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Sample records for desmoid tumors results

  1. Genetics Home Reference: desmoid tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... in my area? Other Names for This Condition aggressive fibromatosis deep fibromatosis desmoid fibromatosis familial infiltrative fibromatosis ... catenin protein and somatic APC mutations in sporadic aggressive fibromatoses (desmoid tumors). Am J Pathol. 1997 Aug; ...

  2. Update on desmoid tumors.

    PubMed

    Escobar, C; Munker, R; Thomas, J O; Li, B D; Burton, G V

    2012-03-01

    Desmoid tumors (DTs) are histologically benign proliferations of stromal cells but may grow locally aggressive. Overall, DTs are rare (0.03% of all neoplasms). A minority of DTs is associated with Gardner syndrome and mutations of the familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) gene. Most spontaneous DTs are associated with mutations of the beta-catenin gene. This mutation results in the activation of Wnt/catenin signaling. Due to their variable clinical presentation and behavior, no standard approach for DTs can be recommended. In most cases of DTs of the extremities surgical extirpation is indicated, whereas in many other cases, a multimodal and multidisciplinary concept should be followed. In this review article, we discuss the diagnosis, pathogenesis, and treatment options for DTs, including targeted therapy with tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

  3. Complete response to exemestane in a patient with a desmoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Debled, Marc; Le Loarer, François; Callonnec, Françoise; Soubeyran, Isabelle; Cambon-Michot, Chantal; Dujardin, Franck; Italiano, Antoine

    2012-04-01

    Desmoid tumors are rare mesenchymal neoplasms without metastatic potential. Despite the benign nature of this condition, some patients develop disease progression despite all locoregional options for care. Aggressive forms of desmoid tumors may induce morbidity that can lead to physical impairment and mortality that is occasionally observed as a result of local infiltrative growth and tissue invasion, in particular with abdominal disease. Few therapeutic options are available for patients with recurrent/unresectable desmoid tumors. Several studies have suggested the potential benefit of antiestrogens such as tamoxifen in this setting. Here we report the first description of the efficacy of an aromatase inhibitor in a patient with a desmoid tumor.

  4. Bilateral desmoid tumor of the breast: case seriesand literature review

    PubMed Central

    Wongmaneerung, Phanchaporn; Somwangprasert, Areewan; Watcharachan, Kirati; Ditsatham, Chagkrit

    2016-01-01

    Background Desmoid tumor of the breast is very rare and locally aggressive but has no distant metastasis. Bilateral lesions are extremely rare, found in only 4% of patients. Two cases of bilateral desmoid tumor of the breast are reported. The clinical presentation, diagnosis, imaging, treatment, and follow-up outcomes of recurrence as well as a brief literature review are provided. Case reports Case 1 is a 31-year-old woman who presented with nipple retraction. An ultrasound revealed BIRAD V in both breasts. She underwent a bilateral excisional biopsy under ultrasound mark with the pathology result of extra-abdominal desmoid tumor in both breasts. The patient had a bilateral mastectomy with silicone implantation due to the involved margins by excision. She remained tumor free after 7-year follow-up. Case 2 is a 28-year-old woman who presented with a lump on her right breast that she had discovered ~2 months earlier. An ultrasound showed a spiculated mass in the right breast and some circumscribed hypoechoic masses in both breasts. A bilateral breast excision was done. The pathology result was an extra-abdominal desmoid tumor. She had recurrence on both sides and underwent a mastectomy and silicone implantation. The tumor has not recurred after 1-year follow-up. Conclusion Imaging cannot distinguish between benign breast lesions and malignancy. Pathology results are helpful in making a definitive diagnosis. Given that the desmoid tumor is locally aggressive, a local excision with clear margins is recommended. Chemotherapy and hormonal treatment are controversial. PMID:27578999

  5. Desmoid tumor following abdominally-based free flap breast reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Christine; Hammoudeh, Ziyad S.

    2017-01-01

    Desmoid tumors are fibroblastic connective tissue tumors that most commonly develop within the anterior abdominal wall. The etiology of desmoid tumors has not been well defined; however, hereditary, hormonal, traumatic, and surgery-related causes have been implicated. Desmoid tumors are believed to arise from musculoaponeurotic structures. Development in the breast is very rare. Several reports of desmoid tumors arising in the vicinity of the fibrous capsule of a breast implant have been described, but to date, the authors are not aware of any published cases following autologous breast reconstruction. This report describes a desmoid tumor developing after a muscle-sparing free transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous (TRAM) flap for breast reconstruction and subsequent surgical management. PMID:28210557

  6. [Intraabdominal desmoid tumors in familial adenomatous polyposis].

    PubMed

    Galletto, Paula; Leoz, Maria Liz; Castells, Antoni; Balaguer, Francesc

    2013-11-01

    Desmoid tumors are currently the main cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis. More than 10% of these patients will develop these tumors during their lifetime and more than a third will suffer their consequences. The main risk factors for their development are female sex and abdominal surgery. The most frequent localization is intraabdominal. The therapeutic approach to these tumors has changed, and the surgical treatment of choice is currently the subject of debate. If a watch and wait approach is adopted, more than 50% of tumors will prove to be indolent. Therefore, the therapeutic strategy should be based on clinical presentation and should be decided by a multidisciplinary team working in a center with experience of these tumors. The present article proposes a prognostic classification to guide the therapeutic approach.

  7. Desmoid tumor of the abdominal wall: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Desmoid tumors are rare lesions without any metastatic potential but a strong tendency to invade locally and to recur. These tumors are associated with women of fertile age, especially during and after pregnancy. Case presentation The case of a desmoid tumor of the anterior abdominal wall in a 40-year-old Caucasian man with no relevant family history is presented, describing its appearance on computed tomography and ultrasonography. The patient, who presented with a painless mass in the left anterolateral abdomen, had a history of previous urgent abdominal surgery after a shotgun injury two years earlier. Radical resection of the affected abdominal wall musculature was performed, and the defect was reconstructed with polypropylene mesh. Conclusion The diagnosis of desmoid tumor should be strongly considered even in male patients with an abdominal mass and a history of previous abdominal surgery. The goal of its treatment is complete tumor excision and avoidance of the development of complications such as hernia. PMID:21787413

  8. Functional and Aesthetic Thorax Reconstruction after Desmoid Tumor Resection

    PubMed Central

    Acosta-Ponce de Leon, Eric; Sanchez-Sosa, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    Summary: This study describes a case report of a 31-year-old patient who presented with a left thoracic tumor on costal cartilages 5 and 6 that was diagnosed as a desmoid tumor 3 years after receiving retropectoral breast implants for cosmetic reasons. The integral reconstruction of the thoracic wall, functional and aesthetic, was planned for a single surgical period. The defect secondary to the tumor resection, which left the pericardium and lung exposed, was closed using the pectoral muscle as a “pre-expanded” flap by the breast implant, and the breast aesthetic was treated bilaterally with new implants in the retromammary position. After 12 months, the patient remained free from tumor recurrence and had a satisfactory aesthetic result. PMID:28280682

  9. Antitumor effects of hyaluronan inhibition in desmoid tumors.

    PubMed

    Briggs, Alexandra; Rosenberg, Laura; Buie, Justin D; Rizvi, Hira; Bertagnolli, Monica M; Cho, Nancy L

    2015-02-01

    Desmoid tumors (DTs) are rare, mesenchymal tumors that exhibit features of an abundant wound healing process. Previously, we showed that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are constituents of DTs and may contribute to desmoid tumorigenesis via activities associated with wound healing. Hyaluronan (HA) is a long-charged chain of repeating glucuronate and N-acetylglucosamine disaccharides that is synthesized by HA synthases (HAS) and degraded by hyaluronidases (HYAL). HA is secreted into the extracellular matrix by injured stroma and is important for normal tissue repair and neoplastic progression. Here, we investigated the presence of HA in DTs and the antitumor effects of the HA inhibitor, 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU), on DT-derived mesenchymal cells. By immunohistochemistry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we found abundant expression of HA in 29/30 DTs as well as >5-fold increased HA levels in DT-derived cell lines relative to controls. Immunohistochemistry also demonstrated high expression of HAS2 in DTs, and quantitative PCR analysis showed increased HAS2 upregulation in frozen DTs and DT-derived cells. 4-MU treatment of DT-derived cells significantly decreased proliferation as well as HA and HAS2 levels. Fluorescent immunohistochemistry showed that MSCs in DTs coexpressed HA, HAS2, HYAL2, as well as the major HA receptor CD44 and HA coreceptor TLR4. Taken together, our results suggest that paracrine regulation of HA signaling in DTs may contribute to MSC recruitment and tumor proliferation. Future studies investigating the role of HA in tumor-stroma crosstalk and inhibition of HA-MSC interactions as a novel therapeutic target in DTs and other solid tumors are warranted.

  10. Role of Radiotherapy in the Management of Desmoid Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Gluck, Iris; Griffith, Kent A.; Biermann, J. Sybil; Feng, Felix Y.; Lucas, David R.; Ben-Josef, Edgar

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: To identify high-risk patients with desmoid tumors who could benefit from postoperative radiotherapy (RT) and to determine the efficacy of postoperative and definitive RT. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis of clinical data for all patients with desmoid tumors who underwent definitive local therapy at the University of Michigan from 1984 through 2008. Estimates for local control were calculated using the product-limit method of Kaplan and Meier, and associations with patient, tumor, and RT characteristics were explored using Cox proportional hazard regression. Results: Treatment for 95 patients who qualified for the study included surgery, RT, or both in 54, 13, and 28 cases, respectively. With a median follow-up of 38 months, the actuarial 3-year local control (95% confidence interval [CI]) was not significantly different (p = 0.3) among the three treatment groups: 84.6% (70.2-92.4), 92.3% (56.6-98.9), and 69.0% (43.1-84.9), respectively. Tumor site in the head/neck (p = 0.03) and history of previous surgical therapy (p = 0.01) were associated with increased recurrence risk (HR = 2.8, 95% CI 1.1-7.4, and HR = 3.2, 95% CI = 1.3-7.8), whereas gender, age, use of RT, and positive margins were not (p > 0.2). Conclusions: Our findings suggest equivalent local control rates after surgery, RT, or a combination of both. Although history of previous surgical therapy or site of origin in the head/neck region were found to be associated with increased risk of recurrence after local therapy, there was no clear association between surgical margin status and local control.

  11. Resection and Abdominal Wall Reconstruction of a Desmoid Tumor with Endometrioma Features

    PubMed Central

    Majors, Jaqueline; Stoikes, Nathaniel F.; Nejati, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Desmoid tumors are rare, musculoaponeurotic mesenchymal origin tumors arising from the proliferation of well-differentiated fibroblasts. Desmoid tumors may arise from any location with the abdominal cavity, abdominal wall and extremity locations being most frequent. We present the case of a 35-year-old female with a history of endometriosis who presented palpable abdominal mass and cyclic abdominal pain. Resection was performed for a presumed desmoid soft tissue tumor. Final pathology demonstrated desmoid histology admixed with abdominal wall endometriosis (endometrioma). This unique pathologic finding has only been rarely reported and is discussed with a brief review of the literature. PMID:27247824

  12. Desmoid tumors: local control and patterns of relapse following radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Leibel, S.A.; Wara, W.M.; Hill, D.R.; Bovill, E.G. Jr.; De Lorimier, A.A.; Beckstead, J.H.; Phillips, T.L.

    1983-08-01

    Desmoid tumors are benign neoplasms, arising from musculoaponeurotic tissues, which tend to be locally infiltrative, resulting in a high rate of local recurrence following surgical resection. Nineteen patients with desmoid tumors underwent radiation therapy at the University of California, San Francisco, between 1970 and 1980. Fifteen patients were referred with local recurrence following one or more surgical resections. Three patients were referred for initial radiation therapy with unresectable tumors, and one patient received planned postoperative irradiation following subtotal tumor resection. At the time of treatment, 8 patients had nonresectable disease measuring greater than 10 cm. The majority of patients were treated to a tumor dose of 50 to 55 Gy at 1.6 to 1.8 Gy per fraction. With a median follow-up of 8 years, 13 patients remained free of recurrent disease following radiation therapy. Local control was not related to the amount of disease present at the time of treatment. Of the 6 patients who developed recurrent disease, only 1 patient had a true in-field recurrence. Four patients recurred at the margin of the radiation field 1 to 5 years following therapy. Moderate dose radiation therapy to desmoid tumors can result in lasting local control when surgical resection is not possible. Post operative radiation can improve the rate of local control for patients with a high risk of recurrence. As desmoid tumors tend to be locally infiltrative, fields must be very generous to prevent marginal recurrence. Systemic chemotherapy offers an alternative to ablative surgery in the event of local failure following radiation therapy.

  13. Mediastinal Desmoid Tumor With Remarkably Rapid Growth: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joon Hyung; Jeong, Jae Seok; Kim, So Ri; Jin, Gong Yong; Chung, Myoung Ja; Kuh, Ja Hong; Lee, Yong Chul

    2015-12-01

    Desmoid tumors (DTs) are a group of rare and benign soft tissue tumors that result from monoclonal proliferation of well-differentiated fibroblasts. Since DTs tend to infiltrate and compress adjacent structures, the location of DTs is one of the most crucial factors for determining the severity of the disease. Furthermore, DTs can further complicate the clinical course of patients when the growth is remarkably rapid, especially for DTs occurring in anatomically critical compartments, including the thoracic cavity.The authors report a case of a 71-year-old man with a known mediastinal mass incidentally detected 4 months ago, presenting dyspnea with right-sided atelectasis and massive pleural effusion. Imaging studies revealed a 16.4 × 9.4-cm fibrous mass with high glucose metabolism in the anterior mediastinum. The mass infiltrated into the chest wall and also displaced the mediastinum contralaterally. Interestingly, the tumor had an extremely rapid doubling time of 31.3 days.En bloc resection of the tumor was performed as a curative as well as a diagnostic measure. Histopathologic examination showed spindle cells with low cellularity and high collagen deposition in the stroma. Immunohistochemical staining was positive for nuclear β-catenin. Based on these pathologic findings, the mass was diagnosed as DT. After surgery, there has been no evidence of recurrence of disease in the patient.This patient presents a mediastinal DT with extremely rapid growth. Notably, the doubling time of DT in our case was the shortest among reported cases of DT. Our experience also highlights the benefits of early interventional strategy, especially for rapidly growing DTs in the thoracic cavity.

  14. Clinical Activity of the γ-Secretase Inhibitor PF-03084014 in Adults With Desmoid Tumors (Aggressive Fibromatosis).

    PubMed

    Kummar, Shivaani; O'Sullivan Coyne, Geraldine; Do, Khanh T; Turkbey, Baris; Meltzer, Paul S; Polley, Eric; Choyke, Peter L; Meehan, Robert; Vilimas, Rasa; Horneffer, Yvonne; Juwara, Lamin; Lih, Ann; Choudhary, Amul; Mitchell, Sandra A; Helman, Lee J; Doroshow, James H; Chen, Alice P

    2017-03-28

    Purpose Desmoid tumors (aggressive fibromatosis) arise from connective tissue cells or fibroblasts. In general, they are slow growing and do not metastasize; however, locally aggressive desmoid tumors can cause severe morbidity and loss of function. Disease recurrence after surgery and/or radiation and diagnosis of multifocal desmoid tumors highlight the need to develop effective systemic treatments for this disease. In this study, we evaluate objective response rate after therapy with the γ-secretase inhibitor PF-03084014 in patients with recurrent, refractory, progressive desmoid tumors. Patients and Methods Seventeen patients with desmoid tumors received PF-03084014 150 mg orally twice a day in 3-week cycles. Response to treatment was evaluated at cycle 1 and every six cycles, that is, 18 weeks, by RECIST (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors) version 1.1. Patient-reported outcomes were measured at baseline and at every restaging visit by using the MD Anderson Symptoms Inventory. Archival tumor and blood samples were genotyped for somatic and germline mutations in APC and CTNNB1. Results Of 17 patients accrued to the study, 15 had mutations in APC or CTNNB1 genes. Sixteen patients (94%) were evaluable for response; five (29%) experienced a confirmed partial response and have been on study for more than 2 years. Another five patients with prolonged stable disease as their best response remain on study. Patient-reported outcomes confirmed clinician reporting that the investigational agent was well tolerated and, in subgroup analyses, participants who demonstrated partial response also experienced clinically meaningful and statistically significant improvements in symptom burden. Conclusion PF-03084014 was well tolerated and demonstrated promising clinical benefit in patients with refractory, progressive desmoid tumors who receive long-term treatment.

  15. Treatment of Extra — Abdominal Desmoid Tumors with Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Corey; Emory, Cynthia; Adams, Sheila; Cohen, Jonathan; Pitcher, John David; Potter, Benjamin Kyle; Temple, H. Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Fibromatosis, or extra-abdominal desmoid tumor, is a benign disease which often has an aggressive clinical course that can be difficult to treat. We performed a retrospective review of 16 patients (12 females and four males) with a mean age of 34.2 years treated with methotrexate and vinblastine for newly diagnosed or recurrent extra-abdominal desmoid tumor. The mean age of our patient cohort was 34.2 years (range 11–70), and the mean tumor size was 11.5 cm (range 2.5–21.2 cm). The mean duration of therapy was 12 months with an average follow-up of 43 months (range 1–149 months). Fourteen of 16 patients demonstrated a clinical response to treatment. Eight of 14 patients demonstrated a radiologic decrease in tumor size. Only one patient progressed on therapy. Six patients developed recurrent symptoms after discontinuation of treatment. Chemotherapy-related symptoms including neutropenia, nausea, and vomiting were common and observed in most patients, however these side effects were mild and transient. Five patients developed peripheral neuropathy that prompted a change from vinblastine to vinorelbine during treatment. One potentially life-threatening complication (pneumocystis pneumonia) occurred which was diagnosed early and successfully treated. The use of methotrexate and vinblastine/vinorelbine in the management of fibromatosis appears to be an effective treatment with minimal treatment-related side effects. PMID:24212959

  16. Pancreatic solid cystic desmoid tumor: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bin; Zhu, Ling-Hua; Wu, Jia-Guo; Wang, Xian-Fa; Matro, Erik; Ni, Jun-Jun

    2013-12-14

    Desmoid tumors (DTs) are nonmetastatic, locally aggressive neoplasms with a high rate of postoperative recurrence. Pancreatic DTs are especially rare; only a few cases have been reported to date. This paper describes a case of a sporadic cystic DT of the pancreas managed successfully with central pancreatectomy, with no signs of recurrence 40 mo after surgery. According to the literature, this is the first reported case in China of a pancreatic DT presenting as a solid cystic lesion, as well as the first pancreatic DT managed with central pancreatectomy and pancreaticogastrostomy. We report the case for its rarity and emphasize disease management by concerted application of clinical, pathological, radiological and immunohistochemical analyses.

  17. Desmoid Tumor of the Chest Wall Mimicking Recurrent Breast Cancer: Multimodality Imaging Findings

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kyeong A; An, Yeong Yi

    2016-01-01

    Desmoid tumor of breast is a rare benign, locally aggressive tumor with a high recurrence rate. It has been associated with scar from previous breast surgery or trauma. Especially in breast cancer patients with previous operation history, it may simulate recurrent breast cancer clinically and radiologically. We presented multimodality imaging findings (ultrasound, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography/computed tomography) of chest wall desmoid tumor mimicking recurrent breast cancer in a 38-year-old patient with a history of left modified mastectomy. The desmoid tumor is a rare benign tumor that should be considered in the differential diagnosis of malignant local tumor recurrence after breast cancer operation. Biopsy was required for accurate diagnosis and wide local excision was its appropriate surgical management. PMID:27895871

  18. [Effect of transarterial chemoembolization for recurrent desmoid tumor - a case report].

    PubMed

    Hori, Atsushi; Murata, Shinichi; Kono, Michihiko; Maeda, Masahiko; Sueyoshi, Satoshi; Seki, Akihiko; Nabiki, Junko; Hori, Shinichi; Kudawara, Ikuo

    2013-09-01

    Desmoid fibromatosis is classified as a benign soft tissue tumor regardless of its local invasive behavior and its, local recurrence rate is 57-85% after local resection. A 19 y/o male patient with post-operative recurrence of a desmoid tumor in the shoulder was initially treated by arterial embolization; however, no improvement of symptoms was obtained. As second-line treatment, 20 mg of epirubicin, 50 mg of cisplatin and 250 mg of 5-FU were infused to tumor-related arteries and embolization was performed with a super absorbent polymer microsphere. After a single session of treatment, reduction of tumor size and improvement of symptoms were achieved. The same treatment was repeated three times without major complications. Considerable reduction of tumor was obtained after treatment. Chemo-embolization should be considered for the postoperative recurrence of desmoid fibromatosis, in order to prevent loss of function and maintain a high QOL for the patient.

  19. Desmoid Tumor of the Anterior Abdominal Wall in Female Patients: Comparison with Endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Krentel, H.; Tchartchian, G.; De Wilde, R. L.

    2012-01-01

    In female patients presenting a tumor of the lower abdominal wall especially after cesarian section, an endometriotic tumor as well as an aggressive desmoid tumor should be considered. Symptoms in correlation with the monthly period can facilitate the presurgical differentiation between endometriosis and fibromatosis. Ultrasound reveals the typical location of both tumors and its remarkable sonographic appearance. In the clinical practice, the desmoid fibromatosis of the lower abdominal wall is a very rare disease. We present a case of a 25-year-old pregnant and discuss diagnostic and therapeutic options by a PubMed literature review. With the knowledge of the prognosis of the desmoid fibromatosis and the respective treatment options including wait and see, complete surgical resection with macroscopically free margins and adjuvant approaches is essential to avoid further interventions and progression of the locally destructive tumor. PMID:22778752

  20. Low-dose dacarbazine-doxorubicin therapy against intra-abdominal desmoid tumors.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hirofumi; Oshiro, Ryota; Nishimura, Junichi; Uemura, Mamoru; Haraguchi, Naotsugu; Hata, Taishi; Takemasa, Ichiro; Mizushima, Tsunekazu; Sekimoto, Mitsugu; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki

    2013-05-01

    Intra-abdominal desmoid tumor is a life-threatening disease. Studies have shown that dacarbazine (DTIC)-doxorubicin (DOX) (D-D) therapy is the most effective treatment. However, myelosuppression is a major problem, and cardiac muscle disorders due to DOX limit the number of administration cycles, whereas it usually requires a long time to achieve tumor shrinkage. To resolve these issues, we introduced low-dose D-D therapy to 3 patients employing 50 mg/m² DOX and 600-700 mg/m² DTIC per cycle, which permits repeated administration cycles up to 10-11 times. Case 1 was a 23-year-old female with a sporadic recurrent mesenterium desmoid tumor located in the pelvis (maximum diameter, 8 cm). Cases 2 and 3 were a 33-year-old female and a 36-year-old male. Both patients had intra-abdominal mesenterium desmoid tumors (maximum diameter 9.6 and 9.0 cm, respectively) that were generated after proctocolectomy due to familial adenomatous polyposis. No severe adverse events occurred during the therapy. With the aid of sulindac and tamoxifen after low-dose D-D therapy, the first two patients achieved a complete response, and the third patient achieved a partial response and awaits further tumor shrinkage. Our experience indicates that low-dose DT-D therapy is a safe and effective regimen for patients with intra-abdominal desmoid tumors.

  1. The Role of Postoperative Irradiation in the Treatment of Locally Recurrent Incompletely Resected Extra-Abdominal Desmoid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Fontanesi, James; Mott, Michael P.; Kraut, Michael J.; Lucas, David P.; Miller, Peter R.

    2004-01-01

    Background: To define the efficacy of postoperative irradiation in patients with recurrent extra-abdominal desmoid tumors in whom surgical intervention has resulted in microscopically or grossly positive surgical margins. Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed on all patients referred to the department of radiation oncology at the Detroit Medical Center with a diagnosis of recurrent extra-abdominal desmoid tumor. This analysis includes all patients seen from 1 January 1990 through 31 December 1999. A total of 11 patients were treated to 13 sites. Ten had microscopically positive margins and three had gross residual disease. Three patients were noted to have multifocal disease at the time of initial representation. Local control, survival, follow-up, and subsequent development of new tumors are measured from the last day of treatment with irradiation. Results: Thirteen sites were treated. Seven patients had received chemotherapy/hormonal therapy prior to surgery and/or irradiation. The most commonly used drug was tamoxifen (n=6). The type of radiation delivered included external beam irradiation alone (n=3), combined external beam irradiation and brachytherapy (n=4), brachytherapy alone (n=3) and 252-Cf neutron brachytherapy alone (n=3). Follow-up has ranged from 29 to 115 months (median=76 months). Three patients have failed locally at 17, 24 and 29 months. One of these was treated for gross residual disease. No patient has died of tumor-related causes. Salvage at the failed sites was possible in twom of three with re-irradiation using external neutrons and/or aggressive surgical intervention and systemic therapy. Complications were most often noted to include decrease range in motion, especially in joint areas, and skin reactions which were normal in presentation. In one site there was development soft tissue necrosis. Conclusion: Based on our experience we recommend postoperative irradiation for all recurrent extra-abdominal desmoid lesions with

  2. Desmoid tumors: clinical features and outcome of an unpredictable and challenging manifestation of familial adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    Campos, Fábio Guilherme; Martinez, Carlos Augusto Real; Novaes, Marleny; Nahas, Sérgio Carlos; Cecconello, Ivan

    2015-06-01

    Background/Aims Desmoid tumors (DTs) are rare, locally invasive neoplasms that may affect 10-25% of familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) patients. Our aim was to evaluate incidence and clinical presentation among our patients, the potential impact on FAP outcome and to discuss treatment. Materials and methods Charts from 133 FAP (1977-2013) were reviewed. Patients with DTs were separated to retrieve demographic, clinical and management data. Follow-up was focused on disease evolution causing complications or death. Results 19 (14.3%) DTs were diagnosed, either after previous trauma (16) or during FAP surgery (3). This group comprised 8 men (42.1%) and 11 women (57.9%) with an average age of 32.9 years. Intervals from surgical trauma to DTs ranged from 7 to 60 months. ECMs were detected in 12 (63.1%) patients. DTs were located in the abdominal wall (8), abdominal cavity (8), abdominal wall and cavity (2) and left arm (1). Five patients (26.3%) referred family history of DTs. Patients presented severe complications such as small bowel obstruction (4) and hydronephrosis (2), being directly responsible for death in three patients. Conclusions (1) DTs developed in 14.3% of FAP, mostly after surgical trauma; (2) 30% caused severe morbidity; (3) identification of clinical risk factors may help surgeons to develop screening and therapeutic decisions.

  3. [Proctocolectomy with ileoanal anastomoses and desmoid tumor treated with resection. One case of familial adenomatous polyposis].

    PubMed

    Villalón-López, José Sebastián; Souto-del Bosque, Rosalía; Méndez-Sashida, Pedro Gonzalo

    2014-01-01

    Introducción: la poliposis adenomatosa familiar (PAF) es una rara enfermedad causada por una mutación en el gen de la poliposis adenomatosa coli (APC). Caso clínico: mujer de 32 años, con dolor y aumento del perímetro abdominal además de evacuaciones melénicas y pérdida de peso. La paciente presentó un tumor de 12 cm de diámetro en la fosa iliaca derecha. Tras la administración de medio de contraste, en una tomografía se apreció el tumor abdominal con reforzamiento compatible con sarcoma frente a tumor desmoide. Se realizó colonoscopia, por medio de la que se encontraron pólipos en el recto y el colon. La biopsia reportó adenomas túbulo-vellosos. Una panendoscopía demostró pólipos en fondo y cuerpo gástrico; el duodeno se encontraba en estado normal. Se realizó resección del tumor en pared abdominal y reconstrucción con malla además de proctocolectomía restaurativa con un reservorio íleo-anal con una ileostomía temporal. Se reportó tumor desmoide en la pared abdominal y se identificaron 152 pólipos túbulo-vellosos que afectaban todas las porciones del colon y el recto. Conclusiones: la PAF es una enfermedad autosómica dominante causada por una mutación en el gen APC que da como resultado el desarrollo de múltiples pólipos tanto en el colon como en el recto. Descrito en 1991, el gen APC se localiza en el cromosoma 5q21. Sin cirugía profiláctica, todos los pacientes desarrollarán cáncer colorrectal en la tercera década de la vida. Los tumores desmoides y los pólipos duodenales son ahora la causa de muerte en los pacientes con PAF.

  4. [A recurrent desmoid tumor of the popliteal fossa with vascular compromise].

    PubMed

    Díaz Hernández, M; Febles, G; Domínguez del Toro, M; Reboso Morales, L E; Llopart López, J R; Gambra Michel, L E

    1993-01-01

    We report a case of a 18-year-old male patient with his fourth relapse of a desmoid tumour of the left popliteal hollow after a traumatism in this area. Arterial displacement and extrinsic compression were showed by arteriography. Tumoration was extirpated including popliteal artery, in this way a terminal by-pass from distal femoral to peroneo-tibial trunks with contralateral great saphena was made. Diagnosis of intestinal polyposis and of the little osseous malformations, was discarded these pathologies frequently are related with these tumours. The research for 8 years and 4 months doesn't show any relapse, nor local neither multicentral. Furthermore, some considerations about this theme are reported.

  5. Desmoid and fibroma tumors differently respond to TGFbeta(1) stimulus and ECM macromolecule accumulation.

    PubMed

    Locci, Paola; Balducci, Chiara; Lilli, Cinzia; Marinucci, Lorella; Becchetti, Ennio; Dolci, Claudia; Calastrini, Carla; Lumare, Eleonora; Stabellini, Giordano

    2007-01-01

    Desmoid and fibroma tumours are characterized by cell proliferation, glycosaminoglycan and collagen fibre accumulation, high levels of transforming growth factor beta(1) (TGFbeta(1)) and different patterns of tissue infiltration. TGFbeta(1) is related to extracellular matrix (ECM) composition which, in turn, regulates cell functions and cell migration. In this study we report changes in cell proliferation, glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and collagen synthesis, TGFbeta(1) mRNA expression and fibronectin levels in normal, desmoid and fibroma fibroblast cultures before and after TGFbeta(1) stimulation. Our data showed cell proliferation, GAG and collagen synthesis, transforming growth factor beta(1) mRNA expression and fibronectin levels were significantly higher in desmoid than in fibroma cultures. TGFbeta(1) treatment had no effect on cell proliferation, but increased TGFbeta(1) mRNA expression, GAG, fibronectin and collagen synthesis in desmoid and fibroma fibroblasts. Its effects were more marked in desmoid cells. Fibronectin favours cell migration, while changes in GAG composition alter cell behaviour and ECM organization. In conclusion our data suggest that the different patterns of infiltration in desmoid and fibroma tumours are due to changes in ECM components and cell-ECM interactions which can be ascribed to altered TGFbeta(1) mRNA expression and TGFbeta(1) activity.

  6. c-Kit expression in desmoid fibromatosis. Comparative immunohistochemical evaluation of two commercial antibodies.

    PubMed

    Lucas, David R; al-Abbadi, Mousa; Tabaczka, Pamela; Hamre, Merlin R; Weaver, Donald W; Mott, Michael J

    2003-03-01

    To determine the frequency of c-Kit staining in desmoids and optimize an assay for clinical use, we stained 19 desmoids from various sites at various dilutions with 2 commonly used rabbit polyclonal, anti-c-Kit antibodies (A4502, DAKO, Carpinteria, CA; C-19, Santa Cruz Biotechnology, Santa Cruz, CA), with and without heat-induced epitope retrieval (HIER) in citrate buffer. Approdpriate external and internal control samples were evaluated for each test condition. At dilutions of 1:50 both antibodies stained substantial numbers of desmoids: with/without HIER, A4502, 89%/63%; C-19, 37%/74%. The staining was cytoplasmic without cell membrane accentuation. However, background stromal staining and nonspecific staining of endothelium and smooth and striated muscle were problematic with both antibodies at 1:50. At higher dilutions, C-19 stained no desmoid; however, diminished staining of external and internal control samples made it unreliable. A4502 similarly stained many fewer desmoids at higher dilutions. However, it retained strong staining of both external and internal control samples and showed much less nonspecific staining. Best results were achieved at 1:250 without HIER; only weak focal staining was present in 1 desmoid. With a simple immunohistochemical method optimized for clinical use, desmoid can be regarded as a c-Kit-negative tumor.

  7. [A Case of Familial Adenomatous Polyposis with a Desmoid Tumor Probably Communicating to the Intestinal Lumen That Was Successfully Treated with Non-Surgical Therapy].

    PubMed

    Ito, Tetsuya; Chika, Noriyasu; Yamamoto, Azusa; Ogura, Toshiro; Amano, Kunihiko; Ishiguro, Toru; Fukuchi, Minoru; Kumagai, Youichi; Ishibashi, Keiichiro; Eguchi, Hidetaka; Okazaki, Yasushi; Mochiki, Erito; Ishida, Hideyuki

    2016-11-01

    A 44-year-old man with familial adenomatous polyposis underwent laparoscopic-assistedtotal proctocolectomy with ilealpouch anal anastomosis(IPAA). Computed tomography conducted 21 months after IPAA demonstrated bilateral hydronephrosis andan intra-abdominal mass with a maximal diameter of 22 cm, leading to a diagnosis of stage IV desmoid disease, according to the classification by Church and associates. Six courses of combination chemotherapy with doxorubicin plus dacarbazine were administered. Computed tomography after chemotherapy demonstrated marked shrinkage of the desmoidtumor with intraabdominal air andfluidcollection extending just below the skin of the ileostomy closure site. Stoollike fluidoverflowedspontaneously through the site of the ileostomy closure andthe abscess cavity was successfully drained. The patient was discharged 30 days after the start of drainage. The patient is doing well 10 months after the drainage without regrowth of the desmoid tumor, even though a cavity-like lesion encapsulatedby a thick wall remains.

  8. Cytoreductive strategy for multiple intra-abdominal and abdominal wall desmoid tumors in familial adenomatous polyposis: report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Koji; Toiyama, Yuji; Okugawa, Yoshinaga; Hiro, Junichiro; Kawamoto, Aya; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Uchida, Keiichi; Araki, Toshimitsu; Mohri, Yasuhiko; Kusunoki, Masato

    2012-10-01

    Desmoid tumors (DTs) are benign myofibroblastic neoplasms originating from the fascia or muscle aponeurosis, which occur in one-third of patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Most FAP-associated DTs occur in the intra-abdominal or abdominal wall region, thus, their infiltrative or expansive growth causes life-threatening organ damage, such as intestinal obstruction, urethral obstruction, and mesenteric infiltration with the involvement of mesenteric vessels. Treatments including surgical resection, cytotoxic chemotherapy, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and anti-estrogen therapy have all been tried with variable success. Here, we report on three patients with FAP who developed multiple intra-abdominal and abdominal wall DTs after total proctocolectomy and ileal pouch-anal anastomosis. Two cases underwent surgical resection of uncontrolled abdominal wall DTs after successful control of intra-abdominal DTs by systemic chemotherapy. The remaining case underwent repeated surgical resections of multiple intra-abdominal and abdominal wall DTs, and consequently had recurrent intra-abdominal DTs, with involvement of the small bowel and ureter. Surgical intervention as tumor volume reduction (cytoreduction) may be useful for cases with medical treatment-refractory or symptomatic FAP-associated abdominal DTs.

  9. Desmoid-type fibromatosis-associated Gardner fibromas: prevalence and impact on local recurrence.

    PubMed

    Cates, Justin M M; Stricker, Thomas P; Sturgeon, Duveen; Coffin, Cheryl M

    2014-10-28

    Although Gardner fibroma is a precursor lesion of desmoid tumor, the prevalence and prognostic importance of Gardner fibroma associated with desmoid tumors has not been systematically studied in adults. From 129 patients with desmoid-type fibromatosis, 170 specimens were re-examined for the presence of an associated Gardner fibroma. Clinicopathologic features of Gardner fibroma-associated desmoid-type fibromatosis were compared to desmoid tumors without associated Gardner fibroma. Recurrence-free survival was compared using multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression to account for known confounding factors. Of 104 evaluable primary desmoid tumor resections, 25 (24%) had an associated Gardner fibroma. When previous incisional biopsies and resection specimens of locally recurrent desmoid tumors were also examined, the overall prevalence of associated Gardner fibroma was 37%. Desmoid tumors arising in high risk anatomic sites (extremities or deep soft tissues of the back and chest wall) were more often associated with Gardner fibroma than tumors at other sites. Median recurrence-free survival for patients with Gardner fibroma-associated desmoid-type fibromatosis was 3.2 years, whereas median survival for patients without associated Gardner fibroma was >25 years (hazard ratio 2.8; P = 0.001). Although the presence of Gardner fibroma had no impact on the recurrence rate of desmoid tumors arising at high risk anatomic sites, associated Gardner fibroma increased the risk of recurrence 4-fold for desmoid tumors at low risk anatomic sites. Associated Gardner fibroma is under-recognized in desmoid-type fibromatosis and increases the risk of local recurrence for a subgroup of patients.

  10. Detection of beta-catenin mutations in paraffin-embedded sporadic desmoid-type fibromatosis by mutation-specific restriction enzyme digestion (MSRED): an ancillary diagnostic tool.

    PubMed

    Amary, Maria Fernanda C; Pauwels, Patrick; Meulemans, Els; Roemen, Guido M; Islam, Lily; Idowu, Bernadine; Bousdras, Konstantinos; Diss, Timothy C; O'Donnell, Paul; Flanagan, Adrienne M

    2007-09-01

    Desmoid-type fibromatosis is a locally aggressive deep soft tissue tumor. Some cases are associated with adenosis polyposis coli germline mutations whereas others harbor somatic beta-catenin point mutations mainly in exon 3, codons 41 and 45. These mutations result in stabilization of beta-catenin, and activation of the Wnt signaling pathway. The aim of this study was to determine the specificity and sensitivity of these 3 most common beta-catenin mutations in the diagnosis of desmoid-type fibromatosis using paraffin-embedded material. The results were compared with nuclear expression of beta-catenin. Mutation-specific restriction enzyme digestion methodology was employed to detect the 3 mutations. One hundred and thirty-three cases were analyzed, including 76 desmoid-type, and 18 superficial fibromatosis, in addition to a further 39 fibromatosis mimics. A restriction site was present for analysis of the codon 41 mutation. Mismatch primers were designed for the codon 45 mutations. Mutations were detected in 66 cases (87%) of 76 desmoid-type fibromatosis (71 extra-abdominal). Of these, 34 (45%) were in codon 45 (TCT>TTT), 27 (35%) in codon 41 (ACC>GCC), and 5 (7%) in codon 45 (TCT>CCT). No mutations were detected in the other lesions studied. All desmoid-type fibromatosis cases and 72% of the mimics tested showed nuclear positivity for beta-catenin indicating immunohistochemistry is a sensitive but not a specific test for desmoid-type fibromatosis. In contrast, to date, beta-catenin mutations have not been detected in any lesions which mimic desmoid-type fibromatosis. Mutation-specific restriction enzyme digestion, a simple and efficient means of detecting the common beta-catenin mutations in desmoid-type fibromatosis, complements light microscopy in reaching a diagnosis.

  11. Synthesis and secretion of transforming growth factor-beta1 by human desmoid fibroblast cell line and its modulation by toremifene.

    PubMed

    Locci, P; Bellocchio, S; Lilli, C; Marinucci, L; Cagini, L; Baroni, T; Giustozzi, G; Balducci, C; Becchetti, E

    2001-11-01

    The present study provides evidence that the in vitro cultured fibroblast cell line from desmoid tumors differs from normal fibrobasts in its extracellular matrix (ECM) macromolecule composition and is modulated by treatment with toremifene, an antiestrogen that reduces tumor mass by an unknown mechanism. The results showed increased transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta1) production, TGF-beta1 mRNA expression, and TGF-beta1 receptor number in desmoid fibroblasts compared with normal cells. As desmoid fibroblasts did not produce tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) but were sensitive to it, which enhanced glycosaminoglycans (GAG) accumulation, we assessed the TGF-beta1 effects on TNF-alpha production by human monocytes. Our results showed TGF-beta1 significantly increased TNF-alpha secretion by monocytes. Toremifene mediated its effects in desmoid fibroblasts via an estrogen receptor-independent pathway. It inhibited GAG accumulation and the secretion of both latent and active forms of TGF-beta1 and had an inhibitory effect on TNF-alpha production by monocytes. Our results suggest that in reducing TGF-beta1 production by desmoid fibroblasts and TNF-alpha production by monocytes, toremifene may restore the balance between the two growth factors.

  12. Attenuated familial adenomatous polyposis with desmoids caused by an APC mutation

    PubMed Central

    Ikenoue, Tsuneo; Yamaguchi, Kiyoshi; Komura, Mitsuhiro; Imoto, Seiya; Yamaguchi, Rui; Shimizu, Eigo; Kasuya, Shinichi; Shibuya, Tetsuo; Hatakeyama, Seira; Miyano, Satoru; Furukawa, Yoichi

    2015-01-01

    We present here a case of attenuated familial adenomatous polyposis (AFAP) with a family history of desmoids and thyroid tumors. This patient had no colonic polyps but did have multiple desmoids. Genetic analysis identified a 4-bp deletion in codon 2644 (c.7932_7935delTTAT: p.Tyr2645LysfsX14) of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene. In cases with limited numbers of colonic polyps and desmoids, AFAP may be caused by a mutation in the 3′ region of APC. PMID:27081525

  13. Familial Adenomatous Polyposis-Associated Desmoids Display Significantly More Genetic Changes than Sporadic Desmoids

    PubMed Central

    Robanus-Maandag, Els; Bosch, Cathy; Amini-Nik, Saeid; Knijnenburg, Jeroen; Szuhai, Karoly; Cervera, Pascale; Poon, Raymond; Eccles, Diana; Radice, Paolo; Giovannini, Marco; Alman, Benjamin A.; Tejpar, Sabine; Devilee, Peter; Fodde, Riccardo

    2011-01-01

    Desmoid tumours (also called deep or aggressive fibromatoses) are potentially life-threatening fibromatous lesions. Hereditary desmoid tumours arise in individuals affected by either familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) or hereditary desmoid disease (HDD) carrying germline mutations in APC. Most sporadic desmoids carry somatic mutations in CTNNB1. Previous studies identified losses on 5q and 6q, and gains on 8q and 20q as recurrent genetic changes in desmoids. However, virtually all genetic changes were derived from sporadic tumours. To investigate the somatic alterations in FAP-associated desmoids and to compare them with changes occurring in sporadic tumours, we analysed 17 FAP-associated and 38 sporadic desmoids by array comparative genomic hybridisation and multiple ligation-dependent probe amplification. Overall, the desmoids displayed only a limited number of genetic changes, occurring in 44% of cases. Recurrent gains at 8q (7%) and 20q (5%) were almost exclusively found in sporadic tumours. Recurrent losses were observed for a 700 kb region at 5q22.2, comprising the APC gene (11%), a 2 Mb region at 6p21.2-p21.1 (15%), and a relatively large region at 6q15-q23.3 (20%). The FAP-associated desmoids displayed a significantly higher frequency of copy number abnormalities (59%) than the sporadic tumours (37%). As predicted by the APC germline mutations among these patients, a high percentage (29%) of FAP-associated desmoids showed loss of the APC region at 5q22.2, which was infrequently (3%) seen among sporadic tumours. Our data suggest that loss of region 6q15-q16.2 is an important event in FAP-associated as well as sporadic desmoids, most likely of relevance for desmoid tumour progression. PMID:21931686

  14. Human desmoid fibroblasts: matrix metalloproteinases, their inhibitors and modulation by Toremifene

    PubMed Central

    Balducci, Chiara; Lilli, Cinzia; Stabellini, Giordano; Marinucci, Lorella; Giustozzi, Giammario; Becchetti, Alessio; Cagini, Lucio; Locci, Paola

    2005-01-01

    Background Desmoid tumour is a benign, non metastasising neoplasm characterised by an elevated deposition of organic macromolecules in the extracellular matrix (ECM). The matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of zinc-dependent proteinases involved in the degradation of ECM macromolecules. The MMPs and their natural inhibitors (TIMPs) have been implicated in tumour growth, invasion and metastasis. In this study we provide evidence that the in vitro cultured cell line from desmoid tumour accumulates more collagen fibres in the ECM than healthy fibroblasts. Methods We investigated collagen accumulation by 3H-thymidine incorporation, MMP expression by substrate gel zymography and TIMP expression by Western blot analysis. Results Desmoid fibroblasts showed a reduction in MMP activity and an increase of type I and III collagen and TIMPs compared to normal fibroblasts. Conclusion The increase in collagen in desmoid fibroblasts was due to inhibited collagen degradation (reduction of MMP activity) rather than to increased collagen synthesis. Adding toremifene, an anti-estrogen triphenylethylene derivate, to desmoid fibroblasts reduced collagen accumulation by decreasing mRNA expression and increasing collagen degradation. PMID:15740610

  15. The challenge of extraabdominal desmoid tumour management in patients with Gardner's syndrome: radiofrequency ablation, a promising option.

    PubMed

    Cobianchi, Lorenzo; Ravetta, Valentina; Viera, Francesca Torello; Filisetti, Claudia; Siri, Barbara; Segalini, Edoardo; Maestri, Marcello; Dominioni, Tommaso; Alessiani, Mario; Rossi, Sandro; Dionigi, Paolo

    2014-11-27

    Desmoid tumours are benign, myofibroblastic stromal neoplasms common in Gardner's syndrome, which is a subtype of familial adenomatous polyposis characterized by colonic polyps, osteomas, thyroid cancer, epidermoid cysts, fibromas and sebaceous cysts. The primary treatment is surgery, followed by adjuvant radiotherapy, but the local recurrence rate is high, and wide resection can result in debilitating loss of function. We report the case of a 39-year-old man with Gardner's syndrome who had already undergone a total prophylactic colectomy. He developed desmoid tumours localized in the mesenteric root, abdominal wall and dorsal region, which were treated from 2003 through 2013 with several surgical procedures and percutaneous radiofrequency ablation. In 2008 and 2013, RFA was applied under ultrasonographic guidance to two desmoid tumours localized in the dorsal thoracic wall. The outcomes were low-grade pain and one case of superficial skin necrosis, but so far there has been no recurrence of desmoid tumours in these locations. Surgical resection remains the first-line therapy for patients with desmoid tumours, but wide resection may lead to a poor quality of life. Radiofrequency ablation is less invasive and expensive and is a possible therapeutic option for desmoid tumours in patients with Gardner's syndrome.

  16. Desmoid Fibromatosis Presenting as Deep Venous Thrombosis: A Case Report and Discussion

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Lisa M.; Neuhaus, Susan J.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 40 Final Diagnosis: Desmoid fibromatosis Symptoms: Discomfort Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Surgery and radiotherapy Specialty: Surgery Objective: Rare disease Background: Venous thromboembolism (VTE), comprising deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE), is a common, serious cardiovascular event. Predisposing factors include genetic disorders, immobility, and underlying malignancy. Soft tissue tumors are by contrast rare, but should be included in the differential etiology of DVT, especially when the patient is young and has few thrombotic risk factors. Case Report: We present a 40-year-old patient whose initial diagnosis was spontaneous DVT of the lower leg, treated conventionally. Subsequently, he developed progressive calf swelling, which was diagnosed as multifocal desmoid fibromatosis, a rare and complex soft tissue tumor. Conclusions: DVT is common but soft tissue tumors are rare. The disparity in incidence of these very distinct pathologies may contribute to late diagnosis of occult soft tissue pathology. We discuss the incidence, etiology, pathology, diagnosis, and best management of both desmoid fibromatosis and DVT, which may co-exist in a causative way. PMID:27994217

  17. Extra-Abdominal Desmoid Tumors (Aggressive Fibromatoses)

    MedlinePlus

    ... not intended to serve as medical advice. Anyone seeking specific orthopaedic advice or assistance should consult his ... topic.cfm?topic=A00188) Editorial Board & Staff Contributors Online Agreements Linking Policy Advertising & Sponsorship Privacy Policy AAOS ...

  18. Sporadic Intra-Abdominal Desmoid: A Rare Presentation as a Hepatic Mass

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Shahana; Ray, Udipta; Chatterjee, Souvik; Kumar, Sanjeev; Satapathy, Ayusman; Chatterjee, Shamita; Choudhury, Tamal Kanti

    2012-01-01

    We report an unusual presentation of a sporadic intra-abdominal desmoid tumour, possibly arising from the diaphragm, masquerading as a hepatic mass in a young female without any history of surgery or trauma. Histopathology ruled out a hepatic origin of the tumour as was inferred from pre- and intraoperative evaluation. Immunohistochemistry showed positivity of lesional fibroblastic cells for β-catenin and negativity for CD34, CD117, EMA, SMA, desmin, vimentin, cytokeratin, and ALK1 thereby confirming the diagnosis of a desmoid tumour. There exist only a few reports in the literature on desmoids related to the diaphragm, but only one on a diaphragmatic desmoid that is possibly primary. PMID:23091764

  19. Pineal region tumors: analysis of treatment results

    SciTech Connect

    Amendola, B.E.; McClatchey, K.; Amendola, M.A.

    1984-07-01

    This article represents a review of 32 patients with pineal region tumors seen and treated at the University of Michigan Medical Center from January 1950 to December 1980. All patients presented with manifestations of increased intracranial pressure: limitation of the upward gaze (Parinaud's syndrome), hydrocephalus and a mass in the posterior aspect of the third ventricle. The tumor was demonstrated by pneumoencephalography, ventriculography, angiography or CT scans. Ventricular decompression was performed in all patients. Twenty-seven patients received post-operative irradiation. The overall 10 year survival for evaluable patients was 16/24 (67%). Few complications were seen.

  20. A systematic review of active treatment options in patients with desmoid tumours

    PubMed Central

    Yao, X.; Corbett, T.; Gupta, A.A.; Kandel, R.A.; Verma, S.; Werier, J.; Ghert, M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction We conducted a systematic review to determine the optimal treatment options in patients with desmoid tumours who have declined observational management. Methods A search was conducted of the medline and embase databases (1990 to September 2012), the Cochrane Library, and relevant guideline Web sites and conference materials. Results One systematic review and forty-six studies met the preplanned study selection criteria; data from twenty-eight articles were extracted and analyzed. For local control, three studies reported a statistically significant difference in favour of surgery plus radiotherapy (rt) compared with surgery alone, and one study did not; two studies reported the lack of a statistical difference between surgery plus rt and rt alone in maintaining local control. Multivariate risk factors for local recurrence included positive surgical margins and young patient age. Single-agent imatinib led to a progression-free survival rate of 55% at 2 years and 58% at 3 years. Methotrexate plus vinblastine led to a progression-free survival rate of 67% at 10 years. Significant toxicities were reported for all treatment modalities, including surgical morbidity, and rt- and chemotherapy-related toxicities. Conclusions In patients who have declined observational management, the local control rate was higher with surgery plus rt than with surgery alone. However, the additional rt-related complications should be considered in treatment decision-making. Surgery, rt, and systemic therapy are all reasonable treatment options for patients with desmoid tumours. PMID:25089111

  1. Iodine-125 Interstitial Brachytherapy for Pediatric Desmoid-Type Fibromatosis of the Head and Neck: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wen-Jie; Guo, Hua-Qiu; Yu, Guang-Yan; Zhang, Jian-Guo

    2017-04-01

    Desmoid-type fibromatosis (DF) is a locally aggressive benign soft tissue tumor. It is rarely observed in the head and neck region and is particularly uncommon in the parotid gland. This report describes the case of a 32-month-old girl with DF of the head and neck. The tumor was resected with gross residual tumors. Recurrence occurred 3 months later and then the patient was treated with iodine-125 interstitial brachytherapy. The tumor was completely absent 6 months after brachytherapy. No recurrence was found 60 months after brachytherapy during follow-up. No severe toxicities or growth abnormalities were observed. Very-low-dose rate brachytherapy as the sole modality could be a reasonable alternative for the treatment of inoperable DF of the head and neck, which avoids the risk of cosmetic deformity caused by surgery, especially in pediatric patients. In addition, long-term follow-up is recommended.

  2. Toremifene decreases type I, type II and increases type III receptors in desmoid and fibroma and inhibits TGFbeta1 binding in desmoid fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Stabellini, Giordano; Balducci, Chiara; Lilli, Cinzia; Marinucci, Lorella; Becchetti, Ennio; Carinci, Francesco; Calastrini, Carla; Dolci, Claudia; Lumare, Eleonora; Locci, Paola

    2008-09-01

    Tissue infiltration is different in desmoid and fibroma tumours. Both produce high levels of transforming growth factor beta1 (TGFbeta1), which is related to extracellular matrix (ECM) accumulation which in turn regulates cell function and cell migration. Interactions between collagen, proteoglycans and cell surface fibronectin are involved in the assembly and functions of the ECM. As toremifene inhibits collagen and TGFbeta1 synthesis, we tested it in normal, desmoid and fibroma fibroblasts. We will report the changes in glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and collagen synthesis, TGFbeta1 activity, fibronectin mRNA expression and TGFbeta1 receptors after toremifene treatment in normal, fibroma and desmoid fibroblasts. We evaluated GAG and collagen synthesis with 3H-glucosamine and 3H-proline incorporation, TGFbeta1 activity with the ELISA method, TGFbeta1 receptor affinity with 125I-TGFbeta1 binding and total RNA with Northern blot analysis. GAG and collagen synthesis, TGFbeta1 activity and fibronectin levels were higher in fibroma and desmoid than normal fibroblasts. The increase was greater in desmoid than fibroma tumour cells. Toremifene treatment reduced GAG and collagen synthesis, TGFbeta1 activity and fibronectin levels in all cell cultures. The percentage reduction in GAG was similar in all cultures; the reduction in collagen synthesis and TGFbeta1 activity was the highest in desmoid fibroblasts. TGFbeta1 receptors were higher in fibroma and desmoid cells than controls. Toremifene reduced TGFbeta1 receptors only in desmoid fibroblasts, with no effect on the changes in type I, II, and III receptors. Our data show that toremifene modifies the ECM components that regulate cytokine activity and cell migration. The reduction in receptor number only in desmoid cells suggests that toremifene may reduce TGFbeta1's affinity for its receptors. Synthesis of a substance regulating protein kinase activity, which is directly involved in the link between TGFbeta1 and its receptors

  3. Mesenchymal Tumors Can Derive from Ng2/Cspg4-Expressing Pericytes with β-Catenin Modulating the Neoplastic Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Sato, Shingo; Tang, Yuning J; Wei, Qingxia; Hirata, Makoto; Weng, Angela; Han, Ilkyu; Okawa, Atsushi; Takeda, Shu; Whetstone, Heather; Nadesan, Puvindran; Kirsch, David G; Wunder, Jay S; Alman, Benjamin A

    2016-07-26

    The cell of origin for most mesenchymal tumors is unclear. One cell type that contributes to this lineages is the pericyte, a cell expressing Ng2/Cspg4. Using lineage tracing, we demonstrated that bone and soft tissue sarcomas driven by the deletion of the Trp53 tumor suppressor, or desmoid tumors driven by a mutation in Apc, can derive from cells expressing Ng2/Cspg4. Deletion of the Trp53 tumor suppressor gene in these cells resulted in the bone and soft tissue sarcomas that closely resemble human sarcomas, while stabilizing β-catenin in this same cell type caused desmoid tumors. Comparing expression between Ng2/Cspg4-expressing pericytes lacking Trp53 and sarcomas that arose from deletion of Trp53 showed inhibition of β-catenin signaling in the sarcomas. Activation of β-catenin inhibited the formation and growth of sarcomas. Thus, pericytes can be a cell of origin for mesenchymal tumors, and β-catenin dysregulation plays an important role in the neoplastic phenotype.

  4. No Detectable Hypoxia in Malignant Salivary Gland Tumors: Preliminary Results

    SciTech Connect

    Wijffels, Karien; Hoogsteen, Ilse J.; Lok, Jasper; Rijken, Paulus F.J.W.; Marres, Henri A.M.; Wilde, Peter C.M. de; Kogel, Albert J. van der; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M.

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: Hypoxia is detected in most solid tumors and is associated with malignant progression and adverse treatment outcomes. However, the oxygenation status of malignant salivary gland tumors has not been previously studied. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential clinical relevance of hypoxia in this tumor type. Methods and Materials: Twelve patients scheduled for surgical resection of a salivary gland tumor were preoperatively injected with the hypoxia marker pimonidazole and the proliferation marker iododeoxyuridine. Tissue samples of the dissected tumor were immunohistochemically stained for blood vessels, pimonidazole, carbonic anhydrase-IX, glucose transporters-1 and -3 (Glut-1, Glut-3), hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha}, iododeoxyuridine, and epidermal growth factor receptor. The tissue sections were quantitatively assessed by computerized image analysis. Results: The tissue material from 8 patients was of sufficient quality for quantitative analysis. All tumors were negative for pimonidazole binding, as well as for carbonic anhydrase-IX, Glut-1, Glut-3, and hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha}. The vascular density was high, with a median value of 285 mm{sup -2} (range, 209-546). The iododeoxyuridine-labeling index varied from <0.1% to 12.2% (median, 2.2%). Epidermal growth factor receptor expression levels were mostly moderate to high. In one-half of the cases, nuclear expression of epidermal growth factor receptor was observed. Conclusion: The absence of detectable pimonidazole binding, as well as the lack of expression of hypoxia-associated proteins in all tumors, indicates that malignant salivary gland tumors are generally well oxygenated. It is unlikely that hypoxia is a relevant factor for their clinical behavior and treatment responsiveness.

  5. Successful Treatment of High Risk and Recurrent Pediatric Desmoids Using Radiation as a Component of Multimodality Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Jabbari, Siavash; Andolino, David; Weinberg, Vivian; Missett, Brian T.; Law, Jason; Wara, William M.; O'Donnell, Richard J.; Matthay, Katherine K.; DuBois, Steven G.; Goldsby, Robert; Haas-Kogan, Daphne A.

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of radiation therapy (RT) as a component of multimodality therapy for pediatric desmoids. Methods and Materials: Twenty-one children diagnosed between 1987 and 2005 were identified. Median age at start of treatment was 13 years (range, 2-21). Primary therapy consisted of resection alone (10), resection + external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) (5), resection + chemotherapy (CT; 3), EBRT alone (1), and CT alone (2). Results: The median follow-up from start of treatment is 75.7 months (range, 16-162). Examining patients with gross total resections (GTRs) (-) margins and those who had GTRs (+) margins followed by EBRT, only 2 of 7 failed primary treatment. Conversely, 13 of 14 patients with other primary treatments failed locally. Of the 15 patients who recurred, only 1 patient had a GTR (-) margins. Seven of these patients had salvage therapy that did not include RT, and of these only 2 have no evidence of disease (NED) at last follow-up. In contrast, the remaining 8 patients received RT as a component of their final salvage therapy and 7 of these are NED at last follow-up. At last follow-up, no patient has died, although toxicities of therapy have occurred. Conclusions: Local control is difficult to achieve in pediatric patients with desmoids. In the setting in which negative surgical margins cannot be achieved, RT plays a key role in achieving NED status. Even after multiple recurrences, successful salvage is achievable, particularly when high-dose focal therapy is incorporated.

  6. Research results on biomagnetic imaging of the lung tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sillerud, Laurel O.; Popa, Sorin G.; Coutsias, Evangelos A.; Sheltraw, Daniel; Kuethe, Dean; Adolphi, Natalie

    2005-04-01

    Recent results on the development and implementation of a novel technology for lung tumor detection and imaging is presented. This technology offers high-sensitivity imaging of magnetic nanoparticles to provide specific diagnostic images of early lung tumors and potential distant metastases. Recent developments in giant magnetostrictive (GMS) or magnetic shape memory (MSM) materials have led to the possibility of developing small, low-cost, room-temperature, portable, high-sensitivity, fiber-optic sensors capable of robustly detecting magnetic nanoparticles, without direct contact with the skin. Magnetic nanoparticles are conjugated with antibodies, which target them to lung tumors. A prototype fiber-optic biomagnetic sensor, based on giant magnetostrictive or magnetic shape memory materials, with the requisite sensitivity to image the magnetic signals generated by antibody-labeled magnetic nanoparticles in lung tumors has been built and calibrated. The uniqueness of the biomagnetic sensor lies in the fact that it offers high sensitivity at room temperature, and is not a SQUID-based system. The results obtained during the process of choosing the right magnetostrictive materials are presented. Then, for the construction of an accurate image of the lung tumor, the optimum spatial distribution of one-channel sensors and nanoparticle polarization has been analyzed.

  7. A suprapubic retroperitoneal operative approach to solitary paravaginal tumors.

    PubMed

    Cowles, T; Schwartz, P E

    1987-03-01

    Five cases of paravaginal tumors including a neurolemmoma, neurofibroma, lipoma, and desmoid tumors are presented. These tumors were approached through a modified Cherney incision. The rectus muscle was removed from the pubic symphysis and the pubococcygeus muscle was divided. This approach allowed good visualization of the paravaginal space, reasonable blood loss, and avoidance of entry into the peritoneal cavity. Although paravaginal tumors are rare, gynecologic surgeons should be aware of the suprapubic approach to the paravaginal space.

  8. Cardiac failure due to a giant desmoid tumour of the posterior mediastinum.

    PubMed

    Bouchikh, Mohammed; Arame, Alex; Riquet, Marc; Le Pimpec-Barthes, Françoise

    2013-12-01

    We report a rare case of a giant desmoid tumour responsible for cardiac and respiratory failure. Complete removal was decided upon, despite an initial failure in another centre because of symptom severity. In such cases, wide local resection remains the best therapeutic approach, but the risk of local recurrence is high. Literature review confirms the exceptional presentation and the benefit of aggressive surgery.

  9. EXTENSIVE SURVEY OF STAT6 EXPRESSION IN A LARGE SERIES OF MESENCHYMAL TUMORS

    PubMed Central

    Demicco, Elizabeth G; Harms, Paul W; Patel, Rajiv M; Smith, Steven C; Ingram, Davis; Torres, Keila; Carskadon, Shannon L; Camelo-Piragua, Sandra; McHugh, Jonathan B; Siddiqui, Javed; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Lucas, David R; Lazar, Alexander J; Wang, Wei-lien

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Expression of strong nuclear STAT6 is thought to be a specific marker for solitary fibrous tumors (SFT). Little is known about subtle expression patterns in other mesenchymal lesions. Methods We performed immunohistochemical studies against the C-terminus of STAT6 in tissue microarrays and whole sections, comprising 2366 mesenchymal lesions. Results Strong nuclear STAT6 was expressed in 285/2021 tumors, including 206/240 SFT, 49/408 well/dedifferentiated liposarcomas, 8/65 unclassified sarcomas, and 14/184 desmoids, among others. Expression in SFT was predominately limited to the nucleus. Other positive tumors typically expressed both nuclear and cytoplasmic STAT6. Complete absence of STAT6 was most common in pleomorphic liposarcoma and alveolar soft part sarcoma (60% and 72% cases negative, respectively). Conclusions Strong nuclear STAT6 is largely specific for SFT. Physiologic low-level cytoplasmic/nuclear expression is common in mesenchymal neoplasia, and is of uncertain significance. PMID:25873501

  10. Desmoid Tumours in Familial Adenomatous Polyposis: Review of 17 Patients from a Portuguese Tertiary Center

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Anabela; Martins, Vilma; Santos, Marisa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Desmoid Tumours (DT) are benign tumours with an estimated incidence of 2-4 per million per year. Between 7-16% of them are associated with Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP) and are mostly parietal or intra-abdominal. They are a challenge in relation to their unpredictable natural course, associated complications and difficult treatment. Aim The aim of the present study was to review the occurrence, management and follow-up of DT on FAP patients treated consecutively at a tertiary care center. Materials and Methods A retrospective review of clinical data from patients treated consecutively between 1993 and 2014. Patients’ data was gathered from clinical records. Data collection included the following variables: demographic data, genotype, FAP phenotype, data on FAP related surgery, DT diagnosis, location, size and number, DT treatment, patients’ status and follow-up data. Results The study population consisted of 17 patients from 9 families; with a mean age of 41 years, mostly women (59%) and most with a mutation either on codon 232 or 554. Most tumours had an intra-abdominal component (59%) with a mean size of 5cm. Fifteen patients were first treated with pharmacotherapy (Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) and Tamoxifen). Five patients (29%) underwent surgery, 4 of them for complications of intra-abdominal tumours and 1 patient for abdominal wall tumours. Two patients underwent chemotherapy in relation to aggressive intra-abdominal disease. The mean follow-up time since diagnosis of DT was 123 months. Overall, 2 patients had remission, 11 patients had regression or stabilized disease, and 2 patients had progression. One patient died due to surgical complications. Conclusion Diagnosis of DT is based on clinical symptoms, without the need for screening, although imaging plays an important role once diagnosis is suspected. The treatment approach is conservative on most patients, leaving surgery for DT related complications. The follow

  11. Hypofractionation Results in Reduced Tumor Cell Kill Compared to Conventional Fractionation for Tumors With Regions of Hypoxia

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, David J.; Keall, Paul J.; Loo, Billy W.; Chen, Zhe J.; Brown, J. Martin

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: Tumor hypoxia has been observed in many human cancers and is associated with treatment failure in radiation therapy. The purpose of this study is to quantify the effect of different radiation fractionation schemes on tumor cell killing, assuming a realistic distribution of tumor oxygenation. Methods and Materials: A probability density function for the partial pressure of oxygen in a tumor cell population is quantified as a function of radial distance from the capillary wall. Corresponding hypoxia reduction factors for cell killing are determined. The surviving fraction of a tumor consisting of maximally resistant cells, cells at intermediate levels of hypoxia, and normoxic cells is calculated as a function of dose per fraction for an equivalent tumor biological effective dose under normoxic conditions. Results: Increasing hypoxia as a function of distance from blood vessels results in a decrease in tumor cell killing for a typical radiotherapy fractionation scheme by a factor of 10{sup 5} over a distance of 130 {mu}m. For head-and-neck cancer and prostate cancer, the fraction of tumor clonogens killed over a full treatment course decreases by up to a factor of {approx}10{sup 3} as the dose per fraction is increased from 2 to 24 Gy and from 2 to 18 Gy, respectively. Conclusions: Hypofractionation of a radiotherapy regimen can result in a significant decrease in tumor cell killing compared to standard fractionation as a result of tumor hypoxia. There is a potential for large errors when calculating alternate fractionations using formalisms that do not account for tumor hypoxia.

  12. Desmoid-Type Fibromatosis of the Thorax: CT, MRI, and FDG PET Characteristics in a Large Series From a Tertiary Referral Center

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hai; Koo, Hyun Jung; Lim, Soyeoun; Lee, Jae Wook; Lee, Han Na; Kim, Dong Kwan; Song, Joon Seon; Kim, Mi Young

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to describe the radiologic findings of computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and 18F-fluorodeoxy glucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) in desmoid-type fibromatosis of the thorax. We retrospectively evaluated 47 consecutive patients with pathologically proven desmoid-type fibromatosis from January 2005 to March 2015. Patients underwent CT (n = 36) and/or MR (n = 32), and 13 patients also underwent FDG PET. Based on CT and MR, the sizes, locations, margins, contours, presence of surrounding fat, extra-compartment extension, bone involvement, and neurovascular involvement of the tumors were recorded. The attenuation, signal intensity, enhancement pattern, and presence of internal low signal band or signal void of the tumors were evaluated. Initial image findings were then compared between 2 groups of tumors: group 1 with recurrence or progression, and group 2 with no recurrence or stable without treatment. Median age at diagnosis of the tumors was 45 years, range 4 to 96, female-to-male ratio 1.8. Median tumor long diameter was 65 mm (range, 22–126 mm). The most common locations were chest wall (42.6%), followed by supraclavicular area, shoulder or axillary area, and mediastinum. The tumors had well-defined margins (83.0%), lobulated in contours (66.0%) surrounding fat (63.8%), extra-compartment extensions (42.6%), bone involvements (42.6%), and neurovascular involvements (27.7%). On CT, tumors had low attenuation (60.0%) with mild enhancement (median 24 HU, range 0–52). On MR, they showed iso-signal intensity (SI) (96.9%) on T1-weighted images (WI), and high SI (90.6%) on T2WI images, with strong (87.5%) and heterogeneous (96.9%) enhancement. Internal low signal bands (84.4%) and signal voids (68.8%) were noted. The median value of maxSUV was 3.1 (range, 2.0–7.3). In group 1 (n = 19, 40.4%), 13 patients suffered recurrence and 6 experienced progression. Group 2 (n = 28, 59

  13. Treatment and follow-up strategies in desmoid tumours: a practice guideline

    PubMed Central

    Ghert, M.; Yao, X.; Corbett, T.; Gupta, A.A.; Kandel, R.A.; Verma, S.; Werier, J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives We set out to determine the optimal treatment options—surgery, radiation therapy (rt), systemic therapy, or any combinations thereof—for patients with desmoid tumours once the decision to undergo active treatment has been made (that is, monitoring and observation have been determined to be inadequate).provide clinical-expert consensus opinions on follow-up strategies in patients with desmoid tumours after primary interventional management. Methods This guideline was developed by Cancer Care Ontario’s Program in Evidence-Based Care and the Sarcoma Disease Site Group. The medline, embase, and Cochrane Library databases, main guideline Web sites, and abstracts of relevant annual meetings (1990 to September 2012) were searched. Internal and external reviews were conducted, with final approval by the Program in Evidence-Based Care and the Sarcoma Disease Site Group. Recommendations Treatments Surgery with or without rt can be a reasonable treatment option for patients with desmoid tumours whose surgical morbidity is deemed to be low. The decision about whether rt should be offered in conjunction with surgery should be made by clinicians and patients after weighing the potential benefit of improved local control against the potential harms and toxicity associated with rt. Depending on individual patient preferences, systemic therapy alone or rt alone might also be reasonable treatment options, regardless of whether the desmoid umours are deemed to be resectable. Follow-Up Strategies Undergo evaluation for rehabilitation (occupational therapy or physical therapy, or both). Continue with rehabilitation until maximal function is achieved. Undergo history and physical examinations with appropriate imaging every 3–6 months for 2–3 years, and then annually. PMID:25089635

  14. [Radionuclide imaging of neurendocrine tumors: biological basis and diagnostic results].

    PubMed

    Genovese, Eugenio Annibale; Mallardo, Vania; Rossi, Michele; Vaccaro, Andrea; Raucci, Antonio; Della Vecchi, Nicoletta; Romano, Giovanna; Califano, Teresa; Schillirò, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Many radiopharmaceuticals have been successfully used in nuclear medicine to detect neuroendocrine tumors, and many of them are based on a specific mechanism of uptake, while others are non-specific probes. This "review" focuses on the clinical applications of metaiodobenzylguanidine, (111)In-pentreotide and positron emission tomography (PET) tracers. New avances in diagnostic imaging will be discussed. Molecular imaging serves these diagnostic functions and provides powerful means for non-invasively detecting disease.

  15. Direct endothelial junction restoration results in significant tumor vascular normalization and metastasis inhibition in mice

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Vijayendra; Maharjan, Sony; Kim, Kyeojin; Kim, Nam-Jung; Son, Jimin; Lee, Keunho; Choi, Hyun-Jung; Rho, Seung-Sik; Ahn, Sunjoo; Won, Moo-Ho; Ha, Sang-Jun; Koh, Gou Young; Kim, Young-Myeong; Suh, Young-Ger; Kwon, Young-Guen

    2014-01-01

    Tumor blood vessels are leaky and immature, which causes inadequate blood supply to tumor tissues resulting in hypoxic microenvironment and promotes metastasis. Here we have explored tumor vessel modulating activity of Sac-1004, a recently developed molecule in our lab, which directly potentiates VE-cadherin-mediated endothelial cell junction. Sac-1004 could enhance vascular junction integrity in tumor vessels and thereby inhibit vascular leakage and enhance vascular perfusion. Improved perfusion enabled Sac-1004 to have synergistic anti-tumor effect on cisplatin-mediated apoptosis of tumor cells. Interestingly, characteristics of normalized blood vessels namely reduced hypoxia, improved pericyte coverage and decreased basement membrane thickness were readily observed in tumors treated with Sac-1004. Remarkably, Sac-1004 was also able to inhibit lung and lymph node metastasis in MMTV and B16BL6 tumor models. This was in correlation with a reduction in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition of tumor cells with considerable diminution in expression of related transcription factors. Moreover, cancer stem cell population dropped substantially in Sac-1004 treated tumor tissues. Taken together, our results showed that direct restoration of vascular junction could be a significant strategy to induce normalization of tumor blood vessels and reduce metastasis. PMID:24811731

  16. Tumor vessel destruction resulting from high-intensity focused ultrasound in patients with solid malignancies.

    PubMed

    Wu, Feng; Chen, Wen-Zhi; Bai, Jin; Zou, Jian-Zhong; Wang, Zhi-Long; Zhu, Hui; Wang, Zhi-Biao

    2002-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the sequential imaging and histologic alterations of tumor blood vessels in the patient with solid malignancies after extracorporeal treatment of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). A total of 164 patients underwent extracorporeal HIFU ablation of malignant solid tumors. After HIFU treatment, enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), color Doppler ultrasound (US) imaging, dynamic radionuclide scanning, digital subtraction angiography, and histologic study were performed to monitor the response of tumor vessels to HIFU ablation. Compared with tumor images in the patients before HIFU, clinical images showed an abrupt interruption, followed by the cessation of blood flow within the tumor vessels after HIFU treatment. The histologic examination indicated that not only the treated tumor cells showed coagulative necrosis, but also small tumor vessels were severely damaged by the HIFU treatment. The results strongly imply that the damaged tumor vessels might play a critical role in secondary tumor cell death, and then indirectly strengthen the destructive force of focused US beams on tumor tissue. It is concluded that tumor vessel damage can be induced by HIFU, which may be a promising strategy in the treatment of patients with solid malignancies.

  17. Vascular normalization induced by sinomenine hydrochloride results in suppressed mammary tumor growth and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huimin; Ren, Yu; Tang, Xiaojiang; Wang, Ke; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Li; Li, Xiao; Liu, Peijun; Zhao, Changqi; He, Jianjun

    2015-03-09

    Solid tumor vasculature is characterized by structural and functional abnormality and results in a hostile tumor microenvironment that mediates several deleterious aspects of tumor behavior. Sinomenine is an alkaloid extracted from the Chinese medicinal plant, Sinomenium acutum, which has been utilized to treat rheumatism in China for over 2000 years. Though sinomenine has been demonstrated to mediate a wide range of pharmacological actions, few studies have focused on its effect on tumor vasculature. We showed here that intraperitoneally administration of 100 mg/kg sinomenine hydrochloride (SH, the hydrochloride chemical form of sinomenine) in two orthotopic mouse breast cancer models for 14 days, delayed mammary tumor growth and decreased metastasis by inducing vascular maturity and enhancing tumor perfusion, while improving chemotherapy and tumor immunity. The effects of SH on tumor vessels were caused in part by its capability to restore the balance between pro-angiogenic factor (bFGF) and anti-angiogenic factor (PF4). However 200 mg/kg SH didn't exhibit the similar inhibitory effect on tumor progression due to the immunosuppressive microenvironment caused by excessive vessel pruning, G-CSF upregulation, and GM-CSF downregulation. Altogether, our findings suggest that SH induced vasculature normalization contributes to its anti-tumor and anti-metastasis effect on breast cancer at certain dosage.

  18. Vascular Normalization Induced by Sinomenine Hydrochloride Results in Suppressed Mammary Tumor Growth and Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huimin; Ren, Yu; Tang, Xiaojiang; Wang, Ke; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Li; Li, Xiao; Liu, Peijun; Zhao, Changqi; He, Jianjun

    2015-01-01

    Solid tumor vasculature is characterized by structural and functional abnormality and results in a hostile tumor microenvironment that mediates several deleterious aspects of tumor behavior. Sinomenine is an alkaloid extracted from the Chinese medicinal plant, Sinomenium acutum, which has been utilized to treat rheumatism in China for over 2000 years. Though sinomenine has been demonstrated to mediate a wide range of pharmacological actions, few studies have focused on its effect on tumor vasculature. We showed here that intraperitoneally administration of 100 mg/kg sinomenine hydrochloride (SH, the hydrochloride chemical form of sinomenine) in two orthotopic mouse breast cancer models for 14 days, delayed mammary tumor growth and decreased metastasis by inducing vascular maturity and enhancing tumor perfusion, while improving chemotherapy and tumor immunity. The effects of SH on tumor vessels were caused in part by its capability to restore the balance between pro-angiogenic factor (bFGF) and anti-angiogenic factor (PF4). However 200 mg/kg SH didn't exhibit the similar inhibitory effect on tumor progression due to the immunosuppressive microenvironment caused by excessive vessel pruning, G-CSF upregulation, and GM-CSF downregulation. Altogether, our findings suggest that SH induced vasculature normalization contributes to its anti-tumor and anti-metastasis effect on breast cancer at certain dosage. PMID:25749075

  19. Disseminated oligodendroglial-like leptomeningeal tumors: preliminary diagnostic and therapeutic results for a novel tumor entity [corrected].

    PubMed

    Preuss, Matthias; Christiansen, Holger; Merkenschlager, Andreas; Hirsch, Franz Wolfgang; Kiess, Wieland; Müller, Wolf; Kästner, Stefanie; Henssler, Andreas; Pekrun, Arnulf; Hauch, Holger; Nathrath, Michaela; Meixensberger, Jürgen; Pietsch, Torsten; Kuchelmeister, Klaus

    2015-08-01

    Pediatric tumors of the central nervous system composed of oligoid tumor cells showing diffuse leptomeningeal spread without a primary mass lesion seem to represent a novel tumor entity. The terms "diffuse leptomeningeal glioneural tumor" or-preferably-"disseminated oligodendroglial-like leptomeningeal tumor of childhood" (DOGLT) were proposed. Four patients were identified with clinico-neuropathologic findings compatible with DOGLT and a mean follow-up time of 54 months was determined. Seven different biopsies obtained from the four patients were histologically evaluated. Clinical course, diagnostic measures, histopathologic and radiologic features and treatment suggestions were recorded, on the basis of which diagnostic and therapeutic algorithm was proposed. Patients with DOGLT presented with hydrocephalus as first symptom, requiring neurosurgical therapy. Open arachnoid biopsy was necessary to confirm diagnosis. The oligoid cells in a desmoplastic or focally myxoid matrix showed OLIG2-, MAP2-, S-100 and rare HuC/HuD protein-immunopositivity. IDH1 (R132H)- and CD99-immunohistochemistry was negative in all patients. None of the evaluable biopsies of three patients showed chromosome 1p/19q deletion, neither as isolated nor combined allelic loss. Chemotherapy according to the SIOP-LGG 2004 standard induction and consolidation protocol resulted in complete response and partial response, respectively, in 50 % of the patients. However, after discontinuation of chemotherapy, two patients experienced tumor progression and one of them succumbed to the disease after 19 months. Radiological criteria as well as preliminary treatment results are presented after observation of four clinical cases. Prognosis and long-term clinical courses remain to be observed.

  20. Systemic Lipoplatin infusion results in preferential tumor uptake in human studies.

    PubMed

    Boulikas, Teni; Stathopoulos, Georgios P; Volakakis, Nikolaos; Vougiouka, Maria

    2005-01-01

    Lipoplatin, a liposomal formulation of cisplatin, was developed with almost negligible nephrotoxicity, ototoxicity and neurotoxicity, as demonstrated in preclinical and Phase I human studies. A polyethylene-glycol coating of the liposome nanoparticles is supposed to result in tumor accumulation of the drug by extravasation through the altered tumor vasculature. We explored the hypothesis that intravenous infusion of Lipoplatin results in tumor targeting in four independent patient cases (one with hepatocellular adenocarcinoma, two with gastric cancer and one with colon cancer) who underwent Lipoplatin infusion followed by a prescheduled surgery approximately 20 h later. Direct measurement of the platinum levels in specimens from the excised tumors and normal tissues showed that the total platinum levels were on average 10-50 times higher in malignant tissue compared to the adjacent normal tissue specimens; most effective targeting was observed in colon cancer, with an accumulation up to 200-fold higher in colon tumors compared to normal colon tissue. Of the several surgical specimens, gastric tumors displayed the highest levels of total platinum suggesting Lipoplatin as a candidate anticancer agent for gastric tumors; gastric tumor specimens had up to 260 micrograms platinum /g tissue, that was higher than any tissue level in animals treated at much higher doses. Fat tissue displayed a high accumulation of total platinum in surgical specimens in three different patients, correlating to the lipid capsule of cisplatin in its Lipoplatin formulation. It was also inferred that normal tissue had more platinum trapped in the tissue but not reacted with macromolecules, whereas tumor tissue displayed platinum that reacted with cellular macromolecules; the data were consistent with a model where Lipoplatin damages more tumor compared to normal cells. In conclusion, Lipoplatin has the ability to preferentially concentrate in malignant tissue both of primary and metastatic

  1. Combined RNAi-mediated suppression of Rictor and EGFR resulted in complete tumor regression in an orthotopic glioblastoma tumor model.

    PubMed

    Verreault, Maite; Weppler, Sherry A; Stegeman, Amelia; Warburton, Corinna; Strutt, Dita; Masin, Dana; Bally, Marcel B

    2013-01-01

    The PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway is commonly over activated in glioblastoma (GBM), and Rictor was shown to be an important regulator downstream of this pathway. EGFR overexpression is also frequently found in GBM tumors, and both EGFR and Rictor are associated with increased proliferation, invasion, metastasis and poor prognosis. This research evaluated in vitro and in vivo whether the combined silencing of EGFR and Rictor would result in therapeutic benefits. The therapeutic potential of targeting these proteins in combination with conventional agents with proven activity in GBM patients was also assessed. In vitro validation studies were carried out using siRNA-based gene silencing methods in a panel of three commercially available human GBM cell lines, including two PTEN mutant lines (U251MG and U118MG) and one PTEN-wild type line (LN229). The impact of EGFR and/or Rictor silencing on cell migration and sensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs in vitro was determined. In vivo validation of these studies was focused on EGFR and/or Rictor silencing achieved using doxycycline-inducible shRNA-expressing U251MG cells implanted orthotopically in Rag2M mice brains. Target silencing, tumor size and tumor cell proliferation were assessed by quantification of immunohistofluorescence-stained markers. siRNA-mediated silencing of EGFR and Rictor reduced U251MG cell migration and increased sensitivity of the cells to irinotecan, temozolomide and vincristine. In LN229, co-silencing of EGFR and Rictor resulted in reduced cell migration, and increased sensitivity to vincristine and temozolomide. In U118MG, silencing of Rictor alone was sufficient to increase this line's sensitivity to vincristine and temozolomide. In vivo, while the silencing of EGFR or Rictor alone had no significant effect on U251MG tumor growth, silencing of EGFR and Rictor together resulted in a complete eradication of tumors. These data suggest that the combined silencing of EGFR and Rictor should be an effective

  2. Combined RNAi-Mediated Suppression of Rictor and EGFR Resulted in Complete Tumor Regression in an Orthotopic Glioblastoma Tumor Model

    PubMed Central

    Verreault, Maite; Weppler, Sherry A.; Stegeman, Amelia; Warburton, Corinna; Strutt, Dita; Masin, Dana; Bally, Marcel B.

    2013-01-01

    The PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway is commonly over activated in glioblastoma (GBM), and Rictor was shown to be an important regulator downstream of this pathway. EGFR overexpression is also frequently found in GBM tumors, and both EGFR and Rictor are associated with increased proliferation, invasion, metastasis and poor prognosis. This research evaluated in vitro and in vivo whether the combined silencing of EGFR and Rictor would result in therapeutic benefits. The therapeutic potential of targeting these proteins in combination with conventional agents with proven activity in GBM patients was also assessed. In vitro validation studies were carried out using siRNA-based gene silencing methods in a panel of three commercially available human GBM cell lines, including two PTEN mutant lines (U251MG and U118MG) and one PTEN-wild type line (LN229). The impact of EGFR and/or Rictor silencing on cell migration and sensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs in vitro was determined. In vivo validation of these studies was focused on EGFR and/or Rictor silencing achieved using doxycycline-inducible shRNA-expressing U251MG cells implanted orthotopically in Rag2M mice brains. Target silencing, tumor size and tumor cell proliferation were assessed by quantification of immunohistofluorescence-stained markers. siRNA-mediated silencing of EGFR and Rictor reduced U251MG cell migration and increased sensitivity of the cells to irinotecan, temozolomide and vincristine. In LN229, co-silencing of EGFR and Rictor resulted in reduced cell migration, and increased sensitivity to vincristine and temozolomide. In U118MG, silencing of Rictor alone was sufficient to increase this line’s sensitivity to vincristine and temozolomide. In vivo, while the silencing of EGFR or Rictor alone had no significant effect on U251MG tumor growth, silencing of EGFR and Rictor together resulted in a complete eradication of tumors. These data suggest that the combined silencing of EGFR and Rictor should be an effective

  3. Intraocular tumor antigen drains specifically to submandibular lymph nodes, resulting in an abortive cytotoxic T cell reaction.

    PubMed

    Boonman, Zita F H M; van Mierlo, Geertje J D; Fransen, Marieke F; Franken, Kees L M C; Offringa, Rienk; Melief, Cornelis J M; Jager, Martine J; Toes, René E M

    2004-02-01

    Ocular immune privilege is considered essential in the protection against sight-threatening immune responses, as illustrated by the ability of the ocular environment to permit the growth of tumors that are rejected when implanted at other sites. Although several studies indicate that soluble Ag can drain directly into the spleen when injected into the anterior chamber, the primary site of intraocular tumor Ag presentation to tumor-specific CTLs has not been studied. To gain a better understanding of the mechanism involved in ocular immune privilege, we examined to which lymphoid organs anterior chamber tumor Ags primarily drain. Our data show that intraocular tumor Ag drains exclusively to the submandibular lymph nodes, resulting in activation of tumor-specific CTLs, whereas no Ag drainage was found in spleen. However, these tumor-specific CTLs do not distribute systemically and, as a consequence, intraocular tumor growth is unhampered. A similar lack of CTL efficacy has been observed in mice bearing s.c. tumors, which is converted to a systemic tumoricidal CTL response by administration of agonistic anti-CD40 mAb. In contrast, systemic anti-CD40 treatment of eye tumor-bearing mice did not result in mobilizing tumor-specific CTLs or tumor eradication. Together, these results show that intraocular tumor Ag drains to regional lymph nodes for activation of tumor-specific CTLs. However, the induced tumor-specific immunity is insufficient for tumor clearance, even combined with otherwise highly effective immune intervention protocols.

  4. Bone tumor mimics: avoiding misdiagnosis.

    PubMed

    Gould, C Frank; Ly, Justin Q; Lattin, Grant E; Beall, Douglas P; Sutcliffe, Joseph B

    2007-01-01

    Whether discovered incidentally or as part of a focused diagnostic evaluation, the finding of a benign osseous lesion that has radiologic features resembling a bone tumor is not uncommon. Some of the more common benign and nonneoplastic entities that can sometimes be confused with tumors are the following: cortical desmoid, Brodie abscess, synovial herniation pit, pseudocyst, enostosis, intraosseous ganglion cyst, fibrous dysplasia, stress fracture, avulsion fracture (healing stage), bone infarct, myositis ossificans, brown tumor, and subchondral cyst. Accurate diagnosis and management of these lesions require a basic understanding of their epidemiology, clinical presentations, anatomic distributions, imaging features, differential considerations, and therapeutic options. This in-depth review of 13 potential bone tumor mimics will assist the radiologist in correctly identifying these benign lesions and in avoiding misdiagnosis and related morbidity. This review will also aid the radiologist in making appropriate recommendations to the referring physician for management or further imaging.

  5. Morphological features of melanocytic tumors with depigmented halo: review of the literature and personal results.

    PubMed

    Nedelcu, Roxana Ioana; Zurac, Sabina Andrada; Brînzea, Alice; Cioplea, Mirela Daniela; Turcu, Gabriela; Popescu, Raluca; Popescu, Cătălin Mihai; Ion, Daniela Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Halo (Sutton's) phenomenon has been described as a depigmented halo that is associated most commonly with acquired melanocytic nevi; but it may be associated with various types of melanocytic skin tumors, melanoma being the most concerning. Different authors have been preoccupied with elucidating morphological features of melanocytic tumors associated with a depigmented halo. We reviewed the literature and discussed the main features of melanocytic halo tumors regarding histopathological, immune microenvironment profile and dermatoscopic appearance. We highlighted similarities and differences between Sutton's nevus and halo melanoma, also presenting relevant aspects of our results. Depigmented halo must be regarded as a phenomenon that may be associated with different types of melanocytic tumors and with a broad spectrum of histopathological atypia degree. Certain correlations between the shape, diameter, symmetry observed in clinical examination, histopathological appearance, dermatoscopic aspect of peritumoral halo and central tumor type could not be established due to insufficient data and contrasting results. Further studies are expected to add valuable information regarding the depigmented halo tumors features.

  6. Evaluation of the results of surgery treatment in patients with benign lung tumors

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri, Reza; Haghi, Seyed Ziaollah; Dalouee, Marziyeh Nouri; Nasiri, Zakiyeh; Rajabnejad, Ata’ollah

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lung tumors are among the common tumors and can be benign or malignant. Benign lung tumors are less common compared to the malignant types. Recognition of the clinical symptoms, types of tumors, paraclinical findings, and treatment approaches can bring better therapeutic results. The present study aims to evaluate the characteristics, diagnosis methods, and therapeutic approaches of different benign lung tumors. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, 32 patients with a diagnosis of benign lung tumor, who had been referred to the Mashhad University of Medical Sciences between 1981 and 2009, were studied. Some of the studied variables were symptoms, the pulmonary location involved, surgery technique, pathology findings, recurrence, and surgery complications. Data were analyzed by SPSS package version 16. Results: The average age of the patients was 51.69 ± 20.5 years. Prevalence of benign lung tumors was equal in both genders. The most common symptom was cough (31.2%); right lung involvement was more common (71.9%), and the most common sampling technique was transbronchial lung biopsy (TBLB) (62.5%); 53.1% of the patients were operated on by thoracotomy and the wedge resection technique. In 78.1% of the patients, no complications occurred after surgery. There was no recurrence. Most operations were performed in one month after the start of the symptoms (68.8%). Conclusions: Benign lung tumors are commonly diagnosed by routine radiography because most of them are asymptomatic. The most common finding in radiography is the presence of mass in the lungs. Transbronchial lung biopsy is a valuable technique to be used for diagnosis. We chose thoracotomy and wedge resection for the treatment of patients. We recommend this approach as a useful method. PMID:25624593

  7. Intra-Abdominal Desmoid Tumour (DT) with Pelvic Extension-A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sathish Selva; Ramachandran, Padmini; G, Veena; Madhusudhan, Napa; Kumbhar, Uday

    2014-01-01

    Desmoid Tumour (DT) is a rare benign, myofibroblastic tumour originating from muscle fascia with tendency to recur but, it rarely metastasizes. We are reporting here a case of DT that presented as an intra-abdominal mass with pelvic extension in a patient who underwent hysterectomy for fibroid uterus seventeen years ago. A clinical diagnosis of ovarian malignancy was made. Ovarian tumour markers for surface epithelial and germ cell tumours were negative. Imaging studies suggested DT and the same was excised surgically. A histopathological diagnosis of DT was made and confirmed with immunohistochemistry (IHC) markers. DT should always be considered especially in female patients with previous history of surgery. A complete surgical excision is the treatment of choice with recurrent cases requiring radiotherapy. A differential diagnosis like sarcoma and further toxic chemotherapy can be avoided with careful histopathological evaluation and IHC confirmation of DTs. PMID:24596759

  8. The use of Permacol® for chest wall reconstruction in a case of desmoid tumour resection.

    PubMed

    Mirzabeigi, Michael N; Moore, John H; Tuma, Gary A

    2011-03-01

    Desmoid tumour resection is a known, albeit rare, cause for chest wall reconstruction. Traditionally, musculocutaneous flaps and synthetic mesh materials have been employed for coverage over these potentially large thoracic defects. More recently, biologic mesh materials have become increasingly more prevalent in a multitude of surgical reconstructions. To date, the current literature describes the usage of select biologic materials, such as human cadaveric acellular dermal matrix, in chest wall reconstruction. One variation of the biologic materials, Permacol(®), has not been well described in the literature for chest wall reconstruction. Permacol(®) is a porcine lyophilised acellular dermal collagen. We report the successful use of Permacol(®) in a complex chest wall reconstruction following the resection of a large desmoid tumour.

  9. Treatment of esophageal tumors using high intensity intraluminal ultrasound: first clinical results

    PubMed Central

    Melodelima, David; Prat, Frederic; Fritsch, Jacques; Theillere, Yves; Cathignol, Dominique

    2008-01-01

    Background Esophageal tumors generally bear a poor prognosis. Radical surgery is generally the only curative method available but is not feasible in the majority of patients; palliative therapy with stent placement is generally performed. It has been demonstrated that High Intensity Ultrasound can induce rapid, complete and well-defined coagulation necrosis. Thus, for the treatment of esophageal tumors, we have designed an ultrasound applicator that uses an intraluminal approach to fill up this therapeutic gap. Methods Thermal ablation is performed with water-cooled ultrasound transducers operating at a frequency of 10 MHz. Single lesions extend from the transducer surface up to 10 mm in depth when applying an intensity of 14 W/cm2 for 10s. A lumen inside the therapy applicator provides path for an endoscopic ultrasound imaging probe operating at a frequency of 12 MHz. The mechanical rotation of the applicator around its axis enables treatment of sectorial or cylindrical volumes. This method is thus particularly suitable for esophageal tumors that may develop only on a portion of the esophageal circumference. Previous experiments were conducted from bench to in vivo studies on pig esophagi. Results Here we report clinical results obtained on four patients included in a pilot study. The treatment of esophageal tumors was performed under fluoroscopic guidance and ultrasound imaging. Objective tumor response was obtained in all cases and a complete necrosis of a tumor was obtained in one case. All patients recovered uneventfully and dysphagia improved significantly within 15 days, allowing for resuming a solid diet in three cases. Conclusion This clinical work demonstrated the efficacy of intraluminal high intensity ultrasound therapy for local tumor destruction in the esophagus. PMID:18533990

  10. Breast Carcinomatous Tumoral Emboli Can Result From Encircling Lymphovasculogenesis Rather Than Lymphovascular Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Mahooti, Sepi; Porter, Kyle; Alpaugh, Mary L.; Ye, Yin; Xiao, Yi; Jones, Susie; Tellez, Joseph D.; Barsky, Sanford H.

    2010-01-01

    The canonical view of the origin of tumor lymphovascular emboli is that they usually originate from lymphovascular invasion as part of a multistep metastatic process. Recent experimental evidence has suggested that metastasis can occur earlier than previously thought and we found evidence that tumor emboli formation can result from the short-circuiting step of encircling lymphovasculogenesis. Experimentally, we used a xenograft of human inflammatory breast cancer (MARY-X), a model that exhibited florid tumor emboli, to generate tumoral spheroids in vitro. In observational studies, we chose human breast carcinoma cases where there appeared to be a possible transition of in situ carcinoma to lymphovascular emboli without intervening stromal invasion. These cases were studied by morphometry as well as IHC with tumor proliferation (Ki-67) and adhesion (E-cadherin) markers, myoepithelial (p63), as well as endothelial (podoplanin [D2-40], CD31, VEGFR-3, Prox-1) markers. Unlabelled spheroids coinjected with either GFP or RFP-human myoepithelial cells or murine embryonal fibroblasts (MEFs) gave rise to tumors which exhibited GFP/RFP immunoreactivity within the cells lining the emboli-containing lymphovascular channels. In vitro studies demonstrated that the tumoral spheroids induced endothelial differentiation of cocultured myoepithelial cells and MEFs, measured by real time PCR and immunofluorescence. In humans, the in situ clusters exhibited similar proliferation, E-cadherin immunoreactivity and size as the tumor emboli (p =.5), suggesting the possibility that the latter originated from the former. The in situ clusters exhibited a loss (50%-100%) of p63 myoepithelial immunoreactivity but not E-cadherin epithelial immunoreactivity. The tumor emboli were mainly present within lymphatic channels whose dual p63/CD31, p63/D2-40 and p63/VEGFR-3 and overall weak patterns of D2-40/CD31/VEGFR-3 immunoreactivities suggested that they represented immature and newly created

  11. Breast carcinomatous tumoral emboli can result from encircling lymphovasculogenesis rather than lymphovascular invasion.

    PubMed

    Mahooti, Sepi; Porter, Kyle; Alpaugh, Mary L; Ye, Yin; Xiao, Yi; Jones, Susie; Tellez, Joseph D; Barsky, Sanford H

    2010-06-01

    The canonical view of the origin of tumor lymphovascular emboli is that they usually originate from lymphovascular invasion as part of a multistep metastatic process. Recent experimental evidence has suggested that metastasis can occur earlier than previously thought and we found evidence that tumor emboli formation can result from the short-circuiting step of encircling lymphovasculogenesis. Experimentally, we used a xenograft of human inflammatory breast cancer (MARY-X), a model that exhibited florid tumor emboli, to generate tumoral spheroids in vitro. In observational studies, we chose human breast carcinoma cases where there appeared to be a possible transition of in situ carcinoma to lymphovascular emboli without intervening stromal invasion. These cases were studied by morphometry as well as IHC with tumor proliferation (Ki-67) and adhesion (E-cadherin) markers, myoepithelial (p63), as well as endothelial (podoplanin [D2-40], CD31, VEGFR-3, Prox-1) markers. Unlabelled spheroids coinjected with either GFP or RFP-human myoepithelial cells or murine embryonal fibroblasts (MEFs) gave rise to tumors which exhibited GFP/RFP immunoreactivity within the cells lining the emboli-containing lymphovascular channels. In vitro studies demonstrated that the tumoral spheroids induced endothelial differentiation of cocultured myoepithelial cells and MEFs, measured by real time PCR and immunofluorescence. In humans, the in situ clusters exhibited similar proliferation, E-cadherin immunoreactivity and size as the tumor emboli (p =.5), suggesting the possibility that the latter originated from the former. The in situclusters exhibited a loss (50%-100%) of p63 myoepithelial immunoreactivity but not E-cadherin epithelial immunoreactivity. The tumor emboli were mainly present within lymphatic channels whose dual p63/CD31, p63/D2-40 and p63/VEGFR-3 and overall weak patterns of D2-40/CD31/VEGFR-3 immunoreactivities suggested that they represented immature and newly created

  12. STAT3 Mediated Remodeling of the Tumor Microenvironment Results in Enhanced Tumor Drug Delivery in a Mouse Model of Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nagathihalli, Nagaraj S.; Castellanos, Jason A.; Shi, Chanjuan; Beesetty, Yugandhar; Reyzer, Michelle L.; Caprioli, Richard; Chen, Xi; Walsh, Alex J.; Skala, Melissa C.; Moses, Harold L.; Merchant, Nipun B.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS A hallmark of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the presence of a dense desmoplastic reaction (stroma) that impedes drug delivery to the tumor. Attempts to deplete the tumor stroma have resulted in formation of more aggressive tumors. We have identified STAT3 as a biomarker of resistance to cytotoxic and molecularly targeted therapy in PDAC. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of targeting STAT3 on the PDAC stroma and on therapeutic resistance. METHODS Activated STAT3 protein expression was determined in human pancreatic tissues and tumor cell lines. In vivo effects of AZD1480, a JAK/STAT3 inhibitor, gemcitabine or the combination were determined in Ptf1acre/+;LSL-KrasG12D/+;Tgfbr2flox/flox (PKT) mice and in orthotopic tumor xenografts. Drug delivery was analyzed by MALDI-imaging mass spectrometry. Collagen second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging quantified tumor collagen alignment and density. RESULTS STAT3 activation correlates with decreased survival and advanced tumor stage in patients with PDAC. STAT3 inhibition combined with gemcitabine significantly inhibits tumor growth in both an orthotopic and the PKT mouse model of PDAC. This combined therapy attenuates in vivo expression of SPARC, increases microvessel density and enhances drug delivery to the tumor without depletion of stromal collagen or hyaluronan. Instead, the PDAC tumors demonstrate vascular normalization, remodeling of the tumor stroma and downregulation of cytidine deaminase (Cda). CONCLUSIONS Targeted inhibition of STAT3 combined with gemcitabine enhances in vivo drug delivery and therapeutic response in PDAC. These effects occur through tumor stromal remodeling and downregulation of Cda without depletion of tumor stromal content. PMID:26255562

  13. Non-lethal heat treatment of cells results in reduction of tumor initiation and metastatic potential

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yoo-Shin; Lee, Tae Hoon; O'Neill, Brian E.

    2015-08-14

    Non-lethal hyperthermia is used clinically as adjuvant treatment to radiation, with mixed results. Denaturation of protein during hyperthermia treatment is expected to synergize with radiation damage to cause cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Alternatively, hyperthermia is known to cause tissue level changes in blood flow, increasing the oxygenation and radiosensitivity of often hypoxic tumors. In this study, we elucidate a third possibility, that hyperthermia alters cellular adhesion and mechanotransduction, with particular impact on the cancer stem cell population. We demonstrate that cell heating results in a robust but temporary loss of cancer cell aggressiveness and metastatic potential in mouse models. In vitro, this heating results in a temporary loss in cell mobility, adhesion, and proliferation. Our hypothesis is that the loss of cellular adhesion results in suppression of cancer stem cells and loss of tumor virulence and metastatic potential. Our study suggests that the metastatic potential of cancer is particularly reduced by the effects of heat on cellular adhesion and mechanotransduction. If true, this could help explain both the successes and failures of clinical hyperthermia, and suggest ways to target treatments to those who would most benefit. - Highlights: • Non-lethal hyperthermia treatment of cancer cells is shown to cause a reduction in rates of tumor initiation and metastasis. • Dynamic imaging of cells during heat treatment shows temporary changes in cell shape, cell migration, and cell proliferation. • Loss of adhesion may lead to the observed effect, which may disproportionately impact the tumor initiating cell fraction. • Loss or suppression of the tumor initiating cell fraction results in the observed loss of metastatic potential in vivo. • This result may lead to new approaches to synergizing hyperthermia with surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy.

  14. Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... plants (aflatoxins) Excessive sunlight exposure Genetic problems Obesity Radiation exposure Viruses Types of tumors known to be caused by or linked with viruses are: Cervical cancer (human papillomavirus) Most anal cancers (human papillomavirus) Some throat ...

  15. Sequential Salinomycin Treatment Results in Resistance Formation through Clonal Selection of Epithelial-Like Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Kopp, Florian; Hermawan, Adam; Oak, Prajakta Shirish; Ulaganathan, Vijay Kumar; Herrmann, Annika; Elnikhely, Nefertiti; Thakur, Chitra; Xiao, Zhiguang; Knyazev, Pjotr; Ataseven, Beyhan; Savai, Rajkumar; Wagner, Ernst; Roidl, Andreas

    2014-12-01

    Acquiring therapy resistance is one of the major obstacles in the treatment of patients with cancer. The discovery of the cancer stem cell (CSC)-specific drug salinomycin raised hope for improved treatment options by targeting therapy-refractory CSCs and mesenchymal cancer cells. However, the occurrence of an acquired salinomycin resistance in tumor cells remains elusive. To study the formation of salinomycin resistance, mesenchymal breast cancer cells were sequentially treated with salinomycin in an in vitro cell culture assay, and the resulting differences in gene expression and salinomycin susceptibility were analyzed. We demonstrated that long-term salinomycin treatment of mesenchymal cancer cells resulted in salinomycin-resistant cells with elevated levels of epithelial markers, such as E-cadherin and miR-200c, a decreased migratory capability, and a higher susceptibility to the classic chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin. The formation of salinomycin resistance through the acquisition of epithelial traits was further validated by inducing mesenchymal-epithelial transition through an overexpression of miR-200c. The transition from a mesenchymal to a more epithelial-like phenotype of salinomycin-treated tumor cells was moreover confirmed in vivo, using syngeneic and, for the first time, transgenic mouse tumor models. These results suggest that the acquisition of salinomycin resistance through the clonal selection of epithelial-like cancer cells could become exploited for improved cancer therapies by antagonizing the tumor-progressive effects of epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

  16. Silencing of Doublecortin-Like (DCL) Results in Decreased Mitochondrial Activity and Delayed Neuroblastoma Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Verissimo, Carla S.; Elands, Rachel; Cheng, Sou; Saaltink, Dirk-Jan; ter Horst, Judith P.; Alme, Maria N.; Pont, Chantal; van de Water, Bob; Håvik, Bjarte; Fitzsimons, Carlos P.; Vreugdenhil, Erno

    2013-01-01

    Doublecortin-like (DCL) is a microtubule-binding protein crucial for neuroblastoma (NB) cell proliferation. We have investigated whether the anti-proliferative effect of DCL knockdown is linked to reduced mitochondrial activity. We found a delay in tumor development after DCL knockdown in vivo in doxycycline-inducible NB tumor xenografts. To understand the mechanisms underlying this tumor growth retardation we performed a series of in vitro experiments in NB cell lines. DCL colocalizes with mitochondria, interacts with the mitochondrial outer membrane protein OMP25/ SYNJ2BP and DCL knockdown results in decreased expression of genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation. Moreover, DCL knockdown decreases cytochrome c oxidase activity and ATP synthesis. We identified the C-terminal Serine/Proline-rich domain and the second microtubule-binding area as crucial DCL domains for the regulation of cytochrome c oxidase activity and ATP synthesis. Furthermore, DCL knockdown causes a significant reduction in the proliferation rate of NB cells under an energetic challenge induced by low glucose availability. Together with our previous studies, our results corroborate DCL as a key player in NB tumor growth in which DCL controls not only mitotic spindle formation and the stabilization of the microtubule cytoskeleton, but also regulates mitochondrial activity and energy availability, which makes DCL a promising molecular target for NB therapy. PMID:24086625

  17. Total enbloc spondylectomy for metastatic high grade spinal tumors: Early results

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Sanganagouda S; Nene, Abhay M

    2016-01-01

    Background: High grade metastatic spinal tumors are most common and are invasive. These patients can succumb to disease progression if not treated timely. Although considered as invasive and morbid, total enbloc spondylectomy (TES) in selected cases has better survival rates. The authors describe the results of TES for high grade metastatic spinal tumors. Materials and Methods: Five patients (four females and one male) underwent TES for solitary metastatic vertebral lesion between November 2012 and January 2014. These patients presented to us with spinal instability, unrelenting severe spinal pain and/or with severe progressive radiculopathy. Average age was 46.2 years (range 39–62 years). After complete investigations, computed tomography scan, magnetic resonance imaging scan and positron emission tomography (PET) scan, it was confirmed that these patients had high grade solitary vertebral metastatic tumor. Results: Average duration of followup was 18 months (range 16–20 months). The average preoperative visual analog scale score of 9.4 (range 9–10) improved to 2 (range 1–4) at last followup. Average blood loss was 1440 mL (range 1000–2000 mL). Average duration of surgery was 198 min (range 180–240 min). Significant pain relief was noticed in each patient in the immediate postoperative period and during followups. These patients attained complete functional activities of daily living with in a month. The imaging showed implants in situ, no recurrence of tumor, and no activity on PET scan at the final followup. Conclusion: The present series shows favorable short term results of TES for solitary, metastatic, high grade vertebral body tumors by a team approach. PMID:27512215

  18. Preliminary results of a non-invasive method to measure tumor size and distribution in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Shu-Ling; Chen, Chien-An; Hung, Ling-Chien; Lee, Moon-Sing; Chiou, Wen-Yen; Lin, Hon-Yi; Su, Yu-Chieh; Lee, Ching-Chih; Hung, Shih-Kai

    2016-01-01

    Molecular imaging of reporter gene expression in cancer cells can provide rapid, sensitive and non-invasive monitoring of tumor behavior. The aim of the present study was to establish a non-invasive method to measure tumor size and distribution in vivo. Briefly, H-Ras-transformed cells were stably transfected with a plasmid containing the luciferase gene (Luc), designated as Ras/Luc. Ras/Luc cells were injected into the back or tail vein of nude BALB/cAnN-Foxn1nu/CrlNarl mice (age, 6–8 weeks). Mice were subsequently administered D-luciferin via intra-peritoneal injection, prior to image acquisition. Photons emitted from the mice were detected via an imaging system. Tumor size and distribution in vivo were quantified as photons/second. Andrographolide has demonstrated radiosensitization in previous in vitro and in vivo studies. In the present study, the potential effects of andrographolide cancer metastasis were investigated further, using an imaging system. Preliminary results of andrographolide combined with radiation indicated the inhibition of cancer metastasis. The present mechanistic study of andrographolide-mediated effects demonstrated that activated extracellular signal regulated kinase protein and H2O2 production levels were significantly increased by andrographolide. In summary, the present study established a non-invasive method to measure tumor size and distribution in vivo and indicated that andrographolide may be a potential therapeutic strategy in cancer therapy. PMID:28105095

  19. Loss of Sparc in p53-null Astrocytes Promotes Macrophage Activation and Phagocytosis Resulting in Decreased Tumor Size and Tumor Cell Survival.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Stacey L; Schultz, Chad R; Mouzon, Ezekiell; Golembieski, William A; El Naili, Reima; Radakrishnan, Archanna; Lemke, Nancy; Poisson, Laila M; Gutiérrez, Jorge A; Cottingham, Sandra; Rempel, Sandra A

    2015-07-01

    Both the induction of SPARC expression and the loss of the p53 tumor suppressor gene are changes that occur early in glioma development. Both SPARC and p53 regulate glioma cell survival by inverse effects on apoptotic signaling. Therefore, during glioma formation, the upregulation of SPARC may cooperate with the loss of p53 to enhance cell survival. This study determined whether the loss of Sparc in astrocytes that are null for p53 would result in reduced cell survival and tumor formation and increased tumor immunogenicity in an in vivo xenograft brain tumor model. In vitro, the loss of Sparc in p53-null astrocytes resulted in an increase in cell proliferation, but a loss of tumorigenicity. At 7 days after intracranial implantation, Sparc-null tumors had decreased tumor cell survival, proliferation and reduced tumor size. The loss of Sparc promoted microglia/macrophage activation and phagocytosis of tumor cells. Our results indicate that the loss of p53 by deletion/mutation in the early stages of glioma formation may cooperate with the induction of SPARC to potentiate cancer cell survival and escape from immune surveillance.

  20. COX-2 inhibitor prevents tumor induced down regulation of classical DC lineage specific transcription factor Zbtb46 resulting in immunocompetent DC and decreased tumor burden.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Vipul K; Amin, Prayag J; Shankar, Bhavani S

    2017-04-01

    The interaction between the immune and tumor cells in the microenvironment is an important factor deciding the progression of cancer. Though many of the soluble mediators in the microenvironment that mediate immunosuppression are known, the mechanism by which the tumor affects the distal progenitors is not known. We report that the tumor derived prostanoids down regulated classical dendritic cells DC (cDC) lineage specific transcription factor Zbtb46 in the progenitor cells which affects its differentiation. Prostanoids also induced ERK/CREB/IL-10 signaling pathway in DC that is more important for maturation of DC. This was observed under in vitro as well as in vivo conditions leading to phenotypic and functional impairment of DC. siRNA mediated knockdown of Zbtb46 and not exogenous IL-10 mimicked the effects of tumor conditioned medium (TCM) on suppression of maturation markers. Treatment of tumor cells with COX-2 inhibitor NS-398 averted TCM induced phenotypic impairment of DC in vitro. Treatment of tumor bearing mice with NS-398 prevented tumor induced down regulation of Zbtb46 resulting in immunocompetent DC which in turn led to a decrease in tumor burden. The effects of NS-398 was indeed through immunomodulation was corroborated by no such response in SCID mice. Our study provides novel insight into the distal regulation of progenitor cells by tumor and the importance of Zbtb46 expression in anti-tumor immunity. These results identify Zbtb46 expression as an indicator of immunocompetent DC in tumor and also highlights that COX-2 inhibitors could be useful in cancer immunotherapy.

  1. Implementation and experimental results of 4D tumor tracking using robotic couch

    SciTech Connect

    Buzurovic, I.; Yu, Y.; Werner-Wasik, M.; Biswas, T.; Anne, P. R.; Dicker, A. P.; Podder, T. K.

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: This study presents the implementation and experimental results of a novel technique for 4D tumor tracking using a commercially available and commonly used treatment couch and evaluates the tumor tracking accuracy in clinical settings. Methods: Commercially available couch is capable of positioning the patient accurately; however, currently there is no provision for compensating physiological movement using the treatment couch in real-time. In this paper, a real-time couch tracking control technique is presented together with experimental results in tumor motion compensation in four dimensions (superior-inferior, lateral, anterior-posterior, and time). To implement real-time couch motion for tracking, a novel control system for the treatment couch was developed. The primary functional requirements for this novel technique were: (a) the treatment couch should maintain all previous/normal features for patient setup and positioning, (b) the new control system should be used as a parallel system when tumor tracking would be deployed, and (c) tracking could be performed in a single direction and/or concurrently in all three directions of the couch motion (longitudinal, lateral, and vertical). To the authors' best knowledge, the implementation of such technique to a regular treatment couch for tumor tracking has not been reported so far. To evaluate the performance of the tracking couch, we investigated the mechanical characteristics of the system such as system positioning resolution, repeatability, accuracy, and tracking performance. Performance of the tracking system was evaluated using dosimetric test as an endpoint. To investigate the accuracy of real-time tracking in the clinical setting, the existing clinical treatment couch was replaced with our experimental couch and the linear accelerator was used to deliver 3D conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plans with and without tracking. The results of

  2. Lymph Node-Targeted Immunotherapy Mediates Potent Immunity Resulting in Regression of Isolated or Metastatic HPV-Transformed Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kent A.; Meisenburg, Brenna L.; Tam, Victor L.; Pagarigan, Robb R.; Wong, Raymond; Joea, Diljeet K.; Lantzy, Liz; Carrillo, Mayra A.; Gross, Todd M.; Malyankar, Uriel M.; Chiang, Chih-Sheng; Da Silva, Diane M.; Kündig, Thomas M.; Kast, W. Martin; Qiu, Zhiyong; Bot, Adrian

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The goal of this study was to investigate the therapeutic potential of a novel immunotherapy strategy resulting in immunity to localized or metastatic HPV 16-transformed murine tumors. Experimental design Animals bearing E7-expressing tumors were co-immunized by lymph node injection with E7 49-57 antigen and TLR3-ligand (synthetic dsRNA). Immune responses were measured by flow cytometry and anti-tumor efficacy was evaluated by tumor size and survival. In situ cytotoxicity assays and identification of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and T regulatory cells were used to assess the mechanisms of treatment resistance in bulky disease. Chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide was explored to augment immunotherapy in late-stage disease. Results In therapeutic and prophylactic settings, immunization resulted in a considerable expansion of E7 49-57 antigen-specific T lymphocytes in the range of 1/10 CD8+ T cells. The resulting immunity was effective in suppressing disease progression and mortality in a pulmonary metastatic disease model. Therapeutic immunization resulted in control of isolated tumors up to a certain volume, and correlated with anti-tumor immune responses measured in blood. In situ analysis showed that within bulky tumors, T cell function was affected by negative regulatory mechanisms linked to an increase in T regulatory cells and could be overcome by cyclophosphamide treatment in conjunction with immunization. Conclusions This study highlights a novel cancer immunotherapy platform with potential for translatability to the clinic and suggests its potential usefulness for controlling metastatic disease, solid tumors of limited size, or larger tumors when combined with cytotoxic agents that reduce the number of tumor-infiltrating T regulatory cells. PMID:19789304

  3. Heating stents with radio frequency energy to prevent tumor ingrowth: modeling and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Thomas P.; Lawes, Kate; Goldberg, S. Nahum

    1998-04-01

    Stents are often inserted into internal orifices to treat blockage due to tumor ingrowth. Stents are favored due to their minimally invasive nature, possible avoidance of a surgical procedure, and their ability to palliate surgically non-resectable disease. Because of rapid tumor growth however, a treatment means to prevent overgrowth through the stent and resultant blockage is required. To further this goal, experiments were performed in which a stent was placed in tissue and heated with radiofrequency (RF) energy to coagulate a cylinder of tissue, thereby eradicating viable tissue in the proximity of the stent. Temperatures were measured at the central stent surface and edges over time during a 5 - 10 minute heating in phantom and in fresh tissue. In addition, a finite element model was used to simulate the electric field and temperature distribution. Blood flow was also introduced in the model by evaluating RF application to stents to determine effectiveness of the energy applications. Changing perfusion and tissue electrical conductivity as a function of temperature was applied as the tissue was heated to 100 degree(s)C. Results from the electric field model will be shown as well as the thermal distribution over time from the simulations. Lastly, results from the damage integral will be discussed.

  4. Preliminary oncological results of endosopic laser surgery in advanced head and neck tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker-Schreyer, Antonio; Sadick, Haneen; Juncker, Cathrine; Bergler, Wolfgang; Hoermann, Karl

    1998-01-01

    Lasersurgery has established itself in the treatment of minor tumors (T1 - T2) of the upper aerodigestive tract. However, advanced carcinomas of the head and neck (T3 - T4) are generally treated with conventional surgical procedures which include pharyngolaryngectomy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the oncological outcome of endoscopic lasersurgery in advanced head and neck tumors and to compare the results with conventional surgical procedures. Between January 1994 to December 1996, 86 patients with advanced squamous cell carcinomas of the larynx and hypopharynx underwent endoscopic lasersurgery instead of pharyngolaryngectomy as a curative measure. Besides the recurrence and survival rate, the necessity of tracheostomy, postoperative complications and the mean duration of hospitalization were documented. The results showed that the recurrence and survival rate were similar or even better after conventional pharyngolaryngectomy, whereas the patients' postoperative rehabilitation was better after lasersurgery. In this contribution the indication for lasersurgical intervention or pharyngolaryngectomy in advanced carcinomas of the head and neck is discussed.

  5. Long-term results of allograft composite total hip prostheses for tumors.

    PubMed

    Langlais, F; Lambotte, J C; Collin, P; Thomazeau, H

    2003-09-01

    The functional results of standard reconstruction prostheses are impaired by instability because of poor muscular reinsertion, especially of the gluteal muscles. In 21 patients, composite hip prostheses including proximal femoral allografts were used after primary malignant tumor resection. Ten reconstructions used combined bone-tendon allografts that allowed reinsertion of the gluteal muscles to the allograft tendons. None of the 21 patients had dislocation or infection. Ten patients died within 2 years of surgery without complications requiring reoperations. The mean followup in the 11 other patients was 10 years. Eight patients had reoperation: four for loosening (two at 3 years, two at 11 and 12 years), and four had autologous graftings for nonunion of the trochanter or of the distal graft-bone interface. Evaluation of function in the 11 patients with follow-ups ranging from 4 to 15 years showed an average Musculoskeletal Tumor Society score of 77%. Satisfactory strength of the abductor muscles was achieved by reinsertion of the trochanter or by suture of the patients gluteal muscles with the combined tendon-bone allograft. At long-term, radiologically, the bony allograft showed no change in five patients, very mild resorption in five, and severe resorption in one. Stem fixation was excellent in 10 patients and fair in one. Comparison between the functional results of reconstruction prostheses versus composite prostheses showed a significant improvement with the composite prosthesis. In the authors' institution, at 10 years, the mechanical survival of composite prostheses was 81%, as compared with only 65% for reconstruction prostheses.

  6. Overexpression of the prostaglandin E2 receptor EP2 results in enhanced skin tumor development.

    PubMed

    Sung, Y M; He, G; Hwang, D H; Fischer, S M

    2006-09-07

    We previously showed that the EP2 knockout mice were resistant to chemically induced skin carcinogenesis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of the overexpression of the EP2 receptor in mouse skin carcinogenesis. To determine the effect of overexpression of EP2, we used EP2 transgenic (TG) mice and wild-type (WT) mice in a DMBA (7,12-dimethylbenz[alpha]anthracene)/TPA (12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate) two-stage carcinogenesis protocol. EP2 TG mice developed significantly more tumors compared with WT mice. Overexpression of the EP2 receptor increased TPA-induced keratinocyte proliferation both in vivo and in vitro. In addition, the epidermis of EP2 TG mice 48 h after topical TPA treatment was significantly thicker compared to that of WT mice. EP2 TG mice showed significantly increased cyclic adenosine monophosphate levels in the epidermis after prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) treatment. The inflammatory response to TPA was increased in EP2 TG mice, as demonstrated by an increased number of macrophages in the dermis. Tumors and 7 x TPA-treated and DMBA-TPA-treated (6 weeks) skins from EP2 TG mice produced more blood vessels than those of WT mice as determined by CD-31 immunostaining. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) protein expression was significantly increased in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) samples from EP2 TG mice compared that of WT mice. There was, however, no difference in the number of apoptotic cells in tumors from WT and EP2 TG mice. Together, our results suggest that the overexpression of the EP2 receptor plays a significant role in the protumorigenic action of PGE2 in mouse skin.

  7. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Inoperable Liver Tumors: Results of a Single Institutional Experience

    PubMed Central

    Hijazi, Hussam; Campeau, Marie-Pierre; Roberge, David; Donath, David; Lapointe, Real; Vandenbroucke-Menu, Franck; Taussky, Daniel; Boudam, Karim; Chan, Gabriel; Bujold, Alexis

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is an emerging treatment option for liver tumors unsuitable for ablation or surgery. We report our experience with SBRT in the treatment of liver tumors. Materials and methods Patients with primary or secondary liver cancer were identified in our local SBRT database. Patients were included irrespective of prior liver-directed therapies. The primary endpoint of our review was in-field local control (LC). Secondary endpoints were progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), and toxicity. Results From 2009 to 2015, a total of 71 liver lesions in 68 patients were treated with SBRT (three patients had two liver lesions treated). The median age was 71 years (27–89 years). Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) was the diagnosis in 23 patients (34%), with the grade of Child–Pugh A (52%), B (39%), or C (nine percent) cirrhosis. Six patients (nine percent) had intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (IHC). The remaining 39 patients (57%) had metastatic liver lesions. Colorectal adenocarcinoma was the most common primary tumor type (81%). The median size for HCC, IHC, and metastatic lesions was 5 cm (2–9 cm), 3.6 cm (2–4.9 cm), and 4 cm (1–8 cm), respectively. The median prescribed dose was 45 Gy (16–50 Gy). Median follow-up was 11.5 months (1–45 months). Actuarial one-year in-field LC for HCC and metastatic lesions was 85% and 64% respectively (p= 0.66). At one year, the actuarial rate of new liver lesions was 40% and 26%, respectively, (p=0.58) for HCC and metastases. Only six patients with IHC were treated with SBRT in this study – in these patients, one-year LC was 78% with new liver lesions in 53%. The SBRT treatments were well tolerated. The side effects included common criteria for adverse events (CTCAE) v4 grade 1 acute gastrointestinal toxicity in three patients, grade 3 nausea in one patient, and grade 3 acute dermatitis in another patient. Two patients had grade 5 toxicity. Radiation pneumonitis was

  8. Time-Domain Optical Mammography: Initial Clinical Results on Detection and Characterization of Breast Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosenick, Dirk; Moesta, K. Thomas; Wabnitz, Heidrun; Mucke, Jörg; Stroszczynski, Christian; MacDonald, Rainer; Schlag, Peter M.; Rinneberg, Herbert

    2003-06-01

    Mammograms of 35 patients suspected of breast cancer were taken along craniocaudal and mediolateral projections with a dual-wavelength scanning laser pulse mammograph measuring time-resolved transmittance. Among 26 tumors known from routine clinical diagnostics, 17 tumors were detected retrospectively in optical mammograms. Effective tumor optical properties derived from a homogeneous model were used to deduce physiological information. All tumors exhibited increased total hemoglobin concentration and decreased or unchanged blood oxygen saturation compared with surrounding healthy tissue. Scatter plots based on a pixelwise analysis of individual mammograms were introduced and applied to represent correlations between characteristic quantities derived from measured distributions of times of flight of photons.

  9. External quality control results for hormones, tumor markers and CRP testing.

    PubMed

    Tatsumi, N; Kawano, K; Takubo, T; Nakamura, H; Tsuda, I

    1999-01-01

    Most hormones, tumor markers, C-reactive protein, and rheumatoid factor (RF) are measured immunologically. Immunological methods based on the antigen-antibody reaction have certain specific problems, including their principle of determination, character of antibodies used, reaction conditions, and others. Free thyroxine (FT4) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), as well as alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), prostate antigen, carcinoantigen 19-9 (CA 19-9), and CA 125 are very commonly measured in the routine medical laboratory. Authentic materials can be obtained for hormones and CRP, and efforts to improve quality control and standardization have been made for years. Results of surveillance for FT4, TSH, and AFP were not poor, but inter-laboratory differences for CEA, CA 19-9, and RF were not insignificant.

  10. Thermosensitive liposomal cisplatin in combination with local hyperthermia results in tumor growth delay and changes in tumor microenvironment in xenograft models of lung carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Dou, Yannan Nancy; Dunne, Michael; Huang, Huang; Mckee, Trevor; Chang, Martin C; Jaffray, David A; Allen, Christine

    2016-11-01

    Treatment efficacy of a heat-activated thermosensitive liposome formulation of cisplatin (CDDP), known as HTLC, was determined in xenograft models of non-small-cell lung carcinoma. The short-term impact of local hyperthermia (HT) on tumor morphology, microvessel density and local inflammatory response was also evaluated. The HTLC formulation in combination with local HT resulted in a significant advantage in therapeutic effect in comparison with free drug and a non-thermosensitive liposome formulation of CDDP (i.e. Lipoplatin(TM)) when administered at their maximum tolerated doses. Local HT-induced widespread cell necrosis and a significant reduction in microvessel density in the necrotic regions of tumors. CD11b-expressing innate leukocytes were demonstrated to infiltrate and reside preferentially at the necrotic rim of tumors, likely as a means to phagocytose-damaged tissue. Colocalization of CD11b with a marker of DNA damage (i.e. γH2AX) revealed a small portion of CD11b-expressing leukocytes that were possibly undergoing apoptosis as a result of HT-induced damage and/or the short lifespan of leukocytes. Overall, HT-induced tissue damage (i.e. at 24-h post-treatment) alone did not result in significant improvements in treatment effect, rather, the enhancement in tumor drug availability was correlated with improved therapeutic outcomes.

  11. SIRT3 is a Mitochondrial Tumor Suppressor and Genetic Loss Results in a Murine Model for ER/PR-Positive Mammary Tumors Connecting Metabolism and Carcinogenesis Mitochondrial Tumor Suppressor. Revision

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-01

    breast cancer in younger women have been established by altering the expression of BRCA genes . In contrast, there are no murine models for the...overarching goal of this proposal is to determine if the mitochondrial sirtuin SIRT3 is a tumor suppressor gene (TSG) that may be used to: (1...tumors. Based on these results we initially proposed a hypothesis that longevity genes impact the process of carcinogenesis via the maintenance of

  12. Complications of Microwave Ablation for Liver Tumors: Results of a Multicenter Study

    SciTech Connect

    Livraghi, Tito; Meloni, Franca; Solbiati, Luigi; Zanus, Giorgio; Collaboration: For the Collaborative Italian Group using AMICA system

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: New technologies for microwave ablation (MWA) have been conceived, designed to achieve larger areas of necrosis compared with radiofrequency ablation (RFA). The purpose of this study was to report complications by using this technique in patients with focal liver cancer. Methods: Members of 14 Italian centers used a 2.45-GMHz generator delivering energy through a cooled miniature-choke MW antenna and a standardized protocol for follow-up. They completed a questionnaire regarding number and type of deaths, major and minor complications and side effects, and likelihood of their relationship to the procedure. Enrollment included 736 patients with 1.037 lesions: 522 had hepatocellular carcinoma with cirrhosis, 187 had metastases predominantly from colorectal cancer, and 27 had cholangiocellular carcinoma. Tumor size ranged from 0.5 to 10 cm. In 13 centers, the approach used was percutaneous, in 4 videolaparoscopic, and in 3 laparotomic. Results: No deaths were reported. Major complications occurred in 22 cases (2.9%), and minor complications in 54 patients (7.3%). Complications of MWA do not differ from those RFA, both being based on the heat damage. Conclusion: Results of this multicenter study confirmed those of single-center experiences, indicating that MWA is a safe procedure, with no mortality and a low rate of major complications. The low rate of complications was probably due to precautions adopted, knowing in advance possible risk conditions, on the basis of prior RFA experience.

  13. Beauty product-related exposures and childhood brain tumors in seven countries: results from the SEARCH International Brain Tumor Study.

    PubMed

    Efird, J T; Holly, E A; Cordier, S; Mueller, B A; Lubin, F; Filippini, G; Peris-Bonet, R; McCredie, M; Arslan, A; Bracci, P; Preston-Martin, S

    2005-04-01

    Data from 1218 cases of childhood brain tumors (CBT) diagnosed between 1976 and 1994 and 2223 matched controls from the general population were included in an analysis of maternal beauty product exposure and beauty-related employment in 9 centers in 7 countries. A 50% increased odds ratio (OR) [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.0-2.1] for CBT was observed among children of mothers who were exposed via personal use of and/or possible ambient contact with beauty products during the 5 years preceding the index child's birth compared with children of mothers never exposed to beauty products during this time period. Overall maternal personal use of hair-coloring agents in the month before or during the pregnancy of the index child's birth was not associated with CBT (OR = 1.0, CI = 0.83-1.3) or with astroglial (OR = 1.1, CI = 0.85-1.4), PNET (OR = 1.0, CI = 0.71-1.5) and other glial subtypes (OR = 1.0, CI = 0.62-1.0). Similarly, no statistically increased ORs or discernable pattern of risk estimates were observed for period of use or for number of applications per year for maternal personal use of hair-coloring agents overall or by histologic type. Among children born on or after 1980, increased ORs for CBT were associated with maternal non-work-related exposure to any beauty products (OR = 2.6, CI = 1.2-5.9), hair-dyes (OR = 11, CI = 1.2-90), and hair sprays (OR = 3.4, CI = 1.0-11). No overall increased OR for CBT was observed among children of mothers employed in beauty-related jobs during the 5 years preceding the index child's birth compared with those who reported no beauty-related employment. In general, other specific beauty product-related exposures were not associated with increased ORs for CBT. Data from our study provide little evidence of an increased risk for CBT with mothers' exposures to beauty products.

  14. Lost in translation: ambiguity in nerve sheath tumor nomenclature and its resultant treatment effect.

    PubMed

    Bernthal, Nicholas M; Jones, Kevin B; Monument, Michael J; Liu, Ting; Viskochil, David; Randall, R Lor

    2013-05-08

    There is much ambiguity surrounding the diagnosis of nerve sheath tumors, including atypical neurofibroma and low-grade MPNST, and yet, the distinction between these entities designates either benign or malignant behavior and thus carries presumed profound prognostic importance that often guides treatment. This study reviews the diagnostic criteria used to designate atypical neurofibroma from low-grade MPNSTs and reviews existing literature the natural history of each of these tumors to see if the distinction is, in fact, of importance.

  15. Radiation therapy combined with novel STING-targeting oligonucleotides results in regression of established tumors

    PubMed Central

    Baird, Jason R.; Friedman, David; Cottam, Benjamin; Dubensky, Thomas W.; Kanne, David B.; Bambina, Shelly; Bahjat, Keith; Crittenden, Marka R.; Gough, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Cytotoxic therapies prime adaptive immune responses to cancer by stimulating the release of tumor-associated antigens. However, the tumor microenvironment into which these antigens are released is typically immunosuppressed, blunting the ability to initiate immune responses. Recently, activation of the DNA sensor molecule STING by cyclic dinucleotides was shown to stimulate infection-related inflammatory pathways in tumors. In this study, we report that the inflammatory pathways activated by STING ligands generate a powerful adjuvant activity for enhancing adaptive immune responses to tumor antigens released by radiation therapy. In a murine model of pancreatic cancer, we showed that combining CT-guided radiation therapy with a novel ligand of murine and human STING could synergize to control local and distant tumors. Mechanistic investigations revealed T cell-independent and TNFα-dependent hemorrhagic necrosis at early times followed by later CD8 T cell-dependent control of residual disease. Clinically, STING was found to be expressed extensively in human pancreatic tumor and stromal cells. Our findings suggest that this novel STING ligand could offer a potent adjuvant for leveraging radiotherapeutic management of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26567136

  16. Garcin syndrome resulting from a giant cell tumor of the skull base in a child.

    PubMed

    Bibas-Bonet, Hilda; Fauze, Ricardo A; Lavado, María Graciela; Páez, Rafael O; Nieman, Judith

    2003-05-01

    Garcin syndrome is characterized by a progressive ipsilateral involvement of cranial nerves, culminating in paralysis of all or at least seven of them, without sensory or motor long-tract disturbance, with no intracranial hypertension, and with osteoclastic involvement in the skull base on radiographic computed tomography. Giant cell tumor is a primary bone tumor rarely affecting the skull base. An 8-year-old female presented with a 3-month history of increasingly worsening right otalgia, tinnitus, hearing loss, right facial numbness, and diplopia. She was admitted with a 2-week history of swallowing difficulties, voice change, and right shoulder pain. Neurologic examination disclosed unilateral paralysis of the right fifth through twelfth cranial nerves, with no other abnormal neurologic findings. Skull radiographic computed tomography revealed lytic lesions in the right temporal petrous portion. Computed tomographic scan indicated a destructive mass involving the right greater wing of the sphenoid bone and temporal petrous apex. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a tumor arising from the temporosphenoidal region, infiltrating neither the brain nor the brainstem. No hydrocephalus was observed. Biopsy revealed giant cell tumor. Posterior treatment consisted of radiotherapy. At an 8-year follow-up, the patient was well but with functional sequelae. There is no magnetic resonance imaging evidence of tumor growth. No other giant cell tumor presenting as Garcin syndrome is known to have been reported.

  17. French brain tumor database: 5-year histological results on 25 756 cases.

    PubMed

    Rigau, Valérie; Zouaoui, Sonia; Mathieu-Daudé, Hélène; Darlix, Amélie; Maran, Aurélie; Trétarre, Brigitte; Bessaoud, Faiza; Bauchet, Fabienne; Attaoua, Redha; Fabbro-Peray, Pascale; Fabbro, Michel; Kerr, Christine; Taillandier, Luc; Duffau, Hugues; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Costes, Valérie; Bauchet, Luc

    2011-11-01

    This work aimed to prospectively record all primary central nervous system tumor (PCNST) cases in France, for which histological diagnosis is available. The objectives were to (i) create a national registry and a network to perform epidemiological studies; (ii) implement clinical and basic research protocols; and (iii) harmonize the health care of patients affected by PCNST. For 5 years, 25 756 cases of newly diagnosed and histologically confirmed PCNST have been recorded. Histological diagnoses included glioma (48.9%), all other neuroepithelial tumors (5%), meningioma (28.8%), nerve sheath tumors (8.4%), lymphoma (3.2%) and others (5.7%). Cryopreservation was reported for 6018 PCNST specimens. Tumor resections (R) were performed in 78% cases, while biopsies accounted for 22%. Median age (MA), sex, percentage R and number of cryopreserved tumors were detailed for each histology; for example, out of 6053 glioblastomas (MA 63 years, male 59.4%, R 62%, 1611 were cryopreserved), and out of 37 atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors (MA 2 years, male 56.8%, R 94%, 17 were cryopreserved). This database or databank dedicated to PCNST cases contains detailed data on clinical, histological and other characteristics, such as the inclusion of data on cryopreserved specimens that are not available in other European registries. Therefore, this is a valuable resource that can be used for planning future epidemiological and clinical research.

  18. Sequential activation of ground pads reduces skin heating during radiofrequency tumor ablation: in vivo porcine results.

    PubMed

    Schutt, David J; Swindle, M Michael; Helke, Kristi L; Bastarrika, Gorka; Schwarz, Florian; Haemmerich, Dieter

    2010-03-01

    Skin burns below ground pads during monopolar RF ablation are increasingly prevalent, thereby hindering the development of higher power RF generators capable of creating larger tumor ablation zones in combination with multiple or new applicators. Our goal was to evaluate reduction in skin temperatures via additional ground pads in an in vivo porcine model. Three ground pads placed on the animal's abdomen were activated either simultaneously or sequentially, where activation timing was adjusted to equilibrate skin temperature below each pad. Thirteen RF ablations (n = 4 simultaneous at 300 W, n = 5 sequential at 300 W, and n = 4 sequential at 375 W) were performed for 12 min via two internally cooled cluster electrodes placed in the gluteus maximus of domestic swine. Temperature rise at each pad and burn degree as determined via histology were compared. Ablation zone size was determined via T2-weighted MRI. Maximum temperature rise was significantly higher with simultaneous activation than with either of the sequential activation group (21.4 degrees C versus 8.1 degrees C or 9.6 degrees C, p < 0.01). Ablation zone diameters during simultaneous (300 W) and sequential activations (300 and 375 W) were and 6.9 +/- 0.3, 5.6 +/- 0.3, and 7.5 +/- 0.6 cm, respectively. Sequential activation of multiple ground pads results in significantly lower skin temperatures and less severe burns, as measured by histological examination.

  19. Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy of Ovarian Cancer Results in Three Patterns of Tumor-Infiltrating Lymphocyte Response with Distinct Implications for Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lo, Charlotte S; Sanii, Sanaz; Kroeger, David R; Milne, Katy; Talhouk, Aline; Chiu, Derek S; Rahimi, Kurosh; Shaw, Patricia A; Clarke, Blaise A; Nelson, Brad H

    2017-02-15

    Purpose: Some forms of chemotherapy can enhance antitumor immunity through immunogenic cell death, resulting in increased T-cell activation and tumor infiltration. Such effects could potentially sensitize tumors to immunotherapies, including checkpoint blockade. We investigated whether platinum- and taxane-based chemotherapy for ovarian cancer induces immunologic changes consistent with this possibility.Experimental Design: Matched pre- and post-neoadjuvant chemotherapy tumor samples from 26 high-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC) patients were analyzed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) for a large panel of immune cells and associated factors. The prognostic significance of post-chemotherapy TIL patterns was assessed in an expanded cohort (n = 90).Results: Neoadjuvant chemotherapy was associated with increased densities of CD3(+), CD8(+), CD8(+) TIA-1(+), PD-1(+) and CD20(+) TIL. Other immune subsets and factors were unchanged, including CD79a(+) CD138(+) plasma cells, CD68(+) macrophages, and MHC class I on tumor cells. Immunosuppressive cell types were also unchanged, including FoxP3(+) PD-1(+) cells (putative regulatory T cells), IDO-1(+) cells, and PD-L1(+) cells (both macrophages and tumor cells). Hierarchical clustering revealed three response patterns: (i) TIL(high) tumors showed increases in multiple immune markers after chemotherapy; (ii) TIL(low) tumors underwent similar increases, achieving patterns indistinguishable from the first group; and (iii) TIL(negative) cases generally remained negative. Despite the dramatic increases seen in the first two patterns, post-chemotherapy TIL showed limited prognostic significance.Conclusions: Chemotherapy augments pre-existing TIL responses but fails to relieve major immune-suppressive mechanisms or confer significant prognostic benefit. Our findings provide rationale for multipronged approaches to immunotherapy tailored to the baseline features of the tumor microenvironment. Clin Cancer Res; 23(4); 925-34. ©2016 AACR.

  20. Keratin 18-deficiency results in steatohepatitis and liver tumors in old mice: A model of steatohepatitis-associated liver carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hofer, Eva M.; Wohlrab, Christina; Golob-Schwarzl, Nicole; Svendova, Vendula; Schimek, Michael G.; Stumptner, Cornelia; Thüringer, Andrea; Speicher, Michael R.; Lackner, Carolin; Zatloukal, Kurt; Denk, Helmut; Haybaeck, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Backround Steatohepatitis (SH)-associated liver carcinogenesis is an increasingly important issue in clinical medicine. SH is morphologically characterized by steatosis, hepatocyte injury, ballooning, hepatocytic cytoplasmic inclusions termed Mallory-Denk bodies (MDBs), inflammation and fibrosis. Results 17-20-months-old Krt18−/− and Krt18+/− mice in contrast to wt mice spontaneously developed liver lesions closely resembling the morphological spectrum of human SH as well as liver tumors. The pathologic alterations were more pronounced in Krt18−/− than in Krt18+/− mice. The frequency of liver tumors with male predominance was significantly higher in Krt18−/− compared to age-matched Krt18+/− and wt mice. Krt18-deficient tumors in contrast to wt animals displayed SH features and often pleomorphic morphology. aCGH analysis of tumors revealed chromosomal aberrations in Krt18−/− liver tumors, affecting loci of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. Materials and Methods Livers of 3-, 6-, 12- and 17-20-months-old aged wild type (wt), Krt18+/− and Krt18−/− (129P2/OlaHsd background) mice were analyzed by light and immunofluorescence microscopy as well as immunohistochemistry. Liver tumors arising in aged mice were analyzed by array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). Conclusions Our findings show that K18 deficiency of hepatocytes leads to steatosis, increasing with age, and finally to SH. K18 deficiency and age promote liver tumor development in mice, frequently on the basis of chromosomal instability, resembling human HCC with stemness features. PMID:27689336

  1. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) of malignant tumors by photosensitzer photosens: results of 45 clinical cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Victor V.; Chissov, Valery I.; Yakubovskaya, Raisa I.; Aristarkhova, E. I.; Filonenko, E. V.; Belous, T. A.; Vorozhtsov, Georgy N.; Zharkova, Natalia N.; Smirnov, V. V.; Zhitkova, Margarita B.

    1996-01-01

    Photosensitizer Photosens is a mixture of sulphonated Al-phthalocyanines with a different number of substituents per phthalocyanine molecule. In the beginning of 1994, this photosensitizer was approved for clinical trials. Since that time till May 1995, 45 patients with 120 tumors were treated by PDT-Photosens. The main tumor localizations were lung (5/6), head and neck (4/4), esophagus (8/8), stomach (2/2), vulva (2/2), bladder (1/1), breast cancer (3/3), skin (basalioma, melanoma, sarcoma Kaposi, mts breast cancer) (20 patients/94 tumors). The lesions were photoirradiated 48-72 h after intravenous injection of Photosens in doses from 0.5 to 2.0 mg/kg b.w. (1.0 mg/kg b.w., on average). PDT was performed by laser power density from 20 to 1400 mW/sq cm (300 mW/sq.cm, on average), energy density varying from 15 to 200 J/sq cm (100 J/sq.cm, on average). The therapeutical effect of PDT was evaluated histologically, endoscopically, roentgenologically and sonographically 3 - 4 weeks after the treatment. Complete regression of tumors was reached in 56%, significant remission was reached in 34%, and partial remission was observed in 10% of cases. The follow-up of patients with complete tumor regression was to 15 months.

  2. Results of multimodal treatment for desmoplastic small round cell tumor of the abdomen and pelvis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuo; Zhang, Yong; Yu, Yong-Hua; Li, Jia

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSRCT) is a rare aggressive malignancy that occurs in a young population with a male predominance. We studied the clinical and pathological characteristics of DSRCT and investigated the effects of multimodal therapy including aggressive surgical resection, induction chemotherapy, and external beam radiotherapy. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed and analyzed our experience with 11 histologically proven cases of DSRCT between March 2004 and October 2014. The clinical information, histological, immunohistochemistry and survival data of the patients were collected. Results: The median age at diagnosis was 31.4 years (range, 14-64 years) and nine (82%) of the patients were males. The most common presenting complaint was abdominal pain (72.7%). Surgical resection was attempted in five patients and included macroscopic total resection in two patients and debulking in three patients. Six patients underwent biopsy only. Eleven patients received multiagent chemotherapy. Five patients (45.5%) received radiotherapy. The median survival of patients who underwent surgical resection was 34.5 months, whereas the patients who underwent biopsy alone was 24.5 months (P<0.05). The median survival was 40.8 months in radiotherapy group, and 19.2 months in non-radiotherapy group (P<0.05). The 3-year progression-free survival rate was 27.2%. The median survival was 29 months, and the median time to local failure was 8.8 months. Cox regression analysis showed surgery and radiotherapy were highly significant in prolonging patients survival. Conclusion: Multimodal therapy consists of combination of surgical resection, chemotherapy and radiotherapy results in improved survival in patients with DSRCT. For unresectable DSRCT, we recommend radiotherapy combined with anthracycline-based chemotherapy. PMID:26309640

  3. Boronated porphyrins in NCT: Results with a new potent tumor localizer

    SciTech Connect

    Kahl, S.B.; Koo, M.S.; Laster, B.H.; Fairchild, R.G.

    1988-01-01

    Several chemical methods are available for the solubilization of boronated porphyrins. We have previously reported the tumor localization of nido carboranyl porphyrins in which the icosahedral carborane cages have been opened to give B/sub 9/C/sub 2/ anions. One of these species has shown tumor boron levels of nearly 50 ..mu..g B/g when delivered by week-long subcutaneous infusions. We report here recent in vivo experiments with a new, highly water-soluble porphyrin based on the hematoporphyrin-type of compound in which aqueous solubility is achieved using the two propionic acid side chains of the ''natural'' porphyrin frame. 7 refs.

  4. Incidence of orbital, conjunctival and lacrimal gland malignant tumors in USA from Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results, 1973-2009

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Waleed M.; Bakry, Mohamed S.; Hassan, Housam M.; Alfaar, Ahmad S.

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine the types and incidence of tumors affecting the orbit, conjunctiva and lacrimal glands and to study the trend line of these tumors in the United States from 1973 to 2009. METHODS We used the publicly available Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database registries to determine the incidence rates. Age was adjusted to the 2000 US Standard Population. Patients were stratified according to age group, gender, race and histological grouping of tumor lesions. Three age groups were defined: 0-19, 20-49 and ≥50y. Annual percentage changes were calculated to examine trends. RESULTS The overall age adjusted incidence rate was 3.39 (95%CI: 3.27-3.52) per million person-years. The tumors were more prevalent in age group ≥50 counting 9.51 (95%CI: 9.11-9.92) per million person-years. Most of the soft tissue sarcomas occurred in the young age with incidence rate of 0.35 (95%CI: 0.28-0.42) per million person-years. Lymphomas were the dominant subtype in the adult population with incidence rate of 5.74 (95%CI: 5.43-6.06) per million person-years. Incidence rates were higher in males than females with an overall rate ratio of 1.31 (95%CI: 1.21-1.41) mainly caused by the increase in carcinoma subtypes. White race had a higher tumor incidence with a rate ratio of 1.47(95%CI: 1.25-1.73) driven by the higher incidence of most histological subtypes. Orbital tumors showed a higher incidence rate followed by conjunctival and lacrimal gland tumors with incidence rates of 1.59, 1.37 and 0.43 per million person-years respectively. The trend line of overall incidence of tumors showed a significant increase (APC=3.11, 95%CI: 2.61-3.61) mainly due to increase of lymphomas. This increase was higher than the increase of lymphomas at other sites. CONCLUSION Orbital, conjunctival and lacrimal gland malignant tumors differ among children and adults. Over the years there has been a noticeable increase in incidence rates of orbital and lacrimal gland tumors mainly

  5. Infant Brain Tumors: Incidence, Survival, and the Role of Radiation Based on Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Data

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, Andrew J.; McDonald, Mark W.; Chang, Andrew L.; Esiashvili, Natia

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the incidence of infant brain tumors and survival outcomes by disease and treatment variables. Methods and Materials: The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program November 2008 submission database provided age-adjusted incidence rates and individual case information for primary brain tumors diagnosed between 1973 and 2006 in infants less than 12 months of age. Results: Between 1973 and 1986, the incidence of infant brain tumors increased from 16 to 40 cases per million (CPM), and from 1986 to 2006, the annual incidence rate averaged 35 CPM. Leading histologies by annual incidence in CPM were gliomas (13.8), medulloblastoma and primitive neuroectodermal tumors (6.6), and ependymomas (3.6). The annual incidence was higher in whites than in blacks (35.0 vs. 21.3 CPM). Infants with low-grade gliomas had the highest observed survival, and those with atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors (ATRTs) or primary rhabdoid tumors of the brain had the lowest. Between 1979 and 1993, the annual rate of cases treated with radiation within the first 4 months from diagnosis declined from 20.5 CPM to <2 CPM. For infants with medulloblastoma, desmoplastic histology and treatment with both surgery and upfront radiation were associated with improved survival, but on multivariate regression, only combined surgery and radiation remained associated with improved survival, with a hazard ratio for death of 0.17 compared with surgery alone (p = 0.005). For ATRTs, those treated with surgery and upfront radiation had a 12-month survival of 100% compared with 24.4% for those treated with surgery alone (p = 0.016). For ependymomas survival was higher in patients treated in more recent decades (p = 0.001). Conclusion: The incidence of infant brain tumors has been stable since 1986. Survival outcomes varied markedly by histology. For infants with medulloblastoma and ATRTs, improved survival was observed in patients treated with both surgery and early radiation

  6. T-Cell Tumor Elimination as a Result of T-Cell Receptor-Mediated Activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashwell, Jonathan D.; Longo, Dan L.; Bridges, Sandra H.

    1987-07-01

    It has recently been shown that activation of murine T-cell hybridomas with antigen inhibits their growth in vitro. The ``suicide'' of these neoplastic T cells upon stimulation with antigen suggested the possibility that activation via the antigen-specific receptor could also inhibit the growth of neoplastic T cells in vivo. To test this, mice were subcutaneously inoculated with antigen-specific T-cell hybridomas and then treated intraperitoneally with antigen. Administration of the appropriate antigen immediately after inoculation with the T-cell hybridoma abrogated tumor formation; antigen administered after tumors had become established decreased the tumor burden and, in a substantial fraction of animals, led to long-term survival. The efficacy of antigen therapy was due to both a direct inhibitory effect on tumor growth and the induction of host immunity. These studies demonstrate the utility of cellular activation as a means of inhibiting neoplastic T-cell growth in vivo and provide a rationale for studying the use of less selective reagents that can mimic the activating properties of antigen, such as monoclonal antibodies, in the treatment of T-cell neoplasms of unknown antigen specificity.

  7. Laser correlation spectroscopy in the diagnosis of tumor diseases of the female reproductive system (preliminary results)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korneeva, A. A.; Sekerskaya, M. N.; Zhordaniya, K. I.; Sapezhinskiy, V. S.; Golubtsova, N. V.; Barmashov, A. E.; Gonchukov, S. A.; Ivanov, A. V.

    2017-01-01

    The study of blood serum of cancer patients by laser correlation spectroscopy to determine the possibility of differentiation of benign and malignant tumors of the female reproductive system. We analyzed the data and assessed the applicability of the method mentioned above target.

  8. DICER governs characteristics of glioma stem cells and the resulting tumors in xenograft mouse models of glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Alamsahebpour, Amir; Burrell, Kelly; Li, Mira; Karabork, Merve; Ekinci, Can; Koch, Elizabeth; Solaroglu, Ihsan; Chang, Jeffery T.; Wouters, Bradly; Aldape, Kenneth; Zadeh, Gelareh

    2016-01-01

    The RNAse III endonuclease DICER is a key regulator of microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis and is frequently decreased in a variety of malignancies. We characterized the role of DICER in glioblastoma (GB), specifically demonstrating its effects on the ability of glioma stem-like cells (GSCs) to form tumors in a mouse model of GB. DICER silencing in GSCs reduced their stem cell characteristics, while tumors arising from these cells were more aggressive, larger in volume, and displayed a higher proliferation index and lineage differentiation. The resulting tumors, however, were more sensitive to radiation treatment. Our results demonstrate that DICER silencing enhances the tumorigenic potential of GSCs, providing a platform for analysis of specific relevant miRNAs and development of potentially novel therapies against GB. PMID:27421140

  9. [Case of ischemic heart disease resulting from persistent diuresis after giant ovarian tumor resection].

    PubMed

    Sata, Naho; Satoh, Masaaki; Seo, Norimasa

    2010-02-01

    A patient with a giant ovarian tumor weighing about 7 kg was successfully removed by operation. However, her ECG demonstrated ischemic changes after the operation. We report a case of ischemic heart disease due to persistent diuresis after giant ovarian tumor resection. A 75-year-old, 56.5 kg, 143.5 cm woman was admitted to our hospital for ovarian tumor resection. The preoperative ECG showed normal sinus rhythm and no ischemic changes. Both general anesthesia and epidural anesthesia were planed. An epidural catheter was inserted at T12-L1. Anesthesia was induced with propofol 100 mg, fentanyl 100 microg and vecuronium 8 mg under 100% oxygen inhalation. General anesthesia was maintained with sevoflurane while epidural anesthesia was achieved using 0.375% ropivacaine 6 ml. During the operation, blood pressure was 90-110/70-80 mmHg, with SaO2, 100% and heart rate, 70-80 beats x min(-1). The content of tumor was suctioned for 30 minutes. Surgery was successfully finished without any other incidence. After extubation, her ECG changed to atrial fibrillation from normal sinus rhythm and showed ST-T depression. And then her systolic blood pressure became 80 mmHg or below, but we found continued diuresis at about 10 ml x kg(-1) x hr(-1) for over 2 hr. The total of 7 unit vasopressin was intermittently given for vasoconstriction and antidiuresis. Her hemodynamic was immediately restored, and ECG turned to normal ST-T. The patient had uneventful postoperative recovery.

  10. [Clinical and histopathological results after the neo-adjuvant treatment of advanced rectal tumors].

    PubMed

    Varga, László; Baradnay, Gellért; Hohn, József; Simonka, Zsolt; Hideghéthy, Katalin; Maráz, Anikó; Nikolényi, Alíz; Veréb, Blanka; Tiszlavicz, László; Németh, István; Mán, Eszter; Lázár, György

    2010-06-01

    The role of the surgical intervention is decisive in treating colorectal tumors. The neo-adjuvant radio-chemotherapy has improved the efficacy of the treatment of advanced rectum tumors. In order to decrease the size and stage of advanced rectal carcinoma and to increase the rate of resecability, we introduced neoadjuvant radio-chemotherapy. We carried out neo-adjuvant and surgical treatment in case of 67 patients with rectal adenocarcinoma (T 2-4 N 1-2 M 0 ) between June 1, 2005 and July 31, 2008. The average age of the patients was 61.2 years, the division according to sex was 44 males/23 females. Regarding the local stage of the rectal process or the proximity to the sphincter, we applied radio-chemotherapy (radiotherapy 25 times altogether 45 Gy and on the first and last week for 5-5 days they received 350 mg/m 2 /day 5-FU and 20 mg/m 2 /day leucovorin chemotherapy, recently complemented with 3 x 1.8 Gy advanced boost radiation aiming at the macroscopic tumor site with security zone). Patients underwent surgery 8 weeks on average after restaging examinations. Thirty-eight patients underwent anterior rectal resection with double stapler procedure; there were 18 abdominoperineal rectal extirpations, 7 Hartmann operations and 4 per annum excisions. Compared to the preoperative staging, the histological evaluation of the resected specimens showed total remission (pT 0 N 0 ) in 11% and partial remission in 43%. The morbidity necessitating reoperation was 5.9%, without mortality and suture insufficiency. The long-term neo-adjuvant oncological treatment led to down-staging of rectal tumors in most cases and increased the resecability and rate of resection operations.

  11. Percutaneous Microwave Ablation of Hepatocellular Carcinoma with a Gas-Cooled System: Initial Clinical Results with 107 Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ziemlewicz, Timothy J.; Hinshaw, J. Louis; Lubner, Meghan G.; Brace, Christopher L.; Alexander, Marci L.; Agarwal, Parul; Lee, Fred T.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To retrospectively review the results of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treatment with a high-power, gas-cooled, multiantenna-capable microwave device. Materials and Methods A total of 107 HCCs in 75 patients (65 men) with a mean age of 61 years (range, 44–82 y) were treated via percutaneous approach. Combination microwave ablation and transarterial chemoembolization was performed for 22 tumors in 19 patients with tumors larger than 4 cm (n = 10), tumors larger than 3 cm with ill-defined margins (n = 7), or lesions not identified with ultrasonography (n = 5). Mean tumor size was 2.1 cm (range, 0.5–4.2 cm), with median follow-up of 14 months, for ablation alone; compared with 3.7 cm (range, 1.0–7.0 cm) and 12 months, respectively, for combination therapy. All procedures were performed with a single microwave system (Certus 140) with one to three 17-gauge antennas. Results Mean ablation time was 5.3 minutes (range, 1–11.5 min). All treatments were considered technically successful in a single session. Primary technique effectiveness rates were 91.6% (98 of 107) overall, 93.7% (89 of 95) for tumors 4 cm or smaller, and 75.0% (nine of 12) for tumors larger than 4 cm; and 91.8% (78 of 85) for ablation alone and 90.9% (20 of 22) for combination therapy. There was no major complication or procedure-related mortality. The overall survival rate was 76.0% at a median 14-month clinical follow-up, with most deaths related to end-stage liver disease (n = 11) or multifocal HCC (n = 5). Conclusions Treating HCC with a gas-cooled, multiantenna-capable microwave ablation device is safe, with promising treatment effectiveness. PMID:25446425

  12. ‘Extra-operatve’ MRI (eoMRI) for Brain Tumor Surgery – Initial Results at a Single Institution

    PubMed Central

    Abd-El-Barr, Muhammad M.; Santos, Seth M.; Aglio, Linda S.; Young, Geoffrey S.; Mukundan, Srinivasan; Golby, Alexandra J.; Gormley, William B.; Dunn, Ian F.

    2015-01-01

    Background There is accumulating evidence that extent of resection (EOR) in intrinsic brain tumor surgery prolongs overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). One of the strategies to increase EOR is the use of intraoperative MRI (ioMRI). However, considerable infrastructure investment is needed to establish and maintain a sophisticated ioMRI. We report the preliminary results of an extra-operative (eoMRI) protocol, with a focus on safety, feasibility and EOR in intrinsic brain tumor surgery. Methods Ten patients underwent an eoMRI protocol consisting of surgical resection in a conventional operating room followed by an immediate MRI in a clinical MRI scanner while the patient was still under anesthesia. If MRI suggested residual safely resectable tumor, the patient was returned to the operating room. Retrospective volumetric analysis was undertaken to investigate the percentage of tumor resected after first resection and if applicable, after further resection. Results 6 out of 10 (60%) patients were felt to require no further resection after eoMRI. The EOR in these patients was 97.8±1.8%. In the 4 patients who underwent further resection, the EOR during the original surgery was 88.5±9.5% (p =0.04). There was an average of 10.1 % more tumor removed between the first and second surgery. In 3/4 (75%) of patients who returned for further resection, gross total resection of was achieved. Conclusion An eoMRI protocol appears to be a safe and practical method to ensure maximum safe resections in patients with brain tumors and can be performed readily in all centers with MRI capability. PMID:25700968

  13. ADAM12 redistributes and activates MMP-14, resulting in gelatin degradation, reduced apoptosis and increased tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Albrechtsen, Reidar; Kveiborg, Marie; Stautz, Dorte; Vikeså, Jonas; Noer, Julie B; Kotzsh, Alexander; Nielsen, Finn Cilius; Wewer, Ulla M; Fröhlich, Camilla

    2013-10-15

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), in particular MMP-2, MMP-9 and MMP-14, play a key role in various aspects of cancer pathology. Likewise, ADAMs (a disintegrin and metalloproteinases), including ADAM12, are upregulated in malignant tumors and contribute to the pathology of cancers. Here, we show that there is a positive correlation between MMP-14 and ADAM12 expression in human breast cancer. We demonstrated that in 293-VnR and human breast cancer cells expressing ADAM12 at the cell surface, endogenous MMP-14 was recruited to the cell surface, resulting in its activation. Subsequent to this activation, gelatin degradation was stimulated and tumor cell apoptosis was decreased, with reduced expression of the pro-apoptotic proteins BCL2L11 and BIK. The effect on gelatin degradation was abrogated by inhibition of the MMP-14 activity and appeared to be dependent on cell surface αVβ3 integrin localization, but neither the catalytic activity of ADAM12 nor the cytoplasmic tail of ADAM12 were required. The significance of ADAM12-induced activation of MMP-14 was underscored by a reduction in MMP-14-mediated gelatin degradation and abolition of apoptosis-protective effects by specific monoclonal antibodies against ADAM12. Furthermore, orthotopic implantation of ADAM12-expressing MCF7 cells in nude mice produced tumors with increased levels of activated MMP-14 and confirmed that ADAM12 protects tumor cells against apoptosis, leading to increased tumor progression. In conclusion, our data suggest that a ternary protein complex composed of ADAM12, αVβ3 integrin and MMP-14 at the tumor cell surface regulates the function of MMP-14. This interaction might point to a novel concept for the development of MMP-14-targeting drugs in treating cancer.

  14. Systemic irradiation for selected stage IV and recurrent pediatric solid tumors: method, toxicity, and preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Wharam, M.D.; Kaizer, H.; Leventhal, B.G.; Munoz, L.; Tutschka, P.J.; Santos, G.W.; Elfenbein, G.J.; Order, S.E.

    1980-02-01

    Eight patients with advanced pediatric solid tumors received either sequential upper and lower half-body irradiation (HBI) (7.5 rad/min to 500 rad total) or total body irradiation (TBI) (7.5 rad/min to 800 rad total) as part of two multimodality treatment regimens. All patients received combination chemotherapy; drugs were determined by the tumor type. The TBI regimen was selected for two patients who had progression of disease with conventional chemotherapy and for two patients with stage IV neuroblastoma. This intensive regimen consisted of bone marrow harvesting, followed by local radiation to gross disease, marrow-ablative chemotherapy, TBI, and re-infusion of the cryopreserved autologous marrow. Significant acute toxicity was followed by hematologic reconstitution in each patient within seven weeks. At this writing, two patients survived, one of whom is disease free two and one half years without maintenance chemotherapy. A less intensive, outpatient regimen was selected for four patients; three had a complete or good partial response to chemotherapy. The fourth patient had tumor-involved bone marrow not responsive to chemotherapy and was therefore ineligible for marrow cryopreservation and TBI. Each of these four patients received HBI after chemotherapy and local radiation to the primary and/or metastatic sites. Acute toxicity was limited to nausea and vomiting. Significant leukopenia and thrombocytopenia occurred in three patients. All four patients were alive 10 to 26 months post HBI. This pilot study demonstrates that chemotherapy can be integrated with local fractionated radiation, and systemic radiation given as HBI or TBI with acceptable toxicity; sufficient bone marrow stem cells can be harvested after conventional chemotherapy and then cryopreserved to permit hematologic reconstitution of the patient who receives marrow ablative therapy.

  15. Technique and preliminary results of interstitial irradiation for primary brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Salcman, M; Sewchand, W; Amin, P P; Bellis, E H

    1986-01-01

    We have conducted a phase-I clinical trial of CT-guided stereotactic implantation of Ir192 in the treatment of malignant astrocytomas. During the past year, 16 patients have been implanted with two to four catheters in the residual enhancing portion of their tumor. These patients represent 50% of our total experience with the CT compatible Leksell frame. Each catheter contains three to six high intensity (2.0 to 2.5 mg Ra equivalent) seeds with 0.5 cm separation between the sources. The total activity of Ir192 per implant has been 30-65 mg radium equivalent. In the 16 patients, 49 catheters have been placed, an average of three targets calculated per patient and no targets have been missed. The radiation exposure to personnel has been surveyed in detail and drops off to less than 2 mr/h six feet from the patient when our custom-built radiation shield is employed. We have reserved permanent implantation of I125 for patients with tumors in unusual locations (e.g. pineal) or for individuals with slowly growing non-gliomatous lesions (i.e. meningioma). The tumor volumes have ranged from 12-120 cm3. Unique aspects of our implant procedure include the use of a Leksell frame already adapted to the GE-8800 scanner, the use of pre- and post-implant computerized treatment planning programs to determine the dose distribution profiles and the use of adjustable metal collars crimped to the outer catheters to provide ease of insertion, uniform pre-implant catheter length, and protection against source migration. Two of our patients have suffered from subacute radiation reactions, primarily due to delayed cerebral edema and both of these cases have largely resolved.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. SU-E-J-94: Positioning Errors Resulting From Using Bony Anatomy Alignment for Treating SBRT Lung Tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Frame, C; Ding, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantify patient setups errors based on bony anatomy registration rather than 3D tumor alignment for SBRT lung treatments. Method: A retrospective study was performed for patients treated with lung SBRT and imaged with kV cone beam computed tomography (kV-CBCT) image-guidance. Daily CBCT images were registered to treatment planning CTs based on bony anatomy alignment and then inter-fraction tumor movement was evaluated by comparing shift in the tumor center in the medial-lateral, anterior-posterior, and superior-inferior directions. The PTV V100% was evaluated for each patient based on the average daily tumor displacement to assess the impact of the positioning error on the target coverage when the registrations were based on bony anatomy. Of the 35 patients studied, 15 were free-breathing treatments, 10 used abdominal compression with a stereotactic body frame, and the remaining 10 were performed with BodyFIX vacuum bags. Results: For free-breathing treatments, the range of tumor displacement error is between 1–6 mm in the medial-lateral, 1–13 mm in the anterior-posterior, and 1–7 mm in the superior-inferior directions. These positioning errors lead to 6–22% underdose coverage for PTV - V100% . Patients treated with abdominal compression immobilization showed positional errors of 0–4mm mediallaterally, 0–3mm anterior-posteriorly, and 0–2 mm inferior-superiorly with PTV - V100% underdose ranging between 6–17%. For patients immobilized with the vacuum bags, the positional errors were found to be 0–1 mm medial-laterally, 0–1mm anterior-posteriorly, and 0–2 mm inferior-superiorly with PTV - V100% under dose ranging between 5–6% only. Conclusion: It is necessary to align the tumor target by using 3D image guidance to ensure adequate tumor coverage before performing SBRT lung treatments. The BodyFIX vacuum bag immobilization method has the least positioning errors among the three methods studied when bony anatomy is used for

  17. Health-Related Quality of Life in Brain Tumor Patients Treated with Surgery: Preliminary Result of a Single Institution

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang-Wook; Joo, Jin-Deok; Kim, Young-Hoon; Han, Jung Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background Alongside the extent of removal and patients’ survival in the management of brain tumors, health-related quality of life (HRQOL) has become an important consideration. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the change of HRQOL in brain tumor patients before and after surgery and to assess the associated factors that contribute to the change of HRQOL. Methods A total of 258 patients who underwent surgical treatment were enrolled in this study. The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire 30 (EORTC QLQ-C30) and the 20-item EORTC QLQ-Brain Neoplasm (QLQ-BN20) were used to assess HRQOL. Patients were asked to fill out the questionnaires before and 3-6 months after surgery. Results Global QOL (p<0.001) and emotional function (p<0.018) were significantly improved after surgery. Physical function (p=0.015) was significantly aggravated. Among the symptoms, headache, pain and nausea and vomiting were significantly decreased (p<0.01, p=0.041, p<0.001, respectively), while dyspnea, communication deficit and weakness of the legs were increased (p=0.005, p=0.040, and p=0.014, respectively). Preoperative neurologic deficit (p=0.019) and tumor diameter (p=0.016) were significantly related to the patients who showed aggravation of global QOL after brain tumor surgery. In the aggravated global QOL group, common complaints and concerns included role function, appetite loss, financial difficulty and future uncertainty. Conclusion In brain tumor patients, HRQOL has improved after surgery. Role function, appetite loss, financial difficulty and future uncertainty were important factors for HRQOL in brain tumor patients treated with surgery. Although there is National Health Insurance and Medical Aid program in Korea, financial difficulty and future uncertainty are much more important in influencing QOL than previously thought. The results of this short-term follow up preliminary study suggest that several factors were

  18. [Disparity between cytohistopathological results of diagnostic specimens and the resected tumor piece in bronchopulmonary carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Varilla, J M; Benítez Moya, J M; Baena Luna, M; Loscertales Abril, J; García Díaz, F; Vázquez Valiente, M; Villa Arellano, F; Márquez Varela, F; Martínez Puentes, V

    1996-04-01

    In 88 patients diagnosed and intervened of lung carcinoma, we evaluate the security of the Diagnostic method--cytology: sputum, brushed bronchial, bronchial aspiration, puncture pulmonary aspiration and histology of the bronchial biopsy--when we correlate them with the histology of the dried up tumour. From the 88 patient, in 11 (12.5%) there was a disparity between some specimen and the piece tumour. If we analyze the specimen: the bronchial biopsy, was different in 3 cases, (4.8%); the brushed and the bronchial biopsy, aspiration in 2, (2.7% and 2.3% respectively); the puncture pulmonary aspiration in 6, (26%) and the cytology of sputum in 2 cases, (2.4%). In 8 patients (9%), the outputs of some specimen were not conclusive, if we remove these we find that: the bronchial biopsy was not conclusive in 2 cases, (3.2%), the brushed bronchial in 5, (6.8%); the bronchial aspiration in 9 (10.2%) and the cytology of sputum in 2 cases, (2.4%). With this data we could infer that sometimes the positive outputs of the specimen have no correlation with the histology of the tumour dried up. This disparity has not been observed in the oat-cells. Therefore when we send the specimens to the pathologist, it would always be advisable for him to inform us if there are any different cells belonging to the principal group of the tumor.

  19. Inhibition of EGFR-AKT Axis Results in the Suppression of Ovarian Tumors In Vitro and in Preclinical Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Parul; Srivastava, Sanjay K.

    2012-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of cancer related deaths in women. Genetic alterations including overexpression of EGFR play a crucial role in ovarian carcinogenesis. Here we evaluated the effect of phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC) in ovarian tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. Oral administration of 12 µmol PEITC resulted in drastically suppressing ovarian tumor growth in a preclinical mouse model. Our in vitro studies demonstrated that PEITC suppress the growth of SKOV-3, OVCAR-3 and TOV-21G human ovarian cancer cells by inducing apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner. Growth inhibitory effects of PEITC were mediated by inhibition of EGFR and AKT, which are known to be overexpressed in ovarian tumors. PEITC treatment caused significant down regulation of constitutive protein levels as well as phosphorylation of EGFR at Tyr1068 in various ovarian cancer cells. In addition, PEITC treatment drastically reduced the phosphorylation of AKT which is downstream to EGFR and disrupted mTOR signaling. PEITC treatment also inhibited the kinase activity of AKT as observed by the down regulation of p-GSK in OVCAR-3 and TOV-21G cells. AKT overexpression or TGF treatment blocked PEITC induced apoptosis in ovarian cancer cells. These results suggest that PEITC targets EGFR/AKT pathway in our model. In conclusion, our study suggests that PEITC could be used alone or in combination with other therapeutic agents to treat ovarian cancer. PMID:22952709

  20. Early Significant Tumor Volume Reduction After Radiosurgery in Brain Metastases From Renal Cell Carcinoma Results in Long-Term Survival

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Wook Ha; Kim, Dong Gyu; Han, Jung Ho; Paek, Sun Ha; Chung, Hyun-Tai; Park, Chul-Kee; Kim, Chae-Yong; Kim, Yong Hwy; Kim, Jin Wook; Jung, Hee-Won

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate survival of patients with brain metastasis from renal cell carcinoma (RCC) after radiosurgery. Patients and Methods: Between 1998 and 2010, 46 patients were treated with radiosurgery, and the total number of lesions was 99. The mean age was 58.9 years (range, 33-78 years). Twenty-six patients (56.5%) had a single brain metastasis. The mean tumor volume was 3.0 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.01-35.1 cm{sup 3}), and the mean marginal dose prescribed was 20.8 Gy (range, 12-25 Gy) at the 50% isodose line. A patient was classified into the good-response group when the sum of the volume of the brain metastases decreased to less than 75% of the original volume at a 1-month follow-up evaluation using MRI. Results: As of December 28, 2010, 39 patients (84.8%) had died, and 7 (15.2%) survived. The overall median survival time was 10.0 {+-} 0.4 months (95% confidence interval, 9.1-10.8). After treatment, local tumor control was achieved in 72 (84.7%) of the 85 tumors assessed using MRI after radiosurgery. The good-response group survived significantly longer than the poor-response group (median survival times of 18.0 and 9.0 months, respectively; p = 0.025). In a multivariate analysis, classification in the good-response group was the only independent prognostic factor for longer survival (p = 0.037; hazard ratio = 0.447; 95% confidence interval, 0.209-0.953). Conclusions: Radiosurgery seems to be an effective treatment modality for patients with brain metastases from RCC. The early significant tumor volume reduction observed after radiosurgery seems to result in long-term survival in RCC patients with brain metastases.

  1. IL-4 inhibits VLA-4 expression on Tc1 cells resulting in poor tumor infiltration and reduced therapy benefit.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Kotaro; Pardee, Angela D; Okada, Hideho; Storkus, Walter J

    2008-10-01

    We and others have previously demonstrated that IL-4-dependent Tc2 are inferior to Tc1-effector CD8+ T cells in regulating tumor progression in vivo. This functional disparity relates, in part, to the comparatively poor ability of Tc2 to migrate into diseased tissues. We now show that IL-4 treatment of committed Tc1 cells promotes the selective loss in the expression of very-late antigen (VLA)-4, without impacting the Tc1 cytokine production profile, cytotoxic activity, or expression of alternate cell surface markers. Down-regulation of VLA-4 expression on Tc1 cells was unique to treatment with IL-4 (i.e. Tc1IL-4) and did not occur in the presence of the Type-2 cytokine IL-13 or the regulatory cytokines IL-10 or TGF-beta. Notably, the inhibitory effects of IL-4 on Tc1 expression of VLA-4 could be blocked by the presence of IL-12, but not IFN-gamma. Predictably, Tc1IL-4 (but not Tc1 control) cells adhere poorly to plate-bound VCAM-1-Fc fusion protein and fail to be co-stimulated by VCAM-1 in vitro. They were also markedly impaired in their ability to traffic into intracranial melanoma lesions after adoptive transfer, yielding inferior therapeutic benefit to tumor-bearing mice. These results suggest a novel suppressive mechanism for IL-4 that limits Tc1 efficacy via preventing their recruitment into tumors.

  2. IL-4 inhibits VLA-4 expression on Tc1 cells resulting in poor tumor infiltration and reduced therapy benefit

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Kotaro; Pardee, Angela D.; Okada, Hideho; Storkus, Walter J.

    2009-01-01

    We and others have previously demonstrated that IL-4-dependent Tc2 are inferior to Tc1 effector CD8+ T cells in regulating tumor progression in vivo. This functional disparity relates, in part, to the comparatively poor ability of Tc2 to migrate into diseased tissues. We now show that IL-4 treatment of committed Tc1 cells promotes the selective loss in expression of Very-Late Antigen (VLA)-4, without impacting the Tc1 cytokine production profile, cytotoxic activity, or expression of alternate cell surface markers. Down-regulation of VLA-4 expression on Tc1 cells was unique to treatment with IL-4 (i.e. Tc1IL-4), and did not occur in the presence of the Type 2 cytokine IL-13 or the regulatory cytokines IL-10 or TGF-β. Notably, the inhibitory effects of IL-4 on Tc1 expression of VLA-4 could be blocked by the presence of IL-12, but not IFN-γ. Predictably, Tc1IL-4 (but not Tc1 control) cells adhere poorly to plate-bound VCAM-1-Fc fusion protein and fail to be co-stimulated by VCAM-1 in vitro. They were also markedly impaired in their ability to traffic into intracranial melanoma lesions after adoptive transfer, yielding inferior therapeutic benefit to tumor-bearing mice. These results suggest a novel suppressive mechanism for IL-4 that limits Tc1 efficacy via preventing their recruitment into tumors. (200 words) PMID:18958887

  3. Breast ultrasound tomography versus magnetic resonance imaging for clinical display of anatomy and tumor rendering: Preliminary results

    PubMed Central

    Ranger, Bryan; Littrup, Peter J.; Duric, Nebojsa; Chandiwala-Mody, Priti; Li, Cuiping; Schmidt, Steven; Lupinacci, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the clinical display thresholds of an ultrasound tomography (UST) prototype relative to magnetic resonance (MR) for comparable visualization of breast anatomy and tumor rendering. Materials and Methods The study was compliant with HIPAA, approved by the IRB, and performed after obtaining informed consent. Thirty-six women were imaged with MR and our UST prototype. The UST scan generated reflection, sound speed and attenuation images. The reflection images were fused with the components of sound speed and attenuation images that achieved thresholds to represent parenchyma and/or solid masses using an image arithmetic process. Qualitative and quantitative comparisons of MR and UST clinical images were used to identify anatomical similarities, and optimized thresholds for tumor shapes and volumes. Results Thresholding techniques generated UST images comparable to MR for visualizing fibrous stroma, parenchyma, fatty tissues, and tumors, of which 25 were cancer and 11 benign. Optimized sound speed thresholds of 1.46±0.1 km/s and 1.52±0.03 km/s were identified to best represent the extent of fibroglandular tissue and solid masses, respectively. An arithmetic combination of attenuation images using the threshold of 0.16±0.04 dB/cm further characterized benign from malignant masses. No significant difference in tumor volume was noted between benign or malignant masses by UST or MR (p>0.1) using these universal thresholds. Conclusion UST demonstrated the ability to image and render breast tissues in a manner comparable to MR. Universal UST threshold values appear feasible for rendering of the size and distribution of benign and malignant tissues without intravenous contrast. PMID:22194502

  4. Results in the study of virus--tumor relationships obtained in the "Stefan S. Nicolau" Institute of Virology.

    PubMed

    Nastac, E

    1979-01-01

    The results of over 200 scientific papers in the field of in vivo and in vitro virus--tumor relationships, worked out in the "Stefan S. Nicolau" Institute of Virology during a period of over 25 years, are very briefly reviewed. Stress is laid on the original theoretical and practical contributions of the institute to the knowledge of viral carcinogenesis in animals and humans. Some personal viewpoints in the interpretation of results are presented and new research prospects in this field--which represents a traditional concern of the institute--are lutlined.

  5. Radiofrequency ablation of renal tumors with an expandable multitined electrode: results, complications, and pilot evaluation of cooled pyeloperfusion for collecting system protection.

    PubMed

    Rouvière, Olivier; Badet, Lionel; Murat, François Joseph; Maréchal, Jean Marie; Colombel, Marc; Martin, Xavier; Lyonnet, Denis; Gelet, Albert

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the results of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of renal tumors with an impedance-based system using an expandable multitined electrode. Twenty-two patients (30 tumors) were treated with RFA over a 7-year period, percutaneously (16 tumors) or intraoperatively (14 tumors). Follow-up imaging was performed at 1-3, 6, and 12 months and yearly thereafter. Twenty-seven of 30 tumors (19/22 patients) showed no residual tumor on the first imaging control. Two residual tumors were successfully ablated by a second RFA procedure. Our mean follow-up period was 35 months (range, 3-84 months). Two tumors that had been completely ablated based on imaging criteria recurred 11 and 48 months after RFA. One was treated by partial nephrectomy. The other one was not treated because the patient developed bone metastases. One patient had nephrectomy because of an RFA-induced ureteropelvic junction stricture. Nine patients (11 sessions) had a pyeloperfusion of cooled saline during RFA. None developed symptomatic complications, even though in three patients the ablation zone extended to the closest calyx (3-5 mm from the tumor). We conclude that RFA of renal tumors is promising, but serious complications to the collecting system must be taken into consideration. Prophylactic per-procedural cooling of the collecting system is feasible but needs further assessment.

  6. Radiofrequency Ablation of Renal Tumors with an Expandable Multitined Electrode: Results, Complications, and Pilot Evaluation of Cooled Pyeloperfusion for Collecting System Protection

    SciTech Connect

    Rouviere, Olivier Badet, Lionel; Murat, Francois Joseph; Marechal, Jean Marie; Colombel, Marc; Martin, Xavier; Lyonnet, Denis; Gelet, Albert

    2008-05-15

    The objective of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the results of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of renal tumors with an impedance-based system using an expandable multitined electrode. Twenty-two patients (30 tumors) were treated with RFA over a 7-year period, percutaneously (16 tumors) or intraoperatively (14 tumors). Follow-up imaging was performed at 1-3, 6, and 12 months and yearly thereafter. Twenty-seven of 30 tumors (19/22 patients) showed no residual tumor on the first imaging control. Two residual tumors were successfully ablated by a second RFA procedure. Our mean follow-up period was 35 months (range, 3-84 months). Two tumors that had been completely ablated based on imaging criteria recurred 11 and 48 months after RFA. One was treated by partial nephrectomy. The other one was not treated because the patient developed bone metastases. One patient had nephrectomy because of an RFA-induced ureteropelvic junction stricture. Nine patients (11 sessions) had a pyeloperfusion of cooled saline during RFA. None developed symptomatic complications, even though in three patients the ablation zone extended to the closest calyx (3-5 mm from the tumor). We conclude that RFA of renal tumors is promising, but serious complications to the collecting system must be taken into consideration. Prophylactic per-procedural cooling of the collecting system is feasible but needs further assessment.

  7. Primary mesenchymal tumors of the pancreas in a single center over 15 years

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongkai; Yu, Shuangni; Wang, Wenze; Cheng, Yin; Xiao, Yu; Lu, Zhaohui; Chen, Jie

    2016-01-01

    In total, 95% of primary tumors in the pancreas are epithelial tumors; primary mesenchymal tumors at this site are extremely rare. At present, only one comprehensive study about these rare tumors has been performed. Another retrospective analysis of these rare tumors is performed in the present study, which, to the best of our knowledge, is the first to be performed in China. In the present study, 10 patients that underwent resection for primary mesenchymal tumors of the pancreas were identified in a 15-year period at the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, which accounted for 0.51% of the total surgically resected primary tumors of the pancreas at this hospital. Among the 10 patients, 7 patients (70%) were diagnosed with benign/borderline tumors, and the remaining 3 patients (30%) were diagnosed with malignant tumors. It was a unique finding of the present study that the preoperative diagnosis was frequently a misdiagnosis, in terms of the specific pathological diagnosis. Therefore, although primary mesenchymal tumors of the pancreas are extremely rare, they should be considered in order to make the correct preoperative diagnosis. Contrarily to a previous study, in the present study, the most common benign tumor was not desmoid tumor, but solitary fibrous tumors; the most frequent primary sarcoma was not undifferentiated/unclassified sarcoma either. In conclusion, the present study aids the understanding of these rare tumors; however, primary mesenchymal tumors of the pancreas require additional exploration in the future. PMID:27895766

  8. KRAS mutation leads to decreased expression of regulator of calcineurin 2, resulting in tumor proliferation in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Niitsu, H; Hinoi, T; Kawaguchi, Y; Sentani, K; Yuge, R; Kitadai, Y; Sotomaru, Y; Adachi, T; Saito, Y; Miguchi, M; Kochi, M; Sada, H; Shimomura, M; Oue, N; Yasui, W; Ohdan, H

    2016-01-01

    KRAS mutations occur in 30–40% of all cases of human colorectal cancer (CRC). However, to date, specific therapeutic agents against KRAS-mutated CRC have not been developed. We previously described the generation of mouse models of colon cancer with and without Kras mutations (CDX2P-G22Cre;Apcflox/flox; LSL-KrasG12D and CDX2P-G22Cre;Apcflox/flox mice, respectively). Here, the two mouse models were compared to identify candidate genes, which may represent novel therapeutic targets or predictive biomarkers. Differentially expressed genes in tumors from the two mouse models were identified using microarray analysis, and their expression was compared by quantitative reverse transcription–PCR (qRT–PCR) and immunohistochemical analyses in mouse tumors and surgical specimens of human CRC, with or without KRAS mutations, respectively. Furthermore, the functions of candidate genes were studied using human CRC cell lines. Microarray analysis of 34 000 transcripts resulted in the identification of 19 candidate genes. qRT–PCR analysis data showed that four of these candidate genes (Clps, Irx5, Bex1 and Rcan2) exhibited decreased expression in the Kras-mutated mouse model. The expression of the regulator of calcineurin 2 (RCAN2) was also observed to be lower in KRAS-mutated human CRC. Moreover, inhibitory function for cancer cell proliferation dependent on calcineurin was indicated with overexpression and short hairpin RNA knockdown of RCAN2 in human CRC cell lines. KRAS mutations in CRC lead to a decrease in RCAN2 expression, resulting in tumor proliferation due to derepression of calcineurin–nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) signaling. Our findings suggest that calcineurin–NFAT signal may represent a novel molecular target for the treatment of KRAS-mutated CRC. PMID:27526107

  9. Targeting breast cancer stem cells by dendritic cell vaccination in humanized mice with breast tumor: preliminary results

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Phuc Van; Le, Hanh Thi; Vu, Binh Thanh; Pham, Viet Quoc; Le, Phong Minh; Phan, Nhan Lu-Chinh; Trinh, Ngu Van; Nguyen, Huyen Thi-Lam; Nguyen, Sinh Truong; Nguyen, Toan Linh; Phan, Ngoc Kim

    2016-01-01

    Background Breast cancer (BC) is one of the leading cancers in women. Recent progress has enabled BC to be cured with high efficiency. However, late detection or metastatic disease often renders the disease untreatable. Additionally, relapse is the main cause of death in BC patients. Breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) are considered to cause the development of BC and are thought to be responsible for metastasis and relapse. This study aimed to target BCSCs using dendritic cells (DCs) to treat tumor-bearing humanized mice models. Materials and methods NOD/SCID mice were used to produce the humanized mice by transplantation of human hematopoietic stem cells. Human BCSCs were injected into the mammary fat pad to produce BC humanized mice. Both hematopoietic stem cells and DCs were isolated from the human umbilical cord blood, and immature DCs were produced from cultured mononuclear cells. DCs were matured by BCSC-derived antigen incubation for 48 hours. Mature DCs were vaccinated to BC humanized mice with a dose of 106 cells/mice, and the survival percentage was monitored in both treated and untreated groups. Results The results showed that DC vaccination could target BCSCs and reduce the tumor size and prolong survival. Conclusion These results suggested that targeting BCSCs with DCs is a promising therapy for BC. PMID:27499638

  10. Multidisciplinary Oncoplastic Approach Reduces Infection in Chest Wall Resection and Reconstruction for Malignant Chest Wall Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Malahias, Marco N.; Balasubramanian, Balapathiran; Djearaman, Madava G.; Naidu, Babu; Grainger, Melvin F.; Kalkat, Maninder

    2016-01-01

    Background: Management of complex thoracic defects post tumor extipiration is challenging because of the nature of pathology, the radical approach, and the insertion of prosthetic material required for biomechanical stability. Wound complications pose a significant problem that can have detrimental effect on patient outcome. The authors outline an institutional experience of a multidisciplinary thoracic oncoplastic approach to improve outcomes. Methods: Prospectively collected data from 71 consecutive patients treated with chest wall resection and reconstruction were analyzed (2009–2015). The demographic data, comorbidities, operative details, and outcomes with special focus on wound infection were recorded. All patients were managed in a multidisciplinary approach to optimize perioperative surgical planning. Results: Pathology included sarcoma (78%), locally advanced breast cancer (15%), and desmoids (6%), with age ranging from 17 to 82 years (median, 42 years) and preponderance of female patients (n = 44). Chest wall defects were located anterior and anterolateral (77.5%), posterior (8.4%), and apical axillary (10%) with skeletal defect size ranging from 56 to 600 cm2 (mean, 154 cm2). Bony reconstruction was performed using polyprolene mesh, methyl methacrylate prosthesis, and titanium plates. Soft tissue reconstructions depended on size, location, and flap availability and were achieved using regional, distant, and free tissue flaps. The postoperative follow-up ranged from 5 to 70 months (median, 32 months). All flaps survived with good functional and aesthetic outcome, whereas 2 patients experienced surgical site infection (2.8%). Conclusions: Multidisciplinary thoracic oncoplastic maximizes outcome for patients with large resection of chest wall tumors with reduction in surgical site infection and wound complications particularly in association with rigid skeletal chest wall reconstruction. PMID:27536488

  11. Functional results of endoscopic laser surgery in advanced head and neck tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadick, Haneen; Baker-Schreyer, Antonio; Bergler, Wolfgang; Maurer, Joachim; Hoermann, Karl

    1998-01-01

    Functional results following lasersurgery of minor laryngeal carcinomas were very encouraging. The indication for lasersurgical intervention was then extended to larger carcinomas of the larynx and hypopharynx. The purpose of this study was to assess vocal function and swallowing ability after endoscopic lasersurgery and to compare the results with conventional surgical procedures. From January 1994 to December 1996, 72 patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx and hypopharynx were examined prospectively. The patients underwent endoscopic lasersurgery instead of laryngopharyngectomy. The voice quality was evaluated pre- and postoperatively by subjective assessment, registration of voice parameters and sonegraphic classification. The swallowing ability was judged according to individual scores. The necessity of tracheostomy and nasogastric tube were registered and the duration of hospitalization was documented. The results showed that laryngeal phonation and swallowing ability were significantly better 12 months after lasersurgery compared to the preoperative findings whereas the recurrence rate was similar or even better after conventional pharyngolaryngectomy. Lasersurgery as an alternative surgical procedure to laryngectomy enables patients to retain a sufficient voice function and swallowing ability.

  12. Experimental and clinical results of mTHPC (Foscan)-mediated photodynamic therapy for malignant brain tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostron, Herwig; Obwegeser, Alois; Jakober, Rosanna; Zimmermann, Andreas; Rueck, Angelika C.

    1998-05-01

    M-THPC, a second generation photosensitizer, has greater potential of phototoxicity than the first generation PS hematoporphyrinderivative because of greater light penetration depth into tissue and higher therapeutic index. The uptake, selectivity and kinetics of C-14 labeled mTHPC was investigated in a C6 glioma induced rat model. The highest amount was detected at 48 to 96 hours after intraperitoneal injection with a ratio of 150:1 of tumor to normal brain concentration (0.53 vs. 0.003 (mu) g/g tissue). A high selectivity was also confirmed by confocal laserscanning microscope in frozen sections of the human glioblastoma. Up to now 15 patients underwent mTHPC-mediated PDT presenting with primary (n equals 2), recurrent (n equals 8) glioblastoma multiform or recurrent metastatic disease of the brain (n equals 3) and of the scull base (n equals 2). After sensitization with 0.15 FoscanR mg/kg i.v. a gross tumor removal was performed on day 4 followed by intraoperative PDT by a KTP pumped dye laser or a diode laser emitting at 652 nm (light dose of 20 J/cm2). Patients with primary glioblastomas underwent additional radiation therapy with one progressing after 5 months, the other is surviving for 6 months, patients with recurrent glioblastomas demonstrated a median time to progression of 4 months and a median survival of 6 months, patients with metastasis faired better with only one progressing after 6 months the remaining 4 patients are alive demonstrating a complete response with a median survival time of 7 months. Our first clinical results of mTHPC mediated PDT in brain tumors demonstrate that the survival time of our patients are not superior as compared to the first generation sensitizer. Due to its superior photophysical properties however, mTHPC should be intensely investigated for its use in neurosurgery.

  13. Does Local Recurrence of Prostate Cancer After Radiation Therapy Occur at the Site of Primary Tumor? Results of a Longitudinal MRI and MRSI Study

    SciTech Connect

    Arrayeh, Elnasif; Westphalen, Antonio C.; Kurhanewicz, John; Roach, Mack; Jung, Adam J.; Carroll, Peter R.; Coakley, Fergus V.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To determine if local recurrence of prostate cancer after radiation therapy occurs at the same site as the primary tumor before treatment, using longitudinal magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and MR spectroscopic imaging to assess dominant tumor location. Methods and Materials: This retrospective study was HIPAA compliant and approved by our Committee on Human Research. We identified all patients in our institutional prostate cancer database (1996 onward) who underwent endorectal MR imaging and MR spectroscopic imaging before radiotherapy for biopsy-proven prostate cancer and again at least 2 years after radiotherapy (n = 124). Two radiologists recorded the presence, location, and size of unequivocal dominant tumor on pre- and postradiotherapy scans. Recurrent tumor was considered to be at the same location as the baseline tumor if at least 50% of the tumor location overlapped. Clinical and biopsy data were collected from all patients. Results: Nine patients had unequivocal dominant tumor on both pre- and postradiotherapy imaging, with mean pre- and postradiotherapy dominant tumor diameters of 1.8 cm (range, 1-2.2) and 1.9 cm (range, 1.4-2.6), respectively. The median follow-up interval was 7.3 years (range, 2.7-10.8). Dominant recurrent tumor was at the same location as dominant baseline tumor in 8 of 9 patients (89%). Conclusions: Local recurrence of prostate cancer after radiation usually occurs at the same site as the dominant primary tumor at baseline, suggesting supplementary focal therapy aimed at enhancing local tumor control would be a rational addition to management.

  14. Aberrant expression of the hematopoietic-restricted minor histocompatibility antigen LRH-1 on solid tumors results in efficient cytotoxic T cell-mediated lysis.

    PubMed

    Overes, Ingrid M; Levenga, T Henriëtte; Vos, Johanna C M; van Horssen-Zoetbrood, Agnes; van der Voort, Robbert; De Mulder, Pieter H; de Witte, Theo M; Dolstra, Harry

    2009-03-01

    CD8(+) T cells recognizing minor histocompatibility antigens (MiHA) on solid tumor cells may mediate effective graft-versus-tumor (GVT) reactivity after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT). Previously, we identified LRH-1 as a hematopoietic-restricted MiHA encoded by the P2X5 gene. Here, we report that LRH-1 is aberrantly expressed on solid tumor cells. P2X5 mRNA expression is demonstrated in a significant portion of solid tumor cell lines, including renal cell carcinoma (RCC), melanoma, colorectal carcinoma, brain cancer and breast cancer. Importantly, P2X5 gene expression was also detected in a subset of primary solid tumor specimens derived from RCC, brain cancer and breast cancer patients. Furthermore, P2X5 expressing solid tumor cells can be effectively targeted by LRH-1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes under inflammatory conditions. The expression of HLA-B7 and CD54 on tumor cells increases upon cytokine stimulation resulting in improved T cell activation as observed by higher levels of degranulation and enhanced tumor cell lysis. Overall, hematopoietic-restricted MiHA LRH-1 is aberrantly expressed on solid tumor cells and may be used as target in GVT-specific immunotherapy after SCT.

  15. Necrosis After Craniospinal Irradiation: Results From a Prospective Series of Children With Central Nervous System Embryonal Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Erin S.; Merchant, Thomas E.; Wu Shengjie; Xiong Xiaoping; Lukose, Renin; Wright, Karen D.; Qaddoumi, Ibrahim; Armstrong, Gregory T.; Broniscer, Alberto; Gajjar, Amar

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: Necrosis of the central nervous system (CNS) is a known complication of craniospinal irradiation (CSI) in children with medulloblastoma and similar tumors. We reviewed the incidence of necrosis in our prospective treatment series. Patients and Methods: Between 1996 and 2009, 236 children with medulloblastoma (n = 185) or other CNS embryonal tumors (n = 51) received postoperative CSI followed by dose-intense cyclophosphamide, vincristine, and cisplatin. Average risk cases (n = 148) received 23.4 Gy CSI, 36 Gy to the posterior fossa, and 55.8 Gy to the primary; after 2003, the treatment was 23.4 Gy CSI and 55.8 Gy to the primary. All high-risk cases (n = 88) received 36-39.6 Gy CSI and 55.8 Gy primary. The primary site clinical target volume margin was 2 cm (pre-2003) or 1 cm (post-2003). With competing risk of death by any cause, we determined the cumulative incidence of necrosis. Results: With a median follow-up of 52 months (range, 4-163 months), eight cases of necrosis were documented. One death was attributed. The median time to the imaging evidence was 4.8 months and to symptoms 6.0 months. The cumulative incidence at 5 years was 3.7% {+-} 1.3% (n = 236) for the entire cohort and 4.4% {+-} 1.5% (n = 196) for infratentorial tumor location. The mean relative volume of infratentorial brain receiving high-dose irradiation was significantly greater for patients with necrosis than for those without: {>=}50 Gy (92.12% {+-} 4.58% vs 72.89% {+-} 1.96%; P=.0337), {>=}52 Gy (88.95% {+-} 5.50% vs 69.16% {+-} 1.97%; P=.0275), and {>=}54 Gy (82.28% {+-} 7.06% vs 63.37% {+-} 1.96%; P=.0488), respectively. Conclusions: Necrosis in patients with CNS embryonal tumors is uncommon. When competing risks are considered, the incidence is 3.7% at 5 years. The volume of infratentorial brain receiving greater than 50, 52, and 54 Gy, respectively, is predictive for necrosis.

  16. A vaccine that co-targets tumor cells and cancer associated fibroblasts results in enhanced antitumor activity by inducing antigen spreading.

    PubMed

    Gottschalk, Stephen; Yu, Feng; Ji, Minjun; Kakarla, Sunitha; Song, Xiao-Tong

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) vaccines targeting only cancer cells have produced limited antitumor activity in most clinical studies. Targeting cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) in addition to cancer cells may enhance antitumor effects, since CAFs, the central component of the tumor stroma, directly support tumor growth and contribute to the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. To co-target CAFs and tumor cells we developed a new compound DC vaccine that encodes an A20-specific shRNA to enhance DC function, and targets fibroblast activation protein (FAP) expressed in CAFs and the tumor antigen tyrosine-related protein (TRP)2 (DC-shA20-FAP-TRP2). DC-shA20-FAP-TRP2 vaccination induced robust FAP- and TRP2-specific T-cell responses, resulting in greater antitumor activity in the B16 melanoma model in comparison to monovalent vaccines or a vaccine encoding antigens and a control shRNA. DC-shA20-FAP-TRP2 vaccination enhanced tumor infiltration of CD8-positive T cells, and induced antigen-spreading resulting in potent antitumor activity. Thus, co-targeting of tumor cells and CAFs results in the induction of broad-based tumor-specific T-cell responses and has the potential to improve current vaccine approaches for cancer.

  17. A Vaccine That Co-Targets Tumor Cells and Cancer Associated Fibroblasts Results in Enhanced Antitumor Activity by Inducing Antigen Spreading

    PubMed Central

    Gottschalk, Stephen; Yu, Feng; Ji, Minjun; Kakarla, Sunitha; Song, Xiao-Tong

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) vaccines targeting only cancer cells have produced limited antitumor activity in most clinical studies. Targeting cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) in addition to cancer cells may enhance antitumor effects, since CAFs, the central component of the tumor stroma, directly support tumor growth and contribute to the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. To co-target CAFs and tumor cells we developed a new compound DC vaccine that encodes an A20-specific shRNA to enhance DC function, and targets fibroblast activation protein (FAP) expressed in CAFs and the tumor antigen tyrosine-related protein (TRP)2 (DC-shA20-FAP-TRP2). DC-shA20-FAP-TRP2 vaccination induced robust FAP- and TRP2-specific T-cell responses, resulting in greater antitumor activity in the B16 melanoma model in comparison to monovalent vaccines or a vaccine encoding antigens and a control shRNA. DC-shA20-FAP-TRP2 vaccination enhanced tumor infiltration of CD8-positive T cells, and induced antigen-spreading resulting in potent antitumor activity. Thus, co-targeting of tumor cells and CAFs results in the induction of broad-based tumor-specific T-cell responses and has the potential to improve current vaccine approaches for cancer. PMID:24349329

  18. Detection of circulating prostate tumor cells: alternative spliced variant of PSM induced false-positive result.

    PubMed

    Hisatomi, Hisashi; Nagao, Kumi; Kawakita, Mutsuji; Matsuda, Tadashi; Hirata, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Shigeki; Nakamoto, Takaaki; Harasawa, Hiroshi; Kaneko, Noboru; Hikiji, Kazumasa; Tsukada, Yutaka

    2002-11-01

    RT-nested PCR has been introduced as a highly specific and sensitive assay method to detect the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSM) mRNA in peripheral blood. However, appreciable percentages of false-positive cases have been reported. Additionally, primer sets reported previously could not discriminate between PSM and PSM', an alternatively spliced variant, mRNA. These isoforms can be produced from a single gene. Switches in alternative splicing patterns are often controlled with strict cell-type or developmental-stage specificity. Therefore, it is most important to discriminate between PSM mRNA and PSM' mRNA. Using our highly specific primer sets, PSM mRNA was detected in 3 of 24 peripheral blood samples of normal male volunteers (12.5%) and was not detected in peripheral blood of 11 normal female volunteers. PSM' mRNA was detected in 5 of 24 peripheral blood samples of normal male volunteers (20.8%) and in 4 of 11 of normal female volunteers (36.4%). PSM' mRNA induced false-positive results, it is important for genetic diagnosis of prostate cancer to discriminate between PSM and PSM' using our primer sets with high specificity. The advances in the uniquely designed primer sets may allow researchers to detect a real PSM mRNA without PSM' mRNA.

  19. The treatment of giant cell tumors by curettage and filling with acrylic cement. Long-term functional results.

    PubMed

    Segura, J; Albareda, J; Bueno, A L; Nuez, A; Palanca, D; Seral, F

    1997-01-01

    Curettage and filling with acrylic cement in the treatment of para-articular giant cell tumor (GCT) has multiple advantages as compared to other methods; nonetheless, the possibility of progression in arthrosis is still a drawback. The literature does not report long-term functional results when this method was used. Four cases are presented with a mean long-term follow-up of 13.5 years (minimum 11, maximum 18). Clinical results, evaluated by the Enneking system (18), were excellent, and there were no radiological modifications, so that we believe that this is the method to choose for Campanacci stage I and II GCT (1), and in some stage III cases, as joint function is not compromised in time.

  20. Pediatric and adult malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors: an analysis of data from the surveillance, epidemiology, and end results program.

    PubMed

    Amirian, E Susan; Goodman, J Clay; New, Pamela; Scheurer, Michael E

    2014-02-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are rare soft tissue sarcomas that arise predominantly from Schwann cells. Despite the fact that MPNSTs have high local recurrence rates and are generally associated with poor prognosis, little is known about prognostic factors or effective clinical management for this tumor type. The purpose of this study was to describe the distributions of patient and tumor characteristics and to identify predictors of cause-specific survival among MPNST cases reported to SEER between 1973 and 2008. Patient and tumor characteristics were compared between pediatric and adult MPNST cases. Cox regression and tree-based survival analysis were used to examine factors associated with MPNST-related mortality separately among adults and children. A total of 1,315 MPNST cases were isolated from the 1973-2008 SEER dataset. Among pediatric cases, sex, race, and radiation therapy predicted MPNST survival, whereas among adults, tumor site, tumor grade, number of primary tumors, and tumor size were significant predictors. As tumor size at diagnosis/resection may be the only somewhat "modifiable" prognostic factor, future studies should aim to identify biological and social attributes associated with tumor size at diagnosis, separately among individuals with and without NF-1, in order to help identify earlier opportunities for clinical intervention.

  1. SIRT3 Is a Mitochondrial Tumor Suppressor and Genetic Loss Results in a Murine Model for ER/PR-Positive Mammary Tumors Connecting Metabolism and Carcinogenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    and determine if these targets are regulated by extracellular stimuli known to activate sirtuin function (e.g., resveratrol ). These targets will... resveratrol or overexpression of a MnSOD gene will prevent increases in ROS in MEFs and/or decrease the development of mammary tumors in Sirt3

  2. Disruption of protein kinase Ceta results in impairment of wound healing and enhancement of tumor formation in mouse skin carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Chida, Kazuhiro; Hara, Takeshi; Hirai, Takaaki; Konishi, Chieko; Nakamura, Kenji; Nakao, Kazuki; Aiba, Atsu; Katsuki, Motoya; Kuroki, Toshio

    2003-05-15

    We have generated a mouse strain lacking protein kinase C (PKC) eta to evaluate its significance in epithelial organization and tumor formation. The PKCeta-deficient mice exhibited increased susceptibility to tumor formation in two-stage skin carcinogenesis by single application of 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) for tumor initiation and repeated applications of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) for tumor promotion. The tumor formation was not enhanced by DMBA or TPA treatment alone, suggesting that PKCeta suppresses tumor promotion. Epidermal hyperplasia induced by topical TPA treatment was prolonged in the mutant mice. The enhanced tumor formation may be closely associated with the prolonged hyperplasia induced by topical TPA treatment. In the mutant mice, after inflicting injury by punch biopsy, wound healing on the dorsal skin, particularly reepithelialization, was significantly delayed and impaired in structure. Impairment of epithelial regeneration in wound healing indicates a possibility that PKCeta plays a role in maintenance of epithelial architecture. Homeostasis in epithelial tissues mediated by PKCeta is important for tumor formation in vivo. We propose that PKCeta is involved in tumor formation modulated by regulation of proliferation and remodeling of epithelial cells in vivo.

  3. Preclinical Evaluation of the Accuracy of HIFU Treatments Using a Tumor-Mimic Model. Results of Animal Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melodelima, D.; N'Djin, W. A.; Parmentier, H.; Rivoire, M.; Chapelon, J. Y.

    2009-04-01

    Presented in this paper is a tumor-mimic model that allows the evaluation at a preclinical stage of the targeting accuracy of HIFU treatments in the liver. The tumor-mimics were made by injecting a warm mixture of agarose, cellulose, and glycerol that polymerizes immediately in hepatic tissue and forms a 1 cm discrete lesion that is detectable by ultrasound imaging and gross pathology. Three studies were conducted: (i) in vitro experiments were conducted to study acoustical proprieties of the tumor-mimics, (ii) animal experiments were conducted in ten pigs to evaluate the tolerance of the tumor-mimics at mid-term (30 days), (iii) ultrasound-guided HIFU ablation has been performed in ten pigs with tumor-mimics to demonstrate that it is possible to treat a predetermined zone accurately. The attenuation of tumor-mimics was 0.39 dB.cm-1 at 1 MHz, the ultrasound propagation velocity was 1523 m.s-1, and the acoustic impedance was 1.8 MRayls. The pigs tolerated tumor-mimics and treatment well over the experimental period. Tumor-mimics were visible with high contrast on ultrasound images. In addition, it has been demonstrated by using the tumor-mimic as a reference target, that tissue destruction induced by HIFU and observed on gross pathology corresponded to the targeted area on the ultrasound images. The average difference between the predetermined location of the HIFU ablation and the actual coagulated area was 16%. These tumor-mimics are identifiable by ultrasound imaging, they do not modify the geometry of HIFU lesions and thus constitutes a viable mimic of tumors indicated for HIFU therapy.

  4. Estimation of Pulmonary Motion in Healthy Subjects and Patients with Intrathoracic Tumors Using 3D-Dynamic MRI: Initial Results

    PubMed Central

    Schoebinger, Max; Herth, Felix; Tuengerthal, Siegfried; Meinzer, Heinz-Peter; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    Objective To estimate a new technique for quantifying regional lung motion using 3D-MRI in healthy volunteers and to apply the technique in patients with intra- or extrapulmonary tumors. Materials and Methods Intraparenchymal lung motion during a whole breathing cycle was quantified in 30 healthy volunteers using 3D-dynamic MRI (FLASH [fast low angle shot] 3D, TRICKS [time-resolved interpolated contrast kinetics]). Qualitative and quantitative vector color maps and cumulative histograms were performed using an introduced semiautomatic algorithm. An analysis of lung motion was performed and correlated with an established 2D-MRI technique for verification. As a proof of concept, the technique was applied in five patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and 5 patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). Results The correlation between intraparenchymal lung motion of the basal lung parts and the 2D-MRI technique was significant (r = 0.89, p < 0.05). Also, the vector color maps quantitatively illustrated regional lung motion in all healthy volunteers. No differences were observed between both hemithoraces, which was verified by cumulative histograms. The patients with NSCLC showed a local lack of lung motion in the area of the tumor. In the patients with MPM, there was global diminished motion of the tumor bearing hemithorax, which improved siginificantly after chemotherapy (CHT) (assessed by the 2D- and 3D-techniques) (p < 0.01). Using global spirometry, an improvement could also be shown (vital capacity 2.9 ± 0.5 versus 3.4 L ± 0.6, FEV1 0.9 ± 0.2 versus 1.4 ± 0.2 L) after CHT, but this improvement was not significant. Conclusion A 3D-dynamic MRI is able to quantify intraparenchymal lung motion. Local and global parenchymal pathologies can be precisely located and might be a new tool used to quantify even slight changes in lung motion (e.g. in therapy monitoring, follow-up studies or even benign lung diseases). PMID:19885311

  5. Sulfatinib, a novel kinase inhibitor, in patients with advanced solid tumors: Results from a phase I study.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jian Ming; Wang, Yan; Chen, Yu Ling; Jia, Ru; Li, Jie; Gong, Ji Fang; Li, Jing; Qi, Chuan; Hua, Ye; Tan, Cui Rong; Wang, Jian; Li, Ke; Sai, Yang; Zhou, Feng; Ren, Yong Xin; Qing, Wei Guo; Jia, Hong; Su, Wei Guo; Shen, Lin

    2017-02-01

    Sulfatinib is a small molecule kinase inhibitor that targets tumor angiogenesis and immune modulation. This phase I study (NCT02133157) investigated the safety, pharmacokinetic characteristics, and preliminary anti-tumor activity of sulfatinib in patients with advanced solid tumors. The study included a dose-escalation phase (50-350 mg/day, 28-day cycle) with a Fibonacci (3+3) design, and a tumor-specific expansion phase investigating the tumor response to treatment. Two sulfatinib formulations were assessed: formulation 1 (5, 25, and 50 mg capsules) and formulation 2 (50 and 200 mg capsules). Seventy-seven Chinese patients received oral sulfatinib; the maximum tolerated dose was not reached. Dose-limiting toxicities included abnormal hepatic function and coagulation tests, and upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage. The most common treatment-related adverse events were proteinuria, hypertension and diarrhea. Among 34 patients receiving sulfatinib formulation 2, one patient with hepatocellular carcinoma and eight with neuroendocrine tumors exhibited a partial response; 15 had stable disease. The objective response rate was 26.5% (9/34) and the disease control rate was 70.6% (24/34). Pharmacokinetic, safety, and efficacy data supported continuous oral administration of sulfatinib at 300 mg as the recommended phase II dose. Sulfatinib exhibited an acceptable safety profile and encouraging antitumor activity in patients with advanced solid tumors, particularly neuroendocrine tumors.

  6. Results from an international case-control study of childhood brain tumors: the role of prenatal vitamin supplementation.

    PubMed Central

    Preston-Martin, S; Pogoda, J M; Mueller, B A; Lubin, F; Modan, B; Holly, E A; Filippini, G; Cordier, S; Peris-Bonet, R; Choi, W; Little, J; Arslan, A

    1998-01-01

    An international case-control study of primary pediatric brain tumors included interviews with mothers of cases diagnosed from 1976 to 1994 and mothers of population controls. Data are available on maternal vitamin use during pregnancy for 1051 cases and 1919 controls from eight geographic areas in North America, Europe, and Israel. Although risk estimates varied by study center, combined results suggest that maternal supplementation for two trimesters may decrease risk of brain tumor (odds ratio [OR] 0.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.5-0.9), with a trend of less risk with longer duration of use (p trend = 0.0007). The greatest risk reduction was among children diagnosed under 5 years of age whose mothers used supplements during all three trimesters (OR 0.5, CI 0.3-0.8). This effect did not vary by histology and was seen for supplementation during pregnancy rather than during the month before pregnancy or while breast feeding. These findings are largely driven by data from the United States, where most mothers took vitamins. The proportion of control mothers who took vitamins during pregnancy varied tremendously: from 3% in Israel and France, 21% in Italy, 33% in Canada, 52% in Spain and 86 to 92% at the three U.S. centers. The composition of the various multivitamin compounds taken also varied: the daily dose of vitamin C ranged from 0 to 600 mg, vitamin E ranged from 0 to 70 mg, vitamin A ranged from 0 to 30,000 IU, and folate ranged from 0 to 2000 micrograms. Mothers also took individual micronutrient supplements (e.g., vitamin C tablets), but most mothers who took these also took multivitamins, making it impossible to determine potential independent effects of these micronutrients. PMID:9646053

  7. Is Antibiotic Prophylaxis for Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation (RFA) of Primary Liver Tumors Necessary? Results From a Single-Center Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatia, Shivank S.; Echenique, Ana Froud, Tatiana Suthar, Rekha Lawson, Ivy Dalal, Ravi; Yrizarry, Jose Narayanan, Govindarajan

    2015-08-15

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to evaluate need for antibiotic prophylaxis for radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of liver tumors in patients with no significant co-existing risk factors for infection.Materials and MethodsFrom January 2004 to September 2013, 83 patients underwent 123 percutaneous RFA procedures for total of 152 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) lesions. None of the patients had pre-existing biliary enteric anastomosis (BEA) or any biliary tract abnormality predisposing to ascending biliary infection or uncontrolled diabetes mellitus. No pre- or post-procedure antibiotic prophylaxis was provided for 121 procedures. Data for potential risk factors were reviewed retrospectively and analyzed for the frequency of infectious complications, including abscess formation.ResultsOne patient (1/121 (0.8 %) RFA sessions) developed a large segment 5 liver abscess/infected biloma communicating with the gallbladder 7 weeks after the procedure, successfully treated over 10 weeks with IV and PO antibiotic therapy and percutaneous catheter drainage. This patient did not receive any antibiotics prior to RFA. During the procedure, there was inadvertent placement of RFA probe tines into the gallbladder. No other infectious complications were documented.ConclusionThese data suggest that the routine use of prophylactic antibiotics for liver RFA is not necessary in majority of the patients undergoing liver ablation for HCC and could be limited to patients with high-risk factors such as the presence of BEA or other biliary abnormalities, uncontrolled diabetes mellitus, and large centrally located tumors in close proximity to central bile ducts. Larger randomized studies are needed to confirm this hypothesis.

  8. Pineal region tumors: results of radiation therapy and indications for elective spinal irradiation. [/sup 60/Co; x ray

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, B.R.; Griffin, T.W.; Tong, D.Y.K.; Russell, A.H.; Kurtz, J.; Laramore, G.E.; Groudine, M.

    1981-05-01

    Eighteen patients with pineal region tumors seen from November 1960 to November 1978 were reviewed. Thirteen patients treated with radiation therapy received tumor doses in the 4000 to 5500 rad range. The five year survival and five year disease-free survival were 73 and 63% respectively. Spinal cord metastasis occurred in 2 of 13 (15%) patients. Attempts at salvage radiotherapy for these patients were unsuccessful. Computerized tomography (CT) scan provides an excellent method of evaluating the response of pineal region tumors to radiation. Rapid regression of the tumor mass on CT scan reflects the highly radioresponsive nature of germinomas, the tumor type most likely to disseminate throughout the neuraxis. This principle can be exploited to select unbiopsied patients with a high risk of spinal cord metastasis for prophylactic spinal radiation at an early stage of treatment.

  9. Combination of vatalanib and a 20-HETE synthesis inhibitor results in decreased tumor growth in an animal model of human glioma

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Adarsh; Borin, Thaiz F; Iskander, Asm; Varma, Nadimpalli RS; Achyut, Bhagelu R; Jain, Meenu; Mikkelsen, Tom; Guo, Austin M; Chwang, Wilson B; Ewing, James R; Bagher-Ebadian, Hassan; Arbab, Ali S

    2016-01-01

    Background Due to the hypervascular nature of glioblastoma (GBM), antiangiogenic treatments, such as vatalanib, have been added as an adjuvant to control angiogenesis and tumor growth. However, evidence of progressive tumor growth and resistance to antiangiogenic treatment has been observed. To counter the unwanted effect of vatalanib on GBM growth, we have added a new agent known as N-hydroxy-N′-(4-butyl-2 methylphenyl)formamidine (HET0016), which is a selective inhibitor of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) synthesis. The aims of the studies were to determine 1) whether the addition of HET0016 can attenuate the unwanted effect of vatalanib on tumor growth and 2) whether the treatment schedule would have a crucial impact on controlling GBM. Methods U251 human glioma cells (4×105) were implanted orthotopically. Two different treatment schedules were investigated. Treatment starting on day 8 (8–21 days treatment) of the tumor implantation was to mimic treatment following detection of tumor, where tumor would have hypoxic microenvironment and well-developed neovascularization. Drug treatment starting on the same day of tumor implantation (0–21 days treatment) was to mimic cases following radiation therapy or surgery. There were four different treatment groups: vehicle, vatalanib (oral treatment 50 mg/kg/d), HET0016 (intraperitoneal treatment 10 mg/kg/d), and combined (vatalanib and HET0016). Following scheduled treatments, all animals underwent magnetic resonance imaging on day 22, followed by euthanasia. Brain specimens were equally divided for immunohistochemistry and protein array analysis. Results Our results demonstrated a trend that HET0016, alone or in combination with vatalanib, is capable of controlling the tumor growth compared with that of vatalanib alone, indicating attenuation of the unwanted effect of vatalanib. When both vatalanib and HET0016 were administered together on the day of the tumor implantation (0–21 days treatment), tumor

  10. Deficiency of protein kinase Calpha in mice results in impairment of epidermal hyperplasia and enhancement of tumor formation in two-stage skin carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hara, Takeshi; Saito, Yuriko; Hirai, Takaaki; Nakamura, Kenji; Nakao, Kazuki; Katsuki, Motoya; Chida, Kazuhiro

    2005-08-15

    We generated a mouse strain lacking protein kinase Calpha (PKCalpha) and evaluated the significance of the enzyme in epithelial hyperplasia and tumor formation. PKCalpha-deficient mice exhibited increased susceptibility to tumor formation in two-stage skin carcinogenesis by single application of 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) for tumor initiation and repeated applications of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) for tumor promotion. Tumor formation was not enhanced by DMBA or TPA treatment alone, suggesting that PKCalpha suppresses tumor promotion. However, the severity of epidermal hyperplasia induced by topical TPA treatment was markedly reduced. In mutant mice, the number of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine-labeled epidermal basal keratinocytes increased 16 to 24 hours after topical TPA treatment as in the case of wild-type mice, but significantly decreased at 36 and 48 hours. Furthermore, the regenerating epithelium induced by skin wound significantly decreased in thickness but was not structurally impaired. The enhanced tumor formation may not be associated with epidermal hyperplasia. The induction levels of epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor ligands, tumor growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha), and heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor, in the skin of mutant mice by TPA treatment were significantly lower than those in the skin of wild-type mice. PKCalpha may regulate the supply of these EGF receptor ligands in basal keratinocytes, resulting in a reduced epidermal hyperplasia severity in the mutant mice. We propose that PKCalpha positively regulates epidermal hyperplasia but negatively regulates tumor formation in two-stage skin carcinogenesis.

  11. Epidermal Platelet-activating Factor Receptor Activation and Ultraviolet B Radiation Result in Synergistic Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha Production

    PubMed Central

    Wolverton, Jay E.; Al-Hassani, Mohammed; Yao, Yongxue; Zhang, Qiwei; Travers, Jeffrey B.

    2010-01-01

    Ultraviolet B radiation (UVB) is a potent stimulator of epidermal cytokine production which has been implicated in photoaggravated dermatoses. In addition to cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), UVB generates bioactive lipids including platelet-activating factor (PAF). Our previous studies have demonstrated that UVB-mediated production of keratinocyte TNF-α is in part due to PAF. The current studies use a human PAF-receptor (PAF-R) negative epithelial cell line transduced with PAF-Rs and PAF–R-deficient mice to demonstrate that activation of the epidermal PAF-R along with UVB irradiation results in a synergistic production of TNF-α. It should be noted that PAF-R effects are mimicked by the protein kinase C (PKC) agonist phorbol myristic acetate, and are inhibited by pharmacological antagonists of the PKC gamma isoenzyme. These studies suggest that concomitant PAF-R activation and UVB irradiation results in a synergistic production of the cytokine TNF-α which is mediated in part via PKC. These studies provide a novel potential mechanism for photosensitivity responses. PMID:19769579

  12. Recurrent angio-fibroma of breast masquerading as phyllodes tumor.

    PubMed

    Chaurasia, Jai K; Alam, Feroz; Shadan, Mariam; Naim, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    A young Indian female presented with a recurring tumor in the right breast masquerading as phyllodes tumor. Patient had history of five times excision and recurrences of the tumor, diagnosed as fibrous phyllodes of the breast. Presently, a well-circumscribed tumor of about 10 cm size, comprising of benign fibrous-angiomatous tissue with evidence of foci of pyogenic vasculitis was observed. Immuno-histochemical markers for the myo-epithelial and epithelial elements excluded the possibility of fibrous phyllodes, inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor, desmoid fibromatosis, and metaplastic carcinoma. The present findings were diagnostic of an inflammatory angio-fibroma of the right breast, not reported in the earlier literature. The observations indicated that the female breast may be susceptible to spontaneous productive and common-antibiotic-resistant focal septic vascular inflammation giving rise to angio-fibromatous proliferation producing a well-defined tumor mass in the breast, distinguishable from the other breast lesions by the connective tissue stains and immuno-histochemical markers.

  13. Ipsilateral irradiation for well lateralized carcinomas of the oral cavity and oropharynx: results on tumor control and xerostomia

    PubMed Central

    Cerezo, Laura; Martín, Margarita; López, Mario; Marín, Alicia; Gómez, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    Background In head and neck cancer, bilateral neck irradiation is the standard approach for many tumor locations and stages. Increasing knowledge on the pattern of nodal invasion leads to more precise targeting and normal tissue sparing. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the morbidity and tumor control for patients with well lateralized squamous cell carcinomas of the oral cavity and oropharynx treated with ipsilateral radiotherapy. Methods Twenty consecutive patients with lateralized carcinomas of the oral cavity and oropharynx were treated with a prospective management approach using ipsilateral irradiation between 2000 and 2007. This included 8 radical oropharyngeal and 12 postoperative oral cavity carcinomas, with Stage T1-T2, N0-N2b disease. The actuarial freedom from contralateral nodal recurrence was determined. Late xerostomia was evaluated using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-H&N35 questionnaire and the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE), version 3. Results At a median follow-up of 58 months, five-year overall survival and loco-regional control rates were 82.5% and 100%, respectively. No local or contralateral nodal recurrences were observed. Mean dose to the contralateral parotid gland was 4.72 Gy and to the contralateral submandibular gland was 15.30 Gy. Mean score for dry mouth was 28.1 on the 0-100 QLQ-H&N35 scale. According to CTCAE v3 scale, 87.5% of patients had grade 0-1 and 12.5% grade 2 subjective xerostomia. The unstimulated salivary flow was > 0.2 ml/min in 81.2% of patients and 0.1-0.2 ml/min in 19%. None of the patients showed grade 3 xerostomia. Conclusion In selected patients with early and moderate stages, well lateralized oral and oropharyngeal carcinomas, ipsilateral irradiation treatment of the primary site and ipsilateral neck spares salivary gland function without compromising loco-regional control. PMID:19723329

  14. Lobar hepatocellular carcinoma with ipsilateral portal vein tumor thrombosis treated with yttrium-90 glass microsphere radioembolization: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Pracht, M; Edeline, J; Lenoir, L; Latournerie, M; Mesbah, H; Audrain, O; Rolland, Y; Clément, B; Raoul, J L; Garin, E; Boucher, E

    2013-01-01

    Portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT) is a common complication of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and has a negative impact on prognosis. This characteristic feature led to the rationale of the present trial designed to assess the efficacy and the safety of yttrium-90 glass-microsphere treatment for advanced-stage lobar HCC with ipsilateral PVTT. 18 patients with unresectable lobar HCC and ipsilateral PVTT were treated in our institution with (90)Y-microS radioembolization. Patients were evaluated every 3 to 6 months for response, survival, and toxicity. Mean follow-up was 13.0 months (2.2-50.6). Outcomes were: complete response (n = 2), partial response (n = 13), stable disease (n = 1), and progressive disease (n = 2) giving a disease control rate of 88.9%. Four patients were downstaged. Treating lobar hepatocellular carcinoma with ipsilateral portal vein thrombosis with yttrium-90 glass-microsphere radioembolization is safe and efficacious. Further clinical trials are warranted to confirm these results and to compare (90)Y-microS with sorafenib, taking into account not only survival but also the possibility of secondary surgery for putative curative intention after downstaging.

  15. Carboxy-terminal domain phosphatase 1 silencing results in the inhibition of tumor formation ability in gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    FU, HONGBING; YANG, DEJUN; WANG, CHANGMING; XU, JIAPENG; WANG, WEIMIN; YAN, RONGLIN; CAI, QINGPING

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC), one of the most malignant types of cancer, is the second greatest cause of cancer-associated mortality worldwide. Novel therapeutic targets for GC treatment are therefore urgently required. Carboxy-terminal domain phosphatase 1 (CTDP1) has a crucial role in the regulation of gene expression. However, to the best of our knowledge, the role of CTDP1 in GC has not previously been explored. In the present study, reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis was used to detect CTDP1 messenger RNA expression in various GC cell lines. CTDP1 was subsequently silenced in GC cells by lentivirus-mediated small interfering RNA (siRNA) infection, and the effects of CTDP1 inhibition on cell proliferation were evaluated by cell number counting, cell cycle analysis with propidium iodide staining and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis, apoptotic rate with Annexin V staining and FACS analysis, as well as colony formation assay in GC cells. The results revealed that CTDP1 was highly expressed in certain GC cell lines and lentivirus-mediated siRNA infection was able to effectively silence CTDP1 expression in GC cells. CTDP1 inhibition decreased cell proliferation, arrested the cell cycle at G0/G1 phase and increased cell apoptosis in GC cells. Furthermore, the colony formation ability of GC cells was also suppressed by silencing CTDP1. Taken together these results indicated that CTDP1 has a significant role in the tumor formation ability of GC cells and is a novel and promising therapeutic target for the treatment of GC. PMID:26722269

  16. A case of pediatric virilizing adrenocortical tumor resulting in hypothalamic-pituitary activation and central precocious puberty following surgical removal.

    PubMed

    Miyoshi, Yoko; Oue, Takaharu; Oowari, Mitsugu; Soh, Hideki; Tachibana, Makiko; Kimura, Sadami; Kiyohara, Yuki; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Bessyo, Kazuhiko; Mushiake, Sotaro; Homma, Keiko; Hasegawa, Tomonobu; Sasano, Hironobu; Ozono, Keiichi

    2009-01-01

    We present a 6-year-old boy with a virilizing adrenocortical tumor who initially presented with peripheral precocious puberty. Development of facial acne, pubic hair and a growth spurt were noted at the age of five. A low-pitched voice as well as maturation of external genitalia was noted at the age of six. Both serum and urinary levels of adrenal androgens were elevated. Abdominal computed tomography revealed a large right suprarenal mass and he underwent surgical resection without any complications. The histological diagnosis was adrenocortical carcinoma according to the criteria of Weiss. Following surgical removal of the androgen-producing tumor, the patient subsequently developed hypothalamic-pituitary activation and demonstrated central precocious puberty. He was treated with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist in order to delay further pubertal progression. Clinical follow-up of potential secondary effects of excess hormone secretion after removal is important in some pediatric patients with virilizing adrenocortical tumor.

  17. Nutritional stress induced by tryptophan-degrading enzymes results in ATF4-dependent reprogramming of the amino acid transporter profile in tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Timosenko, Elina; Ghadbane, Hemza; Silk, Jonathan D.; Shepherd, Dawn; Gileadi, Uzi; Howson, Lauren J.; Laynes, Robert; Zhao, Qi; Strausberg, Robert L.; Olsen, Lars R.; Taylor, Stephen; Buffa, Francesca M.; Boyd, Richard; Cerundolo, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Tryptophan degradation is an immune escape strategy shared by many tumors. However, cancer cells’ compensatory mechanisms remain unclear. We demonstrate that shortage of tryptophan caused by the expression of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) results in ATF4-dependent up-regulation of several amino acid transporters, including SLC1A5 and its truncated isoforms, which enhances tryptophan and glutamine uptake. Importantly, SLC1A5 fails to be up-regulated in resting human T cells kept under low tryptophan conditions, while it is enhanced upon cognate antigen T cell receptor engagement. Our results highlight key differences in the ability of tumor and T cells to adapt to tryptophan starvation, and provide important insights into the poor prognosis of tumors co-expressing IDO and SLC1A5. PMID:27651314

  18. Delta-ALA-mediated fluorescence spectroscopy of gastrointestinal tumors: comparison of in vivo and in vitro results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladimirov, B.; Borisova, E.; Avramov, L.

    2007-06-01

    The limitations of standard endoscopy for detection of dysplastic changes of mucosa are significant challenge and initiate development of new photodiagnostic techniques, additional to diagnostic possibilities of standard endoscopic equipment. One of the most widely examined optical modalities is the laser- or light-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS), because of its rapid and highly sensitive response to early biochemical and morphological changes in biological tissues. In the recent study delta-aminolevulinic acid/protoporphyrin IX is used as fluorescent marker for dysplasia and tumor detection in esophagus and stomach. The δ -ALA is administered per os six hours before measurements at dose 20mg/kg weight. High-power light-emitting diode at 405 nm is used as an excitation source. Special opto-mechanical device is built to use the light guide of standard video-endoscopic system. Through endoscopic instrumental channel a fiber is applied to return information about fluorescence to microspectrometer. The fluorescence detected from in vivo tumor sites has very complex spectral origins. It consists of autofluorescence, fluorescence from exogenous fluorophores and re-absorption from the chromophores accumulated in the tissue investigated. Mucosa autofluorescence lies at 450-600 nm region. The fluorescence of PpIX is clearly pronounced at the 630-710 nm region. Deep minima in the tumor fluorescence signals are observed in the region 540-575 nm, related to hemoglobin re-absorption. Such high hemoglobin content is an indication of the tumors vascularization and it is clearly pronounced in all dysplastic and tumor sites investigated. After formalin conservation for in vitro samples hemoglobin absorption is strongly reduced that increases mucous fluorescence signal in green-yellow spectral region. Simultaneously the maxima at 635 nm and 720 nm are reduced.

  19. EGFR-targeted therapy results in dramatic early lung tumor regression accompanied by imaging response and immune infiltration in EGFR mutant transgenic mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Venugopalan, Abhilash; Lee, Min-Jung; Niu, Gang; Medina-Echeverz, José; Tomita, Yusuke; Lizak, Martin J.; Cultraro, Constance M.; Simpson, Robert Mark; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Trepel, Jane B.; Guha, Udayan

    2016-01-01

    Lung adenocarcinoma patients harboring kinase domain mutations in Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) have significant clinical benefit from EGFR-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Although a majority of patients experience clinical symptomatic benefit immediately, an objective response can only be demonstrated after 6-8 weeks of treatment. Evaluation of patient response by imaging shows that 30-40% of patients do not respond due to intrinsic resistance to these TKIs. We investigated immediate-early effects of EGFR-TKI treatment in mutant EGFR-driven transgenic mouse models by FDG-PET and MRI and correlated the effects on the tumor and the tumor microenvironment. Within 24 hours of erlotinib treatment we saw approximately 65% tumor regression in mice with TKI-sensitive EGFRL858R lung adenocarcinoma. However, mice with EGFRL858R/T790M-driven tumors did not respond to either erlotinib or afatinib monotherapy, but did show a significant tumor response to afatinib-cetuximab combination treatment. The imaging responses correlated with the inhibition of downstream EGFR signaling, increased apoptosis, and decreased proliferation in the tumor tissues. In EGFRL858R-driven tumors, we saw a significant increase in CD45+ leukocytes, NK cells, dendritic cells, macrophages and lymphocytes, particularly CD8+ T cells. In response to erlotinib, these dendritic cells and macrophages had significantly higher MHC class II expression, indicating increased antigen-presenting capabilities. Together, results of our study provide novel insight into the immediate-early therapeutic response to EGFR TKIs in vivo. PMID:27494838

  20. Real-Time US-CT/MRI Image Fusion for Guidance of Thermal Ablation of Liver Tumors Undetectable with US: Results in 295 Cases

    SciTech Connect

    Mauri, Giovanni Cova, Luca; Beni, Stefano De; Ierace, Tiziana Tondolo, Tania Cerri, Anna; Goldberg, S. Nahum; Solbiati, Luigi

    2015-02-15

    PurposeThis study was designed to assess feasibility of US-CT/MRI fusion-guided ablation in liver tumors undetectable with US.MethodsFrom 2002 to 2012, 295 tumors (162 HCCs and 133 metastases; mean diameter 1.3 ± 0.6 cm, range 0.5–2.5 cm) detectable on contrast-enhanced CT/MRI, but completely undetectable with unenhanced US and either totally undetectable or incompletely conspicuous with contrast-enhanced US (CEUS), were treated in 215 sessions using either internally cooled radiofrequency or microwave with standard ablation protocols, guided by an image fusion system (Virtual Navigation System, Esaote S.p.A., Genova, Italy) that combines US with CT/ MRI images. Correct targeting and successful ablation of tumor were verified after 24 hours with CT or MRI.ResultsA total of 282 of 295 (95.6 %) tumors were correctly targeted with successful ablation achieved in 266 of 295 (90.2 %). Sixteen of 295 (5.4 %) tumors were correctly targeted, but unsuccessfully ablated, and 13 of 295 (4.4 %) tumors were unsuccessfully ablated due to inaccurate targeting. There were no perioperative deaths. Major complications were observed in 2 of the 215 treatments sessions (0.9 %).ConclusionsReal-time virtual navigation system with US-CT/MRI fusion imaging is precise for targeting and achieving successful ablation of target tumors undetectable with US alone. Therefore, a larger population could benefit from ultrasound guided ablation procedures.

  1. SU-C-210-06: Quantitative Evaluation of Dosimetric Effects Resulting From Positional Variations of Pancreatic Tumor Volumes

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S; Sehgal, V; Wei, R; Lawrenson, L; Kuo, J; Hanna, N; Ramsinghani, N; Daroui, P; Al-Ghazi, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to quantify dosimetric effects resulting from variation in pancreatic tumor position assessed by bony anatomy and implanted fiducial markers Methods: Twelve pancreatic cancer patients were retrospectively analyzed for this study. All patients received modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment using fiducial-based Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT) to the intact pancreas. Using daily orthogonal kV and/or Cone beam CT images, the shift needed to co-register the daily pre-treatment images to reference CT from fiducial to bone (Fid-Bone) were recorded as Left-Right (LR), Anterior-Posterior (AP) and Superior-Inferior (SI). The original VMAT plan iso-center was shifted based on KV bone matching positions at 5 evenly spaced fractions. Dose coverage of the planning target volumes (PTVs) (V100%), mean dose to liver, kidney and stomach/duodenum were assessed in the modified plans. Results: A total of 306 fractions were analyzed. The absolute fiducial-bone positional shifts were greatest in the SI direction, (AP = 2.7 ± 3.0, LR = 2.8 ± 2.8, and SI 6.3 ± 7.9 mm, mean ± SD). The V100% was significantly reduced by 13.5%, (Fid-Bone = 95.3 ± 2.0 vs. 82.3 ± 11.8%, p=0.02). This varied widely among patients (Fid-Bone V100% Range = 2–60%), where 33% of patients had a reduction in V100% of more than 10%. The impact on OARs was greatest to the liver (Fid-Bone= 14.6 vs. 16.1 Gy, 10%), and stomach, (Fid-Bone = 23.9 vx. 25.5 Gy, 7%), however was not statistically significant (p=0.10 both). Conclusion: Compared to matching by fiducial markers, matching by bony anatomy would have substantially reduced the PTV coverage by 13.5%. This reinforces the importance of online position verification based on fiducial markers. Hence, implantation of fiducial markers is strongly recommended for pancreatic cancer patients undergoing intensity modulated radiation therapy treatments.

  2. Loss of tumor suppressor Merlin results in aberrant activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Erhong; Menezes, Mitchell E.; Bailey, Sarah K.; Metge, Brandon J.; Buchsbaum, Donald J.; Samant, Rajeev S.; Shevde, Lalita A.

    2016-01-01

    The expression of the tumor suppressor Merlin is compromised in nervous system malignancies due to genomic aberrations. We demonstrated for the first time, that in breast cancer, Merlin protein expression is lost due to proteasome-mediated elimination. Immunohistochemical analysis of tumor tissues from patients with metastatic breast cancer revealed characteristically reduced Merlin expression. Importantly, we identified a functional role for Merlin in impeding breast tumor xenograft growth and reducing invasive characteristics. We sought to determine a possible mechanism by which Merlin accomplishes this reduction in malignant activity. We observed that breast and pancreatic cancer cells with loss of Merlin show an aberrant increase in the activity of β-catenin concomitant with nuclear localization of β-catenin. We discovered that Merlin physically interacts with β-catenin, alters the sub-cellular localization of β-catenin, and significantly reduces the protein levels of β-catenin by targeting it for degradation through the upregulation of Axin1. Consequently, restoration of Merlin inhibited β-catenin-mediated transcriptional activity in breast and pancreatic cancer cells. We also present evidence that loss of Merlin sensitizes tumor cells to inhibition by compounds that target β-catenin-mediated activity. Thus, this study provides compelling evidence that Merlin reduces the malignant activity of pancreatic and breast cancer, in part by suppressing the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Given the potent role of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in breast and pancreatic cancer and the flurry of activity to test β-catenin inhibitors in the clinic, our findings are opportune and provide evidence for Merlin in restraining aberrant activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. PMID:26908451

  3. Adults with CNS primitive neuroectodermal tumors/pineoblastomas: results of multimodal treatment according to the pediatric HIT 2000 protocol.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Carsten; Müller, Klaus; von Hoff, Katja; Kwiecien, Robert; Pietsch, Torsten; Warmuth-Metz, Monika; Gerber, Nicolas U; Hau, Peter; Kuehl, Joachim; Kortmann, Rolf D; von Bueren, André O; Rutkowski, Stefan

    2014-02-01

    Central nervous system primitive neuroectodermal tumors (CNS-PNET) and pineoblastomas (PBL) are rare in adulthood. Knowledge on clinical outcome and the efficacy and toxicities of chemotherapy in addition to radiotherapy is limited. Patients older than 21 years at diagnosis were followed in the observational arm of the prospective pediatric multicenter trial HIT 2000. After surgery, craniospinal irradiation and maintenance or sandwich chemotherapy were recommended. Radiotherapy was normo- (35.2 Gy; tumor region, 55.0 Gy; metastasis, 49.6 Gy) or hyperfractionated (40.0 Gy; tumor bed, 68.0 Gy; metastasis, 50-60 Gy). Maintenance chemotherapy consisted of eight courses (vincristine, lomustine, cisplatin). Sandwich chemotherapy included two cycles of postoperative chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy, and four courses of maintenance chemotherapy. Seventeen patients (CNS-PNET, n = 7; PBL, n = 10), median age 30 years, were included. Eight patients had a postoperative residual tumor and four patients metastatic disease. The median follow-up of ten surviving patients was 41 months. The estimated rates for 3-year progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival were 68 ± 12 and 66 ± 13%, respectively. PBL compared to CNS-PNET tended towards a better PFS, although the difference was not clear (p = 0.101). Both chemotherapeutic (maintenance, n = 6; sandwich, n = 8) protocols did not differ in their PFS and were feasible with acceptable toxicities. Intensified regimens of combined chemo- and radiotherapy are generally feasible in adults with CNS-PNET/PBL. The impact of intensified chemotherapy on survival should be further assessed.

  4. Treatment and functional result of desmoplastic fibroma with repeated recurrences in the forearm: A case report

    PubMed Central

    RUI, JING; GUAN, WENJIE; GU, YUDONG; LAO, JIE

    2016-01-01

    Desmoplastic fibroma, alternatively known as aggressive fibromatosis or desmoid tumors, occurs in the form of benign locally aggressive tumors that possess a high rate of recurrence. The forearm bones are rarely involved. The current study presents a case of desmoplastic fibroma in the distal forearm of a 23-year-old man. The tumor was widely resected, and the bone defect was reconstructed using an autologous vascularized fibular graft during the resection procedure. The patient experienced recurrence three times and underwent four resections during the subsequent 3 years following the initial resection. After 10 years of follow-up, the patient's functional recovery remains positive. Despite the implication that surgical resection may be involved in the development of aggressive fibromatosis, surgical wide local excision and functional reconstruction were recommended for the treatment of the present patient. PMID:26893769

  5. Radiotherapy in Ewing tumors of the vertebrae: Treatment results and local relapse analysis of the Chess 81/86 and EICESS 92 trials

    SciTech Connect

    Schuck, Andreas . E-mail: schuck@uni-muenster.de; Ahrens, Susanne; Schorlemer, Ines von; Kuhlen, Michaela; Paulussen, Michael; Hunold, Andrea; Gosheger, Georg; Winkelmann, Winfried; Dunst, Juergen; Willich, Normann; Juergens, Heribert

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: Treatment results in patients with Ewing tumors of the vertebrae enrolled in the Cooperative Ewing's Sarcoma Study (CESS) 81, 86, and the European Intergroup Cooperative Ewing's Sarcoma Study (EICESS) 92 trials were analyzed with special emphasis on radiation-associated factors. Patients and Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed on 116 patients with primary tumors of the cervical, thoracic, or lumbar vertebrae treated between 1981 and 1999. Furthermore, a relapse analysis was done on those patients who underwent radiotherapy and subsequently had a local recurrence. Results: A total of 64.6% of the patients received definitive radiotherapy; 27.5% of patients had surgery and radiotherapy. Only 4 patients (3.4%) underwent definitive surgery. Twenty-seven patients presented with metastases at diagnosis. 22.4% of the total group developed a local relapse. Among the subgroup with definitive radiotherapy, local recurrence was seen in 17 of 75 patients (22.6%). Event-free survival and survival at 5 years were 47% and 58%, respectively. Of the 14 evaluable patients with a local relapse after radiotherapy, 13 were in-field. No correlation between radiation dose and local control could be found. Conclusion: Surgery with wide resection margins is rarely possible. The results after definitive radiotherapy in vertebral tumors are comparable to those of other tumor sites when definitive radiotherapy is given. Nearly all local relapses after radiotherapy are in-field.

  6. Metabolic Tumor Volume as a Prognostic Imaging-Based Biomarker for Head-and-Neck Cancer: Pilot Results From Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 0522

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, David L.; Harris, Jonathan; Yao, Min; Rosenthal, David I.; Opanowski, Adam; Levering, Anthony; Ang, K. Kian; Trotti, Andy M.; Garden, Adam S.; Jones, Christopher U.; Harari, Paul; Foote, Robert; Holland, John; Zhang, Qiang; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate candidate fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) imaging biomarkers for head-and-neck chemoradiotherapy outcomes in the cooperative group trial setting. Methods and Materials: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) protocol 0522 patients consenting to a secondary FDG-PET/CT substudy were serially imaged at baseline and 8 weeks after radiation. Maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax), SUV peak (mean SUV within a 1-cm sphere centered on SUVmax), and metabolic tumor volume (MTV) using 40% of SUVmax as threshold were obtained from primary tumor and involved nodes. Results: Of 940 patients entered onto RTOG 0522, 74 were analyzable for this substudy. Neither high baseline SUVmax nor SUVpeak from primary or nodal disease were associated with poor treatment outcomes. However, primary tumor MTV above the cohort median was associated with worse local-regional control (hazard ratio 4.01, 95% confidence interval 1.28-12.52, P=.02) and progression-free survival (hazard ratio 2.34, 95% confidence interval 1.02-5.37, P=.05). Although MTV and T stage seemed to correlate (mean MTV 6.4, 13.2, and 26.8 for T2, T3, and T4 tumors, respectively), MTV remained a strong independent prognostic factor for progression-free survival in bivariate analysis that included T stage. Primary MTV remained prognostic in p16-associated oropharyngeal cancer cases, although sample size was limited. Conclusion: High baseline primary tumor MTV was associated with worse treatment outcomes in this limited patient subset of RTOG 0522. Additional confirmatory work will be required to validate primary tumor MTV as a prognostic imaging biomarker for patient stratification in future trials.

  7. Familial adenomatous patients with desmoid tumours show increased expression of miR-34a in serum and high levels in tumours

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Sarah-Jane; Lewis, Amy; Jeffery, Rosemary; Thompson, Hannah; Feakins, Roger; Giannoulatou, Eleni; Yau, Christopher; Lindsay, James O.; Clark, Susan K.; Silver, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is rare affecting 1 in 10,000 people and a subset (10%) are at risk of myofibroblastic desmoid tumours (DTs) after colectomy to prevent cancer. DTs are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The absence of markers to monitor progression and a lack of treatment options are significant limitations to clinical management. We investigated microRNAs (miRNA) levels in DTs and serum using expression array analysis on two independent cohorts of FAP patients (total, n=24). Each comprised equal numbers of patients who had formed DTs (cases) and those who had not (controls). All controls had absence of DTs confirmed by clinical and radiological assessment over at least three years post- colectomy. Technical qPCR validation was performed using an expanded cohort (29 FAP patients; 16 cases and 13 controls). The most significant elevated serum miRNA marker of DTs was miR-34a-5p and in-situ hybridisation (ISH) showed most DTs analysed (5/6) expressed miRNA-34a-5p. Exome sequencing of tumour and matched germline DNA did not detect mutations within the miR-34a-5p transcript sites or 3′-UTR of target genes that would alter functional miRNA activity. In conclusion, miR-34a-5p is a potential circulatory marker and therapy target. A large prospective world-wide multi-centre study is now warranted. PMID:27489864

  8. Familial adenomatous patients with desmoid tumours show increased expression of miR-34a in serum and high levels in tumours.

    PubMed

    Walton, Sarah-Jane; Lewis, Amy; Jeffery, Rosemary; Thompson, Hannah; Feakins, Roger; Giannoulatou, Eleni; Yau, Christopher; Lindsay, James O; Clark, Susan K; Silver, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is rare affecting 1 in 10,000 people and a subset (10%) are at risk of myofibroblastic desmoid tumours (DTs) after colectomy to prevent cancer. DTs are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The absence of markers to monitor progression and a lack of treatment options are significant limitations to clinical management. We investigated microRNAs (miRNA) levels in DTs and serum using expression array analysis on two independent cohorts of FAP patients (total, n=24). Each comprised equal numbers of patients who had formed DTs (cases) and those who had not (controls). All controls had absence of DTs confirmed by clinical and radiological assessment over at least three years post- colectomy. Technical qPCR validation was performed using an expanded cohort (29 FAP patients; 16 cases and 13 controls). The most significant elevated serum miRNA marker of DTs was miR-34a-5p and in-situ hybridisation (ISH) showed most DTs analysed (5/6) expressed miRNA-34a-5p. Exome sequencing of tumour and matched germline DNA did not detect mutations within the miR-34a-5p transcript sites or 3'-UTR of target genes that would alter functional miRNA activity. In conclusion, miR-34a-5p is a potential circulatory marker and therapy target. A large prospective world-wide multi-centre study is now warranted.

  9. Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zemsky, Robert; Shaman, Susan; Shapiro, Daniel B.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the Collegiate Results Instrument (CRI), which measures a range of collegiate outcomes for alumni 6 years after graduation. The CRI was designed to target alumni from institutions across market segments and assess their values, abilities, work skills, occupations, and pursuit of lifelong learning. (EV)

  10. MONODISPERSED PEG-DOTA CONJUGATED ANTI-TAG-72 DIABODY HAS LOW KIDNEY UPTAKE AND HIGH TUMOR TO BLOOD RATIOS RESULTING IN IMPROVED 64Cu PET IMAGING

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lin; Turatti, Fabio; Crow, Desiree; Bading, James R.; Anderson, Anne-Line; Poku, Erasmus; Yazaki, Paul J.; Williams, Lawrence E.; Tamvakis, Debra; Sanders, Paul; Leong, David; Raubitschek, Andrew; Hudson, Peter J.; Colcher, David; Shively, John E.

    2011-01-01

    Diabodies are non-covalent dimers of single chain antibody fragments (scFvs) that retain the avidity of intact IgG but have more favorable blood clearance than intact IgGs. Radiometals offer a wide range of half lives and emissions for matching imaging and therapy requirements and provide facile labeling of chelate-antibody conjugates. However, due to their high retention and metabolism in the kidney, use of radiometal labeled diabodies can be problematic for both imaging and therapy. Methods Having previously shown that 111In-DOTA-PEG3400-anti-CEA-diabody has similarly high tumor uptake and retention and less than 50% as much kidney uptake and retention as non-PEGylated diabody, we synthesized a similar derivative for an anti-TAG-72-diabody. We also reduced the molecular size of the polydispersed PEG3400 to monodispersed PEG27 and PEG12 (nominal masses of 1188 and 528, respectively). We performed biodistributions of their DOTA conjugates radiolabeled with 125I, 111In, or 64Cu in tumor bearing athymic mice. Results Addition of PEG3400 to the diabody reduced kidney uptake to a level (≈10 %ID/g) comparable to that obtained with radiometal labeled intact IgG. The PEG27 and PEG12 diabody conjugates also demonstrated low kidney uptake without reduction of tumor uptake or tumor to blood ratios. When radiolabeled with 64Cu, the DOTA-PEG12- and PEG27-diabody conjugates gave high contrast PET images of colon cancer xenografts in athymic mice. Conclusion PEGylated diabodies may be a valuable platform for delivery of radionuclides and other agents to tumors. PMID:20554731

  11. Ligand Stimulation of ErbB4 and A Constitutively-Active ErbB4 Mutant Result in Different Biological Responses In Human Pancreatic Tumor Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Mill, Christopher P.; Gettinger, Kathleen L.; Riese, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Indeed, it has been estimated that 37,000 Americans will die from this disease in 2010. Late diagnosis, chemoresistance, and radioresistance of these tumors are major reasons for poor patient outcome, spurring the search for pancreatic cancer early diagnostic and therapeutic targets. ErbB4 (HER4) is a member of the ErbB family of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), a family that also includes the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR/ErbB1/HER1), Neu/ErbB2/HER2, and ErbB3/HER3. These RTKs play central roles in many human malignancies by regulating cell proliferation, survival, differentiation, invasiveness, motility, and apoptosis. In this report we demonstrate that human pancreatic tumor cell lines exhibit minimal ErbB4 expression; in contrast, these cell lines exhibit varied and in some cases abundant expression and basal tyrosine phosphorylation of EGFR, ErbB2, and ErbB3. Expression of a constitutively-dimerized and -active ErbB4 mutant inhibits clonogenic proliferation of CaPan-1, HPAC, MIA PaCa-2, and PANC-1 pancreatic tumor cell lines. In contrast, expression of wild-type ErbB4 in pancreatic tumor cell lines potentiates stimulation of anchorage-independent colony formation by the ErbB4 ligand Neuregulin1β. These results illustrate the multiple roles that ErbB4 may be playing in pancreatic tumorigenesis and tumor progression. PMID:21110957

  12. Ligand stimulation of ErbB4 and a constitutively-active ErbB4 mutant result in different biological responses in human pancreatic tumor cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Mill, Christopher P.; Gettinger, Kathleen L.; Riese, David J.

    2011-02-15

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Indeed, it has been estimated that 37,000 Americans will die from this disease in 2010. Late diagnosis, chemoresistance, and radioresistance of these tumors are major reasons for poor patient outcome, spurring the search for pancreatic cancer early diagnostic and therapeutic targets. ErbB4 (HER4) is a member of the ErbB family of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), a family that also includes the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR/ErbB1/HER1), Neu/ErbB2/HER2, and ErbB3/HER3. These RTKs play central roles in many human malignancies by regulating cell proliferation, survival, differentiation, invasiveness, motility, and apoptosis. In this report we demonstrate that human pancreatic tumor cell lines exhibit minimal ErbB4 expression; in contrast, these cell lines exhibit varied and in some cases abundant expression and basal tyrosine phosphorylation of EGFR, ErbB2, and ErbB3. Expression of a constitutively-dimerized and -active ErbB4 mutant inhibits clonogenic proliferation of CaPan-1, HPAC, MIA PaCa-2, and PANC-1 pancreatic tumor cell lines. In contrast, expression of wild-type ErbB4 in pancreatic tumor cell lines potentiates stimulation of anchorage-independent colony formation by the ErbB4 ligand Neuregulin 1{beta}. These results illustrate the multiple roles that ErbB4 may be playing in pancreatic tumorigenesis and tumor progression.

  13. A Simplified Approach to Measure the Effect of the Microvasculature in Diffusion-weighted MR Imaging Applied to Breast Tumors: Preliminary Results.

    PubMed

    Teruel, Jose R; Goa, Pål E; Sjøbakk, Torill E; Østlie, Agnes; Fjøsne, Hans E; Bathen, Tone F

    2016-11-01

    Purpose To evaluate the relative change of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) at low- and medium-b-value regimens as a surrogate marker of microcirculation, to study its correlation with dynamic contrast agent-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-derived parameters, and to assess its potential for differentiation between malignant and benign breast tumors. Materials and Methods Ethics approval and informed consent were obtained. From May 2013 to June 2015, 61 patients diagnosed with either malignant or benign breast tumors were prospectively recruited. All patients were scanned with a 3-T MR imager, including diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and DCE MR imaging. Parametric analysis of DWI and DCE MR imaging was performed, including a proposed marker, relative enhanced diffusivity (RED). Spearman correlation was calculated between DCE MR imaging and DWI parameters, and the potential of the different DWI-derived parameters for differentiation between malignant and benign breast tumors was analyzed by dividing the sample into equally sized training and test sets. Optimal cut-off values were determined with receiver operating characteristic curve analysis in the training set, which were then used to evaluate the independent test set. Results RED had a Spearman rank correlation of 0.61 with the initial area under the curve calculated from DCE MR imaging. Furthermore, RED differentiated cancers from benign tumors with an overall accuracy of 90% (27 of 30) on the test set with 88.2% (15 of 17) sensitivity and 92.3% (12 of 13) specificity. Conclusion This study presents promising results introducing a simplified approach to assess results from a DWI protocol sensitive to the intravoxel incoherent motion effect by using only three b values. This approach could potentially aid in the differentiation, characterization, and monitoring of breast pathologies. (©) RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  14. Tracking Viable Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs) in the Peripheral Blood of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Undergoing Definitive Radiation Therapy: Pilot Study Results

    PubMed Central

    Dorsey, Jay F.; Kao, Gary D.; MacArthur, Kelly M.; Ju, Melody; Steinmetz, David; Wileyto, E. Paul; Simone, Charles B.; Hahn, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Assays identifying circulating tumor cells (CTC) allow noninvasive and sequential monitoring of the status of primary or metastatic tumors, potentially yielding clinically useful information. However, the effect of radiation therapy (RT) on CTC in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) to our knowledge has not been previously explored. Methods We describe here results of a pilot study of 30 NSCLC patients undergoing RT, from whom peripheral blood samples were assayed for CTC via an assay that identifies live cells, via an adenoviral probe that detects the elevated telomerase activity present in almost all cancer cells but not normal cells, and with validity of the assay confirmed with secondary tumor-specific markers. Patients were assayed prior to initiation of radiation (Pre-RT), during the RT treatment course, and/or after completion of radiation (Post-RT). Results The assay successfully detected CTC in the majority of patients, including 65% of patients prior to start of RT, and in patients with both EGFR wild type and mutation-positive tumors. Median counts in patients Pre-RT were 9.1 CTC/mL (range: undetectable - 571), significantly higher than the average Post-RT count of 0.6 CTC/mL (range: undetectable - 1.8) (p < 0.001). Sequential CTC counts were available in a subset of patients and demonstrated decreases after RT, except for a patient who subsequently developed distant failure. Conclusions These pilot data suggest that CTC counts appear to reflect response to RT for patients with localized NSCLC. Based on these promising results, we have launched a more comprehensive and detailed clinical trial. PMID:25241991

  15. Microwave tumor ablation: cooperative academic-industry development of a high-power gas-cooled system with early clinical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brace, Christopher L.; Ziemlewicz, Timothy J.; Schefelker, Rick; Hinshaw, J. L.; Lubner, Meghan G.; Lee, Fred T.

    2013-02-01

    Microwave tumor ablation continues to evolve into a viable treatment option for many cancers. Current systems are poised to supplant radiofrequency ablation as the dominant percutaneous thermal therapy. Here is provided an overview of technical details and early clinical results with a high-powered, gas-cooled microwave ablation system. The system was developed with academic-industry collaboration using federal and private funding. The generator comprises three synchronous channels that each produce up to 140W at 2.45GHz. A mountable power distribution module facilitates CT imaging guidance and monitoring and reduces clutter in the sterile field. Cryogenic carbon-dioxide cools the coaxial applicator, permitting a thin applicator profile (~1.5 mm diameter) and high power delivery. A total of 106 liver tumors were treated (96 malignant, 10 benign) from December 2010 to June 2012 at a single academic institution. Mean tumor size +/- standard deviation was 2.5+/-1.3cm (range 0.5-13.9cm). Treatment time was 5.4+/-3.3min (range 1-20min). Median follow-up was 6 months (range 1-16 months). Technical success was reported in 100% of cases. Local tumor progression was noted in 4/96 (4.3%) of malignancies. The only major complication was a pleural effusion that was treated with thoracentesis. Microwave ablation with this system is an effective treatment for liver cancer. Compared to previous data from the same institution, these results suggest an increased efficacy and equivalent safety to RF ablation. Additional data from the lung and kidney support this conclusion.

  16. AB058. Intravenous chemotherapy combined with intravesical chemotherapy to treat T1G3 bladder urothelial carcinoma after transurethral resection of bladder tumor: results of a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Hu, Hailong; Tian, Dawei; Wu, Changli

    2016-01-01

    Objective The management of stage 1 and grade 3 (T1G3) bladder cancer continues to be controversial. Although the transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT) followed by intravesical chemotherapy is a conservative strategy for treatment of T1G3 bladder cancer, a relatively high risk of tumor recurrence and progression remains regarding the therapy. This study aimed to compare the efficacy of intravenous chemotherapy combined with intravesical chemotherapy versus intravesical chemotherapy alone for T1G3 bladder cancer after TURBT surgery. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the cases of 457 patients who were newly diagnosed with T1G3 bladder urothelial carcinoma between January 2009 and March 2014. After TURBT, 281 patients received intravesical chemotherapy alone, whereas 176 patients underwent intravesical chemotherapy in combination with intravenous chemotherapy. Tumor recurrence and progression were monitored periodically by urine cytology and cystoscopy in follow-up. Recurrence-free survival and progression-free survival of the two chemotherapy strategies following TURBT were analyzed. Univariable and multivariable Cox hazards analyses were performed to predict the prognostic factors for tumor recurrence and progression. Results The tumor recurrence rate was 36.7% for patients who received intravesical chemotherapy alone after TURBT, compared with 19.9% for patients who received intravenous chemotherapy combined with intravesical chemotherapy after TURBT (P<0.001). The progression rate was 10.6% for patients who underwent intravesical chemotherapy alone and 2.3% for patients who underwent the combined chemotherapies (P=0.003). Kaplan-Meier curves showed significant differences in recurrence-free survival and progression-free survival between the two treatment strategies, with a log-rank P value of <0.001 and 0.003, respectively. Multivariable analyses revealed that intravenous chemotherapy was the independent prognostic factor for tumor recurrence and

  17. Bone tumor

    MedlinePlus

    Tumor - bone; Bone cancer; Primary bone tumor; Secondary bone tumor; Bone tumor - benign ... The cause of bone tumors is unknown. They often occur in areas of the bone that grow rapidly. Possible causes include: Genetic defects ...

  18. Tumor Location, Interval Between Surgery and Radiotherapy, and Boost Technique Influence Local Control After Breast-Conserving Surgery and Radiation: Retrospective Analysis of Monoinstitutional Long-Term Results

    SciTech Connect

    Knauerhase, Hellen; Strietzel, Manfred; Gerber, Bernd; Reimer, Toralf; Fietkau, Rainer

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: To obtain long-term data on local tumor control after treatment of invasive breast cancer by breast-conserving surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy (RT), in consideration of the interstitial high-dose-rate boost technique. Patients and Methods: A total of 263 women with 268 mammary carcinomas (International Union Against Cancer Stage I-IIB) who had undergone breast-conserving surgery and adjuvant RT between 1990 and 1994 were included. The potential risk factors for local recurrence-free survival were investigated. Results: During a median follow-up period of 94 months, 27 locoregional recurrences, 25 of which were in breast, were diagnosed. The cumulative rate of in-breast recurrence was 4.1% {+-} 1.4% at 5 years of follow-up and 9.9% {+-} 2.4% at 10 years. The multivariate analysis identified medial tumor location and delayed RT (defined as an interval of >2 months between surgery and the start of RT) as significant risk factors for in-breast recurrence in the overall study population. Medial tumor location vs. lateral/central location (hazard ratio, 2.48; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-5.84) resulted in a cumulative in-breast recurrence rate of 22.5% {+-} 8.3% vs. 6.9% {+-} 2.3% at 10 years. Delayed RT (hazard ratio, 2.84; 95% confidence interval, 1.13-7.13) resulted in a cumulative in-breast recurrence rate of 18.5% {+-} 6.2% vs. 6.8% {+-} 2.4% at 10 years. The multivariate analysis also showed that the risk of in-breast recurrence was lower after high-dose-rate boost therapy than after external beam boost therapy in patients with laterally/centrally located tumors (hazard ratio, 3.25; 95% confidence interval, 0.91-11.65). Conclusion: Tumor location, interval between surgery and RT, and boost technique might influence local control of breast cancer treated by breast-conserving surgery and RT.

  19. Secretin-receptor and secretin-receptor-variant expression in gastrinomas: Correlation with clinical and tumoral features and secretin and calcium provocative test results.

    PubMed Central

    Long, Scott H.; Berna, Marc J.; Thill, Michelle; Pace, Andrea; Pradhan, Tapas K.; Hoffmann, K. Martin; Serrano, Jose; Jensen, Robert T.

    2008-01-01

    Context/Objectives The diagnosis of Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (ZES) requires secretin testing in 60%. Even with secretin the diagnosis may be difficult because variable responses occur and 6–30% have negative testing. The basis for variability or negative responses is unclear. It is unknown if the tumor density of secretin receptors or the presence of a secretin-receptor-variant, which can act as a dominant-negative, are important. The aim of this study was to investigate these possibilities. Patients/Methods Secretin-receptor and variant mRNA expression was determined in gastrinomas using real-time-PCR from 54 ZES patients. Results were correlated with Western blotting, secretin-receptor immunohistochemistry, with gastrin-provocative-test results and tumoral/clinical/laboratory features. Results Secretin-receptor mRNA was detectible in all gastrinomas but varied 132-fold with a mean of 0.89±0.12 molecules/β-actin. Secretin-receptor PCR results correlated closely with Western blotting (r=0.95,p<0.0001) and receptor-immunohistochemistry (p=0.0015, r=0.71). The variant was detected in all gastrinomas but levels varied 102-fold and were 72-fold lower than the total. Secretin-receptor levels correlated with variant levels, Δsecretin, but not Δcalcium and with tumor location, but not growth, extent or clinical responses. Variant levels did not correlate with the Δsecretin. Detailed analysis provides no evidence variant expression modified the secretin-receptor response or accounted for negative tests. Conclusions Secretin-receptor and secretin-receptor-variant expression occur in all gastrinomas. Because the expression of the total but not variant correlated with the secretin results and no evidence for dominant negative activity of the variant was found, our results suggest the total-secretin-receptor density is an important determinant of the secretin test response. PMID:17711922

  20. Completeness of required site-specific factors for brain and CNS tumors in the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) 18 database (2004-2012, varying).

    PubMed

    Ostrom, Quinn T; Gittleman, Haley; Kruchko, Carol; Louis, David N; Brat, Daniel J; Gilbert, Mark R; Petkov, Valentina I; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S

    2016-10-01

    Cancer registries are an important source of population-level information on brain tumor incidence and survival. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registries currently collect data on specific required factors related to brain tumors as defined by the American Joint Commission on Cancer, including World Health Organization (WHO) grade, MGMT methylation and 1p/19q codeletion status. We assessed 'completeness', defined as having valid values over the time periods that they have been collected, overall, by year, histology, and registry. Data were obtained through a SEER custom data request for four factors related to brain tumors for the years 2004-2012 (3/4 factors were collected only from 2010 to 2012). SEER*Stat was used to generate frequencies of 'completeness' for each factor overall, and by year, histology and registry. The four factors varied in completeness, but increased over time. WHO grade has been collected the longest, and showed significant increases in completeness. Completeness of MGMT and 1p/19q codeletion was highest for glioma subtypes for which testing is recommended by clinical practice guidelines. Completeness of all factors varied by histology and cancer registry. Overall, several of the factors had high completeness, and all increased in completeness over time. With increasing focus on 'precision medicine' and the incorporation of molecular parameters into the 2016 WHO CNS tumor classification, it is critical that the data are complete, and factors collected at the population level are fully integrated into cancer reporting. It is critical that cancer registries continue to collect established and emerging prognostic and predictive factors.

  1. Epidemiology of Brain Tumors.

    PubMed

    McNeill, Katharine A

    2016-11-01

    Brain tumors are the commonest solid tumor in children, leading to significant cancer-related mortality. Several hereditary syndromes associated with brain tumors are nonfamilial. Ionizing radiation is a well-recognized risk factor for brain tumors. Several industrial exposures have been evaluated for a causal association with brain tumor formation but the results are inconclusive. A casual association between the common mutagens of tobacco, alcohol, or dietary factors has not yet been established. There is no clear evidence that the incidence of brain tumors has changed over time. This article presents the descriptive epidemiology of the commonest brain tumors of children and adults.

  2. Human anti-mouse antibodies: pitfalls in tumor marker measurement and strategies for enhanced assay robustness; including results with Elecsys CEA.

    PubMed

    Nussbaum, S; Roth, H J

    2000-01-01

    Therapies using monoclonal antibodies may have undesirable consequences for the diagnostic use of tumor markers. These effects can be minimised by employing chimeric antibodies as well as special interference eliminating reagents. Human Anti-Mouse Antibodies (HAMA) are produced as a result of the immune response of a patient to treatment with murine monoclonal antibodies. The interaction of HAMA with the murine monoclonal antibodies of a tumor marker assay can simulate (false) positive or negative results leading to misdiagnosis and to inadequate disease management of a patient. To avoid HAMA-interferences "Roche Diagnostics" established a three-component-system: The use of chimeric antibodies, the interference elimination, which is realised in the parameters most frequently used like CEA and TSH. By employing such a chimeric antibody, Elecsys CEA proved to be extremely robust against HAMA-interferences. With 20 clinical relevant samples from different Mab-approaches, no HAMA-interference was observed. By fragmentation of the antibodies, i.e., elimination of the constant region and using monovalent fab-fragments (antigen binding fragment) combined with the addition of special blocking reagents all not-chimerized, Elecsys assays showed comparable results to chimerisation. This could also be shown with 20 clinical relevant samples.

  3. Atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors: a population-based clinical outcomes study involving 174 patients from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database (1973–2010)

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Christine SM; Mahendraraj, Krishnaraj; Chamberlain, Ronald S

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors (ATRTs) are rare, highly malignant embryonal tumors of the central nervous system (CNS) accounting for 20% of CNS tumors in children under the age of 3. This study examines a large cohort of ATRT patients to determine demographic, clinical, and pathologic factors which impact prognosis and survival. Methods Demographic and clinical data were abstracted on 174 ATRT patients (171 pediatric patients age <20 and 3 adult patients age ≥20) from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database (1973–2010). Standard statistical methodology was used. Results A total of 174 ATRT cases (mean age of 2.84 years) were identified. ATRT had a higher incidence in males (56.3%), Caucasians (59.1%), and children <3 years of age (80.5%), P<0.001. The most common primary sites were the cerebellum (17.8%), ventricles (16.1%), and frontal lobe (12.6%). Mean overall survival was 3.2±0.4 years, while overall and cancer-specific mortality were 63.2% and 56.3%, respectively, P=0.005. Most ATRT cases were treated with surgery alone (58.0%), followed by a combination of surgery and radiation (34.3%), no treatment (6.5%), and radiation alone (1.2%). The use of combination therapy has increased significantly (16.1%) since 2005 (P<0.001), while primary surgical resection and radiation therapy rates remain relatively unchanged. The longest survival was observed among ATRT patients receiving combination therapy (5.9±0.7 years), followed by radiation alone (2.8±1.2 years), and surgery alone (1.9±0.4 years), P<0.001. Multivariable analysis identified only distant metastases (OR =4.6) as independently associated with increased mortality, whereas combination therapy (OR =0.4) was associated with reduced mortality, P<0.005. Conclusion ATRT is a rare and highly aggressive embryonal malignancy of the CNS that presents more often as locoregional tumors >4 cm in male Caucasian children of age <3 years, involving the cerebellum, ventricles, or

  4. Deficiency of the adaptor protein SLy1 results in a natural killer cell ribosomopathy affecting tumor clearance.

    PubMed

    Arefanian, Saeed; Schäll, Daniel; Chang, Stephanie; Ghasemi, Reza; Higashikubo, Ryuji; Zheleznyak, Alex; Guo, Yizhan; Yu, Jinsheng; Asgharian, Hosseinali; Li, Wenjun; Gelman, Andrew E; Kreisel, Daniel; French, Anthony R; Zaher, Hani; Plougastel-Douglas, Beatrice; Maggi, Leonard; Yokoyama, Wayne; Beer-Hammer, Sandra; Krupnick, Alexander S

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with robust natural killer (NK) cell function incur lower rates of malignancies. To expand our understanding of genetic factors contributing to this phenomenon, we analyzed NK cells from cancer resistant and susceptible strains of mice. We identified a correlation between NK levels of the X-chromosome-located adaptor protein SLy1 and immunologic susceptibility to cancer. Unlike the case for T or B lymphocytes, where SLy1 shuttles between the cytoplasm and nucleus to facilitate signal transduction, in NK cells SLy1 functions as a ribosomal protein and is located solely in the cytoplasm. In its absence, ribosomal instability results in p53-mediated NK cell senescence and decreased clearance of malignancies. NK defects are reversible under inflammatory conditions and viral clearance is not impacted by SLy1 deficiency. Our work defines a previously unappreciated X-linked ribosomopathy that results in a specific and subtle NK cell dysfunction leading to immunologic susceptibility to cancer.

  5. Long-Term Neurocognitive Functioning and Social Attainment in Adult Survivors of Pediatric CNS Tumors: Results From the St Jude Lifetime Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Krasin, Matthew J.; Liu, Wei; Armstrong, Gregory T.; Ojha, Rohit P.; Sadighi, Zsila S.; Gupta, Pankaj; Kimberg, Cara; Srivastava, Deokumar; Merchant, Thomas E.; Gajjar, Amar; Robison, Leslie L.; Hudson, Melissa M.; Krull, Kevin R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess the prevalence and severity of neurocognitive impairment in adult survivors of pediatric CNS tumors and to examine associated treatment exposures. Patients and Methods Participants included 224 survivors of CNS tumors who were treated at St Jude Children's Research Hospital (current median age [range], 26 years [19 to 53 years]; time from diagnosis, 18 years [11 to 42 years]) and completed neurocognitive testing. Information on cranial radiation therapy (CRT) doses and parameters of delivery were abstracted from medical records. The prevalence of severe impairment (ie, at least two standard deviations below normative mean) was compared across radiation treatment groups (no CRT, focal irradiation, craniospinal irradiation) using the χ2 test. Log-binomial models were used to estimate risk ratios (RRs) and corresponding 95% CIs for severe impairment. Results In multivariable models, craniospinal irradiation was associated with a 1.5- to threefold increased risk of severe impairment compared with no CRT (eg, intelligence: RR = 2.70; 95% CI, 1.37 to 5.34; memory: RR = 2.93; 95% CI, 1.69 to 5.08; executive function: RR = 1.74; 95% CI, 1.24 to 2.45). Seizures were associated with impaired academic performance (RR = 1.48; 95% CI, 1.02 to 2.14), attention (RR = 1.54; 95% CI, 1.12 to 2.13), and memory (RR = 1.44; 95% CI, 1.04 to 1.99). Hydrocephalus with shunt placement was associated with impaired intelligence (RR = 1.78; 95% CI, 1.12 to 2.82) and memory (RR = 1.42; 95% CI, 1.03 to 1.95). Differential follow-up time contributed to variability in prevalence estimates between survivors treated with older nonconformal and those treated with more contemporary conformal radiation therapy methods. Neurocognitive impairment was significantly associated with lower educational attainment, unemployment, and nonindependent living. Conclusion Survivors of pediatric CNS tumors are at risk of severe neurocognitive impairment in adulthood. The prevalence of severe

  6. Trastuzumab improves tumor perfusion and vascular delivery of cytotoxic therapy in a murine model of HER2+ breast cancer: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Sorace, Anna G; Quarles, C Chad; Whisenant, Jennifer G; Hanker, Ariella B; McIntyre, J Oliver; Sanchez, Violeta M; Yankeelov, Thomas E

    2016-01-01

    To employ in vivo imaging and histological techniques to identify and quantify vascular changes early in the course of treatment with trastuzumab in a murine model of HER2+ breast cancer. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) was used to quantitatively characterize vessel perfusion/permeability (via the parameter K (trans) ) and the extravascular extracellular volume fraction (v e ) in the BT474 mouse model of HER2+ breast cancer (N = 20) at baseline, day one, and day four following trastuzumab treatment (10 mg/kg). Additional cohorts of mice were used to quantify proliferation (Ki67), microvessel density (CD31), pericyte coverage (α-SMA) by immunohistochemistry (N = 44), and to quantify human VEGF-A expression (N = 29) throughout the course of therapy. Longitudinal assessment of combination doxorubicin ± trastuzumab (N = 42) tested the hypothesis that prior treatment with trastuzumab will increase the efficacy of subsequent doxorubicin therapy. Compared to control tumors, trastuzumab-treated tumors exhibited a significant increase in K (trans) (P = 0.035) on day four, indicating increased perfusion and/or vessel permeability and a simultaneous significant increase in v e (P = 0.01), indicating increased cell death. Immunohistochemical and ELISA analyses revealed that by day four the trastuzumab-treated tumors had a significant increase in vessel maturation index (i.e., the ratio of α-SMA to CD31 staining) compared to controls (P < 0.001) and a significant decrease in VEGF-A (P = 0.03). Additionally, trastuzumab dosing prior to doxorubicin improved the overall effectiveness of the therapies (P < 0.001). This study identifies and validates improved perfusion characteristics following trastuzumab therapy, resulting in an improvement in trastuzumab-doxorubicin combination therapy in a murine model of HER2+ breast cancer. This data suggests properties of vessel maturation. In particular, the use of DCE-MRI, a clinically available imaging

  7. Trastuzumab improves tumor perfusion and vascular delivery of cytotoxic therapy in a murine model of HER2+ breast cancer: preliminary results

    PubMed Central

    Quarles, C. Chad; Whisenant, Jennifer G.; Hanker, Ariella B.; McIntyre, J. Oliver; Sanchez, Violeta M.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    To employ in vivo imaging and histological techniques to identify and quantify vascular changes early in the course of treatment with trastuzumab in a murine model of HER2+ breast cancer. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) was used to quantitatively characterize vessel perfusion/permeability (via the parameter Ktrans) and the extravascular extracellular volume fraction (ve) in the BT474 mouse model of HER2+ breast cancer (N = 20) at baseline, day one, and day four following trastuzumab treatment (10 mg/kg). Additional cohorts of mice were used to quantify proliferation (Ki67), microvessel density (CD31), pericyte coverage (α-SMA) by immunohistochemistry (N = 44), and to quantify human VEGF-A expression (N = 29) throughout the course of therapy. Longitudinal assessment of combination doxorubicin ± trastuzumab (N = 42) tested the hypothesis that prior treatment with trastuzumab will increase the efficacy of subsequent doxorubicin therapy. Compared to control tumors, trastuzumab-treated tumors exhibited a significant increase in Ktrans (P = 0.035) on day four, indicating increased perfusion and/or vessel permeability and a simultaneous significant increase in ve (P = 0.01), indicating increased cell death. Immunohistochemical and ELISA analyses revealed that by day four the trastuzumab-treated tumors had a significant increase in vessel maturation index (i.e., the ratio of α-SMA to CD31 staining) compared to controls (P < 0.001) and a significant decrease in VEGF-A (P = 0.03). Additionally, trastuzumab dosing prior to doxorubicin improved the overall effectiveness of the therapies (P < 0.001). This study identifies and validates improved perfusion characteristics following trastuzumab therapy, resulting in an improvement in trastuzumab-doxorubicin combination therapy in a murine model of HER2+ breast cancer. This data suggests properties of vessel maturation. In particular, the use of DCE-MRI, a clinically available imaging method

  8. Management of sporadic desmoid-type fibromatosis: a European consensus approach based on patients' and professionals' expertise - a sarcoma patients EuroNet and European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer/Soft Tissue and Bone Sarcoma Group initiative.

    PubMed

    Kasper, B; Baumgarten, C; Bonvalot, S; Haas, R; Haller, F; Hohenberger, P; Moreau, G; van der Graaf, W T A; Gronchi, A

    2015-01-01

    Desmoid-type fibromatosis (DF) is a rare monoclonal, fibroblastic proliferation characterised by a variable and often unpredictable clinical course. It may affect nearly all parts of the body including extremities, trunk and abdomen. Considering the variable clinical presentations, anatomic locations and biological behaviours, an individualised treatment approach is required. No established or evidence-based approach for the treatment of this neoplasm is available as of today. Therefore, we propose a consensus treatment algorithm based on a round table meeting bringing together sarcoma experts from the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Soft Tissue and Bone Sarcoma Group (STBSG) with patient advocates from Sarcoma Patients EuroNet (SPAEN). The aim of the meeting was to develop - for the first time ever - a consensus approach based on professionals' AND patients' expertise. As a fundamental prerequisite, all patients should be discussed in a multidisciplinary setting in centres or professional networks with a specific expertise in the disease.

  9. Ear Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Outer Ear Ear Blockages Ear Tumors External Otitis (Swimmer's Ear) Malignant External Otitis Perichondritis Tumors of the ... Outer Ear Ear Blockages Ear Tumors External Otitis (Swimmer's Ear) Malignant External Otitis Perichondritis NOTE: This is ...

  10. Expression of a tumor necrosis factor alpha transgene in murine pancreatic beta cells results in severe and permanent insulitis without evolution towards diabetes

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Mice bearing a tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha transgene controlled by an insulin promoter developed an increasingly severe lymphocytic insulitis, apparently resulting from the induction of endothelial changes with features similar to those observed in other places of intense lymphocytic traffic. This was accompanied by dissociation of the endocrine tissue (without marked decrease in its total mass), islet fibrosis, and the development of intraislet ductules containing, by places, beta cells in their walls, suggesting a regenerative capacity. Islet disorganization and fibrosis did not result from lymphocytic infiltration, since they were also observed in SCID mice bearing the transgene. Diabetes never developed, even though a number of potentially inducing conditions were used, including the prolonged perfusion of interferon gamma and the permanent expression of a nontolerogenic viral protein on beta cells (obtained by using mice bearing two transgenes). It is concluded that (a) a slow process of TNF release in pancreatic islets induces insulitis, and may be instrumental in the insulitis resulting from local cell-mediated immune reactions, but (b) that insulitis per se is not diabetogenic, lymphocyte stimulation by cells other than beta cells being necessary to trigger extensive beta cell damage. This provides an explanation for the discrepancy between the occurrence of insulitis and that of clinical disease in autoimmune diabetes. PMID:1460428

  11. E6 and E7 gene silencing results in decreased methylation of tumor suppressor genes and induces phenotype transformation of human cervical carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Li, Liming; Xu, Cui; Long, Jia; Shen, Danbei; Zhou, Wuqing; Zhou, Qiyan; Yang, Jia; Jiang, Mingjun

    2015-09-15

    In SiHa and CaSki cells, E6 and E7-targeting shRNA specifically and effectively knocked down human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 E6 and E7 at the transcriptional level, reduced the E6 and E7 mRNA levels by more than 80% compared with control cells that expressed a scrambled-sequence shRNA. E6 and E7 repression resulted in down-regulation of DNA methyltransferase mRNA and protein expression, decreased DNA methylation and increased mRNA expression levels of tumor suppressor genes, induced a certain apoptosis and inhibited proliferation in E6 and E7 shRNA-infected SiHa and CaSki cells compared with the uninfected cells. Repression of E6 and E7 oncogenes resulted in restoration of DNA methyltransferase suppressor pathways and induced apoptosis in HPV16-positive cervical carcinoma cell lines. Our findings suggest that the potential carcinogenic mechanism of HPV16 through influencing DNA methylation pathway to activate the development of cervical cancer exist, and maybe as a candidate therapeutic strategy for cervical and other HPV-associated cancers.

  12. Adenomatous Polyposis Coli Tumor Suppressor Protein Has Signaling Activity in Xenopus laevis Embryos Resulting in the Induction of an Ectopic Dorsoanterior Axis

    PubMed Central

    Vleminckx, Kris; Wong, Ellen; Guger, Kathy; Rubinfeld, Bonnee; Polakis, Paul; Gumbiner, Barry M.

    1997-01-01

    Mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) tumor suppressor gene are linked to both familial and sporadic human colon cancer. So far, a clear biological function for the APC gene product has not been determined. We assayed the activity of APC in the early Xenopus embryo, which has been established as a good model for the analysis of the signaling activity of the APC-associated protein β-catenin. When expressed in the future ventral side of a four-cell embryo, full-length APC induced a secondary dorsoanterior axis and the induction of the homeobox gene Siamois. This is similar to the phenotype previously observed for ectopic β-catenin expression. In fact, axis induction by APC required the availability of cytosolic β-catenin. These results indicate that APC has signaling activity in the early Xenopus embryo. Signaling activity resides in the central domain of the protein, a part of the molecule that is missing in most of the truncating APC mutations in colon cancer. Signaling by APC in Xenopus embryos is not accompanied by detectable changes in expression levels of β-catenin, indicating that it has direct positive signaling activity in addition to its role in β-catenin turnover. From these results we propose a model in which APC acts as part of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, either upstream of, or in conjunction with, β-catenin. PMID:9015311

  13. Tumor Types: Understanding Brain Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Tools & Publications Tumor Types: Understanding Brain Tumors World Health Organization (WHO) Updates Official Classification of Tumors ... Central Nervous System On May 9, 2016, the World Health Organization (WHO) published an official reclassification of ...

  14. Adenovirus-mediated gene transfer of endostatin in vivo results in high level of transgene expression and inhibition of tumor growth and metastases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauter, Bernhard V.; Martinet, Olivier; Zhang, Wei-Jian; Mandeli, John; Woo, Savio L. C.

    2000-04-01

    Inhibition of angiogenesis has been shown to be an effective strategy in cancer therapy in mice. However, its widespread application has been hampered by difficulties in the large-scale production of the antiangiogenic proteins. This limitation may be resolved by in vivo delivery and expression of the antiangiogenic genes. We have constructed a recombinant adenovirus that expresses murine endostatin that is biologically active both in vitro, as determined in endothelial cell proliferation assays, and in vivo, by suppression of angiogenesis induced by vascular endothelial growth factor 165. Persistent high serum levels of endostatin (605-1740 ng/ml; mean, 936 ng/ml) were achieved after systemic administration of the vector to nude mice, which resulted in significant reduction of the growth rates and the volumes of JC breast carcinoma and Lewis lung carcinoma (P < 0.001 and P < 0.05, respectively). In addition, the endostatin vector treatment completely prevented the formation of pulmonary micrometastases in Lewis lung carcinoma (P = 0.0001). Immunohistochemical staining of the tumors demonstrated a decreased number of blood vessels in the treatment group versus the controls. In conclusion, the present study clearly demonstrates the potential of vector-mediated antiangiogenic gene therapy as a component in cancer therapy.

  15. Tumor Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dudley, Andrew C.

    2012-01-01

    The vascular endothelium is a dynamic cellular “organ” that controls passage of nutrients into tissues, maintains the flow of blood, and regulates the trafficking of leukocytes. In tumors, factors such as hypoxia and chronic growth factor stimulation result in endothelial dysfunction. For example, tumor blood vessels have irregular diameters; they are fragile, leaky, and blood flow is abnormal. There is now good evidence that these abnormalities in the tumor endothelium contribute to tumor growth and metastasis. Thus, determining the biological basis underlying these abnormalities is critical for understanding the pathophysiology of tumor progression and facilitating the design and delivery of effective antiangiogenic therapies. PMID:22393533

  16. Dosimetric results in treatments of neuroblastoma and neuroendocrine tumors with {sup 131}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine with implications for the activity to administer

    SciTech Connect

    Mínguez, Pablo; Genollá, José; Guayambuco, Sonía; Delgado, Alejandro; Fombellida, José Cruz

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: The aim was to investigate whole-body and red marrow absorbed doses in treatments of neuroblastoma (NB) and adult neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) with {sup 131}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine and to propose a simple method for determining the activity to administer when dosimetric data for the individual patient are not available. Methods: Nine NB patients and six NET patients were included, giving in total 19 treatments as four patients were treated twice. Whole-body absorbed doses were determined from dose-rate measurements and planar gamma-camera imaging. For six NB and five NET treatments, red marrow absorbed doses were also determined using the blood-based method. Results: Dosimetric data from repeated administrations in the same patient were consistent. In groups of NB and NET patients, similar whole-body residence times were obtained, implying that whole-body absorbed dose per unit of administered activity could be reasonably well described as a power function of the patient mass. For NB, this functional form was found to be consistent with dosimetric data from previously published studies. The whole-body to red marrow absorbed dose ratio was similar among patients, with values of 1.4 ± 0.6–1.7 ± 0.7 (1 standard deviation) in NB treatments and between 1.5 ± 0.6 and 1.7 ± 0.7 (1 standard deviation) in NET treatments. Conclusions: The consistency of dosimetric results between administrations for the same patient supports prescription of the activity based on dosimetry performed in pretreatment studies, or during the first administration in a fractionated schedule. The expressions obtained for whole-body absorbed doses per unit of administered activity as a function of patient mass for NB and NET treatments are believed to be a useful tool to estimate the activity to administer at the stage when the individual patient biokinetics has not yet been measured.

  17. Chemoradiation for Advanced Head and Neck Cancer: Potential for Improving Results to Match Those of Current Treatment Modalities for Early-Stage Tumors-Long-Term Results of Hyperfractionated Chemoradiation With Carbogen Breathing and Anemia Correction With Erythropoietin

    SciTech Connect

    Villar, Alfonso Martinez, Jose Carlos; Serdio, Jose Luis de

    2008-04-01

    Purpose: To attempt to improve results of chemoradiation for head and neck cancer. Methods and Materials: From March 1996 to April 2007, 98 patients with head and neck cancer (15 Stage III and 83 Stage IV) were treated with a twice-daily hyperfractionated schedule. Eleven patients presented with N0, 11 with N1, 13 with N2A, 17 with N2B, 24 with N2C, and 22 with N3. Each fraction of treatment consisted of 5 mg/m{sup 2} of carboplatin plus 115 cGy with carbogen breathing. Treatment was given 5 days per week up to total doses of 350 mg/m{sup 2} of carboplatin plus 8050 cGy in 7 weeks. Anemia was corrected with erythropoietin. Results: Ninety-six patients tolerated the treatment as scheduled. All patients tolerated the planned radiation dose. Local toxicity remained at the level expected with irradiation alone. Chemotherapy toxicity was moderate. Ninety-seven complete responses were achieved. After 11 years of follow-up (median, 81 months), actuarial locoregional control, cause-specific survival, overall survival, and nodal control rates at 5 and 10 years were, respectively, 83% and 83%, 68% and 68%, 57% and 55%, and 100% and 100%. Median follow-up of disease-free survivors was 80 months. No significant differences in survival were observed between the different subsites or between the pretreatment node status groups (N0 vs. N+, N0 vs. N1, N0 vs. N2A, N0 vs. N2B, N0 vs. N2C, and N0 vs. N3). Conclusions: Improving results of chemoradiation for advanced head and neck cancer up to the level obtained with current treatments for early-stage tumors is a potentially reachable goal.

  18. Hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy for primary and metastatic liver tumors using the novalis image-guided system: preliminary results regarding efficacy and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Hiromitsu; Shibamoto, Yuta; Hashizume, Chisa; Mori, Yoshimasa; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Hayashi, Naoki; Kosaki, Katsura; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Kuzuya, Teiji; Utsunomiya, Setsuo

    2010-12-01

    www.tcrt.org The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for primary and metastatic liver tumors using the Novalis image-guided radiotherapy system. After preliminarily treating liver tumors using the Novalis system from July 2006, we started a protocol-based study in February 2008. Eighteen patients (6 with primary hepatocellular carcinoma and 12 with metastatic liver tumor) were treated with 55 or 50 Gy, depending upon their planned dose distribution and liver function, delivered in 10 fractions over 2 weeks. Four non-coplanar and three coplanar static beams were used. Patient age ranged from 54 to 84 years (median: 72 years). The Child-Pugh classification was Grade A in 17 patients and Grade B in 1. Tumor diameter ranged from 12 to 35 mm (median: 23 mm). Toxicities were evaluated according to the Common Terminology Criteria of Adverse Events version 4.0, and radiation-induced liver disease (RILD) was defined by Lawrence's criterion. The median follow-up period was 14.5 months. For all patients, the 1-year overall survival and local control rates were 94% and 86%, respectively. A Grade 1 liver enzyme change was observed in 5 patients, but no RILD or chronic liver dysfunction was observed. SBRT using the Novalis image-guided system is safe and effective for treating primary and metastatic liver tumors. Further investigation of SBRT for liver tumors is warranted. In view of the acceptable toxicity observed with this protocol, we have moved to a new protocol to shorten the overall treatment time and escalate the dose.

  19. Survival and secondary tumors in children with medulloblastoma receiving radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy: results of Children's Oncology Group trial A9961.

    PubMed

    Packer, Roger J; Zhou, Tianni; Holmes, Emi; Vezina, Gilbert; Gajjar, Amar

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the trial was to determine the survival and incidence of secondary tumors in children with medulloblastoma receiving radiotherapy plus chemotherapy. Three hundred seventy-nine eligible patients with nondisseminated medulloblastoma between the ages of 3 and 21 years were treated with 2340 cGy of craniospinal and 5580 cGy of posterior fossa irradiation. Patients were randomized between postradiation cisplatin and vincristine plus either CCNU or cyclophosphamide. Survival, pattern of relapse, and occurrence of secondary tumors were assessed. Five- and 10-year event-free survivals were 81 ± 2% and 75.8 ± 2.3%; overall survivals were 87 ± 1.8% and 81.3 ± 2.1%. Event-free survival was not impacted by chemotherapeutic regimen, sex, race, age at diagnosis, or gender. Seven patients had disease relapse beyond 5 years after diagnosis; relapse was local in 4 patients, local plus supratentorial in 2, and supratentorial alone in 1. Fifteen patients experienced secondary tumors as a first event at a median time of 5.8 years after diagnosis (11 >5 y postdiagnosis). All non-CNS solid secondary tumors (4) occurred in regions that had received radiation. Of the 6 high-grade gliomas, 5 occurred >5 years postdiagnosis. The estimated cumulative 10-year incidence rate of secondary malignancies was 4.2% (1.9%-6.5%). Few patients with medulloblastoma will relapse ≥ 5 years postdiagnosis; relapse will occur predominantly at the primary tumor site. Patients are at risk for development of secondary tumors, many of which are malignant gliomas. This may become an increasing issue as more children survive.

  20. Vismodegib Exerts Targeted Efficacy Against Recurrent Sonic Hedgehog–Subgroup Medulloblastoma: Results From Phase II Pediatric Brain Tumor Consortium Studies PBTC-025B and PBTC-032

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Giles W.; Orr, Brent A.; Wu, Gang; Gururangan, Sridharan; Lin, Tong; Qaddoumi, Ibrahim; Packer, Roger J.; Goldman, Stewart; Prados, Michael D.; Desjardins, Annick; Chintagumpala, Murali; Takebe, Naoko; Kaste, Sue C.; Rusch, Michael; Allen, Sariah J.; Onar-Thomas, Arzu; Stewart, Clinton F.; Fouladi, Maryam; Boyett, James M.; Gilbertson, Richard J.; Curran, Tom; Ellison, David W.; Gajjar, Amar

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Two phase II studies assessed the efficacy of vismodegib, a sonic hedgehog (SHH) pathway inhibitor that binds smoothened (SMO), in pediatric and adult recurrent medulloblastoma (MB). Patients and Methods Adult patients enrolled onto PBTC-025B and pediatric patients enrolled onto PBTC-032 were treated with vismodegib (150 to 300 mg/d). Protocol-defined response, which had to be sustained for 8 weeks, was confirmed by central neuroimaging review. Molecular tests to identify patterns of response and insensitivity were performed when tissue was available. Results A total of 31 patients were enrolled onto PBTC-025B, and 12 were enrolled onto PBTC-032. Three patients in PBTC-025B and one in PBTC-032, all with SHH-subgroup MB (SHH-MB), exhibited protocol-defined responses. Progression-free survival (PFS) was longer in those with SHH-MB than in those with non-SHH–MB, and prolonged disease stabilization occurred in 41% of patient cases of SHH-MB. Among those with SHH-MB, loss of heterozygosity of PTCH1 was associated with prolonged PFS, and diffuse staining of P53 was associated with reduced PFS. Whole-exome sequencing identified mutations in SHH genes downstream from SMO in four of four tissue samples from nonresponders and upstream of SMO in two of four patients with favorable responses. Conclusion Vismodegib exhibits activity against adult recurrent SHH-MB but not against recurrent non-SHH–MB. Inadequate accrual of pediatric patients precluded conclusions in this population. Molecular analyses support the hypothesis that SMO inhibitor activity depends on the genomic aberrations within the tumor. Such inhibitors should be advanced in SHH-MB studies; however, molecular and genomic work remains imperative to identify target populations that will truly benefit. PMID:26169613

  1. Tumors of the spine

    PubMed Central

    Ciftdemir, Mert; Kaya, Murat; Selcuk, Esref; Yalniz, Erol

    2016-01-01

    Spine tumors comprise a small percentage of reasons for back pain and other symptoms originating in the spine. The majority of the tumors involving the spinal column are metastases of visceral organ cancers which are mostly seen in older patients. Primary musculoskeletal system sarcomas involving the spinal column are rare. Benign tumors and tumor-like lesions of the musculoskeletal system are mostly seen in young patients and often cause instability and canal compromise. Optimal diagnosis and treatment of spine tumors require a multidisciplinary approach and thorough knowledge of both spine surgery and musculoskeletal tumor surgery. Either primary or metastatic tumors involving the spine are demanding problems in terms of diagnosis and treatment. Spinal instability and neurological compromise are the main and critical problems in patients with tumors of the spinal column. In the past, only a few treatment options aiming short-term control were available for treatment of primary and metastatic spine tumors. Spine surgeons adapted their approach for spine tumors according to orthopaedic oncologic principles in the last 20 years. Advances in imaging, surgical techniques and implant technology resulted in better diagnosis and surgical treatment options, especially for primary tumors. Also, modern chemotherapy drugs and regimens with new radiotherapy and radiosurgery options caused moderate to long-term local and systemic control for even primary sarcomas involving the spinal column. PMID:26925382

  2. Disparate results between proliferation rates of surgically excised prostate tumors and an in vitro bioassay using sera from a positive randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Azrad, M; Vollmer, R T; Madden, J; Polascik, T J; Snyder, D C; Ruffin, M T; Moul, J W; Brenner, D; He, X; Demark-Wahnefried, W

    2015-04-01

    In vitro bioassay has been used extensively to test the effects of culturing cancer cells in sera from humans participating in dietary interventions, i.e, studies of modified intake of nutrients for the purpose of reducing cancer risk or progression. It has been hypothesized that cell proliferation rates determined by the in vitro bioassay indicate whether modification of dietary intake could decrease cancer cell growth in vivo. It has been suggested, however, that the in vitro bioassay may not correlate with tumor cell proliferation rates in prostate cancer. We investigated the concordance of cell proliferation rates from surgically excised prostate tumor tissue with the in vitro bioassay using sera from matched patients. We used samples from an earlier randomized clinical trial that showed that supplementation with flaxseed significantly inhibited prostate cancer cell proliferation rates in vivo as indicated by Ki67 staining in tumor specimens. Proliferation rates of LNCaP, DU145 and PC3 cell lines cultured in 10% human sera from participants in the flaxseed trial were determined using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Spearman's Rho correlation coefficients (ρ) indicated no association between Ki67 staining in prostate tumors and the in vitro bioassay for the three cell lines. These disparate findings suggest that the in vitro bioassay may not provide an accurate assessment of the environment in vivo.

  3. Observational study of patients with gastroenteropancreatic and bronchial neuroendocrine tumors in Argentina: Results from the large database of a multidisciplinary group clinical multicenter study

    PubMed Central

    O’CONNOR, JUAN MANUEL; MARMISSOLLE, FABIANA; BESTANI, CLAUDIA; PESCE, VERONICA; BELLI, SUSANA; DOMINICHINI, ENZO; MENDEZ, GUILLERMO; PRICE, PAOLA; GIACOMI, NORA; PAIROLA, ALEJANDRO; LORIA, FERNANDO SÁNCHEZ; HUERTAS, EDUARDO; MARTIN, CLAUDIO; PATANE, KARINA; POLERI, CLAUDIA; ROSENBERG, MOISES; CABANNE, ANA; KUJARUK, MIRTA; CAINO, ANALIA; ZAMORA, VICTOR; MARIANI, JAVIER; DIOCA, MARIANO; PARMA, PATRICIA; PODESTA, GUSTAVO; ANDRIANI, OSCAR; GONDOLESI, GABRIEL; ROCA, ENRIQUE

    2014-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NET) include a spectrum of malignancies arising from neuroendocrine cells throughout the body. The objective of this clinical investigation of retrospectively and prospectively collected data was to describe the prevalence, demographic data, clinical symptoms and methods of diagnosis of NET and the treatment and long-term follow-up of patients with NET. Data were provided by the participating centers and assessed for consistency by internal reviewers. All the cases were centrally evaluated (when necessary) by the pathologists in our group. The tissue samples were reviewed by hematoxylin and eosin and immunohistochemical staining techniques to confirm the diagnosis of NET. In total, 532 cases were documented: 461 gastroenteropancreatic-NET (GEP-NET) and 71 bronchial NET (BNET). All the tumors were immunohistochemically defined according to the World Health Organization (WHO) and European Neuroendocrine Tumor Society criteria. The most common initial symptoms in GEP-NET were abdominal pain, diarrhea, bowel obstruction, flushing, gastrointestinal bleeding and weight loss. The most common tumor types were carcinoid (58.0%), non-functional pancreatic tumor (23.0%), metastatic NET of unknown primary (16.0%) and functional pancreatic tumor (3.0%). Of the BNET, 89.0% were typical and 11.0% atypical carcinoids. Of the patients with GEP-NET, 59.2% had distant metastasis at diagnosis. The locations of the primary tumors in GEP-NET were the small bowel (26.9%), pancreas (25.2%), colon-rectum (12.4%), appendix (7.6%), stomach (6.9%), esophagus (2.8%), duodenum (2.0%) and unknown primary (16.3%). The histological subtypes based on the WHO classification were well-differentiated NET (20.1%), well-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas (66.5%) and poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas (10.3%). Overall, 67.3% of the patients underwent surgery, 41.2% with curative intent and 26.1% for palliative purposes. The 5-year survival rates were 65.1% (95

  4. Can brain thallium 201 SPECT substitute for F-18-FDG PET in detecting recurrent brain tumor in the presence of radiation necrosis; correlation with biopsy/surgery results

    SciTech Connect

    Antar, M.A.; Barnett, G.H.; McIntyre, W.J.

    1994-05-01

    F-18-FDG PET man has been largely successful in differentiating between radiation necrosis and recurrent brain tumors. Because of the expense and unavailability of PET scanners in most clinical centers, Tl-201 SPECT scan may offer an alternative. Therefore, we have evaluated both techniques in 18 patients (13 men and 5 women) whose ages range from 28 to 74 year old. Eleven patients had glioblastoma multiformi and 4 patients high grade astrocytoma and 3 patient meningiosarcoma. All patients received radiation therapy (5500-6000 Rad) and 13 patients received also chemotherapy. PET scan was performed 40-60 min. after 5-10 mCi of F-18 FDG (i.v.) and SPECT 30 min. after 4.6 mCi of Tl-201 chloride (i.v.). Severe FDG hypometabolism was evident in the irradiated regions, in all patients. Evidence of tumor recurrence was seen in 15 patients by both FDG PET and Thallium 201 SPECT. The ratio of peak pixel uptake of suspected tumor to that of normal cortex for FDG ranged from 0.67 to 1.5 with a mean of 1.02. The ratio of peak pixel uptake of thallium 201 in the suspected lesion to that of the contralateral scalp area ranges from 0.8 to 1.9 with mean of 1.1. There was concordance between the findings of PET and SPECT in 16/18 patients. However, the volume of involvement differs in these patients; most likely secondary to different mechanisms of uptake and both studies may complement each other. Subsequent biopsy/surgery in 11 patients confirmed tumor recurrence in 10 out of 11 patients. The findings suggest that thallium 201 brain SPECT scan can provide similar (but not identical) information regarding brain tumor recurrence in these patients.

  5. Expression of the EWS/FLI-1 oncogene in murine primary bone-derived cells Results in EWS/FLI-1-dependent, ewing sarcoma-like tumors.

    PubMed

    Castillero-Trejo, Yeny; Eliazer, Susan; Xiang, Lilin; Richardson, James A; Ilaria, Robert L

    2005-10-01

    Ewing sarcoma is the second most common malignant pediatric bone tumor. Over 80% of Ewing sarcoma contain the oncogene EWS/FLI-1, which encodes the EWS/FLI-1 oncoprotein, a hybrid transcription factor comprised of NH2-terminal sequences from the RNA-binding protein EWS and the DNA-binding and COOH-terminal regions of the Ets transcription factor FLI-1. Although numerous genes are dysregulated by EWS/FLI-1, advances in Ewing sarcoma cancer biology have been hindered by the lack of an animal model because of EWS/FLI-1-mediated cytotoxicity. In this study, we have developed conditions for the isolation and propagation of murine primary bone-derived cells (mPBDC) that stably express EWS/FLI-1. Early-passage EWS/FLI-1 mPBDCs were immortalized in culture but inefficient at tumor induction, whereas later-passage cells formed sarcomatous tumors in immunocompetent syngeneic mice. Murine EWS/FLI-1 tumors contained morphologically primitive cells that lacked definitive lineage markers. Molecular characterization of murine EWS/FLI-1 tumors revealed that some but not all had acquired a novel, clonal in-frame p53 mutation associated with a constitutive loss of p21 expression. Despite indications that secondary events facilitated EWS/FLI-1 mPBDC tumorigenesis, cells remained highly dependent on EWS/FLI-1 for efficient transformation in clonogenic assays. This Ewing sarcoma animal model will be a useful tool for dissecting the molecular pathogenesis of Ewing sarcoma and provides rationale for the broader use of organ-specific progenitor cell populations for the study of human sarcoma.

  6. No Evidence of Association Between Anti–Tumor Necrosis Factor Treatment and Mortality in Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis: Results From the British Society for Rheumatology Biologics Register

    PubMed Central

    Lunt, Mark; Watson, Kath D; Dixon, William G; Symmons, Deborah P M; Hyrich, Kimme L

    2010-01-01

    Objective To study the association between anti–tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) therapy and mortality in a national cohort of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Methods We prospectively followed up 12,672 patients who were beginning anti-TNF therapy and 3,522 biologic-naive patients receiving disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) until either July 31, 2008, or death, whichever occurred first. Notification of death and cause of death was received from the UK National Death Register. Mortality was compared using Cox proportional hazards models. Inverse probability of treatment weighting was used to adjust for the confounding effects of baseline differences between groups, including age, sex, disease severity, disability, and comorbidity. Missing baseline data were accounted for using multiple imputation. Results When compared with the DMARD cohort, the anti-TNF cohort was younger (median age 57 years versus 61 years), had greater disease activity (median Disease Activity Score in 28 joints 6.6 versus 5.1), and had greater disability (median Health Assessment Questionnaire score 2.1 versus 1.6). Patients in the DMARD cohort were more likely to have a history of myocardial infarction (4.8% versus 3.1%) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (8.1% versus 4.8%) but were less likely to have had depression (16.5% versus 18.9%). There were 9,445 and 50,803 person-years of followup in the DMARD and anti-TNF cohorts, respectively, during which time 204 DMARD-treated and 856 anti-TNF–treated patients died. The weighted mortality hazard ratios in the anti-TNF cohort were as follows: all-cause 0.86 (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 0.64–1.16), circulatory disease 0.73 (95% CI 0.44–1.23), neoplasm 0.65 (95% CI 0.39–1.09), and respiratory disease 0.81 (95% CI 0.36–1.83). Conclusion Our results indicate that, compared with standard DMARD therapy, treatment with anti-TNF therapies was not associated with an increase in mortality. PMID:20662063

  7. Mammary tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1988-10-01

    Mammary neoplasia is one of the more common malignancies affecting domestic species. Despite their importance, they are often over- diagnosed, undertreated and subject to several misconceptions propagated by veterinarians and pet owners alike. Mammary neoplasia is the most frequent tumor type encountered in the female accounting for almost half of all malignancies reported. The canine has the highest incidence of mammary tumors of all domestic species. In the dog, about 65 percent of mammary tumors are benign mixed tumors, and 25 percent are carcinomas. The rest are adenomas, myoepitheliomas, and malignant mixed tumors. The age distribution of mammary tumors closely follows the age distribution of most tumors in the dog. Mammary tumors are rare in dogs 2 years old, but incidence begins to increase sharply at approximately 6 years of age. Median age at diagnosis is about 10 years. No breed predilection has been consistently reported.

  8. Brain Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    A brain tumor is a growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, ... cancer cells that grow quickly. Some are primary brain tumors, which start in the brain. Others are ...

  9. Urogenital tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1994-03-01

    An overview is provided for veterinary care of urogenital tumors in companion animals, especially the dog. Neoplasms discussed include tumors of the kidney, urinary bladder, prostate, testis, ovary, vagina, vulva and the canine transmissible venereal tumor. Topics addressed include description, diagnosis and treatment.

  10. Wilms Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Wilms Tumor KidsHealth > For Parents > Wilms Tumor Print A A A What's in this article? ... their child has cancer. Fortunately, most kids with Wilms tumor, a rare kidney cancer, survive and go on ...

  11. Pediatric brain tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jingying; Margol, Ashley; Asgharzadeh, Shahab; Erdreich-Epstein, Anat

    2015-02-01

    Pediatric brain tumors as a group, including medulloblastomas, gliomas, and atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors (ATRT) are the most common solid tumors in children and the leading cause of death from childhood cancer. Brain tumor-derived cell lines are critical for studying the biology of pediatric brain tumors and can be useful for initial screening of new therapies. Use of appropriate brain tumor cell lines for experiments is important, as results may differ depending on tumor properties, and can thus affect the conclusions and applicability of the model. Despite reports in the literature of over 60 pediatric brain tumor cell lines, the majority of published papers utilize only a small number of these cell lines. Here we list the approximately 60 currently-published pediatric brain tumor cell lines and summarize some of their central features as a resource for scientists seeking pediatric brain tumor cell lines for their research.

  12. [Perception of pT1a,b pN0 breast tumor prognosis by the French oncology community: Results of the EURISTIC national survey].

    PubMed

    Spielmann, Marc; Dalenc, Florence; Pointreau, Yoann; Azria, David; Classe, Jean-Marc; Dromain, Clarisse; Facchini, Thomas; Gonçalves, Anthony; Liegeois, Philippe; Namer, Moïse; Pivot, Xavier; Vincent-Salomon, Anne

    2016-02-01

    The prognosis of infracentimetric breast cancers (BC) is heterogeneous. The EURISTIC survey describes how French oncology specialists perceive the prognosis of pT1a,b pN0 BCs. A self-administered questionnaire has been sent to over 2000 French BC specialists. Six hundred and sixty-three physicians responded. Fifty-eight percent do not consider tumor size as a key prognostic criterion. They consider that the cutoff for poor prognosis is 22mm, 10mm and 7mm for hormone receptors (HRs)+, HER2+ and triple-negative (TN) tumors respectively. Eighty-three percent of respondents consider that a HR+ pT1a,b tumor has a good prognosis (21% and 8% for HER2+ and TN respectively). Factors perceived as most detrimental are: HER2 overexpression (29% of respondents); HR- (20%); high grade (20%); TN status (14%); high KI67 (5%); presence of lymphovascular invasion (3%); young age (2%) and high mitotic index (1%). For French specialists, immunohistochemical characteristics, in particular hormone and HER2 status, are strong prognostic factors in BCs below 1cm.

  13. Use of the Concept of Equivalent Biologically Effective Dose (BED) to Quantify the Contribution of Hyperthermia to Local Tumor Control in Radiohyperthermia Cervical Cancer Trials, and Comparison With Radiochemotherapy Results

    SciTech Connect

    Plataniotis, George A. Dale, Roger G.

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: To express the magnitude of contribution of hyperthermia to local tumor control in radiohyperthermia (RT/HT) cervical cancer trials, in terms of the radiation-equivalent biologically effective dose (BED) and to explore the potential of the combined modalities in the treatment of this neoplasm. Materials and Methods: Local control rates of both arms of each study (RT vs. RT+HT) reported from randomized controlled trials (RCT) on concurrent RT/HT for cervical cancer were reviewed. By comparing the two tumor control probabilities (TCPs) from each study, we calculated the HT-related log cell-kill and then expressed it in terms of the number of 2 Gy fraction equivalents, for a range of tumor volumes and radiosensitivities. We have compared the contribution of each modality and made some exploratory calculations on the TCPs that might be expected from a combined trimodality treatment (RT+CT+HT). Results: The HT-equivalent number of 2-Gy fractions ranges from 0.6 to 4.8 depending on radiosensitivity. Opportunities for clinically detectable improvement by the addition of HT are only available in tumors with an alpha value in the approximate range of 0.22-0.28 Gy{sup -1}. A combined treatment (RT+CT+HT) is not expected to improve prognosis in radioresistant tumors. Conclusion: The most significant improvements in TCP, which may result from the combination of RT/CT/HT for locally advanced cervical carcinomas, are likely to be limited only to those patients with tumors of relatively low-intermediate radiosensitivity.

  14. Tracheobronchial tumors

    PubMed Central

    Milenkovic, Branislava

    2016-01-01

    Tumors of trachea and bronchi are uncommon and can occur in the form of benign or low- and high-grade malignant tumors. Although tracheobronchial tumors (TBTs) represent only 0.6% of all pulmonary tumors, they are clinically significant. Delays in diagnosis of these tumors commonly occur because the signs and symptoms caused by these tumors are nonspecific and chest radiographs are often considered unremarkable. Therefore, novel radiological techniques and better access to flexible bronchoscopy enable detection of larger number of TBT. The purpose of this article is to provide a review of tracheal and bronchial tumors and discuss significant aspects of the different TBT with focus on clinical manifestations and diagnostic procedures. PMID:28066620

  15. Blood-based detection of RAS mutations to guide anti-EGFR therapy in colorectal cancer patients: concordance of results from circulating tumor DNA and tissue-based RAS testing.

    PubMed

    Schmiegel, Wolff; Scott, Rodney J; Dooley, Susan; Lewis, Wendy; Meldrum, Cliff J; Pockney, Peter; Draganic, Brian; Smith, Steve; Hewitt, Chelsee; Philimore, Hazel; Lucas, Amanda; Shi, Elva; Namdarian, Kateh; Chan, Timmy; Acosta, Danilo; Ping-Chang, Su; Tannapfel, Andrea; Reinacher-Schick, Anke; Uhl, Waldemar; Teschendorf, Christian; Wolters, Heiner; Stern, Josef; Viebahn, Richard; Friess, Helmut; Janssen, Klaus-Peter; Nitsche, Ulrich; Slotta-Huspenina, Julia; Pohl, Michael; Vangala, Deepak; Baraniskin, Alexander; Dockhorn-Dworniczak, Barbara; Hegewisch-Becker, Susanne; Ronga, Philippe; Edelstein, Daniel L; Jones, Frederick S; Hahn, Stephan; Fox, Stephen B

    2017-02-01

    An accurate blood-based RAS mutation assay to determine eligibility of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients for anti-EGFR therapy would benefit clinical practice by better informing decisions to administer treatment independent of tissue availability. The objective of this study was to determine the level of concordance between plasma and tissue RAS mutation status in patients with mCRC to gauge whether blood-based RAS mutation testing is a viable alternative to standard-of-care RAS tumor testing. RAS testing was performed on plasma samples from newly diagnosed metastatic patients, or from recurrent mCRC patients using the highly sensitive digital PCR technology, BEAMing (beads, emulsions, amplification, and magnetics), and compared with DNA sequencing data of respective FFPE (formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded) tumor samples. Discordant tissue RAS results were re-examined by BEAMing, if possible. The prevalence of RAS mutations detected in plasma (51%) vs. tumor (53%) was similar, in accord with the known prevalence of RAS mutations observed in mCRC patient populations. The positive agreement between plasma and tumor RAS results was 90.4% (47/52), the negative agreement was 93.5% (43/46), and the overall agreement (concordance) was 91.8% (90/98). The high concordance of plasma and tissue results demonstrates that blood-based RAS mutation testing is a viable alternative to tissue-based RAS testing.

  16. Tc1 and Tc2 effector cell therapy elicit long-term tumor immunity by contrasting mechanisms that result in complementary endogenous type 1 antitumor responses.

    PubMed

    Dobrzanski, Mark J; Reome, Joyce B; Hollenbaugh, Joseph A; Dutton, Richard W

    2004-02-01

    Cytolytic CD8(+) effector cells fall into two subpopulations based on cytokine secretion. Type 1 CD8(+) T cells (Tc1) secrete IFN-gamma, whereas type 2 CD8(+) T cells (Tc2) secrete IL-4 and IL-5. Both effector cell subpopulations display predominantly perforin-dependent cytolysis in vitro. Using an OVA-transfected B16 lung metastases model, we show that adoptively transferred OVA-specific Tc1 and Tc2 cells induce considerable suppression, but not cure, of pulmonary metastases. However, long-term tumor immunity prolonged survival times indefinitely and was evident by resistance to lethal tumor rechallenge. At early stages after therapy, protection by Tc2 and Tc1 effector cells were dependent in part on effector cell-derived IL-4, IL-5, and IFN-gamma, respectively. Whereas effector cell-derived perforin was not necessary. Over time the numbers of both donor cells diminished to low, yet still detectable, levels. Concomitantly, Tc1 and Tc2 effector cell therapies potentiated endogenous recipient-derived antitumor responses by inducing 1) local T cell-derived chemokines associated with type 1-like immune responses; 2) elevated levels of recipient-derived OVA tetramer-positive CD8 memory T cells that were CD44(high), CD122(+), and Ly6C(high) that predominantly produced IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha; and 3) heightened numbers of activated recipient-derived Th1 and Tc1 T cell subpopulations expressing CD25(+), CD69(+), and CD95(+) cell surface activation markers. Moreover, both Tc2 and Tc1 effector cell therapies were dependent in part on recipient-derived IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha for long-term survival and protection. Collectively, Tc1 and Tc2 effector cell immunotherapy mediate long-term tumor immunity by different mechanisms that subsequently potentiate endogenous recipient-derived type 1 antitumor responses.

  17. Tumor-Targeted Nanomedicines

    PubMed Central

    ElBayoumi, Tamer A.; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The efficacy of drug delivery systems can be enhanced by making them target-specific via the attachment of various ligands. We attempted to enhance tumor accumulation and therapeutic effect of doxorubicin-loaded long-circulating PEGylated liposomes (Doxil®, ALZA Corp.) by coupling to their surface the anti-cancer monoclonal antibody 2C5 (mAb 2C5) with nuclesome (NS)-restricted activity, that can recognize the surface of various tumor but not normal cells and specifically targets pharmaceutical carriers to tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. Following earlier in vitro results with various cancer cell lines, the mAb 2C5-liposomes were studied in vivo vs. plain and non-specific IgG-liposomes. Experimental design Antibody coupling to Doxil® was performed via the “post-insertion” technique. Using 111In-labeled liposomes, the tissue biodistribution and pharmacokinetic profile were studied, as well as their accumulation in tumors in mice was followed by the whole-body γ-scintigraphic imaging. Therapeutic efficacy of mAb 2C5-targeted Doxil® vs. non-specific IgG-modified and original Doxil® controls was followed by registering live tumor growth and determining tumor weights upon mice sacrifice. Results mAb2C5 antibody-targeted liposomes demonstrate enhanced accumulation in tumors, and the in vivo therapeutic activity of the mAb 2C5-Doxil® treatment was found to be significantly superior, resulting in final tumor weights of only 25-40% compared to all Doxil® control treatments, when tested against the subcutaneous primary murine tumors of 4T1 and C26 and human PC3 tumor in nude mice. Conclusions Our results demonstrate the remarkable capability of 2C5-targeted Doxil® to specifically deliver its cargo into various tumors significantly increasing the efficacy of therapy. PMID:19276264

  18. Canine mammary gland tumors.

    PubMed

    Sorenmo, Karin

    2003-05-01

    The National Consensus Group recommends that all women with tumors larger than 1 cm be offered chemotherapy regardless of tumor histology of lymph node status. This recommendation is to ensure that everyone at risk for failing, even though the risk may be low in women with relatively small tumors and favorable histology, has a choice and receives the benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy. This type of treatment recommendation may also be made in dogs based on recognized, well-accepted prognostic factors such as tumor size, stage, type, and histologic differentiation. Based on the limited clinical information available in veterinary medicine, the drugs that are effective in human breast cancer, such as cyclophosphamide, 5-fluorouracil, and doxorubicin, may also have a role in the treatment of malignant mammary gland tumors in dogs. Randomized prospective studies are needed, however, to evaluate the efficacy of chemotherapy in dogs with high-risk mammary gland tumors and to determine which drugs and protocols are the most efficacious. Until such studies are performed, the treatment of canine mammary gland tumors will be based on the individual oncologist's understanding of tumor biology, experience, interpretation of the available studies, and a little bit of gut-feeling. Table 2 is a proposal for treatment guidelines for malignant canine mammary gland tumors according to established prognostic factors, results from published veterinary studies, and current recommendations for breast cancer treatment in women.

  19. Tumor cell metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Garcia, Susana; Lopez-Gonzalez, Jose Sullivan; B´ez-Viveros, José Luis; Aguilar-Cazares, Dolores

    2011-01-01

    Cancer is a genetic disease that is caused by mutations in oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes and stability genes. The fact that the metabolism of tumor cells is altered has been known for many years. However, the mechanisms and consequences of metabolic reprogramming have just begun to be understood. In this review, an integral view of tumor cell metabolism is presented, showing how metabolic pathways are reprogrammed to satisfy tumor cell proliferation and survival requirements. In tumor cells, glycolysis is strongly enhanced to fulfill the high ATP demands of these cells; glucose carbons are the main building blocks in fatty acid and nucleotide biosynthesis. Glutaminolysis is also increased to satisfy NADPH regeneration, whereas glutamine carbons replenish the Krebs cycle, which produces metabolites that are constantly used for macromolecular biosynthesis. A characteristic feature of the tumor microenvironment is acidosis, which results from the local increase in lactic acid production by tumor cells. This phenomenon is attributed to the carbons from glutamine and glucose, which are also used for lactic acid production. Lactic acidosis also directs the metabolic reprogramming of tumor cells and serves as an additional selective pressure. Finally, we also discuss the role of mitochondria in supporting tumor cell metabolism. PMID:22057267

  20. Correlation of scintigraphic results using 123I-methoxybenzamide with hormone levels and tumor size response to quinagolide in patients with pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Ferone, D; Lastoria, S; Colao, A; Varrella, P; Cerbone, G; Acampa, W; Merola, B; Salvatore, M; Lombardi, G

    1998-01-01

    The efficacy of dopaminergic agents in the medical treatment of pituitary adenomas is well known. Quinagolide is a nonergot derivative dopamine agonist, which binds dopamine D2 receptors with high affinity. The treatment with this drug is reported to suppress hormone levels and to cause tumor shrinkage in prolactinomas and in a few GH-secreting pituitary adenomas. In clinically nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas (NFPA), the efficacy of quinagolide treatment is controversial. The scintigraphy of the pituitary region using 123I-methoxybenzamide (123I-IBZM) allows us to visualize in vivo the expression of dopamine D2 receptors on pituitary tumors. In this study, the pituitary scintigraphy with 123I-IBZM was performed in 14 patients with macroadenoma before starting a long-term treatment with quinagolide: 6 NFPA with high circulating alpha-subunit levels, 4 PRL-secreting, and 4 GH-secreting adenomas. A 3-point score was used to grade the ligand accumulation within the pituitary adenomas: 0 = negative, 1 = moderate uptake (equal to that recorded in the cerebral cortex), and 2 = intense uptake (equal to that recorded in the basal nuclei). The treatment with quinagolide was carried out at the dose of 0.3-0.6 mg/day for 6-12 months. Clinical, biochemical and hormonal assessment was repeated monthly during the first 3 months, then quarterly. Sellar magnetic resonance imaging was performed before and after 6 and 12 months of quinagolide treatment, to evaluate tumor shrinkage (> 25% of baseline size). In all 14 patients, a significant positive correlation was found between the degree of 123I-IBZM uptake and the clinical response to quinagolide treatment (r = 0.90; P < 0.001). In particular, the normalization of serum alpha-subunit and PRL levels, respectively, was achieved in 3 patients with NFPA and in 2 patients with prolactinoma, who showed intense 123I-IBZM uptake in the pituitary region. In 4 of these 5 patients with positive scan, a significant tumor shrinkage occurred

  1. Hypothalamic tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... occur at any age. They are often more aggressive in adults than in children. In adults, tumors ... The treatment depends on how aggressive the tumor is, and whether it is a glioma or another type of cancer. Treatment may involve combinations of surgery, radiation , ...

  2. Carcinoid Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    Carcinoid tumors are rare, slow-growing cancers. They usually start in the lining of the digestive tract or in the lungs. They grow ... trouble breathing. Surgery is the main treatment for carcinoid tumors. If they haven't spread to other parts of the body, surgery can cure the cancer.

  3. Pituitary Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... pituitary is the "master control gland" - it makes hormones that affect growth and the functions of other glands in the body. Pituitary tumors are common, but often they don't cause health ... tumor produces hormones and disrupts the balance of hormones in your ...

  4. Pindborg tumor

    PubMed Central

    Caliaperoumal, Santhosh Kumar; Gowri, S.; Dinakar, J.

    2016-01-01

    Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT), also known as Pindborg tumor, is a rare odontogenic epithelial neoplasm. So far, nearly 200 cases have been reported in the literature. We are reporting a case of CEOT in a 42-year-old male patient with painless bony swelling in the mandible. The clinical, radiographic, and histopathologic features are discussed with relevant references. PMID:27041911

  5. Hhip regulates tumor-stroma-mediated upregulation of tumor angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Vijayendra; Kim, Dong Young; Kwon, Young-Guen

    2017-01-01

    Tumor growth is governed by the coordinated action of various types of cells that are present in the tumor environment. Fibroblasts, which constitute a major fraction of the stroma, participate actively in various signaling events and regulate tumor development and metastasis. The Hedgehog (Hh) pathway plays an important role in promoting tumor malignancy via fibroblasts; however, the role of hedgehog interacting protein (hhip; inhibitor of Hh pathway) in tumor growth is poorly understood. Here we implanted B16F10 tumors in hhip+/− mice to study the tumor growth characteristics and the vascular phenotype. Furthermore, the mechanism involved in the observed phenomena was explored to reveal the role of hhip in tumor growth. The tumors that were implanted in hhip+/− mice exhibited accelerated growth and increased tumor angiogenesis. Although we observed a decrease in hypoxia, blood vessels still had abnormal phenotype. We found that increased Hh signaling in tumor fibroblasts induced a high expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which subsequently resulted in an increased proliferation of endothelial cells. Thus, the heterozygous knockdown of hhip in mice could affect Hh signaling in tumor fibroblasts, which could cause the increased production of the growth factor VEGF. This signaling, via a paracrine effect on endothelial cells, increased tumor vascular density. PMID:28127049

  6. Silencing NFBD1/MDC1 enhances the radiosensitivity of human nasopharyngeal cancer CNE1 cells and results in tumor growth inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z; Zeng, Q; Chen, T; Liao, K; Bu, Y; Hong, S; Hu, G

    2015-01-01

    NFBD1 functions in cell cycle checkpoint activation and DNA repair following ionizing radiation (IR). In this study, we defined the NFBD1 as a tractable molecular target to radiosensitize nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cells. Silencing NFBD1 using lentivirus-mediated shRNA-sensitized NPC cells to radiation in a dose-dependent manner, increasing apoptotic cell death, decreasing clonogenic survival and delaying DNA damage repair. Furthermore, downregulation of NFBD1 inhibited the amplification of the IR-induced DNA damage signal, and failed to accumulate and retain DNA damage-response proteins at the DNA damage sites, which leaded to defective checkpoint activation following DNA damage. We also implicated the involvement of NFBD1 in IR-induced Rad51 and DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit foci formation. Xenografts models in nude mice showed that silencing NFBD1 significantly enhanced the antitumor activity of IR, leading to tumor growth inhibition of the combination therapy. Our studies suggested that a combination of gene therapy and radiation therapy may be an effective strategy for human NPC treatment. PMID:26247734

  7. Urokinase-type Plasminogen Activator Resulting from Endometrial Carcinogenesis Enhances Tumor Invasion and Correlates with Poor Outcome of Endometrial Carcinoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chia-Yen; Chang, Ming-Cheng; Huang, Wei-Yun; Huang, Ching-Ting; Tang, Yu-Chien; Huang, Hsien-Da; Kuo, Kuan-Ting; Chen, Chi-An; Cheng, Wen-Fang

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the dysregulated genes involved in the tumorigenesis and progression of endometrial endometrioid adenocarcinoma (EEC), and their possible mechanisms. Endometrial specimens including normal endometrial tissues, atypical endometrial hyperplasia, and EEC were analyzed. The expression profiles were compared using GeneChip Array. The gene expression levels were determined by real-time RT-PCR in the training and testing sets to correlate the clinico-pathological parameters of EEC. Immunoblotting, in vitro cell migration and invasion assays were performed in human endometrial cancer cell lines and their transfectants. In microarray analysis, seven dysregulated genes were identified. Only the levels of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) were higher in EEC with deep myometrial invasion, positive lympho-vascular space invasion, lymph node metastasis, and advanced stages. After multivariate analysis, uPA was the only independent poor prognostic factor for disease-free survival in the EEC patients (hazard ratio: 4.65, p = 0.03). uPA may enhance the migratory and invasive capabilities of endometrial tumor cells by the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, Akt and p38 molecules. uPA is a dysregulated gene involved in the tumorigenesis, bio-pathological features and outcomes of EEC. uPA may be a potential molecule and target for the detection and treatment of EEC. PMID:26033187

  8. Reconstruction of the abdominal wall by using a combination of the human acellular dermal matrix implant and an interpositional omentum flap after extensive tumor resection in patients with abdominal wall neoplasm: A preliminary result

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yan; Tang, Rui; Gong, Ding-Quan; Qian, Yun-Liang

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To present our trial using a combination of the human acellular dermal matrix (HADM) implant and an interpositional omentum flap to repair giant abdominal wall defects after extensive tumor resection. METHODS: Between February and October of 2007, three patients with giant defects of the abdominal wall after extensive tumor resection underwent reconstruction with a combination of HADM and omentum flap. Postoperative morbidities and signs of herniation were monitored. RESULTS: The abdominal wall reconstruction was successful in these three patients, there was no severe morbidity and no signs of herniation in the follow-up period. CONCLUSION: The combination of HADM and omentum flap offers a new, safe and effective alternative to traditional forms in the repair of giant abdominal wall defects. Further analysis of the long-term outcome and more cases are needed to assess the reliability of this technique. PMID:18205267

  9. Spectroscopic-guided brain tumor resection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wei-Chiang; Toms, Steven A.; Jansen, E. Duco; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2000-05-01

    A pilot in vivo study was conducted to investigate the feasibility of using optical spectroscopy for brain tumor margin detection. Fluorescence and diffuse reflectance spectra were acquired using a portable clinical spectroscopic system from normal brain tissues, tumors, and tumor margins in 21 brain tumor patients undergoing craniotomy. Results form this study show the potential of optical spectroscopy in detecting infiltrating tumor margins of primary brain tumors.

  10. Tumor Markers

    MedlinePlus

    ... types: Germ cell tumors, lymphoma, leukemia, melanoma, and neuroblastoma Tissue analyzed: Blood How used: To assess stage, ... NSE) Cancer types: Small cell lung cancer and neuroblastoma Tissue analyzed: Blood How used: To help in ...

  11. Wilms' Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... team and have training in child development, recreation, psychology or social work. If your child must remain ... conditions/wilms-tumor/basics/definition/CON-20043492 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and Terms Any use of ...

  12. Tumor Grade

    MedlinePlus

    ... Other Funding Find NCI funding for small business innovation, technology transfer, and contracts Training Cancer Training at ... much of the tumor tissue has normal breast (milk) duct structures Nuclear grade : an evaluation of the ...

  13. Spinal tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... Livingstone; 2014:chap 49. Read More Brain tumor - children Hodgkin lymphoma Metastasis Spinal cord trauma Review Date 8/15/2016 Updated by: Todd Gersten, MD, Hematology/Oncology, Florida Cancer Specialists & Research Institute, Wellington, FL. Review ...

  14. Wilms tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... a type of kidney cancer that occurs in children. Causes WT is the most common form of childhood kidney cancer. The exact cause of this tumor in most children is unknown. A missing iris of the eye ( ...

  15. Pituitary tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... enough of its hormones. This condition is called hypopituitarism . The causes of pituitary tumors are unknown. Some ... Cyst Endocrine glands Gigantism Growth hormone test Hyperthyroidism Hypopituitarism Multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN) I Prolactin blood test ...

  16. Morphine responsiveness, efficacy and tolerability in patients with chronic non-tumor associated pain - results of a double-blind placebo-controlled trial (MONTAS).

    PubMed

    Maier, Christoph; Hildebrandt, Jan; Klinger, Regine; Henrich-Eberl, Christine; Lindena, Gabriele

    2002-06-01

    Efficacy, long-term effectiveness and safety of opioids in chronic non-tumor associated pain syndromes (NTAS) are still under debate. The study (MONTAS) was performed by physicians and psychologists as a multicenter prospective, randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled crossover trial, followed by an open long-term study. Patients were enrolled only when pain relief from specific defined pretreatment was insufficient. Patients were randomly assigned to group I receiving sustained-release morphine (doses: 20mg/d titrated appropriately to a maximum of 180mg/d) in the first week, placebo in the second week or group II receiving study medication in reverse order. The primary endpoint was defined as: (i) adequate pain relief (pain intensity of less than 50% of pretreatment intensity or less than 5 on a 11 point Numerical Rating Scale) and (ii) pain rated as tolerable and (iii) adverse effects rated as tolerable. Full responders (all criteria fulfilled under morphine) and partial responders (less pain relief, but tolerable side effects) were offered continuation of treatment with oral morphine in an open long-term study (LAMONTAS), to be published later. Forty-nine patients of 997 patients screened fulfilled the inclusion criteria for MONTAS and were enrolled. Mean pain intensity in all patients was reduced by morphine from 7.8 to 5.2 (NNT: 2.2); in 17 (35.4%) responders from 7.4 to 2.9, in 17 (35.4%) partial responders from 7.8 to 5.6 and in 14 (29.2%) non-responders from 8.2 to 7.7. Pain reduction correlated with improvement of physical function. Pain disability, depression score, mood and exercise endurance improved, particularly in responders. Gastrointestinal complaints increased, central nervous system-related complaints were reduced. Efficacy and safety of morphine in NTAS were demonstrated in this randomized-controlled trial. Pretreatment failure was the indication for trying morphine treatment; predictive factors for responsiveness could not be identified.

  17. Intramural esophageal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, Katarzyna; Rębowski, Marek; Kozak, Józef

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Intramural esophageal tumors (IET) are located between unchanged mucous membrane and muscularis mucosae. They can be both benign and malignant. Aim To evaluate diagnostic and therapeutic difficulties of IET. Material and methods During the years 2010–2015, 11 patients with IET were treated in our clinic. Diagnostics included gastroscopy, computed tomography of the chest, endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) guided fine needle biopsy, and positron emission tomography (PET) of the esophagus in cases with no histopathological confirmation. Results Based on the conducted analysis we diagnosed 1 case of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), 1 case of adenocarcinoma, and 2 cases of esophageal cysts. In another 7 cases radiological images resembled leiomyoma but with no histopathological confirmation. Esophagectomy was performed in 2 cases of malignant tumors and 1 case of a large benign tumor. In other cases surgical enucleation of tumors was performed. Postoperatively we diagnosed 6 cases of leiomyoma, 1 case of schwannoma, 2 esophageal cysts, 1 case of GIST and 1 of esophageal cancer. Conclusions Intramural esophageal tumors is a very diverse group of tumors, both malignant and benign. In every case of IET we should seek histopathological conformation. Treatment of IET depends on localization, size and histopathological type of lesion. PMID:28096828

  18. Spinal Cord Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    Spinal cord tumor Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff A spinal tumor is a growth that develops within your ... as vertebral tumors. Tumors that begin within the spinal cord itself are called spinal cord tumors. There are ...

  19. What Is Wilms Tumor?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment? Wilms Tumor About Wilms Tumor What Is Wilms Tumor? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... live normal, healthy lives with just one kidney. Wilms tumors Wilms tumors are the most common cancers in ...

  20. Results of Bladder-Conserving Treatment, Consisting of Brachytherapy Combined With Limited Surgery and External Beam Radiotherapy, for Patients With Solitary T1-T3 Bladder Tumors Less Than 5 cm in Diameter

    SciTech Connect

    Blank, Leo; Koedooder, Kees; Os, Rob van; Kar, Marlou van de; Haitze van der Veen, J.; Koning, Caro

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term, local relapse-free, distant metastasis-free, and overall survival rates in patients with a solitary bladder tumor <5 cm in diameter who were treated with external beam radiotherapy, limited surgery, and brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: The results of 122 patients after bladder-saving treatment were analyzed. After EBRT, the patients underwent cystotomy, and catheters were implanted. Of the 122 patients, 99 were treated with a continuous low-dose-rate technique and 23 patients with a pulsed-dose-rate technique. The median follow-up period was 5 years. Results: The 5-year local and distant relapse-free survival rate was 76% and 83%, respectively. The 5 and 10-year relapse-free survival rate was 69% and 66%, respectively. For overall survival, the corresponding rates were 73% and 49%. Toxicity was low. No differences were found between the continuous low-dose-rate and pulsed-dose-rate groups. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that external beam radiotherapy followed by brachytherapy as a bladder-saving treatment for a selected group of patients with bladder cancer yields excellent local tumor control and low toxicity.

  1. Familiality in brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Blumenthal, Deborah T.; Cannon-Albright, Lisa A.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Familiality in brain tumors is not definitively substantiated. Methods: We used the Utah Population Data Base (UPDB), a genealogy representing the Utah pioneers and their descendants, record-linked to statewide cancer records, to describe the familial nature of primary brain cancer. We examined the familial clustering of primary brain tumors, including subgroups defined by histologic type and age at diagnosis. The UPDB includes 1,401 primary brain tumor cases defined as astrocytoma or glioblastoma, all with at least three generations of genealogy data. We tested the hypothesis of excess relatedness of brain tumor cases using the Genealogical Index of Familiality method. We estimated relative risks for brain tumors in relatives using rates of brain tumors estimated internally. Results: Significant excess relatedness was observed for astrocytomas and glioblastomas considered as a group (n = 1,401), for astrocytomas considered separately (n = 744), but not for glioblastomas considered separately (n = 658). Significantly increased risks to first- and second-degree relatives for astrocytomas were identified for relatives of astrocytomas considered separately. Significantly increased risks to first-degree relatives, but not second degree, were observed for astrocytoma and glioblastoma cases considered together, and for glioblastoma cases considered separately. Conclusions: This study provides strong evidence for a familial contribution to primary brain cancer risk. There is evidence that this familial aspect includes not only shared environment, but also a heritable component. Extended high-risk brain tumor pedigrees identified in the UPDB may provide the opportunity to identify predisposition genes responsible for familial brain tumors. GLOSSARY GBM = glioblastoma; GIF = Genealogical Index of Familiality; HGG = high-grade gliomas; ICD-O = International Classification of Disease–Oncology; LGG = low-grade gliomas; RR = relative risks; SEER = Surveillance

  2. Peri-tumoral leakage during intra-tumoral convection-enhanced delivery has implications for efficacy of peri-tumoral infusion before removal of tumor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoliang; Saito, Ryuta; Nakamura, Taigen; Zhang, Rong; Sonoda, Yukihiko; Kumabe, Toshihiro; Forsayeth, John; Bankiewicz, Krystof; Tominaga, Teiji

    2016-01-01

    In cases of malignant brain tumors, infiltrating tumor cells that exist at the tumor-surrounding brain tissue always escape from cytoreductive surgery and, protected by blood-brain barrier (BBB), survive the adjuvant chemoradiotherapy, eventually leading to tumor recurrence. Local interstitial delivery of chemotherapeutic agents is a promising strategy to target these cells. During our effort to develop effective drug delivery methods by intra-tumoral infusion of chemotherapeutic agents, we found consistent pattern of leakage from the tumor. Here we describe our findings and propose promising strategy to cover the brain tissue surrounding the tumor with therapeutic agents by means of convection-enhanced delivery. First, the intracranial tumor isograft model was used to define patterns of leakage from tumor mass after intra-tumoral infusion of the chemotherapeutic agents. Liposomal doxorubicin, although first distributed inside the tumor, distributed diffusely into the surrounding normal brain once the leakage happen. Trypan blue dye was used to evaluate the distribution pattern of peri-tumoral infusions. When infused intra- or peri-tumorally, infusates distributed robustly into the tumor border. Subsequently, volume of distributions with different infusion scheduling; including intra-tumoral infusion, peri-tumoral infusion after tumor resection, peri-tumoral infusion without tumor removal with or without systemic infusion of steroids, were compared with Evans-blue dye. Peri-tumoral infusion without tumor removal resulted in maximum volume of distribution. Prior use of steroids further increased the volume of distribution. Local interstitial drug delivery targeting tumor surrounding brain tissue before tumor removal should be more effective when targeting the invading cells.

  3. Superior sulcus tumors (Pancoast tumors)

    PubMed Central

    Battistella, Lucia; Mammana, Marco; Calabrese, Francesca; Rea, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Superior Sulcus Tumors, frequently termed as Pancoast tumors, are a wide range of tumors invading the apical chest wall. Due to its localization in the apex of the lung, with the potential invasion of the lower part of the brachial plexus, first ribs, vertebrae, subclavian vessels or stellate ganglion, the superior sulcus tumors cause characteristic symptoms, like arm or shoulder pain or Horner’s syndrome. The management of superior sulcus tumors has dramatically evolved over the past 50 years. Originally deemed universally fatal, in 1956, Shaw and Paulson introduced a new treatment paradigm with combined radiotherapy and surgery ensuring 5-year survival of approximately 30%. During the 1990s, following the need to improve systemic as well as local control, a trimodality approach including induction concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by surgical resection was introduced, reaching 5-year survival rates up to 44% and becoming the standard of care. Many efforts have been persecuted, also, to obtain higher complete resection rates using appropriate surgical approaches and involving multidisciplinary team including spine surgeon or vascular surgeon. Other potential treatment options are under consideration like prophylactic cranial irradiation or the addition of other chemotherapy agents or biologic agents to the trimodality approach. PMID:27429965

  4. Adding a combination of hydroxycitrate and lipoic acid (METABLOC™) to chemotherapy improves effectiveness against tumor development: experimental results and case report.

    PubMed

    Guais, Adeline; Baronzio, GianFranco; Sanders, Edward; Campion, Frédéric; Mainini, Carlo; Fiorentini, Giammaria; Montagnani, Francesco; Behzadi, Mahsa; Schwartz, Laurent; Abolhassani, Mohammad

    2012-02-01

    Altered metabolism of cancer first highlighted by Otto Warburg has a long history. Although ignored for a considerable amount of time, it is now receiving substantial attention. We recently published results obtained with a combination of two drugs, lipoic acid and hydroxycitrate, targeting metabolic enzymes particularly affected in cancer: ATP citrate lyase and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase. This treatment was as efficient as chemotherapy in the three mouse cancer models that were tested. In this work, we asked if our drug combination could be used in conjunction with standard cytotoxic chemotherapy, in particular cisplatin, to improve basic protocol efficacy. A combination of lipoic acid and hydroxycitrate was administered to mice implanted with syngeneic cancer cells, LL/2 lung carcinoma and MBT-2 bladder carcinoma, concommitantly with classical chemotherapy (cisplatin or methotrexate). We demonstrate that the triple combination lipoic acid + hydroxycitrate + cisplatin or methotrexate is more efficient than cisplatin or methotrexate used individually or the combination of lipoic acid and hydroxycitrate administered alone. Of particular note are the results obtained in the treatment of an 80 year-old female who presented with ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas accompanied by liver metastases. A treatment course using gemcitabine plus α-lipoic acid and hydroxycitrate gave highly promising results. The in vivo data, coupled with the case study results, suggest a possible advantage in using a treatment targeted at cancer metabolism in association with classical chemotherapy.

  5. Pituitary Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... almost always benign (not cancerous), but can cause hormonal imbalances and interfere with the normal function of the pituitary gland. Because the pituitary affects so many functions of the body, ... the tumor mass or hormonal changes (either too much or too little hormone). ...

  6. Estimation of the tumor size at cure threshold among aggressive non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs): evidence from the surveillance, epidemiology, and end results (SEER) program and the national lung screening trial (NLST).

    PubMed

    Goldwasser, Deborah L

    2017-03-15

    The National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) demonstrated that non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) mortality can be reduced by a program of annual CT screening in high-risk individuals. However, CT screening regimens and adherence vary, potentially impacting the lung cancer mortality benefit. We defined the NSCLC cure threshold as the maximum tumor size at which a given NSCLC would be curable due to early detection. We obtained data from 518,234 NSCLCs documented in the U.S. SEER cancer registry between 1988 and 2012 and 1769 NSCLCs detected in the NLST. We demonstrated mathematically that the distribution function governing the cure threshold for the most aggressive NSCLCs, G(x|Φ = 1), was embedded in the probability function governing detection of SEER-documented NSCLCs. We determined the resulting probability functions governing detection over a range of G(x|Φ = 1) scenarios and compared them with their expected functional forms. We constructed a simulation framework to determine the cure threshold models most consistent with tumor sizes and outcomes documented in SEER and the NLST. Whereas the median tumor size for lethal NSCLCs documented in SEER is 43 mm (males) and 40 mm (females), a simulation model in which the median cure threshold for the most aggressive NSCLCs is 10 mm (males) and 15 mm (females) best fit the SEER and NLST data. The majority of NSCLCs in the NLST were treated at sizes greater than our median cure threshold estimates. New technology is needed to better distinguish and treat the most aggressive NSCLCs when they are small (i.e., 5-15 mm).

  7. Impact of EWS-ETS fusion type on disease progression in Ewing's sarcoma/peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumor: prospective results from the cooperative Euro-E.W.I.N.G. 99 trial.

    PubMed

    Le Deley, Marie-Cecile; Delattre, Olivier; Schaefer, Karl-Ludwig; Burchill, Sue A; Koehler, Gabriele; Hogendoorn, Pancras C W; Lion, Thomas; Poremba, Christopher; Marandet, Julien; Ballet, Stelly; Pierron, Gaelle; Brownhill, Samantha C; Nesslböck, Michaela; Ranft, Andreas; Dirksen, Uta; Oberlin, Odile; Lewis, Ian J; Craft, Alan W; Jürgens, Heribert; Kovar, Heinrich

    2010-04-20

    PURPOSE EWS-ETS fusion genes are the driving force in Ewing's sarcoma pathogenesis. Because of the variable breakpoint locations in the involved genes, there is heterogeneity in fusion RNA and protein architecture. Since previous retrospective studies suggested prognostic differences among patients expressing different EWS-FLI1 fusion types, the impact of fusion RNA architecture on disease progression and relapse was studied prospectively within the Euro-E.W.I.N.G. 99 clinical trial. PATIENTS AND METHODS Among 1,957 patients who registered before January 1, 2007, 703 primary tumors were accessible for the molecular biology study. Fusion type was assessed by polymerase chain reaction on frozen (n = 578) or paraffin-embedded materials (n = 125). The primary end point was the time to disease progression or relapse. Results After exclusion of noninformative patients, 565 patients were entered into the prognostic factor analysis comparing type 1 (n = 296), type 2 (n = 133), nontype 1/nontype 2 EWS-FLI1 (n = 91) and EWS-ERG fusions (n = 45). Median follow-up time was 4.5 years. The distribution of sex, age, tumor volume, tumor site, disease extension, or histologic response did not differ between the four fusion type groups. We did not observe any significant prognostic value of the fusion type on the risk of progression or relapse. The only slight difference was that the risk of progression or relapse associated with nontype 1/nontype 2 EWS-FLI1 fusions was 1.38 (95% CI, 0.96 to 2.0) times higher than risk associated with other fusion types, but it was not significant (P = .10). CONCLUSION In contrast to retrospective studies, the prospective evaluation did not confirm a prognostic benefit for type 1 EWS-FLI1 fusions.

  8. LanroNET, a non-interventional, prospective study to assess the resource utilization and cost of lanreotide autogel 120 mg in Polish patients with neuroendocrine tumorsresults of interim analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bednarczuk, Tomasz; Kaminski, Grzegorz; Kos-Kudla, Beata

    2014-01-01

    Aim of the study To examine characteristics and treatment patterns of symptomatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) patients who received lanreotide Autogel 120 mg (ATG120) administered as part of routine clinical practice. Material and methods Lanro-NET is a national, multicenter, non-interventional, observational study in the population of adult patients with symptomatic NETs treated with ATG120 for at least three months before inclusion. Data on demographic and clinical characteristics of the population, dosing interval regimen and aspects of administration were collected prospectively during 12 months. Costs were calculated from the perspective of public payer for the year 2014. Results Fifty-two patients were enrolled in the study. Primary tumors were located predominantly in gastrointestinal tract (51.2%), all tumors were metastatic. The most commonly reported disease symptoms were flushing and diarrhea (55.8% of patients). 86% of patients had undergone surgery, chemotherapy and radioisotope therapy were used in 11.6% and 46.5% of patients, respectively. During the 12-months observation 12 (28%) patients received ATG120 at an extended dosing interval (> 4 weeks), the mean number of days between injections was 31.75 (SD 6.74). The cost of ATG12 was estimated at 4273.17 PLN patient/month. In all patients ATG120 was administered by nurse, 51.6% of injections in out-patient setting, 48.4% – in hospital. Conclusions This study presents the current use of ATG120 in the population of Polish NETs patients in a realistic clinical settings. Finding that 28% of patients could be treated with extended dose intervals supports the potential for ATG120 of reducing treatment burden. PMID:25784845

  9. [Testicular germ cell tumors].

    PubMed

    Dourthe, L M; Ouachet, M; Fizazi, K; Droz, J P

    1998-09-01

    Testicle germ cells tumors are the most common young men neoplasm. The incidence is maximal in Scandinavian countries. Cryptorchidism is a predisposing factor. Diagnosis is clinic, first treatment is radical orchidectomy by inguinal incision, after study of tumor markers. Histology shows seminoma or non seminomatous tumor. Carcinoma in situ is the precursor of invasive germ cell tumors. Germ cell tumors have no p53 mutation, and have isochrome of the short arm of chromosome 12 as a specific marker. With the results of histological, biochemical and radiographic evaluation, patient are classified as follows: good, intermediate and poor risk prognosis. Standard treatment of stage I seminoma is prophylactic irradiation. Stage II with less than 3 cm lymph node too. Other situations need a cisplatin based chemotherapy. In case of metastatic residuals masses more than 3 cm, surgery need to be discussed. Stage I non seminomatous germ cell tumors are treated by retroperitoneal lymphadenectomy, by surveillance or by two cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy with cisplatin, etoposide and bleomycin (BEP). Standard treatment of good prognosis stage II and III is three cycles of BEP, four for poor prognosis. Residual mass need surgery, adjuvant chemotherapy is necessary in presence of viable germ cell. Standard treatment for relapses is chemotherapy with cisplatin, ifosfamide and vinblastine with a 30% remission rate. The place of high dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell transplantation is not yet standardised. New drugs, as paclitaxel, are under studies.

  10. AT-57LONG-TERM CLINICAL RESULTS OF EXTENSIVE TUMOR REMOVAL FOLLOWED BY ACNU-BASED CHEMORADIOTHERAPY FOR 147 ANAPLASTIC GLIOMAS

    PubMed Central

    Takayuki, Yasuda; Masayuki, Nitta; Takashi, Maruyama; Taichi, Saito; Satoko, Ikuta; Yoshikazu, Okada; Hiroshi, Iseki; Yoshihiro, Muragaki

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Recent randomized trials showed that highly extent of resection (EOR) and PCV chemoradiotherapy had therapeutic long-term efficacy to anaplastic glioma (AG). From 2000, we have consistently enforced extensive removal and ACNU-based chemoradiotherapy for AG. We report retrospective clinical results of a single institution. METHODS: We reviewed 147 cases of primary AG between 2000 and 2011 (Male : Female = 94:53, average age; 43.9 year-old). 69 were anaplastic astrocytoma (41%), 43 were anaplastic oligoastrocytoma (29%), and 44 were anaplastic oligodendroglioma (30%). The intraoperative MRI was performed in 133 cases (90%), and awake surgery was performed in 58 cases (39%). Gross-total removal was 46 (31%), partial removal was 89 (61%), and biopsy was 12 (8%) (average; 83%, median; 95%). After resection, 60 Gy radiotherapy and ACNU or PAV chemotherapy were performed. The average Mib-1 index was 15%. The mean observation periods were 57 months and 95% follow-up rate. RESULTS: Overall survival (OS) wasn't reached median. The 3y-OS was 82%, 5y-OSs was 72%, and 10y-OS was 66%. There was no statistical significance among AA, AOA, AO (5y-OS; 64%, 79%, 77%). The each 5 years survival rate of gross-total resection, partial resection, and biopsy were 83%, 70%, 39%, and there was statistical significance (P = 0.0024). Extent of resection (EOR) correlated OS in AA (P = 0.02) but not in oligodendroglial subtypes (P = 0.6). Statistical significant factors were EOR (P = 0.0024) and Mib-1 index (P = 0.013). The significant factors in multi variable analysis were EOR (more than 95% or not, HR 2.5) and Mib-1 index (more than 13% or not, HR 2.3). The median PFS was 8.3, and 5y-PFS was 59%,and 10y-PFS was 45%. CONCLUSION: Our long-term clinical results of AG treated with extensive resection and ACNU-based chemoradiotherapy were better than previous reports. The EOR contributed better prognosis especially for AA.

  11. COSMIC: A Regimen of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Plus Dose-Escalated, Raster-Scanned Carbon Ion Boost for Malignant Salivary Gland Tumors: Results of the Prospective Phase 2 Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Alexandra D.; Nikoghosyan, Anna V.; Lossner, Karen; Haberer, Thomas; Jäkel, Oliver; Münter, Marc W.; Debus, Jürgen

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and dose-escalated carbon ion (C12) therapy in adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) and other malignant salivary gland tumors (MSGTs) of the head and neck. Patients and Methods: COSMIC (combined treatment of malignant salivary gland tumors with intensity modulated radiation therapy and carbon ions) is a prospective phase 2 trial of 24 Gy(RBE) C12 followed by 50 Gy IMRT in patients with pathologically confirmed MSGT. The primary endpoint is mucositis Common Terminology Criteria grade 3; the secondary endpoints are locoregional control (LC), progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), and toxicity. Toxicity was scored according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3; treatment response was scored according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors 1.1. Results: Between July 2010 and August 2011, 54 patients were accrued, and 53 were available for evaluation. The median follow-up time was 42 months; patients with microscopically incomplete resections (R1, n=20), gross residual disease (R2, n=17), and inoperable disease (n=16) were included. Eighty-nine percent of patients had ACC, and 57% had T4 tumors. The most common primary sites were paranasal sinus (34%), submandibular gland, and palate. At the completion of radiation therapy, 26% of patients experienced grade 3 mucositis, and 20 patients reported adverse events of the ear (38%). The most common observed late effects were grade 1 xerostomia (49%), hearing impairment (25%, 2% ipsilateral hearing loss), and adverse events of the eye (20%), but no visual impairment or loss of vision. Grade 1 central nervous system necrosis occurred in 6%, and 1 grade 4 ICA hemorrhage without neurologic sequelae. The best response was 54% (complete response/partial remission). At 3 years, the LC, PFS, and OS were 81.9%, 57.9%, and 78.4%, respectively. No difference was found regarding resection status. The

  12. Concordance in Biomarker Status Between Bladder Tumors at Time of Transurethral Resection and Subsequent Radical Cystectomy: Results of a 5-year Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Passoni, Niccolò M.; Shariat, Shahrokh F.; Bagrodia, Aditya; Francis, Franto; Rachakonda, Varun; Xylinas, Evanguelos; Kapur, Payal; Sagalowsky, Arthur I.; Lotan, Yair

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the concordance rate in alterations of molecular markers at the time of transurethral resection (TUR) and subsequent radical cystectomy (RC) among patients with high-grade urothelial carcinoma of the bladder (UCB). Methods: We prospectively performed immunohistochemical staining p53, p21, p27, Ki-67 and cyclin E1 on TUR and on RC specimens from 102 patients treated with RC and bilateral lymphadenectomy for high-grade UCB. We analyzed the concordance rate of individual markers and of the number of altered markers. Concordant and discordant findings were reported in the overall population and according to clinical stage. Results: Median patient age was 74 years (IQR 67–79) and mostly male (86%). Median time from TUR to RC was 1.5 months (IQR 1.0–2.4). Clinical stage at time of RC was cTa/Tis/T1 in 50% , cT2 in 47% , and cT4 in 1% of patients Nine (9%) patients received neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The concordance of biomarkers between TUR and RC specimens was 92.2% , 77.5% , 80.4% , 77.5% , and 83.3% for cyclin E1, p21, p27, p53 and Ki-67, respectively. The concordance between number of altered biomarkers was 51.0%. Conclusions: The rate of individual marker alterations at time of TUR closely approximates that found at RC specimens. However, the correlation of number of altered markers is lower. Molecular marker status at TUR could help predict the marker status at RC and may help guide multimodal therapeutic planning. PMID:27376130

  13. Correlation in Rectal Cancer Between Clinical Tumor Response After Neoadjuvant Radiotherapy and Sphincter or Organ Preservation: 10-Year Results of the Lyon R 96-02 Randomized Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Ortholan, Cecile; Romestaing, Pascale; Chapet, Olivier; Gerard, Jean Pierre

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate, in rectal cancer, the benefit of a neoadjuvant radiation dose escalation with endocavitary contact radiotherapy (CXRT) in addition to external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). This article provides an update of the Lyon R96-02 Phase III trial. Methods and Materials: A total of 88 patients with T2 to T3 carcinoma of the lower rectum were randomly assigned to neoadjuvant EBRT 39 Gy in 13 fractions (43 patients) vs. the same EBRT with CXRT boost, 85 Gy in three fractions (45 patients). Median follow-up was 132 months. Results: The 10-year cumulated rate of permanent colostomy (CRPC) was 63% in the EBRT group vs. 29% in the EBRT+CXRT group (p < 0.001). The 10-year rate of local recurrence was 15% vs. 10% (p = 0.69); 10-year disease-free survival was 54% vs. 53% (p = 0.99); and 10-year overall survival was 56% vs. 55% (p = 0.85). Data of clinical response (CR) were available for 78 patients (36 in the EBRT group and 42 in the EBRT+CXRT group): 12 patients were in complete CR (1 patient vs. 11 patients), 53 patients had a CR {>=}50% (24 patients vs. 29 patients), and 13 patients had a CR <50% (11 patients vs. 2 patients) (p < 0.001). Of the 65 patients with CR {>=}50%, 9 had an organ preservation procedure (meaning no rectal resection) taking advantage of major CR. The 10-year CRPC was 17% for patients with complete CR, 42% for patients with CR {>=}50%, and 77% for patients with CR <50% (p = 0.014). Conclusion: In cancer of the lower rectum, CXRT increases the complete CR, turning in a significantly higher rate of long-term permanent sphincter and organ preservation.

  14. Restorative proctocolectomy or rectum-preserving surgery in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis: results of a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Tonelli, F; Valanzano, R; Monaci, I; Mazzoni, P; Anastasi, A; Ficari, F

    1997-01-01

    Surgical treatment of familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is still controversial. From 1984 we carried out a prospective evaluation of total colectomy with ileorectal anastomosis (IRA) and restorative proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA) to determine differences in postoperative complications, functional results, occurrence of desmoids, and recurrence of polyps in the rectal stump. IRA was performed below the peritoneal reflection and was indicated in the absence of rectal cancer and in the presence of fewer than 10 polyps or minute polyposis in the last 10 cm of the rectal mucosa. IRA patients underwent a regular endoscopic follow-up and prolonged sulindac administration (100 mg twice daily). When criteria for IRA were absent, IPAA was performed adopting a manual anastomosis at the pectinate line. Fourteen patients were operated with IRA and 24 with IPAA. There was no difference in sex and age between the two groups of patients. The number of rectal polyps was significantly different in the two groups. Immediate postoperative complications were observed in only five IPAA patients, three of whom (12%) required reoperation. Late postoperative complications occurred more frequently in IRA patients (14%) than in IPAA patients (4%). Desmoids developed in both groups (five in the IRA group and four in IPAA group). The number of bowel movements was similar in both groups, but 25% of IPAA patients complained of nocturnal fecal soiling. Fulguration or polypectomy for recurrent polyps was necessary in all but two IRA patients at follow-up. The rectal stump was easily eradicated by polyps in all but four patients with minute polyps at surgery. In the latter patients a diffuse or carpeting rectal polyposis occurred. IPAA can give optimum control of colorectal polyposis in FAP patients with an acceptable incidence of postoperative complications and satisfactory functional results. This type of surgical procedure is indicated in most FAP patients, and IRA

  15. "Cancer tumor".

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronshtehn, V. A.

    The title is a phrase borrowed from a speech by a Leningrad pressman, V. E. Lvov, who called upon those attending a theoretical conference on ideological issues in astronomy held by the Leningrad Branch of the All-Union Astronomic and Geodetic Society (13 - 4 December 1948), "to make a more radical emphasis on the negative role of relativistic cosmology which is a cancer tumor disintegrating the contemporary astronomy theory, and a major ideological enemy of a materialist astronomy".

  16. Brain tumor - primary - adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma) - adults; Meningioma - adults; Cancer - brain tumor (adults) ... Primary brain tumors include any tumor that starts in the brain. Primary brain tumors can start from brain cells, ...

  17. Understanding Brain Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Know About Brain Tumors . What is a Brain Tumor? A brain tumor is an abnormal growth
 ... Tumors” from Frankly Speaking Frankly Speaking About Cancer: Brain Tumors Download the full book Questions to ask ...

  18. Brain tumor - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... children; Neuroglioma - children; Oligodendroglioma - children; Meningioma - children; Cancer - brain tumor (children) ... The cause of primary brain tumors is unknown. Primary brain tumors may ... (spread to nearby areas) Cancerous (malignant) Brain tumors ...

  19. Adrenal Gland Tumors: Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gland Tumor: Statistics Request Permissions Adrenal Gland Tumor: Statistics Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 03/ ... primary adrenal gland tumor is very uncommon. Exact statistics are not available for this type of tumor ...

  20. Brain Tumor Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Types of Brain Scans X-rays Laboratory Tests DNA Profiling Biopsy Procedure Malignant and Benign Brain Tumors Tumor ... Types of Brain Scans X-rays Laboratory Tests DNA Profiling Biopsy Procedure Malignant and Benign Brain Tumors Tumor ...

  1. Brain tumors in infants

    PubMed Central

    Ghodsi, Seyyed Mohammad; Habibi, Zohreh; Hanaei, Sara; Moradi, Ehsan; Nejat, Farideh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Brain tumors in infants have different clinical presentations, anatomical distribution, histopathological diagnosis, and clinical prognosis compared with older children. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis was done in patients <12 months old who were operated on for primary brain tumor in Children's Hospital Medical Center since 2008 to 2014. Results: Thirty-one infants, 20 males and 11 females, with the mean age of 7.13 months (0.5–12) were enrolled. There were 16 supratentorial and 15 infratentorial tumors. The presenting symptoms included increased head circumference (16); bulge fontanel (15); vomiting (15); developmental regression (11); sunset eye (7); seizure (4); loss of consciousness (4); irritability (3); nystagmus (2); visual loss (2); hemiparesis (2); torticollis (2); VI palsy (3); VII, IX, X nerve palsy (each 2); and ptosis (1). Gross total and subtotal resection were performed in 19 and 11 cases, respectively. Fourteen patients needed external ventricular drainage in the perioperative period, from whom four infants required a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. One patient underwent ventriculoperitoneal shunting without tumor resection. The most common histological diagnoses were primitive neuroectodermal tumor (7), followed by anaplastic ependymoma (6) and grade II ependymoma. The rate of 30-day mortality was 19.3%. Eighteen patients are now well-controlled with or without adjuvant therapy (overall survival; 58%), from whom 13 cases are tumor free (disease free survival; 41.9%), 3 cases have residual masses with fixed or decreased size (progression-free survival; 9.6%), and 2 cases are still on chemotherapy. Conclusion: Brain tumors in infants should be treated with surgical resection, followed by chemotherapy when necessary. PMID:26962338

  2. Tumor suppressor ARF regulates tissue microenvironment and tumor growth through modulation of macrophage polarization

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-García, Lidia; Herranz, Sandra; Higueras, María Angeles

    2016-01-01

    Tumor microenvironment has been described to play a key role in tumor growth, progression, and metastasis. Macrophages are a major cellular constituent of the tumor stroma, and particularly tumor associated macrophages (TAMs or M2-like macrophages) exert important immunosuppressive activity and a pro-tumoral role within the tumor microenvironment. Alternative-reading frame (ARF) gene is widely inactivated in human cancer. We have previously demonstrated that ARF deficiency severely impairs inflammatory response establishing a new role for ARF in the regulation of innate immunity. On the basis of these observations, we hypothesized that ARF may also regulates tumor growth through recruitment and modulation of the macrophage phenotype in the tumor microenvironment. Xenograft assays of B16F10 melanoma cells into ARF-deficient mice resulted in increased tumor growth compared to those implanted in WT control mice. Tumors from ARF-deficient mice exhibited significantly increased number of TAMs as well as microvascular density. Transwell assays showed crosstalk between tumor cells and macrophages. On the one hand, ARF-deficient macrophages modulate migratory ability of the tumor cells. And on the other, tumor cells promote the skewing of ARF−/− macrophages toward a M2-type polarization. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that ARF deficiency facilitates the infiltration of macrophages into the tumor mass and favors their polarization towards a M2 phenotype, thus promoting tumor angiogenesis and tumor growth. This work provides novel information about the critical role of ARF in the modulation of tumor microenvironment. PMID:27572316

  3. Role of tumor associated macrophages in tumor angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Riabov, Vladimir; Gudima, Alexandru; Wang, Nan; Mickley, Amanda; Orekhov, Alexander; Kzhyshkowska, Julia

    2014-01-01

    Tumor angiogenesis is an essential process for supplying rapidly growing malignant tissues with essential nutrients and oxygen. An angiogenic switch allows tumor cells to survive and grow, and provides them access to vasculature resulting in metastatic disease. Monocyte-derived macrophages recruited and reprogrammed by tumor cells serve as a major source of angiogenic factors boosting the angiogenic switch. Tumor endothelium releases angiopoietin-2 and further facilitates recruitment of TIE2 receptor expressing monocytes (TEM) into tumor sites. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) sense hypoxia in avascular areas of tumors, and react by production of angiogenic factors such as VEGFA. VEGFA stimulates chemotaxis of endothelial cells (EC) and macrophages. In some tumors, TAM appeared to be a major source of MMP9. Elevated expression of MMP9 by TAM mediates extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation and the release of bioactive VEGFA. Other angiogenic factors released by TAM include basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), thymidine phosphorylase (TP), urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), and adrenomedullin (ADM). The same factors used by macrophages for the induction of angiogenesis [like vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) and MMP9] support lymphangiogenesis. TAM can express LYVE-1, one of the established markers of lymphatic endothelium. TAM support tumor lymphangiogenesis not only by secretion of pro-lymphangiogenic factors but also by trans-differentiation into lymphatic EC. New pro-angiogenic factor YKL-40 belongs to a family of mammalian chitinase-like proteins (CLP) that act as cytokines or growth factors. Human CLP family comprises YKL-40, YKL-39, and SI-CLP. Production of all three CLP in macrophages is antagonistically regulated by cytokines. It was recently established that YKL-40 induces angiogenesis in vitro and in animal tumor models. YKL-40-neutralizing monoclonal antibody blocks tumor angiogenesis and progression. The role of YKL-39 and SI

  4. Relative Expression of Vitamin D Hydroxylases, CYP27B1 and CYP24A1, and of Cyclooxygenase-2 and Heterogeneity of Human Colorectal Cancer in Relation to Age, Gender, Tumor Location, and Malignancy: Results from Factor and Cluster Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Brozek, Wolfgang; Manhardt, Teresa; Kállay, Enikö; Peterlik, Meinrad; Cross, Heide S.

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies on the significance of vitamin D insufficiency and chronic inflammation in colorectal cancer development clearly indicated that maintenance of cellular homeostasis in the large intestinal epithelium requires balanced interaction of 1,25-(OH)2D3 and prostaglandin cellular signaling networks. The present study addresses the question how colorectal cancer pathogenesis depends on alterations of activities of vitamin D hydroxylases, i.e., CYP27B1-encoded 25-hydroxyvitamin D-1α-hydroxylase and CYP24A1-encoded 25-hydroxyvitamin D-24-hydroxylase, and inflammation-induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Data from 105 cancer patients on CYP27B1, VDR, CYP24A1, and COX-2 mRNA expression in relation to tumor grade, anatomical location, gender and age were fit into a multivariate model of exploratory factor analysis. Nearly identical results were obtained by the principal factor and the maximum likelihood method, and these were confirmed by hierarchical cluster analysis: Within the eight mutually dependent variables studied four independent constellations were found that identify different features of colorectal cancer pathogenesis: (i) Escape of COX-2 activity from restraints by the CYP27B1/VDR system can initiate cancer growth anywhere in the colorectum regardless of age and gender; (ii) variations in COX-2 expression are mainly responsible for differences in cancer incidence in relation to tumor location; (iii) advancing age has a strong gender-specific influence on cancer incidence; (iv) progression from well differentiated to undifferentiated cancer is solely associated with a rise in CYP24A1 expression. PMID:24213465

  5. TUMOR CONTAMINATION IN THE BIOPSY PATH OF PRIMARY MALIGNANT BONE TUMORS

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Marcelo Parente; Lima, Pablo Moura de Andrade; de Mello, Roberto José Vieira

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study factors possibly associated with tumor contamination in the biopsy path of primary malignant bone tumors. Method: Thirty-five patients who underwent surgical treatment with diagnoses of osteosarcoma, Ewing's tumor and chondrosarcoma were studied retrospectively. The sample was analyzed to characterize the biopsy technique used, histological type of the tumor, neoadjuvant chemotherapy used, local recurrences and tumor contamination in the biopsy path. Results: Among the 35 patients studied, four cases of contamination occurred (11.43%): one from osteosarcoma, two from Ewing's tumor and one from chondrosarcoma. There was no association between the type of tumor and presence of tumor contamination in the biopsy path (p = 0.65). There was also no association between the presence of tumor contamination and the biopsy technique (p = 0.06). On the other hand, there were associations between the presence of tumor contamination and local recurrence (p = 0.01) and between tumor contamination and absence of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (p = 0.02). Conclusion: Tumor contamination in the biopsy path of primary malignant bone tumors was associated with local recurrence. On the other hand, the histological type of the tumor and the type of biopsy did not have an influence on tumor contamination. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy had a protective effect against this complication. Despite these findings, tumor contamination is a complication that should always be taken into consideration, and removal of the biopsy path is recommended in tumor resection surgery. PMID:27047877

  6. Feminizing adrenocortical tumors: Literature review

    PubMed Central

    Chentli, Farida; Bekkaye, Ilyes; Azzoug, Said

    2015-01-01

    Feminizing adrenal tumors (FAT) are extremely rare tumors prevailing in males. Clinical manifestations are gynecomastia and/or other hypogonadism features in adults. They are rarer in pediatric population and their main manifestation is peripheral sexual precocity. In women genital bleeding, uterus hypertrophy, high blood pressure and/or abdomen mass may be the only manifestations. On the biological point, estrogen overproduction with or without increase in other adrenal hormones are the main abnormalities. Radiological examination usually shows the tumor, describes its limits and its eventual metastases. Adrenal and endocrine origins are confirmed by biochemical assessments and histology, but that one is unable to distinguish between benign and malignant tumors, except if metastases are already present. Immunostaining using anti-aromatase antibodies is the only tool that distinguishes FAT from other adrenocortical tumors. Abdominal surgery is the best and the first line treatment. For large tumors (≥10 cm), an open access is preferred to coeliosurgery, but for the small ones, or when the surgeon is experienced, endoscopic surgery seems to give excellent results. Surgery can be preceded by adrenolytic agents such as ortho paraprime dichloro diphenyl dichloroethane (Mitotane), ketoconazole or by aromatase inhibitors, but till now there is not any controlled study to compare the benefit of different drugs. New anti-estrogens can be used too, but their results need to be confirmed in malignant tumors resistant to classical chemotherapy and to conventional radiotherapy. Targeted therapy can be used too, as in other adrenocortical tumors, but the results need to be confirmed. PMID:25932386

  7. Adequate antigen availability: a key issue for novel approaches to tumor vaccination and tumor immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Accolla, Roberto S; Tosi, Giovanna

    2013-03-01

    A crucial parameter for activation of the anti-tumor immune response is an adequate antigen availability (AAA) defined here as the optimal tumor antigen dose and related antigen processing and MHC-II-restricted presentation necessary to efficiently trigger tumor-specific TH cells. We will discuss two distinct experimental systems: a) a preventive anti-tumor vaccination system; b) a therapy-induced anti-tumor vaccination approach. In the first case tumor cells are rendered constitutively MHC-II+ by transfecting them with the MHC-II transcriptional activator CIITA. Here AAA is generated by the function of tumor's newly expressed MHC-II molecules to present tumor-associated antigens to tumor-specific TH cells. In the second case, AAA is generated by treating established tumors with neovasculature-targeted TNFα. In conjuction with Melphalan, targeted TNFα delivery produces extensive areas of tumor necrosis that generate AAA capable of optimally activate tumor-specific TH cells which in turn activate CTL immune effectors. In both experimental systems tumor rejection and persistent and long-lived TH cell anti-tumor memory, responsible of defending the animals from subsequent challenges with tumor cells, are achieved. Based on these and other investigators' results we propose that AAA is a key element for triggering adaptive immune functions resulting in subversion from a pro-tumor to an anti-tumor microenvironment, tumor rejection and acquisition of anti-tumor immune memory. Hypotheses of neuro-immune networks involved in these approaches are discussed. These considerations are important also for the comprehension of how chemotherapy and/or radiation therapies may help to block and/or to eradicate the tumor and for the construction of suitable anti-tumor vaccine strategies.

  8. Submicroscopic deletion of 5q involving tumor suppressor genes (CTNNA1, HSPA9) and copy neutral loss of heterozygosity associated with TET2 and EZH2 mutations in a case of MDS with normal chromosome and FISH results

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Advances in genome-wide molecular cytogenetics allow identification of novel submicroscopic DNA copy number alterations (aCNAs) and copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity (cnLOH) resulting in homozygosity for known gene mutations in myeloid neoplasms. We describe the use of an oligo-SNP array for genomic profiling of aCNA and cnLOH, together with sequence analysis of recurrently mutated genes, in a patient with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) presenting with normal karyotype and FISH results. Oligo-SNP array analysis revealed a hemizygous deletion of 896 kb at chromosome 5q31.2, representing the smallest 5q deletion reported to date. The deletion involved multiple genes, including two tumor suppressor candidate genes (CTNNA1 and HSPA9) that are associated with MDS/AML. The SNP-array study also detected 3 segments of somatic cnLOH: one involved the entire long arm of chromosome 4; the second involved the distal half of the long arm of chromosome 7, and the third encompassed the entire chromosome 22 (UPD 22). Sequence analysis revealed mutations in TET2 (4q), EZH2 (7q), ASXL1 (20q11.21), and RUNX1 (21q22.3). Coincidently, TET2 and EZH2 were located at segments of cnLOH resulting in their homozygosity. Loss of heterozygosity affecting these two chromosomes and mutations in TET2 and EZH2 are indicative of a myelodysplastic syndrome with a poor prognosis. Deletion of the tumor suppressor genes CTNNA1 and HSPA9 is also likely to contribute to a poor prognosis. Furthermore, the original cnLOHs in multiple chromosomes and additional cnLOH 14q in the follow-up study suggest genetic evolution of the disease and poor prognosis. This study attests to the fact that some patients with a myelodysplastic syndrome who exhibit a normal karyotype may have underlying genetic abnormalities detectable by chromosomal microarray and/or targeted mutation analyses. PMID:25177364

  9. Pericyte Antigens in Perivascular Soft Tissue Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jia; Shrestha, Swati; Yen, Yu-Hsin; Asatrian, Greg; Mravic, Marco; Soo, Chia; Ting, Kang; Dry, Sarah M.; Peault, Bruno; James, Aaron W.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Perivascular soft tissue tumors are relatively uncommon neoplasms of unclear line of differentiation, although most are presumed to originate from pericytes or modified perivascular cells. Among these, glomus tumor, myopericytoma, and angioleiomyoma share a spectrum of histologic findings and a perivascular growth pattern. In contrast, solitary fibrous tumor (previously termed hemangiopericytoma) was once hypothesized to have pericytic differentiation. Methods Here, we systematically examine pericyte immunohistochemical markers among glomus tumor (including malignant glomus tumor), myopericytoma, angioleiomyoma, and solitary fibrous tumor. Immunohistochemical staining and semiquantification was performed using well-defined pericyte antigens, including αSMA, CD146, and PDGFRβ. Results Glomus tumor and myopericytoma demonstrate diffuse staining for all pericyte markers, including immunohistochemical reactivity for αSMA, CD146, and PDGFRβ. Malignant glomus tumors all showed some degree of pericyte marker immunoreactivity, although it was significantly reduced. Angioleiomyoma shared a similar αSMA + CD146 + PDGFRβ+ immunophenotype; however, this was predominantly seen in the areas of perivascular tumor growth. Solitary fibrous tumors showed patchy PDGFRβ immunoreactivity only. Discussion In summary, pericyte marker expression is a ubiquitous finding in glomus tumor, myopericytoma, and angioleiomyoma. Malignant glomus tumor shows a comparative reduction in pericyte marker expression, which may represent partial loss of pericytic differentiation. Pericyte markers are essentially not seen in solitary fibrous tumor. The combination of αSMA, CD146, and PDGFRβ immunohistochemical stainings may be of utility for the evaluation of pericytic differentiation in soft tissue tumors. PMID:26085647

  10. Childhood Brain Tumor Epidemiology: A Brain Tumor Epidemiology Consortium Review

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kimberly J.; Cullen, Jennifer; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S.; Ostrom, Quinn T.; Langer, Chelsea E.; Turner, Michelle C.; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; Fisher, James L.; Lupo, Philip J.; Partap, Sonia; Schwartzbaum, Judith A.; Scheurer, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Childhood brain tumors are the most common pediatric solid tumor and include several histological subtypes. Although progress has been made in improving survival rates for some subtypes, understanding of risk factors for childhood brain tumors remains limited to a few genetic syndromes and ionizing radiation to the head and neck. In this report, we review descriptive and analytical epidemiology childhood brain tumor studies from the past decade and highlight priority areas for future epidemiology investigations and methodological work that is needed to advance our understanding of childhood brain tumor causes. Specifically, we summarize the results of a review of studies published since 2004 that have analyzed incidence and survival in different international regions and that have examined potential genetic, immune system, developmental and birth characteristics, and environmental risk factors. PMID:25192704

  11. How Are Wilms Tumors Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tumor Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging How Are Wilms Tumors Diagnosed? Wilms tumors are usually found when a ... Your Child’s Doctor About Wilms Tumor? More In Wilms Tumor About Wilms Tumor Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  12. [Adrenocortical tumors--new perspectives].

    PubMed

    Latronico, Ana Claudia; Mendonça, Berenice B de

    2004-10-01

    A high frequency of adrenocortical tumors has been observed in Brazilian children and adults from South and Southwestern regions. The valuable national experience in the management of these tumors have resulted in several and relevant basic and clinical reports. However, the creation of an adrenocortical tumor national registry, the uniformity of approaches and collaborative studies are target to pursue. In this review article, we briefly described the fundamental points which were discussed in two scientific events on adrenocortical tumors: "International Consensus Conference on Treatment of Adrenal Cancer" and "I Simposio de Diagnóstico e Tratamento dos Tumores Adrenocorticais". The task force involving several Brazilian centers will increase the progress in the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of this devastating disorder.

  13. Imaging probe for tumor malignancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Shotaro; Kizaka-Kondoh, Shinae; Hiraoka, Hasahiro

    2009-02-01

    Solid tumors possess unique microenvironments that are exposed to chronic hypoxic conditions ("tumor hypoxia"). Although more than half a century has passed since it was suggested that tumor hypoxia correlated with poor treatment outcomes and contributed to cancer recurrence, a fundamental solution to this problem has yet to be found. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1) is the main transcription factor that regulates the cellular response to hypoxia. It induces various genes whose functions are strongly associated with malignant alteration of the entire tumor. The cellular changes induced by HIF-1 are extremely important targets of cancer therapy, particularly in therapy against refractory cancers. Imaging of the HIF-1-active microenvironment is therefore important for cancer therapy. To image HIF-1activity in vivo, we developed a PTD-ODD fusion protein, POHA, which was uniquely labeled with near-infrared fluorescent dye at the C-terminal. POHA has two functional domains: protein transduction domain (PTD) and VHL-mediated protein destruction motif in oxygen-dependent degradation (ODD) domain of the alpha subunit of HIF-1 (HIF-1α). It can therefore be delivered to the entire body and remain stabilized in the HIF-1-active cells. When it was intravenously injected into tumor-bearing mice, a tumor-specific fluorescence signal was detected in the tumor 6 h after the injection. These results suggest that POHA can be used an imaging probe for tumor malignancy.

  14. Pulmonary carcinoid tumor associated with nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    DePace, N L; Elquezabal, A; Hardenburg, H C

    1980-04-01

    A patient with carcinoid tumor of the lung associated with nephrotic syndrome was treated. Excision of the tumor resulted in remission of marked proteinuria, hypoalbuminemia, and edema. A review of the literature disclosed many neoplasms associated with the nephrotic syndrome; however, no association of the nephrotic syndrome and a carcinoid tumor of the lung has previously been reported, to our knowledge.

  15. Brain Tumors (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Brain Tumors KidsHealth > For Parents > Brain Tumors Print A ... radiation therapy or chemotherapy, or both. Types of Brain Tumors There are many different types of brain ...

  16. Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... you insights into your child's treatment. LEARN MORE Brain tumors and their treatment can be deadly so ... Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation Board Read more >> Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation 302 Ridgefield Court, Asheville, NC 28806 ...

  17. Childhood Brain Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    Brain tumors are abnormal growths inside the skull. They are among the most common types of childhood ... still be serious. Malignant tumors are cancerous. Childhood brain and spinal cord tumors can cause headaches and ...

  18. Tumors and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    Tumors during pregnancy are rare, but they can happen. Tumors can be either benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer. Malignant ones are. The most common cancers in pregnancy are breast cancer, cervical cancer, lymphoma, and melanoma. ...

  19. Neuroendocrine Tumor: Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tumor > Neuroendocrine Tumor: Statistics Request Permissions Neuroendocrine Tumor: Statistics Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 11/ ... the body. It is important to remember that statistics on how many people survive this type of ...

  20. Pathology of eyelid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Pe’er, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    The eyelids are composed of four layers: skin and subcutaneous tissue including its adnexa, striated muscle, tarsus with the meibomian glands, and the palpebral conjunctiva. Benign and malignant tumors can arise from each of the eyelid layers. Most eyelid tumors are of cutaneous origin, mostly epidermal, which can be divided into epithelial and melanocytic tumors. Benign epithelial lesions, cystic lesions, and benign melanocytic lesions are very common. The most common malignant eyelid tumors are basal cell carcinoma in Caucasians and sebaceous gland carcinoma in Asians. Adnexal and stromal tumors are less frequent. The present review describes the more important eyelid tumors according to the following groups: Benign and malignant epithelial tumors, benign and malignant melanocytic tumors, benign and malignant adnexal tumors, stromal eyelid tumors, lymphoproliferative and metastatic tumors, other rare eyelid tumors, and inflammatory and infections lesions that simulate neoplasms. PMID:27146927

  1. Overview of Heart Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... the heart. Most heart tumors are metastatic cancer. Did You Know... Noncancerous tumors can be as deadly ... slow the tumor's growth. Resources In This Article Did You Know 1 Did You Know... Table 2 ...

  2. Hand and Wrist Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Guide Journal of Hand Surgery (JHS) Home Anatomy Hand Tumors and Wrist Tumors Email to a friend * ... are seen commonly. CAUSES Common Types of Wrist Hand Tumors Ganglion Cysts (Figure 1): This is the ...

  3. Brain Tumors (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Brain Tumors KidsHealth > For Parents > Brain Tumors A A ... radiation therapy or chemotherapy, or both. Types of Brain Tumors There are many different types of brain ...

  4. Lung Carcinoid Tumor: Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tumor Treating Lung Carcinoid Tumors Surgery to Treat Lung Carcinoid Tumors Surgery is the main treatment for ... often be cured by surgery alone. Types of lung surgery Different operations can be used to treat ( ...

  5. Tumor-associated macrophages (not tumor cells) are the determinants of photosensitizer tumor localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korbelik, Mladen; Krosl, Gorazd

    1995-03-01

    The distribution of Photofrin and several other photosensitizers among major cellular populations contained in solid mouse tumors was examined using flow cytometry. Seven tumor models were included in the analysis: sarcomas EMT6, KHT, RIF, FsaR and FsaN, Lewis lung carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma SCCVII. In all these tumors, the highest photosensitizer levels were found in a subpopulation of tumor associated macrophages consisting of activated cells (as suggested by their increased size, granularity, and the number of interleukin 2 receptors). There was no evidence of selective photosensitizer accumulation in malignant tumor cells. Results consistent with these observations were also obtained with the carcinogen induced squamous cell carcinoma growing in hamster cheek pouch.

  6. Whole tumor antigen vaccination using dendritic cells: Comparison of RNA electroporation and pulsing with UV-irradiated tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Benencia, Fabian; Courrèges, Maria C; Coukos, George

    2008-01-01

    Because of the lack of full characterization of tumor associated antigens for solid tumors, whole antigen use is a convenient approach to tumor vaccination. Tumor RNA and apoptotic tumor cells have been used as a source of whole tumor antigen to prepare dendritic cell (DC) based tumor vaccines, but their efficacy has not been directly compared. Here we compare directly RNA electroporation and pulsing of DCs with whole tumor cells killed by ultraviolet (UV) B radiation using a convenient tumor model expressing human papilloma virus (HPV) E6 and E7 oncogenes. Although both approaches led to DCs presenting tumor antigen, electroporation with tumor cell total RNA induced a significantly higher frequency of tumor-reactive IFN-gamma secreting T cells, and E7-specific CD8+ lymphocytes compared to pulsing with UV-irradiated tumor cells. DCs electroporated with tumor cell RNA induced a larger tumor infiltration by T cells and produced a significantly stronger delay in tumor growth compared to DCs pulsed with UV-irradiated tumor cells. We conclude that electroporation with whole tumor cell RNA and pulsing with UV-irradiated tumor cells are both effective in eliciting antitumor immune response, but RNA electroporation results in more potent tumor vaccination under the examined experimental conditions. PMID:18445282

  7. Pediatric Suprasellar Tumors.

    PubMed

    McCrea, Heather J; George, Emilie; Settler, Allison; Schwartz, Theodore H; Greenfield, Jeffrey P

    2016-10-01

    The various childhood suprasellar tumors, while pathologically distinct, present similar clinical and surgical challenges as a result of their common anatomic location. These lesions are in close proximity to or may invade the optic nerve and chiasm, pituitary gland and infundibulum, hypothalamus, and third ventricle, leading to presenting features including visual field loss, impairment in visual acuity, endocrine dysfunction, and hydrocephalus. Though many suprasellar lesions are relatively benign in pathology, treatment may be complicated by high surgical morbidity resulting from damage to the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. Here we review the most frequent pediatric lesions occurring in the suprasellar region: craniopharyngioma, chiasmatic glioma, germ cell tumor, Rathke cleft and arachnoid cysts, pituitary adenoma, and histiocytosis. This review outlines both common presenting features and differentiating aspects of these lesions. It also includes classic radiographic presentations and treatment considerations for each lesion.

  8. Precision radiotherapy for brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Ying; Guo, Zhanwen; Zhang, Haibo; Wang, Ning; Xu, Ying

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Precision radiotherapy plays an important role in the management of brain tumors. This study aimed to identify global research trends in precision radiotherapy for brain tumors using a bibliometric analysis of the Web of Science. DATA RETRIEVAL: We performed a bibliometric analysis of data retrievals for precision radiotherapy for brain tumors containing the key words cerebral tumor, brain tumor, intensity-modulated radiotherapy, stereotactic body radiation therapy, stereotactic ablative radiotherapy, imaging-guided radiotherapy, dose-guided radiotherapy, stereotactic brachytherapy, and stereotactic radiotherapy using the Web of Science. SELECTION CRITERIA: Inclusion criteria: (a) peer-reviewed articles on precision radiotherapy for brain tumors which were published and indexed in the Web of Science; (b) type of articles: original research articles and reviews; (c) year of publication: 2002-2011. Exclusion criteria: (a) articles that required manual searching or telephone access; (b) Corrected papers or book chapters. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: (1) Annual publication output; (2) distribution according to country; (3) distribution according to institution; (4) top cited publications; (5) distribution according to journals; and (6) comparison of study results on precision radiotherapy for brain tumors. RESULTS: The stereotactic radiotherapy, intensity-modulated radiotherapy, and imaging-guided radiotherapy are three major methods of precision radiotherapy for brain tumors. There were 260 research articles addressing precision radiotherapy for brain tumors found within the Web of Science. The USA published the most papers on precision radiotherapy for brain tumors, followed by Germany and France. European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, German Cancer Research Center and Heidelberg University were the most prolific research institutes for publications on precision radiotherapy for brain tumors. Among the top 13 research institutes publishing in this field, seven

  9. Therapeutic modalities for Pancoast tumors.

    PubMed

    Nikolaos, Panagopoulos; Vasilios, Livaditis; Efstratios, Koletsis; Panagiotis, Alexopoulos; Christos, Prokakis; Nikolaos, Baltayiannis; Antonios, Hatzimichalis; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Kougioumtzi, Ioanna; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Tsiouda, Theodora; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Madesis, Athanasios; Vretzakis, Georgios; Kolettas, Alexandros; Dimitrios, Dougenis

    2014-03-01

    A Pancoast tumor, also called a pulmonary sulcus tumor or superior sulcus tumor, is a tumor of the pulmonary apex. It is a type of lung cancer defined primarily by its location situated at the top end of either the right or left lung. It typically spreads to nearby tissues such as the ribs and vertebrae. Most Pancoast tumors are non-small cell cancers. The growing tumor can cause compression of a brachiocephalic vein, subclavian artery, phrenic nerve, recurrent laryngeal nerve, vagus nerve, or, characteristically, compression of a sympathetic ganglion resulting in a range of symptoms known as Horner's syndrome. Pancoast tumors are named for Henry Pancoast, a US radiologist, who described them in 1924 and 1932.The treatment of a Pancoast lung cancer may differ from that of other types of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Its position and close proximity to vital structures may make surgery difficult. As a result, and depending on the stage of the cancer, treatment may involve radiation and chemotherapy given prior to surgery. Surgery may consist of the removal of the upper lobe of a lung together with its associated structures as well as mediastinal lymphadenectomy. Surgical access may be via thoracotomy from the back or the front of the chest and modification. Careful patient selection, improvements in imaging such as the role of PET-CT in restaging of tumors, radiotherapy and surgical advances, the management of previously inoperable lesions by a combined experienced thoracic-neurosurgical team and prompt recognition and therapy of postoperative complications has greatly increased local control and overall survival for patients with these tumors.

  10. Tumor Volume Changes on 1.5 Tesla Endorectal MRI During Neoadjuvant Androgen Suppression Therapy for Higher-Risk Prostate Cancer and Recurrence in Men Treated Using Radiation Therapy Results of the Phase II CALGB 9682 Study

    SciTech Connect

    D'Amico, Anthony V. Halabi, Susan; Tempany, Clare; Titelbaum, David; Philips, George K.; Loffredo, Marian; McMahon, Elizabeth; Sanford, Ben; Vogelzang, Nicholas J.; Small, Eric J.

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: We prospectively determined whether the change in tumor volume (TV) during 2 months of neoadjuvant androgen suppression therapy (nAST) measured using conventional 1.5 Tesla endorectal magnetic resonance imaging (eMRI) was associated with the risk of recurrence after radiation (RT) and 6 months of AST. Patients and Methods: Between 1997 and 2001, 180 men with clinical stage T1c-T3cN0M0 adenocarcinoma of the prostate were registered. Fifteen were found to be ineligible and the institutional MR radiologist could not assess the TV in 32, leaving 133 for analysis. Multivariable Cox regression analysis was used to assess whether a significant association existed between eMRI-defined TV progression during nAST and time to recurrence adjusting for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level, Gleason score (8 to 10 or 7 vs. 6 or less) and stage (T3 vs. T1-2). Results: After a median follow up of 6.7 years and adjusting for known prognostic factors, there was a significant increase in the risk of PSA failure (HR, 2.3 [95% CI, 1.1-4.5; p = 0.025) in men with eMRI-defined TV progression during nAST. Specifically, adjusted estimates of PSA failure were significantly higher (p = 0.032) in men with, compared with men without, eMRI-defined TV progression reaching 38% vs. 19%, respectively, by 5 years. Conclusion: Eradicating intraprostatic hormone refractory prostate cancer (HRPC) by maximizing local control and randomized trials assessing whether survival is improved when agents active against HRPC are combined with maximal local therapy are needed in men who progress based on eMRI during nAST.

  11. Mertk on tumor macrophages is a therapeutic target to prevent tumor recurrence following radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Crittenden, Marka R.; Baird, Jason; Friedman, David; Savage, Talicia; Uhde, Lauren; Alice, Alejandro; Cottam, Benjamin; Young, Kristina; Newell, Pippa; Nguyen, Cynthia; Bambina, Shelly; Kramer, Gwen; Akporiaye, Emmanuel; Malecka, Anna; Jackson, Andrew; Gough, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy provides a means to kill large numbers of cancer cells in a controlled location resulting in the release of tumor-specific antigens and endogenous adjuvants. However, by activating pathways involved in apoptotic cell recognition and phagocytosis, irradiated cancer cells engender suppressive phenotypes in macrophages. We demonstrate that the macrophage-specific phagocytic receptor, Mertk is upregulated in macrophages in the tumor following radiation therapy. Ligation of Mertk on macrophages results in anti-inflammatory cytokine responses via NF-kB p50 upregulation, which in turn limits tumor control following radiation therapy. We demonstrate that in immunogenic tumors, loss of Mertk is sufficient to permit tumor cure following radiation therapy. However, in poorly immunogenic tumors, TGFb inhibition is also required to result in tumor cure following radiation therapy. These data demonstrate that Mertk is a highly specific target whose absence permits tumor control in combination with radiation therapy. PMID:27602953

  12. Non-functioning pituitary tumors: 2012 update.

    PubMed

    Cámara Gómez, Rosa

    2014-03-01

    Non-functioning pituitary adenomas are the most common pituitary macroadenomas in adults, accounting for approximately 14%-28% of all clinically relevant pituitary tumors. They are a heterogeneous group of tumors that cause symptoms by compression and/or hormone deficiencies. The possibility of tumor growth is increased in macroadenomas and solid tumors as compared to microadenomas and cystic tumors. Diagnosis is based on imaging procedures (magnetic resonance imaging), but there are studies reporting promising potential biomarkers. Transsphenoidal surgery remains the first therapeutic option for large tumors with compressive symptoms. There is no evidence that endoscopic procedures improve outcomes, but they decrease morbidity. There is no unanimity in finding prognostic predictors of recurrence. Radiosurgery achieves tumor control and, sometimes, adenoma size reduction. Its adverse effects increase with higher doses and tumor sizes>4cm(3). Drug treatment is of little value. In aggressive non-functioning tumors, temozolomide (TMZ) may be used with caution because no controlled studies are available. TMZ achieves tumor control in 38%-40% of aggressive non-functioning tumors. The optimal treatment regimen and duration have not been defined yet. Lack of response to TMZ after 3 cycles predicts for treatment resistance, but initial response does not ensure optimal mid or long-term results. O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase expression has a limited predictive value of response to treatment with TMZ in aggressive non-functioning tumors. It should therefore not be a determinant factor in selection of patients to be treated with TMZ.

  13. Tongue Tumor Detection in Medical Hyperspectral Images

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi; Wang, Hongjun; Li, Qingli

    2012-01-01

    A hyperspectral imaging system to measure and analyze the reflectance spectra of the human tongue with high spatial resolution is proposed for tongue tumor detection. To achieve fast and accurate performance for detecting tongue tumors, reflectance data were collected using spectral acousto-optic tunable filters and a spectral adapter, and sparse representation was used for the data analysis algorithm. Based on the tumor image database, a recognition rate of 96.5% was achieved. The experimental results show that hyperspectral imaging for tongue tumor diagnosis, together with the spectroscopic classification method provide a new approach for the noninvasive computer-aided diagnosis of tongue tumors. PMID:22368462

  14. Primitive neuroectodermal tumor of the heart.

    PubMed

    Nwaejike, Nnamdi; Rassl, Doris; Ford, Hugo; Large, Stephen R

    2012-02-01

    We present a case of primitive neuroectodermal tumor of the left atrium with involvement of the coronary sinus. The initial presentation was of cardiac tamponade resulting from the size of the tumor. There was no evidence of tumor elsewhere, and after complete resection and without adjuvant chemotherapy the patient is well at 2-year follow-up. There has been no evidence of tumor recurrence. This is a rare reported case of resection of a cardiac primitive neuroectodermal tumor without adjuvant chemotherapy. Other cases in the literature have been treated by orthoptic transplantation and resection with chemotherapy.

  15. Phyllodes tumor of the breast

    PubMed Central

    Herazo, Fernando; Gil, Monica; Echeverri, Carolina; Ángel, Gonzalo; Borrero, Mauricio; Madrid, Jorge; Jaramillo, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Breast Phyllodes tumors are rare breast tumors present in less than 1% of new cases of breast cancer, usually occurring among middle-aged women (40-50 yrs). Objective: This study shows diagnostic experience, surgical management and follows up of patients with this disease during a period of ten years in a oncology referral center. Methods: Retrospectively, breast cancer registries at the institution were reviewed, identifying 77 patients with Phyllodes tumors between 2002 and 2012, who had been operated on at the Instituto de Cancerología - Clínica Las Américas, in Medellín (Colombia). Clinical and histopathological data belonging to these cases was captured and analyzed and descriptive statistics were used. Results: The follow up median was 22.5 months (IQR: 10.5-60.0), average age was 47.2 yrs (SD: 12.4), mean tumor size was 3.6 cm (SD: 4.6), 88.3% of the patients (68 cases) presented negative margins and none of them received adjuvant chemotherapy. Of the patients with Phyllodes tumors; 33.8% had benign, 31.2% had borderline and 35.0% had malignant tumor. Disease-free survival was 85.8% and overall survival was 94.5%. Discussion: Reported data in this article is in accordance with what has been reported in worldwide literature. In our cohort even the high mean size of the tumors, the risk of local relapse and metastatic disease is low than previously reported in literature. Trials with longer follow up and molecular trials in Phyllodes tumors are necessary to understand the behavior of these tumors in Hispanics population. PMID:26600624

  16. Hypoxia in Microscopic Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-Feng; O’Donoghue, Joseph A

    2008-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia has been commonly observed in a broad spectrum of primary solid malignancies. Hypoxia is associated with tumor progression, increased aggressiveness, enhanced metastatic potential and poor prognosis. Hypoxic tumor cells are resistant to radiotherapy and some forms of chemotherapy. Using an animal model, we recently showed that microscopic tumors less than 1 mm diameter were severely hypoxic. In this review, models and techniques for the study of hypoxia in microscopic tumors are discussed. PMID:18384940

  17. Radiation-induced nitric oxide mitigates tumor hypoxia and radioresistance in a murine SCCVII tumor model

    SciTech Connect

    Nagane, Masaki; Yasui, Hironobu; Yamamori, Tohru; Zhao, Songji; Kuge, Yuji; Tamaki, Nagara; Kameya, Hiromi; Nakamura, Hideo; Fujii, Hirotada; Inanami, Osamu

    2013-08-02

    Highlights: •IR-induced NO increased tissue perfusion and pO{sub 2}. •IR increased NO production in tumors without changes in the mRNA and protein levels of NOS isoforms. •NOS activity assay showed that IR upregulated eNOS activity in tumors. •IR-induced NO decreased tumor hypoxia and altered tumor radiosensitivity. -- Abstract: Tumor hypoxia, which occurs mainly as a result of inadequate tissue perfusion in solid tumors, is a well-known challenge for successful radiotherapy. Recent evidence suggests that ionizing radiation (IR) upregulates nitric oxide (NO) production and that IR-induced NO has the potential to increase intratumoral circulation. However, the kinetics of NO production and the responsible isoforms for NO synthase in tumors exposed to IR remain unclear. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the mechanism by which IR stimulates NO production in tumors and the effect of IR-induced NO on tumor radiosensitivity. Hoechst33342 perfusion assay and electron spin resonance oxymetry showed that IR increased tissue perfusion and pO{sub 2} in tumor tissue. Immunohistochemical analysis using two different hypoxic probes showed that IR decreased hypoxic regions in tumors; treatment with a nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor, L-NAME, abrogated the effects of IR. Moreover, IR increased endothelial NOS (eNOS) activity without affecting its mRNA or protein expression levels in SCCVII-transplanted tumors. Tumor growth delay assay showed that L-NAME decreased the anti-tumor effect of fractionated radiation (10 Gy × 2). These results suggested that IR increased eNOS activity and subsequent tissue perfusion in tumors. Increases in intratumoral circulation simultaneously decreased tumor hypoxia. As a result, IR-induced NO increased tumor radiosensitivity. Our study provides a new insight into the NO-dependent mechanism for efficient fractionated radiotherapy.

  18. Modification of tumor response by manipulation of tumor oxygenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qun; Beckers, Jill; Hetzel, Fred W.

    1999-07-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) requires tissue oxygenation during light irradiation. Tumor hypoxia, either pre-existing or induced by PDT during light irradiation, can severely hamper the effectiveness of a PDT treatment. Lowering the light irradiation does rate or fractionating a light dose may improve cell kill of PDT induced hypoxic cells, but will have no effects on pre-existing hypoxic cells. In the current study, we used hyper-oxygenation during PDT to overcome cell hypoxia in PDT. C3H mice with transplanted mammary carcinoma tumor were injected with 12.5 mg/kg Photofrin and irradiated with 630 nm laser light 24 hours later. Tumor oxygenation was manipulated by subjecting the animals to 3 a.t.p. hyperbaric oxygen or normobaric oxygen during PDT light irradiation. The results show a significant improvement in tumor response when PDT was delivered during hyper-oxygenation. With hyper-oxygenation, up to 80% of treated tumors showed no re-growth after 60 days. In comparison, only 20% of tumors treated while animals breathed normal room air, did not re-grow. To quantitatively evaluate the effects of manipulating tumor oxygenation, tumor p02 was measured with microelectrodes positioned in pre-existing hypoxic regions before and during the PDT light irradiation. The results show that hyper-oxygenation may oxygenate pre-existing hypoxic cells and compensate oxygen depletion induced by PDT light irradiation. In conclusion, hyper-oxygenation may provide effective ways to improve PDT treatment efficiency by oxygenating both pre-existing and treatment induced cell hypoxia.

  19. Simulation of Complex Transport of Nanoparticles around a Tumor Using Tumor-Microenvironment-on-Chip

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Bongseop; Ozcelikkale, Altug; Shin, Crystal S.; Park, Kinam; Han, Bumsoo

    2014-01-01

    Delivery of therapeutic agents selectively to tumor tissue, which is referred as “targeted delivery,” is one of the most ardently pursued goals of cancer therapy. Recent advances in nanotechnology enable numerous types of nanoparticles (NPs) whose properties can be designed for targeted delivery to tumors. In spite of promising early results, the delivery and therapeutic efficacy of the majority of NPs are still quite limited. This is mainly attributed to the limitation of currently available tumor models to test these NPs and systematically study the effects of complex transport and pathophysiological barriers around the tumors. In this study, thus, we developed a new in vitro tumor model to recapitulate the tumor microenvironment determining the transport around tumors. This model, named tumor-microenvironment-on-chip (T-MOC), consists of 3-dimensional microfluidic channels where tumor cells and endothelial cells are cultured within extracellular matrix under perfusion of interstitial fluid. Using this T-MOC platform, the transport of NPs and its variation due to tumor microenvironmental parameters have been studied including cut-off pore size, interstitial fluid pressure, and tumor tissue microstructure. The results suggest that T-MOC is capable of simulating the complex transport around the tumor, and providing detailed information about NP transport behavior. This finding confirms that NPs should be designed considering their dynamic interactions with tumor microenvironment. PMID:25194778

  20. Immune response to UV-induced tumors: mediation of progressor tumor rejection by natural killer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Streeter, P.R.; Fortner, G.W.

    1986-03-01

    Skin tumors induced in mice by chronic ultraviolet (UV) irradiation are highly antigenic and can induce a state of transplantation immunity in syngeneic animals. In the present study, the authors compared the in vitro cytolytic activity of splenic lymphocytes from mice immunized with either regressor or progressor UV-tumors. The results of this comparison implicated tumor-specific cytolytic T (Tc) lymphocytes in rejection of regressor UV-tumors, and revealed that immunization with the progressor UV-tumor 2237 failed to elicit detectable levels of progressor tumor-specific Tc cells even as the tumors rejected. Following in vitro resensitization of spleen cells from either regressor or progressor tumor immune animals, the authors found NK-like lymphocytes with anti-tumor activity. As the authors had not detected cells with this activity in splenic lymphocyte preparations prior to in vitro resensitization, the authors examined lymphocytes from the local tumor environment during the course of progressor tumor rejection for this activity. This analysis revealed NK lymphocytes exhibiting significant levels of cytolytic activity against UV-tumors. These results implicate NK cells as potential effector cells in the rejection of progressor UV-tumors by immune animals, and suggests that these cells may be regulated by T lymphocytes.

  1. Delivering nanomedicine to solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Rakesh K.; Stylianopoulos, Triantafyllos

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in nanotechnology have offered new hope for cancer detection, prevention, and treatment. While the enhanced permeability and retention effect has served as a key rationale for using nanoparticles to treat solid tumors, it does not enable uniform delivery of these particles to all regions of tumors in sufficient quantities. This heterogeneous distribution of therapeutics is a result of physiological barriers presented by the abnormal tumor vasculature and interstitial matrix. These barriers are likely to be responsible for the modest survival benefit offered by many FDA-approved nanotherapeutics and must be overcome for the promise of nanomedicine in patients to be realized. Here, we review these barriers to the delivery of cancer therapeutics and summarize strategies that have been developed to overcome these barriers. Finally, we discuss design considerations for optimizing the delivery of nanoparticles to tumors. PMID:20838415

  2. Percutaneous ablation of adrenal tumors.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, Aradhana M; Locklin, Julia; Dupuy, Damian E; Wood, Bradford J

    2010-06-01

    Adrenal tumors comprise a broad spectrum of benign and malignant neoplasms and include functional adrenal adenomas, pheochromocytomas, primary adrenocortical carcinoma, and adrenal metastases. Percutaneous ablative approaches that have been described and used in the treatment of adrenal tumors include percutaneous radiofrequency ablation, cryoablation, microwave ablation, and chemical ablation. Local tumor ablation in the adrenal gland presents unique challenges, secondary to the adrenal gland's unique anatomic and physiological features. The results of clinical series employing percutaneous ablative techniques in the treatment of adrenal tumors are reviewed in this article. Clinical and technical considerations unique to ablation in the adrenal gland are presented, including approaches commonly used in our practices, and risks and potential complications are discussed.

  3. Glomus Tumor of the Hand

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Won; Kwon, Soon Beom; Eo, Su Rak; Kwon, Chan

    2015-01-01

    Background Glomus tumors were first described by Wood in 1812 as painful subcutaneous tubercles. It is an uncommon benign neoplasm involving the glomus body, an apparatus that involves in thermoregulation of cutaneous microvasculature. Glomus tumor constitutes 1%-5% of all hand tumors. It usually occurs at the subungual region and more commonly in aged women. Its classical clinical triad consists of pain, tenderness and temperature intolerance, especially cold sensitivity. This study reviews 15 cases of glomus tumor which were analyzed according to its anatomic location, surgical approach and histologic findings. Methods Fifteen patients with subungual glomus tumors of the hand operated on between January 2006 and March 2013, were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were evaluated preoperatively with standard physical examination including ice cube test and Love's test. Diagnostic imaging consisted of ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. All procedures were performed with tourniquet control under local anesthesia. Eleven patients underwent excision using the transungual approach, 3 patients using the volar approach and 1 patient using the lateral subperiosteal approach. Results Total of 15 cases were reviewed. 11 tumors were located in the nail bed, 3 in the volar pulp and 1 in the radial aspect of the finger tip. After complete excision, patients remained asymptomatic in the immediate postoperative period. In the long term follow up, patients exhibited excellent cosmetic results with no recurrence. Conclusions Accurate diagnosis should be made by physical, radiologic and pathologic examinations. Preoperative localization and complete extirpation is essential in preventing recurrence and subsequent nail deformity. PMID:26015884

  4. Interaction of MSC with tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Melzer, Catharina; Yang, Yuanyuan; Hass, Ralf

    2016-09-08

    Tumor development and tumor progression is not only determined by the corresponding tumor cells but also by the tumor microenvironment. This includes an orchestrated network of interacting cell types (e.g. immune cells, endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and mesenchymal stroma/stem cells (MSC)) via the extracellular matrix and soluble factors such as cytokines, chemokines, growth factors and various metabolites. Cell populations of the tumor microenvironment can interact directly and indirectly with cancer cells by mutually altering properties and functions of the involved partners. Particularly, mesenchymal stroma/stem cells (MSC) play an important role during carcinogenesis exhibiting different types of intercellular communication. Accordingly, this work focusses on diverse mechanisms of interaction between MSC and cancer cells. Moreover, some functional changes and consequences for both cell types are summarized which can eventually result in the establishment of a carcinoma stem cell niche (CSCN) or the generation of new tumor cell populations by MSC-tumor cell fusion.

  5. Image based modeling of tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Meghdadi, N; Soltani, M; Niroomand-Oscuii, H; Ghalichi, F

    2016-09-01

    Tumors are a main cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Despite the efforts of the clinical and research communities, little has been achieved in the past decades in terms of improving the treatment of aggressive tumors. Understanding the underlying mechanism of tumor growth and evaluating the effects of different therapies are valuable steps in predicting the survival time and improving the patients' quality of life. Several studies have been devoted to tumor growth modeling at different levels to improve the clinical outcome by predicting the results of specific treatments. Recent studies have proposed patient-specific models using clinical data usually obtained from clinical images and evaluating the effects of various therapies. The aim of this review is to highlight the imaging role in tumor growth modeling and provide a worthwhile reference for biomedical and mathematical researchers with respect to tumor modeling using the clinical data to develop personalized models of tumor growth and evaluating the effect of different therapies.

  6. Tumor angiogenesis in mice and men.

    PubMed

    Alani, Rhoda M; Silverthorn, Courtney F; Orosz, Kate

    2004-06-01

    Over the past decade much research has focused on understanding the molecular pathways that regulate the development of a tumor-associated vasculature. In 1999, Lyden and colleagues showed that mice deficient in one to three Id1 or Id3 alleles could not support the growth of tumor xenografts due to defects in tumor-associated angiogenesis. Three recently published manuscripts have now re-examined the role of Id genes in the development of a tumor-associated vasculature using more clinically relevant tumor model systems. Remarkably, all three studies have found strikingly different results compared to the original xenograft data published in 1999. Below we review the current understanding of the role of Id genes in the development of a tumor-associated vasculature given the most recent data and suggest ways in which animal tumor model systems might be put to better use to provide more clinically relevant information.

  7. Tumor macroenvironment and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Al-Zoughbi, Wael; Al-Zhoughbi, Wael; Huang, Jianfeng; Paramasivan, Ganapathy S; Till, Holger; Pichler, Martin; Guertl-Lackner, Barbara; Hoefler, Gerald

    2014-04-01

    In this review we introduce the concept of the tumor macroenvironment and explore it in the context of metabolism. Tumor cells interact with the tumor microenvironment including immune cells. Blood and lymph vessels are the critical components that deliver nutrients to the tumor and also connect the tumor to the macroenvironment. Several factors are then released from the tumor itself but potentially also from the tumor microenvironment, influencing the metabolism of distant tissues and organs. Amino acids, and distinct lipid and lipoprotein species can be essential for further tumor growth. The role of glucose in tumor metabolism has been studied extensively. Cancer-associated cachexia is the most important tumor-associated systemic syndrome and not only affects the quality of life of patients with various malignancies but is estimated to be the cause of death in 15%-20% of all cancer patients. On the other hand, systemic metabolic diseases such as obesity and diabetes are known to influence tumor development. Furthermore, the clinical implications of the tumor macroenvironment are explored in the context of the patient's outcome with special consideration for pediatric tumors. Finally, ways to target the tumor macroenvironment that will provide new approaches for therapeutic concepts are described.

  8. Posterior Fossa Tumors.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Lara A; Young Poussaint, Tina

    2017-02-01

    Pediatric brain tumors are the leading cause of death from solid tumors in childhood. The most common posterior fossa tumors in children are medulloblastoma, atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor, cerebellar pilocytic astrocytoma, ependymoma, and brainstem glioma. Location, and imaging findings on computed tomography (CT) and conventional MR (cMR) imaging may provide important clues to the most likely diagnosis. Moreover, information obtained from advanced MR imaging techniques increase diagnostic confidence and help distinguish between different histologic tumor types. Here we discuss the most common posterior fossa tumors in children, including typical imaging findings on CT, cMR imaging, and advanced MR imaging studies.

  9. Metabolic Hallmarks of Tumor and Immune Cells in the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Renner, Kathrin; Singer, Katrin; Koehl, Gudrun E.; Geissler, Edward K.; Peter, Katrin; Siska, Peter J.; Kreutz, Marina

    2017-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes and NK cells play an important role in eliminating malignant tumor cells and the number and activity of tumor-infiltrating T cells represent a good marker for tumor prognosis. Based on these findings, immunotherapy, e.g., checkpoint blockade, has received considerable attention during the last couple of years. However, for the majority of patients, immune control of their tumors is gray theory as malignant cells use effective mechanisms to outsmart the immune system. Increasing evidence suggests that changes in tumor metabolism not only ensure an effective energy supply and generation of building blocks for tumor growth but also contribute to inhibition of the antitumor response. Immunosuppression in the tumor microenvironment is often based on the mutual metabolic requirements of immune cells and tumor cells. Cytotoxic T and NK cell activation leads to an increased demand for glucose and amino acids, a well-known feature shown by tumor cells. These close metabolic interdependencies result in metabolic competition, limiting the proliferation, and effector functions of tumor-specific immune cells. Moreover, not only nutrient restriction but also tumor-driven shifts in metabolite abundance and accumulation of metabolic waste products (e.g., lactate) lead to local immunosuppression, thereby facilitating tumor progression and metastasis. In this review, we describe the metabolic interplay between immune cells and tumor cells and discuss tumor cell metabolism as a target structure for cancer therapy. Metabolic (re)education of tumor cells is not only an approach to kill tumor cells directly but could overcome metabolic immunosuppression in the tumor microenvironment and thereby facilitate immunotherapy. PMID:28337200

  10. Metabolic Hallmarks of Tumor and Immune Cells in the Tumor Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Renner, Kathrin; Singer, Katrin; Koehl, Gudrun E; Geissler, Edward K; Peter, Katrin; Siska, Peter J; Kreutz, Marina

    2017-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes and NK cells play an important role in eliminating malignant tumor cells and the number and activity of tumor-infiltrating T cells represent a good marker for tumor prognosis. Based on these findings, immunotherapy, e.g., checkpoint blockade, has received considerable attention during the last couple of years. However, for the majority of patients, immune control of their tumors is gray theory as malignant cells use effective mechanisms to outsmart the immune system. Increasing evidence suggests that changes in tumor metabolism not only ensure an effective energy supply and generation of building blocks for tumor growth but also contribute to inhibition of the antitumor response. Immunosuppression in the tumor microenvironment is often based on the mutual metabolic requirements of immune cells and tumor cells. Cytotoxic T and NK cell activation leads to an increased demand for glucose and amino acids, a well-known feature shown by tumor cells. These close metabolic interdependencies result in metabolic competition, limiting the proliferation, and effector functions of tumor-specific immune cells. Moreover, not only nutrient restriction but also tumor-driven shifts in metabolite abundance and accumulation of metabolic waste products (e.g., lactate) lead to local immunosuppression, thereby facilitating tumor progression and metastasis. In this review, we describe the metabolic interplay between immune cells and tumor cells and discuss tumor cell metabolism as a target structure for cancer therapy. Metabolic (re)education of tumor cells is not only an approach to kill tumor cells directly but could overcome metabolic immunosuppression in the tumor microenvironment and thereby facilitate immunotherapy.

  11. Recent Advances in Targeting Tumor Energy Metabolism with Tumor Acidosis as a Biomarker of Drug Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Akhenblit, Paul J; Pagel, Mark D

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells employ a deregulated cellular metabolism to leverage survival and growth advantages. The unique tumor energy metabolism presents itself as a promising target for chemotherapy. A pool of tumor energy metabolism targeting agents has been developed after several decades of efforts. This review will cover glucose and fatty acid metabolism, PI3K/AKT/mTOR, HIF-1 and glutamine pathways in tumor energy metabolism, and how they are being exploited for treatments and therapies by promising pre-clinical or clinical drugs being developed or investigated. Additionally, acidification of the tumor extracellular microenvironment is hypothesized to be the result of active tumor metabolism. This implies that tumor extracellular pH (pHe) can be a biomarker for assessing the efficacy of therapies that target tumor metabolism. Several translational molecular imaging methods (PET, MRI) for interrogating tumor acidification and its suppression are discussed as well. PMID:26962408

  12. Ablative Tumor Radiation Can Change the Tumor Immune Cell Microenvironment to Induce Durable Complete Remissions

    PubMed Central

    Filatenkov, Alexander; Baker, Jeanette; Mueller, Antonia M.S.; Kenkel, Justin; Ahn, G-One; Dutt, Suparna; Zhang, Nigel; Kohrt, Holbrook; Jensen, Kent; Dejbakhsh-Jones, Sussan; Shizuru, Judith A.; Negrin, Robert N.; Engleman, Edgar G.; Strober, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The goals of the study were to elucidate the immune mechanisms that contribute to desirable complete remissions of murine colon tumors treated with single radiation dose of 30 Gy. This dose is at the upper end of the ablative range used clinically to treat advanced or metastatic colorectal, liver, and non-small cell lung tumors. Experimental design Changes in the tumor immune microenvironment of single tumor nodules exposed to radiation were studied using 21 day (>1 cm in diameter) CT26 and MC38 colon tumors. These are well-characterized weakly immunogenic tumors. Results We found that the high dose radiation transformed the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment resulting in an intense CD8+ T cell tumor infiltrate, and a loss of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). The change was dependent on antigen cross-presenting CD8+ dendritic cells, secretion of IFN-γ, and CD4+ T cells expressing CD40L. Anti-tumor CD8+ T cells entered tumors shortly after radiotherapy, reversed MDSC infiltration, and mediated durable remissions in an IFN-γ dependent manner. Interestingly, extended fractionated radiation regimen did not result in robust CD8+ T cell infiltration. Conclusion For immunologically sensitive tumors, these results indicate that remissions induced by a short course of high dose radiation therapy depend on the development of anti-tumor immunity that is reflected by the nature and kinetics of changes induced in the tumor cell microenvironment. These results suggest that systematic examination of the tumor immune microenvironment may help in optimizing the radiation regimen used to treat tumors by adding a robust immune response. PMID:25869387

  13. Tumor detection at multiple scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickland, Robin N.; Hahn, Hee I.

    1993-06-01

    We describe detectors capable of locating small tumors of variable size in the highly textured anatomic backgrounds typical of gamma-ray images. The problem of inhomogeneous background noise is solved using a spatially adaptive statistical scaling operation, which effectively pre-whitens the data and leads to a very simple form of adaptive matched filter. Detecting tumors of variable size is accomplished by processing the images formed in a Laplacian pyramid, each of which contains a narrower range of tumor scales. We compare the performance of this pyramid technique with our earlier nonlinear detector, which detects small tumors according to their signature in curvature feature space, where 'curvature' is the local curvature of the image data when viewed as a relief map. Computed curvature values are mapped to a normalized significance space using a windowed t-statistic. The resulting test statistic is thresholded at a chosen level of significance to give a positive detection. Nonuniform anatomic background activity is effectively suppressed. This curvature detector works quite well over a large range of tumor scales, although not as well as the pyramid/adaptive matched filter scheme. None of the multiscale techniques tested perform at the level of the fixed scale detectors. Tests are performed using simulated tumors superimposed on clinical gamma-ray images.

  14. Tumor formations in scleractinian corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loya, Y.; Bull, G.; Pichon, M.

    1984-03-01

    A highly localized incidence of skeletal malformations (tumors) in the scleractinian corals Platygyra pini and P. sinensis on an inshore fringing reef at Cockle Bay, Magnetic Island within the Great Barrier Reef province is reported. These tumors are typified by a localized area of increased growth rate resulting in roughly circular protuberances extending up to 4.5 cm above the colony's surface. In both species, similar proportions of their populations carried tumors (24.1 % in P. pini and 18.7 % in P. sinensis). Larger colonies (>80 cm in diameter) are at least 7 times more likely to possess tumors than smaller colonies (<40 cm in diameter). X-radiographs of the skeletal malformations indicate a point of origin, presumably from a single budded polyp with subsequent, localized, accelerated growth. The mean radial growth rate of the tumorous area was 29 % greater than that of the surrounding normal regions. In contrast to the normal tissue, the tumorous tissue exhibited proliferation of cells, atrophied gastrodermal cells and mesenterial filaments which were larger and disordered in structure. The environmental conditions at Cockle Bay are relatively extreme with high turbidity, periodic exposure of the reef flat, abrupt changes in salinity during the wet season and mechanical damage to corals caused by unpredictable cyclonic storms. It is suggested that a combination of environmental stresses coupled with an injury inflicted on the corals are possible stimuli that initiate the development of these abnormal growth through either bacterial attack or the development of an aberrant polyp during tissue repair.

  15. Challenges for the functional diffusion map in pediatric brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Grech-Sollars, Matthew; Saunders, Dawn E.; Phipps, Kim P.; Kaur, Ramneek; Paine, Simon M.L.; Jacques, Thomas S.; Clayden, Jonathan D.; Clark, Chris A.

    2014-01-01

    Background The functional diffusion map (fDM) has been suggested as a tool for early detection of tumor treatment efficacy. We aim to study 3 factors that could act as potential confounders in the fDM: areas of necrosis, tumor grade, and change in tumor size. Methods Thirty-four pediatric patients with brain tumors were enrolled in a retrospective study, approved by the local ethics committee, to examine the fDM. Tumors were selected to encompass a range of types and grades. A qualitative analysis was carried out to compare how fDM findings may be affected by each of the 3 confounders by comparing fDM findings to clinical image reports. Results Results show that the fDM in areas of necrosis do not discriminate between treatment response and tumor progression. Furthermore, tumor grade alters the behavior of the fDM: a decrease in apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) is a sign of tumor progression in high-grade tumors and treatment response in low-grade tumors. Our results also suggest using only tumor area overlap between the 2 time points analyzed for the fDM in tumors of varying size. Conclusions Interpretation of fDM results needs to take into account the underlying biology of both tumor and healthy tissue. Careful interpretation of the results is required with due consideration to areas of necrosis, tumor grade, and change in tumor size. PMID:24305721

  16. Krukenberg tumor with yolk sac tumor differentiation.

    PubMed

    Zamecnik, Michal; Voltr, Lubomir; Stuk, Jan; Chlumska, Alena

    2008-04-01

    An unusual case of bilateral Krukenberg tumor with foci of yolk sac tumor (YST) differentiation occurring in a 50-year-old patient is reported. The primary tumor was in the gastric antrum, and it showed morphology of poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma with diffuse and solid growth pattern. A component of typical YST was not found in the gastric primary and lymph node metastases, although some cells in these locations were positive for alpha-fetoprotein. In the ovarian metastases, YST element showed microcystic/reticular and solid patterns, whereas the adenocarcinoma component was of diffuse type with signet ring cells and with some undifferentiated areas. The case represents further example of the somatic cell-derived tumor with focal germ cell-type differentiation and the first report of YST differentiation in Krukenberg tumor.

  17. Imaging Tumor Hypoxia to Advance Radiation Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chen-Ting; Boss, Mary-Keara

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Most solid tumors contain regions of low oxygenation or hypoxia. Tumor hypoxia has been associated with a poor clinical outcome and plays a critical role in tumor radioresistance. Recent Advances: Two main types of hypoxia exist in the tumor microenvironment: chronic and cycling hypoxia. Chronic hypoxia results from the limited diffusion distance of oxygen, and cycling hypoxia primarily results from the variation in microvessel red blood cell flux and temporary disturbances in perfusion. Chronic hypoxia may cause either tumor progression or regressive effects depending on the tumor model. However, there is a general trend toward the development of a more aggressive phenotype after cycling hypoxia. With advanced hypoxia imaging techniques, spatiotemporal characteristics of tumor hypoxia and the changes to the tumor microenvironment can be analyzed. Critical Issues: In this review, we focus on the biological and clinical consequences of chronic and cycling hypoxia on radiation treatment. We also discuss the advanced non-invasive imaging techniques that have been developed to detect and monitor tumor hypoxia in preclinical and clinical studies. Future Directions: A better understanding of the mechanisms of tumor hypoxia with non-invasive imaging will provide a basis for improved radiation therapeutic practices. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 313–337. PMID:24329000

  18. Cytogenetic diversity in primary human tumors.

    PubMed

    Wolman, S R; Camuto, P M; Perle, M A

    1988-02-01

    Cytogenetic patterns from primary short-term culture of breast cancer, renal carcinoma, and tumors of the central nervous system are presented to illustrate the range of karyotypic diversity of human solid tumors as well as their biologic differences in culture systems that support their growth. These studies have illustrated several major issues. 1) Results vary with the tissue of origin: primary cultures from breast are almost uniformly diploid, while renal tumors are near-diploid, mosaic, and show clonal aberrations; and CNS tumors are heterogeneous: some diploid, some near-diploid and some highly aneuploid. 2) Results after short-term culture are selective, representing subpopulations from the heterogeneous cells that are detected on direct analysis of fresh tumors by cytogenetics or flow cytometry (FCM). It is not yet clear whether prognosis depends on the dominant population of the primary tumor or alternatively should be influenced by detection of small aneuploid subpopulations. 3) Evidence from all three tumor types supports the interpretation that cytogenetically normal diploid cells constitute part of some tumor populations, and may be better adapted to routine growth in culture than aneuploid subpopulations from the same primary tumors. These cells may also compose a major portion of the viable population of tumors in vivo and, therefore, could represent a useful model for studies of tumorigenesis and therapeutic regimens.

  19. SU-C-210-01: Are Clinically Relevant Dosimetric Endpoints Significantly Better with Gating of Lung SBRT Vs. ITV-Based Treatment?: Results of a Large Cohort Investigation Analyzing Predictive Dosimetric Indicators as a Function of Tumor Volume and Motion Amplitude

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J; Zhao, B; Ajlouni, M; Movsas, B; Chetty, I.J.

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To quantitatively compare patient internal target volume (ITV)-based plans with retrospectively generated gated plans to evaluate potential dosimetric improvements in lung toxicity from gated radiotherapy. Methods: Evaluation was conducted for 150 stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) treatment plans for 128 early-stage (T1–T3, <5cm) NSCLC patients. PTV margins were: ITV+5 mm (ITV-plan) and GTV+5 mm (Gated-plan). ITV-based and gated treatment plans were compared on the same free-breathing CT. ITV-based plan constraints were used to re-optimize and recalculate new gated plans. Plans were generated for 3 fractionation regimens: 3×18Gy, 4×12Gy (original), and 5×10Gy. Physical dose was converted to equivalent dose in 2Gy fractions (EQD2), which was used to determine mean lung dose (MLD) and percent volume of lung receiving ≥20Gy (V20). MLD and V20 differences between gating and ITV-based plans were analyzed as a function of both three-dimensional (3D) motion and tumor volume. The low dose region, V5, was also evaluated. Results: MLD and V20 differences between gated and ITV-based plans were larger for lower (1.48±1.32Gy and 1.44±1.29%) than for upper lobe tumors (0.89±0.74Gy and 0.92±0.71%) due to smaller tumor motion (2.9±3.4mm) compared to lower lobe tumors (8.1±6.1mm). Average differences of <1–2% were noted in V5 between ITV and gated plans. Dosimetric differences between gating and ITV-based methods increased with increasing tumor motion and decreasing tumor volume. Overall, average MLD (8.04±3.92Gy) and V20 (8.29±4.33%) values for ITV-based plans were already well below clinical guidelines, even for the 3×18Gy dose scheme, for which largest differences were noted relative to gated plans. Similar results were obtained for 5×10Gy and 4×12Gy regimens. Conclusion: Clinically relevant improvement in pulmonary toxicity, based on predictors of radiation pneumonitis (MLD and V20) was not generally observed, though improvement for tumors

  20. Children's Brain Tumor Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... CBTF Justin's Hope Fund Grant Recipients Grants Children’s Brain Tumor Foundation, A non-profit organization, was founded ... and the long term outlook for children with brain and spinal cord tumors through research, support, education, ...

  1. Lacrimal gland tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... B. Lacrimal gland tumors. In: Tasman W, Jaeger EA, eds. Duane's Ophthalmology . 16th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott ... JA. Secondary orbital tumors. In: Tasman W, Jaeger EA, eds. Duane's Ophthalmology . 16th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott ...

  2. Gastric stromal tumor.

    PubMed

    Ovali, Gülgün Yilmaz; Tarhan, Serdar; Serter, Selim; Pabuşçu, Yüksel

    2005-06-01

    Gastric stromal tumors are rare neoplasms of the stomach. In this report we present a gastric stromal tumor with an exophytic growth pattern, and describe magnetic resonance imaging and endoscopic ultrasonography findings.

  3. Tumor suppressor ARF

    PubMed Central

    Través, Paqui G.; Luque, Alfonso; Hortelano, Sonsoles

    2012-01-01

    ARF (alternative reading frame) is one of the most important tumor regulator playing critical roles in controlling tumor initiation and progression. Recently, we have demonstrated a novel and unexpected role for ARF as modulator of inflammatory responses. PMID:23162766

  4. Stages of Pituitary Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... tumors that may spread to bones of the skull or the sinus cavity below the pituitary gland. ... sella (the bone at the base of the skull , where the pituitary gland sits). Recurrent Pituitary Tumors ...

  5. American Brain Tumor Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Molecule Read More ABTA News April 6, 2017 Chicago-Based American Brain Tumor Association’s Breakthrough for Brain ... Association 8550 W. Bryn Mawr Ave. Ste 550 Chicago, IL 60631 © 2014 American Brain Tumor Association Phone: ...

  6. Pancreatic islet cell tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... functions. These include blood sugar level and the production of stomach acid. Tumors that arise from islet ... try and shrink the tumors. If the abnormal production of hormones is causing symptoms, you may receive ...

  7. Renal primitive neuroectodermal tumors.

    PubMed

    Bartholow, Tanner; Parwani, Anil

    2012-06-01

    Primitive neuroectodermal tumors exist as a part of the Ewing sarcoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumor family. These tumors most commonly arise in the chest wall and paraspinal regions; cases with a renal origin are rare entities, but have become increasingly reported in recent years. Although such cases occur across a wide age distribution, the average age for a patient with a renal primitive neuroectodermal tumor is the mid- to late 20s, with both males and females susceptible. Histologically, these tumors are characterized by pseudorosettes. Immunohistochemically, CD99 is an important diagnostic marker. Clinically, these are aggressive tumors, with an average 5-year disease-free survival rate of only 45% to 55%. Given that renal primitive neuroectodermal tumor bears many similarities to other renal tumors, it is important to review the histologic features, immunostaining profile, and genetic abnormalities that can be used for its correct diagnosis.

  8. Posterior fossa tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... and the tumor can easily press on delicate structures if it grows. Depending on the type and size of the tumor, radiation treatment may also be used after surgery. Support Groups You can ease the stress of illness ...

  9. Single Unpurified Breast Tumor-Initiating Cells from Multiple Mouse Models Efficiently Elicit Tumors in Immune-Competent Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Kurpios, Natasza A.; Girgis-Gabardo, Adele; Hallett, Robin M.; Rogers, Stephen; Gludish, David W.; Kockeritz, Lisa; Woodgett, James; Cardiff, Robert; Hassell, John A.

    2013-01-01

    The tumor-initiating cell (TIC) frequency of bulk tumor cell populations is one of the criteria used to distinguish malignancies that follow the cancer stem cell model from those that do not. However, tumor-initiating cell frequencies may be influenced by experimental conditions and the extent to which tumors have progressed, parameters that are not always addressed in studies of these cells. We employed limiting dilution cell transplantation of minimally manipulated tumor cells from mammary tumors of several transgenic mouse models to determine their tumor-initiating cell frequency. We determined whether the tumors that formed following tumor cell transplantation phenocopied the primary tumors from which they were isolated and whether they could be serially transplanted. Finally we investigated whether propagating primary tumor cells in different tissue culture conditions affected their resident tumor-initiating cell frequency. We found that tumor-initiating cells comprised between 15% and 50% of the bulk tumor cell population in multiple independent mammary tumors from three different transgenic mouse models of breast cancer. Culture of primary mammary tumor cells in chemically-defined, serum-free medium as non-adherent tumorspheres preserved TIC frequency to levels similar to that of the primary tumors from which they were established. By contrast, propagating the primary tumor cells in serum-containing medium as adherent populations resulted in a several thousand-fold reduction in their tumor-initiating cell fraction. Our findings suggest that experimental conditions, including the sensitivity of the transplantation assay, can dramatically affect estimates of tumor initiating cell frequency. Moreover, conditional on cell culture conditions, the tumor-initiating cell fraction of bulk mouse mammary tumor cell preparations can either be maintained at high or low frequency in vitro thus permitting comparative studies of tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic cancer cells

  10. Malignant tumors of childhood

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, B.J.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 34 papers about malignant tumors. some of the titles are: Invasive Cogenital Mesoblastic Nephroma, Leukemia Update, Unusual Perinatal Neoplasms, Lymphoma Update, Gonadal Germ Cell Tumors in Children, Nutritional Status and Cancer of Childhood, and Chemotherapy of Brain tumors in Children.

  11. Tracing the Tumor Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Navin, Nicholas E.; Hicks, James

    2010-01-01

    Defining the pathways through which tumors progress is critical to our understanding and treatment of cancer. We do not routinely sample patients at multiple time points during the progression of their disease, and thus our research is limited to inferring progression a posteriori from the examination of a single tumor sample. Despite this limitation, inferring progression is possible because the tumor genome contains a natural history of the mutations that occur during the formation of the tumor mass. There are two approaches to reconstructing a lineage of progression: (1) inter-tumor comparisons, and (2) intra-tumor comparisons. The inter-tumor approach consists of taking single samples from large collections of tumors and comparing the complexity of the genomes to identify early and late mutations. The intra-tumor approach involves taking multiple samples from individual heterogeneous tumors to compare divergent clones and reconstruct a phylogenetic lineage. Here we discuss how these approaches can be used to interpret the current models for tumor progression. We also compare data from primary and metastatic copy number profiles to shed light on the final steps of breast cancer progression. Finally, we discuss how recent technical advances in single cell genomics will herald a new era in understanding the fundamental basis of tumor heterogeneity and progression. PMID:20537601

  12. Liver Tumors (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Liver Tumors KidsHealth > For Parents > Liver Tumors Print A A A What's in this ... Malignant (Cancerous) Tumors Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment Coping The liver is the body's largest solid organ. Lying next ...

  13. Treatment Option Overview (Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors / Islet Cell Tumors)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the tumor and a special camera that detects radioactivity is used to show where the tumors are ... the tumor and a special camera that detects radioactivity is used to show where the tumors are ...

  14. Maspin expression in prostate tumor elicits host anti-tumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    Dzinic, Sijana H.; Chen, Kang; Thakur, Archana; Kaplun, Alexander; Daniel Bonfil, R.; Li, Xiaohua; Liu, Jason; Margarida Bernardo, M.; Saliganan, Allen; Back, Jessica B.; Yano, Hiroshi; Schalk, Dana L.; Tomaszewski, Elyse N.; Beydoun, Ahmed S.; Dyson, Gregory; Mujagic, Adelina; Krass, David; Dean, Ivory; Mi, Qing-Sheng; Heath, Elisabeth; Sakr, Wael; Lum, Lawrence G.; Sheng, Shijie

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the current study is to examine the biological effects of epithelial-specific tumor suppressor maspin on tumor host immune response. Accumulated evidence demonstrates an anti-tumor effect of maspin on tumor growth, invasion and metastasis. The molecular mechanism underlying these biological functions of maspin is thought to be through histone deacetylase inhibition, key to the maintenance of differentiated epithelial phenotype. Since tumor-driven stromal reactivities co-evolve in tumor progression and metastasis, it is not surprising that maspin expression in tumor cells inhibits extracellular matrix degradation, increases fibrosis and blocks hypoxia-induced angiogenesis. Using the athymic nude mouse model capable of supporting the growth and progression of xenogeneic human prostate cancer cells, we further demonstrate that maspin expression in tumor cells elicits neutrophil- and B cells-dependent host tumor immunogenicity. Specifically, mice bearing maspin-expressing tumors exhibited increased systemic and intratumoral neutrophil maturation, activation and antibody-dependent cytotoxicity, and decreased peritumoral lymphangiogenesis. These results reveal a novel biological function of maspin in directing host immunity towards tumor elimination that helps explain the significant reduction of xenograft tumor incidence in vivo and the clinical correlation of maspin with better prognosis of several types of cancer. Taken together, our data raised the possibility for novel maspin-based cancer immunotherapies. PMID:25373490

  15. Sleeping Parathyroid Tumor: Rapid Hyperfunction after Removal of the Dominant Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Simonds, William F.; Weinstein, Lee S.; Collins, Michael T.; Kebebew, Electron; Nilubol, Naris; Phan, Giao Q.; Libutti, Steven K.; Remaley, Alan T.; Van Deventer, Manuel; Marx, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Due to frequent multiplicity of tumors in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1, it may be difficult to decide when to stop a parathyroid exploration. A fall of intraoperative serum PTH by a certain percentage during parathyroid surgery is often used as one criterion for ending the operation. Results: We report two patients with primary hyperparathyroidism due to multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 who had their first parathyroidectomy at the National Institutes of Health. In both cases, two and a half glands were removed, an extensive search was done for an occult parathyroid tumor, and intraoperative PTH decreased markedly to the lower limits of normal, suggesting a successful operation. Despite this, both patients became hypercalcemic within 3 d after the operation and showed persistent primary hyperparathyroidism. Detailed findings suggest the following course: chronic hypercalcemia had caused near total suppression of PTH secretion by an undiscovered parathyroid tumor (sleeping parathyroid tumor). When the hypercalcemia decreased after surgery due to the removal of the dominant parathyroid tumor(s), the abnormal yet previously suppressed tumor rapidly began to oversecrete PTH and thus caused postoperative hypercalcemia. Conclusions: Even a fall of the intraoperative PTH to the lower limits of the normal range cannot guarantee that removal of all parathyroid tumors has been complete in cases with multiple tumors. These findings likely reflect strikingly differing PTH secretory functions among distinct tumors in the same patient, with hypercalcemia at least from a dominant tumor suppressing PTH secretion by one or more other parathyroid tumors. PMID:22508712

  16. Tumor immunogenicity determines the effect of B7 costimulation on T cell-mediated tumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    A costimulatory signal through B7 to its counter-receptor CD28 on T cells enhances T cell activation. We have generated recombinant retroviruses containing cDNA for murine B7 and transduced a panel of murine tumor lines with varying immunogenicity to study the effect of B7 costimulation on antitumor immunity. In contrast to the progressive outgrowth of all wild-type (B7-) tumors in unimmunized syngeneic mice, four immunogenic tumors, lymphoma RMA, EL4, mastocytoma P815, and melanoma E6B2, regressed completely when transduced with the B7 gene. In contrast, four nonimmunogenic tumors, sarcomas MCA101, MCA102, and Ag104, and melanoma B16, remained tumorigenic after transduction of the B7 gene. Immunization with B7-transduced immunogenic tumors enhanced protective immunity and increased specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity against the respective wild-type tumors as compared to immunization with nontransduced or mock-transduced tumors. Moreover, cocultivation of CTL with B7-transduced EL4 cells augmented the specificity of tumor-reactive CTL in long-term cultures. Treatment by injection of B7-transduced tumor cells cured 60% of mice with established wild-type EL4 lymphoma. In contrast, immunization with nonimmunogenic tumors transduced with B7 did not provide protective immunity and did not increase specific CTL activity. Our results show that tumor immunogenicity is critical to the outcome of costimulation of T cell-mediated tumor immunity by B7. PMID:7507508

  17. The rare malignancy of the hepatobiliary system: ampullary carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Ozsoy, Mustafa; Ozsoy, Yucel; Canda, Aras Emre; Nalbant, Olcay Ak; Haskaraca, Fatih

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Carcinoid tumors are low-grade tumors originating from endoderm and mostly involving the gastrointestinal system. However; they may be seen in any site within the gastrointestinal system. Case Presentation. A 69-year-old female patient. The results of blood tests were observed to be consistent with obstructive jaundice. A mass appearance was not encountered on tomographic examination. Papilla that was tumor-like macroscopically was seen in the second part of the duodenum in diagnostic endoscopy. Pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy surgical procedure was applied. On pathological examination of the mass, a tumoral mass was detected in ampulla vateri localization, 1.5 × 1 × 0.8 cm in size, which, in immunohistochemical staining, was evaluated as a neuroendocrine tumor. Also, Metastasis was observed. Conclusion. The rarest type of carcinoid tumor is ampullary located carcinoid tumor, and tumor size is not a reliable indicator for tumor aggressivity in ampullary carcinoid tumors.

  18. [New aspects of tumor pathology of the adrenal glands].

    PubMed

    Saeger, W

    2015-05-01

    In daily routine pathology of the adrenal glands three tumor entities are important: adrenocortical tumors, adrenomedullary tumors and metastases. The differentiation of these three main tumor types can often be difficult structurally but immunostaining enables a definite diagnosis in nearly all cases. Adrenocortical tumors are positive for steroidogenic factor 1 and melan-A and always negative for chromogranin A whereas adrenomedullary tumors express chromogranin A but never keratin. A broad spectrum of antibodies is available for the identification of metastases and even the rare epithelioid angiosarcomas. For adrenocortical tumors, adenomas and carcinomas can be differentiated using three scoring systems and the Ki-67 index in adenomas should not exceed 3%. Using scoring systems and the Ki-67 index approximately 90% of cortical tumors can be differentiated into benign or malignant tumors. For pheochromocytomas two scoring systems are used for differentiating benign and malignant tumors but the results are less dependable.

  19. Targeting the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Bournazou, Eirini; Bromberg, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    Persistent JAK-STAT3 signaling is implicated in many aspects of tumorigenesis. Apart from its tumor-intrinsic effects, STAT3 also exerts tumor-extrinsic effects, supporting tumor survival and metastasis. These involve the regulation of paracrine cytokine signaling, alterations in metastatic sites rendering these permissive for the growth of cancer cells and subversion of host immune responses to create an immunosuppressive environment. Targeting this signaling pathway is considered a novel promising therapeutic approach, especially in the context of tumor immunity. In this article, we will review to what extent JAK-STAT3-targeted therapies affect the tumor microenvironment and whether the observed effects underlie responsiveness to therapy. PMID:24058812

  20. Immunology of brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Roth, Patrick; Eisele, Günter; Weller, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Brain tumors of different origin, but notably malignant gliomas, are characterized by their immunosuppressive properties which allow them to escape the host's immune surveillance. The activating immune cell ligands that are expressed by tumor cells, together with potentially immunogenic antigens, are overridden by numerous immune inhibitory signals, with TGF-3 as the master immunosuppressive molecule (Figure 4.1).The ongoing investigation of mechanisms of tumor-derived immunosuppression allows for an increasing understanding of brain tumor immunology. Targeting different mechanisms of tumor-derived immunosuppression, such as inhibition of TGF-[, may represent a promising strategy for future immunotherapeutic approaches.

  1. Imagery of pineal tumors.

    PubMed

    Deiana, G; Mottolese, C; Hermier, M; Louis-Tisserand, G; Berthezene, Y

    2015-01-01

    Pineal tumors are rare and include a large variety of entities. Germ cell tumors are relatively frequent and often secreting lesions. Pineal parenchymal tumors include pineocytomas, pineal parenchymal tumor of intermediate differentiation, pineoblastomas and papillary tumors of the pineal region. Other lesions including astrocytomas and meningiomas as well as congenital malformations i.e. benign cysts, lipomas, epidermoid and dermoid cysts, which can also arise from the pineal region. Imagery is often non-specific but detailed analysis of the images compared with the hormone profile can narrow the spectrum of possible diagnosis.

  2. Ocular surface tumors

    PubMed Central

    Othman, Ihab Saad

    2009-01-01

    Tumors of the conjunctiva and cornea comprise a large and varied spectrum of conditions. These tumors are grouped into two major categories of congenital and acquired lesions. The acquired lesions are further subdivided based on origin of the mass into surface epithelial, mucoepidermoid, melanocytic, vascular, fibrous, neural, histiocytic, myxoid, myogenic, lipomatous, lymphoid, leukemic, metastatic and secondary tumors. Ocular surface tumors include a variety of neoplasms originating from squamous epithelium, melanocytic tumors and lymphocytic resident cells of the conjunctival stroma. In this review, we highlight clinical features of these lesions, important diagnostic and investigative tools and standard care of management. PMID:21234217

  3. Tumor Ablation with Irreversible Electroporation

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sakere, Bassim; André, Franck; Bernat, Claire; Connault, Elisabeth; Opolon, Paule; Davalos, Rafael V.; Rubinsky, Boris; Mir, Lluis M.

    2007-01-01

    We report the first successful use of irreversible electroporation for the minimally invasive treatment of aggressive cutaneous tumors implanted in mice. Irreversible electroporation is a newly developed non-thermal tissue ablation technique in which certain short duration electrical fields are used to permanently permeabilize the cell membrane, presumably through the formation of nanoscale defects in the cell membrane. Mathematical models of the electrical and thermal fields that develop during the application of the pulses were used to design an efficient treatment protocol with minimal heating of the tissue. Tumor regression was confirmed by histological studies which also revealed that it occurred as a direct result of irreversible cell membrane permeabilization. Parametric studies show that the successful outcome of the procedure is related to the applied electric field strength, the total pulse duration as well as the temporal mode of delivery of the pulses. Our best results were obtained using plate electrodes to deliver across the tumor 80 pulses of 100 µs at 0.3 Hz with an electrical field magnitude of 2500 V/cm. These conditions induced complete regression in 12 out of 13 treated tumors, (92%), in the absence of tissue heating. Irreversible electroporation is thus a new effective modality for non-thermal tumor ablation. PMID:17989772

  4. Mesoscopic model for tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo-Kulich, Elena; Nieto-Villar, José Manuel

    2007-10-01

    In this work, we propose a mesoscopic model for tumor growth to improve our understanding of the origin of the heterogeneity of tumor cells. In this sense, this stochastic formalism allows us to not only to reproduce but also explain the experimental results presented by Brú. A significant aspect found by the model is related to the predicted values for beta growth exponent, which capture a basic characteristic of the critical surface growth dynamics. According to the model, the value for growth exponent is between 0,25 and 0,5, which includes the value proposed by Kadar-Parisi-Zhang universality class (0,33) and the value proposed by Brú (0,375) related to the molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) universality class. This result suggests that the tumor dynamics are too complex to be associated to a particular universality class.

  5. Nonfunctioning Juxtaglomerular Cell Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Sakata, Ryoko; Shimoyamada, Hiroaki; Yanagisawa, Masahiro; Murakami, Takayuki; Makiyama, Kazuhide; Nakaigawa, Noboru; Inayama, Yoshiaki; Ohashi, Kenichi; Nagashima, Yoji; Yao, Masahiro; Kubota, Yoshinobu

    2013-01-01

    The juxtaglomerular cell tumor (JGCT) is a rare renal tumor characterized by excessive renin secretion causing intractable hypertension and hypokalemia. However, asymptomatic nonfunctioning JGCT is extremely rare. Here, we report a case of nonfunctioning JGCT in a 31-year-old woman. The patient presented with a left renal tumor without hypertension or hypokalemia. Under a clinical diagnosis of renal cell carcinoma, radical nephrectomy was performed. The tumor was located in the middle portion adjacent to the renal pelvis, measuring 2 cm in size. Pathologically, the tumor was composed of cuboidal cells forming a solid arrangement, immunohistochemically positive for renin. Based on these findings, the tumor was diagnosed as JGCT. In cases with hyperreninism, preoperative diagnosis of JGCT is straightforward but difficult in nonfunctioning case. Generally, JGCT presents a benign biological behavior. Therefore, we should take nonfunctioning JGCT into the differential diagnoses for renal tumors, especially in younger patients to avoid excessive surgery. PMID:23607027

  6. Galectins in tumor angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Griffioen, Arjan W.

    2014-01-01

    The expansion of solid tumors depends on the continuous ingrowth of new blood vessels out of pre-existing capillaries. Consequently, tumor neovascularization or tumor angiogenesis is considered a hallmark of cancer and an attractive target for cancer therapy. Tumor angiogenesis is mainly carried out by endothelial cells (EC), i.e., the cells lining the luminal vessel wall. These cells have to take on different functional activities in order to successfully make new tumor blood vessels. In the last decade it has become apparent that galectins are important regulators of tumor angiogenesis. In the present review we summarize the current knowledge regarding the role galectins in tumor angiogenesis focussing on the endothelial galectins, i.e., gal-1/-3/-8/-9. PMID:25405165

  7. WWOX: A fragile tumor suppressor

    PubMed Central

    Schrock, Morgan S

    2015-01-01

    WWOX, the WW domain-containing oxidoreductase gene at chromosome region 16q23.3–q24.1, spanning chromosomal fragile site FRA16D, encodes the 46 kDa Wwox protein, a tumor suppressor that is lost or reduced in expression in a wide variety of cancers, including breast, prostate, ovarian, and lung. The function of Wwox as a tumor suppressor implies that it serves a function in the prevention of carcinogenesis. Indeed, in vitro studies show that Wwox protein interacts with many binding partners to regulate cellular apoptosis, proliferation, and/or maturation. It has been reported that newborn Wwox knockout mice exhibit nascent osteosarcomas while Wwox+/− mice exhibit increased incidence of spontaneous and induced tumors. Furthermore, absence or reduction of Wwox expression in mouse xenograft models results in increased tumorigenesis, which can be rescued by Wwox re-expression, though there is not universal agreement among investigators regarding the role of Wwox loss in these experimental models. Despite this proposed tumor suppressor function, the overlap of the human WWOX locus with FRA16D sensitizes the gene to protein-inactivating deletions caused by replication stress. The high frequency of deletions within the WWOX locus in cancers of various types, without the hallmark protein inactivation-associated mutations of “classical” tumor suppressors, has led to the proposal that WWOX deletions in cancers are passenger events that occur in early cancer progenitor cells due to fragility of the genetic locus, rather than driver events which provide the cancer cell a selective advantage. Recently, a proposed epigenetic cause of chromosomal fragility has suggested a novel mechanism for early fragile site instability and has implications regarding the involvement of tumor suppressor genes at chromosomal fragile sites in cancer. In this review, we provide an overview of the evidence for WWOX as a tumor suppressor gene and put this into the context of fragility

  8. The medico-legal observation of an aggressive urogenital fibromatosis with isolated development not related to any traumatic event.

    PubMed

    Muccino, Enrico; Gentile, Guendalina; Mantero, Stefano; Marchesi, Matteo; Rancati, Alessandra; Zoja, Riccardo

    2016-03-01

    Desmoid tumor is a fibroproliferative neoplasm with an intermediate malignancy and it can be localized in every bodily district: some locations are considered exceptional, like the urogenital localization. The Author point out a rare case of giant idiopathic scrotal fibromatosis that was found during an autopsy. A widower, that lived alone in poor hygienic conditions, was found dead in his house. The Judicial Authority ordered the autopsy, that was performed two days later at the Medico-Legal Section of Milan University. External examinations revealed only the considerable dimension of the scrotum (cm 24 × 41). The cause of death was fixed in a cardiac tamponade due to a natural heart laceration localized in correspondence of a transmural infarction. The toxicological exam resulted negative, while the histopathological and immunohistochemical analysis qualify the scrotal mass as a desmoids tumor. Due to the absence of predisposing conditions and of fibroproliferative infiltration in bladder and retroperitoneal space, the neoplasm was configured as an idiopathic desmoid tumor. The presented case gives the reason for the discussion concerning medico-legal aspects that are typical of rare neoplasms.

  9. Tumor lysis syndrome: A clinical review

    PubMed Central

    Mirrakhimov, Aibek E; Voore, Prakruthi; Khan, Maliha; Ali, Alaa M

    2015-01-01

    Tumor lysis syndrome is an oncometabolic emergency resulting from rapid cell death. Tumor lysis syndrome can occur as a consequence of tumor targeted therapy or spontaneously. Clinicians should stratify every hospitalized cancer patient and especially those receiving chemotherapy for the risk of tumor lysis syndrome. Several aspects of prevention include adequate hydration, use of uric acid lowering therapies, use of phosphate binders and minimization of potassium intake. Patients at high risk for the development of tumor lysis syndrome should be monitored in the intensive care unit. Established tumor lysis syndrome should be treated in the intensive care unit by aggressive hydration, possible use of loop diuretics, possible use of phosphate binders, use of uric acid lowering agents and dialysis in refractory cases. PMID:25938028

  10. Unusual Glomus Tumor of the Penis

    PubMed Central

    Dagur, Gautam; Warren, Kelly; Miao, Yimei; Singh, Navjot; Suh, Yiji; Khan, Sardar A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Glomus tumors are benign neoplasms commonly found in subungual regions of the extremities and rarely located in the penis. Misdiagnosis of glomus tumors is common; therefore, symptoms and clinical presentations should be reviewed. Objective The primary objective of this review article is to emphasize the pathogenesis, pathology, clinical presentation, symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment methods of glomus tumors in order to better identify and manage the condition. Materials and Methods Research was conducted using PubMed/Medline. The inclusion criteria required glomus tumor to be present on the penis. Results Glomus tumors, which appear as symptomatic or asymptomatic lesions, are attributed to dispersion grouping of neoplastic or non-neoplastic lesions in a particular area. Conclusion Differential diagnosis of glomus tumors includes hemangiomas, neurofibromatosis, epithelial lesions, and spindle-cell lesions. Physical examination and histological findings should be used for diagnosis. Treatment options can be either conservative or invasive, in which the patient undergoes surgical excision. PMID:27867327

  11. Hypothyroidism Enhances Tumor Invasiveness and Metastasis Development

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Iglesias, Olaia; García-Silva, Susana; Regadera, Javier; Aranda, Ana

    2009-01-01

    Background Whereas there is increasing evidence that loss of expression and/or function of the thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) could result in a selective advantage for tumor development, the relationship between thyroid hormone levels and human cancer is a controversial issue. It has been reported that hypothyroidism might be a possible risk factor for liver and breast cancer in humans, but a lower incidence of breast carcinoma has been also reported in hypothyroid patients Methodology/Principal Findings In this work we have analyzed the influence of hypothyroidism on tumor progression and metastasis development using xenografts of parental and TRβ1–expressing human hepatocarcinoma (SK-hep1) and breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-468). In agreement with our previous observations tumor invasiveness and metastasis formation was strongly repressed when TRβ–expressing cells were injected into euthyroid nude mice. Whereas tumor growth was retarded when cells were inoculated into hypothyroid hosts, tumors had a more mesenchymal phenotype, were more invasive and metastatic growth was enhanced. Increased aggressiveness and tumor growth retardation was also observed with parental cells that do not express TRs. Conclusions/Significance These results show that changes in the stromal cells secondary to host hypothyroidism can modulate tumor progression and metastatic growth independently of the presence of TRs on the tumor cells. On the other hand, the finding that hypothyroidism can affect differentially tumor growth and invasiveness can contribute to the explanation of the confounding reports on the influence of thyroidal status in human cancer. PMID:19641612

  12. Tumor Expression of CD200 Inhibits IL-10 Production by Tumor-Associated Myeloid Cells and Prevents Tumor Immune Evasion of CTL Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lixin; Liu, Jin-Qing; Talebian, Fatemeh; El-Omrani, Hani Y.; Khattabi, Mazin; Yu, Li; Bai, Xue-Feng

    2010-01-01

    CD200 is a cell-surface glycoprotein that functions through interaction with the CD200 receptor (CD200R) on myeloid lineage cells to regulate myeloid cell functions. Expression of CD200 has been implicated in multiple types of human cancer, however the impact of tumor expression of CD200 on tumor immunity remains poorly understood. To evaluate this issue, we generated CD200-positive mouse plasmacytoma J558 and mastocytoma P815 cells. We found that established CD200-positive tumors were often completely rejected by adoptively transferred CTL without tumor recurrence; in contrast, CD200-negative tumors were initially rejected by adoptively transferred CTL but the majority of tumors recurred. Tumor expression of CD200 significantly inhibited suppressive activity and IL-10 production by tumor-associated myeloid cells (TAMC), and as a result, more CTL accumulated in the tumor and exhibited a greater capacity to produce IFN-γ in CD200-positive tumors than in CD200-negative tumors. Neutralization of IL-10 significantly inhibited the suppressor activity of TAMC, and IL-10-deficiency allowed TAMC to kill cancer cells and their antigenic variants, which prevented tumor recurrence during CTL therapy. Thus, tumor expression of CD200 prevents tumor recurrence via inhibiting IL-10 production by TAMC. PMID:20662098

  13. Optical properties of tumor tissues grown on the chorioallantoic membrane of chicken eggs: tumor model to assay of tumor response to photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Norihiro; Kariyama, Yoichiro; Hazama, Hisanao; Ishii, Takuya; Kitajima, Yuya; Inoue, Katsushi; Ishizuka, Masahiro; Tanaka, Tohru; Awazu, Kunio

    2015-12-01

    Herein, the optical adequacy of a tumor model prepared with tumor cells grown on the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of a chicken egg is evaluated as an alternative to the mouse tumor model to assess the optimal irradiation conditions in photodynamic therapy (PDT). The optical properties of CAM and mouse tumor tissues were measured with a double integrating sphere and the inverse Monte Carlo technique in the 350- to 1000-nm wavelength range. The hemoglobin and water absorption bands observed in the CAM tumor tissue (10 eggs and 10 tumors) are equal to that of the mouse tumor tissue (8 animals and 8 tumors). The optical intersubject variability of the CAM tumor tissues meets or exceeds that of the mouse tumor tissues, and the reduced scattering coefficient spectra of CAM tumor tissues can be equated with those of mouse tumor tissues. These results confirm that the CAM tumor model is a viable alternative to the mouse tumor model, especially for deriving optimal irradiation conditions in PDT.

  14. Simulating Heterogeneous Tumor Cell Populations

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Sagi, Dafna; Mishra, Bud

    2016-01-01

    Certain tumor phenomena, like metabolic heterogeneity and local stable regions of chronic hypoxia, signify a tumor’s resistance to therapy. Although recent research has shed light on the intracellular mechanisms of cancer metabolic reprogramming, little is known about how tumors become metabolically heterogeneous or chronically hypoxic, namely the initial conditions and spatiotemporal dynamics that drive these cell population conditions. To study these aspects, we developed a minimal, spatially-resolved simulation framework for modeling tissue-scale mixed populations of cells based on diffusible particles the cells consume and release, the concentrations of which determine their behavior in arbitrarily complex ways, and on stochastic reproduction. We simulate cell populations that self-sort to facilitate metabolic symbiosis, that grow according to tumor-stroma signaling patterns, and that give rise to stable local regions of chronic hypoxia near blood vessels. We raise two novel questions in the context of these results: (1) How will two metabolically symbiotic cell subpopulations self-sort in the presence of glucose, oxygen, and lactate gradients? We observe a robust pattern of alternating striations. (2) What is the proper time scale to observe stable local regions of chronic hypoxia? We observe the stability is a function of the balance of three factors related to O2—diffusion rate, local vessel release rate, and viable and hypoxic tumor cell consumption rate. We anticipate our simulation framework will help researchers design better experiments and generate novel hypotheses to better understand dynamic, emergent whole-tumor behavior. PMID:28030620

  15. Epigenetic states of cells of origin and tumor evolution drive tumor-initiating cell phenotype and tumor heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Chow, Kin-Hoe; Shin, Dong-Mi; Jenkins, Molly H; Miller, Emily E; Shih, David J; Choi, Seungbum; Low, Benjamin E; Philip, Vivek; Rybinski, Brad; Bronson, Roderick T; Taylor, Michael D; Yun, Kyuson

    2014-09-01

    A central confounding factor in the development of targeted therapies is tumor cell heterogeneity, particularly in tumor-initiating cells (TIC), within clinically identical tumors. Here, we show how activation of the Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) pathway in neural stem and progenitor cells creates a foundation for tumor cell evolution to heterogeneous states that are histologically indistinguishable but molecularly distinct. In spontaneous medulloblastomas that arise in Patched (Ptch)(+/-) mice, we identified three distinct tumor subtypes. Through cell type-specific activation of the SHH pathway in vivo, we determined that different cells of origin evolved in unique ways to generate these subtypes. Moreover, TICs in each subtype had distinct molecular and cellular phenotypes. At the bulk tumor level, the three tumor subtypes could be distinguished by a 465-gene signature and by differential activation levels of the ERK and AKT pathways. Notably, TICs from different subtypes were differentially sensitive to SHH or AKT pathway inhibitors, highlighting new mechanisms of resistance to targeted therapies. In summary, our results show how evolutionary processes act on distinct cells of origin to contribute to tumoral heterogeneity, at both bulk tumor and TIC levels.

  16. Treatment of solid tumors should obligatorily be combined with the in vivo codepletion of tumor-protecting, CD8+/HLA-DR(+)-suppressor T cells by alloreactive donor T cells whose preprogrammed cell death allows a high GvL-effect before GvHD can be established. Results of animal experiments, including more than 6000 mice.

    PubMed

    Leskovar, P; Bielmeier, J

    1996-01-01

    The FACS-analysis of diseases as different as cancer, autoimmune disorders and chronic (retro)viral infections, including HIV-infection, shows -at least temporarily- a common feature of lymphocyte hyperactivation, characterized by cellular activation markers (HLA-DR, CD26, CD38, CD69, CD2R and/or CD30), as well as by solubilized membrane structures, such as beta-2m, sICAM-I, sIL-2R/sCD25, sCD8, and by some oversecreted immunocyte products (e.g. neopterin, lysozyme and/or cathepsin D). We tested two potential approaches to down-regulate the pathologically elevated CD8+ and HLA-DR+ T cells: (a) In animal model, we tested the sensibility of these, disease inducing and maintaining T cell subsets to in vitro pretreated (cell death preprogrammed) semi-syngeneic and allogeneic donor T cells in tumor-bearing mice. (b) In the first clinical study, we used a novel combination of FDA-approved drugs which inhibits Ca(2+)-influx and concomitantly down-regulates cytosolic cAMP in patient's overstimulated immunocompetent cells. We could achieve a 94.6-100% long-term survival in tumor-bearing mice. In patients, large primary tumors and large metastases shrinked by 80-85% and small metastases disappeared completely. Since in HIV-infected persons, the increased number of HLA-DR+ CD38+T (T8) cells is associated with a fall in CD4-level and with development of AIDS, we are looking for the elimination of these HLA-DR+ targets by our novel technique in two AIDS-simulating (FIV/FeLV and SIV) animal models.

  17. Endoscopic surgery of pituitary tumors.

    PubMed

    Dhepnorrarat, Rataphol Chris; Ang, Beng Ti; Sethi, Dharambir Singh

    2011-08-01

    Endoscopic pituitary surgery has been gaining wide acceptance as the first-line treatment of most functional pituitary adenomas. This technique has many advantages over traditional procedures, and growing evidence supports its use for endocrine control of functioning tumors. This article reviews data on the different modalities of treatment of functioning pituitary adenomas and compares the results. Endoscopic pituitary surgery controls tumor growth and endocrinopathy as well as or better than other treatment modalities. Complication rates are low and patient recovery is fast. Furthermore, surgery provides a means of achieving prompt decompression of neurologic structures and endocrine remission.

  18. Correlation of tumor-associated macrophages and clinicopathological factors in Wilms tumor

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background/purpose Despite high long-term survival rates in patients with Wilms tumor, there is a need to develop better prognostic biomarkers in order to maximize cure while avoiding treatment-associated morbidities. Tumor-associated macrophages have been recently associated with poorer prognosis and increased disease progression in a number of adult cancers. We investigated the relationship between macrophages and clinicopathological fators in this pediatric solid tumor. Methods Tissue microarray sections of 124 Wilms tumor cases obtained from the Cooperative Human Tissue Network were stained with CD68, a macrophage marker using standard immunohistochemical techniques and quantified using digital image processing techniques. Macrophage densities were correlated by tumor stage, and survival analyses were conducted with available clinical data. Immunohistochemistry was performed on 25 additional Wilms tumor cases obtained from the tumor bank at Columbia University Medical Center and correlated with presence of tumor microvascular invasion. Results Mean macrophage count densities in stage IV tumors were significantly greater than densities in stage I and III tumors (p=.021, .036). Although the overall and disease-free survival did not differ between high and low macrophage presence groups across all stages, increased macrophage presence was associated with decreased disease-free survival in patients with stage II tumors (p=0.035). Increased macrophage presence may have also correlated with decreased disease-free survival in stage IV patients, but the sample size was too small to allow detection of this difference with significance (p=0.575). Increased macrophage presence was associated with tumor microvascular invasion (p=0.0004). Conclusion Our results suggest that macrophage recruitment may be associated with disease progression in Wilms tumor. Quantitation of macrophage presence may therefore be a useful adjunct in refining staging algorithms for patients with

  19. Epigenetic Regulation of Ovarian Tumor Immunity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-01

    of tumor challenge. Results: In the past year, we have established that: 1. The administration of HDACi (Trichostatin A) to ovarian tumor...10 0 0 20 40 60 80 Days post treatment % C D 4+ C D 25 +F ox p3 + ce lls  PBS  1-MT  TSA Figure 1: HDACi

  20. [Sarcomas, example of a pathologist network organization].

    PubMed

    Neuville, Agnes; Coindre, Jean-Michel

    2013-12-01

    Sarcomas are rare and heterogeneous with many subtypes explaining the high level of diagnostic difficulty with frequent important therapeutic consequences. In 2009, a national network of pathologists has been set up with the main objective to perform a systematic histological review of every new sarcoma, gastro-intestinal stromal tumor (GIST) and desmoid tumor. We describe the network organization and report the results of the first two years of activity. These results clearly show the interest of this organization for the patients as well as for all pathologists. Moreover, data and material collect allows a better knowledge of these tumors and an improvement of the rules for their diagnostic management.

  1. [Immune system and tumors].

    PubMed

    Terme, Magali; Tanchot, Corinne

    2017-02-01

    Despite having been much debated, it is now well established that the immune system plays an essential role in the fight against cancer. In this article, we will highlight the implication of the immune system in the control of tumor growth and describe the major components of the immune system involved in the antitumoral immune response. The immune system, while exerting pressure on tumor cells, also will play a pro-tumoral role by sculpting the immunogenicity of tumors cells as they develop. Finally, we will illustrate the numerous mechanisms of immune suppression that take place within the tumoral microenvironment which allow tumor cells to escape control from the immune system. The increasingly precise knowledge of the brakes to an effective antitumor immune response allows the development of immunotherapy strategies more and more innovating and promising of hope.

  2. Uterine primitive neuroectodermal tumor.

    PubMed

    Aminimoghaddam, Soheila; Seifirad, Soroush; Abbasi Dezfouli, Golbahar; Abbasi, Neda; Zare Mehrjardi, Ali; Razavi, Seyed Mohsen; Mahmoudzadeh, Fatemeh

    2015-04-01

    Primitive neuroectodermal tumors are fairly rare in uterus. A case of uterine body primitive neuroectodermal tumor in a 32-year-old Iranian woman is presented. The patient was admitted with abdominal pain and fever and underwent emergency exploratory surgery with total abdominal hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, and pelvic lymph node dissection. Posterior wall of the uterus was necrotic and ruptured and a huge tumor disrupted the uterine body. The tumor was strongly positive for CD99, NSE, and chromogranin; No reaction was seen for CD10, CD45 and myogenin. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of an uterine body primitive neuroectodermal tumor and the second report of uterine primitive neuroectodermal tumor from Iran.

  3. Are biomechanical changes necessary for tumor progression?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kas, Josef A.; Fritsch, Anatol; Kiessling, Tobias; Nnetu, David K.; Pawlizak, Steve; Wetzel, Franziska; Zink, Mareike

    2011-03-01

    With an increasing knowledge in tumor biology an overwhelming complexity becomes obvious which roots in the diversity of tumors and their heterogeneous molecular composition. Nevertheless in all solid tumors malignant neoplasia, i.e. uncontrolled growth, invasion of adjacent tissues, and metastasis, occurs. Physics sheds some new light on cancer by approaching this problem from a functional, materials perspective. Recent results indicate that all three pathomechanisms require changes in the active and passive cellular biomechanics. Malignant transformation causes cell softening for small deformations which correlates with an increased rate of proliferation and faster cell migration. The tumor cell's ability to strain harden permits tumor growth against a rigid tissue environment. A highly mechanosensitive, enhanced cell contractility is a prerequisite that tumor cells can cross its tumor boundaries and that this cells can migrate through the extracellular matrix. Insights into the biomechanical changes during tumor progression may lead to selective treatments by altering cell mechanics. Such drugs would not cure by killing cancer cells, but slow down tumor progression with only mild side effects and thus may be an option for older and frail patients.

  4. Maximizing Tumor Immunity With Fractionated Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Schaue, Doerthe; Ratikan, Josephine A.; Iwamoto, Keisuke S.; McBride, William H.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Technologic advances have led to increased clinical use of higher-sized fractions of radiation dose and higher total doses. How these modify the pathways involved in tumor cell death, normal tissue response, and signaling to the immune system has been inadequately explored. Here we ask how radiation dose and fraction size affect antitumor immunity, the suppression thereof, and how this might relate to tumor control. Methods and Materials: Mice bearing B16-OVA murine melanoma were treated with up to 15 Gy radiation given in various-size fractions, and tumor growth followed. The tumor-specific immune response in the spleen was assessed by interferon-{gamma} enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay with ovalbumin (OVA) as the surrogate tumor antigen and the contribution of regulatory T cells (Tregs) determined by the proportion of CD4{sup +}CD25{sup hi}Foxp3{sup +} T cells. Results: After single doses, tumor control increased with the size of radiation dose, as did the number of tumor-reactive T cells. This was offset at the highest dose by an increase in Treg representation. Fractionated treatment with medium-size radiation doses of 7.5 Gy/fraction gave the best tumor control and tumor immunity while maintaining low Treg numbers. Conclusions: Radiation can be an immune adjuvant, but the response varies with the size of dose per fraction. The ultimate challenge is to optimally integrate cancer immunotherapy into radiation therapy.

  5. Tumor cell metabolism: an integral view.

    PubMed

    Romero-Garcia, Susana; Lopez-Gonzalez, Jose Sullivan; Báez-Viveros, José Luis; Aguilar-Cazares, Dolores; Prado-Garcia, Heriberto

    2011-12-01

    Cancer is a genetic disease that is caused by mutations in oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes and stability genes. The fact that the metabolism of tumor cells is altered has been known for many years. However, the mechanisms and consequences of metabolic reprogramming have just begun to be understood. In this review, an integral view of tumor cell metabolism is presented, showing how metabolic pathways are reprogrammed to satisfy tumor cell proliferation and survival requirements. In tumor cells, glycolysis is strongly enhanced to fulfill the high ATP demands of these cells; glucose carbons are the main building blocks in fatty acid and nucleotide biosynthesis. Glutaminolysis is also increased to satisfy NADPH regeneration, whereas glutamine carbons replenish the Krebs cycle, which produces metabolites that are constantly used for macromolecular biosynthesis. A characteristic feature of the tumor microenvironment is acidosis, which results from the local increase in lactic acid production by tumor cells. This phenomenon is attributed to the carbons from glutamine and glucose, which are also used for lactic acid production. Lactic acidosis also directs the metabolic reprogramming of tumor cells and serves as an additional selective pressure. Finally, we also discuss the role of mitochondria in supporting tumor cell metabolism.

  6. [Retroperitoneal germ cell tumor].

    PubMed

    Borrell Palanca, A; García Garzón, J; Villamón Fort, R; Domenech Pérez, C; Martínez Lorente, A; Gunthner, S; García Sisamón, F

    1999-03-01

    We report a case of retroperitoneal extragonadal germ-cell tumor in an 17 years old patient who presented with aedema and pain in left inferior extremity asociated with hemopthysis caused by pulmonar metastasis, who was treated with chemotherapy and resection of residual mass and pulmonary nodes. Dyagnosis was stableshed by fine neadle aspiration biopsy of the wass. We comment on the difficult of stableshing differential dyagnosis between retroperitoneal extragonadal germ-cell tumor and metastasis of a testicular tumor. Dyagnosis is stableshed by the finding of a histologically malignant germ-cell tumor with normal testis. We considered physical examination and ecographyc exploration enough for a correct dyagnosis.

  7. Radioresistance of Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Kevin; Knisely, Jonathan; Symons, Marc; Ruggieri, Rosamaria

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is frequently used as part of the standard of care treatment of the majority of brain tumors. The efficacy of RT is limited by radioresistance and by normal tissue radiation tolerance. This is highlighted in pediatric brain tumors where the use of radiation is limited by the excessive toxicity to the developing brain. For these reasons, radiosensitization of tumor cells would be beneficial. In this review, we focus on radioresistance mechanisms intrinsic to tumor cells. We also evaluate existing approaches to induce radiosensitization and explore future avenues of investigation. PMID:27043632

  8. CNS and spinal tumors.

    PubMed

    Furtado, Andre D; Panigrahy, Ashok; Fitz, Charles R

    2016-01-01

    Primary CNS tumors consist of a diverse group of neoplasms originating from various cell types in the CNS. Brain tumors are the most common solid malignancy in children under the age of 15 years and the second leading cause of cancer death after leukemia. The most common brain neoplasms in children differ consistently from those in older age groups. Pediatric brain tumors demonstrate distinct patterns of occurrence and biologic behavior according to sex, age, and race. This chapter highlights the imaging features of the most common tumors that affect the child's CNS (brain and spinal cord).

  9. Tumor Ablation and Nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Manthe, Rachel L.; Foy, Susan P.; Krishnamurthy, Nishanth; Sharma, Blanka; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2010-01-01

    Next to surgical resection, tumor ablation is a commonly used intervention in the treatment of solid tumors. Tumor ablation methods include thermal therapies, photodynamic therapy, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) producing agents. Thermal therapies induce tumor cell death via thermal energy and include radiofrequency, microwave, high intensity focused ultrasound, and cryoablation. Photodynamic therapy and ROS producing agents cause increased oxidative stress in tumor cells leading to apoptosis. While these therapies are safe and viable alternatives when resection of malignancies is not feasible, they do have associated limitations that prevent their widespread use in clinical applications. To improve the efficacy of these treatments, nanoparticles are being studied in combination with nonsurgical ablation regimens. In addition to better thermal effect on tumor ablation, nanoparticles can deliver anticancer therapeutics that show synergistic anti-tumor effect in the presence of heat and can also be imaged to achieve precision in therapy. Understanding the molecular mechanism of nanoparticle-mediated tumor ablation could further help engineer nanoparticles of appropriate composition and properties to synergize the ablation effect. This review aims to explore the various types of nonsurgical tumor ablation methods currently used in cancer treatment and potential improvements by nanotechnology applications. PMID:20866097

  10. Selected anti-tumor vaccines merit a place in multimodal tumor therapies

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Eva-Maria; Wunderlich, Roland; Ebel, Nina; Rubner, Yvonne; Schlücker, Eberhard; Meyer-Pittroff, Roland; Ott, Oliver J.; Fietkau, Rainer; Gaipl, Udo S.; Frey, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    Multimodal approaches are nowadays successfully applied in cancer therapy. Primary locally acting therapies such as radiotherapy (RT) and surgery are combined with systemic administration of chemotherapeutics. Nevertheless, the therapy of cancer is still a big challenge in medicine. The treatments often fail to induce long-lasting anti-tumor responses. Tumor recurrences and metastases result. Immunotherapies are therefore ideal adjuncts to standard tumor therapies since they aim to activate the patient's immune system against malignant cells even outside the primary treatment areas (abscopal effects). Especially cancer vaccines may have the potential both to train the immune system against cancer cells and to generate an immunological memory, resulting in long-lasting anti-tumor effects. However, despite promising results in phase I and II studies, most of the concepts finally failed. There are some critical aspects in development and application of cancer vaccines that may decide on their efficiency. The time point and frequency of medication, usage of an adequate immune adjuvant, the vaccine's immunogenic potential, and the tumor burden of the patient are crucial. Whole tumor cell vaccines have advantages compared to peptide-based ones since a variety of tumor antigens (TAs) are present. The master requirements of cell-based, therapeutic tumor vaccines are the complete inactivation of the tumor cells and the increase of their immunogenicity. Since the latter is highly connected with the cell death modality, the inactivation procedure of the tumor cell material may significantly influence the vaccine's efficiency. We therefore also introduce high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) as an innovative inactivation technology for tumor cell-based vaccines and outline that HHP efficiently inactivates tumor cells by enhancing their immunogenicity. Finally studies are presented proving that anti-tumor immune responses can be triggered by combining RT with selected immune

  11. Studies of Tumor Suppressor Genes via Chromosome Engineering.

    PubMed

    Kugoh, Hiroyuki; Ohira, Takahito; Oshimura, Mitsuo

    2015-12-30

    The development and progression of malignant tumors likely result from consecutive accumulation of genetic alterations, including dysfunctional tumor suppressor genes. However, the signaling mechanisms that underlie the development of tumors have not yet been completely elucidated. Discovery of novel tumor-related genes plays a crucial role in our understanding of the development and progression of malignant tumors. Chromosome engineering technology based on microcell-mediated chromosome transfer (MMCT) is an effective approach for identification of tumor suppressor genes. The studies have revealed at least five tumor suppression effects. The discovery of novel tumor suppressor genes provide greater understanding of the complex signaling pathways that underlie the development and progression of malignant tumors. These advances are being exploited to develop targeted drugs and new biological therapies for cancer.

  12. Diffuse PTH expression in parathyroid tumors argues against important functional tumor subclones

    PubMed Central

    Juhlin, C Christofer; Kiss, Nimrod B; Larsson, Catharina; Nilsson, Inga-Lena; Höög, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective Primary hyperparathyroidism is usually characterized by a monoclonal parathyroid tumor secreting excess parathyroid hormone (PTH). The main regulator of PTH secretion is calcium and the calcium–PTH set point is shifted in parathyroid tumor cells. We sought to investigate the relationship between tumor PTH and PTH mRNA expression and clinical presentation as well as the regulatory factors including phosphate, vitamin D, and fibroblast growth factor 23. Design A total of 154 parathyroid tumors were analyzed by PTH immunohistochemistry and chromogenic in situ hybridization of PTH mRNA. A subset of samples (n = 34) was analyzed using quantitative real-time PCR. Results Low tumor PTH mRNA level was significantly associated with low tumor PTH immunoreactivity (P = 0.026), but the two did not correlate with regard to histological distribution within individual tumors. Tumors displaying reduced PTH mRNA levels as compared with normal rim were significantly larger (P = 0.013) and showed higher expression of the calcium-sensing receptor (CASR) (P = 0.046). Weaker tumor PTH mRNA level was significantly associated with higher concentration of circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D (P = 0.005). No significant correlation was seen between PTH immunoreactivity and patient biochemistry. Tumor weight was strongly associated with circulatory concentrations of calcium and PTH. Conclusions No areas with apparently higher PTH expression were identified, perhaps suggesting that hyper functioning parathyroid tumor subclones should be rare. Circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels may influence tumor PTH expression in vivo. If PTH immunoreactivity reflects the tumor calcium–PTH set point, our data imply that the main determinant of disease severity should be tumor weight. PMID:26865585

  13. The pericyte antigen RGS5 in perivascular soft tissue tumors.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jia; Shrestha, Swati; Yen, Yu-Hsin; Scott, Michelle A; Soo, Chia; Ting, Kang; Peault, Bruno; Dry, Sarah M; James, Aaron W

    2016-01-01

    Perivascular soft tissue tumors are relatively uncommon neoplasms of unclear lineage of differentiation, although most are presumed to originate from or differentiate to pericytes or a modified perivascular cell. Among these, glomus tumor, myopericytoma, and angioleiomyoma share a spectrum of histologic findings and a perivascular growth pattern. In contrast, solitary fibrous tumor was once hypothesized to have pericytic differentiation--although little bona fide evidence of pericytic differentiation exists. Likewise the perivascular epithelioid cell tumor (PEComa) family shares a perivascular growth pattern, but with distinctive dual myoid-melanocytic differentiation. RGS5, regulator of G-protein signaling 5, is a novel pericyte antigen with increasing use in animal models. Here, we describe the immunohistochemical expression patterns of RGS5 across perivascular soft tissue tumors, including glomus tumor (n = 6), malignant glomus tumor (n = 4), myopericytoma (n = 3), angioleiomyoma (n = 9), myofibroma (n = 4), solitary fibrous tumor (n = 10), and PEComa (n = 19). Immunohistochemical staining and semi-quantification was performed, and compared to αSMA (smooth muscle actin) expression. Results showed that glomus tumor (including malignant glomus tumor), myopericytoma, and angioleiomyoma shared a similar diffuse immunoreactivity for RGS5 and αSMA across all tumors examined. In contrast, myofibroma, solitary fibrous tumor and PEComa showed predominantly focal to absent RGS5 immunoreactivity. These findings further support a common pericytic lineage of differentiation in glomus tumors, myopericytoma and angioleiomyoma. The pericyte marker RGS5 may be of future clinical utility for the evaluation of pericytic differentiation in soft tissue tumors.

  14. Innate Immune Cells Induce Hemorrhage in Tumors during Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Ho-Tin-Noé, Benoit; Carbo, Carla; Demers, Mélanie; Cifuni, Stephen M.; Goerge, Tobias; Wagner, Denisa D.

    2009-01-01

    Platelets are crucial regulators of tumor vascular homeostasis and continuously prevent tumor hemorrhage through secretion of their granules. However, the reason for tumor bleeding in the absence of platelets remains unknown. Tumors are associated with inflammation, a cause of hemorrhage in thrombocytopenia. Here, we investigated the role of the inflamed tumor microenvironment in the induction of tumor vessel injury in thrombocytopenic mice. Using s.c. injections of vascular endothelial growth factor or tumor necrosis factor-α combined with depletion of neutrophils, we demonstrate that enhancing the opening of endothelial cell junctions was not sufficient to cause bleeding in the absence of platelets; instead, induction of tissue hemorrhage in thrombocytopenia required recruitment of leukocytes. Immunohistology revealed that thrombocytopenia-induced tumor hemorrhage occurs at sites of macrophage and neutrophil accumulation. Mice deficient in β2 or β3 integrins, which have decreased neutrophil and/or macrophage infiltration in their tumor stroma, were protected from thrombocytopenia-induced tumor hemorrhage, indicating that, in the absence of platelets, stroma-infiltrating leukocytes induced tumor vessel injury. This injury was independent of reactive oxygen species generation and of complement activation, as suggested by the persistence of tumor hemorrhage in C3- and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase-deficient thrombocytopenic mice. Our results show that platelets counteract tumor-associated inflammation and that the absence of this platelet function elicits vascular injuries by tumor-infiltrating innate immune cells. PMID:19729481

  15. Targeting tumor microenvironment: crossing tumor interstitial fluid by multifunctional nanomedicines

    PubMed Central

    Omidi, Yadollah; Barar, Jaleh

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The genesis of cancer appears to be a complex matter, which is not simply based upon few genetic abnormalities/alteration. In fact, irregular microvasculature and aberrant interstitium of solid tumors impose significant pathophysiologic barrier functions against cancer treatment modalities, hence novel strategies should holistically target bioelements of tumor microenvironment (TME). In this study, we provide some overview and insights on TME and important strategies used to control the impacts of such pathophysiologic barriers. Methods: We reviewed all relevant literature for the impacts of tumor interstitium and microvasculature within the TME as well as the significance of the implemented strategies. Results: While tumorigenesis initiation seems to be in close relation with an emergence of hypoxia and alterations in epigenetic/genetic materials, large panoplies of molecular events emerge as intricate networks during oncogenesis to form unique lenient TME in favor of tumor progression. Within such irregular interstitium, immune system displays defective surveillance functionalities against malignant cells. Solid tumors show multifacial traits with coadaptation and self-regulation potentials, which bestow profound resistance against the currently used conventional chemotherapy and immunotherapy agents that target solely one face of the disease. Conclusion: The cancerous cells attain unique abilities to form its permissive microenvironment, wherein (a) extracellular pH is dysregulated towards acidification, (b) extracellular matrix (ECM) is deformed, (c) stromal cells are cooperative with cancer cells, (d) immune system mechanisms are defective, (e) non-integrated irregular microvasculature with pores (120-1200 nm) are formed, and (h) interstitial fluid pressure is high. All these phenomena are against cancer treatment modalities. As a result, to control such abnormal pathophysiologic traits, novel cancer therapy strategies need to be devised using

  16. Vanishing tumor in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Vimal, M. V.; Budyal, Sweta; Kasliwal, Rajeev; Jagtap, Varsha S.; Lila, Anurag R.; Bandgar, Tushar; Menon, Padmavathy; Shah, Nalini S.

    2012-01-01

    A patient with microprolactinoma, who had two successful pregnancies, is described for management issues. First pregnancy was uneventful. During the second pregnancy, the tumor enlarged to macroprolactinoma with headache and blurring of vision which was managed successfully with bromocriptine. Post delivery, complete disappearance of the tumor was documented. PMID:23226664

  17. Leydig cell tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... the cells in the testicles that release the male hormone, testosterone . ... seem to be linked to undescended testes . Leydig cell tumors make up a very small number of all testicular tumors. They are most often found in men between 30 and 60 years of age. This ...

  18. Skull Base Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz-Ertner, Daniela

    In skull base tumors associated with a low radiosensitivity for conventional radiotherapy (RT), irradiation with proton or carbon ion beams facilitates a safe and accurate application of high tumor doses due to the favorable beam localization properties of these particle beams. Cranial nerves, the brain stem and normal brain tissue can at the same time be optimally spared.

  19. Diffusion characteristics of pediatric pineal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, Matthew T; Siddiqui, Adeel; Klimo, Paul; Boop, Frederick A

    2015-01-01

    Background Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) has been shown to be helpful in characterizing tumor cellularity, and predicting histology. Several works have evaluated this technique for pineal tumors; however studies to date have not focused on pediatric pineal tumors. Objective We evaluated the diffusion characteristics of pediatric pineal tumors to confirm if patterns seen in studies using mixed pediatric and adult populations remain valid. Materials and methods This retrospective study was performed after Institutional Review Board approval. We retrospectively evaluated all patients 18 years of age and younger with pineal tumors from a single institution where preoperative diffusion weighted imaging as well as histologic characterization was available. Results Twenty patients (13 male, 7 female) with pineal tumors were identified: seven with pineoblastoma, four with Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor (PNET), two with other pineal tumors, and seven with germ cell tumors including two germinomas, three teratomas, and one mixed germinoma-teratoma. The mean apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values in pineoblastoma (544 ± 65 × 10–6 mm2/s) and pineoblastoma/PNET (595 ± 144 × 10–6 mm2/s) was lower than that of the germ cell tumors (1284 ± 334 × 10–6 mm2/s; p < 0.0001 vs pineoblastoma). One highly cellular germinoma had an ADC value of 694 × 10–6 mm2/s. Conclusion ADC values can aid in differentiation of pineoblastoma/PNET from germ cell tumors in a population of children with pineal masses. PMID:25963154

  20. Molecular genetic studies of sporadic pituitary tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Boggild, M.D.; Jenkinson, S.; McTernan, P.; Perrett, C.W.; Clayton, R.N.; Thakker, R.V.; Pistorello, M.; Boscaro, M.; Scanarini, M.

    1994-02-01

    Tumor formation may result from the activation of dominant oncogenes or by inactivation of recessive, tumor suppressor genes. The role of such mutations in the development of pituitary tumors has been studied. Tumors from 88 patients, representing the 4 major classes of adenoma, were investigated. In DNA extracted from matched leukocyte and tumor samples, allelic deletions were sought with 15 probes identifying restriction, fragment length polymorphisms on chromosomes 1, 5, 10, 11, 13, 17, 20, and 22. Evidence of amplification or rearrangement of 10 recognized cellular oncogenes (N-ras, mycL1, mycN, myc, H-ras, bcl1, H-stf1, sea, kraS2, and fos) was sought in tumor DNA. Activating dominant mutations of G{sub s{alpha}} were detected using the polymerase chain reaction to amplify exons 7-10 and hybridizing the product to normal and mutant allele-specific oligonucleotides. Allelic deletions on chromosome 11 were identified in 16 tumors (18%) representing all 4 major subtypes. Deletions on other autosomes were observed in less than 6% of tumors. Three adenomas had deletions on multiple autosomes, 2 of these were aggressive and recurrent. Mutations of G{sub s{alpha}} were confirmed to be specific to somatotrophinomas, being identified in 36% of such tumors in this series. No evidence of amplification or rearrangement of other recognized cellular oncogenes was found. Inactivation of a recessive oncogene on chromosome 11 is an important and possibly early event in the development of the four major types of pituitary adenoma, whereas activating mutations of G{sub s{alpha}} are confirmed to be specific to somatotropinomas. Two aggressive tumors were found to have multiple autosomal losses, suggesting a multistep progression in the development of tumors of this phenotype. 30 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Canine parvovirus NS1 protein exhibits anti-tumor activity in a mouse mammary tumor model.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shishir Kumar; Yadav, Pavan Kumar; Gandham, Ravi Kumar; Sahoo, A P; Harish, D R; Singh, Arvind Kumar; Tiwari, A K

    2016-02-02

    Many viral proteins have the ability to kill tumor cells specifically without harming the normal cells. These proteins, on ectopic expression, cause lysis or induction of apoptosis in the target tumor cells. Parvovirus NS1 is one of such proteins, which is known to kill high proliferating tumor cells. In the present study, we assessed the apoptosis inducing ability of canine parvovirus type 2 NS1 protein (CPV2.NS1) in vitro in 4T1 cells, and found it to cause significant cell death due to induction of apoptosis through intrinsic or mitochondrial pathway. Further, we also evaluated the oncolytic activity of CPV2.NS1 protein in a mouse mammary tumor model. The results suggested that CPV2.NS1 was able to inhibit the growth of 4T1 induced mouse mammary tumor as indicated by significantly reduced tumor volume, mitotic, AgNOR and PCNA indices. Further, inhibition of tumor growth was found to be because of induction of apoptosis in the tumor cells, which was evident by a significant increase in the number of TUNEL positive cells. Further, CPV2.NS1 was also able to stimulate the immune cells against the tumor antigens as indicated by the increased CD4+ and CD8+ counts in the blood of CVP2.NS1 treated mice. Further optimization of the delivery of NS1 protein and use of an adjuvant may further enhance its anti-tumor activity.

  2. BRAF exon 15 mutations in pediatric renal stromal tumors: prevalence in metanephric stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Marsden, Lily; Jennings, Lawrence J; Gadd, Samantha; Yu, Min; Perlman, Elizabeth J; Cajaiba, Mariana M

    2017-02-01

    Metanephric stromal tumors (MSTs) are rare renal stromal tumors that predominantly affect children. They belong to the metanephric family of tumors, along with metanephric adenofibroma and metanephric adenoma. The previous documentation of BRAF exon 15 mutations in 88% of metanephric adenomas and in isolated cases of metanephric adenofibroma prompted us to investigate the prevalence of these mutations in MSTs and in other pediatric renal stromal tumors. In this study, 17 MSTs, 22 congenital mesoblastic nephromas, and 6 ossifying renal tumors of infancy were selected for BRAF exon 15 testing. Tumor genomic DNA was extracted from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue, followed by polymerase chain reaction amplification and Sanger dideoxy sequencing with primers flanking the BRAF exon 15 gene. BRAF exon 15 mutations were found in 11 (65%) of the 17 cases of MST, all corresponding to a thymidine-to-adenine substitution at codon 600 (BRAF V600E). All other renal stromal tumors tested were negative for BRAF exon 15 mutations. In conclusion, BRAF V600E mutations are encountered in most MSTs, supporting a link with other metanephric tumors and suggesting a clonal event possibly affecting primordial renal cells. In addition, BRAF V600E mutations have been associated with oncogene-induced senescence in other benign tumors, providing clues to the pathogenesis of metanephric neoplasms in keeping with their overall benign behavior. Our results also suggest a potential diagnostic use for BRAF exon 15 mutations in differentiating MSTs from other pediatric renal stromal tumors, particularly in limited samples.

  3. TWEAK mediates anti-tumor effect of tumor-infiltrating macrophage

    SciTech Connect

    Kaduka, Yuki; Takeda, Kazuyoshi . E-mail: ktakeda@med.juntendo.ac.jp; Nakayama, Masafumi; Kinoshita, Katsuyuki; Yagita, Hideo; Okumura, Ko

    2005-06-03

    TWEAK induces diverse cellular responses, including pro-inflammatory chemokine production, migration, proliferation, and cell death through the TWEAK receptor, Fn14. In the present study, we examined the effect of TWEAK or Fn14 expression in tumor cells on tumor outgrowth in vivo. Administration of neutralizing anti-TWEAK mAb significantly reduced the frequency of tumor rejection and shortened the survival of mice intraperitoneally inoculated with TWEAK-sensitive Fn14-expressing tumor cells. Moreover, anti-TWEAK mAb treatment promoted the subcutaneous growth of TWEAK-sensitive Fn14-expressing tumor cells, and this promotion was abolished by the inhibition of macrophage infiltration but not NK cell depletion. In contrast, administration of anti-TWEAK mAb had no apparent effect on the growth of TWEAK-resistant tumor cells, even if tumor cells expressed Fn14. On the other hand, TWEAK expression in tumor cells had no significant effect on subcutaneous tumor growth. These results indicate that TWEAK mediates anti-tumor effect of macrophages in vivo.

  4. Toll-like receptor 2- and 6-mediated stimulation by macrophage-activating lipopeptide 2 induces lipopolysaccharide (LPS) cross tolerance in mice, which results in protection from tumor necrosis factor alpha but in only partial protection from lethal LPS doses.

    PubMed

    Deiters, Ursula; Gumenscheimer, Marina; Galanos, Chris; Mühlradt, Peter F

    2003-08-01

    Patients or experimental animals previously exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) become tolerant to further LPS challenge. We investigated the potential of the macrophage-activating lipopeptide 2 (MALP-2) to induce in vivo cross tolerance to tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and LPS. MALP-2-induced tolerance could be of practical interest, as MALP-2 proved much less pyrogenic in rabbits than LPS. Whereas LPS signals via Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), MALP-2 uses TLR2 and TLR6. LPS-mediated cytokine release was studied in mice pretreated with intraperitoneal injections of MALP-2. No biologically active TNF-alpha could be detected in the serum of MALP-2-treated animals when challenged with LPS 24 or 72 h later, whereas suppression of LPS-dependent interleukin (IL)-6 lasted for only 24 h. Protection from lethal TNF-alpha shock was studied in galactosamine-treated mice. Dose dependently, MALP-2 prevented death from lethal TNF-alpha doses in TLR4(-/-) but not in TLR2(-/-) mice, with protection lasting from 5 to 24 h. To assay protection from LPS, mice were pretreated with MALP-2 doses of up to 10 micro g. Five and 24 h later, the animals were simultaneously sensitized and challenged by intravenous coinjection of galactosamine and a lethal dose of 50 ng of LPS. There was only limited protection (four of seven mice survived) when mice were challenged 5 h after MALP-2 pretreatment, and no protection when mice were challenged at later times. The high effectiveness of MALP-2 in suppressing TNF-alpha, the known ways of biological inactivation, and low pyrogenicity make MALP-2 a potential candidate for clinical use.

  5. Can Wilms Tumor Be Found Early?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Wilms Tumor Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Can Wilms Tumor Be Found Early? Wilms tumors are usually found ... Your Child’s Doctor About Wilms Tumor? More In Wilms Tumor About Wilms Tumor Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  6. What Happens After Treatment for Wilms Tumor?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tumor After Treatment What Happens After Treatment for Wilms Tumor? During and after treatment for Wilms tumors, the ... Wilms Tumor Survivors and Their Families More In Wilms Tumor About Wilms Tumor Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  7. Cross-talk among myeloid-derived suppressor cells, macrophages, and tumor cells impacts the inflammatory milieu of solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Beury, Daniel W.; Parker, Katherine H.; Nyandjo, Maeva; Sinha, Pratima; Carter, Kayla A.; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    MDSC and macrophages are present in most solid tumors and are important drivers of immune suppression and inflammation. It is established that cross-talk between MDSC and macrophages impacts anti-tumor immunity; however, interactions between tumor cells and MDSC or macrophages are less well studied. To examine potential interactions between these cells, we studied the impact of MDSC, macrophages, and four murine tumor cell lines on each other, both in vitro and in vivo. We focused on IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, TNF-α, and NO, as these molecules are produced by macrophages, MDSC, and many tumor cells; are present in most solid tumors; and regulate inflammation. In vitro studies demonstrated that MDSC-produced IL-10 decreased macrophage IL-6 and TNF-α and increased NO. IL-6 indirectly regulated MDSC IL-10. Tumor cells increased MDSC IL-6 and vice versa. Tumor cells also increased macrophage IL-6 and NO and decreased macrophage TNF-α. Tumor cell-driven macrophage IL-6 was reduced by MDSC, and tumor cells and MDSC enhanced macrophage NO. In vivo analysis of solid tumors identified IL-6 and IL-10 as the dominant cytokines and demonstrated that these molecules were produced predominantly by stromal cells. These results suggest that inflammation within solid tumors is regulated by the ratio of tumor cells to MDSC and macrophages and that interactions of these cells have the potential to alter significantly the inflammatory milieu within the tumor microenvironment. PMID:25170116

  8. Merkel cell tumor.

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, M; Watanabe, H; Kobayashi, H; Ohnishi, Y; Shitara, A; Nitto, H

    1987-06-01

    A Merkel cell tumor appeared on the left cheek of an 83-year-old female was reported. The tumor was located mainly in the dermis and infiltrated to the subcutaneous adipose tissue with an involvement of the blood vessels and lymphatics at the periphery. Electron-microscopically, few of the dense-cored granules and the single globular aggregates of intermediate filaments at the nuclear indentations were observed. Electron-microscopic uranaffin reaction proved positive reaction on the dense-cored granules. Half of the cytoplasmic border was smooth, while the rest had short projections. Desmosomes or junctional complexes were not detected among the tumor cells. Immunohistochemically, the cytoplasm of tumor cell showed positive reaction to both neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and keratin. The single globular positive spots of the latter were localized in accordance with the aggregates of intermediate filaments. These findings suggested a neurogenic origin with double differentiation, epithelial and neuroendocrine, of the Merkel cell tumor.

  9. Method of treating tumors

    DOEpatents

    DeNardo, Sally J.; Burke, Patricia A.; DeNardo, Gerald L.; Goodman, Simon; Matzku, legal representative, Kerstin; Matzku, Siegfried

    2006-04-18

    A method of treating tumors, such as prostate tumors, breast tumors, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and the like, includes the sequential steps of administering to the patient at least one dose of an antiangiogenic cyclo-arginine-glycine-aspartic acid-containing pentapeptide (cRGD pentapeptide); administering to the patient an anti-tumor effective amount of a radioimmunotherapeutic agent (RIT); and then administering to the patient at least one additional dose of cRGD pentapeptide. The cRGD pentapeptide is preferably cyclo-(Arg-Gly-Asp-D-Phe-[N-Me]-Val), and the RIT is preferably a radionuclide-labeled chelating agent-ligand complex in which chelating agent is chemically bonded to a tumor-targeting molecule, such as a monoclonal antibody.

  10. Delayed Contrast Extravasation MRI for Depicting Tumor and Non-Tumoral Tissues in Primary and Metastatic Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zach, Leor; Guez, David; Last, David; Daniels, Dianne; Grober, Yuval; Nissim, Ouzi; Hoffmann, Chen; Nass, Dvora; Talianski, Alisa; Spiegelmann, Roberto; Cohen, Zvi R.; Mardor, Yael

    2012-01-01

    The current standard of care for newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is resection followed by radiotherapy with concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide. Recent studies suggest that nearly half of the patients with early radiological deterioration post treatment do not suffer from tumor recurrence but from pseudoprogression. Similarly, a significant number of patients with brain metastases suffer from radiation necrosis following radiation treatments. Conventional MRI is currently unable to differentiate tumor progression from treatment-induced effects. The ability to clearly differentiate tumor from non-tumoral tissues is crucial for appropriate patient management. Ten patients with primary brain tumors and 10 patients with brain metastases were scanned by delayed contrast extravasation MRI prior to surgery. Enhancement subtraction maps calculated from high resolution MR images acquired up to 75 min after contrast administration were used for obtaining stereotactic biopsies. Histological assessment was then compared with the pre-surgical calculated maps. In addition, the application of our maps for prediction of progression was studied in a small cohort of 13 newly diagnosed GBM patients undergoing standard chemoradiation and followed up to 19.7 months post therapy. The maps showed two primary enhancement populations: the slow population where contrast clearance from the tissue was slower than contrast accumulation and the fast population where clearance was faster than accumulation. Comparison with histology confirmed the fast population to consist of morphologically active tumor and the slow population to consist of non-tumoral tissues. Our maps demonstrated significant correlation with perfusion-weighted MR data acquired simultaneously, although contradicting examples were shown. Preliminary results suggest that early changes in the fast volumes may serve as a predictor for time to progression. These preliminary results suggest that our high resolution

  11. Brain tumors: Special characters for research and banking

    PubMed Central

    Kheirollahi, Majid; Dashti, Sepideh; Khalaj, Zahra; Nazemroaia, Fatemeh; Mahzouni, Parvin

    2015-01-01

    A brain tumor is an intracranial neoplasm within the brain or in the central spinal canal. Primary malignant brain tumors affect about 200,000 people worldwide every year. Brain cells have special characters. Due to the specific properties of brain tumors, including epidemiology, growth, and division, investigation of brain tumors and the interpretation of results is not simple. Research to identify the genetic alterations of human tumors improves our knowledge of tumor biology, genetic interactions, progression, and preclinical therapeutic assessment. Obtaining data for prevention, diagnosis, and therapy requires sufficient samples, and brain tumors have a wide range. As a result, establishing the bank of brain tumors is very important and essential. PMID:25625110

  12. SU-D-201-04: Study On the Impact of Tumor Shape and Size On Drug Delivery to Pancreatic Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Soltani, M; Bazmara, H; Sefidgar, M; Subramaniam, R; Rahmim, A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Drug delivery to solid tumors can be expressed physically using transport phenomena such as convection and diffusion for the drug of interest within extracellular matrices. We aimed to carefully model these phenomena, and to investigate the effect of tumor shape and size on drug delivery to solid tumors in the pancreas. Methods: In this study, multiple tumor geometries as obtained from clinical PET/CT images were considered. An advanced numerical method was used to simultaneously solve fluid flow and solute transport equations. Data from n=45 pancreatic cancer patients with non-resectable locoregional disease were analyzed, and geometrical information from the tumors including size, shape, and aspect ratios were classified. To investigate effect of tumor shape, tumors with similar size but different shapes were selected and analyzed. Moreover, to investigate effect of tumor size, tumors with similar shapes but different sizes, ranging from 1 to 77 cm{sup 3}, were selected and analyzed. A hypothetical tumor similar to one of the analyzed tumors, but scaled to reduce its size below 0.2 cm{sup 3}, was also analyzed. Results: The results showed relatively similar average drug concentration profiles in tumors with different sizes. Generally, smaller tumors had higher absolute drug concentration. In the hypothetical tumor, with volume less than 0.2 cm{sup 3}, the average drug concentration was 20% higher in comparison to its counterparts. For the various real tumor geometries, however, the maximum difference between average drug concentrations was 10% for the smallest and largest tumors. Moreover, the results demonstrated that for pancreatic tumors the shape is not significant. The negligible difference of drug concentration in different tumor shapes was due to the minimum effect of convection in pancreatic tumors. Conclusion: In tumors with different sizes, smaller tumors have higher drug delivery; however, the impact of tumor shape in the case of pancreatic

  13. Tumors of the Infratemporal Fossa

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Rammohan; Quak, Jasper; Egeler, Saskia; Smeele, Ludi; Waal, Isaac v.d.; Valk, Paul v.d.; Leemans, Rene

    2000-01-01

    Neoplastic processes involving the infratemporal fossa may originate from the tissues in the region, but more often are the result of extension from neighboring structures. Metastatic lesions located in the region are rarely encountered. Because of its concealed localization, tumors may remain unnoticed for some time. Clinical signs and symptoms often arise late, are insidious, and may be mistakenly attributed to other structures. The close proximity of the area to the intracranial structures, the orbit, the paranasal sinuses, the nasopharynx, and the facial area demands careful planning of surgical excision and combined procedures may be called for. Modern imaging techniques have made three-dimensional visualization of the extent of the pathology possible. Treatment depends on the histopathology and staging of the tumor. Several surgical approaches have been developed over the years. Radical tumor excision with preservation of the quality of life remain the ultimate goal for those tumors where surgery is indicated. Experience over a decade with various pathologies is presented. ImagesFigure 1p6-bFigure 2Figure 3 PMID:17171095

  14. Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors.

    PubMed

    Durbin, Adam D; Ki, Dong Hyuk; He, Shuning; Look, A Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) are tumors derived from Schwann cells or Schwann cell precursors. Although rare overall, the incidence of MPNST has increased with improved clinical management of patients with the neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) tumor predisposition syndrome. Unfortunately, current treatment modalities for MPNST are limited, with no targeted therapies available and poor efficacy of conventional radiation and chemotherapeutic regimens. Many murine and zebrafish models of MPNST have been developed, which have helped to elucidate the genes and pathways that are dysregulated in MPNST tumorigenesis, including the p53, and the RB1, PI3K-Akt-mTOR, RAS-ERK and Wnt signaling pathways. Preclinical results have suggested that new therapies, including mTOR and ERK inhibitors, may synergize with conventional chemotherapy in human tumors. The discovery of new genome editing technologies, like CRISPR-cas9, and their successful application to the zebrafish model will enable rapid progress in the faithful modeling of MPNST molecular pathogenesis. The zebrafish model is especially suited for high throughput screening of new targeted therapeutics as well as drugs approved for other purposes, which may help to bring enhanced treatment modalities into human clinical trials for this devastating disease.

  15. Hepatic perivascular epithelioid cell tumor

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Da; Wang, Jianmin; Tian, Yuepeng; Li, Qiuguo; Yan, Haixiong; Wang, Biao; Xiong, Li; Li, Qinglong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rational: Perivascular epithelioid cell tumor (PEComa) is a rare mesenchymal neoplasm which expresses both myogenic and melanocytic markers. PEComas are found in a variety locations in the body, but up to now only approximately 30 cases about hepatic perivascular epithelioid cell tumor are reported in English language worldwide. Patient concerns: A 32-year-old woman was admitted in our hospital with intermittent right upper quadrant pain for 1 month and recent (1 day) progressive deterioration. Diagnoses: Based on the results of the laboratory examinations and the findings of the computed tomography, the diagnosis of hepatic hamartoma or the hepatocecullar carcinoma with hemorrhage was made. Interventions: The patient underwent a segmentectomy of the liver, and the finally diagnosis of hepatic PEComa was made with immunohistochemical confirmation with HMB-45 and SMA. Outcomes: There is no clinical or radiographic evidence of recurrence 9 months after surgery. Lessons: This kind of tumor is extremely rare and the natural history of PEComa is uncertain, as the treatment protocol for hepatic PEComa has not reached a consensus. But the main treatment of the disease may be surgical resection. Only after long term follow-up can we know whether the tumor is benign or malignant. It appears that longer clinical follow-up is necessary in all patients with hepatic PEComas. PMID:28002331

  16. The Universal Dynamics of Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Brú, Antonio; Albertos, Sonia; Luis Subiza, José; García-Asenjo, José López; Brú, Isabel

    2003-01-01

    Scaling techniques were used to analyze the fractal nature of colonies of 15 cell lines growing in vitro as well as of 16 types of tumor developing in vivo. All cell colonies were found to exhibit exactly the same growth dynamics—which correspond to the molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) universality class. MBE dynamics are characterized by 1), a linear growth rate, 2), the constraint of cell proliferation to the colony/tumor border, and 3), surface diffusion of cells at the growing edge. These characteristics were experimentally verified in the studied colonies. That these should show MBE dynamics is in strong contrast with the currently established concept of tumor growth: the kinetics of this type of proliferation rules out exponential or Gompertzian growth. Rather, a clear linear growth regime is followed. The importance of new cell movements—cell diffusion at the tumor border—lies in the fact that tumor growth must be conceived as a competition for space between the tumor and the host, and not for nutrients or other factors. Strong experimental evidence is presented for 16 types of tumor, the growth of which cell surface diffusion may be the main mechanism responsible in vivo. These results explain most of the clinical and biological features of colonies and tumors, offer new theoretical frameworks, and challenge the wisdom of some current clinical strategies. PMID:14581197

  17. Giant cell tumor in adipose package Hoffa

    PubMed Central

    Etcheto, H. Rivarola; Escobar, G.; Blanchod, C. Collazo; Palanconi, M.; Zordan, J.; Salinas, E. Alvarez; Autorino₁, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Tumors of adipose Hoffa package are very uncommon, with isolated cases reported in the literature. His presentation in pediatric patients knee is exceptional. The most frequently described tumors are benign including vellonodular synovitis. The extra-articular localized variant there of is known as giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath. It is characterized by locally aggressive nature, and has been described in reports of isolated cases. Objective: A case of giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath in adipose presentation package Hoffa in pediatric patients is presented in this paper. Methods: male patient eleven years with right knee pain after sports practice was evaluated. Physical examination, showed limited extension -30º, joint effusion, stable negative Lachman maneuver without peripheral knee laxity. MRI hyperintense on tumor is observed in T2 and hypointense on T1 homogeneous and defined edges content displayed prior to LCA related to adipose Hoffa package. Results: The tumor specimen was obtained and histopathology is defined as densely cellular tissue accumulation of xantomisados fibrocollagenous with histiocytes and multinucleated giant cells, compatible with giant cell tumor of tendon sheath. Conclusion: The presentation of giant cell tumors of the tendon sheath in Hoffa fat pad is exceptional. However, his suspicion allows adequate preoperative surgical planning, as a whole resection is the only procedure that has been shown to decrease the rate of recurrence of this disease.

  18. Local resection of ampullary tumors.

    PubMed

    Meneghetti, Adam T; Safadi, Bassem; Stewart, Lygia; Way, Lawrence W

    2005-12-01

    There is no consensus on the appropriateness of local resection for ampullary tumors, because malignant recurrence of what were thought to be benign tumors has been reported. This study examined the role of local resection in the management of ampullary tumors. Thirty patients (mean age 66 years) had transduodenal local resections performed at UCSF-Moffitt Hospital or the San Francisco VA Medical Center (February, 1992 to March, 2004). Mean follow-up time was 5.8 years. Preoperative biopsies (obtained in all patients) showed 18 adenomas, four adenomas with dysplasia, five adenomas with atypia, one adenoma with dysplasia and focal adenocarcinoma, and two tumors seen on endoscopy, whose biopsies showed only duodenal mucosa. In comparison with the final pathology findings, the results of frozen section examinations for malignancy in 20 patients, during the operation, were false-negative in three cases. The final pathologic diagnosis was 23 villous adenomas, six adenocarcinomas, and one paraganglioma. On preoperative biopsies, all patients who had high-grade dysplasia and one of five patients with atypia turned out to have invasive adenocarcinoma when the entire specimen was examined postoperatively. Two (33%) adenocarcinomas recurred at a mean of 4 years; both had negative margins at the initial resection. Among the 23 adenomas, three (13%) recurred (all as adenomas) at a mean of 3.2 years; in only one of these cases was the margin positive at the time of resection. Tumor size did not influence recurrence rate. Ampullary tumors with high-grade dysplasia on preoperative biopsy should be treated by pancreaticoduodenectomy because they usually harbor malignancy. Recurrence is too common and unpredictable after local resection of malignant lesions for this to be considered an acceptable alternative to pancreaticoduodenectomy. Ampullary adenomas can be resected locally with good results, but the recurrence rate was 13%, so endoscopic surveillance is indicated

  19. Unarmed, tumor-specific monoclonal antibody effectively treats brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sampson, John H.; Crotty, Laura E.; Lee, Samson; Archer, Gary E.; Ashley, David M.; Wikstrand, Carol J.; Hale, Laura P.; Small, Clayton; Dranoff, Glenn; Friedman, Allan H.; Friedman, Henry S.; Bigner, Darell D.

    2000-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is often amplified and rearranged structurally in tumors of the brain, breast, lung, and ovary. The most common mutation, EGFRvIII, is characterized by an in-frame deletion of 801 base pairs, resulting in the generation of a novel tumor-specific epitope at the fusion junction. A murine homologue of the human EGFRvIII mutation was created, and an IgG2a murine mAb, Y10, was generated that recognizes the human and murine equivalents of this tumor-specific antigen. In vitro, Y10 was found to inhibit DNA synthesis and cellular proliferation and to induce autonomous, complement-mediated, and antibodydependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Systemic treatment with i.p. Y10 of s.c. B16 melanomas transfected to express stably the murine EGFRvIII led to long-term survival in all mice treated (n = 20; P < 0.001). Similar therapy with i.p. Y10 failed to increase median survival of mice with EGFRvIII-expressing B16 melanomas in the brain; however, treatment with a single intratumoral injection of Y10 increased median survival by an average 286%, with 26% long-term survivors (n = 117; P < 0.001). The mechanism of action of Y10 in vivo was shown to be independent of complement, granulocytes, natural killer cells, and T lymphocytes through in vivo complement and cell subset depletions. Treatment with Y10 in Fc receptor knockout mice demonstrated the mechanism of Y10 to be Fc receptor-dependent. These data indicate that an unarmed, tumor-specific mAb may be an effective immunotherapy against human tumors and potentially other pathologic processes in the “immunologically privileged” central nervous system. PMID:10852962

  20. Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) Hepatic Arteriography in Chemoembolization for Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Performance Depicting Tumors and Tumor Feeders

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, In Joon; Chung, Jin Wook Yin, Yong Hu; Kim, Hyo-Cheol; Kim, Young Il; Jae, Hwan Jun; Park, Jae Hyung

    2015-10-15

    PurposeThis study was designed to analyze retrospectively the performance of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) hepatic arteriography in depicting tumors and their feeders and to investigate the related determining factors in chemoembolization for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).MethodsEighty-six patients with 142 tumors satisfying the imaging diagnosis criteria of HCC were included in this study. The performance of CBCT hepatic arteriography for chemoembolization per tumor and per patient was evaluated using maximum intensity projection images alone (MIP analysis) or MIP combined with multiplanar reformation images (MIP + MPR analysis) regarding the following three aspects: tumor depiction, confidence of tumor feeder detection, and trackability of tumor feeders. Tumor size, tumor enhancement, tumor location, number of feeders, diaphragmatic motion, portal vein enhancement, and hepatic artery to parenchyma enhancement ratio were regarded as potential determining factors.ResultsTumors were depicted in 125 (88.0 %) and 142 tumors (100 %) on MIP and MIP + MPR analysis, respectively. Imaging performances on MIP and MIP + MPR analysis were good enough to perform subsegmental chemoembolization without additional angiographic investigation in 88 (62.0 %) and 128 tumors (90.1 %) on per-tumor basis and in 43 (50 %) and 73 (84.9 %) on per-patient basis, respectively. Significant determining factors for performance in MIP + MPR analysis on per tumor basis were tumor size (p = 0.030), tumor enhancement (0.005), tumor location (p = 0.001), and diaphragmatic motion (p < 0.001).ConclusionsCBCT hepatic arteriography provided sufficient information for subsegmental chemoembolization by depicting tumors and their feeders in the vast majority of patients. Combined analysis of MIP and MPR images was essential to enhance the performance of CBCT hepatic arteriography.

  1. TGF-{beta} modulates {beta}-Catenin stability and signaling in mesenchymal proliferations

    SciTech Connect

    Amini Nik, Saeid; Ebrahim, Rasoul Pour; Dam, Kim van; Cassiman, Jean-Jacques; Tejpar, Sabine . E-mail: sabine.tejpar@med.kuleuven.be

    2007-08-01

    Here for the first time we showed, despite the oncogenic mutations in {beta}-Catenin, that TGF-{beta} is a modulator of {beta}-Catenin levels in tumoral fibroblasts as well as non-tumoral fibroblasts. The results show that the TGF-{beta} pathway is active in desmoids cells and in in situ tumors. A dose dependent increase in {beta}-Catenin protein levels was observed after TGF-{beta} treatment in combination with an increased repression of GSK-3{beta} both in normal and tumoral fibroblasts. TGF-{beta} stimulation also led to an altered - up to 5 fold - transcriptional activity of {beta}-Catenin responsive promoters, such as IGFBP6 as well as increase of TOPflash activity. TGF-{beta} stimulation increased cell proliferation and BrdU incorporation 2.5 times. Taken together, we propose that TGF-{beta} is a modulator of {beta}-Catenin levels in tumoral fibroblasts and non-tumoral fibroblasts, despite the oncogenic mutations already present in this gene in tumoral fibroblasts of desmoid tumors. This modulation of {beta}-Catenin levels by TGF-{beta} may be involved in determining the tumoral phenotype of the cells.

  2. Effect of tumor microenvironmental factors on tumor growth dynamics modeled by correlated colored noises with colored cross-correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idris, Ibrahim Mu'awiyya; Abu Bakar, Mohd Rizam

    2016-07-01

    The effect of non-immunogenic tumor microenvironmental factors on tumor growth dynamics modeled by correlated additive and multiplicative colored noises is investigated. Using the Novikov theorem, Fox approach and Ansatz of Hanggi, an approximate Fokker-Planck equation for the system is obtained and analytic expression for the steady state distribution Pst(x) is derived. Based on the numerical results, we find that fluctuations of microenvironmental factors within the tumor site with parameter θ have a diffusive effect on the tumor growth dynamics, and the tumor response to the microenvironmental factors with parameter α inhibits growth at weak correlation time τ. Moreover, at increasing correlation time τ the inhibitive effect of tumor response α is suppressed and instead a systematic growth promotion is noticed. The result also reveals that the strength of the correlation time τ has a strong influence on the growth effects exerted by the non-immunogenic component of tumor microenvironment on tumor growth.

  3. Radiofrequency Ablation of Liver Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Site Index A-Z Radiofrequency Ablation (RFA) of Liver Tumors Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a treatment that ... of Liver Tumors? What is Radiofrequency Ablation of Liver Tumors? Radiofrequency ablation, sometimes referred to as RFA, ...

  4. Radiology of the spine: Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Jeanmart, L.

    1986-01-01

    This book deals with tumors of the spinal cord and various aspects of primary and secondary osseous tumors of the spine. Included in discussion are tumors, chordoma hemangioma, vascular malformation and the terms angioma and hemangiomas.

  5. Inhibition of tumor growth and metastasis by photoimmunotherapy targeting tumor-associated macrophage in a sorafenib-resistant tumor model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chenran; Gao, Liquan; Cai, Yuehong; Liu, Hao; Gao, Duo; Lai, Jianhao; Jia, Bing; Wang, Fan; Liu, Zhaofei

    2016-04-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) play essential roles in tumor invasion and metastasis, and contribute to drug resistance. Clinical evidence suggests that TAM levels are correlated with local tumor relapse, distant metastasis, and poor prognosis in patients. In this study, we synthesized a TAM-targeted probe (IRD-αCD206) by conjugating a monoclonal anti-CD206 antibody with a near-infrared phthalocyanine dye. We then investigated the potential application of the IRD-αCD206 probe to near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging and photoimmunotherapy (PIT) of tumors resistant to treatment with the kinase inhibitor sorafenib. Sorafenib treatment had no effect on tumor growth in a 4T1 mouse model of breast cancer, but induced M2 macrophage polarization in tumors. M2 macrophage recruitment by sorafenib-treated 4T1 tumors was noninvasively visualized by in vivo NIRF imaging of IRD-αCD206. Small-animal single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT and intratumoral microdistribution analysis indicated TAM-specific localization of the IRD-αCD206 probe in 4T1 tumors after several rounds of sorafenib treatment. Upon light irradiation, IRD-αCD206 suppressed the growth of sorafenib-resistant tumors. In vivo CT imaging and ex vivo histological analysis confirmed the inhibition of lung metastasis in mice by IRD-αCD206 PIT. These results demonstrate the utility of the IRD-αCD206 probe for TAM-targeted diagnostic imaging and treatment of tumors that are resistant to conventional therapeutics.

  6. Herpes virus oncolytic therapy reverses tumor immune dysfunction and facilitates tumor antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Benencia, Fabian; Courrèges, Maria C; Fraser, Nigel W; Coukos, George

    2008-08-01

    We have previously shown that intratumor administration of HSV-1716 (an ICP34.5 null mutant) resulted in significant reduction of tumor growth and a significant survival advantage in a murine model of ovarian cancer. Herewith we report that oncolytic HSV-1716 generates vaccination effects in the same model. Upon HSV-1716 infection, mouse ovarian tumor cells showed high levels of expression viral glycoproteins B and D and were highly phagocyted by dendritic cells (DCs). Interestingly, increased phagocytosis of tumor-infected cells by DCs was impaired by heparin, and anti-HSV glycoproteins B and D, indicating that viral infection enhances adhesive interactions between DCs and tumor apoptotic bodies. Moreover, HSV-1716 infected cells expressed high levels of heat shock proteins 70 and GRP94, molecules that have been reported to induce maturation of DCs, increase cross-presentation of antigens and promote antitumor immune response. After phagocytosis of tumor-infected cells, DCs acquired a mature status in vitro and in vivo, upregulated the expression of costimulatory molecule and increased migration towards MIP-3beta. Furthermore, HSV-1716 oncolytic treatment markedly reduced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels in tumor-bearing animals thus abrogating tumor immunosuppressive milieu. These mechanisms may account for the highly enhanced antitumoral immune responses observed in HSV-1716 treated animals. Oncolytic treatment induced a significantly higher frequency of tumor-reactive IFNgamma producing cells, and induced a robust tumor infiltration by T cells. These results indicate that oncolytic therapy with HSV-1716 facilitates antitumor immune responses.

  7. Benign follicular tumors*

    PubMed Central

    Tellechea, Oscar; Cardoso, José Carlos; Reis, José Pedro; Ramos, Leonor; Gameiro, Ana Rita; Coutinho, Inês; Baptista, António Poiares

    2015-01-01

    Benign follicular tumors comprise a large and heterogeneous group of neoplasms that share a common histogenesis and display morphological features resembling one or several portions of the normal hair follicle, or recapitulate part of its embryological development. Most cases present it as clinically nondescript single lesions and essentially of dermatological relevance. Occasionally, however, these lesions be multiple and represent a cutaneous marker of complex syndromes associated with an increased risk of visceral neoplasms. In this article, the authors present the microscopic structure of the normal hair follicle as a basis to understand the type and level of differentiation of the various follicular tumors. The main clinicopathological features and differential diagnosis of benign follicular tumors are then discussed, including dilated pore of Winer, pilar sheath acanthoma, trichoadenoma, trichilemmoma, infundibuloma, proliferating trichilemmal cyst/tumor, trichoblastoma and its variants, pilomatricoma, trichodiscoma/fibrofolliculoma, neurofollicular hamartoma and trichofolliculoma. In addition, the main syndromes presenting with multiple follicular tumors are also discussed, namely Cowden, Birt-Hogg-Dubé, Rombo and Bazex-Dupré-Christol syndromes, as well as multiple tumors of follicular infundibulum (infundibulomatosis) and multiple trichoepitheliomas. Although the diagnosis of follicular tumors relies on histological examination, we highlight the importance of their knowledge for the clinician, especially when in presence of patients with multiple lesions that may be the cutaneous marker of a cancer-prone syndrome. The dermatologist is therefore in a privileged position to recognize these lesions, which is extremely important to provide further propedeutic, appropriate referral and genetic counseling for these patients. PMID:26734858

  8. Enhanced Performance of Brain Tumor Classification via Tumor Region Augmentation and Partition.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jun; Huang, Wei; Cao, Shuangliang; Yang, Ru; Yang, Wei; Yun, Zhaoqiang; Wang, Zhijian; Feng, Qianjin

    2015-01-01

    Automatic classification of tissue types of region of interest (ROI) plays an important role in computer-aided diagnosis. In the current study, we focus on the classification of three types of brain tumors (i.e., meningioma, glioma, and pituitary tumor) in T1-weighted contrast-enhanced MRI (CE-MRI) images. Spatial pyramid matching (SPM), which splits the image into increasingly fine rectangular subregions and computes histograms of local features from each subregion, exhibits excellent results for natural scene classification. However, this approach is not applicable for brain tumors, because of the great variations in tumor shape and size. In this paper, we propose a method to enhance the classification performance. First, the augmented tumor region via image dilation is used as the ROI instead of the original tumor region because tumor surrounding tissues can also offer important clues for tumor types. Second, the augmented tumor region is split into increasingly fine ring-form subregions. We evaluate the efficacy of the proposed method on a large dataset with three feature extraction methods, namely, intensity histogram, gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM), and bag-of-words (BoW) model. Compared with using tumor region as ROI, using augmented tumor region as ROI improves the accuracies to 82.31% from 71.39%, 84.75% from 78.18%, and 88.19% from 83.54% for intensity histogram, GLCM, and BoW model, respectively. In addition to region augmentation, ring-form partition can further improve the accuracies up to 87.54%, 89.72%, and 91.28%. These experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is feasible and effective for the classification of brain tumors in T1-weighted CE-MRI.

  9. Enhanced Performance of Brain Tumor Classification via Tumor Region Augmentation and Partition

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jun; Huang, Wei; Cao, Shuangliang; Yang, Ru; Yang, Wei; Yun, Zhaoqiang; Wang, Zhijian; Feng, Qianjin

    2015-01-01

    Automatic classification of tissue types of region of interest (ROI) plays an important role in computer-aided diagnosis. In the current study, we focus on the classification of three types of brain tumors (i.e., meningioma, glioma, and pituitary tumor) in T1-weighted contrast-enhanced MRI (CE-MRI) images. Spatial pyramid matching (SPM), which splits the image into increasingly fine rectangular subregions and computes histograms of local features from each subregion, exhibits excellent results for natural scene classification. However, this approach is not applicable for brain tumors, because of the great variations in tumor shape and size. In this paper, we propose a method to enhance the classification performance. First, the augmented tumor region via image dilation is used as the ROI instead of the original tumor region because tumor surrounding tissues can also offer important clues for tumor types. Second, the augmented tumor region is split into increasingly fine ring-form subregions. We evaluate the efficacy of the proposed method on a large dataset with three feature extraction methods, namely, intensity histogram, gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM), and bag-of-words (BoW) model. Compared with using tumor region as ROI, using augmented tumor region as ROI improves the accuracies to 82.31% from 71.39%, 84.75% from 78.18%, and 88.19% from 83.54% for intensity histogram, GLCM, and BoW model, respectively. In addition to region augmentation, ring-form partition can further improve the accuracies up to 87.54%, 89.72%, and 91.28%. These experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is feasible and effective for the classification of brain tumors in T1-weighted CE-MRI. PMID:26447861

  10. Safety and Efficacy of Transplantation with Allogeneic Skin Tumors to Treat Chemically-Induced Skin Tumors in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhiwei; Sun, Hua; Zhang, Jianhua; Ge, Chunlei; Dong, Suwei; Li, Zhen; Li, Ruilei; Chen, Xiaodan; Li, Mei; Chen, Yun; Zou, Yingying; Qian, Zhongyi; Yang, Lei; Yang, Jinyan; Zhu, Zhitao; Liu, Zhimin; Song, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Background Transplantation with allogeneic cells has become a promising modality for cancer therapy, which can induce graft-versus-tumor (GVT) effect. This study was aimed at assessing the safety, efficacy, and tissue type GVT (tGVT) response of transplantation with allogeneic skin tumors to treat chemically-induced skin tumors in mice. Material/Methods FVB/N and ICR mice were exposed topically to chemicals to induce skin tumors. Healthy ICR mice were transplanted with allogeneic skin tumors from FVB/N mice to test the safety. The tumor-bearing ICR mice were transplanted with, or without, allogeneic skin tumors to test the efficacy. The body weights (BW), body condition scores (BCS), tumor volumes in situ, metastasis tumors, overall survival, and serum cytokines were measured longitudinally. Results Transplantation with no more than 0.03 g allogeneic skin tumors from FVB/N mice to healthy ICR mice was safe. After transplantation with allogeneic skin tumors to treat tumor-bearing mice, it inhibited the growth of tumors slightly at early stage, accompanied by fewer metastatic tumors at 24 days after transplantation (21.05% vs. 47.37%), while there were no statistically significant differences in the values of BW, BCS, tumor volumes in situ, metastasis tumors, and overall survival between the transplanted and non-transplanted groups. The levels of serum interleukin (IL)-2 were significantly reduced in the controls (P<0.05), but not in the recipients, which may be associated with the tGVT response. Conclusions Our results suggest that transplantation with allogeneic skin tumors is a safe treatment in mice, which can induce short-term tGVT response mediated by IL-2. PMID:27587310

  11. Laser immunotherapy in treatment of metastatic prostate tumors in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei R.; Ritchey, Jerry W.; Bartles, Kenneth E.; Lucroy, Michael D.; Liu, Hong; Nordquist, Robert E.

    2002-07-01

    Laser immunotherapy is a special cancer treatment modality using an intratumor injection of a special formulation consisting of a novel immunoadjuvant and a laser-absorbing dye, followed by a non-invasive near-IR laser irradiation. Our early experiments using a metastatic mammary rat tumor model showed that laser immunotherapy could cause acute selective photothermal tumor destruction and induce a systemic, long-term specific anti-tumor immunity. In the current study, laser immunotherapy was used to treat metastatic prostate tumors in Copenhagen male rats. The transplantable tumors metastasize mainly to the lung and the lung cancer is usually the cause of death. Two experimental were performed in our study. The first was to study the effect of laser immunotherapy on the tumor burdens, both the primary and the metastasis in the lung. The second was to study the effect of laser immunotherapy on the long-term survival of the tumor-bearing rats. For comparison, some rat tumors were also treated by the laser-dye combination to study the photothermal effect. Tour results showed that both the photothermal effect and the laser immunotherapy could slow the growth of primary tumors and the metastatic tumors. The laser-dye-immunoadjuvant treatment resulted in more than 20 percent long-term survival rate in tumor-bearing rats. Our experimental results indicate that the laser immunotherapy has a great potential in treating metastatic tumors.

  12. Targeting the tumor microenvironment

    SciTech Connect

    Kenny, P.A.; Lee, G.Y.; Bissell, M.J.

    2006-11-07

    Despite some notable successes cancer remains, for the most part, a seemingly intractable problem. There is, however, a growing appreciation that targeting the tumor epithelium in isolation is not sufficient as there is an intricate mutually sustaining synergy between the tumor epithelial cells and their surrounding stroma. As the details of this dialogue emerge, new therapeutic targets have been proposed. The FDA has already approved drugs targeting microenvironmental components such as VEGF and aromatase and many more agents are in the pipeline. In this article, we describe some of the 'druggable' targets and processes within the tumor microenvironment and review the approaches being taken to disrupt these interactions.

  13. [Ovarian fibrothecal tumor: case report].

    PubMed

    González Gleason, Alejandro; De la Cruz, Sebastián Iris; Torres Salas, María Esther; Guzmán Patraca, Carlos; Chavarría Olarte, María Eugenia; Reyes Fuentes, Alejandro

    2002-05-01

    Tumors with stromal or sex-cords origin are scarce, and comprise only 5% or less of all ovarian tumors. Nevertheless functional tumor types are the most striking ones, only few of them produce hormonal symptoms. Fibrothecal tumors belong to the stromal cells tumor class, with differentiation towards both fibroblastic-type cells of thecal cell. We present a case report of a 68 years old woman with an ovarian tumor sized 14 x 9 x 7 cm. The treatment was the extirpation of the tumor. Microscopic evaluation of the surgical piece reported an ovarian fibrothecal tumor.

  14. Tumor-Associated Macrophages and Neutrophils in Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jaehong; Bae, Jong-Sup

    2016-01-01

    Distinct tumor microenvironment forms in each progression step of cancer and has diverse capacities to induce both adverse and beneficial consequences for tumorigenesis. It is now known that immune cells can be activated to favor tumor growth and progression, most probably influenced by the tumor microenvironment. Tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils can exert protumoral functions, enhancing tumor cell invasion and metastasis, angiogenesis, and extracellular matrix remodeling, while inhibiting the antitumoral immune surveillance. Considering that neutrophils in inflammatory environments recruit macrophages and that recruited macrophages affect neutrophil functions, there may be various degrees of interaction between tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils. Platelets also play an important role in the recruitment and regulation of monocytic and granulocytic cells in the tumor tissues, suggesting that platelet function may be essential for generation of tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils. In this review, we will explore the biology of tumor-associated macrophages and tumor-associated neutrophils and their possible interactions in the tumor microenvironment. Special attention will be given to the recruitment and activation of these tumor-associated cells and to the roles they play in maintenance of the tumor microenvironment and progression of tumors. PMID:26966341

  15. Hormonal relations of radiation-induced tumors of Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Campell, B.R.; Persinger, S.M.; Town, C.D. )

    1989-04-01

    When gamma-irradiated Arabidopsis seed was germinated, tumors appeared on hypocotyls and apical meristems of the resulting plants. Several tumors have been cultured on hormone free medium for over two years since excision from the plants. The tumor lines display a range of phenotypes suggestive of abnormal hormone balance. To determine whether hormone overproduction or hypersensitivity is involved in tumorigenesis, we are measuring hormone levels in the tumor lines and characterizing their response to exogenously supplied growth regulators. Growth of two tumor lines is stimulated by either NAA or BAP, one is stimulated by NAA only, two by BAP only, and one is stimulated by neither. Growth of all lines tested thus far is inhibited by gibberellic acid, ethephon and ACC. The tumor lines appear more sensitive to ACC than normal callus tissue. Most tumors studied to date appear unlikely to have arisen due to increased hormone sensitivity. Experiments are in progress to determine auxin and cytokinin levels in the tumor lines.

  16. Pazopanib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Progressive Carcinoid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-28

    Atypical Carcinoid Tumor; Foregut Carcinoid Tumor; Hindgut Carcinoid Tumor; Lung Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Midgut Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Regional Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1

  17. Emerging Trends for Radioimmunotherapy in Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Suprit; Kaur, Sukhwinder; Ponnusamy, Moorthy P.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Due to its ability to target both known and occult lesions, radioimmunotherapy (RIT) is an attractive therapeutic modality for solid tumors. Poor tumor uptake and undesirable pharmacokinetics, however, have precluded the administration of radioimmunoconjugates at therapeutically relevant doses thereby limiting the clinical utility of RIT. In solid tumors, efficacy of RIT is further compromised by heterogeneities in blood flow, tumor stroma, expression of target antigens and radioresistance. As a result significant efforts have been invested toward developing strategies to overcome these impediments. Further, there is an emerging interest in exploiting short-range, high energy α-particle emitting radionuclides for the eradication of minimal residual and micrometastatic disease. As a result several modalities for localized therapy and models of minimal disease have been developed for preclinical evaluation. This review provides a brief update on the recent efforts toward improving the efficacy of RIT for solid tumors, and development of RIT strategies for minimal disease associated with solid tumors. Further, some of promising approaches to improve tumor targeting, which showed promise in the past, but have now been ignored are also discussed. PMID:23844555

  18. Matrix stiffening promotes a tumor vasculature phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Bordeleau, Francois; Mason, Brooke N.; Lollis, Emmanuel Macklin; Mazzola, Michael; Zanotelli, Matthew R.; Somasegar, Sahana; Califano, Joseph P.; Montague, Christine; LaValley, Danielle J.; Huynh, John; Mencia-Trinchant, Nuria; Negrón Abril, Yashira L.; Hassane, Duane C.; Bonassar, Lawrence J.; Butcher, Jonathan T.; Weiss, Robert S.; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A.

    2017-01-01

    Tumor microvasculature tends to be malformed, more permeable, and more tortuous than vessels in healthy tissue, effects that have been largely attributed to up-regulated VEGF expression. However, tumor tissue tends to stiffen during solid tumor progression, and tissue stiffness is known to alter cell behaviors including proliferation, migration, and cell–cell adhesion, which are all requisite for angiogenesis. Using in vitro, in vivo, and ex ovo models, we investigated the effects of matrix stiffness on vessel growth and integrity during angiogenesis. Our data indicate that angiogenic outgrowth, invasion, and neovessel branching increase with matrix cross-linking. These effects are caused by increased matrix stiffness independent of matrix density, because increased matrix density results in decreased angiogenesis. Notably, matrix stiffness up-regulates matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity, and inhibiting MMPs significantly reduces angiogenic outgrowth in stiffer cross-linked gels. To investigate the functional significance of altered endothelial cell behavior in response to matrix stiffness, we measured endothelial cell barrier function on substrates mimicking the stiffness of healthy and tumor tissue. Our data indicate that barrier function is impaired and the localization of vascular endothelial cadherin is altered as function of matrix stiffness. These results demonstrate that matrix stiffness, separately from matrix density, can alter vascular growth and integrity, mimicking the changes that exist in tumor vasculature. These data suggest that therapeutically targeting tumor stiffness or the endothelial cell response to tumor stiffening may help restore vessel structure, minimize metastasis, and aid in drug delivery. PMID:28034921

  19. Morphogenesis and Complexity of the Tumor Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izquierdo-Kulich, E.; Nieto-Villar, J. M.

    directly proportional to the invasion capacity. The proposed model assumes: i) only interface cells proliferate and invade the host, and ii) the fractal dimension of tumoral cell patterns, can reproduce the Gompertzian growth law. A mathematical model was obtained to describe the relation between the tissue morphology of cervix carcinoma and both dynamic processes of mitosis and apoptosis, and an expression to quantify the tumor aggressiveness, which in this context is associated with the tumor growth rate. The proposed model was applied to Stage III cervix carcinoma in vivo studies. In this study we found that the apoptosis rate was significantly smaller in the tumor tissues and both the mitosis rate and aggressiveness index decrease with Stage III patient's age. These quantitative results correspond to observed behavior in clinical and genetics studies. Finally, the entropy production rate was determined for avascular tumor growth. The proposed formula relates the fractal dimension of the tumor contour with the quotient between mitosis and apoptosis rate, which can be used to characterize the degree of proliferation of tumor cells. The entropy production rate was determined for fourteen tumor cell lines as a physical function of cancer robustness. The entropy production rate is a hallmark that allows us the possibility of prognosis of tumor proliferation and invasion capacities, key factors to improve cancer therapy.

  20. Intraperitoneal Solitary Fibrous Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Benabdejlil, Youssef; Kouach, Jaouad; Babahabib, Abdellah; Elhassani, Moulay Elmehdi; Rharassi, Issam; Boudhas, Adil; Bakkali, Hicham; Elmarjany, Mohammed; Moussaoui, Driss; Dehayni, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Solitary fibrous tumors of the pelvis are rare. We report the case of a 32-years-old patient who presented with abdominopelvic mass. The imaging studies showed a right adnexal mass of more than 10 cm. Exploratory laparotomy revealed a 20 cm mass at the Douglas pouch which was adhered to the posterior wall of the uterus. Complete resection of the mass was performed. Histological analysis showed a spindle cell undifferentiated tumor whose morphological and immunohistochemical profile are consistent with solitary fibrous tumor. It is important to know that although these tumors are rare, their evolution can be pejorative. Therefore, long-term followup should be recommended. PMID:25276449

  1. Metastatic brain tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... them create an advance directive and power of attorney for health care. Support Groups You can ease ... surgery Brain tumor - children Breast cancer Increased intracranial pressure Lung cancer - small cell Melanoma Renal cell carcinoma ...

  2. Primary hepatic carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jinbo; Hu, Zhijian; Wu, Junwei; Bai, Lishan; Chai, Xinqun

    2011-11-19

    Primary hepatic carcinoid tumor is rare and poses a challenge for diagnosis and management. We presented a case of primary hepatic carcinoid tumor in a 53-year-old female with a complaint of right upper abdominal pain. Computer tomography scans revealed a hypervascular mass in segment 4 of the liver. An ultrasonography-guided biopsy showed a carcinoid tumor. No other lesions were found by the radiological investigations. Surgery resection was performed and histopathological examination revealed a primary hepatic carcinoid tumor. Three years later, recurrence was found and transcatheter arterial chemoembolization was performed. After transcatheter arterial chemoembolization, the patient has been free of symptom and had no radiological disease progression for over 6 months. Surgical resection combination with transcatheter arterial chemoembolization is effective to offer excellent palliation.

  3. Primary renal carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Kanodia, K V; Vanikar, A V; Patel, R D; Suthar, K S; Kute, V B; Modi, P R; Trivedi, H L

    2013-09-01

    Primary renal carcinoid tumor is extremely rare and, therefore, its pathogenesis and prognosis is not well known. We report a primary renal carcinoid in a 26-year-old man treated by radical nephrectomy.

  4. Optic pathway tumors.

    PubMed

    Cohen, M E; Duffner, P K

    1991-05-01

    Overall, the majority of patients with optic pathway tumors will have stable disease regardless if they are radiated or receive chemotherapy. This is a very indolent tumor system and, for the most part, not a threat to life. Because of this, issues regarding appropriate therapeutic approaches have yet to be resolved. Most agree that in patients with progressive visual loss and tumor limited to the orbit, surgery can be associated with a cure. The downside is the loss of vision associated with surgical extirpation. Radiation rather than surgery has been the mainstay of treatment for intracranial tumors of the optic pathway. To eliminate side effects associated with radiotherapy in the young child, chemotherapy may be the more considered choice. However, on escape of control, i.e., conversion of stable disease to progressive disease, radiotherapy should be considered.

  5. Salivary gland tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancers Salivary duct stones Salivary gland infections Dehydration Sarcoidosis Sjögren syndrome The most common type of salivary ... Cancer Cirrhosis Salivary duct stones Salivary gland infections Sarcoidosis Tumor Review Date 10/30/2015 Updated by: ...

  6. Skin tumors on squirrels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herman, C.M.; Reilly, J.R.

    1955-01-01

    Skin tumors having the gross appearance of previously reported fibromas are reported on gray squirrels from N. Y., Md., Va., N. C., and W. Va. and from a fox squirrel from W. Va. and a porcupine from Pa.

  7. Brain Tumor Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Us Our Founders Board of Directors Staff Leadership Strategic Plan Financials News Press Releases Headlines Newsletter ... About Us Our Founders Board of Directors Staff Leadership Strategic Plan Financials News Careers Brain Tumor Information ...

  8. Posterior pole tumor update.

    PubMed

    Ou, Judy I; Wheeler, Sharon M; O'Brien, Joan M

    2002-12-01

    This chapter focuses on the diagnosis and management of choroidal melanoma in light of recent findings from the COMS. Retinoblastoma is emphasized to describe recent trends in primary treatment away from EBRT and toward chemoreduction with local therapy. In addition, vascular and glial tumors of the retina and tumors of the retinal pigment epithelium are described because of the association between these lesions and systemic disease. Recent advances in treatment and genetic testing for these diseases are discussed. Finally, ocular metastasis, intraocular lymphoid tumors, and intraocular leukemia are included because of their importance in determining systemic treatment and prognosis. The chapter gives an overview of important posterior pole tumors and highlights recent developments in the management of each intraocular disease process.

  9. [Immunological tumor therapy].

    PubMed

    Dietrich, K; Theobald, M

    2015-08-01

    Tumor cells could fundamentally be recognized and eliminated by the immune system but malignant cells are able to escape the immune surveillance system. The idea of immunotherapy of cancer is to activate, modulate and amplify the host immune response or to genetically equip the immune repertoire of patients with anti-tumor specificities and effectors. In recent years, a variety of promising immunotherapy strategies have been developed, such as bispecific, multispecific and immunoregulatory antibodies, gene-modified T lymphocytes and tumor vaccines. Some drugs have already been approved and others are available for patients in clinical trials. This article presents the current anti-tumor immune strategies and their molecular basis. Even though further research is needed in some areas, such as the establishment of biomarkers for targeted therapy, duration of therapeutic activity and compatibility of combined strategies, cancer immunotherapy is likely to be a key component in oncological treatment concepts in the very near future.

  10. Brain Tumor Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... be associated with the type, size, and/or location of the tumor, as well as the treatments used to manage it. Surgery, radiation, chemotherapy, and other treatments all have the potential to ... American ...

  11. [Metastatic bronchial carcinoid tumors].

    PubMed

    Bouledrak, K; Walter, T; Souquet, P J; Lombard-Bohas, C

    2016-02-01

    Bronchial carcinoids are uncommon pulmonary neoplasms and represent 1 to 2 % of all lung tumors. In early stage of disease, the mainstay and only curative treatment is surgery. Bronchial carcinoids are generally regarded as low-grade carcinomas and metastatic dissemination is unusual. The management of the metastatic stage is not currently standardized due to a lack of relevant studies. As bronchial carcinoids and in particular their metastatic forms are rare, we apply treatment strategies that have been evaluated in gastrointestinal and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. However, bronchial carcinoids have their own characteristic. A specific therapeutic feature of these metastatic tumors is that they require a dual approach: both anti-secretory for the carcinoid syndrome, and anti-tumoral.

  12. Parallel optimization of tumor model parameters for fast registration of brain tumor images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacharaki, Evangelia I.; Hogea, Cosmina S.; Shen, Dinggang; Biros, George; Davatzikos, Christos

    2008-03-01

    The motivation of this work is to register MR brain tumor images with a brain atlas. Such a registration method can make possible the pooling of data from different brain tumor patients into a common stereotaxic space, thereby enabling the construction of statistical brain tumor atlases. Moreover, it allows the mapping of neuroanatomical brain atlases into the patient's space, for segmenting brains and thus facilitating surgical or radiotherapy treatment planning. However, the methods developed for registration of normal brain images are not directly applicable to the registration of a normal atlas with a tumor-bearing image, due to substantial dissimilarity and lack of equivalent image content between the two images, as well as severe deformation or shift of anatomical structures around the tumor. Accordingly, a model that can simulate brain tissue death and deformation induced by the tumor is considered to facilitate the registration. Such tumor growth simulation models are usually initialized by placing a small seed in the normal atlas. The shape, size and location of the initial seed are critical for achieving topological equivalence between the atlas and patient's images. In this study, we focus on the automatic estimation of these parameters, pertaining to tumor simulation. In particular, we propose an objective function reflecting feature-based similarity and elastic stretching energy and optimize it with APPSPACK (Asynchronous Parallel Pattern Search), for achieving significant reduction of the computational cost. The results indicate that the registration accuracy is high in areas around the tumor, as well as in the healthy portion of the brain.

  13. High rates of chromosome missegregation suppress tumor progression but do not inhibit tumor initiation

    PubMed Central

    Zasadil, Lauren M.; Britigan, Eric M. C.; Ryan, Sean D.; Kaur, Charanjeet; Guckenberger, David J.; Beebe, David J.; Moser, Amy R.; Weaver, Beth A.

    2016-01-01

    Aneuploidy, an abnormal chromosome number that deviates from a multiple of the haploid, has been recognized as a common feature of cancers for >100 yr. Previously, we showed that the rate of chromosome missegregation/chromosomal instability (CIN) determines the effect of aneuploidy on tumors; whereas low rates of CIN are weakly tumor promoting, higher rates of CIN cause cell death and tumor suppression. However, whether high CIN inhibits tumor initiation or suppresses the growth and progression of already initiated tumors remained unclear. We tested this using the ApcMin/+ mouse intestinal tumor model, in which effects on tumor initiation versus progression can be discriminated. ApcMin/+ cells exhibit low CIN, and we generated high CIN by reducing expression of the kinesin-like mitotic motor protein CENP-E. CENP-E+/−;ApcMin/+ doubly heterozygous cells had higher rates of chromosome missegregation than singly heterozygous cells, resulting in increased cell death and a substantial reduction in tumor progression compared with ApcMin/+ animals. Intestinal organoid studies confirmed that high CIN does not inhibit tumor cell initiation but does inhibit subsequent cell growth. These findings support the conclusion that increasing the rate of chromosome missegregation could serve as a successful chemotherapeutic strategy. PMID:27146113

  14. Regulation of Transport Pathways in Tumor Vessels: Role of Tumor Type and Microenvironment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, Susan K.; Monsky, Wayne L.; Yuan, Fan; Roberts, W. Gregory; Griffith, Linda; Torchilin, Vladimir P.; Jain, Rakesh K.

    1998-04-01

    Novel anti-neoplastic agents such as gene targeting vectors and encapsulated carriers are quite large (approximately 100-300 nm in diameter). An understanding of the functional size and physiological regulation of transvascular pathways is necessary to optimize delivery of these agents. Here we analyze the functional limits of transvascular transport and its modulation by the microenvironment. One human and five murine tumors including mammary and colorectal carcinomas, hepatoma, glioma, and sarcoma were implanted in the dorsal skin-fold chamber or cranial window, and the pore cutoff size, a functional measure of transvascular gap size, was determined. The microenvironment was modulated: (i) spatially, by growing tumors in subcutaneous or cranial locations and (ii) temporally, by inducing vascular regression in hormone-dependent tumors. Tumors grown subcutaneously exhibited a characteristic pore cutoff size ranging from 200 nm to 1.2 μ m. This pore cutoff size was reduced in tumors grown in the cranium or in regressing tumors after hormone withdrawal. Vessels induced in basic fibroblast growth factor-containing gels had a pore cutoff size of 200 nm. Albumin permeability was independent of pore cutoff size. These results have three major implications for the delivery of therapeutic agents: (i) delivery may be less efficient in cranial tumors than in subcutaneous tumors, (ii) delivery may be reduced during tumor regression induced by hormonal ablation, and (iii) permeability to a molecule is independent of pore cutoff size as long as the diameter of the molecule is much less than the pore diameter.

  15. Salmonella overcomes tumor immune tolerance by inhibition of tumor indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase 1 expression.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Yu-Diao; Lee, Che-Hsin

    2016-01-05

    Over the past decades, Salmonella has been proven capable of inhibiting tumor growth. It can specifically target tumors and due to its facultative anaerobic property, can be more penetrative than other drug therapies. However, the molecular mechanism by which Salmonella inhibits tumor growth is still incompletely known. The antitumor therapeutic effect mediated by Salmonella is associated with an inflammatory immune response at the tumor site and a T cell-dependent immune response. Many tumors have been proven to have a high expression of indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO), which is a rate-limiting enzyme that catalyzes tryptophan to kynurenine, thus causing immune tolerance within the tumor microenvironment. With decreased expression of IDO, increased immune response can be observed, which might be helpful when developing cancer immunotherapy. The expression of IDO was decreased after tumor cells were infected with Salmonella. In addition, Western blot analysis showed that the expression levels of phospho-protein kinase B (P-AKT), phospho-mammalian targets of rapamycin (P-mTOR), and phospho-p70 ribosomal s6 kinase (P-p70s6K) in tumor cells were decreased after Salmonella infection. In conclusion, our results indicate that Salmonella inhibits IDO expression and plays a crucial role in anti-tumor therapy, which might be a promising strategy combined with other cancer treatments.

  16. Salmonella overcomes tumor immune tolerance by inhibition of tumor indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase 1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Kuan, Yu-Diao; Lee, Che-Hsin

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decades, Salmonella has been proven capable of inhibiting tumor growth. It can specifically target tumors and due to its facultative anaerobic property, can be more penetrative than other drug therapies. However, the molecular mechanism by which Salmonella inhibits tumor growth is still incompletely known. The antitumor therapeutic effect mediated by Salmonella is associated with an inflammatory immune response at the tumor site and a T cell-dependent immune response. Many tumors have been proven to have a high expression of indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO), which is a rate-limiting enzyme that catalyzes tryptophan to kynurenine, thus causing immune tolerance within the tumor microenvironment. With decreased expression of IDO, increased immune response can be observed, which might be helpful when developing cancer immunotherapy. The expression of IDO was decreased after tumor cells were infected with Salmonella. In addition, Western blot analysis showed that the expression levels of phospho-protein kinase B (P-AKT), phospho-mammalian targets of rapamycin (P-mTOR), and phospho-p70 ribosomal s6 kinase (P-p70s6K) in tumor cells were decreased after Salmonella infection. In conclusion, our results indicate that Salmonella inhibits IDO expression and plays a crucial role in anti-tumor therapy, which might be a promising strategy combined with other cancer treatments. PMID:26517244

  17. Motif mimetic of epsin perturbs tumor growth and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yunzhou; Wu, Hao; Rahman, H.N. Ashiqur; Liu, Yanjun; Pasula, Satish; Tessneer, Kandice L.; Cai, Xiaofeng; Liu, Xiaolei; Chang, Baojun; McManus, John; Hahn, Scott; Dong, Jiali; Brophy, Megan L.; Yu, Lili; Song, Kai; Silasi-Mansat, Robert; Saunders, Debra; Njoku, Charity; Song, Hoogeun; Mehta-D’Souza, Padmaja; Towner, Rheal; Lupu, Florea; McEver, Rodger P.; Xia, Lijun; Boerboom, Derek; Srinivasan, R. Sathish; Chen, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Tumor angiogenesis is critical for cancer progression. In multiple murine models, endothelium-specific epsin deficiency abrogates tumor progression by shifting the balance of VEGFR2 signaling toward uncontrolled tumor angiogenesis, resulting in dysfunctional tumor vasculature. Here, we designed a tumor endothelium–targeting chimeric peptide (UPI) for the purpose of inhibiting endogenous tumor endothelial epsins by competitively binding activated VEGFR2. We determined that the UPI peptide specifically targets tumor endothelial VEGFR2 through an unconventional binding mechanism that is driven by unique residues present only in the epsin ubiquitin–interacting motif (UIM) and the VEGFR2 kinase domain. In murine models of neoangiogenesis, UPI peptide increased VEGF-driven angiogenesis and neovascularization but spared quiescent vascular beds. Further, in tumor-bearing mice, UPI peptide markedly impaired functional tumor angiogenesis, tumor growth, and metastasis, resulting in a notable increase in survival. Coadministration of UPI peptide with cytotoxic chemotherapeutics further sustained tumor inhibition. Equipped with localized tumor endothelium–specific targeting, our UPI peptide provides potential for an effective and alternative cancer therapy. PMID:26571402

  18. CONTRIBUTION OF HOST-DERIVED TISSUE FACTOR TO TUMOR NEOVASCULARIZATION

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Joanne; May, Linda; Milsom, Chloe; Anderson, G. Mark; Weitz, Jeffrey I.; Luyendyk, James P.; Broze, George; Mackman, Nigel; Rak, Janusz

    2010-01-01

    Objective The role of host-derived tissue factor (TF) in tumor growth, angiogenesis and metastasis has hitherto been unclear, and was investigated in this study. Methods We compared tumor growth, vascularity and responses to cyclophosphamide (CTX) of tumors in wild type (wt) mice, or in animals with TF levels reduced by 99% (low-TF mice). Results Global growth rate of three different types of transplantable tumors (LLC, B16F1 and ES teratoma), or metastasis were unchanged in low-TF mice. However, several unexpected tumor/context-specific alterations were observed in these mice, including: (i) reduced tumor blood vessel size in B16F1 tumors; (ii) larger spleen size and greater tolerance to CTX toxicity in the LLC model; (iii) aborted tumor growth after inoculation of TF-deficient tumor cells (ES TF-/-) in low-TF mice. TF-deficient tumor cells grew readily in mice with normal TF levels, and attracted exclusively host-related blood vessels (without vasculogenic mimicry). We postulate that this complementarity may result from tumor-vascular transfer of TF-containing microvesicles, as we observed such transfer using human cancer cells (A431) and mouse endothelial cells, both in vitro and in vivo. Conclusions Our study points to an important, but context-dependent role of host TF in tumor formation, angiogenesis and therapy. PMID:18772494

  19. Antibody tumor penetration

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Greg M.; Schmidt, Michael M.; Wittrup, K. Dane

    2009-01-01

    Antibodies have proven to be effective agents in cancer imaging and therapy. One of the major challenges still facing the field is the heterogeneous distribution of these agents in tumors when administered systemically. Large regions of untargeted cells can therefore escape therapy and potentially select for more resistant cells. We present here a summary of theoretical and experimental approaches to analyze and improve antibody penetration in tumor tissue. PMID:18541331

  20. Tracheal and bronchial tumors

    PubMed Central

    Pio, Luca; Brandigi, Elisa; Paraboschi, Irene; Khen-Dunlop, Nazhia; Hervieux, Erik; Muller, Cecile; Mattioli, Girolamo; Sarnacki, Sabine; Torre, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Although primary tracheobronchial tumors are extremely rare in children, recurrent respiratory symptoms resistant to conventional therapy require further investigations to exclude possible malignant obstructive causes. As the matter of fact, early diagnosis may allow minimally invasive surgeries, improving the standard of living and the globally survival rate. The aim of this article is to provide an overview of diagnosis and management of tracheobronchial tumors in the early age, since only few reports are reported in the worldwide literature. PMID:28149577

  1. Endolymphatic sac tumors.

    PubMed

    Wick, Cameron C; Manzoor, Nauman F; Semaan, Maroun T; Megerian, Cliff A

    2015-04-01

    Endolymphatic sac tumors (ELST) are slow-growing, locally aggressive, low-grade malignancies that originate from the epithelium of the endolymphatic duct and sac. ELST often present with sensorineural hearing loss, tinnitus, and vertigo, which may mimic Meniere disease. Large tumors may present with additional cranial neuropathies. Management is primarily via microsurgical excision. Radiation therapy has a limited role for residual or unresectable disease. Early detection may enable hearing preservation techniques. ELST have an association with von Hippel-Lindau disease.

  2. Tumor size and prognosis in patients with Wilms tumor

    PubMed Central

    Provenzi, Valentina Oliveira; Rosa, Rafael Fabiano Machado; Rosa, Rosana Cardoso Manique; Roehe, Adriana Vial; dos Santos, Pedro Paulo Albino; Faulhaber, Fabrízia Rennó Sodero; de Oliveira, Ceres Andréia Vieira; Zen, Paulo Ricardo Gazzola

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Investigate the relationship of the tumor volume after preoperative chemotherapy (TVAPQ) and before preoperative chemotherapy (TVBPQ) with overall survival at two and at five years, and lifetime. METHODS: Our sample consisted of consecutive patients evaluated in the period from 1989 to 2009 in an Onco-Hematology Service. Clinical, histological and volumetric data were collected from the medical records. For analysis, chi-square, Kaplan-Meier, log-rank and Cox regression tests were used. RESULTS: The sample consisted of 32 patients, 53.1% were male with a median age at diagnosis of 43 months. There was a significant association between TVAPQ>500mL and the difference between the TVBPQ and TVAPQ (p=0.015) and histologic types of risk (p=0.008). It was also verified an association between the difference between the TVBPQ and TVAPQ and the predominant stromal tumor (p=0.037). When assessing the TVAPQ of all patients, without a cutoff, there was an association of the variable with lifetime (p=0.013), i.e., for each increase of 10mL in TVAPQ there was an average increase of 2% in the risk of death. CONCLUSIONS: Although our results indicate that the TVAPQ could be considered alone as a predictor of poor prognosis regardless of the cutoff suggested in the literature, more studies are needed to replace the histology and staging by tumor size as best prognostic variable. PMID:25623730

  3. Radiology of juxtaglomerular tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Dunnick, N.R.; Hartman, D.S.; Ford, K.K.; Davis, C.J. Jr.; Amis, E.S. Jr.

    1983-05-01

    Nine cases of proven juxtaglomerular tumor of the kidney are reviewed. Each patient presented with hypertension; elevated peripheral renin levels were found in four patients. As in past studies, this tumor occurred more frequently in women (7/9 cases). Although the patients tended to be younger (mean age, 31 years) than those with essential hypertension, all but two patients were more than 20 years of age. In all cases, the tumor was solitary, well-defined, and curable by surgery. The tumor was identified by excretory urography in 5/8 patients who underwent this procedure. A solid renal mass was detected in each of the seven patients examined by ultrasound. Since the tumor tends to be isodense with normal renal parenchyma, it is sometimes not seen on computed tomography without intravenouse contrast material. Arteriography revealed a hypovascular mass in each of the nine patients. The combination of a hypovascular solid renal mass in a patient with elevated renin but no renal artery lesions should suggest the diagnosis of a juxtaglomerular cell tumor.

  4. Towards tumor immunodiagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Kotoula, Vassiliki

    2016-01-01

    Immunodiagnostic markers applicable on tissue or cytologic material may be prognostic or predictive of response to immunomodulatory drugs and may also be classified according to whether they are cell-specific or tumor-tissue-specific. Cell-specific markers are evaluated under the microscope as (I) morphological, corresponding to the assessment of tumor infiltrating immune cells on routine hematoxylin & eosin (H&E) sections; and (II) immunophenotypic, including the immunohistochemical (IHC) assessment of markers characteristic for tumor infiltrating immune cells. Tumor-tissue-specific markers are assessed in tissue extracts that may be enriched in neoplastic cells but almost inevitably also contain stromal and immune cells infiltrating the tumor. Such markers include (I) immune-response-related gene expression profiles, and (II) tumor genotype characteristics, as recently assessed with large-scale genotyping methods, usually next generation sequencing (NGS) applications. Herein, we discuss the biological nature of immunodiagnostic markers, their potential clinical relevance and the shortcomings that have, as yet, prevented their clinical application. PMID:27563650

  5. Giant Intradiverticular Bladder Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Mohamad Syafeeq Faeez Md; Aziz, Ahmad Fuad Abdul; Ghani, Khairul Asri Mohd; Siang, Christopher Lee Kheng; Yunus, Rosna; Yusof, Mubarak Mohd

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Male, 74 Final Diagnosis: Giant intradiverticular bladder tumor with metastasis Symptoms: Hematuria Medication:— Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Urology Objective: Rare disease Background: Intradiverticular bladder tumors are rare. This renders diagnosis of an intradiverticular bladder tumor difficult. Imaging plays a vital role in achieving the diagnosis, and subsequently staging of the disease. Case Report: A 74-year-old male presented to our center with a few months history of constitutional symptoms. Upon further history, he reported hematuria two months prior to presentation, which stopped temporarily, only to recur a few days prior to coming to the hospital. The patient admitted to having lower urinary tract symptoms. However, there was no dysuria, no sandy urine, and no fever. Palpation of his abdomen revealed a vague mass at the suprapubic region, which was non tender. In view of his history and the clinical examination findings, an ultrasound of the abdomen and computed tomography (CT) was arranged. These investigations revealed a giant tumor that seemed to be arising from a bladder diverticulum, with a mass effect and hydronephrosis. He later underwent operative intervention. Conclusions: Intradiverticular bladder tumors may present a challenge to the treating physician in an atypical presentation; thus requiring a high index of suspicion and knowledge of tumor pathophysiology. As illustrated in our case, CT with its wide availability and multiplanar imaging capabilities offers a useful means for diagnosis, disease staging, operative planning, and follow-up. PMID:28246375

  6. Hyperammonemia in anorectic tumor-bearing rats

    SciTech Connect

    Chance, W.T.; Cao, L.; Nelson, J.L.; Foley-Nelson, T.; Fischer, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    Plasma ammonia concentrations were significantly elevated by 150% in anorectic rats bearing methylcholanthrene sarcomas. Assessment of ammonia levels in blood draining these sarcomas indicated nearly a 20-fold increase as compared with venous blood in control rats, suggesting the tumor mass as the source of this increase in ammonia. Infusing increasing concentrations of ammonium salts produced anorexia and alterations in brain amino acids in normal rats that were similar to those observed in anorectic tumor-bearing rats. Therefore, these results suggest that ammonia released by tumor tissue may be an important factor in the etiology of cancer anorexia.

  7. Hyperammonemia in anorectic tumor-bearing rats.

    PubMed

    Chance, W T; Cao, L; Nelson, J L; Foley-Nelson, T; Fischer, J E

    1988-01-01

    Plasma ammonia concentrations were significantly elevated by 150% in anorectic rats bearing methylcholanthrene sarcomas. Assessment of ammonia levels in blood draining these sarcomas indicated nearly a 20-fold increase as compared with venous blood in control rats, suggesting the tumor mass as the source of this increase in ammonia. Infusing increasing concentrations of ammonium salts produced anorexia and alterations in brain amino acids in normal rats that were similar to those observed in anorectic tumor-bearing rats. Therefore, these results suggest that ammonia released by tumor tissue may be an important factor in the etiology of cancer anorexia.

  8. Induction of abscopal anti-tumor immunity and immunogenic tumor cell death by ionizing irradiation - implications for cancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Frey, B; Rubner, Y; Wunderlich, R; Weiss, E-M; Pockley, A G; Fietkau, R; Gaipl, U S

    2012-01-01

    Although cancer progression is primarily driven by the expansion of tumor cells, the tumor microenvironment and anti-tumor immunity also play important roles. Herein, we consider how tumors can become established by escaping immune surveillance and also how cancer cells can be rendered visible to the immune system by standard therapies such as radiotherapy or chemotherapy, either alone or in combination with additional immune stimulators. Although local radiotherapy results in DNA damage (targeted effects), it is also capable of inducing immunogenic forms of tumor cell death which are associated with a release of immune activating danger signals (non-targeted effects), such as necrosis. Necrotic tumor cells may result from continued exposure to death stimuli and/or an impaired phosphatidylserine (PS) dependent clearance of the dying tumor cells. In such circumstances, mature dendritic cells take up tumor antigen and mediate the induction of adaptive and innate anti-tumor immunity. Locally-triggered, systemic immune activation can also lead to a spontaneous regression of tumors or metastases that are outside the radiation field - an effect which is termed abscopal. Preclinical studies have demonstrated that combining radiotherapy with immune stimulation can induce anti-tumor immunity. Given that it takes time for immunity to develop following exposure to immunogenic tumor cells, we propose practical combination therapies that should be considered as a basis for future research and clinical practice. It is essential that radiation oncologists become more aware of the importance of the immune system to the success of cancer therapy.

  9. Tumor margin detection using optical biopsy techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yan; Liu, Cheng-hui; Li, Jiyou; Li, Zhongwu; Zhou, Lixin; Chen, Ke; Pu, Yang; He, Yong; Zhu, Ke; Li, Qingbo; Alfano, Robert R.

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study is to use the Resonance Raman (RR) and fluorescence spectroscopic technique for tumor margin detection with high accuracy based on native molecular fingerprints of breast and gastrointestinal (GI) tissues. This tumor margins detection method utilizes advantages of RR spectroscopic technique in situ and in real-time to diagnose tumor changes providing powerful tools for clinical guiding intraoperative margin assessments and postoperative treatments. The tumor margin detection procedures by RR spectroscopy were taken by scanning lesion from center or around tumor region in ex-vivo to find the changes in cancerous tissues with the rim of normal tissues using the native molecular fingerprints. The specimens used to analyze tumor margins include breast and GI carcinoma and normal tissues. The sharp margin of the tumor was found by the changes of RR spectral peaks within 2 mm distance. The result was verified using fluorescence spectra with 300 nm, 320 nm and 340 nm excitation, in a typical specimen of gastric cancerous tissue within a positive margin in comparison with normal gastric tissues. This study demonstrates the potential of RR and fluorescence spectroscopy as new approaches with labeling free to determine the intraoperative margin assessment.

  10. New approach to optical imaging of tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achilefu, Samuel I.; Bugaj, Joseph E.; Dorshow, Richard B.; Jimenez, Hermo N.; Rajagopalan, Raghavan

    2001-07-01

    Site specific delivery of drugs and contrast agents to tumors protects normal tissues from the cytotoxic effect of drugs, and enhances the contrast between normal and diseased tissues. In optical medicine, biocompatible dyes can be used as phototherapeutics or as contrast agents. Previous studies have shown that the use of covalent or non-covalent dye conjugates of carriers such as antibiodies, liposomes, and polysaccharides improves the delivery of such molecules to tumors. However, large biomolecules can elicit adverse immunogenic reactions and also result in long blood clearance times, delaying visualization of target tissues. A viable alternative to this strategy is to use small bioactive molecule-dye conjugates. These molecules have several advantages over large biomolecules, including ease of synthesis of a variety of high purity compounds for combinatorial screening of new targets, enhanced diffusivity to solid tumors, and the ability to affect the pharmacokinetics of the conjugates by minor structural changes. Thus, we conjugated a near infrared absorbing dye to several bioactive peptides that specifically target overexpressed tumor receptors in established rat tumor lines. High tumor uptake of the conjugates was obtained without loss of either the peptide receptor affinity or the dye fluorescence. These findings demonstrate the efficacy of a small peptide-dye conjugate strategy for in vivo tumor imaging. Site-specific delivery of photodynamic therapy agents may also benefit from this approach.

  11. Tumor Static Concentration Curves in Combination Therapy.

    PubMed

    Cardilin, Tim; Almquist, Joachim; Jirstrand, Mats; Sostelly, Alexandre; Amendt, Christiane; El Bawab, Samer; Gabrielsson, Johan

    2017-03-01

    Combination therapies are widely accepted as a cornerstone for treatment of different cancer types. A tumor growth inhibition (TGI) model is developed for combinations of cetuximab and cisplatin obtained from xenograft mice. Unlike traditional TGI models, both natural cell growth and cell death are considered explicitly. The growth rate was estimated to 0.006 h(-1) and the natural cell death to 0.0039 h(-1) resulting in a tumor doubling time of 14 days. The tumor static concentrations (TSC) are predicted for each individual compound. When the compounds are given as single-agents, the required concentrations were computed to be 506 μg · mL(-1) and 56 ng · mL(-1) for cetuximab and cisplatin, respectively. A TSC curve is constructed for different combinations of the two drugs, which separates concentration combinations into regions of tumor shrinkage and tumor growth. The more concave the TSC curve is, the lower is the total exposure to test compounds necessary to achieve tumor regression. The TSC curve for cetuximab and cisplatin showed weak concavity. TSC values and TSC curves were estimated that predict tumor regression for 95% of the population by taking between-subject variability into account. The TSC concept is further discussed for different concentration-effect relationships and for combinations of three or more compounds.

  12. A multiphase model for three-dimensional tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Sciumè, G; Shelton, S; Gray, WG; Miller, CT; Hussain, F; Ferrari, M; Decuzzi, P; Schrefler, BA

    2014-01-01

    Several mathematical formulations have analyzed the time-dependent behaviour of a tumor mass. However, most of these propose simplifications that compromise the physical soundness of the model. Here, multiphase porous media mechanics is extended to model tumor evolution, using governing equations obtained via the Thermodynamically Constrained Averaging Theory (TCAT). A tumor mass is treated as a multiphase medium composed of an extracellular matrix (ECM); tumor cells (TC), which may become necrotic depending on the nutrient concentration and tumor phase pressure; healthy cells (HC); and an interstitial fluid (IF) for the transport of nutrients. The equations are solved by a Finite Element method to predict the growth rate of the tumor mass as a function of the initial tumor-to-healthy cell density ratio, nutrient concentration, mechanical strain, cell adhesion and geometry. Results are shown for three cases of practical biological interest such as multicellular tumor spheroids (MTS) and tumor cords. First, the model is validated by experimental data for time-dependent growth of an MTS in a culture medium. The tumor growth pattern follows a biphasic behaviour: initially, the rapidly growing tumor cells tend to saturate the volume available without any significant increase in overall tumor size; then, a classical Gompertzian pattern is observed for the MTS radius variation with time. A core with necrotic cells appears for tumor sizes larger than 150 μm, surrounded by a shell of viable tumor cells whose thickness stays almost constant with time. A formula to estimate the size of the necrotic core is proposed. In the second case, the MTS is confined within a healthy tissue. The growth rate is reduced, as compared to the first case – mostly due to the relative adhesion of the tumor and healthy cells to the ECM, and the less favourable transport of nutrients. In particular, for tumor cells adhering less avidly to the ECM, the healthy tissue is progressively displaced

  13. [Primary orbital tumors in children].

    PubMed

    Składzień, J; Olszewski, E; Reroń, E; Modrzejewski, M; Tomik, J; Paziewski, E

    1996-01-01

    We present the incidence, diagnosis and clinical picture of the primary orbital tumors in children. They were treated in ENT Clinic CM UJ in Kraków between 1981-1990 years. Discovered was preponderance of primary non malignant tumors. The most frequently encountered tumors were dermatomas, angiomas and among the malignant tumors-rhabdomyosarcoma.

  14. [Enophthalmos in an orbital tumor].

    PubMed

    Szabo, Bianca; Szabo, I; Nicula, Cristina; Popescu, Livia Adriana

    2013-01-01

    Enophtalmus is an unusual sign of the orbital tumors often represented by proptosis. One patient with enophtalmus and intraorbital tumor and aplasy is presented. The treatment of choice of orbital tumor is complete surgical excision and careful follow-up. Considering the more aggressive course followed by recurrent tumor, correct diagnosis and management is essential.

  15. Brain tumor imaging of rat fresh tissue using terahertz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Sayuri; Fukushi, Yasuko; Kubota, Oichi; Itsuji, Takeaki; Ouchi, Toshihiko; Yamamoto, Seiji

    2016-07-01

    Tumor imaging by terahertz spectroscopy of fresh tissue without dye is demonstrated using samples from a rat glioma model. The complex refractive index spectrum obtained by a reflection terahertz time-domain spectroscopy system can discriminate between normal and tumor tissues. Both the refractive index and absorption coefficient of tumor tissues are higher than those of normal tissues and can be attributed to the higher cell density and water content of the tumor region. The results of this study indicate that terahertz technology is useful for detecting brain tumor tissue.

  16. Image-guided tumor motion modeling and tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Wu, Y.; Liu, W.; Christensen, J.; Tai, A.; Li, A. X.

    2009-02-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is an important procedure in the treatment of cancer in the thorax and abdomen. However, its efficacy can be severely limited by breathing induced tumor motion. Tumor motion causes uncertainty in the tumor's location and consequently limits the radiation dosage (for fear of damaging normal tissue). This paper describes a novel signal model for tumor motion tracking/prediction that can potentially improve RT results. Using CT and breathing sensor data, it provides a more accurate characterization of the breathing and tumor motion than previous work and is non-invasive. The efficacy of our model is demonstrated on patient data.

  17. Brain tumor imaging of rat fresh tissue using terahertz spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Sayuri; Fukushi, Yasuko; Kubota, Oichi; Itsuji, Takeaki; Ouchi, Toshihiko; Yamamoto, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    Tumor imaging by terahertz spectroscopy of fresh tissue without dye is demonstrated using samples from a rat glioma model. The complex refractive index spectrum obtained by a reflection terahertz time-domain spectroscopy system can discriminate between normal and tumor tissues. Both the refractive index and absorption coefficient of tumor tissues are higher than those of normal tissues and can be attributed to the higher cell density and water content of the tumor region. The results of this study indicate that terahertz technology is useful for detecting brain tumor tissue. PMID:27456312

  18. Tumor detection in vivo NIRF images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celenk, Mehmet; Yang, Lin; Kamalakar, Ganti; Bleyle, Derek J.; Sunkara, Sudhir K.; Wang, Yufei; Prudich, Philip; Huang, Yuangcui; Zhou, Qiang

    2004-05-01

    Recent developments in the field of biotechnology and imaging systems have enabled real-time in vivo imaging at both the cellular and molecular level. This paper focuses on a technique that has been designed to detect tumor cells in vivo when using NIRF (near-infrared 705-715 nm range fluorescence) images. Experimental results indicate that the algorithm offers reasonably accurate estimates of the tumor parameters in the presence of white noise and varying background.

  19. Signs and Symptoms of Wilms Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Signs and Symptoms of Wilms Tumor Wilms tumors can be hard to find early ... Your Child’s Doctor About Wilms Tumor? More In Wilms Tumor About Wilms Tumor Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  20. Characterizing intraocular tumors with photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guan; Xue, Yafang; Gursel, Zeynep; Slimani, Naziha; Wang, Xueding; Demirci, Hakan

    2016-03-01

    Intraocular tumors are life-threatening conditions. Long-term mortality from uveal melanoma, which accounts for 80% of primary intraocular tumors, could be as high as 25% depending on the size, ciliary body involvement and extraocular extension. The treatments of intraocular tumors include eye-sparing approaches such as radiotherapy and thermotherapy, and the more aggressive enucleation. The accurate diagnosis of intraocular tumors is thereby critical in the management and follow-up of the patients. The diagnosis of intraocular tumors is usually based on clinical examination with acoustic backscattering based ultrasonography. By analyzing the high frequency fluctuations within the ultrasound (US) signals, microarchitecture information inside the tumor can be characterized. However, US cannot interrogate the histochemical components formulating the microarchitecture. One representative example is the inability of US imaging (and other contemporary imaging modalities as well) in differentiating nevoid and melanoma cells as the two types of cells possesses similar acoustic backscattering properties. Combining optical and US imaging, photoacoustic (PA) measurements encode both the microarchitecture and histochemical component information in biological tissue. This study attempts to characterize ocular tumors by analyzing the high frequency signal components in the multispectral PA images. Ex vivo human eye globes with melanoma and retinoblastoma tumors were scanned using less than 6 mJ per square centimeters laser energy with tunable range of 600-1700 nm. A PA-US parallel imaging system with US probes CL15-7 and L22-14 were used to acquire the high frequency PA signals in real time. Preliminary results show that the proposed method can identify uveal melanoma against retinoblastoma tumors.

  1. Giant cell tumor of bone: Multimodal approach

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, AK; Nath, R; Mishra, MP

    2007-01-01

    Background: The clinical behavior and treatment of giant cell tumor of bone is still perplexing. The aim of this study is to clarify the clinico-pathological correlation of tumor and its relevance in treatment and prognosis. Materials and Methods: Ninety -three cases of giant cell tumor were treated during 1980-1990 by different methods. The age of the patients varied from 18-58 yrs with male and female ratio as 5:4. The upper end of the tibia was most commonly involved (n=31), followed by the lower end of the femur(n=21), distal end of radius(n=14), upper end of fibula (n=9), proximal end of femur(n=5), upper end of the humerus(n=3), iliac bone(n=2), phalanx (n=2) and spine(n=1). The tumors were also encountered on uncommon sites like metacarpals (n=4) and metatarsal(n=1). Fifty four cases were treated by curettage and bone grafting. Wide excision and reconstruction was performed in twenty two cases. Nine cases were treated by wide excision while primary amputation was performed in four cases. One case required only curettage. Three inaccessible lesions of ilium and spine were treated by radiotherapy. Results: 19 of 54 treated by curettage and bone grafting showed a recurrence. The repeat curettage and bone grafting was performed in 18 cases while amputation was done in one. One each out of the cases treated by wide excision and reconstruction and wide excision alone recurred. In this study we observed that though curettage and bone grafting is still the most commonly adopted treatment, wide excision of tumor with reconstruction has shown lesser recurrence. Conclusion: For radiologically well-contained and histologically typical tumor, curettage and autogenous bone grafting is the treatment of choice. The typical tumors with radiologically deficient cortex, clinically aggressive tumors and tumors with histological Grade III should be treated by wide excision and reconstruction. PMID:21139762

  2. Pathogenesis of Warthin’s tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kuzenko, Yevhen V.; Romanuk, Anatoly M.; Dyachenko, Olena Olegivna; Hudymenko, Olena

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Warthin’s tumor, also known as papillary cystadenoma lymphomatosum, monomorphic adenoma, or adenolymphoma, is a benign cystic tumor of the salivary glands containing abundant lymphocytes and lymph node-like stroma. It is named after the pathologist Aldred Scott Warthin, who described two cases in 1929. Objective The aim of this study is to analyze the pathogenesis of Warthin’s tumor. Methods A total of 15 patients with Warthin’s tumor were studied. Hematoxylin and eosin stains, which have been used for at least a century and are still essential for recognizing various tissue types and the morphologic changes for cancer diagnosis, were used. Warthin’s tumor was evaluated for the expression of MGMT, CD3, HSP90AA1, MMP-1, Bcl-2, CD79A, IgG, Ki-67, p53, IgM, OPN, S100, myeloperoxidase, and VEGF by immunohistochemistry. Results Immunohistochemical staining confirmed that the immune cells within the follicles of Warthin’s tumor were positive for MGMT (10.0 ± 0.34%), Ki-67 (13.3 ± 0.45%), Bcl-2 (42.6 ± 8.33), and p53 (11.6 ± 2.3). The immune cells associated with CD3 were present at the stroma of residual cells (47.3 ± 3.89); however, they were not present in the epithelium cell layers. B cells (CD79A) consistent with germinal centers were present within the immune cells and formed follicles (43.2 ± 13.5%). Conclusions Histopathological analysis of the stroma and parenchyma revealed balanced distribution of epithelial and stromal component. Epithelial component of the Warthin’s tumor is the trigger for the tumor process. This study indicates that the Warthin tumor is a consequence of inflammatory etiology. PMID:28386459

  3. MerTK inhibition in tumor leukocytes decreases tumor growth and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Rebecca S.; Jacobsen, Kristen M.; Wofford, Anne M.; DeRyckere, Deborah; Stanford, Jamie; Prieto, Anne L.; Redente, Elizabeth; Sandahl, Melissa; Hunter, Debra M.; Strunk, Karen E.; Graham, Douglas K.; Earp, H. Shelton

    2013-01-01

    MerTK, a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) of the TYRO3/AXL/MerTK family, is expressed in myeloid lineage cells in which it acts to suppress proinflammatory cytokines following ingestion of apoptotic material. Using syngeneic mouse models of breast cancer, melanoma, and colon cancer, we found that tumors grew slowly and were poorly metastatic in MerTK–/– mice. Transplantation of MerTK–/– bone marrow, but not wild-type bone marrow, into lethally irradiated MMTV-PyVmT mice (a model of metastatic breast cancer) decreased tumor growth and altered cytokine production by tumor CD11b+ cells. Although MerTK expression was not required for tumor infiltration by leukocytes, MerTK–/– leukocytes exhibited lower tumor cell–induced expression of wound healing cytokines, e.g., IL-10 and growth arrest-specific 6 (GAS6), and enhanced expression of acute inflammatory cytokines, e.g., IL-12 and IL-6. Intratumoral CD8+ T lymphocyte numbers were higher and lymphocyte proliferation was increased in tumor-bearing MerTK–/– mice compared with tumor-bearing wild-type mice. Antibody-mediated CD8+ T lymphocyte depletion restored tumor growth in MerTK–/– mice. These data demonstrate that MerTK signaling in tumor-associated CD11b+ leukocytes promotes tumor growth by dampening acute inflammatory cytokines while inducing wound healing cytokines. These results suggest that inhibition of MerTK in the tumor microenvironment may have clinical benefit, stimulating antitumor immune responses or enhancing immunotherapeutic strategies. PMID:23867499

  4. MerTK inhibition in tumor leukocytes decreases tumor growth and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Cook, Rebecca S; Jacobsen, Kristen M; Wofford, Anne M; DeRyckere, Deborah; Stanford, Jamie; Prieto, Anne L; Redente, Elizabeth; Sandahl, Melissa; Hunter, Debra M; Strunk, Karen E; Graham, Douglas K; Earp, H Shelton

    2013-08-01

    MerTK, a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) of the TYRO3/AXL/MerTK family, is expressed in myeloid lineage cells in which it acts to suppress proinflammatory cytokines following ingestion of apoptotic material. Using syngeneic mouse models of breast cancer, melanoma, and colon cancer, we found that tumors grew slowly and were poorly metastatic in MerTK-/- mice. Transplantation of MerTK-/- bone marrow, but not wild-type bone marrow, into lethally irradiated MMTV-PyVmT mice (a model of metastatic breast cancer) decreased tumor growth and altered cytokine production by tumor CD11b+ cells. Although MerTK expression was not required for tumor infiltration by leukocytes, MerTK-/- leukocytes exhibited lower tumor cell-induced expression of wound healing cytokines, e.g., IL-10 and growth arrest-specific 6 (GAS6), and enhanced expression of acute inflammatory cytokines, e.g., IL-12 and IL-6. Intratumoral CD8+ T lymphocyte numbers were higher and lymphocyte proliferation was increased in tumor-bearing MerTK-/- mice compared with tumor-bearing wild-type mice. Antibody-mediated CD8+ T lymphocyte depletion restored tumor growth in MerTK-/- mice. These data demonstrate that MerTK signaling in tumor-associated CD11b+ leukocytes promotes tumor growth by dampening acute inflammatory cytokines while inducing wound healing cytokines. These results suggest that inhibition of MerTK in the tumor microenvironment may have clinical benefit, stimulating antitumor immune responses or enhancing immunotherapeutic strategies.

  5. Cyclophosphamide-facilitated adoptive immunotherapy of an established tumor depends on elimination of tumor-induced suppressor T cells

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    On the basis of preceding studies showing that tumor-induced, T cell- mediated immunosuppression serves as an obstacle to adoptive immunotherapy of the Meth A fibrosarcoma, it was predicted that cyclophosphamide treatment of tumor bearers would remove this obstacle and allow passively transferred immune T cells to cause tumor regression. It was found that infusion of immune spleen cells alone had no effect on tumor growth, and cyclophosphamide alone caused a temporary halt in tumor progression. In contrast, combination therapy consisting of intravenous injection of 100 mg/kg of cyclophosphamide followed 1 h later by intravenous infusion of tumor-immune spleen cells caused small, as well as large tumors, to completely and permanently regress. Tumor regression caused by combination therapy was completely inhibited by intravenous infusion of splenic T cells from donors with established tumors, but not by spleen cells from normal donors. These suppressor T cells were eliminated from the spleen by treating the tumor-bearing donors with 100 mg/kg of cyclophosphamide. Immune T cells, in contrast, were resistant to this dose of cyclophosphamide. These results show that failure of intravenously-infused, tumor- sensitized T cells to cause regression of the Meth A fibrosarcoma growing in its syngeneic or semi-syngeneic host is caused by the presence of a tumor-induced population of cyclophosphamide-sensitive suppressor T cells. PMID:6460831

  6. Tumor-Triggered Geometrical Shape Switch of Chimeric Peptide for Enhanced in Vivo Tumor Internalization and Photodynamic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Han, Kai; Zhang, Jin; Zhang, Weiyun; Wang, Shibo; Xu, Luming; Zhang, Chi; Zhang, Xianzheng; Han, Heyou

    2017-03-17

    Geometrical shape of nanoparticles plays an important role in cellular internalization. However, the applicability in tumor selective therapeutics is still scarcely reported. In this article, we designed a tumor extracellular acidity-responsive chimeric peptide with geometrical shape switch for enhanced tumor internalization and photodynamic therapy. This chimeric peptide could self-assemble into spherical nanoparticles at physiological condition. While at tumor extracellular acidic microenvironment, chimeric peptide underwent detachment of acidity-sensitive 2,3-dimethylmaleic anhydride groups. The subsequent recovery of ionic complementarity between chimeric peptides resulted in formation of rod-like nanoparticles. Both in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated that this acidity-triggered geometrical shape switch endowed chimeric peptide with accelerated internalization in tumor cells, prolonged accumulation in tumor tissue, enhanced photodynamic therapy, and minimal side effects. Our results suggested that fusing tumor microenvironment with geometrical shape switch should be a promising strategy for targeted drug delivery.

  7. Tumor-associated macrophages: effectors of angiogenesis and tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Coffelt, Seth B; Hughes, Russell; Lewis, Claire E

    2009-08-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are a prominent inflammatory cell population in many tumor types residing in both perivascular and avascular, hypoxic regions of these tissues. Analysis of TAMs in human tumor biopsies has shown that they express a variety of tumor-promoting factors and evidence from transgenic murine tumor models has provided unequivocal evidence for the importance of these cells in driving angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis, immunosuppression, and metastasis. This review will summarize the mechanisms by which monocytes are recruited into tumors, their myriad, tumor-promoting functions within tumors, and the influence of the tumor microenvironment in driving these activities. We also discuss recent attempts to both target/destroy TAMs and exploit them as delivery vehicles for anti-cancer gene therapy.

  8. Tasmanian devil facial tumor disease: insights into reduced tumor surveillance from an unusual malignancy.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Iain D

    2010-10-01

    Tasmanian devil facial tumor disease (DFTD) is a highly aggressive cancer involving the facial tissues that currently presents a serious extinction risk for the Tasmanian devil population. Although the histogenesis is uncertain, an origin from a neural crest cell-lineage is considered likely. Epidemiological, cytogenetic and immunological data all support the premise that DFTD arose from a single tumor clone from an individual diseased animal, and is being transmitted between individual animals as a tumor "allograft" by biting during social interaction. The spread of this cancer throughout the species is believed to be facilitated by a reduced MHC diversity, possibly as a result of an evolutionary bottleneck. The pathogenesis of DFTD has some similarities with certain human cancers, including donor-recipient tumor transmission, which may complicate organ transplantation, and certain forms of malignancy at the maternal/fetal interface. The natural history and pathology of DFTD, and the data describing this highly unusual tumor biology are discussed.

  9. [Hepatic tumors and radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Rio, E; Mornex, F; Peiffert, D; Huertas, A

    2016-09-01

    Recent technological developments led to develop the concept of focused liver radiation therapy. We must distinguish primary and secondary tumors as the indications are restricted and must be discussed as an alternative to surgical or medical treatments. For hepatocellular carcinoma 5 to 10cm (or more), a conformational radiation with or without intensity modulation is performed. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is being evaluated and is increasingly proposed as an alternative to radiofrequency ablative treatment for primary or secondary tumors (typically less than 5cm). Tumor (and liver) movements induced by respiratory motions must be taken into account. Strict dosimetric criteria must be met with particular attention to the dose-volume histograms to liver and the hollow organs, including cases of SBRT.

  10. Decay Dynamics of Tumors

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The fractional cell kill is a mathematical expression describing the rate at which a certain population of cells is reduced to a fraction of itself. We investigate the mathematical function that governs the rate at which a solid tumor is lysed by a cell population of cytotoxic lymphocytes. We do it in the context of enzyme kinetics, using geometrical and analytical arguments. We derive the equations governing the decay of a tumor in the limit in which it is plainly surrounded by immune cells. A cellular automaton is used to test such decay, confirming its validity. Finally, we introduce a modification in the fractional cell kill so that the expected dynamics is attained in the mentioned limit. We also discuss the potential of this new function for non-solid and solid tumors which are infiltrated with lymphocytes. PMID:27310010

  11. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Summary Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (pNENs) are a heterogeneous group of tumors including well differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) and neuroendocrine carcinomas (pNECs). The incidence of pNENs has increased over the past few decades. Although, the understanding and interest for this tumor have also increased significantly, the debate about classification and diagnosis continues. Although the primary treatment for pNENs is surgical resection, there is still a lack of effective therapeutic options for patients with advanced unresectable pNENs. Although many therapeutic methods have proven effective, the choice of treatment and specific programs are still unclear. Our article presents an overview of pNENs, with a focus on their diagnostic work-up, clinical presentation and treatment options. PMID:28357177

  12. Devil Facial Tumor Disease.

    PubMed

    Pye, R J; Woods, G M; Kreiss, A

    2016-07-01

    Devil facial tumor disease (DFTD) is an emergent transmissible cancer exclusive to Tasmanian devils (Sarcophilus harrisii) and threatening the species with extinction in the wild. Research on DFTD began 10 years ago, when nothing was known about the tumor and little about the devils. The depth of knowledge gained since then is impressive, with research having addressed significant aspects of the disease and the devils' responses to it. These include the cause and pathogenesis of DFTD, the immune response of the devils and the immune evasion mechanisms of the tumor, the transmission patterns of DFTD, and the impacts of DFTD on the ecosystem. This review aims to collate this information and put it into the context of conservation strategies designed to mitigate the impacts of DFTD on the devil and the Tasmanian ecosystem.

  13. Bilateral Wilms' tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Malcolm, A.W.; Jaffe, N.; Folkman, M.J.; Cassady, J.R.

    1980-02-01

    Twenty children with bilateral Wilms' tumor were presented to the Children's Hospital Medical Center and Children's Cancer Research Foundation, Sidney Farber Cancer Institute, and Joint Center for Radiation Therapy (CHMC-CCRF, SFCI, JCRT) from January 1, 1956 to December 31, 1976. Of these 20, 16 had simultaneous and 4 had metachronous disease on presentation. All patients were treated with surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. Of the 16 patients with simultaneous disease, 10 (63%) are alive and free of disease 12+ to 175+ months post diagnosis and treatment, with median follow-up of 121 months. There were no long-term survivors in the metachronous group; all were dead of disease within 21 months from initial presentation of original tumor. With these data we relate prognosis to extent of disease and discuss a general approach to the management of bilateral Wilms' tumor.

  14. Preoperative Embolization of Cervical Spine Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Vetter, Sylvia C.; Strecker, Ernst-Peter; Ackermann, Ludwig W.; Harms, Juergen

    1997-09-15

    Purpose: To assess the technical success rate, complications, and effect on intraoperative blood loss of preoperative transarterial embolization of cervical spine tumors. Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed on 38 patients with tumors of the cervical spine; 69 vertebrae were affected. Polyvinyl alcohol particles, coils, gelfoam particles, either alone or in combination, were used for preoperative tumor embolization. After embolization a total of 57 corporectomies with titanium basket implantation were performed. Results: In 36 of 38 patients, complete (n= 27) or partial (n= 9) embolization was achieved. In 23 patients one vertebral artery was completely occluded by coil placement, and in one patient the ipsilateral internal and external carotid arteries were occluded in addition. No neurological complications could be directly related to the embolization, but two postoperative brain stem infarctions occurred. The mean intraoperative blood loss was 2.4 L. Conclusion: Transarterial embolization of cervical spine tumors is a safe and effective procedure to facilitate extensive surgery.

  15. Metastatic carcinoid tumor obstructing left ventricular outflow.

    PubMed

    Chrysant, George S; Horstmanshof, Douglas A; Guniganti, Uma M

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac tumors are rare and usually indicate metastatic disease. Characterizing a tumor and reaching an exact diagnosis can be difficult. Diagnosis has been aided greatly by advances in imaging, such as cardiovascular magnetic resonance with the use of gadolinium-pentetic acid. Carcinoid tumors are neuroendocrine neoplasms that are found most often in the intestinal tract, although they can also develop in the lung, stomach, or heart. Herein, we report the case of a 72-year-old woman with a history of intestinal carcinoid disease and presenting symptoms of dizziness, fatigue, and chest pain. We used cardiovascular magnetic resonance with gadolinium enhancement to identify a large mass obstructing left ventricular outflow. The histopathologic results of an endomyocardial biopsy confirmed that the mass was a left-sided metastatic carcinoid ca