system is modeled for reactor pressure vessel protection. Critical parameters, such as peak fuel and vessel temperatures and peak temperatures and pressures in the power conversion loop, are estimated during proposed transients. The impacts of design parameters on component design requirements, safety margin, and economics are to be investigated. Transients initially analyzed will include loss-of-coolant-flow accidents. For initial transients, the axial- and radial-power profiles within the core will remain constant, with power levels decreasing in proportion to the time-dependent decay heating rate of the fuel. Later transients will represent spatial core power shifts during transients without scram. Results from simplified economic models will support relative comparisons among system design options. (authors)

  11. Parallel calculation of sensitivity derivatives for aircraft design using automatic differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bischof, C.H.; Knauff, T.L. Jr.; Green, L.L.; Haigler, K.J.

    1994-01-01

    Realistic multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO) of advanced aircraft using state-of-the-art computers is an extremely challenging problem from both the physical modelling and computer science points of view. In order to produce an efficient aircraft design, many trade-offs must be made among the various physical design variables. Similarly, in order to produce an efficient design scheme, many trade-offs must be made among the various MDO implementation options. In this paper, we examine the effects of vectorization and coarse-grained parallelization on the SD calculation using a representative example taken from a transonic transport design problem.

  12. Parameter estimation and uncertainty quantification in a biogeochemical model using optimal experimental design methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimer, Joscha; Piwonski, Jaroslaw; Slawig, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    The statistical significance of any model-data comparison strongly depends on the quality of the used data and the criterion used to measure the model-to-data misfit. The statistical properties (such as mean values, variances and covariances) of the data should be taken into account by choosing a criterion as, e.g., ordinary, weighted or generalized least squares. Moreover, the criterion can be restricted onto regions or model quantities which are of special interest. This choice influences the quality of the model output (also for not measured quantities) and the results of a parameter estimation or optimization process. We have estimated the parameters of a three-dimensional and time-dependent marine biogeochemical model describing the phosphorus cycle in the ocean. For this purpose, we have developed a statistical model for measurements of phosphate and dissolved organic phosphorus. This statistical model includes variances and correlations varying with time and location of the measurements. We compared the obtained estimations of model output and parameters for different criteria. Another question is if (and which) further measurements would increase the model's quality at all. Using experimental design criteria, the information content of measurements can be quantified. This may refer to the uncertainty in unknown model parameters as well as the uncertainty regarding which model is closer to reality. By (another) optimization, optimal measurement properties such as locations, time instants and quantities to be measured can be identified. We have optimized such properties for additional measurement for the parameter estimation of the marine biogeochemical model. For this purpose, we have quantified the uncertainty in the optimal model parameters and the model output itself regarding the uncertainty in the measurement data using the (Fisher) information matrix. Furthermore, we have calculated the uncertainty reduction by additional measurements depending on time

  13. Simulations of the pipe overpack to compute constitutive model parameters for use in WIPP room closure calculations.

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Byoung Yoon; Hansen, Francis D.

    2004-07-01

    The regulatory compliance determination for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant includes the consideration of room closure. Elements of the geomechanical processes include salt creep, gas generation and mechanical deformation of the waste residing in the rooms. The WIPP was certified as complying with regulatory requirements based in part on the implementation of room closure and material models for the waste. Since the WIPP began receiving waste in 1999, waste packages have been identified that are appreciably more robust than the 55-gallon drums characterized for the initial calculations. The pipe overpack comprises one such waste package. This report develops material model parameters for the pipe overpack containers by using axisymmetrical finite element models. Known material properties and structural dimensions allow well constrained models to be completed for uniaxial, triaxial, and hydrostatic compression of the pipe overpack waste package. These analyses show that the pipe overpack waste package is far more rigid than the originally certified drum. The model parameters developed in this report are used subsequently to evaluate the implications to performance assessment calculations.

  14. Ab initio calculation of Hubbard parameters for Rydberg-dressed atoms in a one-dimensional optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chougale, Yashwant; Nath, Rejish

    2016-07-01

    We obtain ab initio the Hubbard parameters for Rydberg-dressed atoms in a one-dimensional (1D) sinusoidal optical lattice on the basis of maximally-localized Wannier states. Finite range, soft-core interatomic interactions become the trait of Rydberg admixed atoms, which can be extended over many neighboring lattice sites. In contrast to dipolar gases, where the interactions follow an inverse cubic law, the key feature of Rydberg-dressed interactions is the possibility of making neighboring couplings to the same magnitude as that of the onsite ones. The maximally-localized Wannier functions (MLWFs) are typically calculated via a spread-minimization procedure (Marzari N and Vanderbilt D 1997 Phys. Rev. B 56 12847) and are always found to be real functions apart from a trivial global phase when an isolated set of Bloch bands are considered. For an isolated single Bloch band, the above procedure reduces to a simple quasi-momentum-dependent unitary phase transformation. Here, instead of minimizing the spread, we employ a diagonal phase transformation which eliminates the imaginary part of the Wannier functions. The resulting Wannier states are found to be maximally localized and in exact agreement with those obtained via a spread-minimization procedure. Using these findings, we calculate the Hubbard couplings from the Rydberg admixed interactions, including dominant density-assisted tunneling (DAT) coefficients. Finally, we provide realistic lattice parameters for the state-of-the-art experimental Rydberg-dressed rubidium setup.

  15. Computer program TRACK_TEST for calculating parameters and plotting profiles for etch pits in nuclear track materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikezic, D.; Yu, K. N.

    2006-01-01

    A computer program called TRACK_TEST for calculating parameters (lengths of the major and minor axes) and plotting profiles in nuclear track materials resulted from light-ion irradiation and subsequent chemical etching is described. The programming steps are outlined, including calculations of alpha-particle ranges, determination of the distance along the particle trajectory penetrated by the chemical etchant, calculations of track coordinates, determination of the lengths of the major and minor axes and determination of the contour of the track opening. Descriptions of the program are given, including the built-in V functions for the two commonly employed nuclear track materials commercially known as LR 115 (cellulose nitrate) and CR-39 (poly allyl diglycol carbonate) irradiated by alpha particles. Program summaryTitle of the program:TRACK_TEST Catalogue identifier:ADWT Program obtainable from:CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADWT Computer:Pentium PC Operating systems:Windows 95+ Programming language:Fortran 90 Memory required to execute with typical data:256 MB No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 2739 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.:204 526 Distribution format:tar.gz External subprograms used:The entire code must be linked with the MSFLIB library Nature of problem: Fast heavy charged particles (like alpha particles and other light ions etc.) create latent tracks in some dielectric materials. After chemical etching in aqueous NaOH or KOH solutions, these tracks become visible under an optical microscope. The growth of a track is based on the simultaneous actions of the etchant on undamaged regions (with the bulk etch rate V) and along the particle track (with the track etch rate V). Growth of the track is described satisfactorily by these two parameters ( V and V). Several models have been presented in the past describing

  16. Rapid calculation of functional maps of glucose metabolic rate and individual model rate parameters from serial 2-FDG images

    SciTech Connect

    Koeppe, R.A.; Holden, J.E.; Hutchins, G.D.

    1985-05-01

    The authors have developed a method for the rapid pixel-by-pixel estimation of glucose metabolic rate from a dynamic sequence of PCT images acquired over 40 minutes following venous bolus injection of 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose (2-FDG). The calculations are based on the conventional four parameter model. The dephosphorylation rate (k/sub 4/) cannot be reliably estimated from only 40 minutes of data; however, neglecting dephosphorylation can nonetheless introduce significant biases into the parameter estimation processes. In the authors' method, the rate is constrained to fall within a small range about a presumed value. Computer simulation studies show that this constraint greatly reduces the systematic biases in the other three fitted parameters and in the metabolic rate that arise from the assumption of no dephosphorylation. The parameter estimation scheme used is formally identical to one originally developed for dynamic methods of cerebral blood flow estimation. Estimation of metabolic rate and the individual model rate parameters k/sub 1/, k/sub 2/, and k/sub 3/, can be carried out for each pixel sequence of a 100 x 100 pixel image in less than two minutes on our PDP 11/60 minicomputer with floating point processor. While the maps of k/sub 2/ amd k/sub 3/ are quite noisy, accurate estimates of average values can be attained for regions of a few cm/sup 2/. The maps of metabolic rate offer many advantages in addition to that of direct visualization. These include improved statistical precision and the avoidance of averaging failure in the fitting of heterogeneous regions.

  17. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP), Slick Rock, Colorado, Revision 1. Volume 2, Calculations, Final design for construction

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    Volume two contains calculations for: embankment design--slope stability analysis; embankment design--excavation stability; embankment design--settlement and cover cracking analysis; radon barrier design--statistical analysis of ra-226 concentrations for North Continent and Union Carbide sites; radon barrier design--RAECOM input data; radon barrier design--design thickness; and cover design--frost penetration depth.

  18. The slope parameter approach to marine cathodic protection design and its application to impressed current systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hartt, W.H.

    1999-07-01

    The recently developed slope parameter approach to design of galvanic anode cathodic protection (cp) systems for marine structures constitutes an advancement in this technology compared to current practice, primarily because the former is first principles based and the latter is an empirical algorithm. In this paper, the slope parameter approach is reviewed; and related applications for which it can be utilized, including (1) design of new and retrofit cp systems, (2) evaluation of potential survey data, and (3) cp system design for complex geometries, are mentioned. The design current density is identified as the single remaining parameter for which values must be projected solely by experience or experimentation. In addition, the slope parameter approach is applied to the results of impressed current cp experiments, and it is shown how parameters for this can be interrelated with those of galvanic anode cp. Advantages of this capability are identified and discussed.

  19. Development of mathematical pediatric phantoms for internal dose calculations: designs, limitations, and prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Cristy, M.

    1980-01-01

    Mathematical phantoms of the human body at various ages are employed with Monte Carlo radiation transport codes for calculation of photon specific absorbed fractions. The author has developed a pediatric phantom series based on the design of the adult phantom, but with explicit equations for each organ so that organ sizes and marrow distributions could be assigned properly. Since the phantoms comprise simple geometric shapes, predictive dose capability is limited when geometry is critical to the calculation. Hence, there is a demand for better phantom design in situations where geometry is critical, such as for external irradiation or for internal emitters with low energy photons. Recent advances in computerized axial tomography (CAT) present the potential for derivation of anatomical information, which is so critical to development of phantoms, and ongoing developmental work on compuer architecture to handle large arrays for Monte Carlo calculations should make complex-geometry dose calculations economically feasible within this decade.

  20. PYFLOW: A computer code for the calculation of the impact parameters of Dilute Pyroclastic Density Currents (DPDC) based on field data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dioguardi, Fabio; Dellino, Pierfrancesco

    2014-05-01

    PYFLOW is a computer code designed for quantifying the hazard related to Dilute Pyroclastic Density Currents (DPDC). DPDCs are multiphase flows that form during explosive volcanic eruptions. They are the major source of hazard related to volcanic eruptions, as they exert a significant stress over buildings and transport significant amounts of volcanic ash, which is hot and unbreathable. The program calculates the DPDC's impact parameters (e.g. dynamic pressure and particle volumetric concentration) and is founded on the turbulent boundary layer theory adapted to a multiphase framework. Fluid-dynamic variables are searched with a probabilistic approach, meaning that for each variable the average, maximum and minimum solutions are calculated. From these values, PYFLOW creates probability functions that allow to calculate the parameter at a given percentile. The code is written in Fortran 90 and can be compiled and installed on Windows, Mac OS X, Linux operating systems (OS). A User's manual is provided, explaining the details of the theoretical background, the setup and running procedure and the input data. The model inputs are DPDC deposits data, e.g. particle grainsize, layer thickness, particles shape factor and density. PYFLOW reads input data from a specifically designed input file or from the user's direct typing by command lines. Guidelines for writing input data are also contained in the package. PYFLOW guides the user at each step of execution, asking for additional data and inputs. The program is a tool for DPDC hazard assessment and, as an example, an application to the DPDC deposits of the Agnano-Monte Spina eruption (4.1 ky BP) at Campi Flegrei (Italy) is presented.

  1. Origin of parameter degeneracy and molecular shape relationships in geometric-flow calculations of solvation free energies

    SciTech Connect

    Daily, Michael D.; Chun, Jaehun; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Wei, Guowei; Baker, Nathan A.

    2013-11-28

    Implicit solvent models are important tools for calculating solvation free energies for chemical and biophysical studies since they require fewer computational resources but can achieve accuracy comparable to that of explicit-solvent models. In past papers, geometric flow-based solvation models have been established for solvation analysis of small and large compounds. In the present work, the use of realistic experiment-based parameter choices for the geometric flow models is studied. We find that the experimental parameters of solvent internal pressure p = 172 MPa and surface tension γ = 72 mN/m produce solvation free energies within 1 RT of the global minimum root-mean-squared deviation from experimental data over the expanded set. Our results demonstrate that experimental values can be used for geometric flow solvent model parameters, thus eliminating the need for additional parameterization. We also examine the correlations between optimal values of p and γ which are strongly anti-correlated. Geometric analysis of the small molecule test set shows that these results are inter-connected with an approximately linear relationship between area and volume in the range of molecular sizes spanned by the data set. In spite of this considerable degeneracy between the surface tension and pressure terms in the model, both terms are important for the broader applicability of the model.

  2. Origin of parameter degeneracy and molecular shape relationships in geometric-flow calculations of solvation free energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daily, Michael D.; Chun, Jaehun; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Wei, Guowei; Baker, Nathan A.

    2013-11-01

    Implicit solvent models are important tools for calculating solvation free energies for chemical and biophysical studies since they require fewer computational resources but can achieve accuracy comparable to that of explicit-solvent models. In past papers, geometric flow-based solvation models have been established for solvation analysis of small and large compounds. In the present work, the use of realistic experiment-based parameter choices for the geometric flow models is studied. We find that the experimental parameters of solvent internal pressure p = 172 MPa and surface tension γ = 72 mN/m produce solvation free energies within 1 RT of the global minimum root-mean-squared deviation from experimental data over the expanded set. Our results demonstrate that experimental values can be used for geometric flow solvent model parameters, thus eliminating the need for additional parameterization. We also examine the correlations between optimal values of p and γ which are strongly anti-correlated. Geometric analysis of the small molecule test set shows that these results are inter-connected with an approximately linear relationship between area and volume in the range of molecular sizes spanned by the data set. In spite of this considerable degeneracy between the surface tension and pressure terms in the model, both terms are important for the broader applicability of the model.

  3. Development of a neutronics calculation method for designing commercial type Japanese sodium-cooled fast reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, T.; Shimazu, Y.; Hibi, K.; Fujimura, K.

    2012-07-01

    Under the R and D project to improve the modeling accuracy for the design of fast breeder reactors the authors are developing a neutronics calculation method for designing a large commercial type sodium- cooled fast reactor. The calculation method is established by taking into account the special features of the reactor such as the use of annular fuel pellet, inner duct tube in large fuel assemblies, large core. The Verification and Validation, and Uncertainty Qualification (V and V and UQ) of the calculation method is being performed by using measured data from the prototype FBR Monju. The results of this project will be used in the design and analysis of the commercial type demonstration FBR, known as the Japanese Sodium fast Reactor (JSFR). (authors)

  4. Parameters for the RM1 Quantum Chemical Calculation of Complexes of the Trications of Thulium, Ytterbium and Lutetium

    PubMed Central

    Filho, Manoel A. M.; Dutra, José Diogo L.; Rocha, Gerd B.; Simas, Alfredo M.

    2016-01-01

    The RM1 quantum chemical model for the calculation of complexes of Tm(III), Yb(III) and Lu(III) is advanced. Subsequently, we tested the models by fully optimizing the geometries of 126 complexes. We then compared the optimized structures with known crystallographic ones from the Cambridge Structural Database. Results indicate that, for thulium complexes, the accuracy in terms of the distances between the lanthanide ion and its directly coordinated atoms is about 2%. Corresponding results for ytterbium and lutetium are both 3%, levels of accuracy useful for the design of lanthanide complexes, targeting their countless applications. PMID:27223475

  5. Parameters for the RM1 Quantum Chemical Calculation of Complexes of the Trications of Thulium, Ytterbium and Lutetium.

    PubMed

    Filho, Manoel A M; Dutra, José Diogo L; Rocha, Gerd B; Simas, Alfredo M; Freire, Ricardo O

    2016-01-01

    The RM1 quantum chemical model for the calculation of complexes of Tm(III), Yb(III) and Lu(III) is advanced. Subsequently, we tested the models by fully optimizing the geometries of 126 complexes. We then compared the optimized structures with known crystallographic ones from the Cambridge Structural Database. Results indicate that, for thulium complexes, the accuracy in terms of the distances between the lanthanide ion and its directly coordinated atoms is about 2%. Corresponding results for ytterbium and lutetium are both 3%, levels of accuracy useful for the design of lanthanide complexes, targeting their countless applications.

  6. Parameters for the RM1 Quantum Chemical Calculation of Complexes of the Trications of Thulium, Ytterbium and Lutetium.

    PubMed

    Filho, Manoel A M; Dutra, José Diogo L; Rocha, Gerd B; Simas, Alfredo M; Freire, Ricardo O

    2016-01-01

    The RM1 quantum chemical model for the calculation of complexes of Tm(III), Yb(III) and Lu(III) is advanced. Subsequently, we tested the models by fully optimizing the geometries of 126 complexes. We then compared the optimized structures with known crystallographic ones from the Cambridge Structural Database. Results indicate that, for thulium complexes, the accuracy in terms of the distances between the lanthanide ion and its directly coordinated atoms is about 2%. Corresponding results for ytterbium and lutetium are both 3%, levels of accuracy useful for the design of lanthanide complexes, targeting their countless applications. PMID:27223475

  7. Optimum design calculations for detectors based on ZnSe(Те,О) scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katrunov, K.; Ryzhikov, V.; Gavrilyuk, V.; Naydenov, S.; Lysetska, O.; Litichevskyi, V.

    2013-06-01

    Light collection in scintillators ZnSe(X), where X is an isovalent dopant, was studied using Monte Carlo calculations. Optimum design was determined for detectors of "scintillator—Si-photodiode" type, which can involve either one scintillation element or scintillation layers of large area made of small-crystalline grains. The calculations were carried out both for determination of the optimum scintillator shape and for design optimization of light guides, on the surface of which the layer of small-crystalline grains is formed.

  8. Use precise calculation models to operate or design refinery gas treating systems

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    Amine simulators using rate-based calculation methodology can show refinery operators how to treat more acid gas with existing equipment. These simulators can rate the performance and design of an existing unit by evaluating tray size, downcomer configuration, column diameter, wier height, tray depth and operation with a particular solvent. In addition, these simulators can optimize plant designers` solvent selection and equipment sizing in grassroots applications.

  9. The structure and molecular parameters of camphene determined by Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neeman, Elias M.; Dréan, Pascal; Huet, Thérèse R.

    2016-04-01

    Camphene (C10H16) is a bicyclic monoterpene of atmospheric interest. The structure of the unique stable conformer was optimized using density functional theory and ab initio calculations. The rotational spectrum of camphene was recorded in a supersonic jet expansion with a Fourier transform microwave spectrometer over the range 2-20 GHz. Signals from the parent species and from the ten 13C isotopomers were observed in natural abundance. The rotational and centrifugal distortion parameters were fitted to a Watson's Hamiltonian in the A-reduction. Complex line-shapes resulting from a magnetic interaction associated with the pairs of hydrogen nuclei in the methylene groups was observed and modeled. The rotational constants were used together with equilibrium structure to determine the r0 and the rm(1) gas-phase geometries of the carbon skeleton. The present work provides the first spectroscopic characterization of camphene in the gas phase.

  10. A procedure for the calculation of alpha function coefficients for the attraction parameter of Van der Waals equations of state

    SciTech Connect

    Stamateris, B.; Olivera-Fuentes, C.

    1996-12-31

    A new procedure is proposed for the calculation and correlation of cohesion parameters in cubic equations of state of the Van der Waals type. In this method, the derivative (rather than the function itself) is computed subject to the Maxwell (equal area) and Clapeyron equations. Strong experimental evidence indicates that properly formulated a functions must generate negative values at high temperatures. A theoretical analysis demonstrates the correct, hard-body limiting behavior of the cohesion function at infinite temperatures. From this, the simplest possible form of the cohesion function follows as a two-constant expression that can be considered an extension of a functional form previously proposed by Martin. The proposed function`s performance is comparable to more complex expressions previously presented in the literature, predicting vapor pressures of polar and nonpolar fluids with relative deviations (i) of {+-} 1%. 14 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Methodology and input availability parameters for calculating OpEx and CapEx costs for realistic network scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbrugge, S.; Colle, D.; Pickavet, M.; Demeester, P.; Pasqualini, S.; Iselt, A.; Kirstädter, A.; Hülsermann, R.; Westphal, F.-J.; Jäger, M.

    2006-06-01

    The availability requirements for today's networks are very high. Higher availability often comes with a higher cost. We describe several steps required for estimating the costs of realistic network scenarios. Capital expenditures (CapEx) and operational expenditures (OpEx) are classified. An activity-based approach is used to quantify the cost of the event-driven operational processes such as repair and service provisioning. We discuss activity duration and availability parameters as required input data, which are necessary for calculating the processes' costs for realistic network scenarios. The relevant availability measures for an IP-over-Optical network are described using a triplet representation with optimistic, nominal, and conservative values. The model is applied to a reference German network scenario.

  12. The explicitly correlated same number of optimized parameters (SNOOP-F12) scheme for calculating intermolecular interaction energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, Troels Hels; Wang, Yang Min; Kjærgaard, Thomas; Kristensen, Kasper

    2016-05-01

    We augment the recently introduced same number of optimized parameters (SNOOP) scheme [K. Kristensen et al., J. Chem. Phys. 142, 114116 (2015)] for calculating interaction energies of molecular dimers with an F12 correction and generalize the method to enable the determination of interaction energies of general molecular clusters. The SNOOP, uncorrected (UC), and counterpoise (CP) schemes with/without an F12 correction are compared for the S22 test set of Jurečka et al. [Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 8, 1985 (2006)]—which consists of 22 molecular dimers of biological importance—and for water and methane molecular clusters. The calculations have been performed using the Resolution of the Identity second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory method. We conclude from the results that the SNOOP scheme generally yields interaction energies closer to the complete basis set limit value than the UC and CP approaches, regardless of whether the F12 correction is applied or not. Specifically, using the SNOOP scheme with an F12 correction yields the computationally most efficient way of achieving accurate results at low basis set levels. These conclusions hold both for molecular dimers and more general molecular clusters.

  13. Algorithms of D-optimal designs for Morgan Mercer Flodin (MMF) models with three parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widiharih, Tatik; Haryatmi, Sri; Gunardi, Wilandari, Yuciana

    2016-02-01

    Morgan Mercer Flodin (MMF) model is used in many areas including biological growth studies, animal and husbandry, chemistry, finance, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. Locally D-optimal designs for Morgan Mercer Flodin (MMF) models with three parameters are investigated. We used the Generalized Equivalence Theorem of Kiefer and Wolvowitz to determine D-optimality criteria. Number of roots for standardized variance are determined using Tchebysheff system concept and it is used to decide that the design is minimally supported design. In these models, designs are minimally supported designs with uniform weight on its support, and the upper bound of the design region is a support point.

  14. Monte Carlo calculations and experimental measurements of the TG-43U1-recommended dosimetric parameters of 125I (Model IR-Seed2) brachytherapy source.

    PubMed

    Sheikholeslami, Sahar; Nedaie, Hasan Ali; Sadeghi, Mahdi; Pourbeigi, Hossein; Shahzadi, Sohrab; Zehtabian, Mehdi; Hasani, Mohsen; Meigooni, Ali S

    2016-01-01

    A new design of 125I (Model IR-Seed2) brachytherapy source has been manufactured recently at the Applied Radiation Research School, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute in Iran. The source consists of six resin beads (0.5 mm diameter) that are sealed in a cylindrical titanium capsule of 0.7 mm internal and 0.8 mm external diameters. This work aims to evaluate the dosimetric parameters of the newly designed 125I source using experimental measurements and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Dosimetric characteristics (dose rate constant, radial dose function, and 2D and 1D anisotropy functions) of the IR-Seed2 were determined using experimental measurements and MC simulations following the recommendations by the Task Group 43 (TG-43U1) report of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM). MC simulations were performed using the MCNP5 code in water and Plexiglas, and experimental measurements were carried out using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-GR207A) in Plexiglas phantoms. The measured dose to water in Plexiglas data were used for verification of the accuracy of the source and phantom geometry in the Monte Carlo simulations. The final MC simulated data to water in water were recommended for clinical applications. The MC calculated dose rate constant (Λ) of the IR-Seed2 125I seed in water was found to be 0.992 ± 0.025 cGy h-1U-1. Additionally, its radial dose function by line and point source approximations, gL(r) and gp(r), calculated for distances from 0.1 cm to 7 cm. The values of gL(r) at radial distances from 0.5 cm to 5 cm were measured in a Plexiglas phantom to be between 1.212 and 0.413. The calculated and measured of values for 2D anisotropy function, F(r, θ), were obtained for the radial distances ranging from 1.5 cm to 5 cm and angular range of 0°-90° in a Plexiglas phantom. Also, the 2D anisotropy function was calculated in water for the clinical application. The results of these investigations show that the uncertainty of

  15. A computer module used to calculate the horizontal control surface size of a conceptual aircraft design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandlin, Doral R.; Swanson, Stephen Mark

    1990-01-01

    The creation of a computer module used to calculate the size of the horizontal control surfaces of a conceptual aircraft design is discussed. The control surface size is determined by first calculating the size needed to rotate the aircraft during takeoff, and, second, by determining if the calculated size is large enough to maintain stability of the aircraft throughout any specified mission. The tail size needed to rotate during takeoff is calculated from a summation of forces about the main landing gear of the aircraft. The stability of the aircraft is determined from a summation of forces about the center of gravity during different phases of the aircraft's flight. Included in the horizontal control surface analysis are: downwash effects on an aft tail, upwash effects on a forward canard, and effects due to flight in close proximity to the ground. Comparisons of production aircraft with numerical models show good accuracy for control surface sizing. A modified canard design verified the accuracy of the module for canard configurations. Added to this stability and control module is a subroutine that determines one of the three design variables, for a stable vectored thrust aircraft. These include forward thrust nozzle position, aft thrust nozzle angle, and forward thrust split.

  16. Numerical calculation of the parameters of the efflux from a helium dewar used for cooling of heat shields in a satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brendley, K.; Chato, J. C.

    1982-01-01

    The parameters of the efflux from a helium dewar in space were numerically calculated. The flow was modeled as a one dimensional compressible ideal gas with variable properties. The primary boundary conditions are flow with friction and flow with heat transfer and friction. Two PASCAL programs were developed to calculate the efflux parameters: EFFLUZD and EFFLUXM. EFFLUXD calculates the minimum mass flow for the given shield temperatures and shield heat inputs. It then calculates the pipe lengths, diameter, and fluid parameters which satisfy all boundary conditions. Since the diameter returned by EFFLUXD is only rarely of nominal size, EFFLUXM calculates the mass flow and shield heat exchange for given pipe lengths, diameter, and shield temperatures.

  17. A Study on Design Concept for a Braille Tactile Sensor Segment Using Softness Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhongwei; Arabshahi, Sayyed Alireza; Watanabe, Tetsuyou

    The purpose of this report is to introduce and discuss about the design parameters for a segment of a tactile sensor reading one dot of a Braille alphabet. A sensor segment consisting of a piezoelectric (PVDF) film sandwiched between two elastic materials is designed. Experiments and simulations are used to define and examine the design parameters. With regards to the sensor structure, Free and Clamped boundary conditions are presented and the relevant equations containing the design parameters, e.g. “bending softness”, are derived. Applying different materials and thicknesses for layers surrounding the PVDF film, simulations are used to quantize the approximate values for each design parameter. The results show that the output of sensor is mostly dependent on the bending effect near the PVDF layer, and the structure encouraging more bending produces higher output. Finally, it is concluded that the real sensor has a structure which is between Free and Clamped boundary conditions, therefore design parameters are modified to compromise between the two cases and optimum values are presented.

  18. Design parameters and source terms: Volume 2, Source terms: Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-10-01

    The Design Parameters and Source Terms Document was prepared in accordance with DOE request and to provide data for the environmental impact study to be performed in the future for the Deaf Smith County, Texas site for a nuclear waste repository in salt. This document updates a previous unpublished report by Stearns Catalytic Corporation (SCC), entitled ''Design Parameters and Source Terms for a Two-Phase Repository Salt,'' 1985, to the level of the Site Characterization Plan - Conceptual Design Report. The previous unpublished SCC Study identifies the data needs for the Environmental Assessment effort for seven possible Salt Repository sites. 2 tabs.

  19. Design parameters for toroidal and bobbin magnetics. [conversion from English to metric units

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, W. T.

    1974-01-01

    The adoption by NASA of the metric system for dimensioning to replace long-used English units imposes a requirement on the U.S. transformer designer to convert from the familiar units to the less familiar metric equivalents. Material is presented to assist in that transition in the field of transformer design and fabrication. The conversion data makes it possible for the designer to obtain a fast and close approximation of significant parameters such as size, weight, and temperature rise. Nomographs are included to provide a close approximation for breadboarding purposes. For greater convenience, derivations of some of the parameters are also presented.

  20. Design of Si-photonic structures to evaluate their radiation hardness dependence on design parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeiler, M.; Detraz, S.; Olantera, L.; Pezzullo, G.; Seif El Nasr-Storey, S.; Sigaud, C.; Soos, C.; Troska, J.; Vasey, F.

    2016-01-01

    Particle detectors for future experiments at the HL-LHC will require new optical data transmitters that can provide high data rates and be resistant against high levels of radiation. Furthermore, new design paths for future optical readout systems for HL-LHC could be opened if there was a possibility to integrate the optical components with their driving electronics and possibly also the silicon particle sensors themselves. All these functionalities could potentially be combined in the silicon photonics technology which currently receives a lot of attention for conventional optical link systems. Silicon photonic test chips were designed in order to assess the suitability of this technology for deployment in high-energy physics experiments. The chips contain custom-designed Mach-Zehnder modulators, pre-designed ``building-block'' modulators, photodiodes and various other passive test structures. The simulation and design flow of the custom designed Mach-Zehnder modulators and some first measurement results of the chips are presented.

  1. Development of a parameter optimization technique for the design of automatic control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, P. H.

    1977-01-01

    Parameter optimization techniques for the design of linear automatic control systems that are applicable to both continuous and digital systems are described. The model performance index is used as the optimization criterion because of the physical insight that can be attached to it. The design emphasis is to start with the simplest system configuration that experience indicates would be practical. Design parameters are specified, and a digital computer program is used to select that set of parameter values which minimizes the performance index. The resulting design is examined, and complexity, through the use of more complex information processing or more feedback paths, is added only if performance fails to meet operational specifications. System performance specifications are assumed to be such that the desired step function time response of the system can be inferred.

  2. The Structure and Molecular Parameters of Camphene Determined by Fourier Transform Microwave Spectroscopy and Quantum Chemical Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neeman, Elias M.; Dréan, Pascal; Huet, T. R.

    2016-06-01

    The emission of volatile organic compounds, from plants has strong revelance for plant physiology, plant ecology and atmospheric chemistry. Camphene (C10H16) is a bicyclic monoterpene which is emitted in the atmosphere by biogenic sources. The structure of the unique stable conformer was optimized using density functional theory and ab initio calculations. The rotational spectrum of camphene was recorded in a supersonic jet expansion with a Fourier transform microwave spectrometer over the range 2-20 GHz. Signals from the parent species and from the ten 13C isotopomers were observed in natural abundance. The rotational and centrifugal distortion parameters were fitted to a Watson's Hamiltonian in the A-reduction. A magnetic hyperfine structure associated with the pairs of hydrogen nuclei in the methylene groups was observed and modeled.The rotational constants coupled to the equilibrium structure calculations were used to determine the r_0 and the r_m(1) gas-phase geometries of the carbon skeleton. The present work provides the first spectroscopic characterization of camphene in the gas phase and these results are also relevant for ozonolysis kinetics study through Criegee intermediates. R. Baraldi, F. Rapparini, O. Facini, D. Spano and P. Duce, Journal of Mediterranean Ecology, Vol.6, No.1, (2005). A. Bracho-Nunez, N. M. Knothe, S. Welter, M. Staudt, W. R. Costa, M. A. R. Liberato, M. T. F. Piedade, and J. Kesselmeier Biogeosciences, 10, 5855-5873, (2013). Minna Kivimäenpää, Narantsetseg Magsarjav, Rajendra Ghimire, Juha-Matti Markkanen, Juha Heijari, Martti Vuorinen and Jarmo K. Holopainen, Atmospheric Environment, 60, 477-485, (2012). R.C. de M. Oliveira and G. F. Bauerfeldt, J. Phys. Chem. A, 119 2802-2812 (2015)

  3. Correlation of mid-infrared quantum-cascade laser performance with laser design parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leavitt, R. P.; Bradshaw, J. L.; Lascola, K. M.; Towner, F. J.; Pham, J. T.; Bruno, J. D.; Gmachl, C. F.; Liu, P. Q.

    2012-06-01

    Several different quantum-cascade (QC) laser designs spanning the wavelength range between ~3.8 and ~4.8 microns were grown, and devices were fabricated and tested. The active regions of these designs consist of strained layers of (In,Ga)As and (In,Al)As. For several of these designs, we varied design parameters including injector doping, sectioncoupling strength, and the number of QC laser periods. Lasers were tested near room temperature under both quasi-cw and low-duty-cycle conditions. Device performance is compared with theoretical expectations, and conclusions are reached on the relative merit of various design modifications.

  4. Microwave and infrared spectra, adjusted r0 structural parameters, conformational stabilities, vibrational assignments, and theoretical calculations of cyclobutylcarboxylic acid chloride.

    PubMed

    Klaassen, Joshua J; Darkhalil, Ikhlas D; Deodhar, Bhushan S; Gounev, Todor K; Gurusinghe, Ranil M; Tubergen, Michael J; Groner, Peter; Durig, James R

    2013-08-01

    The FT-microwave spectrum of cyclobutylcarboxylic acid chloride, c-C4H7C(O)Cl, has been recorded and 153 transitions for the (35)Cl and (37)Cl isotopologues have been assigned for the gauche-equatorial (g-Eq) conformation. The ground state rotational constants were determined for (35)Cl [(37)Cl]: A = 4349.8429(25) [4322.0555(56)] MHz, B = 1414.8032(25) [1384.5058(25)] MHz, and C = 1148.2411(25) [1126.3546(25)] MHz. From these rotational constants and ab initio predicted parameters, adjusted r0 parameters are reported with distances (Å) rCα-C = 1.491(4), rC═O = 1.193(3), rCα-Cβ = 1.553(4), rCα-Cβ' = 1.540(4), rCγ-Cβ = 1.547(4), rCγ-Cβ' = 1.546(4), rC-Cl = 1.801(3) and angles (deg) τCγCβCβ'Cα = 30.9(5). Variable temperature (-70 to -100 °C) infrared spectra (4000 to 400 cm(-1)) were recorded in liquid xenon and the g-Eq conformer was determined the most stable form, with enthalpy differences of 91 ± 9 cm(-1) (1.09 ± 0.11 kJ/mol) for the gauche-axial (g-Ax) form and 173 ± 17 cm(-1) (2.07 ± 0.20 kJ/mol) for the trans-equatorial (t-Eq) conformer. The relative amounts at ambient temperature are 54% g-Eq, 35 ± 1% g-Ax, and 12 ± 1% t-Eq forms. Vibrational assignments have been provided for the three conformers and theoretical calculations were carried out. The results are discussed and compared to corresponding properties of related molecules.

  5. Calculation of alloying effect on formation enthalpy of TiCu intermetallics from first-principles calculations for designing Ti-Cu-system metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirasawa, Naoya; Takigawa, Yorinobu; Uesugi, Tokuteru; Higashi, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    The effect of alloying on the formation enthalpy of TiCu intermetallics was investigated via first-principles calculations to propose a new design method for Ti-Cu-system metallic glasses. The calculation results showed good agreement with the reported experimental results that Ni, Pd, Sn and Zr improve this system's glass-forming ability. According to the calculation results, a Ti-Zr-Cu-Ga system was designed as a potential new bulk Ti-based metallic glass, and a bulk sample with a 2-mm diameter was fabricated.

  6. Quasi-three dimensional hydraulic design and performance calculation of high specific speed mixed-flow pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, M.; Zhang, Y. X.; Zhang, J. Y.; Hou, H. C.

    2016-05-01

    According to the basic parameters of 211-80 high specific speed mixed-flow pump, based on the quasi-three dimensional flow theory, the hydraulic design of impeller and its matching spaced guide vanes for high specific speed mixed flow pump was completed, in which the iterative calculation of S 1, S 2 stream surfaces was employed to obtain meridional flow fields and the point-by-point integration method was employed to draw blade camber lines. Blades are thickened as well as blade leading edges are smoothed in the conformal mapping surface. Subsequently the internal fields of the whole flow passage of the designed pump were simulated by using RANS equations with RNG k-ε two-equation turbulent model. The results show that, compared with the 211-80 model, the hydraulic efficiency of the designed pump at the optimal flow rate increases 9.1%. The hydraulic efficiency of designed pump in low flow rate condition (78% designed flow rate) increases 6.46%. The hydraulic efficiency in high flow rate areas increases obviously and there is no bad phenomenon of suddenly decrease of hydraulic efficiency in model pump. From the distributions of velocity and pressure fields, it can be seen that the flow in impeller is uniform and the increase of pressure is gentle. There are no obvious impact phenomenon on impeller inlet and obvious wake shedding vortex phenomenon from impeller outlet to guide vanes inlet.

  7. Theoretical calculations of spin-Hamiltonian parameters for the square planer CuCl4 2 - cluster in Cs2ZrCl6 crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Gang; Mei, Yang; Zhang, Xin-Xin; Zheng, Wen-Chen

    2015-05-01

    The high-order perturbation formulas based on a two-mechanism model (where in addition to the contributions from the crystal-field (CF) mechanism in the usually-applied CF theory, those from the generally-neglected charge-transfer (CT) mechanism are also contained) are employed to calculate the spin-Hamiltonian parameters (g factors g//, g⊥ and the hyperfine structure constants A//, A⊥) of the square planar CuCl4 2 - clusters in Cs2ZrCl6 crystal. The needed CF energy levels in the calculations are obtained from the observed optical spectra. The calculated results show reasonable agreement with the experimented values. The negative sign of A// and positive sign of A⊥ are proposed from the calculations. The calculations also suggest that one should take account of the contributions due to both the CF and CT mechanisms for the exact and rational calculations of spin-Hamiltonian parameters of Cu2+-Cl- combination in crystals.

  8. Calculating slope and ED50 of additive dose-response curves, and application of these tabulated parameter values.

    PubMed

    Pöch, G; Pancheva, S N

    1995-06-01

    Comparing dose-response curves (DRCs) of a compound A in the absence and presence of a fixed dose of an antagonist B is standard in pharmacology and toxicology. When B qualitatively resembles A in its action, it is often useful to construct theoretical DRCs of additive and independent combinations. Theoretical curves are calculated from experimental values by the program ALLFIT, which uses the four parameter logistic equation. DRCs of theoretical, additive DRCs are obtained by using the respective values for slope and ED50, which were taken from tables presented here compiled on the basis of the slope of the DRC of A alone (0.6-14) and of the effect of B alone (1-75%). These tables are unnecessary for the construction of theoretical curves if A acts by an independent mechanism, giving values for slope and ED50 identical to those of the DRC of A alone. Experimental DRCs of antiviral and other effects (the latter taken from data in the literature) are compared with theoretical curves by an F-test analysis provided by ALLFIT. The method can be used successfully for the construction of theoretical curves for additive and independent DRCs and comparison with experimental curves. This comparison may help clarify the mode of interaction of A with B. PMID:7640393

  9. Pareto-based evolutionary algorithms for the calculation of transformation parameters and accuracy assessment of historical maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzano-Agugliaro, F.; San-Antonio-Gómez, C.; López, S.; Montoya, F. G.; Gil, C.

    2013-08-01

    When historical map data are compared with modern cartography, the old map coordinates must be transformed to the current system. However, historical data often exhibit heterogeneous quality. In calculating the transformation parameters between the historical and modern maps, it is often necessary to discard highly uncertain data. An optimal balance between the objectives of minimising the transformation error and eliminating as few points as possible can be achieved by generating a Pareto front of solutions using evolutionary genetic algorithms. The aim of this paper is to assess the performance of evolutionary algorithms in determining the accuracy of historical maps in regard to modern cartography. When applied to the 1787 Tomas Lopez map, the use of evolutionary algorithms reduces the linear error by 40% while eliminating only 2% of the data points. The main conclusion of this paper is that evolutionary algorithms provide a promising alternative for the transformation of historical map coordinates and determining the accuracy of historical maps in regard to modern cartography, particularly when the positional quality of the data points used cannot be assured.

  10. Use of hand-held calculator program aids analysis of subsea pipeline design

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, V.B.

    1983-02-14

    The presented SEALINE program (developed for the Hewlett Packard HP-41 calculator) simulates the behavior of the developed transport pipeline after the installation phase. It is often necessary to review the behavior of pipe during the operating phase concerning the proposed environmental condition of the proposed location. It is pointed out that analyses of pipelines designed for transportation of liquid median such as crude oil or deballast water are usually addressed with sophisticated programs for large computers.

  11. Maximum Likelihood Estimation of the Broken Power Law Spectral Parameters with Detector Design Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, Leonard W.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The maximum likelihood procedure is developed for estimating the three spectral parameters of an assumed broken power law energy spectrum from simulated detector responses and their statistical properties investigated. The estimation procedure is then generalized for application to real cosmic-ray data. To illustrate the procedure and its utility, analytical methods were developed in conjunction with a Monte Carlo simulation to explore the combination of the expected cosmic-ray environment with a generic space-based detector and its planned life cycle, allowing us to explore various detector features and their subsequent influence on estimating the spectral parameters. This study permits instrument developers to make important trade studies in design parameters as a function of the science objectives, which is particularly important for space-based detectors where physical parameters, such as dimension and weight, impose rigorous practical limits to the design envelope.

  12. Design and Application of an Easy to Use Oligonucleotide Mass Calculation Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jiong; Leopold, Peter; Helmy, Roy; Parish, Craig; Arvary, Becky; Mao, Bing; Meng, Fanyu

    2013-08-01

    With the development of new synthesis procedures, an ever increasing number of chemical modifications can now be incorporated into synthetic oligonucleotides, representing new challenges for analytical chemists to efficiently identify and characterize such molecules. While conventional mass spectrometry (MS) has proven to be a powerful tool to study nucleic acids, new and improved methods and software are now needed to address this emerging challenge. In this report, we describe a simple yet powerful program that affords great flexibility in the calculation of theoretical masses for conventional as well as modified oligonucleotide molecules. This easy to use program can accept input oligonucleotide sequences and then calculate the theoretical mass values for full length products, process impurities, potential metabolites, and gas phase fragments. We intentionally designed this software so that modified nucleotide residues can be incorporated into oligonucleotide sequences, and corresponding mass values can be rapidly calculated. To test the utility of this program, two oligonucleotides that contain a large number of chemical modifications were synthesized. We have analyzed these samples using a Q-TOF mass spectrometer and compared the calculated masses to the observed ones. We found that all of the data matched very well with less than 30 ppm mass errors, well within the expectation for our instrument operated in its current mode. These data confirmed the validity of calculations performed with this new software.

  13. Optimization of design parameters for bulk micromachined silicon membranes for piezoresistive pressure sensing application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belwanshi, Vinod; Topkar, Anita

    2016-05-01

    Finite element analysis study has been carried out to optimize the design parameters for bulk micro-machined silicon membranes for piezoresistive pressure sensing applications. The design is targeted for measurement of pressure up to 200 bar for nuclear reactor applications. The mechanical behavior of bulk micro-machined silicon membranes in terms of deflection and stress generation has been simulated. Based on the simulation results, optimization of the membrane design parameters in terms of length, width and thickness has been carried out. Subsequent to optimization of membrane geometrical parameters, the dimensions and location of the high stress concentration region for implantation of piezoresistors have been obtained for sensing of pressure using piezoresistive sensing technique.

  14. Theoretical determination of design parameters for an arrayed heat sink with vertical plate fins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shiang-Jiun; Chen, Yi-Jin

    2016-05-01

    This paper employs theoretical approach to determine the adequate design parameters of an arrayed plate-fins heat sink based on maximizing heat flow. According to analyzed results, increasing the dimensions of configurative parameters does not always yield the significant increase in the heat flow. As the fin length and fin space increases until a critical value, the heat flow will significantly reduce the increment or decay, respectively.

  15. Criteria for calculating the efficiency of deep-pleated HEPA filters with aluminum separators during and after design basis accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.; First, M.W.; Anderson, W.L.

    1995-02-01

    We have reviewed the literature on the performance of HEPA filters under normal and abnormal conditions to establish criteria for calculating the efficiency of HEPA filters in a DOE nonreactor nuclear facility during and after a Design Basis Accident (DBA). This study is only applicable to the standard deep-pleated HEPA filter with aluminum separators as specified in ASME N509[1]. Other HEPA filter designs such as the mini-pleat and separatorless filters are not included in this study. The literature review included the performance of new filters and parameters that may cause deterioration in the filter performance such as filter age, radiation, corrosive chemicals, seismic and rough handling, high temperature, moisture, particle clogging, high air flow and pressure pulses. The deterioration of the filter efficiency depends on the exposure parameters; in severe exposure conditions the filter will be damaged and have a residual efficiency of 0%. There are large gaps and limitations in the data that introduce significant error in the estimates of HEPA filter efficiencies under DBA conditions. Because of this limitation, conservative values of filter efficiency were chosen. The estimation of the efficiency of the HEPA filters under DBA conditions involves three steps: (1) The filter pressure drop and environmental parameters are determined during and after the DBA, (2) Comparing the filter pressure drop to a set of threshold values above which the filter is damaged. There is a different threshold value for each combination of environmental parameters, and (3) Determining the filter efficiency. If the filter pressure drop is greater than the threshold value, the filter is damaged and is assigned 0% efficiency. If the pressure drop is less, then the filter is not damaged and the efficiency is determined from literature values of the efficiency at the environmental conditions.

  16. Optimal input design for aircraft parameter estimation using dynamic programming principles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, Vladislav; Morelli, Eugene A.

    1990-01-01

    A new technique was developed for designing optimal flight test inputs for aircraft parameter estimation experiments. The principles of dynamic programming were used for the design in the time domain. This approach made it possible to include realistic practical constraints on the input and output variables. A description of the new approach is presented, followed by an example for a multiple input linear model describing the lateral dynamics of a fighter aircraft. The optimal input designs produced by the new technique demonstrated improved quality and expanded capability relative to the conventional multiple input design method.

  17. Optimal Input Design for Aircraft Parameter Estimation using Dynamic Programming Principles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.; Klein, Vladislav

    1990-01-01

    A new technique was developed for designing optimal flight test inputs for aircraft parameter estimation experiments. The principles of dynamic programming were used for the design in the time domain. This approach made it possible to include realistic practical constraints on the input and output variables. A description of the new approach is presented, followed by an example for a multiple input linear model describing the lateral dynamics of a fighter aircraft. The optimal input designs produced by the new technique demonstrated improved quality and expanded capability relative to the conventional multiple input design method.

  18. Multiobjective sampling design for parameter estimation and model discrimination in groundwater solute transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knopman, D.S.; Voss, C.I.

    1989-01-01

    Optimal design of a sampling network is a sequential process in which the next phase of sampling is designed on the basis of all available physical knowledge of the system. Three objectives are considered: model discrimination, parameter estimation, and cost minimization. For the first two objectives, physically based measures of the value of information obtained from a set of observations are specified. In model discrimination, value of information of an observation point is measured in terms of the difference in solute concentration predicted by hypothesized models of transport. Points of greatest difference in predictions can contribute the most information to the discriminatory power of a sampling design. Sensitivity of solute concentration to a change in a parameter contributes information on the relative variance of a parameter estimate. Inclusion of points in a sampling design with high sensitivities to parameters tends to reduce variance in parameter estimates. Cost minimization accounts for both the capital cost of well installation and the operating costs of collection and analysis of field samples. -from Authors

  19. Maximum Likelihood Estimation of the Broken Power Law Spectral Parameters with Detector Design Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, Leonard W.

    2002-01-01

    The method of Maximum Likelihood (ML) is used to estimate the spectral parameters of an assumed broken power law energy spectrum from simulated detector responses. This methodology, which requires the complete specificity of all cosmic-ray detector design parameters, is shown to provide approximately unbiased, minimum variance, and normally distributed spectra information for events detected by an instrument having a wide range of commonly used detector response functions. The ML procedure, coupled with the simulated performance of a proposed space-based detector and its planned life cycle, has proved to be of significant value in the design phase of a new science instrument. The procedure helped make important trade studies in design parameters as a function of the science objectives, which is particularly important for space-based detectors where physical parameters, such as dimension and weight, impose rigorous practical limits to the design envelope. This ML methodology is then generalized to estimate broken power law spectral parameters from real cosmic-ray data sets.

  20. Invisible cloak design with controlled constitutive parameters and arbitrary shaped boundaries through Helmholtz's equation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Fu, Yunqi; Yuan, Naichang

    2009-03-01

    An approach to design an invisible cloak with controlled constitutive parameters and arbitrary shaped boundaries is presented. Helmholtz's equation is adopted to establish a mapping between original and transformed coordinates inside the cloak. Then the constitutive parameters are obtained by the established mapping. The analytical solution of a regular cloak and the numerical solution of an irregular cloak both verify that that our method will guide electromagnetic wave efficiently and control the constitutive parameters of the cloak conveniently. It has great significance in realizing a cloak practically. PMID:19259197

  1. Influence of regenerator matrix and working fluid on optimisation of design parameters of Stirling cryocoolers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atrey, M. D.; Bapat, S. L.; Narayankhedkar, K. G.

    The performance of Stirling cryocooler is governed by principal designparameters. The optimum combination of these design parameters gives maximum refrigeration effect and minimum desired efforts. The performance of the cryocooler depends significantly on the regenerator functioning and the working fluids. The mesh size of the regenerator affects dead space, pressure drop, regenerator effectiveness, etc. The working fluids differ in their thermal properties and therefore affect the performance significantly, The present paper aims to study the influence of regenerator matrix and working fluids on these design parameters. The matrix material considered is Phosphor Bronze while the working fluids considered are Helium and Hydrogen.

  2. Optimisation of the design parameters of a reflection geometry time-of-flight mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Sankari, M.; Suryanarayana, M.V.

    1996-12-31

    Optimisation of the design parameters for a reflectron geometry time-of-flight mass spectrometer (RTOFMS) has been done by a simplex optimisation method based on a Nelder-Mead Algorithm. The space and energy resolutions obtained are 6100 and 7400, respectively, for mass 200 amu. The resolution is quite adequate for all the applications of RIMS. A high resolution reflectron geometry time-of-flight mass spectrometer (RTOFMS) for resonance ionisation mass spectrometer (RIMS) is being fabricated, based on these optimised design parameters. 19 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Use of linear programming to calculate dwell times for the design of petal tools.

    PubMed

    Santiago-Alvarado, Agustin; González-García, Jorge; Castañeda-Roldan, Cuauhtémoc; Cordero-Dávila, Alberto; Vera-Díaz, Erika; Robledo-Sánchez, Carlos Ignacio

    2007-07-20

    Two constraints in the design of a petal tool are, the angles that define it must all be positive, and wear must never be greater than the desired wear. The first constraint is equivalent to that of the positive dwell times of a small solid tool. In view of this foregoing, we present a design of petal tools that are used to generate conic surfaces from their nearest spheres and that correct the profile of a surface that is polished. We study optimal angular sizes of a petal tool, which are found after we use linear programming to calculate the optimal dwell times of a set of complete annular tools placed in different zones of the glass surface. We report numerical results of designed petal tools.

  4. Substantiation of parameters of the geometric model of the research reactor core for the calculation using the Monte Carlo method

    SciTech Connect

    Radaev, A. I. Schurovskaya, M. V.

    2015-12-15

    The choice of the spatial nodalization for the calculation of the power density and burnup distribution in a research reactor core with fuel assemblies of the IRT-3M and VVR-KN type using the program based on the Monte Carlo code is described. The influence of the spatial nodalization on the results of calculating basic neutronic characteristics and calculation time is investigated.

  5. Finding high-order analytic post-Newtonian parameters from a high-precision numerical self-force calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Abhay G.; Friedman, John L.; Whiting, Bernard F.

    2014-03-01

    We present a novel analytic extraction of high-order post-Newtonian (pN) parameters that govern quasicircular binary systems. Coefficients in the pN expansion of the energy of a binary system can be found from corresponding coefficients in an extreme-mass-ratio inspiral computation of the change ΔU in the redshift factor of a circular orbit at fixed angular velocity. Remarkably, by computing this essentially gauge-invariant quantity to accuracy greater than one part in 10225, and by assuming that a subset of pN coefficients are rational numbers or products of π and a rational, we obtain the exact analytic coefficients. We find the previously unexpected result that the post-Newtonian expansion of ΔU (and of the change ΔΩ in the angular velocity at fixed redshift factor) have conservative terms at half-integral pN order beginning with a 5.5 pN term. This implies the existence of a corresponding 5.5 pN term in the expansion of the energy of a binary system. Coefficients in the pN series that do not belong to the subset just described are obtained to accuracy better than 1 part in 10265-23n at nth pN order. We work in a radiation gauge, finding the radiative part of the metric perturbation from the gauge-invariant Weyl scalar ψ0 via a Hertz potential. We use mode-sum renormalization, and find high-order renormalization coefficients by matching a series in L=ℓ+1/2 to the large-L behavior of the expression for ΔU. The nonradiative parts of the perturbed metric associated with changes in mass and angular momentum are calculated in the Schwarzschild gauge.

  6. Determination of Rotordynamic Coefficients for Labyrinth Seals and Application to Rotordynamic Design Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiser, P.; Nordmann, R.

    1991-01-01

    In today's rotordynamic calculations, the input parameters for a finite element analysis (FEA) determine very much the reliability of eigenvalue and eigenmode predictions. While modeling of an elastic structure by means of beam elements etc. is relatively straightforward to perform and the input data for journal bearings are usually known exactly enough, the determination of stiffness and damping for labyrinth seals is still the subject of many investigations. Therefore, the rotordynamic influence of labyrinths is often not included in FEA for rotating machinery because of a lack of computer programs to calculate these parameters. This circumstance can give rise to severe vibration problems especially for high performance turbines or compressors, resulting in remarkable economic losses. The forces generated in labyrinths can be described for small motions around the seal center with a linearized force-motion relationship. Several years ago, we started with the development of computer codes for the determination of rotordynamic seal coefficients. Our different approaches to evaluate the dynamic fluid forces generated by turbulent, compressible seal flow are introduced.

  7. The simulative calculation and optimum design for FOA, the purge gas sweeping system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liquan; Jing, Yukun; Feng, Bing; Li, Fuquan; Xiang, Yong; Han, Wei; Wang, Fang

    2016-01-01

    This paper first studies the structure effect law in order to design a reasonable option in theory for the Final Optics Assembly(FOA)' harmonic converter module, involved in the design of the fluid theory, including the basic equations of fluid motion, the form of fluid motion and fluid movement in the small hole. Optimizing the structure need to be applied to the simulation software, which requires the Fluent simulation principle. Then, combined with theoretical knowledge to design the overall structure of the multiplier module, It will apply the simulation software to optimize structural parameters of the board and use control system to realize it for verifying the law obtained by simulation under various conditions whether consistent with the law in actual work of the sweeping system.

  8. Design principle and calculations of a Scheffler fixed focus concentrator for medium temperature applications

    SciTech Connect

    Munir, A.; Hensel, O.; Scheffler, W.

    2010-08-15

    Scheffler fixed focus concentrators are successfully used for medium temperature applications in different parts of the world. These concentrators are taken as lateral sections of paraboloids and provide fixed focus away from the path of incident beam radiations throughout the year. The paper presents a complete description about the design principle and construction details of an 8 m{sup 2} surface area Scheffler concentrator. The first part of the paper presents the mathematical calculations to design the reflector parabola curve and reflector elliptical frame with respect to equinox (solar declination = 0) by selecting a specific lateral part of a paraboloid. Crossbar equations and their ellipses, arc lengths and their radii are also calculated to form the required lateral section of the paraboloid. Thereafter, the seasonal parabola equations are calculated for two extreme positions of summer and winter in the northern hemisphere (standing reflectors). The slopes of the parabola equations for equinox (solar declination = 0), summer (solar declination = +23.5) and winter (solar declination = -23.5) for the Scheffler reflector (8 m{sup 2} surface area) are calculated to be 0.17, 0.28, and 0.13 respectively. The y-intercepts of the parabola equations for equinox, summer and winter are calculated as 0, 0.54, and -0.53 respectively. By comparing with the equinox parabola curve, the summer parabola is found to be smaller in size and uses the top part of the parabola curve while the winter parabola is bigger in size and uses the lower part of the parabola curve to give the fixed focus. For this purpose, the reflector assembly is composed of flexible crossbars and a frame to induce the required change of the parabola curves with the changing solar declination. The paper also presents the calculation procedure of seasonal parabola equations for standing reflectors in the southern hemisphere as well as for laying reflectors in the northern and southern hemispheres. Highly

  9. Parallel Calculation of Sensitivity Derivatives for Aircraft Design using Automatic Differentiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bischof, c. H.; Green, L. L.; Haigler, K. J.; Knauff, T. L., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Sensitivity derivative (SD) calculation via automatic differentiation (AD) typical of that required for the aerodynamic design of a transport-type aircraft is considered. Two ways of computing SD via code generated by the ADIFOR automatic differentiation tool are compared for efficiency and applicability to problems involving large numbers of design variables. A vector implementation on a Cray Y-MP computer is compared with a coarse-grained parallel implementation on an IBM SP1 computer, employing a Fortran M wrapper. The SD are computed for a swept transport wing in turbulent, transonic flow; the number of geometric design variables varies from 1 to 60 with coupling between a wing grid generation program and a state-of-the-art, 3-D computational fluid dynamics program, both augmented for derivative computation via AD. For a small number of design variables, the Cray Y-MP implementation is much faster. As the number of design variables grows, however, the IBM SP1 becomes an attractive alternative in terms of compute speed, job turnaround time, and total memory available for solutions with large numbers of design variables. The coarse-grained parallel implementation also can be moved easily to a network of workstations.

  10. Methodology of full-core Monte Carlo calculations with leakage parameter evaluations for benchmark critical experiment analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sboev, A. G.; Ilyashenko, A. S.; Vetrova, O. A.

    1997-02-01

    The method of bucking evaluation, realized in the MOnte Carlo code MCS, is described. This method was applied for calculational analysis of well known light water experiments TRX-1 and TRX-2. The analysis of this comparison shows, that there is no coincidence between Monte Carlo calculations, obtained by different ways: the MCS calculations with given experimental bucklings; the MCS calculations with given bucklings evaluated on base of full core MCS direct simulations; the full core MCNP and MCS direct simulations; the MCNP and MCS calculations, where the results of cell calculations are corrected by the coefficients taking into the account the leakage from the core. Also the buckling values evaluated by full core MCS calculations have differed from experimental ones, especially in the case of TRX-1, when this difference has corresponded to 0.5 percent increase of Keff value.

  11. [Analysis of young male anthropometric parameters for design of driving and operations in cars].

    PubMed

    Xu, Yulin; Zhou, Qianxiang; Wang, Zheng; Wang, Chunhui; Cai, Gui

    2012-06-01

    Fitting formulas of typical parameters were obtained through analysis of anthropometric parameters of armored car driver and operators. These formulas could be a basis for design of product and equipment of cars, cumulating and updating of basic data of similar sample and edition of relative standards. 76 anthropometric static parameters and 11 functional parameters were chosen, and 1 243 soldiers with armored forces were chosen to be tested. The correlation and fitting formulas of body height, sitting height and other parameters were measured and obtained. We also contrasted measured data with data from GJB1835-1993. The present analysis showed that the correlation between sizes of body length and body height and sitting height was significant. Sizes of body length and enclose size and width direction were all increased compared to those in the 1980s. The present results were consistent with other researchers' current research results. The measured data could be an important basis for the data of young male anthropometric parameters and edition of relative standards and design of specific equipment.

  12. Design parameters of paraboloid-hyperboloid telescopes for X-ray astronomy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanspeybroeck, L. P.; Chase, R. C.

    1972-01-01

    A systematic evaluation has been made of the principal optical properties of paraboloid-hyperboloid X-ray telescopes using a ray-tracing procedure. It has been found that the results obtained for resolution, focal plane curvature, and finite source distance effects may be approximated in terms of the design parameters by simple empirical formulas.

  13. 10 CFR 63.132 - Confirmation of geotechnical and design parameters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Confirmation of geotechnical and design parameters. 63.132 Section 63.132 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Performance Confirmation Program §...

  14. 10 CFR 63.132 - Confirmation of geotechnical and design parameters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Confirmation of geotechnical and design parameters. 63.132 Section 63.132 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Performance Confirmation Program §...

  15. 10 CFR 63.132 - Confirmation of geotechnical and design parameters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Confirmation of geotechnical and design parameters. 63.132 Section 63.132 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Performance Confirmation Program §...

  16. 10 CFR 60.141 - Confirmation of geotechnical and design parameters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Confirmation of geotechnical and design parameters. 60.141 Section 60.141 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES Performance Confirmation Program § 60.141 Confirmation of geotechnical...

  17. Ditching Investigations of Dynamic Models and Effects of Design Parameters on Ditching Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Lloyd J; Hoffman, Edward L

    1958-01-01

    Data from ditching investigations conducted at the Langley Aeronautical Laboratory with dynamic scale models of various airplanes are presented in the form of tables. The effects of design parameters on the ditching characteristics of airplanes, based on scale-model investigations and on reports of full-scale ditchings, are discussed. Various ditching aids are also discussed as a means of improving ditching behavior.

  18. Estimating Cosmic-Ray Spectral Parameters from Simulated Detector Responses with Detector Design Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, L. W.

    2001-04-01

    A simple power law model consisting of a single spectral index (alpha-1) is believed to be an adequate description of the galactic cosmic-ray (GCR) proton flux at energies below 1013 eV, with a transition at knee energy (Ek) to a steeper spectral index alpha-2 > alpha-1 above Ek. The maximum likelihood procedure is developed for estimating these three spectral parameters of the broken power law energy spectrum from simulated detector responses. These estimates and their surrounding statistical uncertainty are being used to derive the requirements in energy resolution, calorimeter size, and energy response of a proposed sampling calorimeter for the Advanced Cosmic-ray Composition Experiment for the Space Station (ACCESS). This study thereby permits instrument developers to make important trade studies in design parameters as a function of the science objectives, which is particularly important for space-based detectors where physical parameters, such as dimension and weight, impose rigorous practical limits to the design envelope.

  19. User's manual for an aerodynamic optimization scheeme that updates flow variables and design parameters simultaneously

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizk, Magdi H.

    1988-01-01

    This user's manual is presented for an aerodynamic optimization program that updates flow variables and design parameters simultaneously. The program was developed for solving constrained optimization problems in which the objective function and the constraint function are dependent on the solution of the nonlinear flow equations. The program was tested by applying it to the problem of optimizing propeller designs. Some reference to this particular application is therefore made in the manual. However, the optimization scheme is suitable for application to general aerodynamic design problems. A description of the approach used in the optimization scheme is first presented, followed by a description of the use of the program.

  20. Intelligent, Robust Control of Deteriorated Turbofan Engines via Linear Parameter Varying Quadratic Lyapunov Function Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turso, James A.; Litt, Jonathan S.

    2004-01-01

    A method for accommodating engine deterioration via a scheduled Linear Parameter Varying Quadratic Lyapunov Function (LPVQLF)-Based controller is presented. The LPVQLF design methodology provides a means for developing unconditionally stable, robust control of Linear Parameter Varying (LPV) systems. The controller is scheduled on the Engine Deterioration Index, a function of estimated parameters that relate to engine health, and is computed using a multilayer feedforward neural network. Acceptable thrust response and tight control of exhaust gas temperature (EGT) is accomplished by adjusting the performance weights on these parameters for different levels of engine degradation. Nonlinear simulations demonstrate that the controller achieves specified performance objectives while being robust to engine deterioration as well as engine-to-engine variations.

  1. Interdependence of parameters important to the design of subsonic canard-configured aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feistel, T. W.

    1985-01-01

    An analysis is made of the interrelationship of the longitudinal parameters important to the aerodynamic design of an efficient canard or tandem wing configuration. It is shown that theoretical configuration span efficiencies substantially greater than one are feasible with the proper choice of parameters. This improvement can translate into significantly increased lift/drag ratios assuming fixed spans. The Prandtl-Munk relationship for induced drag is used as a convenient qualitative guide, with stability and trim criteria superimposed. An 'aspect-ratio ratio' parameter is introduced to aid in optimizing a configuration longitudinally. It is shown that a canard/wing 'aspect-ratio ratio' of approximately 3/2 to 2 is necessary to achieve peak span efficiency for a given span ratio and gap, assuming representative parameters.

  2. The influence of Monte Carlo source parameters on detector design and dose perturbation in small field dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, P. H.; Crowe, S. B.; Kairn, T.; Knight, R.; Hill, B.; Kenny, J.; Langton, C. M.; Trapp, J. V.

    2014-03-01

    To obtain accurate Monte Carlo simulations of small radiation fields, it is important model the initial source parameters (electron energy and spot size) accurately. However recent studies have shown that small field dosimetry correction factors are insensitive to these parameters. The aim of this work is to extend this concept to test if these parameters affect dose perturbations in general, which is important for detector design and calculating perturbation correction factors. The EGSnrc C++ user code cavity was used for all simulations. Varying amounts of air between 0 and 2 mm were deliberately introduced upstream to a diode and the dose perturbation caused by the air was quantified. These simulations were then repeated using a range of initial electron energies (5.5 to 7.0 MeV) and electron spot sizes (0.7 to 2.2 FWHM). The resultant dose perturbations were large. For example 2 mm of air caused a dose reduction of up to 31% when simulated with a 6 mm field size. However these values did not vary by more than 2 % when simulated across the full range of source parameters tested. If a detector is modified by the introduction of air, one can be confident that the response of the detector will be the same across all similar linear accelerators and the Monte Carlo modelling of each machine is not required.

  3. Correlation of Electric Field and Critical Design Parameters for Ferroelectric Tunable Microwave Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subramanyam, Guru; VanKeuls, Fred W.; Miranda, Felix A.; Canedy, Chadwick L.; Aggarwal, Sanjeev; Venkatesan, Thirumalai; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy

    2000-01-01

    The correlation of electric field and critical design parameters such as the insertion loss, frequency ability return loss, and bandwidth of conductor/ferroelectric/dielectric microstrip tunable K-band microwave filters is discussed in this work. This work is based primarily on barium strontium titanate (BSTO) ferroelectric thin film based tunable microstrip filters for room temperature applications. Two new parameters which we believe will simplify the evaluation of ferroelectric thin films for tunable microwave filters, are defined. The first of these, called the sensitivity parameter, is defined as the incremental change in center frequency with incremental change in maximum applied electric field (EPEAK) in the filter. The other, the loss parameter, is defined as the incremental or decremental change in insertion loss of the filter with incremental change in maximum applied electric field. At room temperature, the Au/BSTO/LAO microstrip filters exhibited a sensitivity parameter value between 15 and 5 MHz/cm/kV. The loss parameter varied for different bias configurations used for electrically tuning the filter. The loss parameter varied from 0.05 to 0.01 dB/cm/kV at room temperature.

  4. Final Report for "Design calculations for high-space-charge beam-to-RF conversion".

    SciTech Connect

    David N Smithe

    2008-10-17

    Accelerator facility upgrades, new accelerator applications, and future design efforts are leading to novel klystron and IOT device concepts, including multiple beam, high-order mode operation, and new geometry configurations of old concepts. At the same time, a new simulation capability, based upon finite-difference “cut-cell” boundaries, has emerged and is transforming the existing modeling and design capability with unparalleled realism, greater flexibility, and improved accuracy. This same new technology can also be brought to bear on a difficult-to-study aspect of the energy recovery linac (ERL), namely the accurate modeling of the exit beam, and design of the beam dump for optimum energy efficiency. We have developed new capability for design calculations and modeling of a broad class of devices which convert bunched beam kinetic energy to RF energy, including RF sources, as for example, klystrons, gyro-klystrons, IOT's, TWT’s, and other devices in which space-charge effects are important. Recent advances in geometry representation now permits very accurate representation of the curved metallic surfaces common to RF sources, resulting in unprecedented simulation accuracy. In the Phase I work, we evaluated and demonstrated the capabilities of the new geometry representation technology as applied to modeling and design of output cavity components of klystron, IOT's, and energy recovery srf cavities. We identified and prioritized which aspects of the design study process to pursue and improve in Phase II. The development and use of the new accurate geometry modeling technology on RF sources for DOE accelerators will help spark a new generational modeling and design capability, free from many of the constraints and inaccuracy associated with the previous generation of “stair-step” geometry modeling tools. This new capability is ultimately expected to impact all fields with high power RF sources, including DOE fusion research, communications, radar and

  5. Experimental design for estimating parameters of rate-limited mass transfer: Analysis of stream tracer studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Brian J.; Harvey, Judson W.

    Tracer experiments are valuable tools for analyzing the transport characteristics of streams and their interactions with shallow groundwater. The focus of this work is the design of tracer studies in high-gradient stream systems subject to advection, dispersion, groundwater inflow, and exchange between the active channel and zones in surface or subsurface water where flow is stagnant or slow moving. We present a methodology for (1) evaluating and comparing alternative stream tracer experiment designs and (2) identifying those combinations of stream transport properties that pose limitations to parameter estimation and therefore a challenge to tracer test design. The methodology uses the concept of global parameter uncertainty analysis, which couples solute transport simulation with parameter uncertainty analysis in a Monte Carlo framework. Two general conclusions resulted from this work. First, the solute injection and sampling strategy has an important effect on the reliability of transport parameter estimates. We found that constant injection with sampling through concentration rise, plateau, and fall provided considerably more reliable parameter estimates than a pulse injection across the spectrum of transport scenarios likely encountered in high-gradient streams. Second, for a given tracer test design, the uncertainties in mass transfer and storage-zone parameter estimates are strongly dependent on the experimental Damkohler number, DaI, which is a dimensionless combination of the rates of exchange between the stream and storage zones, the stream-water velocity, and the stream reach length of the experiment. Parameter uncertainties are lowest at DaI values on the order of 1.0. When DaI values are much less than 1.0 (owing to high velocity, long exchange timescale, and/or short reach length), parameter uncertainties are high because only a small amount of tracer interacts with storage zones in the reach. For the opposite conditions (DaI>>1.0), solute exchange

  6. Experimental design for estimating parameters of rate-limited mass transfer: Analysis of stream tracer studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagner, B.J.; Harvey, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    Tracer experiments are valuable tools for analyzing the transport characteristics of streams and their interactions with shallow groundwater. The focus of this work is the design of tracer studies in high-gradient stream systems subject to advection, dispersion, groundwater inflow, and exchange between the active channel and zones in surface or subsurface water where flow is stagnant or slow moving. We present a methodology for (1) evaluating and comparing alternative stream tracer experiment designs and (2) identifying those combinations of stream transport properties that pose limitations to parameter estimation and therefore a challenge to tracer test design. The methodology uses the concept of global parameter uncertainty analysis, which couples solute transport simulation with parameter uncertainty analysis in a Monte Carlo framework. Two general conclusions resulted from this work. First, the solute injection and sampling strategy has an important effect on the reliability of transport parameter estimates. We found that constant injection with sampling through concentration rise, plateau, and fall provided considerably more reliable parameter estimates than a pulse injection across the spectrum of transport scenarios likely encountered in high-gradient streams. Second, for a given tracer test design, the uncertainties in mass transfer and storage-zone parameter estimates are strongly dependent on the experimental Damkohler number, DaI, which is a dimensionless combination of the rates of exchange between the stream and storage zones, the stream-water velocity, and the stream reach length of the experiment. Parameter uncertainties are lowest at DaI values on the order of 1.0. When DaI values are much less than 1.0 (owing to high velocity, long exchange timescale, and/or short reach length), parameter uncertainties are high because only a small amount of tracer interacts with storage zones in the reach. For the opposite conditions (DaI >> 1.0), solute exchange

  7. Controller design for wind turbine load reduction via multiobjective parameter synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, A. F.; Weiβ, F. A.

    2016-09-01

    During the design process for a wind turbine load reduction controller many different, sometimes conflicting requirements must be fulfilled simultaneously. If the requirements can be expressed as mathematical criteria, such a design problem can be solved by a criterion-vector and multi-objective design optimization. The software environment MOPS (Multi-Objective Parameter Synthesis) supports the engineer for such a design optimization. In this paper MOPS is applied to design a multi-objective load reduction controller for the well-known DTU 10 MW reference wind turbine. A significant reduction in the fatigue criteria especially the blade damage can be reached by the use of an additional Individual Pitch Controller (IPC) and an additional tower damper. This reduction is reached as a trade-off with an increase of actuator load.

  8. Form and structural response calculations for NIF neutron exposure sample case assembly design

    SciTech Connect

    DiPeso, G.; Serduke, F.; Pillenger, L.

    1996-12-31

    We describe the calculations used to design an aluminum foam protection layer for a stainless steel neutron exposure sample case. The layer protects the case from impulsive loads generated by a 20 MJ NIF capsule 10 cm from the sample case assembly. Impulse only from ablating x-rays and hohlraum plasma debris is considered. One dimensional CALE foam response calculations and analytic estimates are used to show that 1 cm of aluminum 6101-T6 foam 10 % of solid density is sufficient to attenuate the incoming peak pressure without complete melting on crush-up. Two dimensional DYNA calculations show that a 304 stainless steel spherical shell sample case with an inner radius of 1 cm and a wall thickness of 2 mm encased in 1 cm of foam does not yield to the pressure that is transmitted through the foam by a 220 Pa-sec (2.2 ktap), 2 GPa (20 kbar) load due to recoil of x- ray ablation. An unprotected spherical shell case subjected to a gentler load with peak pressure reduced to 0.2 GPa (2 kbar) not only yields but its effective plastic strain exceeds the failure point of 0.4 in 304 stainless steel after 160 microseconds. Doubling the impulse for the protected case to approximately account for debris loading results in very localized yield and an effective plastic strain that does not exceed 0.014. (U)

  9. Development of bright fluorescent quadracyclic adenine analogues: TDDFT-calculation supported rational design

    PubMed Central

    Foller Larsen, Anders; Dumat, Blaise; Wranne, Moa S.; Lawson, Christopher P.; Preus, Søren; Bood, Mattias; Gradén, Henrik; Marcus Wilhelmsson, L.; Grøtli, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent base analogues (FBAs) comprise a family of increasingly important molecules for the investigation of nucleic acid structure and dynamics. We recently reported the quantum chemical calculation supported development of four microenvironment sensitive analogues of the quadracyclic adenine (qA) scaffold, the qANs, with highly promising absorptive and fluorescence properties that were very well predicted by TDDFT calculations. Herein, we report on the efficient synthesis, experimental and theoretical characterization of nine novel quadracyclic adenine derivatives. The brightest derivative, 2-CNqA, displays a 13-fold increased brightness (εΦF = 4500) compared with the parent compound qA and has the additional benefit of being a virtually microenvironment-insensitive fluorophore, making it a suitable candidate for nucleic acid incorporation and use in quantitative FRET and anisotropy experiments. TDDFT calculations, conducted on the nine novel qAs a posteriori, successfully describe the relative fluorescence quantum yield and brightness of all qA derivatives. This observation suggests that the TDDFT-based rational design strategy may be employed for the development of bright fluorophores built up from a common scaffold to reduce the otherwise costly and time-consuming screening process usually required to obtain useful and bright FBAs. PMID:26227585

  10. Development of bright fluorescent quadracyclic adenine analogues: TDDFT-calculation supported rational design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foller Larsen, Anders; Dumat, Blaise; Wranne, Moa S.; Lawson, Christopher P.; Preus, Søren; Bood, Mattias; Gradén, Henrik; Marcus Wilhelmsson, L.; Grøtli, Morten

    2015-07-01

    Fluorescent base analogues (FBAs) comprise a family of increasingly important molecules for the investigation of nucleic acid structure and dynamics. We recently reported the quantum chemical calculation supported development of four microenvironment sensitive analogues of the quadracyclic adenine (qA) scaffold, the qANs, with highly promising absorptive and fluorescence properties that were very well predicted by TDDFT calculations. Herein, we report on the efficient synthesis, experimental and theoretical characterization of nine novel quadracyclic adenine derivatives. The brightest derivative, 2-CNqA, displays a 13-fold increased brightness (ɛΦF = 4500) compared with the parent compound qA and has the additional benefit of being a virtually microenvironment-insensitive fluorophore, making it a suitable candidate for nucleic acid incorporation and use in quantitative FRET and anisotropy experiments. TDDFT calculations, conducted on the nine novel qAs a posteriori, successfully describe the relative fluorescence quantum yield and brightness of all qA derivatives. This observation suggests that the TDDFT-based rational design strategy may be employed for the development of bright fluorophores built up from a common scaffold to reduce the otherwise costly and time-consuming screening process usually required to obtain useful and bright FBAs.

  11. Accelerated materials design of fast oxygen ionic conductors based on first principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xingfeng; Mo, Yifei

    Over the past decades, significant research efforts have been dedicated to seeking fast oxygen ion conductor materials, which have important technological applications in electrochemical devices such as solid oxide fuel cells, oxygen separation membranes, and sensors. Recently, Na0.5Bi0.5TiO3 (NBT) was reported as a new family of fast oxygen ionic conductor. We will present our first principles computation study aims to understand the O diffusion mechanisms in the NBT material and to design this material with enhanced oxygen ionic conductivity. Using the NBT materials as an example, we demonstrate the computation capability to evaluate the phase stability, chemical stability, and ionic diffusion of the ionic conductor materials. We reveal the effects of local atomistic configurations and dopants on oxygen diffusion and identify the intrinsic limiting factors in increasing the ionic conductivity of the NBT materials. Novel doping strategies were predicted and demonstrated by the first principles calculations. In particular, the K doped NBT compound achieved good phase stability and an order of magnitude increase in oxygen ionic conductivity of up to 0.1 S cm-1 at 900 K compared to the experimental Mg doped compositions. Our results provide new avenues for the future design of the NBT materials and demonstrate the accelerated design of new ionic conductor materials based on first principles techniques. This computation methodology and workflow can be applied to the materials design of any (e.g. Li +, Na +) fast ion-conducting materials.

  12. Technology Solutions Case Study: Calculating Design Heating Loads for Superinsulated Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    2015-08-01

    Designing a superinsulated home has many benefits including improved comfort, reduced exterior noise penetration, lower energy bills, and the ability to withstand power and fuel outages under much more comfortable conditions than a typical home. Extremely low heating and cooling loads equate to much smaller HVAC equipment than conventionally required. Sizing the mechanical system to these much lower loads reduces first costs and the size of the distribution system needed. While these homes aren't necessarily constructed with excessive mass in the form of concrete floors and walls, the amount of insulation and the increase in the thickness of the building envelope can lead to a mass effect, resulting in the structures ability to store much more heat than a code built home. This results in a very low thermal inertia making the building much less sensitive to drastic temperature swings thereby decreasing the peak heating load demand. Alternative methods that take this inertia into account along with solar and internal gains result in smaller more appropriate design loads than those calculated using Manual J version 8. During the winter of 2013/2014, the Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings team monitored the energy use of three homes in climate zone 6 in an attempt to evaluate the accuracy of two different mechanical system sizing methods for low load homes. Based on the results, it is recommended that internal and solar gains be included and some credit for thermal inertia be used in sizing calculations for superinsulated homes.

  13. Engineering Parameters in Bioreactor's Design: A Critical Aspect in Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Amoabediny, Ghassem; Pouran, Behdad; Tabesh, Hadi; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Haghighipour, Nooshin; Khatibi, Nahid; Mottaghy, Khosrow; Zandieh-Doulabi, Behrouz

    2013-01-01

    Bioreactors are important inevitable part of any tissue engineering (TE) strategy as they aid the construction of three-dimensional functional tissues. Since the ultimate aim of a bioreactor is to create a biological product, the engineering parameters, for example, internal and external mass transfer, fluid velocity, shear stress, electrical current distribution, and so forth, are worth to be thoroughly investigated. The effects of such engineering parameters on biological cultures have been addressed in only a few preceding studies. Furthermore, it would be highly inefficient to determine the optimal engineering parameters by trial and error method. A solution is provided by emerging modeling and computational tools and by analyzing oxygen, carbon dioxide, and nutrient and metabolism waste material transports, which can simulate and predict the experimental results. Discovering the optimal engineering parameters is crucial not only to reduce the cost and time of experiments, but also to enhance efficacy and functionality of the tissue construct. This review intends to provide an inclusive package of the engineering parameters together with their calculation procedure in addition to the modeling techniques in TE bioreactors. PMID:24000327

  14. The impact of registration accuracy on imaging validation study design: A novel statistical power calculation.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Eli; Fenster, Aaron; Ward, Aaron D

    2013-10-01

    Novel imaging modalities are pushing the boundaries of what is possible in medical imaging, but their signal properties are not always well understood. The evaluation of these novel imaging modalities is critical to achieving their research and clinical potential. Image registration of novel modalities to accepted reference standard modalities is an important part of characterizing the modalities and elucidating the effect of underlying focal disease on the imaging signal. The strengths of the conclusions drawn from these analyses are limited by statistical power. Based on the observation that in this context, statistical power depends in part on uncertainty arising from registration error, we derive a power calculation formula relating registration error, number of subjects, and the minimum detectable difference between normal and pathologic regions on imaging, for an imaging validation study design that accommodates signal correlations within image regions. Monte Carlo simulations were used to evaluate the derived models and test the strength of their assumptions, showing that the model yielded predictions of the power, the number of subjects, and the minimum detectable difference of simulated experiments accurate to within a maximum error of 1% when the assumptions of the derivation were met, and characterizing sensitivities of the model to violations of the assumptions. The use of these formulae is illustrated through a calculation of the number of subjects required for a case study, modeled closely after a prostate cancer imaging validation study currently taking place at our institution. The power calculation formulae address three central questions in the design of imaging validation studies: (1) What is the maximum acceptable registration error? (2) How many subjects are needed? (3) What is the minimum detectable difference between normal and pathologic image regions?

  15. Design of experiments for measuring heat-transfer coefficients with a lumped-parameter calorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanfossen, G. J., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    A theoretical investigation was conducted to determine optimum experimental conditions for using a lumped-parameter calorimeter to measure heat-transfer coefficients and heating rates. A mathematical model of the transient temperature response of the calorimeter was used with the measured temperature response to predict the heat-transfer coefficient and the rate of heating. A sensitivity analysis was used to determine the optimum transient experiment for simultaneously measuring the heat addition during heating and the convective heat-transfer coefficient during heating and cooling of a lumped-parameter calorimeter. Optimum experiments were also designed for measuring the convective heat-transfer coefficient during both heating and cooling and cooling only.

  16. Inferring the temperature dependence of population parameters: the effects of experimental design and inference algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Palamara, Gian Marco; Childs, Dylan Z; Clements, Christopher F; Petchey, Owen L; Plebani, Marco; Smith, Matthew J

    2014-01-01

    Understanding and quantifying the temperature dependence of population parameters, such as intrinsic growth rate and carrying capacity, is critical for predicting the ecological responses to environmental change. Many studies provide empirical estimates of such temperature dependencies, but a thorough investigation of the methods used to infer them has not been performed yet. We created artificial population time series using a stochastic logistic model parameterized with the Arrhenius equation, so that activation energy drives the temperature dependence of population parameters. We simulated different experimental designs and used different inference methods, varying the likelihood functions and other aspects of the parameter estimation methods. Finally, we applied the best performing inference methods to real data for the species Paramecium caudatum. The relative error of the estimates of activation energy varied between 5% and 30%. The fraction of habitat sampled played the most important role in determining the relative error; sampling at least 1% of the habitat kept it below 50%. We found that methods that simultaneously use all time series data (direct methods) and methods that estimate population parameters separately for each temperature (indirect methods) are complementary. Indirect methods provide a clearer insight into the shape of the functional form describing the temperature dependence of population parameters; direct methods enable a more accurate estimation of the parameters of such functional forms. Using both methods, we found that growth rate and carrying capacity of Paramecium caudatum scale with temperature according to different activation energies. Our study shows how careful choice of experimental design and inference methods can increase the accuracy of the inferred relationships between temperature and population parameters. The comparison of estimation methods provided here can increase the accuracy of model predictions, with important

  17. Inferring the temperature dependence of population parameters: the effects of experimental design and inference algorithm.

    PubMed

    Palamara, Gian Marco; Childs, Dylan Z; Clements, Christopher F; Petchey, Owen L; Plebani, Marco; Smith, Matthew J

    2014-12-01

    Understanding and quantifying the temperature dependence of population parameters, such as intrinsic growth rate and carrying capacity, is critical for predicting the ecological responses to environmental change. Many studies provide empirical estimates of such temperature dependencies, but a thorough investigation of the methods used to infer them has not been performed yet. We created artificial population time series using a stochastic logistic model parameterized with the Arrhenius equation, so that activation energy drives the temperature dependence of population parameters. We simulated different experimental designs and used different inference methods, varying the likelihood functions and other aspects of the parameter estimation methods. Finally, we applied the best performing inference methods to real data for the species Paramecium caudatum. The relative error of the estimates of activation energy varied between 5% and 30%. The fraction of habitat sampled played the most important role in determining the relative error; sampling at least 1% of the habitat kept it below 50%. We found that methods that simultaneously use all time series data (direct methods) and methods that estimate population parameters separately for each temperature (indirect methods) are complementary. Indirect methods provide a clearer insight into the shape of the functional form describing the temperature dependence of population parameters; direct methods enable a more accurate estimation of the parameters of such functional forms. Using both methods, we found that growth rate and carrying capacity of Paramecium caudatum scale with temperature according to different activation energies. Our study shows how careful choice of experimental design and inference methods can increase the accuracy of the inferred relationships between temperature and population parameters. The comparison of estimation methods provided here can increase the accuracy of model predictions, with important

  18. Influence of Various Material Design Parameters on Deformation Behaviors of TRIP Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Kyoo Sil; Soulami, Ayoub; Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2010-11-02

    In this paper, the microstructure-based finite element modeling method is used as a virtual design tool in investigating the respective influence of various material design parameters on the deformation behaviors of transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) steels. For this purpose, the separate effects of several different material design parameters, such as the volume fraction and stability of austenite phase and the strengths of the constituent phases, on the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and ductility/formability of TRIP steels are quantitatively examined using different representative volume elements (RVEs) representing different TRIP steels. The computational results suggest that higher austenite stability is helpful in enhancing the ductility and formability of TRIP steels by delaying the martensitic transformation to a later stage, whereas increase of austenite volume fraction and/or ferrite strength alone is not beneficial to improve the performance of TRIP steels. The results in this study also indicate that various material design parameters must be adjusted concurrently to develop high performance TRIP steels. For example, the austenite strength should increase over the ferrite strength in order to induce the gradual/smooth martensitic transformation, and the strength disparity between the ferrite and the freshly-formed martensite phases should decrease in order to avoid higher stress/strain concentration along the phase boundaries. The modeling approach and results presented in this paper can be helpful in providing the deformation fundamentals for the development of high performance TRIP steels.

  19. Criteria for calculating the efficiency of deep-pleated HEPA filters with aluminum separators during and after design basis accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.; First, M.W.; Anderson, W.L.; Gilbert, H.; Jacox, J.W.

    1995-02-01

    The authors have reviewed the literature on the performance of high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters under normal and abnormal conditions to establish criteria for calculating the efficiency of HEPA filters in a DOE nonreactor nuclear facility during and after a Design Basis Accident (DBA). This study is only applicable to the standard deep-pleated HEPA filter with aluminum separators as specified in ASME N509. The literature review included the performance of new filters and parameters that may cause deterioration in the filter performance such as filter age, radiation, corrosive chemicals, seismic and rough handling, high temperature, moisture, particle clogging, high air flow and pressure pulses. The deterioration of the filter efficiency depends on the exposure parameters; in severe exposure conditions the filter will be structurally damaged and have a residual efficiency of 0%. Despite the many studies on HEPA filter performance under adverse conditions, there are large gaps and limitations in the data that introduce significant error in the estimates of HEPA filter efficiencies under DBA conditions. Because of this limitation, conservative values of filter efficiency were chosen when there was insufficient data.

  20. A systematic study on hydrogen bond interactions in sulfabenzamide: DFT calculations of the N-14, O-17, and H-2 NQR parameters.

    PubMed

    Nozad, Ahmad G; Najafi, Hamidreza; Meftah, Sakineh; Aghazadeh, Mustafa

    2009-02-01

    A systematic computational study was carried out to characterize the hydrogen bond, HB, interactions of sulfabenzamide crystal structure by DFT calculations of electric field gradient, EFG, tensors at the sites of 14N, 17O, and 2H nuclei. The computations were performed with the B3LYP and B3PW91 DFT methods and 6-311+G and 6-311++G* standard basis sets using the Gaussian 98 package. To perform the calculations, a hydrogen-bonded heptameric cluster of sulfabenzamide was created by X-ray coordinates where the hydrogen atom positions were optimized and the EFG tensors were calculated for the target molecule. Additional optimization and EFG calculations were also performed for crystalline monomer and an isolated gas-phase sulfabenzamide. The calculated EFG tensors were converted to the experimentally measurable nuclear quadrupole resonance, NQR, parameters: quadrupole coupling constant, C(Q), and asymmetry parameter, eta(Q). The results reveal that the geometrical and NQR parameters of the optimized isolated gas-phase and crystalline phase are different. In addition, the difference between the calculated NQR parameters of the monomer and the target molecule shows how much H-bonding interactions affect the EFG tensors of each nucleus. The evaluated NQR parameters reveal that due to the contribution of the target molecule to N-H...O and C-H...O hydrogen bond interactions, the EFG tensors at the sites of N1, O3 and H1 undergo significant changes from monomer to the target molecule in cluster. These features reveal the major role of N-H...O type intermolecular HBs in cluster model of sulfabenzamide which the presence of these interactions can lead to polymorphism directly related to the drug activity and related properties.

  1. Software design to calculate and simulate the mechanical response of electromechanical lifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, I.; Romero, E.

    2016-05-01

    Lift engineers and lift companies which are involved in the design process of new products or in the research and development of improved components demand a predictive tool of the lift slender system response before testing expensive prototypes. A method for solving the movement of any specified lift system by means of a computer program is presented. The mechanical response of the lift operating in a user defined installation and configuration, for a given excitation and other configuration parameters of real electric motors and its control system, is derived. A mechanical model with 6 degrees of freedom is used. The governing equations are integrated step by step through the Meden-Kutta algorithm in the MATLAB platform. Input data consists on the set point speed for a standard trip and the control parameters of a number of controllers and lift drive machines. The computer program computes and plots very accurately the vertical displacement, velocity, instantaneous acceleration and jerk time histories of the car, counterweight, frame, passengers/loads and lift drive in a standard trip between any two floors of the desired installation. The resulting torque, rope tension and deviation of the velocity plot with respect to the setpoint speed are shown. The software design is implemented in a demo release of the computer program called ElevaCAD. Further on, the program offers the possibility to select the configuration of the lift system and the performance parameters of each component. In addition to the overall system response, detailed information of transients, vibrations of the lift components, ride quality levels, modal analysis and frequency spectrum (FFT) are plotted.

  2. Evolution of calculations of the virtual dipole moment of the Earth for reconstructing the oceanic inversion magnetic layer's parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreider, A. A.; Ignatova, A. A.; Schreider, Al. A.; Sajneva, A. E.; Varga, P.; Denis, C.

    2016-05-01

    The VDM (virtual dipole moment) is one of the most significant characteristics describing the behavior of the time evolution of the terrestrial magnetic field. However, we have revealed that the formulas with which VDM calculations are performed often do not coincide with each other in various literature sources. Hence, results are obtained from these calculations that cannot be identical. Their correctness is verified by comparing the dimension and obtained results with the known value of the VDM for our time.

  3. Human factors engineering design review acceptance criteria for the safety parameter display

    SciTech Connect

    McGevna, V.; Peterson, L.R.

    1981-10-02

    This report contains human factors engineering design review acceptance criteria developed by the Human Factors Engineering Branch (HFEB) of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to use in evaluating designs of the Safety Parameter Display System (SPDS). These criteria were developed in response to the functional design criteria for the SPDS defined in NUREG-0696, Functional Criteria for Emergency Response Facilities. The purpose of this report is to identify design review acceptance criteria for the SPDS installed in the control room of a nuclear power plant. Use of computer driven cathode ray tube (CRT) displays is anticipated. General acceptance criteria for displays of plant safety status information by the SPDS are developed. In addition, specific SPDS review criteria corresponding to the SPDS functional criteria specified in NUREG-0696 are established.

  4. Development of a turbomachinery design optimization procedure using a multiple-parameter nonlinear perturbation method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahara, S. S.

    1984-01-01

    An investigation was carried out to complete the preliminary development of a combined perturbation/optimization procedure and associated computational code for designing optimized blade-to-blade profiles of turbomachinery blades. The overall purpose of the procedures developed is to provide demonstration of a rapid nonlinear perturbation method for minimizing the computational requirements associated with parametric design studies of turbomachinery flows. The method combines the multiple parameter nonlinear perturbation method, successfully developed in previous phases of this study, with the NASA TSONIC blade-to-blade turbomachinery flow solver, and the COPES-CONMIN optimization procedure into a user's code for designing optimized blade-to-blade surface profiles of turbomachinery blades. Results of several design applications and a documented version of the code together with a user's manual are provided.

  5. A Computer Code System for the Calculation of Reactivity and Kinetic Parameters by One-Dimensional Neutron Transport Perturbation Theory.

    1985-02-01

    Version 00 TP1 is a transport theory code, developed to determine reactivity effects and kinetic parameters such as effective delayed neutron fractions and mean generation time by applying the usual perturbation formalism for one-dimensional geometry.

  6. A Computer Program for the Calculation of Reactivity and Kinetic Parameters by Two-Dimensional Neutron Transport Perturbation Theory.

    1985-02-01

    Version 00 TP2 is a transport theory code, developed to determine reactivity effects and kinetic parameters such as effective delayed neutron fractions and mean generation time by applying the usual perturbation formalism for two-dimensional geometry.

  7. Optimizing Friction Stir Welding via Statistical Design of Tool Geometry and Process Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blignault, C.; Hattingh, D. G.; James, M. N.

    2012-06-01

    This article considers optimization procedures for friction stir welding (FSW) in 5083-H321 aluminum alloy, via control of weld process parameters and tool design modifications. It demonstrates the potential utility of the "force footprint" (FF) diagram in providing a real-time graphical user interface (GUI) for process optimization of FSW. Multiple force, torque, and temperature responses were recorded during FS welding using 24 different tool pin geometries, and these data were statistically analyzed to determine the relative influence of a number of combinations of important process and tool geometry parameters on tensile strength. Desirability profile charts are presented, which show the influence of seven key combinations of weld process variables on tensile strength. The model developed in this study allows the weld tensile strength to be predicted for other combinations of tool geometry and process parameters to fall within an average error of 13%. General guidelines for tool profile selection and the likelihood of influencing weld tensile strength are also provided.

  8. Optimal design parameters of the bicycle-rider system for maximal muscle power output.

    PubMed

    Yoshihuku, Y; Herzog, W

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to find the optimal values of design parameters for a bicycle-rider system (crank length, pelvic inclination, seat height, and rate of crank rotation) which maximize the power output from muscles of the human lower limb during bicycling. The human lower limb was modelled as a planar system of five rigid bodies connected by four smooth pin joints and driven by seven functional muscle groups. The muscles were assumed to behave according to an adapted form of Hill's equation. The dependence of the average power on the design parameters was examined. The instantaneous power of each muscle group was studied and simultaneous activity of two seemingly antagonistic muscle groups was analyzed. Average peak power for one full pedal revolution was found to be around 1100 W. The upper body position corresponding to this peak power output was slightly reclined, and the pedalling rate was 155 rpm for a nominal crank length of 170 mm.

  9. Numerical method to determine mechanical parameters of engineering design in rock masses.

    PubMed

    Xue, Ting-He; Xiang, Yi-Qiang; Guo, Fa-Zhong

    2004-07-01

    This paper proposes a new continuity model for engineering in rock masses and a new schematic method for reporting the engineering of rock continuity. This method can be used to evaluate the mechanics of every kind of medium; and is a new way to determine the mechanical parameters used in engineering design in rock masses. In the numerical simulation, the experimental parameters of intact rock were combined with the structural properties of field rock. The experimental results for orthogonally-jointed rock are given. The results included the curves of the stress-strain relationship of some rock masses, the curve of the relationship between the dimension Delta and the uniaxial pressure-resistant strength sc of these rock masses, and pictures of the destructive procedure of some rock masses in uniaxial or triaxial tests, etc. Application of the method to engineering design in rock masses showed the potential of its application to engineering practice.

  10. Electron work function-a promising guiding parameter for material design.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hao; Liu, Ziran; Yan, Xianguo; Li, Dongyang; Parent, Leo; Tian, Harry

    2016-04-14

    Using nickel added X70 steel as a sample material, we demonstrate that electron work function (EWF), which largely reflects the electron behavior of materials, could be used as a guide parameter for material modification or design. Adding Ni having a higher electron work function to X70 steel brings more "free" electrons to the steel, leading to increased overall work function, accompanied with enhanced e(-)-nuclei interactions or higher atomic bond strength. Young's modulus and hardness increase correspondingly. However, the free electron density and work function decrease as the Ni content is continuously increased, accompanied with the formation of a second phase, FeNi3, which is softer with a lower work function. The decrease in the overall work function corresponds to deterioration of the mechanical strength of the steel. It is expected that EWF, a simple but fundamental parameter, may lead to new methodologies or supplementary approaches for metallic materials design or tailoring on a feasible electronic base.

  11. Estimation Model of Spacecraft Parameters and Cost Based on a Statistical Analysis of COMPASS Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerberich, Matthew W.; Oleson, Steven R.

    2013-01-01

    The Collaborative Modeling for Parametric Assessment of Space Systems (COMPASS) team at Glenn Research Center has performed integrated system analysis of conceptual spacecraft mission designs since 2006 using a multidisciplinary concurrent engineering process. The set of completed designs was archived in a database, to allow for the study of relationships between design parameters. Although COMPASS uses a parametric spacecraft costing model, this research investigated the possibility of using a top-down approach to rapidly estimate the overall vehicle costs. This paper presents the relationships between significant design variables, including breakdowns of dry mass, wet mass, and cost. It also develops a model for a broad estimate of these parameters through basic mission characteristics, including the target location distance, the payload mass, the duration, the delta-v requirement, and the type of mission, propulsion, and electrical power. Finally, this paper examines the accuracy of this model in regards to past COMPASS designs, with an assessment of outlying spacecraft, and compares the results to historical data of completed NASA missions.

  12. Design parameters and source terms: Volume 3, Source terms: Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-09-01

    The Design Parameters and Source Terms Document was prepared in accordance with DOE request and to provide data for the environmental impact study to be performed in the future for the Deaf Smith County, Texas site for a nuclear waste repository in salt. This document updates a previous unpublished report to the level of the Site Characterization Plan /endash/ Conceptual Design Report, SCP-CDR. The previous unpublished SCC Study identifies the data needs for the Environmental Assessment effort for seven possible salt repository sites.

  13. Design parameters and source terms: Volume 2, Source terms: Revision 0

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-09-01

    The Design Parameters and Source Terms Document was prepared in accordance with DOE request and to provide data for the environmental impact study to be performed in the future for the Deaf Smith County, Texas site for a nuclear waste repository in salt. This document updates a previous unpublished report to the level of the Site Characterization Plan---Conceptual Design Report SCP-CDR. The previous study identifies the data needs for the Environmental Assessment effort for seven possible salt repository sites. Volume 2 contains tables of source terms.

  14. Magnetic design calculation and FRC formation modeling for the field reversed experiment liner

    SciTech Connect

    Dorf, L. A.; Intrator, T. P.; Renneke, R.; Hsu, S. C.; Wurden, G. A.; Awe, T.; Siemon, R.; Semenov, V. E.

    2008-10-01

    Integrated magnetic modeling and design are important to meet the requirements for (1) formation, (2) translation, and (3) compression of a field reversed configuration (FRC) for magnetized target fusion. Off-the-shelf solutions do not exist for many generic design issues. A predictive capability for time-dependent magnetic diffusion in realistically complicated geometry is essential in designing the experiment. An eddy-current code was developed and used to compute the mutual inductances between driven magnetic coils and passive magnetic shields (flux excluder plates) to calculate the self-consistent axisymmetric magnetic fields during the first two stages. The plasma in the formation stage was modeled as an immobile solid cylinder with selectable constant resistivity and magnetic flux that was free to readjust itself. It was concluded that (1) use of experimentally obtained anomalously large plasma resistivity in magnetic diffusion simulations is sufficient to predict magnetic reconnection and FRC formation, (2) comparison of predicted and experimentally observed timescales for FRC Ohmic decay shows good agreement, and (3) for the typical range of resistivities, the magnetic null radius decay rate scales linearly with resistivity. The last result can be used to predict the rate of change in magnetic flux outside of the separatrix (equal to the back-emf loop voltage), and thus estimate a minimum {theta}-coil loop voltage required to form an FRC.

  15. Program GROUPIE (version 79-1): calculation of Bondarenko self-shielded neutron cross sections and multiband parameters from data in the ENDF/B format

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, D.E.

    1980-07-04

    Program GROUPIE reads evaluated data in the ENDF/B format and uses these data to calculate Bondarenko self-shielded cross sections and multiband parameters. To give as much generality as possible, the program allows the user to specify arbitrary energy groups and an arbitrary energy groups and an arbitrary energy-dependent neutron spectrum (weighing function). To guarantee the accuracy of the results, all integrals are performed analytically; in no case is iteration or any approximate form of integration used. The output from this program includes both listings and multiband parameters suitable for use either in a normal multigroup transport calculation or in a multiband transport calculation. A listing of the source deck is available on request.

  16. Optimal Parameter Design of Coarse Alignment for Fiber Optic Gyro Inertial Navigation System

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Baofeng; Wang, Qiuying; Yu, Chunmei; Gao, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Two different coarse alignment algorithms for Fiber Optic Gyro (FOG) Inertial Navigation System (INS) based on inertial reference frame are discussed in this paper. Both of them are based on gravity vector integration, therefore, the performance of these algorithms is determined by integration time. In previous works, integration time is selected by experience. In order to give a criterion for the selection process, and make the selection of the integration time more accurate, optimal parameter design of these algorithms for FOG INS is performed in this paper. The design process is accomplished based on the analysis of the error characteristics of these two coarse alignment algorithms. Moreover, this analysis and optimal parameter design allow us to make an adequate selection of the most accurate algorithm for FOG INS according to the actual operational conditions. The analysis and simulation results show that the parameter provided by this work is the optimal value, and indicate that in different operational conditions, the coarse alignment algorithms adopted for FOG INS are different in order to achieve better performance. Lastly, the experiment results validate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm. PMID:26121614

  17. Optimal Parameter Design of Coarse Alignment for Fiber Optic Gyro Inertial Navigation System.

    PubMed

    Lu, Baofeng; Wang, Qiuying; Yu, Chunmei; Gao, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Two different coarse alignment algorithms for Fiber Optic Gyro (FOG) Inertial Navigation System (INS) based on inertial reference frame are discussed in this paper. Both of them are based on gravity vector integration, therefore, the performance of these algorithms is determined by integration time. In previous works, integration time is selected by experience. In order to give a criterion for the selection process, and make the selection of the integration time more accurate, optimal parameter design of these algorithms for FOG INS is performed in this paper. The design process is accomplished based on the analysis of the error characteristics of these two coarse alignment algorithms. Moreover, this analysis and optimal parameter design allow us to make an adequate selection of the most accurate algorithm for FOG INS according to the actual operational conditions. The analysis and simulation results show that the parameter provided by this work is the optimal value, and indicate that in different operational conditions, the coarse alignment algorithms adopted for FOG INS are different in order to achieve better performance. Lastly, the experiment results validate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm. PMID:26121614

  18. DFT calculations of isomer shifts and quadrupole splitting parameters in synthetic iron-oxo complexes: applications to methane monooxygenase and ribonucleotide reductase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tiqing; Lovell, Timothy; Han, Wen-Ge; Noodleman, Louis

    2003-08-25

    To predict isomer shifts and quadrupole splitting parameters of Fe atoms in the protein active sites of methane monooxygenase and ribonucleotide reductase, a correlation between experimental isomer shifts ranging 0.1-1.5 mm s(-)(1) for Fe atoms in a training set with the corresponding density functional theory (DFT) calculated electron densities at the Fe nuclei in those complexes is established. The geometries of the species in the training set, consisting of synthetic polar monomeric and dimeric iron complexes, are taken from the Cambridge structural database. A comparison of calculated Mössbauer parameters for Fe atoms from complexes in the training set with their corresponding experimental values shows very good agreement (standard deviation of 0.11 mm/s, correlation coefficient of -0.94). However, for the Fe atoms in the active sites of the structurally characterized proteins of methane monooxygenase and ribonucleotide reductase, the calculated Mössbauer parameters deviate more from their experimentally measured values. The high correlation that exists between calculated and observed quadrupole splitting and isomer shift parameters for the synthetic complexes leads us to conclude that the main source of the error arising for the protein active sites is due to the differing degrees of atomic-level resolution for the protein structural data, compared to the synthetic complexes in the training set. Much lower X-ray resolutions associated with the former introduce uncertainty in the accuracy of several bond lengths. This is ultimately reflected in the calculated isomer shifts and quadrupole splitting parameters of the Fe sites in the proteins. For the proteins, the closest correspondence between predicted and observed Mössbauer isomer shifts follows the order MMOH(red), RNR(red), MMOH(ox), and RNR(ox), with average deviations from experiment of 0.17, 0.17, 0.17-0.20, and 0.32 mm/s, but this requires DFT geometry optimization of the iron-oxo dimer complexes.

  19. Euler Calculations at Off-Design Conditions for an Inlet of Inward Turning RBCC-SSTO Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takashima, N.; Kothari, A. P.

    1998-01-01

    The inviscid performance of an inward turning inlet design is calculated computationally for the first time. Hypersonic vehicle designs based on the inward turning inlets have been shown analytically to have increased effective specific impulse and lower heat load than comparably designed vehicles with two-dimensional inlets. The inward turning inlets are designed inversely from inviscid stream surfaces of known flow fields. The computational study is performed on a Mach 12 inlet design to validate the performance predicted by the design code (HAVDAC) and calculate its off-design Mach number performance. The three-dimensional Euler equations are solved for Mach 4, 8, and 12 using a software package called SAM, which consists of an unstructured mesh generator (SAMmesh), a three-dimensional unstructured mesh flow solver (SAMcfd), and a CAD-based software (SAMcad). The computed momentum averaged inlet throat pressure is within 6% of the design inlet throat pressure. The mass-flux at the inlet throat is also within 7 % of the value predicted by the design code thereby validating the accuracy of the design code. The off-design Mach number results show that flow spillage is minimal, and the variation in the mass capture ratio with Mach number is comparable to an ideal 2-D inlet. The results from the inviscid flow calculations of a Mach 12 inward turning inlet indicate that the inlet design has very good on and off-design performance which makes it a promising design candidate for future air-breathing hypersonic vehicles.

  20. SU-E-T-454: Impact of Calculation Grid Size On Dosimetry and Radiobiological Parameters for Head and Neck IMRT

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S; Das, I; Cheng, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: IMRT has become standard of care for complex treatments to optimize dose to target and spare normal tissues. However, the impact of calculation grid size is not widely known especially dose distribution, tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) which is investigated in this study. Methods: Ten head and neck IMRT patients treated with 6 MV photons were chosen for this study. Using Eclipse TPS, treatment plans were generated for different grid sizes in the range 1–5 mm for the same optimization criterion with specific dose-volume constraints. The dose volume histogram (DVH) was calculated for all IMRT plans and dosimetric data were compared. ICRU-83 dose points such as D2%, D50%, D98%, as well as the homogeneity and conformity indices (HI, CI) were calculated. In addition, TCP and NTCP were calculated from DVH data. Results: The PTV mean dose and TCP decreases with increasing grid size with an average decrease in mean dose by 2% and TCP by 3% respectively. Increasing grid size from 1–5 mm grid size, the average mean dose and NTCP for left parotid was increased by 6.0% and 8.0% respectively. Similar patterns were observed for other OARs such as cochlea, parotids and spinal cord. The HI increases up to 60% and CI decreases on average by 3.5% between 1 and 5 mm grid that resulted in decreased TCP and increased NTCP values. The number of points meeting the gamma criteria of ±3% dose difference and ±3mm DTA was higher with a 1 mm on average (97.2%) than with a 5 mm grid (91.3%). Conclusion: A smaller calculation grid provides superior dosimetry with improved TCP and reduced NTCP values. The effect is more pronounced for smaller OARs. Thus, the smallest possible grid size should be used for accurate dose calculation especially in H and N planning.

  1. The influence of selected design and operating parameters on the dynamics of the steam micro-turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żywica, Grzegorz; Kiciński, Jan

    2015-10-01

    The topic of the article is the analysis of the influence of selected design parameters and operating conditions on the radial steam micro-turbine, which was adapted to operate with low-boiling agent in the Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC). In the following parts of this article the results of the thermal load analysis, the residual unbalance and the stiffness of bearing supports are discussed. Advanced computational methods and numerical models have been used. Computational analysis showed that the steam micro-turbine is characterized by very good dynamic properties and is resistant to extreme operating conditions. The prototype of micro-turbine has passed a series of test calculations. It has been found that it can be subjected to experimental research in the micro combined heat and power system.

  2. Design optimization of structural parameters for highly sensitive photonic crystal label-free biosensors.

    PubMed

    Ju, Jonghyun; Han, Yun-ah; Kim, Seok-min

    2013-01-01

    The effects of structural design parameters on the performance of nano-replicated photonic crystal (PC) label-free biosensors were examined by the analysis of simulated reflection spectra of PC structures. The grating pitch, duty, scaled grating height and scaled TiO2 layer thickness were selected as the design factors to optimize the PC structure. The peak wavelength value (PWV), full width at half maximum of the peak, figure of merit for the bulk and surface sensitivities, and surface/bulk sensitivity ratio were also selected as the responses to optimize the PC label-free biosensor performance. A parametric study showed that the grating pitch was the dominant factor for PWV, and that it had low interaction effects with other scaled design factors. Therefore, we can isolate the effect of grating pitch using scaled design factors. For the design of PC-label free biosensor, one should consider that: (1) the PWV can be measured by the reflection peak measurement instruments, (2) the grating pitch and duty can be manufactured using conventional lithography systems, and (3) the optimum design is less sensitive to the grating height and TiO2 layer thickness variations in the fabrication process. In this paper, we suggested a design guide for highly sensitive PC biosensor in which one select the grating pitch and duty based on the limitations of the lithography and measurement system, and conduct a multi objective optimization of the grating height and TiO2 layer thickness for maximizing performance and minimizing the influence of parameter variation. Through multi-objective optimization of a PC structure with a fixed grating height of 550 nm and a duty of 50%, we obtained a surface FOM of 66.18 RIU-1 and an S/B ratio of 34.8%, with a grating height of 117 nm and TiO2 height of 210 nm.

  3. Design optimization of structural parameters for highly sensitive photonic crystal label-free biosensors.

    PubMed

    Ju, Jonghyun; Han, Yun-ah; Kim, Seok-min

    2013-01-01

    The effects of structural design parameters on the performance of nano-replicated photonic crystal (PC) label-free biosensors were examined by the analysis of simulated reflection spectra of PC structures. The grating pitch, duty, scaled grating height and scaled TiO2 layer thickness were selected as the design factors to optimize the PC structure. The peak wavelength value (PWV), full width at half maximum of the peak, figure of merit for the bulk and surface sensitivities, and surface/bulk sensitivity ratio were also selected as the responses to optimize the PC label-free biosensor performance. A parametric study showed that the grating pitch was the dominant factor for PWV, and that it had low interaction effects with other scaled design factors. Therefore, we can isolate the effect of grating pitch using scaled design factors. For the design of PC-label free biosensor, one should consider that: (1) the PWV can be measured by the reflection peak measurement instruments, (2) the grating pitch and duty can be manufactured using conventional lithography systems, and (3) the optimum design is less sensitive to the grating height and TiO2 layer thickness variations in the fabrication process. In this paper, we suggested a design guide for highly sensitive PC biosensor in which one select the grating pitch and duty based on the limitations of the lithography and measurement system, and conduct a multi objective optimization of the grating height and TiO2 layer thickness for maximizing performance and minimizing the influence of parameter variation. Through multi-objective optimization of a PC structure with a fixed grating height of 550 nm and a duty of 50%, we obtained a surface FOM of 66.18 RIU-1 and an S/B ratio of 34.8%, with a grating height of 117 nm and TiO2 height of 210 nm. PMID:23470487

  4. Program WALKMAN: A code designed to perform electron single collision elastic scattering Monte Carlo calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, D.E.

    1994-08-01

    The computer code WALKMAN performs electron single collision elastic scattering Monte Carlo calculations in spherical or planar geometry. It is intended as a research tool to obtain results that can be compared to the results of condensed history calculations. This code is designed to be self documenting, in the sense that the latest documentation is included as comment lines at the beginning of the code. Printed documentation, such as this document, is periodically published and consists mostly of a copy of the comment lines from the code. The user should be aware that the comment lines within the code are continually updated to reflect the most recent status of the code and these comments should always be considered to be the most recent documentation for the code and may supersede published documentation, such as this document. Therefore, the user is advised to always read the documentation within the actual code. The remainder of this report consists of example results and a listing of the documentation which appears at the beginning of the code.

  5. Guidelines for the Selection of Near-Earth Thermal Environment Parameters for Spacecraft Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, B. J.; Justus, C. G.; Batts, G. W.

    2001-01-01

    Thermal analysis and design of Earth orbiting systems requires specification of three environmental thermal parameters: the direct solar irradiance, Earth's local albedo, and outgoing longwave radiance (OLR). In the early 1990s data sets from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment were analyzed on behalf of the Space Station Program to provide an accurate description of these parameters as a function of averaging time along the orbital path. This information, documented in SSP 30425 and, in more generic form in NASA/TM-4527, enabled the specification of the proper thermal parameters for systems of various thermal response time constants. However, working with the engineering community and SSP-30425 and TM-4527 products over a number of years revealed difficulties in interpretation and application of this material. For this reason it was decided to develop this guidelines document to help resolve these issues of practical application. In the process, the data were extensively reprocessed and a new computer code, the Simple Thermal Environment Model (STEM) was developed to simplify the process of selecting the parameters for input into extreme hot and cold thermal analyses and design specifications. In the process, greatly improved values for the cold case OLR values for high inclination orbits were derived. Thermal parameters for satellites in low, medium, and high inclination low-Earth orbit and with various system thermal time constraints are recommended for analysis of extreme hot and cold conditions. Practical information as to the interpretation and application of the information and an introduction to the STEM are included. Complete documentation for STEM is found in the user's manual, in preparation.

  6. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP), Slick Rock, Colorado, Revision 1. Volume 1, Calculations, Final design for construction

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    Volume one contains calculations for: embankment design--embankment material properties; Union Carbide site--bedrock contours; vicinity properties--origin of contamination; North Continent and Union Carbide sites contaminated materials--excavation quantities; and demolition debris--quantity estimate.

  7. Inductive Powering of Subcutaneous Stimulators: Key Parameters and Their Impact on the Design Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Godfraind, Carmen; Debelle, Adrien; Lonys, Laurent; Acuña, Vicente; Doguet, Pascal; Nonclercq, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    Inductive powering of implantable medical devices involves numerous factors acting on the system efficiency and safety in adversarial ways. This paper lightens up their role and identifies a procedure enabling the system design. The latter enables the problem to be decoupled into four principal steps: the frequency choice, the magnetic link optimization, the secondary circuit and then finally the primary circuit designs. The methodology has been tested for the powering system of a device requirering a power of 300mW and implanted at a distance of 15 to 30mm from the outside power source. It allowed the identification of the most critical parameters. A satisfying efficiency of 34% was reached at 21mm and tend to validate the proposed design procedure. PMID:27478572

  8. Inductive Powering of Subcutaneous Stimulators: Key Parameters and Their Impact on the Design Methodology.

    PubMed

    Godfraind, Carmen; Debelle, Adrien; Lonys, Laurent; Acuña, Vicente; Doguet, Pascal; Nonclercq, Antoine

    2016-06-13

    Inductive powering of implantable medical devices involves numerous factors acting on the system efficiency and safety in adversarial ways. This paper lightens up their role and identifies a procedure enabling the system design. The latter enables the problem to be decoupled into four principal steps: the frequency choice, the magnetic link optimization, the secondary circuit and then finally the primary circuit designs. The methodology has been tested for the powering system of a device requirering a power of 300mW and implanted at a distance of 15 to 30mm from the outside power source. It allowed the identification of the most critical parameters. A satisfying efficiency of 34% was reached at 21mm and tend to validate the proposed design procedure. PMID:27478572

  9. Determination of integral turbulence model parameters as applied to calculation of rod-bundle flows in porous-body approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasov, M. N.; Korsun, A. S.; Maslov, Yu. A.; Merinov, I. G.; Rachkov, V. I.; Kharitonov, V. S.

    2016-03-01

    In the present paper, results of numerical simulation of single-phase flows of heat carrier through square and triangular rod bundles are reported. The simulations were aimed at the determination of parameters involved in an integral model of turbulence being developed for modeling nuclear-reactor cores and heat exchangers in anisotropic porous-body approximation.

  10. Statistical issues including design and sample size calculation in thorough QT/QTc studies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Joanne; Machado, Stella G

    2008-01-01

    After several drugs were removed from the market in recent years because of death due to ventricular tachycardia resulting from drug-induced QT prolongation (Khongphatthanayothin et al., 1998; Lasser et al., 2002; Pratt et al., 1994; Wysowski et al., 2001), the ICH Regulatory agencies requested all sponsors of new drugs to conduct a clinical study, named a Thorough QT/QTc (TQT) study, to assess any possible QT prolongation due to the study drug. The final version of the ICH E14 guidance (ICH, 2005) for "The Clinical Evaluation of QT/QTc Interval Prolongation and Proarrhythmic Potential for Nonantiarrhythmic Drugs" was released in May 2005. The purpose of the ICH E14 guidance (ICH, 2005) is to provide recommendations to sponsors concerning the design, conduct, analysis, and interpretation of clinical studies to assess the potential of a drug to delay cardiac repolarization. The guideline, however, is not specific on several issues. In this paper, we try to address some statistical issues, including study design, primary statistical analysis, assay sensitivity analysis, and the calculation of the sample size for a TQT study.

  11. MEMS 3-DoF gyroscope design, modeling and simulation through equivalent circuit lumped parameter model

    SciTech Connect

    Mian, Muhammad Umer Khir, M. H. Md.; Tang, T. B.; Dennis, John Ojur; Riaz, Kashif; Iqbal, Abid; Bazaz, Shafaat A.

    2015-07-22

    Pre-fabrication, behavioural and performance analysis with computer aided design (CAD) tools is a common and fabrication cost effective practice. In light of this we present a simulation methodology for a dual-mass oscillator based 3 Degree of Freedom (3-DoF) MEMS gyroscope. 3-DoF Gyroscope is modeled through lumped parameter models using equivalent circuit elements. These equivalent circuits consist of elementary components which are counterpart of their respective mechanical components, used to design and fabricate 3-DoF MEMS gyroscope. Complete designing of equivalent circuit model, mathematical modeling and simulation are being presented in this paper. Behaviors of the equivalent lumped models derived for the proposed device design are simulated in MEMSPRO T-SPICE software. Simulations are carried out with the design specifications following design rules of the MetalMUMPS fabrication process. Drive mass resonant frequencies simulated by this technique are 1.59 kHz and 2.05 kHz respectively, which are close to the resonant frequencies found by the analytical formulation of the gyroscope. The lumped equivalent circuit modeling technique proved to be a time efficient modeling technique for the analysis of complex MEMS devices like 3-DoF gyroscopes. The technique proves to be an alternative approach to the complex and time consuming couple field analysis Finite Element Analysis (FEA) previously used.

  12. MEMS 3-DoF gyroscope design, modeling and simulation through equivalent circuit lumped parameter model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mian, Muhammad Umer; Dennis, John Ojur; Khir, M. H. Md.; Riaz, Kashif; Iqbal, Abid; Bazaz, Shafaat A.; Tang, T. B.

    2015-07-01

    Pre-fabrication, behavioural and performance analysis with computer aided design (CAD) tools is a common and fabrication cost effective practice. In light of this we present a simulation methodology for a dual-mass oscillator based 3 Degree of Freedom (3-DoF) MEMS gyroscope. 3-DoF Gyroscope is modeled through lumped parameter models using equivalent circuit elements. These equivalent circuits consist of elementary components which are counterpart of their respective mechanical components, used to design and fabricate 3-DoF MEMS gyroscope. Complete designing of equivalent circuit model, mathematical modeling and simulation are being presented in this paper. Behaviors of the equivalent lumped models derived for the proposed device design are simulated in MEMSPRO T-SPICE software. Simulations are carried out with the design specifications following design rules of the MetalMUMPS fabrication process. Drive mass resonant frequencies simulated by this technique are 1.59 kHz and 2.05 kHz respectively, which are close to the resonant frequencies found by the analytical formulation of the gyroscope. The lumped equivalent circuit modeling technique proved to be a time efficient modeling technique for the analysis of complex MEMS devices like 3-DoF gyroscopes. The technique proves to be an alternative approach to the complex and time consuming couple field analysis Finite Element Analysis (FEA) previously used.

  13. Gradient Theory simulations of pure fluid interfaces using a generalized expression for influence parameters and a Helmholtz energy equation of state for fundamentally consistent two-phase calculations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dahms, Rainer N.

    2014-12-31

    The fidelity of Gradient Theory simulations depends on the accuracy of saturation properties and influence parameters, and require equations of state (EoS) which exhibit a fundamentally consistent behavior in the two-phase regime. Widely applied multi-parameter EoS, however, are generally invalid inside this region. Hence, they may not be fully suitable for application in concert with Gradient Theory despite their ability to accurately predict saturation properties. The commonly assumed temperature-dependence of pure component influence parameters usually restricts their validity to subcritical temperature regimes. This may distort predictions for general multi-component interfaces where temperatures often exceed the critical temperature of vapor phasemore » components. Then, the calculation of influence parameters is not well defined. In this paper, one of the first studies is presented in which Gradient Theory is combined with a next-generation Helmholtz energy EoS which facilitates fundamentally consistent calculations over the entire two-phase regime. Illustrated on pentafluoroethane as an example, reference simulations using this method are performed. They demonstrate the significance of such high-accuracy and fundamentally consistent calculations for the computation of interfacial properties. These reference simulations are compared to corresponding results from cubic PR EoS, widely-applied in combination with Gradient Theory, and mBWR EoS. The analysis reveals that neither of those two methods succeeds to consistently capture the qualitative distribution of obtained key thermodynamic properties in Gradient Theory. Furthermore, a generalized expression of the pure component influence parameter is presented. This development is informed by its fundamental definition based on the direct correlation function of the homogeneous fluid and by presented high-fidelity simulations of interfacial density profiles. As a result, the new model preserves the accuracy of

  14. Gradient Theory simulations of pure fluid interfaces using a generalized expression for influence parameters and a Helmholtz energy equation of state for fundamentally consistent two-phase calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Dahms, Rainer N.

    2014-12-31

    The fidelity of Gradient Theory simulations depends on the accuracy of saturation properties and influence parameters, and require equations of state (EoS) which exhibit a fundamentally consistent behavior in the two-phase regime. Widely applied multi-parameter EoS, however, are generally invalid inside this region. Hence, they may not be fully suitable for application in concert with Gradient Theory despite their ability to accurately predict saturation properties. The commonly assumed temperature-dependence of pure component influence parameters usually restricts their validity to subcritical temperature regimes. This may distort predictions for general multi-component interfaces where temperatures often exceed the critical temperature of vapor phase components. Then, the calculation of influence parameters is not well defined. In this paper, one of the first studies is presented in which Gradient Theory is combined with a next-generation Helmholtz energy EoS which facilitates fundamentally consistent calculations over the entire two-phase regime. Illustrated on pentafluoroethane as an example, reference simulations using this method are performed. They demonstrate the significance of such high-accuracy and fundamentally consistent calculations for the computation of interfacial properties. These reference simulations are compared to corresponding results from cubic PR EoS, widely-applied in combination with Gradient Theory, and mBWR EoS. The analysis reveals that neither of those two methods succeeds to consistently capture the qualitative distribution of obtained key thermodynamic properties in Gradient Theory. Furthermore, a generalized expression of the pure component influence parameter is presented. This development is informed by its fundamental definition based on the direct correlation function of the homogeneous fluid and by presented high-fidelity simulations of interfacial density profiles. As a result, the new model preserves the accuracy of previous

  15. Using experimental design to evaluate processing parameters in soft ferrite manufacture

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.A.T.; Reczek, S.T.; Rosen, A.

    1995-09-01

    The manufacture of soft ferrites is a complex process that involves multitudinous, interrelated steps. Seldom can one variable, such as the effect of the particle size of a raw material, be evaluated without considering other parameters. The particle size of hematite, for example, may affect reaction rate during calcination and consequently the spinel formation. Spinel content affects hardness and is reflected in grinding time. Grinding time affects the amount of iron introduced from the milling media, and so on. To optimize a process, the primary effect of a parameter and the interactions of that affect with other variables should be evaluated. This can be accomplished by using an experimental design that maximizes the information that can be obtained from each set of samples. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of several processing parameters on the magnetic properties of MnZn spinels. An experimental design using an orthogonal array of three variables at two levels was used to examine sintering time, atmosphere containment and part size effects. Four and eight hours at the maximum firing temperature were used for this investigation. Atmosphere containment was achieved by covering saggers with shielding of the same composition as the cores. Size effects, which could result from surface to volume ratio differences, were addressed by comparing the data for large and small cores. The surface to volume ratio of small cores was 1.4 times that of large cores.

  16. Estimating Cosmic-Ray Spectral Parameters from Simulated Detector Responses with Detector Design Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, L. W.

    2001-01-01

    A simple power law model consisting of a single spectral index (alpha-1) is believed to be an adequate description of the galactic cosmic-ray (GCR) proton flux at energies below 10(exp 13) eV, with a transition at knee energy (E(sub k)) to a steeper spectral index alpha-2 > alpha-1 above E(sub k). The maximum likelihood procedure is developed for estimating these three spectral parameters of the broken power law energy spectrum from simulated detector responses. These estimates and their surrounding statistical uncertainty are being used to derive the requirements in energy resolution, calorimeter size, and energy response of a proposed sampling calorimeter for the Advanced Cosmic-ray Composition Experiment for the Space Station (ACCESS). This study thereby permits instrument developers to make important trade studies in design parameters as a function of the science objectives, which is particularly important for space-based detectors where physical parameters, such as dimension and weight, impose rigorous practical limits to the design envelope.

  17. Estimating Cosmic Ray Spectral Parameters From Simulated Detector Responses With Detector Design Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, L. W.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A simple power law model consisting of a single spectral index alpha (sub 1), is believed to be an adequate description of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) proton flux at energies below 10(exp 13) eV, with a transition at knee energy E(sub k) to a steeper spectral index alpha(sub 2) greater than alpha(sub 1) above E(sub k). The maximum likelihood procedure is developed for estimating these three spectral parameters of the broken power law energy spectrum from simulated detector responses. These estimates and their surrounding statistical uncertainty are being used to derive the requirements in energy resolution, calorimeter size, and energy response of a proposed sampling calorimeter for the Advanced Cosmic ray Composition Experiment for the Space Station (ACCESS). This study thereby permits instrument developers to make important trade studies in design parameters as a function of the science objectives, which is particularly important for space-based detectors where physical parameters, such as dimension and weight, impose rigorous practical limits to the design envelope.

  18. Design and parameter estimation of hybrid magnetic bearings for blood pump applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Tau Meng; Zhang, Dongsheng; Yang, Juanjuan; Cheng, Shanbao; Low, Sze Hsien; Chua, Leok Poh; Wu, Xiaowei

    2009-10-01

    This paper discusses the design and parameter estimation of the dynamics characteristics of a high-speed hybrid magnetic bearings (HMBs) system for axial flow blood pump applications. The rotor/impeller of the pump is driven by a three-phase permanent magnet (PM) brushless and sensorless DC motor. It is levitated by two HMBs at both ends in five-degree-of-freedom with proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controllers; among which four radial directions are actively controlled and one axial direction is passively controlled. Test results show that the rotor can be stably supported to speeds of 14,000 rpm. The frequency domain parameter estimation technique with statistical analysis is adopted to validate the stiffness and damping coefficients of the HMBs system. A specially designed test rig facilitated the estimation of the bearing's coefficients in air—in both the radial and axial directions. The radial stiffness of the HMBs is compared to the Ansoft's Maxwell 2D/3D finite element magnetostatic results. Experimental estimation showed that the dynamics characteristics of the HMBs system are dominated by the frequency-dependent stiffness coefficients. The actuator gain was also successfully calibrated and may potentially extend the parameter estimation technique developed in the study of identification and monitoring of the pump's dynamics properties under normal operating conditions with fluid.

  19. TMRBAR: a code to calculate plasma parameters for tandem-mirror reactors operating in the MARS mode

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, R.B.

    1983-08-30

    The purpose of this report is to document the plasma power balance model currently used by LLNL to calculate steady state operating points for tandem mirror reactors. The code developed from this model, TMRBAR, has been used to predict the performance and define supplementary heating requirements for drivers used in the Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS) and for the Fusion Power Demonstration (FPD) study. The equations solved included particle and energy balance for central cell and end cell species, quasineutrality at several cardinal points in the end cell region, as well as calculations of volumes, densities and average energies based on given constraints of beta profiles and fusion power output. Alpha particle ash is treated self-consistently, but no other impurity species is treated.

  20. Mössbauer parameters of Fe-related defects in group-IV semiconductors: First principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, E.; Coutinho, J.; Öberg, S.; Torres, V. J. B.

    2016-05-01

    We employ a combination of pseudopotential and all-electron density functional calculations, to relate the structure of defects in supercells to the isomer shifts and quadrupole splittings observed in Mössbauer spectroscopy experiments. The methodology is comprehensively reviewed and applied to the technologically relevant case of iron-related defects in silicon, and to other group-IV hosts to a lesser degree. Investigated defects include interstitial and substitutional iron, iron-boron pairs, iron-vacancy, and iron-divacancy. We find that, in general, agreement between the calculations and Mössbauer data is within a 10% error bar. Nonetheless, we show that the methodology can be used to make accurate assignments, including to separate peaks of similar defects in slightly different environments.

  1. TR-LIF LIFETIME MEASUREMENTS AND HFR+CPOL CALCULATIONS OF RADIATIVE PARAMETERS IN VANADIUM ATOM (V I)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Q.; Jiang, L. Y.; Shang, X.; Tian, Y. S.; Dai, Z. W.; Quinet, P.; Palmeri, P.; Zhang, W. E-mail: Pascal.quinet@umons.ac.be

    2014-04-01

    Radiative lifetimes of 79 levels belonging to the 3d {sup 3}4s4p, 3d {sup 4}4p, 3d {sup 3}4s5p, 3d {sup 4}5p, and 3d {sup 3}4s4d configurations of V I with energy from 26,604.807 to 46,862.786 cm{sup –1} have been measured using time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence (TR-LIF) spectroscopy in laser-produced plasma. The lifetime values reported in this paper are in the range of 3.3-494 ns, and the uncertainties of these measurements are within ±10%. A good agreement was obtained with previous data. HFR+CPOL calculations have been performed and used to combine the calculated branching fractions with the available experimental lifetimes to determine semi-empirical transition probabilities for 784 V I transitions.

  2. Monte Carlo calculations and experimental measurements of dosimetric parameters of the IRA-{sup 103}Pd brachytherapy source

    SciTech Connect

    Sadeghi, Mahdi; Raisali, Gholamreza; Hosseini, S. Hamed; Shavar, Arzhang

    2008-04-15

    This article presents a brachytherapy source having {sup 103}Pd adsorbed onto a cylindrical silver rod that has been developed by the Agricultural, Medical, and Industrial Research School for permanent implant applications. Dosimetric characteristics (radial dose function, anisotropy function, and anisotropy factor) of this source were experimentally and theoretically determined in terms of the updated AAPM Task group 43 (TG-43U1) recommendations. Monte Carlo simulations were used to calculate the dose rate constant. Measurements were performed using TLD-GR200A circular chip dosimeters using standard methods employing thermoluminescent dosimeters in a Perspex phantom. Precision machined bores in the phantom located the dosimeters and the source in a reproducible fixed geometry, providing for transverse-axis and angular dose profiles over a range of distances from 0.5 to 5 cm. The Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) code, version 4C simulation techniques have been used to evaluate the dose-rate distributions around this model {sup 103}Pd source in water and Perspex phantoms. The Monte Carlo calculated dose rate constant of the IRA-{sup 103}Pd source in water was found to be 0.678 cGy h{sup -1} U{sup -1} with an approximate uncertainty of {+-}0.1%. The anisotropy function, F(r,{theta}), and the radial dose function, g(r), of the IRA-{sup 103}Pd source were also measured in a Perspex phantom and calculated in both Perspex and liquid water phantoms.

  3. Rational Design of Methodology-Independent Metal Parameters Using a Nonbonded Dummy Model.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yang; Zhang, Haiyang; Tan, Tianwei

    2016-07-12

    A nonbonded dummy model for metal ions is highly imperative for the computation of complex biological systems with for instance multiple metal centers. Here we present nonbonded dummy parameters of 11 divalent metallic cations, namely, Mg(2+), V(2+), Cr(2+), Mn(2+), Fe(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), Zn(2+), Cd(2+), Sn(2+), and Hg(2+), that are optimized to be compatible with three widely used water models (TIP3P, SPC/E, and TIP4P-EW). The three sets of metal parameters reproduce simultaneously the solvation free energies (ΔGsol), the ion-oxygen distance in the first solvation shell (IOD), and coordination numbers (CN) in explicit water with a relative error less than 1%. The main sources of errors to ΔGsol that arise from the boundary conditions and treatment of electrostatic interactions are corrected rationally, which ensures the independence of the proposed parameters on the methodology used in the calculation. This work will be of great value for the computational study of metal-containing biological systems. PMID:27182744

  4. Rational Design of Methodology-Independent Metal Parameters Using a Nonbonded Dummy Model.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yang; Zhang, Haiyang; Tan, Tianwei

    2016-07-12

    A nonbonded dummy model for metal ions is highly imperative for the computation of complex biological systems with for instance multiple metal centers. Here we present nonbonded dummy parameters of 11 divalent metallic cations, namely, Mg(2+), V(2+), Cr(2+), Mn(2+), Fe(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), Zn(2+), Cd(2+), Sn(2+), and Hg(2+), that are optimized to be compatible with three widely used water models (TIP3P, SPC/E, and TIP4P-EW). The three sets of metal parameters reproduce simultaneously the solvation free energies (ΔGsol), the ion-oxygen distance in the first solvation shell (IOD), and coordination numbers (CN) in explicit water with a relative error less than 1%. The main sources of errors to ΔGsol that arise from the boundary conditions and treatment of electrostatic interactions are corrected rationally, which ensures the independence of the proposed parameters on the methodology used in the calculation. This work will be of great value for the computational study of metal-containing biological systems.

  5. Calculations of standard-Higgs-boson production cross sections in e/sup +/e/sup -/ collisions by means of a reasonable set of parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Biyajima, M.; Shirane, K.; Terazawa, O.

    1987-10-01

    We calculate cross sections for production of the standard Higgs boson in e/sup +/e/sup -/ collisions and compare our results with those of several authors. It is found that there are appreciable differences among them which can be attributed to the coupling constants used, ..cap alpha..(0) ( = (1/137) and G/sub F/. We also observe that cross sections depend on the magnitudes of the total width of the Z particle. The use of a reasonable set of parameters in calculations is emphasized.

  6. Design and operational parameters of a rooftop rainwater harvesting system: definition, sensitivity and verification.

    PubMed

    Mun, J S; Han, M Y

    2012-01-01

    The appropriate design and evaluation of a rainwater harvesting (RWH) system is necessary to improve system performance and the stability of the water supply. The main design parameters (DPs) of an RWH system are rainfall, catchment area, collection efficiency, tank volume and water demand. Its operational parameters (OPs) include rainwater use efficiency (RUE), water saving efficiency (WSE) and cycle number (CN). The sensitivity analysis of a rooftop RWH system's DPs to its OPs reveals that the ratio of tank volume to catchment area (V/A) for an RWH system in Seoul, South Korea is recommended between 0.03 and 0.08 in terms of rate of change in RUE. The appropriate design value of V/A is varied with D/A. The extra tank volume up to V/A of 0.15∼0.2 is also available, if necessary to secure more water. Accordingly, we should figure out suitable value or range of DPs based on the sensitivity analysis to optimize design of an RWH system or improve operation efficiency. The operational data employed in this study, which was carried out to validate the design and evaluation method of an RWH system, were obtained from the system in use at a dormitory complex at Seoul National University (SNU) in Korea. The results of these operational data are in good agreement with those used in the initial simulation. The proposed method and the results of this research will be useful in evaluating and comparing the performance of RWH systems. It is found that RUE can be increased by expanding the variety of rainwater uses, particularly in the high rainfall season.

  7. Effect of turning parameters on A16351 T6 by using Design of Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annigeri, Ulhas K.; Charan, M.; Vishnu Sai, M.; Ram Charan, T.; Rahul Sai, L.

    2016-09-01

    Aluminium is a well known lightest engineering metals. It is the most productive element on the earth crust. It can be extracted from bauxite, kaolinite or nepheline. It can be used in making aeroplane bodies, automobile parts etc. It is mostly used in multiple applications in order to reduce the weight of the component and it has fancy corrosion resistance. In the present study Al 6351 T6 is selected and a plain turning operation is performed on it with the help of design of experiments. The surface roughness of the samples are tested by varying the cutting parameters such as speed, feed, and depth of cut. A mathematical model is developed and the parameter which affects the surface roughness is determined.

  8. Parameter Design and Optimal Control of an Open Core Flywheel Energy Storage System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pang, D.; Anand, D. K.; Kirk, J. A.

    1996-01-01

    In low earth orbit (LEO) satellite applications spacecraft power is provided by photovoltaic cells and batteries. To overcome battery shortcomings the University of Maryland, working in cooperation with NASA/GSFC and NASA/LeRC, has developed a magnetically suspended flywheel for energy storage applications. The system is referred to as an Open Core Composite Flywheel (OCCF) energy storage system. Successful application of flywheel energy storage requires integration of several technologies, viz. bearings, rotor design, motor/generator, power conditioning, and system control. In this paper we present a parameter design method which has been developed for analyzing the linear SISO model of the magnetic bearing controller for the OCCF. The objective of this continued research is to principally analyze the magnetic bearing system for nonlinear effects in order to increase the region of stability, as determined by high speed and large air gap control. This is achieved by four tasks: (1) physical modeling, design, prototyping, and testing of an improved magnetically suspended flywheel energy storage system, (2) identification of problems that limit performance and their corresponding solutions, (3) development of a design methodology for magnetic bearings, and (4) design of an optimal controller for future high speed applications. Both nonlinear SISO and MIMO models of the magnetic system were built to study limit cycle oscillations and power amplifier saturation phenomenon observed in experiments. The nonlinear models include the inductance of EM coils, the power amplifier saturation, and the physical limitation of the flywheel movement as discussed earlier. The control program EASY5 is used to study the nonlinear SISO and MIMO models. Our results have shown that the characteristics and frequency responses of the magnetic bearing system obtained from modeling are comparable to those obtained experimentally. Although magnetic saturation is shown in the bearings, there

  9. The STATFLUX code: a statistical method for calculation of flow and set of parameters, based on the Multiple-Compartment Biokinetical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, F.; Mesa, J.; Arruda-Neto, J. D. T.; Helene, O.; Vanin, V.; Milian, F.; Deppman, A.; Rodrigues, T. E.; Rodriguez, O.

    2007-03-01

    The code STATFLUX, implementing a new and simple statistical procedure for the calculation of transfer coefficients in radionuclide transport to animals and plants, is proposed. The method is based on the general multiple-compartment model, which uses a system of linear equations involving geometrical volume considerations. Flow parameters were estimated by employing two different least-squares procedures: Derivative and Gauss-Marquardt methods, with the available experimental data of radionuclide concentrations as the input functions of time. The solution of the inverse problem, which relates a given set of flow parameter with the time evolution of concentration functions, is achieved via a Monte Carlo simulation procedure. Program summaryTitle of program:STATFLUX Catalogue identifier:ADYS_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADYS_v1_0 Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: none Computer for which the program is designed and others on which it has been tested:Micro-computer with Intel Pentium III, 3.0 GHz Installation:Laboratory of Linear Accelerator, Department of Experimental Physics, University of São Paulo, Brazil Operating system:Windows 2000 and Windows XP Programming language used:Fortran-77 as implemented in Microsoft Fortran 4.0. NOTE: Microsoft Fortran includes non-standard features which are used in this program. Standard Fortran compilers such as, g77, f77, ifort and NAG95, are not able to compile the code and therefore it has not been possible for the CPC Program Library to test the program. Memory required to execute with typical data:8 Mbytes of RAM memory and 100 MB of Hard disk memory No. of bits in a word:16 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.:6912 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.:229 541 Distribution format:tar.gz Nature of the physical problem:The investigation of transport mechanisms for

  10. Effect of design and process parameters on nip width of soft calendering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanth, Neel; Ray, A. K.; Dang, Riti

    2016-07-01

    Calendering is a well-known operation in which a material is run between rolls to thin it into sheets or to produce smooth or glossy finish. An attempt has been made in this investigation to remove the drawbacks in the model of Meijers and applicable directly to soft calendering, also to make nip mechanics model generalized and applicable, so that it can be applicable where there is roll to roll or roll to plate contact. Also, the effect of various design and process parameters on results of soft calendering has been discussed using the data taken from paper industry.

  11. A normalized wave number variation parameter for acoustic black hole design.

    PubMed

    Feurtado, Philip A; Conlon, Stephen C; Semperlotti, Fabio

    2014-08-01

    In recent years, the concept of the Acoustic Black Hole has been developed as an efficient passive, lightweight absorber of bending waves in plates and beams. Theory predicts greater absorption for a higher thickness taper power. However, a higher taper power also increases the violation of an underlying theory smoothness assumption. This paper explores the effects of high taper power on the reflection coefficient and spatial change in wave number and discusses the normalized wave number variation as a spatial design parameter for performance, assessment, and optimization. PMID:25096139

  12. Atmospheric water parameters in mid-latitude cyclones observed by microwave radiometry and compared to model calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katsaros, Kristina B.; Hammarstrand, Ulla; Petty, Grant W.

    1990-01-01

    Existing and experimental algorithms for various parameters of atmospheric water content such as integrated water vapor, cloud water, precipitation, are used to examine the distribution of these quantities in mid latitude cyclones. The data was obtained from signals given by the special sensor microwave/imager (SSM/I) and compared with data from the nimbus scanning multichannel microwave radiometer (SMMR) for North Atlantic cyclones. The potential of microwave remote sensing for enhancing knowledge of the horizontal structure of these storms and to aid the development and testing of the cloud and precipitation aspects of limited area numerical models of cyclonic storms is investigated.

  13. Methods for calculation of engineering parameters for gas separation. [vapor pressure and solubility of gases in organic liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, D. D.

    1979-01-01

    A group additivity method is generated which allows estimation, from the structural formulas alone, of the energy of vaporization and the molar volume at 25 C of many nonpolar organic liquids. Using these two parameters and appropriate thermodynamic relations, the vapor pressure of the liquid phase and the solubility of various gases in nonpolar organic liquids are predicted. It is also possible to use the data to evaluate organic and some inorganic liquids for use in gas separation stages or liquids as heat exchange fluids in prospective thermochemical cycles for hydrogen production.

  14. Numerical studies of the thermal design sensitivity calculation for a reaction-diffusion system with discontinuous derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Jean W.; Sheen, Jeen S.

    1987-01-01

    The aim of this study is to find a reliable numerical algorithm to calculate thermal design sensitivities of a transient problem with discontinuous derivatives. The thermal system of interest is a transient heat conduction problem related to the curing process of a composite laminate. A logical function which can smoothly approximate the discontinuity is introduced to modify the system equation. Two commonly used methods, the adjoint variable method and the direct differentiation method, are then applied to find the design derivatives of the modified system. The comparisons of numerical results obtained by these two methods demonstrate that the direct differentiation method is a better choice to be used in calculating thermal design sensitivity.

  15. A sensitivity analysis of process design parameters, commodity prices and robustness on the economics of odour abatement technologies.

    PubMed

    Estrada, José M; Kraakman, N J R Bart; Lebrero, Raquel; Muñoz, Raúl

    2012-01-01

    The sensitivity of the economics of the five most commonly applied odour abatement technologies (biofiltration, biotrickling filtration, activated carbon adsorption, chemical scrubbing and a hybrid technology consisting of a biotrickling filter coupled with carbon adsorption) towards design parameters and commodity prices was evaluated. Besides, the influence of the geographical location on the Net Present Value calculated for a 20 years lifespan (NPV20) of each technology and its robustness towards typical process fluctuations and operational upsets were also assessed. This comparative analysis showed that biological techniques present lower operating costs (up to 6 times) and lower sensitivity than their physical/chemical counterparts, with the packing material being the key parameter affecting their operating costs (40-50% of the total operating costs). The use of recycled or partially treated water (e.g. secondary effluent in wastewater treatment plants) offers an opportunity to significantly reduce costs in biological techniques. Physical/chemical technologies present a high sensitivity towards H2S concentration, which is an important drawback due to the fluctuating nature of malodorous emissions. The geographical analysis evidenced high NPV20 variations around the world for all the technologies evaluated, but despite the differences in wage and price levels, biofiltration and biotrickling filtration are always the most cost-efficient alternatives (NPV20). When, in an economical evaluation, the robustness is as relevant as the overall costs (NPV20), the hybrid technology would move up next to BTF as the most preferred technologies.

  16. THERMAL: A routine designed to calculate neutron thermal scattering. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, D.E.

    1995-09-19

    THERMAL is designed to calculate neutron thermal scattering that is elastic and isotropic in the center of mass system. At low energy thermal motion will be included. At high energies the target nuclei are assumed to be stationary. The point of transition between low and high energies has been defined to insure a smooth transition. It is assumed that at low energy the elastic cross section is constant in the relative system. At high energy the cross section can be of any form. You can use this routine for all energies where the elastic scattering is isotropic in the center of mass system. In most materials this will be a fairly high energy, e.g., the keV energy range. The THERMAL method is simple, clean, easy to understand, and most important very efficient; on a SUN SPARC-10 workstation, at low energies with thermal scattering it can do almost 6 million scatters a minute and at high energy over 13 million. Warning: This version of THERMAL completely supersedes the original version described in the same report number, dated February 24, 1995. The method used in the original code is incorrect, as explained in this report.

  17. Exploration of PBPK Model-Calculation of Drug Time Course in Tissue Using IV Bolus Drug Plasma Concentration-Time Profile and the Physiological Parameters of the Organ.

    PubMed

    Berezhkovskiy, Leonid M

    2016-08-01

    An uncommon innovative consideration of the well-stirred linear physiologically based pharmacokinetic model and the drug plasma concentration-time profile, which is measured in routine intravenous bolus pharmacokinetic study, was applied for the calculation of the drug time course in human tissues. This cannot be obtained in the in vivo pharmacokinetic study. The physiological parameters of the organ such as organ tissue volume, organ blood flow rate, and its vascular volume were used in the calculation. The considered method was applied to calculate the time course of midazolam, alprazolam, quinidine, and diclofenac in human organs or tissues. The suggested method might be applied for the prediction of drug concentration-time profile in tissues and consequently the drug concentration level in the targeted tissue, as well as the possible undesirable toxic levels in other tissues. PMID:27290628

  18. [Electroencephalograpic Parameters of Healthy Persons with Different Successfulness of Dual-Task Performance (Postural Control and Calculation)].

    PubMed

    Zhavoronkova, L A; Kushnir, E M; Zharikova, A V; Kuptsova, S V; Shevtsova, T P; Koulikov, M A; Voronov, V G

    2015-01-01

    Complex electroencephalographic (EEG), stabilographic and psychological study was executed during the number dual tasks performance--postural control and calculation in 25 healthy volunteers (age 25 ± 0.7). Successful performances of dual tasks required a high usage of cognitive resources, such as memory and attention as well as good motor command and low level of anxiety. Two EEG-markers of successful dual tasks performance were revealed. An increase of EEG coherence for long diagonal pairs of leads between frontal and parieto-occipital areas was observed. Additionally a decrease of EEG coherence for short pairs of leads was revealed. The poor performance of dual tasks was accompanied by an increase of EEG coherence between local pairs of leads for different spectral bands. PMID:26860002

  19. Measurement and calculation of the Stark-broadening parameters for the resonance lines of singly ionized calcium and magnesium.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. W.; Sanchez, A.; Greig, J. R.; Griem, H. R.

    1972-01-01

    The electron-impact-broadened profiles of the resonance lines of singly ionized calcium and magnesium have been measured using an electromagnetically driven shock tube and a rapid-scanning Fabry-Perot spectrometer. For an electron density of 10 to the 17th power per cu cm and a temperature of 19,000 K, we found the Lorentzian half-width of the Ca+ line to be 0.086 A plus or minus 10% and of the Mg+ line to be 0.044 A plus or minus 10%. Using the quantum-mechanical theory of Barnes and Peach and our semiclassical calculation for the calcium lines, we found that the temperature dependence of the theoretical curves is close to that measured, although both theories predict actual values which are somewhat large.

  20. Calculation set for design and optimization of vegetative soil covers Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect

    Peace, Gerald L.; Goering, Timothy James (GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM)

    2005-02-01

    This study demonstrates that containment of municipal and hazardous waste in arid and semiarid environments can be accomplished effectively without traditional, synthetic materials and complex, multi-layer systems. This research demonstrates that closure covers combining layers of natural soil, native plant species, and climatic conditions to form a sustainable, functioning ecosystem will meet the technical equivalency criteria prescribed by the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency. In this study, percolation through a natural analogue and an engineered cover is simulated using the one-dimensional, numerical code UNSAT-H. UNSAT-H is a Richards. equation-based model that simulates soil water infiltration, unsaturated flow, redistribution, evaporation, plant transpiration, and deep percolation. This study incorporates conservative, site-specific soil hydraulic and vegetation parameters. Historical meteorological data are used to simulate percolation through the natural analogue and an engineered cover, with and without vegetation. This study indicates that a 3-foot (ft) cover in arid and semiarid environments is the minimum design thickness necessary to meet the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency-prescribed technical equivalency criteria of 31.5 millimeters/year and 1 x 10{sup -7} centimeters/second for net annual percolation and average flux, respectively. Increasing cover thickness to 4 or 5 ft results in limited additional improvement in cover performance.

  1. Conceptual Design Parameters for HFIR LEU U-Mo Fuel Conversion Experimental Irradiations

    SciTech Connect

    Renfro, David G; Cook, David Howard; Chandler, David; Ilas, Germina; Jain, Prashant K

    2013-03-01

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) is a versatile research reactor that is operated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The HFIR core is loaded with high-enriched uranium (HEU) and operates at a power level of 85 MW. The primary scientific missions of the HFIR include cold and thermal neutron scattering, materials irradiation, and isotope production. An engineering design study of the conversion of the HFIR from HEU to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel is ongoing at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The LEU fuel considered is based on a uranium-molybdenum alloy that is 10 percent by weight molybdenum (U-10Mo) with a 235U enrichment of 19.75 wt %. The LEU core design discussed in this report is based on the design documented in ORNL/TM-2010/318. Much of the data reported in Sections 1 and 2 of this document was derived from or taken directly out of ORNL/TM-2010/318. The purpose of this report is to document the design parameters for and the anticipated normal operating conditions of the conceptual HFIR LEU fuel to aid in developing requirements for HFIR irradiation experiments.

  2. Sensitivity of Key Parameters in Aerodynamic Wind Turbine Rotor Design on Power and Energy Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bak, Christian

    2007-07-01

    In this paper the influence of different key parameters in aerodynamic wind turbine rotor design on the power efficiency, Cp, and energy production has been investigated. The work was divided into an analysis of 2D airfoils/blade sections and of entire rotors. In the analysis of the 2D airfoils it was seen that there was a maximum of the local Cp for airfoils with finite maximum Cl/Cd values. The local speed ratio should be between 2.4 and 3.8 for airfoils with maximum cl/cd between 50 and 200, respectively, to obtain maximum local Cp. Also, the investigation showed that Re had a significant impact on CP and especially for Re<2mio corresponding to rotors below approximately 400kW this impact was pronounced. The investigation of Cp for rotors was made with three blades and showed that with the assumption of constant maximum cl/cd along the entire blade, the design tip speed ratio changed from X=6 to X=12 for cl/cd=50 and cl/cd=200, respectively, with corresponding values of maximum cp of 0.46 and 0.525. An analysis of existing rotors re-designed with new airfoils but maintaining the absolute thickness distribution to maintain the stiffness showed that big rotors are more aerodynamic efficient than small rotors caused by higher Re. It also showed that the design tip speed ratio was very dependent on the rotor size and on the assumptions of the airfoil flow being fully turbulent (contaminated airfoil) or free transitional (clean airfoil). The investigations showed that rotors with diameter D=1.75m, should be designed for X around 5.5, whereas rotors with diameter D=126m, should be designed for Xbetween 6.5 and 8.5, depending on the airfoil performance.

  3. Electron work function–a promising guiding parameter for material design

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hao; Liu, Ziran; Yan, Xianguo; Li, Dongyang; Parent, Leo; Tian, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Using nickel added X70 steel as a sample material, we demonstrate that electron work function (EWF), which largely reflects the electron behavior of materials, could be used as a guide parameter for material modification or design. Adding Ni having a higher electron work function to X70 steel brings more “free” electrons to the steel, leading to increased overall work function, accompanied with enhanced e−–nuclei interactions or higher atomic bond strength. Young’s modulus and hardness increase correspondingly. However, the free electron density and work function decrease as the Ni content is continuously increased, accompanied with the formation of a second phase, FeNi3, which is softer with a lower work function. The decrease in the overall work function corresponds to deterioration of the mechanical strength of the steel. It is expected that EWF, a simple but fundamental parameter, may lead to new methodologies or supplementary approaches for metallic materials design or tailoring on a feasible electronic base. PMID:27074974

  4. Empirical and theoretical studies on number comparison: design parameters and research questions.

    PubMed

    Ballan, Meltem

    2012-01-01

    For well over one-hundred years, several key factors have been well established in the study of number comparison, including mental number line, numerical distance effect, and effect of sensory representation on number processing. The purpose of this article is to put some of these studies together to discuss design parameters and research questions addressed in the mental number comparison studies. Most of the studies discuss sensory representation and abstract number representation as well as degree of their interaction. In order to give the different views on a particular research question, the author classified studies under the related research questions. For example, Stroop and size congruity effect studies are addressed under this title chronologically. It was very clear that the design parameters and research question might change the interpretation of a task. It may be time to shift attention from the question of the interaction degree of sensory representation and abstract representation to a larger scope. The larger scope would be to understand the differences and similarities between different groups using a universal approach. PMID:24278748

  5. Robust control design with real parameter uncertainty using absolute stability theory. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    How, Jonathan P.; Hall, Steven R.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to investigate an extension of mu theory for robust control design by considering systems with linear and nonlinear real parameter uncertainties. In the process, explicit connections are made between mixed mu and absolute stability theory. In particular, it is shown that the upper bounds for mixed mu are a generalization of results from absolute stability theory. Both state space and frequency domain criteria are developed for several nonlinearities and stability multipliers using the wealth of literature on absolute stability theory and the concepts of supply rates and storage functions. The state space conditions are expressed in terms of Riccati equations and parameter-dependent Lyapunov functions. For controller synthesis, these stability conditions are used to form an overbound of the H2 performance objective. A geometric interpretation of the equivalent frequency domain criteria in terms of off-axis circles clarifies the important role of the multiplier and shows that both the magnitude and phase of the uncertainty are considered. A numerical algorithm is developed to design robust controllers that minimize the bound on an H2 cost functional and satisfy an analysis test based on the Popov stability multiplier. The controller and multiplier coefficients are optimized simultaneously, which avoids the iteration and curve-fitting procedures required by the D-K procedure of mu synthesis. Several benchmark problems and experiments on the Middeck Active Control Experiment at M.I.T. demonstrate that these controllers achieve good robust performance and guaranteed stability bounds.

  6. Use of solubility parameter to design dry suspension of cefaclor as a dual pack system.

    PubMed

    Kuksal, Kiran; Pathak, Kamla

    2008-09-01

    One of the important methods to improve the solubility of a less water-soluble drug is by the use of co solvents. The solubility enhancement produced by two binary blends with a common co solvent (water-propylene glycol and propylene glycol-ethyl acetate) was studied against the solubility parameter of solvent blends (δ(1)) to evaluate the solubility parameter of drug (δ(2)). The binary blend water:propylene glycol (20:80) gave maximum solubility with an experimental δ(2) value of 16.52 (Cal/cm(3))(0.5) that was comparable to the theoretical value of 16.52 (Cal/cm(3))(0.5) determined by molar volume method and 16.35 (Cal/cm(3))(0.5) when determined by method proposed by Lin and Nash. The solvent blend water:propylene glycol (20:80) in which the drug exhibited maximum solubility was used as the reconstituting medium for formulation of dry suspension of cefaclor. The percentage cumulative drug release of cefaclor from the formulation F7 was compared to the marketed formulation by calculating the f1 (dissimilarity factor) and f2 (similarity factor) factors. A higher f1 value and f2 value below 50 indicates difference between the two dissolution profiles. PMID:21394257

  7. Influence of newly designed monorail pressure sensor catheter on coronary diagnostic parameters: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Rupak K; Peelukhana, Srikara V; Goswami, Ishan

    2014-02-01

    The decision to perform intervention on a patient with coronary stenosis is often based on functional diagnostic parameters obtained from pressure and flow measurements using sensor-tipped guidewire at maximal vasodilation (hyperemia). Recently, a rapid exchange Monorail Pressure Sensor catheter of 0.022″ diameter (MPS22), with pressure sensor at distal end has been developed for improved assessment of stenosis severity. The hollow shaft of the MPS22 is designed to slide over any standard 0.014″ guidewire (G14). Hence, influence of MPS22 diameter on coronary diagnostic parameters needs investigation. An in vitro experiment was conducted to replicate physiologic flows in three representative area stenosis (AS): mild (64% AS), intermediate (80% AS), and severe (90% AS), for two arterial diameters, 3mm (N2; more common) and 2.5mm (N1). Influence of MPS22 on diagnostic parameters: fractional flow reserve (FFR) and pressure drop coefficient (CDP) was evaluated both at hyperemic and basal conditions, while comparing it with G14. The FFR values decreased for the MPS22 in comparison to G14, (Mild: 0.87 vs 0.88, Intermediate: 0.68 vs 0.73, Severe: 0.48 vs 0.56) and CDP values increased (Mild: 16 vs 14, Intermediate: 75 vs 56, Severe: 370 vs 182) for N2. Similar trend was observed in the case of N1. The FFR values were found to be well above (mild) and below (intermediate and severe) the diagnostic cut-off of 0.75. Therefore, MPS22 catheter can be used as a possible alternative to G14. Further, irrespective of the MPS22 or G14, basal FFR (FFRb) had overlapping ranges in close proximity for clinically relevant mild and intermediate stenoses that will lead to diagnostic uncertainty under both N1 and N2. However, CDPb had distinct ranges for different stenosis severities and could be a potential diagnostic parameter under basal conditions.

  8. Validation of updated neutronic calculation models proposed for Atucha-II PHWR. Part II: Benchmark comparisons of PUMA core parameters with MCNP5 and improvements due to a simple cell heterogeneity correction

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, C.; Mollerach, R.; Leszczynski, F.; Serra, O.; Marconi, J.; Fink, J.

    2006-07-01

    In 2005 the Argentine Government took the decision to complete the construction of the Atucha-II nuclear power plant, which has been progressing slowly during the last ten years. Atucha-II is a 745 MWe nuclear station moderated and cooled with heavy water, of German (Siemens) design located in Argentina. It has a pressure vessel design with 451 vertical coolant channels and the fuel assemblies (FA) are clusters of 37 natural UO{sub 2} rods with an active length of 530 cm. For the reactor physics area, a revision and update of reactor physics calculation methods and models was recently carried out covering cell, supercell (control rod) and core calculations. This paper presents benchmark comparisons of core parameters of a slightly idealized model of the Atucha-I core obtained with the PUMA reactor code with MCNP5. The Atucha-I core was selected because it is smaller, similar from a neutronic point of view, more symmetric than Atucha-II, and has some experimental data available. To validate the new models benchmark comparisons of k-effective, channel power and axial power distributions obtained with PUMA and MCNP5 have been performed. In addition, a simple cell heterogeneity correction recently introduced in PUMA is presented, which improves significantly the agreement of calculated channel powers with MCNP5. To complete the validation, the calculation of some of the critical configurations of the Atucha-I reactor measured during the experiments performed at first criticality is also presented. (authors)

  9. Interaction of fission products and SiC in TRISO fuel particles: a limiting HTGR design parameter

    SciTech Connect

    Stansfield, O.M.; Homan, F.J.; Simon, W.A.; Turner, R.F.

    1983-09-01

    The fuel particle system for the steam cycle cogeneration HTGR being developed in the US consists of 20% enriched UC/sub 0/./sub 3/O/sub 1/./sub 7/ and ThO/sub 2/ kernels with TRISO coatings. The reaction of fission products with the SiC coating is the limiting thermochemical coating failure mechanism affecting performance. The attack of the SiC by palladium (Pd) is considered the controlling reaction with systems of either oxide or carbide fuels. The lanthanides, such as cerium, neodymium, and praseodymium, also attack SiC in carbide fuel particles. In reactor design, the time-temperature relationships at local points in the core are used to calculate the depth of SiC-Pd reaction. The depth of penetration into the SiC during service varies with core power density, power distribution, outlet gas temperature, and fuel residence time. These parameters are adjusted in specifying the core design to avoid SiC coating failure.

  10. Factors affecting the accuracy of near-infrared spectroscopy concentration calculations for focal changes in oxygenation parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strangman, Gary; Franceschini, Maria Angela; Boas, David A.; Sutton, J. P. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) can be used to noninvasively measure changes in the concentrations of oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin in tissue. We have previously shown that while global changes can be reliably measured, focal changes can produce erroneous estimates of concentration changes (NeuroImage 13 (2001), 76). Here, we describe four separate sources for systematic error in the calculation of focal hemoglobin changes from NIRS data and use experimental methods and Monte Carlo simulations to examine the importance and mitigation methods of each. The sources of error are: (1). the absolute magnitudes and relative differences in pathlength factors as a function of wavelength, (2). the location and spatial extent of the absorption change with respect to the optical probe, (3). possible differences in the spatial distribution of hemoglobin species, and (4). the potential for simultaneous monitoring of multiple regions of activation. We found wavelength selection and optode placement to be important variables in minimizing such errors, and our findings indicate that appropriate experimental procedures could reduce each of these errors to a small fraction (<10%) of the observed concentration changes.

  11. Effect of inflow cannula tip design on potential parameters of blood compatibility and thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kai Chun; Büsen, Martin; Benzinger, Carrie; Gäng, René; Bezema, Mirko; Greatrex, Nicholas; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Steinseifer, Ulrich

    2014-09-01

    During ventricular assist device support, a cannula acts as a bridge between the native cardiovascular system and a foreign mechanical device. Cannula tip design strongly affects the function of the cannula and its potential for blood trauma. In this study, the flow fields of five different tip geometries within the ventricle were evaluated using stereo particle image velocimetry. Inflow cannulae with conventional tip geometries (blunt, blunt with four side ports, beveled with three side ports, and cage) and a custom-designed crown tip were interposed between a mixed-flow rotary blood pump and a compressible, translucent silicone left ventricle. The contractile function of the failing ventricle and hemodynamics were reproduced in a mock circulation loop. The rotary blood pump was interfaced with the ventricle and aorta and used to fully support the failing ventricle. Among these five tip geometries, high-shear volume ( γ ˙ ≥ 2778 / s , potential parameter of platelet activation) was found to be the greatest in the blunt tip. The cage tip was observed to have the highest low-shear volume and recirculation volume ( γ ˙ ≤ 100 / s and Vz  > 0, respectively; potential parameters of thrombus formation). The crown tip, together with conventional tip geometries with side ports (blunt with four side ports and beveled with three side ports) showed no significant difference in either high-shear volume or low-shear volume. However, recirculation volume was reduced significantly in the crown tip. Despite limited generalizability to clinical situations, these transient-state measurements supported the potential mitigation of complications by changing the design of conventional cannula tip geometries.

  12. Calculation of the Electronic Parameters of an Al/DNA/p-Si Schottky Barrier Diode Influenced by Alpha Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ta’ii, Hassan Maktuff Jaber; Amin, Yusoff Mohd; Periasamy, Vengadesh

    2015-01-01

    Many types of materials such as inorganic semiconductors have been employed as detectors for nuclear radiation, the importance of which has increased significantly due to recent nuclear catastrophes. Despite the many advantages of this type of materials, the ability to measure direct cellular or biological responses to radiation might improve detector sensitivity. In this context, semiconducting organic materials such as deoxyribonucleic acid or DNA have been studied in recent years. This was established by studying the varying electronic properties of DNA-metal or semiconductor junctions when exposed to radiation. In this work, we investigated the electronics of aluminium (Al)/DNA/silicon (Si) rectifying junctions using their current-voltage (I-V) characteristics when exposed to alpha radiation. Diode parameters such as ideality factor, barrier height and series resistance were determined for different irradiation times. The observed results show significant changes with exposure time or total dosage received. An increased deviation from ideal diode conditions (7.2 to 18.0) was observed when they were bombarded with alpha particles for up to 40 min. Using the conventional technique, barrier height values were observed to generally increase after 2, 6, 10, 20 and 30 min of radiation. The same trend was seen in the values of the series resistance (0.5889–1.423 Ω for 2–8 min). These changes in the electronic properties of the DNA/Si junctions could therefore be utilized in the construction of sensitive alpha particle detectors. PMID:25730484

  13. The performance of a prototype device designed to evaluate general quality parameters of X-ray equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murata, C. H.; Fernandes, D. C.; Lavínia, N. C.; Caldas, L. V. E.; Pires, S. R.; Medeiros, R. B.

    2014-02-01

    The performance of radiological equipment can be assessed using non-invasive methods and portable instruments that can analyze an X-ray beam with just one exposure. These instruments use either an ionization chamber or a state solid detector (SSD) to evaluate X-ray beam parameters. In Brazil, no such instruments are currently being manufactured; consequently, these instruments come at a higher cost to users due to importation taxes. Additionally, quality control tests are time consuming and impose a high workload on the X-ray tubes when evaluating their performance parameters. The assessment of some parameters, such as the half-value layer (HVL), requires several exposures; however, this can be reduced by using a SSD that requires only a single exposure. One such SSD uses photodiodes designed for high X-ray sensitivity without the use of scintillation crystals. This sensitivity allows one electron-hole pair to be created per 3.63 eV of incident energy, resulting in extremely high and stable quantum efficiencies. These silicon photodiodes operate by absorbing photons and generating a flow of current that is proportional to the incident power. The aim of this study was to show the response of the solid sensor PIN RD100A detector in a multifunctional X-ray analysis system that is designed to evaluate the average peak voltage (kVp), exposure time, and HVL of radiological equipment. For this purpose, a prototype board that uses four SSDs was developed to measure kVp, exposure time, and HVL using a single exposure. The reproducibility and accuracy of the results were compared to that of different X-ray beam analysis instruments. The kVp reproducibility and accuracy results were 2% and 3%, respectively; the exposure time reproducibility and accuracy results were 2% and 1%, respectively; and the HVL accuracy was ±2%. The prototype's methodology was able to calculate these parameters with appropriate reproducibility and accuracy. Therefore, the prototype can be considered

  14. Multi-fields direct design approach in 3D: calculating a two-surface freeform lens with an entrance pupil for line imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Nie, Yunfeng; Thienpont, Hugo; Duerr, Fabian

    2015-12-28

    Including an entrance pupil in optical systems provides clear benefits for balancing the overall performance of freeform and/or rotationally symmetric imaging systems. Current existing direct design methods that are based on perfect imaging of few discrete ray bundles are not well suited for wide field of view systems. In this paper, a three-dimensional multi-fields direct design approach is proposed to balance the full field imaging performance of a two-surface freeform lens. The optical path lengths and image points of numerous fields are calculated during the procedures, wherefore very few initial parameters are needed in advance. Design examples of a barcode scanner lens as well as a line imaging objective are introduced to demonstrate the effectiveness of this method. PMID:26832061

  15. The influence of design parameters on clogging of stormwater biofilters: a large-scale column study.

    PubMed

    Le Coustumer, Sébastien; Fletcher, Tim D; Deletic, Ana; Barraud, Sylvie; Poelsma, Peter

    2012-12-15

    A large-scale laboratory study was conducted to test the influence of design and operating conditions on the lifespan of stormwater biofilters. The evolution of hydraulic conductivity over time was studied in relation to a number of key design parameters (media type, filter depth, vegetation type, system sizing, etc). The biofilters were observed to clog over time, with average hydraulic conductivity decreasing by a factor of 3.6 over the 72 weeks of testing. The choice of plant species appears to have a significant effect on the rate of decrease in permeability, with plants with thick roots (e.g. Melaleuca) demonstrating an ability to maintain permeability over time. Other species studied, with finer roots, had no such beneficial effects. As expected, small systems relative to their catchment (and thus which are subjected to high loading rates) are more prone to clogging, as increases in hydraulic and sediment loading can lead to extremely low hydraulic conductivities. Sizing and the appropriate choice of vegetation are thus key elements in design because they can limit clogging, and therefore, indirectly increase annual load treated by limiting the volume of water bypassing the system.

  16. Planar air-bearing microgravity simulators: Review of applications, existing solutions and design parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybus, Tomasz; Seweryn, Karol

    2016-03-01

    All devices designed to be used in space must be thoroughly tested in relevant conditions. For several classes of devices the reduced gravity conditions are the key factor. In early stages of development and later due to financial reasons, the tests need to be done on Earth. However, in Earth conditions it is impossible to obtain a different gravity field independent on all linear and rotational spatial coordinates. Therefore, various test-bed systems are used, with their design driven by the device's specific needs. One of such test-beds are planar air-bearing microgravity simulators. In such an approach, the tested objects (e.g., manipulators intended for on-orbit operations or vehicles simulating satellites in a close formation flight) are mounted on planar air-bearings that allow almost frictionless motion on a flat surface, thus simulating microgravity conditions in two dimensions. In this paper we present a comprehensive review of research activities related to planar air-bearing microgravity simulators, demonstrating achievements of the most active research groups and describing newest trends and ideas, such as tests of landing gears for low-g bodies. Major design parameters of air-bearing test-beds are also reviewed and a list of notable existing test-beds is presented.

  17. Calculating the parameters of self-oscillations in the vertical combustion chamber of the blast-furnace air heater during unstable combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basok, B. I.; Gotsulenko, V. V.

    2015-01-01

    A procedure for simplified calculation of the parameters of self-oscillations excited during unstable (vibrating) combustion in the vertical combustion chambers of blast-furnace air heaters is developed. The proposed procedure is based on an independent nonlinear dynamic system similar to the equations from the theory of a blade supercharger stalling and surging mode. The head characteristic considered in the blade supercharger stalling and surging theory determines the part of the supercharger drive rotation energy that is converted into the head developed by the supercharger. In the considered system, the supercharger head characteristic is replaced by the combustion chamber head characteristic. Being a function of flow rate, this characteristic describes the part of heat supplied to flow that is converted to the flow head. Unlike the supercharger head characteristic, which is determined by experiment, the combustion chamber head characteristic is determined by calculation, due to which it becomes much easier to calculate the parameters of self-oscillations according to the proposed procedure. In particular, an analysis of the periodic solutions of the obtained dynamic system made it possible to determine the pattern in which the amplitude of considered self-oscillations depends on the surge impedance of the vertical combustion chamber.

  18. Calculating (14)N(16)O2 spectral line parameters in an infrared range: A comparison of "global" and "local" effective operator methods.

    PubMed

    Voitsekhovskaya, O K; Egorov, O V; Kashirskii, D E

    2016-08-01

    Nitrogen dioxide, (14)N(16)O2, line positions and intensities calculated by us based on a "local" effective operator method are compared to the recent results of the "global" calculation. The comparison was made for theoretical absorption coefficients in the spectral range of 600-3700cm(-1) using the measured data taken from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. In order to conduct the calculations, empirical parameters of the effective rotational Hamiltonian of the twenty-one vibrational states were applied from the most recent experimental works. The second order parameters of the dipole moment function of (14)N(16)O2 were determined for the first time. The "local" line list in this research consists of one hundred and four bands and includes the line intensities of the v1+v2+v3 band of (14)N(16)O2 that have not yet been investigated in the literature. Among these bands, only eleven bands are included in HITRAN2012. The reasons behind the disagreements between the theoretical and measured absorption coefficients of (14)N(16)O2 are discussed. PMID:27111152

  19. Calculating 14N16O2 spectral line parameters in an infrared range: A comparison of "global" and "local" effective operator methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voitsekhovskaya, O. K.; Egorov, O. V.; Kashirskii, D. E.

    2016-08-01

    Nitrogen dioxide, 14N16O2, line positions and intensities calculated by us based on a "local" effective operator method are compared to the recent results of the "global" calculation. The comparison was made for theoretical absorption coefficients in the spectral range of 600-3700 cm- 1 using the measured data taken from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. In order to conduct the calculations, empirical parameters of the effective rotational Hamiltonian of the twenty-one vibrational states were applied from the most recent experimental works. The second order parameters of the dipole moment function of 14N16O2 were determined for the first time. The "local" line list in this research consists of one hundred and four bands and includes the line intensities of the v1 + v2 + v3 band of 14N16O2 that have not yet been investigated in the literature. Among these bands, only eleven bands are included in HITRAN2012. The reasons behind the disagreements between the theoretical and measured absorption coefficients of 14N16O2 are discussed.

  20. Direct Effective Dose Calculations in Pediatric Fluoroscopy-Guided Abdominal Interventions with Rando-Alderson Phantoms – Optimization of Preset Parameter Settings

    PubMed Central

    Wildgruber, Moritz; Müller-Wille, René; Goessmann, Holger; Uller, Wibke; Wohlgemuth, Walter A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of the study was to calculate the effective dose during fluoroscopy-guided pediatric interventional procedures of the liver in a phantom model before and after adjustment of preset parameters. Methods Organ doses were measured in three anthropomorphic Rando-Alderson phantoms representing children at various age and body weight (newborn 3.5kg, toddler 10kg, child 19kg). Collimation was performed focusing on the upper abdomen representing mock interventional radiology procedures such as percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography and drainage placement (PTCD). Fluoroscopy and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) acquisitions were performed in a posterior-anterior geometry using a state of the art flat-panel detector. Effective dose was directly measured from multiple incorporated thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) using two different parameter settings. Results Effective dose values for each pediatric phantom were below 0.1mSv per minute fluoroscopy, and below 1mSv for a 1 minute DSA acquisition with a frame rate of 2 f/s. Lowering the values for the detector entrance dose enabled a reduction of the applied effective dose from 12 to 27% for fluoroscopy and 22 to 63% for DSA acquisitions. Similarly, organ doses of radiosensitive organs could be reduced by over 50%, especially when close to the primary x-ray beam. Conclusion Modification of preset parameter settings enabled to decrease the effective dose for pediatric interventional procedures, as determined by effective dose calculations using dedicated pediatric Rando-Alderson phantoms. PMID:27556584

  1. Particle Shape: A New Design Parameter for Micro- and Nanoscale Drug Delivery Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Champion, Julie A.; Katare, Yogesh K.; Mitragotri, Samir

    2014-01-01

    Encapsulation of therapeutic agents in polymer particles has been successfully used in the development of new drug carriers. A number of design parameters that govern the functional behavior of carriers, including the choice of polymer, particle size and surface chemistry, have been tuned to optimize their performance in vivo. However, particle shape, which may also have a strong impact on carrier performance, has not been investigated. This is perhaps due to the limited availability of techniques to produce non-spherical polymer particles. In recent years, a number of reports have emerged to directly address this bottleneck and initial studies have indeed confirmed that particle shape can significantly impact the performance of polymer drug carriers. This article provides a review of this field with respect to methods of particle preparation and the role of particle shape in drug delivery. PMID:17544538

  2. Deep silicon etch for biology MEMS fabrication: review of process parameters influence versus chip design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magis, T.; Ballerand, S.; Bellemin Comte, A.; Pollet, Olivier

    2013-03-01

    Micro-system for biology is a growing market, especially for micro-fluidic applications (environment and health). Key part for the manufacturing of biology MEMS is the deep silicon etching by plasma to create microstructures. Usual etching process as an alternation of etching and passivation steps is a well-known method for MEMS fabrication, nowadays used in high volume production for devices like sensors and actuators. MEMS for biology applications are very different in design compared to more common micro-systems like accelerometers for instance. Indeed, their design includes on the same chip structures of very diverse size like narrow pillars, large trenches and wide cavities. This makes biology MEMS fabrication very challenging for DRIE, since each type of feature considered individually would require a specific etch process. Furthermore process parameters suited to match specifications on small size features (vertical profile, low sidewall roughness) induce issues and defects on bigger structures (undercut, micro-masking) and vice versa. Thus the process window is constrained leading to trade-offs in process development. In this paper process parameters such as source and platen powers, pressure, etching and passivation gas flows and steps duration were investigated to achieve all requirements. As well interactions between those different factors were characterized at different levels, from individual critical feature up to chip scale and to wafer scale. We will show the plasma process development and tuning to reach all these specifications. We also compared different chambers configurations of our ICP tool (source wafer distance, plasma diffusion) in order to obtain a good combination of hardware and process. With optimized etching we successfully fabricate micro-fluidic devices like micro-pumps.

  3. Effects of rock riprap design parameters on flood protection costs for uranium tailings impoundments

    SciTech Connect

    Ecker, R.M.

    1984-07-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is studying the problem of long-term protection of earthen covers on decommissioned uranium tailings impoundments. The major erosive forces acting on these covers will be river flooding and overland flow from rainfall-runoff. For impoundments adjacent to rivers, overbank flooding presents the greater potential for significant erosion. To protect the earthen covers against flood erosion, rock riprap armoring will be placed over the cover surface. Because of the large size rock usually required for riprap, the quarrying, transport, and placement of the rock could be a significant part of the decommissioning cost. This report examines the sensitivity of riprap protection costs to certain design parameters at tailings impoundments. The parameters include flood discharge, riprap materials, impoundment side slopes, and an added safety factor. Two decommissioned tailings impoundments are used as case studies for the evaluation. These are the Grand Junction, Colorado, impoundment located adjacent to the Colorado River and the Slickrock, Colorado, impoundment located adjacent to the Dolores River. The evaluation considers only the cost of riprap protection against flood erosion. The study results show that embankment side slope and rock specific gravity can have optimum values or ranges at a specific site. For both case study sites the optimum side slope is about 5H:1V. Of the rock sources considered at Grand Junction, the optimum specific gravity would be about 2.50; however, an optimum rock specific gravity for the Slickrock site could not be determined. Other results indicate that the arbitrary safety factor usually added in riprap design can lead to large increases in protection costs. 22 references, 19 figures, 15 tables.

  4. Mathematical modeling and analysis of EDM process parameters based on Taguchi design of experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laxman, J.; Raj, K. Guru

    2015-12-01

    Electro Discharge Machining is a process used for machining very hard metals, deep and complex shapes by metal erosion in all types of electro conductive materials. The metal is removed through the action of an electric discharge of short duration and high current density between the tool and the work piece. The eroded metal on the surface of both work piece and the tool is flushed away by the dielectric fluid. The objective of this work is to develop a mathematical model for an Electro Discharge Machining process which provides the necessary equations to predict the metal removal rate, electrode wear rate and surface roughness. Regression analysis is used to investigate the relationship between various process parameters. The input parameters are taken as peak current, pulse on time, pulse off time, tool lift time. and the Metal removal rate, electrode wear rate and surface roughness are as responses. Experiments are conducted on Titanium super alloy based on the Taguchi design of experiments i.e. L27 orthogonal experiments.

  5. Quantitative microscopy of the lung: a problem-based approach. Part 2: stereological parameters and study designs in various diseases of the respiratory tract.

    PubMed

    Mühlfeld, Christian; Ochs, Matthias

    2013-08-01

    Design-based stereology provides efficient methods to obtain valuable quantitative information of the respiratory tract in various diseases. However, the choice of the most relevant parameters in a specific disease setting has to be deduced from the present pathobiological knowledge. Often it is difficult to express the pathological alterations by interpretable parameters in terms of volume, surface area, length, or number. In the second part of this companion review article, we analyze the present pathophysiological knowledge about acute lung injury, diffuse parenchymal lung diseases, emphysema, pulmonary hypertension, and asthma to come up with recommendations for the disease-specific application of stereological principles for obtaining relevant parameters. Worked examples with illustrative images are used to demonstrate the work flow, estimation procedure, and calculation and to facilitate the practical performance of equivalent analyses. PMID:23709622

  6. A design for a relational database for the calculation and storage of greenhouse gas emissions.

    PubMed

    Newcomb, T M

    2001-10-01

    The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has published guidelines for the development of national greenhouse gas-emissions inventories and recommendations for collecting data necessary to calculate greenhouse gas emissions. Many regional and local jurisdictions will be performing inventories of greenhouse gas emissions and estimating the benefits of mitigation strategies to reduce emissions. This article advocates the development of relational databases to calculate and store emissions estimates based on IPCC guidelines and quantities of precursors of greenhouse gases. Specific examples of tables and queries are used to illustrate calculation methods and formulae, the choice of database keys, and the choice of methods for joining tables to construct queries.

  7. Exciton scattering approach for branched conjugated molecules and complexes. II. Extraction of the exciton scattering parameters from quantum-chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chao; Malinin, Sergey V; Tretiak, Sergei; Chernyak, Vladimir Y

    2008-11-01

    We obtain the parameters of the exciton scattering (ES) model from the quantum-chemical calculations of the electronic excitations in simple phenylacetylene-based molecules. We determine the exciton dispersion and the frequency-dependent scattering matrices which describe scattering properties of the molecular ends as well as of meta- and orthoconjugated links. The extracted functions are smooth, which confirms the validity of the ES picture. We find a good agreement between the ES and quantum-chemical results for the excitation energies in simple test molecules. PMID:19045338

  8. Design Concept and Parameters of a 15 T $Nb_{3}Sn$ Dipole Demonstrator for a 100 TEV Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Zlobin, A. V.; Andreev, N.; Barzi, E.; Kashikhin, V. V.; Novitski, I.

    2015-06-01

    FNAL has started the development of a 15 T $Nb_{3}Sn$ dipole demonstrator for a 100 TeV scale hadron collider. This paper describes the design concept and parameters of the 15 T $Nb_{3}Sn$ dipole demonstrator. The dipole magnetic, mechanical and quench protection concept and parameters are presented and discussed.

  9. As-Built design specification for PARPLT. [program to produce scatter plots of crop greenness profile parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompkins, M. A.; Cheng, D. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    The design and implementation of the PARPLT program are described. The program produces scatter plots of the greenness profile derived parameters alpha, beta, and t sub o computed by the CLASFYG program (alpha being the approximate greenness rise time; beta, the greenness decay time; and t sub o, the spectral crop emergence date). Statistical information concerning the parameters is also computed.

  10. Calculating structural and geometrical parameters by laboratory experiments and X-Ray microtomography: a comparative study applied to a limestone sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luquot, Linda; Hebert, Vanessa; Rodriguez, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the structural, geometrical and transport parameters of a limestone rock sample determined by X-ray microtomography (XMT) images and laboratory experiments. Total and effective porosity, surface-to-volume ratio, pore size distribution, permeability, tortuosity and effective diffusion coeffcient have been estimated. Sensitivity analyses of the segmentation parameters have been performed. The limestone rock sample studied here have been characterized using both approaches before and after a reactive percolation experiment. Strong dissolution process occured during the percolation, promoting a wormhole formation. This strong heterogeneity formed after the percolation step allows to apply our methodology to two different samples and enhance the use of experimental techniques or XMT images depending on the rock heterogeneity. We established that for most of the parameters calculated here, the values obtained by computing XMT images are in agreement with the classical laboratory measurements. We demonstrated that the computational porosity is more informative than the laboratory one. We observed that pore size distributions obtained by XMT images and laboratory experiments are slightly different but complementary. Regarding the effective diffusion coeffcient, we concluded that both approaches are valuable and give similar results. Nevertheless, we wrapped up that computing XMT images to determine transport, geometrical and petrophysical parameters provides similar results than the one measured at the laboratory but with much shorter durations.

  11. Calculating structural and geometrical parameters by laboratory measurements and X-ray microtomography: a comparative study applied to a limestone sample before and after a dissolution experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luquot, Linda; Hebert, Vanessa; Rodriguez, Olivier

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the structural, geometrical and transport parameters of a limestone rock sample determined by X-ray microtomography (XMT) images and laboratory experiments. Total and effective porosity, pore-size distribution, tortuosity, and effective diffusion coefficient have been estimated. Sensitivity analyses of the segmentation parameters have been performed. The limestone rock sample studied here has been characterized using both approaches before and after a reactive percolation experiment. Strong dissolution process occurred during the percolation, promoting a wormhole formation. This strong heterogeneity formed after the percolation step allows us to apply our methodology to two different samples and enhance the use of experimental techniques or XMT images depending on the rock heterogeneity. We established that for most of the parameters calculated here, the values obtained by computing XMT images are in agreement with the classical laboratory measurements. We demonstrated that the computational porosity is more informative than the laboratory measurement. We observed that pore-size distributions obtained by XMT images and laboratory experiments are slightly different but complementary. Regarding the effective diffusion coefficient, we concluded that both approaches are valuable and give similar results. Nevertheless, we concluded that computing XMT images to determine transport, geometrical, and petrophysical parameters provide similar results to those measured at the laboratory but with much shorter durations.

  12. Conformational stability, structural parameters and vibrational assignment from variable temperature infrared spectra of krypton solutions and ab initio calculations of ethylisothiocyanate.

    PubMed

    Durig, James R; Zheng, Chao

    2007-11-01

    Variable temperature (-105 to -150 degrees C) studies of the infrared spectra (3500-400 cm(-1)) of ethylisothiocyanate, CH(3)CH(2)NCS, dissolved in liquid krypton have been recorded. Additionally the infrared spectra of the gas and solid have been re-investigated. These spectroscopic data indicate a single conformer in all physical states with a large number of molecules in the gas phase at ambient temperature in excited states of the CN torsional mode which has a very low barrier to conformational interchange. To aid in the analyses of the vibrational and rotational spectra, ab initio calculations have been carried out by the perturbation method to the second order (MP2) with valence and core electron correlation using a variety of basis sets up to 6-311+G(2df,2pd). With the smaller basis sets up to 6-311+G(d,p) and cc-PVDZ, the cis conformer is indicated as a transition state with all larger basis sets the cis conformer is the only stable form. The predicted energy difference from these calculations between the cis form and the higher energy trans conformer is about 125 cm(-1) which represents essentially the barrier to internal rotation of the NCS group (rotation around NC axis). Density functional theory calculation by the B3LYP method with the same basis sets predicts this barrier to be about 25 cm(-1). By utilizing the previously reported microwave rotational constants with the structural parameters predicted by the ab initio MP2(full)/6-311+G(d,p) calculations, adjusted r(0) structural parameters have been obtained for the cis form. The determined heavy atom parameters are: r(NC)=1.196(5), r(CS)=1.579(5), r(CN)=1.439(5), r(CC)=1.519(5)A for the distances and angles of angleCCN=112.1(5), angleCNC=146.2(5), angleNCS=174.0(5) degrees . The centrifugal distortion constants, dipole moments, conformational stability, vibrational frequencies, infrared intensities and Raman activities have been predicted from ab initio calculations and compared to experimental

  13. Advances in binding free energies calculations: QM/MM-based free energy perturbation method for drug design.

    PubMed

    Rathore, R S; Sumakanth, M; Reddy, M Siva; Reddanna, P; Rao, Allam Appa; Erion, Mark D; Reddy, M R

    2013-01-01

    Multiple approaches have been devised and evaluated to computationally estimate binding free energies. Results using a recently developed Quantum Mechanics (QM)/Molecular Mechanics (MM) based Free Energy Perturbation (FEP) method suggest that this method has the potential to provide the most accurate estimation of binding affinities to date. The method treats ligands/inhibitors using QM while using MM for the rest of the system. The method has been applied and validated for a structurally diverse set of fructose 1,6- bisphosphatase (FBPase) inhibitors suggesting that the approach has the potential to be used as an integral part of drug discovery for both lead identification lead optimization, where there is a structure available. In addition, this QM/MM-based FEP method was shown to accurately replicate the anomalous hydration behavior exhibited by simple amines and amides suggesting that the method may also prove useful in predicting physical properties of molecules. While the method is about 5-fold more computationally demanding than conventional FEP, it has the potential to be less demanding on the end user since it avoids development of MM force field parameters for novel ligands and thereby eliminates this time-consuming step that often contributes significantly to the inaccuracy of binding affinity predictions using conventional FEP methods. The QM/MM-based FEP method has been extensively tested with respect to important considerations such as the length of the simulation required to obtain satisfactory convergence in the calculated relative solvation and binding free energies for both small and large structural changes between ligands. Future automation of the method and parallelization of the code is expected to enhance the speed and increase its use for drug design and lead optimization. PMID:23260025

  14. Output-feedback sampled-data control design for linear parameter-varying systems with delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramezanifar, Amin; Mohammadpour, Javad; Grigoriadis, Karolos M.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we address the sampled-data output-feedback control design problem for continuous-time linear parameter-varying systems with time-varying delay in the system states. Due to the combination of the plant's continuous-time dynamics and the controller's discrete-time dynamics connected through A/D and D/A converter devices, the closed-loop system is a hybrid system. In order to analyse this hybrid system from stability and performance perspectives we use the input-delay approach to map the closed-loop system into the continuous-time domain with delay in the states. This results in a closed-loop system containing two types of delays, the system internal delay and the one imposed by the mapping. Next, we use delay-dependent conditions for analysis of stability and ?-norm performance which result in a sampled-data control synthesis procedure. The proposed output-feedback sampled-data controller is obtained based on the solution to a linear matrix inequality optimisation problem using a set of appropriately defined slack variables. A numerical example of a milling machine is presented to demonstrate the viability of the proposed sampled-data control design method to satisfy the stability and performance objectives even with a varying sampling rate.

  15. A sensitivity analysis of hazardous waste disposal site climatic and soil design parameters using HELP3

    SciTech Connect

    Adelman, D.D.; Stansbury, J.

    1997-12-31

    The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Subtitle C, Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, And Liability Act (CERCLA), and subsequent amendments have formed a comprehensive framework to deal with hazardous wastes on the national level. Key to this waste management is guidance on design (e.g., cover and bottom leachate control systems) of hazardous waste landfills. The objective of this research was to investigate the sensitivity of leachate volume at hazardous waste disposal sites to climatic, soil cover, and vegetative cover (Leaf Area Index) conditions. The computer model HELP3 which has the capability to simulate double bottom liner systems as called for in hazardous waste disposal sites was used in the analysis. HELP3 was used to model 54 combinations of climatic conditions, disposal site soil surface curve numbers, and leaf area index values to investigate how sensitive disposal site leachate volume was to these three variables. Results showed that leachate volume from the bottom double liner system was not sensitive to these parameters. However, the cover liner system leachate volume was quite sensitive to climatic conditions and less sensitive to Leaf Area Index and curve number values. Since humid locations had considerably more cover liner system leachate volume than and locations, different design standards may be appropriate for humid conditions than for and conditions.

  16. The Effects of Various Design Parameters on the Free Vibration of Doubly Curved Composite Sandwich Panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    CUNNINGHAM, P. R.; WHITE, R. G.; AGLIETTI, G. S.

    2000-02-01

    Sandwich panels have a very high stiffness to weight ratio, which makes them particularly useful in the aerospace industry where carbon fibre reinforced plastics and lightweight honeycomb cores are being used in the construction of floor panels, fairings and intake barrel panels. In the latter case, the geometry of the panels can be considered doubly curved. This paper presents an introduction to an ongoing study investigating the dynamic response prediction of acoustically excited composite sandwich panels which have double curvature. The final objective is to assess and hopefully produce an up to date set of acoustic fatigue design guidelines for this type of structure. The free vibration of doubly curved composite honeycomb sandwich panels is investigated here, both experimentally and theoretically, the latter using a commerically available finite element package. The design and manufacture of three test panels is covered before presenting experimental results for the natural frequencies of vibration with freely supported boundary conditions. Once validated against the experimental results, the theoretical investigation is extended to study the effects of changing radii of curvature, orthotropic properties of the core, and ply orientation on the natural frequencies of vibration of rectangular panels with various boundary conditions. The results from the parameter studies show curve veering, particularly when studying the effect of changing radii and ply orientation, however, it is not clear whether this phenomenon is due to the approximation method used or occurs in the physical system.

  17. Bioreactor process parameter screening utilizing a Plackett-Burman design for a model monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Agarabi, Cyrus D; Schiel, John E; Lute, Scott C; Chavez, Brittany K; Boyne, Michael T; Brorson, Kurt A; Khan, Mansoor A; Read, Erik K

    2015-06-01

    Consistent high-quality antibody yield is a key goal for cell culture bioprocessing. This endpoint is typically achieved in commercial settings through product and process engineering of bioreactor parameters during development. When the process is complex and not optimized, small changes in composition and control may yield a finished product of less desirable quality. Therefore, changes proposed to currently validated processes usually require justification and are reported to the US FDA for approval. Recently, design-of-experiments-based approaches have been explored to rapidly and efficiently achieve this goal of optimized yield with a better understanding of product and process variables that affect a product's critical quality attributes. Here, we present a laboratory-scale model culture where we apply a Plackett-Burman screening design to parallel cultures to study the main effects of 11 process variables. This exercise allowed us to determine the relative importance of these variables and identify the most important factors to be further optimized in order to control both desirable and undesirable glycan profiles. We found engineering changes relating to culture temperature and nonessential amino acid supplementation significantly impacted glycan profiles associated with fucosylation, β-galactosylation, and sialylation. All of these are important for monoclonal antibody product quality.

  18. Validation of updated neutronic calculation models proposed for Atucha-II PHWR. Part I: Benchmark comparisons of WIMS-D5 and DRAGON cell and control rod parameters with MCNP5

    SciTech Connect

    Mollerach, R.; Leszczynski, F.; Fink, J.

    2006-07-01

    In 2005 the Argentine Government took the decision to complete the construction of the Atucha-II nuclear power plant, which has been progressing slowly during the last ten years. Atucha-II is a 745 MWe nuclear station moderated and cooled with heavy water, of German (Siemens) design located in Argentina. It has a pressure-vessel design with 451 vertical coolant channels, and the fuel assemblies (FA) are clusters of 37 natural UO{sub 2} rods with an active length of 530 cm. For the reactor physics area, a revision and update calculation methods and models (cell, supercell and reactor) was recently carried out covering cell, supercell (control rod) and core calculations. As a validation of the new models some benchmark comparisons were done with Monte Carlo calculations with MCNP5. This paper presents comparisons of cell and supercell benchmark problems based on a slightly idealized model of the Atucha-I core obtained with the WIMS-D5 and DRAGON codes with MCNP5 results. The Atucha-I core was selected because it is smaller, similar from a neutronic point of view, and more symmetric than Atucha-II Cell parameters compared include cell k-infinity, relative power levels of the different rings of fuel rods, and some two-group macroscopic cross sections. Supercell comparisons include supercell k-infinity changes due to the control rods (tubes) of steel and hafnium. (authors)

  19. Use of computational fluid dynamics to simulate the effects of design and operating parameters on the overall performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasserzadeh, V.; Swithenbank, J.

    1995-10-01

    can give valuable insight into the effect of design parameters on the flow field and concentrations of major species. In the case of many pollutants, the equations governing their production does not affect the flow field or concentrations of major species. Thus the equations are effectively decoupled and the pollutant formation, convection and diffusion can be calculated in a post-processor. This paper presents and discusses the results of our CFD modelling work at two large municipal and a newly commissioned 5 MW clinical incinerator plants in UK.

  20. General Rule of Negative Effective Ueff System & Materials Design of High-Tc Superconductors by ab initio Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama-Yoshida, Hiroshi; Nakanishi, Akitaka; Uede, Hiroki; Takawashi, Yuki; Fukushima, Tetsuya; Sato, Kazunori

    2014-03-01

    Based upon ab initio electronic structure calculation, I will discuss the general rule of negative effective U system by (1) exchange-correlation-induced negative effective U caused by the stability of the exchange-correlation energy in Hund's rule with high-spin ground states of d5 configuration, and (2) charge-excitation-induced negative effective U caused by the stability of chemical bond in the closed-shell of s2, p6, and d10 configurations. I will show the calculated results of negative effective U systems such as hole-doped CuAlO2 and CuFeS2. Based on the total energy calculations of antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic states, I will discuss the magnetic phase diagram and superconductivity upon hole doping. I also discuss the computational materials design method of high-Tc superconductors by ab initio calculation to go beyond LDA and multi-scale simulations.

  1. Benchmark calculations on the nuclear quadrupole-coupling parameters for open-shell molecules using non-relativistic and scalar-relativistic coupled-cluster methods

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Lan

    2015-08-14

    Quantum-chemical computations of nuclear quadrupole-coupling parameters for 24 open-shell states of small molecules based on non-relativistic and spin-free exact two-component (SFX2C) relativistic equation-of-motion coupled-cluster (EOM-CC) as well as spin-orbital-based restricted open-shell Hartree-Fock coupled-cluster (ROHF-CC) methods are reported. Relativistic effects, the performance of the EOM-CC and ROHF-CC methods for treating electron correlation, as well as basis-set convergence have been carefully analyzed. Consideration of relativistic effects is necessary for accurate calculations on systems containing third-row (K-Kr) and heavier elements, as expected, and the SFX2C approach is shown to be a useful cost-effective option here. Further, it is demonstrated that the EOM-CC methods constitute flexible and accurate alternatives to the ROHF-CC methods in the calculations of nuclear quadrupole-coupling parameters for open-shell states.

  2. Calculation of the Ion Distribution Function over Transverse Velocities under ICR Heating Conditions and Separation Parameters of a Collector of Heated Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Karchevskii, A.I.; Potanin, E.P.

    2004-12-15

    The ion distribution function over transverse velocities and the ion heating efficiency (which is defined as the fraction {eta} of ions heated above a certain energy W{sub min}) are calculated in the context of a plasma method for isotope separation on the basis of ion cyclotron resonance heating. The ion distribution function over longitudinal velocities is assumed to be linear in the range of low velocities. It is shown that, when the ions are heated to high energies, the averaged ion distribution function over transverse velocities becomes highly nonequilibrium and has two peaks. Results are presented from calculations of the ion heating efficiency {eta} for W{sub min} = 40 eV and for different values of the parameter p that characterizes the ratio of the wavelength {lambda} of the antenna electric field to the length L of the heating region. The relative roles of the time-of-flight and the Doppler broadening are analyzed, and the separation parameters of a collector of heated ions are estimated.

  3. An adduct of Cl-substituted benzotriazole and hydroxy benzophenone as a novel UVA/UVB absorber: Theory-guided design, synthesis, and calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Kemei; Cui, Zhihua; Chen, Weiguo

    2013-01-01

    A novel UVA/UVB absorber UV-D, a combination of Cl-substituted benzotriazole (ClBTZ) and hydroxybenzophenone (HBP) anti-UV functional groups in one molecule, which absorbs UVA and UVB radiation with high efficiency, was synthesized based on the first principle theory-guided design. The synthesized UV absorber was characterized by 1H NMR, FT-IR and UV spectroscopy in detail. Systematic quantum chemistry calculations were performed to investigate the stable structure and UV electronic absorption bands of UV-D. Structure parameters, atoms in molecule (AIM) and natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis show that the intramolecular hydrogen bond (IMHB) in HBP part is stronger than that in ClBTZ part. This work shows that the combination of the first principle theory-guided design and organic synthesis can be used to develop highly efficiency UV absorbers effectively.

  4. Development of a multiple-parameter nonlinear perturbation procedure for transonic turbomachinery flows: Preliminary application to design/optimization problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahara, S. S.; Elliott, J. P.; Spreiter, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to continue the development of perturbation procedures and associated computational codes for rapidly determining approximations to nonlinear flow solutions, with the purpose of establishing a method for minimizing computational requirements associated with parametric design studies of transonic flows in turbomachines. The results reported here concern the extension of the previously developed successful method for single parameter perturbations to simultaneous multiple-parameter perturbations, and the preliminary application of the multiple-parameter procedure in combination with an optimization method to blade design/optimization problem. In order to provide as severe a test as possible of the method, attention is focused in particular on transonic flows which are highly supercritical. Flows past both isolated blades and compressor cascades, involving simultaneous changes in both flow and geometric parameters, are considered. Comparisons with the corresponding exact nonlinear solutions display remarkable accuracy and range of validity, in direct correspondence with previous results for single-parameter perturbations.

  5. Calculation procedures for the analysis of integral experiments for fusion-reactor design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoro, R. T.; Barnes, J. M.; Alsmiller, R. G., Jr.; Oblow, E. M.

    1981-07-01

    The calculational models, nuclear data, and radiation transport codes that are used in the analysis of integral measurements of the transport of approxmately 14 MeV neutrons through laminated slabs of materials typical of those found in fusion reactor shields are described. The two dimensional discrete ordinates calculations to optimize the experimental configuration of reducing the neutron and gamma ray background levels and for obtaining and equivalent, reduced geometry of the calculational model to reduce computer core storage and running times are also presented. The equations and data to determine the energy-angle relations to neutrons produced in the reactions of 250 keV deuterons in a titanium tritide target are given. The procedures used to collapse the 17ln 36gamma VATAMIN C cross section library to a 53n 21 gamma broad group library are described.

  6. Calculation of neutron and gamma ray energy spectra for fusion reactor shield design: comparison with experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Santoro, R.T.; Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.; Barnes, J.M.; Chapman, G.T.

    1980-08-01

    Integral experiments that measure the transport of approx. 14 MeV D-T neutrons through laminated slabs of proposed fusion reactor shield materials have been carried out. Measured and calculated neutron and gamma ray energy spectra are compared as a function of the thickness and composition of stainless steel type 304, borated polyethylene, and Hevimet (a tungsten alloy), and as a function of detector position behind these materials. The measured data were obtained using a NE-213 liquid scintillator using pulse-shape discrimination methods to resolve neutron and gamma ray pulse height data and spectral unfolding methods to convert these data to energy spectra. The calculated data were obtained using two-dimensional discrete ordinates radiation transport methods in a complex calculational network that takes into account the energy-angle dependence of the D-T neutrons and the nonphysical anomalies of the S/sub n/ method.

  7. Design of new ferromagnetic materials with high spin moments by first-principles calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geshi, Masaaki; Kusakabe, Koichi; Suzuki, Naoshi

    2004-12-01

    We have searched for a new highly spin-polarized ferromagnet which has a higher spin moment than that of known half-metallic transition metal pnictides with the zinc-blende structure by first-principles calculations. To generate the high spin moment we focus on Gd compounds. Our calculation shows that a (GdN)1/(CrAs)1 structure is a ferromagnetic material. The total magnetic moment of this ferromagnet is over 9.9 µB per chemical formula.

  8. Design and Performance Calculations of a Propeller for Very High Altitude Flight. Degree awarded by Case Western Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, L. Danielle

    1998-01-01

    Reported here is a design study of a propeller for a vehicle capable of subsonic flight in Earth's stratosphere. All propellers presented were required to absorb 63.4 kW (85 hp) at 25.9 km (85,000 ft) while aircraft cruise velocity was maintained at Mach 0.40. To produce the final design, classic momentum and blade-element theories were combined with two and three-dimensional results from the Advanced Ducted Propfan Analysis Code (ADPAC), a numerical Navier-Stokes analysis code. The Eppler 387 airfoil was used for each of the constant section propeller designs compared. Experimental data from the Langley Low-Turbulence Pressure Tunnel was used in the strip theory design and analysis programs written. The experimental data was also used to validate ADPAC at a Reynolds numbers of 60,000 and a Mach number of 0.20. Experimental and calculated surface pressure coefficients are compared for a range of angles of attack. Since low Reynolds number transonic experimental data was unavailable, ADPAC was used to generate two-dimensional section performance predictions for Reynolds numbers of 60,000 and 100,000 and Mach numbers ranging from 0.45 to 0.75. Surface pressure coefficients are presented for selected angles of attack. in addition to the variation of lift and drag coefficients at each flow condition. A three-dimensional model of the final design was made which ADPAC used to calculated propeller performance. ADPAC performance predictions were compared with strip-theory calculations at design point. Propeller efficiency predicted by ADPAC was within 1.5% of that calculated by strip theory methods, although ADPAC predictions of thrust, power, and torque coefficients were approximately 5% lower than the strip theory results. Simplifying assumptions made in the strip theory account for the differences seen.

  9. Measuring Response to Intervention: Comparing Three Effect Size Calculation Techniques for Single-Case Design Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Sarah Gwen

    2012-01-01

    Response to intervention (RTI) is increasingly being used in educational settings to make high-stakes, special education decisions. Because of this, the accurate use and analysis of single-case designs to monitor intervention effectiveness has become important to the RTI process. Effect size methods for single-case designs provide a useful way to…

  10. Materials by design: methodological developments in the calculation of excited-state properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govoni, Marco

    Density functional theory (DFT) is one of the main tools used in first principle simulations of materials; however several of the current approximations of exchange and correlation functionals do not provide the level of accuracy required for predictive calculations of excited state properties. The application to heterogeneous systems of more accurate post-DFT approaches such as Many-Body Perturbation Theory (MBPT) - for example to nanostructured, disordered, and defective materials - has been hindered by high computational costs. In this talk recent methodological developments in MBPT calculations will be discussed, as recently implemented in the open source code WEST, which efficiently exploits HPC architectures. Results using a formulation that does not require the explicit calculation of virtual states, nor the storage and inversion of large dielectric matrices will be presented; these results include quasi particle energies for systems with thousands of electrons and encompass the electronic structure of aqueous solutions, spin defects in insulators, and benchmarks for molecules and solids containing heavy elements. Simplifications of MBPT calculations based on the use of static response properties, such as dielectric-dependent hybrid functionals, will also be discussed. Work done in collaboration with Hosung Seo, Peter Scherpelz, Ikutaro Hamada, Jonathan Skone, Alex Gaiduk, T. Anh Pham, and Giulia Galli. Supported by DOE-BES.

  11. Parameter optimization and design aspect for electrocoagulation of silica nano-particles in wafer polishing wastewater.

    PubMed

    Den, W; Huang, C

    2006-01-01

    A systematic procedure has been proposed for the design of a multi-channel, continuous-flow electrocoagulation reactor of mono-polar configuration for the removal of sub-micron particles from wastewater. Using the chemical-mechanical-planarization (CMP) process as the target source of wastewater, a series of laboratory-scale studies were conducted to determine the required operating conditions for the efficient removal of the ultrafine particles. These operating criteria included charge loading (> or = 8 F m(-3)), current density (> or = 5.7 A m(-2)), hydraulic retention time (> or = 60 min), as well as the initially operational pH (7 to approximately 10). Furthermore, a steady-state transport equation with second-order reaction kinetics was employed to describe the rate of coagulation as the rate-limiting factor. The actual kinetic constant determined from the laboratory-scale experiments was approximately 1.2 x 10(-21) m3 s(-1), which was three orders of magnitude smaller than that calculated based on Brownian diffusion during the coagulation. The model was subsequently validated with a series of experiments using a pilot-scale electro-coagulation reactor geometrically similar to the laboratory-scale reactor with nearly twenty times volumetric scale-up. PMID:16749457

  12. Parameter optimization and design aspect for electrocoagulation of silica nano-particles in wafer polishing wastewater.

    PubMed

    Den, W; Huang, C

    2006-01-01

    A systematic procedure has been proposed for the design of a multi-channel, continuous-flow electrocoagulation reactor of mono-polar configuration for the removal of sub-micron particles from wastewater. Using the chemical-mechanical-planarization (CMP) process as the target source of wastewater, a series of laboratory-scale studies were conducted to determine the required operating conditions for the efficient removal of the ultrafine particles. These operating criteria included charge loading (> or = 8 F m(-3)), current density (> or = 5.7 A m(-2)), hydraulic retention time (> or = 60 min), as well as the initially operational pH (7 to approximately 10). Furthermore, a steady-state transport equation with second-order reaction kinetics was employed to describe the rate of coagulation as the rate-limiting factor. The actual kinetic constant determined from the laboratory-scale experiments was approximately 1.2 x 10(-21) m3 s(-1), which was three orders of magnitude smaller than that calculated based on Brownian diffusion during the coagulation. The model was subsequently validated with a series of experiments using a pilot-scale electro-coagulation reactor geometrically similar to the laboratory-scale reactor with nearly twenty times volumetric scale-up.

  13. Design of a telemetry system based on wireless power transmission for physiological parameter monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Zhiwei; Yan, Guozheng; Zhu, Bingquan

    2015-04-15

    An implanted telemetry system for experimental animals with or without anaesthesia can be used to continuously monitor physiological parameters. This system is significant not only in the study of organisms but also in the evaluation of drug efficacy, artificial organs, and auxiliary devices. The system is composed of a miniature electronic capsule, a wireless power transmission module, a data-recording device, and a processing module. An electrocardiograph, a temperature sensor, and a pressure sensor are integrated in the miniature electronic capsule, in which the signals are transmitted in vitro by wireless communication after filtering, amplification, and A/D sampling. To overcome the power shortage of batteries, a wireless power transmission module based on electromagnetic induction was designed. The transmitting coil of a rectangular-section solenoid and a 3D receiving coil are proposed according to stability and safety constraints. Experiments show that at least 150 mW of power could pick up on the load in a volume of Φ10.5 mm × 11 mm, with a transmission efficiency of 2.56%. Vivisection experiments verified the feasibility of the integrated radio-telemetry system.

  14. Effect of process design and operating parameters on aerobic methane oxidation in municipal WWTPs.

    PubMed

    Daelman, Matthijs R J; Van Eynde, Tamara; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Volcke, Eveline I P

    2014-12-01

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas and its emission from municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) should be prevented. One way to do this is to promote the biological conversion of dissolved methane over stripping in aeration tanks. In this study, the well-established Activated Sludge Model n°1 (ASM1) and Benchmark Simulation Model n°1 (BSM1) were extended to study the influence of process design and operating parameters on biological methane oxidation. The aeration function used in BSM 1 was upgraded to more accurately describe gas-liquid transfer of oxygen and methane in aeration tanks equipped with subsurface aeration. Dissolved methane could be effectively removed in an aeration tank at an aeration rate that is in agreement with optimal effluent quality. Subsurface bubble aeration proved to be better than surface aeration, while a CSTR configuration was superior to plug flow conditions in avoiding methane emissions. The conversion of methane in the activated sludge tank benefits from higher methane concentrations in the WWTP's influent. Finally, if an activated sludge tank is aerated with methane containing off-gas, a limited amount of methane is absorbed and converted in the mixed liquor. This knowledge helps to stimulate the methane oxidizing capacity of activated sludge in order to abate methane emissions from wastewater treatment to the atmosphere. PMID:25225767

  15. A less field-intensive robust design for estimating demographic parameters with Mark-resight data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McClintock, B.T.; White, Gary C.

    2009-01-01

    The robust design has become popular among animal ecologists as a means for estimating population abundance and related demographic parameters with mark-recapture data. However, two drawbacks of traditional mark-recapture are financial cost and repeated disturbance to animals. Mark-resight methodology may in many circumstances be a less expensive and less invasive alternative to mark-recapture, but the models developed to date for these data have overwhelmingly concentrated only on the estimation of abundance. Here we introduce a mark-resight model analogous to that used in mark-recapture for the simultaneous estimation of abundance, apparent survival, and transition probabilities between observable and unobservable states. The model may be implemented using standard statistical computing software, but it has also been incorporated into the freeware package Program MARK. We illustrate the use of our model with mainland New Zealand Robin (Petroica australis) data collected to ascertain whether this methodology may be a reliable alternative for monitoring endangered populations of a closely related species inhabiting the Chatham Islands. We found this method to be a viable alternative to traditional mark-recapture when cost or disturbance to species is of particular concern in long-term population monitoring programs. ?? 2009 by the Ecological Society of America.

  16. Design parameters of stainless steel plates for maximizing high frequency ultrasound wave transmission.

    PubMed

    Michaud, Mark; Leong, Thomas; Swiergon, Piotr; Juliano, Pablo; Knoerzer, Kai

    2015-09-01

    This work validated, in a higher frequency range, the theoretical predictions made by Boyle around 1930, which state that the optimal transmission of sound pressure through a metal plate occurs when the plate thickness equals a multiple of half the wavelength of the sound wave. Several reactor design parameters influencing the transmission of high frequency ultrasonic waves through a stainless steel plate were examined. The transmission properties of steel plates of various thicknesses (1-7 mm) were studied for frequencies ranging from 400 kHz to 2 MHz and at different distances between plates and transducers. It was shown that transmission of sound pressure through a steel plate showed high dependence of the thickness of the plate to the frequency of the sound wave (thickness ratio). Maximum sound pressure transmission of ∼ 60% of the incident pressure was observed when the ratio of the plate thickness to the applied frequency was a multiple of a half wavelength (2 MHz, 6mm stainless steel plate). In contrast, minimal sound pressure transmission (∼ 10-20%) was measured for thickness ratios that were not a multiple of a half wavelength. Furthermore, the attenuation of the sound pressure in the transmission region was also investigated. As expected, it was confirmed that higher frequencies have more pronounced sound pressure attenuation than lower frequencies. The spatial distribution of the sound pressure transmitted through the plate characterized by sonochemiluminescence measurements using luminol emission, supports the validity of the pressure measurements in this study.

  17. Design of a telemetry system based on wireless power transmission for physiological parameter monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Zhiwei; Yan, Guozheng; Zhu, Bingquan

    2015-04-01

    An implanted telemetry system for experimental animals with or without anaesthesia can be used to continuously monitor physiological parameters. This system is significant not only in the study of organisms but also in the evaluation of drug efficacy, artificial organs, and auxiliary devices. The system is composed of a miniature electronic capsule, a wireless power transmission module, a data-recording device, and a processing module. An electrocardiograph, a temperature sensor, and a pressure sensor are integrated in the miniature electronic capsule, in which the signals are transmitted in vitro by wireless communication after filtering, amplification, and A/D sampling. To overcome the power shortage of batteries, a wireless power transmission module based on electromagnetic induction was designed. The transmitting coil of a rectangular-section solenoid and a 3D receiving coil are proposed according to stability and safety constraints. Experiments show that at least 150 mW of power could pick up on the load in a volume of Φ10.5 mm × 11 mm, with a transmission efficiency of 2.56%. Vivisection experiments verified the feasibility of the integrated radio-telemetry system.

  18. Effect of process design and operating parameters on aerobic methane oxidation in municipal WWTPs.

    PubMed

    Daelman, Matthijs R J; Van Eynde, Tamara; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Volcke, Eveline I P

    2014-12-01

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas and its emission from municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) should be prevented. One way to do this is to promote the biological conversion of dissolved methane over stripping in aeration tanks. In this study, the well-established Activated Sludge Model n°1 (ASM1) and Benchmark Simulation Model n°1 (BSM1) were extended to study the influence of process design and operating parameters on biological methane oxidation. The aeration function used in BSM 1 was upgraded to more accurately describe gas-liquid transfer of oxygen and methane in aeration tanks equipped with subsurface aeration. Dissolved methane could be effectively removed in an aeration tank at an aeration rate that is in agreement with optimal effluent quality. Subsurface bubble aeration proved to be better than surface aeration, while a CSTR configuration was superior to plug flow conditions in avoiding methane emissions. The conversion of methane in the activated sludge tank benefits from higher methane concentrations in the WWTP's influent. Finally, if an activated sludge tank is aerated with methane containing off-gas, a limited amount of methane is absorbed and converted in the mixed liquor. This knowledge helps to stimulate the methane oxidizing capacity of activated sludge in order to abate methane emissions from wastewater treatment to the atmosphere.

  19. Radionuclide release calculations for selected severe accident scenarios. Volume 3. PWR, subatmospheric containment design

    SciTech Connect

    Denning, R.S.; Gieseke, J.A.; Cybulskis, P.; Lee, K.W.; Jordan, H.; Curtis, L.A.; Kelly, R.F.; Kogan, V.; Schumacher, P.M.

    1986-07-01

    This report presents results of analyses of the enviromental releases of fission products (source terms) for severe accident scenarios in a pressurized water reactor with a subatmospheric containment design. The analyses were performed to support the Severe Accident Risk Reduction/Risk Rebaselining Program (SARRP) which is being undertaken for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission by Sandia National Laboratories. In the SARRP program, risk estimates are being generated for a number of reference plant designs. the Surry plant has been used in this study as the reference plant for a subatmospheric design.

  20. Optimization of deterministic transport parameters for the calculation of the dose distribution around a high dose-rate {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source

    SciTech Connect

    Gifford, Kent A.; Price, Michael J.; Horton, John L. Jr.; Wareing, Todd A.; Mourtada, Firas

    2008-06-15

    The goal of this work was to calculate the dose distribution around a high dose-rate {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source using a multi-group discrete ordinates code and then to compare the results with a Monte Carlo calculated dose distribution. The unstructured tetrahedral mesh discrete ordinates code Attila version 6.1.1 was used to calculate the photon kerma rate distribution in water around the Nucletron microSelectron mHDRv2 source. MCNPX 2.5.c was used to compute the Monte Carlo water photon kerma rate distribution. Two hundred million histories were simulated, resulting in standard errors of the mean of less than 3% overall. The number of energy groups, S{sub n} (angular order), P{sub n} (scattering order), and mesh elements were varied in addition to the method of analytic ray tracing to assess their effects on the deterministic solution. Water photon kerma rate matrices were exported from both codes into an in-house data analysis software. This software quantified the percent dose difference distribution, the number of points within {+-}3% and {+-}5%, and the mean percent difference between the two codes. The data demonstrated that a 5 energy-group cross-section set calculated results to within 0.5% of a 15 group cross-section set. S{sub 12} was sufficient to resolve the solution in angle. P{sub 2} expansion of the scattering cross-section was necessary to compute accurate distributions. A computational mesh with 55 064 tetrahedral elements in a 30 cm diameter phantom resolved the solution spatially. An efficiency factor of 110 with the above parameters was realized in comparison to MC methods. The Attila code provided an accurate and efficient solution of the Boltzmann transport equation for the mHDRv2 source.