Science.gov

Sample records for desired time localization

  1. Like mother, like child: Offspring marital timing desires and maternal marriage timing and stability.

    PubMed

    Arocho, Rachel; Kamp Dush, Claire M

    2017-04-01

    Understanding the determinants of marital timing is critical because it has implications for marital functioning and divorce. One salient predictor of marital timing is youth's desires for marriage timing. To shine light on predictors of both desires for marital timing and the timing of marriage itself, we examine offspring marital desires and maternal marriage characteristics in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1979 (NLSY79) cohort and 1979 Child and Young Adult cohort (NLSY79-CYA; biological offspring of the women in the 1979 cohort). Analyses showed that maternal cohabitation postdivorce predicted decreased expectations to ever marry in offspring. Maternal age at marriage was positively associated with offspring desires for age at marriage, but only for those whose mothers had not divorced. Maternal marital age was significantly associated with the offspring's transition into marriage even when controlling for the offspring's desires for marriage timing, but neither maternal marriage age nor offspring desires for marital timing were associated with the timing of entrance into cohabitation, whereas maternal divorce was associated with earlier cohabitation. Our findings suggest that maternal marriage characteristics, particularly divorce, are significant predictors of millennials' desires for and experiences with romantic relationships. (PsycINFO Database Record

  2. Time to Go Local!

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Time to Go Local! Past Issues / Winter 2007 Table of Contents ... MedlinePlus.gov health topic pages, you will find "Go Local" links that take you to information about ...

  3. Public Education in Neoliberal Times: Memory and Desire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerrard, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    This article reflects on the desire to defend and claim public education amidst the educational policy effects of contemporary neoliberal politics. The defence of public education, from schools to higher education, undoubtedly provides a powerful counter-veiling weight to the neoliberal policy logic of education-as-individual-value-accrual. At a…

  4. Public Education in Neoliberal Times: Memory and Desire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerrard, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    This article reflects on the desire to defend and claim public education amidst the educational policy effects of contemporary neoliberal politics. The defence of public education, from schools to higher education, undoubtedly provides a powerful counter-veiling weight to the neoliberal policy logic of education-as-individual-value-accrual. At a…

  5. 48 CFR 52.211-9 - Desired and Required Time of Delivery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Clauses 52.211-9 Desired and Required Time of Delivery. As prescribed in 11.404(a)(3), insert the following clause: Desired and Required Time of Delivery (JUN 1997) (a) The Government desires delivery to be... beyond the time for delivery in the Government's required delivery schedule as follows: REQUIRED DELIVERY...

  6. The Actual and Desired Role of Local Vocational Directors: A Comparison of Perceptions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Gary E.; And Others

    The current and desired role of local vocational directors (LVDs) in North Carolina was assessed through a survey of superintendents, principals, vocational teachers, and LVDs. A literature review indicated differences in various groups' perceptions regarding the actual and ideal role of LVDs. The instrument required respondents to reply 2 times…

  7. Subjective age in early adolescence: relationships with chronological age, pubertal timing, desired age, and problem behaviors.

    PubMed

    Hubley, Anita M; Arım, Rübab G

    2012-04-01

    Subjective age generally refers to the age that one feels. In a cross-sectional questionnaire study of 245 adolescents ages 10-14 years, we examined (a) whether, and when, a cross-over in subjective age occurs, (b) differences in subjective age among pubertal timing groups, (c) correlations between subjective age and each of desired age and five problem behaviors, and (d) the relative contributions of chronological age, pubertal timing, desired age, and problem behaviors to subjective age in boys and girls. Adolescents generally reported subjective and desired ages that were slightly older than their chronological ages. A cross-over in subjective age occurred at 10.4 years. Late maturing adolescents reported relatively younger subjective ages than their early and on-time maturing peers. For boys, only desired age significantly predicted subjective age. For girls, an older desired age, late maturation, and higher scores on anxious/depressed feelings, rule-breaking behavior, and aggressive behavior significantly predicted older subjective ages. Copyright © 2011 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Eye Movements Reveal the Time-Course of Anticipating Behaviour Based on Complex, Conflicting Desires

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Heather J.; Breheny, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The time-course of representing others' perspectives is inconclusive across the currently available models of ToM processing. We report two visual-world studies investigating how knowledge about a character's basic preferences (e.g. "Tom's favourite colour is pink") and higher-order desires (his wish to keep this preference secret) compete to…

  9. Eye Movements Reveal the Time-Course of Anticipating Behaviour Based on Complex, Conflicting Desires

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Heather J.; Breheny, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The time-course of representing others' perspectives is inconclusive across the currently available models of ToM processing. We report two visual-world studies investigating how knowledge about a character's basic preferences (e.g. "Tom's favourite colour is pink") and higher-order desires (his wish to keep this preference secret) compete to…

  10. Subjective Age in Early Adolescence: Relationships with Chronological Age, Pubertal Timing, Desired Age, and Problem Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubley, Anita M.; Arim, Rubab G.

    2012-01-01

    Subjective age generally refers to the age that one feels. In a cross-sectional questionnaire study of 245 adolescents ages 10-14 years, we examined (a) whether, and when, a cross-over in subjective age occurs, (b) differences in subjective age among pubertal timing groups, (c) correlations between subjective age and each of desired age and five…

  11. 48 CFR 52.211-9 - Desired and Required Time of Delivery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Desired and Required Time of Delivery. 52.211-9 Section 52.211-9 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION (CONTINUED) CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions...

  12. Subjective Age in Early Adolescence: Relationships with Chronological Age, Pubertal Timing, Desired Age, and Problem Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubley, Anita M.; Arim, Rubab G.

    2012-01-01

    Subjective age generally refers to the age that one feels. In a cross-sectional questionnaire study of 245 adolescents ages 10-14 years, we examined (a) whether, and when, a cross-over in subjective age occurs, (b) differences in subjective age among pubertal timing groups, (c) correlations between subjective age and each of desired age and five…

  13. Eye movements reveal the time-course of anticipating behaviour based on complex, conflicting desires.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Heather J; Breheny, Richard

    2011-05-01

    The time-course of representing others' perspectives is inconclusive across the currently available models of ToM processing. We report two visual-world studies investigating how knowledge about a character's basic preferences (e.g. Tom's favourite colour is pink) and higher-order desires (his wish to keep this preference secret) compete to influence online expectations about subsequent behaviour. Participants' eye movements around a visual scene were tracked while they listened to auditory narratives. While clear differences in anticipatory visual biases emerged between conditions in Experiment 1, post-hoc analyses testing the strength of the relevant biases suggested a discrepancy in the time-course of predicting appropriate referents within the different contexts. Specifically, predictions to the target emerged very early when there was no conflict between the character's basic preferences and higher-order desires, but appeared to be relatively delayed when comprehenders were provided with conflicting information about that character's desire to keep a secret. However, a second experiment demonstrated that this apparent 'cognitive cost' in inferring behaviour based on higher-order desires was in fact driven by low-level features between the context sentence and visual scene. Taken together, these results suggest that healthy adults are able to make complex higher-order ToM inferences without the need to call on costly cognitive processes. Results are discussed relative to previous accounts of ToM and language processing.

  14. Repeat ground track orbit design with desired revisit time and optimal tilt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafari Nadoushan, Mahdi; Assadian, Nima

    2015-01-01

    A novel method for designing repeat ground track orbits based on the Number Theory is presented. The desired revisit time, tilt capacity, payload swath width, and side-lap are utilized as mission and payload properties for repeat ground track orbit design. The algorithm is developed in the context of the perturbed two body problem, with the secular J4 effect as the only source of perturbation. The concept of the subcycles in the repeat ground track orbits is redefined using the Bezout's theorem and is employed for providing the desired revisit time with the optimal required tilt. This method needs simple calculations and has low computational burden. Therefore, it facilitates the practicing engineers to rapid design of repeat ground track orbits without sophisticated computer programs. The ability of the purposed method is demonstrated by some case studies.

  15. To study hypoactive sexual desire disorder in a fragile X carrier female successfully treated with local testosterone application.

    PubMed

    Raza, S; Baig, M; Ali, J; Rizvi, S

    2008-01-01

    There is still considerable controversy concerning the role of androgen therapy for hypoactive sexual desire disorder in females. Clinical trials have shown that exogenous testosterone therapy improves arousability, sexual desire and fantasy, frequency of sexual activity and orgasm, and satisfaction and pleasure from the sexual act. We report our experience of 36-year-old fragile X carrier female presented to our department with low sex drive and subjectively poor arousal for the past 1 year. We decided to treat her with local testosterone in a pump form (1% 5 g twice a week). She responded very well to the treatment, and in 3 weeks her libido and sexual functions improved dramatically. We decided to continue the same treatment for almost 1 year following up her free and total testosterone, complete lipid profiles, liver functions and complete blood picture every 3 months. During the whole course of treatment, she had mild facial acne, which was resolved in 2 months after completing treatment with testosterone. This is our first and only case of this syndrome with low sexual desire disorder treated with local testosterone in a pump form. Based upon our 1 year follow-up, low-dose testosterone is a safe and effective approach in treating hypoactive sexual desire disorder in a fragile X carrier female, provided the patient is monitored every 3 months for blood counts, lipid profiles, liver functions and free and total testosterone levels.

  16. Adaptive Decomposition of Highly Resolved Time Series into Local and Non‐local Components

    EPA Science Inventory

    Highly time-resolved air monitoring data are widely being collected over long time horizons in order to characterizeambient and near-source air quality trends. In many applications, it is desirable to split the time-resolved data into two ormore components (e.g., local and region...

  17. Adaptive Decomposition of Highly Resolved Time Series into Local and Non‐local Components

    EPA Science Inventory

    Highly time-resolved air monitoring data are widely being collected over long time horizons in order to characterizeambient and near-source air quality trends. In many applications, it is desirable to split the time-resolved data into two ormore components (e.g., local and region...

  18. A framework for tracking post-wildfire trajectories and desired future conditions using NDVI time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, S. P.; Hargrove, W. W.; Lee, D. C.; Spruce, J.

    2013-12-01

    Wildfires could provide a cost-effective means to maintain or restore some aspects of fire-adapted landscapes. Yet with the added influence of climate change and invasives, wildfires may also facilitate or accelerate undesired type conversions. As megafires are becoming increasingly common across portions of the US West, managers require a framework for long-term monitoring that integrates the trajectories of fire-prone landscapes and objectives, not just conditions immediately after a burn. Systematic use of satellite data provides an efficient cross-jurisdictional solution to this problem. Since 2000, MODIS-technology has provided high frequency, 240m resolution observations of Earth. Using this data stream, the ForWarn system, developed through a partnership of the US Forest Service, NASA-Stennis and others, provides 46 estimates of the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) per year for the conterminous US. From this time series, a variety of secondary metrics have been derived including median annual NDVI, amplitude, and phenological spikiness. Each is both a fire and recovery sensitive measure that allows managers to systematically track conditions with respect to either the pre-fire baseline or desired future conditions more adaptively. In dry interior forests where wildfires could be used to thin stands, recovery to untreated conditions may not be desired given fuels objectives or climate change. In more mesic systems, fire effects may be monitored as staged succession. With both coarse filter monitoring and desired conditions in hand, managers can better recognize and prioritize problems in disturbance-prone landscapes.

  19. Desired Fertility and Number of Children Born Across Time and Space.

    PubMed

    Günther, Isabel; Harttgen, Kenneth

    2016-02-01

    Economists have often argued that high fertility rates are mainly driven by women's demand for children (and not by family planning efforts) with low levels of unwanted fertility across countries (and hence with little room for family planning efforts to reduce population growth). We study the relationship between wanted fertility and number of children born in a panel of 200 country-years controlling for country fixed effects and global time trends. In general, we find a close relationship between wanted and actual fertility, with one desired child leading to one additional birth. However, our results also indicate that in the last 20 years, the level of unwanted births has stayed at 2 across African countries but has, on average, decreased from 1 to close to 0 in other developing countries. Hence, women in African countries are less able to translate child preferences into birth outcomes than women in other developing countries, and forces other than fertility demand have been important for previous fertility declines in many developing countries. Family planning efforts only partially explain the observed temporal and spatial differences in achieving desired fertility levels.

  20. Chromosomal Localization of Genes Conferring Desirable Agronomic Traits from Wheat-Agropyron cristatum Disomic Addition Line 5113

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Cuili; Yao, Miaomiao; Zhang, Jinpeng; Yang, Xinming; Liu, Weihua; Li, Xiuquan; Xi, Yajun; Li, Lihui

    2016-01-01

    Creation of wheat-alien disomic addition lines and localization of desirable genes on alien chromosomes are important for utilization of these genes in genetic improvement of common wheat. In this study, wheat-Agropyron cristatum derivative line 5113 was characterized by genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) and specific-locus amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq), and was demonstrated to be a novel wheat-A. cristatum disomic 6P addition line. Compared with its parent Fukuhokomugi (Fukuho), 5113 displayed multiple elite agronomic traits, including higher uppermost internode/plant height ratio, larger flag leaf, longer spike length, elevated grain number per spike and spikelet number per spike, more kernel number in the middle spikelet, more fertile tiller number per plant, and enhanced resistance to powdery mildew and leaf rust. Genes conferring these elite traits were localized on the A. cristatum 6P chromosome by using SLAF-seq markers and biparental populations (F1, BC1F1 and BC1F2 populations) produced from the crosses between Fukuho and 5113. Taken together, chromosomal localization of these desirable genes will facilitate transferring of high-yield and high-resistance genes from A. cristatum into common wheat, and serve as the foundation for the utilization of 5113 in wheat breeding. PMID:27824906

  1. Chromosomal Localization of Genes Conferring Desirable Agronomic Traits from Wheat-Agropyron cristatum Disomic Addition Line 5113.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingfeng; Lu, Yuqing; Pan, Cuili; Yao, Miaomiao; Zhang, Jinpeng; Yang, Xinming; Liu, Weihua; Li, Xiuquan; Xi, Yajun; Li, Lihui

    2016-01-01

    Creation of wheat-alien disomic addition lines and localization of desirable genes on alien chromosomes are important for utilization of these genes in genetic improvement of common wheat. In this study, wheat-Agropyron cristatum derivative line 5113 was characterized by genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) and specific-locus amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq), and was demonstrated to be a novel wheat-A. cristatum disomic 6P addition line. Compared with its parent Fukuhokomugi (Fukuho), 5113 displayed multiple elite agronomic traits, including higher uppermost internode/plant height ratio, larger flag leaf, longer spike length, elevated grain number per spike and spikelet number per spike, more kernel number in the middle spikelet, more fertile tiller number per plant, and enhanced resistance to powdery mildew and leaf rust. Genes conferring these elite traits were localized on the A. cristatum 6P chromosome by using SLAF-seq markers and biparental populations (F1, BC1F1 and BC1F2 populations) produced from the crosses between Fukuho and 5113. Taken together, chromosomal localization of these desirable genes will facilitate transferring of high-yield and high-resistance genes from A. cristatum into common wheat, and serve as the foundation for the utilization of 5113 in wheat breeding.

  2. Time-domain noise reduction based on an orthogonal decomposition for desired signal extraction.

    PubMed

    Benesty, Jacob; Chen, Jingdong; Arden Huang, Yiteng; Gaensler, Tomas

    2012-07-01

    This paper addresses the problem of noise reduction in the time domain where the clean speech sample at every time instant is estimated by filtering a vector of the noisy speech signal. Such a clean speech estimate consists of both the filtered speech and residual noise (filtered noise) as the noisy vector is the sum of the clean speech and noise vectors. Traditionally, the filtered speech is treated as the desired signal after noise reduction. This paper proposes to decompose the clean speech vector into two orthogonal components: one is correlated and the other is uncorrelated with the current clean speech sample. While the correlated component helps estimate the clean speech, it is shown that the uncorrelated component interferes with the estimation, just as the additive noise. Based on this orthogonal decomposition, the paper presents a way to define the error signal and cost functions and addresses the issue of how to design different optimal noise reduction filters by optimizing these cost functions. Specifically, it discusses how to design the maximum SNR filter, the Wiener filter, the minimum variance distortionless response (MVDR) filter, the tradeoff filter, and the linearly constrained minimum variance (LCMV) filter. It demonstrates that the maximum SNR, Wiener, MVDR, and tradeoff filters are identical up to a scaling factor. It also shows from the orthogonal decomposition that many performance measures can be defined, which seem to be more appropriate than the traditional ones for the evaluation of the noise reduction filters.

  3. Mesolimbic dopamine in desire and dread: enabling motivation to be generated by localized glutamate disruptions in nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Faure, Alexis; Reynolds, Sheila M; Richard, Jocelyn M; Berridge, Kent C

    2008-07-09

    An important issue in affective neuroscience concerns the role of mesocorticolimbic dopamine systems in positive-valenced motivation (e.g., reward) versus negative-valenced motivation (e.g., fear). Here, we assessed whether endogenous dopamine receptor stimulation in nucleus accumbens contributes to both appetitive behavior and fearful behavior that is generated in keyboard manner by local glutamate disruptions at different sites in medial shell. 6,7-Dinitroquinoxaline-2,3(1H,4H)-dione (DNQX) microinjections (450 ng) locally disrupt glutamate signals in <4 mm(3) of nucleus accumbens, and generate either desire or fear (or both) depending on precise rostrocaudal location in medial shell. At rostral shell sites, local AMPA/kainate blockade generates positive ingestive behavior, but the elicited motivated behavior becomes incrementally more fearful as the same microinjection is moved caudally. A dopamine-blocking mixture of D(1) and D(2) antagonists (raclopride and SCH-23390 [R(+)-7-chloro-8-hydroxy-3-methyl-1-phenyl-2,3,4,5,-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzazepine hydrochloride]) was combined here in the same microinjection with DNQX to assess the role of endogenous local dopamine in mediating the DNQX-motivated behaviors. We report that local dopamine blockade prevented DNQX microinjections from generating appetitive behavior (eating) in rostral shell, and equally prevented DNQX from generating fearful behavior (defensive treading) in caudal shell. We conclude that local dopamine is needed to enable disruptions of corticolimbic glutamate signals in shell to generate either positive incentive salience or negative fearful salience (valence depending on site and other conditions). Thus, dopamine interacts with localization of valence-biased glutamate circuits in medial shell to facilitate keyboard stimulation of both appetitive and fearful motivations.

  4. The importance of differentiating urban and rural phenomena in examining the unequal distribution of locally desirable land.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yangjian; Tarrant, Michael A; Green, Gary T

    2008-09-01

    Previous research addressing the unequal distribution of locally desirable land (LDL) has mainly ignored their associated environments (i.e., rural or urban). However, this study proposed a new framework that treats rural and urban regions separately. In rural areas, the LDLs included all public lands. In urbanized areas, the LDLs were defined as green open spaces. Potential inequities in the distribution of LDL were assessed with respect to socioeconomic characteristics of residents in the State of Georgia. Using US Census Bureau Data (2000), Census Block Groups (CBGs) adjacent to LDLs were compared to CBGs outside of LDLs on four socioeconomic variables (per capita income, occupation, education, and race) in urban, suburban and rural environments. Results showed that CBGs adjacent to LDLs were composed of statistically significant upper-class communities containing fewer blue-collar workers, more whites, and higher income and higher educated people in rural, suburban and urban areas.

  5. Social capital, desire to increase physical activity and leisure-time physical activity: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Lindström, M

    2011-07-01

    To investigate the associations between social capital (trust) and leisure-time physical activity. The 2004 Public Health Survey in Skåne is a cross-sectional study. In total, 27,757 individuals aged 18-80 years answered a postal questionnaire (59% participation). Logistic regression models were used to investigate the associations between trust, desire to increase physical activity and leisure-time physical activity. The prevalence of low leisure-time physical activity was 15.3% among men and 13.2% among women. Middle-aged men and older women, respondents born abroad, those with medium/low education, those with the desire to increase physical activity but needing support, and those reporting low trust had significantly higher odds ratios of low leisure-time physical activity than their respective reference groups. The associations between low trust and desire to increase physical activity and between low trust and low leisure-time physical activity remained in the multiple models. The positive association between low trust and low leisure-time physical activity remained after multiple adjustments. There is a concentration of men and women with low leisure-time physical activity who report the desire to increase their physical activity but think that they need support to do so. This group also has a significantly higher prevalence of low trust. Copyright © 2011 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Local-time representation of path integrals.

    PubMed

    Jizba, Petr; Zatloukal, Václav

    2015-12-01

    We derive a local-time path-integral representation for a generic one-dimensional time-independent system. In particular, we show how to rephrase the matrix elements of the Bloch density matrix as a path integral over x-dependent local-time profiles. The latter quantify the time that the sample paths x(t) in the Feynman path integral spend in the vicinity of an arbitrary point x. Generalization of the local-time representation that includes arbitrary functionals of the local time is also provided. We argue that the results obtained represent a powerful alternative to the traditional Feynman-Kac formula, particularly in the high- and low-temperature regimes. To illustrate this point, we apply our local-time representation to analyze the asymptotic behavior of the Bloch density matrix at low temperatures. Further salient issues, such as connections with the Sturm-Liouville theory and the Rayleigh-Ritz variational principle, are also discussed.

  7. School Counselor's Time: A Comparison of Counselors' and Principals' Perceptions and Desires.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Partin, Ronald L.

    This study focused on three objectives: (1) to identify those activities which school counselors perceive to be their greatest time wasters; (2) to identify the percentage of time counselors believe they spend on each of the primary counselor job functions; and (3) to compare those perceptions with counselors' ideal allocation of their time.…

  8. Design PID controllers for desired time-domain or frequency-domain response.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weidong; Xi, Yugeng; Yang, Genke; Xu, Xiaoming

    2002-10-01

    Practical requirements on the design of control systems, especially process control systems, are usually specified in terms of time-domain response, such as overshoot and rise time, or frequency-domain response, such as resonance peak and stability margin. Although numerous methods have been developed for the design of the proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller, little work has been done in relation to the quantitative time-domain and frequency-domain responses. In this paper, we study the following problem: Given a nominal stable process with time delay, we design a suboptimal PID controller to achieve the required time-domain response or frequency-domain response for the nominal system or the uncertain system. An H(infinity) PID controller is developed based on optimal control theory and the parameters are derived analytically. Its properties are investigated and compared with that of two developed suboptimal controllers: an H2 PID controller and a Maclaurin PID controller. It is shown that all three controllers can provide the quantitative time-domain and frequency-domain responses.

  9. Anderson localization in the time domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacha, Krzysztof; Delande, Dominique

    2016-08-01

    In analogy with the usual Anderson localization taking place in time-independent disordered quantum systems where the disorder acts in configuration space, systems exposed to temporally disordered potentials can display Anderson localization in the time domain. We demonstrate this phenomenon with one-dimensional examples where a temporally disordered potential induces localization during the quantum evolution of wave packets, in contrast with a fully delocalized classical dynamics. This is an example of a time crystal phenomenon, i.e., a crystalline behavior in the time domain.

  10. Translating Desire (and Frustration)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Chien-Ya

    2017-01-01

    There is a trend in modern times towards taking the individual's desire to be the indicator or basis of what the good life would be for the individual. Desire is believed to be an outer expression of an inner voice. The idea is that the individual's desire shows what matters and therefore what constitutes the good life for her. An assumption is…

  11. Ordinary differential equation for local accumulation time.

    PubMed

    Berezhkovskii, Alexander M

    2011-08-21

    Cell differentiation in a developing tissue is controlled by the concentration fields of signaling molecules called morphogens. Formation of these concentration fields can be described by the reaction-diffusion mechanism in which locally produced molecules diffuse through the patterned tissue and are degraded. The formation kinetics at a given point of the patterned tissue can be characterized by the local accumulation time, defined in terms of the local relaxation function. Here, we show that this time satisfies an ordinary differential equation. Using this equation one can straightforwardly determine the local accumulation time, i.e., without preliminary calculation of the relaxation function by solving the partial differential equation, as was done in previous studies. We derive this ordinary differential equation together with the accompanying boundary conditions and demonstrate that the earlier obtained results for the local accumulation time can be recovered by solving this equation.

  12. Energy Deposition in the Body from External Sources to Chemically Trigger Cellular Responses in Desired Localized Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibsen, Stuart Duncan

    One of the major challenges of modern chemotherapy is to deliver a therapeutic dose of active drug to the tumor tissue without causing systemic exposure. The realization of this goal could considerably reduce the negative side effects experienced by patients. The work conducted in this thesis looks at two different approaches to trigger drug activation with the use of external energy sources. This avoids the challenges of relying solely on biochemical and environmental differences as triggers. The two triggers used were low intensity focused ultrasound and 365 nm light delivered with a custom designed needle UV LED fiber optic system. Both can be localized within the body to spatially highlight just the tumor tissue creating a stark differentiation between it and the healthy tissue. The 365nm light based delivery scheme developed here was the first demonstration of a photoactivatable doxorubicin (DOX) prodrug called DOX-PCB. DOX-PCB was shown to be 200 times less toxic than DOX and could be activated to a fully therapeutic form upon exposure to 365nm light. The pharmacokinetics showed a circulation half life comparable to that of DOX and stability against in vivo metabolic degradation. The 365 nm light was shown to adequately irradiate a centimeter of tumor tissue and cause localized activation. In vivo tumors exposed to the light had significantly higher doses of DOX than unexposed control tumors in the same individual. The second delivery scheme made use of focused ultrasound to activate echogenic drug delivery vehicles. These vehicles were the first demonstration of encapsulating microbubbles within liposomes. Specially designed optical equipment documented that the microbubble was ultrasound responsive. The microbubble was shown to violently cavitate and rupture the outer liposome membrane releasing the payload contents. The three dimensional localization of activation was demonstrated in tissue phantoms. The strengths of these two delivery schemes could

  13. Time Discretization Approach to Dynamic Localization Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papp, E.

    An alternative wavefunction to the description of the dynamic localization of a charged particle moving on a one-dimensional lattice under the influence of a periodic time dependent electric field is written down. For this purpose the method of characteristics such as applied by Dunlap and Kenkre [Phys. Rev. B 34, 3625 (1986)] has been modified by using a different integration variable. Handling this wavefunction one is faced with the selection of admissible time values. This results in a conditionally exactly solvable problem, now by accounting specifically for the implementation of a time discretization working in conjunction with a related dynamic localization condition. In addition, one resorts to the strong field limit, which amounts to replace, to leading order, the large order zeros of the Bessel function J0(z), used before in connection with the cosinusoidal modulation, by integral multiples of π. Here z stands for the ratio between the field amplitude and the frequency. The modulation function of the electric field vanishes on the nodal points of the time grid, which stands for an effective field-free behavior. This opens the way to propose quickly tractable dynamic localization conditions for arbitrary periodic modulations. We have also found that the present time discretization approach produces the minimization of the mean square displacement characterizing the usual exact wavefunction. Other realizations and comparisons have also been presented.

  14. Local public hospitals: changing with the times.

    PubMed

    Felland, Laurie E; Stark, Lucy

    2012-11-01

    Over the last 15 years, public hospitals have pursued multiple strategies to help maintain financial viability without abandoning their mission to care for low-income people, according to findings from the Center for Studying Health System Change's (HSC) site visits to 12 nationally representative metropolitan communities. Local public hospitals serve as core safety net providers in five of these communities--Boston, Cleveland, Indianapolis, Miami and Phoenix--weathering increased demand for care from growing numbers of uninsured and Medicaid patients and fluctuations in public funding over the past 15 years. Generally, these public hospitals have adopted six key strategies to respond to growing capacity and financial pressures: establishing independent governance structures; securing predictable local funding sources; shoring up Medicaid revenues; increasing attention to revenue collection; attracting privately insured patients; and expanding access to community-based primary care. These strategies demonstrate how public hospitals often benefit from functioning somewhat independently from local government, while at the same time, relying heavily on policy decisions and funding from local, state and federal governments. While public hospitals appear poised for changes under national health reform, they will need to adapt to changing payment sources and reduced federal subsidies and compete for newly insured people. Moreover, public hospitals in states that do not expand Medicaid eligibility to most low-income people as envisioned under health reform will likely face significant demand from uninsured patients with less federal Medicaid funding.

  15. The Newborn Behavioral Observations system as a nursing intervention to enhance engagement in first-time mothers: feasibility and desirability.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Leslie Wesley; Buckner, Ellen B

    2006-01-01

    Engagement is the social process of maternal transition that enables growth and transformation and is linked to attachment and bonding. The feasibility and desirability of the Newborn Behavioral Observations (NBO) system as a nursing intervention to enhance engagement in first-time mothers were examined. The NBO is an exploration of the newborn conducted with parents to increase their understanding of their infant's behavioral cues as well as how to respond. Perceptions of the NBO were obtained from mothers who participated in NBO sessions in the postpartum period and from unit nurses who had been given information on the NBO. Mothers (n= 10) rated the NBO high for increasing their knowledge of what their infants can do (m=3.7/4.0, SD=0.48), and how to interact with them (m=3.8/4.0, SD=0.63). Two of the activities of engagement, experiencing the infant and active participation in care, emerged as themes from the mothers' qualitative responses. Nurses (n=20) believed the NBO would be an effective intervention. Participants believed the NBO to be an effective nursing intervention for enhancing maternal engagement in the early postpartum period.

  16. Space-time prospective surveillance based on Knox local statistics.

    PubMed

    Piroutek, Aline; Assunção, Renato; Paiva, Thaís

    2014-07-20

    We studied a surveillance system to prospectively monitor the emergence of space-time clusters in point pattern of disease events. Its aim is to detect a cluster as soon as possible after its emergence, and it is also desired to keep the rate of false alarms at a controlled level. The method is a modification from a previous proposal based on a local version of the Knox statistic and which examined a retrospective surveillance scenario, looking for the earliest time in the past that change could have been deemed to occur. We modify this method to take into account the prospective case, being able then to fix the serious difficulties found by other authors. We evaluated the surveillance system in several scenarios, including without and with emerging clusters, checking distributional assumptions, and assessing performance impacts of different emergence times, shapes, extent, and intensity of the emerging clusters. Our conclusion is that the space-time surveillance system based on local Knox statistics is very efficient in its statistical properties, and it is appealing to epidemiologists and public health officials because it is simple to use and easily understandable. This makes it a promising candidate to practical use by public health official agencies. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Slowing Down Time: An Exploration of Personal Life Extension Desirability as it Relates to Religiosity and Specific Religious Beliefs.

    PubMed

    Ballinger, Scott; Tisdale, Theresa Clement; Sellen, David L; Martin, Loren A

    2017-02-01

    As medical technology continues increasing the possibility of living a longer life, the public's valuing of these developments must be considered. This study examines attitudes toward extending the human life span within a student population at a Christian university. Religious factors were hypothesized to affect life extension desirability. Scores on measures of willingness to defer to God's will, meaning derived from religion, positive afterlife beliefs, and intrinsic religiosity were significantly and inversely related to life extension desirability. Implications of these findings are discussed, including encouraging medical practitioners to respect decision-making processes of religious persons who may find life extension interventions undesirable.

  18. Local time asymmetries in the Venus thermosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, M. J.; Stewart, A. I. F.; Solomon, S. C.; Bougher, S. W.

    1993-06-01

    A comparison is presented of the 130-m images taken in the Venus thermosphere by the Pioneer Venus Orbiter Ultraviolet Spectrometer (PVOUVS) to predictions by a model which incorporates current understanding of the global structure of the thermosphere, the mechanisms which excite the 130-nm transition in O, and the radiative transport of the 130-nm triplet in the thermosphere. The features identified in the data/model comparison appear as a local time asymmetry in B(130) and O at altitudes poleward of 30 deg. Oxygen densities at the evening terminator are typically a factor of 2 higher than those at the morning terminator. This asymmetry in O has never before been observed or predicted in the global thermospheric models.

  19. Women's Desire for Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Kristen S; Green, Tracie; Maher, Barbara; Tipton, Kimberly; O'Bannon, Corrinna; Murphy, Teri; McCurry, Troy; Shaffer, Loretta; Best, Sonya; Hatmaker-Flanigan, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Descriptive qualitative interviews were conducted with 16 women who had given birth in the previous 5 years to identify factors that influenced their desire to become pregnant. All interviews were audiotaped. Following the interviews, the texts were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using Giorgi's method. Five themes emerged from the interviews: (1) timing; (2) spacing; (3) meeting personal criteria; (4) desire for the experience of pregnancy, birth, and parenting; and (5) extended family in close proximity. The study's findings offer an initial step in understanding the attitudes, motivations, and beliefs of healthy childbearing women and their desire for pregnancy. Increased understanding may help health-care providers develop interventions that not only assist women to conceive as desired but also prevent unplanned pregnancies.

  20. The desire to hasten death: Using Grounded Theory for a better understanding "When perception of time tends to be a slippery slope".

    PubMed

    Pestinger, Martina; Stiel, Stephanie; Elsner, Frank; Widdershoven, Guy; Voltz, Raymond; Nauck, Friedemann; Radbruch, Lukas

    2015-09-01

    Some patients with advanced and progressive diseases express a desire to hasten death. This study evaluated the motivations of patients expressing such a desire in a country with prohibitive legislation on euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide. A modified form of Grounded Theory was used. Patients from the departments of palliative medicine in three hospitals in Germany were recruited when they had made a statement or request to hasten death. Participants were interviewed face to face. Recruitment was stopped with 12 participants because of data saturation. Thematic analysis revealed three main motivational themes: self-determination, agony, and time. Expectations toward health professionals, attitudes toward death, and secureness related to the end of life were additional main themes emerging from the analysis. The desire to hasten death may be used as an extreme coping strategy to maintain control against anticipated agony. Patients expected health professionals to listen to and respect their experiences. Emerging hypotheses included the following: (a) patients try to balance life time and anticipated agony, and the perception of time is distressing in this balancing act; (b) anticipated images of agony and suffering in the dying process occur frequently and are experienced by patients as intrusive; (c) patients expressing a desire to hasten death are in need of more information about the dying process; and (d) patients wanted their caregivers to listen to and respect their wish to hasten death, and they did not expect the caregivers to understand this as an order to actually hasten their death. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. A prospective randomized clinical trial of prescription of full-time versus as-desired splint wear for de Quervain tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Menendez, Mariano E; Thornton, Emily; Kent, Suzanne; Kalajian, Tyler; Ring, David

    2015-08-01

    There is no consensus on the best protocol for splint wear in the non-operative management of de Quervain tendinopathy. This study aimed to determine if there is a difference between prescription of strict splint wear compared to selective splint wear in patients with de Quervain tendinopathy. We tested the primary null hypothesis that there is no difference in upper-extremity disability eight weeks after initiating splinting between patients prescribed full-time or as-desired splint wear. Secondary study questions addressed differences in grip strength, pain intensity, and treatment satisfaction. Additionally, we evaluated the influence of psychological factors on disability. Eighty-three patients diagnosed with de Quervain tendinopathy were randomly allocated into two different splint-wearing instructions: full-time wear (N = 43) or as-desired wear (N = 40). At enrollment, patients had grip strength measured and completed measures of upper-extremity disability, pain intensity, and psychological distress. An average of 7.5 weeks later, patients returned for a second visit. Analysis was by intention-to-treat and with use of mean imputation for missing data. Fifty-eight patients (70 %; 26 in the full-time cohort and 32 in the as-desired cohort) completed the study. There were no statistically significant differences in disability (p = 0.77), grip strength (p = 0.82), pain intensity (p = 0.36), and treatment satisfaction (p = 0.91) between patients instructed to wear the splint full-time and those instructed to use it as desired. Disability at final evaluation correlated significantly with baseline levels of pain anxiety (p = 0.008), catastrophic thinking (p = 0.001), and symptoms of depression (p < 0.001). The best multivariable linear regression model included symptoms of depression alone and accounted for 32 % of the variability in disability (p < 0.001). There is no difference in patient-reported outcomes and grip strength

  2. The Congruence between Actual and Desired Use of Time by Older Adults: A Predictor of Life Satisfaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seleen, Diane R.

    1982-01-01

    A significant amount of variation in life satisfaction beyond the demographic variables was found when 205 elderly persons were tested. Two life satisfaction measures were employed and compared. Results supported the use of a single-item inventory and suggested that satisfaction with time use contributes to life satisfaction. (Author/RC)

  3. Upconversion microparticles as time-resolved luminescent probes for multiphoton microscopy: desired signal extraction from the streaking effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pominova, Daria V.; Ryabova, Anastasia V.; Grachev, Pavel V.; Romanishkin, Igor D.; Kuznetsov, Sergei V.; Rozhnova, Julia A.; Yasyrkina, Daria S.; Fedorov, Pavel P.; Loschenov, Victor B.

    2016-09-01

    The great interest in upconversion nanoparticles exists due to their high efficiency under multiphoton excitation. However, when these particles are used in scanning microscopy, the upconversion luminescence causes a streaking effect due to the long lifetime. This article describes a method of upconversion microparticle luminescence lifetime determination with help of modified Lucy-Richardson deconvolution of laser scanning microscope (LSM) image obtained under near-IR excitation using nondescanned detectors. Determination of the upconversion luminescence intensity and the decay time of separate microparticles was done by intensity profile along the image fast scan axis approximation. We studied upconversion submicroparticles based on fluoride hosts doped with Yb3+-Er3+ and Yb3+-Tm3+ rare earth ion pairs, and the characteristic decay times were 0.1 to 1.5 ms. We also compared the results of LSM measurements with the photon counting method results; the spread of values was about 13% and was associated with the approximation error. Data obtained from live cells showed the possibility of distinguishing the position of upconversion submicroparticles inside and outside the cells by the difference of their lifetime. The proposed technique allows using the upconversion microparticles without shells as probes for the presence of OH- ions and CO2 molecules.

  4. Discontinuous Galerkin Methods and Local Time Stepping for Wave Propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Grote, M. J.; Mitkova, T.

    2010-09-30

    Locally refined meshes impose severe stability constraints on explicit time-stepping methods for the numerical simulation of time dependent wave phenomena. To overcome that stability restriction, local time-stepping methods are developed, which allow arbitrarily small time steps precisely where small elements in the mesh are located. When combined with a discontinuous Galerkin finite element discretization in space, which inherently leads to a diagonal mass matrix, the resulting numerical schemes are fully explicit. Starting from the classical Adams-Bashforth multi-step methods, local time stepping schemes of arbitrarily high accuracy are derived. Numerical experiments validate the theory and illustrate the usefulness of the proposed time integration schemes.

  5. The Global-Local Nexus: Desired History Curriculum Components from the Perspective of Future Teachers in a Conflict-Ridden Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yemini, Miri; Yardeni-Kuperberg, Oria; Natur, Nazie

    2015-01-01

    This study reveals the views of future teachers from Israeli-Jewish and Palestinian-Arab communities regarding the desired school history curricula. We applied a quantitative and qualitative survey to a sample of 528 students studying in teachers' preparation programmes in three higher education institutions: one research university with a large…

  6. The Global-Local Nexus: Desired History Curriculum Components from the Perspective of Future Teachers in a Conflict-Ridden Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yemini, Miri; Yardeni-Kuperberg, Oria; Natur, Nazie

    2015-01-01

    This study reveals the views of future teachers from Israeli-Jewish and Palestinian-Arab communities regarding the desired school history curricula. We applied a quantitative and qualitative survey to a sample of 528 students studying in teachers' preparation programmes in three higher education institutions: one research university with a large…

  7. Local Impacts of Religious Discourses on Rights to Express Same-Sex Sexual Desires in Peri-Urban Rio de Janeiro1

    PubMed Central

    García, Jonathan; Laboy, Miguel Muñoz; de Almeida, Vagner; Parker, Richard

    2009-01-01

    This article reports on a study that examined how religious discourses of inclusion and exclusion—in Roman Catholic, evangelical Protestant, and Afro-Brazilian religious traditions—affected people’s rights to express same-sex sexual desires, behaviors, and identities in the socioeconomically marginalized urban periphery of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Using extended ethnographic observation of institutions and religious events over a period of 2 years, the authors identified how sexual rights were constructed within religious discourses and conducted ethnographic interviews with 45 religious leaders. In the low-income and violent urban periphery of Rio de Janeiro, religious leaders and institutions play key roles in molding community inclusion and exclusion. A comparison of the 3 major religious denominations shows a diversity of discourses about same-sex sexual desires and their impacts on community formation. PMID:20161503

  8. Part-Time Community-College Faculty and the Desire for Full-Time Tenure-Track Positions: Results of a Single Institution Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacoby, Dan

    2005-01-01

    According to data derived from a community-college survey in the state of Washington, the majority of part-time faculty prefer full-time work. Using a logit regression analysis, the study reported in this paper suggests that typical part-timers enter their part-time teaching situations with the intent of becoming full-time, but gradually become…

  9. Part-Time Community-College Faculty and the Desire for Full-Time Tenure-Track Positions: Results of a Single Institution Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacoby, Dan

    2005-01-01

    According to data derived from a community-college survey in the state of Washington, the majority of part-time faculty prefer full-time work. Using a logit regression analysis, the study reported in this paper suggests that typical part-timers enter their part-time teaching situations with the intent of becoming full-time, but gradually become…

  10. Time scales of tunneling decay of a localized state

    SciTech Connect

    Ban, Yue; Muga, J. G.; Sherman, E. Ya.; Buettiker, M.

    2010-12-15

    Motivated by recent time-domain experiments on ultrafast atom ionization, we analyze the transients and time scales that characterize, aside from the relatively long lifetime, the decay of a localized state by tunneling. While the tunneling starts immediately, some time is required for the outgoing flux to develop. This short-term behavior depends strongly on the initial state. For the initial state, tightly localized so that the initial transients are dominated by over-the-barrier motion, the time scale for flux propagation through the barrier is close to the Buettiker-Landauer traversal time. Then a quasistationary, slow-decay process follows, which sets ideal conditions for observing diffraction in time at longer times and distances. To define operationally a tunneling time at the barrier edge, we extrapolate backward the propagation of the wave packet that escaped from the potential. This extrapolated time is considerably longer than the time scale of the flux and density buildup at the barrier edge.

  11. A Research on the Algorithm of Local Atomic Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bian; Qu, Li-li; Gao, Yu-ping; Hu, Yong-hui

    2011-04-01

    The goal of all time laboratories' pursue is to produce and keep a stable, precise and reliable time scale. The long-term stability of the time scale is mainly taken into account in the traditional ALGOS algorithm, while the local atomic time scale should give consideration to both the long-term and shortterm stabilities. From the analysis and research on the atomic clock noise model and under the condition that the long-term stability of the local atomic time scale does not drop, a complete algorithm is proposed which is suitable for the calculation of the local time scale TA (NTSC) carried out at the time laboratory with the time-keeping clocks of a unitary type and being close in performance at the National Time Service Center, called the NTSC for short, of Chinese Academy of Sciences. The data of all the clocks in the NTSC which participated in the calculation of the International Atomic Time (TAI) all the year round in 2008 are applied to the test and verification of the new algorithm, with the result showing that both the short- and long-term stability indexes of the obtained TA (NTSC) are improved. The research result is suitable for the calculation of the atomic time scale of the time laboratory whose time keeping system is similar to that of the NTSC.

  12. Direct Observations of PMC Local Time Variations by Aura OMI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLand, Matthew T.; Shettle, Eric P.; Thomas, Gary E.; Olivero, John J.

    2010-01-01

    The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on the Aura satellite obtains unique measurements for polar mesospheric cloud (PMC) analysis. Its wide cross-track viewing swath and high along-track spatial resolution makes it possible to directly evaluate PMC occurrence frequency and brightness variations between 6S" and 8S' latitude as a function of local time over a 12-14 h continuous period. OMI PMC local time variations are closely coupled to concurrent variations in measurement scattering angle, so that ice phase function effects must be considered when interpreting the observations. Two different phase functions corresponding to bright and faint clouds are examined in this analysis. OMI observations show maximum frequency and albedo values at 8-10 h local time in the Northern Hemisphere, with decreasing amplitude at higher latitudes. Southern Hemisphere values reach a minimum at 18-20 h LT. Larger variations are seen in Northern Hemisphere data. No statistically significant longitudinal dependence was seen.

  13. Direct Observations of PMC Local Time Variations by Aura OMI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLand, Matthew T.; Shettle, Eric P.; Thomas, Gary E.; Olivero, John J.

    2010-01-01

    The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on the Aura satellite obtains unique measurements for polar mesospheric cloud (PMC) analysis. Its wide cross-track viewing swath and high along-track spatial resolution makes it possible to directly evaluate PMC occurrence frequency and brightness variations between 6S" and 8S' latitude as a function of local time over a 12-14 h continuous period. OMI PMC local time variations are closely coupled to concurrent variations in measurement scattering angle, so that ice phase function effects must be considered when interpreting the observations. Two different phase functions corresponding to bright and faint clouds are examined in this analysis. OMI observations show maximum frequency and albedo values at 8-10 h local time in the Northern Hemisphere, with decreasing amplitude at higher latitudes. Southern Hemisphere values reach a minimum at 18-20 h LT. Larger variations are seen in Northern Hemisphere data. No statistically significant longitudinal dependence was seen.

  14. Real-Time MEG Source Localization using Regional Clustering

    PubMed Central

    Dinh, Christoph; Strohmeier, Daniel; Luessi, Martin; Güllmar, Daniel; Baumgarten, Daniel; Haueisen, Jens; Hämäläinen, Matti S.

    2015-01-01

    With its millisecond temporal resolution, Magnetoencephalography (MEG) is well suited for real-time monitoring of brain activity. Real-time feedback allows the adaption of the experiment to the subject’s reaction and increases time efficiency by shortening acquisition and offline analysis. Two formidable challenges exist in real-time analysis: the low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the limited time available for computations. Since the low SNR reduces the number of distinguishable sources, we propose an approach which downsizes the source space based on a cortical atlas and allows to discern the sources in the presence of noise. Each cortical region is represented by a small set of dipoles, which is obtained by a clustering algorithm. Using this approach, we adapted dynamic statistical parametric mapping (dSPM) for real-time source localization. In terms of point spread and crosstalk between regions the proposed clustering technique performs better than selecting spatially evenly distributed dipoles. We conducted real-time source localization on MEG data from an auditory experiment. The results demonstrate that the proposed real-time method localizes sources reliably in the superior temporal gyrus. We conclude that real-time source estimation based on MEG is a feasible, useful addition to the standard on-line processing methods, and enables feedback based on neural activity during the measurements. PMID:25782980

  15. Real-Time MEG Source Localization Using Regional Clustering.

    PubMed

    Dinh, Christoph; Strohmeier, Daniel; Luessi, Martin; Güllmar, Daniel; Baumgarten, Daniel; Haueisen, Jens; Hämäläinen, Matti S

    2015-11-01

    With its millisecond temporal resolution, Magnetoencephalography (MEG) is well suited for real-time monitoring of brain activity. Real-time feedback allows the adaption of the experiment to the subject's reaction and increases time efficiency by shortening acquisition and off-line analysis. Two formidable challenges exist in real-time analysis: the low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the limited time available for computations. Since the low SNR reduces the number of distinguishable sources, we propose an approach which downsizes the source space based on a cortical atlas and allows to discern the sources in the presence of noise. Each cortical region is represented by a small set of dipoles, which is obtained by a clustering algorithm. Using this approach, we adapted dynamic statistical parametric mapping for real-time source localization. In terms of point spread and crosstalk between regions the proposed clustering technique performs better than selecting spatially evenly distributed dipoles. We conducted real-time source localization on MEG data from an auditory experiment. The results demonstrate that the proposed real-time method localizes sources reliably in the superior temporal gyrus. We conclude that real-time source estimation based on MEG is a feasible, useful addition to the standard on-line processing methods, and enables feedback based on neural activity during the measurements.

  16. Solar wind control of the local time of substorm onset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grocott, Adrian; Case, Nathan; Laundal, Karl; Laurens, Hannah; Milan, Steve

    2017-04-01

    We use solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field data, along with satellite global auroral imagery, to investigate what controls the magnetic local time (MLT) of substorm onset. We find that substorm onsets occur over a wide range of MLTs (18 - 4 hrs), with a typical MLT (mode) of 23 hrs. In agreement with previous studies, IMF BY , acts to move the onset to an earlier/later local time in the northern hemisphere and a later/earlier local time in the southern hemisphere, depending on the sign of BY , consistent with a twist of the conjugate magnetic field line. This effect explains a small fraction of the observed MLT variation (˜ 1 hr), but cannot account for the tendency of onset to be often displaced to earlier (< 23 hrs) or later (> 23 hrs) MLTs in both hemispheres. We also inspect the relationship between solar wind V Y and onset MLT, which also has a small, but measurable effect on the local time of substorm onset. This effect acts in the same sense in the northern and southern hemispheres, moving onset to earlier times for positive V Y and later times for negative V Y . We find that a function relating both BY and V Y to onset MLT produces a better fit than a function based on either parameter alone.

  17. Desire, Democracy and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thogersen, Ulla

    2011-01-01

    In recent years the concept of eros has found its way back into educational literature with the aim of integrating human desires into educational theories and counteracting a devaluation of emotional life. This paper holds the view that this integration is important because desire expresses a fundamental way of relating to the world. However, part…

  18. Desire, Democracy and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thogersen, Ulla

    2011-01-01

    In recent years the concept of eros has found its way back into educational literature with the aim of integrating human desires into educational theories and counteracting a devaluation of emotional life. This paper holds the view that this integration is important because desire expresses a fundamental way of relating to the world. However, part…

  19. Local time and cutoff rigidity dependences of storm time increase associated with geomagnetic storms

    SciTech Connect

    Kudo, S.; Wada, M. ); Tanskanen, P. ); Kodama, M. )

    1987-05-01

    The cosmic ray increases due to considerable depressions of cosmic ray cutoff rigidity during large geomagnetic storms are investigated. Data from a worldwide network of cosmic ray neutron monitors are analyzed for 17 geomagnetic storms which occurred in the quiet phase of the solar activity cycle during 1966-1978. As expected from the longitudinal asymmetry of the low-altitude geomagnetic field during large geomagnetic storms, a significant local time dependence of the increment in the cosmic ray during large geomagnetic storms, a significant local time dependence of the increment in the cosmic ray intensity is obtained. It is shown that the maximum phases of the local time dependence occur at around 1800 LT and that the amplitudes of the local time dependence are consistent with presently available theoretical estimates. The dependence of the increment on the cutoff rigidity is obtained for both the local time dependent part and the local time independent part of the storm time increase. The local time independent part, excluding the randomizing local time dependent part, shows a clear-cut dependence on cutoff rigidity which is consistent with theoretical estimates.

  20. A time-domain inverse technique for the localization and quantification of rotating sound sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao-Zheng; Bi, Chuan-Xing; Zhang, Yong-Bin; Xu, Liang

    2017-06-01

    A time-domain inverse technique based on the time-domain equivalent source method is proposed for the localization and quantification of rotating sound sources. In this technique, the actual rotating sound sources are modeled by a series of rotating equivalent sources distributed on the source surface. The strengths of these equivalent sources are solved based on the exact transfer relationship between the measured pressure at the receiver time and the desired equivalent source strengths at the source time. Compared to the known time-domain rotating beamforming that just owns the function of source localization, the proposed inverse technique not only can locate rotating sources accurately but also can predict sound fields quantitatively. Moreover, due to the use of retarded time approach, the proposed inverse technique avoids the interpolation of measured pressure that is needed in the time-domain rotating beamforming, thus providing the ability of real-time calculation of source strengths. Numerical simulations and experiments examine the validity of the proposed technique and demonstrate its advantages of locating sources more accurately and enabling to predict sound fields quantitatively by comparing with the time-domain rotating beamforming.

  1. Functional Lagrange formalism for time-non-local Lagrangians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferialdi, L.; Bassi, A.

    2012-05-01

    We develop a time-non-local (TNL) formalism based on variational calculus, which allows for the analysis of TNL Lagrangians. We derive the generalized Euler-Lagrange equations starting from the Hamilton's principle and, by defining a generalized momentum, we introduce the corresponding Hamiltonian formalism. We apply the formalism to second order TNL Lagrangians and we show that it reproduces standard results in the time-local limit. An example will show how the formalism works, and will provide an interesting insight on the non-standard features of TNL equations.

  2. Study on desirable ionospheric corrections accuracy for network-RTK positioning and its impact on time-to-fix and probability of successful single-epoch ambiguity resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paziewski, Jacek

    2016-02-01

    The mitigation of ionospheric delay is still of crucial interest in GNSS positioning, especially in precise solutions such as instantaneous RTK positioning. Thus, several effective algorithms and functional models were developed, and also numerous investigations of ionospheric correction properties in RTK positioning have been performed so far. One of the most highly effective approaches in precise relative positioning is the application of the ionosphere-weighted model with network-derived corrections. This contribution investigates the impact of the accuracy of the network ionospheric corrections on time-to-fix in RTK-OTF positioning. Also, an attempt has been made to estimate the desirable accuracy of the network ionospheric corrections, allowing for reliable instantaneous ambiguity resolution. The experiment is based on a multi-baseline GPS RTK positioning supported with network-derived ionospheric corrections for medium length baselines. The results show that in such scenario, the double-differenced ionospheric correction residuals should not exceed ∼1/3 of the L1 wavelength for successful single-epoch ambiguity resolution.

  3. Non-local in time formulations for reactive transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrera, J.; Willmann, M.; Sanchez-Vila, X.; Silva, O.; Saaltink, M.; Bea, S. A.

    2009-04-01

    The rate at which equilibrium chemical reactions occur is driven by mixing-induced chemical disequilibrium. At the field scale, mixing is poorly represented by an Advection Dispersion type equation (ADE). Instead, non-local in time variants have been proposed to represent effective transport dynamics. These include formulations such as the Multi-Rate Mass Transfer (MRMT) or Continuous Time Random Walk (CTRW) methods, which have been successful in representing breakthrough curves (BTCs) of conservative solutes at intermediate scales. The original formulation of these equations is not amenable to reactive transport, which requires local (in space and time) concentrations. However, such original formulations can be easily localized, which allows using these formulations for general solutions. The objective of our work is, first, to test whether non-local transport models derived from conservative solutes observations, can be used to describe effective reactive transport in heterogeneous media. To this end, we use a numerical approach to obtain the spatial and temporal distribution of mineral precipitation in a binary system at equilibrium in a heterogeneous aquifer. We then compare these reaction rates to those corresponding to an equivalent (i.e. same conservative BTC) homogenized media with transport characterized by a non-local in time equation involving a memory function (MRMT). We find an excellent agreement between the two models in terms of cumulative precipitated mass, and depending on the local heterogeneous structure the match is acceptable for the reaction rate. These results indicate that mass transfer models are an excellent tool for upscaling mixing controlled reactive transport.

  4. Anderson localization and Mott insulator phase in the time domain

    PubMed Central

    Sacha, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Particles in space periodic potentials constitute standard models for investigation of crystalline phenomena in solid state physics. Time periodicity of periodically driven systems is a close analogue of space periodicity of solid state crystals. There is an intriguing question if solid state phenomena can be observed in the time domain. Here we show that wave-packets localized on resonant classical trajectories of periodically driven systems are ideal elements to realize Anderson localization or Mott insulator phase in the time domain. Uniform superpositions of the wave-packets form stationary states of a periodically driven particle. However, an additional perturbation that fluctuates in time results in disorder in time and Anderson localization effects emerge. Switching to many-particle systems we observe that depending on how strong particle interactions are, stationary states can be Bose-Einstein condensates or single Fock states where definite numbers of particles occupy the periodically evolving wave-packets. Our study shows that non-trivial crystal-like phenomena can be observed in the time domain. PMID:26074169

  5. Time-resolved local strain tracking microscopy for cell mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydin, O.; Aksoy, B.; Akalin, O. B.; Bayraktar, H.; Alaca, B. E.

    2016-02-01

    A uniaxial cell stretching technique to measure time-resolved local substrate strain while simultaneously imaging adherent cells is presented. The experimental setup comprises a uniaxial stretcher platform compatible with inverted microscopy and transparent elastomer samples with embedded fluorescent beads. This integration enables the acquisition of real-time spatiotemporal data, which is then processed using a single-particle tracking algorithm to track the positions of fluorescent beads for the subsequent computation of local strain. The present local strain tracking method is demonstrated using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) samples of rectangular and dogbone geometries. The comparison of experimental results and finite element simulations for the two sample geometries illustrates the capability of the present system to accurately quantify local deformation even when the strain distribution is non-uniform over the sample. For a regular dogbone sample, the experimentally obtained value of local strain at the center of the sample is 77%, while the average strain calculated using the applied cross-head displacement is 48%. This observation indicates that considerable errors may arise when cross-head measurement is utilized to estimate strain in the case of non-uniform sample geometry. Finally, the compatibility of the proposed platform with biological samples is tested using a unibody PDMS sample with a well to contain cells and culture media. HeLa S3 cells are plated on collagen-coated samples and cell adhesion and proliferation are observed. Samples with adherent cells are then stretched to demonstrate simultaneous cell imaging and tracking of embedded fluorescent beads.

  6. Effects of Local and Widespread Muscle Fatigue on Movement Timing

    PubMed Central

    Cowley, Jeffrey C.; Dingwell, Jonathan B.; Gates, Deanna H.

    2014-01-01

    Repetitive movements can cause muscle fatigue, leading to motor reorganization, performance deficits, and/or possible injury. The effects of fatigue may depend on the type of fatigue task employed, however. The purpose of this study was to determine how local fatigue of a specific muscle group versus widespread fatigue of various muscle groups affected the control of movement timing. Twenty healthy subjects performed an upper-extremity low-load work task similar to sawing for 5 continuous minutes both before and after completing a protocol that either fatigued all the muscles used in the task (widespread fatigue) or a protocol that selectively fatigued the primary muscles used to execute the pushing stroke of the sawing task (localized fatigue). Subjects were instructed to time their movements with a metronome. Timing error, movement distance, and speed were calculated for each movement. Data were then analyzed using a goal-equivalent manifold (GEM) approach to quantify changes in goal-relevant and non-goal-relevant variability. We applied detrended fluctuation analysis to each time series to quantify changes in fluctuation dynamics that reflected changes in the control strategies used. After localized fatigue, subjects made shorter, slower movements and exerted greater control over non-goal-relevant variability. After widespread fatigue, subjects exerted less control over non-goal-relevant variability and did not change movement patterns. Thus, localized and widespread muscle fatigue affected movement differently. Local fatigue may reduce the available motor solutions and therefore cause greater movement reorganization than widespread muscle fatigue. Subjects altered their control strategies but continued to achieve the timing goal after both fatigue tasks. PMID:25183157

  7. Acoustic emission localization in beams based on time reversed dispersion.

    PubMed

    Ernst, R; Dual, J

    2014-08-01

    The common approach for the localization of acoustic emission sources in beams requires at least two measurements at different positions on the structure. The acoustic emission event is then located by evaluating the difference of the arrival times of the elastic waves. Here a new method is introduced, which allows the detection and localization of multiple acoustic emission sources with only a single, one point, unidirectional measurement. The method makes use of the time reversal principle and the dispersive behavior of the flexural wave mode. Whereas time-of-arrival (TOA) methods struggle with the distortion of elastic waves due to phase dispersion, the method presented uses the dispersive behavior of guided waves to locate the origin of the acoustic emission event. Therefore, the localization algorithm depends solely on the measured wave form and not on arrival time estimation. The method combines an acoustic emission experiment with a numerical simulation, in which the measured and time reversed displacement history is set as the boundary condition. In this paper, the method is described in detail and the feasibility is experimentally demonstrated by breaking pencil leads on aluminum beams and pultruded carbon fiber reinforced plastic beams according to ASTM E976 (Hsu-Nielsen source). It will be shown, that acoustic emissions are successfully localized even on anisotropic structures and in the case of geometrical complexities such as notches, which lead to reflections, and cross sectional changes, which affect the wave speed. The overall relative error in localizing the acoustic emission sources was found to be below 5%. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. THE LOCAL EFFECT TIME (LET) AND HOW IT INCORPORATES ECOLOGY INTO RESIDENCE TIME

    EPA Science Inventory

    A clear and direct connection between constituent/water residence times and ecological effects is necessary to quantitatively relate these time scales to ecology. The concept of "local effect time" (LET) is proposed here as a time scale with adequate spatial resolution to relate ...

  9. THE LOCAL EFFECT TIME (LET) AND HOW IT INCORPORATES ECOLOGY INTO RESIDENCE TIME

    EPA Science Inventory

    A clear and direct connection between constituent/water residence times and ecological effects is necessary to quantitatively relate these time scales to ecology. The concept of "local effect time" (LET) is proposed here as a time scale with adequate spatial resolution to relate ...

  10. Average waiting time in FDDI networks with local priorities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gercek, Gokhan

    1994-01-01

    A method is introduced to compute the average queuing delay experienced by different priority group messages in an FDDI node. It is assumed that no FDDI MAC layer priorities are used. Instead, a priority structure is introduced to the messages at a higher protocol layer (e.g. network layer) locally. Such a method was planned to be used in Space Station Freedom FDDI network. Conservation of the average waiting time is used as the key concept in computing average queuing delays. It is shown that local priority assignments are feasable specially when the traffic distribution is asymmetric in the FDDI network.

  11. A perversion named desire.

    PubMed

    Torres, E R

    1991-01-01

    Inspired by the title of the work, A Streetcar Named Desire by Tennessee Williams, the author argues that desire and perversion are equivalent, based on the following. (1) The notion of infanatile sexuality as polymorphously perverse, and whose components constitute the 'core of our unconscious' and the ultimate 'matter' of unconscious desire. (2) The perspective of narcissism, which establishes desire, supported by the theory that maternity implants an illusion of completeness which culture promotes, despite the fact that such an ideal conflicts with the laws governing the foundation of culture. (3) The resulting forms of the oedipal complex and the castration complex, whether man or woman, imply a visible or unapparent violence with regard to the original 'call' of desire. (4) The traditional structures refer to the possibility of the mother imagining herself as completed by the child: the blocking of that illusion is associated with psychosis; the weakness of the desire, once established, demands, in the context of perversion, the presence of the figure of plenitude. Neurosis prefers its absence on the level of the apparent while insuring its permanence on the unconscious level.

  12. Source localization in a time-varying ocean waveguide.

    PubMed

    Soares, Cristiano; Siderius, Martin; Jesus, Sérgio M

    2002-11-01

    One of the most stringent impairments in matched-field processing is the impact of missing or erroneous environmental information on the final source location estimate. This problem is known in the literature as model mismatch and is strongly frequency dependent. Another unavoidable factor that contributes to model mismatch is the natural time and spatial variability of the ocean waveguide. As a consequence, most of the experimental results obtained to date focus on short source-receiver ranges (usually <5 km), stationary sources, reduced time windows and frequencies generally below 600 Hz. This paper shows that MFP source localization can be made robust to time-space environmental mismatch if the parameters responsible for the mismatch are clearly identified, properly modeled and (time-)adaptively estimated by a focalization procedure prior to MFP source localization. The data acquired during the ADVENT'99 sea trial at 2, 5, and 10 km source-receiver ranges and in two frequency bands, below and above 600 Hz, provided an excellent opportunity to test the proposed techniques. The results indicate that an adequate parametrization of the waveguide is effective up to 10 km range in both frequency bands achieving a precise localization during the whole recording of the 5 km track, and most of the 10 km track. It is shown that the increasing MFP dependence on erroneous environmental information in the higher frequency and at longer ranges can only be accounted for by including a time dependent modeling of the water column sound speed profile.

  13. Study on the Algorithm of Local Atomic Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, B.; Qu, L. L.; Gao, Y. P.; Hu, Y. H.

    2010-10-01

    It is always an endless target for all time and frequency laboratories to develop, own and keep a stable, accurate and reliable time scale. As a comparatively mature algorithm, ALGOS, which has been concerned about the long-term stability of the time scale, is widely used by the majority of time laboratories. For ALGOS, the weights are assumed on the basis of the frequencies of 12 months and the present month interval is included in the computation. This procedure uses clock measurements covering 12 months, so annual frequency variations and long-term drifts can lead to de-weight. This helps to decrease the seasonal variation of the time scale and improve its long-term stability. However, the local atomic time scale is primarily concerned with long-term stability not more than 60 days. So when the local time scale is computed with ALGOS in time laboratories, it is necessary to modify ALGOS correspondingly according to the performances of contributing clocks, the requirement of stability for local time scale and so on. There are 22 high performance atomic clocks at National Time Service Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences (NTSC). They include 18 cesium standards and 4 hydrogen masers. Because hydrogen masers behave poor, we only regard an ensemble of 18 cesium clocks in our improved algorithm. The performances of these clocks are very similar, and the number is less than 20. By analyzing and studying the noise models of atomic clocks, this paper presents a complete improved algorithm of TA(NTSC). This improved TA(NTSC) algorithm includes three aspects: the selection of the maximum weight, the selection of clocks taking part in TA(NTSC) computation and the estimation of the weights of contributing clocks. We validate the new algorithm with the annually atomic clock comparative data of NTSC taking part in TAI computation in 2008. The results show that the long-term and short-term stabilities of TA(NTSC) are all improved. This conclusion is based on the clock

  14. Towards Real-Time Global Localization in Dynamic Unstructured Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kanji; Kondo, Eiji

    Global localization is the problem in which a mobile robot has to estimate the self-position with respect to an a priori given map as it navigates without using any a priori knowledge of the initial self-position. Previous studies on global localization mainly focused on static environments, where the a priori map is almost correct. On the other hand, in dynamic environments, there are several sources of computational complexity. For example, not only the self-position but also the map should be estimated due to the map errors. The main contribution of this paper is to address such computational complexity by decomposing our global localization problem into two smaller subproblems, and solving the subproblems in a practical computation time. Also, we demonstrate the robustness and the efficiency of the proposed method in various large and complex environments.

  15. Local time displacement as a symmetry of nature in flat space-time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Willard E.; Townsend, Lawrence W.

    1988-01-01

    Local time displacement is shown to be a true symmetry of Minkowskian physics, thereby demonstrating the empirical equivalence of different choices of the clock synchronization parameter in generalized Lorentz transformations.

  16. Local finite time Lyapunov exponent, local sampling and probabilistic source and destination regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BozorgMagham, A. E.; Ross, S. D.; Schmale, D. G., III

    2015-05-01

    The time-varying finite time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) is a powerful Lagrangian concept widely used for describing large-scale flow patterns and transport phenomena. However, field experiments usually have modest scales. Therefore, it is necessary to bridge between the powerful concept of FTLE and (local) field experiments. In this paper a new interpretation of the local FTLE, the time series of a FTLE field at a fixed location, is proposed. This concept can practically assist in field experiments where samples are collected at a fixed location and it is necessary to attribute long distance transport phenomena and location of source points to the characteristic variation of the sampled particles. Also, results of this study have the potential to aid in planning of optimal local sampling of passive particles for maximal diversity monitoring of assemblages of microorganisms. Assuming a deterministic flow field, one can use the proposed theorem to (i) estimate the differential distances between the source (or destination) points of the collected (or released) particles when consecutive sampling (or releasing) is performed at a fixed location, (ii) estimate the local FTLE as a function of known differential distances between the source (or destination) points. In addition to the deterministic flows, the more realistic case of unresolved turbulence and low resolution flow data that yield the probabilistic source (or destination) regions are studied. It is shown that similar to deterministic flows, Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS) separate probabilistic source (or destination) regions corresponding to consecutive collected (or released) particles.

  17. A Desire for Parsimony

    PubMed Central

    Cookson, Lawrence J.

    2013-01-01

    An understanding of wildness is being developed as a quality of interactive processing that increases survival opportunities in nature. A link is made between the need to improve interactive quality for wildness, and cognitive desires and interests in art, music, religion and philosophy as these can also be seen as attempts to improve interactive quality internally and externally. Interactive quality can be improved through gains in parsimony, that is, simplifications in the organisation of skills. The importance of parsimony in evolution is discussed, along with indicators of an internal parsimony desire that experiences joy if achieved through processes such as insight and understanding. A mechanism for the production and measurement of the parsimony desire is proposed, based on the number of subcortical pleasure hotspots that can be stimulated at once within the ‘archipelago’ available in the limbic system. PMID:25379257

  18. Hypoactive sexual desire disorder.

    PubMed

    Davison, Sonia L

    2012-08-01

    Hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) is the most prevalent female sexual dysfunction, with estimates of prevalence approximating 10%. By definition it is a deficiency of sexual desire that causes distress. HSDD has no single cause, but physiological, psychological and socio-cultural factors underpinning female sexual desire may all be important in its development. Medical therapeutic strategies to date have concentrated on modulation of hormone levels, particularly androgen administration, yet few products have been approved for the treatment of HSDD in developed countries. More recent medical targets have included agents with 5-hydroxytryptamine agonist activity. Psychological therapeutic approaches have been infrequently studied but concentrate on cognitive behavioural therapy. HSDD is an evolving diagnosis, the existence of which has been questioned by some critics. Whilst HSDD remains the subject of ongoing research, its title and definition are under debate as a new edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of the American Psychiatric Association approaches publication in 2012.

  19. Stochastically gated local and occupation times of a Brownian particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bressloff, Paul C.

    2017-01-01

    We generalize the Feynman-Kac formula to analyze the local and occupation times of a Brownian particle moving in a stochastically gated one-dimensional domain. (i) The gated local time is defined as the amount of time spent by the particle in the neighborhood of a point in space where there is some target that only receives resources from (or detects) the particle when the gate is open; the target does not interfere with the motion of the Brownian particle. (ii) The gated occupation time is defined as the amount of time spent by the particle in the positive half of the real line, given that it can only cross the origin when a gate placed at the origin is open; in the closed state the particle is reflected. In both scenarios, the gate randomly switches between the open and closed states according to a two-state Markov process. We derive a stochastic, backward Fokker-Planck equation (FPE) for the moment-generating function of the two types of gated Brownian functional, given a particular realization of the stochastic gate, and analyze the resulting stochastic FPE using a moments method recently developed for diffusion processes in randomly switching environments. In particular, we obtain dynamical equations for the moment-generating function, averaged with respect to realizations of the stochastic gate.

  20. Stochastically gated local and occupation times of a Brownian particle.

    PubMed

    Bressloff, Paul C

    2017-01-01

    We generalize the Feynman-Kac formula to analyze the local and occupation times of a Brownian particle moving in a stochastically gated one-dimensional domain. (i) The gated local time is defined as the amount of time spent by the particle in the neighborhood of a point in space where there is some target that only receives resources from (or detects) the particle when the gate is open; the target does not interfere with the motion of the Brownian particle. (ii) The gated occupation time is defined as the amount of time spent by the particle in the positive half of the real line, given that it can only cross the origin when a gate placed at the origin is open; in the closed state the particle is reflected. In both scenarios, the gate randomly switches between the open and closed states according to a two-state Markov process. We derive a stochastic, backward Fokker-Planck equation (FPE) for the moment-generating function of the two types of gated Brownian functional, given a particular realization of the stochastic gate, and analyze the resulting stochastic FPE using a moments method recently developed for diffusion processes in randomly switching environments. In particular, we obtain dynamical equations for the moment-generating function, averaged with respect to realizations of the stochastic gate.

  1. Newmark local time stepping on high-performance computing architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rietmann, Max; Grote, Marcus; Peter, Daniel; Schenk, Olaf

    2017-04-01

    In multi-scale complex media, finite element meshes often require areas of local refinement, creating small elements that can dramatically reduce the global time-step for wave-propagation problems due to the CFL condition. Local time stepping (LTS) algorithms allow an explicit time-stepping scheme to adapt the time-step to the element size, allowing near-optimal time-steps everywhere in the mesh. We develop an efficient multilevel LTS-Newmark scheme and implement it in a widely used continuous finite element seismic wave-propagation package. In particular, we extend the standard LTS formulation with adaptations to continuous finite element methods that can be implemented very efficiently with very strong element-size contrasts (more than 100x). Capable of running on large CPU and GPU clusters, we present both synthetic validation examples and large scale, realistic application examples to demonstrate the performance and applicability of the method and implementation on thousands of CPU cores and hundreds of GPUs.

  2. Shear wave arrival time estimates correlate with local speckle pattern.

    PubMed

    Mcaleavey, Stephen A; Osapoetra, Laurentius O; Langdon, Jonathan

    2015-12-01

    We present simulation and phantom studies demonstrating a strong correlation between errors in shear wave arrival time estimates and the lateral position of the local speckle pattern in targets with fully developed speckle. We hypothesize that the observed arrival time variations are largely due to the underlying speckle pattern, and call the effect speckle bias. Arrival time estimation is a key step in quantitative shear wave elastography, performed by tracking tissue motion via cross-correlation of RF ultrasound echoes or similar methods. Variations in scatterer strength and interference of echoes from scatterers within the tracking beam result in an echo that does not necessarily describe the average motion within the beam, but one favoring areas of constructive interference and strong scattering. A swept-receive image, formed by fixing the transmit beam and sweeping the receive aperture over the region of interest, is used to estimate the local speckle pattern. Metrics for the lateral position of the speckle are found to correlate strongly (r > 0.7) with the estimated shear wave arrival times both in simulations and in phantoms. Lateral weighting of the swept-receive pattern improved the correlation between arrival time estimates and speckle position. The simulations indicate that high RF echo correlation does not equate to an accurate shear wave arrival time estimate-a high correlation coefficient indicates that motion is being tracked with high precision, but the location tracked is uncertain within the tracking beam width. The presence of a strong on-axis speckle is seen to imply high RF correlation and low bias. The converse does not appear to be true-highly correlated RF echoes can still produce biased arrival time estimates. The shear wave arrival time bias is relatively stable with variations in shear wave amplitude and sign (-20 μm to 20 μm simulated) compared with the variation with different speckle realizations obtained along a given tracking

  3. Shear Wave Arrival Time Estimates Correlate with Local Speckle Pattern

    PubMed Central

    McAleavey, Stephen A.; Osapoetra, Laurentius O.; Langdon, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    We present simulation and phantom studies demonstrating a strong correlation between errors in shear wave arrival time estimates and the lateral position of the local speckle pattern in targets with fully developed speckle. We hypothesize that the observed arrival time variations are largely due to the underlying speckle pattern, and call the effect speckle bias. Arrival time estimation is a key step in quantitative shear wave elastography, performed by tracking tissue motion via cross correlation of RF ultrasound echoes or similar methods. Variations in scatterer strength and interference of echoes from scatterers within the tracking beam result in an echo that does not necessarily describe the average motion within the beam, but one favoring areas of constructive interference and strong scattering. A swept-receive image, formed by fixing the transmit beam and sweeping the receive aperture over the region of interest, is used to estimate the local speckle pattern. Metrics for the lateral position of the speckle are found to correlate strongly (r>0.7) with the estimated shear wave arrival times both in simulations and in phantoms. Lateral weighting of the swept-receive pattern improved the correlation between arrival time estimates and speckle position. The simulations indicate that high RF echo correlation does not equate to an accurate shear wave arrival time estimate – a high correlation coefficient indicates that motion is being tracked with high precision, but the location tracked is uncertain within the tracking beam width. The presence of a strong on-axis speckle is seen to imply high RF correlation and low bias. The converse does not appear to be true – highly correlated RF echoes can still produce biased arrival time estimates. The shear wave arrival time bias is relatively stable with variations in shear wave amplitude and sign (−20 μm to 20 μm simulated) compared to the variation with different speckle realizations obtained along a given tracking

  4. Pathways of sexual desire.

    PubMed

    Pfaus, James G

    2009-06-01

    Sexual desire is controlled by brain systems involved in sexual excitation and inhibition. Hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) may result from hypofunctional excitation, hyperfunctional inhibition, or some mix of the two. This study aimed to identify neurochemical and neuroanatomical systems involved in sexual excitation and inhibition, their role during normal, and hypoactive sexual expressions. A comprehensive review of the human and animal literature is made, and a theory surrounding the ways that HSDD can be manifested and treated is presented. Drug effects and neural systems derived largely from rat studies that are involved in the stimulation of sexual desire (excitatory system) vs. the stimulation of sexual reward, sedation, and satiety (inhibitory system). Brain dopamine systems (incertohypothalamic and mesolimbic) that link the hypothalamus and limbic system appear to form the core of the excitatory system. This system also includes melanocortins, oxytocin, and norepinephrine. Brain opioid, endocannabinoid, and serotonin systems are activated during periods of sexual inhibition, and blunt the ability of excitatory systems to be activated. Drugs that stimulate the activation of hypothalamic dopamine or that blunt endocannabinoid or serotonin release and/or postsynaptic binding may be effective in stimulating sexual desire in animals and humans. The characterization of how those drugs work will help generate a rational approach to drug development in the treatment of HSDD.

  5. Schooling of Desire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohlin, Karen E.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses education in virtue, inviting college professors to see themselves not as "meddlers" in students' private lives but rather as interlocutors who prompt students to examine their desires--not simply what they hope to gain, but who they hope to become as a result of their university education. Focuses on the philosophies of Plato,…

  6. Schooling of Desire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohlin, Karen E.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses education in virtue, inviting college professors to see themselves not as "meddlers" in students' private lives but rather as interlocutors who prompt students to examine their desires--not simply what they hope to gain, but who they hope to become as a result of their university education. Focuses on the philosophies of Plato,…

  7. Hypoactive Sexual Desire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Helen S.

    1977-01-01

    Low-libido disorders are highly prevalent, may be extremely distressful to patients and their partners, and influence the course and prognosis of therapy. This paper focuses on this important aspect of human sexuality. Some clinical features of hypoactive sexual desire are described, and some hypotheses about etiology and prognosis are presented.…

  8. Hypoactive Sexual Desire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Helen S.

    1977-01-01

    Low-libido disorders are highly prevalent, may be extremely distressful to patients and their partners, and influence the course and prognosis of therapy. This paper focuses on this important aspect of human sexuality. Some clinical features of hypoactive sexual desire are described, and some hypotheses about etiology and prognosis are presented.…

  9. Time-Localization of Forced Oscillations in Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Follum, James D.; Pierre, John W.

    2015-07-26

    In power systems forced oscillations occur, and identification of these oscillations is important for the proper operation of the system. Two of the parameters of interest in analyzing and addressing forced oscillations are the starting and ending points. To obtain estimates of these parameters, this paper proposes a time-localization algorithm based on the geometric analysis of the sample cross-correlation between the measured data and a complex sinusoid at the frequency of the forced oscillation. Results from simulated and measured synchrophasor data demonstrate the algorithm's ability to accurately estimate the starting and ending points of forced oscillations.

  10. [Hypoactive sexual desire disorder, HSDD].

    PubMed

    Mimoun, S

    2011-01-01

    Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder (HSDD) is the most common Female Sexual Dysfunction (FSD) affecting adult women of any age, including postmenopausal women. HSDD may have significant effects on the relationships and emotional balance of women and constitutes the most common form of FSD observed in clinical practice. HSDD is characterised by a deficiency or lack of sexual fantasies and desire for sexual activity, causing serious distress or interpersonal difficulties, and it is not exclusively caused by the effects of another psychiatric disorder, pathology or substance (such as medication). HSDD pathophysiology is not yet well understood, but it is thought to involve an imbalance between factors controlling inhibition and excitation of sexual desire in the brain. Many physicians are reluctant to discuss sexual desire problems with their patients for various reasons, such as insufficient knowledge of the field, an absence of efficient treatments and time constraints. Even though current treatment options are limited, a better understanding of the physiopathology behind HSDD may help develop new therapies.

  11. Locally advanced rectal cancer: time for precision therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Weiser, Martin R; Zhang, Zhen; Schrag, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    The year 2015 marks the 30th anniversary of the publication of NSABP-R01, a landmark trial demonstrating the benefit of adding pelvic radiation to the treatment regimen for locally advanced rectal cancer with a resultant decrease in local recurrence from 25% to 16%. These results ushered in the era of multimodal therapy for rectal cancer, heralding modern treatment and changing the standard of care in the United States. We have seen many advances over the past 3 decades, including optimization of the administration and timing of radiation, widespread adoption of total mesorectal excision (TME), and the implementation of more effective systemic chemotherapy. The current standard is neoadjuvant chemoradiation with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and a radiosensitizer, TME, and adjuvant chemotherapy including 5-FU and oxaliplatin. The results of this regimen have been impressive, with a reported local recurrence rate of less than 10%. However, the rates of distant relapse remain 30% to 40%, indicating room for improvement. In addition, trimodality therapy is arduous and many patients are unable to complete the full course of treatment. In this article we discuss the current standard of care and alternative strategies that have evolved in an attempt to individualize therapy according to risk of recurrence.

  12. Magnetopause characteristics at 0840-1040 hours local time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, D. J.

    1980-01-01

    An analysis of three-dimensional energetic particle distributions for 14 consecutive ISEE satellite orbits during magnetopause crossings and close approaches is presented. The data were collected from the Nov. 10 through Dec. 11, 1977, time period and cover local times of 0840 to 1040 hours. It was found that the magnetopause in this period defined by energetic particles can be represented as sharp particles and a well defined boundary for magnetospherically trapped particles for a wide range of magnetospheric activity and magnetosheath field conditions. The magnetopause position, orientation, and velocity were determined for all identified magnetopause crossings and close approaches using the technique of Williams (1979); it was found that the magnetopause is nearly always in motion with velocities ranging from near zero to at least plus or minus 25 km/s. Correlations with published plasma, magnetic field, and plasma wave magnetopause identifications show the energetic particle results to be accurate and an important factor in determining magnetopause characteristics and behavior.

  13. Nonlinear damage detection and localization using a time domain approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boccardi, S.; Calla, D.-B.; Malfense Fierro, G.-P.; Ciampa, F.; Meo, M.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a damage detection and localization technique based on nonlinear elastic waves propagation in a damage composite laminate. The proposed method relies on the time of arrival estimation of the second harmonic nonlinear response obtained with second order phase symmetry analysis filtering and burst excitation. The Akaike Information Criterion approach was used to estimate the arrival times measured by six receiver transducers. Then, a combination of Newton's method and unconstrained optimization was employed to solve a system of nonlinear equations in order to obtain the material damage coordinates. To validate this methodology, experimental tests were carried out on a damaged composite plate. The results showed that the technique allows calculating the damage position with high accuracy (maximum error ~5 mm).

  14. LOCAL MEASUREMENT OF {Lambda} USING PULSAR TIMING ARRAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Espriu, Domenec; Puigdomenech, Daniel

    2013-02-20

    We consider the propagation of gravitational waves (GWs) in de Sitter spacetime and how a non-zero value of the cosmological constant might affect their detection in pulsar timing arrays (PTAs). If {Lambda} {ne} 0, the waves are anharmonic in Friedmann-Robertson-Walker coordinates, and although this effect is very small it gives rise to noticeable consequences for GWs originating in extragalactic sources such as spiraling black hole binaries. The results indicate that the timing residuals induced by GWs from such sources in PTAs will show a peculiar angular dependence with a marked enhancement around a particular value of the angle subtended by the source and the pulsars, depending mainly on the actual value of the cosmological constant and the distance to the source. The position of the peak could represent a gauge of the value of {Lambda}. The enhancement that the new effect brings about could facilitate the first direct detection of GWs while representing a local measurement of {Lambda}.

  15. Local (in time) maximal lyapunov exponents of fragmenting drops

    PubMed

    Balenzuela; Bonasera; Dorso

    2000-12-01

    We analyze the dynamics of fragment formation in simulations of exploding three-dimensional Lennard-Jones hot drops, using the maximum local (in time) Lyapunov exponent (MLLE). The dependence of this exponent on the excitation energy of the system displays two different behaviors according to the stage of the dynamical evolution: one related to the highly collisional stage of the evolution, at early times, and the other related to the asymptotic state. We show that in the early, highly collisional, stage of the evolution the MLLE is an increasing function of the energy, as in an infinite-size system. On the other hand, at long times, the MLLE displays a maximum, depending mainly on the size of the resulting biggest fragment. We compare the time scale at which the MLLE's reach their asymptotic values with the characteristic time of fragment formation in phase space. Moreover, upon calculation of the maximum Lyapunov exponent (MLE) of the resulting fragments, we show that their dependence with the mass can be traced to bulk effects plus surface corrections. Using this information the asymptotic behavior of the MLLE can be understood and the fluctuations of the MLE of the whole system can be easily calculated. These fluctuations display a sudden increase for that excitation energy which produces a power-law-like asymptotic distribution of fragments.

  16. Local Time Dependence of Jovian Radio Emissions Observed by Galileo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menietti, J. D.; Gurnett, D. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Groene, J. B.

    1999-01-01

    Galileo has been in orbit around Jupiter since December 1995. All the orbits are equatorial and elliptical, with apogees between 60 R(sub J) - 142 R(sub J) and perigees from 8 - 12 R(sub J). Since orbit injection, the plasma wave instrument (PWS) has been collecting data over specific intervals of each of the orbits at all local times and a range of different radial distances. We present the results of a survey of the data for the frequency range 300 kHz to 5.6 MHz, which includes the hectometric (HOM) and low-frequency decametric (DAM) emissions. The results indicate that both the HOM and DAM emission are more intense and occur more frequently in the midnight sector of Jupiter. This is in analogy to Earth and consistent with a magnetic substorm source for a portion of the radio emissions in this frequency range. Another peak in the power levels is observed on the Jovian dayside in the local time range 11 hrs < LT < 12 hrs. This peak does not have a terrestrial counterpart. We speculate that this dayside peak may be a result of sampling near perigee, but we cannot rule out the possibility that this is not the case.

  17. Local-time Variation of Nitric Oxide: Modeling and Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, C. Y. T.; Bailey, S. M.; Yonker, J. D.; Venkataramani, K.; Deng, Y.

    2014-12-01

    NO, a minor species in the thermosphere, is an important indicator of energy balance. It also has the lowest ionization threshold so is the terminal ion in the ionospheric E-region. Solar soft X-ray energy between 0.1 and 7 nm is absorbed mostly in the lower thermosphere between 100 and 150 km. Photoelectrons are created and initiate chains of photochemical reactions which leads to the production of nitric oxide (NO). On the other hand, solar irradiance longer than 150 nm destroys NO. In this study, observation of the local-time variation of NO abundance in the lower thermosphere is derived from the Remote Atmospheric and Ionospheric Detection System (RAIDS) measurements in summer 2010. Soft X-ray and EUV irradiance from the Extreme ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) on the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO) is used to drive the NOx1D model during the same period of time. By comparing variation of NO abundance at local sunlit hours, the effects of solar irradiance on thermospheric NO photochemistry in the model are examined.

  18. What controls the local time extent of flux transfer events?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milan, S. E.; Imber, S. M.; Carter, J. A.; Walach, M.-T.; Hubert, B.

    2016-02-01

    Flux transfer events (FTEs) are the manifestation of bursty and/or patchy magnetic reconnection at the magnetopause. We compare two sequences of the ionospheric signatures of flux transfer events observed in global auroral imagery and coherent ionospheric radar measurements. Both sequences were observed during very similar seasonal and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions, though with differing solar wind speed. A key observation is that the signatures differed considerably in their local time extent. The two periods are 26 August 1998, when the IMF had components BZ≈-10 nT and BY≈9 nT and the solar wind speed was VX≈650 km s-1, and 31 August 2005, IMF BZ≈-7 nT, BY≈17 nT, and VX≈380 km s-1. In the first case, the reconnection rate was estimated to be near 160 kV, and the FTE signatures extended across at least 7 h of magnetic local time (MLT) of the dayside polar cap boundary. In the second, a reconnection rate close to 80 kV was estimated, and the FTEs had a MLT extent of roughly 2 h. We discuss the ramifications of these differences for solar wind-magnetosphere coupling.

  19. Effectiveness of Null Signal Sky Localization in Pulsar Timing Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafiq Hazboun, Jeffrey

    2017-01-01

    A null stream is constructed from the timing residuals of three pulsars by noting that the same source polarization amplitudes appear in the data stream from each pulsar. Linear combinations of a set of individual pulsar data streams can be shown to be a two-parameter family (the two sky position angles of the source) that can be minimized to determine the location of the source on the sky. Taking the product of a number of null streams allows for an even stronger localization of the gravitational wave's source; a large advantage in a PTA where there are more independent signals than other gravitational wave detectors. While a null stream contains the same information as any other data stream with the same number of pulsars, the statistics of a product of noisy signals is inherently different than for a sum of those same signals.A comparison of how null signal searches compare to other techniques for sky localization of PTA sources will be discussed, as well as an assessment of the types of searches for which the method may be useful.

  20. A Time-Frequency Functional Model for Locally Stationary Time Series Data

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Li; Guo, Wensheng; Litt, Brian

    2009-01-01

    Unlike traditional time series analysis that focuses on one long time series, in many biomedical experiments, it is common to collect multiple time series and focus on how the design covariates impact the patterns of stochastic variation over time. In this article, we propose a time-frequency functional model for a family of time series indexed by a set of covariates. This model can be used to compare groups of time series in terms of the patterns of stochastic variation and to estimate the covariate effects. We focus our development on locally stationary time series and propose the covariate-indexed locally stationary setting, which include stationary processes as special cases. We use smoothing spline ANOVA models for the time-frequency coefficients. A two-stage procedure is introduced for estimation. To reduce the computational demand, we develop an equivalent state space model to the proposed model with an efficient algorithm. We also propose a new simulation method to generate replicated time series from their design spectra. An epileptic intracranial electroencephalogram (IEEG) dataset is analyzed for illustration. PMID:20228961

  1. Identification of local myocardial repolarization time by bipolar electrode potential.

    PubMed

    Namba, Tsunetoyo; Todo, Takahiro; Yao, Takenori; Ashihara, Takashi; Haraguchi, Ryo; Nakazawa, Kazuo; Ikeda, Takanori; Ohe, Tohru

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether bipolar electrode potentials (BEPs) reflect local myocardial repolarization dynamics, using computer simulation. Simulated action potential and BEP mapping of myocardial tissue during fibrillation was performed. The BEP was modified to make all the fluctuations have the same polarity. Then, the modified BEP (mBEP) was transformed to "dynamic relative amplitude" (DRA) designed to make all the fluctuations have the similar amplitude. The repolarization end point corresponded to the end of the repolarization-related small fluctuation that clearly appeared in the DRA of mBEP. Using the DRA of mBEP, we could reproduce the repolarization dynamics in the myocardial tissue during fibrillation. The BEP may facilitate identifying the repolarization time. Furthermore, BEP mapping has the possibility that it would be available for evaluating repolarization behavior in myocardial tissue even during fibrillation. The accuracy of activation-recovery interval was also reconfirmed.

  2. Local-time asymmetries in the Venus thermosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, M. J.; Stewart, A. I. F.; Bougher, S. W.

    1992-01-01

    Our current understanding of the global structure and dynamics of the Venus thermosphere is embodied in models such as the Venus Thermospheric General Circulation Model (VTGCM) and empirical composition models such as VIRA and VTS3. We have completed an analysis of ultraviolet images of Venus at 130 nm acquired by the Pioneer Venus Orbiter Ultraviolet Spectrometer (PVOUVS). We have examined 97 images spanning the 10-year period between 1980 and 1990, and have developed a technique for global radiative transfer modeling with which we create synthetic models of each image analyzed. We have developed a hypothesis for understanding the persistent local-time asymmetry observed as a signature of vertically propagating internal gravity waves interacting with the thermospheric SS-AS circulation. This hypothesis is presented.

  3. Long Term Mean Local Time of the Ascending Node Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKinley, David P.

    2007-01-01

    Significant error has been observed in the long term prediction of the Mean Local Time of the Ascending Node on the Aqua spacecraft. This error of approximately 90 seconds over a two year prediction is a complication in planning and timing of maneuvers for all members of the Earth Observing System Afternoon Constellation, which use Aqua's MLTAN as the reference for their inclination maneuvers. It was determined that the source of the prediction error was the lack of a solid Earth tide model in the operational force models. The Love Model of the solid Earth tide potential was used to derive analytic corrections to the inclination and right ascension of the ascending node of Aqua's Sun-synchronous orbit. Additionally, it was determined that the resonance between the Sun and orbit plane of the Sun-synchronous orbit is the primary driver of this error. The analytic corrections have been added to the operational force models for the Aqua spacecraft reducing the two-year 90-second error to less than 7 seconds.

  4. Producing desired ice faces

    PubMed Central

    Shultz, Mary Jane; Brumberg, Alexandra; Bisson, Patrick J.; Shultz, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    The ability to prepare single-crystal faces has become central to developing and testing models for chemistry at interfaces, spectacularly demonstrated by heterogeneous catalysis and nanoscience. This ability has been hampered for hexagonal ice, Ih––a fundamental hydrogen-bonded surface––due to two characteristics of ice: ice does not readily cleave along a crystal lattice plane and properties of ice grown on a substrate can differ significantly from those of neat ice. This work describes laboratory-based methods both to determine the Ih crystal lattice orientation relative to a surface and to use that orientation to prepare any desired face. The work builds on previous results attaining nearly 100% yield of high-quality, single-crystal boules. With these methods, researchers can prepare authentic, single-crystal ice surfaces for numerous studies including uptake measurements, surface reactivity, and catalytic activity of this ubiquitous, fundamental solid. PMID:26512102

  5. Timing of Clinical Billing Reimbursement for a Local Health Department

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objectives A major responsibility of a local health department (LHD) is to assure public health service availability throughout its jurisdiction. Many LHDs face expanded service needs and declining budgets, making billing for services an increasingly important strategy for sustaining public health service provision. Yet, little practice-based data exist to guide practitioners on what to expect financially, especially regarding timing of reimbursement receipt. This study provides results from one LHD on the lag from service delivery to reimbursement receipt. Methods Reimbursement records for all transactions at Maricopa County Department of Public Health immunization clinics from January 2013 through June 2014 were compiled and analyzed to determine the duration between service and reimbursement. Outcomes included daily and cumulative revenues received. Time to reimbursement for Medicaid and private payers was also compared. Results Reimbursement for immunization services was received a median of 68 days after service. Payments were sometimes taken back by payers through credit transactions that occurred a median of 333 days from service. No differences in time to reimbursement between Medicaid and private payers were found. Conclusions Billing represents an important financial opportunity for LHDs to continue to sustainably assure population health. Yet, the lag from service provision to reimbursement may complicate budgeting, especially in initial years of new billing activities. Special consideration may be necessary to establish flexibility in the budget-setting processes for services with clinical billing revenues, because funds for services delivered in one budget period may not be received in the same period. LHDs may also benefit from exploring strategies used by other delivery organizations to streamline billing processes. PMID:26957663

  6. Local Time-Dependent Charging in a Perovskite Solar Cell.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Victor W; Guo, Yunlong; Tanaka, Hideyuki; Hermes, Ilka M; Li, Dan; Klasen, Alexander; Bretschneider, Simon A; Nakamura, Eiichi; Berger, Rüdiger; Weber, Stefan A L

    2016-08-03

    Efficient charge extraction within solar cells explicitly depends on the optimization of the internal interfaces. Potential barriers, unbalanced charge extraction, and interfacial trap states can prevent cells from reaching high power conversion efficiencies. In the case of perovskite solar cells, slow processes happening on time scales of seconds cause hysteresis in the current-voltage characteristics. In this work, we localized and investigated these slow processes using frequency-modulation Kelvin probe force microscopy (FM-KPFM) on cross sections of planar methylammonium lead iodide (MAPI) perovskite solar cells. FM-KPFM can map the charge density distribution and its dynamics at internal interfaces. Upon illumination, space charge layers formed at the interfaces of the selective contacts with the MAPI layer within several seconds. We observed distinct differences in the charging dynamics at the interfaces of MAPI with adjacent layers. Our results indicate that more than one process is involved in hysteresis. This finding is in agreement with recent simulation studies claiming that a combination of ion migration and interfacial trap states causes the hysteresis in perovskite solar cells. Such differences in the charging rates at different interfaces cannot be separated by conventional device measurements.

  7. Measured Response of Local, Mid-range and Far-range Discontinuities of Large Metal Groundplanes using Time Domain Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrader, T.; Münter, K.; Battermann, S.; Garbe, H.

    2005-05-01

    This work describes a method to detect and to quantify any local or mid-range discontinuity on extended flat metal planes. Often these planes are used for antenna calibration (open area test site - OATS) or the plane could be the ground of a semi-anechoic chamber used in Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) testing. The measurement uncertainty of antenna calibration or EMC testing depends on the groundplane's quality, which can be accessed using this method. A vector network analyzer with time-domain option is used to determine the complex-valued input scattering parameter S11,F of an aperture antenna in a monostatic setup. S;11,F contains the information desired about the discontinuities and is measured in the frequency domain with high dynamic range. But only after a linear filtering utilizing the Chirp-Z-Transform the obtained time-domain signal S11,T evidence of local and mid-range discontinuities.

  8. Mean Velocity of Local Populations: Axiality, Age and Time Dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubarsi, Rafael; Alcobé, Santiago

    2007-05-01

    The mean velocity of local stellar populations is analyzed by building a set of hierarchically selected samples from Hipparcos catalog, with the full space motions. The technique for scanning populations, MEMPHIS (Maximum Entropy of the Mixture Probability from HIerarchical Segregation), is a combination of two separate procedures: A sample selecting filter (Alcobé & Cubarsi 2005, A&A 442, 292) and a segregation method (Cubarsi & Alcobé 2004, A&A 427, 131). By continuously increasing the sampling parameter, in our case the absolute value of the stellar velocity, we build a set of nested subsamples containing an increasing number of populations. A bimodal pattern is then applied in order to identify differentiated kinematic populations. The resulting populations can be identified as early-type stars, young disk stars, old disk stars, and thick disk stars. Discontinuities of the velocity dispersion are found for early-type and thick disk stars, while young and old disk stars show a continuous trend that is asymptotically represented by the thin disk galactic component. Similarly, the mean velocity of early-type stars shows a particular behavior, while the remaining populations share a similar average motion. The later populations are studied on the basis of a time-dependent and non-axial Chandrasekhar model, allowing to estimate the degree of deviation from axial symmetry and steady-state hypotheses, as well as the average age of each population. According to this model, the no net radial movement point can be evaluated, having heliocentric velocities U=-18 ± 1 km/s in the radial direction, which is very close to the radial mean velocity of early-type stars, and V=-76 ± 2 km/s in rotation. The remaining populations share a common differential galactic movement, suggesting a common dynamical origin for the rupture of the axial symmetry.

  9. The suicidal desire of Tolstoy.

    PubMed

    Pridmore, Saxby; Pridmore, William

    2011-06-01

    To explore whether a healthy, successful individual may experience suicidal desires. Examination of "A Confession" by Leo Tolstoy. Confirmation that a physically and mentally healthy, well resourced individual may experience suicidal desires. To reduce suicide rates, a broader understanding of the factors which contribute to suicidal desires is required.

  10. My Desire for Art Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hetrick, Laura J.

    2013-01-01

    In this commentary, Laura Hetrick focuses on what is inherently missing from the art education literature about teaching future teachers of art--of addressing nascent teachers' personal, pedagogical, and professional desires. Specifically, she considers teachers' desires for power and recognition, their desires to love and be loved, and…

  11. My Desire for Art Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hetrick, Laura J.

    2013-01-01

    In this commentary, Laura Hetrick focuses on what is inherently missing from the art education literature about teaching future teachers of art--of addressing nascent teachers' personal, pedagogical, and professional desires. Specifically, she considers teachers' desires for power and recognition, their desires to love and be loved, and…

  12. Time-dependent local density approximation study of attosecond time delays in the photoionization of xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magrakvelidze, Maia; Madjet, Mohamed; Chakraborty, Himadri

    2016-05-01

    We investigate Wigner-Smith (WS) time delays of the photoionization from various subshells of xenon using the time-dependent local density approximation (TDLDA) with the Leeuwen and Baerends exchange-correlation functional. At the 4d giant dipole resonance region as well as near all the Cooper minimum anti-resonances in 5p, 5s and 4d photoemissions, effects of electron correlations uniquely determine the shapes of the emission quantum phase. The Wigner-Smith time delay derived from this phase indicates significant variations as a function of energy. The results qualitatively support our TDLDA predictions at the fullerene plasmon region and at 3p Cooper minimum in argon, and should encourage attosecond measurements of Xe photoemission via two-photon interferometric techniques, such as RABITT. The work is supported by the NSF, USA.

  13. Time-dependent fiber bundles with local load sharing.

    PubMed

    Newman, W I; Phoenix, S L

    2001-02-01

    Fiber bundle models, where fibers have random lifetimes depending on their load histories, are useful tools in explaining time-dependent failure in heterogeneous materials. Such models shed light on diverse phenomena such as fatigue in structural materials and earthquakes in geophysical settings. Various asymptotic and approximate theories have been developed for bundles with various geometries and fiber load-sharing mechanisms, but numerical verification has been hampered by severe computational demands in larger bundles. To gain insight at large size scales, interest has returned to idealized fiber bundle models in 1D. Such simplified models typically assume either equal load sharing (ELS) among survivors, or local load sharing (LLS) where a failed fiber redistributes its load onto its two nearest flanking survivors. Such models can often be solved exactly or asymptotically in increasing bundle size, N, yet still capture the essence of failure in real materials. The present work focuses on 1D bundles under LLS. As in previous works, a fiber has failure rate following a power law in its load level with breakdown exponent rho. Surviving fibers under fixed loads have remaining lifetimes that are independent and exponentially distributed. We develop both new asymptotic theories and new computational algorithms that greatly increase the bundle sizes that can be treated in large replications (e.g., one million fibers in thousands of realizations). In particular we develop an algorithm that adapts several concepts and methods that are well-known among computer scientists, but relatively unknown among physicists, to dramatically increase the computational speed with no attendant loss of accuracy. We consider various regimes of rho that yield drastically different behavior as N increases. For 1/2< or =rho< or =1, ELS and LLS have remarkably similar behavior (they have identical lifetime distributions at rho=1) with approximate Gaussian bundle lifetime statistics and a

  14. Cloning to reproduce desired genotypes.

    PubMed

    Westhusin, M E; Long, C R; Shin, T; Hill, J R; Looney, C R; Pryor, J H; Piedrahita, J A

    2001-01-01

    Cloned sheep, cattle, goats, pigs and mice have now been produced using somatic cells for nuclear transplantation. Animal cloning is still very inefficient with on average less than 10% of the cloned embryos transferred resulting in a live offspring. However successful cloning of a variety of different species and by a number of different laboratory groups has generated tremendous interest in reproducing desired genotypes. Some of these specific genotypes represent animal cell lines that have been genetically modified. In other cases there is a significant demand for cloning animals characterized by their inherent genetic value, for example prize livestock, household pets and rare or endangered species. A number of different variables may influence the ability to reproduce a specific genotype by cloning. These include species, source of recipient ova, cell type of nuclei donor, treatment of donor cells prior to nuclear transfer, and the techniques employed for nuclear transfer. At present, there is no solid evidence that suggests cloning will be limited to only a few specific animals, and in fact, most data collected to date suggests cloning will be applicable to a wide variety of different animals. The ability to reproduce any desired genotype by cloning will ultimately depend on the amount of time and resources invested in research.

  15. Instructional Time Loss and Local-Level Governance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abadzi, Helen

    2007-01-01

    Studies have shown that the amount of time students spend engaged in learning tasks is related to learning outcomes. However, schools often offer to the students only a fraction of the time that governments pay for, and schools in lower-income areas often offer less time than governments plan for students. Instructional time ought to be an…

  16. Adaptive filters for monitoring localized brain activity from surface potential time series

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, M.E. |; Leahy, R.M.; Mosher, J.C. |; Lewis, P.S.

    1992-12-01

    We address the problem of processing electroencephalographic (EEG) data to monitor the time series of the components of a current dipole source vector at a given location in the head. This is the spatial filtering problem for vector sources in a lossy, three dimensional, zero delay medium. Dipolar and distributed sources at other than the desired location are canceled or attenuated with an adaptive linearly constrained minimum variance (LCMV) beamformer. Actual EEG data acquired from a human subject serves as the interference in a case where the desired source is simulated and superimposed on the actual data. It is shown that the LCMV beamformer extracts the desired dipole time series while effectively canceling the subjects interference.

  17. Adaptive filters for monitoring localized brain activity from surface potential time series

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, M.E. . Signal and Image Processing Inst. TRW, Inc., Redondo Beach, CA ); Leahy, R.M. . Signal and Image Processing Inst.); Mosher, J.C. . Signal and Image Processing Inst. Lo

    1992-01-01

    We address the problem of processing electroencephalographic (EEG) data to monitor the time series of the components of a current dipole source vector at a given location in the head. This is the spatial filtering problem for vector sources in a lossy, three dimensional, zero delay medium. Dipolar and distributed sources at other than the desired location are canceled or attenuated with an adaptive linearly constrained minimum variance (LCMV) beamformer. Actual EEG data acquired from a human subject serves as the interference in a case where the desired source is simulated and superimposed on the actual data. It is shown that the LCMV beamformer extracts the desired dipole time series while effectively canceling the subjects interference.

  18. Time-Resolved Dynamics in Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory: Significance of Non-locality in Space and Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maitra, Neepa

    2013-03-01

    The usual approximations in Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TDDFT) have achieved an unprecedented balance between accuracy and efficiency for calculating excitation spectra and response. We show however that these approximations are less successful for time-resolved dynamics beyond the linear response regime. Step and peak structures develop in the exact exchange-correlation potential that have a density-dependence that is non-local both in time and in space, missed by all approximations in use today. The lack of these structures leads to their incorrect predictions of dynamics, such as faster time-scales, and incomplete charge-transfer. [P. Elliott, J.I. Fuks, A. Rubio, N.T. Maitra arXiv:1211.2012; J. I. Fuks, P. Elliott, A. Rubio, N. T. Maitra, arXiv:1211.2849] Support from NSF and DOE is gratefully acknowledged.

  19. Recovery after Hip Fracture: Interventions and Their Timing to Address Deficits and Desired Outcomes – Evidence from the Baltimore Hip Studies

    PubMed Central

    Magaziner, Jay; Chiles, Nancy; Orwig, Denise

    2017-01-01

    Hip fracture is a significant public health problem affecting an estimated 1.6 million persons annually. The consequences of hip fracture are also significant, with more than half of those who sustain a fracture either dying or not returning to functional abilities present before fracture required to function independently. The Baltimore Hip Studies (BHS) is a program of research that for more than 30 years has been doing investigations to identify, develop, and evaluate strategies to optimize recovery from hip fracture. This paper provides an overview of known outcomes and recovery patterns following a hip fracture, which are derived primarily from the BHS. Target areas and timing for interventions based on this recovery sequence are suggested. The paper concludes with a discussion of some of the areas that the next generation of studies needs to concentrate on in order to advance knowledge about the care of hip fracture patients to maximize their recovery. PMID:26484873

  20. Development and application of a local linearization algorithm for the integration of quaternion rate equations in real-time flight simulation problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, L. E., Jr.; Bowles, R. L.; Williams, L. H.

    1973-01-01

    High angular rates encountered in real-time flight simulation problems may require a more stable and accurate integration method than the classical methods normally used. A study was made to develop a general local linearization procedure of integrating dynamic system equations when using a digital computer in real-time. The procedure is specifically applied to the integration of the quaternion rate equations. For this application, results are compared to a classical second-order method. The local linearization approach is shown to have desirable stability characteristics and gives significant improvement in accuracy over the classical second-order integration methods.

  1. Distribution and timing of distant metastasis after local therapy in large cohort of patients with esophageal and esophagogastric junction cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shiozaki, Hironori; Sudo, Kazuki; Xiao, Lianchun; Wadhwa, Roopma; Elimova, Elena; Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Skinner, Heath D.; Lee, Jeffrey H.; Weston, Brian; Bhutani, Manoop S.; Blum, Mariela A.; Maru, Dipen M.; Ajani, Jaffer A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with localized esophageal and esophagogastric junction cancer (EAC) receive chemoradiation then surgery (trimodality; TMT) or definitive chemoradiation (bimodality; BMT). Since distant metastases (DMs) are common but the details of the DM distribution and timing in a large cohort have not been described. Methods 629 patients with localized EAC who had TMT or BMT were analyzed. Standard statistical methods were used to define the endpoints. Results The median follow-up time was 37.2 months (interquartile range: 17.8–65.0). Among 356 TMT patients, 33% (119) developed DM as their first relapse and among 273 patients with BMT, 40% (109) developed DM. 91% (TMT) and 96% (BMT) of DMs were diagnosed within 2 years of local therapy. The most common sites of DMs were: lung, distant nodes, liver, peritoneal cavity, bone, brain, and pleura in the order of frequency. The median overall survival of TMT patients with DM was 10.2 months (95% CI: 7.8–12.7) and that for BMT patients with DM was 7.8 months (95% CI: 5.7–9.9). Conclusions Following TMT or BMT, ≥33% of patients developed DMs and most DM occurred within 2 years (>90%) of local therapy. A clinical model that highly associates with high-risk for DM in TMT-eligible patients, prior to surgery, is desirable. PMID:24925190

  2. Real time magnetic resonance guided endomyocardial local delivery

    PubMed Central

    Corti, R; Badimon, J; Mizsei, G; Macaluso, F; Lee, M; Licato, P; Viles-Gonzalez, J F; Fuster, V; Sherman, W

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the feasibility of targeting various areas of left ventricle myocardium under real time magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with a customised injection catheter equipped with a miniaturised coil. Design: A needle injection catheter with a mounted resonant solenoid circuit (coil) at its tip was designed and constructed. A 1.5 T MR scanner with customised real time sequence combined with in-room scan running capabilities was used. With this system, various myocardial areas within the left ventricle were targeted and injected with a gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) and Indian ink mixture. Results: Real time sequencing at 10 frames/s allowed clear visualisation of the moving catheter and its transit through the aorta into the ventricle, as well as targeting of all ventricle wall segments without further image enhancement techniques. All injections were visualised by real time MR imaging and verified by gross pathology. Conclusion: The tracking device allowed real time in vivo visualisation of catheters in the aorta and left ventricle as well as precise targeting of myocardial areas. The use of this real time catheter tracking may enable precise and adequate delivery of agents for tissue regeneration. PMID:15710717

  3. Psychosocial Maturity or Social Desirability?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberger, Ellen

    The psychosocial maturity scale (PSM) described in several earlier papers is a self-report questionnaire. It is vulnerable, as are other questionnaires of this type, to respondents' wishes to present themselves in a socially desirable light. In this study, scores on two social desirability scales are examined in relation to PSM. Correlations…

  4. Activating the Desire to Learn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullo, Bob

    2007-01-01

    Wouldn't your job be easier if students were just more interested in learning? Now, here's a book that will open your eyes to where the desire to learn actually comes from and what teachers can really do to activate it. Using stories from classroom teachers, counselors, administrators, and students, Bob Sullo explains why the desire to learn is…

  5. Modeling of space-time focusing of localized nondiffracting pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamboni-Rached, Michel; Besieris, Ioannis M.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper we develop a method capable of modeling the space-time focusing of nondiffracting pulses. These pulses can possess arbitrary peak velocities and, in addition to being resistant to diffraction, can have their peak intensities and focusing positions chosen a priori. More specifically, we can choose multiple locations (spatial ranges) of space and time focalization; also, the pulse intensities can be chosen in advance. The pulsed wave solutions presented here can have very interesting applications in many different fields, such as free-space optical communications, remote sensing, medical apparatus, etc.

  6. Timing of Z-ring localization in Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukanov, R.; Reshes, G.; Carmon, G.; Fischer-Friedrich, E.; Gov, N. S.; Fishov, I.; Feingold, M.

    2011-12-01

    Bacterial cell division takes place in three phases: Z-ring formation at midcell, followed by divisome assembly and building of the septum per se. Using time-lapse microscopy of live bacteria and a high-precision cell edge detection method, we have previously found the true time for the onset of septation, τc, and the time between consecutive divisions, τg. Here, we combine the above method with measuring the dynamics of the FtsZ-GFP distribution in individual Escherichia coli cells to determine the Z-ring positioning time, τz. To analyze the FtsZ-GFP distribution along the cell, we used the integral fluorescence profile (IFP), which was obtained by integrating the fluorescence intensity across the cell width. We showed that the IFP may be approximated by an exponential peak and followed the peak evolution throughout the cell cycle, to find a quantitative criterion for the positioning of the Z-ring and hence the value of τz. We defined τz as the transition from oscillatory to stable behavior of the mean IFP position. This criterion was corroborated by comparison of the experimental results to a theoretical model for the FtsZ dynamics, driven by Min oscillations. We found that τz < τc for all the cells that were analyzed. Moreover, our data suggested that τz is independent of τc, τg and the cell length at birth, L0. These results are consistent with the current understanding of the Z-ring positioning and cell septation processes.

  7. Time Variable Gravity from Local Mascon Analysis of GRACE Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemoine, Frank G.; Luthcke, Scott B.; Klosko, Steven M.; Rowlands, David; Chinn, Douglas S.; McCarthy, John J.; Cox, Christopher M.; Williams, Terry A.; Pavlis, Despina E.

    2004-01-01

    We have analyzed GRACE Level 1-B data in 2003 and assessed a new approach for extracting time variable gravity that isolates the gravity signal in both time and space. The Level-1B satellite-to-satellite range rate (KBRR) data and accelerometry are processed in daily arcs using the precise orbit products produced by the GRACE team from GPS to calibrate both the accelerometer and KBRR data. We then adjusted select components of the intersatellite baseline vector for each data segment isolated to the region of interest. Herein, we solved for mass anomalies in 45 deg x 45 deg blocks over the Amazon and the nearby Atlantic Ocean and estimate mass flux in units of cm of water over each block. We show with this approach that we can recover mass anomalies on a submonthly basis with 10 to 15 day temporal resolution. We discuss the important issues related to this solution, including the size of the mascon blocks, the weight given to the temporal and spatial constraint used to stabalize the solutions, as well as the optimal correlation in time and distance. We compare the the mascon results with solutions obtained from the more standard approach using spherical harmonics and with independent hydrology models and lake data. This technique demonstrates that sub-monthly medium wavelength mass flux phenomena are well sensed by the hyper-precise line of sight velocity data produced from GRACE.

  8. Time Variable Gravity from Local Mascon Analysis of GRACE Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemoine, Frank G.; Luthcke, Scott B.; Klosko, Steven M.; Rowlands, David; Chinn, Douglas S.; McCarthy, John J.; Cox, Christopher M.; Williams, Terry A.; Pavlis, Despina E.

    2004-01-01

    We have analyzed GRACE Level 1-B data in 2003 and assessed a new approach for extracting time variable gravity that isolates the gravity signal in both time and space. The Level-1B satellite-to-satellite range rate (KBRR) data and accelerometry are processed in daily arcs using the precise orbit products produced by the GRACE team from GPS to calibrate both the accelerometer and KBRR data. We then adjusted select components of the intersatellite baseline vector for each data segment isolated to the region of interest. Herein, we solved for mass anomalies in 45 deg x 45 deg blocks over the Amazon and the nearby Atlantic Ocean and estimate mass flux in units of cm of water over each block. We show with this approach that we can recover mass anomalies on a submonthly basis with 10 to 15 day temporal resolution. We discuss the important issues related to this solution, including the size of the mascon blocks, the weight given to the temporal and spatial constraint used to stabalize the solutions, as well as the optimal correlation in time and distance. We compare the the mascon results with solutions obtained from the more standard approach using spherical harmonics and with independent hydrology models and lake data. This technique demonstrates that sub-monthly medium wavelength mass flux phenomena are well sensed by the hyper-precise line of sight velocity data produced from GRACE.

  9. Dynamic regimes of local homogeneous population model with time lag

    SciTech Connect

    Neverova, Galina; Frisman, Efim

    2016-06-08

    We investigated Moran - Ricker model with time lag 1. It is made analytical and numerical study of the model. It is shown there is co-existence of various dynamic regimes under the same values of parameters. The model simultaneously possesses several different limit regimes: stable state, periodic fluctuations, and chaotic attractor. The research results show if present population size substantially depends on population number of previous year then it is observed quasi-periodic oscillations. Fluctuations with period 2 occur when the growth of population size is regulated by density dependence in the current year.

  10. Social desirability and self-reports: testing models of socially desirable responding.

    PubMed

    Holtgraves, Thomas

    2004-02-01

    The present research investigated the cognitive processes involved in responding to self-report items under varying conditions of social desirability. Participants in three experiments judged the extent to which a set of items (personality traits in Experiments 1 and 2; behaviors in Experiment 3) described them under instructions that either increased or decreased concerns with social desirability. Under most conditions, instructions that produced the greatest concern with social desirability resulted in the longest response times. This finding is consistent with the view that social desirability operates as an editing process; participants retrieve the requested information and then evaluate it before responding. There was also some evidence for individual differences in social desirability; participants scoring high on the trait of self-deception were generally faster at making these judgments than were participants scoring low on self-deception.

  11. Physical interpretation of mean local accumulation time of morphogen gradient formation

    PubMed Central

    Berezhkovskii, Alexander M.; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y.

    2011-01-01

    The paper deals with a reaction-diffusion problem that arises in developmental biology when describing the formation of the concentration profiles of signaling molecules, called morphogens, which control gene expression and, hence, cell differentiation. The mean local accumulation time, which is the mean time required to reach the steady state at a fixed point of a patterned tissue, is an important characteristic of the formation process. We show that this time is a sum of two times, the conditional mean first-passage time from the source to the observation point and the mean local accumulation time in the situation when the source is localized at the observation point. PMID:22029305

  12. Time-dependent local density measurements in unsteady flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenzie, R. L.; Monson, D. J.; Exberger, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    A laser-induced fluorescence technique for measuring the relative time-dependent density fluctuations in unsteady or turbulent flows is demonstrated. Using a 1.5-W continuous-wave Kr(+) laser, measurements have been obtained in 0.1-mm diameter by 1-mm-long sampling volumes in a Mach 3 flow of N2 seeded with biacetyl vapor. A signal amplitude resolution of 2% was achieved for a detection frequency bandwidth of 10 kHz. The measurement uncertainty was found to be dominated by noise behaving as photon statistical noise. The practical limits of signal-to-noise ratios have been characterized for a wide range of detection frequency bandwidths that encompasses those of interest in supersonic turbulence measurements.

  13. Timing matters: sonar call groups facilitate target localization in bats.

    PubMed

    Kothari, Ninad B; Wohlgemuth, Melville J; Hulgard, Katrine; Surlykke, Annemarie; Moss, Cynthia F

    2014-01-01

    To successfully negotiate a cluttered environment, an echolocating bat must control the timing of motor behaviors in response to dynamic sensory information. Here we detail the big brown bat's adaptive temporal control over sonar call production for tracking prey, moving predictably or unpredictably, under different experimental conditions. We studied the adaptive control of vocal-motor behaviors in free-flying big brown bats, Eptesicus fuscus, as they captured tethered and free-flying insects, in open and cluttered environments. We also studied adaptive sonar behavior in bats trained to track moving targets from a resting position. In each of these experiments, bats adjusted the features of their calls to separate target and clutter. Under many task conditions, flying bats produced prominent sonar sound groups identified as clusters of echolocation pulses with relatively stable intervals, surrounded by longer pulse intervals. In experiments where bats tracked approaching targets from a resting position, bats also produced sonar sound groups, and the prevalence of these sonar sound groups increased when motion of the target was unpredictable. We hypothesize that sonar sound groups produced during flight, and the sonar call doublets produced by a bat tracking a target from a resting position, help the animal resolve dynamic target location and represent the echo scene in greater detail. Collectively, our data reveal adaptive temporal control over sonar call production that allows the bat to negotiate a complex and dynamic environment.

  14. Timing matters: sonar call groups facilitate target localization in bats

    PubMed Central

    Kothari, Ninad B.; Wohlgemuth, Melville J.; Hulgard, Katrine; Surlykke, Annemarie; Moss, Cynthia F.

    2014-01-01

    To successfully negotiate a cluttered environment, an echolocating bat must control the timing of motor behaviors in response to dynamic sensory information. Here we detail the big brown bat's adaptive temporal control over sonar call production for tracking prey, moving predictably or unpredictably, under different experimental conditions. We studied the adaptive control of vocal-motor behaviors in free-flying big brown bats, Eptesicus fuscus, as they captured tethered and free-flying insects, in open and cluttered environments. We also studied adaptive sonar behavior in bats trained to track moving targets from a resting position. In each of these experiments, bats adjusted the features of their calls to separate target and clutter. Under many task conditions, flying bats produced prominent sonar sound groups identified as clusters of echolocation pulses with relatively stable intervals, surrounded by longer pulse intervals. In experiments where bats tracked approaching targets from a resting position, bats also produced sonar sound groups, and the prevalence of these sonar sound groups increased when motion of the target was unpredictable. We hypothesize that sonar sound groups produced during flight, and the sonar call doublets produced by a bat tracking a target from a resting position, help the animal resolve dynamic target location and represent the echo scene in greater detail. Collectively, our data reveal adaptive temporal control over sonar call production that allows the bat to negotiate a complex and dynamic environment. PMID:24860509

  15. Local time of Lévy random walks: A path integral approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zatloukal, Václav

    2017-05-01

    The local time of a stochastic process quantifies the amount of time that sample trajectories x (τ ) spend in the vicinity of an arbitrary point x . For a generic Hamiltonian, we employ the phase-space path-integral representation of random walk transition probabilities in order to quantify the properties of the local time. For time-independent systems, the resolvent of the Hamiltonian operator proves to be a central tool for this purpose. In particular, we focus on the local times of Lévy random walks (Lévy flights), which correspond to fractional diffusion equations.

  16. Water age, exposure time, and local flushing time in semi-enclosed, tidal basins with negligible freshwater inflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viero, Daniele Pietro; Defina, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Within the framework of tidally flushed, semi-enclosed basins with negligible freshwater inflow, and under steady periodic flow conditions, three frequently used local transport time scales to quantify the efficiency of water renewal, namely water age, exposure time, and local flushing time are studied and compared to each other. In these environments, water renewal is strongly controlled by diffusion, and it is significantly affected by the return flow (i.e., the fraction of effluent water that returns into the basin on each flood tide). The definition of water age is here modified to account for the return flow, in analogy with exposure time and local flushing time. We consider approximate time scales, whose accuracy is analyzed, in order to overcome problems related to the size of the computational domain and to reduce the computational effort. A new approximate procedure is introduced to estimate water age, which is based on the water aging rate. Also, the concept of local flushing time as a relevant time scale is introduced. Under steady periodic conditions, we demonstrate that the local flushing time quantitatively corresponds to water age, and well approximates exposure time when the flow is dominated by diffusion. Since the effort required to compute water age and exposure time is greater than that required to compute the local flushing time, the present results can also have a practical interest in the assessment of water renewal efficiency of semi-enclosed water basins. The results of a modeling study, in which the lagoon of Venice is used as a benchmark, confirm the substantial quantitative equivalence between these three transport time scales in highly diffusive environments.

  17. Schooling and a "Blamable Desire for Knowledge"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clabaugh, Gary K.

    2005-01-01

    As a teacher the author often wishes that his students were more curious. Yet, Alice Ramos (this issue) proposes that curiosity can be a vice. She writes that there are times when a student might be motivated by a "blamable desire for knowledge." Ramos bases this claim on a distinction made by Thomas Aquinas, the thirteenth-century Aristotelian…

  18. Position-dependent radiative transfer as a tool for studying Anderson localization: Delay time, time-reversal and coherent backscattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Tiggelen, B. A.; Skipetrov, S. E.; Page, J. H.

    2017-05-01

    Previous work has established that the localized regime of wave transport in open media is characterized by a position-dependent diffusion coefficient. In this work we study how the concept of position-dependent diffusion affects the delay time, the transverse confinement, the coherent backscattering, and the time reversal of waves. Definitions of energy transport velocity of localized waves are proposed. We start with a phenomenological model of radiative transfer and then present a novel perturbational approach based on the self-consistent theory of localization. The latter allows us to obtain results relevant for realistic experiments in disordered quasi-1D wave guides and 3D slabs.

  19. Acoustic Source Localization via Time Difference of Arrival Estimation for Distributed Sensor Networks Using Tera-Scale Optical Core Devices

    DOE PAGES

    Imam, Neena; Barhen, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    For real-time acoustic source localization applications, one of the primary challenges is the considerable growth in computational complexity associated with the emergence of ever larger, active or passive, distributed sensor networks. These sensors rely heavily on battery-operated system components to achieve highly functional automation in signal and information processing. In order to keep communication requirements minimal, it is desirable to perform as much processing on the receiver platforms as possible. However, the complexity of the calculations needed to achieve accurate source localization increases dramatically with the size of sensor arrays, resulting in substantial growth of computational requirements that cannot bemore » readily met with standard hardware. One option to meet this challenge builds upon the emergence of digital optical-core devices. The objective of this work was to explore the implementation of key building block algorithms used in underwater source localization on the optical-core digital processing platform recently introduced by Lenslet Inc. This demonstration of considerably faster signal processing capability should be of substantial significance to the design and innovation of future generations of distributed sensor networks.« less

  20. Time-Local Equation for the Exact Optimized Effective Potential in Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Sheng-Lun; Ho, Tak-San; Rabitz, Herschel; Chu, Shih-I.

    2017-06-01

    A long-standing challenge in the time-dependent density functional theory is to efficiently solve the exact time-dependent optimized effective potential (TDOEP) integral equation derived from orbital-dependent functionals, especially for the study of nonadiabatic dynamics in time-dependent external fields. In this Letter, we formulate a completely equivalent time-local TDOEP equation that admits a unique real-time solution in terms of time-dependent Kohn-Sham and effective memory orbitals. The time-local formulation is numerically implemented, with the incorporation of exponential memory loss to address the unaccounted for correlation component in the exact-exchange-only functional, to enable the study of the many-electron dynamics of a one-dimensional hydrogen chain. It is shown that the long time behavior of the electric dipole converges correctly and the zero-force theorem is fulfilled in the current implementation.

  1. Discrete-Time Local Value Iteration Adaptive Dynamic Programming: Admissibility and Termination Analysis.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qinglai; Liu, Derong; Lin, Qiao

    2016-08-03

    In this paper, a novel local value iteration adaptive dynamic programming (ADP) algorithm is developed to solve infinite horizon optimal control problems for discrete-time nonlinear systems. The focuses of this paper are to study admissibility properties and the termination criteria of discrete-time local value iteration ADP algorithms. In the discrete-time local value iteration ADP algorithm, the iterative value functions and the iterative control laws are both updated in a given subset of the state space in each iteration, instead of the whole state space. For the first time, admissibility properties of iterative control laws are analyzed for the local value iteration ADP algorithm. New termination criteria are established, which terminate the iterative local ADP algorithm with an admissible approximate optimal control law. Finally, simulation results are given to illustrate the performance of the developed algorithm.

  2. Flibanserin and Female Sexual Desire.

    PubMed

    Fantasia, Heidi Collins

    2016-01-01

    Female hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) is one type of sexual problem that can affect women. It is characterized by low or absent sexual desire that cannot be attributed to another cause and results in difficulty in interpersonal relationships. HSDD is not well understood, and women may not report symptoms of difficulties to their health care providers. In August 2015, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved flibanserin, a nonhormonal oral medication for the treatment of HSDD in premenopausal women. Flibanserin is the only currently available pharmacologic treatment for HSDD. This article will provide an overview of flibanserin, including potential adverse reactions, special considerations for use, and implications for nursing practice.

  3. Attosecond time delay in valence photoionization and photorecombination of argon: A time-dependent local-density-approximation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magrakvelidze, Maia; Madjet, Mohamed El-Amine; Dixit, Gopal; Ivanov, Misha; Chakraborty, Himadri S.

    2015-06-01

    We determine and analyze the quantum phases and time delays in photoionization and photorecombination of valence 3 p and 3 s electrons of argon using the Kohn-Sham local-density-functional approach. The time-dependent local-density approximation is used to account for the electron correlation. Resulting attosecond Wigner-Smith time delays show very good agreement with the recent experiment on argon that measured the delay in 3 p photorecombination [S. B. Schoun et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 153002 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.112.153002].

  4. Aligning Task Control with Desire for Control: Implications for Performance

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, Alex T.; Etcheverry, Paul E.

    2015-01-01

    The current study examined whether matches between task control and participants' desire for control over their environment lead to better task performance than mismatches. Work control and desire for control were manipulated, and participants engaged in timed tasks. As predicted, performance was higher in cases of match, even when task control and desire for control were low. Task control and desire for control may predict work performance in combination, highlighting the importance of Person-Environment Fit theory for both selection and work design. By manipulating desire for control, our research also explores the potentially state-dependent quality of this individual difference variable. PMID:26045630

  5. Aligning Task Control with Desire for Control: Implications for Performance.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Alex T; Etcheverry, Paul E

    The current study examined whether matches between task control and participants' desire for control over their environment lead to better task performance than mismatches. Work control and desire for control were manipulated, and participants engaged in timed tasks. As predicted, performance was higher in cases of match, even when task control and desire for control were low. Task control and desire for control may predict work performance in combination, highlighting the importance of Person-Environment Fit theory for both selection and work design. By manipulating desire for control, our research also explores the potentially state-dependent quality of this individual difference variable.

  6. Lifelong Learning, Policy and Desire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Heather

    2008-01-01

    Recent lifelong learning policies have been criticized for creating an illusion of freedom whilst simultaneously reducing choice. The concept of desire permits engagement with the conscious and unconscious drives that underpin individual decision-making, which direct the life course. Utilizing the ideas of Hume and Spinoza, the present article…

  7. A Compelling Desire for Deafness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veale, David

    2006-01-01

    A case is described of a patient who has a compelling and persistent desire to become deaf. She often kept cotton wool moistened with oil in her ears and was learning sign language. Living without sound appeared to be a severe form of avoidance behavior from hyperacusis and misophonia. She had a borderline personality disorder that was associated…

  8. Becoming-Teachers: Desiring Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercieca, Duncan

    2012-01-01

    This article proposes a reading of the lives of teachers through a Deleuzian-Guattarian materialistic approach. By asking the question "what kind of life do teachers live?" this article reminds us that teachers sometimes welcome the imposed policies, procedures and programmes, the consequences of which remove them from students. This desire is…

  9. A Compelling Desire for Deafness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veale, David

    2006-01-01

    A case is described of a patient who has a compelling and persistent desire to become deaf. She often kept cotton wool moistened with oil in her ears and was learning sign language. Living without sound appeared to be a severe form of avoidance behavior from hyperacusis and misophonia. She had a borderline personality disorder that was associated…

  10. A METHOD TO INCORPORATE ECOLOGY INTO RESIDENCE TIME OF CHEMICALS IN EMBAYMENTS: LOCAL EFFECT TIME

    EPA Science Inventory

    Residence times are classically defined by the physical and chemical aspects of water bodies rather than by their ecological implications. Therefore, a more clear and direct connection between the residence times and ecological effects is necessary to quantitatively relate these ...

  11. A METHOD TO INCORPORATE ECOLOGY INTO RESIDENCE TIME OF CHEMICALS IN EMBAYMENTS: LOCAL EFFECT TIME

    EPA Science Inventory

    Residence times are classically defined by the physical and chemical aspects of water bodies rather than by their ecological implications. Therefore, a more clear and direct connection between the residence times and ecological effects is necessary to quantitatively relate these ...

  12. Characterizing Time Irreversibility in Disordered Fermionic Systems by the Effect of Local Perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardhan, Shreya; De Tomasi, Giuseppe; Heyl, Markus; Heller, Eric J.; Pollmann, Frank

    2017-07-01

    We study the effects of local perturbations on the dynamics of disordered fermionic systems in order to characterize time irreversibility. We focus on three different systems: the noninteracting Anderson and Aubry-André-Harper (AAH) models and the interacting spinless disordered t -V chain. First, we consider the effect on the full many-body wave functions by measuring the Loschmidt echo (LE). We show that in the extended or ergodic phase the LE decays exponentially fast with time, while in the localized phase the decay is algebraic. We demonstrate that the exponent of the decay of the LE in the localized phase diverges proportionally to the single-particle localization length as we approach the metal-insulator transition in the AAH model. Second, we probe different phases of disordered systems by studying the time expectation value of local observables evolved with two Hamiltonians that differ by a spatially local perturbation. Remarkably, we find that many-body localized systems could lose memory of the initial state in the long-time limit, in contrast to the noninteracting localized phase where some memory is always preserved.

  13. Reconstructed Task Orientation and Local Time Governance in Compulsory Schools: The Swedish Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westlund, Ingrid

    2007-01-01

    Recently, a five-year trial period without a set timetable for compulsory school education in 79 municipalities was concluded in Sweden. The overall idea of the trial was to facilitate local participation, local time governance and flexible learning. Within the pilot trial, each individual pupil's school activities were supposed to be designed to…

  14. Reconstructed Task Orientation and Local Time Governance in Compulsory Schools: The Swedish Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westlund, Ingrid

    2007-01-01

    Recently, a five-year trial period without a set timetable for compulsory school education in 79 municipalities was concluded in Sweden. The overall idea of the trial was to facilitate local participation, local time governance and flexible learning. Within the pilot trial, each individual pupil's school activities were supposed to be designed to…

  15. Precise Time-Tag Generator For A Local-Area-Network Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stauffer, David R.; Tran, Khoa Duy

    1995-01-01

    Time-tag-generating circuit designed for use in LAN monitor, monitors frames of data transmitted among computers on local-area network (LAN). To each frame of data that LAN monitor receives from LAN, time-tag generator appends ancillary data on time of arrival of frame, precise to within 1 microsecond of centrally generated time signal. Inserts ancillary time data in place of already used frame-check data before frames of data stored in memory of LAN monitor.

  16. Local regularity for time-dependent tug-of-war games with varying probabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parviainen, Mikko; Ruosteenoja, Eero

    2016-07-01

    We study local regularity properties of value functions of time-dependent tug-of-war games. For games with constant probabilities we get local Lipschitz continuity. For more general games with probabilities depending on space and time we obtain Hölder and Harnack estimates. The games have a connection to the normalized p (x , t)-parabolic equation ut = Δu + (p (x , t) - 2) Δ∞N u.

  17. Efficient Multi-Stage Time Marching for Viscous Flows via Local Preconditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleb, William L.; Wood, William A.; vanLeer, Bram

    1999-01-01

    A new method has been developed to accelerate the convergence of explicit time-marching, laminar, Navier-Stokes codes through the combination of local preconditioning and multi-stage time marching optimization. Local preconditioning is a technique to modify the time-dependent equations so that all information moves or decays at nearly the same rate, thus relieving the stiffness for a system of equations. Multi-stage time marching can be optimized by modifying its coefficients to account for the presence of viscous terms, allowing larger time steps. We show it is possible to optimize the time marching scheme for a wide range of cell Reynolds numbers for the scalar advection-diffusion equation, and local preconditioning allows this optimization to be applied to the Navier-Stokes equations. Convergence acceleration of the new method is demonstrated through numerical experiments with circular advection and laminar boundary-layer flow over a flat plate.

  18. Children's desire for perioperative information.

    PubMed

    Fortier, Michelle A; Chorney, Jill MacLaren; Rony, Rachel Yaffa Zisk; Perret-Karimi, Danielle; Rinehart, Joseph B; Camilon, Felizardo S; Kain, Zeev N

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to identify what perioperative information children want to receive from the medical staff. As a first step, we developed an instrument based on a qualitative study conducted with children in Great Britain, input from a focus group, and input from school children. On the day of surgery, 143 children aged 7-17 yr completed a 40-item assessment of desired surgical information and a measure of anxiety (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for Children). Parents completed a measure assessing their child's temperament (Emotionality, Activity, Sociability, and Impulsivity Survey) and a measure of their own anxiety (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory). Results indicated that the vast majority of children had a desire for comprehensive information about their surgery, including information about pain and anesthesia, and procedural information and information about potential complications. The most highly endorsed items by children involved information about pain. Children who were more anxious endorsed a stronger desire for pain information and lesser tendency to avoid information. Younger children wanted to know what the perioperative environment would look like more than adolescent children. We conclude that the majority of children aged 7-17 yr who undergo surgery want to be given comprehensive perioperative information and health care providers should ensure adequate information regarding postoperative pain is provided.

  19. Desirable Difficulties in Vocabulary Learning.

    PubMed

    Bjork, Robert A; Kroll, Judith F

    2015-01-01

    In this article we discuss the role of desirable difficulties in vocabulary learning from two perspectives, one having to do with identifying conditions of learning that impose initial challenges to the learner but then benefit later retention and transfer, and the other having to do with the role of certain difficulties that are intrinsic to language processes, are engaged during word learning, and reflect how language is understood and produced. From each perspective we discuss evidence that supports the notion that difficulties in learning and imposed costs to language processing may produce benefits because they are likely to increase conceptual understanding. We then consider the consequences of these processes for actual second-language learning and suggest that some of the domain-general cognitive advantages that have been reported for proficient bilinguals may reflect difficulties imposed by the learning process, and by the requirement to negotiate cross-language competition, that are broadly desirable. As Alice Healy and her collaborators were perhaps the first to demonstrate, research on desirable difficulties in vocabulary and language learning holds the promise of bringing together research traditions on memory and language that have much to offer each other.

  20. Desirable Difficulties in Vocabulary Learning

    PubMed Central

    BJORK, ROBERT A.; KROLL, JUDITH F.

    2016-01-01

    In this article we discuss the role of desirable difficulties in vocabulary learning from two perspectives, one having to do with identifying conditions of learning that impose initial challenges to the learner but then benefit later retention and transfer, and the other having to do with the role of certain difficulties that are intrinsic to language processes, are engaged during word learning, and reflect how language is understood and produced. From each perspective we discuss evidence that supports the notion that difficulties in learning and imposed costs to language processing may produce benefits because they are likely to increase conceptual understanding. We then consider the consequences of these processes for actual second-language learning and suggest that some of the domain-general cognitive advantages that have been reported for proficient bilinguals may reflect difficulties imposed by the learning process, and by the requirement to negotiate cross-language competition, that are broadly desirable. As Alice Healy and her collaborators were perhaps the first to demonstrate, research on desirable difficulties in vocabulary and language learning holds the promise of bringing together research traditions on memory and language that have much to offer each other. PMID:26255443

  1. Real-Time Multi-Target Localization from Unmanned Aerial Vehicles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuan; Liu, Jinghong; Zhou, Qianfei

    2016-12-25

    In order to improve the reconnaissance efficiency of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) electro-optical stabilized imaging systems, a real-time multi-target localization scheme based on an UAV electro-optical stabilized imaging system is proposed. First, a target location model is studied. Then, the geodetic coordinates of multi-targets are calculated using the homogeneous coordinate transformation. On the basis of this, two methods which can improve the accuracy of the multi-target localization are proposed: (1) the real-time zoom lens distortion correction method; (2) a recursive least squares (RLS) filtering method based on UAV dead reckoning. The multi-target localization error model is established using Monte Carlo theory. In an actual flight, the UAV flight altitude is 1140 m. The multi-target localization results are within the range of allowable error. After we use a lens distortion correction method in a single image, the circular error probability (CEP) of the multi-target localization is reduced by 7%, and 50 targets can be located at the same time. The RLS algorithm can adaptively estimate the location data based on multiple images. Compared with multi-target localization based on a single image, CEP of the multi-target localization using RLS is reduced by 25%. The proposed method can be implemented on a small circuit board to operate in real time. This research is expected to significantly benefit small UAVs which need multi-target geo-location functions.

  2. Real-Time Multi-Target Localization from Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuan; Liu, Jinghong; Zhou, Qianfei

    2016-01-01

    In order to improve the reconnaissance efficiency of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) electro-optical stabilized imaging systems, a real-time multi-target localization scheme based on an UAV electro-optical stabilized imaging system is proposed. First, a target location model is studied. Then, the geodetic coordinates of multi-targets are calculated using the homogeneous coordinate transformation. On the basis of this, two methods which can improve the accuracy of the multi-target localization are proposed: (1) the real-time zoom lens distortion correction method; (2) a recursive least squares (RLS) filtering method based on UAV dead reckoning. The multi-target localization error model is established using Monte Carlo theory. In an actual flight, the UAV flight altitude is 1140 m. The multi-target localization results are within the range of allowable error. After we use a lens distortion correction method in a single image, the circular error probability (CEP) of the multi-target localization is reduced by 7%, and 50 targets can be located at the same time. The RLS algorithm can adaptively estimate the location data based on multiple images. Compared with multi-target localization based on a single image, CEP of the multi-target localization using RLS is reduced by 25%. The proposed method can be implemented on a small circuit board to operate in real time. This research is expected to significantly benefit small UAVs which need multi-target geo-location functions. PMID:28029145

  3. Subcellular localization-dependent changes in EGFP fluorescence lifetime measured by time-resolved flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Gohar, Ali Vaziri; Cao, Ruofan; Jenkins, Patrick; Li, Wenyan; Houston, Jessica P.; Houston, Kevin D.

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular protein transport and localization to subcellular regions are processes necessary for normal protein function. Fluorescent proteins can be fused to proteins of interest to track movement and determine localization within a cell. Currently, fluorescence microscopy combined with image processing is most often used to study protein movement and subcellular localization. In this contribution we evaluate a high-throughput time-resolved flow cytometry approach to correlate intracellular localization of human LC3 protein with the fluorescence lifetime of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). Subcellular LC3 localization to autophagosomes is a marker of the cellular process called autophagy. In breast cancer cells expressing native EGFP and EGFP-LC3 fusion proteins, we measured the fluorescence intensity and lifetime of (i) diffuse EGFP (ii) punctate EGFP-LC3 and (iii) diffuse EGFP-ΔLC3 after amino acid starvation to induce autophagy-dependent LC3 localization. We verify EGFP-LC3 localization with low-throughput confocal microscopy and compare to fluorescence intensity measured by standard flow cytometry. Our results demonstrate that time-resolved flow cytometry can be correlated to subcellular localization of EGFP fusion proteins by measuring changes in fluorescence lifetime. PMID:24010001

  4. Local Stable and Unstable Manifolds and Their Control in Nonautonomous Finite-Time Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasuriya, Sanjeeva

    2016-08-01

    It is well known that stable and unstable manifolds strongly influence fluid motion in unsteady flows. These emanate from hyperbolic trajectories, with the structures moving nonautonomously in time. The local directions of emanation at each instance in time is the focus of this article. Within a nearly autonomous setting, it is shown that these time-varying directions can be characterised through the accumulated effect of velocity shear. Connections to Oseledets spaces and projection operators in exponential dichotomies are established. Availability of data for both infinite- and finite-time intervals is considered. With microfluidic flow control in mind, a methodology for manipulating these directions in any prescribed time-varying fashion by applying a local velocity shear is developed. The results are verified for both smoothly and discontinuously time-varying directions using finite-time Lyapunov exponent fields, and excellent agreement is obtained.

  5. Exposing local symmetries in distorted driven lattices via time-averaged invariants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wulf, T.; Morfonios, C. V.; Diakonos, F. K.; Schmelcher, P.

    2016-05-01

    Time-averaged two-point currents are derived and shown to be spatially invariant within domains of local translation or inversion symmetry for arbitrary time-periodic quantum systems in one dimension. These currents are shown to provide a valuable tool for detecting deformations of a spatial symmetry in static and driven lattices. In the static case the invariance of the two-point currents is related to the presence of time-reversal invariance and/or probability current conservation. The obtained insights into the wave functions are further exploited for a symmetry-based convergence check which is applicable for globally broken but locally retained potential symmetries.

  6. Numerical approximations to nonlinear conservation laws with locally varying time and space grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osher, S.; Sanders, R.

    1983-01-01

    Numerical approximations to the initial value problem for nonlinear systems of conservation laws are considered. The considered system is said to be hyperbolic when all eigenvalues of every real linear combination of the Jacobian matrices are real. Solutions may develop discontinuities in finite time, even when the initial data are smooth. In the investigation, explicit finite difference methods which use locally varying time grids are considered. The global CFL restriction is replaced by a local restriction. The numerical flux function is studied from a finite volume viewpoint, and a differencing technique is developed at interface points between regions of distinct time increments.

  7. Body, costume, and desire in Christopher Marlowe.

    PubMed

    Woods, G

    1992-01-01

    All the desired youths in Marlowe come clothed in favors, the tokens of older and richer men's yearning. These bribes and rewards, often feminine or effeminate ornaments, not only beautify the already gorgeous bodies of young men, but also label and augment their value and their power. The moment of virility's blooming, in adolescence, is seen as a time when boys can negotiate favorable terms of entry into the realms of manhood by the seductive use of their glamor. For their part, desirous men are distracted from the affairs and cares of state by their nostalgic encounters with girlish boys, at worst, to the extent that their own patriarchal power is compromised by sodomitic dalliance. Marlowe's involvement in these plots is iterative and committed.

  8. Localized polar cap precipitation in association with nonstorm time airglow patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Ying; Nishimura, Yukitoshi; Lyons, Larry R.; Shiokawa, Kazuo

    2017-01-01

    Although airglow patches are traditionally regarded as high-density ionospheric plasma unrelated to local precipitation, past observations were limited to disturbed conditions. Recent nonstorm time observations show patches to be associated with ionospheric flow channels and localized field-aligned currents. We examine whether nonstorm time patches are related also to polar cap precipitation using Fast Auroral Snapshot-imager conjunctions. We have identified localized precipitation that is enhanced within patches in comparison to the weak polar rain outside patches. The precipitation consists of structured or diffuse soft electron fluxes. While the latter resembles polar rain only with higher fluxes, the former consists of discrete fluxes enhanced by 1-2 orders of magnitude from several to several hundred eV. Therefore, patches should be regarded as part of a localized magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling system along open magnetic field lines and their transpolar evolution as a reflection of mesoscale magnetotail lobe processes. The precipitation a minor contributor to patch ionization.

  9. Timing-based Localization of In-Band Wormhole Tunnels in MANETs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    Timing-based Localization of In-Band Wormhole Tunnels in MANETs Jinsub Kim∗, Dan Sterne†, Rommie Hardy‡, Roshan K. Thomas†, and Lang Tong∗ ∗ECE Dept...rhardy@arl.army.mil ABSTRACT The problem of localizing in-band wormhole tunnels in MAN- ETs is considered. In an in-band wormhole attack, colluding...to disrupt traffic throughout the network. An example is the in-band wormhole attack [19], in which colluding nodes create the illusion that two

  10. A Two-Phase Time Synchronization-Free Localization Algorithm for Underwater Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Luo, Junhai; Fan, Liying

    2017-03-30

    Underwater Sensor Networks (UWSNs) can enable a broad range of applications such as resource monitoring, disaster prevention, and navigation-assistance. Sensor nodes location in UWSNs is an especially relevant topic. Global Positioning System (GPS) information is not suitable for use in UWSNs because of the underwater propagation problems. Hence, some localization algorithms based on the precise time synchronization between sensor nodes that have been proposed for UWSNs are not feasible. In this paper, we propose a localization algorithm called Two-Phase Time Synchronization-Free Localization Algorithm (TP-TSFLA). TP-TSFLA contains two phases, namely, range-based estimation phase and range-free evaluation phase. In the first phase, we address a time synchronization-free localization scheme based on the Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm to obtain the coordinates of the unknown sensor nodes. In the second phase, we propose a Circle-based Range-Free Localization Algorithm (CRFLA) to locate the unlocalized sensor nodes which cannot obtain the location information through the first phase. In the second phase, sensor nodes which are localized in the first phase act as the new anchor nodes to help realize localization. Hence, in this algorithm, we use a small number of mobile beacons to help obtain the location information without any other anchor nodes. Besides, to improve the precision of the range-free method, an extension of CRFLA achieved by designing a coordinate adjustment scheme is updated. The simulation results show that TP-TSFLA can achieve a relative high localization ratio without time synchronization.

  11. A Two-Phase Time Synchronization-Free Localization Algorithm for Underwater Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Junhai; Fan, Liying

    2017-01-01

    Underwater Sensor Networks (UWSNs) can enable a broad range of applications such as resource monitoring, disaster prevention, and navigation-assistance. Sensor nodes location in UWSNs is an especially relevant topic. Global Positioning System (GPS) information is not suitable for use in UWSNs because of the underwater propagation problems. Hence, some localization algorithms based on the precise time synchronization between sensor nodes that have been proposed for UWSNs are not feasible. In this paper, we propose a localization algorithm called Two-Phase Time Synchronization-Free Localization Algorithm (TP-TSFLA). TP-TSFLA contains two phases, namely, range-based estimation phase and range-free evaluation phase. In the first phase, we address a time synchronization-free localization scheme based on the Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm to obtain the coordinates of the unknown sensor nodes. In the second phase, we propose a Circle-based Range-Free Localization Algorithm (CRFLA) to locate the unlocalized sensor nodes which cannot obtain the location information through the first phase. In the second phase, sensor nodes which are localized in the first phase act as the new anchor nodes to help realize localization. Hence, in this algorithm, we use a small number of mobile beacons to help obtain the location information without any other anchor nodes. Besides, to improve the precision of the range-free method, an extension of CRFLA achieved by designing a coordinate adjustment scheme is updated. The simulation results show that TP-TSFLA can achieve a relative high localization ratio without time synchronization. PMID:28358342

  12. Visualizing desirable patient healthcare experiences.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sandra S; Kim, Hyung T; Chen, Jie; An, Lingling

    2010-01-01

    High healthcare cost has drawn much attention and healthcare service providers (HSPs) are expected to deliver high-quality and consistent care. Therefore, an intimate understanding of the most desirable experience from a patient's and/or family's perspective as well as effective mapping and communication of such findings should facilitate HSPs' efforts in attaining sustainable competitive advantage in an increasingly discerning environment. This study describes (a) the critical quality attributes (CQAs) of the experience desired by patients and (b) the application of two visualization tools that are relatively new to the healthcare sector, namely the "spider-web diagram" and "promotion and detraction matrix." The visualization tools are tested with primary data collected from telephone surveys of 1,800 patients who had received care during calendar year 2005 at 6 of 61 hospitals within St. Louis, Missouri-based, Ascension Health. Five CQAs were found by factor analysis. The spider-web diagram illustrates that communication and empowerment and compassionate and respectful care are the most important CQAs, and accordingly, the promotion and detraction matrix shows those attributes that have the greatest effect for creating promoters, preventing detractors, and improving consumer's likelihood to recommend the healthcare provider.

  13. Dynamical localization in chaotic systems: Spectral statistics and localization measure in the kicked rotator as a paradigm for time-dependent and time-independent systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manos, Thanos; Robnik, Marko

    2013-06-01

    We study the kicked rotator in the classically fully chaotic regime using Izrailev's N-dimensional model for various N≤4000, which in the limit N→∞ tends to the quantized kicked rotator. We do treat not only the case K=5, as studied previously, but also many different values of the classical kick parameter 5≤K≤35 and many different values of the quantum parameter k∈[5,60]. We describe the features of dynamical localization of chaotic eigenstates as a paradigm for other both time-periodic and time-independent (autonomous) fully chaotic or/and mixed-type Hamilton systems. We generalize the scaling variable Λ=l∞/N to the case of anomalous diffusion in the classical phase space by deriving the localization length l∞ for the case of generalized classical diffusion. We greatly improve the accuracy and statistical significance of the numerical calculations, giving rise to the following conclusions: (1) The level-spacing distribution of the eigenphases (or quasienergies) is very well described by the Brody distribution, systematically better than by other proposed models, for various Brody exponents βBR. (2) We study the eigenfunctions of the Floquet operator and characterize their localization properties using the information entropy measure, which after normalization is given by βloc in the interval [0,1]. The level repulsion parameters βBR and βloc are almost linearly related, close to the identity line. (3) We show the existence of a scaling law between βloc and the relative localization length Λ, now including the regimes of anomalous diffusion. The above findings are important also for chaotic eigenstates in time-independent systems [Batistić and Robnik, J. Phys. A: Math. Gen.1751-811310.1088/1751-8113/43/21/215101 43, 215101 (2010); arXiv:1302.7174 (2013)], where the Brody distribution is confirmed to a very high degree of precision for dynamically localized chaotic eigenstates, even in the mixed-type systems (after separation of regular and

  14. Real-time EEG Source-mapping Toolbox (REST): Online ICA and source localization.

    PubMed

    Pion-Tonachini, Luca; Hsu, Sheng-Hsiou; Makeig, Scott; Jung, Tzyy-Ping; Cauwenberghs, Gert

    2015-01-01

    The Electroencephalogram (EEG) is a noninvasive functional brain activity recording method that shows promise for becoming a 3-D cortical imaging modality with high temporal resolution. Currently, most of the tools developed for EEG analysis focus mainly on offline processing. This study introduces and demonstrates the Real-time EEG Source-mapping Toolbox (REST), an extension to the widely distributed EEGLAB environment. REST allows blind source separation of EEG data in real-time using Online Recursive Independent Component Analysis (ORICA), plus near real-time localization of separated sources. Two source localization methods are available to fit equivalent current dipoles or estimate spatial source distributions of selected sources. Selected measures of raw EEG data or component activations (e.g. time series of the data, spectral changes over time, equivalent current dipoles, etc.) can be visualized in near real-time. Finally, this study demonstrates the accuracy and functionality of REST with data from two experiments and discusses some relevant applications.

  15. Local time asymmetries and toroidal field line resonances: Global magnetospheric modeling in SWMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellington, S. M.; Moldwin, M. B.; Liemohn, M. W.

    2016-03-01

    We present evidence of resonant wave-wave coupling via toroidal field line resonance (FLR) signatures in the Space Weather Modeling Framework's (SWMF) global, terrestrial magnetospheric model in one simulation driven by a synthetic upstream solar wind with embedded broadband dynamic pressure fluctuations. Using in situ, stationary point measurements of the radial electric field along the 1500 LT meridian, we show that SWMF reproduces a multiharmonic, continuous distribution of FLRs exemplified by 180° phase reversals and amplitude peaks across the resonant L shells. By linearly increasing the amplitude of the dynamic pressure fluctuations in time, we observe a commensurate increase in the amplitude of the radial electric and azimuthal magnetic field fluctuations, which is consistent with the solar wind driver being the dominant source of the fast mode energy. While we find no discernible local time changes in the FLR frequencies despite large-scale, monotonic variations in the dayside equatorial mass density, in selectively sampling resonant points and examining spectral resonance widths, we observe significant radial, harmonic, and time-dependent local time asymmetries in the radial electric field amplitudes. A weak but persistent local time asymmetry exists in measures of the estimated coupling efficiency between the fast mode and toroidal wave fields, which exhibits a radial dependence consistent with the coupling strength examined by Mann et al. (1999) and Zhu and Kivelson (1988). We discuss internal structural mechanisms and additional external energy sources that may account for these asymmetries as we find that local time variations in the strength of the compressional driver are not the predominant source of the FLR amplitude asymmetries. These include resonant mode coupling of observed Kelvin-Helmholtz surface wave generated Pc5 band ultralow frequency pulsations, local time differences in local ionospheric dampening rates, and variations in azimuthal

  16. Characterizing many-body localization by out-of-time-ordered correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Rong-Qiang; Lu, Zhong-Yi

    2017-02-01

    The out-of-time-ordered (OTO) correlation is a key quantity for quantifying quantum chaoticity and has been recently used in the investigation of quantum holography. Here we use it to study and characterize many-body localization (MBL). We find that a long-time logarithmic variation of the OTO correlation occurs in the MBL phase but is absent in the Anderson localized and ergodic phases. We extract a localization length in the MBL phase, which depends logarithmically on interaction and diverges at a critical interaction. Furthermore, the infinite-time "thermal" fluctuation of the OTO correlation is zero (finite) in the ergodic (MBL) phase and thus can be considered as an order parameter for the ergodic-MBL transition, through which the transition can be identified and characterized. Specifically, the critical point and the related critical exponents can be calculated.

  17. Desirable functional processes: A conceptual approach for evaluating ecological condition

    Treesearch

    Alvin L. Medina; Malchus B. Baker; Daniel G. Neary

    1996-01-01

    Determining what "desired future condition" actually means has been viewed as a moving target approach for developing ecosystem management plans. The difficulty arises from trying to define what the desired condition are for any given site. In addition, definitions may be plagued with inconsistencies, contention and argument, indeterminate time frames and...

  18. Fourth order exponential time differencing method with local discontinuous Galerkin approximation for coupled nonlinear Schrodinger equations

    DOE PAGES

    Liang, Xiao; Khaliq, Abdul Q. M.; Xing, Yulong

    2015-01-23

    In this paper, we study a local discontinuous Galerkin method combined with fourth order exponential time differencing Runge-Kutta time discretization and a fourth order conservative method for solving the nonlinear Schrödinger equations. Based on different choices of numerical fluxes, we propose both energy-conserving and energy-dissipative local discontinuous Galerkin methods, and have proven the error estimates for the semi-discrete methods applied to linear Schrödinger equation. The numerical methods are proven to be highly efficient and stable for long-range soliton computations. Finally, extensive numerical examples are provided to illustrate the accuracy, efficiency and reliability of the proposed methods.

  19. Social desirability effects in driver behavior inventories.

    PubMed

    Af Wåhlberg, A E

    2010-04-01

    The use of lie scales to control for common method variance in driver behavior inventories has been very limited. Given that such questionnaires often use self-reported safety variables as criteria, and have social implications, the risk of artefactual associations is high. A questionnaire containing scales from several well known driver inventories that have been claimed to predict traffic accident involvement was distributed three times to a group of young drivers in a driver education program, as well as a random group twice. The Driver Impression Management scale (DIM) was used to control for socially desirable responding. For all behavior scales, the correlation with the DIM scale was substantial. If a scale correlated with self-reported crashes, the amount of predictive power was more than halved when social desirability was controlled for. Results were similar for both samples and all waves. The predictive power of the behavior scales was not increased when values were averaged over questionnaire waves, as should have been the case if the measurement and predictive power were valid. Results were similar for self-reported penalty points. The present results indicate that even the most well-known and accepted psychometric scales used in driver research are susceptible to social desirability bias. As social desirability is only one of a number of common method variance mechanisms that can create artefactual associations, and the great popularity of the self-report methodology, the problem for traffic research is grave. Organizations that fund traffic safety research need to re-evaluate their policies regarding what methods are acceptable. The use of self-reported independent and dependent variables can lead to directly misleading results, with negative effects on traffic safety. Copyright 2010 National Safety Council and Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. From desires to behavior: Moderating factors in a fertility transition

    PubMed Central

    Hayford, Sarah R.; Agadjanian, Victor

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Extensive research in both developed and developing countries has shown that preferences and intentions for future childbearing predict behavior. However, very little of this research has examined high-fertility contexts in sub-Saharan Africa. In particular, the factors that increase or decrease correspondence between fertility desires and behavior in these settings are not well understood. OBJECTIVE This article documents the degree to which the desire to stop childbearing predicts fertility behavior over the short term among married women in rural southern Mozambique, a context where fertility transition is still in the early stages. Analyses test the moderating powers of individual, household, and community characteristics. METHODS Analyses use data from a longitudinal survey of married women of reproductive age (N=1678) carried out in 2006 and 2009 in rural areas of southern Mozambique. Logistic regression models are estimated to predict childbearing between 2006 and 2009 based on desires to stop childbearing and characteristics measured in 2006. RESULTS As expected, the desire to stop childbearing is strongly predictive of fertility behavior. Household wealth, local adult AIDS mortality, and being married to an unsuccessful labor migrant are associated with higher correspondence between reported desire to stop childbearing and fertility behavior. CONCLUSIONS Both factors related to the ability to carry out desires to stop childbearing and factors related to the strength and consistency of these desires moderate the association between desires and behaviors. Future research should expand measurement of fertility preferences to incorporate their strength and consistency as well as direction. PMID:23626485

  1. From desires to behavior: Moderating factors in a fertility transition.

    PubMed

    Hayford, Sarah R; Agadjanian, Victor

    2012-05-31

    Extensive research in both developed and developing countries has shown that preferences and intentions for future childbearing predict behavior. However, very little of this research has examined high-fertility contexts in sub-Saharan Africa. In particular, the factors that increase or decrease correspondence between fertility desires and behavior in these settings are not well understood. This article documents the degree to which the desire to stop childbearing predicts fertility behavior over the short term among married women in rural southern Mozambique, a context where fertility transition is still in the early stages. Analyses test the moderating powers of individual, household, and community characteristics. Analyses use data from a longitudinal survey of married women of reproductive age (N=1678) carried out in 2006 and 2009 in rural areas of southern Mozambique. Logistic regression models are estimated to predict childbearing between 2006 and 2009 based on desires to stop childbearing and characteristics measured in 2006. As expected, the desire to stop childbearing is strongly predictive of fertility behavior. Household wealth, local adult AIDS mortality, and being married to an unsuccessful labor migrant are associated with higher correspondence between reported desire to stop childbearing and fertility behavior. Both factors related to the ability to carry out desires to stop childbearing and factors related to the strength and consistency of these desires moderate the association between desires and behaviors. Future research should expand measurement of fertility preferences to incorporate their strength and consistency as well as direction.

  2. Time series-based damage detection and localization algorithm with application to the ASCE benchmark structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, K. Krishnan; Kiremidjian, Anne S.; Law, Kincho H.

    2006-03-01

    In this paper, a time series algorithm is presented for damage identification and localization. The vibration signals obtained from sensors are modeled as autoregressive moving average (ARMA) time series. A new damage-sensitive feature, DSF, is defined as a function of the first three auto regressive (AR) components. It is found that the mean values of the DSF for the damaged and undamaged signals are different. Thus, a hypothesis test involving the t-test is used to obtain a damage decision. Two damage localization indices LI 1 and LI 2, are introduced based on the AR coefficients. At the sensor locations where damage is introduced, the values of LI 1 and LI 2 appear to increase from their values obtained at the undamaged baseline state. The damage detection and localization algorithms are valid for stationary signals obtained from linear systems. To test the efficacy of the damage detection and localization methodologies, the algorithm has been tested on the analytical and experimental results of the ASCE benchmark structure. In contrast to prior pattern classification and statistical signal processing algorithms that have been able to identify primarily severe damage and have not been able to localize the damage effectively, the proposed algorithm is able to identify and localize minor to severe damage as defined for the benchmark structure.

  3. Local dominance of exotic plants declines with residence time: a role for plant–soil feedback?

    PubMed Central

    Speek, Tanja A.A.; Schaminée, Joop H.J.; Stam, Jeltje M.; Lotz, Lambertus A.P.; Ozinga, Wim A.; van der Putten, Wim H.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that introduced exotic plant species may be released from their native soil-borne pathogens, but that they become exposed to increased soil pathogen activity in the new range when time since introduction increases. Other studies have shown that introduced exotic plant species become less dominant when time since introduction increases, and that plant abundance may be controlled by soil-borne pathogens; however, no study yet has tested whether these soil effects might explain the decline in dominance of exotic plant species following their initial invasiveness. Here we determine plant–soil feedback of 20 plant species that have been introduced into The Netherlands. We tested the hypotheses that (i) exotic plant species with a longer residence time have a more negative soil feedback and (ii) greater local dominance of the introduced exotic plant species correlates with less negative, or more positive, plant–soil feedback. Although the local dominance of exotic plant species decreased with time since introduction, there was no relationship of local dominance with plant–soil feedback. Plant–soil feedback also did not become more negative with increasing time since introduction. We discuss why our results may deviate from some earlier published studies and why plant–soil feedback may not in all cases, or not in all comparisons, explain patterns of local dominance of introduced exotic plant species. PMID:25770013

  4. Divergent selection on flowering time contributes to local adaptation in Mimulus guttatus populations.

    PubMed

    Hall, Megan C; Willis, John H

    2006-12-01

    The timing of when to initiate reproduction is an important transition in any organism's life cycle. There is much variation in flowering time among populations, but we do not know to what degree this variation contributes to local adaptation. Here we use a reciprocal transplant experiment to examine the presence of divergent natural selection for flowering time and local adaptation between two distinct populations of Mimulus guttatus. We plant both parents and hybrids (to tease apart differences in suites of associated parental traits) between these two populations into each of the two native environments and measure floral, vegetative, life-history, and fitness characters to assess which traits are under selection at each site. Analysis of fitness components indicates that each of these plant populations is locally adapted. We obtain striking evidence for divergent natural selection on date of first flower production at these two sites. Early flowering is favored at the montane site, which is inhabited by annual plants and characterized by dry soils in midsummer, whereas intermediate (though later) flowering dates are selectively favored at the temperate coastal site, which is inhabited by perennial plants and is almost continually moist. Divergent selection on flowering time contributes to local adaptation between these two populations of M. guttatus, suggesting that genetic differentiation in the timing of reproduction may also serve as a partial reproductive isolating barrier to gene flow among populations.

  5. Evolution of localized states in Lieb lattices under time-dependent magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouveia, J. D.; Maceira, I. A.; Dias, R. G.

    2016-11-01

    We study the slow time evolution of localized states of the open-boundary Lieb lattice when a magnetic flux is applied perpendicularly to the lattice and increased linearly in time. In this system, Dirac cones periodically disappear, reappear, and touch the flat band as the flux increases. We show that the slow time evolution of a localized state in this system is analogous to that of a zero-energy state in a three-level system whose energy levels intersect periodically and that this evolution can be mapped into a classical precession motion with a precession axis that rotates as times evolves. Beginning with a localized state of the Lieb lattice, as the magnetic flux is increased linearly and slowly, the evolving state precesses around a state with a small itinerant component and the amplitude of its localized component oscillates around a constant value (below but close to 1), except at multiples of the flux quantum where it may vary sharply. This behavior reflects the existence of an electric field (generated by the time-dependent magnetic field) which breaks the C4 symmetry of the constant flux Hamiltonian.

  6. Local time dependence of polar mesospheric clouds and model validation with satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Francie; Berger, Uwe; Lübken, Franz-Josef

    2016-04-01

    Polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs), also known as noctilucent clouds (NLCs), consist of water-ice cystals. They occur at high latitudes in the summer mesopause region at very low temperatures below 150 K. In this case PMCs are highly sensitive to atmospheric conditions. Therefore, PMCs are thought to be sensitive indicators of climate changes in the middle atmosphere. The ice clouds show spatial and temporal variations. We present a model that can help to understand the variability of mesospheric clouds. The model is called Mesospheric Ice Microphysics And tranSport model (MIMAS) and is a threedimensional Lagrangian transport model, which can be used on multiple dynamic fields. MIMAS is a good instrument to check observations and also to fill some gaps that are included in satellite observations, e.g., the local time dependence of PMCs. The ice model is used to study local time dependencies of the PMC occurrence frequency, brightness and ice water content. At the station ALOMAR in Northern Norway (69°N, 16°E) we have the most ice water content with a total mean of around 90 g/km² (July 2008) in the morning hours. In the afternoons the ice water content decreases to 10 g/km² and increases again in the evening hours to 50 g/km². Tidal variability will impact results of long-term PMC observations which do not cover the full diurnal cycle. To investigate the local time dependence of PMCs in its entirety, ground-based remote sensing instruments, e.g., lidars are usefull. Variations in PMCs relating to occurrence frequency and brightness as function of local time had been already observed with the ALOMAR Rayleigh/Mie/Raman lidar. But lidar measurements offer only observations at a single local station. Models give the opportunity of a global perspective on a possible local time dependence of PMCs. In this context we will present latitudinal variations regarding to local time dependence. The combination of further observations and modeling studies can help to understand

  7. Development of a real-time lumbar ultrasound image processing system for epidural needle entry site localization.

    PubMed

    Yusong Leng; Shuang Yu; Kok Kiong Tan; Tildsley, Philip; Sia, Alex Tiong Heng; Ban Leong Sng

    2016-08-01

    A fully-automatic ultrasound image processing system that can determine the needle entry site for epidural anesthesia (EA) in real time is presented in this paper. Neither the knowledge of anesthetists nor additional hardware is required to operate the system, which firstly directs the anesthetists to reach the desired insertion region in the longitudinal view, i.e., lumbar level L3-L4, and then locates the ideal puncture site by instructing the anesthetists to rotate and slightly adjust the position of ultrasound probe. In order to implement these functions, modules including image processing, panorama stitching, feature extraction/selection, template matching and support vector machine (SVM) classification are incorporated in this system. Additionally, a user-friendly graphical user interface (GUI), which displays the processing results and guides anesthetists intuitively, is further designed to conceal the intricacy of algorithms. Feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed system has been evaluated through a set of realtime tests on 53 volunteers from a local hospital.

  8. Continuous time random walks for non-local radial solute transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dentz, Marco; Kang, Peter K.; Le Borgne, Tanguy

    2015-08-01

    This study formulates and analyzes continuous time random walk (CTRW) models in radial flow geometries for the quantification of non-local solute transport induced by heterogeneous flow distributions and by mobile-immobile mass transfer processes. To this end we derive a general CTRW framework in radial coordinates starting from the random walk equations for radial particle positions and times. The particle density, or solute concentration is governed by a non-local radial advection-dispersion equation (ADE). Unlike in CTRWs for uniform flow scenarios, particle transition times here depend on the radial particle position, which renders the CTRW non-stationary. As a consequence, the memory kernel characterizing the non-local ADE, is radially dependent. Based on this general formulation, we derive radial CTRW implementations that (i) emulate non-local radial transport due to heterogeneous advection, (ii) model multirate mass transfer (MRMT) between mobile and immobile continua, and (iii) quantify both heterogeneous advection in a mobile region and mass transfer between mobile and immobile regions. The expected solute breakthrough behavior is studied using numerical random walk particle tracking simulations. This behavior is analyzed by explicit analytical expressions for the asymptotic solute breakthrough curves. We observe clear power-law tails of the solute breakthrough for broad (power-law) distributions of particle transit times (heterogeneous advection) and particle trapping times (MRMT model). The combined model displays two distinct time regimes. An intermediate regime, in which the solute breakthrough is dominated by the particle transit times in the mobile zones, and a late time regime that is governed by the distribution of particle trapping times in immobile zones. These radial CTRW formulations allow for the identification of heterogeneous advection and mobile-immobile processes as drivers of anomalous transport, under conditions relevant for field tracer

  9. Real time object localization based on histogram of s-RGB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudjirahardjo, Panca; Suyono, Hadi; Setyawan, Raden Arief

    2017-09-01

    Object localization is the first task in pattern detection and recognition. This task is very important due to it reduces the searching time to the interest object. In this paper we introduce our novel method of object localization based on color feature. Our novel method is a histogram of s-RGB. This histogram is used in the training phase to determine the color dominant in the initial Region of Interest (ROI). Then this information is used to label the interest object. To reduce noise and localize the interest object, we apply the row and column density function of pixels. The comparison result with some processes, our system gives a best result and takes a short computation time of 26.56 ms, in the video rate of 15 frames per second (fps).

  10. Observing electron localization in a dissociating H2+ molecule in real time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, H.; Li, Zhichao; He, Feng; Wang, X.; Atia-Tul-Noor, A.; Kielpinski, D.; Sang, R. T.; Litvinyuk, I. V.

    2017-06-01

    Dissociation of diatomic molecules with odd number of electrons always causes the unpaired electron to localize on one of the two resulting atomic fragments. In the simplest diatomic molecule H2+ dissociation yields a hydrogen atom and a proton with the sole electron ending up on one of the two nuclei. That is equivalent to breaking of a chemical bond--the most fundamental chemical process. Here we observe such electron localization in real time by performing a pump-probe experiment. We demonstrate that in H2+ electron localization is complete in just 15 fs when the molecule's internuclear distance reaches 8 atomic units. The measurement is supported by a theoretical simulation based on numerical solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. This observation advances our understanding of detailed dynamics of molecular dissociation.

  11. Thermal stratification influences maturation and timing of spawning in a local Clupea harengus population.

    PubMed

    Langård, L; Slotte, A; Skaret, G; Johannessen, A

    2014-04-01

    Maturation and timing of spawning in relation to temperature were studied in a local Atlantic herring Clupea harengus population inhabiting a small semi-enclosed ecosystem (7 km(2)) separated from the larger outer fjord system by narrow sills on the west coast of Norway. Ambient temperatures varied annually up to 4° C during both the pre-spawning and spawning periods from February to April, but without affecting the spawning time. Instead, the timing of spawning was found to be related to thermal stratification in response to spring warming, which occurred about the same time every year regardless of initial temperatures. © 2014 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  12. Geometrical properties of an internal local octonionic space in curved space time

    SciTech Connect

    Marques, S.; Oliveira, C.G.

    1986-04-01

    A geometrical treatment on a flat tangent space local to a generalized complex, quaternionic, and octonionic space-time is constructed. It is shown that it is possible to find an Einstein-Maxwell-Yang-Mills correspondence in this generalized (Minkowskian) tangent space. 9 refs.

  13. Impact localization on composite structures using time difference and MUSIC approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Yongteng; Xiang, Jiawei

    2017-05-01

    1-D uniform linear array (ULA) has the shortcoming of the half-plane mirror effect, which does not allow discriminating between a target placed above the array and a target placed below the array. This paper presents time difference (TD) and multiple signal classification (MUSIC) based omni-directional impact localization on a large stiffened composite structure using improved linear array, which is able to perform omni-directional 360° localization. This array contains 2M+3 PZT sensors, where 2M+1 PZT sensors are arranged as a uniform linear array, and the other two PZT sensors are placed above and below the array. Firstly, the arrival times of impact signals observed by the other two sensors are determined using the wavelet transform. Compared with each other, the direction range of impact source can be decided in general, 0°to 180° or 180°to 360°. And then, two dimensional multiple signal classification (2D-MUSIC) based spatial spectrum formula using the uniform linear array is applied for impact localization by the general direction range. When the arrival times of impact signals observed by upper PZT is equal to that of lower PZT, the direction can be located in x axis (0°or 180°). And time difference based MUSIC method is present to locate impact position. To verify the proposed approach, the proposed approach is applied to a composite structure. The localization results are in good agreement with the actual impact occurring positions.

  14. Contributed Review: Source-localization algorithms and applications using time of arrival and time difference of arrival measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xinya; Deng, Zhiqun Daniel; Rauchenstein, Lynn T.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2016-04-01

    Locating the position of fixed or mobile sources (i.e., transmitters) based on received measurements from sensors is an important research area that is attracting much research interest. In this paper, we present localization algorithms using time of arrivals (TOA) and time difference of arrivals (TDOA) to achieve high accuracy under line-of-sight conditions. The circular (TOA) and hyperbolic (TDOA) location systems both use nonlinear equations that relate the locations of the sensors and tracked objects. These nonlinear equations can develop accuracy challenges because of the existence of measurement errors and efficiency challenges that lead to high computational burdens. Least squares-based and maximum likelihood-based algorithms have become the most popular categories of location estimators. We also summarize the advantages and disadvantages of various positioning algorithms. By improving measurement techniques and localization algorithms, localization applications can be extended into the signal-processing-related domains of radar, sonar, the Global Positioning System, wireless sensor networks, underwater animal tracking, mobile communications, and multimedia.

  15. A conservative finite volume scheme with time-accurate local time stepping for scalar transport on unstructured grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalcanti, José Rafael; Dumbser, Michael; Motta-Marques, David da; Fragoso Junior, Carlos Ruberto

    2015-12-01

    In this article we propose a new conservative high resolution TVD (total variation diminishing) finite volume scheme with time-accurate local time stepping (LTS) on unstructured grids for the solution of scalar transport problems, which are typical in the context of water quality simulations. To keep the presentation of the new method as simple as possible, the algorithm is only derived in two space dimensions and for purely convective transport problems, hence neglecting diffusion and reaction terms. The new numerical method for the solution of the scalar transport is directly coupled to the hydrodynamic model of Casulli and Walters (2000) that provides the dynamics of the free surface and the velocity vector field based on a semi-implicit discretization of the shallow water equations. Wetting and drying is handled rigorously by the nonlinear algorithm proposed by Casulli (2009). The new time-accurate LTS algorithm allows a different time step size for each element of the unstructured grid, based on an element-local Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy (CFL) stability condition. The proposed method does not need any synchronization between different time steps of different elements and is by construction locally and globally conservative. The LTS scheme is based on a piecewise linear polynomial reconstruction in space-time using the MUSCL-Hancock method, to obtain second order of accuracy in both space and time. The new algorithm is first validated on some classical test cases for pure advection problems, for which exact solutions are known. In all cases we obtain a very good level of accuracy, showing also numerical convergence results; we furthermore confirm mass conservation up to machine precision and observe an improved computational efficiency compared to a standard second order TVD scheme for scalar transport with global time stepping (GTS). Then, the new LTS method is applied to some more complex problems, where the new scalar transport scheme has also been coupled to

  16. Three-dimensional localization of low activity gamma-ray sources in real-time scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Manish K.; Alajo, Ayodeji B.; Lee, Hyoung K.

    2016-03-01

    Radioactive source localization plays an important role in tracking radiation threats in homeland security tasks. Its real-time application requires computationally efficient and reasonably accurate algorithms even with limited data to support detection with minimum uncertainty. This paper describes a statistic-based grid-refinement method for backtracing the position of a gamma-ray source in a three-dimensional domain in real-time. The developed algorithm used measurements from various known detector positions to localize the source. This algorithm is based on an inverse-square relationship between source intensity at a detector and the distance from the source to the detector. The domain discretization was developed and implemented in MATLAB. The algorithm was tested and verified from simulation results of an ideal case of a point source in non-attenuating medium. Subsequently, an experimental validation of the algorithm was performed to determine the suitability of deploying this scheme in real-time scenarios. Using the measurements from five known detector positions and for a measurement time of 3 min, the source position was estimated with an accuracy of approximately 53 cm. The accuracy improved and stabilized to approximately 25 cm for higher measurement times. It was concluded that the error in source localization was primarily due to detection uncertainties. In verification and experimental validation of the algorithm, the distance between 137Cs source and any detector position was between 0.84 m and 1.77 m. The results were also compared with the least squares method. Since the discretization algorithm was validated with a weak source, it is expected that it can localize the source of higher activity in real-time. It is believed that for the same physical placement of source and detectors, a source of approximate activity 0.61-0.92 mCi can be localized in real-time with 1 s of measurement time and same accuracy. The accuracy and computational efficiency

  17. Desirable Skills in New Pharmacists.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Catherine E; Flowers, Schwanda K; Stowe, Cindy D

    2017-02-01

    To compare survey responses between licensed pharmacists who work with or employ new graduates and graduating senior pharmacy students at a college of pharmacy. This was a retrospective analysis of surveys given to 2 groups of pharmacists and students. Responses to items regarding importance of desirable qualities in new pharmacists and level of preparation of new graduates were analyzed. Qualities included drug information, pharmacology, therapeutics, communication with patients/customers or health care professionals, professionalism, ethics, management, and conflict resolution. There was consensus between pharmacists and students regarding the importance of all items ( P > .05 for all comparisons). However, the percentage of pharmacists versus students who agreed that new graduates communicate effectively differed (86.7% vs 100%, respectively, P < .05). Of pharmacists surveyed at a career fair, 64.1% chose communication as the 1 skill that would distinguish an applicant, and retail and hospital pharmacists displayed a statistically significant ( P < .05) difference in the audience (patients/customers vs other health care professionals). Pharmacists and students agree on the knowledge and skills essential for pharmacy practice but disagree on the level of preparation for effective communication. These results support ongoing efforts to improve the development of communication skills in the professional pharmacy curriculum.

  18. Real-time automatic small infrared target detection using local spectral filtering in the frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hao; Zhang, Hong; Li, Jiafeng; Yuan, Ding; Sun, Mingui

    2014-11-01

    Accurate and fast detection of small infrared target has very important meaning for infrared precise guidance, early warning, video surveillance, etc. Based on human visual attention mechanism, an automatic detection algorithm for small infrared target is presented. In this paper, instead of searching for infrared targets, we model regular patches that do not attract much attention by our visual system. This is inspired by the property that the regular patches in spatial domain turn out to correspond to the spikes in the amplitude spectrum. Unlike recent approaches using global spectral filtering, we define the concept of local maxima suppression using local spectral filtering to smooth the spikes in the amplitude spectrum, thereby producing the pop-out of the infrared targets. In the proposed method, we firstly compute the amplitude spectrum of an input infrared image. Second, we find the local maxima of the amplitude spectrum using cubic facet model. Third, we suppress the local maxima using the convolution of the local spectrum with a low-pass Gaussian kernel of an appropriate scale. At last, the detection result in spatial domain is obtained by reconstructing the 2D signal using the original phase and the log amplitude spectrum by suppressing local maxima. The experiments are performed for some real-life IR images, and the results prove that the proposed method has satisfying detection effectiveness and robustness. Meanwhile, it has high detection efficiency and can be further used for real-time detection and tracking.

  19. Real-space imaginary-time propagators for non-local nucleon-nucleon potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynn, J. E.; Schmidt, K. E.

    2012-07-01

    Nuclear structure quantum Monte Carlo methods such as Green's function or auxiliary field diffusion Monte Carlo have used phenomenological local real-space potentials containing as few derivatives as possible, such as the Argonne-Urbana family of interactions, to make sampling simple and efficient. Basis set methods such as no-core shell model and coupled-cluster techniques typically use softer non-local potentials because of their more rapid convergence with basis set size. These non-local potentials are usually defined in momentum space and are often based on effective field theory. Comparisons of the results of the two types of methods can be difficult when different potentials are used. We show methods for evaluating the real-space imaginary-time propagators needed to perform quantum Monte Carlo calculations using such non-local potentials. We explore the universality of the large imaginary time propagators for different potentials and discuss how non-local potentials can be used in quantum Monte Carlo calculations.

  20. Radial and local time structure of the Saturnian ring current, revealed by Cassini

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergis, N.; Jackman, C. M.; Thomsen, M. F.; Krimigis, S. M.; Mitchell, D. G.; Hamilton, D. C.; Dougherty, M. K.; Krupp, N.; Wilson, R. J.

    2017-02-01

    We analyze particle and magnetic field data obtained between July 2004 and December 2013 in the equatorial magnetosphere of Saturn, by the Cassini spacecraft. The radial and local time distribution of the total (thermal and suprathermal) particle pressure and total plasma beta (ratio of particle to magnetic pressure) over radial distances from 5 to 16 Saturn radii (RS = 60,258 km) is presented. The average azimuthal current density Jϕ and its separate components (inertial, pressure gradient, and anisotropy) are computed as a function of radial distance and local time and presented as equatorial maps. We explore the relative contribution of different physical mechanisms that drive the ring current at Saturn. Results show that (a) the particle pressure is controlled by thermal plasma inside of 8 RS and by the hot ions beyond 12 RS, exhibiting strong local time asymmetry with higher pressures measured at the dusk and night sectors; (b) the plasma beta increases with radial distance and remains >1 beyond 8-10 RS for all local times; (c) the ring current is asymmetric in local time and forms a maximum region between 7 and 13 RS, with values up to 100-115 pA/m2; and (d) the ring current is inertial everywhere inside of 7 RS, exhibits a mixed nature between 7 and 11 RS and is pressure gradient driven beyond 11 RS, with the exception of the noon sector where the mixed nature persists. In the dawn sector, it appears strongly pressure gradient driven for a wider range of radial distance, consistent with fast return flow of hot, tenuous magnetospheric plasma following tail reconnection.

  1. Local Stability of AIDS Epidemic Model Through Treatment and Vertical Transmission with Time Delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novi W, Cascarilla; Lestari, Dwi

    2016-02-01

    This study aims to explain stability of the spread of AIDS through treatment and vertical transmission model. Human with HIV need a time to positively suffer AIDS. The existence of a time, human with HIV until positively suffer AIDS can be delayed for a time so that the model acquired is the model with time delay. The model form is a nonlinear differential equation with time delay, SIPTA (susceptible-infected-pre AIDS-treatment-AIDS). Based on SIPTA model analysis results the disease free equilibrium point and the endemic equilibrium point. The disease free equilibrium point with and without time delay are local asymptotically stable if the basic reproduction number is less than one. The endemic equilibrium point will be local asymptotically stable if the time delay is less than the critical value of delay, unstable if the time delay is more than the critical value of delay, and bifurcation occurs if the time delay is equal to the critical value of delay.

  2. Bibliotherapy for low sexual desire: evidence for effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Mintz, Laurie B; Balzer, Alexandra M; Zhao, Xinting; Bush, Hannah E

    2012-07-01

    This study examines the effectiveness of bibliotherapy for low sexual desire among women, which is the most frequent sexual concern brought to counselors. Forty-five women responded to an advertisement for participation in a study on low sexual desire and were assigned to either the intervention or the wait-list control group. The intervention group completed the Hurlbert Index of Sexual Desire (HISD; Apt & Hurlbert, 1992) and the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI; R. Rosen et al., 2000), read the self-help book under study in 6 weeks, and completed the measures a second time. The control group completed the same measures 6 weeks apart. Results demonstrated that the intervention group made statistically greater gains over time as compared with the control group on measures of sexual desire (HISD and FSFI Desire subscale), sexual arousal (FSFI Arousal subscale), sexual satisfaction (FSFI Satisfaction subscale), and overall sexual functioning (FSFI Total Score). A subset of participants in the intervention group participated in a 7-week follow-up study, and these participants maintained their gains in sexual desire and overall sexual functioning. Findings have important implications for future research on the efficacy of bibliotherapy generally and for low sexual desire specifically. Results also have vital implications for the treatment of low sexual desire.

  3. Assessing Significance of Global Climate Change in Local Climate Time Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livezey, M. M.; Bair, A.; Livezey, R.; Hollingshead, A.; Horsfall, F. M. C.; Meyers, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    A common question by users to NOAA National Weather Service (NWS) local offices is how significant is global climate change in their local area. The scientific community provides copious information on global climate change, including assessments, for large regions. However, most decisions are made at the local level, where little or no information typically exists. To address this need, NOAA NWS released operationally the Local Climate Analysis Tool (LCAT) in 2013 and specifically incorporated a capability into the tool to determine the local Rate of Change (ROC). Although ROC provides answers to some questions, we have seen an additional need for clarification on the significance of the ROC, such as whether or not it differentiates natural variability from a real signal of longer-term climate change. This question becomes very important for decision makers in consideration of their long term planning efforts to build local resilience to changes in climate. LCAT uses three trend adjustment methods in computing ROC: Hinge, Optimal Climate Normals (OCN), and Exponentially Weighted Moving Average (EWMA). The Hinge tracks changes in climate time series, and OCN and EWMS track changes in climate normals. ROC is the slope of the straight line fit of the trend. Standard statistical methodology in use provides guidance for confidence intervals of the slope parameter (von Storch and Zwiers, 1999), which works well for a linear regression fit and can be used for ROCs of OCN and EWMA. However the Hinge, which is a linear fit anchored on one end, needs some additional adjustments and most likely will have smaller confidence intervals than those estimated by the statistical method. An additional way to look at the problem is to assess how the climate change signal compares to climate variability in the local time series. Livezey et al. (2007) suggested the use of the signal to noise ratio to estimate the significance of the rate of climate change. The signal to noise ratio of

  4. A RF time domain approach for electric arcs detection and localization systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deacu, Daniela; Tamas, Razvan; Petrescu, Teodor; Paun, Mirel; Anchidin, Liliana; Algiu, Madalina

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we propose a new method for detection and localization of electric arcs by using two ultra-wide band (UWB) antennas together with data processing in the time-domain. The source of electric arcs is localized by computing an average on the inter-correlation functions of the signals received on two channels. By calculating the path length difference to the antennas, the direction of the electric arcs is then found. The novelty of the method consists in the spatial averaging in order to reduce the incertitude caused by the finite sampling rate.

  5. Nonlinear Waves on Localized and Periodic Backgrounds with Time-Space Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mei-Kun; Yang, Zhan-Ying; Yang, Wen-Li

    2017-05-01

    We present one family of general analytical solutions for the generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation with time-space modulation via the method of a combination of the Darboux transformation and similarity transformation. Nonlinear waves on different localized and periodic backgrounds depending on the corresponding nonlinearity modulations are obtained. In particular, we demonstrate the existence and property of localized modes on a double-periodic background under a special designed optical lattice potential. Our results may raise the possibility of related experiments and potential applications in nonlinear optics and Bose-Einstein condensates. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11475135 and 11547302

  6. Latitude and local time dependence of precipitated low energy electrons at high latitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gustafsson, G.

    1972-01-01

    Data from particle detectors on board the satellite OGO-4 were used to study the precipitation of electrons in the energy range 0.7 to 24 keV. The latitude dependence of these particles in the local time region from midnight to dawn was investigated in detail. The analysis shows that the precipitation of particles of energies 2.3 to 24 keV is centered at an invariant latitude of about 68 deg at midnight with a clear shift in latitude with increasing local time and this shift is more pronounced for lower energies. The highest fluxes of particles in this energy interval are measured at midnight and they decrease rapidly with local time. The data in the energy range 2.3 to 24 keV support a theory where particles are injected in the midnight region from the tail gaining energy due to a betatron process and then drift eastwards in a combined electric and magnetic field. The main part of the electrons at 0.7 keV show a different behavior. They seem to undergo an acceleration process which is rather local, sometimes giving field aligned fluxes which may be super-imposed on the background precipitation.

  7. Real-Time Retinal Vessel Mapping and Localization for Intraocular Surgery.

    PubMed

    Becker, Brian C; Riviere, Cameron N

    2013-01-01

    Computer-aided intraocular surgery requires precise, real-time knowledge of the vasculature during retinal procedures such as laser photocoagulation or vessel cannulation. Because vitreoretinal surgeons manipulate retinal structures on the back of the eye through ports in the sclera, voluntary and involuntary tool motion rotates the eye in the socket and causes movement to the microscope view of the retina. The dynamic nature of the surgical workspace during intraocular surgery makes mapping, tracking, and localizing vasculature in real time a challenge. We present an approach that both maps and localizes retinal vessels by temporally fusing and registering individual-frame vessel detections. On video of porcine and human retina, we demonstrate real-time performance, rapid convergence, and robustness to variable illumination and tool occlusion.

  8. Wide localized solutions of the parity-time-symmetric nonautonomous nonlinear Schrödinger equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meza, L. E. Arroyo; Dutra, A. de Souza; Hott, M. B.; Roy, P.

    2015-01-01

    By using canonical transformations we obtain localized (in space) exact solutions of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE) with cubic and quintic space and time modulated nonlinearities and in the presence of time-dependent and inhomogeneous external potentials and amplification or absorption (source or drain) coefficients. We obtain a class of wide localized exact solutions of NLSE in the presence of a number of non-Hermitian parity-time (PT )-symmetric external potentials, which are constituted by a mixing of external potentials and source or drain terms. The exact solutions found here can be applied to theoretical studies of ultrashort pulse propagation in optical fibers with focusing and defocusing nonlinearities. We show that, even in the presence of gain or loss terms, stable solutions can be found and that the PT symmetry is an important feature to guarantee the conservation of the average energy of the system.

  9. Sexual Desire and Hormonal Contraception

    PubMed Central

    Boozalis, Amanda; Tutlam, Nhial T.; Robbins, Camaryn Chrisman; Peipert, Jeffrey F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the effect of hormonal contraception on sexual desire. Materials and Methods We performed a cross-sectional analysis of 1,938 of the 9,256 participants enrolled in the Contraceptive CHOICE Project. This subset included participants enrolled between April and September 2011 who completed a baseline and six-month telephone survey. Multivariable logistic regression was used to assess the association between contraceptive method and report of lacking interest in sex, controlling for potential confounding variables. Results More than one in five participants (23.9%) reported lacking interest in sex at 6 months after initiating a new contraceptive method. Of 262 copper IUD users (referent group), 18.3% reported lacking interest in sex. Our primary outcome was more prevalent in women who are young (<18 years: adjusted odds ratio (ORadj)=2.04), black (ORadj=1.78), and married or living with a partner (ORadj=1.82). Compared to copper IUD users, participants using depot medroxyprogesterone (ORadj=2.61, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.47-4.61), the vaginal ring (ORadj=2.53, 95% CI=1.37-4.69), and the implant (ORadj=1.60, 95% CI=1.03-2.49) more commonly reported lack of interest in sex. We found no association between use of the hormonal IUD, oral contraceptive pill, and patch and lack of interest in sex. Conclusion CHOICE participants using depot medroxyprogesterone acetate, the contraceptive ring, and implant were more likely to report a lack of interest in sex compared to copper IUD users. Future research should confirm these findings and their possible physiological basis. Clinicians should be reassured that most women do not experience reduced sex drive with the use of most contraceptive methods. PMID:26855094

  10. Complex-time singularity and locality estimates for quantum lattice systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bouch, Gabriel

    2015-12-15

    We present and prove a well-known locality bound for the complex-time dynamics of a general class of one-dimensional quantum spin systems. Then we discuss how one might hope to extend this same procedure to higher dimensions using ideas related to the Eden growth process and lattice trees. Finally, we demonstrate with a specific family of lattice trees in the plane why this approach breaks down in dimensions greater than one and prove that there exist interactions for which the complex-time dynamics blows-up in finite imaginary time. .

  11. Real-time image dehazing using local adaptive neighborhoods and dark-channel-prior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valderrama, Jesus A.; Díaz-Ramírez, Víctor H.; Kober, Vitaly; Hernandez, Enrique

    2015-09-01

    A real-time algorithm for single image dehazing is presented. The algorithm is based on calculation of local neighborhoods of a hazed image inside a moving window. The local neighborhoods are constructed by computing rank-order statistics. Next the dark-channel-prior approach is applied to the local neighborhoods to estimate the transmission function of the scene. By using the suggested approach there is no need for applying a refining algorithm to the estimated transmission such as the soft matting algorithm. To achieve high-rate signal processing the proposed algorithm is implemented exploiting massive parallelism on a graphics processing unit (GPU). Computer simulation results are carried out to test the performance of the proposed algorithm in terms of dehazing efficiency and speed of processing. These tests are performed using several synthetic and real images. The obtained results are analyzed and compared with those obtained with existing dehazing algorithms.

  12. An Adaptive Non-Local-Means Filter for Real-Time MR-Thermometry.

    PubMed

    Zachiu, Cornel; Ries, Mario; Moonen, Chrit; de Senneville, Baudouin Denis

    2017-04-01

    Proton resonance frequency shift-based magnetic resonance thermometry is a currently used technique for monitoring temperature during targeted thermal therapies. However, in order to provide temperature updates with very short latency times, fast MR acquisition schemes are usually employed, which in turn might lead to noisy temperature measurements. This will, in general, have a direct impact on therapy control and endpoint detection. In this paper, we address this problem through an improved non-local filtering technique applied on the temperature images. Compared with previous non-local filtering methods, the proposed approach considers not only spatial information but also exploits temporal redundancies. The method is fully automatic and designed to improve the precision of the temperature measurements while at the same time maintaining output accuracy. In addition, the implementation was optimized in order to ensure real-time availability of the temperature measurements while having a minimal impact on latency. The method was validated in three complementary experiments: a simulation, an ex-vivo and an in-vivo study. Compared to the original non-local means filter and two other previously employed temperature filtering methods, the proposed approach shows considerable improvement in both accuracy and precision of the filtered data. Together with the low computational demands of the numerical scheme, the proposed filtering technique shows great potential for improving temperature measurements during real-time MR thermometry dedicated to targeted thermal therapies.

  13. Particle filtering for arrival time tracking in space and source localization.

    PubMed

    Michalopoulou, Zoi-Heleni; Jain, Rashi

    2012-11-01

    Locating and tracking a source in an ocean environment and estimating environmental parameters of a sound propagation medium are critical tasks in ocean acoustics. Many approaches for both are based on full field calculations which are computationally intensive and sensitive to assumptions on the structure of the environment. Alternative methods that use only select features of the acoustic field for localization and environmental parameter estimation have been proposed. The focus of this paper is the development of a method that extracts arrival times and amplitudes of distinct paths from measured acoustic time-series using sequential Bayesian filtering, namely, particle filtering. These quantities, along with complete posterior probability density functions, also extracted by filtering, are employed in source localization and bathymetry estimation. Aspects of the filtering methodology are presented and studied in terms of their impact on the uncertainty in the arrival time estimates. Using the posterior probability densities of arrival times, source localization and water depth estimation are performed for the Haro Strait Primer experiment; the results are compared to those of conventional methods. The comparison demonstrates a significant advantage in the proposed approach.

  14. Local-in-Time Adjoint-Based Method for Optimal Control/Design Optimization of Unsteady Compressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamaleev, N. K.; Diskin, B.; Nielsen, E. J.

    2009-01-01

    .We study local-in-time adjoint-based methods for minimization of ow matching functionals subject to the 2-D unsteady compressible Euler equations. The key idea of the local-in-time method is to construct a very accurate approximation of the global-in-time adjoint equations and the corresponding sensitivity derivative by using only local information available on each time subinterval. In contrast to conventional time-dependent adjoint-based optimization methods which require backward-in-time integration of the adjoint equations over the entire time interval, the local-in-time method solves local adjoint equations sequentially over each time subinterval. Since each subinterval contains relatively few time steps, the storage cost of the local-in-time method is much lower than that of the global adjoint formulation, thus making the time-dependent optimization feasible for practical applications. The paper presents a detailed comparison of the local- and global-in-time adjoint-based methods for minimization of a tracking functional governed by the Euler equations describing the ow around a circular bump. Our numerical results show that the local-in-time method converges to the same optimal solution obtained with the global counterpart, while drastically reducing the memory cost as compared to the global-in-time adjoint formulation.

  15. Moving object tracking by using a novel real-time 2D local-polar-edge-detection method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chialun John

    2011-04-01

    The LPED (local polar edge detection) method is a newly developed 2D image processing method that automatically utilizes the center-of-mass polar coordinate to represent, in a unique way by a 36-dimension analog vector, the boundary of each object embedded in a picture frame. This 36D vector is the object ID for the particular object it represents. This ID vector is independent of the position of the object and independent of the orientation of the object, but it is a characteristic property from object to object. The background noises are automatically filtered out if the background objects are much smaller and much more randomly distributed than the objects of interest. This concise ID vector will not only identify the object precisely in a large picture frame where multiple-shaped objects lie, it will also track the object automatically when the object moves and it will record the data of movement periodically. I.e., it can measure automatically the distance of movement, the angular change of object-orientation, and the new locations of the central of mass of the moving object between successive sampling time intervals. In other words, it can automatically predict the near future movement of the tracked object. The applications of this novel image processing technique, to name a few, may be (1) automatic satellite-tracking and targeting of ground moving vehicles, (2) robotic identification of surrounding environment by some shape selected scenic part in the environment (e.g., the cross-section of an underground tunnel) with self guidance for the robot to go along a desired path through the whole tunnel without hitting the tunnel wall. This paper describes the principle of LPED and some extensive experimental results, regarding the application (1) described above, by utilizing a real-time soft-ware program designed by the author.

  16. Is social desirability associated with self-reported physical activity?

    PubMed

    Motl, Robert W; McAuley, Edward; DiStefano, Christine

    2005-06-01

    Physical activity has been considered to be a socially desirable behavior that might be overreported because of a social desirability bias. This study involved an examination of the possible influence of social desirability on self-report measures of physical activity. Participants were male and female college students (N = 782) who completed the Lie scale of the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (L-scale), Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale (SDS), Godin Leisure-Time Exercise Questionnaire (GLTEQ), and Stanford Usual Activity Questionnaire. Scores from the Lie scale were not significantly correlated with scores from either the Godin Leisure-Time Exercise Questionnaire or the Stanford Usual Activity Questionnaire. With the Social Desirability Scale, there were statistically significant, but weak correlations with scores from the Godin Leisure-Time Exercise Questionnaire and the Stanford Usual Activity Questionnaire. There was no influence of the Lie scale and Social Desirability Scale on the magnitude of the correlations between scores from the two measures of physical activity. This study provides minimal evidence of an influence of social desirability on scores from two self-report instruments for measuring physical activity in young adults.

  17. Pleasure/Desire, Sexularism and Sexuality Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasmussen, Mary Louise

    2012-01-01

    Pleasure and desire have been important components of researchers' vision for sexuality education for over 20 years, a trend inspired by Michelle Fine's seminal paper, "Sexuality, Schooling, and Adolescent Females: The Missing Discourse of Desire." This essay considers how discourses related to pleasure and desire have been taken up in the USA and…

  18. [How does summer affect sexual desire?].

    PubMed

    Kontula, Osmo; Väisälä, Leena

    2013-01-01

    Sexual desire involves many different things such as sexual thoughts and images, excitement, expectation and orgasm. Mood has a strong association with sexual desire. Fatigue and depression in particular cause lack of sexual desire. By affecting the state of alertness and energy in humans, sunlight may increase sexual activity.

  19. Pleasure/Desire, Sexularism and Sexuality Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasmussen, Mary Louise

    2012-01-01

    Pleasure and desire have been important components of researchers' vision for sexuality education for over 20 years, a trend inspired by Michelle Fine's seminal paper, "Sexuality, Schooling, and Adolescent Females: The Missing Discourse of Desire." This essay considers how discourses related to pleasure and desire have been taken up in the USA and…

  20. Toward a Sociology of the Reconciliation of Conflicting Desires.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Susan; Perley, David

    2016-11-01

    Desire-based research provides people and communities the opportunity to share their dreams and hopes for a better future. However, conflicting desires are difficult to reconcile. We suggest that sociological research to understand conflicting desires is required to support reconciliation work by Indigenous and non-Indigenous people in Canada. Our contribution begins by identifying much of current and past sociological research about Indigenous people and communities as damaged-centered, that is, identifying problems and obstacles in the hope that the knowledge will lead to change. This model of social change is flawed. We believe that most Canadians desire justice for Indigenous peoples while at the same time desiring land and access to resources, desires that deny that justice. How we as a society reconcile these desires will determine the extent to which true justice for Indigenous peoples will be achieved. We propose a sociology of the reconciliation of conflicting desires and suggest some practical ways that this type of research could move forward. © 2016 Canadian Sociological Association/La Société canadienne de sociologie.

  1. Wireless acoustic modules for real-time data fusion using asynchronous sniper localization algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hengy, S.; De Mezzo, S.; Duffner, P.; Naz, P.

    2012-11-01

    The presence of snipers in modern conflicts leads to high insecurity for the soldiers. In order to improve the soldier's protection against this threat, the French German Research Institute of Saint-Louis (ISL) has been conducting studies in the domain of acoustic localization of shots. Mobile antennas mounted on the soldier's helmet were initially used for real-time detection, classification and localization of sniper shots. It showed good performances in land scenarios, but also in urban scenarios if the array was in the shot corridor, meaning that the microphones first detect the direct wave and then the reflections of the Mach and muzzle waves (15% distance estimation error compared to the actual shooter array distance). Fusing data sent by multiple sensor nodes distributed on the field showed some of the limitations of the technologies that have been implemented in ISL's demonstrators. Among others, the determination of the arrays' orientation was not accurate enough, thereby degrading the performance of data fusion. Some new solutions have been developed in the past year in order to obtain better performance for data fusion. Asynchronous localization algorithms have been developed and post-processed on data measured in both free-field and urban environments with acoustic modules on the line of sight of the shooter. These results are presented in the first part of the paper. The impact of GPS position estimation error is also discussed in the article in order to evaluate the possible use of those algorithms for real-time processing using mobile acoustic nodes. In the frame of ISL's transverse project IMOTEP (IMprovement Of optical and acoustical TEchnologies for the Protection), some demonstrators are developed that will allow real-time asynchronous localization of sniper shots. An embedded detection and classification algorithm is implemented on wireless acoustic modules that send the relevant information to a central PC. Data fusion is then processed and the

  2. Process synchronization and data communication between processes in real time local area networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haeger, R.

    1985-12-01

    This thesis extends the multi-computer real-time executive, MCORTEX. The multiple cluster system RTC (Real Time Cluster Star), consisting of clusters of single board computers (INTEL iSBC 86/12A), which are connected via an Ethernet Local Area Network, serves as a hardware basis for the implementation of extended MCORTEX. The extension upgrades MCORTEX to system-wide synchronization and general data communication between any processes in the system. An intercluster shared memory model is developed, that partially replicates intracluster shared memory, such that shared data replication is minimized and the system's processing speed is maximized. This implementation, by transmitting produced shared data to all consuming clusters as soon as possible after production, guarantees that only cluster local hits occur in the system. Shared memory space is used efficiently by transmitting shared data to consuming clusters only, and by the ability to store shared data contiguously in intracluster shared memory.

  3. Reformulating time-dependent density functional theory with non-orthogonal localized molecular orbitals.

    PubMed

    Cui, Ganglong; Fang, Weihai; Yang, Weitao

    2010-01-14

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) has broad application in the study of electronic response, excitation and transport. To extend such application to large and complex systems, we develop a reformulation of TDDFT equations in terms of non-orthogonal localized molecular orbitals (NOLMOs). NOLMO is the most localized representation of electronic degrees of freedom and has been used in ground state calculations. In atomic orbital (AO) representation, the sparsity of NOLMO is transferred to the coefficient matrix of molecular orbitals (MOs). Its novel use in TDDFT here leads to a very simple form of time propagation equations which can be solved with linear-scaling effort. We have tested the method for several long-chain saturated and conjugated molecular systems within the self-consistent charge density-functional tight-binding method (SCC-DFTB) and demonstrated its accuracy. This opens up pathways for TDDFT applications to large bio- and nano-systems.

  4. The role of solar local time in polar cap magnetic variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langel, R. A.; Svalgaard, L.

    1974-01-01

    The role of the earth's main field in controlling the morphology of magnetic disturbance is usually accounted for by use of invariant latitude and MLT (magnetic local time) as a coordinate system. Magnetic disturbance from ionospheric currents is also controlled by ionospheric conductivity. At high latitudes, where SLT (solar local time) can be very different from MLT, the use of only MLT can give misleading results. In particular, those diurnal magnetic variations in the polar cap that change characteristics between interplanetary magnetic sectors have a tendency to peak near noon SLT rather than noon MLT at Alert, where noon MLT and noon SLT differ by more than 10 hours. Because of the sparsity of magnetic observatories it is not possible to completely separate SLT and MLT effects.

  5. The local time dependence of the anisotropic solar cosmic ray flux.

    PubMed

    Smart, D F; Shea, M A

    2003-01-01

    The distribution of the solar cosmic radiation flux over the earth is not uniform, but the result of complex phenomena involving the interplanetary magnetic field, the geomagnetic field and latitude and longitude of locations on the earth. The latitude effect relates to the geomagnetic shield; the longitude effect relates to local time. For anisotropic solar cosmic ray events the maximum particle flux is always along the interplanetary magnetic field direction, sometimes called the Archimedean spiral path from the sun to the earth. During anisotropic solar cosmic ray event, the locations on the earth viewing "sunward" into the interplanetary magnetic field direction will observe the largest flux (when adjustments are made for the magnetic latitude effect). To relate this phenomena to aircraft routes, for anisotropic solar cosmic ray events that occur during "normal quiescent" conditions, the maximum solar cosmic ray flux (and corresponding solar particle radiation dose) will be observed in the dawn quadrant, ideally at about 06 hours local time.

  6. Acoustic source localization using time-difference of arrival and neural-network analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Nan; Dong, Jiancheng; Ying, Ren D.

    2013-03-01

    The developing embedded technology requires revolutions in human-machine interaction. In this paper, we propose a novel method using localization of the taping sound on the table to replace the keyboard as manual input device. The method is applicable with a quad-channel-array collection of acoustic signals, from which the time-of-arrival differences and the position information could be estimated. In practice, as our table is in a limited size and the material properties are complex, the traditional localization algorithm based on time-of-arrival differences contains a sizable margin for error. Furthermore, we use neural-network analysis to improve recognition accuracy. Then experiments and simulations are carried out to verify this signal processing algorithm.

  7. Local radial point interpolation (MLRPI) method for solving time fractional diffusion-wave equation with damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, Vahid Reza; Shivanian, Elyas; Chen, Wen

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of the current investigation is to determine numerical solution of time-fractional diffusion-wave equation with damping for Caputo's fractional derivative of order α (1 < α ≤ 2). A meshless local radial point interpolation (MLRPI) scheme based on Galerkin weak form is analyzed. The reason of choosing MLRPI approach is that it does not require any background integrations cells, instead integrations are implemented over local quadrature domains which are further simplified for reducing the complication of computation using regular and simple shape. The unconditional stability and convergence with order O (τ 6 - 2 α) are proved, where τ is time stepping. Also, several numerical experiments are illustrated to verify theoretical analysis.

  8. Acoustic time delay estimation and sensor network self-localization: Experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ash, Joshua N.; Moses, Randolph L.

    2005-08-01

    Experimental results are presented on propagation, coherence, and time-delay estimation (TDE) from a microphone array in an outdoor aeroacoustic environment. The primary goal is to understand the achievable accuracy of acoustic TDE using low-cost, commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) speakers and microphones. In addition, through the use of modulated pseudo-noise sequences, the experiment seeks to provide an empirical understanding of the effects of center frequency, bandwidth, and signal duration on TDE effectiveness and compares this to the theoretical expectations established by the Weiss-Weinstein lower bound. Finally, sensor network self-localization is performed using a maximum likelihood estimator and the time-delay estimates. Experimental network localization error is presented as a function of the acoustic calibration signal parameters.

  9. Short-time movement of E. coli chromosomal loci depends on coordinate and subcellular localization.

    PubMed

    Javer, Avelino; Long, Zhicheng; Nugent, Eileen; Grisi, Marco; Siriwatwetchakul, Kamin; Dorfman, Kevin D; Cicuta, Pietro; Cosentino Lagomarsino, Marco

    2013-01-01

    In bacteria, chromosomal architecture shows strong spatial and temporal organization, and regulates key cellular functions, such as transcription. Tracking the motion of chromosomal loci at short timescales provides information related to both the physical state of the nucleo-protein complex and its local environment, independent of large-scale motions related to genome segregation. Here we investigate the short-time (0.1-10 s) dynamics of fluorescently labelled chromosomal loci in Escherichia coli at different growth rates. At these timescales, we observe for the first time a dependence of the loci's apparent diffusion on both their subcellular localization and chromosomal coordinate, and we provide evidence that the properties of the chromosome are similar in the tested growth conditions. Our results indicate that either non-equilibrium fluctuations due to enzyme activity or the organization of the genome as a polymer-protein complex vary as a function of the distance from the origin of replication.

  10. Local-in-time well-posedness of a regularized mathematical model for silicon MESFET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blokhin, A. M.; Tkachev, D. L.

    2010-10-01

    We prove the local-in-time well-posedness of the initial boundary value problem for a system of quasilinear equations. This system is used for finding numerical stationary solutions of the hydrodynamical model of charge transport in the silicon MESFET (metal semiconductor field effect transistor). The initial boundary value problem has the following peculiarities: the quasilinear system is not a Cauchy-Kovalevskaya-type system; the boundary is a non-smooth curve and has angular points; nonlinearity of the problem is mainly connected with squares of gradients of the unknown functions. By using a special representation for the solution of a model problem we reduce the original problem to an integro-differential system. The local-in-time existence of a weakened generalized solution of this system is then proved by the fixed-point argument.

  11. Chatanika radar observations relating to the latitudinal and local time variations of Joule heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, P. M.; Foster, J. C.; Doupnik, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    Observations of plasma convection made with the Chatanika incoherent scatter radar have been analyzed to give latitude/local time plots of the electric field contribution (E squared) to thermospheric Joule heating. The data, which plan the invariant latitude range 56 deg to 75 deg, show the presence of strong heating throughout the auroral regions. Of special interest are brief interludes of intense heating (greater than 50 mW/sq m) that are observed at nearly all local times and latitudes in response to magnetospheric disturbances. Further, there seem to be particular regions of the auroral oval where Joule heating seems to be continually enhanced above the broad background. The results of six 24-hour experiments are presented to illustrate summer and winter conditions. A shorter eight hour experiment is also given to show the characteristics of cleft heating, insofar as they are visible to the Chatanika radar.

  12. Nonlinear Localized Dissipative Structures for Long-Time Solution of Wave Equation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    Fatemi, E., Engquist, B., and Osher, S., " Numerical Solution of the High Frequency Asymptotic Expansion for the Scalar Wave Equation ", Journal of...FINAL REPORT Grant Title: Nonlinear Localized Dissipative Structures for Long-Time Solution of Wave Equation By Dr. John Steinhoff Grant number... numerical method, "Wave Confinement" (WC), is developed to efficiently solve the linear wave equation . This is similar to the originally developed

  13. Digital Sequences and a Time Reversal-Based Impact Region Imaging and Localization Method

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Lei; Yuan, Shenfang; Mei, Hanfei; Qian, Weifeng

    2013-01-01

    To reduce time and cost of damage inspection, on-line impact monitoring of aircraft composite structures is needed. A digital monitor based on an array of piezoelectric transducers (PZTs) is developed to record the impact region of impacts on-line. It is small in size, lightweight and has low power consumption, but there are two problems with the impact alarm region localization method of the digital monitor at the current stage. The first one is that the accuracy rate of the impact alarm region localization is low, especially on complex composite structures. The second problem is that the area of impact alarm region is large when a large scale structure is monitored and the number of PZTs is limited which increases the time and cost of damage inspections. To solve the two problems, an impact alarm region imaging and localization method based on digital sequences and time reversal is proposed. In this method, the frequency band of impact response signals is estimated based on the digital sequences first. Then, characteristic signals of impact response signals are constructed by sinusoidal modulation signals. Finally, the phase synthesis time reversal impact imaging method is adopted to obtain the impact region image. Depending on the image, an error ellipse is generated to give out the final impact alarm region. A validation experiment is implemented on a complex composite wing box of a real aircraft. The validation results show that the accuracy rate of impact alarm region localization is approximately 100%. The area of impact alarm region can be reduced and the number of PZTs needed to cover the same impact monitoring region is reduced by more than a half. PMID:24084123

  14. Deuterium diffusion and localized hopping in lanthanum trideuteride from deuteron spin-relaxation-time measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Borsa, F.; Barnes, R.G.; Beaudry, B.J.; Torgeson, D.R.

    1982-08-01

    The deuteron spin-relaxation times T/sub 1/, T/sub 1/rho, T/sub 2/, and T(/sub 2/ have been measured as a function of temperature in lanthanum trideuteride, LaD/sub 3/. Information is obtained both about deuteron diffusion and about the localized hopping motion of the deuterons occupying the octahedral interstitial sites in the fcc metal lattice.

  15. Digital sequences and a time reversal-based impact region imaging and localization method.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Lei; Yuan, Shenfang; Mei, Hanfei; Qian, Weifeng

    2013-10-01

    To reduce time and cost of damage inspection, on-line impact monitoring of aircraft composite structures is needed. A digital monitor based on an array of piezoelectric transducers (PZTs) is developed to record the impact region of impacts on-line. It is small in size, lightweight and has low power consumption, but there are two problems with the impact alarm region localization method of the digital monitor at the current stage. The first one is that the accuracy rate of the impact alarm region localization is low, especially on complex composite structures. The second problem is that the area of impact alarm region is large when a large scale structure is monitored and the number of PZTs is limited which increases the time and cost of damage inspections. To solve the two problems, an impact alarm region imaging and localization method based on digital sequences and time reversal is proposed. In this method, the frequency band of impact response signals is estimated based on the digital sequences first. Then, characteristic signals of impact response signals are constructed by sinusoidal modulation signals. Finally, the phase synthesis time reversal impact imaging method is adopted to obtain the impact region image. Depending on the image, an error ellipse is generated to give out the final impact alarm region. A validation experiment is implemented on a complex composite wing box of a real aircraft. The validation results show that the accuracy rate of impact alarm region localization is approximately 100%. The area of impact alarm region can be reduced and the number of PZTs needed to cover the same impact monitoring region is reduced by more than a half.

  16. Localization of Wireless Emitters Based on the Time Difference of Arrival (TDOA) and Wavelet Denoising

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-05-01

    policy or position of the Department of Defense or the United States Government. 12a. DISTRIBUTION/AVAILABILITY STATEMENT 12b. DISTRIBUTION CODE Approved...wireless communication units . One major commercial factor behind the recent interest in localization is the Federal Communications Commission ( FCC ...and any processing and response delay within the mobile unit . Due to the variations in design and manufacture of the handsets the time estimate is

  17. Direct picosecond time resolution of unimolecular reactions initiated by local mode excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherer, N. F.; Doany, F. E.; Zewail, A. H.; Perry, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    Attention is given to the first results of direct, picosec measurements of the Delta-nu(OH) 5 local mode transition of H2O2. These time-resolved studies yield a direct measure of the unimolecular dissociation rate, and furnish a lower limit for the rate of energy redistribution from the OH stretch to the O-O reaction coordinate. The data thus determined may be used to ascertain the domain of validity for statistical unimolecular reaction rate theories.

  18. Investigation of S3-2 satellite data for local time variation of energetic electron precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robbe, S.; Sheldon, W. R.; Benbrook, J. R.; Bering, E. A.; Vampola, A. L.

    1994-01-01

    Data on precipitating electrons from the S3-2 satellite were investigated for local time variation at four L = 4 stations in the southern hemisphere. The equatorial pitch angles of electrons mirroring at 100 km, assumed to be the edge of the bounce loss cone, are calculated for L = 4 using the International Geomagnetic Reference Field for the epoch of the S3-2 data, along with the variation in mirror altitude per degree of equatorial pitch angle. The largest obstacle to the investigation was uneven sampling in terms of local time for all of the stations. However, this situation was improved upon by the use of S3-2 measurements at the conjugate locations of the four stations which provided additional data on electrons in the southern hemisphere bounce loss cone. Evidence for an effect of the dawn-to-dusk geoelectric field was found at two of the stations, Halley Bay and Siple, in the form of a minimum in electron precipitation at dusk. However, the present study does not completely resolve the question of local time modulation of electron precipitation at L = 4 in the southern hemisphere. Furthermore, while the average precipitation was lowest at the Kerguelen site, as would be expected on the basis of drift loss cone (DLC) theories, the intensity at that site exceeds the level that is expected on the basis of these DLC theories.

  19. Time-lapse monitoring of localized changes within heterogeneous media with scattered waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinaemerem, Kanu

    Time-lapse monitoring of geological and mechanical media has been the focus of various studies over the past four decades because of the information that the inferred changes within the medium provides insight into the dynamic characteristics of the medium. Time-lapse changes within a medium can be used to characterize the temporal evolution of the medium, evaluate the forces driving the changes within the medium and make predictions on the future state of the monitored medium. The detectability of the changes within a material depends on the characteristics of the change to be imaged, the sensitivity of the monitoring data to the change, and the time-lapse monitoring parameters such as the monitoring source-receiver array and the spectral content of the monitoring waves. Various time-lapse monitoring tools have been used to monitor changes within media ranging from the earth's surface to tumors within the human body. These monitoring tools include the use of 4D active surveys were an imprint of the change within the medium is extracted from the time-lapse surveys and the use of interferometric techniques that use singly or multiply scattered waves. My major goal in this study is to image and localize changes present within a scattering medium using time-lapse multiply scattered waves generated within the monitored medium. The changes to be imaged are generally localized in space. This work is an extension of coda wave interferometry. Coda wave interferometry focuses on the identification and extraction of average velocity change occurring within a scattering medium. Due to the non-linear characteristics of multiply scattered waves and limited information of the origin of the multiply scattered waves, coda wave interferometry resolves the average velocity change within the scattering medium with no or limited indication of the location of the change. In this study, I demonstrate that time-lapse changes can be imaged and localized within scattering media using

  20. Cdc5-Dependent Asymmetric Localization of Bfa1 Fine-Tunes Timely Mitotic Exit

    PubMed Central

    Bahk, Young Yil; Song, Kiwon

    2012-01-01

    In budding yeast, the major regulator of the mitotic exit network (MEN) is Tem1, a GTPase, which is inhibited by the GTPase-activating protein (GAP), Bfa1/Bub2. Asymmetric Bfa1 localization to the bud-directed spindle pole body (SPB) during metaphase also controls mitotic exit, but the molecular mechanism and function of this localization are not well understood, particularly in unperturbed cells. We identified four novel Cdc5 target residues within the Bfa1 C-terminus: 452S, 453S, 454S, and 559S. A Bfa1 mutant in which all of these residues had been changed to alanine (Bfa14A) persisted on both SPBs at anaphase and was hypo-phosphorylated, despite retaining its GAP activity for Tem1. A Bfa1 phospho-mimetic mutant in which all of these residues were switched to aspartate (Bfa14D) always localized asymmetrically to the SPB. These observations demonstrate that asymmetric localization of Bfa1 is tightly linked to its Cdc5-dependent phosphorylation, but not to its GAP activity. Consistent with this, in kinase-defective cdc5-2 cells Bfa1 was not phosphorylated and localized to both SPBs, whereas Bfa14D was asymmetrically localized. BFA14A cells progressed through anaphase normally but displayed delayed mitotic exit in unperturbed cell cycles, while BFA14D cells underwent mitotic exit with the same kinetics as wild-type cells. We suggest that Cdc5 induces the asymmetric distribution of Bfa1 to the bud-directed SPB independently of Bfa1 GAP activity at anaphase and that Bfa1 asymmetry fine-tunes the timing of MEN activation in unperturbed cell cycles. PMID:22253605

  1. Local adaptation in the flowering-time gene network of balsam poplar, Populus balsamifera L.

    PubMed

    Keller, Stephen R; Levsen, Nicholas; Olson, Matthew S; Tiffin, Peter

    2012-10-01

    Identifying the signature and targets of local adaptation is an increasingly important goal in empirical population genetics. Using data from 443 balsam poplar Populus balsamifera trees sampled from 31 populations, we tested for evidence of geographically variable selection shaping diversity at 27 homologues of the Arabidopsis flowering-time network. These genes are implicated in the control of seasonal phenology, an important determinant of fitness. Using 335 candidate and 412 reference single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), we tested for evidence of local adaptation by searching for elevated population differentiation using F(ST)-based outlier analyses implemented in BayeScan or a Hierarchical Model in Arelquin and by testing for significant associations between allele frequency and environmental variables using BAYENV. A total of 46 SNPs from 14 candidate genes had signatures of local adaptation-either significantly greater population differentiation or significant covariance with one or more environmental variable relative to reference SNP distributions. Only 11 SNPs from two genes exhibited both elevated population differentiation and covariance with one or more environmental variables. Several genes including the abscisic acid gene ABI1B and the circadian clock genes ELF3 and GI5 harbored a large number of SNPs with signatures of local adaptation-with SNPs in GI5 strongly covarying with both latitude and precipitation and SNPs in ABI1B strongly covarying with temperature. In contrast to several other systems, we find little evidence that photoreceptors, including phytochromes, play an important role in local adaptation. Our results additionally show that detecting local adaptation is sensitive to the analytical approaches used and that model-based significance thresholds should be viewed with caution.

  2. Locally conformal finite-difference time-domain techniques for particle-in-cell plasma simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, R. E.; Welch, D. R.; Zimmerman, W. R.; Miller, C. L.; Genoni, T. C.; Rose, D. V.; Price, D. W.; Martin, P. N.; Short, D. J.; Jones, A. W. P.; Threadgold, J. R.

    2011-02-01

    The Dey-Mittra [S. Dey, R. Mitra, A locally conformal finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) algorithm for modeling three-dimensional perfectly conducting objects, IEEE Microwave Guided Wave Lett. 7 (273) 1997] finite-difference time-domain partial cell method enables the modeling of irregularly shaped conducting surfaces while retaining second-order accuracy. We present an algorithm to extend this method to include charged particle emission and absorption in particle-in-cell codes. Several examples are presented that illustrate the possible improvements that can be realized using the new algorithm for problems relevant to plasma simulation.

  3. Localization of a noisy broadband surface target using time differences of multipath arrivals.

    PubMed

    Gebbie, John; Siderius, Martin; McCargar, Reid; Allen, John S; Pusey, Grant

    2013-07-01

    Previous studies [Tiemann et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 120, 2355-2365 (2006)] have reported the localization of marine mammals in 3-D from their clicks using multipath arrivals. Bathymetric variations were advantageously used to predict multipath arrival times with a raytracer. These arrivals are directly discernible from the time series for impulsive sources, such as whale clicks, but extension of the method to continuous broadband sources presents additional complications. By pulse compressing noise emitted from a small boat using two hydrophones, the hyperbolic direct-arrival ambiguity can be refined in both range and bearing. Acoustic-derived results are validated with target GPS measurements.

  4. Fermion sign problem in imaginary-time projection continuum quantum Monte Carlo with local interaction.

    PubMed

    Calcavecchia, Francesco; Holzmann, Markus

    2016-04-01

    We use the shadow wave function formalism as a convenient model to study the fermion sign problem affecting all projector quantum Monte Carlo methods in continuum space. We demonstrate that the efficiency of imaginary-time projection algorithms decays exponentially with increasing number of particles and/or imaginary-time propagation. Moreover, we derive an analytical expression that connects the localization of the system with the magnitude of the sign problem, illustrating this behavior through numerical results. Finally, we discuss the computational complexity of the fermion sign problem and methods for alleviating its severity.

  5. A systematic method for constructing time discretizations of integrable lattice systems: local equations of motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchida, Takayuki

    2010-10-01

    We propose a new method for discretizing the time variable in integrable lattice systems while maintaining the locality of the equations of motion. The method is based on the zero-curvature (Lax pair) representation and the lowest-order 'conservation laws'. In contrast to the pioneering work of Ablowitz and Ladik, our method allows the auxiliary dependent variables appearing in the stage of time discretization to be expressed locally in terms of the original dependent variables. The time-discretized lattice systems have the same set of conserved quantities and the same structures of the solutions as the continuous-time lattice systems; only the time evolution of the parameters in the solutions that correspond to the angle variables is discretized. The effectiveness of our method is illustrated using examples such as the Toda lattice, the Volterra lattice, the modified Volterra lattice, the Ablowitz-Ladik lattice (an integrable semi-discrete nonlinear Schrödinger system) and the lattice Heisenberg ferromagnet model. For the modified Volterra lattice, we also present its ultradiscrete analogue.

  6. DETECTION, LOCALIZATION, AND CHARACTERIZATION OF GRAVITATIONAL WAVE BURSTS IN A PULSAR TIMING ARRAY

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, Lee Samuel; Lommen, Andrea N.

    2010-08-01

    Efforts to detect gravitational waves by timing an array of pulsars have traditionally focused on stationary gravitational waves, e.g., stochastic or periodic signals. Gravitational wave bursts-signals whose duration is much shorter than the observation period-will also arise in the pulsar timing array waveband. Sources that give rise to detectable bursts include the formation or coalescence of supermassive black holes (SMBHs), the periapsis passage of compact objects in highly elliptic or unbound orbits about an SMBH, or cusps on cosmic strings. Here, we describe how pulsar timing array data may be analyzed to detect and characterize these bursts. Our analysis addresses, in a mutually consistent manner, a hierarchy of three questions. (1) What are the odds that a data set includes the signal from a gravitational wave burst? (2) Assuming the presence of a burst, what is the direction to its source? (3) Assuming the burst propagation direction, what is the burst waveform's time dependence in each of its polarization states? Applying our analysis to synthetic data sets, we find that we can detect gravitational waves even when the radiation is too weak to either localize the source or infer the waveform, and detect and localize sources even when the radiation amplitude is too weak to permit the waveform to be determined. While the context of our discussion is gravitational wave detection via pulsar timing arrays, the analysis itself is directly applicable to gravitational wave detection using either ground- or space-based detector data.

  7. Desire on and off the couch.

    PubMed

    Friedberg, Ahron L

    2013-03-01

    The concept of desire is potentially useful and underutilized for elucidating and understanding psychoanalytic material and informing psychoanalytic technique. It can be employed as a lens for viewing and clarifying diverse clinical phenomenon and other mental productions. One way of defining desire as a conceptual framework as applied to psychoanalytic theory is to refract it into three components: (1) love (emotional desire), (2) sex (physical desire), and (3) passion (other manifestations of desire). These different aspects of desire are manifest in and of themselves and as enhancements of one another. Focusing on each of them as manifest in the transference/countertransference relationship in analysis can facilitate a patient becoming more aware of psychological conflicts and working them through in analysis. This paper presents and discusses a case study in which these different aspects of desire are employed and analyzed.

  8. Desire thinking as a predictor of gambling.

    PubMed

    Fernie, Bruce A; Caselli, Gabriele; Giustina, Lucia; Donato, Gilda; Marcotriggiani, Antonella; Spada, Marcantonio M

    2014-04-01

    Desire thinking is a voluntary cognitive process involving verbal and imaginal elaboration of a desired target. A desired target can relate to an object, an internal state or an activity, such as gambling. This study investigated the role of desire thinking in gambling in a cohort of participants recruited from community and clinical settings. Ninety five individuals completed a battery of self-report measures consisting of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), the Gambling Craving Scale (GCS), the Desire Thinking Questionnaire (DTQ) and the South Oaks Gambling Screen (SOGS). Correlation analyses revealed that gender, educational level, recruitment source, anxiety and depression, craving and desire thinking were correlated with gambling. A hierarchical multiple regression analysis revealed that both recruitment source and desire thinking were the only independent predictors of gambling when controlling for all other study variables, including craving. These findings are discussed in the light of metacognitive therapy (MCT).

  9. Iterated local search algorithm for solving the orienteering problem with soft time windows.

    PubMed

    Aghezzaf, Brahim; Fahim, Hassan El

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we study the orienteering problem with time windows (OPTW) and the impact of relaxing the time windows on the profit collected by the vehicle. The way of relaxing time windows adopted in the orienteering problem with soft time windows (OPSTW) that we study in this research is a late service relaxation that allows linearly penalized late services to customers. We solve this problem heuristically by considering a hybrid iterated local search. The results of the computational study show that the proposed approach is able to achieve promising solutions on the OPTW test instances available in the literature, one new best solution is found. On the newly generated test instances of the OPSTW, the results show that the profit collected by the OPSTW is better than the profit collected by the OPTW.

  10. Local identifiability for two and three-compartment pharmacokinetic models with time-lags.

    PubMed

    Merino, J A; De Biasi, J; Plusquellec, Y; Houin, G

    1998-06-01

    In this paper, we show that time-lags between compartments in a 2 and 3 compartment pharmacokinetic model may be taken into account but that separate identification for model parameters and for time-lags would not be suitable. Furthermore, it may happen that a time-lag model is locally identifiable while the corresponding model without delay is not. For two-compartment delayed models, with only one observation, it is not necessary to have two different inputs contrary to the case without time-lag. Both the Laplace transformation and a Jacobian matrix are used in an identifiability study. For all two-compartment models we have investigated which kind of parameters or lags are identifiable from amount (Q) or concentration (C) measures.

  11. Development of a protocol to quantify local bone adaptation over space and time: Quantification of reproducibility.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yongtao; Boudiffa, Maya; Dall'Ara, Enrico; Bellantuono, Ilaria; Viceconti, Marco

    2016-07-05

    In vivo micro-computed tomography (µCT) scanning of small rodents is a powerful method for longitudinal monitoring of bone adaptation. However, the life-time bone growth in small rodents makes it a challenge to quantify local bone adaptation. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop a protocol, which can take into account large bone growth, to quantify local bone adaptations over space and time. The entire right tibiae of eight 14-week-old C57BL/6J female mice were consecutively scanned four times in an in vivo µCT scanner using a nominal isotropic image voxel size of 10.4µm. The repeated scan image datasets were aligned to the corresponding baseline (first) scan image dataset using rigid registration. 80% of tibia length (starting from the endpoint of the proximal growth plate) was selected as the volume of interest and partitioned into 40 regions along the tibial long axis (10 divisions) and in the cross-section (4 sectors). The bone mineral content (BMC) was used to quantify bone adaptation and was calculated in each region. All local BMCs have precision errors (PE%CV) of less than 3.5% (24 out of 40 regions have PE%CV of less than 2%), least significant changes (LSCs) of less than 3.8%, and 38 out of 40 regions have intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) of over 0.8. The proposed protocol allows to quantify local bone adaptations over an entire tibia in longitudinal studies, with a high reproducibility, an essential requirement to reduce the number of animals to achieve the necessary statistical power.

  12. Carcinoma of the tonsil: the effect of dose-time-volume factors on local control

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, P.G.; Beale, F.A.; Cummings, B.J.; Harwood, A.R.; Keane, T.J.; Payne, D.G.; Rider, W.D.

    1985-04-01

    Between 1970 and 1979, 372 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsil were treated with primary irradiation therapy, with salvage surgery for failures. The median age was 60 years and the male to female ratio was 2:1. All patients received external beam radiation which was supplemented in 68 patients with a radioactive implant for disease into adjacent tongue. The overall survival for all patients was 38% at 5 years and 54% when corrected for intercurrent disease. Local control was 87% for T1 lesions, 68% for T2 lesions and 50% for T3 lesions. Regional control was 96% for NO, 67% for N1 and 37% for N2-3. A detailed dose-time-volume analysis revealed that increasing volume improved local control in T1 and T2 lesions. Increasing the dose in the range of 5000 to 6500 rad had no significant effect on primary control in any stage of disease. The addition of a radioactive implant did not increase local control if disease extended into the tongue. This study demonstrates the significance of adequate treatment volume in local control for carcinoma of the tonsil. No significant dose response was found and subsequent surgery was not compromised when a moderate dose of radiation was used.

  13. Local and global hydrological contributions to time-variable gravity in Southwest Niger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeffer, Julia; Boucher, Marie; Hinderer, Jacques; Favreau, Guillaume; Boy, Jean-Paul; de Linage, Caroline; Cappelaere, Bernard; Luck, Bernard; Oi, Monique; Le Moigne, Nicolas

    2011-02-01

    Advances in methods of observation are essential to ensure a better understanding of changes in water resources considering climate variability and human activities. The GHYRAF (Gravity and Hydrology in Africa) experiments aim to combine gravimetric measurements with dense hydrological surveys to better characterize the annual water storage variability in tropical West Africa. The first absolute gravimetric measurements were performed in Southwest Niger, near a temporary pond where rapid infiltration to an unconfined aquifer occurs. As gravity is sensitive both to local and global variations of water mass distribution, the large-scale hydrological contribution to time-variable gravity has been removed using either GRACE satellite data or global hydrology models. The effect of the local water storage changes was modelled using in situ measurements of the water table, soil moisture and pond water level. The adjustment of these simulations to residual ground gravity observations helped to constrain the specific yield to a value ranging between 1.8 and 6.2 per cent. This range of value is consistent, albeit on the low side, with the aquifer water content (6-12 per cent) estimated by magnetic resonance soundings, which are known to slightly overestimate the specific yield in this geological context. The comparison of these two independent geophysical methods shows their potential to constrain the local hydrogeological parameters. Besides, this study evidences the worth of correcting the gravity signal for large-scale hydrology before recovering local water storage parameters.

  14. Space-Time Localization of Plasma Turbulence Using Multiple Spacecraft Radio Links

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, John W.; Estabrook, Frank B.

    2011-01-01

    Space weather is described as the variability of solar wind plasma that can disturb satellites and systems and affect human space exploration. Accurate prediction requires information of the heliosphere inside the orbit of the Earth. However, for predictions using remote sensing, one needs not only plane-of-sky position but also range information the third spatial dimension to show the distance to the plasma disturbances and thus when they might propagate or co-rotate to create disturbances at the orbit of the Earth. Appropriately processed radio signals from spacecraft having communications lines-of-sight passing through the inner heliosphere can be used for this spacetime localization of plasma disturbances. The solar plasma has an electron density- and radio-wavelength-dependent index of refraction. An approximately monochromatic wave propagating through a thin layer of plasma turbulence causes a geometrical-optics phase shift proportional to the electron density at the point of passage, the radio wavelength, and the thickness of the layer. This phase shift is the same for a wave propagating either up or down through the layer at the point of passage. This attribute can be used for space-time localization of plasma irregularities. The transfer function of plasma irregularities to the observed time series depends on the Doppler tracking mode. When spacecraft observations are in the two-way mode (downlink radio signal phase-locked to an uplink radio transmission), plasma fluctuations have a two-pulse response in the Doppler. In the two-way mode, the Doppler time series y2(t) is the difference between the frequency of the downlink signal received and the frequency of a ground reference oscillator. A plasma blob localized at a distance x along the line of sight perturbs the phase on both the up and down link, giving rise to two events in the two-way tracking time series separated by a time lag depending the blob s distance from the Earth: T2-2x/c, where T2 is the

  15. Producing graphite with desired properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, J. M.; Imprescia, R. J.; Reiswig, R. D.; Smith, M. C.

    1971-01-01

    Isotropic or anisotropic graphite is synthesized with precise control of particle size, distribution, and shape. The isotropic graphites are nearly perfectly isotropic, with thermal expansion coefficients two or three times those of ordinary graphites. The anisotropic graphites approach the anisotropy of pyrolytic graphite.

  16. Local spectrum analysis of field propagation in an anisotropic medium. Part I. Time-harmonic fields.

    PubMed

    Tinkelman, Igor; Melamed, Timor

    2005-06-01

    The phase-space beam summation is a general analytical framework for local analysis and modeling of radiation from extended source distributions. In this formulation, the field is expressed as a superposition of beam propagators that emanate from all points in the source domain and in all directions. In this Part I of a two-part investigation, the theory is extended to include propagation in anisotropic medium characterized by a generic wave-number profile for time-harmonic fields; in a companion paper [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 22, 1208 (2005)], the theory is extended to time-dependent fields. The propagation characteristics of the beam propagators in a homogeneous anisotropic medium are considered. With use of Gaussian windows for the local processing of either ordinary or extraordinary electromagnetic field distributions, the field is represented by a phase-space spectral distribution in which the propagating elements are Gaussian beams that are formulated by using Gaussian plane-wave spectral distributions over the extended source plane. By applying saddle-point asymptotics, we extract the Gaussian beam phenomenology in the anisotropic environment. The resulting field is parameterized in terms of the spatial evolution of the beam curvature, beam width, etc., which are mapped to local geometrical properties of the generic wave-number profile. The general results are applied to the special case of uniaxial crystal, and it is found that the asymptotics for the Gaussian beam propagators, as well as the physical phenomenology attached, perform remarkably well.

  17. Sound Source Localization for HRI Using FOC-Based Time Difference Feature and Spatial Grid Matching.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaofei; Liu, Hong

    2013-08-01

    In human-robot interaction (HRI), speech sound source localization (SSL) is a convenient and efficient way to obtain the relative position between a speaker and a robot. However, implementing a SSL system based on TDOA method encounters many problems, such as noise of real environments, the solution of nonlinear equations, switch between far field and near field. In this paper, fourth-order cumulant spectrum is derived, based on which a time delay estimation (TDE) algorithm that is available for speech signal and immune to spatially correlated Gaussian noise is proposed. Furthermore, time difference feature of sound source and its spatial distribution are analyzed, and a spatial grid matching (SGM) algorithm is proposed for localization step, which handles some problems that geometric positioning method faces effectively. Valid feature detection algorithm and a decision tree method are also suggested to improve localization performance and reduce computational complexity. Experiments are carried out in real environments on a mobile robot platform, in which thousands of sets of speech data with noise collected by four microphones are tested in 3D space. The effectiveness of our TDE method and SGM algorithm is verified.

  18. Time-distance domain transformation for Acoustic Emission source localization in thin metallic plates.

    PubMed

    Grabowski, Krzysztof; Gawronski, Mateusz; Baran, Ireneusz; Spychalski, Wojciech; Staszewski, Wieslaw J; Uhl, Tadeusz; Kundu, Tribikram; Packo, Pawel

    2016-05-01

    Acoustic Emission used in Non-Destructive Testing is focused on analysis of elastic waves propagating in mechanical structures. Then any information carried by generated acoustic waves, further recorded by a set of transducers, allow to determine integrity of these structures. It is clear that material properties and geometry strongly impacts the result. In this paper a method for Acoustic Emission source localization in thin plates is presented. The approach is based on the Time-Distance Domain Transform, that is a wavenumber-frequency mapping technique for precise event localization. The major advantage of the technique is dispersion compensation through a phase-shifting of investigated waveforms in order to acquire the most accurate output, allowing for source-sensor distance estimation using a single transducer. The accuracy and robustness of the above process are also investigated. This includes the study of Young's modulus value and numerical parameters influence on damage detection. By merging the Time-Distance Domain Transform with an optimal distance selection technique, an identification-localization algorithm is achieved. The method is investigated analytically, numerically and experimentally. The latter involves both laboratory and large scale industrial tests.

  19. Output feedback fuzzy controller design with local nonlinear feedback laws for discrete-time nonlinear systems.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jiuxiang; Wang, Youyi; Yang, Guang-Hong

    2010-12-01

    This paper considers the output feedback control problem for nonlinear discrete-time systems, which are represented by a type of fuzzy systems with local nonlinear models. By using the estimations of the states and nonlinear functions in local models, sufficient conditions for designing observer-based controllers are given for discrete-time nonlinear systems. First, a separation property, i.e., the controller and the observer can be independently designed, is proved for the class of fuzzy systems. Second, a two-step procedure with cone complementarity linearization algorithms is also developed for solving the H( ∞) dynamic output feedback (DOF) control problem. Moreover, for the case where the nonlinear functions in local submodels are measurable, a convex condition for designing H(∞) controllers is given by a new DOF control scheme. In contrast to the existing methods, the new methods can design output feedback controllers with fewer fuzzy rules as well as less computational burden, which is helpful for controller designs and implementations. Lastly, numerical examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  20. Local spectrum analysis of field propagation in an anisotropic medium. Part I. Time-harmonic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinkelman, Igor; Melamed, Timor

    2005-06-01

    The phase-space beam summation is a general analytical framework for local analysis and modeling of radiation from extended source distributions. In this formulation, the field is expressed as a superposition of beam propagators that emanate from all points in the source domain and in all directions. In this Part I of a two-part investigation, the theory is extended to include propagation in anisotropic medium characterized by a generic wave-number profile for time-harmonic fields; in a companion paper [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A22, 1208 (2005)], the theory is extended to time-dependent fields. The propagation characteristics of the beam propagators in a homogeneous anisotropic medium are considered. With use of Gaussian windows for the local processing of either ordinary or extraordinary electromagnetic field distributions, the field is represented by a phase-space spectral distribution in which the propagating elements are Gaussian beams that are formulated by using Gaussian plane-wave spectral distributions over the extended source plane. By applying saddle-point asymptotics, we extract the Gaussian beam phenomenology in the anisotropic environment. The resulting field is parameterized in terms of the spatial evolution of the beam curvature, beam width, etc., which are mapped to local geometrical properties of the generic wave-number profile. The general results are applied to the special case of uniaxial crystal, and it is found that the asymptotics for the Gaussian beam propagators, as well as the physical phenomenology attached, perform remarkably well.

  1. Is the local linearity of space-time inherited from the linearity of probabilities?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Markus P.; Carrozza, Sylvain; Höhn, Philipp A.

    2017-02-01

    The appearance of linear spaces, describing physical quantities by vectors and tensors, is ubiquitous in all of physics, from classical mechanics to the modern notion of local Lorentz invariance. However, as natural as this seems to the physicist, most computer scientists would argue that something like a ‘local linear tangent space’ is not very typical and in fact a quite surprising property of any conceivable world or algorithm. In this paper, we take the perspective of the computer scientist seriously, and ask whether there could be any inherently information-theoretic reason to expect this notion of linearity to appear in physics. We give a series of simple arguments, spanning quantum information theory, group representation theory, and renormalization in quantum gravity, that supports a surprising thesis: namely, that the local linearity of space-time might ultimately be a consequence of the linearity of probabilities. While our arguments involve a fair amount of speculation, they have the virtue of being independent of any detailed assumptions on quantum gravity, and they are in harmony with several independent recent ideas on emergent space-time in high-energy physics.

  2. Global flow impacts time-to-passage judgments based on local motion cues

    PubMed Central

    Beardsley, Scott A.; Sikoglu, Elif M.; Hecht, Heiko; Vaina, Lucia M.

    2011-01-01

    We assessed the effect of the coherence of optic flow on time-to-passage judgments in order to investigate the strategies that observers use when local expansion information is reduced or lacking. In the standard display, we presented a cloud of dots whose image expanded consistent with constant observer motion. The dots themselves, however, did not expand and were thus devoid of object expansion cues. Only the separations between the dots expanded. Subjects had to judge which of two colored target dots, presented at different simulated depths and lateral displacements would pass them first. Image velocities of the target dots were chosen so as to correlate with time-to-passage only some of the time. When optic flow was mainly incoherent, subjects’ responses were biased and relied on image velocities rather than on global flow analysis. However, the bias induced by misleading image velocity cues diminished as a function of the coherence of the optic flow. We discuss the results in the context of a global tau mechanism and settle a debate whether local expansion cues or optic flow analysis are the basis for time-to-passage estimation. PMID:21763711

  3. Global flow impacts time-to-passage judgments based on local motion cues.

    PubMed

    Beardsley, Scott A; Sikoglu, Elif M; Hecht, Heiko; Vaina, Lucia M

    2011-08-15

    We assessed the effect of the coherence of optic flow on time-to-passage judgments in order to investigate the strategies that observers use when local expansion information is reduced or lacking. In the standard display, we presented a cloud of dots whose image expanded consistent with constant observer motion. The dots themselves, however, did not expand and were thus devoid of object expansion cues. Only the separations between the dots expanded. Subjects had to judge which of two colored target dots, presented at different simulated depths and lateral displacements would pass them first. Image velocities of the target dots were chosen so as to correlate with time-to-passage only some of the time. When optic flow was mainly incoherent, subjects' responses were biased and relied on image velocities rather than on global flow analysis. However, the bias induced by misleading image velocity cues diminished as a function of the coherence of the optic flow. We discuss the results in the context of a global tau mechanism and settle a debate whether local expansion cues or optic flow analysis are the basis for time-to-passage estimation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Real-time realizations of the Bayesian Infrasonic Source Localization Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinsky, V.; Arrowsmith, S.; Hofstetter, A.; Nippress, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Bayesian Infrasonic Source Localization method (BISL), introduced by Mordak et al. (2010) and upgraded by Marcillo et al. (2014) is destined for the accurate estimation of the atmospheric event origin at local, regional and global scales by the seismic and infrasonic networks and arrays. The BISL is based on probabilistic models of the source-station infrasonic signal propagation time, picking time and azimuth estimate merged with a prior knowledge about celerity distribution. It requires at each hypothetical source location, integration of the product of the corresponding source-station likelihood functions multiplied by a prior probability density function of celerity over the multivariate parameter space. The present BISL realization is generally time-consuming procedure based on numerical integration. The computational scheme proposed simplifies the target function so that integrals are taken exactly and are represented via standard functions. This makes the procedure much faster and realizable in real-time without practical loss of accuracy. The procedure executed as PYTHON-FORTRAN code demonstrates high performance on a set of the model and real data.

  5. Contributed Review: Source-localization algorithms and applications using time of arrival and time difference of arrival measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinya; Deng, Zhiqun Daniel; Rauchenstein, Lynn T.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2016-04-01

    Locating the position of fixed or mobile sources (i.e., transmitters) based on measurements obtained from sensors (i.e., receivers) is an important research area that is attracting much interest. In this paper, we review several representative localization algorithms that use time of arrivals (TOAs) and time difference of arrivals (TDOAs) to achieve high signal source position estimation accuracy when a transmitter is in the line-of-sight of a receiver. Circular (TOA) and hyperbolic (TDOA) position estimation approaches both use nonlinear equations that relate the known locations of receivers and unknown locations of transmitters. Estimation of the location of transmitters using the standard nonlinear equations may not be very accurate because of receiver location errors, receiver measurement errors, and computational efficiency challenges that result in high computational burdens. Least squares and maximum likelihood based algorithms have become the most popular computational approaches to transmitter location estimation. In this paper, we summarize the computational characteristics and position estimation accuracies of various positioning algorithms. By improving methods for estimating the time-of-arrival of transmissions at receivers and transmitter location estimation algorithms, transmitter location estimation may be applied across a range of applications and technologies such as radar, sonar, the Global Positioning System, wireless sensor networks, underwater animal tracking, mobile communications, and multimedia.

  6. The Local Discontinuous Galerkin Method for Time-Dependent Convection-Diffusion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cockburn, Bernardo; Shu, Chi-Wang

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, we study the Local Discontinuous Galerkin methods for nonlinear, time-dependent convection-diffusion systems. These methods are an extension of the Runge-Kutta Discontinuous Galerkin methods for purely hyperbolic systems to convection-diffusion systems and share with those methods their high parallelizability, their high-order formal accuracy, and their easy handling of complicated geometries, for convection dominated problems. It is proven that for scalar equations, the Local Discontinuous Galerkin methods are L(sup 2)-stable in the nonlinear case. Moreover, in the linear case, it is shown that if polynomials of degree k are used, the methods are k-th order accurate for general triangulations; although this order of convergence is suboptimal, it is sharp for the LDG methods. Preliminary numerical examples displaying the performance of the method are shown.

  7. Localized operator partitioning method for electronic excitation energies in the time-dependent density functional formalism.

    PubMed

    Nagesh, Jayashree; Frisch, Michael J; Brumer, Paul; Izmaylov, Artur F

    2016-12-28

    We extend the localized operator partitioning method (LOPM) [J. Nagesh, A. F. Izmaylov, and P. Brumer, J. Chem. Phys. 142, 084114 (2015)] to the time-dependent density functional theory framework to partition molecular electronic energies of excited states in a rigorous manner. A molecular fragment is defined as a collection of atoms using Becke's atomic partitioning. A numerically efficient scheme for evaluating the fragment excitation energy is derived employing a resolution of the identity to preserve standard one- and two-electron integrals in the final expressions. The utility of this partitioning approach is demonstrated by examining several excited states of two bichromophoric compounds: 9-((1- naphthyl)- methyl)- anthracene and 4-((2- naphthyl)- methyl)- benzaldehyde. The LOPM is found to provide nontrivial insights into the nature of electronic energy localization that is not accessible using a simple density difference analysis.

  8. Localized operator partitioning method for electronic excitation energies in the time-dependent density functional formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagesh, Jayashree; Frisch, Michael J.; Brumer, Paul; Izmaylov, Artur F.

    2016-12-01

    We extend the localized operator partitioning method (LOPM) [J. Nagesh, A. F. Izmaylov, and P. Brumer, J. Chem. Phys. 142, 084114 (2015)] to the time-dependent density functional theory framework to partition molecular electronic energies of excited states in a rigorous manner. A molecular fragment is defined as a collection of atoms using Becke's atomic partitioning. A numerically efficient scheme for evaluating the fragment excitation energy is derived employing a resolution of the identity to preserve standard one- and two-electron integrals in the final expressions. The utility of this partitioning approach is demonstrated by examining several excited states of two bichromophoric compounds: 9-((1- naphthyl)- methyl)- anthracene and 4-((2- naphthyl)- methyl)- benzaldehyde. The LOPM is found to provide nontrivial insights into the nature of electronic energy localization that is not accessible using a simple density difference analysis.

  9. Locally parity-time-symmetric and globally parity-symmetric systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, W. W.; Herrero, R.; Botey, M.; Staliunas, K.

    2016-11-01

    We introduce a class of systems holding parity-time (PT ) symmetry locally, whereas being globally P symmetric. The potential, U =U (|r |) , fulfills PT symmetry with respect to periodically distributed points r0:U (| r0+r |) =U*(| r0-r |) being r0≠0 . We show that such systems hold unusual properties arising from the merging of the two different symmetries, leading to a strong field localization and enhancement at the double-symmetry center, r =0 , when the coupling of outward to inward propagating waves is favored. We explore such general potentials in one and two dimensions, which could have actual realizations combining gain-loss and index modulations in nanophotonic structures. In particular, we show how to render a broad aperture vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser into a bright and narrow beam source, as a direct application.

  10. Particle swarm optimization and its application in MEG source localization using single time sliced data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Juan; Liu, Chenglian; Guo, Yongning

    2014-10-01

    The estimation of neural active sources from the magnetoencephalography (MEG) data is a very critical issue for both clinical neurology and brain functions research. A widely accepted source-modeling technique for MEG involves calculating a set of equivalent current dipoles (ECDs). Depth in the brain is one of difficulties in MEG source localization. Particle swarm optimization(PSO) is widely used to solve various optimization problems. In this paper we discuss its ability and robustness to find the global optimum in different depths of the brain when using single equivalent current dipole (sECD) model and single time sliced data. The results show that PSO is an effective global optimization to MEG source localization when given one dipole in different depths.

  11. Sparse representation based on local time-frequency template matching for bearing transient fault feature extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qingbo; Ding, Xiaoxi

    2016-05-01

    The transients caused by the localized fault are important measurement information for bearing fault diagnosis. Thus it is crucial to extract the transients from the bearing vibration or acoustic signals that are always corrupted by a large amount of background noise. In this paper, an iterative transient feature extraction approach is proposed based on time-frequency (TF) domain sparse representation. The approach is realized by presenting a new method, called local TF template matching. In this method, the TF atoms are constructed based on the TF distribution (TFD) of the Morlet wavelet bases and local TF templates are formulated from the TF atoms for the matching process. The instantaneous frequency (IF) ridge calculated from the TFD of an analyzed signal provides the frequency parameter values for the TF atoms as well as an effective template matching path on the TF plane. In each iteration, local TF templates are employed to do correlation with the TFD of the analyzed signal along the IF ridge tube for identifying the optimum parameters of transient wavelet model. With this iterative procedure, transients can be extracted in the TF domain from measured signals one by one. The final signal can be synthesized by combining the extracted TF atoms and the phase of the raw signal. The local TF template matching builds an effective TF matching-based sparse representation approach with the merit of satisfying the native pulse waveform structure of transients. The effectiveness of the proposed method is verified by practical defective bearing signals. Comparison results also show that the proposed method is superior to traditional methods in transient feature extraction.

  12. The local maxima method for enhancement of time-frequency map and its application to local damage detection in rotating machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obuchowski, Jakub; Wyłomańska, Agnieszka; Zimroz, Radosław

    2014-06-01

    In this paper a new method of fault detection in rotating machinery is presented. It is based on a vibration time series analysis in time-frequency domain. A raw vibration signal is decomposed via the short-time Fourier transform (STFT). The time-frequency map is considered as matrix (M×N) with N sub-signals with length M. Each sub-signal is considered as a time series and might be interpreted as energy variation for narrow frequency bins. Each sub-signal is processed using a novel approach called the local maxima method. Basically, we search for local maxima because they should appear in the signal if local damage in bearings or gearbox exists. Finally, information for all sub-signals is combined in order to validate impulsive behavior of energy. Due to random character of the obtained time series, each maximum occurrence has to be checked for its significance. If there are time points for which the average number of local maxima for all sub-signals is significantly higher than for the other time instances, then location of these maxima is “weighted” as more important (at this time instance local maxima create for a set of Δf a pattern on the time-frequency map). This information, called vector of weights, is used for enhancement of spectrogram. When vector of weights is applied for spectrogram, non-informative energy is suppressed while informative features on spectrogram are enhanced. If the distribution of local maxima on spectrogram creates a pattern of wide-band cyclic energy growth, the machine is suspected of being damaged. For healthy condition, the vector of the average number of maxima for each time point should not have outliers, aggregation of information from all sub-signals is rather random and does not create any pattern. The method is illustrated by analysis of very noisy both real and simulated signals.

  13. Cerebellar potentiation and learning a whisker-based object localization task with a time response window.

    PubMed

    Rahmati, Negah; Owens, Cullen B; Bosman, Laurens W J; Spanke, Jochen K; Lindeman, Sander; Gong, Wei; Potters, Jan-Willem; Romano, Vincenzo; Voges, Kai; Moscato, Letizia; Koekkoek, Sebastiaan K E; Negrello, Mario; De Zeeuw, Chris I

    2014-01-29

    Whisker-based object localization requires activation and plasticity of somatosensory and motor cortex. These parts of the cerebral cortex receive strong projections from the cerebellum via the thalamus, but it is unclear whether and to what extent cerebellar processing may contribute to such a sensorimotor task. Here, we subjected knock-out mice, which suffer from impaired intrinsic plasticity in their Purkinje cells and long-term potentiation at their parallel fiber-to-Purkinje cell synapses (L7-PP2B), to an object localization task with a time response window (RW). Water-deprived animals had to learn to localize an object with their whiskers, and based upon this location they were trained to lick within a particular period ("go" trial) or refrain from licking ("no-go" trial). L7-PP2B mice were not ataxic and showed proper basic motor performance during whisking and licking, but were severely impaired in learning this task compared with wild-type littermates. Significantly fewer L7-PP2B mice were able to learn the task at long RWs. Those L7-PP2B mice that eventually learned the task made unstable progress, were significantly slower in learning, and showed deficiencies in temporal tuning. These differences became greater as the RW became narrower. Trained wild-type mice, but not L7-PP2B mice, showed a net increase in simple spikes and complex spikes of their Purkinje cells during the task. We conclude that cerebellar processing, and potentiation in particular, can contribute to learning a whisker-based object localization task when timing is relevant. This study points toward a relevant role of cerebellum-cerebrum interaction in a sophisticated cognitive task requiring strict temporal processing.

  14. Local Effect of Space-Time Expansion ---- How Galaxies Form and Evolve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jian Liang; Hua, He Yu

    2016-09-01

    generalize gravitational theory of central field to the expanding space-time, and realize the unification of structure of big scope space-time and physical phenomena of small scope, and reasonably and systematically explain gravitational anomalies of solar system such as extra receding rate of lunar orbit, the increase of astronomical unit, the secular change of day length, the earth's expansion as well as the extra acceleration of artificial aerocrafts and so on, which cannot be treated by current knowledge. Besides, it is disclosed that galaxies form from continued growth but not the assemblage of existent matter after big bang, new matter continuously creates in the interior of celestial bodies, celestial bodies, galaxies and space simultaneously enlarge at the same proportion, and it is the local effect of space-time expansion that determines formation and evolution of galaxies.

  15. The Stability of Social Desirability: A Latent Change Analysis.

    PubMed

    Haberecht, Katja; Schnuerer, Inga; Gaertner, Beate; John, Ulrich; Freyer-Adam, Jennis

    2015-08-01

    Social desirability has been shown to be stable in samples with higher school education. However, little is known about the stability of social desirability in more heterogeneous samples differing in school education. This study aimed to investigate the stability of social desirability and which factors predict interindividual differences in intraindividual change. As part of a randomized controlled trial, 1,243 job seekers with unhealthy alcohol use were systematically recruited at three job agencies. A total of 1,094 individuals (87.8%) participated in at least one of two follow-ups (6 and 15 months after baseline) and constitute this study's sample. The Social Desirability Scale-17 was applied. Two latent change models were conducted: Model 1 tested for interindividual differences in intraindividual change of social desirability between both follow-ups; Model 2 included possible predictors (age, sex, education, current employment status) of interindividual differences in intraindividual change. Model 1 revealed a significant decrease of social desirability over time. Model 2 revealed school education to be the only significant predictor of change. These findings indicate that stability of social desirability may depend on school education. It may not be as stable in individuals with higher school education as in individuals with lower education. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Female adolescents' perceptions of male partners' pregnancy desire.

    PubMed

    Heavey, Elizabeth J; Moysich, Kirsten B; Hyland, Andrew; Druschel, Charlotte M; Sill, Michael W

    2008-01-01

    Our objective was to examine the relationship between pregnancy desire among female adolescents and their perception of desire for pregnancy in their male partners. This is an observational cross-sectional study which examined 92 surveys administered to adolescent women between the ages of 14 to 19 years at two obstetrical care services serving a population from limited socioeconomic backgrounds. Participants were all pregnant or awaiting pregnancy test results. Participants were asked about their levels of pregnancy happiness and desire and their partners' levels of pregnancy happiness and desire. Spearman's correlation coefficient was calculated and discordant pairs were examined with McNemar's test. Logistic regression was utilized to examine the relationship between male and female pregnancy happiness and desire. We found that there was a significant correlation between the adolescents' feelings about pregnancy and their perceptions of their male partners' feelings about pregnancy (0.326; P = .004). McNemar's test indicated that male partners were significantly more likely to be reported to feel positively about the pregnancy than female partners (P = .017). Female adolescents who reported male partners who felt positively about the pregnancy were four times as likely to report having desired their pregnancy now or sooner (odds ratio [OR] = 4.35). We conclude that male partners may impact adolescent pregnancy desire. Further prospective studies are needed and male-focused adolescent pregnancy interventions should be developed.

  17. Optical eye tracking system for real-time noninvasive tumor localization in external beam radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Via, Riccardo Fassi, Aurora; Fattori, Giovanni; Fontana, Giulia; Pella, Andrea; Tagaste, Barbara; Ciocca, Mario; Riboldi, Marco; Baroni, Guido; Orecchia, Roberto

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: External beam radiotherapy currently represents an important therapeutic strategy for the treatment of intraocular tumors. Accurate target localization and efficient compensation of involuntary eye movements are crucial to avoid deviations in dose distribution with respect to the treatment plan. This paper describes an eye tracking system (ETS) based on noninvasive infrared video imaging. The system was designed for capturing the tridimensional (3D) ocular motion and provides an on-line estimation of intraocular lesions position based on a priori knowledge coming from volumetric imaging. Methods: Eye tracking is performed by localizing cornea and pupil centers on stereo images captured by two calibrated video cameras, exploiting eye reflections produced by infrared illumination. Additionally, torsional eye movements are detected by template matching in the iris region of eye images. This information allows estimating the 3D position and orientation of the eye by means of an eye local reference system. By combining ETS measurements with volumetric imaging for treatment planning [computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR)], one is able to map the position of the lesion to be treated in local eye coordinates, thus enabling real-time tumor referencing during treatment setup and irradiation. Experimental tests on an eye phantom and seven healthy subjects were performed to assess ETS tracking accuracy. Results: Measurements on phantom showed an overall median accuracy within 0.16 mm and 0.40° for translations and rotations, respectively. Torsional movements were affected by 0.28° median uncertainty. On healthy subjects, the gaze direction error ranged between 0.19° and 0.82° at a median working distance of 29 cm. The median processing time of the eye tracking algorithm was 18.60 ms, thus allowing eye monitoring up to 50 Hz. Conclusions: A noninvasive ETS prototype was designed to perform real-time target localization and eye movement monitoring

  18. Optical eye tracking system for real-time noninvasive tumor localization in external beam radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Via, Riccardo; Fassi, Aurora; Fattori, Giovanni; Fontana, Giulia; Pella, Andrea; Tagaste, Barbara; Riboldi, Marco; Ciocca, Mario; Orecchia, Roberto; Baroni, Guido

    2015-05-01

    External beam radiotherapy currently represents an important therapeutic strategy for the treatment of intraocular tumors. Accurate target localization and efficient compensation of involuntary eye movements are crucial to avoid deviations in dose distribution with respect to the treatment plan. This paper describes an eye tracking system (ETS) based on noninvasive infrared video imaging. The system was designed for capturing the tridimensional (3D) ocular motion and provides an on-line estimation of intraocular lesions position based on a priori knowledge coming from volumetric imaging. Eye tracking is performed by localizing cornea and pupil centers on stereo images captured by two calibrated video cameras, exploiting eye reflections produced by infrared illumination. Additionally, torsional eye movements are detected by template matching in the iris region of eye images. This information allows estimating the 3D position and orientation of the eye by means of an eye local reference system. By combining ETS measurements with volumetric imaging for treatment planning [computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR)], one is able to map the position of the lesion to be treated in local eye coordinates, thus enabling real-time tumor referencing during treatment setup and irradiation. Experimental tests on an eye phantom and seven healthy subjects were performed to assess ETS tracking accuracy. Measurements on phantom showed an overall median accuracy within 0.16 mm and 0.40° for translations and rotations, respectively. Torsional movements were affected by 0.28° median uncertainty. On healthy subjects, the gaze direction error ranged between 0.19° and 0.82° at a median working distance of 29 cm. The median processing time of the eye tracking algorithm was 18.60 ms, thus allowing eye monitoring up to 50 Hz. A noninvasive ETS prototype was designed to perform real-time target localization and eye movement monitoring during ocular radiotherapy treatments. The

  19. Local temperature fine-tunes the timing of spring migration in birds.

    PubMed

    Tøttrup, Anders P; Rainio, Kalle; Coppack, Timothy; Lehikoinen, Esa; Rahbek, Carsten; Thorup, Kasper

    2010-09-01

    Evidence for climate-driven phenological changes is rapidly increasing at all trophic levels. Our current poor knowledge of the detailed control of bird migration from the level of genes and hormonal control to direct physiological and behavioral responses hampers our ability to understand and predict consequences of climatic change for migratory birds. In order to better understand migration phenology and adaptation in environmental changes, we here assess the scale at which weather affects timing of spring migration in passerine birds. We use three commonly used proxies of spring-time climatic conditions: (1) vegetation "greenness" (NDVI) in Europe, (2) local spring temperatures in northern Europe, and (3) the North Atlantic Oscillation Index (NAO) as predictors of the phenology of avian migration as well as the strength of their effect on different subsets of populations and the dependence of correlations on species-specific migratory strategy. We analyze phenological patterns of the entire spring migration period in 12 Palaearctic passerine species, drawing on long-term data collected at three locations along a longitudinal gradient situated close to their northern European breeding area. Local temperature was the best single predictor of phenology with the highest explanatory power achieved in combination with NAO. Furthermore, early individuals are more affected by climatic variation compared to individuals on later passage, indicating that climatic change affects subsets of migratory populations differentially. Species wintering closer to the breeding areas were affected more than were those travelling longer distances and this pattern was strongest for the earliest subsets of the population. Overall, our results suggest that at least early subsets of the population are affected by local conditions and early birds use local conditions to fine-tune the date of their spring arrival while individuals arriving later are driven by other factors than local

  20. Effective real-time vehicle tracking using discriminative sparse coding on local patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, XiangJun; Ye, Feiyue; Ruan, Yaduan; Chen, Qimei

    2016-01-01

    A visual tracking framework that provides an object detector and tracker, which focuses on effective and efficient visual tracking in surveillance of real-world intelligent transport system applications, is proposed. The framework casts the tracking task as problems of object detection, feature representation, and classification, which is different from appearance model-matching approaches. Through a feature representation of discriminative sparse coding on local patches called DSCLP, which trains a dictionary on local clustered patches sampled from both positive and negative datasets, the discriminative power and robustness has been improved remarkably, which makes our method more robust to a complex realistic setting with all kinds of degraded image quality. Moreover, by catching objects through one-time background subtraction, along with offline dictionary training, computation time is dramatically reduced, which enables our framework to achieve real-time tracking performance even in a high-definition sequence with heavy traffic. Experiment results show that our work outperforms some state-of-the-art methods in terms of speed, accuracy, and robustness and exhibits increased robustness in a complex real-world scenario with degraded image quality caused by vehicle occlusion, image blur of rain or fog, and change in viewpoint or scale.

  1. The Relative Contribution of Interaural Time and Magnitude Cues to Dynamic Sound Localization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary data from a study examining the relative contribution of interaural time differences (ITDs) and interaural level differences (ILDs) to the localization of virtual sound sources both with and without head motion. The listeners' task was to estimate the apparent direction and distance of virtual sources (broadband noise) presented over headphones. Stimuli were synthesized from minimum phase representations of nonindividualized directional transfer functions; binaural magnitude spectra were derived from the minimum phase estimates and ITDs were represented as a pure delay. During dynamic conditions, listeners were encouraged to move their heads; the position of the listener's head was tracked and the stimuli were synthesized in real time using a Convolvotron to simulate a stationary external sound source. ILDs and ITDs were either correctly or incorrectly correlated with head motion: (1) both ILDs and ITDs correctly correlated, (2) ILDs correct, ITD fixed at 0 deg azimuth and 0 deg elevation, (3) ITDs correct, ILDs fixed at 0 deg, 0 deg. Similar conditions were run for static conditions except that none of the cues changed with head motion. The data indicated that, compared to static conditions, head movements helped listeners to resolve confusions primarily when ILDs were correctly correlated, although a smaller effect was also seen for correct ITDs. Together with the results for static conditions, the data suggest that localization tends to be dominated by the cue that is most reliable or consistent, when reliability is defined by consistency over time as well as across frequency bands.

  2. The Relative Contribution of Interaural Time and Magnitude Cues to Dynamic Sound Localization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary data from a study examining the relative contribution of interaural time differences (ITDs) and interaural level differences (ILDs) to the localization of virtual sound sources both with and without head motion. The listeners' task was to estimate the apparent direction and distance of virtual sources (broadband noise) presented over headphones. Stimuli were synthesized from minimum phase representations of nonindividualized directional transfer functions; binaural magnitude spectra were derived from the minimum phase estimates and ITDs were represented as a pure delay. During dynamic conditions, listeners were encouraged to move their heads; the position of the listener's head was tracked and the stimuli were synthesized in real time using a Convolvotron to simulate a stationary external sound source. ILDs and ITDs were either correctly or incorrectly correlated with head motion: (1) both ILDs and ITDs correctly correlated, (2) ILDs correct, ITD fixed at 0 deg azimuth and 0 deg elevation, (3) ITDs correct, ILDs fixed at 0 deg, 0 deg. Similar conditions were run for static conditions except that none of the cues changed with head motion. The data indicated that, compared to static conditions, head movements helped listeners to resolve confusions primarily when ILDs were correctly correlated, although a smaller effect was also seen for correct ITDs. Together with the results for static conditions, the data suggest that localization tends to be dominated by the cue that is most reliable or consistent, when reliability is defined by consistency over time as well as across frequency bands.

  3. Local Time Variation of Water Ice Clouds on Mars as Observed by THEMIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    The move of the Odyssey spacecraft to an orbit with local time near 6:00 AM and PM enables systematic retrieval of water ice clouds at a time of day not accessible from Mars Global Surveyor, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, or previous Odyssey observations. Although surface temperature is reduced near sunrise and sunset compared to afternoon, THEMIS observations show that there is still sufficient thermal contrast between the surface and atmosphere over a range of latitudes near the sub-solar point to retrieve accurate aerosol optical depth. Because water ice clouds form by condensation, relatively small changes in atmospheric temperature can cause clouds to form or sublimate quickly, and there can be large changes in water ice cloud optical depth over the course of a day. Here we present recent retrievals of water ice aerosol optical depth from THEMIS observations. These retrievals show significant differences in cloud locations and opitcal depth compared against THEMIS retrievals from previous Mars Years that were taken at an earlier local time.

  4. Relationship of edge localized mode burst times with divertor flux loop signal phase in JET

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, S. C.; Dendy, R. O.; Todd, T. N.; Webster, A. J.; Morris, J.; Watkins, N. W.; Calderon, F. A.

    2014-06-15

    A phase relationship is identified between sequential edge localized modes (ELMs) occurrence times in a set of H-mode tokamak plasmas to the voltage measured in full flux azimuthal loops in the divertor region. We focus on plasmas in the Joint European Torus where a steady H-mode is sustained over several seconds, during which ELMs are observed in the Be II emission at the divertor. The ELMs analysed arise from intrinsic ELMing, in that there is no deliberate intent to control the ELMing process by external means. We use ELM timings derived from the Be II signal to perform direct time domain analysis of the full flux loop VLD2 and VLD3 signals, which provide a high cadence global measurement proportional to the voltage induced by changes in poloidal magnetic flux. Specifically, we examine how the time interval between pairs of successive ELMs is linked to the time-evolving phase of the full flux loop signals. Each ELM produces a clear early pulse in the full flux loop signals, whose peak time is used to condition our analysis. The arrival time of the following ELM, relative to this pulse, is found to fall into one of two categories: (i) prompt ELMs, which are directly paced by the initial response seen in the flux loop signals; and (ii) all other ELMs, which occur after the initial response of the full flux loop signals has decayed in amplitude. The times at which ELMs in category (ii) occur, relative to the first ELM of the pair, are clustered at times when the instantaneous phase of the full flux loop signal is close to its value at the time of the first ELM.

  5. Localized time-lapse elastic waveform inversion using wavefield injection and extrapolation: 2-D parametric studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Shihao; Fuji, Nobuaki; Singh, Satish; Borisov, Dmitry

    2017-06-01

    We present a methodology to invert seismic data for a localized area by combining source-side wavefield injection and receiver-side extrapolation method. Despite the high resolving power of seismic full waveform inversion, the computational cost for practical scale elastic or viscoelastic waveform inversion remains a heavy burden. This can be much more severe for time-lapse surveys, which require real-time seismic imaging on a daily or weekly basis. Besides, changes of the structure during time-lapse surveys are likely to occur in a small area rather than the whole region of seismic experiments, such as oil and gas reservoir or CO2 injection wells. We thus propose an approach that allows to image effectively and quantitatively the localized structure changes far deep from both source and receiver arrays. In our method, we perform both forward and back propagation only inside the target region. First, we look for the equivalent source expression enclosing the region of interest by using the wavefield injection method. Second, we extrapolate wavefield from physical receivers located near the Earth's surface or on the ocean bottom to an array of virtual receivers in the subsurface by using correlation-type representation theorem. In this study, we present various 2-D elastic numerical examples of the proposed method and quantitatively evaluate errors in obtained models, in comparison to those of conventional full-model inversions. The results show that the proposed localized waveform inversion is not only efficient and robust but also accurate even under the existence of errors in both initial models and observed data.

  6. Real-time analysis application for identifying bursty local areas related to emergency topics.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Tatsuhiro; Tamura, Keiichi

    2015-01-01

    Since social media started getting more attention from users on the Internet, social media has been one of the most important information source in the world. Especially, with the increasing popularity of social media, data posted on social media sites are rapidly becoming collective intelligence, which is a term used to refer to new media that is displacing traditional media. In this paper, we focus on geotagged tweets on the Twitter site. These geotagged tweets are referred to as georeferenced documents because they include not only a short text message, but also the documents' posting time and location. Many researchers have been tackling the development of new data mining techniques for georeferenced documents to identify and analyze emergency topics, such as natural disasters, weather, diseases, and other incidents. In particular, the utilization of geotagged tweets to identify and analyze natural disasters has received much attention from administrative agencies recently because some case studies have achieved compelling results. In this paper, we propose a novel real-time analysis application for identifying bursty local areas related to emergency topics. The aim of our new application is to provide new platforms that can identify and analyze the localities of emergency topics. The proposed application is composed of three core computational intelligence techniques: the Naive Bayes classifier technique, the spatiotemporal clustering technique, and the burst detection technique. Moreover, we have implemented two types of application interface: a Web application interface and an android application interface. To evaluate the proposed application, we have implemented a real-time weather observation system embedded the proposed application. we used actual crawling geotagged tweets posted on the Twitter site. The weather observation system successfully detected bursty local areas related to observed emergency weather topics.

  7. RadTrac : A system for detecting, localizing, and tracking radioactive sources in real time.

    SciTech Connect

    Vilim, R.; Klann, R.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-10-01

    Within the homeland security and emergency response communities, there is a need for a low-profile system to detect and locate radioactive sources. RadTrac has been developed at Argonne National Laboratory as an integrated system for the detection, localization, identification, and tracking of radioactive sources in real time. The system is based on a network of radiation detectors and advanced signal-processing algorithms. Features include video surveillance, automated tracking, easy setup, and logging of all data and images. This paper describes the advanced algorithms that were developed and implemented for source detection, localization, and tracking in real time. In the physio-spatial integration approach to source localization, counts from multiple detectors are processed according to the underlying physics linking these counts to obtain the probability that a source is present at any point in space. This information is depicted in a probability density function map. This type of depiction allows the results to be presented in a simple, easy-to-understand manner. It also allows for many different complicated factors to be accounted for in a single image as each factor is computed as a probability density in space. These factors include spatial limitations, variable shielding, directional detectors, moving detectors, and different detector sizes and orientations. The utility and versatility of this approach is described in further detail. Advanced signal-processing algorithms have also been incorporated to improve real-time tracking and to increase signal-to-noise ratios including temporal linking and energy binning. Measurements aimed at demonstrating the sensitivity improvements through the use of advanced signal-processing techniques were performed and are presented. Results of tracking weak sources (<100 {micro}Ci {sup 137}Cs) using four fixed-position detectors are presented.

  8. Time dependence and local structure of tracer dispersion in oscillating liquid Hele-Shaw flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roht, Y. L.; Auradou, H.; Hulin, J.-P.; Salin, D.; Chertcoff, R.; Ippolito, I.

    2015-10-01

    Passive tracer dispersion in oscillating Poiseuille liquid flows of zero net velocity is studied experimentally in a Hele-Shaw cell and numerically by 2D simulations: this study is particularly focused on the time dependence and local properties of the dispersion. The dispersion mechanism is found to be controlled by the ratio τm/T of the molecular diffusion time across the gap and the oscillation period (when molecular diffusion parallel to the flow is negligible). The 2D numerical simulations complement the experiments by providing the local concentration c(x, z, t) at a given distance z from the cell walls (instead of only the average over z). Above a time lapse scaling like τm, the variation of c with the distance x along the flow becomes a Gaussian of width constant with z while the mean distance x ¯ may depend both on z and t. For τm/T ≲ 2, the front spreads through Taylor-like dispersion and the normalized dispersivity scales as τm/T. The front oscillates parallel to the flow with an amplitude constant across the gap; its width increases monotonically at a rate modulated at twice the flow frequency, due to variations of the instantaneous dispersivity. For τm/T ≳ 20, the molecular diffusion distance during a period of the flow is smaller than the gap and the normalized dispersivity scales as (τm/T)-1. The oscillations of the different points of the front follow the local fluid velocity: this produces a reversible modulation of the global front width at twice the flow frequency and in quadrature with that in the Taylor-like regime.

  9. Detection of the Third Heart Sound Based on Nonlinear Signal Decomposition and Time-Frequency Localization.

    PubMed

    Barma, Shovan; Chen, Bo-Wei; Ji, Wen; Rho, Seungmin; Chou, Chih-Hung; Wang, Jhing-Fa

    2016-08-01

    This study presents a precise way to detect the third ( S3 ) heart sound, which is recognized as an important indication of heart failure, based on nonlinear single decomposition and time-frequency localization. The detection of the S3 is obscured due to its significantly low energy and frequency. Even more, the detected S3 may be misunderstood as an abnormal second heart sound with a fixed split, which was not addressed in the literature. To detect such S3, the Hilbert vibration decomposition method is applied to decompose the heart sound into a certain number of subcomponents while intactly preserving the phase information. Thus, the time information of all of the decomposed components are unchanged, which further expedites the identification and localization of any module/section of a signal properly. Next, the proposed localization step is applied to the decomposed subcomponents by using smoothed pseudo Wigner-Ville distribution followed by the reassignment method. Finally, based on the positional information, the S3 is distinguished and confirmed by measuring time delays between the S2 and S3. In total, 82 sets of cardiac cycles collected from different databases including Texas Heart Institute database are examined for evaluation of the proposed method. The result analysis shows that the proposed method can detect the S3 correctly, even when the normalized temporal energy of S3 is larger than 0.16, and the frequency of those is larger than 34 Hz. In a performance analysis, the proposed method demonstrates that the accuracy rate of S3 detection is as high as 93.9%, which is significantly higher compared with the other methods. Such findings prove the robustness of the proposed idea for detecting substantially low-energized S3 .

  10. Focal therapy for localized unifocal and multifocal prostate cancer: A prospective development study using real time MR guided focused ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napoli, A.; Caliolo, G.; Boni, F.; Anzidei, M.; Catalano, C.

    2017-03-01

    To assess safety and feasibility of non-invasive high intensity 3T MR guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) treatment of localized prostate cancer in an exploratory designed study. Men aged 45-80 years were eligible for this prospective study if they had low-risk localized prostate cancer (prostate specific antigen [PSA] ≤10 ng/mL, Gleason score ≤ 3 + 3), with no previous androgen deprivation or treatment for prostate cancer, and who could safely undergo multiparametric MRI (Discovery 750, GE; Gd-Bopta, Bracco) and have a spinal anesthetic. Patients underwent focal therapy using real time MR guided high intensity focused ultrasound (MRgFUS), delivered to all known cancer lesions, with a margin of normal tissue. Primary endpoints were adverse events (serious and otherwise) and urinary symptoms and erectile function assessed using patient questionnaires. 8 men were recruited between June 2011 and June 2012. After treatment, one man was admitted to hospital for acute urinary retention. Another patient had self-resolving, mild, intermittent dysuria (median duration 5.0 days). Urinary tract infection was not reported. Urinary debris occurred in 6 men (75%), with a median duration of 12 days. Median overall International Index of Erectile Function-15 (IIEF-15) scores were similar at baseline and at 6 to 12 months (p=0.060), as were median IIEF-15 scores for intercourse satisfaction (p=0.433), sexual desire (p=0.622), and overall satisfaction (p=0.256). There was an improvement in lower urinary tract symptoms, assessed by International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), between baseline and 6 to 12 months (p=0.026). All 8 men with no baseline urinary incontinence were leak-free and pad-free by 9 months. No histological evidence of cancer was identified in 7 of 8 men biopsied at 6 months (87,5%); overall, the entire population (8 patients) was free of clinically significant cancer and had no evidence of disease on multi-parametric MRI at 6 to 12 months. MR guided Focused

  11. Element analysis: a wavelet-based method for analysing time-localized events in noisy time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilly, Jonathan M.

    2017-04-01

    A method is derived for the quantitative analysis of signals that are composed of superpositions of isolated, time-localized `events'. Here, these events are taken to be well represented as rescaled and phase-rotated versions of generalized Morse wavelets, a broad family of continuous analytic functions. Analysing a signal composed of replicates of such a function using another Morse wavelet allows one to directly estimate the properties of events from the values of the wavelet transform at its own maxima. The distribution of events in general power-law noise is determined in order to establish significance based on an expected false detection rate. Finally, an expression for an event's `region of influence' within the wavelet transform permits the formation of a criterion for rejecting spurious maxima due to numerical artefacts or other unsuitable events. Signals can then be reconstructed based on a small number of isolated points on the time/scale plane. This method, termed element analysis, is applied to the identification of long-lived eddy structures in ocean currents as observed by along-track measurements of sea surface elevation from satellite altimetry.

  12. Deconvolution of acoustic emissions for source localization using time reverse modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocur, Georg Karl

    2017-01-01

    Impact experiments on small-scale slabs made of concrete and aluminum were carried out. Wave motion radiated from the epicenter of the impact was recorded as voltage signals by resonant piezoelectric transducers. Numerical simulations of the elastic wave propagation are performed to simulate the physical experiments. The Hertz theory of contact is applied to estimate the force impulse, which is subsequently used for the numerical simulation. Displacements at the transducer positions are calculated numerically. A deconvolution function is obtained by comparing the physical (voltage signal) and the numerical (calculated displacement) experiments. Acoustic emission signals due to pencil-lead breaks are recorded, deconvolved and applied for localization using time reverse modeling.

  13. MØLLER Energy-Momentum Prescription for a Locally Rotationally Symmetric Space-Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydogdu, Oktay

    The energy distribution in the Locally Rotationally Symmetric (LRS) Bianchi type II space-time is obtained by considering the Møller energy-momentum definition in both Einstein's theory of general relativity and teleparallel theory of relativity. The energy distribution which includes both the matter and gravitational field is found to be zero in both of these different gravitation theories. This result agrees with previous works of Cooperstock and Israelit, Rosen, Johri et al., Banerjee and Sen, Vargas, and Aydogdu and Salti. Our result — the total energy of the universe is zero — supports the view points of Albrow and Tryon.

  14. Application of Empirical Mode Decomposition with Local Linear Quantile Regression in Financial Time Series Forecasting

    PubMed Central

    Jaber, Abobaker M.; Ismail, Mohd Tahir; Altaher, Alsaidi M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper mainly forecasts the daily closing price of stock markets. We propose a two-stage technique that combines the empirical mode decomposition (EMD) with nonparametric methods of local linear quantile (LLQ). We use the proposed technique, EMD-LLQ, to forecast two stock index time series. Detailed experiments are implemented for the proposed method, in which EMD-LPQ, EMD, and Holt-Winter methods are compared. The proposed EMD-LPQ model is determined to be superior to the EMD and Holt-Winter methods in predicting the stock closing prices. PMID:25140343

  15. Application of empirical mode decomposition with local linear quantile regression in financial time series forecasting.

    PubMed

    Jaber, Abobaker M; Ismail, Mohd Tahir; Altaher, Alsaidi M

    2014-01-01

    This paper mainly forecasts the daily closing price of stock markets. We propose a two-stage technique that combines the empirical mode decomposition (EMD) with nonparametric methods of local linear quantile (LLQ). We use the proposed technique, EMD-LLQ, to forecast two stock index time series. Detailed experiments are implemented for the proposed method, in which EMD-LPQ, EMD, and Holt-Winter methods are compared. The proposed EMD-LPQ model is determined to be superior to the EMD and Holt-Winter methods in predicting the stock closing prices.

  16. Local terahertz field enhancement for time-resolved x-ray diffraction

    DOE PAGES

    Kozina, M.; Pancaldi, M.; Bernhard, C.; ...

    2017-02-20

    We report local field strength enhancement of single-cycle terahertz (THz) pulses in an ultrafast time-resolved x-ray diffraction experiment. We show that patterning the sample with gold microstructures increases the THz field without changing the THz pulse shape or drastically affecting the quality of the x-ray diffraction pattern. Lastly, we find a five-fold increase in THz-induced x-ray diffraction intensity change in the presence of microstructures on a SrTiO3 thin-film sample.

  17. Social desirability and sexual offenders: a review.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lavinia; Grace, Randolph C

    2008-03-01

    Social desirability--the desire to make a favorable impression on others-poses a significant threat to the validity of self-reports. This review examines research on social desirability in both forensic and nonforensic populations with the goal of identifying how best to minimize threats to the validity of research with sexual offenders. Although social desirability has long been a major research topic in personality, consensus has not been reached on key questions such as its dimensional structure and whether social desirability constitutes a trait or a response bias. Research with offenders has shown that social desirability is negatively related to recidivism and that different offender subtypes vary in the degree to which social desirability appears to influence self-reports, with child molesters exhibiting the strongest tendency to "fake good." Several methods of controlling for social desirability have been proposed, but the effectiveness of these methods in increasing validity of offender self reports is questionable. Given the lack of consensus in the personality literature, a fresh start is needed in which basic questions regarding social desirability are revisited with respect to offender populations.

  18. Non-local effects in dual-probe-sideband Brillouin optical time domain analysis.

    PubMed

    Dominguez-Lopez, Alejandro; Angulo-Vinuesa, Xabier; Lopez-Gil, Alexia; Martin-Lopez, Sonia; Gonzalez-Herraez, Miguel

    2015-04-20

    According to recent models, non-local effects in dual-probe-sideband Brillouin Optical Time Domain Analysis (BOTDA) systems should be essentially negligible whenever the probe power is below the Stimulated Brillouin Scattering (SBS) threshold. This paper shows that actually there appear non-local effects in this type of systems before the SBS threshold. To explain these effects it is necessary to take into account a full spectral description of the SBS process. The pump pulse experiences a frequency-dependent spectral deformation that affects the readout process differently in the gain and loss configurations. This paper provides a simple analytical model of this phenomenon, which is validated against compelling experimental data, showing good agreement. The main conclusion of our study is that the measurements in gain configuration are more robust to this non-local effect than the loss configuration. Experimental and theoretical results show that, for a total probe wave power of ~1 mW (500 μW on each sideband), there is an up-shifting of ~1 MHz in the Brillouin Frequency Shift (BFS) retrieved from the Brillouin Loss Spectrum, whereas the BFS extracted from the measured Brillouin Gain Spectrum is up-shifted only ~0.6 MHz. These results are of particular interest for manufacturers of long-range BOTDA systems.

  19. Local Discontinuous Galerkin Approximations And Variable Step Size, Variable Order Time Integration For Richards' Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Farthing, M. W.; Dawson, C. N.; Miller, C. T.

    2004-12-01

    Numerical simulation of Richards' equation continues to be difficult. It is highly nonlinear under common constitutive relations and exhibits sharp fronts in both the pressure head and volume fraction for many problems of interest. For a number of multiphase flow problems, the use of variable order and variable step size temporal discretizations has shown some advantages. However, the spatial discretizations commonly used for variably saturated flow are dominated by nonadaptive, low-order finite difference and finite element methods. Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) finite element methods have received significant attention in a number of fields for hyperbolic PDE's and, more recently, for elliptic and parabolic problems. DG approaches like the local discontinuous Galerkin (LDG) method are appealing for modeling subsurface flow since they can lead to velocity fields that are locally mass-conservative without the need for auxiliary variables or alternative meshes. DG discretizations are also inherently local and so better-suited for unstructured meshes and h-p adaption strategies than traditional methods. While some work has been done recently for multiphase subsurface flow, there are a range of issues related to the performance of DG methods for highly nonlinear parabolic problems like Richards' equation that have not been investigated fully. In this work, we consider the combination of higher order adaptive time integration with an LDG spatial discretization for Richards' equation. We compare this approach to standard low-order methods for a series of test problems and consider a number of issues including the methods' relative accuracy and computational efficiency.

  20. Fatigue damage localization using time-domain features extracted from nonlinear Lamb waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Ming; Su, Zhongqing; Lu, Ye; Cheng, Li

    2014-03-01

    Nonlinear guided waves are sensitive to small-scale fatigue damage that may hardly be identified by traditional techniques. A characterization method for fatigue damage is established based on nonlinear Lamb waves in conjunction with the use of a piezoelectric sensor network. Theories on nonlinear Lamb waves for damage detection are first introduced briefly. Then, the ineffectiveness of using pure frequency-domain information of nonlinear wave signals for locating damage is discussed. With a revisit to traditional gross-damage localization techniques based on the time of flight, the idea of using temporal signal features of nonlinear Lamb waves to locate fatigue damage is introduced. This process involves a time-frequency analysis that enables the damage-induced nonlinear signal features, which are either undiscernible in the original time history or uninformative in the frequency spectrum, to be revealed. Subsequently, a finite element modeling technique is employed, accounting for various sources of nonlinearities in a fatigued medium. A piezoelectric sensor network is configured to actively generate and acquire probing Lamb waves that involve damageinduced nonlinear features. A probability-based diagnostic imaging algorithm is further proposed, presenting results in diagnostic images intuitively. The approach is experimentally verified on a fatigue-damaged aluminum plate, showing reasonably good accuracy. Compared to existing nonlinear ultrasonics-based inspection techniques, this approach uses a permanently attached sensor network that well accommodates automated online health monitoring; more significantly, it utilizes time-domain information of higher-order harmonics from time-frequency analysis, and demonstrates a great potential for quantitative characterization of small-scale damage with improved localization accuracy.

  1. Relationships between spike-free local field potentials and spike timing in human temporal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Zanos, Theodoros P.; Marmarelis, Vasilis Z.; Ojemann, George A.; Fetz, Eberhard E.

    2012-01-01

    Intracortical recordings comprise both fast events, action potentials (APs), and slower events, known as local field potentials (LFPs). Although it is believed that LFPs mostly reflect local synaptic activity, it is unclear which of their signal components are most closely related to synaptic potentials and would therefore be causally related to the occurrence of individual APs. This issue is complicated by the significant contribution from AP waveforms, especially at higher LFP frequencies. In recordings of single-cell activity and LFPs from the human temporal cortex, we computed quantitative, nonlinear, causal dynamic models for the prediction of AP timing from LFPs, at millisecond resolution, before and after removing AP contributions to the LFP. In many cases, the timing of a significant number of single APs could be predicted from spike-free LFPs at different frequencies. Not surprisingly, model performance was superior when spikes were not removed. Cells whose activity was predicted by the spike-free LFP models generally fell into one of two groups: in the first group, neuronal spike activity was associated with specific phases of low LFP frequencies, lower spike activity at high LFP frequencies, and a stronger linear component in the spike-LFP model; in the second group, neuronal spike activity was associated with larger amplitude of high LFP frequencies, less frequent phase locking, and a stronger nonlinear model component. Spike timing in the first group was better predicted by the sign and level of the LFP preceding the spike, whereas spike timing in the second group was better predicted by LFP power during a certain time window before the spike. PMID:22157112

  2. Accelerating spectral-element simulations of seismic wave propagation using local time stepping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, D. B.; Rietmann, M.; Galvez, P.; Nissen-Meyer, T.; Grote, M.; Schenk, O.

    2013-12-01

    Seismic tomography using full-waveform inversion requires accurate simulations of seismic wave propagation in complex 3D media. However, finite element meshing in complex media often leads to areas of local refinement, generating small elements that accurately capture e.g. strong topography and/or low-velocity sediment basins. For explicit time schemes, this dramatically reduces the global time-step for wave-propagation problems due to numerical stability conditions, ultimately making seismic inversions prohibitively expensive. To alleviate this problem, local time stepping (LTS) algorithms allow an explicit time-stepping scheme to adapt the time-step to the element size, allowing near-optimal time-steps everywhere in the mesh. Numerical simulations are thus liberated of global time-step constraints potentially speeding up simulation runtimes significantly. We present here a new, efficient multi-level LTS-Newmark scheme for general use with spectral-element methods (SEM) with applications in seismic wave propagation. We fit the implementation of our scheme onto the package SPECFEM3D_Cartesian, which is a widely used community code, simulating seismic and acoustic wave propagation in earth-science applications. Our new LTS scheme extends the 2nd-order accurate Newmark time-stepping scheme, and leads to an efficient implementation, producing real-world speedup of multi-resolution seismic applications. Furthermore, we generalize the method to utilize many refinement levels with a design specifically for continuous finite elements. We demonstrate performance speedup using a state-of-the-art dynamic earthquake rupture model for the Tohoku-Oki event, which is currently limited by small elements along the rupture fault. Utilizing our new algorithmic LTS implementation together with advances in exploiting graphic processing units (GPUs), numerical seismic wave propagation simulations in complex media will dramatically reduce computation times, empowering high

  3. Real-time network traffic classification technique for wireless local area networks based on compressed sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balouchestani, Mohammadreza

    2017-05-01

    Network traffic or data traffic in a Wireless Local Area Network (WLAN) is the amount of network packets moving across a wireless network from each wireless node to another wireless node, which provide the load of sampling in a wireless network. WLAN's Network traffic is the main component for network traffic measurement, network traffic control and simulation. Traffic classification technique is an essential tool for improving the Quality of Service (QoS) in different wireless networks in the complex applications such as local area networks, wireless local area networks, wireless personal area networks, wireless metropolitan area networks, and wide area networks. Network traffic classification is also an essential component in the products for QoS control in different wireless network systems and applications. Classifying network traffic in a WLAN allows to see what kinds of traffic we have in each part of the network, organize the various kinds of network traffic in each path into different classes in each path, and generate network traffic matrix in order to Identify and organize network traffic which is an important key for improving the QoS feature. To achieve effective network traffic classification, Real-time Network Traffic Classification (RNTC) algorithm for WLANs based on Compressed Sensing (CS) is presented in this paper. The fundamental goal of this algorithm is to solve difficult wireless network management problems. The proposed architecture allows reducing False Detection Rate (FDR) to 25% and Packet Delay (PD) to 15 %. The proposed architecture is also increased 10 % accuracy of wireless transmission, which provides a good background for establishing high quality wireless local area networks.

  4. Relativistic Coulomb excitation within the time dependent superfluid local density approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Stetcu, I.; Bertulani, C. A.; Bulgac, A.; Magierski, P.; Roche, K. J.

    2015-01-06

    Within the framework of the unrestricted time-dependent density functional theory, we present for the first time an analysis of the relativistic Coulomb excitation of the heavy deformed open shell nucleus 238U. The approach is based on the superfluid local density approximation formulated on a spatial lattice that can take into account coupling to the continuum, enabling self-consistent studies of superfluid dynamics of any nuclear shape. We compute the energy deposited in the target nucleus as a function of the impact parameter, finding it to be significantly larger than the estimate using the Goldhaber-Teller model. The isovector giant dipole resonance, the dipole pygmy resonance, and giant quadrupole modes are excited during the process. As a result, the one-body dissipation of collective dipole modes is shown to lead a damping width Γ↓≈0.4 MeV and the number of preequilibrium neutrons emitted has been quantified.

  5. Techniques for automated local activation time annotation and conduction velocity estimation in cardiac mapping

    PubMed Central

    Cantwell, C.D.; Roney, C.H.; Ng, F.S.; Siggers, J.H.; Sherwin, S.J.; Peters, N.S.

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of cardiac conduction velocity provide valuable functional and structural insight into the initiation and perpetuation of cardiac arrhythmias, in both a clinical and laboratory context. The interpretation of activation wavefronts and their propagation can identify mechanistic properties of a broad range of electrophysiological pathologies. However, the sparsity, distribution and uncertainty of recorded data make accurate conduction velocity calculation difficult. A wide range of mathematical approaches have been proposed for addressing this challenge, often targeted towards specific data modalities, species or recording environments. Many of these algorithms require identification of activation times from electrogram recordings which themselves may have complex morphology or low signal-to-noise ratio. This paper surveys algorithms designed for identifying local activation times and computing conduction direction and speed. Their suitability for use in different recording contexts and applications is assessed. PMID:25978869

  6. Time-dependent behavior of a localized electron at a heterojunction boundary of graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Min S.; Kim, Hyungjun; Atwater, Harry A.; Goddard, William A.

    2010-01-01

    We develop a finite-difference time-domain(FDTD) method for simulating the dynamics of graphene electrons, denoted GraFDTD. We then use GraFDTD to study the temporal behavior of a single localized electron wave packet, showing that it exhibits optical-like dynamics including the Goos–Hänchen effect [F. Goos and H. Hänchen, Ann. Phys.436, 333 (1947)] at a heterojunction, but the behavior is quantitatively different than for electromagnetic waves. This suggests issues that must be addressed in designing graphene-based electronic devices analogous to optical devices. GraFDTD should be useful for studying such complex time-dependent behavior of a quasiparticle in graphene.

  7. Local discontinuous Galerkin method for a nonlinear time-fractional fourth-order partial differential equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yanwei; Liu, Yang; Li, Hong; Fang, Zhichao; He, Siriguleng

    2017-09-01

    In this article, a fully discrete local discontinuous Galerkin (LDG) method with high-order temporal convergence rate is presented and developed to look for the numerical solution of nonlinear time-fractional fourth-order partial differential equation (PDE). In the temporal direction, for approximating the fractional derivative with order α ∈ (0 , 1), the weighted and shifted Grünwald difference (WSGD) scheme with second-order convergence rate is introduced and for approximating the integer time derivative, two step backward Euler method with second-order convergence rate is used. For the spatial direction, the LDG method is used. For the numerical theories, the stability is derived and a priori error results are proved. Further, some error results and convergence rates are calculated by numerical procedure to illustrate the effectiveness of proposed method.

  8. Techniques for automated local activation time annotation and conduction velocity estimation in cardiac mapping.

    PubMed

    Cantwell, C D; Roney, C H; Ng, F S; Siggers, J H; Sherwin, S J; Peters, N S

    2015-10-01

    Measurements of cardiac conduction velocity provide valuable functional and structural insight into the initiation and perpetuation of cardiac arrhythmias, in both a clinical and laboratory context. The interpretation of activation wavefronts and their propagation can identify mechanistic properties of a broad range of electrophysiological pathologies. However, the sparsity, distribution and uncertainty of recorded data make accurate conduction velocity calculation difficult. A wide range of mathematical approaches have been proposed for addressing this challenge, often targeted towards specific data modalities, species or recording environments. Many of these algorithms require identification of activation times from electrogram recordings which themselves may have complex morphology or low signal-to-noise ratio. This paper surveys algorithms designed for identifying local activation times and computing conduction direction and speed. Their suitability for use in different recording contexts and applications is assessed. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Acoustic Source Localization via Time Difference of Arrival Estimation for Distributed Sensor Networks using Tera-scale Optical-Core Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Imam, Neena; Barhen, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    For real-time acoustic source localization applications, one of the primary challenges is the considerable growth in computational complexity associated with the emergence of ever larger, active or passive, distributed sensor networks. These sensors rely heavily on battery-operated system components to achieve highly functional automation in signal and information processing. In order to keep communication requirements minimal, it is desirable to perform as much processing on the receiver platforms as possible. However, the complexity of the calculations needed to achieve accurate source localization increases dramatically with the size of sensor arrays, resulting in substantial growth of computational requirements that cannot be readily met with standard hardware. One option to meet this challenge builds upon the emergence of digital optical-core devices. The objective of this work was to explore the implementation of key building block algorithms used in underwater source localization on the optical-core digital processing platform recently introduced by Lenslet Inc. This demonstration of considerably faster signal processing capability should be of substantial significance to the design and innovation of future generations of distributed sensor networks.

  10. Local algorithm for computing complex travel time based on the complex eikonal equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xingguo; Sun, Jianguo; Sun, Zhangqing

    2016-04-01

    The traditional algorithm for computing the complex travel time, e.g., dynamic ray tracing method, is based on the paraxial ray approximation, which exploits the second-order Taylor expansion. Consequently, the computed results are strongly dependent on the width of the ray tube and, in regions with dramatic velocity variations, it is difficult for the method to account for the velocity variations. When solving the complex eikonal equation, the paraxial ray approximation can be avoided and no second-order Taylor expansion is required. However, this process is time consuming. In this case, we may replace the global computation of the whole model with local computation by taking both sides of the ray as curved boundaries of the evanescent wave. For a given ray, the imaginary part of the complex travel time should be zero on the central ray. To satisfy this condition, the central ray should be taken as a curved boundary. We propose a nonuniform grid-based finite difference scheme to solve the curved boundary problem. In addition, we apply the limited-memory Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno technology for obtaining the imaginary slowness used to compute the complex travel time. The numerical experiments show that the proposed method is accurate. We examine the effectiveness of the algorithm for the complex travel time by comparing the results with those from the dynamic ray tracing method and the Gauss-Newton Conjugate Gradient fast marching method.

  11. Neighbourhood selection for local modelling and prediction of hydrological time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayawardena, A. W.; Li, W. K.; Xu, P.

    2002-02-01

    The prediction of a time series using the dynamical systems approach requires the knowledge of three parameters; the time delay, the embedding dimension and the number of nearest neighbours. In this paper, a new criterion, based on the generalized degrees of freedom, for the selection of the number of nearest neighbours needed for a better local model for time series prediction is presented. The validity of the proposed method is examined using time series, which are known to be chaotic under certain initial conditions (Lorenz map, Henon map and Logistic map), and real hydro meteorological time series (discharge data from Chao Phraya river in Thailand, Mekong river in Thailand and Laos, and sea surface temperature anomaly data). The predicted results are compared with observations, and with similar predictions obtained by using arbitrarily fixed numbers of neighbours. The results indicate superior predictive capability as measured by the mean square errors and coefficients of variation by the proposed approach when compared with the traditional approach of using a fixed number of neighbours.

  12. Simulation of a Real-Time Local Data Integration System over East-Central Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Case, Jonathan

    1999-01-01

    The Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) simulated a real-time configuration of a Local Data Integration System (LDIS) using data from 15-28 February 1999. The objectives were to assess the utility of a simulated real-time LDIS, evaluate and extrapolate system performance to identify the hardware necessary to run a real-time LDIS, and determine the sensitivities of LDIS. The ultimate goal for running LDIS is to generate analysis products that enhance short-range (less than 6 h) weather forecasts issued in support of the 45th Weather Squadron, Spaceflight Meteorology Group, and Melbourne National Weather Service operational requirements. The simulation used the Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) Data Analysis System (ADAS) software on an IBM RS/6000 workstation with a 67-MHz processor. This configuration ran in real-time, but not sufficiently fast for operational requirements. Thus, the AMU recommends a workstation with a 200-MHz processor and 512 megabytes of memory to run the AMU's configuration of LDIS in real-time. This report presents results from two case studies and several data sensitivity experiments. ADAS demonstrates utility through its ability to depict high-resolution cloud and wind features in a variety of weather situations. The sensitivity experiments illustrate the influence of disparate data on the resulting ADAS analyses.

  13. Local accumulation time for the formation of morphogen gradients from a Lévy diffusion process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Hongwei; Wen, Xiaoqing; Zhou, Tianshou

    2013-10-01

    Morphogen gradients provide very precise spatial information on the control of cell fate specification in many developing tissues. In previous studies, morphogen gradient formation was commonly modelled as Fickian diffusion. However, the complexity of morphogen transport and anisotropy of intracellular and extracellular environments in vivo can lead to Lévy flights of morphogens. In this case, a natural question is whether morphogen gradients reach steady states on timescales relevant to developmental patterning. Here, we build and analyse a Lévy diffusion model of morphogen transport, which is based on a continuous time random walk with a long-tailed jump length distribution. Importantly, we derive the analytical expression of local accumulation time that provides a time scale that characterizes relaxation to a steady state at an arbitrary position within the patterned field, and shows that this time depends on cell positions in a nonlinear and asymmetric manner. Our analytical result provides an explicit connection between the key parameters of the problem and the time needed to reach a steady state value at an arbitrarily given position, which is important for a better understanding of tissue patterning by morphogen gradients in a more real case.

  14. Sufficient and necessary conditions for discrete-time nonlinear switched systems with uniform local exponential stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Junjie; She, Zhikun

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we investigate sufficient and necessary conditions of uniform local exponential stability (ULES) for the discrete-time nonlinear switched system (DTNSS). We start with the definition of T-step common Lyapunov functions (CLFs), which is a relaxation of traditional CLFs. Then, for a time-varying DTNSS, by constructing such a T-step CLF, a necessary and sufficient condition for its ULES is provided. Afterwards, we strengthen it based on a T-step Lipschitz continuous CLF. Especially, when the system is time-invariant, by the smooth approximation theorem, the Lipschitz continuity condition of T-step CLFs can further be replaced by continuous differentiability; and when the system is time-invariant and homogeneous, due to the extension of Weierstrass approximation theorem, T-step continuously differentiable CLFs can even be strengthened to be T-step polynomial CLFs. Furthermore, three illustrative examples are additionally used to explain our main contribution. In the end, an equivalence between time-varying DTNSSs and their corresponding linearisations is discussed.

  15. Evoked Potentials in Motor Cortical Local Field Potentials Reflect Task Timing and Behavioral Performance

    PubMed Central

    Confais, Joachim; Ponce-Alvarez, Adrián; Diesmann, Markus; Riehle, Alexa

    2010-01-01

    Evoked potentials (EPs) are observed in motor cortical local field potentials (LFPs) during movement execution (movement-related potentials [MRPs]) and in response to relevant visual cues (visual evoked potentials [VEPs]). Motor cortical EPs may be directionally selective, but little is known concerning their relation to other aspects of motor behavior, such as task timing and performance. We recorded LFPs in motor cortex of two monkeys during performance of a precued arm-reaching task. A time cue at the start of each trial signaled delay duration and thereby the pace of the task and the available time for movement preparation. VEPs and MRPs were strongly modulated by the delay duration, VEPs being systematically larger in short-delay trials and MRPs larger in long-delay trials. Despite these systematic modulations related to the task timing, directional selectivity was similar in short and long trials. The behavioral reaction time was positively correlated with MRP size and negatively correlated with VEP size, within sessions. In addition, the behavioral performance improved across sessions, in parallel with a slow decrease in the size of VEPs and MRPs. Our results clearly show the strong influence of the behavioral context and performance on motor cortical population activity during movement preparation and execution. PMID:20884766

  16. The effects of local prevalence and explicit expectations on search termination times

    PubMed Central

    Kita, Shinichi; Wolfe, Jeremy M.

    2014-01-01

    In visual search tasks, the relative proportions of target-present and -absent trials have important effects on behavior. Miss error rates rise as target prevalence decreases (Wolfe, Horowitz, & Kenner, Nature 435, 439–440, 2005). At the same time, search termination times on target-absent trials become shorter (Wolfe & Van Wert, Current Biology 20, 121–124, 2010). These effects must depend on some implicit or explicit knowledge of the current prevalence. What is the nature of that knowledge? In Experiment 1, we conducted visual search tasks at three levels of prevalence (6%, 50%, and 94%) and analyzed performance as a function of “local prevalence,” the prevalence over the last n trials. The results replicated the usual effects of overall prevalence but revealed only weak or absent effects of local prevalence. In Experiment 2, the overall prevalence in a block of trials was 20%, 50%, or 80%. However, a 100%-valid cue informed observers of the prevalence on the next trial. These explicit cues had a modest effect on target-absent RTs, but explicit expectation could not explain the full prevalence effect. We conclude that observers predict prevalence on the basis of an assessment of a relatively long prior history. Each trial contributes a small amount to that assessment, and this can be modulated but not overruled by explicit instruction. PMID:22006528

  17. Global meta-analysis reveals no net change in local-scale plant biodiversity over time

    PubMed Central

    Vellend, Mark; Baeten, Lander; Myers-Smith, Isla H.; Elmendorf, Sarah C.; Beauséjour, Robin; Brown, Carissa D.; De Frenne, Pieter; Verheyen, Kris; Wipf, Sonja

    2013-01-01

    Global biodiversity is in decline. This is of concern for aesthetic and ethical reasons, but possibly also for practical reasons, as suggested by experimental studies, mostly with plants, showing that biodiversity reductions in small study plots can lead to compromised ecosystem function. However, inferring that ecosystem functions will decline due to biodiversity loss in the real world rests on the untested assumption that such loss is actually occurring at these small scales in nature. Using a global database of 168 published studies and >16,000 nonexperimental, local-scale vegetation plots, we show that mean temporal change in species diversity over periods of 5–261 y is not different from zero, with increases at least as likely as declines over time. Sites influenced primarily by plant species’ invasions showed a tendency for declines in species richness, whereas sites undergoing postdisturbance succession showed increases in richness over time. Other distinctions among studies had little influence on temporal richness trends. Although maximizing diversity is likely important for maintaining ecosystem function in intensely managed systems such as restored grasslands or tree plantations, the clear lack of any general tendency for plant biodiversity to decline at small scales in nature directly contradicts the key assumption linking experimental results to ecosystem function as a motivation for biodiversity conservation in nature. How often real world changes in the diversity and composition of plant communities at the local scale cause ecosystem function to deteriorate, or actually to improve, remains unknown and is in critical need of further study. PMID:24167259

  18. Calculations of the time-averaged local heat transfer coefficients in circulating fluidized bed

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, T.H.; Qian, R.Z.; Ai, Y.F.

    1999-04-01

    The great potential to burn a wide variety of fuels and the reduced emission of pollutant gases mainly SO{sub x} and NO{sub x} have inspired the investigators to conduct research at a brisk pace all around the world on circulating fluidized bed (CFB) technology. An accurate understanding of heat transfer to bed walls is required for proper design of CFB boilers. To develop an optimum economic design of the boiler, it is also necessary to know how the heat transfer coefficient depends on different design and operating parameters. It is impossible to do the experiments under all operating conditions. Thus, the mathematical model prediction is a valuable method instead. Based on the cluster renewal theory of heat transfer in circulating fluidized beds, a mathematical model for predicting the time-averaged local bed-to-wall heat transfer coefficients is developed. The effects of the axial distribution of the bed density on the time-average local heat transfer coefficients are taken into account via dividing the bed into a series of sections along its height. The assumptions are made about the formation and falling process of clusters on the wall. The model predictions are in an acceptable agreement with the published data.

  19. Formation of the equatorial thermosphere anomaly trough: Local time and solar cycle variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Vicki W.; Thayer, Jeffrey P.; Lei, Jiuhou; Wang, Wenbin

    2014-12-01

    This paper evaluates the formation and behavior of the equatorial thermosphere anomaly (ETA) trough in neutral temperature and mass density using the National Center for Atmospheric Research thermosphere-ionosphere electrodynamics general circulation model under quiet geomagnetic activity and March equinox conditions. The driving mechanism for the generation of the ETA trough in the model is field-aligned ion drag. In our simulations, during the daytime, field-aligned ion drag on the north-south flanks of the magnetic equator causes a divergence in meridional winds, leading to an upward change in vertical winds, adiabatic cooling, and a reduction in neutral temperature of about 30 K over the magnetic equator near 400 km. This response closely links ETA behavior to variations in the equatorial ionosphere anomaly (EIA) associated with local time and solar cycle. As the EIA begins to disappear in the evening, the processes in the ETA mechanism recede, causing the ETA trough to subside. The ETA trough is not completely eliminated until about after 23:00 LT. In our simulations, the trough becomes more prominent as the solar cycle progresses from low (F10.7=80) to high (F10.7=180), in agreement with observations. The neutral-ion collision frequency (proportional to variations in electron density) controls ETA day-to-night and solar cycle variations, while plasma scale height and gradients in electron number density and plasma temperature produce a secondary structure in ETA local time behavior that varies with solar cycle levels.

  20. Global meta-analysis reveals no net change in local-scale plant biodiversity over time.

    PubMed

    Vellend, Mark; Baeten, Lander; Myers-Smith, Isla H; Elmendorf, Sarah C; Beauséjour, Robin; Brown, Carissa D; De Frenne, Pieter; Verheyen, Kris; Wipf, Sonja

    2013-11-26

    Global biodiversity is in decline. This is of concern for aesthetic and ethical reasons, but possibly also for practical reasons, as suggested by experimental studies, mostly with plants, showing that biodiversity reductions in small study plots can lead to compromised ecosystem function. However, inferring that ecosystem functions will decline due to biodiversity loss in the real world rests on the untested assumption that such loss is actually occurring at these small scales in nature. Using a global database of 168 published studies and >16,000 nonexperimental, local-scale vegetation plots, we show that mean temporal change in species diversity over periods of 5-261 y is not different from zero, with increases at least as likely as declines over time. Sites influenced primarily by plant species' invasions showed a tendency for declines in species richness, whereas sites undergoing postdisturbance succession showed increases in richness over time. Other distinctions among studies had little influence on temporal richness trends. Although maximizing diversity is likely important for maintaining ecosystem function in intensely managed systems such as restored grasslands or tree plantations, the clear lack of any general tendency for plant biodiversity to decline at small scales in nature directly contradicts the key assumption linking experimental results to ecosystem function as a motivation for biodiversity conservation in nature. How often real world changes in the diversity and composition of plant communities at the local scale cause ecosystem function to deteriorate, or actually to improve, remains unknown and is in critical need of further study.

  1. A superposed epoch analysis of auroral evolution during substorms: Local time of onset region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milan, S. E.; Grocott, A.; Hubert, B.

    2010-10-01

    Previous workers have shown that the magnetic local time (MLT) of substorm onset depends on the prevailing east-west component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). To investigate the influence of the onset MLT on the subsequent auroral response we perform a superposed epoch analysis of the auroral evolution during approximately 2000 substorms using observations from the FUV instrument on the Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) spacecraft. We subdivide the substorms by onset latitude and onset local time before determining average auroral images before and after substorm onset, for both electron and proton aurorae. We find that during the growth phase there is preexisting auroral emission in the MLT sector of the subsequent onset. After onset the auroral bulge expands eastward and westward, but remains centered on the onset sector. Approximately 30 min after onset, during the substorm recovery phase, the peaks in electron and proton auroral emission move into the postnoon and prenoon sectors, respectively, reflecting the “average” auroral precipitation patterns determined by previous studies. Superposed epoch analysis of the interplanetary magnetic field for the substorms under study suggests that the BY component of the IMF must be biased toward positive or negative values for up to a day prior to onset for the onset MLT to be influenced.

  2. Integration of local and regional species-area relationships from space-time species accumulation.

    PubMed

    Fridley, Jason D; Peet, Robert K; van der Maarel, Eddy; Willems, Jo H

    2006-08-01

    A long-standing observation in community ecology is that the scaling of species richness, as exemplified by species-area curves, differs on local and regional scales. This decoupling of scales may be largely due to sampling processes (the increasing constraint imposed by sampling fewer individuals at fine scales), as distinct from ecological processes, such as environmental heterogeneity, that operate across scales. Removal of the sampling constraint from fine-scale richness estimates should yield species-area curves that behave like those of the regions in which they are embedded, but an effective method for this removal has not been available. We suggest an approach that incorporates the manner in which small areas accumulate species over time as a way to remove the signature of sampling processes from fine-scale species-area curves. We report for three species-rich grasslands from two continents how local plant species richness is distributed through time at multiple, nested spatial scales, and we ask whether sampling-corrected curves reflect the spatial scaling of richness of each larger floristic province. Our analysis suggests that fine-scale values of richness are highly constrained by sampling processes, but once these constraints are removed, the spatial scaling of species richness is consistent from the scale of individuals to that of an entire province.

  3. A local space–time kriging approach applied to a national outpatient malaria data set

    PubMed Central

    Gething, P.W.; Atkinson, P.M.; Noor, A.M.; Gikandi, P.W.; Hay, S.I.; Nixon, M.S.

    2007-01-01

    Increases in the availability of reliable health data are widely recognised as essential for efforts to strengthen health-care systems in resource-poor settings worldwide. Effective health-system planning requires comprehensive and up-to-date information on a range of health metrics and this requirement is generally addressed by a Health Management Information System (HMIS) that coordinates the routine collection of data at individual health facilities and their compilation into national databases. In many resource-poor settings, these systems are inadequate and national databases often contain only a small proportion of the expected records. In this paper, we take an important health metric in Kenya (the proportion of outpatient treatments for malaria (MP)) from the national HMIS database and predict the values of MP at facilities where monthly records are missing. The available MP data were densely distributed across a spatiotemporal domain and displayed second-order heterogeneity. We used three different kriging methodologies to make cross-validation predictions of MP in order to test the effect on prediction accuracy of (a) the extension of a spatial-only to a space–time prediction approach, and (b) the replacement of a globally stationary with a locally varying random function model. Space–time kriging was found to produce predictions with 98.4% less mean bias and 14.8% smaller mean imprecision than conventional spatial-only kriging. A modification of space–time kriging that allowed space–time variograms to be recalculated for every prediction location within a spatially local neighbourhood resulted in a larger decrease in mean imprecision over ordinary kriging (18.3%) although the mean bias was reduced less (87.5%). PMID:19424510

  4. Source-space ICA for EEG source separation, localization, and time-course reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Jonmohamadi, Yaqub; Poudel, Govinda; Innes, Carrie; Jones, Richard

    2014-11-01

    We propose source-space independent component analysis (ICA) for separation, tomography, and time-course reconstruction of EEG and MEG source signals. Source-space ICA is based on the application of singular value decomposition and ICA on the neuroelectrical signals from all brain voxels obtained post minimum-variance beamforming of sensor-space EEG or MEG. We describe the theoretical background and equations, then evaluate the performance of this technique in several different situations, including weak sources, bilateral correlated sources, multiple sources, and cluster sources. In this approach, tomographic maps of sources are obtained by back-projection of the ICA mixing coefficients into the source-space (3-D brain template). The advantages of source-space ICA over the popular alternative approaches of sensor-space ICA together with dipole fitting and power mapping via minimum-variance beamforming are demonstrated. Simulated EEG data were produced by forward head modeling to project the simulated sources onto scalp sensors, then superimposed on real EEG background. To illustrate the application of source-space ICA to real EEG source reconstruction, we show the localization and time-course reconstruction of visual evoked potentials. Source-space ICA is superior to the minimum-variance beamforming in the reconstruction of multiple weak and strong sources, as ICA allows weak sources to be identified and reconstructed in the presence of stronger sources. Source-space ICA is also superior to sensor-space ICA on accuracy of localization of sources, as source-space ICA applies ICA to the time-courses of voxels reconstructed from minimum-variance beamforming on a 3D scanning grid and these time-courses are optimally unmixed via the beamformer. Each component identified by source-space ICA has its own tomographic map which shows the extent to which each voxel has contributed to that component. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Death Anxiety and Social Desirability among Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Thomas O.

    1982-01-01

    Studied death anxiety in a sample of 210 Canadian nurses. Analysis indicated a significant inverse relationship between social desirability and death anxiety denial. No other significant relationships were found between social desirability and remaining Death Anxiety Scale factors. (Author/JAC)

  6. A Social Desirability Questionnaire for Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, LeRoy H., Jr.; Rubin, Barry M.

    1970-01-01

    A Young Children's Social Desirability Scale based on the MMPI was constructed and administered to nursery school children. Results showed that social desirability scores increased with age, showed a low positive relationship to picture vocabularly IQ, and were unrelated to sex in a high socieconomic sample. (KJ)

  7. Comparative vs. Absolute Judgments of Trait Desirability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofstee, Willem K. B.

    1970-01-01

    Reversals of trait desirability are studied. Terms indicating conservativw behavior appeared to be judged relatively desirable in comparative judgement, while traits indicating dynamic and expansive behavior benefited from absolute judgement. The reversal effect was shown to be a general one, i.e. reversals were not dependent upon the specific…

  8. The Influence of Outcome Desirability on Optimism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krizan, Zlatan; Windschitl, Paul D.

    2007-01-01

    People are often presumed to be vulnerable to a desirability bias, namely, a tendency to be overoptimistic about a future outcome as a result of their preferences or desires for that outcome. In this article, this form of wishful thinking is distinguished from the more general concepts of motivated reasoning and overoptimism, and the evidence for…

  9. Cyberinfrastructure to support Real-time, End-to-End, High Resolution, Localized Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramamurthy, M. K.; Lindholm, D.; Baltzer, T.; Domenico, B.

    2004-12-01

    From natural disasters such as flooding and forest fires to man-made disasters such as toxic gas releases, the impact of weather-influenced severe events on society can be profound. Understanding, predicting, and mitigating such local, mesoscale events calls for a cyberinfrastructure to integrate multidisciplinary data, tools, and services as well as the capability to generate and use high resolution data (such as wind and precipitation) from localized models. The need for such end to end systems -- including data collection, distribution, integration, assimilation, regionalized mesoscale modeling, analysis, and visualization -- has been realized to some extent in many academic and quasi-operational environments, especially for atmospheric sciences data. However, many challenges still remain in the integration and synthesis of data from multiple sources and the development of interoperable data systems and services across those disciplines. Over the years, the Unidata Program Center has developed several tools that have either directly or indirectly facilitated these local modeling activities. For example, the community is using Unidata technologies such as the Internet Data Distribution (IDD) system, Local Data Manger (LDM), decoders, netCDF libraries, Thematic Realtime Environmental Distributed Data Services (THREDDS), and the Integrated Data Viewer (IDV) in their real-time prediction efforts. In essence, these technologies for data reception and processing, local and remote access, cataloging, and analysis and visualization coupled with technologies from others in the community are becoming the foundation of a cyberinfrastructure to support an end-to-end regional forecasting system. To build on these capabilities, the Unidata Program Center is pleased to be a significant contributor to the Linked Environments for Atmospheric Discovery (LEAD) project, a NSF-funded multi-institutional large Information Technology Research effort. The goal of LEAD is to create an

  10. Object of desire self-consciousness theory.

    PubMed

    Bogaert, Anthony F; Brotto, Lori A

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss the construct of object of desire self-consciousness, the perception that one is romantically and sexually desirable in another's eyes. The authors discuss the nature of the construct, variations in its expression, and how it may function as part of a self-schemata or script related to romance and sexuality. The authors suggest that object of desire self-consciousness may be an adaptive, evolved psychological mechanism allowing sexual and romantic tactics suitable to one's mate value. The authors also suggest that it can act as a signal that one has high mate value in the sexual marketplace. The authors then review literature (e.g., on fantasies, on sexual activity preferences, on sexual dysfunctions, on language) suggesting that object of desire self-consciousness plays a particularly important role in heterosexual women's sexual/romantic functioning and desires.

  11. Analysis of locality-sensitive hashing for fast critical event prediction on physiological time series.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yongwook Bryce; O'Reilly, Una-May

    2016-08-01

    We apply the sublinear time, scalable locality-sensitive hashing (LSH) and majority discrimination to the problem of predicting critical events based on physiological waveform time series. Compared to using the linear exhaustive k-nearest neighbor search, our proposed method vastly speeds up prediction time up to 25 times while sacrificing only 1% of accuracy when demonstrated on an arterial blood pressure dataset extracted from the MIMIC2 database. We compare two widely used variants of LSH, the bit sampling based (L1LSH) and the random projection based (E2LSH) methods to measure their direct impact on retrieval and prediction accuracy. We experimentally show that the more sophisticated E2LSH performs worse than L1LSH in terms of accuracy, correlation, and the ability to detect false negatives. We attribute this to E2LSH's simultaneous integration of all dimensions when hashing the data, which actually makes it more impotent against common noise sources such as data misalignment. We also demonstrate that the deterioration of accuracy due to approximation at the retrieval step of LSH has a diminishing impact on the prediction accuracy as the speed up gain accelerates.

  12. Floor Covering and Surface Identification for Assistive Mobile Robotic Real-Time Room Localization Application

    PubMed Central

    Gillham, Michael; Howells, Gareth; Spurgeon, Sarah; McElroy, Ben

    2013-01-01

    Assistive robotic applications require systems capable of interaction in the human world, a workspace which is highly dynamic and not always predictable. Mobile assistive devices face the additional and complex problem of when and if intervention should occur; therefore before any trajectory assistance is given, the robotic device must know where it is in real-time, without unnecessary disruption or delay to the user requirements. In this paper, we demonstrate a novel robust method for determining room identification from floor features in a real-time computational frame for autonomous and assistive robotics in the human environment. We utilize two inexpensive sensors: an optical mouse sensor for straightforward and rapid, texture or pattern sampling, and a four color photodiode light sensor for fast color determination. We show how data relating floor texture and color obtained from typical dynamic human environments, using these two sensors, compares favorably with data obtained from a standard webcam. We show that suitable data can be extracted from these two sensors at a rate 16 times faster than a standard webcam, and that these data are in a form which can be rapidly processed using readily available classification techniques, suitable for real-time system application. We achieved a 95% correct classification accuracy identifying 133 rooms' flooring from 35 classes, suitable for fast coarse global room localization application, boundary crossing detection, and additionally some degree of surface type identification. PMID:24351647

  13. Local spectrum analysis of field propagation in an anisotropic medium. Part II. Time-dependent fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinkelman, Igor; Melamed, Timor

    2005-06-01

    In Part I of this two-part investigation [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A22, 1200 (2005)], we presented a theory for phase-space propagation of time-harmonic electromagnetic fields in an anisotropic medium characterized by a generic wave-number profile. In this Part II, these investigations are extended to transient fields, setting a general analytical framework for local analysis and modeling of radiation from time-dependent extended-source distributions. In this formulation the field is expressed as a superposition of pulsed-beam propagators that emanate from all space-time points in the source domain and in all directions. Using time-dependent quadratic-Lorentzian windows, we represent the field by a phase-space spectral distribution in which the propagating elements are pulsed beams, which are formulated by a transient plane-wave spectrum over the extended-source plane. By applying saddle-point asymptotics, we extract the beam phenomenology in the anisotropic environment resulting from short-pulsed processing. Finally, the general results are applied to the special case of uniaxial crystal and compared with a reference solution.

  14. Local spectrum analysis of field propagation in an anisotropic medium. Part II. Time-dependent fields.

    PubMed

    Tinkelman, Igor; Melamed, Timor

    2005-06-01

    In Part I of this two-part investigation [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 22, 1200 (2005)], we presented a theory for phase-space propagation of time-harmonic electromagnetic fields in an anisotropic medium characterized by a generic wave-number profile. In this Part II, these investigations are extended to transient fields, setting a general analytical framework for local analysis and modeling of radiation from time-dependent extended-source distributions. In this formulation the field is expressed as a superposition of pulsed-beam propagators that emanate from all space-time points in the source domain and in all directions. Using time-dependent quadratic-Lorentzian windows, we represent the field by a phase-space spectral distribution in which the propagating elements are pulsed beams, which are formulated by a transient plane-wave spectrum over the extended-source plane. By applying saddle-point asymptotics, we extract the beam phenomenology in the anisotropic environment resulting from short-pulsed processing. Finally, the general results are applied to the special case of uniaxial crystal and compared with a reference solution.

  15. Time course and localization of brain activity in humor comprehension: An ERP/sLORETA study.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Midori; Terasawa, Yuri; Osumi, Takahiro; Masui, Keita; Ito, Yuichi; Sato, Arisa; Umeda, Satoshi

    2017-02-15

    Although a number of studies have investigated the incongruity-detection and resolution process in humor comprehension, it is difficult to functionally and anatomically dissociate these processes. We used event-related potentials (ERP) and standardized low resolution brain electromagnetic tomography analysis (sLORETA) to examine the time course and localization of brain activity during incongruity detection and resolution. We used the same materials as in our previous fMRI study. Eighteen participants read funny and unfunny scenarios and judged whether the target sentence was funny or not. Results indicated that ERPs elicited by a funny punch line showed a P2 component followed by a P600 component over the centro-parietal electrode sites. Our sLORETA analysis of the P2 ERPs revealed a stronger activation for the funny vs. unfunny condition in the superior frontal gyrus (SFG) and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). For the P600 ERPs, the funny punch line elicited greater activation in the temporal-parietal regions. These results indicate that incongruity-detection processes activate the SFG and mPFC in the P2 time window, while incongruity-resolution processes generate activation at the temporal-parietal regions in the P600 time window. These results provide the evidence that verbal humor comprehension is processed in steps which start with the incongruity detection in the early P2 time window and followed by a P600 component reflecting incongruity resolution.

  16. Media Impacts on Women's Fertility Desires: A Prolonged Exposure Experiment.

    PubMed

    Knobloch-Westerwick, Silvia; Willis, Laura E; Kennard, Ashley R

    2016-06-01

    Media exposure may have implications for family planning, a public health issue of key importance. Drawing on social comparison theory and social identity theory, a prolonged exposure experiment examined whether media portrayals of women's social roles affect fertility desires among 166 American, nonstudent, never married, childless women ages 21-35 years old. After sign-up and baseline sessions, participants viewed magazine pages five days in a row. Stimuli presented women in either mother/homemaker roles, beauty ideal roles, or professional roles. Three days later, participants again indicated their number of desired children and time planned until first birth. Exposure to mother/homemaker and beauty ideal portrayals increased the number of desired children across time. Exposure to professional portrayals increased the time planned until 1st birth compared to beauty ideal portrayals-this impact was partially mediated by a shift toward more progressive gender norms (per social identity theory) and assimilation (per social comparison theory).

  17. Derivation of local-in-time fourth post-Newtonian ADM Hamiltonian for spinless compact binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaranowski, Piotr; Schäfer, Gerhard

    2015-12-01

    The paper gives full details of the computation within the canonical formalism of Arnowitt, Deser, and Misner of the local-in-time part of the fourth post-Newtonian, i.e. of power eight in one over speed of light, conservative Hamiltonian of spinless compact binary systems. The Hamiltonian depends only on the bodies' positions and momenta. Dirac delta distributions are taken as source functions. Their full control is furnished by dimensional continuation, by means of which the occurring ultraviolet (UV) divergences are uniquely regularized. The applied near-zone expansion of the time-symmetric Green function leads to infrared (IR) divergences. Their analytic regularization results in one single ambiguity parameter. Unique fixation of it was successfully performed in T. Damour, P. Jaranowski, and G. Schäfer, Phys. Rev. D 89, 064058 (2014) through far-zone matching. Technically as well as conceptually (backscatter binding energy), the level of the Lamb shift in quantum electrodynamics is reached. In a first run a computation of all terms is performed in three-dimensional space using analytic Riesz-Hadamard regularization techniques. Then divergences are treated locally (i.e., around particles' positions for UV and in the vicinity of spatial infinity for IR divergences) by means of combined dimensional and analytic regularization. Various evolved analytic expressions are presented for the first time. The breakdown of the Leibniz rule for distributional derivatives is addressed as well as the in general nondistributive law when regularizing value of products of functions evaluated at their singular point.

  18. Hydrograph structure informed calibration in the frequency domain with time localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumarasamy, K.; Belmont, P.

    2015-12-01

    Complex models with large number of parameters are commonly used to estimate sediment yields and predict changes in sediment loads as a result of changes in management or conservation practice at large watershed (>2000 km2) scales. As sediment yield is a strongly non-linear function that responds to channel (peak or mean) velocity or flow depth, it is critical to accurately represent flows. The process of calibration in such models (e.g., SWAT) generally involves the adjustment of several parameters to obtain better estimates of goodness of fit metrics such as Nash Sutcliff Efficiency (NSE). However, such indicators only provide a global view of model performance, potentially obscuring accuracy of the timing or magnitude of specific flows of interest. We describe an approach for streamflow calibration that will greatly reduce the black-box nature of calibration, when response from a parameter adjustment is not clearly known. Fourier Transform or the Short Term Fourier Transform could be used to characterize model performance in the frequency domain as well, however, the ambiguity of a Fourier transform with regards to time localization renders its implementation in a model calibration setting rather useless. Brief and sudden changes (e.g. stream flow peaks) in signals carry the most interesting information from parameter adjustments, which are completely lost in the transform without time localization. Wavelet transform captures the frequency component in the signal without compromising time and is applied to contrast changes in signal response to parameter adjustments. Here we employ the mother wavelet called the Mexican hat wavelet and apply a Continuous Wavelet Transform to understand the signal in the frequency domain. Further, with the use of the cross-wavelet spectrum we examine the relationship between the two signals (prior or post parameter adjustment) in the time-scale plane (e.g., lower scales correspond to higher frequencies). The non-stationarity of

  19. Time-Accurate Local Time Stepping and High-Order Time CESE Methods for Multi-Dimensional Flows Using Unstructured Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan; Venkatachari, Balaji Shankar; Cheng, Gary

    2013-01-01

    With the wide availability of affordable multiple-core parallel supercomputers, next generation numerical simulations of flow physics are being focused on unsteady computations for problems involving multiple time scales and multiple physics. These simulations require higher solution accuracy than most algorithms and computational fluid dynamics codes currently available. This paper focuses on the developmental effort for high-fidelity multi-dimensional, unstructured-mesh flow solvers using the space-time conservation element, solution element (CESE) framework. Two approaches have been investigated in this research in order to provide high-accuracy, cross-cutting numerical simulations for a variety of flow regimes: 1) time-accurate local time stepping and 2) highorder CESE method. The first approach utilizes consistent numerical formulations in the space-time flux integration to preserve temporal conservation across the cells with different marching time steps. Such approach relieves the stringent time step constraint associated with the smallest time step in the computational domain while preserving temporal accuracy for all the cells. For flows involving multiple scales, both numerical accuracy and efficiency can be significantly enhanced. The second approach extends the current CESE solver to higher-order accuracy. Unlike other existing explicit high-order methods for unstructured meshes, the CESE framework maintains a CFL condition of one for arbitrarily high-order formulations while retaining the same compact stencil as its second-order counterpart. For large-scale unsteady computations, this feature substantially enhances numerical efficiency. Numerical formulations and validations using benchmark problems are discussed in this paper along with realistic examples.

  20. Dynamics of choice: relative rate and amount affect local preference at three different time scales.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, Carlos F; Baum, William M

    2009-05-01

    To examine extended control over local choice, the present study investigated preference in transition as food-rate ratio provided by two levers changed across seven components within daily sessions, and food-amount ratio changed across phases. Phase 1 arranged a food-amount ratio of 4:1 (i.e., the left lever delivered four pellets and the right lever one pellet); Phase 2 reversed the food-amount ratio to 1:4, and in Phase 3 the food-amount ratio was 3:2. At a relatively extended time scale, preference was described well by a linear relation between log response ratio and log rate ratio (the generalized matching law). A small amount of carryover occurred from one rate ratio to the next but disappeared after four food deliveries. Estimates of sensitivity to food-amount ratio were around 1.0 and were independent of rate ratio. Analysis across food deliveries within rate-ratio components showed that the effect of a small amount was diminished by the presence of a large amount-that is, when a larger amount was present in the situation (three or four pellets), the value of a small amount (one or two pellets) became paltry. More local analysis of visits to the levers between food deliveries showed that postfood visits following a large amount were disproportionately longer than following a small amount. Continuing food deliveries from the same source tended to make visits less dependent on relative amount, but a discontinuation (i.e., food from the other lever) reinstated dependence on relative amount. Analysis at a still smaller time scale revealed preference pulses following food deliveries that confirmed the tendency toward dependence on absolute amount with continuing deliveries, and toward dependence on relative amount following discontinuations. A mathematical model based on a linear-operator equation accounts for many of the results. The larger and longer preference following a switch to a larger amount is consistent with the idea that local preference depends on

  1. DYNAMICS OF CHOICE: RELATIVE RATE AND AMOUNT AFFECT LOCAL PREFERENCE AT THREE DIFFERENT TIME SCALES

    PubMed Central

    Aparicio, Carlos F; Baum, William M

    2009-01-01

    To examine extended control over local choice, the present study investigated preference in transition as food-rate ratio provided by two levers changed across seven components within daily sessions, and food-amount ratio changed across phases. Phase 1 arranged a food-amount ratio of 4∶1 (i.e., the left lever delivered four pellets and the right lever one pellet); Phase 2 reversed the food-amount ratio to 1∶4, and in Phase 3 the food-amount ratio was 3∶2. At a relatively extended time scale, preference was described well by a linear relation between log response ratio and log rate ratio (the generalized matching law). A small amount of carryover occurred from one rate ratio to the next but disappeared after four food deliveries. Estimates of sensitivity to food-amount ratio were around 1.0 and were independent of rate ratio. Analysis across food deliveries within rate-ratio components showed that the effect of a small amount was diminished by the presence of a large amount—that is, when a larger amount was present in the situation (three or four pellets), the value of a small amount (one or two pellets) became paltry. More local analysis of visits to the levers between food deliveries showed that postfood visits following a large amount were disproportionately longer than following a small amount. Continuing food deliveries from the same source tended to make visits less dependent on relative amount, but a discontinuation (i.e., food from the other lever) reinstated dependence on relative amount. Analysis at a still smaller time scale revealed preference pulses following food deliveries that confirmed the tendency toward dependence on absolute amount with continuing deliveries, and toward dependence on relative amount following discontinuations. A mathematical model based on a linear-operator equation accounts for many of the results. The larger and longer preference following a switch to a larger amount is consistent with the idea that local preference

  2. SNR enhancement of highly-accelerated real-time cardiac MRI acquisitions based on non-local means algorithm.

    PubMed

    Naegel, Benoît; Cernicanu, Alexandru; Hyacinthe, Jean-Noël; Tognolini, Maurizio; Vallée, Jean-Paul

    2009-08-01

    Real-time cardiac MRI appears as a promising technique to evaluate the mechanical function of the heart. However, ultra-fast MRI acquisitions come with an important signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) penalty, which drastically reduces the image quality. Hence, a real-time denoising approach would be desirable for SNR amelioration. In the clinical context of cardiac dysfunction assessment, long acquisitions are required and for most patients the acquisition takes place with free breathing. Hence, it is necessary to compensate respiratory motion in real-time. In this article, a real-time and interactive method for sequential registration and denoising of real-time MR cardiac images is presented. The method has been experimented on 60 fast MRI acquisitions in five healthy volunteers and five patients. These experiments assessed the feasibility of the method in a real-time context.

  3. Localized Single Frequency Lasing States in a Finite Parity-Time Symmetric Resonator Chain

    PubMed Central

    Phang, Sendy; Vukovic, Ana; Creagh, Stephen C.; Sewell, Phillip D.; Gradoni, Gabriele; Benson, Trevor M.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper a practical case of a finite periodic Parity Time chain made of resonant dielectric cylinders is considered. The paper analyzes a more general case where PT symmetry is achieved by modulating both the real and imaginary part of the material refractive index along the resonator chain. The band-structure of the finite periodic PT resonator chains is compared to infinite chains in order to understand the complex interdependence of the Bloch phase and the amount of the gain/loss in the system that causes the PT symmetry to break. The results show that the type of the modulation along the unit cell can significantly affect the position of the threshold point of the PT system. In all cases the lowest threshold is achieved near the end of the Brillouin zone. In the case of finite PT-chains, and for a particular type of modulation, early PT symmetry breaking is observed and shown to be caused by the presence of termination states localized at the edges of the finite chain resulting in localized lasing and dissipative modes at each end of the chain. PMID:26848095

  4. Detection and localization of continuous gravitational waves with pulsar timing arrays: the role of pulsar terms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, X.-J.; Wen, L.; Xiong, J.; Xu, Y.; Wang, Y.; Mohanty, S. D.; Hobbs, G.; Manchester, R. N.

    2016-09-01

    A pulsar timing array is a Galactic-scale detector of nanohertz gravitational waves (GWs). Its target signals contain two components: the `Earth term' and the `pulsar term' corresponding to GWs incident on the Earth and pulsar, respectively. In this work we present a Frequentist method for the detection and localization of continuous waves that takes into account the pulsar term and is significantly faster than existing methods. We investigate the role of pulsar terms by comparing a full-signal search with an Earth-term-only search for non-evolving black hole binaries. By applying the method to synthetic data sets, we find that (i) a full-signal search can slightly improve the detection probability (by about five per cent); (ii) sky localization is biased if only Earth terms are searched for and the inclusion of pulsar terms is critical to remove such a bias; (iii) in the case of strong detections (with signal-to-noise ratio ≳30), it may be possible to improve pulsar distance estimation through GW measurements.

  5. Real-time ultrasound transducer localization in fluoroscopy images by transfer learning from synthetic training data.

    PubMed

    Heimann, Tobias; Mountney, Peter; John, Matthias; Ionasec, Razvan

    2014-12-01

    The fusion of image data from trans-esophageal echography (TEE) and X-ray fluoroscopy is attracting increasing interest in minimally-invasive treatment of structural heart disease. In order to calculate the needed transformation between both imaging systems, we employ a discriminative learning (DL) based approach to localize the TEE transducer in X-ray images. The successful application of DL methods is strongly dependent on the available training data, which entails three challenges: (1) the transducer can move with six degrees of freedom meaning it requires a large number of images to represent its appearance, (2) manual labeling is time consuming, and (3) manual labeling has inherent errors. This paper proposes to generate the required training data automatically from a single volumetric image of the transducer. In order to adapt this system to real X-ray data, we use unlabeled fluoroscopy images to estimate differences in feature space density and correct covariate shift by instance weighting. Two approaches for instance weighting, probabilistic classification and Kullback-Leibler importance estimation (KLIEP), are evaluated for different stages of the proposed DL pipeline. An analysis on more than 1900 images reveals that our approach reduces detection failures from 7.3% in cross validation on the test set to zero and improves the localization error from 1.5 to 0.8mm. Due to the automatic generation of training data, the proposed system is highly flexible and can be adapted to any medical device with minimal efforts.

  6. Real-time imaging of evoked activity in local circuits of the salamander olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Kauer, J S

    1988-01-14

    The encoding of olfactory information in the central nervous system (CNS) depends on spatially distributed patterns of activity generated simultaneously in many neuronal circuits. Optical neurophysiological recording permits analysis of neural activity non-invasively and with high spatial and temporal resolution. Here, a video method for imaging voltage-sensitive dye fluorescence in vivo is used to map neuronal activity in local circuits of the salamander olfactory bulb. The method permits the imaging of simultaneous ensemble transmembrane activity in real time. After electrical stimulation of the olfactory nerve, activity spreads centripetally from the sites of synaptic input to generate nonhomogeneous response patterns that are presumably mediated by local circuits within the bulbar layers. The results also show the overlapping temporal sequences of activation of cell groups in each layer. The method thus provides high resolution, sequential video images of the spatial and temporal progression of transmembrane events in neuronal circuits after afferent stimulation and offers the opportunity for studying ensemble events in other brain regions.

  7. Estimates of local biodiversity change over time stand up to scrutiny.

    PubMed

    Vellend, Mark; Dornelas, Maria; Baeten, Lander; Beauséjour, Robin; Brown, Carissa D; De Frenne, Pieter; Elmendorf, Sarah C; Gotelli, Nicholas J; Moyes, Faye; Myers-Smith, Isla H; Magurran, Anne E; McGill, Brian J; Shimadzu, Hideyasu; Sievers, Caya

    2017-02-01

    We present new data and analyses revealing fundamental flaws in a critique of two recent meta-analyses of local-scale temporal biodiversity change. First, the conclusion that short-term time series lead to biased estimates of long-term change was based on two errors in the simulations used to support it. Second, the conclusion of negative relationships between temporal biodiversity change and study duration was entirely dependent on unrealistic model assumptions, the use of a subset of data, and inclusion of one outlier data point in one study. Third, the finding of a decline in local biodiversity, after eliminating post-disturbance studies, is not robust to alternative analyses on the original data set, and is absent in a larger, updated data set. Finally, the undebatable point, noted in both original papers, that studies in the ecological literature are geographically biased, was used to cast doubt on the conclusion that, outside of areas converted to croplands or asphalt, the distribution of biodiversity trends is centered approximately on zero. Future studies may modify conclusions, but at present, alternative conclusions based on the geographic-bias argument rely on speculation. In sum, the critique raises points of uncertainty typical of all ecological studies, but does not provide an evidence-based alternative interpretation. © 2016 by the Ecological Society of America.

  8. Magnetic STAR technology for real-time localization and classification of unexploded ordnance and buried mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegert, R. F.

    2009-05-01

    A man-portable Magnetic Scalar Triangulation and Ranging ("MagSTAR") technology for Detection, Localization and Classification (DLC) of unexploded ordnance (UXO) has been developed by Naval Surface Warfare Center Panama City Division (NSWC PCD) with support from the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP). Proof of principle of the MagSTAR concept and its unique advantages for real-time, high-mobility magnetic sensing applications have been demonstrated by field tests of a prototype man-portable MagSTAR sensor. The prototype comprises: a) An array of fluxgate magnetometers configured as a multi-tensor gradiometer, b) A GPS-synchronized signal processing system. c) Unique STAR algorithms for point-by-point, standoff DLC of magnetic targets. This paper outlines details of: i) MagSTAR theory, ii) Design and construction of the prototype sensor, iii) Signal processing algorithms recently developed to improve the technology's target-discrimination accuracy, iv) Results of field tests of the portable gradiometer system against magnetic dipole targets. The results demonstrate that the MagSTAR technology is capable of very accurate, high-speed localization of magnetic targets at standoff distances of several meters. These advantages could readily be transitioned to a wide range of defense, security and sensing applications to provide faster and more effective DLC of UXO and buried mines.

  9. Using a "time machine" to test for local adaptation of aquatic microbes to temporal and spatial environmental variation.

    PubMed

    Fox, Jeremy W; Harder, Lawrence D

    2015-01-01

    Local adaptation occurs when different environments are dominated by different specialist genotypes, each of which is relatively fit in its local conditions and relatively unfit under other conditions. Analogously, ecological species sorting occurs when different environments are dominated by different competing species, each of which is relatively fit in its local conditions. The simplest theory predicts that spatial, but not temporal, environmental variation selects for local adaptation (or generates species sorting), but this prediction is difficult to test. Although organisms can be reciprocally transplanted among sites, doing so among times seems implausible. Here, we describe a reciprocal transplant experiment testing for local adaptation or species sorting of lake bacteria in response to both temporal and spatial variation in water chemistry. The experiment used a -80°C freezer as a "time machine." Bacterial isolates and water samples were frozen for later use, allowing transplantation of older isolates "forward in time" and newer isolates "backward in time." Surprisingly, local maladaptation predominated over local adaptation in both space and time. Such local maladaptation may indicate that adaptation, or the analogous species sorting process, fails to keep pace with temporal fluctuations in water chemistry. This hypothesis could be tested with more finely resolved temporal data.

  10. Localized Mode DFT-S-OFDMA Implementation Using Frequency and Time Domain Interpolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viholainen, Ari; Ihalainen, Tero; Rinne, Mika; Renfors, Markku

    2009-12-01

    This paper presents a novel method to generate a localized mode single-carrier frequency division multiple access (SC-FDMA) waveform. Instead of using DFT-spread OFDMA (DFT-S-OFDMA) processing, the new structure called SCiFI-FDMA relies on frequency and time domain interpolation followed by a user-specific frequency shift. SCiFI-FDMA can provide signal waveforms that are compatible to DFT-S-OFDMA. In addition, it provides any resolution of user bandwidth allocation for the uplink multiple access with comparable computational complexity, because the DFT is avoided. Therefore, SCiFI-FDMA allows a flexible choice of parameters appreciated in broadband mobile communications in the future.

  11. Global Auroral Energy Deposition during Substorm Onset Compared with Local Time and Solar Wind IMF Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, J. F.; Brittnacher, M.; Fillingim, M. O.; Germany, G. A.; Parks, G. K.

    1998-01-01

    The global images made by the Ultraviolet Imager (UVI) aboard the IASTP/Polar Satellite are used to derive the global auroral energy deposited in the ionosphere resulting from electron precipitation. During a substorm onset, the energy deposited and its location in local time are compared to the solar wind IMF conditions. Previously, insitu measurements of low orbiting satellites have made precipitating particle measurements along the spacecraft track and global images of the auroral zone, without the ability to quantify energy parameters, have been available. However, usage of the high temporal, spatial, and spectral resolution of consecutive UVI images enables quantitative measurement of the energy deposited in the ionosphere not previously available on a global scale. Data over an extended period beginning in January 1997 will be presented.

  12. Empirical wind model for the middle and lower atmosphere. Part 2: Local time variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedin, A. E.; Fleming, E. L.; Manson, A. H.; Schmidlin, F. J.; Avery, S. K.; Clark, R. R.; Franke, S. J.; Fraser, G. J.; Tsuda, T.; Vial, F.

    1993-01-01

    The HWM90 thermospheric wind model was revised in the lower thermosphere and extended into the mesosphere and lower atmosphere to provide a single analytic model for calculating zonal and meridional wind profiles representative of the climatological average for various geophysical conditions. Local time variations in the mesosphere are derived from rocket soundings, incoherent scatter radar, MF radar, and meteor radar. Low-order spherical harmonics and Fourier series are used to describe these variations as a function of latitude and day of year with cubic spline interpolation in altitude. The model represents a smoothed compromise between the original data sources. Although agreement between various data sources is generally good, some systematic differences are noted. Overall root mean square differences between measured and model tidal components are on the order of 5 to 10 m/s.

  13. Localization Framework for Real-Time UAV Autonomous Landing: An On-Ground Deployed Visual Approach

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Weiwei; Hu, Tianjiang; Zhang, Daibing; Shen, Lincheng; Zhang, Jianwei

    2017-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges for fixed-wing unmanned aircraft vehicles (UAVs) is safe landing. Hereafter, an on-ground deployed visual approach is developed in this paper. This approach is definitely suitable for landing within the global navigation satellite system (GNSS)-denied environments. As for applications, the deployed guidance system makes full use of the ground computing resource and feedbacks the aircraft’s real-time localization to its on-board autopilot. Under such circumstances, a separate long baseline stereo architecture is proposed to possess an extendable baseline and wide-angle field of view (FOV) against the traditional fixed baseline schemes. Furthermore, accuracy evaluation of the new type of architecture is conducted by theoretical modeling and computational analysis. Dataset-driven experimental results demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the developed approach. PMID:28629189

  14. Global Auroral Energy Deposition during Substorm Onset Compared with Local Time and Solar Wind IMF Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, J. F.; Brittnacher, M.; Fillingim, M. O.; Germany, G. A.; Parks, G. K.

    1998-01-01

    The global images made by the Ultraviolet Imager (UVI) aboard the IASTP/Polar Satellite are used to derive the global auroral energy deposited in the ionosphere resulting from electron precipitation. During a substorm onset, the energy deposited and its location in local time are compared to the solar wind IMF conditions. Previously, insitu measurements of low orbiting satellites have made precipitating particle measurements along the spacecraft track and global images of the auroral zone, without the ability to quantify energy parameters, have been available. However, usage of the high temporal, spatial, and spectral resolution of consecutive UVI images enables quantitative measurement of the energy deposited in the ionosphere not previously available on a global scale. Data over an extended period beginning in January 1997 will be presented.

  15. The local time-dependant characteristics of flux rope at Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Ruilong; Yao, Zhonghua; Wei, Yong

    2017-04-01

    Flux rope, which is often called as plasmoid when the guide field is small, is an important process to transfer magnetic flux and plasmas in the magnetosphere of terrestrial and planetary magnetosphere. At Earth, the formation of flux rope in the magnetotail is mainly controlled by the "Dungey-cycle", which is associated with the acceleration of electrons and loss of plasma in the magnetosphere. At giant planets (i.e., Saturn and Jupiter), the "Vasyliunas-cycle" is an additional important (might be dominant) process to generate flux ropes. The information of how flux rope is formed and evolved at giant planets is pivotal in understanding the energy coupling process at these planets. The Cassini spacecraft has detected an amount of flux rope events in the Saturnian magnetosphere. In this work, the guide field, axis orientation, and electron properties are compared between the flux ropes recorded at different local times. We also compare the characteristics with the flux rope at Earth.

  16. MINVAR: a local optimization criterion for rate-distortion tradeoff in real time video coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhenzhong; Ngan, King Ngi

    2005-10-01

    In this paper, we propose a minimum variation (MINVAR) distortion criterion based approach for the rate distortion tradeoff in video coding. The MINVAR based rate distortion tradeoff framework provides a local optimization strategy as a rate control mechanism in real time video coding applications by minimizing the distortion variation while the corresponding bit rate fluctuation is limited by utilizing the encoder buffer. We use the H.264 video codec to evaluate the performance of the proposed method. As shown in the simulation results, the decoded picture quality of the proposed approach is smoother than that of the traditional H.264 joint model (JM) rate control algorithm. The global video quality, the average PSNR, is maintained while a better subjective visual quality is guaranteed.

  17. Localization Framework for Real-Time UAV Autonomous Landing: An On-Ground Deployed Visual Approach.

    PubMed

    Kong, Weiwei; Hu, Tianjiang; Zhang, Daibing; Shen, Lincheng; Zhang, Jianwei

    2017-06-19

    [-5]One of the greatest challenges for fixed-wing unmanned aircraft vehicles (UAVs) is safe landing. Hereafter, an on-ground deployed visual approach is developed in this paper. This approach is definitely suitable for landing within the global navigation satellite system (GNSS)-denied environments. As for applications, the deployed guidance system makes full use of the ground computing resource and feedbacks the aircraft's real-time localization to its on-board autopilot. Under such circumstances, a separate long baseline stereo architecture is proposed to possess an extendable baseline and wide-angle field of view (FOV) against the traditional fixed baseline schemes. Furthermore, accuracy evaluation of the new type of architecture is conducted by theoretical modeling and computational analysis. Dataset-driven experimental results demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the developed approach.

  18. The complex nature of storm-time ion dynamics: Transport and local acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denton, M. H.; Reeves, G. E.; Thomsen, M. F.; Henderson, M. G.; Friedel, R. H. W.; Larsen, B.; Skoug, R. M.; Funsten, H. O.; Spence, H. E.; Kletzing, C. A.

    2016-10-01

    Data from the Van Allen Probes Helium, Oxygen, Proton, and Electron (HOPE) spectrometers reveal hitherto unresolved spatial structure and dynamics in ion populations. Complex regions of O+ dominance, at energies from a few eV to >10 keV, are observed throughout the magnetosphere. Isolated regions on the dayside that are rich in energetic O+ might easily be interpreted as strong energization of ionospheric plasma. We demonstrate, however, that both the energy spectrum and the limited magnetic local time extent of these features can be explained by energy-dependent drift of particles injected on the nightside 24 h earlier. Particle tracing simulations show that the energetic O+ can originate in the magnetotail, not in the ionosphere. Enhanced wave activity is colocated with the heavy ion-rich plasma, and we further conclude that the waves were not a source of free energy for accelerating ionospheric plasma but rather the consequence of the arrival of substorm-injected plasma.

  19. Real-time detection of generic objects using objectness estimation and locally adaptive regression kernels matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zhihui; Gao, Lei; Xiao, Liping; Zhou, Bin; Gao, Shibo

    2015-12-01

    Our purpose is to develop a detection algorithm capable of searching for generic interest objects in real time without large training sets and long-time training stages. Instead of the classical sliding window object detection paradigm, we employ an objectness measure to produce a small set of candidate windows efficiently using Binarized Normed Gradients and a Laplacian of Gaussian-like filter. We then extract Locally Adaptive Regression Kernels (LARKs) as descriptors both from a model image and the candidate windows which measure the likeness of a pixel to its surroundings. Using a matrix cosine similarity measure, the algorithm yields a scalar resemblance map, indicating the likelihood of similarity between the model and the candidate windows. By employing nonparametric significance tests and non-maxima suppression, we detect the presence of objects similar to the given model. Experiments show that the proposed detection paradigm can automatically detect the presence, the number, as well as location of similar objects to the given model. The high quality and efficiency of our method make it suitable for real time multi-category object detection applications.

  20. Time domain localization technique with sparsity constraint for imaging acoustic sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padois, Thomas; Doutres, Olivier; Sgard, Franck; Berry, Alain

    2017-09-01

    This paper addresses source localization technique in time domain for broadband acoustic sources. The objective is to accurately and quickly detect the position and amplitude of noise sources in workplaces in order to propose adequate noise control options and prevent workers hearing loss or safety risk. First, the generalized cross correlation associated with a spherical microphone array is used to generate an initial noise source map. Then a linear inverse problem is defined to improve this initial map. Commonly, the linear inverse problem is solved with an l2 -regularization. In this study, two sparsity constraints are used to solve the inverse problem, the orthogonal matching pursuit and the truncated Newton interior-point method. Synthetic data are used to highlight the performances of the technique. High resolution imaging is achieved for various acoustic sources configurations. Moreover, the amplitudes of the acoustic sources are correctly estimated. A comparison of computation times shows that the technique is compatible with quasi real-time generation of noise source maps. Finally, the technique is tested with real data.

  1. The Timing for Neuronal Maturation in the Adult Hippocampus Is Modulated by Local Network Activity

    PubMed Central

    Piatti, Verónica C.; Davies-Sala, M. Georgina; Espósito, M. Soledad; Mongiat, Lucas A.; Trinchero, Mariela F.; Schinder, Alejandro F.

    2013-01-01

    The adult hippocampus continuously generates new cohorts of immature neurons with increased excitability and plasticity. The window for the expression of those unique properties in each cohort is determined by the time required to acquire a mature neuronal phenotype. Here, we show that local network activity regulates the rate of maturation of adult-born neurons along the septotemporal axis of the hippocampus. Confocal microscopy and patch-clamp recordings were combined to assess marker expression, morphological development, and functional properties in retrovirally labeled neurons over time. The septal dentate gyrus displayed higher levels of basal network activity and faster rates of newborn neuron maturation than the temporal region. Voluntary exercise enhanced network activity only in the temporal region and, in turn, accelerated neuronal development. Finally, neurons developing within a highly active environment exhibited a delayed maturation when their intrinsic electrical activity was reduced by the cell-autonomous overexpression of Kir2.1, an inward-rectifying potassium channel. Our findings reveal a novel type of activity-dependent plasticity acting on the timing of neuronal maturation and functional integration of newly generated neurons along the longitudinal axis of the adult hippocampus. PMID:21613484

  2. The importance of local mean time in remote sensing for mapping megatidal zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deroin, Jean-Paul; Shimada, Masanobu

    2010-01-01

    The local mean time is rarely debated in applied remote sensing, although it is a key parameter, especially for the geological mapping of coastal areas with high tidal ranges. French test sites are used to illustrate the role of this parameter. Depending from location and for an average time of acquisition of 11:00 UTC, the exposed tidal flat ranges from 55% (Baie des Veys), 80% (Mont Saint-Michel) to 100% (Cap-Ferret). Eight multisource satellite images were used in the Mont Saint-Michel Bay to draw the limit of the sea and evaluate the corresponding tidal flat's surfaces for various times of acquisition. The relation emphasizes some geometrical properties of the lower part of the intertidal zone. A NW-SE profile allows one to identify a distal part with a slope of 0.2% and a proximal part with a slope of only 0.06%. JERS 1-OPS and ALOS-AVNIR-2 data have been also compared to evaluate the progression of the halophytic vegetation, covering more than 6 km 2 between 1992 and 2007. From a methodological point of view, the ALOS-AVNIR-2 acquired on October 2007 is the first satellite data covering the Mont Saint-Michel Bay with a water elevation of only 2.56 m, i.e. a tidal flat free of water over 80% of its surface.

  3. CFD simulation of local and global mixing time in an agitated tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liangchao; Xu, Bin

    2017-01-01

    The Issue of mixing efficiency in agitated tanks has drawn serious concern in many industrial processes. The turbulence model is very critical to predicting mixing process in agitated tanks. On the basis of computational fluid dynamics(CFD) software package Fluent 6.2, the mixing characteristics in a tank agitated by dual six-blade-Rushton-turbines(6-DT) are predicted using the detached eddy simulation(DES) method. A sliding mesh(SM) approach is adopted to solve the rotation of the impeller. The simulated flow patterns and liquid velocities in the agitated tank are verified by experimental data in the literature. The simulation results indicate that the DES method can obtain more flow details than Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes(RANS) model. Local and global mixing time in the agitated tank is predicted by solving a tracer concentration scalar transport equation. The simulated results show that feeding points have great influence on mixing process and mixing time. Mixing efficiency is the highest for the feeding point at location of midway of the two impellers. Two methods are used to determine global mixing time and get close result. Dimensionless global mixing time remains unchanged with increasing of impeller speed. Parallel, merging and diverging flow pattern form in the agitated tank, respectively, by changing the impeller spacing and clearance of lower impeller from the bottom of the tank. The global mixing time is the shortest for the merging flow, followed by diverging flow, and the longest for parallel flow. The research presents helpful references for design, optimization and scale-up of agitated tanks with multi-impeller.

  4. Equatorial ionization anomaly in the low-latitude topside ionosphere: Local time evolution and longitudinal difference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yiding; Liu, Libo; Le, Huijun; Wan, Weixing; Zhang, Hui

    2016-07-01

    Although the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) has been widely studied, it was seldom investigated from observations for the topside ionosphere. In this paper, the climatology characteristics of the latitudinal structure of topside ion density (Ni) were investigated in detail using ROCSAT-1 and DMSP Ni observations. EIA double-peak structure may exist at 600 km, depending on longitude, local time, season, and solar activity, while it is not a prevalent characteristic at 840 km even at solar maximum sunset. Local time evolution of the EIA at 600 km was presented. The double-peak structure begins to appear at noontime, being later than the appearance of the EIA in F2 peak region. The pronounced EIA induced by the strong prereversal enhancement at solar maximum begins to appear at 19:00 LT and can last to premidnight; EIA crest-to-trough ratio is largest (lowest) at March equinox (June solstice) and reaches a maximum at 20:00 LT in all seasons. EIA structure shows evident longitudinal difference. Pronounced EIA exists around about 100°E at 13:00 LT at the two equinoxes and June solstice, while it exists at more extensive longitudes (about 90°E to 240°E) at December solstice. The trans-equator plasma transport induced by neutral winds can weaken the double-peak structure in the topside ionosphere. The longitudinal difference in the EIA structure at 600 km is related to the longitudinal variations of equatorial upward plasma drift and geomagnetic declination.

  5. Separation of hydrological effects from GNSS time series on regional and local scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Giuliana; Zuliani, David; Fabris, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    Continuous GNSS networks provide unique information about the crustal displacements, of use for studies concerning gravity field, plate motions, tectonic processes, and earthquake cycle understanding. For these purposes, overall in the case of regions with slow deformation strain, we have to individuate and separate all the possible contributions, at the various frequencies. Among the others, hydrological loading effects can be present over a wide frequency range and have to be accurately modelled. The present work is aimed to test, whether the GNSS signal is sensitive to hydrological effects at a regional or a more local scale. The dataset we chose for the tests is ideal: it relates to a relatively small region, where the active collisional processes generate a moderate seismic activity and is characterized by high rainfall rate and significant hydrological phenomena. The data belong to the Friuli Regional Deformation Network (FReDNet) of OGS (Istituto Nazionale di Oceanografia e Geofisica Sperimentale), consisting of 16 GNSS permanent sites distributed on the northern edge of the Adria microplate (NE-Italy). The data set includes the time series from the 10 GNSS permanent sites of the Marussi network of the Friuli-Venezia Giulia Regional Council. The time-span covered by the network overcomes in many cases the twelve years, giving the possibility to study the various terms superimposed to the linear one, due to the plate motion. After a first processing of the GPS data of the longest time series, using GAMIT/GLOBK, eliminating the outliers, and filling eventual short gaps in the data through linear interpolation, we corrected them for the annual and seasonal terms and the displacements due to hydrological mass loading effects on multiyear timescales. For our test, we first addressed the regional level problem. Following the approach of Chamoli et al. (2014), we separated the annual, semiannual, and pluriannual terms of the displacements excited by the

  6. Impact of job insecurity on sexual desire: an exploratory analysis.

    PubMed

    Domenighetti, Gianfranco; Tomada, Angelo; Marazzi, Alfio; Abazi, Ornela; Quaglia, Jacqueline

    2009-08-22

    To explore, for the first time, the impact of job insecurity on sexual desire. Cross-sectional analysis of a nationally representative sample of 7247 individuals aged 20-64 years working as full or part-time employees in Switzerland. The logistic regression analysis showed that workers aged 20-49 years perceiving high levels of job insecurity are exposed to a significantly higher risk of decrease of sexual desire compared to the reference group. The risk is 53% higher among men (OR 1.53; 95% CI 1.16-2.01) and 47% for woman (OR 1.47; 1.13-1.91). No increased risk was found for employees aged 50-64 years old. An increasing fear of job loss is associated with a deterioration in sexual desire. These first preliminary findings should promote further epidemiological and clinical prospective studies on the impact of job insecurity on intimate relationships and sexual dysfunction.

  7. Metallicity gradients in local Universe galaxies: Time evolution and effects of radial migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magrini, Laura; Coccato, Lodovico; Stanghellini, Letizia; Casasola, Viviana; Galli, Daniele

    2016-04-01

    Context. Our knowledge of the shape of radial metallicity gradients in disc galaxies has recently improved. Conversely, the understanding of their time evolution is more complex, since it requires analysis of stellar populations with different ages or systematic studies of galaxies at different redshifts. In the local Universe, H ii regions and planetary nebulae (PNe) are important tools to investigate radial metallicity gradients in disc galaxies. Aims: We present an in-depth study of all nearby spiral galaxies (M33, M31, NGC 300, and M81) with direct-method nebular abundances of both populations, aiming at studying the evolution of their radial metallicity gradients. For the first time, we also evaluate the radial migration of PN populations. Methods: For the selected galaxies, we analysed H ii region and PN properties to: determine whether oxygen in PNe is a reliable tracer for past interstellar medium (ISM) composition; homogenise published datasets; estimate the migration of the oldest stellar populations; and determine the overall chemical enrichment and slope evolution. Results: We confirm that oxygen in PNe is a reliable tracer for past ISM metallicity. We find that PN gradients are flatter than or equal to those of H ii regions. When radial motions are negligible, this result provides a direct measurement of the time evolution of the gradient. For galaxies with dominant radial motions, we provide upper limits on the gradient evolution. Finally, the total metal content increases with time in all target galaxies, and early morphological types have a larger increment Δ(O/H) than late-type galaxies. Conclusions: Our findings provide important constraints to discriminate among different galactic evolutionary scenarios, favouring cosmological models with enhanced feedback from supernovae. The advent of extremely large telescopes allows us to include galaxies in a wider range of morphologies and environments, thus putting firmer constraints on galaxy formation

  8. Intrafractional prostate motion during external beam radiotherapy monitored by a real-time target localization system.

    PubMed

    Tong, Xu; Chen, Xiaoming; Li, Jinsheng; Xu, Qianqian; Lin, Mu-Han; Chen, Lili; Price, Robert A; Ma, Chang-Ming

    2015-03-08

    This paper investigates the clinical significance of real-time monitoring of intrafractional prostate motion during external beam radiotherapy using a commercial 4D localization system. Intrafractional prostate motion was tracked during 8,660 treatment fractions for 236 patients. The following statistics were analyzed: 1) the percentage of fractions in which the prostate shifted 2-7 mm for a certain duration; 2) the proportion of the entire tracking time during which the prostate shifted 2-7mm; and 3) the proportion of each minute in which the shift exceeded 2-7 mm. The ten patients exhibiting maximum intrafractional-motion patterns were analyzed separately. Our results showed that the percentage of fractions in which the prostate shifted by > 2, 3, 5, and 7 mm off the baseline in any direction for > 30 s was 56.8%, 27.2%, 4.6%, and 0.7% for intact prostate and 68.7%, 35.6%, 10.1%, and 1.8% for postprostatectomy patients, respectively. For the ten patients, these percentages were 91.3%, 72.4%, 36.3%, and 6%, respectively. The percentage of tracking time during which the prostate shifted > 2, 3, 5, and 7 mm was 27.8%, 10.7%, 1.6%, and 0.3%, respectively, and it was 56.2%, 33.7%, 11.2%, and 2.1%, respectively, for the ten patients. The percentage of tracking time for a > 3 mm posterior motion was four to five times higher than that in other directions. For treatments completed in 5 min (VMAT) and 10 min (IMRT), the proportion for the prostate to shift by > 3mm was 4% and 12%, respectively. Although intrafractional prostate motion was generally small, caution should be taken for patients who exhibit frequent large intrafractional motion. For those patients, adjustment of patient positioning may be necessary or a larger treatment margin may be used. After the initial alignment, the likelihood of prostate motion increases with time. Therefore, it is favorable to use advanced techniques (e.g., VMAT) that require less delivery time in order to reduce the treatment

  9. [Desirable way for oral biomaterial research].

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Keiichi

    2007-07-01

    This review article is based on the ingredients of my lecture titled "Desirable way for oral biomaterial research in the JPS - considering Journal of Oral Rehabilitation Summer School 2006" at the JPS Advanced Seminar which was held with the general assembly meeting at March 4, 2007. How we explore the desirable way for oral biomaterial research in Japan was discussed with referral of the contents and discussion in the summer school.

  10. Implicit theories of a desire for fame.

    PubMed

    Maltby, John; Day, Liz; Giles, David; Gillett, Raphael; Quick, Marianne; Langcaster-James, Honey; Linley, P Alex

    2008-05-01

    The aim of the present studies was to generate implicit theories of a desire for fame among the general population. In Study 1, we were able to develop a nine-factor analytic model of conceptions of the desire to be famous that initially comprised nine separate factors; ambition, meaning derived through comparison with others, psychologically vulnerable, attention seeking, conceitedness, social access, altruistic, positive affect, and glamour. Analysis that sought to examine replicability among these factors suggested that three factors (altruistic, positive affect, and glamour) neither display factor congruence nor display adequate internal reliability. A second study examined the validity of these factors in predicting profiles of individuals who may desire fame. The findings from this study suggested that two of the nine factors (positive affect and altruism) could not be considered strong factors within the model. Overall, the findings suggest that implicit theories of a desire for fame comprise six factors. The discussion focuses on how an implicit model of a desire for fame might progress into formal theories of a desire for fame.

  11. Positional stability of electromagnetic transponders used for prostate localization and continuous, real-time tracking.

    PubMed

    Litzenberg, Dale W; Willoughby, Twyla R; Balter, James M; Sandler, Howard M; Wei, John; Kupelian, Patrick A; Cunningham, Alexis A; Bock, Andrea; Aubin, Michele; Roach, Mack; Shinohara, Katsuto; Pouliot, Jean

    2007-07-15

    To determine the relative positional stability of implanted glass-encapsulated circuits (transponders) used in continuous electromagnetic localization and tracking of target volumes during radiation therapy. Ideally, the distances between transponders remains constant over the course of treatment. In this work, we evaluate the accuracy of these conditions. Three transponders were implanted in each of 20 patients. Images (CT scan or X-ray pair) were acquired at 13 time points. These images occurred from the day of implant (2 weeks before simulation) to 4 weeks posttreatment. The distance between transponders was determined from each dataset. The average and standard deviation of each distance were determined, and changes were evaluated over several time periods, including pretreatment and during therapy. Of 60 transponders implanted, 58 showed no significant migration from their intended positions. Of the two transponders that did migrate, one appears to have been implanted in the venous plexus, and the other in the urethra, with no clinical consequences to the patients. An analysis that included the planning CT scan and all subsequent distance measurements showed that the standard deviation of intertransponder distances was < or =1.2 mm for up to 1 month after the completion of therapy. Implanted transponders demonstrate the same long-term stability characteristics as implanted gold markers, within statistical uncertainties. As with gold markers, and using the same implant procedure, basic guidelines for the placement of transponders within the prostate help ensure minimal migration.

  12. Dynamic binaural sound localization based on variations of interaural time delays and system rotations.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Claude; Rogers, Chris; Massen, Francis

    2015-08-01

    This work develops the mathematical model for a steerable binaural system that determines the instantaneous direction of a sound source in space. The model combines system angular speed and interaural time delays (ITDs) in a differential equation, which allows monitoring the change of source position in the binaural reference frame and therefore resolves the confusion about azimuth and elevation. The work includes the analysis of error propagation and presents results from a real-time application that was performed on a digital signal processing device. Theory and experiments demonstrate that the azimuthal angle to the sound source is accurately yielded in the case of horizontal rotations, whereas the elevation angle is estimated with large uncertainty. This paper also proves the equivalence of the ITD derivative and the Doppler shift appearing between the binaurally captured audio signals. The equation of this Doppler shift is applicable for any kind of motion. It shows that weak binaural pitch differences may represent an additional cue in localization of sound. Finally, the paper develops practical applications from this relationship, such as the synthesizing of binaural images of pure and complex tones emitted by a moving source, and the generation of multiple frequency images for binaural beat experiments.

  13. Relativistic Coulomb excitation within the time dependent superfluid local density approximation

    DOE PAGES

    Stetcu, I.; Bertulani, C. A.; Bulgac, A.; ...

    2015-01-06

    Within the framework of the unrestricted time-dependent density functional theory, we present for the first time an analysis of the relativistic Coulomb excitation of the heavy deformed open shell nucleus 238U. The approach is based on the superfluid local density approximation formulated on a spatial lattice that can take into account coupling to the continuum, enabling self-consistent studies of superfluid dynamics of any nuclear shape. We compute the energy deposited in the target nucleus as a function of the impact parameter, finding it to be significantly larger than the estimate using the Goldhaber-Teller model. The isovector giant dipole resonance, themore » dipole pygmy resonance, and giant quadrupole modes are excited during the process. As a result, the one-body dissipation of collective dipole modes is shown to lead a damping width Γ↓≈0.4 MeV and the number of preequilibrium neutrons emitted has been quantified.« less

  14. Magnetic local time variation and scaling of poleward auroral boundary dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longden, N.; Chisham, G.; Freeman, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    The balance of dayside and nightside reconnection processes within the Earth's magnetosphere and its effect on the amount of open magnetic flux threading the ionosphere is well understood in terms of the expanding-contracting polar cap model. However, the nature and character of the consequential fluctuations in the polar cap boundary are poorly understood. By using the poleward auroral luminosity boundary (PALB), as measured by the FUV instrument of the IMAGE spacecraft, as a proxy for the polar cap boundary, we have studied the motion of this boundary for more than 2 years across the complete range of magnetic local time. Our results show that the dayside PALB dynamics are broadly self-similar on timescales of 12 min to 6 h and appear to be monofractal. Similarity with the characteristics of solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field variability suggests that this dayside monofractal behavior is predominantly inherited from the solar wind via the reconnection process. The nightside PALB dynamics exhibit scale-free behavior at intermediate time scales (12-90 min) and appear to be multifractal. We propose that this character is a result of the intermittent multifractal structure of magnetotail reconnection.

  15. Detection and localization of single-source gravitational waves with pulsar timing arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, X.-J.; Wen, L.; Hobbs, G.; Zhang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Madison, D. R.; Manchester, R. N.; Kerr, M.; Rosado, P. A.; Wang, J.-B.

    2015-05-01

    Pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) can be used to search for very low frequency (10-9-10-7 Hz) gravitational waves (GWs). In this paper, we present a general method for the detection and localization of single-source GWs using PTAs. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this new method for three types of signals: monochromatic waves as expected from individual supermassive binary black holes in circular orbits, GWs from eccentric binaries and GW bursts. We also test its implementation in realistic data sets that include effects such as uneven sampling and heterogeneous data spans and measurement precision. It is shown that our method, which works in the frequency domain, performs as well as published time-domain methods. In particular, we find it equivalent to the Fe-statistic for monochromatic waves. We also discuss the construction of null streams - data streams that have null response to GWs, and the prospect of using null streams as a consistency check in the case of detected GW signals. Finally, we present sensitivities to individual supermassive binary black holes in eccentric orbits. We find that a monochromatic search that is designed for circular binaries can efficiently detect eccentric binaries with both high and low eccentricities, while a harmonic summing technique provides greater sensitivities only for binaries with moderate eccentricities.

  16. The best timing for administering systemic chemotherapy in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shimodaira, Yusuke; Harada, Kazuto; Lin, Quan

    2016-01-01

    Over the past several decades, outcomes for patients with rectal cancer have improved considerably. However, several questions have emerged as survival times have lengthened and quality of life has improved for these patients. Currently patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) are often recommended multimodality therapy with fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy (CT) and radiation followed by total mesorectal excision (TME), with consideration given to FOLFOX before chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Recently, Garcia-Aguilar and colleagues reported in Lancet Oncology that the addition of mFOLFOX6 administered between CRT and surgery affected the number of patients achieving pathologic complete response (pathCR), which is of great interest from the standpoint of pursuit of optimal timing of systemic CT delivery. This was a multicenter phase II study consisting of 4 sequential treatment groups of patients with LARC, and they reported that patients given higher number CT cycles between CRT and surgery achieved higher rates of pathCR than those given standard treatment. There was no association between response improvement and tumor progression, increased technical difficulty, or surgical complications. Ongoing phase III clinical trial further assessing this strategy might result in a paradigm shift. PMID:26889491

  17. The best timing for administering systemic chemotherapy in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Shimodaira, Yusuke; Harada, Kazuto; Lin, Quan; Ajani, Jaffer A

    2016-01-01

    Over the past several decades, outcomes for patients with rectal cancer have improved considerably. However, several questions have emerged as survival times have lengthened and quality of life has improved for these patients. Currently patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) are often recommended multimodality therapy with fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy (CT) and radiation followed by total mesorectal excision (TME), with consideration given to FOLFOX before chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Recently, Garcia-Aguilar and colleagues reported in Lancet Oncology that the addition of mFOLFOX6 administered between CRT and surgery affected the number of patients achieving pathologic complete response (pathCR), which is of great interest from the standpoint of pursuit of optimal timing of systemic CT delivery. This was a multicenter phase II study consisting of 4 sequential treatment groups of patients with LARC, and they reported that patients given higher number CT cycles between CRT and surgery achieved higher rates of pathCR than those given standard treatment. There was no association between response improvement and tumor progression, increased technical difficulty, or surgical complications. Ongoing phase III clinical trial further assessing this strategy might result in a paradigm shift.

  18. An innovative application of time-domain spectroscopy on localized surface plasmon resonance sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Meng-Chi; Chang, Ying-Feng; Wang, Huai-Yi; Lin, Yu-Xen; Kuo, Chien-Cheng; Annie Ho, Ja-An; Lee, Cheng-Chung; Su, Li-Chen

    2017-03-01

    White-light scanning interferometry (WLSI) is often used to study the surface profiles and properties of thin films because the strength of the technique lies in its ability to provide fast and high resolution measurements. An innovative attempt is made in this paper to apply WLSI as a time-domain spectroscopic system for localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) sensing. A WLSI-based spectrometer is constructed with a breadboard of WLSI in combination with a spectral centroid algorithm for noise reduction and performance improvement. Experimentally, the WLSI-based spectrometer exhibits a limit of detection (LOD) of 1.2 × 10-3 refractive index units (RIU), which is better than that obtained with a conventional UV-Vis spectrometer, by resolving the LSPR peak shift. Finally, the bio-applicability of the proposed spectrometer was investigated using the rs242557 tau gene, an Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease biomarker. The LOD was calculated as 15 pM. These results demonstrate that the proposed WLSI-based spectrometer could become a sensitive time-domain spectroscopic biosensing platform.

  19. An innovative application of time-domain spectroscopy on localized surface plasmon resonance sensing

    PubMed Central

    Li, Meng-Chi; Chang, Ying-Feng; Wang, Huai-Yi; Lin, Yu-Xen; Kuo, Chien-Cheng; Annie Ho, Ja-an; Lee, Cheng-Chung; Su, Li-Chen

    2017-01-01

    White-light scanning interferometry (WLSI) is often used to study the surface profiles and properties of thin films because the strength of the technique lies in its ability to provide fast and high resolution measurements. An innovative attempt is made in this paper to apply WLSI as a time-domain spectroscopic system for localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) sensing. A WLSI-based spectrometer is constructed with a breadboard of WLSI in combination with a spectral centroid algorithm for noise reduction and performance improvement. Experimentally, the WLSI-based spectrometer exhibits a limit of detection (LOD) of 1.2 × 10−3 refractive index units (RIU), which is better than that obtained with a conventional UV-Vis spectrometer, by resolving the LSPR peak shift. Finally, the bio-applicability of the proposed spectrometer was investigated using the rs242557 tau gene, an Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease biomarker. The LOD was calculated as 15 pM. These results demonstrate that the proposed WLSI-based spectrometer could become a sensitive time-domain spectroscopic biosensing platform. PMID:28281689

  20. Predicting the time derivative of local magnetic perturbations with physics based models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, G.; Meng, X.; Liemohn, M. W.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2012-12-01

    The Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC) expressed interest in predicting the time derivative of the local magnetic field perturbations (dB/dt). The dB/dt quantity is closely related to the geomagnetically induced currents (GIC) which is one of the most important quantities that the end-users of SWPC would like to receive. The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) has run several models for several events to evaluate the predictive capabilities of the models. It was clear from the beginning that one cannot hope to predict the instantaneous value of dB/dt with the current models. For this reason it was decided that the models will attempt to predict if some component of dB/dt exceeds or not some threshold values in a time period. The models showed some success in doing so, and achieved positive (better than random) skill scores. Here we investigate if one can improve the efficiency of the prediction further. The idea is that the magnitude of dB/dt is quite strongly correlated to the magnitude of the magnetic perturbation dB. Our model, the Space Weather Modeling Framework, shows significantly better skill scores in predicting the magnetic perturbation than predicting dB/dt, especially for large deviations. This suggests that one can use the predicted value of dB to improve on the prediction accuracy of dB/dt. We find that this is indeed the case.

  1. An innovative application of time-domain spectroscopy on localized surface plasmon resonance sensing.

    PubMed

    Li, Meng-Chi; Chang, Ying-Feng; Wang, Huai-Yi; Lin, Yu-Xen; Kuo, Chien-Cheng; Annie Ho, Ja-An; Lee, Cheng-Chung; Su, Li-Chen

    2017-03-10

    White-light scanning interferometry (WLSI) is often used to study the surface profiles and properties of thin films because the strength of the technique lies in its ability to provide fast and high resolution measurements. An innovative attempt is made in this paper to apply WLSI as a time-domain spectroscopic system for localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) sensing. A WLSI-based spectrometer is constructed with a breadboard of WLSI in combination with a spectral centroid algorithm for noise reduction and performance improvement. Experimentally, the WLSI-based spectrometer exhibits a limit of detection (LOD) of 1.2 × 10(-3) refractive index units (RIU), which is better than that obtained with a conventional UV-Vis spectrometer, by resolving the LSPR peak shift. Finally, the bio-applicability of the proposed spectrometer was investigated using the rs242557 tau gene, an Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease biomarker. The LOD was calculated as 15 pM. These results demonstrate that the proposed WLSI-based spectrometer could become a sensitive time-domain spectroscopic biosensing platform.

  2. Local time variation in land/ocean lightning flash density as measured by the World Wide Lightning Location Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lay, Erin H.; Jacobson, Abram R.; Holzworth, Robert H.; Rodger, Craig J.; Dowden, Richard L.

    2007-07-01

    We study local time variation in high peak current lightning over land versus over ocean by using lightning locations from the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN). Optical lightning data from the photodiode detector on the Fast On-Orbit Recording of Transient Events (FORTE) satellite are used to determine the relative detection efficiency of the WWLLN for lightning events by region, as well as over land versus over ocean. We find that the peak lightning flash density varies for the different continents by up to 5 hours in local time. Because the WWLLN measures lightning strokes with large peak currents, the variation in local time of WWLLN-detected strokes suggests a similar variation in local time of transient luminous events (e.g., elves) and their effects on the lower ionosphere.

  3. Suppression and Revival of Weak Localization of Ultra-Cold Atoms by Manipulation of Time-Reversal Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aspect, Alain

    In the early 1980's, observation of a magneto-resistance anomaly in metallic thin films was attributed to the phenomenon of weak localization of electrons and to time-reversal symmetry breaking due to a magnetic field acting upon charged particles. We have observed weak localization of ultra-cold atoms in a 2D configuration, placed in a disordered potential created by a laser speckle. In order to manipulate time-reversal symmetry with our neutral atoms, we take advantage of the slow evolution of our system, and we observe the suppression and revival of weak localization when time reversal symmetry is cancelled and reestablished. References: K. Muller, J. Richard, V. V. Volchkov, V. Denechaud, P. Bouyer, A. Aspect, and V. Josse, ''Suppression and Revival of Weak Localization through Control of Time-Reversal Symmetry,'' Physical Review Letters 114 (20) (2015) and references in. Work supported by the ERC Avanced Grant Quantatop.

  4. Local weather effects on emergency department visits: a time series and regression analysis.

    PubMed

    Zibners, Lara M; Bonsu, Bema K; Hayes, John R; Cohen, Daniel M

    2006-02-01

    The ability to forecast atypical emergency department (ED) volumes may aid staff/resource allocation. We determine whether deviations from short-term predictions of weather can be used to forecast deviations from short-term predictions of ED volumes. In this retrospective study, we attempted to predict the volume of patient visits to an academic pediatric ED based on short-interval local weather patterns (2000). Local temperature and precipitation data in 1- and 3-hour increments were obtained. Precipitation was coded to be present if it exceeded 0.04 in and subclassified as cold rain/snow if the ambient temperature was lower than 40 degrees F. ED visits were categorized as injuries, emergent, or nonemergent visits. For each category of visit, Box-Jenkins Auto-Regressive Integrated Moving Average time-series models were created of natural trends and cycles in temperature and patient volumes. From these models, differences (residuals) between predicted and observed values of these variables were estimated. The correlation between residuals for temperature and ED volumes was derived for various kinds of ED visit, after controlling for type/volume of precipitation. Residuals for ambient temperature controlled for precipitation correlated poorly with residuals for patient volumes, accounting for 1% to 6% of the variability in the volume of injuries, emergent, and nonemergent visits (R2 = 1%, 1%, and 6%, respectively). Deviations from short-term predictions of temperature correlate poorly with deviations from predictions of patient volume after adjusting for natural trends and cycles in these variables and controlling for precipitation. These weather variables are of little practical benefit for predicting fluctuations in the rates of ED utilization.

  5. Real-Time Ligand Binding Pocket Database Search Using Local Surface Descriptors

    PubMed Central

    Chikhi, Rayan; Sael, Lee; Kihara, Daisuke

    2010-01-01

    Due to the increasing number of structures of unknown function accumulated by ongoing structural genomics projects, there is an urgent need for computational methods for characterizing protein tertiary structures. As functions of many of these proteins are not easily predicted by conventional sequence database searches, a legitimate strategy is to utilize structure information in function characterization. Of a particular interest is prediction of ligand binding to a protein, as ligand molecule recognition is a major part of molecular function of proteins. Predicting whether a ligand molecule binds a protein is a complex problem due to the physical nature of protein-ligand interactions and the flexibility of both binding sites and ligand molecules. However, geometric and physicochemical complementarity is observed between the ligand and its binding site in many cases. Therefore, ligand molecules which bind to a local surface site in a protein can be predicted by finding similar local pockets of known binding ligands in the structure database. Here, we present two representations of ligand binding pockets and utilize them for ligand binding prediction by pocket shape comparison. These representations are based on mapping of surface properties of binding pockets, which are compactly described either by the two dimensional pseudo-Zernike moments or the 3D Zernike descriptors. These compact representations allow a fast real-time pocket searching against a database. Thorough benchmark study employing two different datasets show that our representations are competitive with the other existing methods. Limitations and potentials of the shape-based methods as well as possible improvements are discussed. PMID:20455259

  6. Three-dimensional crustal structure for the Mendocino Triple Junction region from local earthquake travel times

    SciTech Connect

    Verdonck, D.; Zandt, G.

    1994-12-10

    The large-scale, three-dimensional geometry of the Mendocino Triple Junction at Cape Mendocino, California, was investigated by inverting nearly 19,000 P wave arrival times from over 1400 local earthquakes to estimate the three-dimensional velocity structure and hypocentral parameters. A velocity grid 175 km (N-S) by 125 km (E-W) centered near Garberville, California, was constructed with 25 km horizontal and 5 km vertical node spacing. The model was well resolved near Cape Mendocino, where the earthquakes and stations are concentrated. At about 40.6{degrees}N latitude a high-velocity gradient between 6.5 and 7.5 km/s dips gently to the south and east from about 15 km depth near the coast. Relocated hypocenters concentrate below this high gradient which the authors interpret as the oceanic crust of the subducted Gorda Plate. Therefore the depth to the top of the Gorda Plate near Cape Mendocino is interpreted to be {approximately} 15 km. The Gorda Plate appears intact and dipping {approximately}8{degrees} eastward due to subduction and flexing downward 6{degrees}-12{degrees} to the south. Both hypocenters and velocity structure suggest that the southern edge of the plate intersects the coastline at 40.3{degrees}N latitude and maintains a linear trend 15{degrees} south of east to at least 123{degrees}W longitude. The top of a large low-velocity region at 20-30 km depth extends about 50 km N-S and 75 km E-W (roughly between Garberville and Covelo) and is located above and south of the southern edge of the Gorda Plate. The authors interpret this low velocity area to be locally thickened crust (8-10 km) due to either local compressional forces associated with north-south compression caused by the northward impingement of the rigid Pacific Plate or by underthrusting of the base of the accretionary subduction complex at the southern terminous of the Cascadia Subduction Zone. 66 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Validity of the decreased sexual desire screener for diagnosing hypoactive sexual desire disorder.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Anita H; Goldfischer, Evan; Goldstein, Irwin; DeRogatis, Leonard; Nappi, Rossella; Lewis-D'Agostino, Diane J; Kimura, Toshio; Hebert, Antoine; Pyke, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The decreased sexual desire screener is a brief diagnostic instrument for generalized acquired hypoactive sexual desire disorder in women. During the screening visit of 2 clinical trials, the authors assessed sensitivity of the decreased sexual desire screener in premenopausal women presenting with decreased sexual desire. The authors compared diagnoses of generalized acquired hypoactive sexual desire disorder made by clinicians who were not trained or specialized in the diagnosis of female sexual dysfunction using the decreased sexual desire screener with diagnoses made by expert clinicians after an extensive diagnostic interview. The sensitivity of the decreased sexual desire screener was 0.946 in a North American trial and 0.960 in a European trial.

  8. Modelling of human low frequency sound localization acuity demonstrates dominance of spatial variation of interaural time difference and suggests uniform just-noticeable differences in interaural time difference.

    PubMed

    Smith, Rosanna C G; Price, Stephen R

    2014-01-01

    Sound source localization is critical to animal survival and for identification of auditory objects. We investigated the acuity with which humans localize low frequency, pure tone sounds using timing differences between the ears. These small differences in time, known as interaural time differences or ITDs, are identified in a manner that allows localization acuity of around 1° at the midline. Acuity, a relative measure of localization ability, displays a non-linear variation as sound sources are positioned more laterally. All species studied localize sounds best at the midline and progressively worse as the sound is located out towards the side. To understand why sound localization displays this variation with azimuthal angle, we took a first-principles, systemic, analytical approach to model localization acuity. We calculated how ITDs vary with sound frequency, head size and sound source location for humans. This allowed us to model ITD variation for previously published experimental acuity data and determine the distribution of just-noticeable differences in ITD. Our results suggest that the best-fit model is one whereby just-noticeable differences in ITDs are identified with uniform or close to uniform sensitivity across the physiological range. We discuss how our results have several implications for neural ITD processing in different species as well as development of the auditory system.

  9. Modelling of Human Low Frequency Sound Localization Acuity Demonstrates Dominance of Spatial Variation of Interaural Time Difference and Suggests Uniform Just-Noticeable Differences in Interaural Time Difference

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Rosanna C. G.; Price, Stephen R.

    2014-01-01

    Sound source localization is critical to animal survival and for identification of auditory objects. We investigated the acuity with which humans localize low frequency, pure tone sounds using timing differences between the ears. These small differences in time, known as interaural time differences or ITDs, are identified in a manner that allows localization acuity of around 1° at the midline. Acuity, a relative measure of localization ability, displays a non-linear variation as sound sources are positioned more laterally. All species studied localize sounds best at the midline and progressively worse as the sound is located out towards the side. To understand why sound localization displays this variation with azimuthal angle, we took a first-principles, systemic, analytical approach to model localization acuity. We calculated how ITDs vary with sound frequency, head size and sound source location for humans. This allowed us to model ITD variation for previously published experimental acuity data and determine the distribution of just-noticeable differences in ITD. Our results suggest that the best-fit model is one whereby just-noticeable differences in ITDs are identified with uniform or close to uniform sensitivity across the physiological range. We discuss how our results have several implications for neural ITD processing in different species as well as development of the auditory system. PMID:24558468

  10. Writing Queer across the Borders of Geography and Desire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malagreca, Miguel A.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author merges biographical notes, autoethnography and experimental writing to situate his migrant self as a self that "performs through writing," i.e. planned, experimental writing that subverts the centrality of the monolingual heterosexual identity. He explores the intersections of time, desire, and power across…

  11. Sex Differences in Judgments of Social Desirability.

    PubMed

    Paunonen, Sampo V

    2016-08-01

    This study evaluates sex differences in the perceived desirability of personality behaviors and beliefs. Men and women (N = 149, Mage  = 18.7) judged the social desirability scale values (SDSVs) of 150 personality statements as applied either to a male target or a female target. For comparison, some estimated SDSVs with no target sex specified. A separate sample of 537 respondents endorsed the 150 items via self-report. Raters showed a high consensus in their SDSV judgments within conditions (α = .86 to .90) and no sex-of-rater effects across conditions. Substantial sex-of-target effects (p < .001), however, revealed many behaviors that were viewed as desirable for one sex but not for the other. The behaviors seen as more (less) desirable when applied to men rather than to women were endorsed more (less) by men than by women in the respondent sample. Similar results were found when no target sex was specified for the SDSV ratings, presumably because judges evaluated the behaviors as applied to a target of their own sex. The present results have important implications for the measurement and reporting of SDSVs, the evaluation of substance versus style in self-reports, and the construction of desirability-reduced personality inventories. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Notes on the desire for knowledge.

    PubMed

    Thorner, H A

    1981-01-01

    The desire for knowledge, which was much discussed by Freud, Abraham and Melanie Klein, had for many years scarcely been mentioned in the analytical literature until it was taken up again by Bion, but from a different point of view. For Freud the desire for knowledge was related to the sexual instinct-it was even called an epistemological instinct although it was never considered to be an instinct in the narrow sense of the word. Abraham and Klein followed Freud, but in her later writings Klein understood the desire for knowledge as part of the defence against anxiety dur to fantasied damage done by the aggressive instincts. In this paper I discussed Bion's contribution to the psychoanalysis of knowledge in detail and illustrated it by clinical examples. Bion restricts the concept of knowledge to what is knowable and knowledge can only be an approximation to the truth. Interpretations make the truth knowable. The desire for knowledge of the truth is for Bion elementary and necessary for mental health. This view, although different from, is not dissimilar to, Freud's who described the compelling nature of the desire for knowledge as an epistemological instinct.

  13. PhySIC: a veto supertree method with desirable properties.

    PubMed

    Ranwez, Vincent; Berry, Vincent; Criscuolo, Alexis; Fabre, Pierre-Henri; Guillemot, Sylvain; Scornavacca, Celine; Douzery, Emmanuel J P

    2007-10-01

    This paper focuses on veto supertree methods; i.e., methods that aim at producing a conservative synthesis of the relationships agreed upon by all source trees. We propose desirable properties that a supertree should satisfy in this framework, namely the non-contradiction property (PC) and the induction property (PI). The former requires that the supertree does not contain relationships that contradict one or a combination of the source topologies, whereas the latter requires that all topological information contained in the supertree is present in a source tree or collectively induced by several source trees. We provide simple examples to illustrate their relevance and that allow a comparison with previously advocated properties. We show that these properties can be checked in polynomial time for any given rooted supertree. Moreover, we introduce the PhySIC method (PHYlogenetic Signal with Induction and non-Contradiction). For k input trees spanning a set of n taxa, this method produces a supertree that satisfies the above-mentioned properties in O(kn(3) + n(4)) computing time. The polytomies of the produced supertree are also tagged by labels indicating areas of conflict as well as those with insufficient overlap. As a whole, PhySIC enables the user to quickly summarize consensual information of a set of trees and localize groups of taxa for which the data require consolidation. Lastly, we illustrate the behaviour of PhySIC on primate data sets of various sizes, and propose a supertree covering 95% of all primate extant genera. The PhySIC algorithm is available at http://atgc.lirmm.fr/cgi-bin/PhySIC.

  14. Teleseismic attenuation, time delays, and raypath bending, and local reflected phases at Uturuncu volcano, Bolivia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, A. K.; McNutt, S. R.

    2016-12-01

    A set of 13 teleseismic earthquakes sourced to the NW (4, Japan Subduction Zone), SE (5, South Sandwich Subduction Zone), and SW (4, Kermadec-Tonga Subduction Zones) was studied to determine how wave propagation was affected by a presumed magma body beneath Uturuncu. The number of events is small but the events have good signal-to-noise ratios and very similar waveforms for each event so that reliable measurements could be made of arrival times and amplitudes. Attenuation of amplitudes occurs in a NW-SE trend beneath the volcano, 14 by 33 km, with calculated values of quality factor Qas low as 1.7, suggesting strong seismic attenuation. Relative time delays (between the theoretical and observed travel times) of up to 0.8 sec were also observed. The pattern of attenuation and relative time delays together showed four trends: fast and not attenuated (normal crust), slow and attenuated (partial melt), fast and attenuated (likely high fracture density), and slow but not attenuated (possible deep low Vp structure). Results suggest partial melt as high as 16-60% in a region of low Bouguer gravity, high Vp/Vs, persistent seismicity, and overlapping a locus of uplift. Realistically, percent partial melt values above 30% are unlikely and therefore, to account for this, the anomaly would need to have a greater thickness along the raypath for the stations showing 30% or more, thus giving a mean partial melt zone thickness of 24.7 km for an assumed uniform percent partial melt value of 20%. Additionally, there is evidence of reflected phases from some local earthquakes interacting with the top of the mid-crustal magma body. These can be used to reduce depth uncertainty in earthquake locations as well as to determine parameters of the magma body itself, such as determining whether the contact with the country rock is sharp or gradual, resolving the presence and direction of anisotropy, and estimating whether the surface of the magma body is flat or irregular.

  15. Differential Subnuclear Localization and Replication Timing of Histone H3 Lysine 9 Methylation States

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Rong; Terry, Anna V.; Singh, Prim B.; Gilbert, David M.

    2005-01-01

    Mono-, di-, and trimethylation of specific histone residues adds an additional level of complexity to the range of histone modifications that may contribute to a histone code. However, it has not been clear whether different methylated states reside stably at different chromatin sites or whether they represent dynamic intermediates at the same chromatin sites. Here, we have used recently developed antibodies that are highly specific for mono-, di-, and trimethylated lysine 9 of histone H3 (MeK9H3) to examine the subnuclear localization and replication timing of chromatin containing these epigenetic marks in mammalian cells. Me1K9H3 was largely restricted to early replicating, small punctate domains in the nuclear interior. Me2K9H3 was the predominant MeK9 epitope at the nuclear and nucleolar periphery and colocalized with sites of DNA synthesis primarily in mid-S phase. Me3K9H3 decorated late-replicating pericentric heterochromatin in mouse cells and sites of DAPI-dense intranuclear heterochromatin in human and hamster cells that replicated throughout S phase. Disruption of the Suv39h1,2 or G9a methyltransferases in murine embryonic stem cells resulted in a redistribution of methyl epitopes, but did not alter the overall spatiotemporal replication program. These results demonstrate that mono-, di-, and trimethylated states of K9H3 largely occupy distinct chromosome domains. PMID:15788566

  16. Real time magma transport imaging and earthquake localization using seismic amplitude ratio analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taisne, B.; Brenguier, F.; Nercessian, A.; Beauducel, F.; Smith, P. J.

    2011-12-01

    Seismic amplitude ratio analysis (SARA) has been used successfully to track the sub-surface migration of magma prior to an eruption at Piton de la Fournaise volcano, La Réunion. The methodology is based on the temporal analysis of the seismic amplitude ratio between different pairs of stations, along with a model of seismic wave attenuation. This method has already highlighted the complexity of magma migration in the shallower part of the volcanic edifice during a seismic crisis using continuous records. We will see that this method can also be applied to the localization of individual earthquakes triggered by monitoring systems, prior to human intervention such as phase picking. As examples, the analysis is performed on two kinds of seismic events observed at Soufrière Hills Volcano, Montserrat during the last 15 years, namely: Hybrids events and Volcano-Tectonic earthquakes. Finally, we present the implementation of a fully automatic SARA method for monitoring of Piton de la Fournaise volcano using continuous data in real-time.

  17. Nonlinear waves in repulsive media supported by spatially localized parity-time-symmetric potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devassy, Lini; Jisha, Chandroth P.; Alberucci, Alessandro; Kuriakose, V. C.

    2017-06-01

    We study the existence, stability and dynamics of solitons in a PT-symmetric potential in the presence of a local defocusing nonlinearity. For the sake of concreteness, we refer to Bose-Einstein condensates, where defocusing nonlinearity stems from a repulsive inter-particle interaction. Two kinds of transverse profiles for the gain-loss mechanism, i.e., the imaginary part of the potential, are considered. Differently from the attractive inter-particle interaction, solitons exist only inside a narrow band of chemical potential and particle number. The existence region shrinks as the magnitude of the gain-loss is increased, with the soliton ceasing to exist above the linear exceptional point, that is, the point at which PT symmetry is broken. Using linear stability analysis together with full numerical simulations of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation, we show that solitons survive on temporal scales much longer than the diffusion time. For magnitude of gain-loss close to the exceptional point, stability depends on the transverse profile of the gain-loss mechanism and the magnitude of the nonlinear excitation.

  18. Sound-intensity-dependent compensation for the small interaural time difference cue for sound source localization.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Eri; Yamada, Rei; Kuba, Hiroshi; Hioki, Hiroyuki; Furuta, Takahiro; Kaneko, Takeshi; Ohmori, Harunori

    2008-07-09

    Interaural time difference (ITD) is a major cue for sound source localization. However, animals with small heads experience small ITDs, making ITD detection difficult, particularly for low-frequency sound. Here, we describe a sound-intensity-dependent mechanism for compensating for the small ITD cues in the coincidence detector neurons in the nucleus laminaris (NL) of the chicken aged from 3 to 29 d after hatching. The hypothesized compensation mechanisms were confirmed by simulation. In vivo single-unit recordings revealed an improved contrast of ITD tuning in low-best-frequency (<1 kHz) NL neurons by suppressing the firing activity at the worst ITD, whereas the firing rate was increased with increasing sound intensity at the best ITD. In contrast, level-dependent suppression was so weak in the middle- and high-best-frequency (> or =1 kHz) NL neurons that loud sounds led to increases in firing rate at both the best and the worst ITDs. The suppression of firing activity at the worst ITD in the low-best-frequency neurons required the activation of the superior olivary nucleus (SON) and was eliminated by electrolytic lesions of the SON. The frequency-dependent suppression reflected the dense projection from the SON to the low-frequency region of NL. Thus, the small ITD cues available in low-frequency sounds were partly compensated for by a sound-intensity-dependent inhibition from the SON.

  19. Saturnian Local Time Effects in Titan's Interaction- A multi-fluid MHD study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yingjuan; Russell, Chris; Nagy, Andrew; Toth, Gabor; Dougherty, Michele; Cravens, Tom

    2013-04-01

    We use a multi-fluid MHD model to study the effects of Saturnian Local Time(SLT). The multi-fluid model improves the previously used 7-species single-fluid MHD model by solving the density, velocity and pressure equations for each of the seven ion fluids. This model allows the motion of the different ion fluids to be decoupled. The model is first applied to an idealized case and the results are compared in detail with that of the 7-species single-fluid MHD model to illustrate the importance of the multi-fluid effects. Simulation results show that the multi-fluid model is able to reproduce asymmetric results along the convection electric field direction. The velocities patterns are different for different mass ion fluids. The heavier the ion is, the more significant is the flow along the convection electric field direction. Also the multi-fluid MHD model predicts that more heavy ions are escaping from the satellite as compared with the single-fluid model. We also apply the model to test the effects of SLT and find that the escaping fluxes of heavy ions vary significantly with SLT.

  20. Interplay between ballooning and peeling modes in simulations of the time evolution of edge localized modes

    SciTech Connect

    Onjun, Thawatchai; Kritz, Arnold H.; Bateman, Glenn; Parail, Vassili; Wilson, Howard R.; Dnestrovskij, Alex

    2005-01-01

    The time evolution of edge localized modes (ELMs) in the Joint European Torus tokamak [P. H. Rebut et al., Nucl. Fusion 25, 1011 (1985)] is investigated using the JETTO predictive modeling code [M. Erba et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 39, 261 (1997)]. It is found that both pressure-driven ballooning and current-driven peeling modes can play a role in triggering the ELM crashes. In the simulations carried out, each large ELM consists of a sequence of quasicontinuous small ELM crashes. Each sequence of ELM crashes is separated from the next sequence by a relatively longer ELM-free period. The initial crash in each ELM sequence can be triggered either by a pressure-driven ballooning mode or by a current-driven peeling mode, while the subsequent crashes within that sequence are triggered by current-driven peeling modes, which are made more unstable by the reduction in the pressure gradient resulting from the initial crash. The HELENA and MISHKA ideal magnetohydrodynamic stability codes [A. B. Mikhailovskii et al., Plasma Phys. Rep. 23, 713 (1997)] are used to validate the stability criteria used in the JETTO simulations. This stability analysis includes infinite-n ideal ballooning, finite-n ballooning, and low-n kink/peeling modes.

  1. Is committed desire intentional? A qualitative exploration of sexual desire and differentiation of self in couples.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Luana Cunha; Fraenkel, Peter; Narciso, Isabel; Novo, Rosa

    2015-06-01

    The question of what heightens or diminishes sexual desire has long been a passionate theme across cultures in literature, arts, media, and medicine. Yet, little research has been conducted to determine what affects level of desire within couples. The degree of differentiation of self has been suggested as an important variable in shaping partners' level of desire. Through a qualitative analysis of dyadic couple interviews, this study provides an account of characteristics, processes, and trajectories of sexual desire and differentiation in 33 heterosexual couples of varying ages and relationship duration. Factors associated with high desire were change and autonomy, whereas conflict and children were reported to be desire-diminishing factors. Innovation, sharing, autonomy, and effort emerged as desire-promoting strategies, while fostering personal interests, investing in a positive connection, and enhancing personal integrity were identified as couples' strategies to promote and preserve differentiation of self. The results also shed light on couples' perceptions of whether and how sexual desire changes over the course of the relationship and challenge common cultural assumptions about desire in committed relationships-namely the myth that the only authentic expression of desire is that which occurs spontaneously and without intention and planning. Implications for couple therapy are discussed.

  2. Trait inferences in goal-directed behavior: ERP timing and localization under spontaneous and intentional processing.

    PubMed

    Van Overwalle, Frank; Van den Eede, Sofie; Baetens, Kris; Vandekerckhove, Marie

    2009-06-01

    This study measured event-related potentials (ERPs) during multiple goal and trait inferences, under spontaneous or intentional instructions. Participants read sentences describing several goal-implying behaviors of a target person from which also a strong trait could be inferred or not. The last word of each sentence determined the consistency with the inference induced during preceding sentences. In comparison with behaviors that implied only a goal, stronger waveforms beginning at approximately 150 ms were obtained when the behaviors additionally implied a trait. These ERPs showed considerable parallels between spontaneous and intentional inferences. This suggests that traits embedded in a stream of goal-directed behaviors were detected more rapidly and automatically than mere goals, irrespective of the participants' spontaneous or intentional instructions. In line with this, source localization (LORETA) of the ERPs show predominantly activation in the temporo-parietal junction (TPJ) during 150-200 ms, suggesting that goals were detected at that time interval. During 200-300 ms, activation was stronger at the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) for multiple goals and traits as opposed to goals only, suggesting that traits were inferred during this time window. A cued recall measure taken after the presentation of the stimulus material support the occurrence of goal and trait inferences and shows significant correlations with the neural components, indicating that these components are valid neural indices of spontaneous and intentional social inferences. The early detection of multiple goal and trait inferences is explained in terms of their greater social relevance, leading to privileged attention allocation and processing in the brain.

  3. Learned regulation of spatially localized brain activation using real-time fMRI.

    PubMed

    deCharms, R Christopher; Christoff, Kalina; Glover, Gary H; Pauly, John M; Whitfield, Susan; Gabrieli, John D E

    2004-01-01

    It is not currently known whether subjects can learn to voluntarily control activation in localized regions of their own brain using neuroimaging. Here, we show that subjects were able to learn enhanced voluntary control over task-specific activation in a chosen target region, the somatomotor cortex. During an imagined manual action task, subjects were provided with continuous direction regarding their cognitive processes. Subjects received feedback information about their current level of activation in a target region of interest (ROI) derived using real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rtfMRI), and they received automatically-adjusted instructions for the level of activation to achieve. Information was provided both as continously upated graphs and using a simple virtual reality interface that provided an image analog of the level of activation. Through training, subjects achieved an enhancement in their control over brain activation that was anatomically specific to the target ROI, the somatomotor cortex. The enhancement took place when rtfMRI-based training was provided, but not in a control group that received similar training without rtfMRI information, showing that the effect was not due to conventional, practice-based neural plasticity alone. Following training, using cognitive processes alone subjects could volitionally induce fMRI activation in the somatomotor cortex that was comparable in magnitude to the activation observed during actual movement. The trained subjects increased fMRI activation without muscle tensing, and were able to continue to control brain activation even when real-time fMRI information was no longer provided. These results show that rtfMRI information can be used to direct cognitive processes, and that subjects are able to learn volitionally regulate activation in an anatomically-targeted brain region, surpassing the task-driven activation present before training.

  4. Magnetic Local Time dependency in modeling of the Earth radiation belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, Damien; Maget, Vincent; Bourdarie, Sébastien; Rolland, Guy

    2017-04-01

    For many years, ONERA has been at the forefront of the modeling of the Earth radiation belts thanks to the Salammbô model, which accurately reproduces their dynamics over a time scale of the particles' drift period. This implies that we implicitly assume an homogeneous repartition of the trapped particles along a given drift shell. However, radiation belts are inhomogeneous in Magnetic Local Time (MLT). So, we need to take this new coordinate into account to model rigorously the dynamical structures, particularly induced during a geomagnetic storm. For this purpose, we are working on both the numerical resolution of the Fokker-Planck diffusion equation included in the model and on the MLT dependency of physic-based processes acting in the Earth radiation belts. The aim of this talk is first to present the 4D-equation used and the different steps we used to build Salammbô 4D model before focusing on physical processes taken into account in the Salammbô code, specially transport due to convection electric field. Firstly, we will briefly introduce the Salammbô 4D code developped by talking about its numerical scheme and physic-based processes modeled. Then, we will focus our attention on the impact of the outer boundary condition (localisation and spectrum) at lower L∗ shell by comparing modeling performed with geosynchronous data from LANL-GEO satellites. Finally, we will discuss the prime importance of the convection electric field to the radial and drift transport of low energy particles around the Earth.

  5. Trait inferences in goal-directed behavior: ERP timing and localization under spontaneous and intentional processing

    PubMed Central

    Van den Eede, Sofie; Baetens, Kris; Vandekerckhove, Marie

    2009-01-01

    This study measured event-related potentials (ERPs) during multiple goal and trait inferences, under spontaneous or intentional instructions. Participants read sentences describing several goal-implying behaviors of a target person from which also a strong trait could be inferred or not. The last word of each sentence determined the consistency with the inference induced during preceding sentences. In comparison with behaviors that implied only a goal, stronger waveforms beginning at ∼150 ms were obtained when the behaviors additionally implied a trait. These ERPs showed considerable parallels between spontaneous and intentional inferences. This suggests that traits embedded in a stream of goal-directed behaviors were detected more rapidly and automatically than mere goals, irrespective of the participants’ spontaneous or intentional instructions. In line with this, source localization (LORETA) of the ERPs show predominantly activation in the temporo-parietal junction (TPJ) during 150–200 ms, suggesting that goals were detected at that time interval. During 200–300 ms, activation was stronger at the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) for multiple goals and traits as opposed to goals only, suggesting that traits were inferred during this time window. A cued recall measure taken after the presentation of the stimulus material support the occurrence of goal and trait inferences and shows significant correlations with the neural components, indicating that these components are valid neural indices of spontaneous and intentional social inferences. The early detection of multiple goal and trait inferences is explained in terms of their greater social relevance, leading to privileged attention allocation and processing in the brain. PMID:19270041

  6. Oscillatory dynamics of vasoconstriction and vasodilation identified by time-localized phase coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppard, L. W.; Vuksanović, V.; McClintock, P. V. E.; Stefanovska, A.

    2011-06-01

    We apply wavelet-based time-localized phase coherence to investigate the relationship between blood flow and skin temperature, and between blood flow and instantaneous heart rate (IHR), during vasoconstriction and vasodilation provoked by local cooling or heating of the skin. A temperature-controlled metal plate (≈10 cm2) placed on the volar side of the left arm was used to provide the heating and cooling. Beneath the plate, the blood flow was measured by laser Doppler flowmetry and the adjacent skin temperature by a thermistor. Two 1 h datasets were collected from each of the ten subjects. In each case a 30 min basal recording was followed by a step change in plate temperature, to either 24 °C or 42 °C. The IHR was derived from simultaneously recorded ECG. We confirm the changes in the energy and frequency of blood flow oscillations during cooling and heating reported earlier. That is, during cooling, there was a significant decrease in the average frequency of myogenic blood flow oscillations (p < 0.05) and the myogenic spectral peak became more prominent. During heating, there was a significant (p < 0.05) general increase in spectral energy, associated with vasodilation, except in the myogenic interval. Weak phase coherence between temperature and blood flow was observed for unperturbed skin, but it increased in all frequency intervals as a result of heating. It was not significantly affected by cooling. We also show that significant (p < 0.05) phase coherence exists between blood flow and IHR in the respiratory and myogenic frequency intervals. Cooling did not affect this phase coherence in any of the frequency intervals, whereas heating enhanced the phase coherence in the respiratory and myogenic intervals. This can be explained by the reduction in vascular resistance produced by heating, a process where myogenic mechanisms play a key role. We conclude that the mechanisms of vasodilation and vasoconstriction, in response to temperature change, are

  7. Fertility Desires among Women Living with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Ryan; Potter, JoNell Efantis; Miron-Shatz, Talya; Chakhtoura, Nahida; Spence, Andrew; Byrne, Margaret M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Rates of pregnancy among women living with HIV (WLHIV) have increased with the availability of effective HIV treatment. Planning for pregnancy and childbirth is an increasingly important element of HIV care. Though rates of unintended pregnancies are high among women in general, among couples affected by HIV, significant planning and reproductive decisions must be considered to prevent negative health consequences for WLHIV and their neonates. To gain insight into this reproductive decision-making process among WLHIV, this study explored women’s knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding fertility planning, reproductive desires, and safer conception practices. It was hypothesized that pregnancy desires would be influenced by partners, families, the potential risk of HIV transmission to infants, and physicians’ recommendations. Methods WLHIV of childbearing age were recruited from urban South Florida, and completed an assessment of demographics (N = 49), fertility desires and a conjoint survey of factors associated with reproductive decision-making. Results Using conjoint analysis, we found that different decision paths exist for different types of women: Younger women and those with less education desired children if their partners wanted children; reproductive desires among those with less education, and with less HIV pregnancy-related knowledge, displayed a trend toward additional emphasis on their family’s desires. Conversely, older women and those with more education appeared to place more importance on physician endorsement in their plans for childbearing. Conclusions Results of this study highlight the importance of ongoing preconception counselling for all women of reproductive age during routine HIV care. Counselling should be tailored to patient characteristics, and physicians should consider inclusion of families and/or partners in the process. PMID:27610626

  8. Time dependent weak localization of a 2DEG in the presence of Andreev reflections

    SciTech Connect

    Drexler, H.; Harris, J.; Yuh, E.L.

    1995-12-31

    Experiments on superconducting-normal-superconducting, SNS, junctions, comprised of Nb-2D InAs - Nb, exhibit AC currents at v = 4eV/h, twice the Josephson frequency. These currents can be ascribed to time dependent weak localization in the 2D InAs electron gas modulated by the presence of superconducting electrodes. The change of the current-voltage characteristic of a SNS structure under far-infrared (FIR) illumination (180GHz, 300GHz) has been investigated as a function of temperature, FIR power and magnetic field. The sample is an InAs/AlSb quantum well with a 1{mu}m-period Nb grating contacting the InAs. In the experiments a series connection of N = 300 junctions is measured. The differential resistance of the sample shows a very clear subharmonic gap structure, indicating multiple Andreev reflections between the SN-interfaces. Below a temperature of about T = 5K the sample is superconductive. At sufficiently high temperatures (T > 6K) the photoresponse of the sample under FIR illumination exhibits only a single resonance. This resonance is at V = Nhv/4e, that is half the voltage at which the first step of the AC Josephson effect would occur. B.Z. Spivak and D.E. Khmel`nitskii predicted this effect which arises from the quantum correction of the conductivity of a normal state electron gas due to Andreev reflections. Electrons and holes that are Andreev reflected at the superconductor interface acquire a phase shift that is determined by the phase {Phi} of the superconductor. Interference terms of time reversed paths that include Andreev reflections on adjacent superconductor stripes oscillate with 2({Phi}{sub 2}-{Phi}{sub 1}) = 4eVt/h and therefore lead to a time-dependent conductivity. The manifestation of the oscillating conductivity in the experiments is similar to the Shapiro steps of the AC Josephson effect but with twice the frequency. The experiments show that this effect is very sensitive to an applied magnetic field.

  9. Local to Global Scale Time Series Analysis of US Dryland Degradation Using Landsat, AVHRR, and MODIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washington-Allen, R. A.; Ramsey, R. D.; West, N. E.; Kulawardhana, W.; Reeves, M. C.; Mitchell, J. E.; Van Niel, T. G.

    2011-12-01

    Drylands cover 41% of the terrestrial land surface and annually generate $1 trillion in ecosystem goods and services for 38% of the global population, yet estimates of the global extent of Dryland degradation is uncertain with a range of 10 - 80%. It is currently understood that Drylands exhibit topological complexity including self-organization of parameters of different levels-of-organization, e.g., ecosystem and landscape parameters such as soil and vegetation pattern and structure, that gradually or discontinuously shift to multiple basins of attraction in response to herbivory, fire, and climatic drivers at multiple spatial and temporal scales. Our research has shown that at large geographic scales, contemporaneous time series of 10 to 20 years for response and driving variables across two or more spatial scales is required to replicate and differentiate between the impact of climate and land use activities such as commercial grazing. For example, the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) is a major driver of Dryland net primary productivity (NPP), biodiversity, and ecological resilience with a 10-year return interval, thus 20 years of data are required to replicate its impact. Degradation is defined here as a change in physiognomic composition contrary to management goals, a persistent reduction in vegetation response, e.g., NPP, accelerated soil erosion, a decline in soil quality, and changes in landscape configuration and structure that lead to a loss of ecosystem function. Freely available Landsat, Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradimeter (MODIS) archives of satellite imagery exist that provide local to global spatial coverage and time series between 1972 to the present from which proxies of land degradation can be derived. This paper presents time series assessments between 1972 and 2011 of US Dryland degradation including early detection of dynamic regime shifts in the Mojave and landscape pattern and

  10. Two Years of California's Local Control Funding Formula: Time to Reaffirm the Grand Vision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koppich, Julia E.; Humphrey, Daniel C.; Marsh, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    California ended 40 years of reliance on categorical funding for schools when Governor Jerry Brown signed the Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF) into law on July 1, 2013. LCFF intends to enhance services for high-needs students through new flexibility, targeted student funding, and local accountability. Two years into LCFF implementation,…

  11. Children's Social Desirability and Dietary Reports.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Suzanne Domel; Smith, Albert F; Litaker, Mark S; Baglio, Michelle L; Guinn, Caroline H; Shaffer, Nicole M

    2004-01-01

    We investigated telephone administration of the Children's Social Desirability (CSD) scale and our adaptation for children of the Social Desirability for Food scale (C-SDF). Each of 100 4th-graders completed 2 telephone interviews 28 days apart. CSD scores had adequate internal consistency and test-retest reliability, and a 14-item subset was identified that sufficiently measures the same construct. Our C-SDF scale performed less well in terms of internal consistency and test-retest reliability; factor analysis revealed 2 factors, 1 of which was moderately related to the CSD. The 14-item subset of the CSD scale may help researchers understand error in children's dietary reports.

  12. Women's sexual desire: a feminist critique.

    PubMed

    Wood, Jill M; Koch, Patricia Barthalow; Mansfield, Phyllis Kernoff

    2006-08-01

    This paper offers a critical feminist analysis of the biomedical conceptualization of women's sexual desire. The five major features of the biomedical model of female sexual desire examined and critiqued are: 1) use of the male model as the standard, 2) use of a linear model of sexual response, 3) biological reductionism, 4) depoliticalization, and 5) medicalization of variation. A "New View", an alternative to the biomedical model, is offered for reconceptualizing women's sexual problems. This analysis concludes with recommendations for feminist-based biopsychosocial research.

  13. More on the nature of sexual desire.

    PubMed

    Levine, S B

    1987-01-01

    A definition of sexual desire is offered that stresses the psychobiologic nature of its energy, its antecedent and accompaniment roles in relation to sexual arousal, and its tendency to generate sexual behavior. Two inherent properties are recognized: fluctuation of frequency and intensity and capacity to appear baffling. These properties are products of the changeable contributions of biologic drive, cognitive wish, and emotional willingness. These three elements of desire vary somewhat predictably with the stage in the life cycle, quality of current relationship, and the couple's rules that govern their sexual behavior. The transferential and sexual identity contributions are less predictable.

  14. Factors affecting desired family size in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Kabir, M; Amin, R; Ahmed, A U; Chowdhury, J

    1994-07-01

    Factors affecting desired family size in rural Bangladesh are examined using data from contraceptive prevalence surveys conducted between 1983 and 1991. The analysis suggests that mothers having two sons and one daughter are more inclined to perceive their family as complete than those having three sons and no daughter. Logistic regression analysis indicates that important determinants of desire for more children are age of woman, current contraceptive use status, work status, and family planning worker's visit. The policy implications of these findings are discussed.

  15. Local activation time sampling density for atrial tachycardia contact mapping: how much is enough?

    PubMed

    Williams, Steven E; Harrison, James L; Chubb, Henry; Whitaker, John; Kiedrowicz, Radek; Rinaldi, Christopher A; Cooklin, Michael; Wright, Matthew; Niederer, Steven; O'Neill, Mark D

    2017-04-03

    Local activation time (LAT) mapping forms the cornerstone of atrial tachycardia diagnosis. Although anatomic and positional accuracy of electroanatomic mapping (EAM) systems have been validated, the effect of electrode sampling density on LAT map reconstruction is not known. Here, we study the effect of chamber geometry and activation complexity on optimal LAT sampling density using a combined in silico and in vivo approach. In vivo 21 atrial tachycardia maps were studied in three groups: (1) focal activation, (2) macro-re-entry, and (3) localized re-entry. In silico activation was simulated on a 4×4cm atrial monolayer, sampled randomly at 0.25-10 points/cm2 and used to re-interpolate LAT maps. Activation patterns were studied in the geometrically simple porcine right atrium (RA) and complex human left atrium (LA). Activation complexity was introduced into the porcine RA by incomplete inter-caval linear ablation. In all cases, optimal sampling density was defined as the highest density resulting in minimal further error reduction in the re-interpolated maps. Optimal sampling densities for LA tachycardias were 0.67 ± 0.17 points/cm2 (focal activation), 1.05 ± 0.32 points/cm2 (macro-re-entry) and 1.23 ± 0.26 points/cm2 (localized re-entry), P = 0.0031. Increasing activation complexity was associated with increased optimal sampling density both in silico (focal activation 1.09 ± 0.14 points/cm2; re-entry 1.44 ± 0.49 points/cm2; spiral-wave 1.50 ± 0.34 points/cm2, P < 0.0001) and in vivo (porcine RA pre-ablation 0.45 ± 0.13 vs. post-ablation 0.78 ± 0.17 points/cm2, P = 0.0008). Increasing chamber geometry was also associated with increased optimal sampling density (0.61 ± 0.22 points/cm2 vs. 1.0 ± 0.34 points/cm2, P = 0.0015). Optimal sampling densities can be identified to maximize diagnostic yield of LAT maps. Greater sampling density is required to correctly reveal complex activation and

  16. Locally covariant quantum field theory and the problem of formulating the same physics in all space-times.

    PubMed

    Fewster, Christopher J

    2015-08-06

    The framework of locally covariant quantum field theory is discussed, motivated in part using 'ignorance principles'. It is shown how theories can be represented by suitable functors, so that physical equivalence of theories may be expressed via natural isomorphisms between the corresponding functors. The inhomogeneous scalar field is used to illustrate the ideas. It is argued that there are two reasonable definitions of the local physical content associated with a locally covariant theory; when these coincide, the theory is said to be dynamically local. The status of the dynamical locality condition is reviewed, as are its applications in relation to (i) the foundational question of what it means for a theory to represent the same physics in different space-times and (ii) a no-go result on the existence of natural states.

  17. Current Systems in Saturn's Magnetosphere and their Local-time Asymmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khurana, K. K.; Liu, J.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2016-12-01

    Electric currents in a magnetosphere help confine, guide and accelerate plasmas through the action of Lorentz force. A knowledge of large-scale current systems in a magnetosphere provides valuable clues about the dominant physical processes operating in that magnetosphere. In addition, field-aligned currents transport linear and angular momentum between the ionosphere and the magnetosphere. An understanding of these current systems is therefore vital in characterizing the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling processes. The only comprehensive study of current systems in outer planetary magnetosphere is that by Khurana (2001) which used Galileo magnetometer data in the Jovian magnetosphere. This work showed that there are clear noon-midnight asymmetries in the height-integrated azimuthal current and equally strong dawn-dusk asymmetries in the height integrated radial current in most regions of the Jovian magnetosphere suggesting that solar wind forcing plays a major role in this magnetosphere. We would like to know if similar asymmetries exist in Saturn's magnetosphere. In this presentation we present results from a new data fitting technique that uses a generalized form of a Harris current sheet to solve for current density and current sheet thickness in different local time and radial distance regions of Saturn's magnetosphere. This study uses data primarily from the magnetometer from all regions of the magnetosphere mapped by Cassini during the period of June 2004- Sep 2014. We show that the current sheet is indeed thicker in the dusk magnetosphere compared to its thickness in the dawn magnetosphere. We also observe a clear day/night asymmetry in the strength of the ring current suggesting that a partial ring current also exists in Saturn's magnetosphere.

  18. A Local Index of Cloud Immersion in Tropical Forests Using Time-Lapse Photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassiouni, M.; Scholl, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Data on the frequency, duration and elevation of cloud immersion is essential to improve estimates of cloud water deposition in water budgets in cloud forests. Here, we present a methodology to detect local cloud immersion in remote tropical forests using time-lapse photography. A simple approach is developed to detect cloudy conditions in photographs within the canopy where image depth during clear conditions may be less than 10 meters and moving leaves and branches and changes in lighting are unpredictable. A primary innovation of this study is that cloudiness is determined from images without using a reference clear image and without minimal threshold value determination or human judgment for calibration. Five sites ranging from 600 to 1000 meters elevation along a ridge in the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory, Puerto Rico were each equipped with a trail camera programmed to take an image every 30 minutes since March 2014. Images were classified using four selected cloud-sensitive image characteristics (SCICs) computed for small image regions: contrast, the coefficient of variation and the entropy of the luminance of each image pixel, and image colorfulness. K-means clustering provided reasonable results to discriminate cloudy from clear conditions. Preliminary results indicate that 79-94% (daytime) and 85-93% (nighttime) of validation images were classified accurately at one open and two closed canopy sites. The euclidian distances between SCICs vectors of images during cloudy conditions and the SCICs vector of the centroid of the cluster of clear images show potential to quantify cloud density in addition to immersion. The classification method will be applied to determine spatial and temporal patterns of cloud immersion in the study area. The presented approach offers promising applications to increase observations of low-lying clouds at remote mountain sites where standard instruments to measure visibility and cloud base may not be practical.

  19. Local time distribution of the SSC-associated HF-Doppler frequency shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kikuchi, T.; Sugiuchi, H.; Ishimine, T.

    1985-01-01

    The HF-Doppler frequency shift observed at the storm's sudden commencement is composed of a frequency increase (+) and decrease (-), and classified into four types, SCF(+ -), SCF(- +), SCF(+) and SCF(-). Since the latter two types are special cases of the former two types, two different kinds of electrical field exist in the F region and cause the ExB drift motion of plasma. HUANG (1976) interpreted the frequency increase of SCF(+ -) as due to the westward induction electric field proportional to delta H/ delta t and the succeeding frequency decrease due to the eastward conduction electric field which produces ionospheric currents responsible for the magnetic increase on the ground. In spite of his success in interpreting the SCF(+ -), some other interpretations are needed for the explanation of the whole set of SCF's, particularly SCF(- +). Local time distributions of the SCF's are derived from 41 SCF's which are observed on the HF standard signal (JJY) as received in Okinawa (path length =1600 km) and Kokubunji (60 km). It is shown that the SCF(+ -) appears mainly during the day, whereas the SCF(- +) is observed during the night. The results indicate that the preliminary frequency shift (+) of SCF(+ -) and (-) of SCF(- +) is caused by a westward electric field in the dayside hemisphere, while by an eastward electric field in the nightside hemisphere. The main frequency shift (-) of SCF(+ -) and (+) of SCF(- +) is caused by the reversed electric field. Consequently, the preliminary frequency shift is caused by the dusk-to-dawn electric field, while the main frequency shift by the dawn-to-dusk electric field.

  20. Localizing the sources of two independent noises: role of time varying amplitude differences.

    PubMed

    Yost, William A; Brown, Christopher A

    2013-04-01

    Listeners localized the free-field sources of either one or two simultaneous and independently generated noise bursts. Listeners' localization performance was better when localizing one rather than two sound sources. With two sound sources, localization performance was better when the listener was provided prior information about the location of one of them. Listeners also localized two simultaneous noise bursts that had sinusoidal amplitude modulation (AM) applied, in which the modulation envelope was in-phase across the two source locations or was 180° out-of-phase. The AM was employed to investigate a hypothesis as to what process listeners might use to localize multiple sound sources. The results supported the hypothesis that localization of two sound sources might be based on temporal-spectral regions of the combined waveform in which the sound from one source was more intense than that from the other source. The interaural information extracted from such temporal-spectral regions might provide reliable estimates of the sound source location that produced the more intense sound in that temporal-spectral region.

  1. Localizing the sources of two independent noises: Role of time varying amplitude differences

    PubMed Central

    Yost, William A.; Brown, Christopher A.

    2013-01-01

    Listeners localized the free-field sources of either one or two simultaneous and independently generated noise bursts. Listeners' localization performance was better when localizing one rather than two sound sources. With two sound sources, localization performance was better when the listener was provided prior information about the location of one of them. Listeners also localized two simultaneous noise bursts that had sinusoidal amplitude modulation (AM) applied, in which the modulation envelope was in-phase across the two source locations or was 180° out-of-phase. The AM was employed to investigate a hypothesis as to what process listeners might use to localize multiple sound sources. The results supported the hypothesis that localization of two sound sources might be based on temporal-spectral regions of the combined waveform in which the sound from one source was more intense than that from the other source. The interaural information extracted from such temporal-spectral regions might provide reliable estimates of the sound source location that produced the more intense sound in that temporal-spectral region. PMID:23556597

  2. Infinite-time average of local fields in an integrable quantum field theory after a quantum quench.

    PubMed

    Mussardo, G

    2013-09-06

    The infinite-time average of the expectation values of local fields of any interacting quantum theory after a global quench process are key quantities for matching theoretical and experimental results. For quantum integrable field theories, we show that they can be obtained by an ensemble average that employs a particular limit of the form factors of local fields and quantities extracted by the generalized Bethe ansatz.

  3. Social Desirability Scales: More Substance than Style.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCrae, Robert R.; Costa, Paul T., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Compared self-reports from 215 adults to the external criterion of spouse ratings of personality traits to separate substance from style in social desirability (SD) scales. Results showed that correcting self-reports for SD failed to improve correspondence with an external, objective criterion and in several cases lowered agreement. (LLL)

  4. CONSTRAINTS ON DESIRABLE ACTIVITIES: EMPIRICAL ANALYSIS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    desirable but in which he has never engaged. This was a pilot study for one to be carried out in another cultural setting as well as part of a program to...analyze social change. Happy individuals were more constrained by environmental factors, such as lack of an accessable location to engage in the

  5. Modeling Socially Desirable Responding and Its Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziegler, Matthias; Buehner, Markus

    2009-01-01

    The impact of socially desirable responding or faking on noncognitive assessments remains an issue of strong debate. One of the main reasons for the controversy is the lack of a statistical method to model such response sets. This article introduces a new way to model faking based on the assumption that faking occurs due to an interaction between…

  6. Modeling Socially Desirable Responding and Its Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziegler, Matthias; Buehner, Markus

    2009-01-01

    The impact of socially desirable responding or faking on noncognitive assessments remains an issue of strong debate. One of the main reasons for the controversy is the lack of a statistical method to model such response sets. This article introduces a new way to model faking based on the assumption that faking occurs due to an interaction between…

  7. Age and the Desire to Marry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahay, Jenna; Lewin, Alisa C.

    2007-01-01

    Understanding attitudes toward marriage at older ages is increasingly important as young adults delay marriage and large numbers of people return to the marriage market after divorce. This study examines age differences in the desire to marry among singles age 18 to 69 years, taking into account selection into marriage. Using data drawn from the…

  8. Localization of magnetic pills

    PubMed Central

    Laulicht, Bryan; Gidmark, Nicholas J.; Tripathi, Anubhav; Mathiowitz, Edith

    2011-01-01

    Numerous therapeutics demonstrate optimal absorption or activity at specific sites in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Yet, safe, effective pill retention within a desired region of the GI remains an elusive goal. We report a safe, effective method for localizing magnetic pills. To ensure safety and efficacy, we monitor and regulate attractive forces between a magnetic pill and an external magnet, while visualizing internal dose motion in real time using biplanar videofluoroscopy. Real-time monitoring yields direct visual confirmation of localization completely noninvasively, providing a platform for investigating the therapeutic benefits imparted by localized oral delivery of new and existing drugs. Additionally, we report the in vitro measurements and calculations that enabled prediction of successful magnetic localization in the rat small intestines for 12 h. The designed system for predicting and achieving successful magnetic localization can readily be applied to any area of the GI tract within any species, including humans. The described system represents a significant step forward in the ability to localize magnetic pills safely and effectively anywhere within the GI tract. What our magnetic pill localization strategy adds to the state of the art, if used as an oral drug delivery system, is the ability to monitor the force exerted by the pill on the tissue and to locate the magnetic pill within the test subject all in real time. This advance ensures both safety and efficacy of magnetic localization during the potential oral administration of any magnetic pill-based delivery system. PMID:21257903

  9. In the right place at the right time: visualizing and understanding mRNA localization

    PubMed Central

    Buxbaum, Adina R.; Haimovich, Gal

    2015-01-01

    The spatial regulation of protein translation is an efficient way to create functional and structural asymmetries in cells. Recent research has furthered our understanding of how individual cells spatially organize protein synthesis, by applying innovative technology to characterize the relationship between mRNAs and their regulatory proteins, single-mRNA trafficking dynamics, physiological effects of abrogating mRNA localization in vivo and for endogenous mRNA labelling. The implementation of new imaging technologies has yielded valuable information on mRNA localization, for example, by observing single molecules in tissues. The emerging movements and localization patterns of mRNAs in morphologically distinct unicellular organisms and in neurons have illuminated shared and specialized mechanisms of mRNA localization, and this information is complemented by transgenic and biochemical techniques that reveal the biological consequences of mRNA mislocalization. PMID:25549890

  10. Control synthesis of continuous-time T-S fuzzy systems with local nonlinear models.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jiuxiang; Wang, Youyi; Yang, Guang-Hong

    2009-10-01

    This paper is concerned with the problem of designing fuzzy controllers for a class of nonlinear dynamic systems. The considered nonlinear systems are described by T-S fuzzy models with nonlinear local models, and the fuzzy models have fewer fuzzy rules than conventional T-S fuzzy models with local linear models. A new fuzzy control scheme with local nonlinear feedbacks is proposed, and the corresponding control synthesis conditions are given in terms of solutions to a set of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs). In contrast to the existing methods for fuzzy control synthesis, the new proposed control design method is based on fewer fuzzy rules and less computational burden. Moreover, the local nonlinear feedback laws in the new fuzzy controllers are also helpful in achieving good control effects. Numerical examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  11. Teaching Bodies/Learning Desire: Rethinking the Role of Desire in the Pedagogic Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Megan

    2008-01-01

    Desire is a crucial aspect of the pedagogic process. For too long, however, there has been a dichotomous relationship between understandings of teacher and student desire. The former is often configured as a pedagogic anachronism, problematised and needing to be contained. Conversely, the latter is essentialised as a force that should not be…

  12. Teaching Bodies/Learning Desire: Rethinking the Role of Desire in the Pedagogic Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Megan

    2008-01-01

    Desire is a crucial aspect of the pedagogic process. For too long, however, there has been a dichotomous relationship between understandings of teacher and student desire. The former is often configured as a pedagogic anachronism, problematised and needing to be contained. Conversely, the latter is essentialised as a force that should not be…

  13. Neutrophil accumulation in ischemic canine myocardium. Insights into time course, distribution, and mechanism of localization during early reperfusion

    SciTech Connect

    Dreyer, W.J.; Michael, L.H.; West, M.S.; Smith, C.W.; Rothlein, R.; Rossen, R.D.; Anderson, D.C.; Entman, M.L. )

    1991-07-01

    The authors have previously demonstrated that chemotactic factors released from the ischemic canine myocardium peak early during reperfusion and that they elicit neutrophil adherence reactions in vitro that are dependent on the CD18 glycoprotein family. In this study they investigated the hypothesis that neutrophil localization in ischemic canine myocardium in vivo occurs over a similar time course during early reperfusion and involves a CD18-dependent mechanism. they concluded the circumflex coronary artery for 1 hour in acute, open-chest dogs, followed by reperfusion for 1, 2, 3, or 4 hours. Regional myocardial blood flow was determined using radiolabeled microspheres, and localization was traced using technetium-99m-labeled autologous neutrophils. In the first hour of reperfusion, neutrophil localization occurred preferentially within the subendocardial region and was inversely related to flow. Neutrophil localization diminished across the ischemic myocardium from endocardium to epicardium but remained negatively related to flow in the midmyocardial region. Regardless of flow, little neutrophil localization occurred in the subepicardial region. Neutrophil localization was greatest in the first hour of reperfusion and diminished thereafter. By 4 hours of reperfusion, the rate of localization was markedly attenuated relative to 1 hour. Dogs given anti-CD18 monoclonal antibody R15.7 (1 mg/kg i.v.) before occlusion underwent 1 hour of occlusion followed by 1 hour of reperfusion. When compared with 1-hour reperfusion controls, the R15.7-treated dogs demonstrated significant attenuation of neutrophil localization in the subendocardial region. These data support the concepts that rapid neutrophil localization during reperfusion occurs within regions of previous myocardial ischemia and that neutrophils preferentially localize within the subendocardial region.

  14. Software for real-time localization of baleen whale calls using directional sonobuoys: A case study on Antarctic blue whales.

    PubMed

    Miller, Brian S; Calderan, Susannah; Gillespie, Douglas; Weatherup, Graham; Leaper, Russell; Collins, Kym; Double, Michael C

    2016-03-01

    Directional frequency analysis and recording (DIFAR) sonobuoys can allow real-time acoustic localization of baleen whales for underwater tracking and remote sensing, but limited availability of hardware and software has prevented wider usage. These software limitations were addressed by developing a module in the open-source software PAMGuard. A case study is presented demonstrating that this software provides greater efficiency and accessibility than previous methods for detecting, localizing, and tracking Antarctic blue whales in real time. Additionally, this software can easily be extended to track other low and mid frequency sounds including those from other cetaceans, pinnipeds, icebergs, shipping, and seismic airguns.

  15. Perceptual blurring and recognition memory: A desirable difficulty effect revealed.

    PubMed

    Rosner, Tamara M; Davis, Hanae; Milliken, Bruce

    2015-09-01

    Recent research in the area of desirable difficulty--defined as processing difficulty at either encoding or retrieval that improves long-term retention--has demonstrated that perceptually blurring an item makes processing less fluent, but does not improve remembering (Yue et al., 2013). This result led us to examine more closely perceptual blurring as a potential desirable difficulty. In Experiment 1, better recognition of blurry than clear words was observed, a result that contrasts with those reported by Yue et al. This result was replicated in Experiment 2, in which both mixed-list and pure-list designs were used. The following experiments were conducted to determine when blurring does and does not result in enhanced remembering. The desirable difficulty effect observed in Experiments 1 and 2 was replicated in Experiments 3A, 3B, and 3C, despite varying encoding intent during study, context reinstatement at the time of test, study list length, and the nature of the distractor task between study and test phases. It was only in Experiments 4A and 4B that a null effect of perceptual blurring on remembering was found. These experiments demonstrated that (1) the level of blurring used is critical, with a lower blurring level producing results similar to Yue et al. (2013), and (2) the introduction of judgments of learning at the time of study eliminated the benefit of blurring on remembering. These results extend the desirable difficulty principle to encoding manipulations involving perceptual blurring, and identify judgments of learning at encoding as a powerful moderator of this particular desirable difficulty effect. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Investigation of local time dependence of Mercury's sodium exosphere based on a numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misawa, Hiroaki; Sonobe, Aya; Morioka, Akira; Okano, Shoichi

    2008-11-01

    Mercury has a surface-bounded exosphere (SBE) similar to that of the Moon. One of the atmospheric species, sodium, was found by ground-based observations to be the most prominent component. Mercury's sodium SBE is known to be non-uniform with respect to local time (LT) in low-latitude regions: the sodium column density in the dawn-side region is larger than that in the dusk-side region, and the sodium abundance is the largest in the morning-noon region. To reveal the production processes for the exosphere near Mercury's surface, the LT dependence of the exosphere was investigated through a numerical simulation. Three data sets of sodium column densities observed for the dawn-side hemisphere, observed by Sprague et al. [1997. Distribution and abundance of sodium in Mercury's atmosphere, 1985-1988. Icarus 12, 506-527], were compared with results simulated by a 3D Monte Carlo method, and the source rates and density of sodium of the planetary surface were estimated. In the simulation, the photon-stimulated desorption (PSD) and thermal desorption (TD) processes were assumed as the release mechanisms. The sodium source rates for the three data sets, at respective heliocentric distances of about 0.33, 0.42, and 0.44 AU, were estimated as 1-4×10 8 Na/cm 2/s with weak LT dependence. In contrast, the expected sodium surface density showed clear dependence on LT and the heliocentric distance. The sodium surface density decreases from early morning to noon by a few orders, and, particularly for large heliocentric distances, the surface is in a condition of sodium excess and depletion with respect to the surface sodium density assumed by Killen et al. [2004. Source rates and ion recycling rates for Na and K in Mercury's atmosphere. Icarus 171, 1-19] in the early morning and morning-noon regions, respectively. This study implies that the decrease in sodium surface density from the early morning to noon regions might produce the characteristic LT dependence in the low

  17. Radiation Treatment Time and Overall Survival in Locally Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Matthew T; Ojerholm, Eric; Verma, Vivek; Higgins, Kristin A; Singhal, Sunil; Predina, Jarrod D; Berman, Abigail T; Grover, Surbhi; Robinson, Cliff G; Simone, Charles B

    2017-08-01

    Prolonged radiation treatment (RT) time (RTT) has been associated with worse survival in several malignancies. The present study investigated whether delays during RT are associated with overall survival (OS) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The National Cancer Database was queried for patients with stage III NSCLC who had received definitive concurrent chemotherapy and fractionated RT to standard doses (59.4-70.0 Gy) and fractionation from 2004 to 2013. The RTT was classified as standard or prolonged for each treatment regimen according to the radiation dose and number of fractions. Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate the association between the following factors and OS: RTT, RT fractionation, demographic and pathologic factors, and chemotherapeutic agents. Of 14,154 patients, the RTT was prolonged in 6262 (44.2%). Factors associated with prolonged RTT included female sex (odds ratio [OR] 1.21, P<.0001), black race (OR 1.20, P=.001), nonprivate health insurance (OR 1.30, P<.0001), and lower income (<$63,000 annually, OR 1.20, P<.0001). The median OS was significantly worse for patients with prolonged RTT than that for those with standard RTT (18.6 vs 22.7 months, P<.0001). Furthermore, the OS worsened with each cumulative interval of delay (standard RTT vs prolonged 1-2 days, 20.5 months, P=.009; prolonged 3-5 days, 17.9 months, P<.0001; prolonged 6-9 days, 17.7 months, P<.0001; prolonged >9 days, 17.1 months, P<.0001). On multivariable analysis, prolonged RTT was independently associated with inferior OS (hazard ratio 1.21, P<.0001). Prolonged RTT as a continuous variable was also significantly associated with worse OS (hazard ratio 1.001, P=.0007). Delays during RT appear to negatively affect survival for patients with locally advanced NSCLC. We have detailed the demographic and socioeconomic barriers influencing prolonged RTT as a method to address the health disparities in this regard. Cumulative interruptions of RT should be

  18. Cellular Force, and Geometry Sensing (Over Time) Can Detect Matrix Rigidity: Local Modules Produce Global Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheetz, Michael

    2006-03-01

    The shape and behavior of mammalian cells is defined by an interplay between extracellular signals and the cellular responses. Although the chemical nature of the external signals is important, there is a growing realization that the physical aspects of the external environment are equally important. In particular, the stresses, rigidity and form of the external environment have major effects on cell behavior. Of particular importance is rigidity since cancerous cells can often grow on soft agar or in a fluid phase without force production. For most mammalian cells there are relatively few types of motility that are evident from quantitative analyses of rapidly spreading fibroblasts (Dubin-Thaler et al., Biophys. J. 86:1794-1806, 2004). One motile phase that we have studied extensively involves periodic contractions (24 s period) in local regions of the leading edge of the cell (Giannone et al., Cell, 116:431-443, 2004). The periodic signal is carried radially from the cell edge toward the center and is part of a general mechanism for rigidity-directed movement and pathfinding. Another motile phase involves the movement of individual collagen fibers in a hand-over-hand fashion (Meshel et al., Nature Cell Biol. 7:157-164, 2005) where the form of the fiber is being sensed. Rigidity and form sensing in these systems is dependent upon the cytoskeleton and force-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation through oncogenes (Sawada and Sheetz, J Cell Biol. 156:609-15, 2002; Tamada et al., Developmental Cell, 7:706-718, 2004). Recent studies indicate that the cell rigidity sensing occurs preferentially at the leading edges of moving cells and involves forces of 10-20 pN generated by displacements of 50-100 nm (Jiang et al., Biophys J. In Press). We will discuss how cells organize motility tools in motile phases (Döbereiner et al., Phys. Rev. Letters. 93:108105-1-4, 2004) in a dialogue with the environment to define cell morphology and behavior over time..

  19. 'Gay times': identity, locality, memory, and the Brixton squats in 1970's London.

    PubMed

    Cook, Matt

    2013-01-01

    Through a thick description of a gay squatting community in south London in the 1970s, this piece explores the ways in which local histories complicate broader accounts of gay life, politics, and culture. Such a focus alerts us to the impact of personal encounters, of local politics, and material circumstances, of coincident local communities, of jobs (or the lack of them), and of major local events (like the Brixton riots of 1981). The local focus and the oral history sources also illuminate the complex ways in which unspoken and often unconscious imperatives associated with ethnicity, class, and the familial, social, and cultural contexts of our upbringings are played out under new and changing circumstances. Taking this approach fractures homogenizing assumptions about gay identity and community--even of a self-identified gay community like this squatting collective. It can also decentre sexuality as a primary category of identity and analysis as other factors come into sharper focus and shed light on the ebb and flow of identification and on the ways in which broader histories are woven into everyday lives. The piece thus considers different scales of analysis, the limits of identification, the inclusions and exclusions enacted when communities come together and identities coalesce, the continuities and discontinuities between broader and counter cultures (especially in relation to ideas and lived experiences of home), and the way memories of the squats and of the 1970s are modulated by subsequent national and gay politics, by AIDS, and by a profound sense of loss.

  20. Testing the role of phenotypic plasticity for local adaptation: growth and development in time-constrained Rana temporaria populations.

    PubMed

    Lind, M I; Johansson, F

    2011-12-01

    Phenotypic plasticity can be important for local adaptation, because it enables individuals to survive in a novel environment until genetic changes have been accumulated by genetic accommodation. By analysing the relationship between development rate and growth rate, it can be determined whether plasticity in life-history traits is caused by changed physiology or behaviour. We extended this to examine whether plasticity had been aiding local adaptation, by investigating whether the plastic response had been fixed in locally adapted populations. Tadpoles from island populations of Rana temporaria, locally adapted to different pool-drying regimes, were monitored in a common garden. Individual differences in development rate were caused by different foraging efficiency. However, developmental plasticity was physiologically mediated by trading off growth against development rate. Surprisingly, plasticity has not aided local adaptation to time-stressed environments, because local adaptation was not caused by genetic assimilation but on selection on the standing genetic variation in development time. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2011 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  1. SU-F-R-20: Image Texture Features Correlate with Time to Local Failure in Lung SBRT Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, M; Abazeed, M; Woody, N; Stephans, K; Videtic, G; Xia, P; Zhuang, T

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To explore possible correlation between CT image-based texture and histogram features and time-to-local-failure in early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT).Methods and Materials: From an IRB-approved lung SBRT registry for patients treated between 2009–2013 we selected 48 (20 male, 28 female) patients with local failure. Median patient age was 72.3±10.3 years. Mean time to local failure was 15 ± 7.1 months. Physician-contoured gross tumor volumes (GTV) on the planning CT images were processed and 3D gray-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) based texture and histogram features were calculated in Matlab. Data were exported to R and a multiple linear regression model was used to examine the relationship between texture features and time-to-local-failure. Results: Multiple linear regression revealed that entropy (p=0.0233, multiple R2=0.60) from GLCM-based texture analysis and the standard deviation (p=0.0194, multiple R2=0.60) from the histogram-based features were statistically significantly correlated with the time-to-local-failure. Conclusion: Image-based texture analysis can be used to predict certain aspects of treatment outcomes of NSCLC patients treated with SBRT. We found entropy and standard deviation calculated for the GTV on the CT images displayed a statistically significant correlation with and time-to-local-failure in lung SBRT patients.

  2. Binaural speech unmasking and localization in noise with bilateral cochlear implants using envelope and fine-timing based strategies.

    PubMed

    van Hoesel, Richard; Böhm, Melanie; Pesch, Jörg; Vandali, Andrew; Battmer, Rolf D; Lenarz, Thomas

    2008-04-01

    Four adult bilateral cochlear implant users, with good open-set sentence recognition, were tested with three different sound coding strategies for binaural speech unmasking and their ability to localize 100 and 500 Hz click trains in noise. Two of the strategies tested were envelope-based strategies that are clinically widely used. The third was a research strategy that additionally preserved fine-timing cues at low frequencies. Speech reception thresholds were determined in diotic noise for diotic and interaurally time-delayed speech using direct audio input to a bilateral research processor. Localization in noise was assessed in the free field. Overall results, for both speech and localization tests, were similar with all three strategies. None provided a binaural speech unmasking advantage due to the application of 700 micros interaural time delay to the speech signal, and localization results showed similar response patterns across strategies that were well accounted for by the use of broadband interaural level cues. The data from both experiments combined indicate that, in contrast to normal hearing, timing cues available from natural head-width delays do not offer binaural advantages with present methods of electrical stimulation, even when fine-timing cues are explicitly coded.

  3. A real-time localization system for an endoscopic capsule using magnetic sensors.

    PubMed

    Pham, Duc Minh; Aziz, Syed Mahfuzul

    2014-11-05

    Magnetic sensing technology offers an attractive alternative for in vivo tracking with much better performance than RF and ultrasound technologies. In this paper, an efficient in vivo magnetic tracking system is presented. The proposed system is intended to localize an endoscopic capsule which delivers biomarkers around specific locations of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. For efficiently localizing a magnetic marker inside the capsule, a mathematical model has been developed for the magnetic field around a cylindrical magnet and used with a localization algorithm that provides minimum error and fast computation. The proposed tracking system has much reduced complexity compared to the ones reported in the literature to date. Laboratory tests and in vivo animal trials have demonstrated the suitability of the proposed system for tracking a magnetic marker with expected accuracy.

  4. A Real-Time Localization System for an Endoscopic Capsule Using Magnetic Sensors †

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Duc Minh; Aziz, Syed Mahfuzul

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic sensing technology offers an attractive alternative for in vivo tracking with much better performance than RF and ultrasound technologies. In this paper, an efficient in vivo magnetic tracking system is presented. The proposed system is intended to localize an endoscopic capsule which delivers biomarkers around specific locations of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. For efficiently localizing a magnetic marker inside the capsule, a mathematical model has been developed for the magnetic field around a cylindrical magnet and used with a localization algorithm that provides minimum error and fast computation. The proposed tracking system has much reduced complexity compared to the ones reported in the literature to date. Laboratory tests and in vivo animal trials have demonstrated the suitability of the proposed system for tracking a magnetic marker with expected accuracy. PMID:25379813

  5. Local Demand for a Global Intervention: Policy Priorities in the Time of AIDS

    PubMed Central

    DIONNE, KIM YI

    2012-01-01

    Summary — The success of global health and development interventions ultimately depends on local reception. This paper documents local demand for HIV/AIDS interventions in Africa and seeks to explain patterns of demand using data from a country hard-hit by AIDS. As international agencies and national governments scale up HIV/AIDS interventions in Africa, I find HIV-positive respondents more highly prioritize HIV/AIDS programs, however, cross-national opinion data paired with interviews of villagers and their headmen in rural Malawi show weak prioritization of HIV/AIDS. The data illustrate a misalignment of policy preferences in the global-to-local hierarchy, highlighting the import of studying preferences of intended beneficiaries. PMID:23585707

  6. Dynamics in protein powders on the nanosecond-picosecond time scale are dominated by localized motions.

    PubMed

    Nickels, Jonathan D; García Sakai, Victoria; Sokolov, Alexei P

    2013-10-03

    We present analysis of nanosecond-picosecond dynamics of Green Fluorescence Protein (GFP) using neutron scattering data obtained on three spectrometers. GFP has a β-barrel structure that differs significantly from the structure of other globular proteins and is thought to result in a more rigid local environment. Despite this difference, our analysis reveals that the dynamics of GFP are similar to dynamics of other globular proteins such as lysozyme and myoglobin. We suggest that the same general concept of protein dynamics may be applicable to all these proteins. The dynamics of dry protein are dominated by methyl group rotations, while hydration facilitates localized diffusion-like motions in the protein. The latter has an extremely broad relaxation spectrum. The nanosecond-picosecond dynamics of both dry and hydrated GFP are localized to distances of ∼1-3.5 Å, in contrast to the longer range diffusion of hydration water.

  7. Children's Social Desirability and Dietary Reports

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, Suzanne Domel; Smith, Albert F.; Litaker, Mark S.; Baglio, Michelle L.; Guinn, Caroline H.; Shaffer, Nicole M.

    2005-01-01

    We investigated telephone administration of the Children's Social Desirability (CSD) scale and our adaptation for children of the Social Desirability for Food scale (C-SDF). Each of 100 4th-graders completed 2 telephone interviews 28 days apart. CSD scores had adequate internal consistency and test—retest reliability, and a 14-item subset was identified that sufficiently measures the same construct. Our C-SDF scale performed less well in terms of internal consistency and test—retest reliability; factor analysis revealed 2 factors, 1 of which was moderately related to the CSD. The 14-item subset of the CSD scale may help researchers understand error in children's dietary reports. PMID:15068757

  8. Desirable attributes of public educational websites.

    PubMed

    Whitbeck, Caroline

    2005-07-01

    Certain attributes are particularly desirable for public educational websites, and websites for ethics education in particular. Among the most important of these attributes is wide accessibility through adherence to the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) standards for HTML code. Adherence to this standard produces webpages that can be rendered by a full range of web browsers, including Braille and speech browsers. Although almost no academic websites, including ethics websites, and even fewer commercial websites are accessible by W3C standards, as illustrated by the Online Ethics Center for Engineering and Science , even websites created on limited budgets and with an undergraduate student staff can fulfill these standards. Other desirable attributes, such as provision of annotation for all links and the use of annotated links to give the user alternate ways of ordering and organizing content, are important for making full use of the educational possibilities of hypermedia for websites.

  9. [Desire for a child: a mad passion?].

    PubMed

    Rosenblum, O

    2007-10-01

    Could the desire for having a baby be considered as a pathological state? Indeed this desire is the most legitimate expression of a human being and must not be questioned. Nevertheless, as professionals, we are in a position to ask if any kind of solicitation concerning Assisted Reproductive Techniques (ART) would be well-grounded. As a matter of fact, we stand quite often on the front line when facing the growing demands of a population, which rightly embodies the great strides in the medical field after having integrated every restraint of a once mortal chronic disease. What methods linked to psychodynamic clinic can we use in order to take care of an unsatisfied infantile wish dressed up in a mask of a passionate wish of having a baby?

  10. Characteristic time-stepping or local preconditioning of the Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Leer, Bram; Lee, Wen-Tzong; Roe, Philip L.

    1991-01-01

    A derivation is presented of a local preconditioning matrix for multidimensional Euler equations, that reduces the spread of the characteristic speeds to the lowest attainable value. Numerical experiments with this preconditioning matrix are applied to an explicit upwind discretization of the two-dimensional Euler equations, showing that this matrix significantly increases the rate of convergence to a steady solution. It is predicted that local preconditioning will also simplify convergence-acceleration boundary procedures such as the Karni (1991) procedure for the far field and the Mazaheri and Roe (1991) procedure for a solid wall.

  11. Children’s Desire for Perioperative Information

    PubMed Central

    Fortier, Michelle A.; Chorney, Jill MacLaren; Rony, Rachel Yaffa Zisk; Perret-Karimi, Danielle; Rinehart, Joseph B.; Camilon, Felizardo S.; Kain, Zeev N.

    2010-01-01

    Background The purpose of this investigation was to identify what perioperative information children want to be given by the medical staff. Methods As a first step we developed an instrument based on a qualitative study conducted with children in Great Britain, input from a focus group, and input from school children. On the day of surgery, 143 children aged 7-17 years old completed a 40-item assessment of desired surgical information and a measure of anxiety (STAIC). Parents completed a measure assessing their child’s temperament (EASI), and a measure of their own anxiety (STAI). Results Results indicated that the vast majority of children had a desire for comprehensive information about their surgery, including information about pain and anesthesia, as well as procedural information and information about potential complications. The most highly endorsed items by children involved information about pain. Children who were more anxious endorsed a stronger desire for pain information and lesser tendency to avoid information. Younger children wanted to know what the perioperative environment would look like more than adolescent children. Conclusions We conclude that the majority of children aged 7-17 years old who undergo surgery want to be given comprehensive perioperative information and healthcare providers should ensure adequate information regarding postoperative pain is provided. PMID:19762736

  12. SNSMIL, a real-time single molecule identification and localization algorithm for super-resolution fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yunqing; Dai, Luru; Zhang, Xiaoming; Li, Junbai; Hendriks, Johnny; Fan, Xiaoming; Gruteser, Nadine; Meisenberg, Annika; Baumann, Arnd; Katranidis, Alexandros; Gensch, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Single molecule localization based super-resolution fluorescence microscopy offers significantly higher spatial resolution than predicted by Abbe’s resolution limit for far field optical microscopy. Such super-resolution images are reconstructed from wide-field or total internal reflection single molecule fluorescence recordings. Discrimination between emission of single fluorescent molecules and background noise fluctuations remains a great challenge in current data analysis. Here we present a real-time, and robust single molecule identification and localization algorithm, SNSMIL (Shot Noise based Single Molecule Identification and Localization). This algorithm is based on the intrinsic nature of noise, i.e., its Poisson or shot noise characteristics and a new identification criterion, QSNSMIL, is defined. SNSMIL improves the identification accuracy of single fluorescent molecules in experimental or simulated datasets with high and inhomogeneous background. The implementation of SNSMIL relies on a graphics processing unit (GPU), making real-time analysis feasible as shown for real experimental and simulated datasets. PMID:26098742

  13. A coupling strategy for adaptive local refinement in space and time with a fixed global model in explicit dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettinotti, Omar; Allix, Olivier; Malherbe, Benoît

    2014-04-01

    In dynamics, domain decomposition methods (DDMs) enable one to use different spatial and temporal discretizations depending on the physical phenomenon being taken into account. Thus, DDMs provide the analyst with key tools for dealing with problems in which phenomena occur on different temporal and spatial scales. This paper focuses on a less intrusive variation of this type of method which enables the global (industrial) mesh to remain unchanged while the local problem is being refined in space and in time where needed. This property is particularly useful in the case of a local problem whose localization evolves rapidly with time, as is the case for delamination. The downside is that the technique is iterative. The method is presented in the context of linear explicit dynamics, but, as with domain decomposition, its extension to other integration schemes and to nonlinear problems should be possible.

  14. A multi-tiered time-series modelling approach to forecasting respiratory syncytial virus incidence at the local level.

    PubMed

    Spaeder, M C; Fackler, J C

    2012-04-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common cause of documented viral respiratory infections, and the leading cause of hospitalization, in young children. We performed a retrospective time-series analysis of all patients aged <18 years with laboratory-confirmed RSV within a network of multiple affiliated academic medical institutions. Forecasting models of weekly RSV incidence for the local community, inpatient paediatric hospital and paediatric intensive-care unit (PICU) were created. Ninety-five percent confidence intervals calculated around our models' 2-week forecasts were accurate to ±9·3, ±7·5 and ±1·5 cases/week for the local community, inpatient hospital and PICU, respectively. Our results suggest that time-series models may be useful tools in forecasting the burden of RSV infection at the local and institutional levels, helping communities and institutions to optimize distribution of resources based on the changing burden and severity of illness in their respective communities.

  15. Correlates of Changes in Desired Control Scores and in Life Satisfaction Scores among Elderly Persons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziegler, Michael; Reid, David W.

    1983-01-01

    Describes the correlates of life satisfaction and desired control among 79 elderly residents by assessing residents at three points in time. Both life satisfaction and desired control were intercorrelated and related to other indices of psychological well-being at all three points in time. (Author/RC)

  16. Dynamics of Choice: Relative Rate and Amount Affect Local Preference at Three Different Time Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aparicio, Carlos F.; Baum, William M.

    2009-01-01

    To examine extended control over local choice, the present study investigated preference in transition as food-rate ratio provided by two levers changed across seven components within daily sessions, and food-amount ratio changed across phases. Phase 1 arranged a food-amount ratio of 4:1 (i.e., the left lever delivered four pellets and the right…

  17. Real Time Localization of Assets in Hospitals Using Quuppa Indoor Positioning Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Ham, M. F. S.; Zlatanova, S.; Verbree, E.; Voûte, R.

    2016-09-01

    At the most fundamental level, smart buildings deliver useful building services that make occupants productive. Smart asset management in hostipals starts with knowing the whereabouts of medical equipment. This paper investigates the subject of indoor localization of medical equipment in hospitals by defining functional spaces. In order to localize the assets indoors, a localization method is developed that takes into account several factors such as geometrical influences, characteristics of the Quuppa positioning system and obstructions in the indoor environment. For matching the position data to a real world location, several location types are developed by subdividing the floor plan into location clusters. The research has shown that a high-performance level can be achieved for locations that are within the high-resolution range of the receiver. The performance at the smallest subspaces can only be achieved when having a dense distribution of receivers. Test cases that were defined for specific situations in the test-area show successful localization in these subspaces for the majority of the test data.

  18. Adapting to Hard Times: Family Participation Patterns in Local Thrift Economies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Spencer; Brown, Ralph B.; Goodsell, Todd L.; Stovall, Josh; Flaherty, Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    Using survey data from a western U.S. county (N = 595), we examined how lower, middle, and higher income families negotiate a period of economic stress--the closing of a major employer in the community--through their shopping patterns. Specifically, we examined their participation in local thrift economies such as yard sales and secondhand stores.…

  19. Fine-scale local adaptation in an invasive freshwater fish has evolved in contemporary time

    PubMed Central

    Westley, Peter A. H.; Ward, Eric J.; Fleming, Ian A.

    2013-01-01

    Adaptive evolutionary change in only a few generations can increase the ability of non-native invasive species to spread, and yet adaptive divergence is rarely assessed in recently established populations. In this study, we experimentally test for evidence of fine-scale local adaptation in juvenile survival and growth among three populations of an invasive freshwater fish with reciprocal transplants and common-garden experiments. Despite intrinsic differences in habitat quality, in two of three populations we detected evidence of increased survival in ‘home’ versus ‘away’ environments with a Bayesian occupancy model fitted to mark–recapture data. We found support for the ‘local’ versus ‘foreign’ criterion of local adaptation as 14 of 15 pairwise comparisons of performance were consistent with local adaptation (p < 0.001). Patterns in growth were less clear, though we detected evidence of location- and population-level effects. Although the agents of divergent ecological selection are not known in this system, our results combine to indicate that adaptive divergence—reflected by higher relative survival of local individuals—can occur in a small number of generations and only a few kilometres apart on the landscape. PMID:23193126

  20. Adapting to Hard Times: Family Participation Patterns in Local Thrift Economies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Spencer; Brown, Ralph B.; Goodsell, Todd L.; Stovall, Josh; Flaherty, Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    Using survey data from a western U.S. county (N = 595), we examined how lower, middle, and higher income families negotiate a period of economic stress--the closing of a major employer in the community--through their shopping patterns. Specifically, we examined their participation in local thrift economies such as yard sales and secondhand stores.…

  1. Local Mesh Refinement in the Space-Time CE/SE Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Sin-Chung; Wu, Yuhui; Wang, Xiao-Yen; Yang, Vigor

    2000-01-01

    A local mesh refinement procedure for the CE/SE method which does not use an iterative procedure in the treatments of grid-to-grid communications is described. It is shown that a refinement ratio higher than ten can be applied successfully across a single coarse grid/fine grid interface.

  2. Simulation of near-field plasmonic interactions with a local approximation order discontinuous Galerkin time-domain method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viquerat, Jonathan; Lanteri, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    During the last ten years, the discontinuous Galerkin time-domain (DGTD) method has progressively emerged as a viable alternative to well established finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) and finite-element time-domain (FETD) methods for the numerical simulation of electromagnetic wave propagation problems in the time-domain. The method is now actively studied in various application contexts including those requiring to model light/matter interactions on the nanoscale. Several recent works have demonstrated the viability of the DGDT method for nanophotonics. In this paper we further demonstrate the capabilities of the method for the simulation of near-field plasmonic interactions by considering more particularly the possibility of combining the use of a locally refined conforming tetrahedral mesh with a local adaptation of the approximation order.

  3. Desire thinking as a predictor of craving and binge drinking: A longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Martino, Francesca; Caselli, Gabriele; Felicetti, Federica; Rampioni, Margherita; Romanelli, Pierluigi; Troiani, Lorena; Sassaroli, Sandra; Albery, Ian P; Spada, Marcantonio M

    2017-01-01

    Desire thinking is a conscious and voluntary cognitive process orienting to prefigure images, information and memories about positive target-related experience. Desire thinking has been found to be associated with both craving and alcohol use in clinical and non-clinical populations, however its role in predicting craving and problematic drinking patterns has never been investigated using a longitudinal design. The central aim of the present study was to explore the role of desire thinking at Time 2 (3months post-baseline) in predicting craving and binge drinking and Time 3 (6months post-baseline), controlling for levels of both these constructs and Time 1 (baseline). One hundred and thirty three non-hazardous drinkers were assessed on craving and binge drinking at Times 1 and 3, and on desire thinking at Time 2. Findings showed that desire thinking at Time 2 predicted craving and binge drinking at Time 3, controlling for craving and binge drinking at Time 1. Furthermore, the imaginal prefiguration component of desire thinking at Time 2 was found to mediate the relationship between craving at Times 1 and 3; conversely the verbal perseveration component of desire thinking at Time 2 was found to mediate the relationship between binge drinking at Times 1 and 3. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  4. Phytoliths infer locally dense and heterogeneous paleovegetation at FLK North and surrounding localities during upper Bed I time, Olduvai Gorge, Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barboni, Doris; Ashley, Gail M.; Dominguez-Rodrigo, Manuel; Bunn, Henry T.; Mabulla, Audax Z. P.; Baquedano, Enrique

    2010-11-01

    The phytolith content of 10 samples collected immediately under Tuff IF (~ 1.785 Ma) at FLK N and other surrounding localities (~ 2 km²) provides a direct botanical evidence for woody vegetation in the eastern margin of Olduvai Gorge during uppermost Bed I time. Observation and counting of 143 phytolith types (5 to >150 μ) reveal dense but heterogeneous woody cover (~ 40-90%) of unidentified trees and/or shrubs and palms associated to the freshwater springs surrounding FLK N, and more open formation (presumably ~ 25-70% woody cover) in the southeast at localities VEK, HWK W and HWK E. The paleovegetation is best described as groundwater palm forest/woodland or bushland, which current analogue may be found near Lake Manyara in similar hydrogeological context (freshwater springs near saline/alkaline lake). Re-evaluating the published pollen data based on this analogy shows that 70% of the pollen signal at FLK N may be attributed to thicket-woodland, Acacia groundwater woodland, gallery and groundwater forests; while < 30% is attributed to swamp herbage and grasslands. Micro-botanical, isotopic, and taphonomical studies of faunal remains converge on the same conclusion that the area surrounding FLK N, which attracted both carnivores and hominins in the early Pleistocene, was densely wooded during uppermost Bed I time.

  5. Anticipating by Pigeons Depends on Local Statistical Information in a Serial Response Time Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Froehlich, Alyson L.; Herbranson, Walter T.; Loper, Julia D.; Wood, David M.; Shimp, Charles P.

    2004-01-01

    Pigeons responded in a serial response time task patterned after that of M. J. Nissen and P. Bullemer (1987) with humans. Experiment 1 produced global facilitation: Response times in repeating lists of locations were faster than when locations were random. Response time to a spatial location was also a function of both that location's 1st- and…

  6. Detection of Local Temperature Change on HTS Cables via Time-Frequency Domain Reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bang, Su Sik; Lee, Geon Seok; Kwon, Gu-Young; Lee, Yeong Ho; Ji, Gyeong Hwan; Sohn, Songho; Park, Kijun; Shin, Yong-June

    2017-07-01

    High temperature superconducting (HTS) cables are drawing attention as transmission and distribution cables in future grid, and related researches on HTS cables have been conducted actively. As HTS cables have come to the demonstration stage, failures of cooling systems inducing quench phenomenon of the HTS cables have become significant. Several diagnosis of the HTS cables have been developed but there are still some limitations of the experimental setup. In this paper, a non-destructive diagnostic technique for the detection of the local temperature change point is proposed. Also, a simulation model of HTS cables with a local temperature change point is suggested to verify the proposed diagnosis. The performance of the diagnosis is checked by comparative analysis between the proposed simulation results and experiment results of a real-world HTS cable. It is expected that the suggested simulation model and diagnosis will contribute to the commercialization of HTS cables in the power grid.

  7. Analysis of memory use for improved design and compile-time allocation of local memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcniven, Geoffrey D.; Davidson, Edward S.

    1986-01-01

    Trace analysis techniques are used to study memory referencing behavior for the purpose of designing local memories and determining how to allocate them for data and instructions. In an attempt to assess the inherent behavior of the source code, the trace analysis system described here reduced the effects of the compiler and host architecture on the trace by using a technical called flattening. The variables in the trace, their associated single-assignment values, and references are histogrammed on the basis of various parameters describing memory referencing behavior. Bounds are developed specifying the amount of memory space required to store all live values in a particular histogram class. The reduction achieved in main memory traffic by allocating local memory is specified for each class.

  8. Target Localization by Resolving the Time Synchronization Problem in Bistatic Radar Systems Using Space Fast-Time Adaptive Processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madurasinghe, D.; Shaw, A. P.

    2009-12-01

    The proposed technique allows the radar receiver to accurately estimate the range of a large number of targets using a transmitter of opportunity as long as the location of the transmitter is known. The technique does not depend on the use of communication satellites or GPS systems, instead it relies on the availability of the direct transmit copy of the signal from the transmitter and the reflected paths off the various targets. An array-based space-fast time adaptive processor is implemented in order to estimate the path difference between the direct signal and the delayed signal, which bounces off the target. This procedure allows us to estimate the target distance as well as bearing.

  9. Real time network traffic monitoring for wireless local area networks based on compressed sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balouchestani, Mohammadreza

    2017-05-01

    A wireless local area network (WLAN) is an important type of wireless networks which connotes different wireless nodes in a local area network. WLANs suffer from important problems such as network load balancing, large amount of energy, and load of sampling. This paper presents a new networking traffic approach based on Compressed Sensing (CS) for improving the quality of WLANs. The proposed architecture allows reducing Data Delay Probability (DDP) to 15%, which is a good record for WLANs. The proposed architecture is increased Data Throughput (DT) to 22 % and Signal to Noise (S/N) ratio to 17 %, which provide a good background for establishing high qualified local area networks. This architecture enables continuous data acquisition and compression of WLAN's signals that are suitable for a variety of other wireless networking applications. At the transmitter side of each wireless node, an analog-CS framework is applied at the sensing step before analog to digital converter in order to generate the compressed version of the input signal. At the receiver side of wireless node, a reconstruction algorithm is applied in order to reconstruct the original signals from the compressed signals with high probability and enough accuracy. The proposed algorithm out-performs existing algorithms by achieving a good level of Quality of Service (QoS). This ability allows reducing 15 % of Bit Error Rate (BER) at each wireless node.

  10. [Trigerred desire--new look at hypoactive sexual desire disorder among women].

    PubMed

    Iniewicz, Grzegorz; Strzelczak, Anna

    2013-01-01

    This article aims to present controversy surrounding current desire disorder criteria listed in DSM IV. Developed by Masters and Jonhson in 1996, completed later by Kaplan in 1974, the human sexual response cycle which is the basis for contemporary desire disorder criteria, in some aspects stands in opposition to the results of the newest research. This paper presents evidence to change the DSM criteria suggested by Basson and analyzes recent proposals for DSM V criteria for consideration of these arguments.

  11. Qualities and attributes desired in menopause clinicians.

    PubMed

    Schnatz, Peter F; Johnson, Amy M; O'sullivan, David M

    2007-02-20

    To assess the qualities and attributes desired in menopause clinicians. Women > or =45 years of age (n=72) were surveyed about the qualities and attributes desired in their physician. Surveys were performed in physician waiting rooms in Connecticut. Although fewer men are entering the practice of ObGyn, more than 88% of peri- and post-menopausal women believe that gender does not affect the quality of their women's health provider. Among the 68 women from whom valid data were obtained, experience (95.6%), knowledge (95.6%), and ability (92.6%) were the most important qualities. Only 4.2% listed gender in the top three most important qualities. If the patient's visit was for wellness- and screening-related issues, 6.6% (n=4) preferred a male, 13.1% (n=8) preferred a female, and 80.3% (n=49) had no preference for gender. The percentage of patients preferring to see a female was slightly higher (29.2%) if the visit was for a pelvic exam, while the percentage preferring to see a male (14.5%) was greater if care involved gynecological surgery. As medical practices meet the increasing demand of menopausal women, it is helpful to know the qualities and attributes that patients desire. Menopause clinicians should seek to convey experience, knowledge, and competence to their patients. A menopause practice should strive for a well-diversified team that will bring these qualities to menopausal patients. Given the shifting balance of male and female ObGyn providers, when hiring providers or establishing a menopause clinic, it is helpful to know that gender diversification is of minor importance.

  12. Decision Regret following Treatment for Localized Breast Cancer: Is Regret Stable Over Time?

    PubMed

    Martinez, Kathryn A; Li, Yun; Resnicow, Ken; Graff, John J; Hamilton, Ann S; Hawley, Sarah T

    2015-05-01

    While studies suggest most women have little regret regarding their breast cancer treatment decisions immediately following treatment, no studies to date have evaluated how regret may change over time. To measure the stability of posttreatment decision regret over time among women with breast cancer. Women diagnosed with breast cancer between August 2005 and May 2007 reported to the Detroit, Michigan, or Los Angeles County Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registry and completed surveys at 9 months following diagnosis (time 1) and again approximately 4 years later (time 2). A decision regret scale consisting of 5 items was summed to create 2 decision regret scores at both time 1 and time 2 (range, 0-20). Multivariable linear regression was used to examine change in regret from 9 months to 4 years. Independent variables included surgery type, receipt of reconstruction, and recurrence status at follow-up. The model controlled for demographic and clinical factors. The analytic sample included 1536 women. Mean regret in the overall sample was 4.9 at time 1 and 5.4 at time 2 (P < 0.001). In the multivariable linear model, we found no difference in change in decision regret over time by surgery type. Reporting a new diagnosis of breast cancer at time 2 was associated with a 2.6-point increase in regret over time compared with women without an additional diagnosis (P = 0.003). Receipt of reconstruction was not associated with change in decision regret over time. Decision regret following treatment was low and relatively stable over time for most women. Those facing an additional diagnosis of breast cancer following treatment may be at risk for elevated regret-related distress. © The Author(s) 2014.

  13. Decision regret following treatment for localized breast cancer: is regret stable over time?

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Kathryn A.; Li, Yun; Resnicow, Ken; Graff, John J.; Hamilton, Ann S.; Hawley, Sarah T

    2015-01-01

    Background While studies suggest most women have little regret regarding their breast cancer treatment decisions immediately following treatment, to date no studies have evaluated how regret may change over time. Objective To measure the stability of post-treatment decision regret over time among women with breast cancer. Methods Women diagnosed with breast cancer between August 2005 and May 2007 reported to the Detroit, Michigan or Los Angeles County Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) registry completed surveys at 9 months following diagnosis (Time 1) and again approximately 4 years later (Time 2). A decision regret scale consisting of 5 items was summed to create two decision regret scores at both Time 1 and Time 2 (range: 0 to 20). Multivariable linear regression was used to examine change in regret from 9 months to 4 years. Independent variables included surgery type, receipt of reconstruction, and recurrence status at follow-up. The model controlled for demographic and clinical factors. Results The analytic sample included 1,536 women. Mean regret in the overall sample was 4.9 at Time 1 and 5.4 at Time 2 (p<0.001). In the multivariable linear model, we found no difference in change in decision regret over time by surgery type. Reporting a new diagnosis of breast cancer at Time 2 was associated with 2.6 point increase in regret over time, compared to women without an additional diagnosis (p=0.003). Receipt of reconstruction was not associated with change in decision regret over time. Conclusions Decision regret following treatment was low and relatively stable over time for most women. Those facing an additional diagnosis of breast cancer following treatment may be at risk for elevated regret-related distress. PMID:25532824

  14. Desired skills and attributes for dietitian preceptors.

    PubMed

    Walker, Sharon; Grosjean, Garnet

    2010-01-01

    We examined the research literature to determine the skills and attributes that dietetic interns desire in clinical preceptors. A search of three databases produced little information specific to dietetics. Literature on preceptors in other health disciplines identified preceptor attributes that students in clinical placements value. We were able to cluster the data from these studies into four themes: knowledge and experience, personal characteristics, teaching skills and attitudes, and interpersonal relationships. This review suggests a need for further development of dietitian preceptor training, as well as for further research specific to dietetic interns' needs.

  15. Closing the loop In Practice to Assure the Desired Performance

    PubMed Central

    Stead, William W.; Patel, Neal R.; Starmer, John M.

    2008-01-01

    A closed loop control process assures that a system performs within control limits. In closed loop control, the system's output feeds back directly to change the system's inputs. We describe an approach to planning and monitoring care that uses closed loop control to assure the desired performance using examples from Vanderbilt University Medical Center's ventilator management initiative. The approach has three components: an explicit end-to-end plan; a record of what is done as it is done; and an instant display of the status of each patient against their plan. The status display provides process control by showing the clinical team where correction is needed while they have time to act prospectively. Plans, displays and performance evolve together iteratively until the desired performance is achieved. PMID:18596845

  16. Functional localization of a "Time Keeper" function separate from attentional resources and task strategy.

    PubMed

    Tracy, J I; Faro, S H; Mohamed, F B; Pinsk, M; Pinus, A

    2000-03-01

    The functional neuroanatomy of time estimation has not been well-documented. This research investigated the fMRI measured brain response to an explicit, prospective time interval production (TIP) task. The study tested for the presence of brain activity reflecting a primary time keeper function, distinct from the brain systems involved either in conscious strategies to monitor time or attentional resource and other cognitive processes to accomplish the task. In the TIP task participants were given a time interval and asked to indicate when it elapsed. Two control tasks (counting forwards, backwards) were administered, in addition to a dual task format of the TIP task. Whole brain images were collected at 1.5 Tesla. Analyses (n = 6) yielded a statistical parametric map (SPM ¿z¿) reflecting time keeping and not strategy (counting, number manipulation) or attention resource utilization. Additional SPM ¿z¿s involving activation associated with the accuracy and magnitude the of time estimation response are presented. Results revealed lateral cerebellar and inferior temporal lobe activation were associated with primary time keeping. Behavioral data provided evidence that the procedures for the explicit time judgements did not occur automatically and utilized controlled processes. Activation sites associated with accuracy, magnitude, and the dual task provided indications of the other structures involved in time estimation that implemented task components related to controlled processing. The data are consistent with prior proposals that the cerebellum is a repository of codes for time processing, but also implicate temporal lobe structures for this type of time estimation task.

  17. Time-dependent local and average structural evolution of δ-phase 239Pu-Ga alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Alice I.; Page, Katharine L.; Siewenie, Joan E.; Losko, Adrian S.; Vogel, Sven C.; Gourdon, Olivier A.; Richmond, Scott; Saleh, Tarik A.; Ramos, Michael; Schwartz, Daniel S.

    2016-08-05

    Here, plutonium metal is a very unusual element, exhibiting six allotropes at ambient pressure, between room temperature and its melting point, a complicated phase diagram, and a complex electronic structure. Many phases of plutonium metal are unstable with changes in temperature, pressure, chemical additions, or time. This strongly affects structure and properties, and becomes of high importance, particularly when considering effects on structural integrity over long periods of time [1]. This paper presents a time-dependent neutron total scattering study of the local and average structure of naturally aging δ-phase239Pu-Ga alloys, together with preliminary results on neutron tomography characterization.

  18. [Local fractal analysis of noise-like time series by all permutations method for 1-115 min periods].

    PubMed

    Panchelyuga, V A; Panchelyuga, M S

    2015-01-01

    Results of local fractal analysis of 329-per-day time series of 239Pu alpha-decay rate fluctuations by means of all permutations method (APM) are presented. The APM-analysis reveals in the time series some steady frequency set. The coincidence of the frequency set with the Earth natural oscillations was demonstrated. A short review of works by different authors who analyzed the time series of fluctuations in processes of different nature is given. We have shown that the periods observed in those works correspond to the periods revealed in our study. It points to a common mechanism of the phenomenon observed.

  19. Time-dependent local and average structural evolution of δ-phase 239Pu-Ga alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Smith, Alice I.; Page, Katharine L.; Siewenie, Joan E.; ...

    2016-08-05

    Here, plutonium metal is a very unusual element, exhibiting six allotropes at ambient pressure, between room temperature and its melting point, a complicated phase diagram, and a complex electronic structure. Many phases of plutonium metal are unstable with changes in temperature, pressure, chemical additions, or time. This strongly affects structure and properties, and becomes of high importance, particularly when considering effects on structural integrity over long periods of time [1]. This paper presents a time-dependent neutron total scattering study of the local and average structure of naturally aging δ-phase239Pu-Ga alloys, together with preliminary results on neutron tomography characterization.

  20. Time-dependent local and average structural evolution of δ-phase 239Pu-Ga alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Alice I.; Page, Katharine L.; Siewenie, Joan E.; Losko, Adrian S.; Vogel, Sven C.; Gourdon, Olivier A.; Richmond, Scott; Saleh, Tarik A.; Ramos, Michael; Schwartz, Daniel S.

    2016-08-05

    Here, plutonium metal is a very unusual element, exhibiting six allotropes at ambient pressure, between room temperature and its melting point, a complicated phase diagram, and a complex electronic structure. Many phases of plutonium metal are unstable with changes in temperature, pressure, chemical additions, or time. This strongly affects structure and properties, and becomes of high importance, particularly when considering effects on structural integrity over long periods of time [1]. This paper presents a time-dependent neutron total scattering study of the local and average structure of naturally aging δ-phase239Pu-Ga alloys, together with preliminary results on neutron tomography characterization.

  1. Injury reporting on local TV news: a prime-time opportunity for prevention.

    PubMed

    Pribble, James M; Trowbridge, Matthew J; Kamat, Sonia V; Fowler, Erika Franklin; Goldstein, Kenneth M; Hargarten, Stephen W

    2008-05-01

    Local television news is America's primary source of information and may be an opportunity to shape public opinion surrounding issues such as injury prevention. This study sought to systematically evaluate unintentional-injury coverage on local television news and to identify frequently interviewed public-service professionals and factors associated with discussion of risk factors and prevention. Late news broadcasts from 122 local television stations within the U.S. during October 2002 were analyzed. The main outcomes variables were counts of case-injury stories: motor-vehicle crashes, fires, falls, drowning, poisonings, and sports-recreational injuries; identification of interviewed public service professionals; and discussion of risk factors and prevention. Bivariate and mulitvariate analysis was performed to identify predictors of discussion of prevention measures, risk factors, or both. Data were analyzed in Fall 2006. From 2795 broadcasts, 1748 case-injury stories were identified. Fires and motor-vehicle crashes constituted 84% of the case-injury stories. There were 245 case-injury stories containing an interview with a public service professional. Police officers and firefighters accounted for 82% of these interviews. Interviews with police officers and firefighters were independently associated with discussion of risk factors and prevention measures for motor-vehicle crashes (OR=2.49, CI=1.7-3.6) and fires (OR=2.77, CI=1.2-5.9), respectively. Motor-vehicle crashes and fires were the most commonly reported injury topics. Police officers and firefighters were most commonly interviewed and, if interviewed, increased the likelihood that risk factors, prevention measures, or both were discussed. Optimizing the messages delivered by public service professionals through public service professional-level and media-level interventions may be an opportunity for disseminating injury-prevention information to the public and to policymakers, and methods to increase the

  2. Quantum statistical gravity: time dilation due to local information in many-body quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sels, Dries; Wouters, Michiel

    2017-08-01

    We propose a generic mechanism for the emergence of a gravitational potential that acts on all classical objects in a quantum system. Our conjecture is based on the analysis of mutual information in many-body quantum systems. Since measurements in quantum systems affect the surroundings through entanglement, a measurement at one position reduces the entropy in its neighbourhood. This reduction in entropy can be described by a local temperature, that is directly related to the gravitational potential. A crucial ingredient in our argument is that ideal classical mechanical motion occurs at constant probability. This definition is motivated by the analysis of entropic forces in classical systems.

  3. Fighting desires: Henry Miller's Queer Tropic.

    PubMed

    Hardin, Michael

    2002-01-01

    "Fighting Desires: Henry Miller's Queer Tropic" is an investigation of Tropic of Cancer that investigates the deeply repressed homoerotic desire that periodically surfaces. This reading is dependent upon an interpretation of Eve Sedgwick that proposes male sexuality as a continuum. By looking at the nature of the male-male relationships, as well as the lack of emotion and presence in the male-female relationships, I will show that the most intimate relationships are between men, and that these relationships are expressed through the telling of stories about (heterosexual) sex; this is the function of women within the novel: one has sex with a woman, not for the pleasure that the act brings, but for the pleasure that the recounting of the story to other men brings. Furthermore, I will look at Miller's use of puns within the novel and how they also contribute to a homoerotic reading. None of this is to argue that Miller was not homophobic and sexist--Miller very clearly was--the purpose of this essay is to show the complex nature of sexuality, even within a protagonist who asserts a very defined heterosexuality.

  4. Three-Dimensional, Finite-Difference, Time-Domain Modeling of Local Volcano Infrasound Radiation Using GPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K.; Lees, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    Since volcano infrasound is a direct measure of atmospheric pressure fluctuation near open-vent activity, it can provide important constraints on eruption source parameters including the volume of gas released and eruption velocity. Local infrasound data (<15 Km) have been used to quantify and characterize acoustic sources of volcanic eruptions since they are relatively less affected by atmospheric velocity structures in the near field. The interaction of volcano infrasound sources and complex topography near the volcanic edifice, however, has not been fully explored. Infrasound observations from world-wide volcanoes and two-dimensional numerical modeling of infrasound radiation in the vicinity of the crater suggest a strong distortion of the wavefield by local topography [Kim and Lees, GRL, 2011]. To get a complete picture of these effects, however, full three-dimensional modeling is required. We have developed a new, accelerated, 3D finite-difference time-domain program using GPU (Grpahic Processing Units) to simulate local infrasound propagation near volcanoes, while taking into account complex topography, local wind distortion, and atmospheric sound velocity structures. While CPU-based 3D FDTD method requires a prohibitive amount of computational resources, GPU-based algorithms significantly reduce the computational time of infrasound modeling, making parallel processing practical even on a desktop computer. In these simulations we provide a comprehensive solution of volcano infrasound radiation assuming different acoustic sources and real volcano topography. We illustrate the interaction of local vent topography and difference acoustic sources and how they combine to affect the infrasound wavefield. By removing topographic effects from local infrasound observation we can begin to quantitatively model acoustic sources and finally establish the partitioning of energy, at the vent, between the acoustic and seismic wavefields.

  5. MRI under hyperbaric air and oxygen: effects on local magnetic field and relaxation times.

    PubMed

    Muir, Eric R; Cardenas, Damon; Huang, Shiliang; Roby, John; Li, Guang; Duong, Timothy Q

    2014-10-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy has shown efficacies in the treatment of a number of diseases. The goal of this study was to develop a rodent hyperbaric chamber for MRI studies and to investigate the effects of hyperbaric air and hyperbaric oxygen on local magnetic field (B0 ) and MRI relaxation parameters in the rat brain. A hyperbaric chamber, constructed to fit inside an animal MRI scanner, was pressurized with air to four atmospheres, while oxygen was delivered locally via nose cone. B0 , T2 , T2 *, and T1 maps in the rat brain were evaluated under normobaric air, hyperbaric air, and hyperbaric oxygen at 7T. Under hyperbaric oxygen, images exhibited artifacts and temporal instability, attributable to fluctuating oxygen concentration from air and oxygen mixing near the imaging region. Physically shielding the imaging region from fluctuating oxygen concentration resolved the problems. With increasing oxygen at hyperbaric pressure, B0 was shifted downfield with increased inhomogeneity near the ear canals and nose. Brain T2 and T2 * were lengthened, and T1 was shortened. This study establishes the means to perform MRI on rodents under hyperbaric conditions. Hyperbaric air and hyperbaric oxygen have significant effects on B0 and tissue relaxation parameters compared with normobaric air. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Demonstration of delivery of orthoimagery in real time for local emergency response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeown, Donald; Faulring, Jason; Krzaczek, Robert; Cavilia, Stephen; van Aardt, Jan

    2011-06-01

    The Information Products Laboratory for Emergency Response (IPLER) is a new initiative led by the Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT) to develop and put into use new information products and tools derived from remote sensing data. This effort involves technical development and outreach to the user community having the two-fold objective of providing new information tools to enhance public safety and fostering economic development. Specifically, this paper addresses the demonstration of the collection and delivery of geo-referenced overhead imagery to local (county level) emergency managers in near realtime. The demonstration proved valuable to county personnel in showing what is possible and valuable to the researchers in highlighting the very real constraints of operatives in local government. The demonstration consisted of four major elements; 1) a multiband imaging system incorporating 4 cameras operating simultaneously in the visible (color), shortwave infrared, midwave infrared and long wave infrared, 2) an on-board inertial navigation and data processing system that renders the imagery into geo-referenced coordinates, 3) a microwave digital downlink, and 4) a data dissemination service via FTP and WMS-based browser. In this particular exercise, we successfully collected and downloaded over 700 images and delivered them to county servers located in their Emergency Operations Center as well as to a remote GIS van.

  7. Charge transport and localization in nanocrystalline CdS films: A time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mics, Z.; Němec, H.; Rychetský, I.; Kužel, P.; Formánek, P.; Malý, P.; Němec, P.

    2011-04-01

    Assessment of characteristic length and time scales of the charge localization in nanostructured semiconductors is a key point for understanding the initial stage of carrier transport after photoexcitation. A concerted use of time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy and Monte Carlo simulations of the motion of confined electrons allow us to obtain this information and develop a quantitative microscopic model of the electron transport in a nanocrystalline CdS film. A weak localization is observed inside individual nanocrystals while much stronger localization stems from the existence of nanocrystal clusters partially surrounded by voids. The efficiency of the short-range transport is controlled by the excess energy of electrons: Its increase enhances the conductive coupling between adjacent nanocrystals and clusters. Relaxation of electrons with high excess energy then leads to a decrease of their mobility on a subpicosecond time scale. Filling of conduction-band states by increasing the optical pump fluence allows us to maintain a high level of conductive coupling even at later times.

  8. Developmental time rather than local environment regulates the schedule of epithelial polarization in the zebrafish neural rod

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Morphogenesis requires developmental processes to occur both at the right time and in the right place. During neural tube formation in the zebrafish embryo, the generation of the apical specializations of the lumen must occur in the center of the neural rod after the neural cells have undergone convergence, invagination and interdigitation across the midline. How this coordination is achieved is uncertain. One possibility is that environmental signaling at the midline of the neural rod controls the schedule of apical polarization. Alternatively, polarization could be regulated by a timing mechanism and then independent morphogenetic processes ensure the cells are in the correct spatial location. Results Ectopic transplantation demonstrates the local environment of the neural midline is not required for neural cell polarization. Neural cells can self-organize into epithelial cysts in ectopic locations in the embryo and also in three-dimensional gel cultures. Heterochronic transplants demonstrate that the schedule of polarization and the specialized cell divisions characteristic of the neural rod are more strongly regulated by time than local environmental signals. The cells’ schedule for polarization is set prior to gastrulation, is stable through several rounds of cell division and appears independent of the morphogenetic movements of gastrulation and neurulation. Conclusions Time rather than local environment regulates the schedule of epithelial polarization in zebrafish neural rod. PMID:23521850

  9. [Prognostic significance of local and systemic indicators of lipid peroxidation and antioxidant system in perforating wounds of the eyes and their time course during local antioxidant treatment].

    PubMed

    Arkhipova, L T; Dolgova, I G

    2001-01-01

    Lipid peroxidation parameters malonic dialdehyde (MDA) and dienic conjugates (DC) and antioxidant defense (AOD) values superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, alpha-tocopherol were measured in the blood neutrophils and lacrimal fluid of 66 patients on days 1-2, 7-8, 14-15, and 21-22 after perforating wound of first, second, third, and fourth degree of severity according to P, 1. Lebekhov and in repeated injury, and the time course of these parameters during local treatment with therapeutic films with emoxipin and emoxipin + piridoxine was evaluated. A stable increase of MDA and DC levels in blood neutrophils, decrease of catalase, SOD, and alpha-tocopherol levels in blood neutrophils, and decrease of catalase enzymes and SOD activities in the lacrimal fluid of injured eye starting from days 7-8 are prognostically unfavorable signs. These data prompt the use of local and systemic treatment with antioxidants (emoxipin, tocopherol, etc.) in perforating wounds starting from the first days after the injury. Good clinical and antioxidant effect was observed after treatment with ocular therapeutic films with emoxipin and piridoxine.

  10. Adjustment of interaural time difference in head related transfer functions based on listeners' anthropometry and its effect on sound localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yôiti; Watanabe, Kanji; Iwaya, Yukio; Gyoba, Jiro; Takane, Shouichi

    2005-04-01

    Because the transfer functions governing subjective sound localization (HRTFs) show strong individuality, sound localization systems based on synthesis of HRTFs require suitable HRTFs for individual listeners. However, it is impractical to obtain HRTFs for all listeners based on measurements. Improving sound localization by adjusting non-individualized HRTFs to a specific listener based on that listener's anthropometry might be a practical method. This study first developed a new method to estimate interaural time differences (ITDs) using HRTFs. Then correlations between ITDs and anthropometric parameters were analyzed using the canonical correlation method. Results indicated that parameters relating to head size, and shoulder and ear positions are significant. Consequently, it was attempted to express ITDs based on listener's anthropometric data. In this process, the change of ITDs as a function of azimuth angle was parameterized as a sum of sine functions. Then the parameters were analyzed using multiple regression analysis, in which the anthropometric parameters were used as explanatory variables. The predicted or individualized ITDs were installed in the nonindividualized HRTFs to evaluate sound localization performance. Results showed that individualization of ITDs improved horizontal sound localization.

  11. Local and global synchronization transitions induced by time delays in small-world neuronal networks with chemical synapses.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haitao; Wang, Jiang; Du, Jiwei; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xile

    2015-02-01

    Effects of time delay on the local and global synchronization in small-world neuronal networks with chemical synapses are investigated in this paper. Numerical results show that, for both excitatory and inhibitory coupling types, the information transmission delay can always induce synchronization transitions of spiking neurons in small-world networks. In particular, regions of in-phase and out-of-phase synchronization of connected neurons emerge intermittently as the synaptic delay increases. For excitatory coupling, all transitions to spiking synchronization occur approximately at integer multiples of the firing period of individual neurons; while for inhibitory coupling, these transitions appear at the odd multiples of the half of the firing period of neurons. More importantly, the local synchronization transition is more profound than the global synchronization transition, depending on the type of coupling synapse. For excitatory synapses, the local in-phase synchronization observed for some values of the delay also occur at a global scale; while for inhibitory ones, this synchronization, observed at the local scale, disappears at a global scale. Furthermore, the small-world structure can also affect the phase synchronization of neuronal networks. It is demonstrated that increasing the rewiring probability can always improve the global synchronization of neuronal activity, but has little effect on the local synchronization of neighboring neurons.

  12. Automatic determination of seismic phase arrival times for microearthquakes in local to regional distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Tae-Seob; Kim, Minook; Rhie, Junkee

    2017-04-01

    P- and S-wave phase arrival picking is important for hypocenter source inversion. This study developed a method for the automatic determination of arrival times of seismic phases. The implementation of the method consists of five steps. The first one is the initial declaration of an event in continuous seismic data using a characteristic function, which was also designed in this study. The second is the automatic determination of the P-wave phase arrival time using the normalized squared-envelope function. The third is the application of three-axes rotation using the energy ratio computed as a combination of the three-component seismograms of the detected events. The fourth is the automatic determination of the S-wave phase arrival time. The final step is the removal of falsely determined time in some records using a Wadati diagram, which plots S-P times against P-wave phase arrival times for the stations used in the initial stage. The method is applied to continuous waveform data from a temporary broadband seismograph network consisting of 20 stations distributed throughout Jeju Island. Comparison is made with the results of KMA and KIGAM which administrate the regional seismic networks in Korea. It is confirmed that the automatic event detection and determination of phase arrival times using the proposed algorithm were accurate, resulting in a hypocenter difference of only about 0.5 km in a comparison with the manual analysis, but difference of about 3 km with KMA and KIGAM.

  13. Sound localization in common vampire bats: acuity and use of the binaural time cue by a small mammal.

    PubMed

    Heffner, Rickye S; Koay, Gimseong; Heffner, Henry E

    2015-01-01

    Passive sound-localization acuity and the ability to use binaural time and intensity cues were determined for the common vampire bat (Desmodus rotundus). The bats were tested using a conditioned suppression/avoidance procedure in which they drank defibrinated blood from a spout in the presence of sounds from their right, but stopped drinking (i.e., broke contact with the spout) whenever a sound came from their left, thereby avoiding a mild shock. The mean minimum audible angle for three bats for a 100-ms noise burst was 13.1°-within the range of thresholds for other bats and near the mean for mammals. Common vampire bats readily localized pure tones of 20 kHz and higher, indicating they could use interaural intensity-differences. They could also localize pure tones of 5 kHz and lower, thereby demonstrating the use of interaural time-differences, despite their very small maximum interaural distance of 60 μs. A comparison of the use of locus cues among mammals suggests several implications for the evolution of sound localization and its underlying anatomical and physiological mechanisms.

  14. Sound localization in common vampire bats: Acuity and use of the binaural time cue by a small mammal

    PubMed Central

    Heffner, Rickye S.; Koay, Gimseong; Heffner, Henry E.

    2015-01-01

    Passive sound-localization acuity and the ability to use binaural time and intensity cues were determined for the common vampire bat (Desmodus rotundus). The bats were tested using a conditioned suppression/avoidance procedure in which they drank defibrinated blood from a spout in the presence of sounds from their right, but stopped drinking (i.e., broke contact with the spout) whenever a sound came from their left, thereby avoiding a mild shock. The mean minimum audible angle for three bats for a 100-ms noise burst was 13.1°—within the range of thresholds for other bats and near the mean for mammals. Common vampire bats readily localized pure tones of 20 kHz and higher, indicating they could use interaural intensity-differences. They could also localize pure tones of 5 kHz and lower, thereby demonstrating the use of interaural time-differences, despite their very small maximum interaural distance of 60 μs. A comparison of the use of locus cues among mammals suggests several implications for the evolution of sound localization and its underlying anatomical and physiological mechanisms. PMID:25618037

  15. The local properties of ocean surface waves by the phase-time method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Norden E.; Long, Steven R.; Tung, Chi-Chao; Donelan, Mark A.; Yuan, Yeli; Lai, Ronald J.

    1992-01-01

    A new approach using phase information to view and study the properties of frequency modulation, wave group structures, and wave breaking is presented. The method is applied to ocean wave time series data and a new type of wave group (containing the large 'rogue' waves) is identified. The method also has the capability of broad applications in the analysis of time series data in general.

  16. Development of a WLAN-based real time localization system for patient tracking in a Level I Trauma center.

    PubMed

    Stübig, Timo; Zeckey, Christian; Min, William; Citak, Musa; Krettek, Christian; Hüfner, Tobias; Gaulke, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    Patient tracking helps improve workflow, decrease wait times, optimize costs, and enhance medical treatment in the outpatient setting. In that regard, real-time patient tracking may serve as a potential way to perform efficient patient care. In recent years, the increasing popularity of wireless local area networks (WLANs) has led to a growing number of devices utilizing wireless fidelity (WiFi) networks. This application has been used in various industries to enhance management processes. In that regard, we believe that this technology may enhance patient tracking, as the existing WLAN architecture in many clinics may allow for real-time tracking of patients. However, current literature regarding the clinical applicability of these devices is sparse. The aim of this study is to analyze the developmental process and feasibility of our protytope model for real-time patient tracking, using WLAN in the outpatient setting of our Level I Trauma center. We performed the study in various stages. First, we analyzed our current patient workflow, and then devised a study protocol and prototype model that implemented both this workflow schematic and our current technology infrastructure. Second, we implemented our prototype model to determine the accuracy, feasibility, and safety of data transmission in our clinical setting. The factors examined during prototype implementation included the accuracy of patient localization and the time spent by each patient in the various areas of our clinic (as determined by patient tracking). In our outpatient clinic, our prototype was capable of localizing and automating patient data with excellent accuracy and security. WLAN-based real-time patient localization systems can help overcome a number of common challenges and inefficiencies seen in the outpatient clinics. Real-time localization systems using WLAN technology performed adequately and safely in this pilot study. We believe that this will eventually lead to lower costs overall due

  17. Adapting to Hard Times: Family Participation Patterns in Local Thrift Economies.

    PubMed

    James, Spencer; Brown, Ralph B; Goodsell, Todd L; Stovall, Josh; Flaherty, Jeremy

    2010-10-01

    Using survey data from a western U.S. county (N = 595), we examined how lower, middle, and higher income families negotiate a period of economic stress-the closing of a major employer in the community-through their shopping patterns. Specifically, we examined their participation in local thrift economies such as yard sales and secondhand stores. We found that lower and middle income households shop more frequently at these venues. They also tend to shop more for furniture and clothing, whereas higher income households tend to shop for antiques and trinkets. These relationships varied across the type of thrift economy examined. Overall, findings support the argument that engagement in thrift economies may constitute one mechanism families use during periods of economic stress.

  18. Adapting to Hard Times: Family Participation Patterns in Local Thrift Economies

    PubMed Central

    James, Spencer; Brown, Ralph B.; Goodsell, Todd L.; Stovall, Josh; Flaherty, Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    Using survey data from a western U.S. county (N = 595), we examined how lower, middle, and higher income families negotiate a period of economic stress—the closing of a major employer in the community—through their shopping patterns. Specifically, we examined their participation in local thrift economies such as yard sales and secondhand stores. We found that lower and middle income households shop more frequently at these venues. They also tend to shop more for furniture and clothing, whereas higher income households tend to shop for antiques and trinkets. These relationships varied across the type of thrift economy examined. Overall, findings support the argument that engagement in thrift economies may constitute one mechanism families use during periods of economic stress. PMID:21197154

  19. Use of the local Knox statistic for the prospective monitoring of disease occurrences in space and time.

    PubMed

    Brooke Marshall, J; Spitzner, Dan J; Woodall, William H

    2007-03-30

    The detection of clusters of events occurring close together both temporally and spatially is important in finding outbreaks of disease within a geographic region. The Knox statistic is often used in epidemiology to test for space-time clustering retrospectively. For quicker detection of epidemics, prospective methods should be used in which observed events in space and time are assessed as they are recorded. The cumulative sum (CUSUM) surveillance method for monitoring the local Knox statistic tests for space-time clustering each time there is an incoming observation. We consider the design of this control chart by determining the in-control average run length (ARL) performance of the CUSUM chart for different space and time closeness thresholds as well as for different control limit values. We also explain the effect of population density and region shape on the in-control ARL and discuss other distributional issues that should be considered when implementing this method.

  20. A Modeling and Observational Framework for Diagnosing Local Land-Atmosphere Coupling on Diurnal Time Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santanello, J. A.; Peters-Lidard, C. D.; Kumar, S.

    2009-12-01

    Land-atmosphere interactions play a critical role in determining the diurnal evolution of both planetary boundary layer (PBL) and land surface temperature and moisture states. The degree of coupling between the land surface and PBL in numerical weather prediction and climate models remains largely unexplored and undiagnosed due to the complex interactions and feedbacks present across a range of scales. Further, uncoupled systems or experiments (e.g., the Project for Intercomparison of Land Parameterization Schemes, PILPS) may lead to inaccurate water and energy cycle process understanding by neglecting feedback processes such as PBL-top entrainment. In this study, a framework for diagnosing local land-atmosphere coupling is presented using a coupled mesoscale model with a suite of PBL and land surface model (LSM) options along with observations during the summer of 2006 and 2007 in the Southern Great Plains. Specifically, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model has been coupled to the Land Information System (LIS), which provides a flexible and high-resolution representation and initialization of land surface physics and states. Mixing diagram diagnostics based on the evolution of 2m temperature and humidity are examined for the dry/wet extremes of this region, along with the sensitivity of PBL-LSM coupling to perturbations in soil moisture. As such, this methodology provides a potential pathway to study factors controlling local land-atmosphere coupling (LoCo) using the LIS-WRF system, which will serve as a testbed for future experiments to evaluate coupling diagnostics within the community.