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Sample records for desired time localization

  1. Time to Go Local!

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Time to Go Local! Past Issues / Winter 2007 Table of Contents ... MedlinePlus.gov health topic pages, you will find "Go Local" links that take you to information about ...

  2. Subjective Age in Early Adolescence: Relationships with Chronological Age, Pubertal Timing, Desired Age, and Problem Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubley, Anita M.; Arim, Rubab G.

    2012-01-01

    Subjective age generally refers to the age that one feels. In a cross-sectional questionnaire study of 245 adolescents ages 10-14 years, we examined (a) whether, and when, a cross-over in subjective age occurs, (b) differences in subjective age among pubertal timing groups, (c) correlations between subjective age and each of desired age and five…

  3. Eye Movements Reveal the Time-Course of Anticipating Behaviour Based on Complex, Conflicting Desires

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Heather J.; Breheny, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The time-course of representing others' perspectives is inconclusive across the currently available models of ToM processing. We report two visual-world studies investigating how knowledge about a character's basic preferences (e.g. "Tom's favourite colour is pink") and higher-order desires (his wish to keep this preference secret) compete to…

  4. Eye movements reveal the time-course of anticipating behaviour based on complex, conflicting desires.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Heather J; Breheny, Richard

    2011-05-01

    The time-course of representing others' perspectives is inconclusive across the currently available models of ToM processing. We report two visual-world studies investigating how knowledge about a character's basic preferences (e.g. Tom's favourite colour is pink) and higher-order desires (his wish to keep this preference secret) compete to influence online expectations about subsequent behaviour. Participants' eye movements around a visual scene were tracked while they listened to auditory narratives. While clear differences in anticipatory visual biases emerged between conditions in Experiment 1, post-hoc analyses testing the strength of the relevant biases suggested a discrepancy in the time-course of predicting appropriate referents within the different contexts. Specifically, predictions to the target emerged very early when there was no conflict between the character's basic preferences and higher-order desires, but appeared to be relatively delayed when comprehenders were provided with conflicting information about that character's desire to keep a secret. However, a second experiment demonstrated that this apparent 'cognitive cost' in inferring behaviour based on higher-order desires was in fact driven by low-level features between the context sentence and visual scene. Taken together, these results suggest that healthy adults are able to make complex higher-order ToM inferences without the need to call on costly cognitive processes. Results are discussed relative to previous accounts of ToM and language processing.

  5. Synchronization extends the life time of the desired behavior of globally coupled systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapitaniak, Marcin; Lazarek, Mateusz; Nielaczny, Michal; Czolczynski, Krzysztof; Perlikowski, Przemyslaw; Kapitaniak, Tomasz

    2014-03-01

    Synchronization occurs widely in natural and technological world, but it has not been widely used to extend the life time of the desirable behavior of the coupled systems. Here we consider the globally coupled system consisting of n units and show that the initial synchronous state extends the lifetime of desired behavior of the coupled system in the case when the excitation of one or few units is suddenly (breakdown of energy supply) or gradually (as the effect of aging and fatigue) switched off. We give evidence that for the properly chosen coupling the energy transfer from the excited units allows unexcited units to operate in the desired manner. As proof of concept, we examine the system of coupled externally excited rotating pendula. After the partial excitation switch off the initial complete synchronization of all pendula is replaced by phase synchronization with a constant phase shift between the clusters of excited and unexcited pendula. Our results show that the described extension of the system's life time occurs for the wide range of coupling parameters and is robust to the external perturbations.

  6. Adaptive Decomposition of Highly Resolved Time Series into Local and Non‐local Components

    EPA Science Inventory

    Highly time-resolved air monitoring data are widely being collected over long time horizons in order to characterizeambient and near-source air quality trends. In many applications, it is desirable to split the time-resolved data into two ormore components (e.g., local and region...

  7. Local-time representation of path integrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jizba, Petr; Zatloukal, Václav

    2015-12-01

    We derive a local-time path-integral representation for a generic one-dimensional time-independent system. In particular, we show how to rephrase the matrix elements of the Bloch density matrix as a path integral over x -dependent local-time profiles. The latter quantify the time that the sample paths x (t ) in the Feynman path integral spend in the vicinity of an arbitrary point x . Generalization of the local-time representation that includes arbitrary functionals of the local time is also provided. We argue that the results obtained represent a powerful alternative to the traditional Feynman-Kac formula, particularly in the high- and low-temperature regimes. To illustrate this point, we apply our local-time representation to analyze the asymptotic behavior of the Bloch density matrix at low temperatures. Further salient issues, such as connections with the Sturm-Liouville theory and the Rayleigh-Ritz variational principle, are also discussed.

  8. Local-time representation of path integrals.

    PubMed

    Jizba, Petr; Zatloukal, Václav

    2015-12-01

    We derive a local-time path-integral representation for a generic one-dimensional time-independent system. In particular, we show how to rephrase the matrix elements of the Bloch density matrix as a path integral over x-dependent local-time profiles. The latter quantify the time that the sample paths x(t) in the Feynman path integral spend in the vicinity of an arbitrary point x. Generalization of the local-time representation that includes arbitrary functionals of the local time is also provided. We argue that the results obtained represent a powerful alternative to the traditional Feynman-Kac formula, particularly in the high- and low-temperature regimes. To illustrate this point, we apply our local-time representation to analyze the asymptotic behavior of the Bloch density matrix at low temperatures. Further salient issues, such as connections with the Sturm-Liouville theory and the Rayleigh-Ritz variational principle, are also discussed.

  9. Energy Deposition in the Body from External Sources to Chemically Trigger Cellular Responses in Desired Localized Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibsen, Stuart Duncan

    One of the major challenges of modern chemotherapy is to deliver a therapeutic dose of active drug to the tumor tissue without causing systemic exposure. The realization of this goal could considerably reduce the negative side effects experienced by patients. The work conducted in this thesis looks at two different approaches to trigger drug activation with the use of external energy sources. This avoids the challenges of relying solely on biochemical and environmental differences as triggers. The two triggers used were low intensity focused ultrasound and 365 nm light delivered with a custom designed needle UV LED fiber optic system. Both can be localized within the body to spatially highlight just the tumor tissue creating a stark differentiation between it and the healthy tissue. The 365nm light based delivery scheme developed here was the first demonstration of a photoactivatable doxorubicin (DOX) prodrug called DOX-PCB. DOX-PCB was shown to be 200 times less toxic than DOX and could be activated to a fully therapeutic form upon exposure to 365nm light. The pharmacokinetics showed a circulation half life comparable to that of DOX and stability against in vivo metabolic degradation. The 365 nm light was shown to adequately irradiate a centimeter of tumor tissue and cause localized activation. In vivo tumors exposed to the light had significantly higher doses of DOX than unexposed control tumors in the same individual. The second delivery scheme made use of focused ultrasound to activate echogenic drug delivery vehicles. These vehicles were the first demonstration of encapsulating microbubbles within liposomes. Specially designed optical equipment documented that the microbubble was ultrasound responsive. The microbubble was shown to violently cavitate and rupture the outer liposome membrane releasing the payload contents. The three dimensional localization of activation was demonstrated in tissue phantoms. The strengths of these two delivery schemes could

  10. Anderson localization in the time domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacha, Krzysztof; Delande, Dominique

    2016-08-01

    In analogy with the usual Anderson localization taking place in time-independent disordered quantum systems where the disorder acts in configuration space, systems exposed to temporally disordered potentials can display Anderson localization in the time domain. We demonstrate this phenomenon with one-dimensional examples where a temporally disordered potential induces localization during the quantum evolution of wave packets, in contrast with a fully delocalized classical dynamics. This is an example of a time crystal phenomenon, i.e., a crystalline behavior in the time domain.

  11. Local-time representation of path integrals.

    PubMed

    Jizba, Petr; Zatloukal, Václav

    2015-12-01

    We derive a local-time path-integral representation for a generic one-dimensional time-independent system. In particular, we show how to rephrase the matrix elements of the Bloch density matrix as a path integral over x-dependent local-time profiles. The latter quantify the time that the sample paths x(t) in the Feynman path integral spend in the vicinity of an arbitrary point x. Generalization of the local-time representation that includes arbitrary functionals of the local time is also provided. We argue that the results obtained represent a powerful alternative to the traditional Feynman-Kac formula, particularly in the high- and low-temperature regimes. To illustrate this point, we apply our local-time representation to analyze the asymptotic behavior of the Bloch density matrix at low temperatures. Further salient issues, such as connections with the Sturm-Liouville theory and the Rayleigh-Ritz variational principle, are also discussed. PMID:26764662

  12. Sources of Local Time Asymmetries in Magnetodiscs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arridge, C. S.; Kane, M.; Sergis, N.; Khurana, K. K.; Jackman, C. M.

    2015-04-01

    The rapidly rotating magnetospheres at Jupiter and Saturn contain a near-equatorial thin current sheet over most local times known as the magnetodisc, resembling a wrapped-up magnetotail. The Pioneer, Voyager, Ulysses, Galileo, Cassini and New Horizons spacecraft at Jupiter and Saturn have provided extensive datasets from which to observationally identify local time asymmetries in these magnetodiscs. Imaging in the infrared and ultraviolet from ground- and space-based instruments have also revealed the presence of local time asymmetries in the aurora which therefore must map to local time asymmetries in the magnetosphere. Asymmetries are found in (i) the configuration of the magnetic field and magnetospheric currents, where a thicker disc is found in the noon and dusk sectors; (ii) plasma flows where the plasma flow has local time-dependent radial components; (iii) a thicker plasma sheet in the dusk sector. Many of these features are also reproduced in global MHD simulations. Several models have been developed to interpret these various observations and typically fall into two groups: ones which invoke coupling with the solar wind (via reconnection or viscous processes) and ones which invoke internal rotational processes operating inside an asymmetrical external boundary. In this paper we review these observational in situ findings, review the models which seek to explain them, and highlight open questions and directions for future work.

  13. Local finite-time Lyapunov exponent, local sampling and probabilistic source and destination regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BozorgMagham, A. E.; Ross, S. D.; Schmale, D. G., III

    2015-11-01

    The finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) is a powerful Lagrangian concept widely used for describing large-scale flow patterns and transport phenomena. However, field experiments usually have modest scales. Therefore, it is necessary to bridge the gap between the concept of FTLE and field experiments. In this paper, two independent observations are discussed: (i) approximation of the local FTLE time series at a fixed location as a function of known distances between the destination (or source) points of released (or collected) particles and local velocity, and (ii) estimation of the distances between the destination (or source) points of the released (or collected) particles when consecutive release (or sampling) events are performed at a fixed location. These two observations lay the groundwork for an ansatz methodology that can practically assist in field experiments where consecutive samples are collected at a fixed location, and it is desirable to attribute source locations to the collected particles, and also in planning of optimal local sampling of passive particles for maximal diversity monitoring of atmospheric assemblages of microorganisms. In addition to deterministic flows, the more realistic case of unresolved turbulence and low-resolution flow data that yield probabilistic source (or destination) regions are studied. It is shown that, similar to deterministic flows, Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS) and local FTLE can describe the separation of probabilistic source (or destination) regions corresponding to consecutively collected (or released) particles.

  14. Space-time prospective surveillance based on Knox local statistics.

    PubMed

    Piroutek, Aline; Assunção, Renato; Paiva, Thaís

    2014-07-20

    We studied a surveillance system to prospectively monitor the emergence of space-time clusters in point pattern of disease events. Its aim is to detect a cluster as soon as possible after its emergence, and it is also desired to keep the rate of false alarms at a controlled level. The method is a modification from a previous proposal based on a local version of the Knox statistic and which examined a retrospective surveillance scenario, looking for the earliest time in the past that change could have been deemed to occur. We modify this method to take into account the prospective case, being able then to fix the serious difficulties found by other authors. We evaluated the surveillance system in several scenarios, including without and with emerging clusters, checking distributional assumptions, and assessing performance impacts of different emergence times, shapes, extent, and intensity of the emerging clusters. Our conclusion is that the space-time surveillance system based on local Knox statistics is very efficient in its statistical properties, and it is appealing to epidemiologists and public health officials because it is simple to use and easily understandable. This makes it a promising candidate to practical use by public health official agencies.

  15. A comparative study of factors influencing decisions on desired family size among married men and women in Bokkos, a rural local government area in Plateau state.

    PubMed

    Kahansim, Makshwar L; Hadejia, Idris S; Sambo, Mohammed N

    2013-03-01

    The total fertility rate of Nigerian women has remained high at 5.7. This is even higher for women in rural areas. Men and women in rural areas desire more children than those in urban areas. This study was aimed at describing and comparing the factors that influence family size decisions among men and women in Bokkos, a rural Local Government Area in Plateau state, Nigeria. A cross sectional descriptive comparative study was used. Data was collected using structured interviewer administered questionnaires. Seventy two percent of women and 83.6% of men who desire to have 1-4 children had at least a secondary school education. Close to seventy percent of both men and women would have fewer children if they are certain of their survival to adulthood. Over 50% of the respondents believe that the husbands should have the final say on family size decisions. Preference for male children influences decisions on family size among men and women in the study population.

  16. The Global-Local Nexus: Desired History Curriculum Components from the Perspective of Future Teachers in a Conflict-Ridden Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yemini, Miri; Yardeni-Kuperberg, Oria; Natur, Nazie

    2015-01-01

    This study reveals the views of future teachers from Israeli-Jewish and Palestinian-Arab communities regarding the desired school history curricula. We applied a quantitative and qualitative survey to a sample of 528 students studying in teachers' preparation programmes in three higher education institutions: one research university with a…

  17. Local Impacts of Religious Discourses on Rights to Express Same-Sex Sexual Desires in Peri-Urban Rio de Janeiro1

    PubMed Central

    García, Jonathan; Laboy, Miguel Muñoz; de Almeida, Vagner; Parker, Richard

    2009-01-01

    This article reports on a study that examined how religious discourses of inclusion and exclusion—in Roman Catholic, evangelical Protestant, and Afro-Brazilian religious traditions—affected people’s rights to express same-sex sexual desires, behaviors, and identities in the socioeconomically marginalized urban periphery of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Using extended ethnographic observation of institutions and religious events over a period of 2 years, the authors identified how sexual rights were constructed within religious discourses and conducted ethnographic interviews with 45 religious leaders. In the low-income and violent urban periphery of Rio de Janeiro, religious leaders and institutions play key roles in molding community inclusion and exclusion. A comparison of the 3 major religious denominations shows a diversity of discourses about same-sex sexual desires and their impacts on community formation. PMID:20161503

  18. Desire, Democracy and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thogersen, Ulla

    2011-01-01

    In recent years the concept of eros has found its way back into educational literature with the aim of integrating human desires into educational theories and counteracting a devaluation of emotional life. This paper holds the view that this integration is important because desire expresses a fundamental way of relating to the world. However, part…

  19. Direct Observations of PMC Local Time Variations by Aura OMI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLand, Matthew T.; Shettle, Eric P.; Thomas, Gary E.; Olivero, John J.

    2010-01-01

    The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on the Aura satellite obtains unique measurements for polar mesospheric cloud (PMC) analysis. Its wide cross-track viewing swath and high along-track spatial resolution makes it possible to directly evaluate PMC occurrence frequency and brightness variations between 6S" and 8S' latitude as a function of local time over a 12-14 h continuous period. OMI PMC local time variations are closely coupled to concurrent variations in measurement scattering angle, so that ice phase function effects must be considered when interpreting the observations. Two different phase functions corresponding to bright and faint clouds are examined in this analysis. OMI observations show maximum frequency and albedo values at 8-10 h local time in the Northern Hemisphere, with decreasing amplitude at higher latitudes. Southern Hemisphere values reach a minimum at 18-20 h LT. Larger variations are seen in Northern Hemisphere data. No statistically significant longitudinal dependence was seen.

  20. A desire for parsimony.

    PubMed

    Cookson, Lawrence J

    2013-12-01

    An understanding of wildness is being developed as a quality of interactive processing that increases survival opportunities in nature. A link is made between the need to improve interactive quality for wildness, and cognitive desires and interests in art, music, religion and philosophy as these can also be seen as attempts to improve interactive quality internally and externally. Interactive quality can be improved through gains in parsimony, that is, simplifications in the organisation of skills. The importance of parsimony in evolution is discussed, along with indicators of an internal parsimony desire that experiences joy if achieved through processes such as insight and understanding. A mechanism for the production and measurement of the parsimony desire is proposed, based on the number of subcortical pleasure hotspots that can be stimulated at once within the 'archipelago' available in the limbic system. PMID:25379257

  1. A Desire for Parsimony

    PubMed Central

    Cookson, Lawrence J.

    2013-01-01

    An understanding of wildness is being developed as a quality of interactive processing that increases survival opportunities in nature. A link is made between the need to improve interactive quality for wildness, and cognitive desires and interests in art, music, religion and philosophy as these can also be seen as attempts to improve interactive quality internally and externally. Interactive quality can be improved through gains in parsimony, that is, simplifications in the organisation of skills. The importance of parsimony in evolution is discussed, along with indicators of an internal parsimony desire that experiences joy if achieved through processes such as insight and understanding. A mechanism for the production and measurement of the parsimony desire is proposed, based on the number of subcortical pleasure hotspots that can be stimulated at once within the ‘archipelago’ available in the limbic system. PMID:25379257

  2. Hypoactive Sexual Desire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Helen S.

    1977-01-01

    Low-libido disorders are highly prevalent, may be extremely distressful to patients and their partners, and influence the course and prognosis of therapy. This paper focuses on this important aspect of human sexuality. Some clinical features of hypoactive sexual desire are described, and some hypotheses about etiology and prognosis are presented.…

  3. Schooling of Desire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohlin, Karen E.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses education in virtue, inviting college professors to see themselves not as "meddlers" in students' private lives but rather as interlocutors who prompt students to examine their desires--not simply what they hope to gain, but who they hope to become as a result of their university education. Focuses on the philosophies of Plato,…

  4. Anderson localization and Mott insulator phase in the time domain.

    PubMed

    Sacha, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Particles in space periodic potentials constitute standard models for investigation of crystalline phenomena in solid state physics. Time periodicity of periodically driven systems is a close analogue of space periodicity of solid state crystals. There is an intriguing question if solid state phenomena can be observed in the time domain. Here we show that wave-packets localized on resonant classical trajectories of periodically driven systems are ideal elements to realize Anderson localization or Mott insulator phase in the time domain. Uniform superpositions of the wave-packets form stationary states of a periodically driven particle. However, an additional perturbation that fluctuates in time results in disorder in time and Anderson localization effects emerge. Switching to many-particle systems we observe that depending on how strong particle interactions are, stationary states can be Bose-Einstein condensates or single Fock states where definite numbers of particles occupy the periodically evolving wave-packets. Our study shows that non-trivial crystal-like phenomena can be observed in the time domain. PMID:26074169

  5. Anderson localization and Mott insulator phase in the time domain

    PubMed Central

    Sacha, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Particles in space periodic potentials constitute standard models for investigation of crystalline phenomena in solid state physics. Time periodicity of periodically driven systems is a close analogue of space periodicity of solid state crystals. There is an intriguing question if solid state phenomena can be observed in the time domain. Here we show that wave-packets localized on resonant classical trajectories of periodically driven systems are ideal elements to realize Anderson localization or Mott insulator phase in the time domain. Uniform superpositions of the wave-packets form stationary states of a periodically driven particle. However, an additional perturbation that fluctuates in time results in disorder in time and Anderson localization effects emerge. Switching to many-particle systems we observe that depending on how strong particle interactions are, stationary states can be Bose-Einstein condensates or single Fock states where definite numbers of particles occupy the periodically evolving wave-packets. Our study shows that non-trivial crystal-like phenomena can be observed in the time domain. PMID:26074169

  6. Time-resolved local strain tracking microscopy for cell mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydin, O.; Aksoy, B.; Akalin, O. B.; Bayraktar, H.; Alaca, B. E.

    2016-02-01

    A uniaxial cell stretching technique to measure time-resolved local substrate strain while simultaneously imaging adherent cells is presented. The experimental setup comprises a uniaxial stretcher platform compatible with inverted microscopy and transparent elastomer samples with embedded fluorescent beads. This integration enables the acquisition of real-time spatiotemporal data, which is then processed using a single-particle tracking algorithm to track the positions of fluorescent beads for the subsequent computation of local strain. The present local strain tracking method is demonstrated using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) samples of rectangular and dogbone geometries. The comparison of experimental results and finite element simulations for the two sample geometries illustrates the capability of the present system to accurately quantify local deformation even when the strain distribution is non-uniform over the sample. For a regular dogbone sample, the experimentally obtained value of local strain at the center of the sample is 77%, while the average strain calculated using the applied cross-head displacement is 48%. This observation indicates that considerable errors may arise when cross-head measurement is utilized to estimate strain in the case of non-uniform sample geometry. Finally, the compatibility of the proposed platform with biological samples is tested using a unibody PDMS sample with a well to contain cells and culture media. HeLa S3 cells are plated on collagen-coated samples and cell adhesion and proliferation are observed. Samples with adherent cells are then stretched to demonstrate simultaneous cell imaging and tracking of embedded fluorescent beads.

  7. Average waiting time in FDDI networks with local priorities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gercek, Gokhan

    1994-01-01

    A method is introduced to compute the average queuing delay experienced by different priority group messages in an FDDI node. It is assumed that no FDDI MAC layer priorities are used. Instead, a priority structure is introduced to the messages at a higher protocol layer (e.g. network layer) locally. Such a method was planned to be used in Space Station Freedom FDDI network. Conservation of the average waiting time is used as the key concept in computing average queuing delays. It is shown that local priority assignments are feasable specially when the traffic distribution is asymmetric in the FDDI network.

  8. Sexual Desire Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Keith A.

    2008-01-01

    Hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) and sexual aversion disorder (SAD) are an under-diagnosed group of disorders that affect men and women. Despite their prevalence, these two disorders are often not addressed by healthcare providers and patients due their private and awkward nature. As physicians, we need to move beyond our own unease in order to adequately address our patients’ sexual problems and implement appropriate treatment. Using the Sexual Response Cycle as the model of the physiological changes of humans during sexual stimulation and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition this article will review the current literature on the desire disorders focusing on prevalence, etiology, and treatment. PMID:19727285

  9. OFDM, Laurent operators, and time-frequency localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strohmer, Thomas

    2000-12-01

    Orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) has gained considerable interest as an efficient technology for high- date-data transmission over wireless channels. The design of pulse shapes that are well-localized in the time-frequency plane is of great importance in order to combat intersymbol interference and interchannel interference caused by the mobile radio channel. Recently proposed methods to construct such well-localized functions are utilizing the link between OFDM and Gabor systems. We derive a theoretical framework that shows why and under which conditions these methods will yield well-localized pulse shapes. In our analysis we exploit the connection between Gabor systems, Laurent operators and the classical work of Gelfand, Raikov, and Shilov on commutative Banach algebras. In the language of Gabor analysis we derive a general condition under which the dual window and the canonical tight window inherit the decay properties of the analysis window.

  10. Towards Real-Time Global Localization in Dynamic Unstructured Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kanji; Kondo, Eiji

    Global localization is the problem in which a mobile robot has to estimate the self-position with respect to an a priori given map as it navigates without using any a priori knowledge of the initial self-position. Previous studies on global localization mainly focused on static environments, where the a priori map is almost correct. On the other hand, in dynamic environments, there are several sources of computational complexity. For example, not only the self-position but also the map should be estimated due to the map errors. The main contribution of this paper is to address such computational complexity by decomposing our global localization problem into two smaller subproblems, and solving the subproblems in a practical computation time. Also, we demonstrate the robustness and the efficiency of the proposed method in various large and complex environments.

  11. Local time displacement as a symmetry of nature in flat space-time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Willard E.; Townsend, Lawrence W.

    1988-01-01

    Local time displacement is shown to be a true symmetry of Minkowskian physics, thereby demonstrating the empirical equivalence of different choices of the clock synchronization parameter in generalized Lorentz transformations.

  12. Time-resolved local strain tracking microscopy for cell mechanics.

    PubMed

    Aydin, O; Aksoy, B; Akalin, O B; Bayraktar, H; Alaca, B E

    2016-02-01

    A uniaxial cell stretching technique to measure time-resolved local substrate strain while simultaneously imaging adherent cells is presented. The experimental setup comprises a uniaxial stretcher platform compatible with inverted microscopy and transparent elastomer samples with embedded fluorescent beads. This integration enables the acquisition of real-time spatiotemporal data, which is then processed using a single-particle tracking algorithm to track the positions of fluorescent beads for the subsequent computation of local strain. The present local strain tracking method is demonstrated using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) samples of rectangular and dogbone geometries. The comparison of experimental results and finite element simulations for the two sample geometries illustrates the capability of the present system to accurately quantify local deformation even when the strain distribution is non-uniform over the sample. For a regular dogbone sample, the experimentally obtained value of local strain at the center of the sample is 77%, while the average strain calculated using the applied cross-head displacement is 48%. This observation indicates that considerable errors may arise when cross-head measurement is utilized to estimate strain in the case of non-uniform sample geometry. Finally, the compatibility of the proposed platform with biological samples is tested using a unibody PDMS sample with a well to contain cells and culture media. HeLa S3 cells are plated on collagen-coated samples and cell adhesion and proliferation are observed. Samples with adherent cells are then stretched to demonstrate simultaneous cell imaging and tracking of embedded fluorescent beads. PMID:26931864

  13. Local finite time Lyapunov exponent, local sampling and probabilistic source and destination regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BozorgMagham, A. E.; Ross, S. D.; Schmale, D. G., III

    2015-05-01

    The time-varying finite time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) is a powerful Lagrangian concept widely used for describing large-scale flow patterns and transport phenomena. However, field experiments usually have modest scales. Therefore, it is necessary to bridge between the powerful concept of FTLE and (local) field experiments. In this paper a new interpretation of the local FTLE, the time series of a FTLE field at a fixed location, is proposed. This concept can practically assist in field experiments where samples are collected at a fixed location and it is necessary to attribute long distance transport phenomena and location of source points to the characteristic variation of the sampled particles. Also, results of this study have the potential to aid in planning of optimal local sampling of passive particles for maximal diversity monitoring of assemblages of microorganisms. Assuming a deterministic flow field, one can use the proposed theorem to (i) estimate the differential distances between the source (or destination) points of the collected (or released) particles when consecutive sampling (or releasing) is performed at a fixed location, (ii) estimate the local FTLE as a function of known differential distances between the source (or destination) points. In addition to the deterministic flows, the more realistic case of unresolved turbulence and low resolution flow data that yield the probabilistic source (or destination) regions are studied. It is shown that similar to deterministic flows, Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS) separate probabilistic source (or destination) regions corresponding to consecutive collected (or released) particles.

  14. Shear wave arrival time estimates correlate with local speckle pattern.

    PubMed

    Mcaleavey, Stephen A; Osapoetra, Laurentius O; Langdon, Jonathan

    2015-12-01

    We present simulation and phantom studies demonstrating a strong correlation between errors in shear wave arrival time estimates and the lateral position of the local speckle pattern in targets with fully developed speckle. We hypothesize that the observed arrival time variations are largely due to the underlying speckle pattern, and call the effect speckle bias. Arrival time estimation is a key step in quantitative shear wave elastography, performed by tracking tissue motion via cross-correlation of RF ultrasound echoes or similar methods. Variations in scatterer strength and interference of echoes from scatterers within the tracking beam result in an echo that does not necessarily describe the average motion within the beam, but one favoring areas of constructive interference and strong scattering. A swept-receive image, formed by fixing the transmit beam and sweeping the receive aperture over the region of interest, is used to estimate the local speckle pattern. Metrics for the lateral position of the speckle are found to correlate strongly (r > 0.7) with the estimated shear wave arrival times both in simulations and in phantoms. Lateral weighting of the swept-receive pattern improved the correlation between arrival time estimates and speckle position. The simulations indicate that high RF echo correlation does not equate to an accurate shear wave arrival time estimate-a high correlation coefficient indicates that motion is being tracked with high precision, but the location tracked is uncertain within the tracking beam width. The presence of a strong on-axis speckle is seen to imply high RF correlation and low bias. The converse does not appear to be true-highly correlated RF echoes can still produce biased arrival time estimates. The shear wave arrival time bias is relatively stable with variations in shear wave amplitude and sign (-20 μm to 20 μm simulated) compared with the variation with different speckle realizations obtained along a given tracking

  15. Music Education Desire(ing): Language, Literacy, and Lieder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    Issues of desire in music education are integral and anathema to the profession. Constituted of and by desire, we bodily engage music emotionally and cognitively; yet references to the body are limited to how it may be better managed in order to produce more satisfactory (desired) sounds, thus disciplining desire as we focus on the content of…

  16. Producing desired ice faces

    PubMed Central

    Shultz, Mary Jane; Brumberg, Alexandra; Bisson, Patrick J.; Shultz, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    The ability to prepare single-crystal faces has become central to developing and testing models for chemistry at interfaces, spectacularly demonstrated by heterogeneous catalysis and nanoscience. This ability has been hampered for hexagonal ice, Ih––a fundamental hydrogen-bonded surface––due to two characteristics of ice: ice does not readily cleave along a crystal lattice plane and properties of ice grown on a substrate can differ significantly from those of neat ice. This work describes laboratory-based methods both to determine the Ih crystal lattice orientation relative to a surface and to use that orientation to prepare any desired face. The work builds on previous results attaining nearly 100% yield of high-quality, single-crystal boules. With these methods, researchers can prepare authentic, single-crystal ice surfaces for numerous studies including uptake measurements, surface reactivity, and catalytic activity of this ubiquitous, fundamental solid. PMID:26512102

  17. Producing desired ice faces.

    PubMed

    Shultz, Mary Jane; Brumberg, Alexandra; Bisson, Patrick J; Shultz, Ryan

    2015-11-10

    The ability to prepare single-crystal faces has become central to developing and testing models for chemistry at interfaces, spectacularly demonstrated by heterogeneous catalysis and nanoscience. This ability has been hampered for hexagonal ice, Ih--a fundamental hydrogen-bonded surface--due to two characteristics of ice: ice does not readily cleave along a crystal lattice plane and properties of ice grown on a substrate can differ significantly from those of neat ice. This work describes laboratory-based methods both to determine the Ih crystal lattice orientation relative to a surface and to use that orientation to prepare any desired face. The work builds on previous results attaining nearly 100% yield of high-quality, single-crystal boules. With these methods, researchers can prepare authentic, single-crystal ice surfaces for numerous studies including uptake measurements, surface reactivity, and catalytic activity of this ubiquitous, fundamental solid.

  18. Time-Localization of Forced Oscillations in Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Follum, James D.; Pierre, John W.

    2015-07-26

    In power systems forced oscillations occur, and identification of these oscillations is important for the proper operation of the system. Two of the parameters of interest in analyzing and addressing forced oscillations are the starting and ending points. To obtain estimates of these parameters, this paper proposes a time-localization algorithm based on the geometric analysis of the sample cross-correlation between the measured data and a complex sinusoid at the frequency of the forced oscillation. Results from simulated and measured synchrophasor data demonstrate the algorithm's ability to accurately estimate the starting and ending points of forced oscillations.

  19. Magnetopause characteristics at 0840-1040 hours local time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, D. J.

    1980-01-01

    An analysis of three-dimensional energetic particle distributions for 14 consecutive ISEE satellite orbits during magnetopause crossings and close approaches is presented. The data were collected from the Nov. 10 through Dec. 11, 1977, time period and cover local times of 0840 to 1040 hours. It was found that the magnetopause in this period defined by energetic particles can be represented as sharp particles and a well defined boundary for magnetospherically trapped particles for a wide range of magnetospheric activity and magnetosheath field conditions. The magnetopause position, orientation, and velocity were determined for all identified magnetopause crossings and close approaches using the technique of Williams (1979); it was found that the magnetopause is nearly always in motion with velocities ranging from near zero to at least plus or minus 25 km/s. Correlations with published plasma, magnetic field, and plasma wave magnetopause identifications show the energetic particle results to be accurate and an important factor in determining magnetopause characteristics and behavior.

  20. What controls the local time extent of flux transfer events?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milan, S. E.; Imber, S. M.; Carter, J. A.; Walach, M.-T.; Hubert, B.

    2016-02-01

    Flux transfer events (FTEs) are the manifestation of bursty and/or patchy magnetic reconnection at the magnetopause. We compare two sequences of the ionospheric signatures of flux transfer events observed in global auroral imagery and coherent ionospheric radar measurements. Both sequences were observed during very similar seasonal and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions, though with differing solar wind speed. A key observation is that the signatures differed considerably in their local time extent. The two periods are 26 August 1998, when the IMF had components BZ≈-10 nT and BY≈9 nT and the solar wind speed was VX≈650 km s-1, and 31 August 2005, IMF BZ≈-7 nT, BY≈17 nT, and VX≈380 km s-1. In the first case, the reconnection rate was estimated to be near 160 kV, and the FTE signatures extended across at least 7 h of magnetic local time (MLT) of the dayside polar cap boundary. In the second, a reconnection rate close to 80 kV was estimated, and the FTEs had a MLT extent of roughly 2 h. We discuss the ramifications of these differences for solar wind-magnetosphere coupling.

  1. Young Children's Understanding of Desire Formation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moses, Louis J.; Coon, Jennifer A.; Wusinich, Nicole

    2000-01-01

    Two studies examined preschoolers' appreciation of how mental states arise. Findings suggest that 3- and 5-year-olds better understood perception-generated beliefs and attitude-generated desires than physiology-generated desires. Four- and 5-year-olds better understood the effects of quantity of experience than of time of experience on…

  2. Efficient use of continuous, real-time prostate localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinowski, Kathleen T.; Noel, Camille; Roy, Meghana; Willoughby, Twyla; Djemi, Toufik; Jani, Shirish; Solberg, Timothy; Liu, David; Levine, Lisa; Parikh, Parag J.

    2008-09-01

    Recent technological advances make it possible to monitor prostate movement during radiation delivery. Using previously published data from 35 patients who underwent continuous localization during prostate cancer treatment, we simulated various interventions to identify the radiation-gating and patient-repositioning strategies that least prolonged the time to complete the daily treatment. Acceptable response protocols were those that resulted in at least 95% of patients' prostates remaining within the planning margins at least 95% of the time. Gating and repositioning were not necessary for margins of 7 or 10 mm because of the rarity of excursions at these margins. However, intervention was routinely necessary for margins of 3 and 5 mm. In simulated interventions for which the therapist could reposition the treatment couch without entering the room, the most time-efficient response protocol was to reposition the couch immediately after the prostate position was outside the treatment margins. In simulations in which the therapist had to enter the room to reposition the couch, overall treatment time could be reduced and accuracy could be increased by manually gating treatment for 11 and 21 s for 3- and 5-mm margins, respectively, before interrupting treatment to reposition the treatment couch.

  3. Local-time asymmetries in the Venus thermosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, M. J.; Stewart, A. I. F.; Bougher, S. W.

    1992-01-01

    Our current understanding of the global structure and dynamics of the Venus thermosphere is embodied in models such as the Venus Thermospheric General Circulation Model (VTGCM) and empirical composition models such as VIRA and VTS3. We have completed an analysis of ultraviolet images of Venus at 130 nm acquired by the Pioneer Venus Orbiter Ultraviolet Spectrometer (PVOUVS). We have examined 97 images spanning the 10-year period between 1980 and 1990, and have developed a technique for global radiative transfer modeling with which we create synthetic models of each image analyzed. We have developed a hypothesis for understanding the persistent local-time asymmetry observed as a signature of vertically propagating internal gravity waves interacting with the thermospheric SS-AS circulation. This hypothesis is presented.

  4. Energy-time entanglement, elements of reality, and local realism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jogenfors, Jonathan; Larsson, Jan-Åke

    2014-10-01

    The Franson interferometer, proposed in 1989 (Franson 1989 Phys. Rev. Lett. 62 2205-08), beautifully shows the counter-intuitive nature of light. The quantum description predicts sinusoidal interference for specific outcomes of the experiment, and these predictions can be verified in experiment. In the spirit of Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen it is possible to ask if the quantum-mechanical description (of this setup) can be considered complete. This question will be answered in detail in this paper, by delineating the quite complicated relation between energy-time entanglement experiments and Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) elements of reality. The mentioned sinusoidal interference pattern is the same as that giving a violation in the usual Bell experiment. Even so, depending on the precise requirements made on the local realist model, this can imply (a) no violation, (b) smaller violation than usual, or (c) full violation of the appropriate statistical bound. Alternatives include (a) using only the measurement outcomes as EPR elements of reality, (b) using the emission time as EPR element of reality, (c) using path realism, or (d) using a modified setup. This paper discusses the nature of these alternatives and how to choose between them. The subtleties of this discussion needs to be taken into account when designing and setting up experiments intended to test local realism. Furthermore, these considerations are also important for quantum communication, for example in Bell-inequality-based quantum cryptography, especially when aiming for device independence. This article is part of a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical devoted to ‘50 years of Bell’s theorem’.

  5. Long Term Mean Local Time of the Ascending Node Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKinley, David P.

    2007-01-01

    Significant error has been observed in the long term prediction of the Mean Local Time of the Ascending Node on the Aqua spacecraft. This error of approximately 90 seconds over a two year prediction is a complication in planning and timing of maneuvers for all members of the Earth Observing System Afternoon Constellation, which use Aqua's MLTAN as the reference for their inclination maneuvers. It was determined that the source of the prediction error was the lack of a solid Earth tide model in the operational force models. The Love Model of the solid Earth tide potential was used to derive analytic corrections to the inclination and right ascension of the ascending node of Aqua's Sun-synchronous orbit. Additionally, it was determined that the resonance between the Sun and orbit plane of the Sun-synchronous orbit is the primary driver of this error. The analytic corrections have been added to the operational force models for the Aqua spacecraft reducing the two-year 90-second error to less than 7 seconds.

  6. Cloning to reproduce desired genotypes.

    PubMed

    Westhusin, M E; Long, C R; Shin, T; Hill, J R; Looney, C R; Pryor, J H; Piedrahita, J A

    2001-01-01

    Cloned sheep, cattle, goats, pigs and mice have now been produced using somatic cells for nuclear transplantation. Animal cloning is still very inefficient with on average less than 10% of the cloned embryos transferred resulting in a live offspring. However successful cloning of a variety of different species and by a number of different laboratory groups has generated tremendous interest in reproducing desired genotypes. Some of these specific genotypes represent animal cell lines that have been genetically modified. In other cases there is a significant demand for cloning animals characterized by their inherent genetic value, for example prize livestock, household pets and rare or endangered species. A number of different variables may influence the ability to reproduce a specific genotype by cloning. These include species, source of recipient ova, cell type of nuclei donor, treatment of donor cells prior to nuclear transfer, and the techniques employed for nuclear transfer. At present, there is no solid evidence that suggests cloning will be limited to only a few specific animals, and in fact, most data collected to date suggests cloning will be applicable to a wide variety of different animals. The ability to reproduce any desired genotype by cloning will ultimately depend on the amount of time and resources invested in research.

  7. Local Time-Dependent Charging in a Perovskite Solar Cell.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Victor W; Guo, Yunlong; Tanaka, Hideyuki; Hermes, Ilka M; Li, Dan; Klasen, Alexander; Bretschneider, Simon A; Nakamura, Eiichi; Berger, Rüdiger; Weber, Stefan A L

    2016-08-01

    Efficient charge extraction within solar cells explicitly depends on the optimization of the internal interfaces. Potential barriers, unbalanced charge extraction, and interfacial trap states can prevent cells from reaching high power conversion efficiencies. In the case of perovskite solar cells, slow processes happening on time scales of seconds cause hysteresis in the current-voltage characteristics. In this work, we localized and investigated these slow processes using frequency-modulation Kelvin probe force microscopy (FM-KPFM) on cross sections of planar methylammonium lead iodide (MAPI) perovskite solar cells. FM-KPFM can map the charge density distribution and its dynamics at internal interfaces. Upon illumination, space charge layers formed at the interfaces of the selective contacts with the MAPI layer within several seconds. We observed distinct differences in the charging dynamics at the interfaces of MAPI with adjacent layers. Our results indicate that more than one process is involved in hysteresis. This finding is in agreement with recent simulation studies claiming that a combination of ion migration and interfacial trap states causes the hysteresis in perovskite solar cells. Such differences in the charging rates at different interfaces cannot be separated by conventional device measurements.

  8. Local Time-Dependent Charging in a Perovskite Solar Cell.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Victor W; Guo, Yunlong; Tanaka, Hideyuki; Hermes, Ilka M; Li, Dan; Klasen, Alexander; Bretschneider, Simon A; Nakamura, Eiichi; Berger, Rüdiger; Weber, Stefan A L

    2016-08-01

    Efficient charge extraction within solar cells explicitly depends on the optimization of the internal interfaces. Potential barriers, unbalanced charge extraction, and interfacial trap states can prevent cells from reaching high power conversion efficiencies. In the case of perovskite solar cells, slow processes happening on time scales of seconds cause hysteresis in the current-voltage characteristics. In this work, we localized and investigated these slow processes using frequency-modulation Kelvin probe force microscopy (FM-KPFM) on cross sections of planar methylammonium lead iodide (MAPI) perovskite solar cells. FM-KPFM can map the charge density distribution and its dynamics at internal interfaces. Upon illumination, space charge layers formed at the interfaces of the selective contacts with the MAPI layer within several seconds. We observed distinct differences in the charging dynamics at the interfaces of MAPI with adjacent layers. Our results indicate that more than one process is involved in hysteresis. This finding is in agreement with recent simulation studies claiming that a combination of ion migration and interfacial trap states causes the hysteresis in perovskite solar cells. Such differences in the charging rates at different interfaces cannot be separated by conventional device measurements. PMID:27377472

  9. Measured Response of Local, Mid-range and Far-range Discontinuities of Large Metal Groundplanes using Time Domain Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrader, T.; Münter, K.; Battermann, S.; Garbe, H.

    2005-05-01

    This work describes a method to detect and to quantify any local or mid-range discontinuity on extended flat metal planes. Often these planes are used for antenna calibration (open area test site - OATS) or the plane could be the ground of a semi-anechoic chamber used in Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) testing. The measurement uncertainty of antenna calibration or EMC testing depends on the groundplane's quality, which can be accessed using this method. A vector network analyzer with time-domain option is used to determine the complex-valued input scattering parameter S11,F of an aperture antenna in a monostatic setup. S;11,F contains the information desired about the discontinuities and is measured in the frequency domain with high dynamic range. But only after a linear filtering utilizing the Chirp-Z-Transform the obtained time-domain signal S11,T evidence of local and mid-range discontinuities.

  10. Local stability analysis of discrete-time, continuous-state, complex-valued recurrent neural networks with inner state feedback.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, Mohamad; Teich, Werner G; Lindner, Jürgen

    2014-04-01

    Recurrent neural networks (RNNs) are well known for their capability to minimize suitable cost functions without the need for a training phase. This is possible because they can be Lyapunov stable. Although the global stability analysis has attracted a lot of interest, local stability is desirable for specific applications. In this brief, we investigate the local asymptotical stability of two classes of discrete-time, continuous-state, complex-valued RNNs with parallel update and inner state feedback. We show that many already known results are special cases of the results obtained here. We also generalize some known results from the real-valued case to the complex-valued one. Finally, we investigate the stability in the presence of time-variant activation functions. Complex-valued activation functions in this brief are separable with respect to the real and imaginary parts.

  11. Time-dependent local density approximation study of attosecond time delays in the photoionization of xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magrakvelidze, Maia; Madjet, Mohamed; Chakraborty, Himadri

    2016-05-01

    We investigate Wigner-Smith (WS) time delays of the photoionization from various subshells of xenon using the time-dependent local density approximation (TDLDA) with the Leeuwen and Baerends exchange-correlation functional. At the 4d giant dipole resonance region as well as near all the Cooper minimum anti-resonances in 5p, 5s and 4d photoemissions, effects of electron correlations uniquely determine the shapes of the emission quantum phase. The Wigner-Smith time delay derived from this phase indicates significant variations as a function of energy. The results qualitatively support our TDLDA predictions at the fullerene plasmon region and at 3p Cooper minimum in argon, and should encourage attosecond measurements of Xe photoemission via two-photon interferometric techniques, such as RABITT. The work is supported by the NSF, USA.

  12. Time-dependent fiber bundles with local load sharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, W. I.; Phoenix, S. L.

    2001-02-01

    Fiber bundle models, where fibers have random lifetimes depending on their load histories, are useful tools in explaining time-dependent failure in heterogeneous materials. Such models shed light on diverse phenomena such as fatigue in structural materials and earthquakes in geophysical settings. Various asymptotic and approximate theories have been developed for bundles with various geometries and fiber load-sharing mechanisms, but numerical verification has been hampered by severe computational demands in larger bundles. To gain insight at large size scales, interest has returned to idealized fiber bundle models in 1D. Such simplified models typically assume either equal load sharing (ELS) among survivors, or local load sharing (LLS) where a failed fiber redistributes its load onto its two nearest flanking survivors. Such models can often be solved exactly or asymptotically in increasing bundle size, N, yet still capture the essence of failure in real materials. The present work focuses on 1D bundles under LLS. As in previous works, a fiber has failure rate following a power law in its load level with breakdown exponent ρ. Surviving fibers under fixed loads have remaining lifetimes that are independent and exponentially distributed. We develop both new asymptotic theories and new computational algorithms that greatly increase the bundle sizes that can be treated in large replications (e.g., one million fibers in thousands of realizations). In particular we develop an algorithm that adapts several concepts and methods that are well-known among computer scientists, but relatively unknown among physicists, to dramatically increase the computational speed with no attendant loss of accuracy. We consider various regimes of ρ that yield drastically different behavior as N increases. For 1/2<=ρ<=1, ELS and LLS have remarkably similar behavior (they have identical lifetime distributions at ρ=1) with approximate Gaussian bundle lifetime statistics and a finite limiting

  13. Activating the Desire to Learn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullo, Bob

    2007-01-01

    Wouldn't your job be easier if students were just more interested in learning? Now, here's a book that will open your eyes to where the desire to learn actually comes from and what teachers can really do to activate it. Using stories from classroom teachers, counselors, administrators, and students, Bob Sullo explains why the desire to learn is…

  14. Paedophilia, Sexual Desire, and Perversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spiecker, Ben; Steutel, Jan

    1997-01-01

    Criticizes justifications given by pedophiles for having sex with children, including an analysis of "sexual desire" and "erotic." Raises the question of whether pedophile activities can ever be morally permissible. Uses principles of mutual consent and non-exploitation to answer negatively. Examines whether pedophile desires can be regarded as…

  15. Adaptive filters for monitoring localized brain activity from surface potential time series

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, M.E. . Signal and Image Processing Inst. TRW, Inc., Redondo Beach, CA ); Leahy, R.M. . Signal and Image Processing Inst.); Mosher, J.C. . Signal and Image Processing Inst. Lo

    1992-01-01

    We address the problem of processing electroencephalographic (EEG) data to monitor the time series of the components of a current dipole source vector at a given location in the head. This is the spatial filtering problem for vector sources in a lossy, three dimensional, zero delay medium. Dipolar and distributed sources at other than the desired location are canceled or attenuated with an adaptive linearly constrained minimum variance (LCMV) beamformer. Actual EEG data acquired from a human subject serves as the interference in a case where the desired source is simulated and superimposed on the actual data. It is shown that the LCMV beamformer extracts the desired dipole time series while effectively canceling the subjects interference.

  16. Adaptive filters for monitoring localized brain activity from surface potential time series

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, M.E. |; Leahy, R.M.; Mosher, J.C. |; Lewis, P.S.

    1992-12-01

    We address the problem of processing electroencephalographic (EEG) data to monitor the time series of the components of a current dipole source vector at a given location in the head. This is the spatial filtering problem for vector sources in a lossy, three dimensional, zero delay medium. Dipolar and distributed sources at other than the desired location are canceled or attenuated with an adaptive linearly constrained minimum variance (LCMV) beamformer. Actual EEG data acquired from a human subject serves as the interference in a case where the desired source is simulated and superimposed on the actual data. It is shown that the LCMV beamformer extracts the desired dipole time series while effectively canceling the subjects interference.

  17. Development and application of a local linearization algorithm for the integration of quaternion rate equations in real-time flight simulation problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, L. E., Jr.; Bowles, R. L.; Williams, L. H.

    1973-01-01

    High angular rates encountered in real-time flight simulation problems may require a more stable and accurate integration method than the classical methods normally used. A study was made to develop a general local linearization procedure of integrating dynamic system equations when using a digital computer in real-time. The procedure is specifically applied to the integration of the quaternion rate equations. For this application, results are compared to a classical second-order method. The local linearization approach is shown to have desirable stability characteristics and gives significant improvement in accuracy over the classical second-order integration methods.

  18. Distribution and timing of distant metastasis after local therapy in large cohort of patients with esophageal and esophagogastric junction cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shiozaki, Hironori; Sudo, Kazuki; Xiao, Lianchun; Wadhwa, Roopma; Elimova, Elena; Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Skinner, Heath D.; Lee, Jeffrey H.; Weston, Brian; Bhutani, Manoop S.; Blum, Mariela A.; Maru, Dipen M.; Ajani, Jaffer A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with localized esophageal and esophagogastric junction cancer (EAC) receive chemoradiation then surgery (trimodality; TMT) or definitive chemoradiation (bimodality; BMT). Since distant metastases (DMs) are common but the details of the DM distribution and timing in a large cohort have not been described. Methods 629 patients with localized EAC who had TMT or BMT were analyzed. Standard statistical methods were used to define the endpoints. Results The median follow-up time was 37.2 months (interquartile range: 17.8–65.0). Among 356 TMT patients, 33% (119) developed DM as their first relapse and among 273 patients with BMT, 40% (109) developed DM. 91% (TMT) and 96% (BMT) of DMs were diagnosed within 2 years of local therapy. The most common sites of DMs were: lung, distant nodes, liver, peritoneal cavity, bone, brain, and pleura in the order of frequency. The median overall survival of TMT patients with DM was 10.2 months (95% CI: 7.8–12.7) and that for BMT patients with DM was 7.8 months (95% CI: 5.7–9.9). Conclusions Following TMT or BMT, ≥33% of patients developed DMs and most DM occurred within 2 years (>90%) of local therapy. A clinical model that highly associates with high-risk for DM in TMT-eligible patients, prior to surgery, is desirable. PMID:24925190

  19. Time-independent quantum circuits with local interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifnashri, Sahand; Kianvash, Farzad; Nobakht, Jahangir; Karimipour, Vahid

    2016-06-01

    Heisenberg spin chains can act as quantum wires transferring quantum states either perfectly or with high fidelity. Gaussian packets of excitations passing through dual rails can encode the two states of a logical qubit, depending on which rail is empty and which rail is carrying the packet. With extra interactions in one or between different chains, one can introduce interaction zones in arrays of such chains, where specific one- or two-qubit gates act on any qubit which passes through these interaction zones. Therefore, universal quantum computation is made possible in a static way where no external control is needed. This scheme will then pave the way for a scalable way of quantum computation where specific hardware can be connected to make large quantum circuits. Our scheme is an improvement of a recent scheme where we borrowed an idea from quantum electrodynamics to replace nonlocal interactions between spin chains with local interactions mediated by an ancillary chain.

  20. Local feature saliency classifier for real-time intrusion monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buch, Norbert; Velastin, Sergio A.

    2014-07-01

    We propose a texture saliency classifier to detect people in a video frame by identifying salient texture regions. The image is classified into foreground and background in real time. No temporal image information is used during the classification. The system is used for the task of detecting people entering a sterile zone, which is a common scenario for visual surveillance. Testing is performed on the Imagery Library for Intelligent Detection Systems sterile zone benchmark dataset of the United Kingdom's Home Office. The basic classifier is extended by fusing its output with simple motion information, which significantly outperforms standard motion tracking. A lower detection time can be achieved by combining texture classification with Kalman filtering. The fusion approach running at 10 fps gives the highest result of F1=0.92 for the 24-h test dataset. The paper concludes with a detailed analysis of the computation time required for the different parts of the algorithm.

  1. Modeling of space-time focusing of localized nondiffracting pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamboni-Rached, Michel; Besieris, Ioannis M.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper we develop a method capable of modeling the space-time focusing of nondiffracting pulses. These pulses can possess arbitrary peak velocities and, in addition to being resistant to diffraction, can have their peak intensities and focusing positions chosen a priori. More specifically, we can choose multiple locations (spatial ranges) of space and time focalization; also, the pulse intensities can be chosen in advance. The pulsed wave solutions presented here can have very interesting applications in many different fields, such as free-space optical communications, remote sensing, medical apparatus, etc.

  2. Time Variable Gravity from Local Mascon Analysis of GRACE Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemoine, Frank G.; Luthcke, Scott B.; Klosko, Steven M.; Rowlands, David; Chinn, Douglas S.; McCarthy, John J.; Cox, Christopher M.; Williams, Terry A.; Pavlis, Despina E.

    2004-01-01

    We have analyzed GRACE Level 1-B data in 2003 and assessed a new approach for extracting time variable gravity that isolates the gravity signal in both time and space. The Level-1B satellite-to-satellite range rate (KBRR) data and accelerometry are processed in daily arcs using the precise orbit products produced by the GRACE team from GPS to calibrate both the accelerometer and KBRR data. We then adjusted select components of the intersatellite baseline vector for each data segment isolated to the region of interest. Herein, we solved for mass anomalies in 45 deg x 45 deg blocks over the Amazon and the nearby Atlantic Ocean and estimate mass flux in units of cm of water over each block. We show with this approach that we can recover mass anomalies on a submonthly basis with 10 to 15 day temporal resolution. We discuss the important issues related to this solution, including the size of the mascon blocks, the weight given to the temporal and spatial constraint used to stabalize the solutions, as well as the optimal correlation in time and distance. We compare the the mascon results with solutions obtained from the more standard approach using spherical harmonics and with independent hydrology models and lake data. This technique demonstrates that sub-monthly medium wavelength mass flux phenomena are well sensed by the hyper-precise line of sight velocity data produced from GRACE.

  3. Spike-Timing-Based Computation in Sound Localization

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Dan F. M.; Brette, Romain

    2010-01-01

    Spike timing is precise in the auditory system and it has been argued that it conveys information about auditory stimuli, in particular about the location of a sound source. However, beyond simple time differences, the way in which neurons might extract this information is unclear and the potential computational advantages are unknown. The computational difficulty of this task for an animal is to locate the source of an unexpected sound from two monaural signals that are highly dependent on the unknown source signal. In neuron models consisting of spectro-temporal filtering and spiking nonlinearity, we found that the binaural structure induced by spatialized sounds is mapped to synchrony patterns that depend on source location rather than on source signal. Location-specific synchrony patterns would then result in the activation of location-specific assemblies of postsynaptic neurons. We designed a spiking neuron model which exploited this principle to locate a variety of sound sources in a virtual acoustic environment using measured human head-related transfer functions. The model was able to accurately estimate the location of previously unknown sounds in both azimuth and elevation (including front/back discrimination) in a known acoustic environment. We found that multiple representations of different acoustic environments could coexist as sets of overlapping neural assemblies which could be associated with spatial locations by Hebbian learning. The model demonstrates the computational relevance of relative spike timing to extract spatial information about sources independently of the source signal. PMID:21085681

  4. Time-dependent local density measurements in unsteady flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenzie, R. L.; Monson, D. J.; Exberger, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    A laser-induced fluorescence technique for measuring the relative time-dependent density fluctuations in unsteady or turbulent flows is demonstrated. Using a 1.5-W continuous-wave Kr(+) laser, measurements have been obtained in 0.1-mm diameter by 1-mm-long sampling volumes in a Mach 3 flow of N2 seeded with biacetyl vapor. A signal amplitude resolution of 2% was achieved for a detection frequency bandwidth of 10 kHz. The measurement uncertainty was found to be dominated by noise behaving as photon statistical noise. The practical limits of signal-to-noise ratios have been characterized for a wide range of detection frequency bandwidths that encompasses those of interest in supersonic turbulence measurements.

  5. Time-dependent local density measurements in unsteady flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenzie, R. L.; Monson, D. J.; Exberger, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    A laser-induced fluorescence technique for measuring the relative time-dependent density fluctuations in unsteady or turbulent flows is demonstrated. Using a 1.5-W continuous-wave Kr(+) laser, measurements have been obtained in 0.1-mm-diameter by 1-mm-long sampling volumes in a Mach 3 flow of N2 seeded with biacetyl vapor. A signal amplitude resolution of 2% was achieved for a detection frequency bandwidth of 10 kHz. The measurement uncertainty was found to be dominated by noise behaving as photon statistical noise. The practical limits of signal-to-noise ratios have been characterized for a wide range of detection frequency bandwidths that encompasses those of interest in supersonic turbulence measurements.

  6. Becoming-Teachers: Desiring Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercieca, Duncan

    2012-01-01

    This article proposes a reading of the lives of teachers through a Deleuzian-Guattarian materialistic approach. By asking the question "what kind of life do teachers live?" this article reminds us that teachers sometimes welcome the imposed policies, procedures and programmes, the consequences of which remove them from students. This desire is…

  7. Criminal defendants who desire punishment.

    PubMed

    Appelbaum, K L

    1990-01-01

    Some defendants desire to be punished. Sometimes psychotic motivations underlie punishment-seeking behavior; sometimes they do not. The defendant's clinical status is relevant to his competency to stand trial and to waive other rights. These issues are illustrated by presentation of a case of a defendant who sought punishment. The importance of psychiatric assessments of these defendants is emphasized.

  8. A Compelling Desire for Deafness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veale, David

    2006-01-01

    A case is described of a patient who has a compelling and persistent desire to become deaf. She often kept cotton wool moistened with oil in her ears and was learning sign language. Living without sound appeared to be a severe form of avoidance behavior from hyperacusis and misophonia. She had a borderline personality disorder that was associated…

  9. Lifelong Learning, Policy and Desire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Heather

    2008-01-01

    Recent lifelong learning policies have been criticized for creating an illusion of freedom whilst simultaneously reducing choice. The concept of desire permits engagement with the conscious and unconscious drives that underpin individual decision-making, which direct the life course. Utilizing the ideas of Hume and Spinoza, the present article…

  10. Timing matters: sonar call groups facilitate target localization in bats

    PubMed Central

    Kothari, Ninad B.; Wohlgemuth, Melville J.; Hulgard, Katrine; Surlykke, Annemarie; Moss, Cynthia F.

    2014-01-01

    To successfully negotiate a cluttered environment, an echolocating bat must control the timing of motor behaviors in response to dynamic sensory information. Here we detail the big brown bat's adaptive temporal control over sonar call production for tracking prey, moving predictably or unpredictably, under different experimental conditions. We studied the adaptive control of vocal-motor behaviors in free-flying big brown bats, Eptesicus fuscus, as they captured tethered and free-flying insects, in open and cluttered environments. We also studied adaptive sonar behavior in bats trained to track moving targets from a resting position. In each of these experiments, bats adjusted the features of their calls to separate target and clutter. Under many task conditions, flying bats produced prominent sonar sound groups identified as clusters of echolocation pulses with relatively stable intervals, surrounded by longer pulse intervals. In experiments where bats tracked approaching targets from a resting position, bats also produced sonar sound groups, and the prevalence of these sonar sound groups increased when motion of the target was unpredictable. We hypothesize that sonar sound groups produced during flight, and the sonar call doublets produced by a bat tracking a target from a resting position, help the animal resolve dynamic target location and represent the echo scene in greater detail. Collectively, our data reveal adaptive temporal control over sonar call production that allows the bat to negotiate a complex and dynamic environment. PMID:24860509

  11. Timing matters: sonar call groups facilitate target localization in bats.

    PubMed

    Kothari, Ninad B; Wohlgemuth, Melville J; Hulgard, Katrine; Surlykke, Annemarie; Moss, Cynthia F

    2014-01-01

    To successfully negotiate a cluttered environment, an echolocating bat must control the timing of motor behaviors in response to dynamic sensory information. Here we detail the big brown bat's adaptive temporal control over sonar call production for tracking prey, moving predictably or unpredictably, under different experimental conditions. We studied the adaptive control of vocal-motor behaviors in free-flying big brown bats, Eptesicus fuscus, as they captured tethered and free-flying insects, in open and cluttered environments. We also studied adaptive sonar behavior in bats trained to track moving targets from a resting position. In each of these experiments, bats adjusted the features of their calls to separate target and clutter. Under many task conditions, flying bats produced prominent sonar sound groups identified as clusters of echolocation pulses with relatively stable intervals, surrounded by longer pulse intervals. In experiments where bats tracked approaching targets from a resting position, bats also produced sonar sound groups, and the prevalence of these sonar sound groups increased when motion of the target was unpredictable. We hypothesize that sonar sound groups produced during flight, and the sonar call doublets produced by a bat tracking a target from a resting position, help the animal resolve dynamic target location and represent the echo scene in greater detail. Collectively, our data reveal adaptive temporal control over sonar call production that allows the bat to negotiate a complex and dynamic environment.

  12. Water age, exposure time, and local flushing time in semi-enclosed, tidal basins with negligible freshwater inflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viero, Daniele Pietro; Defina, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Within the framework of tidally flushed, semi-enclosed basins with negligible freshwater inflow, and under steady periodic flow conditions, three frequently used local transport time scales to quantify the efficiency of water renewal, namely water age, exposure time, and local flushing time are studied and compared to each other. In these environments, water renewal is strongly controlled by diffusion, and it is significantly affected by the return flow (i.e., the fraction of effluent water that returns into the basin on each flood tide). The definition of water age is here modified to account for the return flow, in analogy with exposure time and local flushing time. We consider approximate time scales, whose accuracy is analyzed, in order to overcome problems related to the size of the computational domain and to reduce the computational effort. A new approximate procedure is introduced to estimate water age, which is based on the water aging rate. Also, the concept of local flushing time as a relevant time scale is introduced. Under steady periodic conditions, we demonstrate that the local flushing time quantitatively corresponds to water age, and well approximates exposure time when the flow is dominated by diffusion. Since the effort required to compute water age and exposure time is greater than that required to compute the local flushing time, the present results can also have a practical interest in the assessment of water renewal efficiency of semi-enclosed water basins. The results of a modeling study, in which the lagoon of Venice is used as a benchmark, confirm the substantial quantitative equivalence between these three transport time scales in highly diffusive environments.

  13. Aligning Task Control with Desire for Control: Implications for Performance

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, Alex T.; Etcheverry, Paul E.

    2015-01-01

    The current study examined whether matches between task control and participants' desire for control over their environment lead to better task performance than mismatches. Work control and desire for control were manipulated, and participants engaged in timed tasks. As predicted, performance was higher in cases of match, even when task control and desire for control were low. Task control and desire for control may predict work performance in combination, highlighting the importance of Person-Environment Fit theory for both selection and work design. By manipulating desire for control, our research also explores the potentially state-dependent quality of this individual difference variable. PMID:26045630

  14. Flibanserin and Female Sexual Desire.

    PubMed

    Fantasia, Heidi Collins

    2016-01-01

    Female hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) is one type of sexual problem that can affect women. It is characterized by low or absent sexual desire that cannot be attributed to another cause and results in difficulty in interpersonal relationships. HSDD is not well understood, and women may not report symptoms of difficulties to their health care providers. In August 2015, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved flibanserin, a nonhormonal oral medication for the treatment of HSDD in premenopausal women. Flibanserin is the only currently available pharmacologic treatment for HSDD. This article will provide an overview of flibanserin, including potential adverse reactions, special considerations for use, and implications for nursing practice. PMID:27287358

  15. Desirable Difficulties in Vocabulary Learning.

    PubMed

    Bjork, Robert A; Kroll, Judith F

    2015-01-01

    In this article we discuss the role of desirable difficulties in vocabulary learning from two perspectives, one having to do with identifying conditions of learning that impose initial challenges to the learner but then benefit later retention and transfer, and the other having to do with the role of certain difficulties that are intrinsic to language processes, are engaged during word learning, and reflect how language is understood and produced. From each perspective we discuss evidence that supports the notion that difficulties in learning and imposed costs to language processing may produce benefits because they are likely to increase conceptual understanding. We then consider the consequences of these processes for actual second-language learning and suggest that some of the domain-general cognitive advantages that have been reported for proficient bilinguals may reflect difficulties imposed by the learning process, and by the requirement to negotiate cross-language competition, that are broadly desirable. As Alice Healy and her collaborators were perhaps the first to demonstrate, research on desirable difficulties in vocabulary and language learning holds the promise of bringing together research traditions on memory and language that have much to offer each other. PMID:26255443

  16. Desirable Difficulties in Vocabulary Learning.

    PubMed

    Bjork, Robert A; Kroll, Judith F

    2015-01-01

    In this article we discuss the role of desirable difficulties in vocabulary learning from two perspectives, one having to do with identifying conditions of learning that impose initial challenges to the learner but then benefit later retention and transfer, and the other having to do with the role of certain difficulties that are intrinsic to language processes, are engaged during word learning, and reflect how language is understood and produced. From each perspective we discuss evidence that supports the notion that difficulties in learning and imposed costs to language processing may produce benefits because they are likely to increase conceptual understanding. We then consider the consequences of these processes for actual second-language learning and suggest that some of the domain-general cognitive advantages that have been reported for proficient bilinguals may reflect difficulties imposed by the learning process, and by the requirement to negotiate cross-language competition, that are broadly desirable. As Alice Healy and her collaborators were perhaps the first to demonstrate, research on desirable difficulties in vocabulary and language learning holds the promise of bringing together research traditions on memory and language that have much to offer each other.

  17. Desirable Difficulties in Vocabulary Learning

    PubMed Central

    BJORK, ROBERT A.; KROLL, JUDITH F.

    2016-01-01

    In this article we discuss the role of desirable difficulties in vocabulary learning from two perspectives, one having to do with identifying conditions of learning that impose initial challenges to the learner but then benefit later retention and transfer, and the other having to do with the role of certain difficulties that are intrinsic to language processes, are engaged during word learning, and reflect how language is understood and produced. From each perspective we discuss evidence that supports the notion that difficulties in learning and imposed costs to language processing may produce benefits because they are likely to increase conceptual understanding. We then consider the consequences of these processes for actual second-language learning and suggest that some of the domain-general cognitive advantages that have been reported for proficient bilinguals may reflect difficulties imposed by the learning process, and by the requirement to negotiate cross-language competition, that are broadly desirable. As Alice Healy and her collaborators were perhaps the first to demonstrate, research on desirable difficulties in vocabulary and language learning holds the promise of bringing together research traditions on memory and language that have much to offer each other. PMID:26255443

  18. Acoustic Source Localization via Time Difference of Arrival Estimation for Distributed Sensor Networks Using Tera-Scale Optical Core Devices

    DOE PAGES

    Imam, Neena; Barhen, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    For real-time acoustic source localization applications, one of the primary challenges is the considerable growth in computational complexity associated with the emergence of ever larger, active or passive, distributed sensor networks. These sensors rely heavily on battery-operated system components to achieve highly functional automation in signal and information processing. In order to keep communication requirements minimal, it is desirable to perform as much processing on the receiver platforms as possible. However, the complexity of the calculations needed to achieve accurate source localization increases dramatically with the size of sensor arrays, resulting in substantial growth of computational requirements that cannot bemore » readily met with standard hardware. One option to meet this challenge builds upon the emergence of digital optical-core devices. The objective of this work was to explore the implementation of key building block algorithms used in underwater source localization on the optical-core digital processing platform recently introduced by Lenslet Inc. This demonstration of considerably faster signal processing capability should be of substantial significance to the design and innovation of future generations of distributed sensor networks.« less

  19. A METHOD TO INCORPORATE ECOLOGY INTO RESIDENCE TIME OF CHEMICALS IN EMBAYMENTS: LOCAL EFFECT TIME

    EPA Science Inventory

    Residence times are classically defined by the physical and chemical aspects of water bodies rather than by their ecological implications. Therefore, a more clear and direct connection between the residence times and ecological effects is necessary to quantitatively relate these ...

  20. Time-local Heisenberg-Langevin equations and the driven qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whalen, S. J.; Carmichael, H. J.

    2016-06-01

    The time-local master equation for a driven boson system interacting with a boson environment is derived by way of a time-local Heisenberg-Langevin equation. Extension to the driven qubit fails—except for weak excitation—due to the lost linearity of the system-environment interaction. We show that a reported time-local master equation for the driven qubit is incorrect. As a corollary to our demonstration, we also uncover odd asymptotic behavior in the "repackaged" time-local dynamics of a system driven to a far-from-equilibrium steady state: the density operator becomes steady while time-dependent coefficients oscillate (with periodic singularities) forever.

  1. Visualizing desirable patient healthcare experiences.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sandra S; Kim, Hyung T; Chen, Jie; An, Lingling

    2010-01-01

    High healthcare cost has drawn much attention and healthcare service providers (HSPs) are expected to deliver high-quality and consistent care. Therefore, an intimate understanding of the most desirable experience from a patient's and/or family's perspective as well as effective mapping and communication of such findings should facilitate HSPs' efforts in attaining sustainable competitive advantage in an increasingly discerning environment. This study describes (a) the critical quality attributes (CQAs) of the experience desired by patients and (b) the application of two visualization tools that are relatively new to the healthcare sector, namely the "spider-web diagram" and "promotion and detraction matrix." The visualization tools are tested with primary data collected from telephone surveys of 1,800 patients who had received care during calendar year 2005 at 6 of 61 hospitals within St. Louis, Missouri-based, Ascension Health. Five CQAs were found by factor analysis. The spider-web diagram illustrates that communication and empowerment and compassionate and respectful care are the most important CQAs, and accordingly, the promotion and detraction matrix shows those attributes that have the greatest effect for creating promoters, preventing detractors, and improving consumer's likelihood to recommend the healthcare provider.

  2. Visualizing desirable patient healthcare experiences.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sandra S; Kim, Hyung T; Chen, Jie; An, Lingling

    2010-01-01

    High healthcare cost has drawn much attention and healthcare service providers (HSPs) are expected to deliver high-quality and consistent care. Therefore, an intimate understanding of the most desirable experience from a patient's and/or family's perspective as well as effective mapping and communication of such findings should facilitate HSPs' efforts in attaining sustainable competitive advantage in an increasingly discerning environment. This study describes (a) the critical quality attributes (CQAs) of the experience desired by patients and (b) the application of two visualization tools that are relatively new to the healthcare sector, namely the "spider-web diagram" and "promotion and detraction matrix." The visualization tools are tested with primary data collected from telephone surveys of 1,800 patients who had received care during calendar year 2005 at 6 of 61 hospitals within St. Louis, Missouri-based, Ascension Health. Five CQAs were found by factor analysis. The spider-web diagram illustrates that communication and empowerment and compassionate and respectful care are the most important CQAs, and accordingly, the promotion and detraction matrix shows those attributes that have the greatest effect for creating promoters, preventing detractors, and improving consumer's likelihood to recommend the healthcare provider. PMID:20155554

  3. Reconstructed Task Orientation and Local Time Governance in Compulsory Schools: The Swedish Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westlund, Ingrid

    2007-01-01

    Recently, a five-year trial period without a set timetable for compulsory school education in 79 municipalities was concluded in Sweden. The overall idea of the trial was to facilitate local participation, local time governance and flexible learning. Within the pilot trial, each individual pupil's school activities were supposed to be designed to…

  4. Precise Time-Tag Generator For A Local-Area-Network Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stauffer, David R.; Tran, Khoa Duy

    1995-01-01

    Time-tag-generating circuit designed for use in LAN monitor, monitors frames of data transmitted among computers on local-area network (LAN). To each frame of data that LAN monitor receives from LAN, time-tag generator appends ancillary data on time of arrival of frame, precise to within 1 microsecond of centrally generated time signal. Inserts ancillary time data in place of already used frame-check data before frames of data stored in memory of LAN monitor.

  5. Local regularity for time-dependent tug-of-war games with varying probabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parviainen, Mikko; Ruosteenoja, Eero

    2016-07-01

    We study local regularity properties of value functions of time-dependent tug-of-war games. For games with constant probabilities we get local Lipschitz continuity. For more general games with probabilities depending on space and time we obtain Hölder and Harnack estimates. The games have a connection to the normalized p (x , t)-parabolic equation ut = Δu + (p (x , t) - 2) Δ∞Nu.

  6. The local autocorrelation time in thin film and semi-infinite model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korneta, W.; Pytel, Z.

    1984-05-01

    The nearest-neighbour Ising model of a film in which exchange couplings in surface layers can differ from exchange couplings in other layers is considered. The dependence of the local autocorrelation time on distances to surfaces of the film, temperature and surface exchange couplings is discussed. The behaviour of the local autocorrelation time in a three-dimensional semi-infinite model is obtained assuming that the thickness of the film tends to infinity.

  7. Efficient Multi-Stage Time Marching for Viscous Flows via Local Preconditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleb, William L.; Wood, William A.; vanLeer, Bram

    1999-01-01

    A new method has been developed to accelerate the convergence of explicit time-marching, laminar, Navier-Stokes codes through the combination of local preconditioning and multi-stage time marching optimization. Local preconditioning is a technique to modify the time-dependent equations so that all information moves or decays at nearly the same rate, thus relieving the stiffness for a system of equations. Multi-stage time marching can be optimized by modifying its coefficients to account for the presence of viscous terms, allowing larger time steps. We show it is possible to optimize the time marching scheme for a wide range of cell Reynolds numbers for the scalar advection-diffusion equation, and local preconditioning allows this optimization to be applied to the Navier-Stokes equations. Convergence acceleration of the new method is demonstrated through numerical experiments with circular advection and laminar boundary-layer flow over a flat plate.

  8. Preschool Children's Understanding of Conflicting Desires

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassidy, Kimberly Wright; Cosetti, Maura; Jones, Ressa; Kelton, Emily; Rafal, Valerie Meier; Richman, Lisa; Stanhaus, Heather

    2005-01-01

    This study examines the conditions under which 3-year-olds can use the desires of others to predict others' behavior. In Study 1, children were highly successful in predicting the actions of an agent based on that agent's desires when they were explicitly told about the agent's desires, even when the agent's desires were strongly different from…

  9. From desires to behavior: Moderating factors in a fertility transition

    PubMed Central

    Hayford, Sarah R.; Agadjanian, Victor

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Extensive research in both developed and developing countries has shown that preferences and intentions for future childbearing predict behavior. However, very little of this research has examined high-fertility contexts in sub-Saharan Africa. In particular, the factors that increase or decrease correspondence between fertility desires and behavior in these settings are not well understood. OBJECTIVE This article documents the degree to which the desire to stop childbearing predicts fertility behavior over the short term among married women in rural southern Mozambique, a context where fertility transition is still in the early stages. Analyses test the moderating powers of individual, household, and community characteristics. METHODS Analyses use data from a longitudinal survey of married women of reproductive age (N=1678) carried out in 2006 and 2009 in rural areas of southern Mozambique. Logistic regression models are estimated to predict childbearing between 2006 and 2009 based on desires to stop childbearing and characteristics measured in 2006. RESULTS As expected, the desire to stop childbearing is strongly predictive of fertility behavior. Household wealth, local adult AIDS mortality, and being married to an unsuccessful labor migrant are associated with higher correspondence between reported desire to stop childbearing and fertility behavior. CONCLUSIONS Both factors related to the ability to carry out desires to stop childbearing and factors related to the strength and consistency of these desires moderate the association between desires and behaviors. Future research should expand measurement of fertility preferences to incorporate their strength and consistency as well as direction. PMID:23626485

  10. Local Stable and Unstable Manifolds and Their Control in Nonautonomous Finite-Time Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasuriya, Sanjeeva

    2016-08-01

    It is well known that stable and unstable manifolds strongly influence fluid motion in unsteady flows. These emanate from hyperbolic trajectories, with the structures moving nonautonomously in time. The local directions of emanation at each instance in time is the focus of this article. Within a nearly autonomous setting, it is shown that these time-varying directions can be characterised through the accumulated effect of velocity shear. Connections to Oseledets spaces and projection operators in exponential dichotomies are established. Availability of data for both infinite- and finite-time intervals is considered. With microfluidic flow control in mind, a methodology for manipulating these directions in any prescribed time-varying fashion by applying a local velocity shear is developed. The results are verified for both smoothly and discontinuously time-varying directions using finite-time Lyapunov exponent fields, and excellent agreement is obtained.

  11. Exposing local symmetries in distorted driven lattices via time-averaged invariants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wulf, T.; Morfonios, C. V.; Diakonos, F. K.; Schmelcher, P.

    2016-05-01

    Time-averaged two-point currents are derived and shown to be spatially invariant within domains of local translation or inversion symmetry for arbitrary time-periodic quantum systems in one dimension. These currents are shown to provide a valuable tool for detecting deformations of a spatial symmetry in static and driven lattices. In the static case the invariance of the two-point currents is related to the presence of time-reversal invariance and/or probability current conservation. The obtained insights into the wave functions are further exploited for a symmetry-based convergence check which is applicable for globally broken but locally retained potential symmetries.

  12. Numerical approximations to nonlinear conservation laws with locally varying time and space grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osher, S.; Sanders, R.

    1983-01-01

    Numerical approximations to the initial value problem for nonlinear systems of conservation laws are considered. The considered system is said to be hyperbolic when all eigenvalues of every real linear combination of the Jacobian matrices are real. Solutions may develop discontinuities in finite time, even when the initial data are smooth. In the investigation, explicit finite difference methods which use locally varying time grids are considered. The global CFL restriction is replaced by a local restriction. The numerical flux function is studied from a finite volume viewpoint, and a differencing technique is developed at interface points between regions of distinct time increments.

  13. Suppression and Revival of Weak Localization through Control of Time-Reversal Symmetry.

    PubMed

    Müller, K; Richard, J; Volchkov, V V; Denechaud, V; Bouyer, P; Aspect, A; Josse, V

    2015-05-22

    We report on the observation of suppression and revival of coherent backscattering of ultracold atoms launched in an optical disorder in a quasi-2D geometry and submitted to a short dephasing pulse, as proposed by Micklitz, Müller, and Altland [Phys. Rev. B 91, 064203 (2015)]. This observation demonstrates a novel and general method to study weak localization by manipulating time reversal symmetry in disordered systems. In future experiments, this scheme could be extended to investigate higher order localization processes at the heart of Anderson (strong) localization.

  14. Suppression and Revival of Weak Localization through Control of Time-Reversal Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, K.; Richard, J.; Volchkov, V. V.; Denechaud, V.; Bouyer, P.; Aspect, A.; Josse, V.

    2015-05-01

    We report on the observation of suppression and revival of coherent backscattering of ultracold atoms launched in an optical disorder in a quasi-2D geometry and submitted to a short dephasing pulse, as proposed by Micklitz, Müller, and Altland [Phys. Rev. B 91, 064203 (2015)]. This observation demonstrates a novel and general method to study weak localization by manipulating time reversal symmetry in disordered systems. In future experiments, this scheme could be extended to investigate higher order localization processes at the heart of Anderson (strong) localization.

  15. Real-time EEG Source-mapping Toolbox (REST): Online ICA and source localization.

    PubMed

    Pion-Tonachini, Luca; Hsu, Sheng-Hsiou; Makeig, Scott; Jung, Tzyy-Ping; Cauwenberghs, Gert

    2015-01-01

    The Electroencephalogram (EEG) is a noninvasive functional brain activity recording method that shows promise for becoming a 3-D cortical imaging modality with high temporal resolution. Currently, most of the tools developed for EEG analysis focus mainly on offline processing. This study introduces and demonstrates the Real-time EEG Source-mapping Toolbox (REST), an extension to the widely distributed EEGLAB environment. REST allows blind source separation of EEG data in real-time using Online Recursive Independent Component Analysis (ORICA), plus near real-time localization of separated sources. Two source localization methods are available to fit equivalent current dipoles or estimate spatial source distributions of selected sources. Selected measures of raw EEG data or component activations (e.g. time series of the data, spectral changes over time, equivalent current dipoles, etc.) can be visualized in near real-time. Finally, this study demonstrates the accuracy and functionality of REST with data from two experiments and discusses some relevant applications.

  16. Desiring productivity: nary a wasted moment, never a missed step!

    PubMed

    Rudge, Trudy

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore how nurses are enrolled into and take part in programmes of efficiency and effectiveness. Using the philosophical theorizing about desire as a force or power, I focus specifically on what is understood as relations between desire and productivity in current Westernized health-care systems. Use is made of the idea from Spinoza that human emotions consist only of pleasure, pain, and desire as these act as a motive force. This is then linked with more contemporary work on the politics and discourses of desire. A report on the implementation of a productivity programme in the United Kingdom, The Productive Ward: Releasing time to care™, is explored for the ways its developers set about motivating nurses to endorse and enact the programme. In exploring the mechanics of desire in these processes, a view of desire as productive is promoted. Looking at desire as assembling actions, and an assemblage, moves the analysis to an interrogation of actions and practices used to enable and bring nurses to the process. Moreover, in working through the various modalities and operations of desire, the potential and limits of such projects are abstracted. Such potentials and limits are necessarily set by the intensification of power and desire in the capitalist economy, saturating areas of nursing, and health-care provision.

  17. Dynamical localization in chaotic systems: spectral statistics and localization measure in the kicked rotator as a paradigm for time-dependent and time-independent systems.

    PubMed

    Manos, Thanos; Robnik, Marko

    2013-06-01

    We study the kicked rotator in the classically fully chaotic regime using Izrailev's N-dimensional model for various N≤4000, which in the limit N→∞ tends to the quantized kicked rotator. We do treat not only the case K=5, as studied previously, but also many different values of the classical kick parameter 5≤K≤35 and many different values of the quantum parameter kε[5,60]. We describe the features of dynamical localization of chaotic eigenstates as a paradigm for other both time-periodic and time-independent (autonomous) fully chaotic or/and mixed-type Hamilton systems. We generalize the scaling variable Λ=l(∞)/N to the case of anomalous diffusion in the classical phase space by deriving the localization length l(∞) for the case of generalized classical diffusion. We greatly improve the accuracy and statistical significance of the numerical calculations, giving rise to the following conclusions: (1) The level-spacing distribution of the eigenphases (or quasienergies) is very well described by the Brody distribution, systematically better than by other proposed models, for various Brody exponents β(BR). (2) We study the eigenfunctions of the Floquet operator and characterize their localization properties using the information entropy measure, which after normalization is given by β(loc) in the interval [0,1]. The level repulsion parameters β(BR) and β(loc) are almost linearly related, close to the identity line. (3) We show the existence of a scaling law between β(loc) and the relative localization length Λ, now including the regimes of anomalous diffusion. The above findings are important also for chaotic eigenstates in time-independent systems [Batistić and Robnik, J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 43, 215101 (2010); arXiv:1302.7174 (2013)], where the Brody distribution is confirmed to a very high degree of precision for dynamically localized chaotic eigenstates, even in the mixed-type systems (after separation of regular and chaotic eigenstates).

  18. Local time asymmetries and toroidal field line resonances: Global magnetospheric modeling in SWMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellington, S. M.; Moldwin, M. B.; Liemohn, M. W.

    2016-03-01

    We present evidence of resonant wave-wave coupling via toroidal field line resonance (FLR) signatures in the Space Weather Modeling Framework's (SWMF) global, terrestrial magnetospheric model in one simulation driven by a synthetic upstream solar wind with embedded broadband dynamic pressure fluctuations. Using in situ, stationary point measurements of the radial electric field along the 1500 LT meridian, we show that SWMF reproduces a multiharmonic, continuous distribution of FLRs exemplified by 180° phase reversals and amplitude peaks across the resonant L shells. By linearly increasing the amplitude of the dynamic pressure fluctuations in time, we observe a commensurate increase in the amplitude of the radial electric and azimuthal magnetic field fluctuations, which is consistent with the solar wind driver being the dominant source of the fast mode energy. While we find no discernible local time changes in the FLR frequencies despite large-scale, monotonic variations in the dayside equatorial mass density, in selectively sampling resonant points and examining spectral resonance widths, we observe significant radial, harmonic, and time-dependent local time asymmetries in the radial electric field amplitudes. A weak but persistent local time asymmetry exists in measures of the estimated coupling efficiency between the fast mode and toroidal wave fields, which exhibits a radial dependence consistent with the coupling strength examined by Mann et al. (1999) and Zhu and Kivelson (1988). We discuss internal structural mechanisms and additional external energy sources that may account for these asymmetries as we find that local time variations in the strength of the compressional driver are not the predominant source of the FLR amplitude asymmetries. These include resonant mode coupling of observed Kelvin-Helmholtz surface wave generated Pc5 band ultralow frequency pulsations, local time differences in local ionospheric dampening rates, and variations in azimuthal

  19. Fourth order exponential time differencing method with local discontinuous Galerkin approximation for coupled nonlinear Schrodinger equations

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Xiao; Khaliq, Abdul Q. M.; Xing, Yulong

    2015-01-23

    In this paper, we study a local discontinuous Galerkin method combined with fourth order exponential time differencing Runge-Kutta time discretization and a fourth order conservative method for solving the nonlinear Schrödinger equations. Based on different choices of numerical fluxes, we propose both energy-conserving and energy-dissipative local discontinuous Galerkin methods, and have proven the error estimates for the semi-discrete methods applied to linear Schrödinger equation. The numerical methods are proven to be highly efficient and stable for long-range soliton computations. Finally, extensive numerical examples are provided to illustrate the accuracy, efficiency and reliability of the proposed methods.

  20. Local dominance of exotic plants declines with residence time: a role for plant–soil feedback?

    PubMed Central

    Speek, Tanja A.A.; Schaminée, Joop H.J.; Stam, Jeltje M.; Lotz, Lambertus A.P.; Ozinga, Wim A.; van der Putten, Wim H.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that introduced exotic plant species may be released from their native soil-borne pathogens, but that they become exposed to increased soil pathogen activity in the new range when time since introduction increases. Other studies have shown that introduced exotic plant species become less dominant when time since introduction increases, and that plant abundance may be controlled by soil-borne pathogens; however, no study yet has tested whether these soil effects might explain the decline in dominance of exotic plant species following their initial invasiveness. Here we determine plant–soil feedback of 20 plant species that have been introduced into The Netherlands. We tested the hypotheses that (i) exotic plant species with a longer residence time have a more negative soil feedback and (ii) greater local dominance of the introduced exotic plant species correlates with less negative, or more positive, plant–soil feedback. Although the local dominance of exotic plant species decreased with time since introduction, there was no relationship of local dominance with plant–soil feedback. Plant–soil feedback also did not become more negative with increasing time since introduction. We discuss why our results may deviate from some earlier published studies and why plant–soil feedback may not in all cases, or not in all comparisons, explain patterns of local dominance of introduced exotic plant species. PMID:25770013

  1. Local time dependence of polar mesospheric clouds and model validation with satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Francie; Berger, Uwe; Lübken, Franz-Josef

    2016-04-01

    Polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs), also known as noctilucent clouds (NLCs), consist of water-ice cystals. They occur at high latitudes in the summer mesopause region at very low temperatures below 150 K. In this case PMCs are highly sensitive to atmospheric conditions. Therefore, PMCs are thought to be sensitive indicators of climate changes in the middle atmosphere. The ice clouds show spatial and temporal variations. We present a model that can help to understand the variability of mesospheric clouds. The model is called Mesospheric Ice Microphysics And tranSport model (MIMAS) and is a threedimensional Lagrangian transport model, which can be used on multiple dynamic fields. MIMAS is a good instrument to check observations and also to fill some gaps that are included in satellite observations, e.g., the local time dependence of PMCs. The ice model is used to study local time dependencies of the PMC occurrence frequency, brightness and ice water content. At the station ALOMAR in Northern Norway (69°N, 16°E) we have the most ice water content with a total mean of around 90 g/km² (July 2008) in the morning hours. In the afternoons the ice water content decreases to 10 g/km² and increases again in the evening hours to 50 g/km². Tidal variability will impact results of long-term PMC observations which do not cover the full diurnal cycle. To investigate the local time dependence of PMCs in its entirety, ground-based remote sensing instruments, e.g., lidars are usefull. Variations in PMCs relating to occurrence frequency and brightness as function of local time had been already observed with the ALOMAR Rayleigh/Mie/Raman lidar. But lidar measurements offer only observations at a single local station. Models give the opportunity of a global perspective on a possible local time dependence of PMCs. In this context we will present latitudinal variations regarding to local time dependence. The combination of further observations and modeling studies can help to understand

  2. [How does summer affect sexual desire?].

    PubMed

    Kontula, Osmo; Väisälä, Leena

    2013-01-01

    Sexual desire involves many different things such as sexual thoughts and images, excitement, expectation and orgasm. Mood has a strong association with sexual desire. Fatigue and depression in particular cause lack of sexual desire. By affecting the state of alertness and energy in humans, sunlight may increase sexual activity. PMID:23901739

  3. Pleasure/Desire, Sexularism and Sexuality Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasmussen, Mary Louise

    2012-01-01

    Pleasure and desire have been important components of researchers' vision for sexuality education for over 20 years, a trend inspired by Michelle Fine's seminal paper, "Sexuality, Schooling, and Adolescent Females: The Missing Discourse of Desire." This essay considers how discourses related to pleasure and desire have been taken up in the USA and…

  4. Continuous time random walks for non-local radial solute transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dentz, Marco; Kang, Peter K.; Le Borgne, Tanguy

    2015-08-01

    This study formulates and analyzes continuous time random walk (CTRW) models in radial flow geometries for the quantification of non-local solute transport induced by heterogeneous flow distributions and by mobile-immobile mass transfer processes. To this end we derive a general CTRW framework in radial coordinates starting from the random walk equations for radial particle positions and times. The particle density, or solute concentration is governed by a non-local radial advection-dispersion equation (ADE). Unlike in CTRWs for uniform flow scenarios, particle transition times here depend on the radial particle position, which renders the CTRW non-stationary. As a consequence, the memory kernel characterizing the non-local ADE, is radially dependent. Based on this general formulation, we derive radial CTRW implementations that (i) emulate non-local radial transport due to heterogeneous advection, (ii) model multirate mass transfer (MRMT) between mobile and immobile continua, and (iii) quantify both heterogeneous advection in a mobile region and mass transfer between mobile and immobile regions. The expected solute breakthrough behavior is studied using numerical random walk particle tracking simulations. This behavior is analyzed by explicit analytical expressions for the asymptotic solute breakthrough curves. We observe clear power-law tails of the solute breakthrough for broad (power-law) distributions of particle transit times (heterogeneous advection) and particle trapping times (MRMT model). The combined model displays two distinct time regimes. An intermediate regime, in which the solute breakthrough is dominated by the particle transit times in the mobile zones, and a late time regime that is governed by the distribution of particle trapping times in immobile zones. These radial CTRW formulations allow for the identification of heterogeneous advection and mobile-immobile processes as drivers of anomalous transport, under conditions relevant for field tracer

  5. Clinical service desires of medical cannabis patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Medical cannabis dispensaries following the social or hybrid model offer supplementary holistic services in addition to dispensing medical cannabis. Historically, alternative physical health services have been the norm for these dispensaries, including services such as yoga, acupuncture, or chiropractor visits. A clinical service dearth remains for medical cannabis patients seeking substance use, misuse, dependence, and mental health services. This study examined patient desires for various clinical services and level of willingness to participate in specific clinical services. Methods Anonymous survey data (N = 303) were collected at Harborside Health Center (HHC), a medical cannabis dispensary in Oakland, CA. The sample was 70% male, 48% Caucasian and 21% African American. The mean male age was 38 years old and female mean age was 30. Sixty two percent of the male participants and 44% of the female participants are single. Sixteen percent of the population reported having a domestic partner. Forty six percent of the participants are employed full time, 41% have completed at least some college, and 49% make less than $40,000 a year. Results A significant portion of the sample, 62%, indicated a desire to participate in free clinical services at HHC, 34% would like more information about substances and use, and 41% want to learn more about reducing harms from substance use. About one quarter of the participants marked "would" or "likely would" participate in individual services such as consultation. Approximately 20% indicated "would" or "likely would" participate in psycho-educational forums, harm reduction information sharing sessions, online support groups, and coping, life, and social skills group. There was little interest in traditional NA/AA 12-step groups or adapted 12-step groups. Conclusions Desired clinical services can be qualified as a combination of harm reduction, educational, skills-based, peer support and therapeutic individual and group

  6. EMPIRICAL LIKELIHOOD INFERENCE FOR THE COX MODEL WITH TIME-DEPENDENT COEFFICIENTS VIA LOCAL PARTIAL LIKELIHOOD

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yanqing; Sundaram, Rajeshwari; Zhao, Yichuan

    2009-01-01

    The Cox model with time-dependent coefficients has been studied by a number of authors recently. In this paper, we develop empirical likelihood (EL) pointwise confidence regions for the time-dependent regression coefficients via local partial likelihood smoothing. The EL simultaneous confidence bands for a linear combination of the coefficients are also derived based on the strong approximation methods. The empirical likelihood ratio is formulated through the local partial log-likelihood for the regression coefficient functions. Our numerical studies indicate that the EL pointwise/simultaneous confidence regions/bands have satisfactory finite sample performances. Compared with the confidence regions derived directly based on the asymptotic normal distribution of the local constant estimator, the EL confidence regions are overall tighter and can better capture the curvature of the underlying regression coefficient functions. Two data sets, the gastric cancer data and the Mayo Clinic primary biliary cirrhosis data, are analyzed using the proposed method. PMID:19838322

  7. Producing graphite with desired properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, J. M.; Imprescia, R. J.; Reiswig, R. D.; Smith, M. C.

    1971-01-01

    Isotropic or anisotropic graphite is synthesized with precise control of particle size, distribution, and shape. The isotropic graphites are nearly perfectly isotropic, with thermal expansion coefficients two or three times those of ordinary graphites. The anisotropic graphites approach the anisotropy of pyrolytic graphite.

  8. Geometrical properties of an internal local octonionic space in curved space time

    SciTech Connect

    Marques, S.; Oliveira, C.G.

    1986-04-01

    A geometrical treatment on a flat tangent space local to a generalized complex, quaternionic, and octonionic space-time is constructed. It is shown that it is possible to find an Einstein-Maxwell-Yang-Mills correspondence in this generalized (Minkowskian) tangent space. 9 refs.

  9. Probabilistic prediction of real-world time series: A local regression approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laio, Francesco; Ridolfi, Luca; Tamea, Stefania

    2007-02-01

    We propose a probabilistic prediction method, based on local polynomial regressions, which complements the point forecasts with robust estimates of the corresponding forecast uncertainty. The reliability, practicability and generality of the method is demonstrated by applying it to astronomical, physiological, economic, and geophysical time series.

  10. Local volume-time averaged equations of motion for dispersed, turbulent, multiphase flows

    SciTech Connect

    Sha, W.T.; Slattery, J.C.

    1980-11-01

    In most flows of liquids and their vapors, the phases are dispersed randomly in both space and time. These dispersed flows can be described only statistically or in terms of averages. Local volume-time averaging is used here to derive a self-consistent set of equations governing momentum and energy transfer in dispersed, turbulent, multiphase flows. The empiricisms required for use with these equations are the subject of current research.

  11. Three-dimensional localization of low activity gamma-ray sources in real-time scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Manish K.; Alajo, Ayodeji B.; Lee, Hyoung K.

    2016-03-01

    Radioactive source localization plays an important role in tracking radiation threats in homeland security tasks. Its real-time application requires computationally efficient and reasonably accurate algorithms even with limited data to support detection with minimum uncertainty. This paper describes a statistic-based grid-refinement method for backtracing the position of a gamma-ray source in a three-dimensional domain in real-time. The developed algorithm used measurements from various known detector positions to localize the source. This algorithm is based on an inverse-square relationship between source intensity at a detector and the distance from the source to the detector. The domain discretization was developed and implemented in MATLAB. The algorithm was tested and verified from simulation results of an ideal case of a point source in non-attenuating medium. Subsequently, an experimental validation of the algorithm was performed to determine the suitability of deploying this scheme in real-time scenarios. Using the measurements from five known detector positions and for a measurement time of 3 min, the source position was estimated with an accuracy of approximately 53 cm. The accuracy improved and stabilized to approximately 25 cm for higher measurement times. It was concluded that the error in source localization was primarily due to detection uncertainties. In verification and experimental validation of the algorithm, the distance between 137Cs source and any detector position was between 0.84 m and 1.77 m. The results were also compared with the least squares method. Since the discretization algorithm was validated with a weak source, it is expected that it can localize the source of higher activity in real-time. It is believed that for the same physical placement of source and detectors, a source of approximate activity 0.61-0.92 mCi can be localized in real-time with 1 s of measurement time and same accuracy. The accuracy and computational efficiency

  12. Local Stability of AIDS Epidemic Model Through Treatment and Vertical Transmission with Time Delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novi W, Cascarilla; Lestari, Dwi

    2016-02-01

    This study aims to explain stability of the spread of AIDS through treatment and vertical transmission model. Human with HIV need a time to positively suffer AIDS. The existence of a time, human with HIV until positively suffer AIDS can be delayed for a time so that the model acquired is the model with time delay. The model form is a nonlinear differential equation with time delay, SIPTA (susceptible-infected-pre AIDS-treatment-AIDS). Based on SIPTA model analysis results the disease free equilibrium point and the endemic equilibrium point. The disease free equilibrium point with and without time delay are local asymptotically stable if the basic reproduction number is less than one. The endemic equilibrium point will be local asymptotically stable if the time delay is less than the critical value of delay, unstable if the time delay is more than the critical value of delay, and bifurcation occurs if the time delay is equal to the critical value of delay.

  13. Real-time automatic small infrared target detection using local spectral filtering in the frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hao; Zhang, Hong; Li, Jiafeng; Yuan, Ding; Sun, Mingui

    2014-11-01

    Accurate and fast detection of small infrared target has very important meaning for infrared precise guidance, early warning, video surveillance, etc. Based on human visual attention mechanism, an automatic detection algorithm for small infrared target is presented. In this paper, instead of searching for infrared targets, we model regular patches that do not attract much attention by our visual system. This is inspired by the property that the regular patches in spatial domain turn out to correspond to the spikes in the amplitude spectrum. Unlike recent approaches using global spectral filtering, we define the concept of local maxima suppression using local spectral filtering to smooth the spikes in the amplitude spectrum, thereby producing the pop-out of the infrared targets. In the proposed method, we firstly compute the amplitude spectrum of an input infrared image. Second, we find the local maxima of the amplitude spectrum using cubic facet model. Third, we suppress the local maxima using the convolution of the local spectrum with a low-pass Gaussian kernel of an appropriate scale. At last, the detection result in spatial domain is obtained by reconstructing the 2D signal using the original phase and the log amplitude spectrum by suppressing local maxima. The experiments are performed for some real-life IR images, and the results prove that the proposed method has satisfying detection effectiveness and robustness. Meanwhile, it has high detection efficiency and can be further used for real-time detection and tracking.

  14. Assessing Significance of Global Climate Change in Local Climate Time Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livezey, M. M.; Bair, A.; Livezey, R.; Hollingshead, A.; Horsfall, F. M. C.; Meyers, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    A common question by users to NOAA National Weather Service (NWS) local offices is how significant is global climate change in their local area. The scientific community provides copious information on global climate change, including assessments, for large regions. However, most decisions are made at the local level, where little or no information typically exists. To address this need, NOAA NWS released operationally the Local Climate Analysis Tool (LCAT) in 2013 and specifically incorporated a capability into the tool to determine the local Rate of Change (ROC). Although ROC provides answers to some questions, we have seen an additional need for clarification on the significance of the ROC, such as whether or not it differentiates natural variability from a real signal of longer-term climate change. This question becomes very important for decision makers in consideration of their long term planning efforts to build local resilience to changes in climate. LCAT uses three trend adjustment methods in computing ROC: Hinge, Optimal Climate Normals (OCN), and Exponentially Weighted Moving Average (EWMA). The Hinge tracks changes in climate time series, and OCN and EWMS track changes in climate normals. ROC is the slope of the straight line fit of the trend. Standard statistical methodology in use provides guidance for confidence intervals of the slope parameter (von Storch and Zwiers, 1999), which works well for a linear regression fit and can be used for ROCs of OCN and EWMA. However the Hinge, which is a linear fit anchored on one end, needs some additional adjustments and most likely will have smaller confidence intervals than those estimated by the statistical method. An additional way to look at the problem is to assess how the climate change signal compares to climate variability in the local time series. Livezey et al. (2007) suggested the use of the signal to noise ratio to estimate the significance of the rate of climate change. The signal to noise ratio of

  15. Designing and Evaluating Desired Outcomes for Program Improvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fagan, Tom; Emge, Lou

    This guide presents Federal requirements for statements of the desired outcomes of compensatory education programs. Local education authorities (LEAs) must state their goals for improving the educational opportunities of educationally deprived children so that they will succeed in the regular educational program of the LEA, attain grade-level…

  16. Latitude and local time dependence of precipitated low energy electrons at high latitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gustafsson, G.

    1972-01-01

    Data from particle detectors on board the satellite OGO-4 were used to study the precipitation of electrons in the energy range 0.7 to 24 keV. The latitude dependence of these particles in the local time region from midnight to dawn was investigated in detail. The analysis shows that the precipitation of particles of energies 2.3 to 24 keV is centered at an invariant latitude of about 68 deg at midnight with a clear shift in latitude with increasing local time and this shift is more pronounced for lower energies. The highest fluxes of particles in this energy interval are measured at midnight and they decrease rapidly with local time. The data in the energy range 2.3 to 24 keV support a theory where particles are injected in the midnight region from the tail gaining energy due to a betatron process and then drift eastwards in a combined electric and magnetic field. The main part of the electrons at 0.7 keV show a different behavior. They seem to undergo an acceleration process which is rather local, sometimes giving field aligned fluxes which may be super-imposed on the background precipitation.

  17. A new real time filter for local exposure correction in panoramic radiographs

    SciTech Connect

    Frosio, I.; Borghese, N. A.

    2006-09-15

    A new real time filter for local exposure correction in panoramic radiographs is presented here. The filter, called PaRSEC, allows eliminating the exposure artifacts, mainly introduced by Automatic Exposure Control (AEC) systems. These artifacts reduce the image readability and its diagnostic utility. The PaRSEC filter operates a local exposure equalization, based on a reliable estimate of the column mean gray level. Qualitative and quantitative results are reported for typical panoramic radiographs. They show a complete removal of the artifacts. The method compares favorably with other classical methods targeted to exposure correction.

  18. Processing advances for localization of beaked whales using time difference of arrival.

    PubMed

    Baggenstoss, Paul M

    2013-06-01

    This paper is concerned with the localization of clicking Blainville's beaked whales (Mesoplodon densirostris) using an array of widely spaced bottom-mounted hydrophones. A set of signal and data processing advances are presented that together make reliable tracking a possibility. These advances include a species-specific detector, elimination of spurious time-difference-of-arrival (TDOA) estimates, improved tracking of TDOA estimates, positive association of TDOA estimates using different hydrophone pairs, and joint localization of multiple whales. A key innovation in three of these advances is the principle of click-matching. The methods are demonstrated using real data.

  19. Approximate local magnetic-to-electric surface operators for time-harmonic Maxwell's equations

    SciTech Connect

    El Bouajaji, M.

    2014-12-15

    The aim of this paper is to propose new local and accurate approximate magnetic-to-electric surface boundary operators for the three-dimensional time-harmonic Maxwell's equations. After their construction where their accuracy is improved through a regularization process, a localization of these operators and a full finite element approximation is introduced. Next, their numerical efficiency and accuracy is investigated in detail for different scatterers when these operators are used in the extreme situation of On-Surface Radiation Conditions methods.

  20. Local time-correlation approach for calculations of x-ray spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, A. J.; Vila, F. D.; Rehr, J. J.

    2012-09-01

    We present a local time-correlation function method for real-time calculations of core level x-ray spectra (RTXS). The approach is implemented in a local orbital basis using a Crank-Nicolson time-evolution algorithm applied to an extension of the siesta code, together with projector augmented wave (PAW) atomic transition matrix elements. Our RTXS is formally equivalent to ΔSCF (Δ self consistent field) Fermi's golden rule calculations with a screened core-hole and an effective independent particle approximation. Illustrative calculations are presented for several molecular and condensed matter systems and found to be in good agreement with experiment. The method can also be advantageous compared to conventional frequency-space methods.

  1. Real-Time Retinal Vessel Mapping and Localization for Intraocular Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Brian C.; Riviere, Cameron N.

    2013-01-01

    Computer-aided intraocular surgery requires precise, real-time knowledge of the vasculature during retinal procedures such as laser photocoagulation or vessel cannulation. Because vitreoretinal surgeons manipulate retinal structures on the back of the eye through ports in the sclera, voluntary and involuntary tool motion rotates the eye in the socket and causes movement to the microscope view of the retina. The dynamic nature of the surgical workspace during intraocular surgery makes mapping, tracking, and localizing vasculature in real time a challenge. We present an approach that both maps and localizes retinal vessels by temporally fusing and registering individual-frame vessel detections. On video of porcine and human retina, we demonstrate real-time performance, rapid convergence, and robustness to variable illumination and tool occlusion. PMID:24488000

  2. Complex-time singularity and locality estimates for quantum lattice systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bouch, Gabriel

    2015-12-15

    We present and prove a well-known locality bound for the complex-time dynamics of a general class of one-dimensional quantum spin systems. Then we discuss how one might hope to extend this same procedure to higher dimensions using ideas related to the Eden growth process and lattice trees. Finally, we demonstrate with a specific family of lattice trees in the plane why this approach breaks down in dimensions greater than one and prove that there exist interactions for which the complex-time dynamics blows-up in finite imaginary time. .

  3. Complex-time singularity and locality estimates for quantum lattice systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouch, Gabriel

    2015-12-01

    We present and prove a well-known locality bound for the complex-time dynamics of a general class of one-dimensional quantum spin systems. Then we discuss how one might hope to extend this same procedure to higher dimensions using ideas related to the Eden growth process and lattice trees. Finally, we demonstrate with a specific family of lattice trees in the plane why this approach breaks down in dimensions greater than one and prove that there exist interactions for which the complex-time dynamics blows-up in finite imaginary time.

  4. The analysis of space time structure in QCD vacuum, I: localization vs global behavior in local observables and Dirac eigenmodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horváth, Ivan

    2005-03-01

    The structure of QCD vacuum can be studied from first principles using lattice-regularized theory. This line of research entered a qualitatively new phase recently, wherein the space-time structure (at least for some quantities) can be directly observed in configurations dominating the QCD path integral, i.e., without any subjective processing of typical configurations. This approach to QCD vacuum structure does not rely on any proposed picture of QCD vacuum but rather attempts to characterize this structure in a model-independent manner, so that a coherent physical picture of the vacuum can emerge when such unbiased numerical information accumulates to a sufficient degree. An important part of this program is to develop a set of suitable quantitative characteristics describing the space-time structure in a meaningful and physically relevant manner. One of the basic pertinent issues here is whether QCD vacuum dynamics can be understood in terms of localized vacuum objects, or whether such objects behave as inherently global entities. The first direct studies of vacuum structure strongly support the latter. In this paper, we develop a formal framework which allows to answer this question in a quantitative manner. We discuss in detail how to apply this approach to Dirac eigenmodes and to basic scalar and pseudoscalar composites of gauge fields (action density and topological charge density). The approach is illustrated numerically on overlap Dirac zero modes and near-zero modes. This illustrative data provides direct quantitative evidence supporting our earlier arguments for the global nature of QCD Dirac eigenmodes.

  5. Particle filtering for arrival time tracking in space and source localization.

    PubMed

    Michalopoulou, Zoi-Heleni; Jain, Rashi

    2012-11-01

    Locating and tracking a source in an ocean environment and estimating environmental parameters of a sound propagation medium are critical tasks in ocean acoustics. Many approaches for both are based on full field calculations which are computationally intensive and sensitive to assumptions on the structure of the environment. Alternative methods that use only select features of the acoustic field for localization and environmental parameter estimation have been proposed. The focus of this paper is the development of a method that extracts arrival times and amplitudes of distinct paths from measured acoustic time-series using sequential Bayesian filtering, namely, particle filtering. These quantities, along with complete posterior probability density functions, also extracted by filtering, are employed in source localization and bathymetry estimation. Aspects of the filtering methodology are presented and studied in terms of their impact on the uncertainty in the arrival time estimates. Using the posterior probability densities of arrival times, source localization and water depth estimation are performed for the Haro Strait Primer experiment; the results are compared to those of conventional methods. The comparison demonstrates a significant advantage in the proposed approach.

  6. Local-in-Time Adjoint-Based Method for Optimal Control/Design Optimization of Unsteady Compressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamaleev, N. K.; Diskin, B.; Nielsen, E. J.

    2009-01-01

    .We study local-in-time adjoint-based methods for minimization of ow matching functionals subject to the 2-D unsteady compressible Euler equations. The key idea of the local-in-time method is to construct a very accurate approximation of the global-in-time adjoint equations and the corresponding sensitivity derivative by using only local information available on each time subinterval. In contrast to conventional time-dependent adjoint-based optimization methods which require backward-in-time integration of the adjoint equations over the entire time interval, the local-in-time method solves local adjoint equations sequentially over each time subinterval. Since each subinterval contains relatively few time steps, the storage cost of the local-in-time method is much lower than that of the global adjoint formulation, thus making the time-dependent optimization feasible for practical applications. The paper presents a detailed comparison of the local- and global-in-time adjoint-based methods for minimization of a tracking functional governed by the Euler equations describing the ow around a circular bump. Our numerical results show that the local-in-time method converges to the same optimal solution obtained with the global counterpart, while drastically reducing the memory cost as compared to the global-in-time adjoint formulation.

  7. Crustal Structure Beneath Pleasant Valley, Nevada from Local and Regional Earthquake Travel Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kant, L. B.; Nabelek, J.; Braunmiller, J.

    2011-12-01

    In 1915 the Pleasant Valley fault in the Basin and Range Province of northern Nevada ruptured in a Mw~7 earthquake, one of the largest normal faulting earthquakes in U.S. history. We are currently operating a densely spaced linear array of broadband three-component seismometers across the Pleasant Valley fault to investigate the structure and the geometry of the fault zone. Here, we present a local crustal velocity model derived from P and S wave travel times of local and regional earthquakes recorded by the Pleasant Valley array. Regional events in northern California, eastern Nevada and Utah that occurred in line with the array are well recorded and provide constraints on upper mantle velocities. Many local seismic events were also observed. Only a few of these events were detected by the ANSS network, reflecting the limited detection capability in sparsely instrumented northern Nevada. The local event set includes earthquakes, mining blasts and sonic booms from nearby jet airplane flights. A subset of these events was located using Hypoinverse. Their travel time curves are used to estimate crustal structure and velocity in the Pleasant Valley region. This is an EarthScope FlexArray project.

  8. Moving object tracking by using a novel real-time 2D local-polar-edge-detection method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chialun John

    2011-04-01

    The LPED (local polar edge detection) method is a newly developed 2D image processing method that automatically utilizes the center-of-mass polar coordinate to represent, in a unique way by a 36-dimension analog vector, the boundary of each object embedded in a picture frame. This 36D vector is the object ID for the particular object it represents. This ID vector is independent of the position of the object and independent of the orientation of the object, but it is a characteristic property from object to object. The background noises are automatically filtered out if the background objects are much smaller and much more randomly distributed than the objects of interest. This concise ID vector will not only identify the object precisely in a large picture frame where multiple-shaped objects lie, it will also track the object automatically when the object moves and it will record the data of movement periodically. I.e., it can measure automatically the distance of movement, the angular change of object-orientation, and the new locations of the central of mass of the moving object between successive sampling time intervals. In other words, it can automatically predict the near future movement of the tracked object. The applications of this novel image processing technique, to name a few, may be (1) automatic satellite-tracking and targeting of ground moving vehicles, (2) robotic identification of surrounding environment by some shape selected scenic part in the environment (e.g., the cross-section of an underground tunnel) with self guidance for the robot to go along a desired path through the whole tunnel without hitting the tunnel wall. This paper describes the principle of LPED and some extensive experimental results, regarding the application (1) described above, by utilizing a real-time soft-ware program designed by the author.

  9. Wireless acoustic modules for real-time data fusion using asynchronous sniper localization algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hengy, S.; De Mezzo, S.; Duffner, P.; Naz, P.

    2012-11-01

    The presence of snipers in modern conflicts leads to high insecurity for the soldiers. In order to improve the soldier's protection against this threat, the French German Research Institute of Saint-Louis (ISL) has been conducting studies in the domain of acoustic localization of shots. Mobile antennas mounted on the soldier's helmet were initially used for real-time detection, classification and localization of sniper shots. It showed good performances in land scenarios, but also in urban scenarios if the array was in the shot corridor, meaning that the microphones first detect the direct wave and then the reflections of the Mach and muzzle waves (15% distance estimation error compared to the actual shooter array distance). Fusing data sent by multiple sensor nodes distributed on the field showed some of the limitations of the technologies that have been implemented in ISL's demonstrators. Among others, the determination of the arrays' orientation was not accurate enough, thereby degrading the performance of data fusion. Some new solutions have been developed in the past year in order to obtain better performance for data fusion. Asynchronous localization algorithms have been developed and post-processed on data measured in both free-field and urban environments with acoustic modules on the line of sight of the shooter. These results are presented in the first part of the paper. The impact of GPS position estimation error is also discussed in the article in order to evaluate the possible use of those algorithms for real-time processing using mobile acoustic nodes. In the frame of ISL's transverse project IMOTEP (IMprovement Of optical and acoustical TEchnologies for the Protection), some demonstrators are developed that will allow real-time asynchronous localization of sniper shots. An embedded detection and classification algorithm is implemented on wireless acoustic modules that send the relevant information to a central PC. Data fusion is then processed and the

  10. Social desirability and sexual offenders: a review.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lavinia; Grace, Randolph C

    2008-03-01

    Social desirability--the desire to make a favorable impression on others-poses a significant threat to the validity of self-reports. This review examines research on social desirability in both forensic and nonforensic populations with the goal of identifying how best to minimize threats to the validity of research with sexual offenders. Although social desirability has long been a major research topic in personality, consensus has not been reached on key questions such as its dimensional structure and whether social desirability constitutes a trait or a response bias. Research with offenders has shown that social desirability is negatively related to recidivism and that different offender subtypes vary in the degree to which social desirability appears to influence self-reports, with child molesters exhibiting the strongest tendency to "fake good." Several methods of controlling for social desirability have been proposed, but the effectiveness of these methods in increasing validity of offender self reports is questionable. Given the lack of consensus in the personality literature, a fresh start is needed in which basic questions regarding social desirability are revisited with respect to offender populations. PMID:18420557

  11. Real-time EEG Source-mapping Toolbox (REST): Online ICA and source localization.

    PubMed

    Pion-Tonachini, Luca; Hsu, Sheng-Hsiou; Makeig, Scott; Jung, Tzyy-Ping; Cauwenberghs, Gert

    2015-08-01

    The Electroencephalogram (EEG) is a noninvasive functional brain activity recording method that shows promise for becoming a 3-D cortical imaging modality with high temporal resolution. Currently, most of the tools developed for EEG analysis focus mainly on offline processing. This study introduces and demonstrates the Real-time EEG Source-mapping Toolbox (REST), an extension to the widely distributed EEGLAB environment. REST allows blind source separation of EEG data in real-time using Online Recursive Independent Component Analysis (ORICA), plus near real-time localization of separated sources. Two source localization methods are available to fit equivalent current dipoles or estimate spatial source distributions of selected sources. Selected measures of raw EEG data or component activations (e.g. time series of the data, spectral changes over time, equivalent current dipoles, etc.) can be visualized in near real-time. Finally, this study demonstrates the accuracy and functionality of REST with data from two experiments and discusses some relevant applications. PMID:26737199

  12. The local time dependence of the anisotropic solar cosmic ray flux.

    PubMed

    Smart, D F; Shea, M A

    2003-01-01

    The distribution of the solar cosmic radiation flux over the earth is not uniform, but the result of complex phenomena involving the interplanetary magnetic field, the geomagnetic field and latitude and longitude of locations on the earth. The latitude effect relates to the geomagnetic shield; the longitude effect relates to local time. For anisotropic solar cosmic ray events the maximum particle flux is always along the interplanetary magnetic field direction, sometimes called the Archimedean spiral path from the sun to the earth. During anisotropic solar cosmic ray event, the locations on the earth viewing "sunward" into the interplanetary magnetic field direction will observe the largest flux (when adjustments are made for the magnetic latitude effect). To relate this phenomena to aircraft routes, for anisotropic solar cosmic ray events that occur during "normal quiescent" conditions, the maximum solar cosmic ray flux (and corresponding solar particle radiation dose) will be observed in the dawn quadrant, ideally at about 06 hours local time.

  13. The local time dependence of the anisotropic solar cosmic ray flux.

    PubMed

    Smart, D F; Shea, M A

    2003-01-01

    The distribution of the solar cosmic radiation flux over the earth is not uniform, but the result of complex phenomena involving the interplanetary magnetic field, the geomagnetic field and latitude and longitude of locations on the earth. The latitude effect relates to the geomagnetic shield; the longitude effect relates to local time. For anisotropic solar cosmic ray events the maximum particle flux is always along the interplanetary magnetic field direction, sometimes called the Archimedean spiral path from the sun to the earth. During anisotropic solar cosmic ray event, the locations on the earth viewing "sunward" into the interplanetary magnetic field direction will observe the largest flux (when adjustments are made for the magnetic latitude effect). To relate this phenomena to aircraft routes, for anisotropic solar cosmic ray events that occur during "normal quiescent" conditions, the maximum solar cosmic ray flux (and corresponding solar particle radiation dose) will be observed in the dawn quadrant, ideally at about 06 hours local time. PMID:14727670

  14. Local-in-time well-posedness of a regularized mathematical model for silicon MESFET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blokhin, A. M.; Tkachev, D. L.

    2010-10-01

    We prove the local-in-time well-posedness of the initial boundary value problem for a system of quasilinear equations. This system is used for finding numerical stationary solutions of the hydrodynamical model of charge transport in the silicon MESFET (metal semiconductor field effect transistor). The initial boundary value problem has the following peculiarities: the quasilinear system is not a Cauchy-Kovalevskaya-type system; the boundary is a non-smooth curve and has angular points; nonlinearity of the problem is mainly connected with squares of gradients of the unknown functions. By using a special representation for the solution of a model problem we reduce the original problem to an integro-differential system. The local-in-time existence of a weakened generalized solution of this system is then proved by the fixed-point argument.

  15. Direct picosecond time resolution of unimolecular reactions initiated by local mode excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherer, N. F.; Doany, F. E.; Zewail, A. H.; Perry, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    Attention is given to the first results of direct, picosec measurements of the Delta-nu(OH) 5 local mode transition of H2O2. These time-resolved studies yield a direct measure of the unimolecular dissociation rate, and furnish a lower limit for the rate of energy redistribution from the OH stretch to the O-O reaction coordinate. The data thus determined may be used to ascertain the domain of validity for statistical unimolecular reaction rate theories.

  16. Time and Space Variations of Local Seismic Signals in the NW-Bohemia/Vogtland Swarm Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouskova, A.; Horalek, J.; Fischer, T.; Hudova, Z.

    2003-04-01

    Local WEBNET stations in the NW-Bohemia/Vogtland earthquake swarm region provide high quality data, which make possible a detailed analysis of converted phases contained in the seismograms. Seismograms of local earthquakes display pronounced reflections or splitting of P- and S-waves. Some of the reflections could origin from the presence of fluids or a molten material at a short distance from the earthquake hypocentres, the other reflect the complex geological structure of the region. The existence of split phases can verify the anisotropy of earth crust in this area. The occurrence of secondary phases, similarly to the other attributes of seismic wave propagation (velocity ratio of P- and S- waves, wave back-azimuth), varies in time and space. This contribution presents the space and time changes of some of observed secondary phases in the local NW-Bohemia seismograms and also gives some possible interpretations of these phenomena. Consequently, we discuss the processes acting during earthquake swarms in the NW- Bohemia/Vogtland region and in the time intervals between swarm activity.

  17. Real-Time Lexicon-Free Scene Text Localization and Recognition.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Lukas; Matas, Jiri

    2016-09-01

    An end-to-end real-time text localization and recognition method is presented. Its real-time performance is achieved by posing the character detection and segmentation problem as an efficient sequential selection from the set of Extremal Regions. The ER detector is robust against blur, low contrast and illumination, color and texture variation. In the first stage, the probability of each ER being a character is estimated using features calculated by a novel algorithm in constant time and only ERs with locally maximal probability are selected for the second stage, where the classification accuracy is improved using computationally more expensive features. A highly efficient clustering algorithm then groups ERs into text lines and an OCR classifier trained on synthetic fonts is exploited to label character regions. The most probable character sequence is selected in the last stage when the context of each character is known. The method was evaluated on three public datasets. On the ICDAR 2013 dataset the method achieves state-of-the-art results in text localization; on the more challenging SVT dataset, the proposed method significantly outperforms the state-of-the-art methods and demonstrates that the proposed pipeline can incorporate additional prior knowledge about the detected text. The proposed method was exploited as the baseline in the ICDAR 2015 Robust Reading competition, where it compares favourably to the state-of-the art. PMID:26540676

  18. Investigation of S3-2 satellite data for local time variation of energetic electron precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robbe, S.; Sheldon, W. R.; Benbrook, J. R.; Bering, E. A.; Vampola, A. L.

    1994-01-01

    Data on precipitating electrons from the S3-2 satellite were investigated for local time variation at four L = 4 stations in the southern hemisphere. The equatorial pitch angles of electrons mirroring at 100 km, assumed to be the edge of the bounce loss cone, are calculated for L = 4 using the International Geomagnetic Reference Field for the epoch of the S3-2 data, along with the variation in mirror altitude per degree of equatorial pitch angle. The largest obstacle to the investigation was uneven sampling in terms of local time for all of the stations. However, this situation was improved upon by the use of S3-2 measurements at the conjugate locations of the four stations which provided additional data on electrons in the southern hemisphere bounce loss cone. Evidence for an effect of the dawn-to-dusk geoelectric field was found at two of the stations, Halley Bay and Siple, in the form of a minimum in electron precipitation at dusk. However, the present study does not completely resolve the question of local time modulation of electron precipitation at L = 4 in the southern hemisphere. Furthermore, while the average precipitation was lowest at the Kerguelen site, as would be expected on the basis of drift loss cone (DLC) theories, the intensity at that site exceeds the level that is expected on the basis of these DLC theories.

  19. Patterns of local adaptation in space and time among soil bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kraemer, Susanne A; Kassen, Rees

    2015-03-01

    Our understanding of microbial biogeography has been governed by the dictum "Everything is everywhere, but the environment selects." In other words, the distribution of microbes is thought to occur in a regime of extensive dispersal and strong selection, generating local adaptation. However, direct tests of these assumptions are rare. Here, we investigate the extent of local adaptation in space and time of a collection of soil-derived microbial isolates, most belonging to the genus Pseudomonas, across a growing season from a deciduous forest in western Quebec, Canada, using a reciprocal transplant design. Average performance of all clones varied substantially in both space and time, in line with the expectation of strong selection in both dimensions. The behavior of genotype-by-environment variance in fitness and its components, responsiveness and inconsistency, in space and through time suggests that the strength of divergent selection increases as sites become more distant from each other in both dimensions. However, divergent selection was not strong enough to maintain different specialized types across the environments studied, which suggests that Pseudomonas and their close relatives are not locally adapted to the prevailing conditions of growth.

  20. Loschmidt echo in many-spin systems: contrasting time scales of local and global measurements.

    PubMed

    Zangara, Pablo R; Bendersky, Denise; Levstein, Patricia R; Pastawski, Horacio M

    2016-06-13

    A local excitation in a quantum many-spin system evolves deterministically. A time-reversal procedure, involving the inversion of the signs of every energy and interaction, should produce the excitation revival. This idea, experimentally coined in nuclear magnetic resonance, embodies the concept of the Loschmidt echo (LE). While such an implementation involves a single spin autocorrelation M(1,1), i.e. a local LE, theoretical efforts have focused on the study of the recovery probability of a complete many-body state, referred to here as global or many-body LE MMB Here, we analyse the relation between these magnitudes, with regard to their characteristic time scales and their dependence on the number of spins N We show that the global LE can be understood, to some extent, as the simultaneous occurrence of N independent local LEs, i.e. MMB∼(M(1,1))(N/4) This extensive hypothesis is exact for very short times and confirmed numerically beyond such a regime. Furthermore, we discuss a general picture of the decay of M1,1 as a consequence of the interplay between the time scale that characterizes the reversible interactions (T(2)) and that of the perturbation (τ(Σ)). Our analysis suggests that the short-time decay, characterized by the time scale τ(Σ), is greatly enhanced by the complex processes that occur beyond T(2) This would ultimately lead to the experimentally observed T(3), which was found to be roughly independent of τ(Σ) but closely tied to T(2). PMID:27140970

  1. Loschmidt echo in many-spin systems: contrasting time scales of local and global measurements.

    PubMed

    Zangara, Pablo R; Bendersky, Denise; Levstein, Patricia R; Pastawski, Horacio M

    2016-06-13

    A local excitation in a quantum many-spin system evolves deterministically. A time-reversal procedure, involving the inversion of the signs of every energy and interaction, should produce the excitation revival. This idea, experimentally coined in nuclear magnetic resonance, embodies the concept of the Loschmidt echo (LE). While such an implementation involves a single spin autocorrelation M(1,1), i.e. a local LE, theoretical efforts have focused on the study of the recovery probability of a complete many-body state, referred to here as global or many-body LE MMB Here, we analyse the relation between these magnitudes, with regard to their characteristic time scales and their dependence on the number of spins N We show that the global LE can be understood, to some extent, as the simultaneous occurrence of N independent local LEs, i.e. MMB∼(M(1,1))(N/4) This extensive hypothesis is exact for very short times and confirmed numerically beyond such a regime. Furthermore, we discuss a general picture of the decay of M1,1 as a consequence of the interplay between the time scale that characterizes the reversible interactions (T(2)) and that of the perturbation (τ(Σ)). Our analysis suggests that the short-time decay, characterized by the time scale τ(Σ), is greatly enhanced by the complex processes that occur beyond T(2) This would ultimately lead to the experimentally observed T(3), which was found to be roughly independent of τ(Σ) but closely tied to T(2).

  2. Control of pattern formation by time-delay feedback with global and local contributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stich, Michael; Beta, Carsten

    2010-09-01

    We consider the suppression of spatiotemporal chaos in the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation by a combined global and local time-delay feedback. Feedback terms are implemented as a control scheme, i.e., they are proportional to the difference between the time-delayed state of the system and its current state. We perform a linear stability analysis of uniform oscillations with respect to space-dependent perturbations and compare with numerical simulations. Similarly, for the fixed-point solution that corresponds to amplitude death in the spatially extended system, a linear stability analysis with respect to space-dependent perturbations is performed and complemented by numerical simulations.

  3. Fermion sign problem in imaginary-time projection continuum quantum Monte Carlo with local interaction.

    PubMed

    Calcavecchia, Francesco; Holzmann, Markus

    2016-04-01

    We use the shadow wave function formalism as a convenient model to study the fermion sign problem affecting all projector quantum Monte Carlo methods in continuum space. We demonstrate that the efficiency of imaginary-time projection algorithms decays exponentially with increasing number of particles and/or imaginary-time propagation. Moreover, we derive an analytical expression that connects the localization of the system with the magnitude of the sign problem, illustrating this behavior through numerical results. Finally, we discuss the computational complexity of the fermion sign problem and methods for alleviating its severity. PMID:27176442

  4. Locally conformal finite-difference time-domain techniques for particle-in-cell plasma simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, R. E.; Welch, D. R.; Zimmerman, W. R.; Miller, C. L.; Genoni, T. C.; Rose, D. V.; Price, D. W.; Martin, P. N.; Short, D. J.; Jones, A. W. P.; Threadgold, J. R.

    2011-02-01

    The Dey-Mittra [S. Dey, R. Mitra, A locally conformal finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) algorithm for modeling three-dimensional perfectly conducting objects, IEEE Microwave Guided Wave Lett. 7 (273) 1997] finite-difference time-domain partial cell method enables the modeling of irregularly shaped conducting surfaces while retaining second-order accuracy. We present an algorithm to extend this method to include charged particle emission and absorption in particle-in-cell codes. Several examples are presented that illustrate the possible improvements that can be realized using the new algorithm for problems relevant to plasma simulation.

  5. Local adaptation in the flowering-time gene network of balsam poplar, Populus balsamifera L.

    PubMed

    Keller, Stephen R; Levsen, Nicholas; Olson, Matthew S; Tiffin, Peter

    2012-10-01

    Identifying the signature and targets of local adaptation is an increasingly important goal in empirical population genetics. Using data from 443 balsam poplar Populus balsamifera trees sampled from 31 populations, we tested for evidence of geographically variable selection shaping diversity at 27 homologues of the Arabidopsis flowering-time network. These genes are implicated in the control of seasonal phenology, an important determinant of fitness. Using 335 candidate and 412 reference single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), we tested for evidence of local adaptation by searching for elevated population differentiation using F(ST)-based outlier analyses implemented in BayeScan or a Hierarchical Model in Arelquin and by testing for significant associations between allele frequency and environmental variables using BAYENV. A total of 46 SNPs from 14 candidate genes had signatures of local adaptation-either significantly greater population differentiation or significant covariance with one or more environmental variable relative to reference SNP distributions. Only 11 SNPs from two genes exhibited both elevated population differentiation and covariance with one or more environmental variables. Several genes including the abscisic acid gene ABI1B and the circadian clock genes ELF3 and GI5 harbored a large number of SNPs with signatures of local adaptation-with SNPs in GI5 strongly covarying with both latitude and precipitation and SNPs in ABI1B strongly covarying with temperature. In contrast to several other systems, we find little evidence that photoreceptors, including phytochromes, play an important role in local adaptation. Our results additionally show that detecting local adaptation is sensitive to the analytical approaches used and that model-based significance thresholds should be viewed with caution.

  6. DETECTION, LOCALIZATION, AND CHARACTERIZATION OF GRAVITATIONAL WAVE BURSTS IN A PULSAR TIMING ARRAY

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, Lee Samuel; Lommen, Andrea N.

    2010-08-01

    Efforts to detect gravitational waves by timing an array of pulsars have traditionally focused on stationary gravitational waves, e.g., stochastic or periodic signals. Gravitational wave bursts-signals whose duration is much shorter than the observation period-will also arise in the pulsar timing array waveband. Sources that give rise to detectable bursts include the formation or coalescence of supermassive black holes (SMBHs), the periapsis passage of compact objects in highly elliptic or unbound orbits about an SMBH, or cusps on cosmic strings. Here, we describe how pulsar timing array data may be analyzed to detect and characterize these bursts. Our analysis addresses, in a mutually consistent manner, a hierarchy of three questions. (1) What are the odds that a data set includes the signal from a gravitational wave burst? (2) Assuming the presence of a burst, what is the direction to its source? (3) Assuming the burst propagation direction, what is the burst waveform's time dependence in each of its polarization states? Applying our analysis to synthetic data sets, we find that we can detect gravitational waves even when the radiation is too weak to either localize the source or infer the waveform, and detect and localize sources even when the radiation amplitude is too weak to permit the waveform to be determined. While the context of our discussion is gravitational wave detection via pulsar timing arrays, the analysis itself is directly applicable to gravitational wave detection using either ground- or space-based detector data.

  7. The taming of desire: Unspecific postponement reduces desire for and consumption of postponed temptations.

    PubMed

    Mead, Nicole L; Patrick, Vanessa M

    2016-01-01

    The present investigation began with the conjecture that people may do better by saying "some other time" instead of "no, not ever" in response to temptations. Drawing from learning theories, we hypothesized that people interpret unspecific postponement ("I can have it some other time") as a signal that they do not strongly value the postponed temptation. In this way, unspecific postponement may reduce desire for and consumption of postponed temptations, both in the present moment and over time. Four experiments tested those hypotheses. A multiphase study using the free-choice paradigm supported the learning account for the effects of postponement: unspecific postponement reduced immediate desire for a self-selected temptation which in turn statistically accounted for diminished consumption during the week after the manipulation--but only when postponement was induced, not when it was imposed (Experiment 1). Supporting the hypothesis that unspecific but not specific postponement connotes weak valuation, only unspecific postponement reduced attention to (Experiment 2) and consumption of (Experiment 3) the postponed temptation. Additionally, unspecific postponement delayed consumption primarily among those who were highly motivated to forgo consumption of the temptation (Experiment 3). A final multiphase experiment compared the effectiveness of unspecific postponement to the classic self-control mechanism of restraint, finding that unspecific postponement (vs. restraint) reduced consumption of the temptation in the heat of the moment and across 1 week postmanipulation (Experiment 4). The current research provides novel insight into self-control facilitation, the modification of desire, and the differential effects of unspecific and specific intentions for reducing unwanted behavior. PMID:26727664

  8. The taming of desire: Unspecific postponement reduces desire for and consumption of postponed temptations.

    PubMed

    Mead, Nicole L; Patrick, Vanessa M

    2016-01-01

    The present investigation began with the conjecture that people may do better by saying "some other time" instead of "no, not ever" in response to temptations. Drawing from learning theories, we hypothesized that people interpret unspecific postponement ("I can have it some other time") as a signal that they do not strongly value the postponed temptation. In this way, unspecific postponement may reduce desire for and consumption of postponed temptations, both in the present moment and over time. Four experiments tested those hypotheses. A multiphase study using the free-choice paradigm supported the learning account for the effects of postponement: unspecific postponement reduced immediate desire for a self-selected temptation which in turn statistically accounted for diminished consumption during the week after the manipulation--but only when postponement was induced, not when it was imposed (Experiment 1). Supporting the hypothesis that unspecific but not specific postponement connotes weak valuation, only unspecific postponement reduced attention to (Experiment 2) and consumption of (Experiment 3) the postponed temptation. Additionally, unspecific postponement delayed consumption primarily among those who were highly motivated to forgo consumption of the temptation (Experiment 3). A final multiphase experiment compared the effectiveness of unspecific postponement to the classic self-control mechanism of restraint, finding that unspecific postponement (vs. restraint) reduced consumption of the temptation in the heat of the moment and across 1 week postmanipulation (Experiment 4). The current research provides novel insight into self-control facilitation, the modification of desire, and the differential effects of unspecific and specific intentions for reducing unwanted behavior.

  9. Development of a protocol to quantify local bone adaptation over space and time: Quantification of reproducibility.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yongtao; Boudiffa, Maya; Dall'Ara, Enrico; Bellantuono, Ilaria; Viceconti, Marco

    2016-07-01

    In vivo micro-computed tomography (µCT) scanning of small rodents is a powerful method for longitudinal monitoring of bone adaptation. However, the life-time bone growth in small rodents makes it a challenge to quantify local bone adaptation. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop a protocol, which can take into account large bone growth, to quantify local bone adaptations over space and time. The entire right tibiae of eight 14-week-old C57BL/6J female mice were consecutively scanned four times in an in vivo µCT scanner using a nominal isotropic image voxel size of 10.4µm. The repeated scan image datasets were aligned to the corresponding baseline (first) scan image dataset using rigid registration. 80% of tibia length (starting from the endpoint of the proximal growth plate) was selected as the volume of interest and partitioned into 40 regions along the tibial long axis (10 divisions) and in the cross-section (4 sectors). The bone mineral content (BMC) was used to quantify bone adaptation and was calculated in each region. All local BMCs have precision errors (PE%CV) of less than 3.5% (24 out of 40 regions have PE%CV of less than 2%), least significant changes (LSCs) of less than 3.8%, and 38 out of 40 regions have intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) of over 0.8. The proposed protocol allows to quantify local bone adaptations over an entire tibia in longitudinal studies, with a high reproducibility, an essential requirement to reduce the number of animals to achieve the necessary statistical power.

  10. Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, J. Gayle

    1995-01-01

    Reviews the current state of knowledge about hypoactive sexual desire disorder. Despite clinical attention to this disorder, ambiguity remains concerning the nature and treatment of low sexual desire. Reviews diagnostic issues, including prevalence estimates. Highlights current theories of etiology and maintenance, as well as assessment…

  11. Space-Time Localization of Plasma Turbulence Using Multiple Spacecraft Radio Links

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, John W.; Estabrook, Frank B.

    2011-01-01

    Space weather is described as the variability of solar wind plasma that can disturb satellites and systems and affect human space exploration. Accurate prediction requires information of the heliosphere inside the orbit of the Earth. However, for predictions using remote sensing, one needs not only plane-of-sky position but also range information the third spatial dimension to show the distance to the plasma disturbances and thus when they might propagate or co-rotate to create disturbances at the orbit of the Earth. Appropriately processed radio signals from spacecraft having communications lines-of-sight passing through the inner heliosphere can be used for this spacetime localization of plasma disturbances. The solar plasma has an electron density- and radio-wavelength-dependent index of refraction. An approximately monochromatic wave propagating through a thin layer of plasma turbulence causes a geometrical-optics phase shift proportional to the electron density at the point of passage, the radio wavelength, and the thickness of the layer. This phase shift is the same for a wave propagating either up or down through the layer at the point of passage. This attribute can be used for space-time localization of plasma irregularities. The transfer function of plasma irregularities to the observed time series depends on the Doppler tracking mode. When spacecraft observations are in the two-way mode (downlink radio signal phase-locked to an uplink radio transmission), plasma fluctuations have a two-pulse response in the Doppler. In the two-way mode, the Doppler time series y2(t) is the difference between the frequency of the downlink signal received and the frequency of a ground reference oscillator. A plasma blob localized at a distance x along the line of sight perturbs the phase on both the up and down link, giving rise to two events in the two-way tracking time series separated by a time lag depending the blob s distance from the Earth: T2-2x/c, where T2 is the

  12. Object of desire self-consciousness theory.

    PubMed

    Bogaert, Anthony F; Brotto, Lori A

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss the construct of object of desire self-consciousness, the perception that one is romantically and sexually desirable in another's eyes. The authors discuss the nature of the construct, variations in its expression, and how it may function as part of a self-schemata or script related to romance and sexuality. The authors suggest that object of desire self-consciousness may be an adaptive, evolved psychological mechanism allowing sexual and romantic tactics suitable to one's mate value. The authors also suggest that it can act as a signal that one has high mate value in the sexual marketplace. The authors then review literature (e.g., on fantasies, on sexual activity preferences, on sexual dysfunctions, on language) suggesting that object of desire self-consciousness plays a particularly important role in heterosexual women's sexual/romantic functioning and desires. PMID:23905711

  13. Contributed Review: Source-localization algorithms and applications using time of arrival and time difference of arrival measurements.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinya; Deng, Zhiqun Daniel; Rauchenstein, Lynn T; Carlson, Thomas J

    2016-04-01

    Locating the position of fixed or mobile sources (i.e., transmitters) based on measurements obtained from sensors (i.e., receivers) is an important research area that is attracting much interest. In this paper, we review several representative localization algorithms that use time of arrivals (TOAs) and time difference of arrivals (TDOAs) to achieve high signal source position estimation accuracy when a transmitter is in the line-of-sight of a receiver. Circular (TOA) and hyperbolic (TDOA) position estimation approaches both use nonlinear equations that relate the known locations of receivers and unknown locations of transmitters. Estimation of the location of transmitters using the standard nonlinear equations may not be very accurate because of receiver location errors, receiver measurement errors, and computational efficiency challenges that result in high computational burdens. Least squares and maximum likelihood based algorithms have become the most popular computational approaches to transmitter location estimation. In this paper, we summarize the computational characteristics and position estimation accuracies of various positioning algorithms. By improving methods for estimating the time-of-arrival of transmissions at receivers and transmitter location estimation algorithms, transmitter location estimation may be applied across a range of applications and technologies such as radar, sonar, the Global Positioning System, wireless sensor networks, underwater animal tracking, mobile communications, and multimedia. PMID:27131647

  14. Contributed Review: Source-localization algorithms and applications using time of arrival and time difference of arrival measurements.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinya; Deng, Zhiqun Daniel; Rauchenstein, Lynn T; Carlson, Thomas J

    2016-04-01

    Locating the position of fixed or mobile sources (i.e., transmitters) based on measurements obtained from sensors (i.e., receivers) is an important research area that is attracting much interest. In this paper, we review several representative localization algorithms that use time of arrivals (TOAs) and time difference of arrivals (TDOAs) to achieve high signal source position estimation accuracy when a transmitter is in the line-of-sight of a receiver. Circular (TOA) and hyperbolic (TDOA) position estimation approaches both use nonlinear equations that relate the known locations of receivers and unknown locations of transmitters. Estimation of the location of transmitters using the standard nonlinear equations may not be very accurate because of receiver location errors, receiver measurement errors, and computational efficiency challenges that result in high computational burdens. Least squares and maximum likelihood based algorithms have become the most popular computational approaches to transmitter location estimation. In this paper, we summarize the computational characteristics and position estimation accuracies of various positioning algorithms. By improving methods for estimating the time-of-arrival of transmissions at receivers and transmitter location estimation algorithms, transmitter location estimation may be applied across a range of applications and technologies such as radar, sonar, the Global Positioning System, wireless sensor networks, underwater animal tracking, mobile communications, and multimedia.

  15. Contributed Review: Source-localization algorithms and applications using time of arrival and time difference of arrival measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinya; Deng, Zhiqun Daniel; Rauchenstein, Lynn T.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2016-04-01

    Locating the position of fixed or mobile sources (i.e., transmitters) based on measurements obtained from sensors (i.e., receivers) is an important research area that is attracting much interest. In this paper, we review several representative localization algorithms that use time of arrivals (TOAs) and time difference of arrivals (TDOAs) to achieve high signal source position estimation accuracy when a transmitter is in the line-of-sight of a receiver. Circular (TOA) and hyperbolic (TDOA) position estimation approaches both use nonlinear equations that relate the known locations of receivers and unknown locations of transmitters. Estimation of the location of transmitters using the standard nonlinear equations may not be very accurate because of receiver location errors, receiver measurement errors, and computational efficiency challenges that result in high computational burdens. Least squares and maximum likelihood based algorithms have become the most popular computational approaches to transmitter location estimation. In this paper, we summarize the computational characteristics and position estimation accuracies of various positioning algorithms. By improving methods for estimating the time-of-arrival of transmissions at receivers and transmitter location estimation algorithms, transmitter location estimation may be applied across a range of applications and technologies such as radar, sonar, the Global Positioning System, wireless sensor networks, underwater animal tracking, mobile communications, and multimedia.

  16. Sound Source Localization for HRI Using FOC-Based Time Difference Feature and Spatial Grid Matching.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaofei; Liu, Hong

    2013-08-01

    In human-robot interaction (HRI), speech sound source localization (SSL) is a convenient and efficient way to obtain the relative position between a speaker and a robot. However, implementing a SSL system based on TDOA method encounters many problems, such as noise of real environments, the solution of nonlinear equations, switch between far field and near field. In this paper, fourth-order cumulant spectrum is derived, based on which a time delay estimation (TDE) algorithm that is available for speech signal and immune to spatially correlated Gaussian noise is proposed. Furthermore, time difference feature of sound source and its spatial distribution are analyzed, and a spatial grid matching (SGM) algorithm is proposed for localization step, which handles some problems that geometric positioning method faces effectively. Valid feature detection algorithm and a decision tree method are also suggested to improve localization performance and reduce computational complexity. Experiments are carried out in real environments on a mobile robot platform, in which thousands of sets of speech data with noise collected by four microphones are tested in 3D space. The effectiveness of our TDE method and SGM algorithm is verified. PMID:26502430

  17. Output feedback fuzzy controller design with local nonlinear feedback laws for discrete-time nonlinear systems.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jiuxiang; Wang, Youyi; Yang, Guang-Hong

    2010-12-01

    This paper considers the output feedback control problem for nonlinear discrete-time systems, which are represented by a type of fuzzy systems with local nonlinear models. By using the estimations of the states and nonlinear functions in local models, sufficient conditions for designing observer-based controllers are given for discrete-time nonlinear systems. First, a separation property, i.e., the controller and the observer can be independently designed, is proved for the class of fuzzy systems. Second, a two-step procedure with cone complementarity linearization algorithms is also developed for solving the H( ∞) dynamic output feedback (DOF) control problem. Moreover, for the case where the nonlinear functions in local submodels are measurable, a convex condition for designing H(∞) controllers is given by a new DOF control scheme. In contrast to the existing methods, the new methods can design output feedback controllers with fewer fuzzy rules as well as less computational burden, which is helpful for controller designs and implementations. Lastly, numerical examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  18. Local spectrum analysis of field propagation in an anisotropic medium. Part I. Time-harmonic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinkelman, Igor; Melamed, Timor

    2005-06-01

    The phase-space beam summation is a general analytical framework for local analysis and modeling of radiation from extended source distributions. In this formulation, the field is expressed as a superposition of beam propagators that emanate from all points in the source domain and in all directions. In this Part I of a two-part investigation, the theory is extended to include propagation in anisotropic medium characterized by a generic wave-number profile for time-harmonic fields; in a companion paper [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A22, 1208 (2005)], the theory is extended to time-dependent fields. The propagation characteristics of the beam propagators in a homogeneous anisotropic medium are considered. With use of Gaussian windows for the local processing of either ordinary or extraordinary electromagnetic field distributions, the field is represented by a phase-space spectral distribution in which the propagating elements are Gaussian beams that are formulated by using Gaussian plane-wave spectral distributions over the extended source plane. By applying saddle-point asymptotics, we extract the Gaussian beam phenomenology in the anisotropic environment. The resulting field is parameterized in terms of the spatial evolution of the beam curvature, beam width, etc., which are mapped to local geometrical properties of the generic wave-number profile. The general results are applied to the special case of uniaxial crystal, and it is found that the asymptotics for the Gaussian beam propagators, as well as the physical phenomenology attached, perform remarkably well.

  19. Sound Source Localization for HRI Using FOC-Based Time Difference Feature and Spatial Grid Matching.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaofei; Liu, Hong

    2013-08-01

    In human-robot interaction (HRI), speech sound source localization (SSL) is a convenient and efficient way to obtain the relative position between a speaker and a robot. However, implementing a SSL system based on TDOA method encounters many problems, such as noise of real environments, the solution of nonlinear equations, switch between far field and near field. In this paper, fourth-order cumulant spectrum is derived, based on which a time delay estimation (TDE) algorithm that is available for speech signal and immune to spatially correlated Gaussian noise is proposed. Furthermore, time difference feature of sound source and its spatial distribution are analyzed, and a spatial grid matching (SGM) algorithm is proposed for localization step, which handles some problems that geometric positioning method faces effectively. Valid feature detection algorithm and a decision tree method are also suggested to improve localization performance and reduce computational complexity. Experiments are carried out in real environments on a mobile robot platform, in which thousands of sets of speech data with noise collected by four microphones are tested in 3D space. The effectiveness of our TDE method and SGM algorithm is verified.

  20. Real-time realizations of the Bayesian Infrasonic Source Localization Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinsky, V.; Arrowsmith, S.; Hofstetter, A.; Nippress, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Bayesian Infrasonic Source Localization method (BISL), introduced by Mordak et al. (2010) and upgraded by Marcillo et al. (2014) is destined for the accurate estimation of the atmospheric event origin at local, regional and global scales by the seismic and infrasonic networks and arrays. The BISL is based on probabilistic models of the source-station infrasonic signal propagation time, picking time and azimuth estimate merged with a prior knowledge about celerity distribution. It requires at each hypothetical source location, integration of the product of the corresponding source-station likelihood functions multiplied by a prior probability density function of celerity over the multivariate parameter space. The present BISL realization is generally time-consuming procedure based on numerical integration. The computational scheme proposed simplifies the target function so that integrals are taken exactly and are represented via standard functions. This makes the procedure much faster and realizable in real-time without practical loss of accuracy. The procedure executed as PYTHON-FORTRAN code demonstrates high performance on a set of the model and real data.

  1. The Local Discontinuous Galerkin Method for Time-Dependent Convection-Diffusion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cockburn, Bernardo; Shu, Chi-Wang

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, we study the Local Discontinuous Galerkin methods for nonlinear, time-dependent convection-diffusion systems. These methods are an extension of the Runge-Kutta Discontinuous Galerkin methods for purely hyperbolic systems to convection-diffusion systems and share with those methods their high parallelizability, their high-order formal accuracy, and their easy handling of complicated geometries, for convection dominated problems. It is proven that for scalar equations, the Local Discontinuous Galerkin methods are L(sup 2)-stable in the nonlinear case. Moreover, in the linear case, it is shown that if polynomials of degree k are used, the methods are k-th order accurate for general triangulations; although this order of convergence is suboptimal, it is sharp for the LDG methods. Preliminary numerical examples displaying the performance of the method are shown.

  2. Particle swarm optimization and its application in MEG source localization using single time sliced data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Juan; Liu, Chenglian; Guo, Yongning

    2014-10-01

    The estimation of neural active sources from the magnetoencephalography (MEG) data is a very critical issue for both clinical neurology and brain functions research. A widely accepted source-modeling technique for MEG involves calculating a set of equivalent current dipoles (ECDs). Depth in the brain is one of difficulties in MEG source localization. Particle swarm optimization(PSO) is widely used to solve various optimization problems. In this paper we discuss its ability and robustness to find the global optimum in different depths of the brain when using single equivalent current dipole (sECD) model and single time sliced data. The results show that PSO is an effective global optimization to MEG source localization when given one dipole in different depths.

  3. Sparse representation based on local time-frequency template matching for bearing transient fault feature extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qingbo; Ding, Xiaoxi

    2016-05-01

    The transients caused by the localized fault are important measurement information for bearing fault diagnosis. Thus it is crucial to extract the transients from the bearing vibration or acoustic signals that are always corrupted by a large amount of background noise. In this paper, an iterative transient feature extraction approach is proposed based on time-frequency (TF) domain sparse representation. The approach is realized by presenting a new method, called local TF template matching. In this method, the TF atoms are constructed based on the TF distribution (TFD) of the Morlet wavelet bases and local TF templates are formulated from the TF atoms for the matching process. The instantaneous frequency (IF) ridge calculated from the TFD of an analyzed signal provides the frequency parameter values for the TF atoms as well as an effective template matching path on the TF plane. In each iteration, local TF templates are employed to do correlation with the TFD of the analyzed signal along the IF ridge tube for identifying the optimum parameters of transient wavelet model. With this iterative procedure, transients can be extracted in the TF domain from measured signals one by one. The final signal can be synthesized by combining the extracted TF atoms and the phase of the raw signal. The local TF template matching builds an effective TF matching-based sparse representation approach with the merit of satisfying the native pulse waveform structure of transients. The effectiveness of the proposed method is verified by practical defective bearing signals. Comparison results also show that the proposed method is superior to traditional methods in transient feature extraction.

  4. Writing Queer across the Borders of Geography and Desire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malagreca, Miguel A.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author merges biographical notes, autoethnography and experimental writing to situate his migrant self as a self that "performs through writing," i.e. planned, experimental writing that subverts the centrality of the monolingual heterosexual identity. He explores the intersections of time, desire, and power across time and…

  5. Cerebellar potentiation and learning a whisker-based object localization task with a time response window.

    PubMed

    Rahmati, Negah; Owens, Cullen B; Bosman, Laurens W J; Spanke, Jochen K; Lindeman, Sander; Gong, Wei; Potters, Jan-Willem; Romano, Vincenzo; Voges, Kai; Moscato, Letizia; Koekkoek, Sebastiaan K E; Negrello, Mario; De Zeeuw, Chris I

    2014-01-29

    Whisker-based object localization requires activation and plasticity of somatosensory and motor cortex. These parts of the cerebral cortex receive strong projections from the cerebellum via the thalamus, but it is unclear whether and to what extent cerebellar processing may contribute to such a sensorimotor task. Here, we subjected knock-out mice, which suffer from impaired intrinsic plasticity in their Purkinje cells and long-term potentiation at their parallel fiber-to-Purkinje cell synapses (L7-PP2B), to an object localization task with a time response window (RW). Water-deprived animals had to learn to localize an object with their whiskers, and based upon this location they were trained to lick within a particular period ("go" trial) or refrain from licking ("no-go" trial). L7-PP2B mice were not ataxic and showed proper basic motor performance during whisking and licking, but were severely impaired in learning this task compared with wild-type littermates. Significantly fewer L7-PP2B mice were able to learn the task at long RWs. Those L7-PP2B mice that eventually learned the task made unstable progress, were significantly slower in learning, and showed deficiencies in temporal tuning. These differences became greater as the RW became narrower. Trained wild-type mice, but not L7-PP2B mice, showed a net increase in simple spikes and complex spikes of their Purkinje cells during the task. We conclude that cerebellar processing, and potentiation in particular, can contribute to learning a whisker-based object localization task when timing is relevant. This study points toward a relevant role of cerebellum-cerebrum interaction in a sophisticated cognitive task requiring strict temporal processing.

  6. The local maxima method for enhancement of time-frequency map and its application to local damage detection in rotating machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obuchowski, Jakub; Wyłomańska, Agnieszka; Zimroz, Radosław

    2014-06-01

    In this paper a new method of fault detection in rotating machinery is presented. It is based on a vibration time series analysis in time-frequency domain. A raw vibration signal is decomposed via the short-time Fourier transform (STFT). The time-frequency map is considered as matrix (M×N) with N sub-signals with length M. Each sub-signal is considered as a time series and might be interpreted as energy variation for narrow frequency bins. Each sub-signal is processed using a novel approach called the local maxima method. Basically, we search for local maxima because they should appear in the signal if local damage in bearings or gearbox exists. Finally, information for all sub-signals is combined in order to validate impulsive behavior of energy. Due to random character of the obtained time series, each maximum occurrence has to be checked for its significance. If there are time points for which the average number of local maxima for all sub-signals is significantly higher than for the other time instances, then location of these maxima is “weighted” as more important (at this time instance local maxima create for a set of Δf a pattern on the time-frequency map). This information, called vector of weights, is used for enhancement of spectrogram. When vector of weights is applied for spectrogram, non-informative energy is suppressed while informative features on spectrogram are enhanced. If the distribution of local maxima on spectrogram creates a pattern of wide-band cyclic energy growth, the machine is suspected of being damaged. For healthy condition, the vector of the average number of maxima for each time point should not have outliers, aggregation of information from all sub-signals is rather random and does not create any pattern. The method is illustrated by analysis of very noisy both real and simulated signals.

  7. Local Effect of Space-Time Expansion ---- How Galaxies Form and Evolve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jian Liang; Hua, He Yu

    2016-09-01

    generalize gravitational theory of central field to the expanding space-time, and realize the unification of structure of big scope space-time and physical phenomena of small scope, and reasonably and systematically explain gravitational anomalies of solar system such as extra receding rate of lunar orbit, the increase of astronomical unit, the secular change of day length, the earth's expansion as well as the extra acceleration of artificial aerocrafts and so on, which cannot be treated by current knowledge. Besides, it is disclosed that galaxies form from continued growth but not the assemblage of existent matter after big bang, new matter continuously creates in the interior of celestial bodies, celestial bodies, galaxies and space simultaneously enlarge at the same proportion, and it is the local effect of space-time expansion that determines formation and evolution of galaxies.

  8. Media Impacts on Women's Fertility Desires: A Prolonged Exposure Experiment.

    PubMed

    Knobloch-Westerwick, Silvia; Willis, Laura E; Kennard, Ashley R

    2016-06-01

    Media exposure may have implications for family planning, a public health issue of key importance. Drawing on social comparison theory and social identity theory, a prolonged exposure experiment examined whether media portrayals of women's social roles affect fertility desires among 166 American, nonstudent, never married, childless women ages 21-35 years old. After sign-up and baseline sessions, participants viewed magazine pages five days in a row. Stimuli presented women in either mother/homemaker roles, beauty ideal roles, or professional roles. Three days later, participants again indicated their number of desired children and time planned until first birth. Exposure to mother/homemaker and beauty ideal portrayals increased the number of desired children across time. Exposure to professional portrayals increased the time planned until 1st birth compared to beauty ideal portrayals-this impact was partially mediated by a shift toward more progressive gender norms (per social identity theory) and assimilation (per social comparison theory). PMID:27166510

  9. Media Impacts on Women's Fertility Desires: A Prolonged Exposure Experiment.

    PubMed

    Knobloch-Westerwick, Silvia; Willis, Laura E; Kennard, Ashley R

    2016-06-01

    Media exposure may have implications for family planning, a public health issue of key importance. Drawing on social comparison theory and social identity theory, a prolonged exposure experiment examined whether media portrayals of women's social roles affect fertility desires among 166 American, nonstudent, never married, childless women ages 21-35 years old. After sign-up and baseline sessions, participants viewed magazine pages five days in a row. Stimuli presented women in either mother/homemaker roles, beauty ideal roles, or professional roles. Three days later, participants again indicated their number of desired children and time planned until first birth. Exposure to mother/homemaker and beauty ideal portrayals increased the number of desired children across time. Exposure to professional portrayals increased the time planned until 1st birth compared to beauty ideal portrayals-this impact was partially mediated by a shift toward more progressive gender norms (per social identity theory) and assimilation (per social comparison theory).

  10. Optical eye tracking system for real-time noninvasive tumor localization in external beam radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Via, Riccardo Fassi, Aurora; Fattori, Giovanni; Fontana, Giulia; Pella, Andrea; Tagaste, Barbara; Ciocca, Mario; Riboldi, Marco; Baroni, Guido; Orecchia, Roberto

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: External beam radiotherapy currently represents an important therapeutic strategy for the treatment of intraocular tumors. Accurate target localization and efficient compensation of involuntary eye movements are crucial to avoid deviations in dose distribution with respect to the treatment plan. This paper describes an eye tracking system (ETS) based on noninvasive infrared video imaging. The system was designed for capturing the tridimensional (3D) ocular motion and provides an on-line estimation of intraocular lesions position based on a priori knowledge coming from volumetric imaging. Methods: Eye tracking is performed by localizing cornea and pupil centers on stereo images captured by two calibrated video cameras, exploiting eye reflections produced by infrared illumination. Additionally, torsional eye movements are detected by template matching in the iris region of eye images. This information allows estimating the 3D position and orientation of the eye by means of an eye local reference system. By combining ETS measurements with volumetric imaging for treatment planning [computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR)], one is able to map the position of the lesion to be treated in local eye coordinates, thus enabling real-time tumor referencing during treatment setup and irradiation. Experimental tests on an eye phantom and seven healthy subjects were performed to assess ETS tracking accuracy. Results: Measurements on phantom showed an overall median accuracy within 0.16 mm and 0.40° for translations and rotations, respectively. Torsional movements were affected by 0.28° median uncertainty. On healthy subjects, the gaze direction error ranged between 0.19° and 0.82° at a median working distance of 29 cm. The median processing time of the eye tracking algorithm was 18.60 ms, thus allowing eye monitoring up to 50 Hz. Conclusions: A noninvasive ETS prototype was designed to perform real-time target localization and eye movement monitoring

  11. Relationship of edge localized mode burst times with divertor flux loop signal phase in JET

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, S. C.; Dendy, R. O.; Todd, T. N.; Webster, A. J.; Morris, J.; Watkins, N. W.; Calderon, F. A.

    2014-06-15

    A phase relationship is identified between sequential edge localized modes (ELMs) occurrence times in a set of H-mode tokamak plasmas to the voltage measured in full flux azimuthal loops in the divertor region. We focus on plasmas in the Joint European Torus where a steady H-mode is sustained over several seconds, during which ELMs are observed in the Be II emission at the divertor. The ELMs analysed arise from intrinsic ELMing, in that there is no deliberate intent to control the ELMing process by external means. We use ELM timings derived from the Be II signal to perform direct time domain analysis of the full flux loop VLD2 and VLD3 signals, which provide a high cadence global measurement proportional to the voltage induced by changes in poloidal magnetic flux. Specifically, we examine how the time interval between pairs of successive ELMs is linked to the time-evolving phase of the full flux loop signals. Each ELM produces a clear early pulse in the full flux loop signals, whose peak time is used to condition our analysis. The arrival time of the following ELM, relative to this pulse, is found to fall into one of two categories: (i) prompt ELMs, which are directly paced by the initial response seen in the flux loop signals; and (ii) all other ELMs, which occur after the initial response of the full flux loop signals has decayed in amplitude. The times at which ELMs in category (ii) occur, relative to the first ELM of the pair, are clustered at times when the instantaneous phase of the full flux loop signal is close to its value at the time of the first ELM.

  12. The Relative Contribution of Interaural Time and Magnitude Cues to Dynamic Sound Localization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary data from a study examining the relative contribution of interaural time differences (ITDs) and interaural level differences (ILDs) to the localization of virtual sound sources both with and without head motion. The listeners' task was to estimate the apparent direction and distance of virtual sources (broadband noise) presented over headphones. Stimuli were synthesized from minimum phase representations of nonindividualized directional transfer functions; binaural magnitude spectra were derived from the minimum phase estimates and ITDs were represented as a pure delay. During dynamic conditions, listeners were encouraged to move their heads; the position of the listener's head was tracked and the stimuli were synthesized in real time using a Convolvotron to simulate a stationary external sound source. ILDs and ITDs were either correctly or incorrectly correlated with head motion: (1) both ILDs and ITDs correctly correlated, (2) ILDs correct, ITD fixed at 0 deg azimuth and 0 deg elevation, (3) ITDs correct, ILDs fixed at 0 deg, 0 deg. Similar conditions were run for static conditions except that none of the cues changed with head motion. The data indicated that, compared to static conditions, head movements helped listeners to resolve confusions primarily when ILDs were correctly correlated, although a smaller effect was also seen for correct ITDs. Together with the results for static conditions, the data suggest that localization tends to be dominated by the cue that is most reliable or consistent, when reliability is defined by consistency over time as well as across frequency bands.

  13. Effective real-time vehicle tracking using discriminative sparse coding on local patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, XiangJun; Ye, Feiyue; Ruan, Yaduan; Chen, Qimei

    2016-01-01

    A visual tracking framework that provides an object detector and tracker, which focuses on effective and efficient visual tracking in surveillance of real-world intelligent transport system applications, is proposed. The framework casts the tracking task as problems of object detection, feature representation, and classification, which is different from appearance model-matching approaches. Through a feature representation of discriminative sparse coding on local patches called DSCLP, which trains a dictionary on local clustered patches sampled from both positive and negative datasets, the discriminative power and robustness has been improved remarkably, which makes our method more robust to a complex realistic setting with all kinds of degraded image quality. Moreover, by catching objects through one-time background subtraction, along with offline dictionary training, computation time is dramatically reduced, which enables our framework to achieve real-time tracking performance even in a high-definition sequence with heavy traffic. Experiment results show that our work outperforms some state-of-the-art methods in terms of speed, accuracy, and robustness and exhibits increased robustness in a complex real-world scenario with degraded image quality caused by vehicle occlusion, image blur of rain or fog, and change in viewpoint or scale.

  14. Local Time Variation of Water Ice Clouds on Mars as Observed by THEMIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    The move of the Odyssey spacecraft to an orbit with local time near 6:00 AM and PM enables systematic retrieval of water ice clouds at a time of day not accessible from Mars Global Surveyor, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, or previous Odyssey observations. Although surface temperature is reduced near sunrise and sunset compared to afternoon, THEMIS observations show that there is still sufficient thermal contrast between the surface and atmosphere over a range of latitudes near the sub-solar point to retrieve accurate aerosol optical depth. Because water ice clouds form by condensation, relatively small changes in atmospheric temperature can cause clouds to form or sublimate quickly, and there can be large changes in water ice cloud optical depth over the course of a day. Here we present recent retrievals of water ice aerosol optical depth from THEMIS observations. These retrievals show significant differences in cloud locations and opitcal depth compared against THEMIS retrievals from previous Mars Years that were taken at an earlier local time.

  15. Real-time analysis application for identifying bursty local areas related to emergency topics.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Tatsuhiro; Tamura, Keiichi

    2015-01-01

    Since social media started getting more attention from users on the Internet, social media has been one of the most important information source in the world. Especially, with the increasing popularity of social media, data posted on social media sites are rapidly becoming collective intelligence, which is a term used to refer to new media that is displacing traditional media. In this paper, we focus on geotagged tweets on the Twitter site. These geotagged tweets are referred to as georeferenced documents because they include not only a short text message, but also the documents' posting time and location. Many researchers have been tackling the development of new data mining techniques for georeferenced documents to identify and analyze emergency topics, such as natural disasters, weather, diseases, and other incidents. In particular, the utilization of geotagged tweets to identify and analyze natural disasters has received much attention from administrative agencies recently because some case studies have achieved compelling results. In this paper, we propose a novel real-time analysis application for identifying bursty local areas related to emergency topics. The aim of our new application is to provide new platforms that can identify and analyze the localities of emergency topics. The proposed application is composed of three core computational intelligence techniques: the Naive Bayes classifier technique, the spatiotemporal clustering technique, and the burst detection technique. Moreover, we have implemented two types of application interface: a Web application interface and an android application interface. To evaluate the proposed application, we have implemented a real-time weather observation system embedded the proposed application. we used actual crawling geotagged tweets posted on the Twitter site. The weather observation system successfully detected bursty local areas related to observed emergency weather topics. PMID:25918679

  16. Time-localized projectors in string field theory with an E-field

    SciTech Connect

    Maccaferri, C.; Scherer Santos, R.J.; Tolla, D.D.

    2005-03-15

    We extend the analysis of Bonora et al. [hep-th/0409063] to the case of a constant electric field turned on the world volume and on a transverse direction of a D-brane. We show that time localization is still obtained by inverting the discrete eigenvalues of the lump solution. The lifetime of the unstable soliton is shown to depend on two free parameters: the b parameter and the value of the electric field. As a by-product, we construct the normalized diagonal basis of the star algebra in the B{sub {mu}}{sub {nu}}-field background.

  17. Non-Markovian Quantum Evolution: Time-Local Generators and Memory Kernels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chruściński, Dariusz; Należyty, Paweł

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we provide a basic introduction to the topic of quantum non-Markovian evolution presenting both time-local and memory kernel approach to the evolution of open quantum systems. We start with the standard notion of a classical Markovian stochastic process and generalize it to classical Markovian stochastic evolution which in turn becomes a starting point of the quantum setting. Our approach is based on the notion of P-divisible, CP-divisible maps and their refinements to k-divisible maps. Basic methods enabling one to detect non-Markovianity of the quantum evolution are also presented. Our analysis is illustrated by several simple examples.

  18. Fatigue damage localization using time-domain features extracted from nonlinear Lamb waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Ming; Su, Zhongqing; Lu, Ye; Cheng, Li

    2014-03-01

    Nonlinear guided waves are sensitive to small-scale fatigue damage that may hardly be identified by traditional techniques. A characterization method for fatigue damage is established based on nonlinear Lamb waves in conjunction with the use of a piezoelectric sensor network. Theories on nonlinear Lamb waves for damage detection are first introduced briefly. Then, the ineffectiveness of using pure frequency-domain information of nonlinear wave signals for locating damage is discussed. With a revisit to traditional gross-damage localization techniques based on the time of flight, the idea of using temporal signal features of nonlinear Lamb waves to locate fatigue damage is introduced. This process involves a time-frequency analysis that enables the damage-induced nonlinear signal features, which are either undiscernible in the original time history or uninformative in the frequency spectrum, to be revealed. Subsequently, a finite element modeling technique is employed, accounting for various sources of nonlinearities in a fatigued medium. A piezoelectric sensor network is configured to actively generate and acquire probing Lamb waves that involve damageinduced nonlinear features. A probability-based diagnostic imaging algorithm is further proposed, presenting results in diagnostic images intuitively. The approach is experimentally verified on a fatigue-damaged aluminum plate, showing reasonably good accuracy. Compared to existing nonlinear ultrasonics-based inspection techniques, this approach uses a permanently attached sensor network that well accommodates automated online health monitoring; more significantly, it utilizes time-domain information of higher-order harmonics from time-frequency analysis, and demonstrates a great potential for quantitative characterization of small-scale damage with improved localization accuracy.

  19. Local inertial oscillations in the surface ocean generated by time-varying winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shengli; Polton, Jeff A.; Hu, Jianyu; Xing, Jiuxing

    2015-12-01

    A new relationship is presented to give a review study on the evolution of inertial oscillations in the surface ocean locally generated by time-varying wind stress. The inertial oscillation is expressed as the superposition of a previous oscillation and a newly generated oscillation, which depends upon the time-varying wind stress. This relationship is employed to investigate some idealized wind change events. For a wind series varying temporally with different rates, the induced inertial oscillation is dominated by the wind with the greatest variation. The resonant wind, which rotates anti-cyclonically at the local inertial frequency with time, produces maximal amplitude of inertial oscillations, which grows monotonically. For the wind rotating at non-inertial frequencies, the responses vary periodically, with wind injecting inertial energy when it is in phase with the currents, but removing inertial energy when it is out of phase. The wind rotating anti-cyclonically with time is much more favorable to generate inertial oscillations than the cyclonic rotating wind. The wind with a frequency closer to the inertial frequency generates stronger inertial oscillations. For a diurnal wind, the induced inertial oscillation is dependent on latitude and is most significant at 30 °. This relationship is also applied to examine idealized moving cyclones. The inertial oscillation is much stronger on the right-hand side of the cyclone path than on the left-hand side (in the northern hemisphere). This is due to the wind being anti-cyclonic with time on the right-hand side, but cyclonic on the other side. The inertial oscillation varies with the cyclone translation speed. The optimal translation speed generating the greatest inertial oscillations is 2 m/s at the latitude of 10 ° and gradually increases to 6 m/s at the latitude of 30 °.

  20. Endovascular Stents and Stent-Grafts: Is Heparin Coating Desirable?

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Stephen R.; Souza, Nandita M. de; Allison, David J.

    2000-07-15

    Heparins are glycosaminoglycans that, in addition to their anticoagulant activity, have interactions with growth factors and other glycoproteins. These interactions may stimulate neointimal hyperplasia when heparin is delivered locally on stents and stent-grafts. Modifying the structure of heparin to retain anticoagulant activity while minimizing these stimulatory effects on the vascular endothelium is desirable and may be achieved by understanding the relationships between the structure and function of the various parts of the heparin molecule.

  1. Techniques for automated local activation time annotation and conduction velocity estimation in cardiac mapping

    PubMed Central

    Cantwell, C.D.; Roney, C.H.; Ng, F.S.; Siggers, J.H.; Sherwin, S.J.; Peters, N.S.

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of cardiac conduction velocity provide valuable functional and structural insight into the initiation and perpetuation of cardiac arrhythmias, in both a clinical and laboratory context. The interpretation of activation wavefronts and their propagation can identify mechanistic properties of a broad range of electrophysiological pathologies. However, the sparsity, distribution and uncertainty of recorded data make accurate conduction velocity calculation difficult. A wide range of mathematical approaches have been proposed for addressing this challenge, often targeted towards specific data modalities, species or recording environments. Many of these algorithms require identification of activation times from electrogram recordings which themselves may have complex morphology or low signal-to-noise ratio. This paper surveys algorithms designed for identifying local activation times and computing conduction direction and speed. Their suitability for use in different recording contexts and applications is assessed. PMID:25978869

  2. Time-dependent behavior of a localized electron at a heterojunction boundary of graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Min S.; Kim, Hyungjun; Atwater, Harry A.; Goddard, William A.

    2010-01-01

    We develop a finite-difference time-domain(FDTD) method for simulating the dynamics of graphene electrons, denoted GraFDTD. We then use GraFDTD to study the temporal behavior of a single localized electron wave packet, showing that it exhibits optical-like dynamics including the Goos–Hänchen effect [F. Goos and H. Hänchen, Ann. Phys.436, 333 (1947)] at a heterojunction, but the behavior is quantitatively different than for electromagnetic waves. This suggests issues that must be addressed in designing graphene-based electronic devices analogous to optical devices. GraFDTD should be useful for studying such complex time-dependent behavior of a quasiparticle in graphene.

  3. Relativistic Coulomb excitation within the time dependent superfluid local density approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Stetcu, I.; Bertulani, C. A.; Bulgac, A.; Magierski, P.; Roche, K. J.

    2015-01-06

    Within the framework of the unrestricted time-dependent density functional theory, we present for the first time an analysis of the relativistic Coulomb excitation of the heavy deformed open shell nucleus 238U. The approach is based on the superfluid local density approximation formulated on a spatial lattice that can take into account coupling to the continuum, enabling self-consistent studies of superfluid dynamics of any nuclear shape. We compute the energy deposited in the target nucleus as a function of the impact parameter, finding it to be significantly larger than the estimate using the Goldhaber-Teller model. The isovector giant dipole resonance, the dipole pygmy resonance, and giant quadrupole modes are excited during the process. As a result, the one-body dissipation of collective dipole modes is shown to lead a damping width Γ↓≈0.4 MeV and the number of preequilibrium neutrons emitted has been quantified.

  4. Local algorithm for computing complex travel time based on the complex eikonal equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xingguo; Sun, Jianguo; Sun, Zhangqing

    2016-04-01

    The traditional algorithm for computing the complex travel time, e.g., dynamic ray tracing method, is based on the paraxial ray approximation, which exploits the second-order Taylor expansion. Consequently, the computed results are strongly dependent on the width of the ray tube and, in regions with dramatic velocity variations, it is difficult for the method to account for the velocity variations. When solving the complex eikonal equation, the paraxial ray approximation can be avoided and no second-order Taylor expansion is required. However, this process is time consuming. In this case, we may replace the global computation of the whole model with local computation by taking both sides of the ray as curved boundaries of the evanescent wave. For a given ray, the imaginary part of the complex travel time should be zero on the central ray. To satisfy this condition, the central ray should be taken as a curved boundary. We propose a nonuniform grid-based finite difference scheme to solve the curved boundary problem. In addition, we apply the limited-memory Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno technology for obtaining the imaginary slowness used to compute the complex travel time. The numerical experiments show that the proposed method is accurate. We examine the effectiveness of the algorithm for the complex travel time by comparing the results with those from the dynamic ray tracing method and the Gauss-Newton Conjugate Gradient fast marching method.

  5. Local velocity measurements in heterogeneous and time-dependent flows of a micellar solution.

    PubMed

    Decruppe, J P; Greffier, O; Manneville, S; Lerouge, S

    2006-06-01

    We present and discuss the results of pointwise velocity measurements performed on a viscoelastic micellar solution made of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide and sodium salicylate in water, respectively, at the concentrations of 50 and 100 mmol. The sample is contained in a Couette device and subjected to flow in the strain controlled mode. This particular solution shows shear banding and, in a narrow range of shear rates at the right end of the stress plateau, apparent shear thickening occurs. Time-dependent recordings of the shear stress in this range reveal that the flow has become unstable and that large sustained oscillations of the shear stress and of the first normal stresses difference emerge and grow in the flow. Local pointwise velocity measurements clearly reveal a velocity profile typical of shear banding when the imposed shear rate belongs to the plateau, but also important wall slip in the entire range of velocity gradients investigated. In the oscillations regime, the velocity is recorded as a function of time at a fixed point close to the rotor of the Couette device. The time-dependent velocity profile reveals random fluctuations but, from time to time, sharp decreases much larger than the standard deviation are observed. An attempt is made to correlate these strong variations with the stress oscillations and a correlation coefficient r is computed. However, the small value found for the coefficient r does not allow us to draw a final conclusion as concerns the correlation between stress oscillations and velocity fast decreases.

  6. Simulation of a Real-Time Local Data Integration System over East-Central Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Case, Jonathan

    1999-01-01

    The Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) simulated a real-time configuration of a Local Data Integration System (LDIS) using data from 15-28 February 1999. The objectives were to assess the utility of a simulated real-time LDIS, evaluate and extrapolate system performance to identify the hardware necessary to run a real-time LDIS, and determine the sensitivities of LDIS. The ultimate goal for running LDIS is to generate analysis products that enhance short-range (less than 6 h) weather forecasts issued in support of the 45th Weather Squadron, Spaceflight Meteorology Group, and Melbourne National Weather Service operational requirements. The simulation used the Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) Data Analysis System (ADAS) software on an IBM RS/6000 workstation with a 67-MHz processor. This configuration ran in real-time, but not sufficiently fast for operational requirements. Thus, the AMU recommends a workstation with a 200-MHz processor and 512 megabytes of memory to run the AMU's configuration of LDIS in real-time. This report presents results from two case studies and several data sensitivity experiments. ADAS demonstrates utility through its ability to depict high-resolution cloud and wind features in a variety of weather situations. The sensitivity experiments illustrate the influence of disparate data on the resulting ADAS analyses.

  7. Local algorithm for computing complex travel time based on the complex eikonal equation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xingguo; Sun, Jianguo; Sun, Zhangqing

    2016-04-01

    The traditional algorithm for computing the complex travel time, e.g., dynamic ray tracing method, is based on the paraxial ray approximation, which exploits the second-order Taylor expansion. Consequently, the computed results are strongly dependent on the width of the ray tube and, in regions with dramatic velocity variations, it is difficult for the method to account for the velocity variations. When solving the complex eikonal equation, the paraxial ray approximation can be avoided and no second-order Taylor expansion is required. However, this process is time consuming. In this case, we may replace the global computation of the whole model with local computation by taking both sides of the ray as curved boundaries of the evanescent wave. For a given ray, the imaginary part of the complex travel time should be zero on the central ray. To satisfy this condition, the central ray should be taken as a curved boundary. We propose a nonuniform grid-based finite difference scheme to solve the curved boundary problem. In addition, we apply the limited-memory Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno technology for obtaining the imaginary slowness used to compute the complex travel time. The numerical experiments show that the proposed method is accurate. We examine the effectiveness of the algorithm for the complex travel time by comparing the results with those from the dynamic ray tracing method and the Gauss-Newton Conjugate Gradient fast marching method. PMID:27176428

  8. Neighbourhood selection for local modelling and prediction of hydrological time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayawardena, A. W.; Li, W. K.; Xu, P.

    2002-02-01

    The prediction of a time series using the dynamical systems approach requires the knowledge of three parameters; the time delay, the embedding dimension and the number of nearest neighbours. In this paper, a new criterion, based on the generalized degrees of freedom, for the selection of the number of nearest neighbours needed for a better local model for time series prediction is presented. The validity of the proposed method is examined using time series, which are known to be chaotic under certain initial conditions (Lorenz map, Henon map and Logistic map), and real hydro meteorological time series (discharge data from Chao Phraya river in Thailand, Mekong river in Thailand and Laos, and sea surface temperature anomaly data). The predicted results are compared with observations, and with similar predictions obtained by using arbitrarily fixed numbers of neighbours. The results indicate superior predictive capability as measured by the mean square errors and coefficients of variation by the proposed approach when compared with the traditional approach of using a fixed number of neighbours.

  9. Sufficient and necessary conditions for discrete-time nonlinear switched systems with uniform local exponential stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Junjie; She, Zhikun

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we investigate sufficient and necessary conditions of uniform local exponential stability (ULES) for the discrete-time nonlinear switched system (DTNSS). We start with the definition of T-step common Lyapunov functions (CLFs), which is a relaxation of traditional CLFs. Then, for a time-varying DTNSS, by constructing such a T-step CLF, a necessary and sufficient condition for its ULES is provided. Afterwards, we strengthen it based on a T-step Lipschitz continuous CLF. Especially, when the system is time-invariant, by the smooth approximation theorem, the Lipschitz continuity condition of T-step CLFs can further be replaced by continuous differentiability; and when the system is time-invariant and homogeneous, due to the extension of Weierstrass approximation theorem, T-step continuously differentiable CLFs can even be strengthened to be T-step polynomial CLFs. Furthermore, three illustrative examples are additionally used to explain our main contribution. In the end, an equivalence between time-varying DTNSSs and their corresponding linearisations is discussed.

  10. Local algorithm for computing complex travel time based on the complex eikonal equation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xingguo; Sun, Jianguo; Sun, Zhangqing

    2016-04-01

    The traditional algorithm for computing the complex travel time, e.g., dynamic ray tracing method, is based on the paraxial ray approximation, which exploits the second-order Taylor expansion. Consequently, the computed results are strongly dependent on the width of the ray tube and, in regions with dramatic velocity variations, it is difficult for the method to account for the velocity variations. When solving the complex eikonal equation, the paraxial ray approximation can be avoided and no second-order Taylor expansion is required. However, this process is time consuming. In this case, we may replace the global computation of the whole model with local computation by taking both sides of the ray as curved boundaries of the evanescent wave. For a given ray, the imaginary part of the complex travel time should be zero on the central ray. To satisfy this condition, the central ray should be taken as a curved boundary. We propose a nonuniform grid-based finite difference scheme to solve the curved boundary problem. In addition, we apply the limited-memory Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno technology for obtaining the imaginary slowness used to compute the complex travel time. The numerical experiments show that the proposed method is accurate. We examine the effectiveness of the algorithm for the complex travel time by comparing the results with those from the dynamic ray tracing method and the Gauss-Newton Conjugate Gradient fast marching method.

  11. Local helioseismology of sunspot regions: Comparison of ring-diagram and time-distance results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosovichev, A. G.; Basu, S.; Bogart, R.; Duvall, T. L., Jr.; Gonzalez-Hernandez, I.; Haber, D.; Hartlep, T.; Howe, R.; Komm, R.; Kholikov, S.; Parchevsky, K. V.; Tripathy, S.; Zhao, J.

    2011-01-01

    Local helioseismology provides unique information about the subsurface structure and dynamics of sunspots and active regions. However, because of complexity of sunspot regions local helioseismology diagnostics require careful analysis of systematic uncertainties and physical interpretation of the inversion results. We present new results of comparison of the ring-diagram analysis and time-distance helioseismology for active region NOAA 9787, for which a previous comparison showed significant differences in the subsurface sound-speed structure, and discuss systematic uncertainties of the measurements and inversions. Our results show that both the ring-diagram and time-distance techniques give qualitatively similar results, revealing a characteristic two-layer seismic sound-speed structure consistent with the results for other active regions. However, a quantitative comparison of the inversion results is not straightforward. It must take into account differences in the sensitivity, spatial resolution and the averaging kernels. In particular, because of the acoustic power suppression, the contribution of the sunspot seismic structure to the ring-diagram signal can be substantially reduced. We show that taking into account this effect reduces the difference in the depth of transition between the negative and positive sound-speed variations inferred by these methods. Further detailed analysis of the sensitivity, resolution and averaging properties of the local helioseismology methods is necessary for consolidation of the inversion results. It seems to be important that both methods indicate that the seismic structure of sunspots is rather deep and extends to at least 20 Mm below the surface, putting constraints on theoretical models of sunspots.

  12. Global meta-analysis reveals no net change in local-scale plant biodiversity over time.

    PubMed

    Vellend, Mark; Baeten, Lander; Myers-Smith, Isla H; Elmendorf, Sarah C; Beauséjour, Robin; Brown, Carissa D; De Frenne, Pieter; Verheyen, Kris; Wipf, Sonja

    2013-11-26

    Global biodiversity is in decline. This is of concern for aesthetic and ethical reasons, but possibly also for practical reasons, as suggested by experimental studies, mostly with plants, showing that biodiversity reductions in small study plots can lead to compromised ecosystem function. However, inferring that ecosystem functions will decline due to biodiversity loss in the real world rests on the untested assumption that such loss is actually occurring at these small scales in nature. Using a global database of 168 published studies and >16,000 nonexperimental, local-scale vegetation plots, we show that mean temporal change in species diversity over periods of 5-261 y is not different from zero, with increases at least as likely as declines over time. Sites influenced primarily by plant species' invasions showed a tendency for declines in species richness, whereas sites undergoing postdisturbance succession showed increases in richness over time. Other distinctions among studies had little influence on temporal richness trends. Although maximizing diversity is likely important for maintaining ecosystem function in intensely managed systems such as restored grasslands or tree plantations, the clear lack of any general tendency for plant biodiversity to decline at small scales in nature directly contradicts the key assumption linking experimental results to ecosystem function as a motivation for biodiversity conservation in nature. How often real world changes in the diversity and composition of plant communities at the local scale cause ecosystem function to deteriorate, or actually to improve, remains unknown and is in critical need of further study.

  13. Global meta-analysis reveals no net change in local-scale plant biodiversity over time.

    PubMed

    Vellend, Mark; Baeten, Lander; Myers-Smith, Isla H; Elmendorf, Sarah C; Beauséjour, Robin; Brown, Carissa D; De Frenne, Pieter; Verheyen, Kris; Wipf, Sonja

    2013-11-26

    Global biodiversity is in decline. This is of concern for aesthetic and ethical reasons, but possibly also for practical reasons, as suggested by experimental studies, mostly with plants, showing that biodiversity reductions in small study plots can lead to compromised ecosystem function. However, inferring that ecosystem functions will decline due to biodiversity loss in the real world rests on the untested assumption that such loss is actually occurring at these small scales in nature. Using a global database of 168 published studies and >16,000 nonexperimental, local-scale vegetation plots, we show that mean temporal change in species diversity over periods of 5-261 y is not different from zero, with increases at least as likely as declines over time. Sites influenced primarily by plant species' invasions showed a tendency for declines in species richness, whereas sites undergoing postdisturbance succession showed increases in richness over time. Other distinctions among studies had little influence on temporal richness trends. Although maximizing diversity is likely important for maintaining ecosystem function in intensely managed systems such as restored grasslands or tree plantations, the clear lack of any general tendency for plant biodiversity to decline at small scales in nature directly contradicts the key assumption linking experimental results to ecosystem function as a motivation for biodiversity conservation in nature. How often real world changes in the diversity and composition of plant communities at the local scale cause ecosystem function to deteriorate, or actually to improve, remains unknown and is in critical need of further study. PMID:24167259

  14. Global meta-analysis reveals no net change in local-scale plant biodiversity over time

    PubMed Central

    Vellend, Mark; Baeten, Lander; Myers-Smith, Isla H.; Elmendorf, Sarah C.; Beauséjour, Robin; Brown, Carissa D.; De Frenne, Pieter; Verheyen, Kris; Wipf, Sonja

    2013-01-01

    Global biodiversity is in decline. This is of concern for aesthetic and ethical reasons, but possibly also for practical reasons, as suggested by experimental studies, mostly with plants, showing that biodiversity reductions in small study plots can lead to compromised ecosystem function. However, inferring that ecosystem functions will decline due to biodiversity loss in the real world rests on the untested assumption that such loss is actually occurring at these small scales in nature. Using a global database of 168 published studies and >16,000 nonexperimental, local-scale vegetation plots, we show that mean temporal change in species diversity over periods of 5–261 y is not different from zero, with increases at least as likely as declines over time. Sites influenced primarily by plant species’ invasions showed a tendency for declines in species richness, whereas sites undergoing postdisturbance succession showed increases in richness over time. Other distinctions among studies had little influence on temporal richness trends. Although maximizing diversity is likely important for maintaining ecosystem function in intensely managed systems such as restored grasslands or tree plantations, the clear lack of any general tendency for plant biodiversity to decline at small scales in nature directly contradicts the key assumption linking experimental results to ecosystem function as a motivation for biodiversity conservation in nature. How often real world changes in the diversity and composition of plant communities at the local scale cause ecosystem function to deteriorate, or actually to improve, remains unknown and is in critical need of further study. PMID:24167259

  15. The effects of local prevalence and explicit expectations on search termination times

    PubMed Central

    Kita, Shinichi; Wolfe, Jeremy M.

    2014-01-01

    In visual search tasks, the relative proportions of target-present and -absent trials have important effects on behavior. Miss error rates rise as target prevalence decreases (Wolfe, Horowitz, & Kenner, Nature 435, 439–440, 2005). At the same time, search termination times on target-absent trials become shorter (Wolfe & Van Wert, Current Biology 20, 121–124, 2010). These effects must depend on some implicit or explicit knowledge of the current prevalence. What is the nature of that knowledge? In Experiment 1, we conducted visual search tasks at three levels of prevalence (6%, 50%, and 94%) and analyzed performance as a function of “local prevalence,” the prevalence over the last n trials. The results replicated the usual effects of overall prevalence but revealed only weak or absent effects of local prevalence. In Experiment 2, the overall prevalence in a block of trials was 20%, 50%, or 80%. However, a 100%-valid cue informed observers of the prevalence on the next trial. These explicit cues had a modest effect on target-absent RTs, but explicit expectation could not explain the full prevalence effect. We conclude that observers predict prevalence on the basis of an assessment of a relatively long prior history. Each trial contributes a small amount to that assessment, and this can be modulated but not overruled by explicit instruction. PMID:22006528

  16. Source-space ICA for EEG source separation, localization, and time-course reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Jonmohamadi, Yaqub; Poudel, Govinda; Innes, Carrie; Jones, Richard

    2014-11-01

    We propose source-space independent component analysis (ICA) for separation, tomography, and time-course reconstruction of EEG and MEG source signals. Source-space ICA is based on the application of singular value decomposition and ICA on the neuroelectrical signals from all brain voxels obtained post minimum-variance beamforming of sensor-space EEG or MEG. We describe the theoretical background and equations, then evaluate the performance of this technique in several different situations, including weak sources, bilateral correlated sources, multiple sources, and cluster sources. In this approach, tomographic maps of sources are obtained by back-projection of the ICA mixing coefficients into the source-space (3-D brain template). The advantages of source-space ICA over the popular alternative approaches of sensor-space ICA together with dipole fitting and power mapping via minimum-variance beamforming are demonstrated. Simulated EEG data were produced by forward head modeling to project the simulated sources onto scalp sensors, then superimposed on real EEG background. To illustrate the application of source-space ICA to real EEG source reconstruction, we show the localization and time-course reconstruction of visual evoked potentials. Source-space ICA is superior to the minimum-variance beamforming in the reconstruction of multiple weak and strong sources, as ICA allows weak sources to be identified and reconstructed in the presence of stronger sources. Source-space ICA is also superior to sensor-space ICA on accuracy of localization of sources, as source-space ICA applies ICA to the time-courses of voxels reconstructed from minimum-variance beamforming on a 3D scanning grid and these time-courses are optimally unmixed via the beamformer. Each component identified by source-space ICA has its own tomographic map which shows the extent to which each voxel has contributed to that component.

  17. Past-time Radar Rainfall Estimates using Radar AWS Rainrate system with Local Gauge Correction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, D.; Lee, M. H.; Suk, M. K.; Nam, K. Y.; Hwang, J.; Ko, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    The Weather Radar Center at Korea Meteorological Administration (KMA) has radar network for warnings for heavy rainfall and severe storms. We have been operating an operational real-time adjusted the Radar-Automatic Weather Station (AWS) Rainrate (RAR) system developed by KMA in 2006 for providing radar-based quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE) to meteorologists. This system has several uncertainty in estimating precipitation by radar reflectivity (Z) and rainfall intensity (R) relationship. To overcome uncertainty of the RAR system and improve the accuracy of QPE, we are applied the Local Gauge Correction (LGC) method which uses geo-statistical effective radius of errors of the QPE to RAR system in 2012. According to the results of previous study in 2014 (Lee et al., 2014), the accuracy of the RAR system with LGC method improved about 7.69% than before in the summer season of 2012 (from June to August). It has also improved the accuracy of hydrograph when we examined the accuracy of flood simulation using hydrologic model and data derived by the RAR system with LGC method. We confirmed to have its effectiveness through these results after the application of LGC method. It is required for high quality data of long term to utilize in hydrology field. To provide QPE data more precisely and collect past-time data, we produce that calculated by the RAR system with LGC method in the summer season from 2006 to 2009 and investigate whether the accuracy of past-time radar rainfall estimation enhance or not. Keywords : Radar-AWS Rainrate system, Local gauge correction, past-time Radar rainfall estimation Acknowledgements : This research is supported by "Development and application of Cross governmental dual-pol radar harmonization (WRC-2013-A-1)" project of the Weather Radar Center, Korea Meteorological Administration in 2015.

  18. Source-space ICA for EEG source separation, localization, and time-course reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Jonmohamadi, Yaqub; Poudel, Govinda; Innes, Carrie; Jones, Richard

    2014-11-01

    We propose source-space independent component analysis (ICA) for separation, tomography, and time-course reconstruction of EEG and MEG source signals. Source-space ICA is based on the application of singular value decomposition and ICA on the neuroelectrical signals from all brain voxels obtained post minimum-variance beamforming of sensor-space EEG or MEG. We describe the theoretical background and equations, then evaluate the performance of this technique in several different situations, including weak sources, bilateral correlated sources, multiple sources, and cluster sources. In this approach, tomographic maps of sources are obtained by back-projection of the ICA mixing coefficients into the source-space (3-D brain template). The advantages of source-space ICA over the popular alternative approaches of sensor-space ICA together with dipole fitting and power mapping via minimum-variance beamforming are demonstrated. Simulated EEG data were produced by forward head modeling to project the simulated sources onto scalp sensors, then superimposed on real EEG background. To illustrate the application of source-space ICA to real EEG source reconstruction, we show the localization and time-course reconstruction of visual evoked potentials. Source-space ICA is superior to the minimum-variance beamforming in the reconstruction of multiple weak and strong sources, as ICA allows weak sources to be identified and reconstructed in the presence of stronger sources. Source-space ICA is also superior to sensor-space ICA on accuracy of localization of sources, as source-space ICA applies ICA to the time-courses of voxels reconstructed from minimum-variance beamforming on a 3D scanning grid and these time-courses are optimally unmixed via the beamformer. Each component identified by source-space ICA has its own tomographic map which shows the extent to which each voxel has contributed to that component. PMID:25108125

  19. Acoustic Source Localization via Time Difference of Arrival Estimation for Distributed Sensor Networks using Tera-scale Optical-Core Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Imam, Neena; Barhen, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    For real-time acoustic source localization applications, one of the primary challenges is the considerable growth in computational complexity associated with the emergence of ever larger, active or passive, distributed sensor networks. These sensors rely heavily on battery-operated system components to achieve highly functional automation in signal and information processing. In order to keep communication requirements minimal, it is desirable to perform as much processing on the receiver platforms as possible. However, the complexity of the calculations needed to achieve accurate source localization increases dramatically with the size of sensor arrays, resulting in substantial growth of computational requirements that cannot be readily met with standard hardware. One option to meet this challenge builds upon the emergence of digital optical-core devices. The objective of this work was to explore the implementation of key building block algorithms used in underwater source localization on the optical-core digital processing platform recently introduced by Lenslet Inc. This demonstration of considerably faster signal processing capability should be of substantial significance to the design and innovation of future generations of distributed sensor networks.

  20. Floor Covering and Surface Identification for Assistive Mobile Robotic Real-Time Room Localization Application

    PubMed Central

    Gillham, Michael; Howells, Gareth; Spurgeon, Sarah; McElroy, Ben

    2013-01-01

    Assistive robotic applications require systems capable of interaction in the human world, a workspace which is highly dynamic and not always predictable. Mobile assistive devices face the additional and complex problem of when and if intervention should occur; therefore before any trajectory assistance is given, the robotic device must know where it is in real-time, without unnecessary disruption or delay to the user requirements. In this paper, we demonstrate a novel robust method for determining room identification from floor features in a real-time computational frame for autonomous and assistive robotics in the human environment. We utilize two inexpensive sensors: an optical mouse sensor for straightforward and rapid, texture or pattern sampling, and a four color photodiode light sensor for fast color determination. We show how data relating floor texture and color obtained from typical dynamic human environments, using these two sensors, compares favorably with data obtained from a standard webcam. We show that suitable data can be extracted from these two sensors at a rate 16 times faster than a standard webcam, and that these data are in a form which can be rapidly processed using readily available classification techniques, suitable for real-time system application. We achieved a 95% correct classification accuracy identifying 133 rooms' flooring from 35 classes, suitable for fast coarse global room localization application, boundary crossing detection, and additionally some degree of surface type identification. PMID:24351647

  1. Local spectrum analysis of field propagation in an anisotropic medium. Part II. Time-dependent fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinkelman, Igor; Melamed, Timor

    2005-06-01

    In Part I of this two-part investigation [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A22, 1200 (2005)], we presented a theory for phase-space propagation of time-harmonic electromagnetic fields in an anisotropic medium characterized by a generic wave-number profile. In this Part II, these investigations are extended to transient fields, setting a general analytical framework for local analysis and modeling of radiation from time-dependent extended-source distributions. In this formulation the field is expressed as a superposition of pulsed-beam propagators that emanate from all space-time points in the source domain and in all directions. Using time-dependent quadratic-Lorentzian windows, we represent the field by a phase-space spectral distribution in which the propagating elements are pulsed beams, which are formulated by a transient plane-wave spectrum over the extended-source plane. By applying saddle-point asymptotics, we extract the beam phenomenology in the anisotropic environment resulting from short-pulsed processing. Finally, the general results are applied to the special case of uniaxial crystal and compared with a reference solution.

  2. Local spectrum analysis of field propagation in an anisotropic medium. Part II. Time-dependent fields.

    PubMed

    Tinkelman, Igor; Melamed, Timor

    2005-06-01

    In Part I of this two-part investigation [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 22, 1200 (2005)], we presented a theory for phase-space propagation of time-harmonic electromagnetic fields in an anisotropic medium characterized by a generic wave-number profile. In this Part II, these investigations are extended to transient fields, setting a general analytical framework for local analysis and modeling of radiation from time-dependent extended-source distributions. In this formulation the field is expressed as a superposition of pulsed-beam propagators that emanate from all space-time points in the source domain and in all directions. Using time-dependent quadratic-Lorentzian windows, we represent the field by a phase-space spectral distribution in which the propagating elements are pulsed beams, which are formulated by a transient plane-wave spectrum over the extended-source plane. By applying saddle-point asymptotics, we extract the beam phenomenology in the anisotropic environment resulting from short-pulsed processing. Finally, the general results are applied to the special case of uniaxial crystal and compared with a reference solution.

  3. Floor covering and surface identification for assistive mobile robotic real-time room localization application.

    PubMed

    Gillham, Michael; Howells, Gareth; Spurgeon, Sarah; McElroy, Ben

    2013-01-01

    Assistive robotic applications require systems capable of interaction in the human world, a workspace which is highly dynamic and not always predictable. Mobile assistive devices face the additional and complex problem of when and if intervention should occur; therefore before any trajectory assistance is given, the robotic device must know where it is in real-time, without unnecessary disruption or delay to the user requirements. In this paper, we demonstrate a novel robust method for determining room identification from floor features in a real-time computational frame for autonomous and assistive robotics in the human environment. We utilize two inexpensive sensors: an optical mouse sensor for straightforward and rapid, texture or pattern sampling, and a four color photodiode light sensor for fast color determination. We show how data relating floor texture and color obtained from typical dynamic human environments, using these two sensors, compares favorably with data obtained from a standard webcam. We show that suitable data can be extracted from these two sensors at a rate 16 times faster than a standard webcam, and that these data are in a form which can be rapidly processed using readily available classification techniques, suitable for real-time system application. We achieved a 95% correct classification accuracy identifying 133 rooms' flooring from 35 classes, suitable for fast coarse global room localization application, boundary crossing detection, and additionally some degree of surface type identification. PMID:24351647

  4. Time-Accurate Local Time Stepping and High-Order Time CESE Methods for Multi-Dimensional Flows Using Unstructured Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan; Venkatachari, Balaji Shankar; Cheng, Gary

    2013-01-01

    With the wide availability of affordable multiple-core parallel supercomputers, next generation numerical simulations of flow physics are being focused on unsteady computations for problems involving multiple time scales and multiple physics. These simulations require higher solution accuracy than most algorithms and computational fluid dynamics codes currently available. This paper focuses on the developmental effort for high-fidelity multi-dimensional, unstructured-mesh flow solvers using the space-time conservation element, solution element (CESE) framework. Two approaches have been investigated in this research in order to provide high-accuracy, cross-cutting numerical simulations for a variety of flow regimes: 1) time-accurate local time stepping and 2) highorder CESE method. The first approach utilizes consistent numerical formulations in the space-time flux integration to preserve temporal conservation across the cells with different marching time steps. Such approach relieves the stringent time step constraint associated with the smallest time step in the computational domain while preserving temporal accuracy for all the cells. For flows involving multiple scales, both numerical accuracy and efficiency can be significantly enhanced. The second approach extends the current CESE solver to higher-order accuracy. Unlike other existing explicit high-order methods for unstructured meshes, the CESE framework maintains a CFL condition of one for arbitrarily high-order formulations while retaining the same compact stencil as its second-order counterpart. For large-scale unsteady computations, this feature substantially enhances numerical efficiency. Numerical formulations and validations using benchmark problems are discussed in this paper along with realistic examples.

  5. Female sexual dysfunction: focus on low desire.

    PubMed

    Kingsberg, Sheryl A; Woodard, Terri

    2015-02-01

    Low or absent sexual desire is the most common sexual dysfunction in women, and its prevalence peaks during midlife. Its etiology is complex and may include biologic, psychologic, and social elements. Major risk factors for its development include poor health status, depression, certain medications, dissatisfaction with partner relationship, and history of physical abuse, sexual abuse, or both. Diagnosis is based on criteria set by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th Edition) and requires that a woman experience personal distress. Clinical evaluation should include medical history, sexual history, and, sometimes, a physical examination. Laboratory data are of limited value, except when warranted by history or physical examination. Treatment options include nonpharmacologic interventions such as education, office-based counseling, and psychotherapy. Although there are no U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved treatments for low desire, pharmacologic agents have been used off-label for this purpose. Bupropion is an antidepressant that has been shown to improve desire in some women with and without depression. Systemic estrogen therapy is not recommended in the absence of vasomotor symptoms and is not directly associated with desire. However, vaginal estrogen is useful in patients presenting with concomitant vaginal atrophy and dyspareunia. Ospemifene is a selective estrogen receptor modulator that can be used as an alternative to vaginal estrogen. Exogenous testosterone has demonstrated efficacy in treating loss of desire in postmenopausal women. However, patients should be counseled that it is not FDA-approved for this purpose and there are limited published long-term safety data. Several agents for the treatment of low desire are currently in development. Gynecologists are in a unique position to address concerns about sexual desire in women.

  6. Derivation of local-in-time fourth post-Newtonian ADM Hamiltonian for spinless compact binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaranowski, Piotr; Schäfer, Gerhard

    2015-12-01

    The paper gives full details of the computation within the canonical formalism of Arnowitt, Deser, and Misner of the local-in-time part of the fourth post-Newtonian, i.e. of power eight in one over speed of light, conservative Hamiltonian of spinless compact binary systems. The Hamiltonian depends only on the bodies' positions and momenta. Dirac delta distributions are taken as source functions. Their full control is furnished by dimensional continuation, by means of which the occurring ultraviolet (UV) divergences are uniquely regularized. The applied near-zone expansion of the time-symmetric Green function leads to infrared (IR) divergences. Their analytic regularization results in one single ambiguity parameter. Unique fixation of it was successfully performed in T. Damour, P. Jaranowski, and G. Schäfer, Phys. Rev. D 89, 064058 (2014) through far-zone matching. Technically as well as conceptually (backscatter binding energy), the level of the Lamb shift in quantum electrodynamics is reached. In a first run a computation of all terms is performed in three-dimensional space using analytic Riesz-Hadamard regularization techniques. Then divergences are treated locally (i.e., around particles' positions for UV and in the vicinity of spatial infinity for IR divergences) by means of combined dimensional and analytic regularization. Various evolved analytic expressions are presented for the first time. The breakdown of the Leibniz rule for distributional derivatives is addressed as well as the in general nondistributive law when regularizing value of products of functions evaluated at their singular point.

  7. Hydrograph structure informed calibration in the frequency domain with time localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumarasamy, K.; Belmont, P.

    2015-12-01

    Complex models with large number of parameters are commonly used to estimate sediment yields and predict changes in sediment loads as a result of changes in management or conservation practice at large watershed (>2000 km2) scales. As sediment yield is a strongly non-linear function that responds to channel (peak or mean) velocity or flow depth, it is critical to accurately represent flows. The process of calibration in such models (e.g., SWAT) generally involves the adjustment of several parameters to obtain better estimates of goodness of fit metrics such as Nash Sutcliff Efficiency (NSE). However, such indicators only provide a global view of model performance, potentially obscuring accuracy of the timing or magnitude of specific flows of interest. We describe an approach for streamflow calibration that will greatly reduce the black-box nature of calibration, when response from a parameter adjustment is not clearly known. Fourier Transform or the Short Term Fourier Transform could be used to characterize model performance in the frequency domain as well, however, the ambiguity of a Fourier transform with regards to time localization renders its implementation in a model calibration setting rather useless. Brief and sudden changes (e.g. stream flow peaks) in signals carry the most interesting information from parameter adjustments, which are completely lost in the transform without time localization. Wavelet transform captures the frequency component in the signal without compromising time and is applied to contrast changes in signal response to parameter adjustments. Here we employ the mother wavelet called the Mexican hat wavelet and apply a Continuous Wavelet Transform to understand the signal in the frequency domain. Further, with the use of the cross-wavelet spectrum we examine the relationship between the two signals (prior or post parameter adjustment) in the time-scale plane (e.g., lower scales correspond to higher frequencies). The non-stationarity of

  8. Time-Reversal to Estimate Focal Depth for Local, Shallow Earthquakes in Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, F.; Lu, R.; Toksoz, N.

    2007-12-01

    Current approaches for focal depth estimation are typically based on travel times and result in large uncertainties primarily due to poor data coverage and inaccurate travel time picks. We propose an alternative method based on an adaptation of time-reversed acoustics (TRA). In the context of TRA theory, the autocorrelation of an earthquake recording can be thought of as the convolution of the source autocorrelation function with the autocorrelation of the Green's function describing propagation between source and receiver. Furthermore, the signal to noise ratio (S/N) of stationary phases in the Green's function may be improved by stacking the autocorrelations from many receivers. In this study, we employ such an approach to estimate the focal depth of shallow earthquakes based on the time lag between the direct P phase and pP converted phase, which is assumed to be stationary across the receiver array. Focal depth estimates are easily obtained by multiplying half the pP time lag by the average velocity above the earthquake. We apply this methodology to estimate focal depths for several local earthquakes in Southern California. Earthquake recordings were obtained from the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) for events with accurate, independent estimates of focal depth below about 15 km, and local magnitudes between 4.0 and 6.0. We observe pP in the stacked autocorrelations that correspond to the focal depths listed in the SCEC catalog for earthquakes located throughout Southern California. The predictive capability of the method is limited by S/N, defined as the pP amplitude divided by the background noise level of the stacked correlation. By considering subsets of the Southern California array, we explore the sensitivity of the S/N on station density and location (i.e. epicentral distance & azimuth). We find S/N is generally better for subsets of receivers within regions with relatively simple geologic structure. We are currently developing an extension

  9. Localized Single Frequency Lasing States in a Finite Parity-Time Symmetric Resonator Chain

    PubMed Central

    Phang, Sendy; Vukovic, Ana; Creagh, Stephen C.; Sewell, Phillip D.; Gradoni, Gabriele; Benson, Trevor M.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper a practical case of a finite periodic Parity Time chain made of resonant dielectric cylinders is considered. The paper analyzes a more general case where PT symmetry is achieved by modulating both the real and imaginary part of the material refractive index along the resonator chain. The band-structure of the finite periodic PT resonator chains is compared to infinite chains in order to understand the complex interdependence of the Bloch phase and the amount of the gain/loss in the system that causes the PT symmetry to break. The results show that the type of the modulation along the unit cell can significantly affect the position of the threshold point of the PT system. In all cases the lowest threshold is achieved near the end of the Brillouin zone. In the case of finite PT-chains, and for a particular type of modulation, early PT symmetry breaking is observed and shown to be caused by the presence of termination states localized at the edges of the finite chain resulting in localized lasing and dissipative modes at each end of the chain. PMID:26848095

  10. Magnetic STAR technology for real-time localization and classification of unexploded ordnance and buried mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegert, R. F.

    2009-05-01

    A man-portable Magnetic Scalar Triangulation and Ranging ("MagSTAR") technology for Detection, Localization and Classification (DLC) of unexploded ordnance (UXO) has been developed by Naval Surface Warfare Center Panama City Division (NSWC PCD) with support from the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP). Proof of principle of the MagSTAR concept and its unique advantages for real-time, high-mobility magnetic sensing applications have been demonstrated by field tests of a prototype man-portable MagSTAR sensor. The prototype comprises: a) An array of fluxgate magnetometers configured as a multi-tensor gradiometer, b) A GPS-synchronized signal processing system. c) Unique STAR algorithms for point-by-point, standoff DLC of magnetic targets. This paper outlines details of: i) MagSTAR theory, ii) Design and construction of the prototype sensor, iii) Signal processing algorithms recently developed to improve the technology's target-discrimination accuracy, iv) Results of field tests of the portable gradiometer system against magnetic dipole targets. The results demonstrate that the MagSTAR technology is capable of very accurate, high-speed localization of magnetic targets at standoff distances of several meters. These advantages could readily be transitioned to a wide range of defense, security and sensing applications to provide faster and more effective DLC of UXO and buried mines.

  11. Detection and localization of continuous gravitational waves with pulsar timing arrays: the role of pulsar terms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, X.-J.; Wen, L.; Xiong, J.; Xu, Y.; Wang, Y.; Mohanty, S. D.; Hobbs, G.; Manchester, R. N.

    2016-09-01

    A pulsar timing array is a Galactic-scale detector of nanohertz gravitational waves (GWs). Its target signals contain two components: the `Earth term' and the `pulsar term' corresponding to GWs incident on the Earth and pulsar, respectively. In this work we present a Frequentist method for the detection and localization of continuous waves that takes into account the pulsar term and is significantly faster than existing methods. We investigate the role of pulsar terms by comparing a full-signal search with an Earth-term-only search for non-evolving black hole binaries. By applying the method to synthetic data sets, we find that (i) a full-signal search can slightly improve the detection probability (by about five per cent); (ii) sky localization is biased if only Earth terms are searched for and the inclusion of pulsar terms is critical to remove such a bias; (iii) in the case of strong detections (with signal-to-noise ratio ≳30), it may be possible to improve pulsar distance estimation through GW measurements.

  12. Time reversal for localization of sources of infrasound signals in a windy stratified atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Lonzaga, Joel B

    2016-06-01

    Time reversal is used for localizing sources of recorded infrasound signals propagating in a windy, stratified atmosphere. Due to the convective effect of the background flow, the back-azimuths of the recorded signals can be substantially different from the source back-azimuth, posing a significant difficulty in source localization. The back-propagated signals are characterized by negative group velocities from which the source back-azimuth and source-to-receiver (STR) distance can be estimated using the apparent back-azimuths and trace velocities of the signals. The method is applied to several distinct infrasound arrivals recorded by two arrays in the Netherlands. The infrasound signals were generated by the Buncefield oil depot explosion in the U.K. in December 2005. Analyses show that the method can be used to substantially enhance estimates of the source back-azimuth and the STR distance. In one of the arrays, for instance, the deviations between the measured back-azimuths of the signals and the known source back-azimuth are quite large (-1° to -7°), whereas the deviations between the predicted and known source back-azimuths are small with an absolute mean value of <1°. Furthermore, the predicted STR distance is off only by <5% of the known STR distance. PMID:27369127

  13. Real-time ultrasound transducer localization in fluoroscopy images by transfer learning from synthetic training data.

    PubMed

    Heimann, Tobias; Mountney, Peter; John, Matthias; Ionasec, Razvan

    2014-12-01

    The fusion of image data from trans-esophageal echography (TEE) and X-ray fluoroscopy is attracting increasing interest in minimally-invasive treatment of structural heart disease. In order to calculate the needed transformation between both imaging systems, we employ a discriminative learning (DL) based approach to localize the TEE transducer in X-ray images. The successful application of DL methods is strongly dependent on the available training data, which entails three challenges: (1) the transducer can move with six degrees of freedom meaning it requires a large number of images to represent its appearance, (2) manual labeling is time consuming, and (3) manual labeling has inherent errors. This paper proposes to generate the required training data automatically from a single volumetric image of the transducer. In order to adapt this system to real X-ray data, we use unlabeled fluoroscopy images to estimate differences in feature space density and correct covariate shift by instance weighting. Two approaches for instance weighting, probabilistic classification and Kullback-Leibler importance estimation (KLIEP), are evaluated for different stages of the proposed DL pipeline. An analysis on more than 1900 images reveals that our approach reduces detection failures from 7.3% in cross validation on the test set to zero and improves the localization error from 1.5 to 0.8mm. Due to the automatic generation of training data, the proposed system is highly flexible and can be adapted to any medical device with minimal efforts.

  14. Real-time ultrasound transducer localization in fluoroscopy images by transfer learning from synthetic training data.

    PubMed

    Heimann, Tobias; Mountney, Peter; John, Matthias; Ionasec, Razvan

    2014-12-01

    The fusion of image data from trans-esophageal echography (TEE) and X-ray fluoroscopy is attracting increasing interest in minimally-invasive treatment of structural heart disease. In order to calculate the needed transformation between both imaging systems, we employ a discriminative learning (DL) based approach to localize the TEE transducer in X-ray images. The successful application of DL methods is strongly dependent on the available training data, which entails three challenges: (1) the transducer can move with six degrees of freedom meaning it requires a large number of images to represent its appearance, (2) manual labeling is time consuming, and (3) manual labeling has inherent errors. This paper proposes to generate the required training data automatically from a single volumetric image of the transducer. In order to adapt this system to real X-ray data, we use unlabeled fluoroscopy images to estimate differences in feature space density and correct covariate shift by instance weighting. Two approaches for instance weighting, probabilistic classification and Kullback-Leibler importance estimation (KLIEP), are evaluated for different stages of the proposed DL pipeline. An analysis on more than 1900 images reveals that our approach reduces detection failures from 7.3% in cross validation on the test set to zero and improves the localization error from 1.5 to 0.8mm. Due to the automatic generation of training data, the proposed system is highly flexible and can be adapted to any medical device with minimal efforts. PMID:24856101

  15. Using a "time machine" to test for local adaptation of aquatic microbes to temporal and spatial environmental variation.

    PubMed

    Fox, Jeremy W; Harder, Lawrence D

    2015-01-01

    Local adaptation occurs when different environments are dominated by different specialist genotypes, each of which is relatively fit in its local conditions and relatively unfit under other conditions. Analogously, ecological species sorting occurs when different environments are dominated by different competing species, each of which is relatively fit in its local conditions. The simplest theory predicts that spatial, but not temporal, environmental variation selects for local adaptation (or generates species sorting), but this prediction is difficult to test. Although organisms can be reciprocally transplanted among sites, doing so among times seems implausible. Here, we describe a reciprocal transplant experiment testing for local adaptation or species sorting of lake bacteria in response to both temporal and spatial variation in water chemistry. The experiment used a -80°C freezer as a "time machine." Bacterial isolates and water samples were frozen for later use, allowing transplantation of older isolates "forward in time" and newer isolates "backward in time." Surprisingly, local maladaptation predominated over local adaptation in both space and time. Such local maladaptation may indicate that adaptation, or the analogous species sorting process, fails to keep pace with temporal fluctuations in water chemistry. This hypothesis could be tested with more finely resolved temporal data.

  16. Global Auroral Energy Deposition during Substorm Onset Compared with Local Time and Solar Wind IMF Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, J. F.; Brittnacher, M.; Fillingim, M. O.; Germany, G. A.; Parks, G. K.

    1998-01-01

    The global images made by the Ultraviolet Imager (UVI) aboard the IASTP/Polar Satellite are used to derive the global auroral energy deposited in the ionosphere resulting from electron precipitation. During a substorm onset, the energy deposited and its location in local time are compared to the solar wind IMF conditions. Previously, insitu measurements of low orbiting satellites have made precipitating particle measurements along the spacecraft track and global images of the auroral zone, without the ability to quantify energy parameters, have been available. However, usage of the high temporal, spatial, and spectral resolution of consecutive UVI images enables quantitative measurement of the energy deposited in the ionosphere not previously available on a global scale. Data over an extended period beginning in January 1997 will be presented.

  17. The inner magnetosphere ion composition and local time distribution over a solar cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kistler, L. M.; Mouikis, C. G.

    2016-03-01

    Using the Cluster/Composition and Distribution Function (CODIF) analyzer data set from 2001 to 2013, a full solar cycle, we determine the ion distributions for H+, He+, and O+ in the inner magnetosphere (L < 12) over the energy range 40 eV to 40 keV as a function magnetic local time, solar EUV (F10.7), and geomagnetic activity (Kp). Concentrating on L = 6-7 for comparison with previous studies at geosynchronous orbit, we determine both the average flux at 90° pitch angle and the pitch angle anisotropy as a function of energy and magnetic local time. We clearly see the minimum in the H+ spectrum that results from the competition between eastward and westward drifts. The feature is weaker in O+ and He+, leading to higher O+/H+ and He+/H+ ratios in the affected region, and also to a higher pitch angle anisotropy, both features expected from the long-term effects of charge exchange. We also determine how the nightside L = 6-7 densities and temperatures vary with geomagnetic activity (Kp) and solar EUV (F10.7). Consistent with other studies, we find that the O+ density and relative abundance increase significantly with both Kp and F10.7. He+ density increases with F10.7, but not significantly with Kp. The temperatures of all species decrease with increasing F10.7. The O+ and He+ densities increase from L = 12 to L ~ 3-4, both absolutely and relative to H+, and then drop off sharply. The results give a comprehensive view of the inner magnetosphere using a contiguous long-term data set that supports much of the earlier work from GEOS, ISEE, Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers, and Polar from previous solar cycles.

  18. PhySIC: a veto supertree method with desirable properties.

    PubMed

    Ranwez, Vincent; Berry, Vincent; Criscuolo, Alexis; Fabre, Pierre-Henri; Guillemot, Sylvain; Scornavacca, Celine; Douzery, Emmanuel J P

    2007-10-01

    This paper focuses on veto supertree methods; i.e., methods that aim at producing a conservative synthesis of the relationships agreed upon by all source trees. We propose desirable properties that a supertree should satisfy in this framework, namely the non-contradiction property (PC) and the induction property (PI). The former requires that the supertree does not contain relationships that contradict one or a combination of the source topologies, whereas the latter requires that all topological information contained in the supertree is present in a source tree or collectively induced by several source trees. We provide simple examples to illustrate their relevance and that allow a comparison with previously advocated properties. We show that these properties can be checked in polynomial time for any given rooted supertree. Moreover, we introduce the PhySIC method (PHYlogenetic Signal with Induction and non-Contradiction). For k input trees spanning a set of n taxa, this method produces a supertree that satisfies the above-mentioned properties in O(kn(3) + n(4)) computing time. The polytomies of the produced supertree are also tagged by labels indicating areas of conflict as well as those with insufficient overlap. As a whole, PhySIC enables the user to quickly summarize consensual information of a set of trees and localize groups of taxa for which the data require consolidation. Lastly, we illustrate the behaviour of PhySIC on primate data sets of various sizes, and propose a supertree covering 95% of all primate extant genera. The PhySIC algorithm is available at http://atgc.lirmm.fr/cgi-bin/PhySIC. PMID:17918032

  19. Fertility Desires among Women Living with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Ryan; Potter, JoNell Efantis; Miron-Shatz, Talya; Chakhtoura, Nahida; Spence, Andrew; Byrne, Margaret M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Rates of pregnancy among women living with HIV (WLHIV) have increased with the availability of effective HIV treatment. Planning for pregnancy and childbirth is an increasingly important element of HIV care. Though rates of unintended pregnancies are high among women in general, among couples affected by HIV, significant planning and reproductive decisions must be considered to prevent negative health consequences for WLHIV and their neonates. To gain insight into this reproductive decision-making process among WLHIV, this study explored women’s knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding fertility planning, reproductive desires, and safer conception practices. It was hypothesized that pregnancy desires would be influenced by partners, families, the potential risk of HIV transmission to infants, and physicians’ recommendations. Methods WLHIV of childbearing age were recruited from urban South Florida, and completed an assessment of demographics (N = 49), fertility desires and a conjoint survey of factors associated with reproductive decision-making. Results Using conjoint analysis, we found that different decision paths exist for different types of women: Younger women and those with less education desired children if their partners wanted children; reproductive desires among those with less education, and with less HIV pregnancy-related knowledge, displayed a trend toward additional emphasis on their family’s desires. Conversely, older women and those with more education appeared to place more importance on physician endorsement in their plans for childbearing. Conclusions Results of this study highlight the importance of ongoing preconception counselling for all women of reproductive age during routine HIV care. Counselling should be tailored to patient characteristics, and physicians should consider inclusion of families and/or partners in the process. PMID:27610626

  20. Metallicity gradients in local Universe galaxies: Time evolution and effects of radial migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magrini, Laura; Coccato, Lodovico; Stanghellini, Letizia; Casasola, Viviana; Galli, Daniele

    2016-04-01

    Context. Our knowledge of the shape of radial metallicity gradients in disc galaxies has recently improved. Conversely, the understanding of their time evolution is more complex, since it requires analysis of stellar populations with different ages or systematic studies of galaxies at different redshifts. In the local Universe, H ii regions and planetary nebulae (PNe) are important tools to investigate radial metallicity gradients in disc galaxies. Aims: We present an in-depth study of all nearby spiral galaxies (M33, M31, NGC 300, and M81) with direct-method nebular abundances of both populations, aiming at studying the evolution of their radial metallicity gradients. For the first time, we also evaluate the radial migration of PN populations. Methods: For the selected galaxies, we analysed H ii region and PN properties to: determine whether oxygen in PNe is a reliable tracer for past interstellar medium (ISM) composition; homogenise published datasets; estimate the migration of the oldest stellar populations; and determine the overall chemical enrichment and slope evolution. Results: We confirm that oxygen in PNe is a reliable tracer for past ISM metallicity. We find that PN gradients are flatter than or equal to those of H ii regions. When radial motions are negligible, this result provides a direct measurement of the time evolution of the gradient. For galaxies with dominant radial motions, we provide upper limits on the gradient evolution. Finally, the total metal content increases with time in all target galaxies, and early morphological types have a larger increment Δ(O/H) than late-type galaxies. Conclusions: Our findings provide important constraints to discriminate among different galactic evolutionary scenarios, favouring cosmological models with enhanced feedback from supernovae. The advent of extremely large telescopes allows us to include galaxies in a wider range of morphologies and environments, thus putting firmer constraints on galaxy formation

  1. Intrafractional prostate motion during external beam radiotherapy monitored by a real-time target localization system.

    PubMed

    Tong, Xu; Chen, Xiaoming; Li, Jinsheng; Xu, Qianqian; Lin, Mu-Han; Chen, Lili; Price, Robert A; Ma, Chang-Ming

    2015-03-08

    This paper investigates the clinical significance of real-time monitoring of intrafractional prostate motion during external beam radiotherapy using a commercial 4D localization system. Intrafractional prostate motion was tracked during 8,660 treatment fractions for 236 patients. The following statistics were analyzed: 1) the percentage of fractions in which the prostate shifted 2-7 mm for a certain duration; 2) the proportion of the entire tracking time during which the prostate shifted 2-7mm; and 3) the proportion of each minute in which the shift exceeded 2-7 mm. The ten patients exhibiting maximum intrafractional-motion patterns were analyzed separately. Our results showed that the percentage of fractions in which the prostate shifted by > 2, 3, 5, and 7 mm off the baseline in any direction for > 30 s was 56.8%, 27.2%, 4.6%, and 0.7% for intact prostate and 68.7%, 35.6%, 10.1%, and 1.8% for postprostatectomy patients, respectively. For the ten patients, these percentages were 91.3%, 72.4%, 36.3%, and 6%, respectively. The percentage of tracking time during which the prostate shifted > 2, 3, 5, and 7 mm was 27.8%, 10.7%, 1.6%, and 0.3%, respectively, and it was 56.2%, 33.7%, 11.2%, and 2.1%, respectively, for the ten patients. The percentage of tracking time for a > 3 mm posterior motion was four to five times higher than that in other directions. For treatments completed in 5 min (VMAT) and 10 min (IMRT), the proportion for the prostate to shift by > 3mm was 4% and 12%, respectively. Although intrafractional prostate motion was generally small, caution should be taken for patients who exhibit frequent large intrafractional motion. For those patients, adjustment of patient positioning may be necessary or a larger treatment margin may be used. After the initial alignment, the likelihood of prostate motion increases with time. Therefore, it is favorable to use advanced techniques (e.g., VMAT) that require less delivery time in order to reduce the treatment

  2. Analysis of local ionospheric time varying characteristics with singular value decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakobsen, Jakob; Knudsen, Per; Jensen, Anna B. O.

    2010-07-01

    In this paper, a time series from 1999 to 2007 of absolute total electron content (TEC) values has been computed and analyzed using singular value decomposition (SVD). The data set has been computed using a Kalman Filter and is based on dual frequency GPS data from three reference stations in Denmark located in the midlatitude region. The station separation between the three stations is 132-208 km (the time series of the TEC can be freely downloaded at http://www.heisesgade.dk ). For each year, a SVD has been performed on the TEC time series in order to identify the three time varying (daily, yearly, and 11 yearly) characteristics of the ionosphere. The applied SVD analysis provides a new method for separating the daily from the yearly components. The first singular value is very dominant (approximately six times larger than the second singular value), and this singular value corresponds clearly to the variation of the daily cycle over the year. The second singular value corresponds to variations of the width of the daily peak over the year, and the third singular value shows a clear yearly variation of the daily signal with peaks around the equinoxes. The singular values for each year show a very strong correlation with the sunspot number for all the singular values. The correlation coefficients for the first 5 sets of singular values are all above 0.96. Based on the SVD analysis yearly models of the TEC in the ionosphere can be recomposed and illustrate the three time varying characteristics of the ionosphere very clearly. By prediction of the yearly mean sunspot number, future yearly models can also be predicted. These can serve as a priori information for a real time space weather service providing information of the current status of the ionosphere. They will improve the Kalman filter processing making it more robust, but can also be used as

  3. Magnetic latitude and local time distributions of ionospheric currents during a geomagnetic storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Yuji; Shinbori, Atsuki; Kikuchi, Takashi; Nagatsuma, Tsutomu

    2012-07-01

    In order to clarify the global distribution of ionospheric currents during a geomagnetic storm, we analyzed ground magnetic disturbances from high latitudes to the magnetic equator for the storm on September 7-8, 2002, with the minimum SYM-H value of -168 nT. In this analysis, we investigated magnetic field deviations in the northward component from the SYM-H, as functions of the dipole magnetic latitude (DMLAT) and the magnetic local time (MLT). During the main phase of the storm, the deviations at the low latitudes (10°-35° in DMLAT) were positive/negative in the dawn/dusk (0-9/11-24 h MLT) sector. On the other hand, the deviations at the dayside middle latitudes (35°-55° in DMLAT) were negative/positive in the morning/afternoon (6-12/13-15 h MLT) sector. The local time distribution at the low latitudes may represent the dawn-dusk asymmetry of the storm time ring current, while that at the dayside middle latitudes coincides with the DP2 currents due to the convection electric field associated with the Region 1 field-aligned currents (R1 FACs). All over the nightside middle latitude, the deviations were positive. This implies the direct effect of the R1 FACs through the Biot-Savart's law. At the geomagnetic equator, the eastward and westward electrojets were intensified on the day and nightside, respectively, being caused by the penetrated dawn-to-dusk convection electric field. We found that the MLT distribution of the magnetic deviations during the recovery phase was in opposite sense to that during the main phase at the dayside middle latitudes. The reversed magnetic disturbances must be due to the overshielding electric field associated with the Region 2 field-aligned currents (R2 FACs). Similarly, the deviations at the dayside and nightside equator were reversed, indicating penetration of the dusk-to-dawn overshielding electric field into the equatorial ionosphere. Based on the above results, we propose a current system including the ionospheric currents

  4. Tomographic imaging of local earthquake delay times for three-dimensional velocity variation in western Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.M.; Crosson, R.S. )

    1990-04-10

    Tomographic inversion is applied to delay times from local earthquakes to image three dimensional velocity variations in the Puget Sound region of western Washington. The 37,500 square km region is represented by nearly cubic blocks of 5 km per side. P-wave arrival time observations from 4,387 crustal earthquakes, with depths of 0 to 40 km, were used as sources producing 36,865 rays covering the target region. A conjugate gradient method (LSQR) is used to invert the large, sparse system of equations. To diminish the effects of noisy data, the Laplacian is constrained to be zero within horizontal layers, providing smoothing of the model. The resolution is estimated by calculating impulse responses at blocks of interest and estimates of standard errors are calculated by the jackknife statistical procedure. Results of the inversion are correlated with some known geologic features and independent geophysical measurements. High P-wave velocities along the eastern flank of the Olympic Peninsula are interpreted to reflect the subsurface extension of Crescent terrane. Low velocities beneath the Puget Sound further to the east are inferred to reflect thick sediment accumulations. The Crescent terrane appears to extend beneath Puget Sound, consistent with its interpretation as a major accretionary unit. In the southern Puget Sound basin, high velocity anomalies at depths of 10-20 km are interpreted as Crescent terrane and are correlated with a region of low seismicity. Near Mt. Ranier, high velocity anomalies may reflect buried plutons.

  5. Relativistic Coulomb excitation within the time dependent superfluid local density approximation

    DOE PAGES

    Stetcu, I.; Bertulani, C. A.; Bulgac, A.; Magierski, P.; Roche, K. J.

    2015-01-06

    Within the framework of the unrestricted time-dependent density functional theory, we present for the first time an analysis of the relativistic Coulomb excitation of the heavy deformed open shell nucleus 238U. The approach is based on the superfluid local density approximation formulated on a spatial lattice that can take into account coupling to the continuum, enabling self-consistent studies of superfluid dynamics of any nuclear shape. We compute the energy deposited in the target nucleus as a function of the impact parameter, finding it to be significantly larger than the estimate using the Goldhaber-Teller model. The isovector giant dipole resonance, themore » dipole pygmy resonance, and giant quadrupole modes are excited during the process. As a result, the one-body dissipation of collective dipole modes is shown to lead a damping width Γ↓≈0.4 MeV and the number of preequilibrium neutrons emitted has been quantified.« less

  6. Detection and localization of single-source gravitational waves with pulsar timing arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, X.-J.; Wen, L.; Hobbs, G.; Zhang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Madison, D. R.; Manchester, R. N.; Kerr, M.; Rosado, P. A.; Wang, J.-B.

    2015-05-01

    Pulsar timing arrays (PTAs) can be used to search for very low frequency (10-9-10-7 Hz) gravitational waves (GWs). In this paper, we present a general method for the detection and localization of single-source GWs using PTAs. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this new method for three types of signals: monochromatic waves as expected from individual supermassive binary black holes in circular orbits, GWs from eccentric binaries and GW bursts. We also test its implementation in realistic data sets that include effects such as uneven sampling and heterogeneous data spans and measurement precision. It is shown that our method, which works in the frequency domain, performs as well as published time-domain methods. In particular, we find it equivalent to the Fe-statistic for monochromatic waves. We also discuss the construction of null streams - data streams that have null response to GWs, and the prospect of using null streams as a consistency check in the case of detected GW signals. Finally, we present sensitivities to individual supermassive binary black holes in eccentric orbits. We find that a monochromatic search that is designed for circular binaries can efficiently detect eccentric binaries with both high and low eccentricities, while a harmonic summing technique provides greater sensitivities only for binaries with moderate eccentricities.

  7. Dynamic binaural sound localization based on variations of interaural time delays and system rotations.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Claude; Rogers, Chris; Massen, Francis

    2015-08-01

    This work develops the mathematical model for a steerable binaural system that determines the instantaneous direction of a sound source in space. The model combines system angular speed and interaural time delays (ITDs) in a differential equation, which allows monitoring the change of source position in the binaural reference frame and therefore resolves the confusion about azimuth and elevation. The work includes the analysis of error propagation and presents results from a real-time application that was performed on a digital signal processing device. Theory and experiments demonstrate that the azimuthal angle to the sound source is accurately yielded in the case of horizontal rotations, whereas the elevation angle is estimated with large uncertainty. This paper also proves the equivalence of the ITD derivative and the Doppler shift appearing between the binaurally captured audio signals. The equation of this Doppler shift is applicable for any kind of motion. It shows that weak binaural pitch differences may represent an additional cue in localization of sound. Finally, the paper develops practical applications from this relationship, such as the synthesizing of binaural images of pure and complex tones emitted by a moving source, and the generation of multiple frequency images for binaural beat experiments. PMID:26328682

  8. The best timing for administering systemic chemotherapy in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shimodaira, Yusuke; Harada, Kazuto; Lin, Quan

    2016-01-01

    Over the past several decades, outcomes for patients with rectal cancer have improved considerably. However, several questions have emerged as survival times have lengthened and quality of life has improved for these patients. Currently patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) are often recommended multimodality therapy with fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy (CT) and radiation followed by total mesorectal excision (TME), with consideration given to FOLFOX before chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Recently, Garcia-Aguilar and colleagues reported in Lancet Oncology that the addition of mFOLFOX6 administered between CRT and surgery affected the number of patients achieving pathologic complete response (pathCR), which is of great interest from the standpoint of pursuit of optimal timing of systemic CT delivery. This was a multicenter phase II study consisting of 4 sequential treatment groups of patients with LARC, and they reported that patients given higher number CT cycles between CRT and surgery achieved higher rates of pathCR than those given standard treatment. There was no association between response improvement and tumor progression, increased technical difficulty, or surgical complications. Ongoing phase III clinical trial further assessing this strategy might result in a paradigm shift. PMID:26889491

  9. Local THz time domain spectroscopy of duplex DNA via fluorescence of an embedded probe.

    PubMed

    Dallmann, André; Pfaffe, Matthias; Mügge, Clemens; Mahrwald, Rainer; Kovalenko, Sergey A; Ernsting, Nikolaus P

    2009-11-26

    We demonstrate that THz vibrational activity of a biopolymer can be measured locally, on the effective length scale for polar solvation, with an embedded molecular probe. For this purpose, the polarity probe 2-hydroxy-7-nitrofluorene was linked into a 13mer DNA duplex opposite an abasic site. The NMR solution structure shows that the fluorene moiety occupies a well-defined position in place of a base pair but can flip around the long axis on a millisecond time scale. Femtosecond optical pump-probe experiments are used to measure the time-resolved Stokes shift of emission from the probe. The dynamic shifts for solution in H(2)O and D(2)O are quantified. Their difference is much larger than that expected for free water, implying that only bound water is observed. A weak 26 cm(-1) spectral oscillation of the emission band is observed, which is not present when the probe is free in solution and is therefore caused by the supramolecular structure (DNA and hydration water). PMID:19764701

  10. Children's Social Desirability Judgements about Ingratiation Tactics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryan, James H.; Sonnefeld, L. Joseph

    Fifty-eight children (mean age 11 years), 22 of whom were diagnosed as learning disabled, were administered a questionnaire in which scenarios were presented involving various ingratiation tactics toward three types of targets (parents, teachers, and peers) and were asked to rate each tactic as to its social desirability. Results indicated that…

  11. Suppression and Revival of Weak Localization of Ultra-Cold Atoms by Manipulation of Time-Reversal Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aspect, Alain

    In the early 1980's, observation of a magneto-resistance anomaly in metallic thin films was attributed to the phenomenon of weak localization of electrons and to time-reversal symmetry breaking due to a magnetic field acting upon charged particles. We have observed weak localization of ultra-cold atoms in a 2D configuration, placed in a disordered potential created by a laser speckle. In order to manipulate time-reversal symmetry with our neutral atoms, we take advantage of the slow evolution of our system, and we observe the suppression and revival of weak localization when time reversal symmetry is cancelled and reestablished. References: K. Muller, J. Richard, V. V. Volchkov, V. Denechaud, P. Bouyer, A. Aspect, and V. Josse, ''Suppression and Revival of Weak Localization through Control of Time-Reversal Symmetry,'' Physical Review Letters 114 (20) (2015) and references in. Work supported by the ERC Avanced Grant Quantatop.

  12. The Local Group as a time machine: studying the high-redshift Universe with nearby galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Weisz, Daniel R.; Johnson, Benjamin D.; Bullock, James S.; Conroy, Charlie; Fitts, Alex

    2015-10-01

    We infer the UV luminosities of Local Group galaxies at early cosmic times (z ˜ 2 and z ˜ 7) by combining stellar population synthesis modelling with star formation histories derived from deep colour-magnitude diagrams constructed from Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations. Our analysis provides a basis for understanding high-z galaxies - including those that may be unobservable even with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) - in the context of familiar, well-studied objects in the very low-z Universe. We find that, at the epoch of reionization, all Local Group dwarfs were less luminous than the faintest galaxies detectable in deep HST observations of blank fields. We predict that JWST will observe z ˜ 7 progenitors of galaxies similar to the Large Magellanic Cloud today; however, the HST Frontier Fields initiative may already be observing such galaxies, highlighting the power of gravitational lensing. Consensus reionization models require an extrapolation of the observed blank-field luminosity function (LF) at z ≈ 7 by at least 2 orders of magnitude in order to maintain reionization. This scenario requires the progenitors of the Fornax and Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxies to be contributors to the ionizing background at z ˜ 7. Combined with numerical simulations, our results argue for a break in the UV LF from a faint-end slope of α ˜ -2 at MUV ≲ -13 to α ˜ -1.2 at lower luminosities. Applied to photometric samples at lower redshifts, our analysis suggests that HST observations in lensing fields at z ˜ 2 are capable of probing galaxies with luminosities comparable to the expected progenitor of Fornax.

  13. PEGylation of antibody fragments greatly increases their local residence time following delivery to the respiratory tract.

    PubMed

    Koussoroplis, Salome Juliette; Paulissen, Geneviève; Tyteca, Donatienne; Goldansaz, Hadi; Todoroff, Julie; Barilly, Céline; Uyttenhove, Catherine; Van Snick, Jacques; Cataldo, Didier; Vanbever, Rita

    2014-08-10

    Inhalation aerosols offer a targeted therapy for respiratory diseases. However, the therapeutic efficacy of inhaled biopharmaceuticals is limited by the rapid clearance of macromolecules in the lungs. The aim of this research was to study the effects of the PEGylation of antibody fragments on their local residence time after administration to the respiratory tract. We demonstrate that the conjugation of a two-armed 40-kDa polyethylene glycol (PEG) chain to anti-interleukin-17A (IL-17A) F(ab')2 and anti-IL-13 Fab' greatly prolonged the presence of these fragments within the lungs of mice. The content of PEGylated antibody fragments within the lungs plateaued up to 4h post-delivery, whereas the clearance of unconjugated proteins started immediately after administration. Forty-eight hours post-delivery, F(ab')2 and Fab' contents in the lungs had decreased to 10 and 14% of the dose initially deposited, respectively. However, this value was 40% for both PEG40-F(ab')2 and PEG40-Fab'. The prolonged pulmonary residency of the anti-IL-17A PEG40-F(ab')2 translated into an improved efficacy in reducing lung inflammation in a murine model of house dust mite-induced lung inflammation. We demonstrate that PEGylated proteins were principally retained within the lung lumen rather than the nasal cavities or lung parenchyma. In addition, we report that PEG increased pulmonary retention of antibody fragments through mucoadhesion and escape from alveolar macrophages rather than increased hydrodynamic size or improved enzymatic stability. The PEGylation of proteins might find broad application in the local delivery of therapeutic proteins to diseased airways. PMID:24845126

  14. Three-dimensional crustal structure of the Mendocino Triple Junction region from local earthquake travel times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdonck, David; Zandt, George

    1994-12-01

    The large-scale, three-dimensional geometry of the Mendocino Triple Junction at Cape Mendocino, California, was investigated by inverting nearly 19,000 P wave arrival times from over 1400 local earthquakes to estimate the three-dimensional velocity structure and hypocentral parameters. A velocity grid 175 km (N-S) by 125 km (E-W) centered near Garberville, California, was constructed with 25 km horizontal and 5 km vertical mode spacing. The model was well resolved near Cape Mendocino, where the earthquakes and stations are concentrated. At about 40.6 N latitude a high-velocity gradient between 6.5 and 7.5 km/s dips gently to the south and east from about 15 km depth near the coast. Relocated hypocenters concentrate below this high gradient which we interpret as the oceanic crust of the subducted Gorda Plate. Therefore the depth to the top of the Gorda Plate near Cape Mendocino is interpreted to be approximately 15 km. The Gorda Plate appears intact and dipping approximately 8 deg eastward due to subduction and flexing downward 6 deg - 12 deg to the south. Both hypocenters and velocity structure suggest that the southern edge of the plate intersects the coastline at 40.3 N latitude and maintains a linear trend 15 deg south of east to at least 123 W longitude. The top of a large low-velocity region at 20-30 km depth extends about 50 km N-S and 75 km E-W (roughly between Garberville and Covelo) and is located above and south of the southern edge of the Gorda Plate. We interpret this low velocity area to be locally thickened crust (8-10 km) due to either local compressional forces associated with north-south compression caused by the northward impingement of the rigid Pacific Plate or by underthrusting of the base of the accretionary subduction complex at the southern terminous of the Cascadia Subduction Zone. South of Cape Mendocino and southwest of the Garberville fault, high velocities indicative of oceanic crust are detected at 15 km depth. We interpret this

  15. Modelling of human low frequency sound localization acuity demonstrates dominance of spatial variation of interaural time difference and suggests uniform just-noticeable differences in interaural time difference.

    PubMed

    Smith, Rosanna C G; Price, Stephen R

    2014-01-01

    Sound source localization is critical to animal survival and for identification of auditory objects. We investigated the acuity with which humans localize low frequency, pure tone sounds using timing differences between the ears. These small differences in time, known as interaural time differences or ITDs, are identified in a manner that allows localization acuity of around 1° at the midline. Acuity, a relative measure of localization ability, displays a non-linear variation as sound sources are positioned more laterally. All species studied localize sounds best at the midline and progressively worse as the sound is located out towards the side. To understand why sound localization displays this variation with azimuthal angle, we took a first-principles, systemic, analytical approach to model localization acuity. We calculated how ITDs vary with sound frequency, head size and sound source location for humans. This allowed us to model ITD variation for previously published experimental acuity data and determine the distribution of just-noticeable differences in ITD. Our results suggest that the best-fit model is one whereby just-noticeable differences in ITDs are identified with uniform or close to uniform sensitivity across the physiological range. We discuss how our results have several implications for neural ITD processing in different species as well as development of the auditory system.

  16. The effect of local mild cold exposure on pulse transit time.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin-Yu; Zhang, Yuan-Ting

    2006-07-01

    Pulse transit time (PTT) is a simple, noninvasive technique which shows great promise in the continuous monitoring of blood pressure and the assessment of arterial stiffness, and has potential applications in wearable healthcare devices. Usually, PTT is measured from the electrocardiogram (ECG) R-wave to a characteristic point on the peripheral pulse by photoplethysmography. However, peripheral blood circulation is sensitive to local temperature variation. This study investigated the effect of mild cold exposure on PTT by immersing one finger into cold water. The photoplethysmographic (PPG) signals were recorded from the cooled and adjacent uncooled fingers. The significant change in dc and ac amplitudes of the PPG pulse indicates that the mild cold exposure has a substantial effect on finger blood circulation. Three measurements of PTT were performed by calculating the time delay from the ECG R-wave to three different characteristic points on the PPG pulse, namely, the foot (PTT1), the point on the rising limb with maximal slope (PTT2) and the peak (PTT3), respectively. PTT3 was found to be easily subject to waveform distortion. Significant changes in the difference of PTT1 and PTT2 between two fingers were observed after a 5 min recovery period. The changes in PTT1 and PTT2 on the reference finger also showed close correlation (r = -0.77 and r = -0.80, p < 0.001) with the changes in SBP after recovery, whereas those measured on the test finger have low correlation (r = -0.53 and r = -0.38, p > 0.15). The results suggest that mild cold exposure may have a delay effect on PTT due to cold-induced vasodilatation and could be a potential source of error. The effect of cold exposure should be carefully examined, especially when PTT that includes a large portion of rising time of peripheral pulse is applied.

  17. Time and Frequency-Dependent Modulation of Local Field Potential Synchronization by Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    McCracken, Clinton B.; Kiss, Zelma H. T.

    2014-01-01

    High-frequency electrical stimulation of specific brain structures, known as deep brain stimulation (DBS), is an effective treatment for movement disorders, but mechanisms of action remain unclear. We examined the time-dependent effects of DBS applied to the entopeduncular nucleus (EP), the rat homolog of the internal globus pallidus, a target used for treatment of both dystonia and Parkinson’s disease (PD). We performed simultaneous multi-site local field potential (LFP) recordings in urethane-anesthetized rats to assess the effects of high-frequency (HF, 130 Hz; clinically effective), low-frequency (LF, 15 Hz; ineffective) and sham DBS delivered to EP. LFP activity was recorded from dorsal striatum (STR), ventroanterior thalamus (VA), primary motor cortex (M1), and the stimulation site in EP. Spontaneous and acute stimulation-induced LFP oscillation power and functional connectivity were assessed at baseline, and after 30, 60, and 90 minutes of stimulation. HF EP DBS produced widespread alterations in spontaneous and stimulus-induced LFP oscillations, with some effects similar across regions and others occurring in a region- and frequency band-specific manner. Many of these changes evolved over time. HF EP DBS produced an initial transient reduction in power in the low beta band in M1 and STR; however, phase synchronization between these regions in the low beta band was markedly suppressed at all time points. DBS also enhanced low gamma synchronization throughout the circuit. With sustained stimulation, there were significant reductions in low beta synchronization between M1-VA and STR-VA, and increases in power within regions in the faster frequency bands. HF DBS also suppressed the ability of acute EP stimulation to induce beta oscillations in all regions along the circuit. This dynamic pattern of synchronizing and desynchronizing effects of EP DBS suggests a complex modulation of activity along cortico-BG-thalamic circuits underlying the therapeutic effects

  18. Teaching Bodies/Learning Desire: Rethinking the Role of Desire in the Pedagogic Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Megan

    2008-01-01

    Desire is a crucial aspect of the pedagogic process. For too long, however, there has been a dichotomous relationship between understandings of teacher and student desire. The former is often configured as a pedagogic anachronism, problematised and needing to be contained. Conversely, the latter is essentialised as a force that should not be…

  19. Local, real-time measurement of drying films of aqueous polymer solutions using active microrheology.

    PubMed

    Komoda, Yoshiyuki; Leal, L Gary; Squires, Todd M

    2014-05-13

    Oscillatory microdisk rheometry was applied to evaluate the evolution of the viscoelastic properties at the surface of a film of an aqueous solution of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) during drying. The drying rate was measured concurrently, based upon measurements of the variation of film thickness. A fully hydrolyzed PVA solution shows a constant drying rate, while a less hydrolyzed PVA solution exhibits a decreased drying rate in the latter part of the drying process, which occurred at the same time as an increase of the elastic modulus. We suggest that this difference in behavior is a consequence of the fact that both the configuration of the PVA molecule and the strength of interaction with water depend on the degree to which the PVA is hydrolyzed. The polymer concentration at the film surface can be estimated from the measured viscosity at the surface for the fully hydrolyzed PVA solution, and this result then can be compared with two theoretical calculations: one in which the polymer concentration is assumed to remain uniform throughout the film, and the other in which the polymer concentration distribution is determined via a one-dimensional diffusion model. This comparison suggests that the polymer is first concentrated locally near the surface but later in the drying process the distribution of polymer becomes increasingly uniform, possibly due to a spontaneously generated convective flow inside the film.

  20. Real time magma transport imaging and earthquake localization using seismic amplitude ratio analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taisne, B.; Brenguier, F.; Nercessian, A.; Beauducel, F.; Smith, P. J.

    2011-12-01

    Seismic amplitude ratio analysis (SARA) has been used successfully to track the sub-surface migration of magma prior to an eruption at Piton de la Fournaise volcano, La Réunion. The methodology is based on the temporal analysis of the seismic amplitude ratio between different pairs of stations, along with a model of seismic wave attenuation. This method has already highlighted the complexity of magma migration in the shallower part of the volcanic edifice during a seismic crisis using continuous records. We will see that this method can also be applied to the localization of individual earthquakes triggered by monitoring systems, prior to human intervention such as phase picking. As examples, the analysis is performed on two kinds of seismic events observed at Soufrière Hills Volcano, Montserrat during the last 15 years, namely: Hybrids events and Volcano-Tectonic earthquakes. Finally, we present the implementation of a fully automatic SARA method for monitoring of Piton de la Fournaise volcano using continuous data in real-time.

  1. Trait inferences in goal-directed behavior: ERP timing and localization under spontaneous and intentional processing

    PubMed Central

    Van den Eede, Sofie; Baetens, Kris; Vandekerckhove, Marie

    2009-01-01

    This study measured event-related potentials (ERPs) during multiple goal and trait inferences, under spontaneous or intentional instructions. Participants read sentences describing several goal-implying behaviors of a target person from which also a strong trait could be inferred or not. The last word of each sentence determined the consistency with the inference induced during preceding sentences. In comparison with behaviors that implied only a goal, stronger waveforms beginning at ∼150 ms were obtained when the behaviors additionally implied a trait. These ERPs showed considerable parallels between spontaneous and intentional inferences. This suggests that traits embedded in a stream of goal-directed behaviors were detected more rapidly and automatically than mere goals, irrespective of the participants’ spontaneous or intentional instructions. In line with this, source localization (LORETA) of the ERPs show predominantly activation in the temporo-parietal junction (TPJ) during 150–200 ms, suggesting that goals were detected at that time interval. During 200–300 ms, activation was stronger at the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) for multiple goals and traits as opposed to goals only, suggesting that traits were inferred during this time window. A cued recall measure taken after the presentation of the stimulus material support the occurrence of goal and trait inferences and shows significant correlations with the neural components, indicating that these components are valid neural indices of spontaneous and intentional social inferences. The early detection of multiple goal and trait inferences is explained in terms of their greater social relevance, leading to privileged attention allocation and processing in the brain. PMID:19270041

  2. Disentangling desire and arousal: a classificatory conundrum.

    PubMed

    Sarin, Sabina; Amsel, Rhonda M; Binik, Yitzchak M

    2013-08-01

    A controversial proposal to collapse sexual disorders of desire and arousal is forthcoming in the diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (5th ed.) (DSM-5). Yet, no study has attempted to empirically distinguish these disorders by using explicit criteria to recruit and compare distinct groups of low desire and arousal sufferers. The goal of the current study was to test the feasibility of finding medically healthy men and women meeting clearly operationalized DSM-IV-TR criteria for disorders of desire and/or arousal and compare them to matched controls. To assess operational criteria, participants completed a comprehensive telephone screening interview assessing DSM-IV-TR and DSM-5 criteria, as well as standardized self-report measures of sexual functioning. The use of operationalized DSM-IV-TR criteria to recruit participants led to the exclusion of over 75% of those reporting sexual difficulties, with the primary reason for exclusion being failure to meet at least one central diagnostic criterion. The application of the DSM-5 criteria was even more restrictive and led to the exclusion of all but four men and one woman using the original four-symptom criteria, and four men and five women using the revised three-symptom criteria. Cluster analyses supported the distinction between desire and genital arousal difficulties, and suggest that different groups with distinct clusters of symptoms may exist, two of which are consistent with the DSM-5 criteria. Overall, results highlight the need for revisions to the diagnostic criteria, which, as they stand, do not capture the full range of many people's sexual difficulties.

  3. Oscillatory dynamics of vasoconstriction and vasodilation identified by time-localized phase coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppard, L. W.; Vuksanović, V.; McClintock, P. V. E.; Stefanovska, A.

    2011-06-01

    We apply wavelet-based time-localized phase coherence to investigate the relationship between blood flow and skin temperature, and between blood flow and instantaneous heart rate (IHR), during vasoconstriction and vasodilation provoked by local cooling or heating of the skin. A temperature-controlled metal plate (≈10 cm2) placed on the volar side of the left arm was used to provide the heating and cooling. Beneath the plate, the blood flow was measured by laser Doppler flowmetry and the adjacent skin temperature by a thermistor. Two 1 h datasets were collected from each of the ten subjects. In each case a 30 min basal recording was followed by a step change in plate temperature, to either 24 °C or 42 °C. The IHR was derived from simultaneously recorded ECG. We confirm the changes in the energy and frequency of blood flow oscillations during cooling and heating reported earlier. That is, during cooling, there was a significant decrease in the average frequency of myogenic blood flow oscillations (p < 0.05) and the myogenic spectral peak became more prominent. During heating, there was a significant (p < 0.05) general increase in spectral energy, associated with vasodilation, except in the myogenic interval. Weak phase coherence between temperature and blood flow was observed for unperturbed skin, but it increased in all frequency intervals as a result of heating. It was not significantly affected by cooling. We also show that significant (p < 0.05) phase coherence exists between blood flow and IHR in the respiratory and myogenic frequency intervals. Cooling did not affect this phase coherence in any of the frequency intervals, whereas heating enhanced the phase coherence in the respiratory and myogenic intervals. This can be explained by the reduction in vascular resistance produced by heating, a process where myogenic mechanisms play a key role. We conclude that the mechanisms of vasodilation and vasoconstriction, in response to temperature change, are

  4. Time dependent weak localization of a 2DEG in the presence of Andreev reflections

    SciTech Connect

    Drexler, H.; Harris, J.; Yuh, E.L.

    1995-12-31

    Experiments on superconducting-normal-superconducting, SNS, junctions, comprised of Nb-2D InAs - Nb, exhibit AC currents at v = 4eV/h, twice the Josephson frequency. These currents can be ascribed to time dependent weak localization in the 2D InAs electron gas modulated by the presence of superconducting electrodes. The change of the current-voltage characteristic of a SNS structure under far-infrared (FIR) illumination (180GHz, 300GHz) has been investigated as a function of temperature, FIR power and magnetic field. The sample is an InAs/AlSb quantum well with a 1{mu}m-period Nb grating contacting the InAs. In the experiments a series connection of N = 300 junctions is measured. The differential resistance of the sample shows a very clear subharmonic gap structure, indicating multiple Andreev reflections between the SN-interfaces. Below a temperature of about T = 5K the sample is superconductive. At sufficiently high temperatures (T > 6K) the photoresponse of the sample under FIR illumination exhibits only a single resonance. This resonance is at V = Nhv/4e, that is half the voltage at which the first step of the AC Josephson effect would occur. B.Z. Spivak and D.E. Khmel`nitskii predicted this effect which arises from the quantum correction of the conductivity of a normal state electron gas due to Andreev reflections. Electrons and holes that are Andreev reflected at the superconductor interface acquire a phase shift that is determined by the phase {Phi} of the superconductor. Interference terms of time reversed paths that include Andreev reflections on adjacent superconductor stripes oscillate with 2({Phi}{sub 2}-{Phi}{sub 1}) = 4eVt/h and therefore lead to a time-dependent conductivity. The manifestation of the oscillating conductivity in the experiments is similar to the Shapiro steps of the AC Josephson effect but with twice the frequency. The experiments show that this effect is very sensitive to an applied magnetic field.

  5. Efficient Semi-numerical Implementation of Global and Local Hybrid Functionals for Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory.

    PubMed

    Maier, Toni M; Bahmann, Hilke; Kaupp, Martin

    2015-09-01

    Local hybrid functionals with position-dependent exact-exchange admixture offer increased flexibility compared to global hybrids. For sufficiently advanced functionals of this type, this is expected to hold also for a wide range of electronic excitations within time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). Following a recent semi-numerical implementation of local hybrid functionals for ground-state self-consistent-field calculations (Bahmann, H.; Kaupp, M. J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2015, 11, 1540-1548), the first linear-response TDDFT implementation of local hybrids is reported, using a semi-numerical integration technique. The timings and accuracy of the semi-numerical implementation are evaluated by comparison with analytical schemes for time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) and for the TPSSh global hybrid. In combination with the RI approximation to the Coulomb part of the kernel, the semi-numerical implementation is faster than the existing analytical TDDFT/TDHF implementation of global hybrid functionals in the TURBOMOLE code, even for small systems and moderate basis sets. Moreover, timings for global and local hybrids are practically equal for the semi-numerical scheme. The way to TDDFT calculations with local hybrid functionals for large systems is thus now open, and more sophisticated parametrizations of local hybrids may be evaluated.

  6. Two Years of California's Local Control Funding Formula: Time to Reaffirm the Grand Vision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koppich, Julia E.; Humphrey, Daniel C.; Marsh, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    California ended 40 years of reliance on categorical funding for schools when Governor Jerry Brown signed the Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF) into law on July 1, 2013. LCFF intends to enhance services for high-needs students through new flexibility, targeted student funding, and local accountability. Two years into LCFF implementation,…

  7. Locally covariant quantum field theory and the problem of formulating the same physics in all space-times.

    PubMed

    Fewster, Christopher J

    2015-08-01

    The framework of locally covariant quantum field theory is discussed, motivated in part using 'ignorance principles'. It is shown how theories can be represented by suitable functors, so that physical equivalence of theories may be expressed via natural isomorphisms between the corresponding functors. The inhomogeneous scalar field is used to illustrate the ideas. It is argued that there are two reasonable definitions of the local physical content associated with a locally covariant theory; when these coincide, the theory is said to be dynamically local. The status of the dynamical locality condition is reviewed, as are its applications in relation to (i) the foundational question of what it means for a theory to represent the same physics in different space-times and (ii) a no-go result on the existence of natural states.

  8. Asymmetric Continuous-Time Neural Networks without Local Traps for Solving Constraint Satisfaction Problems

    PubMed Central

    Molnár, Botond; Ercsey-Ravasz, Mária

    2013-01-01

    There has been a long history of using neural networks for combinatorial optimization and constraint satisfaction problems. Symmetric Hopfield networks and similar approaches use steepest descent dynamics, and they always converge to the closest local minimum of the energy landscape. For finding global minima additional parameter-sensitive techniques are used, such as classical simulated annealing or the so-called chaotic simulated annealing, which induces chaotic dynamics by addition of extra terms to the energy landscape. Here we show that asymmetric continuous-time neural networks can solve constraint satisfaction problems without getting trapped in non-solution attractors. We concentrate on a model solving Boolean satisfiability (k-SAT), which is a quintessential NP-complete problem. There is a one-to-one correspondence between the stable fixed points of the neural network and the k-SAT solutions and we present numerical evidence that limit cycles may also be avoided by appropriately choosing the parameters of the model. This optimal parameter region is fairly independent of the size and hardness of instances, this way parameters can be chosen independently of the properties of problems and no tuning is required during the dynamical process. The model is similar to cellular neural networks already used in CNN computers. On an analog device solving a SAT problem would take a single operation: the connection weights are determined by the k-SAT instance and starting from any initial condition the system searches until finding a solution. In this new approach transient chaotic behavior appears as a natural consequence of optimization hardness and not as an externally induced effect. PMID:24066045

  9. Asymmetric continuous-time neural networks without local traps for solving constraint satisfaction problems.

    PubMed

    Molnár, Botond; Ercsey-Ravasz, Mária

    2013-01-01

    There has been a long history of using neural networks for combinatorial optimization and constraint satisfaction problems. Symmetric Hopfield networks and similar approaches use steepest descent dynamics, and they always converge to the closest local minimum of the energy landscape. For finding global minima additional parameter-sensitive techniques are used, such as classical simulated annealing or the so-called chaotic simulated annealing, which induces chaotic dynamics by addition of extra terms to the energy landscape. Here we show that asymmetric continuous-time neural networks can solve constraint satisfaction problems without getting trapped in non-solution attractors. We concentrate on a model solving Boolean satisfiability (k-SAT), which is a quintessential NP-complete problem. There is a one-to-one correspondence between the stable fixed points of the neural network and the k-SAT solutions and we present numerical evidence that limit cycles may also be avoided by appropriately choosing the parameters of the model. This optimal parameter region is fairly independent of the size and hardness of instances, this way parameters can be chosen independently of the properties of problems and no tuning is required during the dynamical process. The model is similar to cellular neural networks already used in CNN computers. On an analog device solving a SAT problem would take a single operation: the connection weights are determined by the k-SAT instance and starting from any initial condition the system searches until finding a solution. In this new approach transient chaotic behavior appears as a natural consequence of optimization hardness and not as an externally induced effect. PMID:24066045

  10. A Local Index of Cloud Immersion in Tropical Forests Using Time-Lapse Photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassiouni, M.; Scholl, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Data on the frequency, duration and elevation of cloud immersion is essential to improve estimates of cloud water deposition in water budgets in cloud forests. Here, we present a methodology to detect local cloud immersion in remote tropical forests using time-lapse photography. A simple approach is developed to detect cloudy conditions in photographs within the canopy where image depth during clear conditions may be less than 10 meters and moving leaves and branches and changes in lighting are unpredictable. A primary innovation of this study is that cloudiness is determined from images without using a reference clear image and without minimal threshold value determination or human judgment for calibration. Five sites ranging from 600 to 1000 meters elevation along a ridge in the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory, Puerto Rico were each equipped with a trail camera programmed to take an image every 30 minutes since March 2014. Images were classified using four selected cloud-sensitive image characteristics (SCICs) computed for small image regions: contrast, the coefficient of variation and the entropy of the luminance of each image pixel, and image colorfulness. K-means clustering provided reasonable results to discriminate cloudy from clear conditions. Preliminary results indicate that 79-94% (daytime) and 85-93% (nighttime) of validation images were classified accurately at one open and two closed canopy sites. The euclidian distances between SCICs vectors of images during cloudy conditions and the SCICs vector of the centroid of the cluster of clear images show potential to quantify cloud density in addition to immersion. The classification method will be applied to determine spatial and temporal patterns of cloud immersion in the study area. The presented approach offers promising applications to increase observations of low-lying clouds at remote mountain sites where standard instruments to measure visibility and cloud base may not be practical.

  11. Infinite-time average of local fields in an integrable quantum field theory after a quantum quench.

    PubMed

    Mussardo, G

    2013-09-01

    The infinite-time average of the expectation values of local fields of any interacting quantum theory after a global quench process are key quantities for matching theoretical and experimental results. For quantum integrable field theories, we show that they can be obtained by an ensemble average that employs a particular limit of the form factors of local fields and quantities extracted by the generalized Bethe ansatz.

  12. Engineering reverse saturable absorbers for desired wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Band, Yehuda B.; Scharf, Benjamin

    1986-06-01

    A variety of applications exist for reverse saturable absorbers (RSAs) in laser science (RSAs are substances whose excited-state absorption cross section is larger than their ground-state absorption cross section at a given wavelength and possess a number of other properties). We propose an approach to designing RSAs at a desired wavelength by construction of dimers of dye molecules which absorb near the wavelength of interest. The dimer ground-state absorption is to a state in which the excitation is spread over both monomeric units and the excited-state absorption commences from this state to the doubly excited electronic state in which both monomeric units are excited.

  13. [Geriatric homes: a non desired "good"].

    PubMed

    Jaques, Maria Ermelinda Miranda Ribeiro

    2007-01-01

    The great problems which affect old people on this beginning of the XXI century, are not limited to illness. The morbid processes have other causes associated with them:forgetfulness, loneliness, insecurity and, specially, the lack of trust on the actual socio-political structures. This reflection treats the data collected from afield work developed in the city of Viana do Castelo, and the results show that the old people are now living alone, in precarious socio-relational conditions and with few resources to face their needs. The desired proximity with and by the citizen, at all levels, faces the distance and misconception of the supporting structures at the moment. PMID:17703850

  14. Parenting desires among bisexual women and lesbians.

    PubMed

    Johnson, S R; Smith, E M; Guenther, S M

    1987-03-01

    Parenting desires were ascertained among a large group of lesbians (n = 1,921) and bisexual women (n = 424) recruited in a nonclinical setting. More than 50% of each sexual-orientation group had considered having a child since recognizing their current sexual identity. Lesbians were more likely than bisexuals to favor adoption and donor insemination as options, whereas bisexuals were more likely to consider intercourse with either a cooperative or unsuspecting man. Overall, however, 47 women (2%) reported success in obtaining a child through one of these options.

  15. In the right place at the right time: visualizing and understanding mRNA localization

    PubMed Central

    Buxbaum, Adina R.; Haimovich, Gal

    2015-01-01

    The spatial regulation of protein translation is an efficient way to create functional and structural asymmetries in cells. Recent research has furthered our understanding of how individual cells spatially organize protein synthesis, by applying innovative technology to characterize the relationship between mRNAs and their regulatory proteins, single-mRNA trafficking dynamics, physiological effects of abrogating mRNA localization in vivo and for endogenous mRNA labelling. The implementation of new imaging technologies has yielded valuable information on mRNA localization, for example, by observing single molecules in tissues. The emerging movements and localization patterns of mRNAs in morphologically distinct unicellular organisms and in neurons have illuminated shared and specialized mechanisms of mRNA localization, and this information is complemented by transgenic and biochemical techniques that reveal the biological consequences of mRNA mislocalization. PMID:25549890

  16. Control synthesis of continuous-time T-S fuzzy systems with local nonlinear models.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jiuxiang; Wang, Youyi; Yang, Guang-Hong

    2009-10-01

    This paper is concerned with the problem of designing fuzzy controllers for a class of nonlinear dynamic systems. The considered nonlinear systems are described by T-S fuzzy models with nonlinear local models, and the fuzzy models have fewer fuzzy rules than conventional T-S fuzzy models with local linear models. A new fuzzy control scheme with local nonlinear feedbacks is proposed, and the corresponding control synthesis conditions are given in terms of solutions to a set of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs). In contrast to the existing methods for fuzzy control synthesis, the new proposed control design method is based on fewer fuzzy rules and less computational burden. Moreover, the local nonlinear feedback laws in the new fuzzy controllers are also helpful in achieving good control effects. Numerical examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  17. Ethical Reasoning in a Time of Revolution: A Study of Local Officials in Poland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Debra W; Sprinthall, Norman; Siemienska, Renata

    1997-01-01

    Interviews with 485 local officials in Poland showed that both elected and appointed officials strongly preferred principled reasoning for ethical decision making. Gender and attitude toward the change from Communism made a difference in preferred modes of ethical reasoning. (SK)

  18. Local antibiotic delivery systems in diabetic foot osteomyelitis: time for one step beyond?

    PubMed

    Panagopoulos, Periklis; Drosos, Georgios; Maltezos, Efstratios; Papanas, Nikolaos

    2015-03-01

    In patients with diabetes mellitus, osteomyelitis is a severe, difficult-to-treat form of foot infection. In the management of diabetic foot osteomyelitis, carriers for local delivery of antimicrobial agents have begun to be tried, in an attempt to provide high local antibiotic concentrations. Randomized clinical trials are now expected to clarify when this new approach should be used and how it can be integrated into the overall therapeutic strategy for diabetic foot osteomyelitis.

  19. Barriers to completion of desired postpartum sterilization.

    PubMed

    Boardman, Lori A; DeSimone, Michael; Allen, Rebecca H

    2013-02-01

    Tubal sterilization is a highly effective, permanent, and safe method of contraception. Many women who desire postpartum sterilization do not obtain the procedure due to barriers. We performed a retrospective cohort study examining patients from a single obstetrics practice who delivered between 1/1/07 and 6/30/07 at Women and Infants Hospital in Providence, RI. During the study period, 626 women in the practice delivered. Of these subjects, 87 (14%) desired postpartum sterilization. Of these 87, 45 (51.7%) underwent sterilization as planned. In multivariable analysis controlling for age, BMI, delivery mode and marital status, older age (OR 2.15, 95% CI 1.12, 4.12, p=0.02) and cesarean delivery (OR 19.65, 95% CI 3.75, 103.1, p < 0.001) were associated with completion of postpartum sterilization and being married (OR 0.10, 95% CI 0.02, 0.56, p=0.009) and having a higher BMI (OR 0.60, 95% CI 0.39, 0.91, p=0.02) were associated with incompletion. Only half of women who request postpartum sterilization antenatally end up obtaining the procedure.

  20. Fighting desires: Henry Miller's Queer Tropic.

    PubMed

    Hardin, Michael

    2002-01-01

    "Fighting Desires: Henry Miller's Queer Tropic" is an investigation of Tropic of Cancer that investigates the deeply repressed homoerotic desire that periodically surfaces. This reading is dependent upon an interpretation of Eve Sedgwick that proposes male sexuality as a continuum. By looking at the nature of the male-male relationships, as well as the lack of emotion and presence in the male-female relationships, I will show that the most intimate relationships are between men, and that these relationships are expressed through the telling of stories about (heterosexual) sex; this is the function of women within the novel: one has sex with a woman, not for the pleasure that the act brings, but for the pleasure that the recounting of the story to other men brings. Furthermore, I will look at Miller's use of puns within the novel and how they also contribute to a homoerotic reading. None of this is to argue that Miller was not homophobic and sexist--Miller very clearly was--the purpose of this essay is to show the complex nature of sexuality, even within a protagonist who asserts a very defined heterosexuality.

  1. Software for real-time localization of baleen whale calls using directional sonobuoys: A case study on Antarctic blue whales.

    PubMed

    Miller, Brian S; Calderan, Susannah; Gillespie, Douglas; Weatherup, Graham; Leaper, Russell; Collins, Kym; Double, Michael C

    2016-03-01

    Directional frequency analysis and recording (DIFAR) sonobuoys can allow real-time acoustic localization of baleen whales for underwater tracking and remote sensing, but limited availability of hardware and software has prevented wider usage. These software limitations were addressed by developing a module in the open-source software PAMGuard. A case study is presented demonstrating that this software provides greater efficiency and accessibility than previous methods for detecting, localizing, and tracking Antarctic blue whales in real time. Additionally, this software can easily be extended to track other low and mid frequency sounds including those from other cetaceans, pinnipeds, icebergs, shipping, and seismic airguns. PMID:27036292

  2. Software for real-time localization of baleen whale calls using directional sonobuoys: A case study on Antarctic blue whales.

    PubMed

    Miller, Brian S; Calderan, Susannah; Gillespie, Douglas; Weatherup, Graham; Leaper, Russell; Collins, Kym; Double, Michael C

    2016-03-01

    Directional frequency analysis and recording (DIFAR) sonobuoys can allow real-time acoustic localization of baleen whales for underwater tracking and remote sensing, but limited availability of hardware and software has prevented wider usage. These software limitations were addressed by developing a module in the open-source software PAMGuard. A case study is presented demonstrating that this software provides greater efficiency and accessibility than previous methods for detecting, localizing, and tracking Antarctic blue whales in real time. Additionally, this software can easily be extended to track other low and mid frequency sounds including those from other cetaceans, pinnipeds, icebergs, shipping, and seismic airguns.

  3. Neutrophil accumulation in ischemic canine myocardium. Insights into time course, distribution, and mechanism of localization during early reperfusion

    SciTech Connect

    Dreyer, W.J.; Michael, L.H.; West, M.S.; Smith, C.W.; Rothlein, R.; Rossen, R.D.; Anderson, D.C.; Entman, M.L. )

    1991-07-01

    The authors have previously demonstrated that chemotactic factors released from the ischemic canine myocardium peak early during reperfusion and that they elicit neutrophil adherence reactions in vitro that are dependent on the CD18 glycoprotein family. In this study they investigated the hypothesis that neutrophil localization in ischemic canine myocardium in vivo occurs over a similar time course during early reperfusion and involves a CD18-dependent mechanism. they concluded the circumflex coronary artery for 1 hour in acute, open-chest dogs, followed by reperfusion for 1, 2, 3, or 4 hours. Regional myocardial blood flow was determined using radiolabeled microspheres, and localization was traced using technetium-99m-labeled autologous neutrophils. In the first hour of reperfusion, neutrophil localization occurred preferentially within the subendocardial region and was inversely related to flow. Neutrophil localization diminished across the ischemic myocardium from endocardium to epicardium but remained negatively related to flow in the midmyocardial region. Regardless of flow, little neutrophil localization occurred in the subepicardial region. Neutrophil localization was greatest in the first hour of reperfusion and diminished thereafter. By 4 hours of reperfusion, the rate of localization was markedly attenuated relative to 1 hour. Dogs given anti-CD18 monoclonal antibody R15.7 (1 mg/kg i.v.) before occlusion underwent 1 hour of occlusion followed by 1 hour of reperfusion. When compared with 1-hour reperfusion controls, the R15.7-treated dogs demonstrated significant attenuation of neutrophil localization in the subendocardial region. These data support the concepts that rapid neutrophil localization during reperfusion occurs within regions of previous myocardial ischemia and that neutrophils preferentially localize within the subendocardial region.

  4. Global processing takes time: A meta-analysis on local-global visual processing in ASD.

    PubMed

    Van der Hallen, Ruth; Evers, Kris; Brewaeys, Katrien; Van den Noortgate, Wim; Wagemans, Johan

    2015-05-01

    What does an individual with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) perceive first: the forest or the trees? In spite of 30 years of research and influential theories like the weak central coherence (WCC) theory and the enhanced perceptual functioning (EPF) account, the interplay of local and global visual processing in ASD remains only partly understood. Research findings vary in indicating a local processing bias or a global processing deficit, and often contradict each other. We have applied a formal meta-analytic approach and combined 56 articles that tested about 1,000 ASD participants and used a wide range of stimuli and tasks to investigate local and global visual processing in ASD. Overall, results show no enhanced local visual processing nor a deficit in global visual processing. Detailed analysis reveals a difference in the temporal pattern of the local-global balance, that is, slow global processing in individuals with ASD. Whereas task-dependent interaction effects are obtained, gender, age, and IQ of either participant groups seem to have no direct influence on performance. Based on the overview of the literature, suggestions are made for future research.

  5. Laterally localizing potential as a tool for controlling the electron spin relaxation time in GaAs quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Larionov, A. V.; Il’in, A. I.

    2013-12-15

    The coherent spin dynamics of electrons localized in a plane of GaAs quantum wells is studied experimentally by the application of an electrically controlled potential. The localizing potential is produced with the use of a metal gate with submicrometer windows deposited onto the sample surface. The photoinduced spin Kerr effect is used to study the electron spin lifetime as a function of the temperature, applied bias, and magnetic field for gates with different sets of windows. It is shown that, with an electrically controlled laterally localizing potential, it is possible to gradually change the electron spin lifetime from several hundreds of picoseconds to several tens of nanoseconds. The dependence of the electron spin relaxation time on the sizes of the lateral localization region is in good qualitative agreement with theoretical prediction.

  6. Characteristic time-stepping or local preconditioning of the Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Leer, Bram; Lee, Wen-Tzong; Roe, Philip L.

    1991-01-01

    A derivation is presented of a local preconditioning matrix for multidimensional Euler equations, that reduces the spread of the characteristic speeds to the lowest attainable value. Numerical experiments with this preconditioning matrix are applied to an explicit upwind discretization of the two-dimensional Euler equations, showing that this matrix significantly increases the rate of convergence to a steady solution. It is predicted that local preconditioning will also simplify convergence-acceleration boundary procedures such as the Karni (1991) procedure for the far field and the Mazaheri and Roe (1991) procedure for a solid wall.

  7. PID controller design for nonlinear systems represented by discrete-time local model networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hametner, Christoph; Mayr, Christian H.; Kozek, Martin; Jakubek, Stefan

    2013-09-01

    This paper deals with proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller design for nonlinear systems represented by local model networks. The proposed method is based on the concept of parallel distributed compensators where the scheduling of the local model network is adopted for the PID parameters. The proposed design method for nonlinear PID controllers considers closed-loop stability by means of a Lyapunov stability criterion as well as closed-loop performance. All PID parameters are determined by a multi-objective genetic algorithm (multiGA), which handles the trade-off between stability and performance. A simulation example demonstrates the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  8. On the potential strength and consequences for nonrandom gene flow caused by local adaptation in flowering time.

    PubMed

    Weis, A E

    2015-03-01

    Gene flow is generally considered a random process, that is the loci under consideration have no effect on dispersal success. Edelaar and Bolnick (Trends Ecol Evol, 27, 2012 659) recently argued that nonrandom gene flow could exert a significant evolutionary force. It can, for instance, ameliorate the maladaptive effects of immigration into locally adapted populations. I examined the potential strength for nonrandom gene flow for flowering time genes, a trait frequently found to be locally adapted. The idea is that plants that successfully export pollen into a locally adapted resident population will be a genetically biased subset of their natal population - they will have resident-like flowering times. Reciprocally, recipients will be more migrant-like than the resident population average. I quantified the potential for biased pollen exchange among three populations along a flowering time cline in Brassica rapa from southern California. A two-generation line cross experiment demonstrated genetic variance in flowering time, both within and among populations. Calculations based on the variation in individual flowering schedules showed that resident plants with the most migrant-like flowering times could expect to have up to 10 times more of the their flowers pollinated by immigrant pollen than the least migrant-like. Further, the mean flowering time of the pollen exporters that have access to resident mates differs by up to 4 weeks from the mean in the exporters' natal population. The data from these three populations suggest that the bias in gene flow for flowering time cuts the impact on the resident population by as much as half. This implies that when selection is divergent between populations, migrants with the highest mating success tend to be resident-like in their flowering times, and so, fewer maladaptive alleles will be introduced into the locally adapting gene pool.

  9. Flibanserin for Treating Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Sang, Jae Hong; Kim, Tae-Hee

    2016-01-01

    There have been several products developed for male sexual dysfunction. However, developing agents for female sexual dysfunction is lagging behind for various reasons. Sildenafil citrate (Viagra) and Tadalafil (Cialis), which have been prescribed for male sexual function disorders, are known to act on vessels.[1] On the other hand, flibanserin is thought to act on brain. Flibanserin has been approved by U. S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for treatment of hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) of premenopausal women in 2015, and is expected to be released in South Korea soon. Authors wrote this article to acknowledge flibanserin to sexologists for females or physicians for menopausal medicine, so that this agent can be safely used for females who have HSDD. PMID:27152308

  10. Substituting telecommunications for travel - Feasible or desirable

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Vleck, E. M.

    1974-01-01

    This paper reviews recent advances in telecommunications and examines the detailed structure of travel to estimate the feasibility of substituting telecommunications for various travel objectives. The impact of travel is analyzed from a social, economic, energy, and pollution standpoint to assess the desirability of substitution. Perhaps 35-50% of the nation's travel could, in theory, be replaced by very advanced telecommunications (such as a much improved large-screen teleconferencing network), but public resistance would be massive. Much economic dislocation would result since, for example, over 25% of retail sales are travel-related. The energy savings would be modest since only 25% of the nation's energy is consumed by transportation. However, all pollution would be reduced substantially since transportation accounts for 75% of the carbon monoxide, 60% of the hydrocarbon, and 55% of the nitrogen oxide pollution in the nation. Problems related to the implementation of large-scale substitution are discussed.

  11. Flibanserin for Treating Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder.

    PubMed

    Sang, Jae Hong; Kim, Tae-Hee; Kim, Soo Ah

    2016-04-01

    There have been several products developed for male sexual dysfunction. However, developing agents for female sexual dysfunction is lagging behind for various reasons. Sildenafil citrate (Viagra) and Tadalafil (Cialis), which have been prescribed for male sexual function disorders, are known to act on vessels.[1] On the other hand, flibanserin is thought to act on brain. Flibanserin has been approved by U. S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for treatment of hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) of premenopausal women in 2015, and is expected to be released in South Korea soon. Authors wrote this article to acknowledge flibanserin to sexologists for females or physicians for menopausal medicine, so that this agent can be safely used for females who have HSDD. PMID:27152308

  12. SNSMIL, a real-time single molecule identification and localization algorithm for super-resolution fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yunqing; Dai, Luru; Zhang, Xiaoming; Li, Junbai; Hendriks, Johnny; Fan, Xiaoming; Gruteser, Nadine; Meisenberg, Annika; Baumann, Arnd; Katranidis, Alexandros; Gensch, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Single molecule localization based super-resolution fluorescence microscopy offers significantly higher spatial resolution than predicted by Abbe’s resolution limit for far field optical microscopy. Such super-resolution images are reconstructed from wide-field or total internal reflection single molecule fluorescence recordings. Discrimination between emission of single fluorescent molecules and background noise fluctuations remains a great challenge in current data analysis. Here we present a real-time, and robust single molecule identification and localization algorithm, SNSMIL (Shot Noise based Single Molecule Identification and Localization). This algorithm is based on the intrinsic nature of noise, i.e., its Poisson or shot noise characteristics and a new identification criterion, QSNSMIL, is defined. SNSMIL improves the identification accuracy of single fluorescent molecules in experimental or simulated datasets with high and inhomogeneous background. The implementation of SNSMIL relies on a graphics processing unit (GPU), making real-time analysis feasible as shown for real experimental and simulated datasets. PMID:26098742

  13. Local Mesh Refinement in the Space-Time CE/SE Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Sin-Chung; Wu, Yuhui; Wang, Xiao-Yen; Yang, Vigor

    2000-01-01

    A local mesh refinement procedure for the CE/SE method which does not use an iterative procedure in the treatments of grid-to-grid communications is described. It is shown that a refinement ratio higher than ten can be applied successfully across a single coarse grid/fine grid interface.

  14. Real Time Localization of Assets in Hospitals Using Quuppa Indoor Positioning Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Ham, M. F. S.; Zlatanova, S.; Verbree, E.; Voûte, R.

    2016-09-01

    At the most fundamental level, smart buildings deliver useful building services that make occupants productive. Smart asset management in hostipals starts with knowing the whereabouts of medical equipment. This paper investigates the subject of indoor localization of medical equipment in hospitals by defining functional spaces. In order to localize the assets indoors, a localization method is developed that takes into account several factors such as geometrical influences, characteristics of the Quuppa positioning system and obstructions in the indoor environment. For matching the position data to a real world location, several location types are developed by subdividing the floor plan into location clusters. The research has shown that a high-performance level can be achieved for locations that are within the high-resolution range of the receiver. The performance at the smallest subspaces can only be achieved when having a dense distribution of receivers. Test cases that were defined for specific situations in the test-area show successful localization in these subspaces for the majority of the test data.

  15. Adapting to Hard Times: Family Participation Patterns in Local Thrift Economies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Spencer; Brown, Ralph B.; Goodsell, Todd L.; Stovall, Josh; Flaherty, Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    Using survey data from a western U.S. county (N = 595), we examined how lower, middle, and higher income families negotiate a period of economic stress--the closing of a major employer in the community--through their shopping patterns. Specifically, we examined their participation in local thrift economies such as yard sales and secondhand stores.…

  16. Dynamics of Choice: Relative Rate and Amount Affect Local Preference at Three Different Time Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aparicio, Carlos F.; Baum, William M.

    2009-01-01

    To examine extended control over local choice, the present study investigated preference in transition as food-rate ratio provided by two levers changed across seven components within daily sessions, and food-amount ratio changed across phases. Phase 1 arranged a food-amount ratio of 4:1 (i.e., the left lever delivered four pellets and the right…

  17. Needle Trajectory and Tip Localization in Real-Time 3-D Ultrasound Using a Moving Stylus.

    PubMed

    Beigi, Parmida; Rohling, Robert; Salcudean, Tim; Lessoway, Victoria A; Ng, Gary C

    2015-07-01

    Described here is a novel approach to needle localization in 3-D ultrasound based on automatic detection of small changes in appearance on movement of the needle stylus. By stylus oscillation, including its full insertion into the cannula to the tip, the image processing techniques can localize the needle trajectory and the tip in the 3-D ultrasound volume. The 3-D needle localization task is reduced to two 2-D localizations using orthogonal projections. To evaluate our method, we tested it on three different ex vivo tissue types, and the preliminary results indicated that the method accuracy lies within clinical acceptance, with average error ranges of 0.9°-1.4° in needle trajectory and 0.8-1.1 mm in needle tip. Results also indicate that method performance is independent of the echogenicity of the tissue. This technique is a safe way of producing ultrasonic intensity changes and appears to introduce negligible risk to the patient, as the outer cannula remains fixed.

  18. Simulation of near-field plasmonic interactions with a local approximation order discontinuous Galerkin time-domain method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viquerat, Jonathan; Lanteri, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    During the last ten years, the discontinuous Galerkin time-domain (DGTD) method has progressively emerged as a viable alternative to well established finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) and finite-element time-domain (FETD) methods for the numerical simulation of electromagnetic wave propagation problems in the time-domain. The method is now actively studied in various application contexts including those requiring to model light/matter interactions on the nanoscale. Several recent works have demonstrated the viability of the DGDT method for nanophotonics. In this paper we further demonstrate the capabilities of the method for the simulation of near-field plasmonic interactions by considering more particularly the possibility of combining the use of a locally refined conforming tetrahedral mesh with a local adaptation of the approximation order.

  19. Time-dependent fiber bundles with local load sharing. II. General Weibull fibers.

    PubMed

    Phoenix, S Leigh; Newman, William I

    2009-12-01

    Fiber bundle models (FBMs) are useful tools in understanding failure processes in a variety of material systems. While the fibers and load sharing assumptions are easily described, FBM analysis is typically difficult. Monte Carlo methods are also hampered by the severe computational demands of large bundle sizes, which overwhelm just as behavior relevant to real materials starts to emerge. For large size scales, interest continues in idealized FBMs that assume either equal load sharing (ELS) or local load sharing (LLS) among fibers, rules that reflect features of real load redistribution in elastic lattices. The present work focuses on a one-dimensional bundle of N fibers under LLS where life consumption in a fiber follows a power law in its load, with exponent rho , and integrated over time. This life consumption function is further embodied in a functional form resulting in a Weibull distribution for lifetime under constant fiber stress and with Weibull exponent, beta. Thus the failure rate of a fiber depends on its past load history, except for beta=1 . We develop asymptotic results validated by Monte Carlo simulation using a computational algorithm developed in our previous work [Phys. Rev. E 63, 021507 (2001)] that greatly increases the size, N , of treatable bundles (e.g., 10(6) fibers in 10(3) realizations). In particular, our algorithm is O(N ln N) in contrast with former algorithms which were O(N2) making this investigation possible. Regimes are found for (beta,rho) pairs that yield contrasting behavior for large N. For rho>1 and large N, brittle weakest volume behavior emerges in terms of characteristic elements (groupings of fibers) derived from critical cluster formation, and the lifetime eventually goes to zero as N-->infinity , unlike ELS, which yields a finite limiting mean. For 1/2

  20. Time-dependent fiber bundles with local load sharing. II. General Weibull fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phoenix, S. Leigh; Newman, William I.

    2009-12-01

    Fiber bundle models (FBMs) are useful tools in understanding failure processes in a variety of material systems. While the fibers and load sharing assumptions are easily described, FBM analysis is typically difficult. Monte Carlo methods are also hampered by the severe computational demands of large bundle sizes, which overwhelm just as behavior relevant to real materials starts to emerge. For large size scales, interest continues in idealized FBMs that assume either equal load sharing (ELS) or local load sharing (LLS) among fibers, rules that reflect features of real load redistribution in elastic lattices. The present work focuses on a one-dimensional bundle of N fibers under LLS where life consumption in a fiber follows a power law in its load, with exponent ρ , and integrated over time. This life consumption function is further embodied in a functional form resulting in a Weibull distribution for lifetime under constant fiber stress and with Weibull exponent, β . Thus the failure rate of a fiber depends on its past load history, except for β=1 . We develop asymptotic results validated by Monte Carlo simulation using a computational algorithm developed in our previous work [Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81063-651X 63, 021507 (2001)] that greatly increases the size, N , of treatable bundles (e.g., 106 fibers in 103 realizations). In particular, our algorithm is O(NlnN) in contrast with former algorithms which were O(N2) making this investigation possible. Regimes are found for (β,ρ) pairs that yield contrasting behavior for large N . For ρ>1 and large N , brittle weakest volume behavior emerges in terms of characteristic elements (groupings of fibers) derived from critical cluster formation, and the lifetime eventually goes to zero as N→∞ , unlike ELS, which yields a finite limiting mean. For 1/2≤ρ≤1 , however, LLS has remarkably similar behavior to ELS (appearing to be virtually identical for ρ=1 ) with an asymptotic Gaussian lifetime distribution and a

  1. Anticipating by Pigeons Depends on Local Statistical Information in a Serial Response Time Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Froehlich, Alyson L.; Herbranson, Walter T.; Loper, Julia D.; Wood, David M.; Shimp, Charles P.

    2004-01-01

    Pigeons responded in a serial response time task patterned after that of M. J. Nissen and P. Bullemer (1987) with humans. Experiment 1 produced global facilitation: Response times in repeating lists of locations were faster than when locations were random. Response time to a spatial location was also a function of both that location's 1st- and…

  2. Analysis of memory use for improved design and compile-time allocation of local memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcniven, Geoffrey D.; Davidson, Edward S.

    1986-01-01

    Trace analysis techniques are used to study memory referencing behavior for the purpose of designing local memories and determining how to allocate them for data and instructions. In an attempt to assess the inherent behavior of the source code, the trace analysis system described here reduced the effects of the compiler and host architecture on the trace by using a technical called flattening. The variables in the trace, their associated single-assignment values, and references are histogrammed on the basis of various parameters describing memory referencing behavior. Bounds are developed specifying the amount of memory space required to store all live values in a particular histogram class. The reduction achieved in main memory traffic by allocating local memory is specified for each class.

  3. Phytoliths infer locally dense and heterogeneous paleovegetation at FLK North and surrounding localities during upper Bed I time, Olduvai Gorge, Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barboni, Doris; Ashley, Gail M.; Dominguez-Rodrigo, Manuel; Bunn, Henry T.; Mabulla, Audax Z. P.; Baquedano, Enrique

    2010-11-01

    The phytolith content of 10 samples collected immediately under Tuff IF (~ 1.785 Ma) at FLK N and other surrounding localities (~ 2 km²) provides a direct botanical evidence for woody vegetation in the eastern margin of Olduvai Gorge during uppermost Bed I time. Observation and counting of 143 phytolith types (5 to >150 μ) reveal dense but heterogeneous woody cover (~ 40-90%) of unidentified trees and/or shrubs and palms associated to the freshwater springs surrounding FLK N, and more open formation (presumably ~ 25-70% woody cover) in the southeast at localities VEK, HWK W and HWK E. The paleovegetation is best described as groundwater palm forest/woodland or bushland, which current analogue may be found near Lake Manyara in similar hydrogeological context (freshwater springs near saline/alkaline lake). Re-evaluating the published pollen data based on this analogy shows that 70% of the pollen signal at FLK N may be attributed to thicket-woodland, Acacia groundwater woodland, gallery and groundwater forests; while < 30% is attributed to swamp herbage and grasslands. Micro-botanical, isotopic, and taphonomical studies of faunal remains converge on the same conclusion that the area surrounding FLK N, which attracted both carnivores and hominins in the early Pleistocene, was densely wooded during uppermost Bed I time.

  4. Decision regret following treatment for localized breast cancer: is regret stable over time?

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Kathryn A.; Li, Yun; Resnicow, Ken; Graff, John J.; Hamilton, Ann S.; Hawley, Sarah T

    2015-01-01

    Background While studies suggest most women have little regret regarding their breast cancer treatment decisions immediately following treatment, to date no studies have evaluated how regret may change over time. Objective To measure the stability of post-treatment decision regret over time among women with breast cancer. Methods Women diagnosed with breast cancer between August 2005 and May 2007 reported to the Detroit, Michigan or Los Angeles County Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) registry completed surveys at 9 months following diagnosis (Time 1) and again approximately 4 years later (Time 2). A decision regret scale consisting of 5 items was summed to create two decision regret scores at both Time 1 and Time 2 (range: 0 to 20). Multivariable linear regression was used to examine change in regret from 9 months to 4 years. Independent variables included surgery type, receipt of reconstruction, and recurrence status at follow-up. The model controlled for demographic and clinical factors. Results The analytic sample included 1,536 women. Mean regret in the overall sample was 4.9 at Time 1 and 5.4 at Time 2 (p<0.001). In the multivariable linear model, we found no difference in change in decision regret over time by surgery type. Reporting a new diagnosis of breast cancer at Time 2 was associated with 2.6 point increase in regret over time, compared to women without an additional diagnosis (p=0.003). Receipt of reconstruction was not associated with change in decision regret over time. Conclusions Decision regret following treatment was low and relatively stable over time for most women. Those facing an additional diagnosis of breast cancer following treatment may be at risk for elevated regret-related distress. PMID:25532824

  5. Real-time renewal of the digital map for local government by using remote sensing and RTK-GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuno, Aki; Shikada, Masaaki

    2004-12-01

    Much local government has been using a large scale digital map with Geographic Information System (GIS). However, the updating method of a map is not established yet. The purpose of this study is the real-time renewal of the digital map for local government by using Remote Sensing and RTK-GPS. This concept was defined as REAL TIME GIS. This system has the problem that RTK-GPS measuring data is Japanese Geodetic Datum 2000 (JGD2000) of WGS-84, but most of the digital maps of local government are still Tokyo Datum of old geodetic system. It is necessary to transform an old geodetic system to a new one. In this study, the coordinate transformation methods were compared Affine Transformation with TKY2JGD. Moreover, the number and arrangement of control points were changed, coordinates were converted by Affine Transformation. In this paper, the parameters which were calculated by Affine Transformation were called "High-Accuracy Regional Parameter (HARP)". As a result, TKY2JGD has a maximum 15cm error. Affine Transformation has 2cm errors using 4 control points at the corner of unit. It is suggested that the process of REAL TIME GIS and HARP should be introduced to the work of local government.

  6. Robust and low complexity localization algorithm based on head-related impulse responses and interaural time difference.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xinwang; Liang, Juan

    2013-01-01

    This article introduces a biologically inspired localization algorithm using two microphones, for a mobile robot. The proposed algorithm has two steps. First, the coarse azimuth angle of the sound source is estimated by cross-correlation algorithm based on interaural time difference. Then, the accurate azimuth angle is obtained by cross-channel algorithm based on head-related impulse responses. The proposed algorithm has lower computational complexity compared to the cross-channel algorithm. Experimental results illustrate that the localization performance of the proposed algorithm is better than those of the cross-correlation and cross-channel algorithms. PMID:23298016

  7. The Desire for Structure: A Deconstructive Analysis of "Desire under the Elms."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Joel K.; Bowman, Michael S.

    A brief reading of "Desire under the Elms" by Eugene O'Neill illustrates how a conventional Oedipal reading of the playscript opens up spaces within the text for deconstructive free-play. In this case, a tension is identified and foregrounded between this conventional application of the Oedipal complex and Freud's interpretation of the Oedipal…

  8. Effects of Sexual Experience on Dating Desirability and Marriage Desirability: An Experimental Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Istvan, Joseph; Griffitt, William

    1980-01-01

    Inexperienced men and both inexperienced and moderately experienced women rated highly experienced opposite-sex peers as less desirable dates and marriage partners. Moderately and highly experienced men and highly experienced women tended to rate all opposite-sex peers similarly along these same dimensions. (Author)

  9. [Local fractal analysis of noise-like time series by all permutations method for 1-115 min periods].

    PubMed

    Panchelyuga, V A; Panchelyuga, M S

    2015-01-01

    Results of local fractal analysis of 329-per-day time series of 239Pu alpha-decay rate fluctuations by means of all permutations method (APM) are presented. The APM-analysis reveals in the time series some steady frequency set. The coincidence of the frequency set with the Earth natural oscillations was demonstrated. A short review of works by different authors who analyzed the time series of fluctuations in processes of different nature is given. We have shown that the periods observed in those works correspond to the periods revealed in our study. It points to a common mechanism of the phenomenon observed. PMID:26016038

  10. Time-dependent local and average structural evolution of δ-phase 239Pu-Ga alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Smith, Alice I.; Page, Katharine L.; Siewenie, Joan E.; Losko, Adrian S.; Vogel, Sven C.; Gourdon, Olivier A.; Richmond, Scott; Saleh, Tarik A.; Ramos, Michael; Schwartz, Daniel S.

    2016-08-05

    Here, plutonium metal is a very unusual element, exhibiting six allotropes at ambient pressure, between room temperature and its melting point, a complicated phase diagram, and a complex electronic structure. Many phases of plutonium metal are unstable with changes in temperature, pressure, chemical additions, or time. This strongly affects structure and properties, and becomes of high importance, particularly when considering effects on structural integrity over long periods of time [1]. This paper presents a time-dependent neutron total scattering study of the local and average structure of naturally aging δ-phase239Pu-Ga alloys, together with preliminary results on neutron tomography characterization.

  11. [Local fractal analysis of noise-like time series by all permutations method for 1-115 min periods].

    PubMed

    Panchelyuga, V A; Panchelyuga, M S

    2015-01-01

    Results of local fractal analysis of 329-per-day time series of 239Pu alpha-decay rate fluctuations by means of all permutations method (APM) are presented. The APM-analysis reveals in the time series some steady frequency set. The coincidence of the frequency set with the Earth natural oscillations was demonstrated. A short review of works by different authors who analyzed the time series of fluctuations in processes of different nature is given. We have shown that the periods observed in those works correspond to the periods revealed in our study. It points to a common mechanism of the phenomenon observed.

  12. Nameless desire: alexithymia and the anorexic patient.

    PubMed

    Petterson, Regina

    2004-03-01

    In this article, the author attempts to provide a psychoanalytic understanding of the anorexic patient who is disconnected from her affective experience and is considered to be alexithymic. Through her restrictive food ritual, this type of patient may organize her internal states by repeatedly creating an illusion of what it is that she needs and desires. The author asserts that the task of the therapist working with the anorexic patient with alexithymia is to be aware of his own sensation-based reverie as lived within the intersubjective arena. This will enable the therapist to assist the patient in building an affective vocabulary to accurately identify, differentiate, and label the internal signals of her body. It is suggested that the subjective emotional experience of the patient will continue to be reorganized, expanded, and enriched as the therapist and patient mutually influence one another in this unique relational matrix. A clinical vignette is provided to illustrate intersubjective treatment interventions with a difficult-to-reach anorexic patient.

  13. Grating image with desired shaped dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honma, Hideaki; Toda, Toshiki; Takahashi, Susumu; Sawamura, Chikara; Iwata, Fujio

    2000-03-01

    A new type of Grating Image we dominate as `Sparklegram' is presented. The Sparklegram is characterized because it provides high quality and better design flexibility. These features are achieved by constructing it with shaped dots as desired. Each dot can be designed as an individual shape, for example, a star or a triangle. As dot shapes, we can use not only geometric patterns, but also some kind of symbols. Not only flexibility of each consists dot shape, but also the quality of reconstructed image is remarkably increased too. Because of these features, the constructed image with the new type of Grating Image, Sparklegram has high quality and high flexibility. It can be applied to security use, for example on credit-cards, tickets, etc., and also can be applied to the package of software products, CDs, videos and other kind of items requiring security. And with these features of flexibility and high quality, Sparklegram has also advantages to be applied to other use, for example amusement use, comics and game characters' goods and packages.

  14. Three-Dimensional, Finite-Difference, Time-Domain Modeling of Local Volcano Infrasound Radiation Using GPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K.; Lees, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    Since volcano infrasound is a direct measure of atmospheric pressure fluctuation near open-vent activity, it can provide important constraints on eruption source parameters including the volume of gas released and eruption velocity. Local infrasound data (<15 Km) have been used to quantify and characterize acoustic sources of volcanic eruptions since they are relatively less affected by atmospheric velocity structures in the near field. The interaction of volcano infrasound sources and complex topography near the volcanic edifice, however, has not been fully explored. Infrasound observations from world-wide volcanoes and two-dimensional numerical modeling of infrasound radiation in the vicinity of the crater suggest a strong distortion of the wavefield by local topography [Kim and Lees, GRL, 2011]. To get a complete picture of these effects, however, full three-dimensional modeling is required. We have developed a new, accelerated, 3D finite-difference time-domain program using GPU (Grpahic Processing Units) to simulate local infrasound propagation near volcanoes, while taking into account complex topography, local wind distortion, and atmospheric sound velocity structures. While CPU-based 3D FDTD method requires a prohibitive amount of computational resources, GPU-based algorithms significantly reduce the computational time of infrasound modeling, making parallel processing practical even on a desktop computer. In these simulations we provide a comprehensive solution of volcano infrasound radiation assuming different acoustic sources and real volcano topography. We illustrate the interaction of local vent topography and difference acoustic sources and how they combine to affect the infrasound wavefield. By removing topographic effects from local infrasound observation we can begin to quantitatively model acoustic sources and finally establish the partitioning of energy, at the vent, between the acoustic and seismic wavefields.

  15. Damage localization of marine risers using time series of vibration signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hao; Yang, Hezhen; Liu, Fushun

    2014-10-01

    Based on dynamic response signals a damage detection algorithm is developed for marine risers. Damage detection methods based on numerous modal properties have encountered issues in the researches in offshore oil community. For example, significant increase in structure mass due to marine plant/animal growth and changes in modal properties by equipment noise are not the result of damage for riser structures. In an attempt to eliminate the need to determine modal parameters, a data-based method is developed. The implementation of the method requires that vibration data are first standardized to remove the influence of different loading conditions and the autoregressive moving average (ARMA) model is used to fit vibration response signals. In addition, a damage feature factor is introduced based on the autoregressive (AR) parameters. After that, the Euclidean distance between ARMA models is subtracted as a damage indicator for damage detection and localization and a top tensioned riser simulation model with different damage scenarios is analyzed using the proposed method with dynamic acceleration responses of a marine riser as sensor data. Finally, the influence of measured noise is analyzed. According to the damage localization results, the proposed method provides accurate damage locations of risers and is robust to overcome noise effect.

  16. Demonstration of delivery of orthoimagery in real time for local emergency response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeown, Donald; Faulring, Jason; Krzaczek, Robert; Cavilia, Stephen; van Aardt, Jan

    2011-06-01

    The Information Products Laboratory for Emergency Response (IPLER) is a new initiative led by the Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT) to develop and put into use new information products and tools derived from remote sensing data. This effort involves technical development and outreach to the user community having the two-fold objective of providing new information tools to enhance public safety and fostering economic development. Specifically, this paper addresses the demonstration of the collection and delivery of geo-referenced overhead imagery to local (county level) emergency managers in near realtime. The demonstration proved valuable to county personnel in showing what is possible and valuable to the researchers in highlighting the very real constraints of operatives in local government. The demonstration consisted of four major elements; 1) a multiband imaging system incorporating 4 cameras operating simultaneously in the visible (color), shortwave infrared, midwave infrared and long wave infrared, 2) an on-board inertial navigation and data processing system that renders the imagery into geo-referenced coordinates, 3) a microwave digital downlink, and 4) a data dissemination service via FTP and WMS-based browser. In this particular exercise, we successfully collected and downloaded over 700 images and delivered them to county servers located in their Emergency Operations Center as well as to a remote GIS van.

  17. Developmental time rather than local environment regulates the schedule of epithelial polarization in the zebrafish neural rod

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Morphogenesis requires developmental processes to occur both at the right time and in the right place. During neural tube formation in the zebrafish embryo, the generation of the apical specializations of the lumen must occur in the center of the neural rod after the neural cells have undergone convergence, invagination and interdigitation across the midline. How this coordination is achieved is uncertain. One possibility is that environmental signaling at the midline of the neural rod controls the schedule of apical polarization. Alternatively, polarization could be regulated by a timing mechanism and then independent morphogenetic processes ensure the cells are in the correct spatial location. Results Ectopic transplantation demonstrates the local environment of the neural midline is not required for neural cell polarization. Neural cells can self-organize into epithelial cysts in ectopic locations in the embryo and also in three-dimensional gel cultures. Heterochronic transplants demonstrate that the schedule of polarization and the specialized cell divisions characteristic of the neural rod are more strongly regulated by time than local environmental signals. The cells’ schedule for polarization is set prior to gastrulation, is stable through several rounds of cell division and appears independent of the morphogenetic movements of gastrulation and neurulation. Conclusions Time rather than local environment regulates the schedule of epithelial polarization in zebrafish neural rod. PMID:23521850

  18. Adjustment of interaural time difference in head related transfer functions based on listeners' anthropometry and its effect on sound localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yôiti; Watanabe, Kanji; Iwaya, Yukio; Gyoba, Jiro; Takane, Shouichi

    2005-04-01

    Because the transfer functions governing subjective sound localization (HRTFs) show strong individuality, sound localization systems based on synthesis of HRTFs require suitable HRTFs for individual listeners. However, it is impractical to obtain HRTFs for all listeners based on measurements. Improving sound localization by adjusting non-individualized HRTFs to a specific listener based on that listener's anthropometry might be a practical method. This study first developed a new method to estimate interaural time differences (ITDs) using HRTFs. Then correlations between ITDs and anthropometric parameters were analyzed using the canonical correlation method. Results indicated that parameters relating to head size, and shoulder and ear positions are significant. Consequently, it was attempted to express ITDs based on listener's anthropometric data. In this process, the change of ITDs as a function of azimuth angle was parameterized as a sum of sine functions. Then the parameters were analyzed using multiple regression analysis, in which the anthropometric parameters were used as explanatory variables. The predicted or individualized ITDs were installed in the nonindividualized HRTFs to evaluate sound localization performance. Results showed that individualization of ITDs improved horizontal sound localization.

  19. Local and global synchronization transitions induced by time delays in small-world neuronal networks with chemical synapses.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haitao; Wang, Jiang; Du, Jiwei; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xile

    2015-02-01

    Effects of time delay on the local and global synchronization in small-world neuronal networks with chemical synapses are investigated in this paper. Numerical results show that, for both excitatory and inhibitory coupling types, the information transmission delay can always induce synchronization transitions of spiking neurons in small-world networks. In particular, regions of in-phase and out-of-phase synchronization of connected neurons emerge intermittently as the synaptic delay increases. For excitatory coupling, all transitions to spiking synchronization occur approximately at integer multiples of the firing period of individual neurons; while for inhibitory coupling, these transitions appear at the odd multiples of the half of the firing period of neurons. More importantly, the local synchronization transition is more profound than the global synchronization transition, depending on the type of coupling synapse. For excitatory synapses, the local in-phase synchronization observed for some values of the delay also occur at a global scale; while for inhibitory ones, this synchronization, observed at the local scale, disappears at a global scale. Furthermore, the small-world structure can also affect the phase synchronization of neuronal networks. It is demonstrated that increasing the rewiring probability can always improve the global synchronization of neuronal activity, but has little effect on the local synchronization of neighboring neurons.

  20. Sound localization in common vampire bats: acuity and use of the binaural time cue by a small mammal.

    PubMed

    Heffner, Rickye S; Koay, Gimseong; Heffner, Henry E

    2015-01-01

    Passive sound-localization acuity and the ability to use binaural time and intensity cues were determined for the common vampire bat (Desmodus rotundus). The bats were tested using a conditioned suppression/avoidance procedure in which they drank defibrinated blood from a spout in the presence of sounds from their right, but stopped drinking (i.e., broke contact with the spout) whenever a sound came from their left, thereby avoiding a mild shock. The mean minimum audible angle for three bats for a 100-ms noise burst was 13.1°-within the range of thresholds for other bats and near the mean for mammals. Common vampire bats readily localized pure tones of 20 kHz and higher, indicating they could use interaural intensity-differences. They could also localize pure tones of 5 kHz and lower, thereby demonstrating the use of interaural time-differences, despite their very small maximum interaural distance of 60 μs. A comparison of the use of locus cues among mammals suggests several implications for the evolution of sound localization and its underlying anatomical and physiological mechanisms.

  1. Sound localization in common vampire bats: acuity and use of the binaural time cue by a small mammal.

    PubMed

    Heffner, Rickye S; Koay, Gimseong; Heffner, Henry E

    2015-01-01

    Passive sound-localization acuity and the ability to use binaural time and intensity cues were determined for the common vampire bat (Desmodus rotundus). The bats were tested using a conditioned suppression/avoidance procedure in which they drank defibrinated blood from a spout in the presence of sounds from their right, but stopped drinking (i.e., broke contact with the spout) whenever a sound came from their left, thereby avoiding a mild shock. The mean minimum audible angle for three bats for a 100-ms noise burst was 13.1°-within the range of thresholds for other bats and near the mean for mammals. Common vampire bats readily localized pure tones of 20 kHz and higher, indicating they could use interaural intensity-differences. They could also localize pure tones of 5 kHz and lower, thereby demonstrating the use of interaural time-differences, despite their very small maximum interaural distance of 60 μs. A comparison of the use of locus cues among mammals suggests several implications for the evolution of sound localization and its underlying anatomical and physiological mechanisms. PMID:25618037

  2. Sound localization in common vampire bats: Acuity and use of the binaural time cue by a small mammal

    PubMed Central

    Heffner, Rickye S.; Koay, Gimseong; Heffner, Henry E.

    2015-01-01

    Passive sound-localization acuity and the ability to use binaural time and intensity cues were determined for the common vampire bat (Desmodus rotundus). The bats were tested using a conditioned suppression/avoidance procedure in which they drank defibrinated blood from a spout in the presence of sounds from their right, but stopped drinking (i.e., broke contact with the spout) whenever a sound came from their left, thereby avoiding a mild shock. The mean minimum audible angle for three bats for a 100-ms noise burst was 13.1°—within the range of thresholds for other bats and near the mean for mammals. Common vampire bats readily localized pure tones of 20 kHz and higher, indicating they could use interaural intensity-differences. They could also localize pure tones of 5 kHz and lower, thereby demonstrating the use of interaural time-differences, despite their very small maximum interaural distance of 60 μs. A comparison of the use of locus cues among mammals suggests several implications for the evolution of sound localization and its underlying anatomical and physiological mechanisms. PMID:25618037

  3. Adapting to Hard Times: Family Participation Patterns in Local Thrift Economies

    PubMed Central

    James, Spencer; Brown, Ralph B.; Goodsell, Todd L.; Stovall, Josh; Flaherty, Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    Using survey data from a western U.S. county (N = 595), we examined how lower, middle, and higher income families negotiate a period of economic stress—the closing of a major employer in the community—through their shopping patterns. Specifically, we examined their participation in local thrift economies such as yard sales and secondhand stores. We found that lower and middle income households shop more frequently at these venues. They also tend to shop more for furniture and clothing, whereas higher income households tend to shop for antiques and trinkets. These relationships varied across the type of thrift economy examined. Overall, findings support the argument that engagement in thrift economies may constitute one mechanism families use during periods of economic stress. PMID:21197154

  4. Modeling and Observational Framework for Diagnosing Local Land-Atmosphere Coupling on Diurnal Time Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santanello, Joseph A., Jr.; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.; Kumar, Sujay V.; Alonge, Charles; Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2009-01-01

    Land-atmosphere interactions play a critical role in determining the diurnal evolution of both planetary boundary layer (PBL) and land surface temperature and moisture states. The degree of coupling between the land surface and PBL in numerical weather prediction and climate models remains largely unexplored and undiagnosed due to the complex interactions and feedbacks present across a range of scales. Further, uncoupled systems or experiments (e.g., the Project for Intercomparison of Land Parameterization Schemes, PILPS) may lead to inaccurate water and energy cycle process understanding by neglecting feedback processes such as PBL-top entrainment. In this study, a framework for diagnosing local land-atmosphere coupling is presented using a coupled mesoscale model with a suite of PBL and land surface model (LSM) options along with observations during field experiments in the U. S. Southern Great Plains. Specifically, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model has been coupled to the Land Information System (LIS), which provides a flexible and high-resolution representation and initialization of land surface physics and states. Within this framework, the coupling established by each pairing of the available PBL schemes in WRF with the LSMs in LIS is evaluated in terms of the diurnal temperature and humidity evolution in the mixed layer. The co-evolution of these variables and the convective PBL is sensitive to and, in fact, integrative of the dominant processes that govern the PBL budget, which are synthesized through the use of mixing diagrams. Results show how the sensitivity of land-atmosphere interactions to the specific choice of PBL scheme and LSM varies across surface moisture regimes and can be quantified and evaluated against observations. As such, this methodology provides a potential pathway to study factors controlling local land-atmosphere coupling (LoCo) using the LIS-WRF system, which will serve as a testbed for future experiments to evaluate

  5. An implicit difference scheme for the long-time evolution of localized solutions of a generalized Boussinesq system

    SciTech Connect

    Christov, C.I.; Maugin, G.A.

    1995-01-01

    We consider the nonlinear system of equations built up from a generalized Boussinesq equation coupled with a wave equation which is a model for the one-dimensional dynamics of phases in martensitic alloys. The strongly implicit scheme employing Newton`s quasilinearisation allows us to track the long time evolution of the localized solutions of the system. Two distinct classes of solutions are encountered for the pure Boussinesq equation. The first class consists of oscillatory pulses whose envelopes are localized waves. The second class consists of smoother solutions whose shapes are either heteroclinic (kinks) or homoclinic (bumps). The homoclinics decrease in amplitude with time while their support increases. An appropriate self-similar scaling is found analytically and confirmed by the direct numerical simulations to high accuracy. The rich phenomenology resulting from the coupling with the wave equation is also investigated. 11 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Space-time models based on random fields with local interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hristopulos, Dionissios T.; Tsantili, Ivi C.

    2016-08-01

    The analysis of space-time data from complex, real-life phenomena requires the use of flexible and physically motivated covariance functions. In most cases, it is not possible to explicitly solve the equations of motion for the fields or the respective covariance functions. In the statistical literature, covariance functions are often based on mathematical constructions. In this paper, we propose deriving space-time covariance functions by solving “effective equations of motion”, which can be used as statistical representations of systems with diffusive behavior. In particular, we propose to formulate space-time covariance functions based on an equilibrium effective Hamiltonian using the linear response theory. The effective space-time dynamics is then generated by a stochastic perturbation around the equilibrium point of the classical field Hamiltonian leading to an associated Langevin equation. We employ a Hamiltonian which extends the classical Gaussian field theory by including a curvature term and leads to a diffusive Langevin equation. Finally, we derive new forms of space-time covariance functions.

  7. The local autocorrelation time near the surface of a system with uniaxial anisotropy in a transverse field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korneta, W.; Pytel, Z.

    1988-07-01

    A three-dimensional semi-infinite system with strong uniaxial anisotropy ina transverse field is considered. The behaviour of the local autocorrelation time for the component of the order parameter in the direction parallel to the easy axis near the second-order phase transition for this component induced by the transverse field is given. The effect of the surface on this behaviour is discussed. The Landau approximation is used.

  8. Local constraints on cosmic string loops from photometry and pulsar timing

    SciTech Connect

    Pshirkov, M. S.; Tuntsov, A. V.

    2010-04-15

    We constrain the cosmological density of cosmic string loops using two observational signatures--gravitational microlensing and the Kaiser-Stebbins effect. Photometry from RXTE and CoRoT space missions and pulsar timing from Parkes Pulsar Timing Array, Arecibo and Green Bank radio telescopes allow us to probe cosmic strings in a wide range of tensions G{mu}/c{sup 2}=10{sup -16} divide 10{sup -10}. We find that pulsar timing data provide the most stringent constraints on the abundance of light strings at the level {Omega}{sub s{approx}}10{sup -3}. Future observational facilities such as the Square Kilometer Array will allow one to improve these constraints by orders of magnitude.

  9. A Bayesian approach to real-time 3D tumor localization via monoscopic x-ray imaging during treatment delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ruijiang; Fahimian, Benjamin P.; Xing, Lei

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Monoscopic x-ray imaging with on-board kV devices is an attractive approach for real-time image guidance in modern radiation therapy such as VMAT or IMRT, but it falls short in providing reliable information along the direction of imaging x-ray. By effectively taking consideration of projection data at prior times and/or angles through a Bayesian formalism, the authors develop an algorithm for real-time and full 3D tumor localization with a single x-ray imager during treatment delivery. Methods: First, a prior probability density function is constructed using the 2D tumor locations on the projection images acquired during patient setup. Whenever an x-ray image is acquired during the treatment delivery, the corresponding 2D tumor location on the imager is used to update the likelihood function. The unresolved third dimension is obtained by maximizing the posterior probability distribution. The algorithm can also be used in a retrospective fashion when all the projection images during the treatment delivery are used for 3D localization purposes. The algorithm does not involve complex optimization of any model parameter and therefore can be used in a ''plug-and-play'' fashion. The authors validated the algorithm using (1) simulated 3D linear and elliptic motion and (2) 3D tumor motion trajectories of a lung and a pancreas patient reproduced by a physical phantom. Continuous kV images were acquired over a full gantry rotation with the Varian TrueBeam on-board imaging system. Three scenarios were considered: fluoroscopic setup, cone beam CT setup, and retrospective analysis. Results: For the simulation study, the RMS 3D localization error is 1.2 and 2.4 mm for the linear and elliptic motions, respectively. For the phantom experiments, the 3D localization error is < 1 mm on average and < 1.5 mm at 95th percentile in the lung and pancreas cases for all three scenarios. The difference in 3D localization error for different scenarios is small and is not

  10. Statins research unfinished saga: desirability versus feasibility.

    PubMed

    Fisman, Enrique Z; Adler, Yehuda; Tenenbaum, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    Drugs in the same class are generally thought to be therapeutically equivalent because of similar mechanisms of action (the so-called "class effect"). However, statins differ in multiple characteristics, including liver and renal metabolism, half-life, effects on several serum lipid components, bioavailability and potency. Some are fungal derivatives, and others are synthetic compounds. The percentage absorption of an oral dose, amount of protein binding, degree of renal excretion, hydrophilicity, and potency on a weight basis is variable. These differences may be even greater in diabetic patients, who may present diabetes-induced abnormalities in P450 isoforms and altered hepatic metabolic pathways. Thus, it is obvious that head-to-head comparisons between different statins are preferable than trial-to-trial comparisons. Such assessments are of utmost importance, especially in cases in which specific populations with a distinct lipid profile and altered metabolic pathways, like diabetics, are studied. It should be specially pinpointed that patients with metabolic syndrome and diabetes constitute also a special population regarding their atherogenic dyslipidemia, which is usually associated with low HDL-cholesterol, hypertriglyceridemia and predominance of small dense LDL-cholesterol. Therefore, these patients may benefit from fibrates or combined statin/fibrate treatment. This policy is not accomplished since in the real world things are more complex. Trials would require very large sample sizes and long-term follow-up to detect significant differences in myocardial infarction or death between two different statins. Moreover, the fact that new compounds are under several phases of research and development represents an additional drawback for performing the trials. Ideally, head-to-head trials regarding clinically important outcomes should be conducted for all drugs. Nonetheless, the desirability of performing such trials, which epitomize modern evidence

  11. Wavelets, period-doubling, and time-frequency localization with application to organization of convection over the tropical western Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weng, Hengyi; Lau, K.-M.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, preliminary results in using orthogonal and continuous wavelet transform (WT) to identify period doubling and time-frequency localization in both synthetic and real data are presented. First, the Haar WT is applied to synthetic time series derived from a simple nonlinear dynamical system- a first-order quadratic difference equation. Second, the complex Morlet WT is used to study the time-frequency localization of tropical convection based on a high-resolution Japanese Geostationary Meteorological Satellite infrared (IR) radiance dataset. The Haar WT of the synthetic time series indicates the presence and distinct separation of multiple frequencies in a period-doubling sequence. The period-doubling process generates a multiplicity of intermediate frequencies, which are manifested in the nonuniformity in time with respect to the phase of oscillations in the lower frequencies. Wavelet transform also enables the detection of extremely weak signals in high-order subharmonics resulting from the period-doubling bifurcations. These signals are either undetected or considered statistically insignificant by traditional Fourier analysis. The Morlet WT of the IR radiance dataset indicates the presence of multiple timescales, which are localized in both frequency and time. There are two regimes in the variation of IR radiance, corresponding to the wet and dry periods. Multiple timescales, ranging from semidiurnal, diurnal, synoptic, to intraseasonal with embedding structures, are active in the wet regime. In particular, synoptic variability is more prominent during the wet phase of an intensive intraseasonal cycle. These are not only consistent with, but also show more details than, previous findings by using other techniques. The phase-locking relationships among the oscillations with different time-scales suggest that both synoptic and intraseasonal variations may be mixed oscillations due to the interaction of self-excited oscillations in the tropical

  12. Auditory Attention to Frequency and Time: An Analogy to Visual Local-Global Stimuli

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Justus, Timothy; List, Alexandra

    2005-01-01

    Two priming experiments demonstrated exogenous attentional persistence to the fundamental auditory dimensions of frequency (Experiment 1) and time (Experiment 2). In a divided-attention task, participants responded to an independent dimension, the identification of three-tone sequence patterns, for both prime and probe stimuli. The stimuli were…

  13. Localized Nonlinear Waves in Systems with Time- and Space-Modulated Nonlinearities

    SciTech Connect

    Belmonte-Beitia, Juan; Perez-Garcia, Victor M.; Vekslerchik, Vadym; Konotop, Vladimir V.

    2008-04-25

    Using similarity transformations we construct explicit nontrivial solutions of nonlinear Schroedinger equations with potentials and nonlinearities depending both on time and on the spatial coordinates. We present the general theory and use it to calculate explicitly nontrivial solutions such as periodic (breathers), resonant, or quasiperiodically oscillating solitons. Some implications to the field of matter waves are also discussed.

  14. On the Cusp between Global and Local: Young Journalists at "The Straights Times," Singapore.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Josephi, Beate

    2002-01-01

    Portrays the induction process of young journalists into the newsroom at the Singaporean English daily, "The Straights Times." Contends that professional journalism education is greatly influenced by the newsroom socialization process. Explains that front-end controls make the young reporters work in close cooperation with their assigned…

  15. A Conditional Joint Modeling Approach for Locally Dependent Item Responses and Response Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meng, Xiang-Bin; Tao, Jian; Chang, Hua-Hua

    2015-01-01

    The assumption of conditional independence between the responses and the response times (RTs) for a given person is common in RT modeling. However, when the speed of a test taker is not constant, this assumption will be violated. In this article we propose a conditional joint model for item responses and RTs, which incorporates a covariance…

  16. Brain signatures of perceiving a smile: Time course and source localization.

    PubMed

    Beltrán, David; Calvo, Manuel G

    2015-11-01

    Facial happiness is consistently recognized faster than other expressions of emotion. In this study, to determine when and where in the brain such a recognition advantage develops, EEG activity during an expression categorization task was subjected to temporospatial PCA analysis and LAURA source localizations. Happy, angry, and neutral faces were presented either in whole or bottom-half format (with the mouth region visible). The comparison of part- versus whole-face conditions served to examine the role of the smile. Two neural signatures underlying the happy face advantage emerged. One peaked around 140 ms (left N140) and was source-located at the left IT cortex (MTG), with greater activity for happy versus non-happy faces in both whole and bottom-half face format. This suggests an enhanced perceptual encoding mechanism for salient smiles. The other peaked around 370 ms (P3b and N3) and was located at the right IT (FG) and dorsal cingulate (CC) cortices, with greater activity specifically for bottom-half happy versus non-happy faces. This suggests an enhanced recruitment of face-specific information to categorize (or reconstruct) facial happiness from diagnostic smiling mouths. Additional differential brain responses revealed a specific "anger effect," with greater activity for angry versus non-angry expressions (right N170 and P230; right pSTS and IPL); and a coarse "emotion effect," with greater activity for happy and angry versus neutral expressions (anterior P2 and posterior N170; vmPFC and right IFG).

  17. Radiotherapy beyond cancer: Target localization in real-time MRI and treatment planning for cardiac radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Ipsen, S.; Blanck, O.; Rades, D.; Oborn, B.; Bode, F.; Liney, G.; Hunold, P.; Schweikard, A.; Keall, P. J.

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: Atrial fibrillation (AFib) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia that affects millions of patients world-wide. AFib is usually treated with minimally invasive, time consuming catheter ablation techniques. While recently noninvasive radiosurgery to the pulmonary vein antrum (PVA) in the left atrium has been proposed for AFib treatment, precise target location during treatment is challenging due to complex respiratory and cardiac motion. A MRI linear accelerator (MRI-Linac) could solve the problems of motion tracking and compensation using real-time image guidance. In this study, the authors quantified target motion ranges on cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and analyzed the dosimetric benefits of margin reduction assuming real-time motion compensation was applied. Methods: For the imaging study, six human subjects underwent real-time cardiac MRI under free breathing. The target motion was analyzed retrospectively using a template matching algorithm. The planning study was conducted on a CT of an AFib patient with a centrally located esophagus undergoing catheter ablation, representing an ideal case for cardiac radiosurgery. The target definition was similar to the ablation lesions at the PVA created during catheter treatment. Safety margins of 0 mm (perfect tracking) to 8 mm (untracked respiratory motion) were added to the target, defining the planning target volume (PTV). For each margin, a 30 Gy single fraction IMRT plan was generated. Additionally, the influence of 1 and 3 T magnetic fields on the treatment beam delivery was simulated using Monte Carlo calculations to determine the dosimetric impact of MRI guidance for two different Linac positions. Results: Real-time cardiac MRI showed mean respiratory target motion of 10.2 mm (superior–inferior), 2.4 mm (anterior–posterior), and 2 mm (left–right). The planning study showed that increasing safety margins to encompass untracked respiratory motion leads to overlapping structures even in the

  18. Lead-time reduction utilizing lean tools applied to healthcare: the inpatient pharmacy at a local hospital.

    PubMed

    Al-Araidah, Omar; Momani, Amer; Khasawneh, Mohammad; Momani, Mohammed

    2010-01-01

    The healthcare arena, much like the manufacturing industry, benefits from many aspects of the Toyota lean principles. Lean thinking contributes to reducing or eliminating nonvalue-added time, money, and energy in healthcare. In this paper, we apply selected principles of lean management aiming at reducing the wasted time associated with drug dispensing at an inpatient pharmacy at a local hospital. Thorough investigation of the drug dispensing process revealed unnecessary complexities that contribute to delays in delivering medications to patients. We utilize DMAIC (Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, Control) and 5S (Sort, Set-in-order, Shine, Standardize, Sustain) principles to identify and reduce wastes that contribute to increasing the lead-time in healthcare operations at the pharmacy understudy. The results obtained from the study revealed potential savings of > 45% in the drug dispensing cycle time. PMID:20151593

  19. Lead-time reduction utilizing lean tools applied to healthcare: the inpatient pharmacy at a local hospital.

    PubMed

    Al-Araidah, Omar; Momani, Amer; Khasawneh, Mohammad; Momani, Mohammed

    2010-01-01

    The healthcare arena, much like the manufacturing industry, benefits from many aspects of the Toyota lean principles. Lean thinking contributes to reducing or eliminating nonvalue-added time, money, and energy in healthcare. In this paper, we apply selected principles of lean management aiming at reducing the wasted time associated with drug dispensing at an inpatient pharmacy at a local hospital. Thorough investigation of the drug dispensing process revealed unnecessary complexities that contribute to delays in delivering medications to patients. We utilize DMAIC (Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, Control) and 5S (Sort, Set-in-order, Shine, Standardize, Sustain) principles to identify and reduce wastes that contribute to increasing the lead-time in healthcare operations at the pharmacy understudy. The results obtained from the study revealed potential savings of > 45% in the drug dispensing cycle time.

  20. Optimizing density patterns to achieve desired light extraction for displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenport, T. L. R.; Cassarly, W. J.

    2007-01-01

    In displays such as backlights and signage, it is often desirable to produce a particular spatial luminance distribution of light. This work demonstrates an iterative optimization technique for determining the density of light extractors required to produce desired luminance distributions.

  1. [Condylar hyperplasia. Early detection is desired].

    PubMed

    van der Zwan, J

    1998-12-01

    When single-sided excessive condylar growth is detected in time, removal of the affected condyle is sufficient. In cases of late detection, extensive surgery of upper and lower jaw and the chin may be necessary. PMID:11928146

  2. Real time tracker based upon local hit correlation circuit for silicon strip sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, Niklaus; Pirrami, Lorenzo; Blue, Andrew; Diez, Sergio; Dressnandt, Nandor; Duner, Silvan; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Haber, Carl; Halgeri, Amogh; Keener, Paul; Keller, John; Newcomer, Mitchell; Pasner, Jacob; Peschke, Richard; Risbud, Amar; Ropraz, Eric; Stalder, Jonas; Wang, Haichen

    2016-01-01

    For the planned high luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a significant performance improvement of the detectors is required, including new tracker and trigger systems that makes use of charged track information early on. In this note we explore the principle of real time track reconstruction integrated in the readout electronics. A prototype was built using the silicon strip sensor for the ATLAS phase-II upgrade. The real time tracker is not the baseline for ATLAS but is nevertheless of interest, as the upgraded trigger design has not yet been finalized. For this, a new readout scheme in parallel with conventional readout, called the Fast Cluster Finder (FCF), was included in the latest prototype of the ATLAS strip detector readout chip (ABC130). The FCF is capable of finding hits within 6 ns and transmitting the found hit information synchronously every 25 ns. Using the FCF together with external correlation logic makes it possible to look for pairs of hits consistent with tracks from the interaction point above a transverse momentum threshold. A correlator logic finds correlations between two closely spaced parallel sensors, a "doublet", and can generate information used as input to a lowest level trigger decision. Such a correlator logic was developed as part of a demonstrator and was successfully tested in an electron beam. The results of this test beam experiment proved the concept of the real time track vector processor with FCF.

  3. Linking El Niño, local rainfall, and migration timing in a tropical migratory species.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Allison K; Kelly, Kathryn A

    2013-11-01

    Current climate models project changes in both temperature and precipitation patterns across the globe in the coming years. Migratory species, which move to take advantage of seasonal climate patterns, are likely to be affected by these changes, and indeed, a number of studies have shown a relationship between changing climate and the migration timing of various species. However, these studies have almost exclusively focused on the effects of temperature change on species that inhabit temperate zones. Here, we explore the relationship between rainfall and migration timing in a tropical species, Gecarcoidea natalis (Christmas Island red crab). We find that the timing of the annual crab breeding migration is closely related to the amount of rain that falls during a 'migration window' period prior to potential egg release dates, which is in turn related to the Southern Oscillation Index, an atmospheric El Niño-Southern Oscillation Index. As reproduction in this species is conditional on successful migration, major changes in migration patterns could have detrimental consequences for the survival of the species. This study serves to broaden our understanding of the effects of climate change on migratory species and will hopefully inspire future work on rainfall and tropical migrations.

  4. Brain signatures of perceiving a smile: Time course and source localization.

    PubMed

    Beltrán, David; Calvo, Manuel G

    2015-11-01

    Facial happiness is consistently recognized faster than other expressions of emotion. In this study, to determine when and where in the brain such a recognition advantage develops, EEG activity during an expression categorization task was subjected to temporospatial PCA analysis and LAURA source localizations. Happy, angry, and neutral faces were presented either in whole or bottom-half format (with the mouth region visible). The comparison of part- versus whole-face conditions served to examine the role of the smile. Two neural signatures underlying the happy face advantage emerged. One peaked around 140 ms (left N140) and was source-located at the left IT cortex (MTG), with greater activity for happy versus non-happy faces in both whole and bottom-half face format. This suggests an enhanced perceptual encoding mechanism for salient smiles. The other peaked around 370 ms (P3b and N3) and was located at the right IT (FG) and dorsal cingulate (CC) cortices, with greater activity specifically for bottom-half happy versus non-happy faces. This suggests an enhanced recruitment of face-specific information to categorize (or reconstruct) facial happiness from diagnostic smiling mouths. Additional differential brain responses revealed a specific "anger effect," with greater activity for angry versus non-angry expressions (right N170 and P230; right pSTS and IPL); and a coarse "emotion effect," with greater activity for happy and angry versus neutral expressions (anterior P2 and posterior N170; vmPFC and right IFG). PMID:26252428

  5. Transit-time devices as local oscillators for frequencies above 100 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisele, H.; Kidner, C.; Haddad, G. I.

    1992-01-01

    Very promising preliminary experimental results have been obtained from GaAs IMPATT diodes at F-band frequencies (75 mW, 3.5 percent at 111.1 GHz and 20 mW, 1.4 percent at 120.6 GHz) and from GaAs TUNNETT diodes at W-band frequencies (26 mW, 1.6 percent at 87.2 GHz and 32 mW, 2.6 percent at 93.5 GHz). These results indicate that IMPATT, MITATT and TUNNETT diodes have the highest potential of delivering significant amounts of power at Terahertz frequencies. As shown recently, the noise performance of GaAs W-band IMPATT diodes can compete with that of Gunn devices. Since TUNNETT diodes take advantage of the quieter tunnel injection, they are expected to be especially suited for low-noise local oscillators. This paper will focus on the two different design principles for IMPATT and TUNNETT diodes, the material parameters involved in the design and some aspects of the present device technology. Single-drift flat-profile GaAs D-band IMPATT diodes had oscillations up to 129 GHz with 9 mW, 0.9 percent at 128.4 GHz. Single-drift GaAs TUNNETT diodes had oscillations up to 112.5 GHz with 16 mW and output power levels up to 33 mW and efficiencies up to 3.4 percent around 102 GHz. These results are the best reported so far from GaAs IMPATT and TUNNETT diodes.

  6. Governing Educational Desire: Culture, Politics, and Schooling in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kipnis, Andrew B.

    2011-01-01

    Parents in China greatly value higher education for their children, but the intensity and effects of their desire to achieve this goal have largely gone unexamined--until now. "Governing Educational Desire" explores the cultural, political, and economic origins of Chinese desire for a college education as well as its vast consequences, which…

  7. Girls' Portraits of Desire: Picturing a Missing Discourse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Louisa

    2013-01-01

    This paper revisits the missing discourse of female desire [Fine, M. 1988. Sexuality, schooling and adolescent females: The missing discourse of desire. "Harvard Educational Review" 58, no. 1: 29-53] in secondary schools. Instead of echoing previous studies that have documented how female desire is missing, this research starts from the premise…

  8. A Contrapuntal Analysis of Discourses of Desire in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logue, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    Implicated in contributing to the problems youth today face in trying to claim an education, an informed active participation in the social order, dominant discourses of desire in education foreclose formal, critical analysis of social structures that construct, police, entreat, and deny desire. Looking at the ways in which desire is encoded in…

  9. An Investigation of Desired Friendships during Early Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Katelyn K.; Bowker, Julie C.

    2013-01-01

    This study of 384 young adolescents (45% girls, "M" age = 12.94 years) and their desired friendships (friendships that adolescents indicate they would like to form in the future) examined whether (a) adolescents desire to be friends with peers who are well-liked, popular, aggressive, and prosocial; (b) having desired friendships is…

  10. Preschoolers Use Information about Speakers' Desires to Learn New Words

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saylor, Megan M.; Troseth, Georgene L.

    2006-01-01

    This research investigates preschoolers' use of desires for word learning. Three-year-old children were shown pairs of novel toys and were asked about their own desire and told about a researcher's desire. For half of the children the researcher liked the same object they did and for the other half the researcher liked a different object. The…

  11. Time to failure after definitive therapy for prostate cancer: implications for importance of aggressive local treatment

    PubMed Central

    Taira, Al V.; Butler, Wayne M.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Fiano, Ryan; Wallner, Kent E.; Adamovich, Edward

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To explore patterns of time to failure in men receiving high doses of permanent seed brachytherapy with or without external beam radiation therapy as a function of risk status. Material and methods Two thousand two hundred and thirty four patients were treated with prostate brachytherapy with median follow up of 8.0 years. The population was 35% low risk, 49% intermediate risk, and 16% high risk (NCCN). Median day 0 implant D90 was 119% and V100 was 98%. Treatment failure was defined as PSA > 0.40 ng/mL after nadir. Rates of biochemical failure, distant metastases, and prostate cancer death were determined with non-prostate death as a competing risk. Results For all patients, the 10-year biochemical failure, distant metastases, and cause-specific mortality were 4.4%, 1.4%, and 1.3%, respectively. The biochemical failure rates were 1.3%, 4.8%, and 10.0% for men with low, intermediate, and high risk disease, respectively. Median time to failure was 2.8 years. In men who died from prostate cancer, the median time from treatment failure to death was 4.2 years. Overall, 83% of biochemical failures and 97% of metastases occurred within the first 4 years after treatment. Conclusions With the dose escalation achieved by high quality brachytherapy dosimetry, even high-risk prostate cancer patients have excellent long term biochemical outcomes. Treatment failures occur early, and one third become metastatic and progress rapidly to prostate cancer death. The low frequency and pattern of failures suggest the presence of micrometastatic disease prior to treatment is rare, even in high risk patients. PMID:24474970

  12. Gamma-Ray Burst Arrival Time Localizations: Simultaneous Observations by Mars Observer, Compton Gamma Ray Observatory and Ulysses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laros, J. G.; Boynton, W. V.; Hurley, K.; Kouveliotou, C.; McCollough, M. L.; Fishman, G. J.; Meegan, C. A.

    1997-01-01

    Between 1992 October 4 and 1993 August 1, concurrent coverage by the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO), Mars Observer (MO), and Ulysses spacecraft was obtained for 78 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Although most of these were below the MO and Ulysses thresholds, nine were positively detected by all three spacecraft, with data quality adequate for quantitative localization analysis. All were localized independently to approximately 2 deg accuracy by the CGRO Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE). We computed arrival-time error boxes with larger dimensions ranging from a few arcminutes to the diameters of the BATSE-only boxes and with smaller dimensions in the arcminute range. Three events are of particular interest: GB 930704 (BATSE 2428) has been described as a possible repeater. The arrival-time information is consistent with that hypothesis, but only just so. The GB 930706 (2431) box, at approximately 1 min x 4 min, is the only one this small obtained since Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) entered the Venusian atmosphere in 1992 October. Sensitive radio and optical observations of this location were made within 8 and 9 days of the burst, but no counterpart candidates were identified. GB 930801 (2477) is the first GRB that had its localization improved by taking into account BATSE Earth occultation.

  13. Emergence of Space-Time Localization and Cosmic Decoherence:. More on Irreversible Time, Dark Energy, Anti-Matter and Black-Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnon, Anne

    2005-04-01

    A non geometric cosmology is presented, based on logic of observability, where logical categories of our perception set frontiers to comprehensibility. The Big-Bang singularity finds here a substitute (comparable to a "quantum jump"): a logical process (tied to self-referent and divisible totality) by which information emerges, focalizes on events and recycles, providing a transition from incoherence to causal coherence. This jump manufactures causal order and space-time localization, as exact solutions to Einstein's equation, where the last step of the process disentangles complex Riemann spheres into real null-cones (a geometric overturning imposed by self-reference, reminding us of our ability to project the cosmos within our mental sphere). Concepts such as antimatter and dark energy (dual entities tied to bifurcations or broken symmetries, and their compensation), are presented as hidden in the virtual potentialities, while irreversible time appears with the recycling of information and related flow. Logical bifurcations (such as the "part-totality" category, a quantum of information which owes its recycling to non localizable logical separations, as anticipated by unstability or horizon dependence of the quantum vacuum) induce broken symmetries, at the (complex or real) geometric level [eg. the antiselfdual complex non linear graviton solutions, which break duality symmetry, provide a model for (hidden) anti-matter, itself compensated with dark-energy, and providing, with space-time localization, the radiative gravitational energy (Bondi flux and related bifurcations of the peeling off type), as well as mass of isolated bodies]. These bifurcations are compensated by inertial effects (non geometric precursors of the Coriolis forces) able to explain (on logical grounds) the cosmic expansion (a repulsion?) and critical equilibrium of the cosmic tissue. Space-time environment, itself, emerges through the jump, as a censor to totality, a screen to incoherence (as

  14. Replication Timing of Human Telomeres Is Chromosome Arm–Specific, Influenced by Subtelomeric Structures and Connected to Nuclear Localization

    PubMed Central

    Arnoult, Nausica; Schluth-Bolard, Caroline; Letessier, Anne; Drascovic, Irena; Bouarich-Bourimi, Rachida; Campisi, Judith; Kim, Sahn-ho; Boussouar, Amina; Ottaviani, Alexandre; Magdinier, Frédérique; Gilson, Eric; Londoño-Vallejo, Arturo

    2010-01-01

    The mechanisms governing telomere replication in humans are still poorly understood. To fill this gap, we investigated the timing of replication of single telomeres in human cells. Using in situ hybridization techniques, we have found that specific telomeres have preferential time windows for replication during the S-phase and that these intervals do not depend upon telomere length and are largely conserved between homologous chromosomes and between individuals, even in the presence of large subtelomeric segmental polymorphisms. Importantly, we show that one copy of the 3.3 kb macrosatellite repeat D4Z4, present in the subtelomeric region of the late replicating 4q35 telomere, is sufficient to confer both a more peripheral localization and a later-replicating property to a de novo formed telomere. Also, the presence of β-satellite repeats next to a newly created telomere is sufficient to delay its replication timing. Remarkably, several native, non-D4Z4–associated, late-replicating telomeres show a preferential localization toward the nuclear periphery, while several early-replicating telomeres are associated with the inner nuclear volume. We propose that, in humans, chromosome arm–specific subtelomeric sequences may influence both the spatial distribution of telomeres in the nucleus and their replication timing. PMID:20421929

  15. Local time variations of high-energy plasmaspheric ion pitch angle distributions

    DOE PAGES

    Sarno-Smith, Lois K.; Liemohn, Michael W.; Skoug, Ruth M.; Larsen, Brian Arthur; Moldwin, Mark B.; Katus, Roxanne M.; Wygant, John R.

    2016-07-05

    Recent observations from the Van Allen Probes Helium Oxygen Proton Electron (HOPE) instrument revealed a persistent depletion in the 1–10 eV ion population in the postmidnight sector during quiet times in the 2 < L < 3 region. This study explores the source of this ion depletion by developing an algorithm to classify 26 months of pitch angle distributions measured by the HOPE instrument. We correct the HOPE low energy fluxes for spacecraft potential using measurements from the Electric Field and Waves (EFW) instrument. A high percentage of low count pitch angle distributions is found in the postmidnight sector coupledmore » with a low percentage of ion distributions peaked perpendicular to the field line. A peak in loss cone distributions in the dusk sector is also observed. Here, these results characterize the nature of the dearth of the near 90° pitch angle 1–10 eV ion population in the near-Earth postmidnight sector. This study also shows, for the first time, low-energy HOPE differential number fluxes corrected for spacecraft potential and 1–10 eV H+ fluxes at different levels of geomagnetic activity.« less

  16. Contested Desires: The Edible Landscape of School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Catherine

    2005-01-01

    Food and drink are associated with survival and for children and young people the edible landscape represents an essential part of survival in the modern school. Within any institution that "contains" persons over time, such as schools, hospitals and prisons, the organization and control of eating and drinking takes on a particularly significant…

  17. Is a Fuller Relinguification of TESOL Desirable?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fishman, Joshua A.

    2009-01-01

    The author well remembers the First TESOL War (TW1), in the 1950s, a "war" personified by an obvious altercation between Professors Rudy Troike and Jim Alatis, as to whether TESOL was good or bad for bilingual education. It was imperfectly resolved, for the time being, at least, by the National Association for Bilingual Education's (NABE's)…

  18. Real-Time Localization of Moving Dipole Sources for Tracking Multiple Free-Swimming Weakly Electric Fish

    PubMed Central

    Jun, James Jaeyoon; Longtin, André; Maler, Leonard

    2013-01-01

    In order to survive, animals must quickly and accurately locate prey, predators, and conspecifics using the signals they generate. The signal source location can be estimated using multiple detectors and the inverse relationship between the received signal intensity (RSI) and the distance, but difficulty of the source localization increases if there is an additional dependence on the orientation of a signal source. In such cases, the signal source could be approximated as an ideal dipole for simplification. Based on a theoretical model, the RSI can be directly predicted from a known dipole location; but estimating a dipole location from RSIs has no direct analytical solution. Here, we propose an efficient solution to the dipole localization problem by using a lookup table (LUT) to store RSIs predicted by our theoretically derived dipole model at many possible dipole positions and orientations. For a given set of RSIs measured at multiple detectors, our algorithm found a dipole location having the closest matching normalized RSIs from the LUT, and further refined the location at higher resolution. Studying the natural behavior of weakly electric fish (WEF) requires efficiently computing their location and the temporal pattern of their electric signals over extended periods. Our dipole localization method was successfully applied to track single or multiple freely swimming WEF in shallow water in real-time, as each fish could be closely approximated by an ideal current dipole in two dimensions. Our optimized search algorithm found the animal’s positions, orientations, and tail-bending angles quickly and accurately under various conditions, without the need for calibrating individual-specific parameters. Our dipole localization method is directly applicable to studying the role of active sensing during spatial navigation, or social interactions between multiple WEF. Furthermore, our method could be extended to other application areas involving dipole source

  19. Real-Time Local Range On-Demand and Dynamic Regional Range Images

    SciTech Connect

    Tsap, L.V.

    2000-02-22

    This paper presents a new approach to a gesture tracking system using real-time range on-demand. The system represents a gesture-controlled interface for interactive visual exploration of large data sets. The paper describes a method performing range processing only when necessary and where necessary. Range data is processed only for non-static regions of interest. This is accomplished by a set of filters on the color, motion, and range data. The speedup achieved is between 41% and 54%. The algorithm also includes a robust skin color segmentation insensitive to illumination changes. Selective range processing results in dynamic regional range images (DRRIs). This development is also placed in a broader context of a biological visual system emulation, specifically redundancies and attention mechanisms.

  20. Real-Time Local Range On-Demand for Tracking Gestures and Dynamic Regional Range Images

    SciTech Connect

    Tsap, L.V.

    2000-05-30

    This paper presents a new approach to a gesture-tracking system using real-time range on-demand. The system represents a gesture-controlled interface for interactive visual exploration of large data sets. The paper describes a method performing range processing only when necessary and where necessary. Range data is processed only for non-static regions of interest. This is accomplished by a set of filters on the color, motion, and range data. The speedup achieved is between 41% and 54%. The algorithm also includes a robust skin-color segmentation insensitive to illumination changes. Selective range processing results in dynamic regional range images (DRRIs). This development is also placed in a broader context of a biological visual system emulation, specifically redundancies and attention mechanisms.

  1. Automated seismic event location by arrival time stacking: Applications to local and micro-seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoli, F.; Cesca, S.; Braun, T.; Philipp, J.; Dahm, T.

    2012-04-01

    Locating seismic events is one of the oldest problem in seismology. In microseismicity application, when the number of event is very large, it is not possible to locate earthquake manually and automated location procedures must be established. Automated seismic event location at different scales is very important in different application areas, including mining monitoring, reservoir geophysics and early warning systems. Location is needed to start rescue operations rapidly. Locating and mapping microearthquakes or acoustic emission sources in mining environments is important for monitoring of mines stability. Mapping fractures through microseimicity distribution inside hydrocarbon reservoirs is needed to find areas with an higher permeability and enhance oil production. In the last 20 years a large number of picking algorithm was developed in order to locate seismic events automatically. While P onsets can now be accurately picked using automatic routines, the automatic picking of later seismic phases (including S onset) is still problematic , thus limiting the location performance. In this work we present a picking free location method based on the use of the Short-Term-Average/Long-Term-Average (STA/LTA) traces at different stations as observed data. For different locations and origin times, observed STA/LTA are stacked along the travel time surface corresponding to the selected hypocentre. Iterating this procedure on a three-dimensional grid we retrieve a multidimensional matrix whose absolute maximum corresponds to the spatio-temporal coordinates of the seismic event. We tested our methodology on synthetic data, simulating different environments and network geometries. Finally, we apply our method to real datasets related to microseismic activity in mines and earthquake swarms in Italy. This work has been funded by the German BMBF "Geotechnologien" project MINE (BMBF03G0737A).

  2. Optimal time interval between capecitabine intake and radiotherapy in preoperative chemoradiation for locally advanced rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Chang Sik; Kim, Tae Won; Kim, Jong Hoon . E-mail: jhkim2@amc.seoul.kr; Choi, Won Sik; Kim, Hee Cheol; Chang, Heung Moon; Ryu, Min Hee; Jang, Se Jin; Ahn, Seung Do; Lee, Sang-wook; Shin, Seong Soo; Choi, Eun Kyung; Kim, Jin Cheon

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: Capecitabine and its metabolites reach peak plasma concentrations 1 to 2 hours after a single oral administration, and concentrations rapidly decrease thereafter. We performed a retrospective analysis to find the optimal time interval between capecitabine administration and radiotherapy for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: The time interval between capecitabine intake and radiotherapy was measured in patients who were treated with preoperative radiotherapy and concurrent capecitabine for rectal cancer. Patients were classified into the following groups. Group A1 included patients who took capecitabine 1 hour before radiotherapy, and Group B1 included all other patients. Group B1 was then subdivided into Group A2 (patients who took capecitabine 2 hours before radiotherapy) and Group B2. Group B2 was further divided into Group A3 and Group B3 with the same method. Total mesorectal excision was performed 6 weeks after completion of chemoradiation and the pathologic response was evaluated. Results: A total of 200 patients were enrolled in this study. Pathologic examination showed that Group A1 had higher rates of complete regression of primary tumors in the rectum (23.5% vs. 9.6%, p = 0.01), good response (44.7% vs. 25.2%, p = 0.006), and lower T stages (p = 0.021) compared with Group B1; however, Groups A2 and A3 did not show any improvement compared with Groups B2 and B3. Multivariate analysis showed that increases in primary tumors in the rectum and good response were only significant when capecitabine was administered 1 hour before radiotherapy. Conclusion: In preoperative chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer, the pathologic response could be improved by administering capecitabine 1 hour before radiotherapy.

  3. FUNDAMENTAL STUDY ON REAL-TIME FLOOD FORECASTING METHOD FOR LOCALLY HEAVY RAINFALL IN URBAN DRAINAGE AREAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Makoto; Kido, Yoshinobu; Nakakita, Eiichi

    Recently, locally heavy rainfall occurs frequently at highly urbanized area, and causes serious personal accidents, so importance of flood forecasting system is growing in order to reduce damage of inundation. However, flood forecasting that secured lead-time for evacuation is extremely difficult, because the rainfall flows out rapidly. In this study, the numerical simulation model that can finely express inundation mechanism of urban drainage areas was applied with the most recent available data and analysis tool. The influence of the factor (i.e. sewer system, overland and rainfall information) which affected inundation mechanism was evaluated through the sensibility analysis with this model, and evaluation results show some requirements of model condition and information on time and space resolution of real-time flood forecasting.

  4. Quantifying the relevance of local blockings for temperature extremes on sub-daily to daily time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfahl, S.

    2012-04-01

    Atmospheric blockings can influence near-surface temperature, on the one hand by inducing circulation anomalies, on the other hand since they are associated with clear-sky conditions, which can lead to anomalies in the surface radiation budget. The latter is due to subsiding motions and the deflection of low pressure systems. In this study, it is quantified how relevant these effects are locally (at the location of the blocking) for the occurrence of sub-daily and daily temperature extremes, based on ERA-Interim reanalysis data in the Northern Hemisphere for the period 1989-2009. Blockings are identified from the reanalysis dataset as negative anomalies of the vertically integrated potential vorticity (PV) between 150 hPa and 500 hPa with a lifetime longer than 5 days. The threshold for the identification of the PV anomalies is varied between -1.3 PVU and -0.7 PVU in order to distinguish between strong and weaker blocking systems. Temperature extremes are identified at each grid point if the six-hourly maximum (minimum) temperature exceeds (falls below) its local 99% (1%) percentile. For investigating extremes on longer time scales, the temperature time series are smoothed with a 1- or 3-day running mean before identifying the extremes. Finally, a blocking is assumed to be locally related to a temperature extreme if both occur simultaneously at the same grid point. The percentage of temperature extremes coinciding with a blocking is then quantified at every grid point. The percentage of hot temperature extremes associated with a strong blocking reaches maxima of more than 50% over southern Greenland and Quebec and around 30% over Northern Europe and Asia, exceeding the climatological blocking frequency by about a factor of 5. The spatial patterns of this percentage are similar if the smoothed time series are used, but the maxima are increased up to 70%. If also weaker blockings are considered, in the order of 80% of the six-hourly hot extremes coincide with such

  5. Validation of Scores on the Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale and the Balanced Inventory of Desirable Responding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leite, Walter L.; Beretvas, S. Natasha

    2005-01-01

    The Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale (MCSDS), the most commonly used social desirability bias (SDB) assessment, conceptualizes SDB as an individual's need for approval. The Balanced Inventory of Desirable Responding (BIDR) measures SDB as two separate constructs: impression management and self-deception. Scores on SDB scales are commonly…

  6. Platelets aggregation in pathological conditions: role of local shear rates and platelet activation delay time.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, He; Zarif Khalili Yazdani, Alireza; Karniadakis, George

    2015-11-01

    Platelets play an essential role in the initiation and formation of a thrombus, however their detailed motion in blood vessels with complex geometries, such as in the aneurysmal vessel or stenotic vessel in atherosclerosis, has not been studied systematically. Here, we perform spectral element simulations (NEKTAR code) to obtain the 3D flow field in blood vessel with cavities, and we apply the force coupling method (FCM) to simulate the motion of platelets in blood flow. Specifically, simulations of platelets are performed in a 0.25 mm diameter circular blood vessel with 1 mm length. Corresponding coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations are employed to provide input to the NEKTAR-FCM code. Simulations are conducted at several different Reynolds numbers (Re). An ellipsoid-shaped cavity is selected to intersect with the middle part of the circular vessel to represent the aneurysmal part of the blood vessel. Based on the simulation results, we quantify how the platelets motion and aggregation in the blood vessel cavities depend on Re, platelet activation delay time, and the geometry of the cavities.

  7. Pinsker estimators for local helioseismology: inversion of travel times for mass-conserving flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, Damien; Gizon, Laurent; Holzke, Martin; Hohage, Thorsten

    2016-10-01

    A major goal of helioseismology is the three-dimensional reconstruction of the three velocity components of convective flows in the solar interior from sets of wave travel-time measurements. For small amplitude flows, the forward problem is described in good approximation by a large system of convolution equations. The input observations are highly noisy random vectors with a known dense covariance matrix. This leads to a large statistical linear inverse problem. Whereas for deterministic linear inverse problems several computationally efficient minimax optimal regularization methods exist, only one minimax-optimal linear estimator exists for statistical linear inverse problems: the Pinsker estimator. However, it is often computationally inefficient because it requires a singular value decomposition of the forward operator or it is not applicable because of an unknown noise covariance matrix, so it is rarely used for real-world problems. These limitations do not apply in helioseismology. We present a simplified proof of the optimality properties of the Pinsker estimator and show that it yields significantly better reconstructions than traditional inversion methods used in helioseismology, i.e. regularized least squares (Tikhonov regularization) and SOLA (approximate inverse) methods. Moreover, we discuss the incorporation of the mass conservation constraint in the Pinsker scheme using staggered grids. With this improvement we can reconstruct not only horizontal, but also vertical velocity components that are much smaller in amplitude.

  8. Observations of traveling ionospheric disturbances with a satellite-beacon radio interferometer: Seasonal and local time behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, A.R.; Carlos, R.C.; Massey, R.S.; Wui, Guanghui

    1995-02-01

    The authors have operated a very long baseline interferometer array at a northern midlatitude site, illuminated by VHF radio beacons from two geosynchronous satellites, quasi-continuously for over a year. The array can detect and measure the trace velocity of traveling ionosphere disturbances (TIDs) via their signatures in the line-of-sight total electron content (TEC). The system noise level is of the order of 10{sup 13} m{sup {minus}2} in the TEC, so that even very weak perturbations can be studied. They have used the year-long TID detection/velocimetry data set to describe local time and seasonal dependences of the wave parameters. The most striking finding is that the preferred azimuths of TIDs in the data set tend to belong to either of two modes: The first mode, strongest at midday and in the early afternoon, particularly around winter equinox, propagates southward. The second mode, strongest in the evening, especially during summer solstice through autumn equinox, propagates west-northwestward. The two modes are disposed in local time such as to suggest the agency of clockwise rotation of the TID preferred azimuths versus time, as expected by wind filtering in the thermospheric diurnal tide. However, there is a gap between the two modes` azimuth bands. Moreover, the two modes exist in all trace-speed quartiles of the data set TIDs, a finding which is at variance with the hypothesis of wind filtering being the primary explanation of these modes. 28 refs., 13 figs.

  9. Analysis of the effects of mean local node-crossing time on the evolution of Sun-synchronous orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, P.; Blaes, V.; Roszman, L.; Cooley, J.

    1993-01-01

    An investigation of the effect of mean local node-crossing time on the evolution of Sun-synchronous orbits was undertaken during Phase-A orbit analysis for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) O,P,Q environmental spacecraft. That analysis added to the growing body of evidence that individual Sun-synchronous missions, at differing node-crossing times, experience nodal drift rates that can differ in both magnitude and direction. A Sun-synchronous orbit is obtained by means of a nodal drift rate approximating the 0.9856-degree-per-day apparent precession of the position of the mean Sun. This drift rate is achieved through the interaction of the orbital semimajor axis and inclination in Earth's geopotential field. Influencing perturbations include atmospheric drag and, most important, the effects of solar gravitation on inclination. The present analysis examines a series of Sun-synchronous orbits with mean local node-crossing times at 1-hour intervals from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. It considers the fixed geometry of each orbital plane with respect to both the Sun and the diurnal atmospheric bulge, then analyzes the influence of these features upon the evolution of the semimajor axix and inclination and thus upon the rate of the nodal drift in the course of 1 year.

  10. The Structure of Titan's Ionosphere from 10 Years of Cassini Measurements: Solar Cycle and Saturn Local Time Dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edberg, N. J. T.; Kurth, W. S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Andrews, D. J.; Vigren, E.; Shebanits, O.; Agren, K.; Wahlund, J. E.; Opgenoorth, H. J.; Holmberg, M.; Jackman, C. M.; Cravens, T.; Bertucci, C.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2014-12-01

    We present measurements from the Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Science/Langmuir probe (RPWS/LP) instrument of the electron density in the ionosphere of Titan from the first ~100 flybys (2004-2014). After more than 10 years of measurements a good number of measurements exists from Titan's ionosphere. This allows for statistical studies of the structure of Titan's ionosphere. The electron density has been shown to vary significantly from one flyby to the next, as well as on longer time scales and here we discern some of the reasons for the observed ionospheric variability. Firstly, following the rise to the recent solar maximum we show how the ionospheric peak density, normalized to a common solar zenith angle, Nnorm clearly varies with the ~11-year solar cycle. Nnorm correlates well with the solar energy flux Fe and we find that Nnorm ∝ Fek, with k = 0.54 ± 0.18, which is close to the theoretical value of 0.5. Secondly, we present results that indicate that the ionospheric density in the topside ionosphere (altitude range 1200-2400 km) are generally significantly increased, roughly by a factor of 2, when Titan is located in the post-midnight sector of Saturn, i.e. at Saturn local times 00 - 03 h, compared to other local time sectors. We suggest that this increase could be caused by additional particle impact ionization from reconnection events in the Saturn tail.

  11. Research applications of night-time aerial photography, from local to global scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hale, J.; Sadler, J.

    2012-12-01

    Artificial lighting of the earth's surface is changing at a global scale, with numerous social, economic and environmental implications. In many regions, the extent, brightness and spectral range of lighting is increasing, reflecting economic and technological development, population growth and urbanization. Its benefits include improving the perception of neighbourhood safety and increasing people's options for when activities can take place. Impacts range from the disruption of sleep patterns by a single street lamp to obscured views of the night sky for tens of kilometers surrounding an urban area. There is therefore a need to secure baseline maps of artificial lighting, and to detect changes in their extent and quality over time. Considerable success has been achieved in generating global lighting datasets from Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Operational Linescan System (OLS) data, which have been used to support a broad range of research and policy applications. However, their coarse spatial and spectral resolution and difficulties in radiance calibration have been recognised as barriers to some potential applications. We present the first multi-spectral radiance calibrated lighting data for cities at a fine spatial resolution (10cm). We then illustrate how these data can be effective for exploring relationships between lighting and urban form, and that they can support the radiance calibration of lighting datasets with much greater spatial extents. Color night photography was collected for two major English cities - Birmingham and London. Ground photometry and radiometry surveys were undertaken, permitting the reclassification of the images to represent incident lux and the identification and classification of individual lamps. Total illuminated area and lamp density both correlated positively with percentage built surface cover, although the strength of these relationships differed between cities. This suggests that artificial lighting may

  12. Local flow management/profile descent algorithm. Fuel-efficient, time-controlled profiles for the NASA TSRV airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groce, J. L.; Izumi, K. H.; Markham, C. H.; Schwab, R. W.; Thompson, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    The Local Flow Management/Profile Descent (LFM/PD) algorithm designed for the NASA Transport System Research Vehicle program is described. The algorithm provides fuel-efficient altitude and airspeed profiles consistent with ATC restrictions in a time-based metering environment over a fixed ground track. The model design constraints include accommodation of both published profile descent procedures and unpublished profile descents, incorporation of fuel efficiency as a flight profile criterion, operation within the performance capabilities of the Boeing 737-100 airplane with JT8D-7 engines, and conformity to standard air traffic navigation and control procedures. Holding and path stretching capabilities are included for long delay situations.

  13. Travel time calculation in regular 3D grid in local and regional scale using fast marching method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polkowski, M.

    2015-12-01

    Local and regional 3D seismic velocity models of crust and sediments are very important for numerous technics like mantle and core tomography, localization of local and regional events and others. Most of those techniques require calculation of wave travel time through the 3D model. This can be achieved using multiple approaches from simple ray tracing to advanced full waveform calculation. In this study simple and efficient implementation of fast marching method is presented. This method provides more information than ray tracing and is much less complicated than methods like full waveform being the perfect compromise. Presented code is written in C++, well commented and is easy to modify for different types of studies. Additionally performance is widely discussed including possibilities of multithreading and massive parallelism like GPU. Source code will be published in 2016 as it is part of the PhD thesis. National Science Centre Poland provided financial support for this work via NCN grant DEC-2011/02/A/ST10/00284.

  14. Temporal Non-Local Means Filtering Reveals Real-Time Whole-Brain Cortical Interactions in Resting fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Bhushan, Chitresh; Chong, Minqi; Choi, Soyoung; Joshi, Anand A.; Haldar, Justin P.; Damasio, Hanna; Leahy, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    Intensity variations over time in resting BOLD fMRI exhibit spatial correlation patterns consistent with a set of large scale cortical networks. However, visualizations of this data on the brain surface, even after extensive preprocessing, are dominated by local intensity fluctuations that obscure larger scale behavior. Our novel adaptation of non-local means (NLM) filtering, which we refer to as temporal NLM or tNLM, reduces these local fluctuations without the spatial blurring that occurs when using standard linear filtering methods. We show examples of tNLM filtering that allow direct visualization of spatio-temporal behavior on the cortical surface. These results reveal patterns of activity consistent with known networks as well as more complex dynamic changes within and between these networks. This ability to directly visualize brain activity may facilitate new insights into spontaneous brain dynamics. Further, temporal NLM can also be used as a preprocessor for resting fMRI for exploration of dynamic brain networks. We demonstrate its utility through application to graph-based functional cortical parcellation. Simulations with known ground truth functional regions demonstrate that tNLM filtering prior to parcellation avoids the formation of false parcels that can arise when using linear filtering. Application to resting fMRI data from the Human Connectome Project shows significant improvement, in comparison to linear filtering, in quantitative agreement with functional regions identified independently using task-based experiments as well as in test-retest reliability. PMID:27391481

  15. Temporal Non-Local Means Filtering Reveals Real-Time Whole-Brain Cortical Interactions in Resting fMRI.

    PubMed

    Bhushan, Chitresh; Chong, Minqi; Choi, Soyoung; Joshi, Anand A; Haldar, Justin P; Damasio, Hanna; Leahy, Richard M

    2016-01-01

    Intensity variations over time in resting BOLD fMRI exhibit spatial correlation patterns consistent with a set of large scale cortical networks. However, visualizations of this data on the brain surface, even after extensive preprocessing, are dominated by local intensity fluctuations that obscure larger scale behavior. Our novel adaptation of non-local means (NLM) filtering, which we refer to as temporal NLM or tNLM, reduces these local fluctuations without the spatial blurring that occurs when using standard linear filtering methods. We show examples of tNLM filtering that allow direct visualization of spatio-temporal behavior on the cortical surface. These results reveal patterns of activity consistent with known networks as well as more complex dynamic changes within and between these networks. This ability to directly visualize brain activity may facilitate new insights into spontaneous brain dynamics. Further, temporal NLM can also be used as a preprocessor for resting fMRI for exploration of dynamic brain networks. We demonstrate its utility through application to graph-based functional cortical parcellation. Simulations with known ground truth functional regions demonstrate that tNLM filtering prior to parcellation avoids the formation of false parcels that can arise when using linear filtering. Application to resting fMRI data from the Human Connectome Project shows significant improvement, in comparison to linear filtering, in quantitative agreement with functional regions identified independently using task-based experiments as well as in test-retest reliability. PMID:27391481

  16. Optimization of Milling Parameters Employing Desirability Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, J. L. S.; Rubio, J. C. Campos; Abrão, A. M.

    2011-01-01

    The principal aim of this paper is to investigate the influence of tool material (one cermet and two coated carbide grades), cutting speed and feed rate on the machinability of hardened AISI H13 hot work steel, in order to identify the cutting conditions which lead to optimal performance. A multiple response optimization procedure based on tool life, surface roughness, milling forces and the machining time (required to produce a sample cavity) was employed. The results indicated that the TiCN-TiN coated carbide and cermet presented similar results concerning the global optimum values for cutting speed and feed rate per tooth, outperforming the TiN-TiCN-Al2O3 coated carbide tool.

  17. The impact of sexual trauma on sexual desire and function.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Barry; Farr, Emily

    2011-01-01

    The field of sexual trauma is one of the most controversial and value-laden in mental health. The three factors which most affect adult sexual desire and function are the type of sexual trauma, how the sexual incidents were dealt with at the time and, most important, whether the person views her/himself as a survivor or victim. The assessment and treatment program described focuses on couple sex therapy with a special focus on processing the sexual trauma, honoring the person's veto and being 'partners in healing'. The core therapeutic theme is valuing intimate, erotic sexuality, which reinforces being a proud survivor rather than a shameful, anxious or angry victim. It is crucial to create a relapse prevention program to ensure that the person with the sexual trauma history continues to experience the positive roles of adult couple sexuality. PMID:22005207

  18. Desiring T, desiring self: "T-style" pop singers and lesbian culture in China.

    PubMed

    Kam, Lucetta Y L

    2014-01-01

    This article examines an emerging group of "T-style" female singers in the popular music scene in China. The expression "T," which is developed from the term "tomboy," refers to lesbians with masculine gender style. It is a widely used form of identification in local lesbian communities in China. The emergence of "T-style" female singers coincided with the rapid development of local lesbian communities in major cities in China. By exploring the intersections-or mutual modeling-of "T-style" singers and local lesbian gender culture, this article also analyzes the different receptions of "T-style" singers by local lesbian women, and explores whether "T-style" singers are seen as a "cultural resource" that aids the construction of lesbian gender and sexual identities. PMID:24972284

  19. Desiring T, desiring self: "T-style" pop singers and lesbian culture in China.

    PubMed

    Kam, Lucetta Y L

    2014-01-01

    This article examines an emerging group of "T-style" female singers in the popular music scene in China. The expression "T," which is developed from the term "tomboy," refers to lesbians with masculine gender style. It is a widely used form of identification in local lesbian communities in China. The emergence of "T-style" female singers coincided with the rapid development of local lesbian communities in major cities in China. By exploring the intersections-or mutual modeling-of "T-style" singers and local lesbian gender culture, this article also analyzes the different receptions of "T-style" singers by local lesbian women, and explores whether "T-style" singers are seen as a "cultural resource" that aids the construction of lesbian gender and sexual identities.

  20. Real-Time Two-Dimensional Mapping of Relative Local Surface Temperatures with a Thin-Film Sensor Array.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Wang, Zhenhai; Mao, Xinyu; Zhang, Yinghuang; Huo, Xiaoye; Liu, Haixiao; Xu, Shengyong

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic mapping of an object's local temperature distribution may offer valuable information for failure analysis, system control and improvement. In this letter we present a computerized measurement system which is equipped with a hybrid, low-noise mechanical-electrical multiplexer for real-time two-dimensional (2D) mapping of surface temperatures. We demonstrate the performance of the system on a device embedded with 32 pieces of built-in Cr-Pt thin-film thermocouples arranged in a 4 × 8 matrix. The system can display a continuous 2D mapping movie of relative temperatures with a time interval around 1 s. This technique may find applications in a variety of practical devices and systems. PMID:27347969

  1. Real-Time Two-Dimensional Mapping of Relative Local Surface Temperatures with a Thin-Film Sensor Array

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Wang, Zhenhai; Mao, Xinyu; Zhang, Yinghuang; Huo, Xiaoye; Liu, Haixiao; Xu, Shengyong

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic mapping of an object’s local temperature distribution may offer valuable information for failure analysis, system control and improvement. In this letter we present a computerized measurement system which is equipped with a hybrid, low-noise mechanical-electrical multiplexer for real-time two-dimensional (2D) mapping of surface temperatures. We demonstrate the performance of the system on a device embedded with 32 pieces of built-in Cr-Pt thin-film thermocouples arranged in a 4 × 8 matrix. The system can display a continuous 2D mapping movie of relative temperatures with a time interval around 1 s. This technique may find applications in a variety of practical devices and systems. PMID:27347969

  2. Real-Time Two-Dimensional Mapping of Relative Local Surface Temperatures with a Thin-Film Sensor Array.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Wang, Zhenhai; Mao, Xinyu; Zhang, Yinghuang; Huo, Xiaoye; Liu, Haixiao; Xu, Shengyong

    2016-06-25

    Dynamic mapping of an object's local temperature distribution may offer valuable information for failure analysis, system control and improvement. In this letter we present a computerized measurement system which is equipped with a hybrid, low-noise mechanical-electrical multiplexer for real-time two-dimensional (2D) mapping of surface temperatures. We demonstrate the performance of the system on a device embedded with 32 pieces of built-in Cr-Pt thin-film thermocouples arranged in a 4 × 8 matrix. The system can display a continuous 2D mapping movie of relative temperatures with a time interval around 1 s. This technique may find applications in a variety of practical devices and systems.

  3. Locally non-uniform finite-difference time domain with application to stealth, crosstalk, and narrow apertures

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, D.J.

    1993-04-01

    A technique to integrate a dense, locally non-uniform mesh into finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) codes is presented. The method is designed for the full-wave analysis of multi-material layers that are physically thin, but perhaps electrically thick. Such layers are often used for the purpose of suppressing electromagnetic reflections from conducting surfaces. Throughout the non-uniform local mesh, average values for the conductivity and permittivity are used, where as variations in permeability are accommodated by splitting H-field line integrals and enforcing continuity of the normal B field. A unique interpolation scheme provides accuracy and late-time stability for mesh discontinuities as large as 1000 to 1. Application is made to resistive sheets, the absorbing Salisbury screen, crosstalk on printed circuit boards, and apertures that are narrow both in width and depth with regard to a uniform cell. Where appropriate, comparisons are made with the MoM code CARLOS and transmission-line theory. The hybrid mesh formulation has been highly optimized for both vector and parallel-processing on Cray YMP architectures.

  4. The influence of time-dependent electric and magnetic fields on the dynamic localization of lattice electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papp, E.; Micu, C.; Aur, L.

    2008-12-01

    In this paper we deal with the derivation of dynamic localization conditions for electrons on the one-dimensional (1D) lattice under the influence of ac electric and magnetic fields of the same frequency. We resort, for convenience, to a tight-binding single-band Hamiltonian. Our emphasis is on a more fundamental theoretical understanding by investigating interplays between such fields and the nearest-neighbor hopping interactions characterizing the Hamiltonian. In general, such conditions get expressed in terms of infinite sums of binary products of Bessel functions of the first kind. These sums are hardly tractable, but we found that selecting in a suitable manner the phases of time-dependent modulations leads to controllable frequency-mixing effects providing appreciable simplifications. Such mixings concern competitions between the number of flux quanta and the quotients of field amplitudes and field frequencies. More exactly, tuning one of the mixed frequencies to zero opens the way to establishing the simplified dynamic localization conditions. By resorting again to the zeros of the Bessel function of zeroth order. This results in quickly tractable relationships between the amplitudes of electric and magnetic fields, the field frequency, and the zeros referred to just above. Pure field limits and superpositions between uniform electric and time-dependent magnetic fields are also discussed. Comments concerning the role of disorder and of the Coulomb interaction are also made.

  5. Improvements in localized proton NMR spectroscopy of human brain. Water suppression, short echo times, and 1 ml resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frahm, J.; Michaelis, T.; Merboldt, K. D.; Bruhn, H.; Gyngell, M. L.; Hänicke, W.

    Considerable technical improvements are reported for localized proton NMR spectroscopy using stimulated echoes. When compared to previous results, proton NMR spectra of the human brain are now obtainable (i) with in vivo water suppression factors of ⩾1000, (ii) with only minor T2 losses and negligible distortions due to J modulation at short echo times of 10-20 ms, and (iii) from volumes of interest as small as 1-8 ml within measuring times of 1-10 min. As a consequence, the detection of cerebral metabolites is greatly facilitated. This particularly applies to the assignment of those resonances (e.g., glutamate, taurine, inositols) that suffer from strong spin-spin coupling at the field strengths commonly in use for NMR in man. Studies of regional metabolite differences, tissue heterogeneity, and focal lesions in patients benefit from the increased spatial resolution and a concomitant reduction of partial volume effects. Localized proton NMR spectroscopy was performed on young healthy volunteers. Experiments were carried out on a 2.0 T whole-body MRI/MRS system using the standard headcoil for both imaging and spectroscopy.

  6. Local time-space mesh refinement for simulation of elastic wave propagation in multi-scale media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostin, Victor; Lisitsa, Vadim; Reshetova, Galina; Tcheverda, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an original approach to local time-space grid refinement for the numerical simulation of wave propagation in models with localized clusters of micro-heterogeneities. The main features of the algorithm are the application of temporal and spatial refinement on two different surfaces; the use of the embedded-stencil technique for the refinement of grid step with respect to time; the use of the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT)-based interpolation to couple variables for spatial mesh refinement. The latter makes it possible to perform filtration of high spatial frequencies, which provides stability in the proposed finite-difference schemes. In the present work, the technique is implemented for the finite-difference simulation of seismic wave propagation and the interaction of such waves with fluid-filled fractures and cavities of carbonate reservoirs. However, this approach is easy to adapt and/or combine with other numerical techniques, such as finite elements, discontinuous Galerkin method, or finite volumes used for approximation of various types of linear and nonlinear hyperbolic equations.

  7. Role of trimethylated chitosan (TMC) in nasal residence time, local distribution and toxicity of an intranasal influenza vaccine.

    PubMed

    Hagenaars, Niels; Mania, Marta; de Jong, Pascal; Que, Ivo; Nieuwland, Rob; Slütter, Bram; Glansbeek, Harrie; Heldens, Jacco; van den Bosch, Han; Löwik, Clemens; Kaijzel, Eric; Mastrobattista, Enrico; Jiskoot, Wim

    2010-05-21

    The nose is a promising immunization site and intranasal (i.n.) vaccination studies with whole inactivated influenza virus (WIV) adjuvanted with N,N,N-trimethylchitosan (TMC-WIV) have shown promising results. In this study, the influence of TMC on the i.n. delivery of WIV was studied in mice by comparing the nasal residence time and the specific location in the nasal cavity of WIV and TMC-WIV. Additionally, the local toxicity profile of the WIV formulations was assessed. In vivo fluorescence imaging was used to study the nasal residence time and the fate of the bulk vaccine in mice that received vaccines fluorescently labeled with IRDye800CW. An immunohistochemical (IHC) staining method for nasal cross-sections was developed to visualize the antigen in the nasal cavity. Therefore, mice were sacrificed at different time points after vaccination with various vaccine formulations and nasal cross-sections were made. The local toxicity was assessed using hematoxylin and eosin staining for the nasal cross-sections. No significant differences in the nasal residence time between WIV and TMC-WIV were observed. However, IHC revealed a striking difference in the location and distribution of WIV in the nasal cavity. When formulated as plain WIV, positive staining was mainly found in the nasal cavity, presumably in mucus blobs. TMC-coated WIV, on the other hand, was mostly present as a thin layer on the epithelial surfaces of the naso- and maxilloturbinates. This difference in staining pattern correlates with the observed differences in immunogenicity of these two vaccines and indicates that TMC-WIV results in a much closer interaction of WIV with the epithelial surfaces than WIV alone, potentially leading to enhanced uptake and induction of immune responses. This study further shows that both WIV and TMC-WIV formulations induce minimal local toxicity. Taken altogether, these results provide more insight in the mode of action and safety of TMC and justify further research to

  8. An Advanced Electrospinning Method of Fabricating Nanofibrous Patterned Architectures with Controlled Deposition and Desired Alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasel, Sheikh Md

    We introduce a versatile advanced method of electrospinning for fabricating various kinds of nanofibrous patterns along with desired alignment, controlled amount of deposition and locally variable density into the architectures. In this method, we employed multiple electrodes whose potentials have been altered in milliseconds with the help of microprocessor based control system. Therefore, key success of this method was that the electrical field as well as charge carrying fibers could be switched shortly from one electrode's location to another, as a result, electrospun fibers could be deposited on the designated areas with desired alignment. A wide range of nanofibrous patterned architectures were constructed using proper arrangement of multiple electrodes. By controlling the concurrent activation time of two adjacent electrodes, we demonstrated that amount of fibers going into the pattern can be adjusted and desired alignment in electrospun fibers can be obtained. We also revealed that the deposition density of electrospun fibers in different areas of patterned architectures can be varied. We showed that by controlling the deposition time between two adjacent electrodes, a number of functionally graded patterns can be generated with uniaxial alignment. We also demonstrated that this handy method was capable of producing random, aligned, and multidirectional nanofibrous mats by engaging a number of electrodes and switching them in desired patterns. A comprehensive study using finite element method was carried out to understand the effects of electrical field. Simulation results revealed that electrical field strength alters shortly based on electrode control switch patterns. Nanofibrous polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) scaffolds and its composite reinforced with wollastonite and wood flour were fabricated using rotating drum electrospinning technique. Morphological, mechanical, and thermal, properties were characterized on PVA/wollastonite and PVA/wood flour nanocomposites

  9. Cues Resulting in Desire for Sexual Activity in Women

    PubMed Central

    McCall, Katie; Meston, Cindy

    2010-01-01

    Introduction A number of questionnaires have been created to assess levels of sexual desire in women, but to our knowledge, there are currently no validated measures for assessing cues that result in sexual desire. A questionnaire of this nature could be useful for both clinicians and researchers, because it considers the contextual nature of sexual desire and it draws attention to individual differences in factors that can contribute to sexual desire. Aim The aim of the present study was to create a multidimensional assessment tool of cues for sexual desire in women that is validated in women with and without hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD). Methods Factor analyses conducted on both an initial sample (N = 874) and a community sample (N = 138) resulted in the Cues for Sexual Desire Scale (CSDS) which included four factors: (i) Emotional Bonding Cues; (ii) Erotic/ Explicit Cues; (iii) Visual/Proximity Cues; and (iv) Implicit/Romantic Cues. Main Outcome Measures Scale construction of cues associated with sexual desire and differences between women with and without sexual dysfunction. Results The CSDS demonstrated good reliability and validity and was able to detect significant differences between women with and without HSDD. Results from regression analyses indicated that both marital status and level of sexual functioning predicted scores on the CSDS. The CSDS provided predictive validity for the Female Sexual Function Index desire and arousal domain scores, and increased cues were related to a higher reported frequency of sexual activity in women. Conclusions The findings from the present study provide valuable information regarding both internal and external triggers that can result in sexual desire for women. We believe that the CSDS could be beneficial in therapeutic settings to help identify cues that do and do not facilitate sexual desire in women with clinically diagnosed desire difficulties. PMID:16942529

  10. Projection of Romantic and Sexual Desire in Opposite-Sex Friendships: How Wishful Thinking Creates a Self-Fulfilling Prophecy.

    PubMed

    Lemay, Edward P; Wolf, Noah R

    2016-07-01

    In two studies, the authors examined the projection of romantic and sexual desire in opposite-sex friendships. In both studies, perceivers who strongly desired their friends projected this desire onto their friends, believing that their desire was more reciprocated than was actually the case. In turn, projection of desire appeared to motivate perceivers into enacting relationship initiation behaviors, which predicted changes in targets' romantic and sexual desires over time (Study 2). Projection was elevated for perceivers who saw themselves as high in mate value, and targets appeared to be influenced by perceivers' overtures primarily when they believed perceivers were high in mate value. This research suggests that, for perceivers high in mate value, romantic and sexual desire creates biased perceptions that initiate self-fulfilling prophecies. PMID:27189004

  11. [Testosterone therapy in female hypoactive sexual desire disorder].

    PubMed

    Meyer, Patrick

    2016-03-16

    Hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) is a deficiency of sexual desire that causes marked personal or interpersonal distress. It occurs in approximately 1 in 10 adult women. A number of potential contributory factors (hormonal, neurobiological and psychosocial) have been identified. Testosterone plays an excitatory role in sexual desire but the mechanism is not yet well understood. Treatment with testosterone has been shown to improve sexual desire in menopausal women with HSDD. However, there are limited data concerning premenopausal women and long-term safety. At present, physiological testosterone preparations for use in women are not available in Switzerland. PMID:27149714

  12. [Testosterone therapy in female hypoactive sexual desire disorder].

    PubMed

    Meyer, Patrick

    2016-03-16

    Hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) is a deficiency of sexual desire that causes marked personal or interpersonal distress. It occurs in approximately 1 in 10 adult women. A number of potential contributory factors (hormonal, neurobiological and psychosocial) have been identified. Testosterone plays an excitatory role in sexual desire but the mechanism is not yet well understood. Treatment with testosterone has been shown to improve sexual desire in menopausal women with HSDD. However, there are limited data concerning premenopausal women and long-term safety. At present, physiological testosterone preparations for use in women are not available in Switzerland.

  13. TreeMAC: Localized TDMA MAC protocol for real-time high-data-rate sensor networks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Song, W.-Z.; Huang, R.; Shirazi, B.; LaHusen, R.

    2009-01-01

    Earlier sensor network MAC protocols focus on energy conservation in low-duty cycle applications, while some recent applications involve real-time high-data-rate signals. This motivates us to design an innovative localized TDMA MAC protocol to achieve high throughput and low congestion in data collection sensor networks, besides energy conservation. TreeMAC divides a time cycle into frames and each frame into slots. A parent node determines the children's frame assignment based on their relative bandwidth demand, and each node calculates its own slot assignment based on its hop-count to the sink. This innovative 2-dimensional frame-slot assignment algorithm has the following nice theory properties. First, given any node, at any time slot, there is at most one active sender in its neighborhood (including itself). Second, the packet scheduling with TreeMAC is bufferless, which therefore minimizes the probability of network congestion. Third, the data throughput to the gateway is at least 1/3 of the optimum assuming reliable links. Our experiments on a 24-node testbed show that TreeMAC protocol significantly improves network throughput, fairness, and energy efficiency compared to TinyOS's default CSMA MAC protocol and a recent TDMA MAC protocol Funneling-MAC. Partial results of this paper were published in Song, Huang, Shirazi and Lahusen [W.-Z. Song, R. Huang, B. Shirazi, and R. Lahusen, TreeMAC: Localized TDMA MAC protocol for high-throughput and fairness in sensor networks, in: The 7th Annual IEEE International Conference on Pervasive Computing and Communications, PerCom, March 2009]. Our new contributions include analyses of the performance of TreeMAC from various aspects. We also present more implementation detail and evaluate TreeMAC from other aspects. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V.

  14. Fat, desire and disgust in the colonial imagination.

    PubMed

    Forth, Christopher E

    2012-01-01

    This article tracks the relatively unexamined ways in which ethnographic, travel and medical knowledge interrelated in the construction of fat stereotypes in the nineteenth century, often plotted along a temporal curve from ‘primitive’ corpulence to ‘civilized’ moderation. By showing how the complementary insights of medicine and ethnography circulated in beauty manuals, weight-loss guides and popular ethnographic books – all of which were aimed at middle-class readers and thus crystallize certain bourgeois attitudes of the time – it argues that the pronounced denigration of fat that emerged in Britain and France by the early twentieth century acquired some of its edge through this ongoing tendency to depict desire for and acceptance of fat as fundamentally ‘savage’ or ‘uncivilized’ traits. This tension between fat and ‘civilization’ was by no means univocal or stable. Rather, this analysis shows, a complex and wide-ranging series of similarities and differences, identifications and refusals can be traced between British and French perceptions of their own bodies and desires and the shortcomings they saw in foreign cultures. It sheds light as well on those aspects of their own societies that seemed ‘primitive’ in ways that bore an uncomfortable similarity to the colonial peoples they governed, demonstrating how a gendered, yet ultimately unstable, double standard was sustained for much of the nineteenth century. Finally it reveals a subtle and persistent racial subtext to the anti-fat discourses that would become more aggressive in the twentieth century and which are ubiquitous today.

  15. Effect of a local, one time, low-dose injection of zoledronic acid on titanium implant osseointegration in ovariectomized rats

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Gao; Bo, Lian; Yanjun, Jiao; Lina, Wu

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Local application of bisphosphonates has been proven to be safer than systemic administration to promote implant fixation. The objective of this study was to introduce such a simple, convenient and efficient method to enhance titanium (Ti) implant osseointegration in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. Material and methods Twenty female Sprague-Dawley rats sequentially underwent bilateral ovariectomy and tibia implantation, and injection of 30 µg/implant zoledronic acid (ZOL) at the site of implantation was performed. At the end of the study, the tibiae, mandibles, femurs and vertebrae were harvested for dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, histology and micro-computed tomography examination. Results Ovariectomized rats showed poor bone density, bone mass and trabecular microstructure. OVX + ZOL rats were characterized by significantly improved peri-implant bone area (1.72-fold), bone contact (2.30-fold), bone mineral density (1.57-fold) and bone mineral content (1.67-fold), as well as moderately increased bone volume to total volume ratio (1.34-fold), percentage osteointegration (1.54-fold), connectivity density (1.45-fold), and trabecular number (1.43-fold), but decreased trabecular separation (57.69%) when compared with the control levels (p < 0.05). No histological signs of jaw osteonecrosis were observed in the rats treated with ZOL, and there was no significant difference between the OVX group and OVX + ZOL group in the bone mass of the mandible, femur and 5th lumbar vertebra (p > 0.05). In addition, the overproduction of osteoporosis-induced advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) was completely prevented by local treatment with 30 µg/implant ZOL. Conclusions A local, one time, low-dose injection of ZOL at the site of implantation is able to promote the osseointegration of Ti implants following postmenopausal osteoporosis, and this action may be partly mediated by inhibition of the osteoporosis-induced AGE overproduction in the bone marrow. PMID:27695483

  16. Effect of a local, one time, low-dose injection of zoledronic acid on titanium implant osseointegration in ovariectomized rats

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Gao; Bo, Lian; Yanjun, Jiao; Lina, Wu

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Local application of bisphosphonates has been proven to be safer than systemic administration to promote implant fixation. The objective of this study was to introduce such a simple, convenient and efficient method to enhance titanium (Ti) implant osseointegration in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. Material and methods Twenty female Sprague-Dawley rats sequentially underwent bilateral ovariectomy and tibia implantation, and injection of 30 µg/implant zoledronic acid (ZOL) at the site of implantation was performed. At the end of the study, the tibiae, mandibles, femurs and vertebrae were harvested for dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, histology and micro-computed tomography examination. Results Ovariectomized rats showed poor bone density, bone mass and trabecular microstructure. OVX + ZOL rats were characterized by significantly improved peri-implant bone area (1.72-fold), bone contact (2.30-fold), bone mineral density (1.57-fold) and bone mineral content (1.67-fold), as well as moderately increased bone volume to total volume ratio (1.34-fold), percentage osteointegration (1.54-fold), connectivity density (1.45-fold), and trabecular number (1.43-fold), but decreased trabecular separation (57.69%) when compared with the control levels (p < 0.05). No histological signs of jaw osteonecrosis were observed in the rats treated with ZOL, and there was no significant difference between the OVX group and OVX + ZOL group in the bone mass of the mandible, femur and 5th lumbar vertebra (p > 0.05). In addition, the overproduction of osteoporosis-induced advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) was completely prevented by local treatment with 30 µg/implant ZOL. Conclusions A local, one time, low-dose injection of ZOL at the site of implantation is able to promote the osseointegration of Ti implants following postmenopausal osteoporosis, and this action may be partly mediated by inhibition of the osteoporosis-induced AGE overproduction in the bone marrow.

  17. The candidate gene, Clock, localizes to a strong spawning time quantitative trait locus region in rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Leder, E H; Danzmann, R G; Ferguson, M M

    2006-01-01

    We applied a candidate gene mapping approach to an existing quantitative trait loci (QTL) data set for spawning date in rainbow trout (Oncorynchus mykiss) to ascertain whether these genes could potentially account for any observed QTL effects. Several genes were chosen for their known or suspected roles in reproduction, circadian, or circannual timing, including salmon-type gonadotropin-releasing hormone 3A and 3B (GnRH3A and GnRH3B), Clock, Period1, and arylalkylamine N-acetlytransferase-1 and -2 (AANAT-1 and AANAT-2). Genes were sequenced, and polymorphisms were identified in parents of two rainbow trout mapping families, one of which was used previously to detect spawn timing QTL. Interval mapping was used to identify associations between genetic markers and spawning date effects. Using a genetic map that was updated with 574 genetic markers (775 total), we found evidence for 11 significant or suggestive QTL regions. Most QTL were only localized within one of the parents; however, a strong QTL region was identified in both female and male parents on linkage group RT-8 that explained 20% and 50% of trait variance, respectively. The Clock gene mapped to this region. Period1 mapped to a region in the female parent associated with a marginal effect (P = .056) on spawn timing. Other candidate genes were not associated with significant QTL effects.

  18. TreeMAC: Localized TDMA MAC protocol for real-time high-data-rate sensor networks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Song, W.-Z.; Huang, R.; Shirazi, B.; Husent, R.L.

    2009-01-01

    Earlier sensor network MAC protocols focus on energy conservation in low-duty cycle applications, while some recent applications involve real-time high-data-rate signals. This motivates us to design an innovative localized TDMA MAC protocol to achieve high throughput and low congestion in data collection sensor networks, besides energy conservation. TreeMAC divides a time cycle into frames and frame into slots. Parent determines children's frame assigmnent based on their relative bandwidth demand, and each node calculates its own slot assignment based on its hop-count to the sink. This innovative 2-dimensional frame-slot assignment algorithm has the following nice theory properties. Firstly, given any node, at any time slot, there is at most one active sender in its neighborhood (includ ing itself). Secondly, the packet scheduling with TreelMAC is bufferless, which therefore minimizes the probability of network congestion. Thirdly, the data throughput to gateway is at least 1/3 of the optimum assuming reliable links. Our experiments on a 24 node test bed demonstrate that TreeMAC protocol significantly improves network throughput and energy efficiency, by comparing to the TinyOS's default CSMA MAC protocol and a recent TDMA MAC protocol Funneling-MAC[8]. ?? 2009 IEEE.

  19. Dispersive and mixing characteristics for turbulent porous media flows based on local length and time scale measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liburdy, James; Patil, Vishal

    2012-11-01

    Porous media flows have a very wide range of applications, both in engineering applications and natural flows. Local mixing and dispersion is strongly influenced by the complex pore geometry. Understanding mixing properties requires knowledge of the range of scales present within the flow and how they vary with Reynolds number. Experiments have been conducted using time resolved two component PIV based on refractive index matching of the solid and liquid phases. The flow characteristics vary over a large range of Reynolds numbers, typically based on an average pore velocity and hydraulic diameter or bead size as the characteristic length. In this study we examine the effect of increased pore Reynolds number on the turbulence characteristics for Reynolds numbers from approximately 400 to 4000. In particular the integral and Kolmogorov length scales are estimated, along with the determination of the integral velocity and Eulerian time scales. These are then used to estimate the Lagrangian time scale. The asymptotic behavior associated with increasing pore Reynolds number is shown, and used to evaluate the scaling relationships. Results are also used to demonstrate the evaluation of the mechanical dispersion coefficient and that it compares well with results obtained using global methods such as solute breakthrough curves. Funding by NSF grant 0933857, Particulate and Multiphase Processing.

  20. Relative capacities of time-gated versus continuous-wave imaging to localize tissue embedded vessels with increasing depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Nimit L.; Lin, Zi-Jing; Rathore, Yajuvendra; Livingston, Edward H.; Liu, Hanli; Alexandrakis, George

    2010-01-01

    Surgeons often cannot see major vessels embedded in adipose tissue and inadvertently injure them. One such example occurs during surgical removal of the gallbladder, where injury of the nearby common bile duct leads to life-threatening complications. Near-infrared imaging of the intraoperative field may help surgeons localize such critical tissue-embedded vessels. We have investigated how continuous-wave (CW) imaging performs relative to time-gated wide-field imaging, presently a rather costly technology, under broad Gaussian beam-illumination conditions. We have studied the simplified case of an isolated cylinder having bile-duct optical properties, embedded at different depths within a 2-cm slab of adipose tissue. Monte Carlo simulations were preformed for both reflectance and transillumination geometries. The relative performance of CW versus time-gated imaging was compared in terms of spatial resolution and contrast-to-background ratio in the resulting simulated images. It was found that time-gated imaging offers superior spatial resolution and vessel-detection sensitivity in most cases, though CW transillumination measurements may also offer satisfactory performance for this tissue geometry at lower cost. Experiments were performed in reflectance geometry to validate simulation results, and potential challenges in the translation of this technology to the clinic are discussed.

  1. An algorithm for the localization of multiple interfering sperm whales using multi-sensor time difference of arrival.

    PubMed

    Baggenstoss, Paul M

    2011-07-01

    In this paper an algorithm is described for the localization of individual sperm whales in situations where several near-by animals are simultaneously vocalizing. The algorithm operates on time-difference of arrival (TDOA) measurements observed at sensor pairs and assumes no prior knowledge of the TDOA-whale associations. In other words, it solves the problem of associating TDOAs to whales. The algorithm is able to resolve association disputes where a given TDOA measurement may fit to more than one position estimate and can handle spurious TDOAs. The algorithm also provides estimates of Cramer-Rao lower bound for the position estimates. The algorithm was tested with real data using TDOA estimates obtained by cross-correlating click-trains. The click-trains were generated by a separate algorithm that operated independently on each sensor to produce click-trains corresponding to a given whale and to reject click-trains from reflected propagation paths.

  2. Methodology for the passive control of orbital inclination and mean local time to meet sun-synchronous orbit requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folta, David; Kraft, Lauri

    1992-01-01

    The mean local time (MLT) of equatorial crossing of a sun-synchronous Earth-observing spacecraft orbit drifts with inclination; therefore, in order to maintain the MLT, the inclination must be controlled. Inclination may be maintained actively by costly out-of-plane maneuvers or passively by using the perturbing forces due to the sun and moon. This paper examines the passive control approach using the Earth Observing System (EOS) as a basis for the discussion. Applications to Landsat and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) spacecraft are presented for comparison. This technique is especially beneficial to spacecraft lacking propulsion systems. The results indicate that passive inclination control appears to be the preferable maintenance method when spacecraft weight restrictions, operational considerations, and scientific requirements apply.

  3. Time- and locally resolved photoluminescence of semipolar GaInN /GaN facet light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wunderer, Thomas; Brückner, Peter; Hertkorn, Joachim; Scholz, Ferdinand; Beirne, Gareth J.; Jetter, Michael; Michler, Peter; Feneberg, Martin; Thonke, Klaus

    2007-04-01

    The authors investigate the carrier lifetime and photoluminescence (PL) intensity of a semipolar GaInN /GaN sample which was realized by growing five GaInN /GaN quantum wells on the {11¯01} side facets of selectively grown n-GaN stripes that have a triangular shape running along the ⟨112¯0⟩ direction. Time- and locally resolved PL measurements show drastically reduced lifetimes for the semipolar sample of only 650ps at 4K whereas lifetimes exceeding 50ns were found for a polar reference sample. Furthermore, more than a doubling of the luminescence intensity and a significantly reduced blueshift of the PL peak wavelength with increasing excitation power density provide further evidence for the presence of reduced piezoelectric fields in the semipolar sample.

  4. "Non-Coercive Rearrangements": Theorizing Desire in TESOL

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Motha, Suhanthie; Lin, Angel

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the authors argue that at the center of every English language learning moment lies desire: desire for the language; for the identities that English represents; for capital, power, and images that are associated with English; for what is believed to lie beyond the doors that English unlocks. However, despite its centrality within…

  5. Neural Correlates of Belief- and Desire-Reasoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, David; Meltzoff, Andrew N.; Wellman, Henry M.

    2009-01-01

    Theory of mind requires an understanding of both desires and beliefs. Moreover, children understand desires before beliefs. Little is known about the mechanisms underlying this developmental lag. Additionally, previous neuroimaging and neurophysiological studies have neglected the direct comparison of these developmentally critical mental-state…

  6. Intergalactic Encounters: Desire and the Political Immediacy of Children's Drawing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulte, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    The author of this article creates a semblance between Deleuze and Guattari's conception of a politics of desire and the four realities, as outlined by Brent and Marjorie Wilson. By making this theoretical move, the author advances the idea that children's drawing unfolds from one moment to the next through the assemblages of desire that are most…

  7. Human Sexual Desire Disorder: Do We Have a Problem?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNab, Warren L.; Henry, Jean

    2006-01-01

    Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder (HSDD), loss of sexual desire for sexual activity, is one of the most common sexual dysfunctions of men and women in the United States. This article presents an overview of this specific sexual dysfunction including incidence, possible causes, treatment options, and the role of the health educator in addressing…

  8. Social Desirability, Environmental Attitudes, and General Ecological Behaviour in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oerke, Britta; Bogner, Franz X.

    2013-01-01

    Socially desirable responses have been widely discussed as potentially biasing self-reported measures of environmental attitude and behaviour assessment. The direct and moderating effect of social desirability on children has not been analysed before. By applying a Lie scale together with a two-factor environmental attitude set measure and a scale…

  9. Detecting Social Desirability Bias Using Factor Mixture Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leite, Walter L.; Cooper, Lou Ann

    2010-01-01

    Based on the conceptualization that social desirable bias (SDB) is a discrete event resulting from an interaction between a scale's items, the testing situation, and the respondent's latent trait on a social desirability factor, we present a method that makes use of factor mixture models to identify which examinees are most likely to provide…

  10. Breaking up with Deleuze: Desire and Valuing the Irreconcilable

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuck, Eve

    2010-01-01

    In this article, Eve Tuck grapples with Gilles Deleuze's conceptualization of desire, finding it simultaneously generative and unsatisfying. Recognizing that Deleuze will not "say" what Tuck wants him to say about desire--that it is smart, and constitutes expertise--Tuck reasons that there is only one thing she can do: break up with Deleuze. The…

  11. Understanding the Desirability of English Language Education in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tseng, Chao-Ling

    2008-01-01

    The popularity and desirability of English language education has become somewhat unbeatable in Taiwan. This article seeks to understand the multiple threads of reasoning systems that come together to constitute and sustain the desirability of English learning. It conceptualizes that language education is more than teaching and learning a…

  12. Racial and Ethnic Differences in the Desire to Marry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South, Scott J.

    1993-01-01

    Used data from over 2,000 respondents to explore racial, ethnic, and gender differences in desire to marry. African Americans were significantly less desiring of marriage than whites; racial difference among men was significantly larger than difference among women. Compared to nonhispanic whites of same gender, Hispanic men were more likely,…

  13. The Role of Creativity and Proactivity on Perceived Entrepreneurial Desirability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zampetakis, Leonidas A.

    2008-01-01

    The study tested the extent to which perceived desirability mediates the effects of student creativity and proactivity on entrepreneurial intent. Participants were 199 engineering and business university students from Greek Universities. Results using Structural Equation Modelling indicated that perceived desirability fully mediates the…

  14. Bibliotherapy for Low Sexual Desire: Evidence for Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mintz, Laurie B.; Balzer, Alexandra M.; Zhao, Xinting; Bush, Hannah E.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the effectiveness of bibliotherapy for low sexual desire among women, which is the most frequent sexual concern brought to counselors. Forty-five women responded to an advertisement for participation in a study on low sexual desire and were assigned to either the intervention or the wait-list control group. The intervention…

  15. Library Users' Service Desires: A LibQUAL+ Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Bruce; Kyrillidou, Martha; Cook, Colleen

    2008-01-01

    The present study was conducted to explore library users' desired service quality levels on the twenty-two core LibQUAL+ items. Specifically, we explored similarities and differences in users' desired library service quality levels across user groups (i.e., undergraduate students, graduate students, and faculty), across geographic locations (i.e.,…

  16. Local and Catchment-Scale Water Storage Changes in Northern Benin Deduced from Gravity Monitoring at Various Time-Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinderer, J.; Hector, B.; Séguis, L.; Descloitres, M.; Cohard, J.; Boy, J.; Calvo, M.; Rosat, S.; Riccardi, U.; Galle, S.

    2013-12-01

    Water storage changes (WSC) are investigated by the mean of gravity monitoring in Djougou, northern Benin, in the frame of the GHYRAF (Gravity and Hydrology in Africa) project. In this area, WSC are 1) part of the control system for evapotranspiration (ET) processes, a key variable of the West-African monsoon cycle and 2) the state variable for resource management, a critical issue in storage-poor hard rock basement contexts such as in northern Benin. We show the advantages of gravity monitoring for analyzing different processes in the water cycle involved at various time and space scales, using the main gravity sensors available today (FG5 absolute gravimeter, superconducting gravimeter -SG- and CG5 micro-gravimeter). The study area is also part of the long-term observing system AMMA-Catch, and thus under intense hydro-meteorological monitoring (rain, soil moisture, water table level, ET ...). Gravity-derived WSC are compared at all frequencies to hydrological data and to hydrological models calibrated on these data. Discrepancies are analyzed to discuss the pros and cons of each approach. Fast gravity changes (a few hours) are significant when rain events occur, and involve different contributions: rainfall itself, runoff, fast subsurface water redistribution, screening effect of the gravimeter building and local topography. We investigate these effects and present the statistical results of a set of rain events recorded with the SG installed in Djougou since July 2010. The intermediate time scale of gravity changes (a few days) is caused by ET and both vertical and horizontal water redistribution. The integrative nature of gravity measurements does not allow to separate these different contributions, and the screening from the shelter reduces our ability to retrieve ET values. Also, atmospheric corrections are critical at such frequencies, and deserve some specific attention. However, a quick analysis of gravity changes following rain events shows that the

  17. Continuous, high-resolution spatial mapping of water isotopes: improving tools for quantifying local evaporation and residence times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, Kate J.; Carter, Jeffrey A.; Winkler, Renato; Downing, Brian; Kendall, Carol; Bergamaschi, Brian

    2015-04-01

    Stable isotopes of water (d2H, d18O) are unique tracers of many hydrological processes including evaporation, precipitation, reservoir mixing and residence time. Historically, discrete water samples have been collected and analyzed via either Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry, or more recently laser-based spectroscopic methods, such as Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS). However, the analysis of discrete samples precludes the ability to construct high resolution water isotope data sets through time and space. By coupling a recently developed front-end peripheral device (Continuous Water Sampler or CWS) to a CRDS analyzer (Picarro L2130-i), we continuously measured and spatially mapped water isotopes on a transect of the Sacramento River Delta following an extended period of drought. More than two-thousand five-second average d18O and d2H measurements were made aboard the R/V King (USGS) over a six-hour period. In addition to water isotopes, nitrate, chlorophyll, dissolved organic matter (DOM) fluorescence, and other water quality parameters were also measured continuously. As you travel northeast up the delta, surface waters become progressively more enriched in 18O and 2H, while nitrate decreased in concentration and chlorophyll and DOM increased. We utilize the spatially-mapped isotope data within a single transect to understand local evaporation and residence time by (i) utilizing the secondary parameter, d-excess, and (ii) using a simple mass balance model of water moving through the system (inflow, outflow and evaporation). Additional transects, to be conducted during the rainy season, should highlight how the Delta system evolves seasonally. In concert with other data previously collected from the Sacramento River Delta, we suggest the lower region represents a mixture of river waters derived from the Sierra Nevada Mountains and the more marine waters from the mouth of the San Francisco Bay. Moving NE up the Delta into shallow sloughs through flooded wetlands

  18. Desire to work as a death anxiety buffer mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yaakobi, Erez

    2015-01-01

    Four studies were conducted to examine the death anxiety buffering function of work as a terror management mechanism, and the possible moderating role of culture. In Study 1, making mortality salient led to higher reports of participants' desire to work. In Study 2, activating thoughts of fulfillment of the desire to work after mortality salience reduced the accessibility of death-related thoughts. In Study 3, activating thoughts of fulfillment of the desire to work reduced the effects of mortality salience on out-group derogation. In Study 4, priming thoughts about obstacles to the actualization of desire to work led to greater accessibility of death-related thoughts. Although two different cultures with contrasting work values were examined, the results were consistent, indicating that the desire to work serves as a death anxiety buffer mechanism in both cultures.

  19. Desire to work as a death anxiety buffer mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yaakobi, Erez

    2015-01-01

    Four studies were conducted to examine the death anxiety buffering function of work as a terror management mechanism, and the possible moderating role of culture. In Study 1, making mortality salient led to higher reports of participants' desire to work. In Study 2, activating thoughts of fulfillment of the desire to work after mortality salience reduced the accessibility of death-related thoughts. In Study 3, activating thoughts of fulfillment of the desire to work reduced the effects of mortality salience on out-group derogation. In Study 4, priming thoughts about obstacles to the actualization of desire to work led to greater accessibility of death-related thoughts. Although two different cultures with contrasting work values were examined, the results were consistent, indicating that the desire to work serves as a death anxiety buffer mechanism in both cultures. PMID:25384641

  20. Wishful seeing: more desired objects are seen as closer.

    PubMed

    Balcetis, Emily; Dunning, David

    2010-01-01

    Although people assume that they see the surrounding environment as it truly is, we suggest that perception of the natural environment is dependent upon the internal goal states of perceivers. Five experiments demonstrated that perceivers tend to see desirable objects (i.e., those that can fulfill immediate goals-a water bottle to assuage their thirst, money they can win, a personality test providing favorable feedback) as physically closer to them than less desirable objects. Biased distance perception was revealed through verbal reports and through actions toward the object (e.g., underthrowing a beanbag at a desirable object). We suggest that seeing desirable objects as closer than less desirable objects serves the self-regulatory function of energizing the perceiver to approach objects that fulfill needs and goals. PMID:20424036

  1. Perceptions of desirable graduate competencies for science and technology new graduates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coll, Richard K.; Zegwaard, Karsten E.

    2006-05-01

    Work-integrated learning (WIL) programmes that combine on-campus classroom-based study with off-campus authentic work experience are a growing area of interest internationally. Despite widespread practice of WIL, there are few reports that shed light on appropriate pedagogies for the work experience in particular. As with any form of education, providers hold certain views as to desirable outcomes in terms of graduate profiles and of desirable graduate competencies. A complication for multi-party WIL programmes is that educational stakeholders (e.g., staff working in tertiary education provider institutions and employers) may hold different views as to desirable graduate competencies. Here we argue that an understanding of stakeholder views of desirable graduate competencies is an essential prerequisite of pedagogical design. The research reported here is an intrinsic case study and comprised an investigation of perceptions of 24 desirable graduate competencies for new science and technology graduates entering the workforce both today, and in ten years’ time. Stakeholders for four sector stakeholder groups (n = 458): undergraduate students (n = 71), recent graduates (n = 143), employers of graduates (n = 172), and faculty (n = 72), were surveyed using a previously reported and validated instrument. The research findings suggest that science and technology stakeholders see all 24 competencies as desirable, and see the importance of all skills and some skills in particular as likely to increase in ten years’ time. Despite emphasis on cognitive and technical skills (often termed ‘hard’ skills), the single most desirable skill is ability and willingness to learn, a behavioural skill (often termed ‘soft’ skills). It is proposed that classroom-based instruction is unlikely to produce graduates with the desired skills, and that work-integrated learning may have a role to play in the development of graduate competencies.

  2. Self-contained diffuse optical imaging system for real-time detection and localization of vascular occlusions.

    PubMed

    Pollonini, Luca; Forseth, Kiefer J; Dacso, Clifford C; Parazynski, Scott E; Friedman, Jeffrey D

    2015-08-01

    Free flap surgery is a procedure where healthy tissue is transferred from a donor site to a recipient site of the body to fill a defect without maintaining the original blood supply to the flap. The anastomosis of the vascular network of the flap to the blood vessels adjacent to the recipient site has associated risks of arterial and/or venous occlusions that must be promptly detected to avoid temporary or permanent tissue damage. In this work, we present a skin-contact diffusion optical imaging (DOI) system able to continuously provide a three-dimensional representation of the flap oxygenation to promptly detect vascular occlusions potentially occurring in the flap. Multiple near-infrared LEDs and photodetectors were embedded into a self-contained optical sensor for prolonged monitoring of concentration changes of oxygenated (HbO) and deoxygenated hemoglobin (HbR) at multiple locations and depths. A time-efficient algorithm mapped measured oxygenation changes in a three-dimensional volume to allow surgeons and clinical personnel to detect and localize abnormal blood perfusion changes during or after surgery, in time for corrective intervention. The image reconstruction algorithm was validated using computerized flap models in which oxygenation was synthetically altered, whereas the optical system was preliminarily tested on a healthy forearm simulating a flap undergoing arterial and venous occlusions, proving the feasibility of implementing DOI in the form of a wearable patch for prolonged perfusion monitoring. PMID:26737630

  3. Spectral narrowing and spin echo for localized carriers with heavy-tailed Lévy distribution of hopping times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Z.; Mkhitaryan, V. V.; Raikh, M. E.

    2016-05-01

    We study analytically the free induction decay and the spin echo decay originating from the localized carriers moving between the sites which host random magnetic fields. Due to disorder in the site positions and energies, the on-site residence times, τ , are widely spread according to the Lévy distribution. The power-law tail ∝τ-1 -α in the distribution of τ does not affect the conventional spectral narrowing for α >2 but leads to a dramatic acceleration of the free induction decay in the domain 2 >α >1 . The next abrupt acceleration of the decay takes place as α becomes smaller than 1. In the latter domain the decay does not follow a simple-exponent law. To capture the behavior of the average spin in this domain, we solve the evolution equation for the average spin using the approach different from the conventional approach based on the Laplace transform. Unlike the free induction decay, the tail in the distribution of the residence times leads to the slow decay of the spin echo. The echo is dominated by realizations of the carrier motion for which the number of sites, visited by the carrier, is minimal.

  4. The impact of Local Authorities' interventions on household waste collection: a case study approach using time series modelling.

    PubMed

    Cole, Christine; Quddus, Mohammed; Wheatley, Andrew; Osmani, Mohamed; Kay, Kath

    2014-02-01

    At a local Government level there have been many interventions and changes made to household waste collection services to meet new regulatory requirements. These changes include separate collection of recyclable and organic materials. This paper has used a time series model to quantify the success of interventions introduced by a LA. The case study was a medium sized UK LA, Charnwood Borough Council (CBC), the research analyses monthly data of quantities of recyclates, garden waste for composting and residual waste for landfill disposal. The time series model was validated with a five year data set and used to measure the impacts of the various changes to identify which intervention was the most successful, while controlling for season and number of working days. The results show the interventions analysed both had abrupt and permanent positive impacts on the yield of recyclable materials, and a corresponding negative impact on the residual waste. The model could be added to the National data base to help LAs to compare interventions and to understand which schemes encourage householder participation and improve recycling performance. PMID:24256716

  5. Tracking Local Conformational Changes of Ribonuclease A Using Picosecond Time-Resolved Fluorescence of the Six Tyrosine Residues

    PubMed Central

    Noronha, Melinda; Lima, João C.; Paci, Emanuele; Santos, Helena; Maçanita, António L.

    2007-01-01

    The six tyrosine residues of ribonuclease A (RNase A) are used as individual intrinsic probes for tracking local conformational changes during unfolding. The fluorescence decays of RNase A are well described by sums of three exponentials with decay times (τ1 = 1.7 ns, τ2 = 180 ps, and τ3 = 30 ps) and preexponential coefficients (A1 = 1, A2 = 1, and A3 = 4) at pH 7, 25°C. The decay times are controlled by photo-induced electron transfer from individual tyrosine residues to the nearest disulphide (–SS–), bridge, which is distance (R) dependent. We assign τ1 to Tyr-76 (R = 12.8 Å), τ2 to Tyr-115 (R = 6.9 Å), and τ3 to Tyr-25, Tyr-73, Tyr-92, and Tyr-97 (all four at R = 5.5 ± 0.3 Å) at 23°C. On the basis of this assignment, the results show that, upon thermal or chemical unfolding only Tyr-25, Tyr-92, and Tyr-76 undergo significant displacement from their nearest –SS– bridge. Despite reporting on different regions of the protein, the concordance between the transition temperatures, Tm, obtained from Tyr-76 (Tm = 59.2°C) and Tyr-25 and Tyr-92 (Tm = 58.2°C) suggests a single unfolding event in this temperature range that affects all these regions similarly. PMID:17384067

  6. The impact of Local Authorities' interventions on household waste collection: a case study approach using time series modelling.

    PubMed

    Cole, Christine; Quddus, Mohammed; Wheatley, Andrew; Osmani, Mohamed; Kay, Kath

    2014-02-01

    At a local Government level there have been many interventions and changes made to household waste collection services to meet new regulatory requirements. These changes include separate collection of recyclable and organic materials. This paper has used a time series model to quantify the success of interventions introduced by a LA. The case study was a medium sized UK LA, Charnwood Borough Council (CBC), the research analyses monthly data of quantities of recyclates, garden waste for composting and residual waste for landfill disposal. The time series model was validated with a five year data set and used to measure the impacts of the various changes to identify which intervention was the most successful, while controlling for season and number of working days. The results show the interventions analysed both had abrupt and permanent positive impacts on the yield of recyclable materials, and a corresponding negative impact on the residual waste. The model could be added to the National data base to help LAs to compare interventions and to understand which schemes encourage householder participation and improve recycling performance.

  7. A multiscale maximum entropy moment closure for locally regulated space-time point process models of population dynamics.

    PubMed

    Raghib, Michael; Hill, Nicholas A; Dieckmann, Ulf

    2011-05-01

    The prevalence of structure in biological populations challenges fundamental assumptions at the heart of continuum models of population dynamics based only on mean densities (local or global). Individual-based models (IBMs) were introduced during the last decade in an attempt to overcome this limitation by following explicitly each individual in the population. Although the IBM approach has been quite useful, the capability to follow each individual usually comes at the expense of analytical tract ability, which limits the generality of the statements that can be made. For the specific case of spatial structure in populations of sessile (and identical) organisms, space-time point processes with local regulation seem to cover the middle ground between analytical tract ability and a higher degree of biological realism. This approach has shown that simplified representations of fecundity, local dispersal and density-dependent mortality weighted by the local competitive environment are sufficient to generate spatial patterns that mimic field observations. Continuum approximations of these stochastic processes try to distill their fundamental properties, and they keep track of not only mean densities, but also higher order spatial correlations. However, due to the non-linearities involved they result in infinite hierarchies of moment equations. This leads to the problem of finding a 'moment closure'; that is, an appropriate order of (lower order) truncation, together with a method of expressing the highest order density not explicitly modelled in the truncated hierarchy in terms of the lower order densities. We use the principle of constrained maximum entropy to derive a closure relationship for truncation at second order using normalisation and the product densities of first and second orders as constraints, and apply it to one such hierarchy. The resulting 'maxent' closure is similar to the Kirkwood superposition approximation, or 'power-3' closure, but it is

  8. Space Monitoring of air pollution using satellite time series: from a global view down to local scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanorte, Antonio; Aromando, Angelo; Desantis, Fortunato; Lasaponara, Rosa

    2013-04-01

    Assessment of air pollution has been performed by different means over the years and, recently, the use of satellite data for detecting and monitoring atmospheric pollution has received considerable attention especially for application in industrial and urban areas. Methods based on satellite data (such as Landsat TM, SPOT MODIS images) are focused on the estimation of aerosol optical thickness (AOT) that is a measure of aerosol loading in the atmosphere, and therefore, it is considered as the main significant parameter of the presence/absence of atmospheric pollutants. A higher AOT value expresses the degree to which aerosols prevent the transmission of light, therefore, higher columnar of aerosol loading means lower visibility and higher aerosol concentration Several state-of-art aerosol retrieval techniques provide aerosol properties in global scale, as for example products from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on board the Earth Observing System (EOS) Terra and Aqua satellites. The current aerosol optical thickness (AOT) products from MODIS (available free of charge by the NASA web site) is 10 km. This product is suitable for global research, but it faces difficulty in local area research, especially in urban areas However, new aerosol retrieval algorithm for the (MODIS) 500m resolution data have been developed to retrieve aerosol properties over land, which helps on addressing the aerosol climatic issues in local/urban scale. Over the years, several algorithms for determining the aerosol optical thickness have been developed using several approaches and satellite sensors including medium (Landsat; ASTER) and high resolution imagery (IKONOS and Quickbird). A comparison of results from these methods and independent data sets has been performed in the Basilicata region in the framework of the MITRA project (ref). This research activity was conducted in order to analyze their temporal dynamics and reliability for systematically using them

  9. Time-dependent localization of high- and low-sulfated keratan sulfates in the song nuclei of developing zebra finches.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Hisataka; Ohgomori, Tomohiro; Abe, Kentaro; Uchimura, Kenji; Kadomatsu, Kenji; Jinno, Shozo

    2015-11-01

    Keratan sulfate proteoglycans (KSPGs) and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) consist of a protein core with covalently attached glycosaminoglycan side chain. Although CSPGs are known to regulate the end of the critical period, the role of KSPGs in brain development remains unclear. Young male zebra finches memorise song templates during development. The brain regions that are responsible for song learning, known as song nuclei, are recognized as a suitable model for the study of brain development. To understand the potential role of KSPGs, here we examined the localization of KSs with different degrees of sulfation in the brain of developing male zebra finches. Exclusively in the song nuclei, an increase in expression of 5-D-4-positive (5-D-4(+)) high-sulfated KS started after hatching, and reached a plateau at the end of the sensory period, during which the young bird listens to and memorises the song of an adult tutor. By contrast, weak and ubiquitous expression of BCD-4(+) low-sulfated KS remained unchanged until the end of the sensory period, and first increased in the song nuclei at the end of the sensorimotor period, during which the young bird produces plastic songs. Immunoblot analysis showed that phosphacan was a common core protein of 5-D-4(+) KS and BCD-4(+) KS. Finally, we confirmed that the sulfotransferase responsible for the synthesis of high-sulfated KS was exclusively localised in the song nuclei. Our observations suggest that time-dependent localization of KSPGs with different sulfation patterns in the song nuclei may underlie song learning in developing male zebra finches. PMID:26369722

  10. Binaural model for artificial spatial sound localization based on interaural time delays and movements of the interaural axis.

    PubMed

    Kneip, Laurent; Baumann, Claude

    2008-11-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model for sound localization in space using two-microphone devices that possess at least two degrees of freedom. It proves a series of theorems and lemmas that are based on time difference of arrival measurements and movements of the interaural axis, forming a powerful instrument for practical robot applications. For instance, it shows that a single determined rotation of the interaural axis is sufficient to exactly yield the azimuth or the elevation of an immobile sound source in the far field, independently of microphone spacing and the speed of sound and hence of the surrounding medium. It proves that at any moment the knowledge of one value determines the magnitude of the other, with the restriction that the sign of the second value is undefined, which means that, depending on the rotation, either the back-front or the up-down ambiguity is kept unsolved. This paper also shows that parallax motion unlocks essential information about the distance and the Cartesian coordinates of the sound source. Shifting the microphone system sideways fixes the distance and the coordinate on the interaural axis. Combining rotation and translation movements completely solves the localization problem. In order to illustrate the efficacy of the model, this paper presents experiments with a low cost robot developer kit during which the azimuth, the elevation, and the distance of continuous sound sources are determined at a precision of 10 degrees and 0.5 m, respectively. Achieving this performance with low power material demonstrates how easily the model can be implemented into any robotic system.

  11. Anisotropic velocity structure of the crust and upper mantle in the Taiwan region from local travel time tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakovlev, Andrey; Koulakov, Ivan; Wu, Yih-Min

    2014-05-01

    Taiwan Island located in a contact zone between the Eurasian and Philippine Sea plates, the tectonic processes in this area are mostly controlled by the relative kinematics of these two plates. In the east, the Philippine Sea plate subducts northward under the Eurasian plate along the Ryukyu trench. Off the southern tip of Taiwan, the South China Sea subplate, part of the Eurasian plate, subducts eastward under the Philippine Sea plate underneath the Luzon Island. The Taiwan Island is located at the junction between these two subduction zones. Here we present anisotropic velocity model of the crust and upper mantle in the Taiwan region derived from local travel time tomography. We use more than 300 000 P and more than 150 000 S rays coming from 12910 earthquakes occurred in the Taiwan region and registered by 816 stations of different local Taiwanese seismic networks. The ANITA algorithm, for iterative nonlinear inversion of local earthquake data in orthorhombic anisotropic media with one predefined vertical orientation, was used for the tomographic inversion. This algorithm presumes anisotropy for only P velocity described as horizontally oriented ellipsoid. For S velocity we presume an isotropic model. Results show a good agreement with tectonic structure of the region. Obtained isotropic P and S velocity models show fit to each other. The most prominent features of the models are Philippine Sea plate characterized by increased velocities and decreased velocities observed along the Luzon and Ryukyu arcs. We observe that orientation of the fast velocity axis within the Philippine Sea plate coincides with direction of its displacement. Along the Luzon and Ryukyu arcs orientation of the fast velocities axis coincide with the arcs extension. The results show that upper mantle beneath the eastern Taiwan characterized by decreased velocities and N-S orientation of the fast velocity axis. The western Taiwan characterized by alteration of the relatively small negative

  12. Decoding a bistable percept with integrated time-frequency representation of single-trial local field potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhisong; Logothetis, Nikos K.; Liang, Hualou

    2008-12-01

    Bistable perception emerges when a stimulus under continuous view is perceived as the alternation of two mutually exclusive states. Such a stimulus provides a unique opportunity for understanding the neural basis of visual perception because it dissociates the perception from the visual input. In this paper we analyze the dynamic activity of local field potential (LFP), simultaneously collected from multiple channels in the middle temporal (MT) visual cortex of a macaque monkey, for decoding its bistable structure-from-motion (SFM) perception. Based on the observation that the discriminative information of neuronal population activity evolves and accumulates over time, we propose to select features from the integrated time-frequency representation of LFP using a relaxation (RELAX) algorithm and a sequential forward selection (SFS) algorithm with maximizing the Mahalanobis distance as the criterion function. The integrated-spectrogram based feature selection is much more robust and can achieve significantly better features than the instantaneous-spectrogram based feature selection. We exploit the support vector machines (SVM) classifier and the linear discriminant analysis (LDA) classifier based on the selected features to decode the reported perception on a single trial basis. Our results demonstrate the excellent performance of the integrated-spectrogram based feature selection and suggest that the features in the gamma frequency band (30-100 Hz) of LFP within specific temporal windows carry the most discriminative information for decoding bistable perception. The proposed integrated-spectrogram based feature selection approach may have potential for a myriad of applications involving multivariable time series such as brain-computer interfaces (BCI).

  13. What’s in a Kiss? The Effect of Romantic Kissing on Mate Desirability

    PubMed Central

    Wlodarski, Rafael; Dunbar, Robin I. M.

    2015-01-01

    Past research suggests that various courtship rituals, such as romantic kissing, may convey useful mate quality information. Two studies were carried out to examine how purported romantic kissing abilities, as a potential cue to some form of mate information, affect appraisals of potential mating partners. In Experiment 1, 724 participants were presented with vignette descriptions of potential mating partners and were asked to rate partner desirability for various mating-related situations. The primary result of this experiment was that purported kissing ability increased mate desirability in “casual sex” mating situations for women to a greater extent than for men. Experiment 2 repeated the same procedure with another 178 participants, this time including visual information alongside vignette descriptions containing kissing-related information to examine the relative effects of these two modalities. It was found that the presence of a picture alongside a descriptive vignette negated the effect of kissing-related information only when rating potential partners on attractiveness or desirability for further courtship, though not when evaluating partners for casual sex or long-term relationship scenarios. Visual information containing “attractive” photos of potential partners was also found to have a greater effect on men’s ratings of partner desirability than on women’s ratings of partner desirability. The results are discussed in light of romantic kissing’s potential function of conveying important mate quality and desirability information, and its relative role in the presence of additional visual mate cues. PMID:25299759

  14. Treating Inhibited Sexual Desire: A Marital Therapy Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fish, Linda Stone; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Defines inhibited sexual desire (ISD) as a relational phenomenon best treated in the marital context. Discusses ISD as it relates to the central marital issues of power, intimacy, and boundaries. (JAC)

  15. Social Desirability, Environmental Attitudes, and General Ecological Behaviour in Children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oerke, Britta; Bogner, Franz X.

    2013-03-01

    Socially desirable responses have been widely discussed as potentially biasing self-reported measures of environmental attitude and behaviour assessment. The direct and moderating effect of social desirability on children has not been analysed before. By applying a Lie scale together with a two-factor environmental attitude set measure and a scale of self-reported General Ecological Behaviour (GEB) to 198 pupils, we found a moderate impact of Lie scores on only one of both attitude measures and a small impact on GEB. In a multiple regression analysis general behaviour was predicted by attitude, social desirability, and the interaction of both. Social desirability had no moderating effect on the relationship between environmental attitudes and behaviour. Implications of these outcomes for research on environmental issues with children are discussed.

  16. Local Recurrence in Women With Stage I Breast Cancer: Declining Rates Over Time in a Large, Population-Based Cohort

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, Joycelin; Truong, Pauline T.; Smith, Sally L.; Lu, Linghong; Lesperance, Mary; Olivotto, Ivo A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether local recurrence (LR) risk has changed over time among women with stage I breast cancer treated with breast-conserving therapy. Methods and Materials: Subjects were 5974 women aged ≥50 years diagnosis with pT1N0 breast cancer from 1989 to 2006, treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiation therapy. Clinicopathologic characteristics, treatment, and LR outcomes were compared among 4 cohorts stratified by year of diagnosis: 1989 to 1993 (n=1077), 1994 to 1998 (n=1633), 1999 to 2002 (n=1622), and 2003 to 2006 (n=1642). Multivariable analysis was performed, with year of diagnosis as a continuous variable. Results: Median follow-up time was 8.6 years. Among patients diagnosed in 1989 to 1993, 1994 to 1998, 1999 to 2002, and 2003 to 2006, the proportions of grade 1 tumors increased (16% vs 29% vs 40% vs 39%, respectively, P<.001). Surgical margin clearance rates increased from 82% to 93% to 95% and 88%, respectively (P<.001). Over time, the proportions of unknown estrogen receptor (ER) status decreased (29% vs 10% vs 1.2% vs 0.5%, respectively, P<.001), whereas ER-positive tumors increased (56% vs 77% vs 86% vs 86%, respectively, P<.001). Hormone therapy use increased (23% vs 23% vs 62% vs 73%, respectively, P<.001), and chemotherapy use increased (2% vs 5% vs 10% vs 13%, respectively, P<.001). The 5-year cumulative incidence rates of LR over the 4 time periods were 2.8% vs 1.7% vs 0.9% vs 0.8%, respectively (Gray's test, P<.001). On competing risk multivariable analysis, year of diagnosis was significantly associated with decreased LR (hazard ratio, 0.92 per year, P=.0003). Relative to grade 1 histology, grades 2, 3, and unknown were associated with increased LR. Hormone therapy use was associated with reduced LR. Conclusion: Significant changes in the multimodality management of stage I breast cancer have occurred over the past 2 decades. More favorable-risk tumors were diagnosed, and margin clearance and systemic therapy use

  17. Method for preparing salt solutions having desired properties

    DOEpatents

    Ally, Moonis R.; Braunstein, Jerry

    1994-01-01

    The specification discloses a method for preparing salt solutions which exhibit desired thermodynamic properties. The method enables prediction of the value of the thermodynamic properties for single and multiple salt solutions over a wide range of conditions from activity data and constants which are independent of concentration and temperature. A particular application of the invention is in the control of salt solutions in a process to provide a salt solution which exhibits the desired properties.

  18. "This Way!", "No! That Way!"--3-Year Olds Know that Two People Can Have Mutually Incompatible Desires

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rakoczy, Hannes; Warneken, Felix; Tomasello, Michael

    2007-01-01

    In theory of mind research, there is a long standing dispute about whether children come to understand the subjectivity of both desires and beliefs at the same time (around age 4), or whether there is an asymmetry such that desires are understood earlier. To address this issue, 3-year olds' understanding of situations in which two persons have…

  19. Wavelet-based denoising of the Fourier metric in real-time wavefront correction for single molecule localization microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tehrani, Kayvan Forouhesh; Mortensen, Luke J.; Kner, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Wavefront sensorless schemes for correction of aberrations induced by biological specimens require a time invariant property of an image as a measure of fitness. Image intensity cannot be used as a metric for Single Molecule Localization (SML) microscopy because the intensity of blinking fluorophores follows exponential statistics. Therefore a robust intensity-independent metric is required. We previously reported a Fourier Metric (FM) that is relatively intensity independent. The Fourier metric has been successfully tested on two machine learning algorithms, a Genetic Algorithm and Particle Swarm Optimization, for wavefront correction about 50 μm deep inside the Central Nervous System (CNS) of Drosophila. However, since the spatial frequencies that need to be optimized fall into regions of the Optical Transfer Function (OTF) that are more susceptible to noise, adding a level of denoising can improve performance. Here we present wavelet-based approaches to lower the noise level and produce a more consistent metric. We compare performance of different wavelets such as Daubechies, Bi-Orthogonal, and reverse Bi-orthogonal of different degrees and orders for pre-processing of images.

  20. Velocity structure of the Long Valley caldera from the inversion of local earthquake P and S travel times

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, A.E. Jr.; McEvilly, T.V.; Majer, E.L.

    1993-11-10

    A high-resolution tomographic study of the Long Valley region began in 1989 with the installation of a special fan array of eight three-component borehole (80-160 m depths) receivers on the northwestern rim of the caldera to provide the data necessary for a joint inversion for hypocenters and the three-dimensional P and S wave velocity structure in and below the caldera. The experiment specifically targeted the subsurface location of the previously inferred magma chamber beneath the Resurgent Dome. Additional coverage was provided by existing US Geological Survey and University of Nevada, Reno seismographic networks. The authors employed the progressive inversion scheme of Thurber, with cubic spline interpolation after Michelini and McEvilly. The final model is based on data from 280 well-distributed local earthquakes. Some 6900 arrival times were used, including about 700 S wave times from the three-component stations. The resulting velocity structure reflects the known geology, defining the low-velocity Sierran block and highland terrane. No isolated distinct low-velocity anomalies are revealed beneath the caldera floor, although a diffuse zone of reduced velocity persists to a depth of about 8 km. These lower velocities may be related to hydrothermal alteration and/or extensive fractures. The Vp/Vs structure contains significant lateral variation within and beneath the caldera to about 8 km depth, and these variations can be related to accepted models of the active geothermal system. The lack of a significant S wave velocity anomaly, along with the normal or low values of the Vp/Vs ratio, argues against the presence of a sizable and distinct magma body at shallow to midcrustal depth beneath Long Valley caldera, although a very low percentage of partial melt cannot be precluded. 37 refs., 7 figs.

  1. Local Group timing in Milgromian dynamics. A past Milky Way-Andromeda encounter at z > 0.8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, H.; Famaey, B.; Lüghausen, F.; Kroupa, P.

    2013-09-01

    Context. Local Group (LG) timing is one of the first historical probes of the so-called missing mass problem. Whilst modern cosmological probes indicate that pure baryonic dynamics is not sufficient on the largest scales, nearby galaxies and small galaxy groups persistently obey Milgrom's MOND law, which implies that dynamics at small scales is possibly entirely predicted by the baryons. Aims: Here, we investigate LG timing in this context of Milgromian dynamics. Methods: We used the latest measured proper motions and radial velocities for Andromeda and the Magellanic clouds, and we integrated their orbits backwards by making use of the Milgromian two-body equation of motion. Results: With the currently measured proper motions and radial velocity of M31, we find that MOND would imply that the Milky Way (MW) and M31 first moved apart via Hubble expansion after birth, but then necessarily were attracted again by the Milgromian gravitational attraction, and had a past fly-by encounter before coming to their present positions. This encounter would most probably have happened 7 to 11 Gyr ago (0.8 < z < 3). The absence of a dark matter halo and its associated dynamical friction is necessary for such a close encounter not to have triggered a merger. Observational arguments which could exclude or favour such a past encounter would thus be very important in order to falsify or vindicate Milgromian dynamics on the scale of the LG. Interestingly, the closest approach of the encounter is small enough (<55 kpc) to have had severe consequences on the disc dynamics, including perhaps thick disc formation, and on the satellite systems of both galaxies. The ages of the satellite galaxies and of the young halo globular clusters, all of which form the vast polar structure around the MW, are consistent with these objects having been born during this encounter.

  2. An activation-repolarization time metric to predict localized regions of high susceptibility to re-entry

    PubMed Central

    Child, Nicholas; Bishop, Martin J.; Hanson, Ben; Coronel, Ruben; Opthof, Tobias; Bourkens, Bastiaan; Walton, Richard; Efimov, Igor; Bostock, Julian; Hill, Yolanda; Rinaldi, Christopher A; Razavi, Reza; Gill, Jaswinder; Taggart, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background Initiation of re-entrant ventricular tachycardia (VT) involves complex interactions between activation and repolarization wavefronts. Recent experimental work has identified the time interval between S2 repolarization proximal to a line of functional block and the activation at the adjacent distal side, as a critical determinant of re-entry. Objective We hypothesized: (1) an algorithm could be developed which would generate a spatial map of this interval (designated the “re-entry vulnerability index”-RVI); (2) that this would accurately identify a pathway of re-entry as well as rotor formation in animal experiments and in a computational model; and, (3) that it would be possible to generate an RVI map in humans during routine clinical procedures and co-register with anatomical and electrophysiological features. Methods and Results An algorithm was developed which sampled all points on a multielectrode grid and calculated RVI between all pairs of electrodes within a given radius. The algorithm successfully identified the spatial region with increased susceptibility to re-entry in an established Langendorff pig heart model and the site of re-entry and rotor formation in an optically mapped sheep heart model and corresponding computational simulations. The feasibility of RVI mapping was evaluated during a clinical procedure by co-registering with the anatomy and physiology in a patient undergoing a VT ablation. Conclusions We developed an algorithm to calculate a re-entry vulnerability index from intervals between local repolarization and activation times at all adjacent points over a multielectrode grid. The algorithm accurately identified the region of re-entry in two animal models of functional re-entry. The possibility of clinical application was demonstrated in a patient with VT. PMID:25863160

  3. Female hypoactive sexual desire disorder: epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Warnock, Julia Jill K

    2002-01-01

    Female hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) may occur in up to one-third of adult women in the US. The essential feature of female HSDD is a deficiency or absence of sexual fantasies and desire for sexual activity that causes marked distress or interpersonal difficulty. The evaluation of female HSDD generally requires careful and thoughtful consideration of the patient and the multitude of factors that impact on the various components of adult female sexual desire. Several female reproductive life experiences may uniquely affect sexual desire. These events include menstrual cycles, hormonal contraceptives, postpartum states and lactation, oophorectomy and hysterectomy, and perimenopausal and postmenopausal states. Sexual dysfunctions in women have strong positive associations with low feelings of physical and emotional satisfaction and low feelings of happiness. Thus, female HSDD can greatly impact on quality of life. In this article, treatment options are discussed with special attention to significant reproductive life events that may impact on sexual desire in adult women. Depending on the particular phase of reproductive life that a woman is experiencing, different recommendations are made. Various options in the treatment of HSDD in women include lifestyle changes, treatment of coexisting medical or psychiatric disorders, switching or discontinuing medications that could impact on sexual desire, hormone therapy and marital therapy. Clinical trials are presently underway to assess medications that may potentially benefit female patients with HSDD.

  4. Exploring the effects of sexual desire discrepancy among married couples.

    PubMed

    Willoughby, Brian J; Farero, Adam M; Busby, Dean M

    2014-04-01

    Previous studies have found associations between the individual discrepancy of desired sexual frequency and actual sexual frequency and relational outcomes among premarital couples. The present study extended this research by using a sample of 1,054 married couples to explore how actor and partner individual sexual desire discrepancy (SDD) scores were associated with relationship satisfaction, stability, communication, and conflict during marriage. All participants took an online survey which assessed both couple sexual dynamics and relationship outcomes. Findings suggested that higher actor individual SDD was generally associated with negative relational outcomes, including lower reported relationship satisfaction, stability, and more reported couple conflict. These effects were found after controlling for background factors, baseline sexual frequency and desire, and couple desire discrepancies. Some partner effects were also found and were generally in the same direction. Marital length did not moderate the effects found although gender moderated associations between individual SDD and reported couple communication. Negative associations between individual SDD and communication were particularly strong when the husband reported high discrepancies between desired and actual sexual frequency. Results suggested that higher individual sexual desire discrepancies among married individuals may undermine relationship well-being. Applications of these findings to a clinical setting are also discussed. PMID:24045904

  5. Satisfaction with Appearance and the Desired Treatment to Improve Aesthetics

    PubMed Central

    Al-Zarea, Bader K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To identify participants' satisfaction with appearance and the desired treatment to improve aesthetics. Materials and Methods. 220 participants (127 males and 93 females, mean age = 21.4 ± 1.5 years) were recruited into the study. A structured questionnaire was used to assess patients' satisfaction with appearance and what treatment they desire to improve aesthetics. Participants scored the level of satisfaction with appearance using visual analogue scale. Results. The VAS mean score of satisfaction with general appearance was 6.8 ± 2.3. Half participants were dissatisfied with tooth appearance and 65.9% were dissatisfied with tooth colour. Higher VAS scores were associated with higher desire for all treatments that improve tooth appearance (P < .05). Dissatisfaction with tooth appearance increased with increased dissatisfaction with teeth colour, feeling of poor tooth alignment, presence of fractured anterior teeth, and increased desire for orthodontic, crowns, and dentures treatments (P < .05). Dissatisfaction with tooth colour was associated with increased desire for tooth whitening and tooth coloured fillings (P < .05). Conclusions. Participants had high levels of dissatisfaction with tooth appearance and tooth colour. Dissatisfaction with tooth colour contributed to the increased dissatisfaction with tooth appearance. Dissatisfaction with tooth appearance, colour, alignment, and condition was significantly related to high desire for aesthetic treatments. PMID:23509462

  6. Probabilistic reconstructions of local temperature and soil moisture from tree-ring data with potentially time-varying climatic response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolwinski-Ward, S. E.; Tingley, M. P.; Evans, M. N.; Hughes, M. K.; Nychka, D. W.

    2015-02-01

    We explore a probabilistic, hierarchical Bayesian approach to the simultaneous reconstruction of local temperature and soil moisture from tree-ring width observations. The model explicitly allows for differing calibration and reconstruction interval responses of the ring-width series to climate due to slow changes in climatology coupled with the biological climate thresholds underlying tree-ring growth. A numerical experiment performed using synthetically generated data demonstrates that bimodality can occur in posterior estimates of past climate when the data do not contain enough information to determine whether temperature or moisture limitation controlled reconstruction-interval tree-ring variability. This manifestation of nonidentifiability is a result of the many-to-one mapping from bivariate climate to time series of tree-ring widths. The methodology is applied to reconstruct temperature and soil moisture conditions over the 1080-1129 C.E. interval at Methusalah Walk in the White Mountains of California, where co-located isotopic dendrochronologies suggest that observed moisture limitations on tree growth may have been alleviated. Our model allows for assimilation of both data sources, and computation of the probability of a change in the climatic controls on ring-width relative to those observed in the calibration period. While the probability of a change in control is sensitive to the choice of prior distribution, the inference that conditions were moist and cool at Methuselah Walk during the 1080-1129 C.E. interval is robust. Results also illustrate the power of combining multiple proxy data sets to reduce uncertainty in reconstructions of paleoclimate.

  7. [The effect of group size on salience of member desirability].

    PubMed

    Sugimori, S

    1993-04-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that undesirable members are salient in a small group, while desirable members become salient in a larger group. One hundred and forty-five students were randomly assigned to twelve conditions, and read sentences desirably, undesirably, or neutrally describing each member of a college student club. The twelve clubs had one of three group sizes: 13, 39, or 52, and the proportion of the desirable or undesirable to the neutral was either 11:2 or 2:11, forming a three-way (3 x 2 x 2) factorial. Twelve subjects each were asked to make proportion judgments and impression ratings. Results indicated that proportion of the undesirable members was over estimated when the group size was 13, showing negativity bias, whereas proportion of the desirable was overestimated when the size was 52, displaying positivity bias. The size 39 showed neither positivity nor negativity bias. These results along with those from impression ratings suggested that salience of member desirability interacted with group size. It is argued that illusory correlation and group cognition studies may well take these effects into consideration. PMID:8355426

  8. [The effect of group size on salience of member desirability].

    PubMed

    Sugimori, S

    1993-04-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that undesirable members are salient in a small group, while desirable members become salient in a larger group. One hundred and forty-five students were randomly assigned to twelve conditions, and read sentences desirably, undesirably, or neutrally describing each member of a college student club. The twelve clubs had one of three group sizes: 13, 39, or 52, and the proportion of the desirable or undesirable to the neutral was either 11:2 or 2:11, forming a three-way (3 x 2 x 2) factorial. Twelve subjects each were asked to make proportion judgments and impression ratings. Results indicated that proportion of the undesirable members was over estimated when the group size was 13, showing negativity bias, whereas proportion of the desirable was overestimated when the size was 52, displaying positivity bias. The size 39 showed neither positivity nor negativity bias. These results along with those from impression ratings suggested that salience of member desirability interacted with group size. It is argued that illusory correlation and group cognition studies may well take these effects into consideration.

  9. Desired emotions across cultures: A value-based account.

    PubMed

    Tamir, Maya; Schwartz, Shalom H; Cieciuch, Jan; Riediger, Michaela; Torres, Claudio; Scollon, Christie; Dzokoto, Vivian; Zhou, Xiaolu; Vishkin, Allon

    2016-07-01

    Values reflect how people want to experience the world; emotions reflect how people actually experience the world. Therefore, we propose that across cultures people desire emotions that are consistent with their values. Whereas prior research focused on the desirability of specific affective states or 1 or 2 target emotions, we offer a broader account of desired emotions. After reporting initial evidence for the potential causal effects of values on desired emotions in a preliminary study (N = 200), we tested the predictions of our proposed model in 8 samples (N = 2,328) from distinct world cultural regions. Across cultural samples, we found that people who endorsed values of self-transcendence (e.g., benevolence) wanted to feel more empathy and compassion, people who endorsed values of self-enhancement (e.g., power) wanted to feel more anger and pride, people who endorsed values of openness to change (e.g., self-direction) wanted to feel more interest and excitement, and people who endorsed values of conservation (e.g., tradition) wanted to feel more calmness and less fear. These patterns were independent of differences in emotional experience. We discuss the implications of our value-based account of desired emotions for understanding emotion regulation, culture, and other individual differences. (PsycINFO Database Record

  10. Disentangling prototypicality and social desirability: the case of the KNOWI task.

    PubMed

    Turan, Bulent

    2011-01-01

    The prototype of indicators of a relationship partner who can be trusted to be responsive at times of stress is one kind of social knowledge structure. The Knowledge of Indicators (KNOWI) Task assesses individual differences in knowledge about these prototypic indicators. In constructing the KNOWI, an iterative procedure was used in an attempt to identify those indicators for which ratings of prototypicality are not influenced by social desirability. Study 1 demonstrated that the correlation between ratings of prototypicality and social desirability is indeed eliminated for the final set of indicators retained in the KNOWI. Study 2 tested the prototype matching hypothesis: Comparing an actual partner to the prototype might shape global judgments about that partner's responsiveness. Because in Study 2 only those indicators that are uncorrelated with social desirability were used, this result cannot be explained by social desirability. These results support the construct validity of the indicators used in the KNOWI Task, which seems to be a precise assessment tool not influenced by social desirability.

  11. Representing female desire within a labial framework of sexuality.

    PubMed

    Schiller, Britt-Marie

    2012-12-01

    Sexual experiences, rather than being neutral, are specifically male or female. Yet at present no conceptual framework exists for representing female sexual desire. This has resulted in frequent misrepresentations of female sexual experience. To correct this, a labial framework is proposed, not to replace or oppose a phallic framework, but to exist alongside it. The lips of the mouth and those of the genitals provide a felicitous doubling of sexuality and speech to represent female desire and sexual pleasure as labial. Phallic and labial rhythms are organized differently in sexual arousal and desire, since, as Simone de Beauvoir put it, "Man 'gets stiff,' but woman 'gets wet.'" The labial framework therefore represents female psychosexuality more in terms of "wetware" than of "hardware."

  12. Is love colorblind? Political orientation and interracial romantic desire.

    PubMed

    Eastwick, Paul W; Richeson, Jennifer A; Son, Deborah; Finkel, Eli J

    2009-09-01

    The present research examined the association of political orientation with ingroup favoritism in two live romantic contexts. In Study 1, White participants had sequential interactions with both a White and Black confederate and reported their romantic desire for each. In Study 2, both White and Black participants speed-dated multiple potential romantic partners and reported whether they would be interested in meeting each speed-dating partner again. In both studies, White participants' political conservatism positively predicted the strength of the ingroup-favoring bias: White conservatives were less likely than White liberals to desire Black (interracial) relative to White potential romantic partners. In contrast, Black participants' political conservatism negatively predicted the strength of the ingroup-favoring bias: Consistent with system-justification theory, Black conservatives were more likely than Black liberals to desire White (interracial) relative to Black potential romantic partners. Political orientation may be a key factor that influences the initiation of interracial romantic relationships.

  13. Desire thinking: A risk factor for binge eating?

    PubMed

    Spada, Marcantonio M; Caselli, Gabriele; Fernie, Bruce A; Manfredi, Chiara; Boccaletti, Fabio; Dallari, Giulia; Gandini, Federica; Pinna, Eleonora; Ruggiero, Giovanni M; Sassaroli, Sandra

    2015-08-01

    In the current study we explored the role of desire thinking in predicting binge eating independently of Body Mass Index, negative affect and irrational food beliefs. A sample of binge eaters (n=77) and a sample of non-binge eaters (n=185) completed the following self-report instruments: Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Irrational Food Beliefs Scale, Desire Thinking Questionnaire, and Binge Eating Scale. Mann-Whitney U tests revealed that all variable scores were significantly higher for binge eaters than non-binge eaters. A logistic regression analysis indicated that verbal perseveration was a predictor of classification as a binge eater over and above Body Mass Index, negative affect and irrational food beliefs. A hierarchical regression analysis, on the combined sample, indicated that verbal perseveration predicted levels of binge eating independently of Body Mass Index, negative affect and irrational food beliefs. These results highlight the possible role of desire thinking as a risk factor for binge eating. PMID:25880044

  14. Is love colorblind? Political orientation and interracial romantic desire.

    PubMed

    Eastwick, Paul W; Richeson, Jennifer A; Son, Deborah; Finkel, Eli J

    2009-09-01

    The present research examined the association of political orientation with ingroup favoritism in two live romantic contexts. In Study 1, White participants had sequential interactions with both a White and Black confederate and reported their romantic desire for each. In Study 2, both White and Black participants speed-dated multiple potential romantic partners and reported whether they would be interested in meeting each speed-dating partner again. In both studies, White participants' political conservatism positively predicted the strength of the ingroup-favoring bias: White conservatives were less likely than White liberals to desire Black (interracial) relative to White potential romantic partners. In contrast, Black participants' political conservatism negatively predicted the strength of the ingroup-favoring bias: Consistent with system-justification theory, Black conservatives were more likely than Black liberals to desire White (interracial) relative to Black potential romantic partners. Political orientation may be a key factor that influences the initiation of interracial romantic relationships. PMID:19571275

  15. Fluoxetine attenuates alcohol intake and desire to drink.

    PubMed

    Naranjo, C A; Poulos, C X; Bremner, K E; Lanctot, K L

    1994-09-01

    Several serotonin uptake inhibitors, including the long-acting fluoxetine, have been found to decrease alcohol intake in moderately dependent alcoholics. While the mechanism of their effect is not fully elucidated, a previous study with citalopram indicated that decreased desire to drink may be an important factor. Therefore, we tested fluoxetine effects on alcohol intake and desire to drink in a placebo-controlled study. Subjects, recruited by advertisement, were mildly/moderately dependent alcoholics (12 male, four female, aged 19-59 years, healthy, non-depressed) who did not believe they had a drinking problem and were not requesting treatment. After a 1 week baseline they received, single-blind, 2 weeks placebo followed by 2 weeks fluoxetine 60 mg/day. As out-patients, subjects recorded daily standard drinks (13.6 g ethanol) and rated interest, desire, craving and liking for alcohol biweekly. Each out-patient period was immediately followed by a double-blind experimental drinking session. Out-patient daily drinks slightly decreased during fluoxetine to 6.6 +/- 0.9 (mean +/- S.E.M.) compared with during placebo (7.16 +/- 0.95, p = 0.07, N.S.) and baseline (7.18 +/- 1.0, p > 0.1, N.S.). Desire, interest and craving for alcohol decreased during fluoxetine vs placebo baseline (p < 0.05), but not vs placebo. Appetite loss and decrease in food intake (p < 0.01, fluoxetine vs placebo) correlated with each other (r = 0.91, p < 0.01) but neither correlated with decrease in alcohol intake (appetite: r = 0.26, N.S.; food intake: r = 0.22, N.S.). Weight loss occurred during fluoxetine (p < 0.05 vs placebo) but did not correlate with decrease in alcohol intake (r = 0.1, N.S.). In the experimental drinking sessions after placebo and fluoxetine treatments subjects rated their desire for each of 18 mini-drinks (each one-third of a standard drink) offered at 5 min intervals. Fluoxetine decreased desire to drink throughout the sessions; both mean and maximum desire ratings were

  16. Supersonic projectile models for asynchronous shooter localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozick, Richard J.; Whipps, Gene T.; Ash, Joshua N.

    2011-06-01

    In this work we consider the localization of a gunshot using a distributed sensor network measuring time differences of arrival between a firearm's muzzle blast and the shockwave induced by a supersonic bullet. This so-called MB-SW approach is desirable because time synchronization is not required between the sensors, however it suffers from increased computational complexity and requires knowledge of the bullet's velocity at all points along its trajectory. While the actual velocity profile of a particular gunshot is unknown, one may use a parameterized model for the velocity profile and simultaneously fit the model and localize the shooter. In this paper we study efficient solutions for the localization problem and identify deceleration models that trade off localization accuracy and computational complexity. We also develop a statistical analysis that includes bias due to mismatch between the true and actual deceleration models and covariance due to additive noise.

  17. Importance of Time Scale and Local Environment in Electron-Driven Proton Transfer. The Anion of Acetoacetic Acid.

    PubMed

    Keolopile, Zibo G; Gutowski, Maciej; Buonaugurio, Angela; Collins, Evan; Zhang, Xinxing; Erb, Jeremy; Lectka, Thomas; Bowen, Kit H; Allan, Michael

    2015-11-18

    Anion photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) probe different regions of the anionic potential energy surface. These complementary techniques provided information about anionic states of acetoacetic acid (AA). Electronic structure calculations facilitated the identification of the most stable tautomers and conformers for both neutral and anionic AA and determined their relative stabilities and excess electron binding energies. The most stable conformers of the neutral keto and enol tautomers differ by less than 1 kcal/mol in terms of electronic energies corrected for zero-point vibrations. Thermal effects favor these conformers of the keto tautomer, which do not support an intramolecular hydrogen bond between the keto and the carboxylic groups. The valence anion displays a distinct minimum which results from proton transfer from the carboxylic to the keto group; thus, we name it an ol structure. The minimum is characterized by a short intramolecular hydrogen bond, a significant electron vertical detachment energy of 2.38 eV, but a modest adiabatic electron affinity of 0.33 eV. The valence anion was identified in the anion PES experiments, and the measured electron vertical detachment energy of 2.30 eV is in good agreement with our computational prediction. We conclude that binding an excess electron in a π* valence orbital changes the localization of a proton in the fully relaxed structure of the AA(-) anion. The results of EELS experiments do not provide evidence for an ultrarapid proton transfer in the lowest π* resonance of AA(-), which would be capable of competing with electron autodetachment. This observation is consistent with our computational results, indicating that major gas-phase conformers and tautomers of neutral AA do not support the intramolecular hydrogen bond that would facilitate ultrarapid proton transfer and formation of the ol valence anion. This is confirmed by our vibrational EELS spectrum. Anions

  18. WE-G-17A-05: Real-Time Catheter Localization Using An Active MR Tracker for Interstitial Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W; Damato, A; Viswanathan, A; Cormack, R; Penzkofer, T; Schmidt, E; Pan, L; Gilson, W; Seethamraju, R

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a novel active MR-tracking system which can provide accurate and rapid localization of brachytherapy catheters, and assess its reliability and spatial accuracy in comparison to standard catheter digitization using MR images. Methods: An active MR tracker for brachytherapy was constructed by adding three printed-circuit micro-coils to the shaft of a commercial metallic stylet. A gel phantom with an embedded framework was built, into which fifteen 14-Gauge catheters were placed, following either with parallel or crossed paths. The tracker was inserted sequentially into each catheter, with MR-tracking running continuously. Tracking was also performed during the tracker's removal from each catheter. Catheter trajectories measured from the insertion and the removal procedures using the same micro-coil were compared, as well as trajectories obtained using different micro-coils. A 3D high-resolution MR image dataset of the phantom was acquired and imported into a treatment planning system (TPS) for catheter digitization. A comparison between MR-tracked positions and positions digitized from MR images by TPS was performed. Results: The MR tracking shows good consistency for varying catheter paths and for all micro-coils (mean difference ∼1.1 mm). The average distance between the MR-tracking trajectory and catheter digitization from the MR images was 1.1 mm. Ambiguity in catheter assignment from images due to crossed paths was resolved by active tracking. When tracking was interleaved with imaging, real-time images were continuously acquired at the instantaneous tip positions and displayed on an external workstation. Conclusion: The active MR tracker may be used to provide an independent measurement of catheter location in the MR environment, potentially eliminating the need for subsequent CT. It may also be used to control realtime imaging of catheter placement. This will enable MR-based brachytherapy planning of interstitial implants without ionizing

  19. Functional Family Therapy and the Treatment of Inhibited Sexual Desire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regas, Susan J.; Sprenkle, Douglas H.

    1984-01-01

    Describes the therapy, assessment, and education principles of Functional Family Therapy and applies them to the treatment of inhibited sexual desire, using a case illustration. Functional Family Therapy works at motivating the couple to want change, rather than providing an understanding of underlying causes of the problem. (JAC)

  20. Iranian Adolescents' Intended Age of Marriage and Desired Family Size.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tashakkori, Abbas; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Examined questionnaire data pertaining to intended age of marriage and desired family size from Iranian 12th graders. Proximal factors (individual level variables such as self-concept and school success) were stronger predictors on both dependent measures than were distal factors (parental education, sibling size, and family modernity). Proximal…

  1. Ranking, selecting, and prioritising genes with desirability functions.

    PubMed

    Lazic, Stanley E

    2015-01-01

    In functional genomics experiments, researchers often select genes to follow-up or validate from a long list of differentially expressed genes. Typically, sharp thresholds are used to bin genes into groups such as significant/non-significant or fold change above/below a cut-off value, and ad hoc criteria are also used such as favouring well-known genes. Binning, however, is inefficient and does not take the uncertainty of the measurements into account. Furthermore, p-values, fold-changes, and other outcomes are treated as equally important, and relevant genes may be overlooked with such an approach. Desirability functions are proposed as a way to integrate multiple selection criteria for ranking, selecting, and prioritising genes. These functions map any variable to a continuous 0-1 scale, where one is maximally desirable and zero is unacceptable. Multiple selection criteria are then combined to provide an overall desirability that is used to rank genes. In addition to p-values and fold-changes, further experimental results and information contained in databases can be easily included as criteria. The approach is demonstrated with a breast cancer microarray data set. The functions and an example data set can be found in the desiR package on CRAN (https://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/desiR/) and the development version is available on GitHub (https://github.com/stanlazic/desiR). PMID:26644980

  2. 48 CFR 30.603-2 - Unilateral and desirable changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS ADMINISTRATION CAS Administration 30.603-2... disclosed or established cost accounting practices, but the Government shall not pay any increased cost, in... the CFAO has determined a change to a cost accounting practice is a desirable change, the change is...

  3. Desirable Leadership Behaviours of Multi-Cultural Managers in China.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Littrell, Romie F.

    2002-01-01

    Hotel managers (both expatriate and indigenous) and supervisors (n=122) in China identified desirable and actual leadership traits in English and Chinese versions of the Leadership Behavior Description Questionnaire. Indigenous managers had more tolerance of freedom than expatriate managers. Supervisors were more tolerant than managers.…

  4. Eliciting Change in Maltreating Fathers: Goals, Processes, and Desired Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crooks, Claire V.; Scott, Katreena L.; Francis, Karen J.; Kelly, Tim; Reid, Maureen

    2006-01-01

    There has been a growing recognition of the need to provide appropriate intervention services to fathers who have been abusive in their families. This paper highlights four specific treatment goals for fathers who maltreat their children, along with therapeutic strategies necessary to accomplish desired outcomes. These goals were developed as part…

  5. Residual magnetism holds solenoid armature in desired position

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, R. P.

    1967-01-01

    Holding solenoid uses residual magnetism to hold its armature in a desired position after excitation current is removed from the coil. Although no electrical power or mechanical devices are used, the solenoid has a low tolerance to armature displacement from the equilibrium position.

  6. Topology of Sustainable Management of Dynamical Systems with Desirable States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heitzig, Jobst; Kittel, Tim

    2015-04-01

    To keep the Earth System in a desirable region of its state space, such as the recently suggested 'tolerable environment and development window', 'planetary boundaries', or 'safe (and just) operating space', in addition to the identification of the quantitative internal dynamics and the available options for influencing it (management), there is an urgent need to understand the systems' state space structure with regard to questions such as (i) which of its parts can be reached from which others with or without leaving the desirable region, (ii) which parts are in a variety of senses 'safe' to stay in when management options break away, and which qualitative decision problems may occur as a consequence of this structure. To complement existing approaches from optimal control focusing on quantitative optimization and being much applied in both engineering and integrated assessment, we develop a mathematical theory of the qualitative topology that partitions the state space of a dynamical system with management options and desirable states including terminology suggestions for the various resulting parts. Our detailed formal classification of the possible states and management options with respect to the possibility of avoiding or leaving the undesired region indicates that before performing some form of quantitative optimization, the sustainable management of the Earth System may require decisions of a more discrete type, e.g. choosing between ultimate safety and permanent desirability, or between permanent safety and increasing future options.

  7. Information and Services Obtained and Desired by Parents of Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klemer, Richard H.; Kivett, Vira R.

    The 3 main objectives of this study, the fourth and final phase of an investigation to determine the information and services obtained and desired by rural parents during 4 stages of child rearing, were to determine: (1) the sources from which parents of adolescents received information and services regarding child care and development; (2) the…

  8. Ranking, selecting, and prioritising genes with desirability functions.

    PubMed

    Lazic, Stanley E

    2015-01-01

    In functional genomics experiments, researchers often select genes to follow-up or validate from a long list of differentially expressed genes. Typically, sharp thresholds are used to bin genes into groups such as significant/non-significant or fold change above/below a cut-off value, and ad hoc criteria are also used such as favouring well-known genes. Binning, however, is inefficient and does not take the uncertainty of the measurements into account. Furthermore, p-values, fold-changes, and other outcomes are treated as equally important, and relevant genes may be overlooked with such an approach. Desirability functions are proposed as a way to integrate multiple selection criteria for ranking, selecting, and prioritising genes. These functions map any variable to a continuous 0-1 scale, where one is maximally desirable and zero is unacceptable. Multiple selection criteria are then combined to provide an overall desirability that is used to rank genes. In addition to p-values and fold-changes, further experimental results and information contained in databases can be easily included as criteria. The approach is demonstrated with a breast cancer microarray data set. The functions and an example data set can be found in the desiR package on CRAN (https://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/desiR/) and the development version is available on GitHub (https://github.com/stanlazic/desiR).

  9. Desiring Diversity and Backlash: White Property Rights in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patel, Leigh

    2015-01-01

    In this theoretical essay, I argue that the current incidences of backlash to diversity are best understood as a dynamic of complicated, historic and intertwined desires for racial diversity and white entitlement to property. I frame this argument in the theories of critical race theory and settler colonialism, each of which provide necessary but…

  10. Re-visioning Clients' Pathology into Initiatory Desire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Michael J.

    1993-01-01

    Presents perspective of therapy that re-visions clients' pathology into desire for initiatory experience. Takes symbolic perspective of clients' presenting problems to provide meaning to symptoms and eliminate constraints of diagnoses and/or treatments. Lays developmental foundation to support clinical application of perspective in symbolic…

  11. 50 CFR 80.9 - Notice of desire to participate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE-WILDLIFE SPORT FISH RESTORATION PROGRAM ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS, PITTMAN-ROBERTSON WILDLIFE RESTORATION AND DINGELL-JOHNSON SPORT FISH RESTORATION ACTS § 80.9 Notice of desire to... Federal Assistance which contains plans for the use of Wildlife and Sport Fish Restoration Program...

  12. Desire: A Key Factor for Successful Online GED Adult Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Donita; Tham, Yuen San Sarah; Hogle, Julie; Koch, Jody

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the experiences of 12 adult online General Educational Development (GED) students to determine the role of program and personal factors that influenced their successful passing of the GED or their dropping-out of the program. Through surveys and interviews, we discovered that desire was the key factor for…

  13. 48 CFR 30.603-2 - Unilateral and desirable changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... changes. 30.603-2 Section 30.603-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION... Unilateral and desirable changes. (a) Unilateral changes. (1) The contractor may unilaterally change its... the aggregate, as a result of the unilateral change. (2) Prior to making any contract price or...

  14. Sexuality Education and Desire: Still Missing after All These Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fine, Michelle; McClelland, Sara

    2006-01-01

    Nearly twenty years after the publication of Michelle Fine's essay "Sexuality, Schooling, and Adolescent Females: The Missing Discourse of Desire," the question of how sexuality education influences the development and health of adolescents remains just as relevant as it was in 1988. In this article, Michelle Fine and Sara McClelland examine the…

  15. Women selectively guard their (desirable) mates from ovulating women.

    PubMed

    Krems, Jaimie Arona; Neel, Rebecca; Neuberg, Steven L; Puts, David A; Kenrick, Douglas T

    2016-04-01

    For women, forming close, cooperative relationships with other women at once poses important opportunities and possible threats-including to mate retention. To maximize the benefits and minimize the costs of same-sex social relationships, we propose that women's mate guarding is functionally flexible and that women are sensitive to both interpersonal and contextual cues indicating whether other women might be likely and effective mate poachers. Here, we assess one such cue: other women's fertility. Because ovulating (i.e., high-fertility) women are both more attractive to men and also more attracted to (desirable) men, ovulating women may be perceived to pose heightened threats to other women's romantic relationships. Across 4 experiments, partnered women were exposed to photographs of other women taken during either their ovulatory or nonovulatory menstrual-cycle phases, and consistently reported intentions to socially avoid ovulating (but not nonovulating) women-but only when their own partners were highly desirable. Exposure to ovulating women also increased women's sexual desires for their (highly desirable) partners. These findings suggest that women can be sensitive to subtle cues of other women's fertility and respond (e.g., via social exclusion, enhanced sexual attention to own mate) in ways that may facilitate their mate retention goals while not thwarting their affiliative goals. PMID:26766112

  16. Drawing Desire: Male Youth and Homoerotic Fan Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennis, Jeffery P.

    2010-01-01

    Although Western mass media aimed at juvenile audiences aggressively eliminates any references to same-sex desire and behavior, it inspires a tremendous amount of homoerotic fan art. To determine how same-sex potential is portrayed in juvenile fan art, a content analysis was conducted of 872 male homoerotic images by 442 juvenile male and female…

  17. Desired Outcomes for Children and Adolescents with Autistic Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beresford, Bryony; Tozer, Rosemary; Rabiee, Parvaneh; Sloper, Patricia

    2007-01-01

    Within children's services, frameworks for assessing outcomes have been developed in the absence of consultation with children with autistic spectrum disorders and their parents. The research reported here worked with parents, other key adults and children with autistic spectrum disorders to identify desired outcomes. It found similarities with…

  18. 48 CFR 30.603-2 - Unilateral and desirable changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... disclosed or established cost accounting practices, but the Government shall not pay any increased cost, in... protect the Government from the payment of the estimated increased costs, in the aggregate; and (ii) The... costs to the Government, in the aggregate. (b) Desirable changes. (1) Prior to taking action under...

  19. (Un)Desirable Effects of Output Funding for Flemish Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cantillon, B.; De Ridder, A.; Vanhaecht, E.; Verbist, G.

    2011-01-01

    Governments introducing output parameters (e.g. graduation numbers) in the funding rule of universities believe that it will induce universities to raise their teaching efforts while educational standards will remain unaffected. In this article we first show on theoretical grounds that this desire can only be fulfilled if there exist positive…

  20. Factors Influencing the Desire To Take Environmental Action in Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pruneau, Diane; Chouinard, Omer; Musafiri, Jean-Pierre; IsaBelle, Claire

    In a coastal community, four social groups were chosen to participate in various educational programs designed to promote their desire to take environmental action. At the end of these educational programs, conducted by a scientist and an environmental educator, the participants were invited to get involved in the resolution of an environmental…

  1. Characteristics of Athletic Training Students That Preceptors Find Desirable

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, W. David; Thomas, Spencer; Paulsen, Jenica; Chiu, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Context: Athletic training students acquire clinical hours under the direct supervision of athletic training preceptors. Objective: The purpose of this project was to explore what characteristics preceptors desire in their athletic training students. Design and Setting: Online survey instrument. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 286…

  2. The context of perceived and desired social support among Korean older adults.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Seunghyun

    2013-01-01

    Social support has multiple dimensions, the context of which can be explored by qualitative methods. In this study, face-to-face interviews were conducted with 21 local senior center members (9 men and 12 women aged 65 and older) in Seoul, South Korea, in order to explore how they perceive and desire social support in an aging society. The qualitative methods in this study also included thematic analysis and constant comparison to identify three main themes: "no or denied support," "not to be greedy and shameless," and "justification and hopelessness." In the interviews, perceived and desired support did not emerge immediately as the participants were reluctant to share personal concerns with or to seek support from others. Nevertheless, they would turn to spouses and children for both emotional and instrumental support when in dire need. A shared norm among the participants was that seeking support would be an embarrassing and shameless act for themselves and a burden to others. They justified the discrepancy between the perceived and desired support as part of aging and felt hopelessness about it. The findings of this study have implications that implicit, individual social support may be effective than explicit, group support activities for those who are passive in recognizing the need for and seeking social support. In assessing and interpreting social support in old age, both perceived and desired support should be included and contextual approaches can be useful in so doing. The senior centers should be a more active advocate of successful aging that would offset hopelessness, negative attitude toward life, and social disconnection. Future research should focus on identifying effective strategies to bridge the gap between perceived and desired social support in older adults in this society of changing values and social norms.

  3. Support Desired by Women Following Termination of Pregnancy for a Fetal Anomaly.

    PubMed

    Ramdaney, Aarti; Hashmi, Syed S; Monga, Manju; Carter, Rebecca; Czerwinski, Jennifer

    2015-12-01

    With the rapidly evolving field of prenatal testing, there is a growing need to provide support for women pursuing termination of pregnancy following the discovery of a fetal anomaly. Previous studies have documented that women in this situation often feel unsupported, but the type of resources desired by this population remains undetermined. We studied the awareness and utilization of support resources in 51 women at the time of the procedure, at 6 weeks, and at 3 months following the event. Though largely knowledgeable of existing resources at the time of the procedure, only 50 % admitted contemplating their individualized need for support. Most expected to rely on the support of family and friends. Additionally, 50 % expressed the desire to commemorate the pregnancy, though none wanted direct contact with their healthcare provider(s). Responses from the 6 weeks and 3 months assessments were consistent with previous literature as many women indicated not coping as expected and were unprepared for the psychological consequences following the procedure. Our findings indicate that women in these situations may not realize what their long-term support needs will be. They further indicate that guidelines for routine follow-up care should be established among healthcare providers that respect this population's initial desires to avoid reminders of the pregnancy and promote a flexible timeframe for support uptake. Additional support resources that promote flexible uptake as well as meet the desires of anonymity and ease of access need to be developed for this population.

  4. Support Desired by Women Following Termination of Pregnancy for a Fetal Anomaly.

    PubMed

    Ramdaney, Aarti; Hashmi, Syed S; Monga, Manju; Carter, Rebecca; Czerwinski, Jennifer

    2015-12-01

    With the rapidly evolving field of prenatal testing, there is a growing need to provide support for women pursuing termination of pregnancy following the discovery of a fetal anomaly. Previous studies have documented that women in this situation often feel unsupported, but the type of resources desired by this population remains undetermined. We studied the awareness and utilization of support resources in 51 women at the time of the procedure, at 6 weeks, and at 3 months following the event. Though largely knowledgeable of existing resources at the time of the procedure, only 50 % admitted contemplating their individualized need for support. Most expected to rely on the support of family and friends. Additionally, 50 % expressed the desire to commemorate the pregnancy, though none wanted direct contact with their healthcare provider(s). Responses from the 6 weeks and 3 months assessments were consistent with previous literature as many women indicated not coping as expected and were unprepared for the psychological consequences following the procedure. Our findings indicate that women in these situations may not realize what their long-term support needs will be. They further indicate that guidelines for routine follow-up care should be established among healthcare providers that respect this population's initial desires to avoid reminders of the pregnancy and promote a flexible timeframe for support uptake. Additional support resources that promote flexible uptake as well as meet the desires of anonymity and ease of access need to be developed for this population. PMID:25828421

  5. A Recent Swedish Attempt to Weaken State Control and Strengthen School Autonomy: The Experiment with Local Time Schedules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ronnberg, Linda

    2007-01-01

    In 1999, after a series of far-reaching reforms aiming at decentralisation, deregulation and increased local autonomy in Swedish education, the Government decided to introduce a five-year experiment, which would develop these reform efforts even further. Even though Swedish compulsory schools already were the most autonomous in Europe with regard…

  6. The Global/Local Nexus in Comparative Policy Studies: Analysing the Triple Bonus System in Mongolia over Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steiner-Khamsi, Gita

    2012-01-01

    The article analyses a phenomenon that has accompanied teacher salary reform in Mongolia: the import of two global education policies that were nearly identical to the already existing local bonus system ("olympiads"). To make sense of an import that appears superfluous, the author analyses the reception and translation of the triple bonus system…

  7. TIMING APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, A.E.; Geisow, J.C.H.

    1956-04-17

    The timing device comprises an escapement wheel and pallet, a spring drive to rotate the escapement wheel to a zero position, means to wind the pretensioned spring proportional to the desired signal time, and a cam mechanism to control an electrical signal switch by energizing the switch when the spring has been wound to the desired position, and deenergizing it when it reaches the zero position. This device produces an accurately timed signal variably witain the control of the operator.

  8. ["Manual on physician behavior at the time of death certification" created through collaboration with different local healthcare workers].

    PubMed

    Kusakabe, Akihiko; Hirano, Kazue; Ikenaga, Keiko; Saitou, Naohiro; Mikan, Fukiko; Okita, Masato; Inamori, Masahiko; Shirado, Akemi; Morita, Tatsuya

    2014-12-01

    It is thought that physicians' behavior at the scene of death certification has a considerable influence on the grief of the bereaved. We constructed a manual to guide the physician's behavior at death certification and educate residents and medical students. We collaborated locally across several occupations(e.g., visiting nurse, visiting pharmacist)for the purpose of upgrading the manual. We conducted interviews with physicians and nurses who perform home medical care in this area regarding the scene at a real death certification in making our manual. It was evaluated well in this trial, and participants were cooperative with the interview. We can conduct many collaborations locally in various forms. The regional alliances become smoother as a function of such collaborations. In addition, it is thought that the manual that was constructed following this process will be easily received in the area.

  9. Local molecular clocks in three nuclear genes: divergence times for rodents and other mammals and incompatibility among fossil calibrations.

    PubMed

    Douzery, Emmanuel J P; Delsuc, Frédéric; Stanhope, Michael J; Huchon, Dorothée

    2003-01-01

    Reconstructing the chronology of mammalian evolution is a debated issue between molecule- and fossil-based inferences. A methodological limitation of molecules is the evolutionary rate variation among lineages, precluding the application of the global molecular clock. We considered 2422 first and second codon positions of the combined ADRA2B, IRBP, and vWF nuclear genes for a well-documented set of placentals including an extensive sampling of rodents. Using seven independent calibration points and a maximum-likelihood framework, we evaluated whether molecular and paleontological estimates of mammalian divergence dates may be reconciled by the local molecular clocks approach, allowing local constancy of substitution rates with variations at larger phylogenetic scales. To handle the difficulty of choosing among all possible rate assignments for various lineages, local molecular clocks were based on the results of branch-length and two-cluster tests. Extensive lineage-specific variation of evolutionary rates was detected, even among rodents. Cross-calibrations indicated some incompatibilities between divergence dates based on different paleontological references. To decrease the impact of a single calibration point, estimates derived from independent calibrations displaying only slight reciprocal incompatibility were averaged. The divergence dates inferred for the split between mice and rats (approximately 13-19 Myr) was younger than previously published molecular estimates. The most recent common ancestors of rodents, primates and rodents, boreoeutherians, and placentals were estimated to be, respectively, approximately 60, 70, 75, and 78 Myr old. Global clocks, local clocks, and quartet dating analyses suggested a Late Cretaceous origin of the crown placental clades followed by a Tertiary radiation of some placental orders like rodents.

  10. Characterizing Methane Emissions at Local Scales with a 20 Year Total Hydrocarbon Time Series, Imaging Spectrometry, and Web Facilitated Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Eliza Swan

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas for which uncertainty in local emission strengths necessitates improved source characterizations. Although CH4 plume mapping did not motivate the NASA Airborne Visible InfraRed Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) design and municipal air quality monitoring stations were not intended for studying marine geological seepage, these assets have capabilities that can make them viable for studying concentrated (high flux, highly heterogeneous) CH4 sources, such as the Coal Oil Point (COP) seep field (˜0.015 Tg CH4 yr-1) offshore Santa Barbara, California. Hourly total hydrocarbon (THC) data, spanning 1990 to 2008 from an air pollution station located near COP, were analyzed and showed geologic CH4 emissions as the dominant local source. A band ratio approach was developed and applied to high glint AVIRIS data over COP, resulting in local-scale mapping of natural atmospheric CH4 plumes. A Cluster-Tuned Matched Filter (CTMF) technique was applied to Gulf of Mexico AVIRIS data to detect CH4 venting from offshore platforms. Review of 744 platform-centered CTMF subsets was facilitated through a flexible PHP-based web portal. This dissertation demonstrates the value of investigating municipal air quality data and imaging spectrometry for gathering insight into concentrated methane source emissions and highlights how flexible web-based solutions can help facilitate remote sensing research.

  11. Hope over experience: desirability and the persistence of optimism.

    PubMed

    Massey, Cade; Simmons, Joseph P; Armor, David A

    2011-02-01

    Many important decisions hinge on expectations of future outcomes. Decisions about health, investments, and relationships all depend on predictions of the future. These expectations are often optimistic: People frequently believe that their preferred outcomes are more likely than is merited. Yet it is unclear whether optimism persists with experience and, surprisingly, whether optimism is truly caused by desire. These are important questions because life's most consequential decisions often feature both strong preferences and the opportunity to learn. We investigated these questions by collecting football predictions from National Football League fans during each week of the 2008 season. Despite accuracy incentives and extensive feedback, predictions about preferred teams remained optimistically biased through the entire season. Optimism was as strong after 4 months as it was after 4 weeks. We exploited variation in preferences and matchups to show that desirability fueled this optimistic bias.

  12. Perceived parental behavior and the social desirability response set.

    PubMed

    Gooden, W E; Struble, K D

    1990-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the potential effects of the social desirability response set as a confounding variable in research involving self-report measures of perceived parental behavior. Scores on the Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale (M-C SDS) were correlated with each of the three factors on the Bronfenbrenner Parental Behavior Scale (BPB): (1) Loving, (2) Punishing, and (3) Demanding. Fifty-eight young adults participated in the study; the sample included roughly equal numbers of black and white subjects, male and female subjects, and college students and other community residents. Scores were analyzed by sex of subject and sex of parent as well as in combined groups. Significant correlations (p<.05, p<.01) were obtained from female subjects on BPB factors 2 and 3. Implications for the BPB's validity and suggestions for future research are discussed.

  13. Actual and desired computer literacy among allied health students.

    PubMed

    Agho, A O; Williams, A M

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the level of computer literacy among allied health students, with specific focus on physical therapy, occupational therapy, and respiratory therapy students, and to investigate the perceived differences between actual computer literacy and desired computer literacy. Two established measurement instruments were used to collect data from a sample of 377 allied health students. T-tests and Pearson product-moment correlations were conducted to analyze the data. Results show that allied health students take very few computer courses, but they are generally aware of the applications of computers in the practice of allied health and they desire a higher level of computer literacy than they currently have.

  14. Simultaneous recording of brain extracellular glucose, spike and local field potential in real time using an implantable microelectrode array with nano-materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wenjing; Song, Yilin; Fan, Xinyi; Zhang, Song; Wang, Li; Xu, Shengwei; Wang, Mixia; Cai, Xinxia

    2016-03-01

    Glucose is the main substrate for neurons in the central nervous system. In order to efficiently characterize the brain glucose mechanism, it is desirable to determine the extracellular glucose dynamics as well as the corresponding neuroelectrical activity in vivo. In the present study, we fabricated an implantable microelectrode array (MEA) probe composed of platinum electrochemical and electrophysiology microelectrodes by standard micro electromechanical system (MEMS) processes. The MEA probe was modified with nano-materials and implanted in a urethane-anesthetized rat for simultaneous recording of striatal extracellular glucose, local field potential (LFP) and spike on the same spatiotemporal scale when the rat was in normoglycemia, hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia. During these dual-mode recordings, we observed that increase of extracellular glucose enhanced the LFP power and spike firing rate, while decrease of glucose had an opposite effect. This dual mode MEA probe is capable of examining specific spatiotemporal relationships between electrical and chemical signaling in the brain, which will contribute significantly to improve our understanding of the neuron physiology.

  15. Desirable features of a "humanoid" robot-therapist.

    PubMed

    Morasso, Pietro; Casadio, Maura; Giannoni, Psiche; Masia, Lorenzo; Sanguineti, Vittorio; Squeri, Valentina; Vergaro, Elena

    2009-01-01

    In relation with a recent Cochrane review, the paper discusses desirable features of a "humanoid" robot-therapist: 1) high mechanical compliance, 2) large range of force, 3) minimum assistance level, 4) soft haptic interaction for proprioceptive awareness, 5) adaptative assistance properties. It also proposes a framework for addressing optimal assistance and learning paradigms in view of a consensus in the community of rehabilitation engineers about shared principles and common standards. PMID:19965200

  16. Effect of radiotherapy delay in overall treatment time on local control and survival in head and neck cancer: Review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    González Ferreira, José A.; Jaén Olasolo, Javier; Azinovic, Ignacio; Jeremic, Branislav

    2015-01-01

    Treatment delays in completing radiotherapy (RT) for many neoplasms are a major problem affecting treatment outcome, as increasingly shown in the literature. Overall treatment time (OTT) could be a critical predictor of local tumor control and/or survival. In an attempt to establish a protocol for managing delays during RT, especially for heavily overloaded units, we have extensively reviewed the available literature on head and neck cancer. We confirmed a large deleterious effect of prolonged OTT on both local control and survival of these patients. PMID:26549990

  17. Carrier capture times of the localized states in an InGaN thin film with indium-rich nanocluster structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hsiang-Chen; Lu, Yen-Cheng; Chen, Cheng-Yen; Yang, C. C.

    2006-07-01

    A femtosecond nondegenerate pump-probe technique of using two beta barium borate crystals for frequency doubling a 7fs Ti:sapphire laser is used for studying the ultrafast carrier dynamics in an InGaN thin film, in which nanoscale indium-rich clusters have been observed. The carrier capture time of the localized states (the cluster states) from the free-carrier states (the states of the background compound) is calibrated. The initial rise times of the differential transmission of the probe intensity are calibrated to give the time constant of about 300fs for the degenerate cases over the whole photoluminescence spectral range and for the nondegenerate cases, in which both pump and probe wavelengths correspond to the free-carrier states. However, when the carriers are excited in the free-carrier states and probed in the localized states, the rise time increases to the range of 590-715fs, which represents the carrier capture time of the localized states from the free-carrier states.

  18. Spontaneous ultra-weak light emissions from wheat seedlings are rhythmic and synchronized with the time profile of the local gravimetric tide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moraes, Thiago A.; Barlow, Peter W.; Klingelé, Emile; Gallep, Cristiano M.

    2012-06-01

    Semi-circadian rhythms of spontaneous photon emission from wheat seedlings germinated and grown in a constant environment (darkened chamber) were found to be synchronized with the rhythm of the local gravimetric (lunisolar) tidal acceleration. Time courses of the photon-count curves were also found to match the growth velocity profile of the seedlings. Pair-wise analyses of the data—growth, photon count, and tidal—by local tracking correlation always revealed significant coefficients ( P > 0.7) for more than 80% of any of the time periods considered. Using fast Fourier transform, the photon-count data revealed periodic components similar to those of the gravimetric tide. Time courses of biophoton emissions would appear to be an additional, useful, and innovative tool in both chronobiological and biophysical studies.

  19. Analysis and prediction of aperiodic hydrodynamic oscillatory time series by feed-forward neural networks, fuzzy logic, and a local nonlinear predictor

    SciTech Connect

    Gentili, Pier Luigi; Gotoda, Hiroshi; Dolnik, Milos; Epstein, Irving R.

    2015-01-15

    Forecasting of aperiodic time series is a compelling challenge for science. In this work, we analyze aperiodic spectrophotometric data, proportional to the concentrations of two forms of a thermoreversible photochromic spiro-oxazine, that are generated when a cuvette containing a solution of the spiro-oxazine undergoes photoreaction and convection due to localized ultraviolet illumination. We construct the phase space for the system using Takens' theorem and we calculate the Lyapunov exponents and the correlation dimensions to ascertain the chaotic character of the time series. Finally, we predict the time series using three distinct methods: a feed-forward neural network, fuzzy logic, and a local nonlinear predictor. We compare the performances of these three methods.

  20. Desired machines: cinema and the world in its own image.

    PubMed

    Canales, Jimena

    2011-09-01

    In 1895 when the Lumière brothers unveiled their cinematographic camera, many scientists were elated. Scientists hoped that the machine would fulfill a desire that had driven research for nearly half a century: that of capturing the world in its own image. But their elation was surprisingly short-lived, and many researchers quickly distanced themselves from the new medium. The cinematographic camera was soon split into two machines, one for recording and one for projecting, enabling it to further escape from the laboratory. The philosopher Henri Bergson joined scientists, such as Etienne-Jules Marey, who found problems with the new cinematographic order. Those who had worked to make the dream come true found that their efforts had been subverted. This essay focuses on the desire to build a cinematographic camera, with the purpose of elucidating how dreams and reality mix in the development of science and technology. It is about desired machines and their often unexpected results. The interplay between what "is" (the technical), what "ought" (the ethical), and what "could" be (the fantastical) drives scientific research.

  1. Determining Desirable Cursor Control Device Characteristics for NASA Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandor, Aniko; Holden, Kritina

    2007-01-01

    The Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) that will travel to the moon and Mars, and all future Exploration vehicles and habitats will be highly computerized, necessitating an accurate method of interaction with the computers. The design of a cursor control device will have to take into consideration g-forces, vibration, gloved operations, and the specific types of tasks to be performed. The study described here is being undertaken to begin identifying characteristics of cursor control devices that will work well for the unique Exploration mission environments. The objective of the study is not to identify a particular device, but to begin identifying design characteristics that are usable and desirable for space missions. Most cursor control devices have strengths and weaknesses; they are more appropriate for some tasks and less suitable for others. The purpose of this study is to collect some initial usability data on a large number of commercially available and proprietary cursor control devices. A software test battery was developed for this purpose. Once data has been collected using these low-level, basic point/click/drag tasks, higher fidelity, scenario-driven evaluations will be conducted with a reduced set of devices. The standard tasks used for testing cursor control devices are based on a model of human movement known as Fitts law. Fitts law predicts that the time to acquire a target is logarithmically related to the distance over the target size. To gather data for analysis with this law, fundamental, low-level tasks are used such as dragging or pointing at various targets of different sizes from various distances. The first four core tasks for the study were based on the ISO 9241-9:(2000) document from the International Organization for Standardization that contains the requirements for non-keyboard input devices. These include two pointing tasks, one dragging and one tracking task. The fifth task from ISO 9241-9, the circular tracking task was not used

  2. Time?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoroso, Richard L.

    2013-09-01

    The concept of time in the `clockwork' Newtonian world was irrelevant; and has generally been ignored until recently by several generations of physicists since the implementation of quantum mechanics. We will set aside the utility of time as a property relating to physical calculations of events relating to a metrics line element or as an aspect of the transformation of a particles motion/interaction in a coordinate system or in relation to thermodynamics etc., i.e. we will discard all the usual uses of time as a concept used to circularly define physical parameters in terms of other physical parameters; concentrating instead on time as an aspect of the fundamental cosmic topology of our virtual reality especially as it inseparably relates to the nature and role of the observer in natural science.

  3. Fertility Desires and Intentions among People Living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) in Southern India

    PubMed Central

    Jose, Hyma; Chowta, Nithyananda; Ramapuram, John; Bhaskaran, Unnikrishnan; Achappa, Basavaprabhu; Chandran, Vishnu

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The desire of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) to have children can have significant public health implications. Combination Antiretroviral Therapy (cART) has increased the life expectancy of PLWHA as a result of which they may consider child bearing. There are hardly any studies from India addressing the fertility desires among PLWHA. Aim This study was done to assess the fertility desires of PLWHA in Southern India. Materials and Methods It was a cross-sectional study conducted among 230 HIV-positive men and women who presented to Kasturba Medical College (KMC), Mangalore, India. Study was conducted between October 2012 and October 2014. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS software version 11.5. Chi-square test, Fisher’s exact test and student t-test was used to find out the association of various factors affecting fertility desire. A p-value of less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results The mean age of our study population was 36.3±5.5 years. The mean age of males was 37.3±6 years and for female 34.9±5 years. In our study 132 (57.4%) were males. Majority were literate 229 (99%). Majority of patients were employed 166 (72%). In our study 195 (84.7%) were on cART. Out of 230 PLWHA 39 (16.95%) were unmarried and 151(65.5%) married PLHIV were living with partners at the time of study. In our study 77 (33.5%) patients had fertility desire. Age, gender, marital status, number of children, partner’s fertility desire and HIV status of partner had an association with fertility desire. Conclusion Providing universal access to cART is the main aim of national programs. It is high time that these programs focus on fertility issues of PLWHA. Reproductive rights of PLWHA need to be respected. Physicians and HIV counselors should proactively discuss and address reproductive issues of PLWHA. PMID:27504328

  4. The progenitors of local ultra-massive galaxies across cosmic time: from dusty star-bursting to quiescent stellar populations

    SciTech Connect

    Marchesini, Danilo; Marsan, Cemile Z.; Muzzin, Adam; Franx, Marijn; Stefanon, Mauro; Brammer, Gabriel G.; Vulcani, Benedetta; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Milvang-Jensen, Bo; Dunlop, James S.; Buitrago, Fernando

    2014-10-10

    Using the UltraVISTA catalogs, we investigate the evolution in the 11.4 Gyr since z = 3 of the progenitors of local ultra-massive galaxies (log (M {sub star}/M {sub ☉}) ≈ 11.8; UMGs), providing a complete and consistent picture of how the most massive galaxies at z = 0 have assembled. By selecting the progenitors with a semi-empirical approach using abundance matching, we infer a growth in stellar mass of 0.56{sub −0.25}{sup +0.35} dex, 0.45{sub −0.20}{sup +0.16} dex, and 0.27{sub −0.12}{sup +0.08} dex from z = 3, z = 2, and z = 1, respectively, to z = 0. At z < 1, the progenitors of UMGs constitute a homogeneous population of only quiescent galaxies with old stellar populations. At z > 1, the contribution from star-forming galaxies progressively increases, with the progenitors at 2 < z < 3 being dominated by massive (M {sub star} ≈ 2 × 10{sup 11} M {sub ☉}), dusty (A {sub V} ∼ 1-2.2 mag), star-forming (SFR ∼ 100-400 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}) galaxies with a large range in stellar ages. At z = 2.75, ∼15% of the progenitors are quiescent, with properties typical of post-starburst galaxies with little dust extinction and strong Balmer break, and showing a large scatter in color. Our findings indicate that at least half of the stellar content of local UMGs was assembled at z > 1, whereas the remaining was assembled via merging from z ∼ 1 to the present. Most of the quenching of the star-forming progenitors happened between z = 2.75 and z = 1.25, in good agreement with the typical formation redshift and scatter in age of z = 0 UMGs as derived from their fossil records. The progenitors of local UMGs, including the star-forming ones, never lived on the blue cloud since z = 3. We propose an alternative path for the formation of local UMGs that refines previously proposed pictures and that is fully consistent with our findings.

  5. Learning Time in America: Trends to Reform the American School Calendar--A Snapshot of Federal, State, and Local Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farbman, David

    2011-01-01

    The National Center on Time & Learning (NCTL), an organization dedicated to redesigning and expanding school time to improve opportunities and outcomes for high poverty students, and the Education Commission of the States (ECS), with a mission to foster both the exchange of ideas on education issues among the states and long range strategic…

  6. Prefrontal cortex modulates desire and dread generated by nucleus accumbens glutamate disruption

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Jocelyn M.; Berridge, Kent. C

    2012-01-01

    Background Corticolimbic circuits, including direct projections from prefrontal cortex to nucleus accumbens (NAc), permit “top-down” control of intense motivations generated by subcortical circuits. In rats, localized disruptions of glutamate signaling within medial shell of NAc generate desire or dread, anatomically organized along a rostrocaudal gradient analogous to a limbic “keyboard”. At rostral locations in shell these disruptions generate appetitive eating, but at caudal locations the disruptions generate progressively fearful behaviors (distress vocalizations, escape attempts and antipredator reactions). Here we asked whether medial prefrontal cortex can modulate intense motivations generated by subcortical NAc disruptions. Methods We used simultaneous microinjections in medial prefrontal cortex regions and in NAc shell to examine whether the desire or dread generated by NAc shell disruptions is modulated by activation/inhibition of three specific regions of prefrontal cortex: medial orbitofrontal cortex, infralimbic cortex (homologous to area 25 or subgenual anterior cingulate in the human), or prelimbic cortex (midventral anterior cingulate). Results We found that activation of medial orbitofrontal cortex biased intense bivalent motivation in an appetitive direction by amplifying generation of eating behavior by middle to caudal NAc disruptions, without altering fear. In contrast, activation of infralimbic prefrontal cortex powerfully and generally suppressed both appetitive eating and fearful behaviors generated by NAc shell disruptions. Conclusions These results suggest that corticolimbic projections from discrete prefrontal regions can either bias motivational valence or generally suppress subcortically-generated intense motivations of desire or fear. PMID:22981656

  7. A time series generalized functional model based method for vibration-based damage precise localization in structures consisting of 1D, 2D, and 3D elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaris, C. S.; Sakellariou, J. S.; Fassois, S. D.

    2016-06-01

    This study focuses on the problem of vibration-based damage precise localization via data-based, time series type, methods for structures consisting of 1D, 2D, or 3D elements. A Generalized Functional Model Based method is postulated based on an expanded Vector-dependent Functionally Pooled ARX (VFP-ARX) model form, capable of accounting for an arbitrary structural topology. The FP model's operating parameter vector elements are properly constrained to reflect any given topology. Damage localization is based on operating parameter vector estimation within the specified topology, so that the location estimate and its uncertainty bounds are statistically optimal. The method's effectiveness is experimentally demonstrated through damage precise localization on a laboratory spatial truss structure using various damage scenarios and a single pair of random excitation - vibration response signals in a low and limited frequency bandwidth.

  8. Localization of ictal onset zones in Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS) based on information theoretical time delay analysis of intracranial electroencephalography (iEEG).

    PubMed

    Cho, Jae-Hyun; Kang, Hoon-Chul; Jung, Young-Jin; Lee, Yong-Ho; Jung, Ki-Young; Kim, Heung Dong; Im, Chang-Hwan

    2012-03-01

    Precise localization of ictal onset zones is of great clinical importance for successful surgery in patients with intractable drug-resistant epilepsy. Time delay analysis has been one of the most reliable and most widely used computational electroencephalogram (EEG) analysis methods for localizing ictal onset zones. However, the majority of previous studies have only been applied to the localization of ictal onset zones in focal epilepsy. In the present study, we analyzed intracranial EEG (iEEG) recordings acquired from patients with Lennox-Gaustaut syndrome (LGS), which is a type of intractable, pediatric, secondary generalized epilepsies with bilaterally synchronous ictal epileptiform discharges. To estimate the ictal onset zones from ictal iEEG recordings, we estimated time delays among iEEG signals based on the information theoretical approach. The results of the time delay analysis applied to the iEEG data of four successfully treated LGS patients corresponded well with the surgical resection areas identified by experienced epileptologists and multiple neuroimaging modalities, suggesting that the time delay analysis may provide useful information on the precise locations of ictal onset zones prior to epilepsy surgery in LGS patients.

  9. Local existence of symmetric spinor potentials for symmetric (3,1)-spinors in Einstein space-times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, F.; Edgar, S. B.

    2001-03-01

    We investigate the possibility of existence of a symmetric potential HABA' B' = H( AB)( A' B') for a symmetric (3,1)-spinor LABCA' , e.g., a Lanczos potential of the Weyl spinor, as defined by the equation LABCA' =∇ ( AB' HBC) A' B' . We prove that in all Einstein space-times such a symmetric potential HABA' B' exists. Potentials of this type have been found earlier in investigations of some very special spinors in restricted classes of space-times. A tensor version of this result is also given. We apply similar ideas and results by Illge to Maxwell's equations in a curved space-time.

  10. Imaging the Aurora - Desires, Needs, Reality and Capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paxton, L. J.

    2008-05-01

    Imaging the aurora, especially imaging the aurora with sufficient spectral, spatial and temporal resolution to meet the scientific community's desires and national needs, can be a difficult and costly problem if we follow the old paradigm of building a sensor or sensor suite that is all things to all users. In this talk I consider what can be done within the constraints of a relatively low cost mission design. To begin the process we have to start with questions: What are the scientific questions that require auroral imagery? What has to be imaged and why? What are the temporal and spatial resolution requirements? How can this be achieved? What does the instrument tradespace look like? Rather than posit a scientific question, I'll ask the reader of this abstract to consider a few questions. Is it important to be able to see the entire aurora at once (very important or is just enough to get the boundary and a good estimate of the precipitating particle power)? How much time do you have to be able to have auroral imagery (constantly monitoring or often enough to have a reasonable chance of observing a particular kind of event or only in concert with another measurement)? What kind of temporal resolution is required (fractions of a seconds, seconds, a minute)? What kind of spatial resolution is required (fine scale high resolution of the brightest features or general morphology and features)? How much of the data are you prepared to handle (every bit costs at the spacecraft and on the ground so how much do you really need)? Do you need to be able to image the sunlit aurora? What energy range of precipitating particles do you need to be able to image (or at least be sensitive to)? How long a data set do you need (as long as possible, a solar cycle, long enough to see superstorms, substorms)? These questions and many others determine what we must do in order to provide auroral imagery to meet a given users needs. We can not, as a community, afford to "require" that the

  11. 4-D imaging of seepage in earthen embankments with time-lapse inversion of self-potential data constrained by acoustic emissions localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rittgers, J. B.; Revil, A.; Planes, T.; Mooney, M. A.; Koelewijn, A. R.

    2015-02-01

    New methods are required to combine the information contained in the passive electrical and seismic signals to detect, localize and monitor hydromechanical disturbances in porous media. We propose a field experiment showing how passive seismic and electrical data can be combined together to detect a preferential flow path associated with internal erosion in a Earth dam. Continuous passive seismic and electrical (self-potential) monitoring data were recorded during a 7-d full-scale levee (earthen embankment) failure test, conducted in Booneschans, Netherlands in 2012. Spatially coherent acoustic emissions events and the development of a self-potential anomaly, associated with induced concentrated seepage and internal erosion phenomena, were identified and imaged near the downstream toe of the embankment, in an area that subsequently developed a series of concentrated water flows and sand boils, and where liquefaction of the embankment toe eventually developed. We present a new 4-D grid-search algorithm for acoustic emissions localization in both time and space, and the application of the localization results to add spatially varying constraints to time-lapse 3-D modelling of self-potential data in the terms of source current localization. Seismic signal localization results are utilized to build a set of time-invariant yet spatially varying model weights used for the inversion of the self-potential data. Results from the combination of these two passive techniques show results that are more consistent in terms of focused ground water flow with respect to visual observation on the embankment. This approach to geophysical monitoring of earthen embankments provides an improved approach for early detection and imaging of the development of embankment defects associated with concentrated seepage and internal erosion phenomena. The same approach can be used to detect various types of hydromechanical disturbances at larger scales.

  12. Estimating the population local wavelet spectrum with application to non-stationary functional magnetic resonance imaging time series.

    PubMed

    Gott, Aimee N; Eckley, Idris A; Aston, John A D

    2015-12-20

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a dynamic four-dimensional imaging modality. However, in almost all fMRI analyses, the time series elements of this data are assumed to be second-order stationary. In this paper, we examine, using time series spectral methods, whether such stationary assumptions can be made and whether estimates of non-stationarity can be used to gain understanding into fMRI experiments. A non-stationary version of replicated stationary time series analysis is proposed that takes into account the replicated time series that are available from nearby voxels in a region of interest (ROI). These are used to investigate non-stationarities in both the ROI itself and the variations within the ROI. The proposed techniques are applied to simulated data and to an anxiety-inducing fMRI experiment.

  13. “A time of fear”: local, national, and international responses to a large Ebola outbreak in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background This paper documents and analyses some of the responses to the largest Ebola outbreak on record, which took place in Uganda between September 2000 and February 2001. Four hundred and twenty five people developed clinical symptoms in three geographically distinct parts of the country (Gulu, Masindi, and Mbarara), of whom 224 (53%) died. Given the focus of previous social scientific Ebola research on experiences in communities that have been directly affected, this article expands the lens to include responses to the outbreak in local, national, and international contexts over the course of the outbreak. Methods Responses to the outbreak were gauged through the articles, editorials, cartoons, and letters that were published in the country’s two main English language daily national newspapers: the New Vision and the Monitor (now the Daily Monitor). All the relevant pieces from these two sources over the course of the epidemic were cut out, entered onto a computer, and the originals filed. The three a priori codes, based on the local, national, and international levels, were expanded into six, to include issues that emerged inductively during analysis. The data within each code were subsequently worked into coherent, chronological narratives. Results A total of 639 cuttings were included in the analysis. Strong and varied responses to the outbreak were identified from across the globe. These included, among others: confusion, anger, and serious stigma in affected communities; medical staff working themselves to exhaustion, with some quitting their posts; patients fleeing from hospitals; calls on spiritual forces for protection against infection; a well-coordinated national control strategy; and the imposition of some international travel restrictions. Responses varied both quantitatively and qualitatively according to the level (i.e. local, national, or international) at which they were manifested. Conclusions The Ugandan experience of 2000

  14. Comparing Local-Time and Storm-Phase Distributions of EMIC Waves Observed by Van Allen Probes A, GOES-13, and Halley, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnsted, M.; Engebretson, M. J.; Posch, J. L.; Lessard, M.; Singer, H. J.; Kletzing, C.; Smith, C. W.; Horne, R. B.

    2015-12-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are expected to be highly efficient in depleting the ring current and in removing outer radiation belt electrons. However, the distribution of these waves in subauroral regions has not been well characterized. In this study we present 0-5 Hz magnetic field data from the Van Allen Probes A (RBSP A) spacecraft (in elliptical equatorial orbit with apogee at 5.8 RE), 0-1 Hz data from GOES-13 (in geosynchronous orbit), and 0-5 Hz data from Halley, Antarctica (L ~4.6), during the first full local-time precession of the Van Allen Probes from October 2012 through July 2014. The considerably different hourly local time vs. L distributions observed point to distinct locations and geomagnetic activity-dependent patterns of EMIC wave activity. GOES-13 wave occurrences exhibited a broad peak in the noon-to-dusk sector. He+ band events peaked near dusk, while H+ band waves peaked near noon, with a secondary peak centered near dawn. More EMIC waves occurred during storm main phase in the He+ band (5%) than in the H+ band (1%), and 80% and 89% of the He+ and H+ band waves, respectively, occurred under late storm recovery or quiet conditions. During all storm phases the local time occurrence patterns of < 0.4 Hz and 0.4-1.0 Hz events at Halley resembled those of He+ and H+ band waves, respectively, at GOES-13. The relatively few wave events at Halley with f > 1.0 Hz occurred at all local times, but with a modest, broad peak near dawn. Roughly 90% of both the 1570 Halley events < 1.0 Hz and the 142 Halley events > 1.0 Hz occurred during late storm recovery and quiet conditions. Events during compressions at GOES-13 (10%), Halley (6%), and RBSP A (6%) peaked near local noon, but with a secondary peak near midnight. Waves observed by RBSP A were distributed rather evenly in local time in all L shell ranges between 3 and 6, and the percentage occurring during late storm recovery or quiet conditions was only 65%. We interpret the difference in

  15. Educating the Canadian public about the social determinants of health: the time for local public health action is now!

    PubMed

    Raphael, Dennis

    2012-09-01

    Despite Canada's history of developing health promotion and population health concepts, Canada falls behind other wealthy nations in having these ideas implemented in the form of public policy that strengthens the social determinants of health (SDH). Much of this has to do with the lack of awareness by Canadians about the SDH that stems from the lack of media reporting on the determinants of health and the unwillingness of most local public health units across Canada to raise these issues in a consistent manner. Canada is not unique in this situation. If the public health community in Canada is to live up to its self-professed mission of improving the health of Canadians it must undertake to educate the public about the SDH as effectively as it took on the task of educating the public of the importance of not smoking, of exercising and adopting a healthy diet.

  16. The desired moral attitude of the physician: (II) compassion.

    PubMed

    Gelhaus, Petra

    2012-11-01

    Professional medical ethics demands of health care professionals in addition to specific duties and rules of conduct that they embody a responsible and trustworthy personality. In the public discussion, different concepts are suggested to describe the desired implied attitude of physicians. In a sequel of three articles, a set of three of these concepts is presented in an interpretation that is meant to characterise the morally emotional part of this attitude: "empathy", "compassion" and "care". In the first article of the series, "empathy" has been developed as a mainly cognitive and morally neutral capacity of understanding. In this article, the emotional and virtuous core of the desired professional attitude-compassion-is elaborated. Compassion is distinguished from sympathy, empathy and pity. Several problems of compassion as a spontaneous, warm emotion for being a professional virtue are discussed: especially questions of over-demand, of justice and of concerns because of a possible threat to the patient's dignity and autonomy. An interpretation of compassion as processed and learned professional attitude, that founds dignity on the general idea of man as a sentient being and on solidarity, not on his independence and capacities, is developed. It is meant to rule out the possible side effects and to make compassion as a professional attitude and as professional virtue attractive, teachable and acquirable. In order to reach the adequate warmth and closeness for the particular physician-patient-relation, professional compassion has to be combined with the capacity of empathy. If appropriate, the combination of both empathy and compassion as "empathic compassion" can demand a much warmer attitude towards the patient than each of the elements alone, or the simple addition of them can provide. The concept of "care" that will be discussed in a forthcoming article of this sequel is a missing necessary part to describe the active potential of the desired moral

  17. Assessing the correlates of desired family size in Shaanxi, China.

    PubMed

    Zick, C D; Xiang, N

    1994-01-01

    This exploratory analysis of factors associated with Chinese women's fertility desires uses data on married women between the ages of 18 and 35 who live in Shaanxi Province, China. Analyses using an economic framework found that both rural and urban couples who intended to sign, or who had already signed, the one-child certificate reported wanting significantly fewer children. However, in rural areas (where 80 per cent of the provincial population lives), education level, living arrangements, participation in an arranged marriage, attitudes regarding the ideal age for marriage, and knowledge of the reasons for the government's fertility policies appear to play a relatively larger role in shaping fertility preferences.

  18. [Desire disorders in the couple: accident, dream, sexuality].

    PubMed

    Stauffacher, M; Godat, A

    2013-03-20

    Eros, as few only would doubt about it, takes part in the deepest and most intimate area of the human being. Our contemporaries attach great importance to sexuality, but feed the illusion that mastering it could lead to miracles in the couple. We suggest that giving up control and committing himself to fully listening to the patient, the physician will be able to orient him in the blind rules of desire and to accept fortuity. Unexpected (?) accident, dream, hypnosis, often powerfully catalyze changes. Some clinical situations are described in this article with their evolution as consultations develop, without foreseeing their interpretation.

  19. The desired moral attitude of the physician: (II) compassion.

    PubMed

    Gelhaus, Petra

    2012-11-01

    Professional medical ethics demands of health care professionals in addition to specific duties and rules of conduct that they embody a responsible and trustworthy personality. In the public discussion, different concepts are suggested to describe the desired implied attitude of physicians. In a sequel of three articles, a set of three of these concepts is presented in an interpretation that is meant to characterise the morally emotional part of this attitude: "empathy", "compassion" and "care". In the first article of the series, "empathy" has been developed as a mainly cognitive and morally neutral capacity of understanding. In this article, the emotional and virtuous core of the desired professional attitude-compassion-is elaborated. Compassion is distinguished from sympathy, empathy and pity. Several problems of compassion as a spontaneous, warm emotion for being a professional virtue are discussed: especially questions of over-demand, of justice and of concerns because of a possible threat to the patient's dignity and autonomy. An interpretation of compassion as processed and learned professional attitude, that founds dignity on the general idea of man as a sentient being and on solidarity, not on his independence and capacities, is developed. It is meant to rule out the possible side effects and to make compassion as a professional attitude and as professional virtue attractive, teachable and acquirable. In order to reach the adequate warmth and closeness for the particular physician-patient-relation, professional compassion has to be combined with the capacity of empathy. If appropriate, the combination of both empathy and compassion as "empathic compassion" can demand a much warmer attitude towards the patient than each of the elements alone, or the simple addition of them can provide. The concept of "care" that will be discussed in a forthcoming article of this sequel is a missing necessary part to describe the active potential of the desired moral

  20. The JET Alfvén Eigenmode Local Manager for the real-time detection and tracking of MHD instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Testa, D.; Carfantan, H.; Goodyear, A.; Blanchard, P.; Klein, A.; Panis, T.; contributors, JET-EFDA

    2010-12-01

    In this work we report the successful application of an innovative method, based on the Sparse Representation of signals, to perform a real-time, unsupervised detection of the individual components in a frequency degenerate, multi-harmonic spectrum, using a small number of data unevenly sampled in the spatial domain. This method has been developed from its original applications in astronomy, and is now routinely used in the JET thermonuclear fusion experiment to obtain the decomposition of a spectrum of high-frequency (~10-500 kHz range) magnetic instabilities with a sub-ms time resolution, allowing the real-time tracking of its individual components as the plasma background evolves. This work opens a path towards developing real-time control tools for electro-magnetic instabilities in future fusion devices aimed at achieving a net energy gain. More generally, the speed and accuracy of this algorithm is recommended for instances of physics measurements and control engineering where an unsupervised, real-time decomposition of a degenerate signal is required from a small number of data.