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Sample records for desmoid tumors results

  1. Genetics Home Reference: desmoid tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... in my area? Other Names for This Condition aggressive fibromatosis deep fibromatosis desmoid fibromatosis familial infiltrative fibromatosis ... catenin protein and somatic APC mutations in sporadic aggressive fibromatoses (desmoid tumors). Am J Pathol. 1997 Aug; ...

  2. Desmoid Tumors in Pregnant and Postpartum Women

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, William A.; McMillan, Colette; Kendall, Amy; Pearlman, Nathan

    2012-01-01

    We report here a review of the current medical literature on pregnancy associated desmoids, including 10 cases of our own. The pertinent findings are that a large percentage of desmoids in females arise in and around pregnancy. Most occur in the abdominal muscles, particularly the right rectus abdominus, perhaps related to trauma from abdominal stretching and fetal movement. While these tumors may regress spontaneously after delivery most can be surgically resected with low recurrence rates even with R1 resections and this is clearly the treatment of choice. Subsequent pregnancies do not appear to result in recurrence in either FAP or non FAP patients. It is not clear from currently available data whether pregnancy associated desmoids are molecularly distinct from other desmoids. PMID:24213235

  3. Desmoid tumors and deep fibromatoses.

    PubMed

    Schlemmer, Marcus

    2005-06-01

    Desmoid tumors (also called deep fibromatoses) are rare benign tumors associated with pregnancy and Gardner syndrome. These tumors are characterized by bland-appearing fibroblasts, indistinct margins, and an ability to cause pathology by local invasion and recurrence. They arise in the abdominal cavity, in the abdominal wall, or in the extremities/trunk, each with a slightly different biologic behavior. Though they are not cancer and do not metastasize, desmoids can cause significant morbidity and occasionally death through local/regional invasion of critical structures. Treatment primarily is surgical, although radiation or systemic therapy can be beneficial to the patient when surgery is not feasible. This article highlights the biology and clinical features of desmoid tumors.

  4. Desmoid Tumors in the Pediatric Population

    PubMed Central

    Honeyman, Joshua N.; La Quaglia, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    Desmoid tumors are benign soft tissue tumors associated with locally aggressive growth and high rates of morbidity, but they do not metastasize via lymphatic or hematogenous routes. While most of the data on desmoid tumors originates in the adult literature, many of the findings have been applied to the management of pediatric patients. This article discusses the epidemiology, etiology, clinical presentation, pathology, and treatment of this rare tumor in the pediatric population and includes a literature review of the most recent large series of pediatric patients with desmoid tumors. PMID:24213241

  5. Desmoid tumor: an unusual case of gross hematuria

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Vikas; Horn, Adam; Lele, Subodh M.; Lagrange, Chad A.

    2015-01-01

    Desmoid tumors are rare soft-tissue masses originating from the proliferation of fibroblasts in the fibroconnective tissues. Intra-abdominal desmoid tumors pose special diagnostic challenge due to multiplicity of differential diagnoses, and difficulty to well characterize the lesions on imaging studies. Desmoid tumors can have atypical presentation making clinical correlation challenging to unsuspecting urologists. Only a few cases have been reported in the urology literature. In this report, we present a case of desmoid tumor presenting with gross hematuria. PMID:25642294

  6. Desmoid tumor (fibromatosis) of the head and neck

    PubMed Central

    Alherabi, Ameen Z.; Marglani, Osama A.; Bukhari, Deemah H.; Al-Khatib, Talal A.

    2015-01-01

    Desmoid tumors (fibromatosis) are rare benign tumors, they arise from musculoaponeurotic structures throughout the body. They are locally infiltrative, resulting in a high rate of local recurrence following surgical resection. Due to the rarity of these tumors in the head and neck region, we report a case of a patient with a desmoid tumor in the upper neck that was diagnosed and treated in our institution, to increase the awareness of the Otolaryngology-Head and Neck surgeons, and report available treatment options of this condition. PMID:25630012

  7. Intrathoracic Desmoid Tumor Presenting as Multiple Lung Nodules 13 Years after Previous Resection of Abdominal Wall Desmoid Tumor.

    PubMed

    Koo, Gun Woo; Chung, Sung Jun; Kwak, Joo Hee; Oh, Chang Kyo; Park, Dong Won; Kwak, Hyeon Jung; Moon, Ji-Yong; Kim, Sang-Heon; Sohn, Jang Won; Yoon, Ho Joo; Shin, Dong Ho; Park, Sung Soo; Oh, Young-Ha; Pyo, Ju Yeon; Kim, Tae-Hyung

    2015-07-01

    Desmoid tumors are rare soft tissue tumors considered to have locally infiltrative features without distant metastasis until now. Although they are most commonly intraabdominal, very few cases have extra-abdominal locations. The origin of intrathoracic desmoid tumors is predominantly the chest wall with occasional involvement of pleura. True intrathoracic primary desmoid tumors with no involvement of the chest wall or pleura are extremely rare. We recently experienced a case of true intrathoracic desmoid tumor presenting as multiple lung nodules at 13 years after resection of a previous intraabdominal desmoid tumor.

  8. Extra-abdominal desmoid tumors associated with familial adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    Calvert, George T; Monument, Michael J; Burt, Randall W; Jones, Kevin B; Randall, R Lor

    2012-01-01

    Extra-abdominal desmoid tumors are a significant cause of morbidity in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis syndrome. Understanding of the basic biology and natural history of these tumors has increased substantially over the past decade. Accordingly, medical and surgical management of desmoid tumors has also evolved. This paper analyzes recent evidence pertaining to the epidemiology, molecular biology, histopathology, screening, and treatment of extra-abdominal desmoid tumors associated with familial adenomatous polyposis syndrome.

  9. Simple resection of truncal desmoid tumors: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, Yoshihiro; Tsukushi, Satoshi; Urakawa, Hiroshi; Hamada, Shunsuke; Kozawa, Eiji; Ikuta, Kunihiro; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Desmoid tumors of the extra-abdominal and abdominal wall have been associated with morbidity due to the aggressive nature of the surgery and high recurrence rates. Surgery that does not cause functional impairment is desired for patients with desmoid tumors. In the present study, among patients with desmoid tumors who were prospectively and consecutively treated with identical conservative treatment with meloxicam, a selected patients of patients were treated with less invasive surgery than wide-resection. Out of 60 patients pathologically diagnosed with desmoid tumors, 9 patients with tumors refractory to conservative treatment and 4 patients who refused to receive this type of treatment were treated with planned simple resection. Subsequently, the clinical outcome of the patients and the mutational status of the catenin β-1 (CTNNB1) gene in the tumors were analyzed. The mean age of the 13 patients that underwent planned simple resection was 39 years, and the tumors were located in the abdominal wall in 6 cases, the chest wall in 4 cases and the neck in 3 cases. All excised specimens were evaluated and positive microscopic margins were identified; however, during the mean follow-up period of 30 months, 12/13 cases, 7 of which had T41A mutations and 5 of which had no mutations (wild-type), did not develop recurrence. Only 1 initial case with an S45F mutation in the CTNNB1 gene developed recurrence. The results of the present prospectively treated with simple resection and retrospectively analyzed study suggest that planned simple resection could serve as a therapeutic modality for extraperitoneal desmoid tumors, particularly truncal ones with a wild-type or T41A mutational status. PMID:27446472

  10. Bilateral desmoid tumor of the breast: case seriesand literature review

    PubMed Central

    Wongmaneerung, Phanchaporn; Somwangprasert, Areewan; Watcharachan, Kirati; Ditsatham, Chagkrit

    2016-01-01

    Background Desmoid tumor of the breast is very rare and locally aggressive but has no distant metastasis. Bilateral lesions are extremely rare, found in only 4% of patients. Two cases of bilateral desmoid tumor of the breast are reported. The clinical presentation, diagnosis, imaging, treatment, and follow-up outcomes of recurrence as well as a brief literature review are provided. Case reports Case 1 is a 31-year-old woman who presented with nipple retraction. An ultrasound revealed BIRAD V in both breasts. She underwent a bilateral excisional biopsy under ultrasound mark with the pathology result of extra-abdominal desmoid tumor in both breasts. The patient had a bilateral mastectomy with silicone implantation due to the involved margins by excision. She remained tumor free after 7-year follow-up. Case 2 is a 28-year-old woman who presented with a lump on her right breast that she had discovered ~2 months earlier. An ultrasound showed a spiculated mass in the right breast and some circumscribed hypoechoic masses in both breasts. A bilateral breast excision was done. The pathology result was an extra-abdominal desmoid tumor. She had recurrence on both sides and underwent a mastectomy and silicone implantation. The tumor has not recurred after 1-year follow-up. Conclusion Imaging cannot distinguish between benign breast lesions and malignancy. Pathology results are helpful in making a definitive diagnosis. Given that the desmoid tumor is locally aggressive, a local excision with clear margins is recommended. Chemotherapy and hormonal treatment are controversial. PMID:27578999

  11. EXTRA-ABDOMINAL DESMOID TUMOR: LOCAL RECURRENCE AND TREATMENT OPTIONS

    PubMed Central

    TEIXEIRA, LUIZ EDUARDO MOREIRA; ARANTES, EUGÊNIO COSTA; VILLELA, RAFAEL FREITAS; SOARES, CLAUDIO BELING GONÇALVES; COSTA, ROBERTO BITARÃES DE CARVALHO; ANDRADE, MARCO ANTÔNIO PERCOPE DE

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the rate of local recurrence of extra-abdominal desmoid tumor and compare the outcomes of surgical treatment and conservative treatment. Methods: Twenty one patients (14 women and seven men), mean age 33.0±8.7 years old, with a diagnosis of desmoid tumor were evaluated. The mean follow-up period was 58.5±29.0 months. Fourteen cases involved the lower limbs, four cases involved the upper limbs, and three cases involved the trunk. The average tumor size was 12.7±7.5 cm. Of the 21 patients, 14 did not undergo previous treatment and seven patients relapsed before the initial evaluation. Surgical treatment was performed in 16 patients and conservative treatment was performed in five patients. Results: Recurrence occurred in seven patients (33%) and six of them relapsed within the first 18 months. No significant difference was observed between conservative and surgical treatment. However, a significant difference was observed among patients undergoing wide resection and who experienced improved local control. Conclusion: The recurrence rate of desmoid tumor was 33.3%. There was no difference in recurrence between conservative and surgical treatment. In surgical treatment, wide margins showed better results for recurrence control. Level of Evidence III. Retrospective Observational Study. PMID:27217816

  12. Radiation therapy for aggressive fibromatosis (desmoid tumors): Results of a national Patterns of Care Study

    SciTech Connect

    Micke, Oliver . E-mail: omicke@benign-news.de; Seegenschmiedt, M. Heinrich

    2005-03-01

    Purpose: After a general Patterns of Care Study (PCS) the German Cooperative Group on Radiotherapy for Benign Diseases (GCG-BD) initiated a multicenter cohort study to analyze the radiation therapy practice for aggressive fibromatosis. Methods and materials: In 2002 a PCS was conducted in all German radiotherapy (RT) institutions by mailing a standardized structured questionnaire, to assess patients accrual, number, pretreatment, treatment indications, RT, and target volume concepts for irradiation in aggressive fibromatosis. In addition, the treatment outcome of individual patients was evaluated. The PCS was structured and analyzed according to the model for quality assessment by Donabedian in three major components: structure, process, and outcome evaluation. Results: A total of 101 institutions returned the questionnaire: 52.7% reported satisfactory clinical data and experience for inclusion in this analysis. A total accrual rate of 278 patients per year was reported with median number of 2 cases (1-7 cases) per institution. Satisfactory data for a long-term clinical evaluation was reported for 345 patients from 19 different institutions. The applied total doses ranged between 36 and 65 Gy (median, 60 Gy). The local control rate was 81.4% in primary RT for unresectable tumors and 79.6% in postoperative RT. No acute or late radiation toxicities > Grade 2 (RTOG) were observed. No clear dose-response relationship could be established, but there was a tendency toward a lower local control rate in patients with a higher number of operative procedures before RT and patients treated for recurrent aggressive fibromatosis. Conclusions: This study comprises the largest database of cases reported for RT in aggressive fibromatosis. Radiotherapy provides a high local control rate in the postoperative setting and in unresectable tumors. This PCS may serve as a starting point for a national or international prospective multicenter study or registry, or both.

  13. Desmoid tumor of the abdominal wall: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Desmoid tumors are rare lesions without any metastatic potential but a strong tendency to invade locally and to recur. These tumors are associated with women of fertile age, especially during and after pregnancy. Case presentation The case of a desmoid tumor of the anterior abdominal wall in a 40-year-old Caucasian man with no relevant family history is presented, describing its appearance on computed tomography and ultrasonography. The patient, who presented with a painless mass in the left anterolateral abdomen, had a history of previous urgent abdominal surgery after a shotgun injury two years earlier. Radical resection of the affected abdominal wall musculature was performed, and the defect was reconstructed with polypropylene mesh. Conclusion The diagnosis of desmoid tumor should be strongly considered even in male patients with an abdominal mass and a history of previous abdominal surgery. The goal of its treatment is complete tumor excision and avoidance of the development of complications such as hernia. PMID:21787413

  14. Desmoid tumor in Gardner's Syndrome presented as acute abdomen

    PubMed Central

    Hatzimarkou, Andreas; Filippou, Dimitrios; Papadopoulos, Vasilios; Filippou, Georgios; Rizos, Spiros; Skandalakis, Panagiotis

    2006-01-01

    Background Gardner's syndrome can occasionally be complicated with intra-abdominal desmoid tumor. These tumors usually remain asymptomatic but can exhibit symptoms due to intestinal, vascular and ureteral compression and obstruction. Case presentation A rare case of a 41-year-old male patient with Gardner's syndrome complicated with intra-abdominal desmoid tumor, which first presented as acute abdomen, is presented. Conclusion Extra-abdominal manifestations of Gardner's syndrome along with a palpable abdominal mass would raise suspicion for the presence of a desmoid tumor in the majority of cases. In life-threatening cases, surgical treatment should be considered as a palliative approach, though the extent of excision remains debatable PMID:16569244

  15. Desmoid tumor occurring after reconstruction mammaplasty for breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Dale, P S; Wardlaw, J C; Wootton, D G; Resnick, J I; Giuliano, A E

    1995-11-01

    We present a case of desmoid tumor associated with prior alloplastic breast reconstruction. Wide local excision that includes chest wall resection, if necessary, is the primary treatment of choice. Patients with extensive nonresectable or recurrent disease may benefit from radiation therapy. Systemic therapy is a possibility in certain cases, but its toxicity generally precludes its use with this nonmetastatic tumor. Although this is the fourth reported case of desmoid tumor arising after implantation of a silicone prosthesis, we cannot claim a causal relationship. Careful follow-up consisting of yearly physical and mammagraphic examinations may facilitate early diagnosis and treatment of locally aggressive desmoid tumors but is not warranted, except in the context of routine screening for breast carcinoma. PMID:8579271

  16. Clinical outcomes of systemic therapy for patients with deep fibromatoses (desmoid tumors)

    PubMed Central

    de Camargo, Veridiana Pires; Keohan, Mary L.; D’Adamo, David R.; Antonescu, Cristina R.; Brennan, Murray F.; Singer, Samuel; Ahn, Linda S.; Maki, Robert G.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives We examined outcomes of patients with desmoid tumors receiving systemic therapy at a single institution to provide a basis for examination of newer agents. Methods We reviewed records of patients with desmoid tumors treated with chemotherapy at our institution. The activity of NSAIDs was not addressed. Patients without measurable disease, those receiving therapy we could not document, and those receiving prophylactic therapy were excluded. Results Sixty-eight patients received 157 lines of therapy. Nine patients died, 7 of progressive disease. The cohort was 62% female with median age 32.5, 32% with Gardner syndrome, median follow-up 63 months, and median of 2 lines of therapy. Intra-abdominal primary location was most common (44%). The greatest RECIST response rate was observed with anthracyclines and hormonal therapy and lowest with single agent dacarbazine/temozolomide or tyrosine kinase inhibitors, principally imatinib. In a multivariate analysis, only nodular gross morphology and presence of Gardner syndrome were the only tumor factors associated with greater time to progression. Conclusions Anti-estrogens and anthracycline-containing regimens are associated with a higher radiological response rate against desmoid tumors than other agents. Systemic therapy for desmoid tumors can be successful in patients with desmoids, and is a viable option in lieu of morbid or disabling surgery. PMID:20187095

  17. [Desmoid tumors or intra-abdominal fibromatoses].

    PubMed

    Lasser, P; Elias, D; Contesso, G; Genin, J; Mankarios, H; Rougier, P

    1993-01-01

    Intraabdominal desmoid tumour or fibromatosis, recurrent but non-metastatic, invasive, fibroblastic proliferations, are rare tumours. From 1968 to 1989, 16 patients were treated at Gustave Roussy Institute. They were associated with familial adenomatous polyposis in 10% of cases. These tumours, observed mainly in young women (70 to 85% of cases), are aggravated by pregnancy, and spontaneous regression can occur at menopause, proving their hormonal dependence. Although histologically benign, they are serious lesions due to their invasive character; their excision is complete in only 50% of cases. They recur in 30% to 75% of cases and cause death of the patient in 30% of cases. Treatment is surgical but due to their often very slow course, and their spontaneous stabilisation in some cases, a mutilating surgical treatment (extensive small intestine resection) does not seem to be justified. Radiotherapy is effective only at doses incompatible with the site of these tumours (35 to 60 Gy). Chemotherapy has never been shown to be effective.

  18. Current Perspectives on Desmoid Tumors: The Mayo Clinic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Joglekar, Siddharth B.; Rose, Peter S.; Sim, Franklin; Okuno, Scott; Petersen, Ivy

    2011-01-01

    Desmoid tumors are a rare group of locally aggressive, non malignant tumors of fibroblastic origin that can lead to significant morbidity due to local invasion. Despite advances in the understanding of these tumors, their natural history is incompletely understood and the optimal treatment is still a matter of debate. Local control is the main goal of treatment and there has been a change in philosophy regarding the management of these tumors from aggressive surgical resection to function preservation. A multidisciplinary approach is essential to plan local control with acceptable morbidity. The current Mayo Clinic algorithm for the treatment of these tumors is based on institutional experience and the available evidence in the literature: asymptomatic/non progressive lesions away from vital structures are managed with observation and regular imaging; primary or recurrent desmoid tumors which are symptomatic or progressive or near vital structures are managed with wide surgical resection when wide surgical margins are possible with minimal functional and cosmetic loss. When positive or close surgical margins are likely, surgical resection with adjuvant radiotherapy or definitive radiotherapy is preferred. If likely functional or cosmetic deficit is unacceptable, radiotherapy is the treatment of choice. Unresectable lesions are considered for radiotherapy, chemotherapy or newer modalities however an unresectable lesion associated with a painful, functionless, infected extremity is managed with an amputation. PMID:24212949

  19. Destructive invasion of the clavicle by desmoid tumor: a case report.

    PubMed

    Togral, Guray; Yildizgoren, Mustafa Turgut; Arikan, Murat; Gungor, Safak

    2014-01-01

    Desmoid tumors are rare, soft-tissue neoplasms that do not metastasize, but exhibit aggressive growth and local invasion. They originate most frequently from abdominal fascial structures, although they can also appear at extra-abdominal sites. The most common extra-abdominal locations include the shoulder, chest wall, back, thigh, and head and neck. In children, desmoid tumors are more infiltrative, having a tendency towards osseous involvement more frequently than in adult patients. We report acase of a supraspinatus muscle desmoid tumor in a female patient with clavicle destruction. PMID:25995779

  20. Desmoid Tumor of the Anterior Abdominal Wall in Female Patients: Comparison with Endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Krentel, H.; Tchartchian, G.; De Wilde, R. L.

    2012-01-01

    In female patients presenting a tumor of the lower abdominal wall especially after cesarian section, an endometriotic tumor as well as an aggressive desmoid tumor should be considered. Symptoms in correlation with the monthly period can facilitate the presurgical differentiation between endometriosis and fibromatosis. Ultrasound reveals the typical location of both tumors and its remarkable sonographic appearance. In the clinical practice, the desmoid fibromatosis of the lower abdominal wall is a very rare disease. We present a case of a 25-year-old pregnant and discuss diagnostic and therapeutic options by a PubMed literature review. With the knowledge of the prognosis of the desmoid fibromatosis and the respective treatment options including wait and see, complete surgical resection with macroscopically free margins and adjuvant approaches is essential to avoid further interventions and progression of the locally destructive tumor. PMID:22778752

  1. Radiation therapy in the treatment of aggressive fibromatoses (desmoid tumors).

    PubMed

    Kiel, K D; Suit, H D

    1984-11-15

    Twenty-five patients with aggressive fibromatoses (desmoid tumors) have been treated or followed in the Department of Radiation Medicine at the Massachusetts General Hospital between 1972 and 1982. Seventeen patients were treated by radiation, 4 for primary and 13 for recurrent disease. Seven patients were treated in conjunction with surgery. Partial or complete regression was achieved in 76%, and 59% are without evidence of disease (NED) at 9 to 94 months follow-up. Eight of ten patients treated primarily with radiation have achieved complete response without an attempt at resection (five) or have achieved stabilization (three) of their disease after some regression. Consistent complete control was seen with doses above 60 Gy. Periods to 27 months were required to observe complete responses. Only three failures within the radiation field were observed, two after low doses (22 and 24 Gy, respectively). Eight patients were seen after resection but with uncertain or histologically minimum positive margins, and were followed regularly and not treated. One patient has failed to date and is NED after resection. Radiation therapy is recommended in those situations where wide-field resection without significant morbidity is not possible for gross local disease. If minimally positive margins exist after resection in a patient who may be followed carefully, frequent follow-up and prompt treatment at recurrence may be an effective alternative to immediate radiation therapy.

  2. A Sporadic Desmoid Tumor: an Exceptional Pancreatic Cystic-Solid Mass.

    PubMed

    Ardakani, Jalal Vahedian; Mehrjardi, Ali Zare; Wadji, Massoud Baghai; Saraee, Amir

    2016-08-01

    Desmoid tumors are locally aggressive and non-metastatic neoplasms with a high rate of recurrence. Desmoid tumors of the pancreas are, however, very rare, and only a few cases have been reported in the literature. This paper reports an anecdotal case of a diffuse pancreatic desmoid tumor with the involvement of the pancreatic head, body, and-partially-tail. The patient underwent the Whipple procedure and subtotal pancreatectomy. Histopathological assessment showed that the tissues were partly positive for smooth muscle actin, but not for S100 or PanCK. The Ki67 index of the cells was only 1 %. Unfortunately, the patient died on the 10th postoperative day due to massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:27574352

  3. Increased beta-catenin protein and somatic APC mutations in sporadic aggressive fibromatoses (desmoid tumors).

    PubMed

    Alman, B A; Li, C; Pajerski, M E; Diaz-Cano, S; Wolfe, H J

    1997-08-01

    Sporadic aggressive fibromatosis (also called desmoid tumor) is a monoclonal proliferation of spindle (fibrocyte-like) cells that is locally invasive but does not metastasize. A similarity to abdominal fibromatoses (desmoids) in familial adenomatous polyposis and a cytogenetic study showing partial deletion of 5q in a subset of aggressive fibromatoses suggests that the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene plays a role in its pathogenesis. APC helps regulate the cellular level of beta-catenin, which is a downstream mediator in Wnt (Wingless) signaling. beta-Catenin has a nuclear function (binds transcription factors) and a cell membrane function (is a component of epithelial cell adherens junctions). Six cases of aggressive fibromatosis of the extremities from patients without familial adenomatous polyposis, or a family history of colon cancer, were studied. Immunohistochemistry, using carboxy and amino terminus antibodies to APC, and DNA sequencing showed that three of the six contained an APC-truncating mutation, whereas normal tissues did not contain a mutation. Western blot and Northern dot blot showed that all six tumors had a higher level of beta-catenin protein than surrounding normal tissues, despite containing similar levels of beta-catenin mRNA. Immunohistochemistry localized beta-catenin throughout the cell in tumor tissues, although it localized more to the periphery in cells from normal tissues. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction showed that the tumors expressed N-cadherin but not E-cadherin (a pattern of expression of proteins making up adherens junctions similar to fibrocytes), suggesting that the specific adherens junctions present in epithelial cells are not necessary for beta-catenin function. Increased beta-catenin may cause the growth advantage of cells in this tumor through a nuclear mechanism. The increased protein level, relative to the RNA level, suggests that beta-catenin is degraded at a lower rate compared with normal tissues

  4. Increased beta-catenin protein and somatic APC mutations in sporadic aggressive fibromatoses (desmoid tumors).

    PubMed Central

    Alman, B. A.; Li, C.; Pajerski, M. E.; Diaz-Cano, S.; Wolfe, H. J.

    1997-01-01

    Sporadic aggressive fibromatosis (also called desmoid tumor) is a monoclonal proliferation of spindle (fibrocyte-like) cells that is locally invasive but does not metastasize. A similarity to abdominal fibromatoses (desmoids) in familial adenomatous polyposis and a cytogenetic study showing partial deletion of 5q in a subset of aggressive fibromatoses suggests that the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene plays a role in its pathogenesis. APC helps regulate the cellular level of beta-catenin, which is a downstream mediator in Wnt (Wingless) signaling. beta-Catenin has a nuclear function (binds transcription factors) and a cell membrane function (is a component of epithelial cell adherens junctions). Six cases of aggressive fibromatosis of the extremities from patients without familial adenomatous polyposis, or a family history of colon cancer, were studied. Immunohistochemistry, using carboxy and amino terminus antibodies to APC, and DNA sequencing showed that three of the six contained an APC-truncating mutation, whereas normal tissues did not contain a mutation. Western blot and Northern dot blot showed that all six tumors had a higher level of beta-catenin protein than surrounding normal tissues, despite containing similar levels of beta-catenin mRNA. Immunohistochemistry localized beta-catenin throughout the cell in tumor tissues, although it localized more to the periphery in cells from normal tissues. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction showed that the tumors expressed N-cadherin but not E-cadherin (a pattern of expression of proteins making up adherens junctions similar to fibrocytes), suggesting that the specific adherens junctions present in epithelial cells are not necessary for beta-catenin function. Increased beta-catenin may cause the growth advantage of cells in this tumor through a nuclear mechanism. The increased protein level, relative to the RNA level, suggests that beta-catenin is degraded at a lower rate compared with normal tissues

  5. [A Case of Intra-Abdominal Desmoid Tumor with Abacterial Peritonitis].

    PubMed

    Sumiyama, Fusao; Inada, Ryo; Nakamura, Fumiko; Ryota, Hironori; Miki, Hirokazu; Oishi, Masaharu; Matsumoto, Tomoko; Iwamoto, Shigeyoshi; Mukaide, Yumi; Ozaki, Takeshi; Michiura, Taku; Inoue, Kentaro; Kon, Masanori; Miyasaka, Chika; Uemura, Yoshiko; Hamada, Madoka

    2016-03-01

    A woman in her 50s visited our hospital in February 2015 with a complaint of dull abdominal pain in the right lower quadrant. She had a medical history of appendectomy for appendicitis in her 20s. Computed tomography(CT)revealed a tumor 90 mm in diameter near the ileocecum. Elective surgery was planned under the suspicion of gastrointestinal tumor, malignant lymphoma, or ileal cancer. She was emergently hospitalized 1 day earlier than scheduled because of high fever and severe abdominal pain. CT revealed that the tumor had increased to 120 mm in diameter without free air. Her white blood cell count was not elevated, and her symptoms improved readily with medical treatment. Thus, we performed the operation as scheduled. A tumor with a dark red recess on the surface had invaded the transverse colon intraoperatively, and a small amount of purulent ascites was present at the pouch of Douglas. We performed ileocecal resection with partial transverse colectomy. Histopathological examination led to the diagnosis of desmoid tumor in the mesentery of the terminal ileum. The surgical margins were negative for tumor cells. The tumor surface around the recess showed peritonitis, and the ascites showed no bacteria or tumor cells. The patient had been doing well without recurrence after discharge. Some cases of desmoid tumor with peritonitis have been reported, but most were caused by tumor penetration into the intestinal tract. We report herein a rare case of intra-abdominal desmoid tumor with abacterial peritonitis.

  6. [Obstructive uropathy in Gardner's syndrome. Intra-abdominal desmoid tumor].

    PubMed

    Olivier Gómez, C M; Carballido Rodríguez, J A

    1989-01-01

    Desmoid tumours are benign neoplasias manifesting themselves clinically as aggressive fibromatoses. They may be sited both in mesenteric and retroperitoneal fat. Owing to the great size they reach and to their local infiltrative character they occasionally lead to the development of intestinal occlusive syndromes and, in exceptional cases, to obstructive uropathy of the upper urinary tract. Their incidence of presentation in the general population is low, however they develop more frequently in patients suffering from colonic polyposis in the family and they form part of the extracolonic manifestations of Gardner's syndrome. In 1987 we treated a young patient, a genetic carrier of familiar colonic polyposis who had presented relapse of a previous desmoid. The location of the tumour in narrow pelvis made its clinical debut as a intestinal pseudo-occlusion and determined a bilateral ureteral obstruction and the formation of a major urinoma. The joint utilization of instrumental maneuvers and surgical approaches enabled us to solve the intestinal and urological commitment satisfactorily. We carry out an overall review and analyse the data published on the incidence, prognosis and treatment of obstructive uropathy in Gardner's syndrome. We also carry out an updating on the biology of the desmoid tumour.

  7. The Role of Postoperative Irradiation in the Treatment of Locally Recurrent Incompletely Resected Extra-Abdominal Desmoid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Fontanesi, James; Mott, Michael P.; Kraut, Michael J.; Lucas, David P.; Miller, Peter R.

    2004-01-01

    Background: To define the efficacy of postoperative irradiation in patients with recurrent extra-abdominal desmoid tumors in whom surgical intervention has resulted in microscopically or grossly positive surgical margins. Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed on all patients referred to the department of radiation oncology at the Detroit Medical Center with a diagnosis of recurrent extra-abdominal desmoid tumor. This analysis includes all patients seen from 1 January 1990 through 31 December 1999. A total of 11 patients were treated to 13 sites. Ten had microscopically positive margins and three had gross residual disease. Three patients were noted to have multifocal disease at the time of initial representation. Local control, survival, follow-up, and subsequent development of new tumors are measured from the last day of treatment with irradiation. Results: Thirteen sites were treated. Seven patients had received chemotherapy/hormonal therapy prior to surgery and/or irradiation. The most commonly used drug was tamoxifen (n=6). The type of radiation delivered included external beam irradiation alone (n=3), combined external beam irradiation and brachytherapy (n=4), brachytherapy alone (n=3) and 252-Cf neutron brachytherapy alone (n=3). Follow-up has ranged from 29 to 115 months (median=76 months). Three patients have failed locally at 17, 24 and 29 months. One of these was treated for gross residual disease. No patient has died of tumor-related causes. Salvage at the failed sites was possible in twom of three with re-irradiation using external neutrons and/or aggressive surgical intervention and systemic therapy. Complications were most often noted to include decrease range in motion, especially in joint areas, and skin reactions which were normal in presentation. In one site there was development soft tissue necrosis. Conclusion: Based on our experience we recommend postoperative irradiation for all recurrent extra-abdominal desmoid lesions with

  8. [Proctocolectomy with ileoanal anastomoses and desmoid tumor treated with resection. One case of familial adenomatous polyposis].

    PubMed

    Villalón-López, José Sebastián; Souto-del Bosque, Rosalía; Méndez-Sashida, Pedro Gonzalo

    2014-01-01

    Introducción: la poliposis adenomatosa familiar (PAF) es una rara enfermedad causada por una mutación en el gen de la poliposis adenomatosa coli (APC). Caso clínico: mujer de 32 años, con dolor y aumento del perímetro abdominal además de evacuaciones melénicas y pérdida de peso. La paciente presentó un tumor de 12 cm de diámetro en la fosa iliaca derecha. Tras la administración de medio de contraste, en una tomografía se apreció el tumor abdominal con reforzamiento compatible con sarcoma frente a tumor desmoide. Se realizó colonoscopia, por medio de la que se encontraron pólipos en el recto y el colon. La biopsia reportó adenomas túbulo-vellosos. Una panendoscopía demostró pólipos en fondo y cuerpo gástrico; el duodeno se encontraba en estado normal. Se realizó resección del tumor en pared abdominal y reconstrucción con malla además de proctocolectomía restaurativa con un reservorio íleo-anal con una ileostomía temporal. Se reportó tumor desmoide en la pared abdominal y se identificaron 152 pólipos túbulo-vellosos que afectaban todas las porciones del colon y el recto. Conclusiones: la PAF es una enfermedad autosómica dominante causada por una mutación en el gen APC que da como resultado el desarrollo de múltiples pólipos tanto en el colon como en el recto. Descrito en 1991, el gen APC se localiza en el cromosoma 5q21. Sin cirugía profiláctica, todos los pacientes desarrollarán cáncer colorrectal en la tercera década de la vida. Los tumores desmoides y los pólipos duodenales son ahora la causa de muerte en los pacientes con PAF.

  9. A Giant Mesenteric Desmoid Tumor Revealed by Acute Pulmonary Embolism due to Compression of the Inferior Vena Cava

    PubMed Central

    Palladino, Elisa; Nsenda, Joseph; Siboni, Renaud; Lechner, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Male, 69 Final Diagnosis: Mesenteric desmoid tumor Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Surgery Objective: Rare disease Background: Intra-abdominal fibromatosis is a benign rare tumor of fibrous origin with a significant potential for local invasion and no ability to metastasize, but it can recur. The etiology of desmoid tumors is unknown. It is often associated with conditions such as familial adenomatous polyposis and Gardner syndrome. Case Report: We report the case of a 69-year-old man who presented to our hospital with an acute pulmonary embolism. The patient had a past history of colic surgery for a polyp with a high-grade dysplasia. Pulmonary angiography showed partial occlusion of the right superior lobe artery and partial occlusion of the middle lobe artery. The patient was given thrombolytic therapy. Abdominal computerized tomography revealed a mesenterial giant mass with compression of the inferior vena cava (IVC). A biopsy of the mass, confirming aggressive fibromatosis. A laparotomy was performed, which revealed a massive growth occupying the abdomen and attached to the previous ileocolic anastomosis. One day after surgery, his condition deteriorated. Conclusions: This report underlines the potential of imaging investigations of abdomen and vena cava if pulmonary embolism is suspected, especially when there is no evidence of peripheral venous thrombosis or other predisposing factors. Unfortunately, data on the surgical management of desmoid tumor is scarce. Therefore, the standard of treatment is a surgical resection for resectable tumors. PMID:25180474

  10. Desmoid tumors in adults: the role of radiotherapy in their management

    SciTech Connect

    Bataini, J.P.; Belloir, C.; Mazabraud, A.; Pilleron, J.P.; Cartigny, A.; Jaulerry, C.; Ghossein, N.A.

    1988-06-01

    Twenty-six adult patients with the pathologic diagnosis of desmoid tumor were treated between 1964 and 1983 at the Institut Curie in Paris with megavoltage irradiation. Twenty of these patients (76 percent) had extraabdominal tumors. Definitive surgical resection was performed on nine patients (one received preoperative radiotherapy). At last follow-up 1 1/2 to 10 years after treatment, all of the patients had no evidence of disease. Seven of the nine had follow-up examinations from 5 to 10 years after treatment. Seven patients had postoperative radiotherapy with doses from 4,700 to 6,500 rads (47 to 65 Gy) for either microscopic (three patients) or gross (four patients) residual disease. All but one patient had no evidence of disease from 2 to 8 years after treatment. Nine patients had radiotherapy for recurrent inoperable tumors and six had no evidence of disease from 3 to 20 years after treatment. Recurrences developed in three patients; outside the treatment portal in one, and the other two had received less than 5,000 rads (50 Gy). Clinical regression of tumors after treatment was slow, with complete regression taking up to 2 years. Postoperative radiotherapy with doses of at least 5,000 to 6,000 rads (50 to 60 Gy) was effective in achieving local control of inoperable or incompletely resected tumors, thus the need for repeated resections was avoided. Computerized tomography has greatly improved the assessment of tumor extension and should be used routinely before either operation or radiotherapy to obtain adequate margins and minimize the chance of missing disease.

  11. Surgical Management of Desmoid Tumor of the Female Pelvis: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Begum, S A; Chowdhury, T S; Mahmud, T; Chowdhury, S; Chowdhury, T A; Urmi, S J; Khatun, S; Nessa, A; Fatema, N

    2016-07-01

    A 25 years married women having one child delivered vaginaly presented in the department of Obs & Gynae, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University, Bangladesh on April 2013 with pelvic pain and discomfort. No history of previous pelvic trauma was present. Patient examination showed a isolated mass in the right lower abdomen, right adnexa, extending to the pelvic wall upto lower end of ureter. Tumor markers were within normal limit. Intravenous pyelogram (IVP) showed mild right hydroureter and hydronephrosis with obstruction at the lower end of ureter. She was diagnosed as a case of adnexal mass with mild hydroureter & mild hydronephrosis and it was decided to operate on the patient. The surgical approach was transabdominal. On laparotomy a pseudocystic lesion 12×10cm in size was found over the right paracolic gutter and extending down into the pelvis involving the right parametrium. No abnormality was found in the uterus or tubes. The histological examination revealed a desmoid tumor of the pelvis. The patient's recovery was uneventful. PMID:27612912

  12. [Desmoid tumor of the breast in a 9 years old little girl].

    PubMed

    Muller, Matthieu; Dessogne, Philippe; Baron, Marc; Picquenot, Jean-Michel; Riopel, Céline; Diologent, Brigitte; Dupre, Pierre-François; Collet, Michel

    2011-02-01

    Aggressive fibromatosis (desmoid tumour) of the breast is a rare tumour that accounts only for 0.2% of primary breast tumours. This is a benign mesenchymal tumour that develops from muscular fasciae and aponeuroses. It is characterized by its local evolution and its tendency to relapse without metastasizing. Wide radical resection should be attempted whenever possible. Positive margins at resection and reoperation are associated with a high risk of local recurrence. The role of radiotherapy and of medical treatments- especially anti-estrogens - remains unclear. We report here the case of desmoid tumour of the breast arising in a 9-year-old little girl.

  13. Desmoid Fibromatosis of Submandibular Region

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Rohana; Parthiban, Nirmalatiban; O’Dwyer, Tadgh

    2014-01-01

    Desmoid fibromatosis is a benign yet locally aggressive tumor with a tendency to recur. It causes considerable morbidity particularly when it arises in a small area in the head and neck region. This tumor is extremely rare in the submandibular region. We report a case of desmoid tumor in the submandibular region in a 32-year-old male who presented with right submandibular swelling postextraction of right lower wisdom tooth. Excision biopsy was carried out initially following inconclusive fine needle aspiration and discussion at multidisciplinary meeting. The tumor recurred 4 months following initial excisional biopsy necessitating a more radical secondary approach involving segmental mandibulectomy. Intraoperatively we also noted that the tumor was originating from the site of previous wisdom tooth extraction, raising the question of surgical trauma as precursor of desmoid tumor. We achieved a negative resection margin and a complete remission for 24 months. PMID:25013548

  14. [First description of a desmoid tumor in a goat and comparative observations to human fibromatosis. Case report].

    PubMed

    Tontis, A; Rossi, G L

    1993-08-01

    The macroscopical, histological, and ultrastructural aspects of the abdominal and extra-abdominal desmoid tumour are reported in a 1 1/2-year old goat (breed: Nera-Verzasca, Tessin mountain goat). Macroscopically, the disease was characterized by glassy, whitish, very hard, plate-forming masses found in the abdominal wall and in the medial aspect of the upper hind limbs. Histologically, the masses consisted of well differentiated fibroblasts which locally infiltrated the surrounding tissues. No capsule formation was found. On electron microscopy, the cells appeared to be active, young, collagen-producing fibroblasts. The pathogenesis of this disease is unknown.

  15. Desmoid-Type Fibromatosis: Evolving Treatment Standards.

    PubMed

    Fiore, Marco; MacNeill, Andrea; Gronchi, Alessandro; Colombo, Chiara

    2016-10-01

    Desmoid-type fibromatosis is a rare nonmetastasizing neoplasm with variable behavior. Recent discoveries into the biology of this disease hold promise for identifying prognostic and predictive features and novel therapeutic targets. Surgery has been the historical standard of care but carries considerable drawbacks in terms of high local recurrence rates and poor functional outcomes. Improved understanding of the natural history of desmoid-type fibromatosis has resulted in a paradigm shift toward nonoperative management. Effective medical treatment options include nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, hormone therapy, cytotoxic chemotherapy, and targeted agents. A treatment algorithm has been proposed with the objective of optimizing treatment. PMID:27591500

  16. Desmoid-Type Fibromatosis: Evolving Treatment Standards.

    PubMed

    Fiore, Marco; MacNeill, Andrea; Gronchi, Alessandro; Colombo, Chiara

    2016-10-01

    Desmoid-type fibromatosis is a rare nonmetastasizing neoplasm with variable behavior. Recent discoveries into the biology of this disease hold promise for identifying prognostic and predictive features and novel therapeutic targets. Surgery has been the historical standard of care but carries considerable drawbacks in terms of high local recurrence rates and poor functional outcomes. Improved understanding of the natural history of desmoid-type fibromatosis has resulted in a paradigm shift toward nonoperative management. Effective medical treatment options include nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, hormone therapy, cytotoxic chemotherapy, and targeted agents. A treatment algorithm has been proposed with the objective of optimizing treatment.

  17. Metachronous multifocal desmoid-type fibromatoses along the neuraxis with adenomatous polyposis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chung, K H Carlos; Charlton, Amanda; Arbuckle, Susan; Chaseling, Raymond; Owler, Brian K

    2010-10-01

    Desmoid-type fibromatosis, aggressive fibromatosis, or desmoid tumor is an uncommon benign but locally aggressive fibroblastic lesion. Although intraabdominal desmoid-type fibromatoses are well described in association with adenomatous polyposis syndrome, their occurrence along the neuraxis is extremely rare. The authors report the case of a 14-year-old boy with metachronous intracranial and spinal desmoid-type fibromatoses with preceding medulloblastoma. He was ultimately diagnosed with adenomatous polyposis syndrome. This is the first reported case of spinal desmoid-type fibromatosis in association with adenomatous polyposis syndrome. The identification of an underlying genetic instability allows for screening to detect lesions and institute measures to avoid preventable mortality from nonneurological tumors.

  18. A nation-wide study comparing sporadic and familial adenomatous polyposis-related desmoid-type fibromatoses.

    PubMed

    Nieuwenhuis, Marry H; Casparie, Mariel; Mathus-Vliegen, Lisbeth M H; Dekkers, Olaf M; Hogendoorn, Pancras C W; Vasen, Hans F A

    2011-07-01

    Desmoid-type fibromatoses are neoplasms of fibroblastic origin, occurring sporadically or associated with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) coli. By comparing sporadic and FAP-associated desmoid-type fibromatoses, we tried to identify clinical characteristics, which may indicate FAP. Histopathology data of all Dutch patients with desmoid-type fibromatoses diagnosed between 1999 and 2009 were retrieved from PALGA, the nation-wide network and registry of histopathology in the Netherlands. For calculation of incidence rates, person-years from the general matched population were used. Based on polyp counts in pathological records, the cohort was divided into a FAP group and a non-FAP group. Patient- and tumor characteristics were compared between the two groups. A total number of 519 patients older than 10 years with a confirmed diagnosis of desmoid-type fibromatoses were included. Thirty-nine (7.5%) desmoid patients were documented of having FAP. The incidences of sporadic and FAP-related desmoid-type fibromatoses were 3.42 and 2,784 per million person-years, respectively. The majority of FAP patients developed desmoid-type fibromatoses after the diagnosis of FAP. Having FAP was associated with male gender [odds ratio (OR) 2.0, p = 0.034], desmoid diagnosis at an earlier age (mean 36 vs. 42 years, p = 0.031), and desmoid localization intra-abdominally (OR 18.9, p ≤ 0.001) or in the abdominal wall (OR 4.8, p ≤ 0.001), compared to extra-abdominal desmoid localization. In conclusion, patients with desmoid-type fibromatoses are at risk of underlying FAP. Especially cases with desmoid localization intra-abdominal or in the abdominal wall, and all patients younger than 60 years, have a substantial increased risk and should be referred for colonoscopy.

  19. Signal Transduction Pathway Analysis in Desmoid-type Fibromatosis: TGFβ, COX2 and Sex Steroid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Mignemi, Nicholas A.; Itani, Doha M.; Fasig, John H.; Keedy, Vicki L.; Hande, Kenneth R.; Whited, Brent W.; Homlar, Kelly C.; Correa, Hernan; Coffin, Cheryl M.; Black, Jennifer O.; Yi, Yajun; Halpern, Jennifer L.; Holt, Ginger E.; Schwartz, Herbert S.; Schoenecker, Jonathan G.; Cates, Justin M. M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Despite reports of sex steroid receptor and COX2 expression in desmoid-type fibromatosis, responses to single agent therapy with anti-estrogens and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are unpredictable. Perhaps combination pharmacotherapy might be more effective in desmoid tumors that co-express these targets. Clearly, a further understanding of the signaling pathways deregulated in desmoid tumors is essential for development of targeted molecular therapy. Transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) and bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are important regulators of fibroblast proliferation and matrix deposition, but little is known about the TGFβ superfamily in fibromatosis. A tissue microarray representing 27 desmoid tumors was constructed; 14 samples of healing scar and 6 samples of normal fibrous tissue were included for comparison. Expression of selected receptors and activated downstream transcription factors of TGFβ family signaling pathways, β-catenin, sex steroid hormone receptors and COX2 were assessed by immunohistochemistry; patterns of co-expression were explored via correlational statistical analyses. In addition to β-catenin, immunoreactivity for phosphorylated SMAD2/3 (indicative of active TGFβ signaling) and COX2 was significantly increased in desmoid tumors compared to healing scar and quiescent fibrous tissue. Low levels of phosphorylated SMAD1/5/8 were detected in only a minority of cases. TGFβ receptor type 1 and androgen receptor were expressed in both desmoid tumors and scar, but not in fibrous tissue. Estrogen receptor-β was present in all cases studied. TGFβ signaling appears to be activated in desmoid-type fibromatosis and phosphorylated SMAD2/3 and COX2 immunoreactivity may be of diagnostic utility in these tumors. Given the frequency of androgen receptor, estrogen receptor-β and COX2 co-expression in desmoid tumors, further assessment of the efficacy of combination pharmacotherapy using hormonal agonists/antagonists together

  20. Desmoid-type fibromatosis.

    PubMed

    Otero, S; Moskovic, E C; Strauss, D C; Benson, C; Miah, A B; Thway, K; Messiou, C

    2015-09-01

    Desmoid-type fibromatosis is a rare, locally infiltrative, mesenchymal neoplasm that is associated with high rates of local recurrence but lacks the potential to metastasise. The disease affects younger individuals, with a peak age of 30 years, and is the most common cause of an anterior abdominal wall mass in young women of childbearing age. It may, however, involve nearly every body part, including the extremities, head and neck, trunk, and abdominal cavity; as such, desmoid-type fibromatosis may present to a range of general and subspecialty radiologists. These rare tumours have a widely variable clinical presentation and unpredictable natural history, hence input from a soft-tissue tumour centre is recommended, although much of the imaging may be performed at the patient's local hospital. The consensus for treatment has changed over the past decade, with most centres moving away from primary radical surgery towards a front-line 'watch-and-wait' policy. Therefore, imaging has an increasingly important role to play in both the diagnosis and follow-up of these patients. This review will discuss the typical imaging characteristics of these lesions and suggest diagnostic and follow-up magnetic resonance imaging protocols, with details of suitable sequences and scanning intervals. PMID:26162574

  1. Chemotherapy for desmoid tumours in association with familial adenomatous polyposis: a report of three cases

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Lisa; Blackstein, Martin; Berk, Terri; McLeod, Robin S.; Gallinger, Steven; Madlensky, Lisa; Cohen, Zane

    1996-01-01

    Objective To determine the efficacy of chemotherapy for inoperable desmoid tumours associated with familial adenomatous polyposis. Design A review of three cases of unresectable desmoid tumours and of the literature on the subject. Setting The Steven Atanas Stavro Polyposis Registry at Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto. Patients Three patients with symptomatic, unresectable desmoid tumours associated with familial adenomatous polyposis and unresponsive to conventional hormone therapy. Intervention A chemotherapy regimen of seven cycles of doxorubicin (dose ranging from 60 to 90 mg/m2) and dacarbazine (1000 mg/m2), followed by carboplatin (400 mg/m2) and dacarbazine. Outcome Measures Clinical improvement and tumour regression demonstrated by computed tomography. Results In each of the three cases significant tumour regression was seen clinically and radiologically. Conclusions Cytotoxic chemotherapy is an effective treatment for desmoid tumours associated with familial adenomatous polyposis. The chemotherapy should be started early in cases of symptomatic desmoid tumour unresponsive to conventional medical therapy. PMID:8640627

  2. [Desmoid in a laparatomy scar].

    PubMed

    Amin, F M; Bolanca, M; Urbanke, A

    1977-01-01

    A patient, aged 55, three years after having undergone abdominal histerectomy and adnexectomy for a myoma, developed a hard swelling near the surgical cut in the abdominal wall. A similar swelling appeared also in another patient, aged 33, as early as three months following salpingectomy for tubal pregnancy. In both cases these hard tumours radially permeating the facia and muscles were surgically removed and histologically verified as desmoids.

  3. Hereditary desmoid disease due to a frameshift mutation at codon 1924 of the APC gene.

    PubMed Central

    Eccles, D. M.; van der Luijt, R.; Breukel, C.; Bullman, H.; Bunyan, D.; Fisher, A.; Barber, J.; du Boulay, C.; Primrose, J.; Burn, J.; Fodde, R.

    1996-01-01

    Desmoid tumors are slowly growing fibrous tumors highly resistant to therapy and often fatal. Here, we report hereditary desmoid disease (HDD), a novel autosomal dominant trait with 100% penetrance affecting a three-generation kindred. Desmoid tumors are usually a complication of familial adenomatous polyposis, a predisposition to the early development of premalignant adenomatous polyps in the colorectum due to chain-terminating mutations of the APC gene. In general, one or more members in approximately 10% of the FAP families manifest desmoid tumors. Affected individuals from the HDD kindred are characterized by multifocal fibromatosis of the paraspinal muscles, breast, occiput, arms, lower ribs, abdominal wall, and mesentery. Osteomas, epidermal cysts, and other congenital features were also observed. We show that HDD segregates with an unusual germ-line chain-terminating mutation at the 3' end of the APC gene (codon 1924) with somatic loss of the wild-type allele leading to tumor development. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8940264

  4. Clinical and diagnostic problems of desmoid-type fibromatosis of the mesentery: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    La Greca, Gaetano; Santangelo, Antonio; Primo, Stefano; Sofia, Maria; Latteri, Saverio; Russello, Domenico; Magro, Gaetano

    2014-12-12

    In accordo con la “World Health Organization”, il tumore desmoide viene definito come una “proliferazione di tipo clonale dei fibroblasti che origina dai tessuti molli posti più in profondità e che risulta essere caratterizzata da una crescita infiltrante con la tendenza a dare delle recidive locali ma con l’incapacità di metastatizzare”. Noi riportiamo il caso di una giovane donna di 33 anni che presentava una sintomatologia aspecifica, con la presenza di una massa palpabile in sede addominale. La prima diagnosi, eseguita in altra Unità Operativa con US, evidenziava una neoformazione classificata come Leiomioma uterino. Il reperto intraoperatorio durante intervento di isterectomia evidenziava, invece, una neoformazione a partenza dal mesentere. L’esecuzione di due esami bioptici estemporanei non ha portato a nessuna diagnosi di certezza. Veniva quindi eseguita una resezione “en bloc”, allargata con criteri oncologici, della massa, comprendendo digiuno, ileo e colon destro. La diagnosi istologica definitiva è stata poi di Tumore Desmoide. La revisione della letteratura condotta con 25 casi di tumore desmoide del mesentere, ha confermato definitivamente come la diagnosi è molto difficile e quasi mai disponibile prima o durante l’intervento chirurgico. Appare quindi chiaro che la prima scelta di trattamento di questa neoplasia rimane quella chirurgica con margini di resezione R0, pur esistendo la possibilità di un trattamento conservativo farmacologico o radioterapico. Il trattamento del Tumore Desmoide rimane comunque difficile e richiede esperienza ed collaborazione interdisciplinare.

  5. Desmoid-Type Fibromatosis of the Mesentery: Report of a Sporadic Case with Emphasis on Differential Diagnostic Problems

    PubMed Central

    Pennisi, Monica

    2014-01-01

    Desmoid-type fibromatosis is a rare mesenchymal neoplasm with local aggressiveness. The incidence of desmoid-type fibromatosis is 2–5/million/year with intra-abdominal fibromatosis, such as that which is reported in this clinical case, occurring only in 12–18% of cases. After having analyzed the pathogenetic hypotheses of desmoid-type fibromatosis, the authors point out that the diagnosis of this disease, especially in the intra-abdominal form, is often late, specifically when highly demolitive interventions are needed or when the limits of radical surgery have been exceeded. In the clinical case reported, the tumor was infiltrating both ileus and sigma. The authors consider the differential diagnosis of desmoid-type fibromatosis, especially with GISTs, with regard to both the radiological preoperative diagnostic and histological studies on the surgical specimen. Radical surgical excision is not always, for this disease, a sign of healing; in fact, even when the resection margins are negative, the incidence of recurrence is between 13 and 68%. The average time of recurrence is between 15 and 24 months; in this case report, the patient, who has not been subjected to complementary therapies, is tumor-free for over 30 months since surgery; his prognosis may be satisfactory if we consider the negativity of resection margins, which in any case remains the most important prognostic factor. PMID:25349618

  6. Pineal region tumors: analysis of treatment results

    SciTech Connect

    Amendola, B.E.; McClatchey, K.; Amendola, M.A.

    1984-07-01

    This article represents a review of 32 patients with pineal region tumors seen and treated at the University of Michigan Medical Center from January 1950 to December 1980. All patients presented with manifestations of increased intracranial pressure: limitation of the upward gaze (Parinaud's syndrome), hydrocephalus and a mass in the posterior aspect of the third ventricle. The tumor was demonstrated by pneumoencephalography, ventriculography, angiography or CT scans. Ventricular decompression was performed in all patients. Twenty-seven patients received post-operative irradiation. The overall 10 year survival for evaluable patients was 16/24 (67%). Few complications were seen.

  7. [Gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the abdominal wall. An unusual localization of a rare tumor].

    PubMed

    Thalheimer, A; Meyer, D; Gattenlöhner, S; Timmermann, W; Thiede, A

    2004-07-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are the most common mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. We describe here for the first time a patient with a huge GIST of the abdominal wall without any relation to the gastrointestinal tract, omentum, or mesentery. With regard to the size of 24 cm and a low mitotic index, this GIST is considered an intermediate risk for metastasis. Radical surgical resection was performed with negative pathologic resection margins. The classic immunohistochemical phenotype of the tumor described facilitates the differential diagnosis to exclude abdominal desmoid tumor and solitary fibrous tumor (SFT). In the case of metastasis, therapeutic nihilism no longer seems justified with the availability of imatinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, which shows encouraging results in the therapy of metastatic GIST.

  8. Cortical desmoids in adolescent top-level athletes

    PubMed Central

    Biedert, Roland M; Gal, Imre

    2015-01-01

    Two adolescent, highly active athletes are presented with unspecific symptoms of anterior knee pain. Conventional radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a suspicious but pathognomonic cortical irregularity of the dorsal, medial femoral condyle. Cortical desmoid is one of the most common incidental osseous findings on conventional radiographs and MRI of the knee. It often needs no follow-up examination in asymptomatic patients. Malignancy needs however to be ruled out. PMID:25992301

  9. [The diagnosis and immediate treatment results in retroperitoneal tumors].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, S; Karanov, S; Kurtev, P

    1989-01-01

    Immediate results of treatment of 20 patients with primary retroperitoneal tumors treated over a period of 5 years (1980-1985) at the Research Institute of Oncology in Sofia are reported. Attempt is made for anamnestic analysis, aimed at elucidating the semiotics of the disease. Analysis of the diagnostic methods serves to give recommendations for "first-rate" diagnostic procedure--computer tomography when a retroperitoneal tumor is suspected. Complex therapeutic approach consisting of radical operation and adjuvant radiation treatment is advised.

  10. Spatio-temporal genetic heterogeneity of CTNNB1 mutations in sporadic desmoid type fibromatosis lesions.

    PubMed

    Doyen, Jérôme; Duranton-Tanneur, Valérie; Hostein, Isabelle; Karanian-Philippe, Marie; Chevreau, Christine; Breibach, Florence; Coutts, Michael; Dadone, Bérengère; Saint-Paul, Marie-Christine; Gugenheim, Jean; Duffaud, Florence; Pedeutour, Florence

    2016-03-01

    Desmoid type fibromatosis (DT) is a rare lesion of unclear pathogenesis that most often presents a mutation of the (β-catenin) gene. The natural history and clinical evolution are highly variable between patients and to date there is no consensus on optimal therapy. We report two cases of a patient with multiple DT lesions. Molecular investigations performed in both patients on multiple tumors at different anatomical sites revealed non-identical CTNNB1 mutations. The first patient was a 39-year-old man with a history of recurrent DT. In two of the DT lesions, three different mutations were found in codons 41 and 45, respectively. The lesions showed marked inflammatory features, characterized by IgG4 positive lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates and a foreign body reaction, which increased in intensity over time. The patient was eventually treated with a COX-2 inhibitor and the remaining mass was stabilized. In the two DT lesions of the second patient, CTNNB1 mutations S45P and T41A were found. The presence of different mutations in multiple focally recurrent sporadic DT lesions indicates that they do not have a clonal relationship. Our data suggest that a CTNNB1 mutation is a necessary event probably by providing a selective growth advantage. An IgG4 host antigen response is discussed as a potential predisposing factor for one of the patients. PMID:26666421

  11. No Detectable Hypoxia in Malignant Salivary Gland Tumors: Preliminary Results

    SciTech Connect

    Wijffels, Karien; Hoogsteen, Ilse J.; Lok, Jasper; Rijken, Paulus F.J.W.; Marres, Henri A.M.; Wilde, Peter C.M. de; Kogel, Albert J. van der; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M.

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: Hypoxia is detected in most solid tumors and is associated with malignant progression and adverse treatment outcomes. However, the oxygenation status of malignant salivary gland tumors has not been previously studied. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential clinical relevance of hypoxia in this tumor type. Methods and Materials: Twelve patients scheduled for surgical resection of a salivary gland tumor were preoperatively injected with the hypoxia marker pimonidazole and the proliferation marker iododeoxyuridine. Tissue samples of the dissected tumor were immunohistochemically stained for blood vessels, pimonidazole, carbonic anhydrase-IX, glucose transporters-1 and -3 (Glut-1, Glut-3), hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha}, iododeoxyuridine, and epidermal growth factor receptor. The tissue sections were quantitatively assessed by computerized image analysis. Results: The tissue material from 8 patients was of sufficient quality for quantitative analysis. All tumors were negative for pimonidazole binding, as well as for carbonic anhydrase-IX, Glut-1, Glut-3, and hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha}. The vascular density was high, with a median value of 285 mm{sup -2} (range, 209-546). The iododeoxyuridine-labeling index varied from <0.1% to 12.2% (median, 2.2%). Epidermal growth factor receptor expression levels were mostly moderate to high. In one-half of the cases, nuclear expression of epidermal growth factor receptor was observed. Conclusion: The absence of detectable pimonidazole binding, as well as the lack of expression of hypoxia-associated proteins in all tumors, indicates that malignant salivary gland tumors are generally well oxygenated. It is unlikely that hypoxia is a relevant factor for their clinical behavior and treatment responsiveness.

  12. Research results on biomagnetic imaging of the lung tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sillerud, Laurel O.; Popa, Sorin G.; Coutsias, Evangelos A.; Sheltraw, Daniel; Kuethe, Dean; Adolphi, Natalie

    2005-04-01

    Recent results on the development and implementation of a novel technology for lung tumor detection and imaging is presented. This technology offers high-sensitivity imaging of magnetic nanoparticles to provide specific diagnostic images of early lung tumors and potential distant metastases. Recent developments in giant magnetostrictive (GMS) or magnetic shape memory (MSM) materials have led to the possibility of developing small, low-cost, room-temperature, portable, high-sensitivity, fiber-optic sensors capable of robustly detecting magnetic nanoparticles, without direct contact with the skin. Magnetic nanoparticles are conjugated with antibodies, which target them to lung tumors. A prototype fiber-optic biomagnetic sensor, based on giant magnetostrictive or magnetic shape memory materials, with the requisite sensitivity to image the magnetic signals generated by antibody-labeled magnetic nanoparticles in lung tumors has been built and calibrated. The uniqueness of the biomagnetic sensor lies in the fact that it offers high sensitivity at room temperature, and is not a SQUID-based system. The results obtained during the process of choosing the right magnetostrictive materials are presented. Then, for the construction of an accurate image of the lung tumor, the optimum spatial distribution of one-channel sensors and nanoparticle polarization has been analyzed.

  13. Transsacrococcygeal approach for resection of retrorectal tumors.

    PubMed

    Gong, Lei; Liu, Wei; Li, Peiyu; Huang, Xiaohui

    2015-06-01

    Retrorectal tumors, are a rare and interesting entity, traditionally managed with surgery. The surgical approach is a key to get an easy and safe access. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the results of resection by a transsacrococcygeal approach. Thirty-six patients had retrorectal tumors resected by a transsacrococcygeal approach in our department. All the tumors were en bloc resected, irrespective of size and anatomical depth. The clinic data were retrospectively reviewed. Tumor mean size was 10 ± 4.4 cm. In 16 cases, tumors were 10 cm or more in size. The largest tumor measured 20 cm. The estimated mean blood loss was 130 ml. No mortality and severe postoperative complications were observed. The most significant issues were wound infection and delayed healing. Pathology showed 15 cases of epidermal cysts, two cases of enterogenous cyst, one case of bronchogenic cyst, 12 cases of teratoma, two cases of schwannoma, two cases of low-grade malignant fibrous myxoma, one case of aggressive angiomyxoma, one case of desmoid tumor. The transsacrococcygeal approach gives an easy access and good visualization with fewer complications. This surgical approach shows to be safe and effective for resection of retrorectal tumors. PMID:26031268

  14. Surgical treatment of extra-abdominal desmoid tumours (aggressive fibromatoses).

    PubMed

    Higaki, S; Tateishi, A; Ohno, T; Abe, S; Ogawa, K; Iijima, T; Kojima, T

    1995-01-01

    Extra-abdominal desmoid tumours (EADT) are benign lesions but difficult to cure because of their infiltrative nature and tendency to recur. Among many treatments recommended in the past, wide excision has been successful, even in difficult cases. We have analyzed retrospectively 41 cases of histologically confirmed EADTs. A total of 98 operations were performed on these patients: 29 wide excisions on 22 patients, 52 intra-lesional excisions with wide margins on 16 patients, and 17 incomplete excisions on 3 patients. One patient, with intra-pelvic lesions, died of a massive haemorrhage 3 days after surgery. Forty patients were followed from between 3 and 29 years. One, who had a multicentric EADT for 21 years, died from the disease. The significant factors concerning local recurrence after wide procedures were an unsatisfactory initial wide local excision, disease affecting 4 or more muscles and the invasive nature of the recurrences. We recommend wide local excision of these tumours in all anatomical areas that allow this procedure. When major nerves and vessels are involved, we recommend an intralesional excision with wide margins in order to preserve limb function. Radiation therapy should be confined to cases in which wide local procedures are not feasible. Overall, 37 of our patients (90%) were cured of the disease, 2 had their disease controlled, and 2 died.

  15. Mechanical Disruption of Tumors by Iron Particles and Magnetic Field Application Results in Increased Anti-Tumor Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Bouchlaka, Myriam N.; Sckisel, Gail D.; Wilkins, Danice; Maverakis, Emanual; Monjazeb, Arta M.; Fung, Maxwell; Welniak, Lisbeth; Redelman, Doug; Fuchs, Alan; Evrensel, Cahit A.; Murphy, William J.

    2012-01-01

    The primary tumor represents a potential source of antigens for priming immune responses for disseminated disease. Current means of debulking tumors involves the use of cytoreductive conditioning that impairs immune cells or removal by surgery. We hypothesized that activation of the immune system could occur through the localized release of tumor antigens and induction of tumor death due to physical disruption of tumor architecture and destruction of the primary tumor in situ. This was accomplished by intratumor injection of magneto-rheological fluid (MRF) consisting of iron microparticles, in Balb/c mice bearing orthotopic 4T1 breast cancer, followed by local application of a magnetic field resulting in immediate coalescence of the particles, tumor cell death, slower growth of primary tumors as well as decreased tumor progression in distant sites and metastatic spread. This treatment was associated with increased activation of DCs in the draining lymph nodes and recruitment of both DCs and CD8(+)T cells to the tumor. The particles remained within the tumor and no toxicities were observed. The immune induction observed was significantly greater compared to cryoablation. Further anti-tumor effects were observed when MRF/magnet therapy was combined with systemic low dose immunotherapy. Thus, mechanical disruption of the primary tumor with MRF/magnetic field application represents a novel means to induce systemic immune activation in cancer. PMID:23133545

  16. EXTENSIVE SURVEY OF STAT6 EXPRESSION IN A LARGE SERIES OF MESENCHYMAL TUMORS

    PubMed Central

    Demicco, Elizabeth G; Harms, Paul W; Patel, Rajiv M; Smith, Steven C; Ingram, Davis; Torres, Keila; Carskadon, Shannon L; Camelo-Piragua, Sandra; McHugh, Jonathan B; Siddiqui, Javed; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Lucas, David R; Lazar, Alexander J; Wang, Wei-lien

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Expression of strong nuclear STAT6 is thought to be a specific marker for solitary fibrous tumors (SFT). Little is known about subtle expression patterns in other mesenchymal lesions. Methods We performed immunohistochemical studies against the C-terminus of STAT6 in tissue microarrays and whole sections, comprising 2366 mesenchymal lesions. Results Strong nuclear STAT6 was expressed in 285/2021 tumors, including 206/240 SFT, 49/408 well/dedifferentiated liposarcomas, 8/65 unclassified sarcomas, and 14/184 desmoids, among others. Expression in SFT was predominately limited to the nucleus. Other positive tumors typically expressed both nuclear and cytoplasmic STAT6. Complete absence of STAT6 was most common in pleomorphic liposarcoma and alveolar soft part sarcoma (60% and 72% cases negative, respectively). Conclusions Strong nuclear STAT6 is largely specific for SFT. Physiologic low-level cytoplasmic/nuclear expression is common in mesenchymal neoplasia, and is of uncertain significance. PMID:25873501

  17. Pattern of primary tumors and tumor-like lesions of bone in children: retrospective survey of biopsy results

    PubMed Central

    Özkan, Esra Akyüz; Göret, Ceren Canbey; Özdemir, Zeynep Tuğba; Yanık, Serdar; Doğan, Meryem; Gönültaş, Aylin; Akkoca, Ayşe Neslin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although primary bone tumors are relatively uncommon, they constitute the most important tumors in patients less than 20 years. We aimed to determine the frequencies of primary bone tumors and tumor-like lesions of bone and the anatomical sites of their occurrence. Methods: A retrospective review of histopathology reports of all bone specimens received in a private pathology laboratory in Istanbul between 2009 and 2015. Results: A total of 57 patients (aged 5 to 18 years) with a mean of 13.12 years were studied. Thirty five patients (61.4%) were males and 22 (38.6%) were females. Fifty five (94.4%) of the tumors were benign. Osteochondroma was the commonest tumor accounting for 31 cases (54.3%) followed by osteoid osteoma, 9 cases (15.7%). Chondrosarcoma observed in two patients and Ewing sarcoma in one patient as malignant tumors. Of the 57 bone tumors 13 (22.8%) occurred in the upper extremities, while 44 (77.2%) were in the lower extremities. Proximal humerus was the most commonly involved site in upper extremity tumors, with osteochondromas representing the most frequent type of tumor (4 patients; 7%). In the lower extremities again osteochondromas were the most common type of tumor (8 cases, 14%), with the femur being the most common site of involvement (18 patients, 31.5%). Of the patients with tumor-like lesions; four patients had fibrous dysplasia, 4 patients had non-ossified fibromas, 4 patients had simple bone cysts and 3 had aneurismal bone cyst. Conclusion: This study showed that primary bone tumors were mainly benign, settled predominantly in the lower extremities mostly in the femur with a male preponderance. Osteochondroma was the most common benign bone tumor. We didn’t observed osteosarcoma, which is the most frequent malignant bone tumor. PMID:26617888

  18. Hypofractionation Results in Reduced Tumor Cell Kill Compared to Conventional Fractionation for Tumors With Regions of Hypoxia

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, David J.; Keall, Paul J.; Loo, Billy W.; Chen, Zhe J.; Brown, J. Martin

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: Tumor hypoxia has been observed in many human cancers and is associated with treatment failure in radiation therapy. The purpose of this study is to quantify the effect of different radiation fractionation schemes on tumor cell killing, assuming a realistic distribution of tumor oxygenation. Methods and Materials: A probability density function for the partial pressure of oxygen in a tumor cell population is quantified as a function of radial distance from the capillary wall. Corresponding hypoxia reduction factors for cell killing are determined. The surviving fraction of a tumor consisting of maximally resistant cells, cells at intermediate levels of hypoxia, and normoxic cells is calculated as a function of dose per fraction for an equivalent tumor biological effective dose under normoxic conditions. Results: Increasing hypoxia as a function of distance from blood vessels results in a decrease in tumor cell killing for a typical radiotherapy fractionation scheme by a factor of 10{sup 5} over a distance of 130 {mu}m. For head-and-neck cancer and prostate cancer, the fraction of tumor clonogens killed over a full treatment course decreases by up to a factor of {approx}10{sup 3} as the dose per fraction is increased from 2 to 24 Gy and from 2 to 18 Gy, respectively. Conclusions: Hypofractionation of a radiotherapy regimen can result in a significant decrease in tumor cell killing compared to standard fractionation as a result of tumor hypoxia. There is a potential for large errors when calculating alternate fractionations using formalisms that do not account for tumor hypoxia.

  19. Primary tumors of the trachea. Results of radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, J.N.; Rigaud, G.; Emami, B.N.

    1989-06-15

    From 1959 to 1986, 24 patients with primary malignant tumors of the trachea received radiotherapy as all or part of treatment. Common presentations included respiratory symptoms in 20 patients and hemoptysis in 15. Thirteen patients had squamous carcinomas with undifferentiated and adenoid cystic cancers in five and four patients, respectively. Overall actuarial survival was 45% at 1 year, 25% at 5 years, and 13% at 10 years. Survival was significantly correlated to histologic type (adenoid cystic versus squamous, P less than 0.03), but not to tumor extent or to patient age or sex. Local control was attained in 10 of 24 patients overall and was more frequent for patients with tumors localized to the trachea and for patients who were treated with combined surgery and radiotherapy. For the 18 patients treated with radiotherapy alone, complete response (CR) was seen to be significantly (P less than 0.001) related to dose: six of seven (86%) patients receiving greater than or equal to 6000 cGy attained CR versus one of 11 (9%) receiving less than 6000 cGy. Three patients developed complications related to radiotherapy. Radiotherapy can provide durable local control of localized tracheal tumors and should be considered for medically inoperable patients with localized tumors and for patients with high risk of recurrence after resection.

  20. Desmoid tumour. The risk of recurrent or new disease with subsequent pregnancy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Way, Jeffrey C.; Culham, Beverley A.

    1999-01-01

    Desmoid tumours are rare, benign tumours arising from fibrous tissue in muscle fascia or aponeurosis. They are most common in women of child-bearing age and most often appear during or after pregnancy in this age group. The recommended treatment is wide surgical excision, if possible, but unresectable tumours may be treated with radiotherapy, anticancer drugs, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents or antiestrogenic compounds. The recurrence rate is high and seems to be related to the achievement of resection margins free of tumour. The literature is not specific about how to counsel woment who have had a desmoid tumour and subsequently wish to have a child. Patients should be advised that these tumours may be estrogen sensitive but subsequent pregnancy is not necessarily a risk factor for recurrence or development of new disease. PMID:10071588

  1. Current trends in the management of extra-abdominal desmoid tumours

    PubMed Central

    Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis J; Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Mitsiokapa, Evanthia A; Papaparaskeva, Kleo Th; Galanis, Evanthia C; Soucacos, Panayotis N

    2006-01-01

    Extra-abdominal desmoid tumours are slow-growing, histologically benign tumours of fibroblastic origin with variable biologic behaviour. They are locally aggressive and invasive to surrounding anatomic structures. Magnetic resonance imaging is the modality of choice for the diagnosis and the evaluation of the tumours. Current management of desmoids involves a multidisciplinary approach. Wide margin surgical resection remains the main treatment modality for local control of the tumour. Amputation should not be the initial treatment, and function-preserving procedures should be the primary treatment goal. Adjuvant radiation therapy is recommended both for primary and recurrent lesions. Chemotherapy may be used for recurrent or unresectable disease. Overall local recurrence rates vary and depend on patient's age, tumour location and margins at resection. PMID:16584569

  2. Direct endothelial junction restoration results in significant tumor vascular normalization and metastasis inhibition in mice

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Vijayendra; Maharjan, Sony; Kim, Kyeojin; Kim, Nam-Jung; Son, Jimin; Lee, Keunho; Choi, Hyun-Jung; Rho, Seung-Sik; Ahn, Sunjoo; Won, Moo-Ho; Ha, Sang-Jun; Koh, Gou Young; Kim, Young-Myeong; Suh, Young-Ger; Kwon, Young-Guen

    2014-01-01

    Tumor blood vessels are leaky and immature, which causes inadequate blood supply to tumor tissues resulting in hypoxic microenvironment and promotes metastasis. Here we have explored tumor vessel modulating activity of Sac-1004, a recently developed molecule in our lab, which directly potentiates VE-cadherin-mediated endothelial cell junction. Sac-1004 could enhance vascular junction integrity in tumor vessels and thereby inhibit vascular leakage and enhance vascular perfusion. Improved perfusion enabled Sac-1004 to have synergistic anti-tumor effect on cisplatin-mediated apoptosis of tumor cells. Interestingly, characteristics of normalized blood vessels namely reduced hypoxia, improved pericyte coverage and decreased basement membrane thickness were readily observed in tumors treated with Sac-1004. Remarkably, Sac-1004 was also able to inhibit lung and lymph node metastasis in MMTV and B16BL6 tumor models. This was in correlation with a reduction in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition of tumor cells with considerable diminution in expression of related transcription factors. Moreover, cancer stem cell population dropped substantially in Sac-1004 treated tumor tissues. Taken together, our results showed that direct restoration of vascular junction could be a significant strategy to induce normalization of tumor blood vessels and reduce metastasis. PMID:24811731

  3. Direct endothelial junction restoration results in significant tumor vascular normalization and metastasis inhibition in mice.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Vijayendra; Maharjan, Sony; Kim, Kyeojin; Kim, Nam-Jung; Son, Jimin; Lee, Keunho; Choi, Hyun-Jung; Rho, Seung-Sik; Ahn, Sunjoo; Won, Moo-Ho; Ha, Sang-Jun; Koh, Gou Young; Kim, Young-Myeong; Suh, Young-Ger; Kwon, Young-Guen

    2014-05-15

    Tumor blood vessels are leaky and immature, which causes inadequate blood supply to tumor tissues resulting in hypoxic microenvironment and promotes metastasis. Here we have explored tumor vessel modulating activity of Sac-1004, a recently developed molecule in our lab, which directly potentiates VE-cadherin-mediated endothelial cell junction. Sac-1004 could enhance vascular junction integrity in tumor vessels and thereby inhibit vascular leakage and enhance vascular perfusion. Improved perfusion enabled Sac-1004 to have synergistic anti-tumor effect on cisplatin-mediated apoptosis of tumor cells. Interestingly, characteristics of normalized blood vessels namely reduced hypoxia, improved pericyte coverage and decreased basement membrane thickness were readily observed in tumors treated with Sac-1004. Remarkably, Sac-1004 was also able to inhibit lung and lymph node metastasis in MMTV and B16BL6 tumor models. This was in correlation with a reduction in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition of tumor cells with considerable diminution in expression of related transcription factors. Moreover, cancer stem cell population dropped substantially in Sac-1004 treated tumor tissues. Taken together, our results showed that direct restoration of vascular junction could be a significant strategy to induce normalization of tumor blood vessels and reduce metastasis. PMID:24811731

  4. Secretion of both IL-2 and IL-4 by tumor cells results in rejection and immunity.

    PubMed

    Strome, S E; Chang, A E; Shu, S; Krauss, J C

    1996-01-01

    The generation of a therapeutic immune response to malignancy is critically dependent on the inherent immunogenicity of the tumor. Our study demonstrates that secretion of both interleukin-2 (IL-2) and IL-4 by a seemingly nonimmunogenic tumor abrogates tumorigenicity, and mice that have rejected the genetically modified tumor are immune to challenges with the parental tumor. The induction of immunity by the IL-2/IL-4-secreting tumor was significantly better than that achieved with the admixture of tumor cells and the classic adjuvant, Corynebacterium parvum. To elicit a primary immune response, the majority of cells needed to secrete both cytokines. Ad-mixture of IL-2-secreting cells with IL-4-secreting cells did not result in tumor cell rejection. The IL-2/IL-4-secreting tumor cells were efficiently rejected in animals immunosuppressed by total body irradiation. Depletion of CD4+ or CD8+ T cells did not abrogate rejection of the tumor cells, but the animals depleted of CD4 cells failed to generate protective immunity. Our study demonstrates that secretion of the combination of IL-2 and IL-4 significantly enhances tumor immunogenicity. The requirement of cells secreting both cytokines suggests an intricate mechanism different from the mere presence of both cytokines at the tumor-inoculation site. PMID:9147701

  5. Image-Guided Percutaneous Ablation of Bone and Soft Tissue Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kurup, A. Nicholas; Callstrom, Matthew R.

    2010-01-01

    Image-guided percutaneous ablation of bone and soft tissue tumors is an effective minimally invasive alternative to conventional therapies, such as surgery and external beam radiotherapy. Proven applications include treatment of benign primary bone tumors, particularly osteoid osteoma, as well as palliation of painful bone metastases. Use of percutaneous ablation in combination with cementoplasty can provide stabilization of metastases at risk for fracture. Local control of oligometastatic disease and treatment of desmoid tumors are emerging applications. PMID:22550367

  6. Clinical Outcomes of Patients with Rare and Heavily Pretreated Solid Tumors Treated according to the Results of Tumor Molecular Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Hayden, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    Patients with heavily pretreated advanced cancer or with rare tumors are difficult to treat. Molecular profiling (MP) of tumors to identify biomarkers that predict potential outcomes with individual therapies is an emerging strategy to guide treatment decisions. Patients with rare tumors for which standard-of-care therapy was unavailable or more common tumors for which standard-of-care options had been exhausted underwent MP at a single Australian center. Data regarding treating physicians' choice of therapy, MP results and recommendations, and patient outcomes were collected. Seven patients had received prior standard first-line therapy (PST), 16 had rare tumors, and 31 had been heavily pretreated (HPT; ≥2 prior lines). Most treatments suggested by MP (541/594; 91.1%) were common chemotherapy drugs available in generic formulations. MP-guided therapy recommendations differed from physician's recommendations in 48 patients (88.9%). MP-guided therapy produced clinical benefit (improved QOL and/or performance status, symptoms, bodyweight, or RECIST) in 19/31 (61.3%), 11/16 (68.8%), and 3/7 (42.9%) patients with HPTs, rare tumors, and PSTs, respectively, and had a PFS ratio ≥1.3 in 22/37 evaluable patients (59.5%; 95% confidence interval 44–76%). The null hypothesis that ≤15% of these patients would have a PFS ratio ≥1.3 was rejected (one-sided p < 0.0001). In conclusion, using MP to guide therapy selection is feasible in clinical practice and may improve patient outcomes. PMID:27525268

  7. Clinical Outcomes of Patients with Rare and Heavily Pretreated Solid Tumors Treated according to the Results of Tumor Molecular Profiling.

    PubMed

    Dean, Andrew; Byrne, Aisling; Marinova, Mira; Hayden, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    Patients with heavily pretreated advanced cancer or with rare tumors are difficult to treat. Molecular profiling (MP) of tumors to identify biomarkers that predict potential outcomes with individual therapies is an emerging strategy to guide treatment decisions. Patients with rare tumors for which standard-of-care therapy was unavailable or more common tumors for which standard-of-care options had been exhausted underwent MP at a single Australian center. Data regarding treating physicians' choice of therapy, MP results and recommendations, and patient outcomes were collected. Seven patients had received prior standard first-line therapy (PST), 16 had rare tumors, and 31 had been heavily pretreated (HPT; ≥2 prior lines). Most treatments suggested by MP (541/594; 91.1%) were common chemotherapy drugs available in generic formulations. MP-guided therapy recommendations differed from physician's recommendations in 48 patients (88.9%). MP-guided therapy produced clinical benefit (improved QOL and/or performance status, symptoms, bodyweight, or RECIST) in 19/31 (61.3%), 11/16 (68.8%), and 3/7 (42.9%) patients with HPTs, rare tumors, and PSTs, respectively, and had a PFS ratio ≥1.3 in 22/37 evaluable patients (59.5%; 95% confidence interval 44-76%). The null hypothesis that ≤15% of these patients would have a PFS ratio ≥1.3 was rejected (one-sided p < 0.0001). In conclusion, using MP to guide therapy selection is feasible in clinical practice and may improve patient outcomes. PMID:27525268

  8. Diffusion-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in the Diagnosis of Bone Tumors: Preliminary Results

    PubMed Central

    Pekcevik, Yeliz; Kahya, Mehmet Onur; Kaya, Ahmet

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The study aims to determine whether apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) can help differentiate benign and malignant bone tumors. Materials and Methods: From January 2012 to February 2013, we prospectively included 26 patients. Of these 15 patients were male and 11 were female; ranging in age from 8 to 76 years (mean age, 34.5 years). Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was obtained with a single-shot echo-planar imaging sequence using a 1.5T MR scanner. We grouped malignant lesions as primary, secondary, and primary tumor with chondroid matrix. The minimum ADC was measured in the tumors and mean minimum ADC values were selected for statistical analysis. ADC values were compared between malignant and benign tumors using the Mann-Whitney U-test and receiver operating curve analysis were done to determine optimal cut-off values. Results: The mean ADC values from the area with lowest ADC values of benign and malignant tumors were 1.99 ± 0.57 × 10−3 mm2/s and 1.02 ± 1.0 × 10−3 mm2/s, respectively. The mean minimum ADC values of benign and malignant tumors were statistically different (P = 0.029). With cut-off value of 1.37 (10−3 mm2/s), sensitivity was 77.8% and specificity was 82.4%, for distinguishing benign and malignant lesion. Benign and secondary malignant tumors showed statistically significant difference (P = 0.002). There was some overlap in ADC values between benign and malignant tumors. The mean minimum ADC values of benign and malignant chondroid tumors were high. Giant cell tumor, non-ossifying fibroma and fibrous dysplasia showed lower ADC values. Conclusion: Although there is some overlap, ADC values of benign and malignant bone tumors seem to be different. Further studies with larger patient groups are needed to find an optimal cut-off ADC value. PMID:24605258

  9. A chemical energy approach of avascular tumor growth: multiscale modeling and qualitative results.

    PubMed

    Ampatzoglou, Pantelis; Dassios, George; Hadjinicolaou, Maria; Kourea, Helen P; Vrahatis, Michael N

    2015-01-01

    In the present manuscript we propose a lattice free multiscale model for avascular tumor growth that takes into account the biochemical environment, mitosis, necrosis, cellular signaling and cellular mechanics. This model extends analogous approaches by assuming a function that incorporates the biochemical energy level of the tumor cells and a mechanism that simulates the behavior of cancer stem cells. Numerical simulations of the model are used to investigate the morphology of the tumor at the avascular phase. The obtained results show similar characteristics with those observed in clinical data in the case of the Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS) of the breast. PMID:26558163

  10. Radioimmunotherapy with radioactive nanoparticles: First results of dosimetry for vascularized and necrosed solid tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchat, V.; Nuttens, V. E.; Lucas, S.; Michiels, C.; Masereel, B.; Feron, O.; Gallez, B.; Borght, T. Vander

    2007-11-15

    Radioimmunotherapy uses monoclonal antibodies that are still labeled with only one radioactive atom. The aim of this paper is to assess, by means of MCNPX simulations, the doses delivered around and throughout a solid tumor when the radioactive atom linked to each antibody is replaced by a 5 nm diameter nanoparticle composed of numerous radionuclides. A new model for a spherical vascularized tumor has been developed in which the antibody distributions inside the tumor can be uniform or heterogeneous. It is also possible to simulate a central necrotic core inside the tumor where the concentration of radiolabeled antibodies is assumed to be zero. Dosimetry calculations have been performed for the beta-emitting radionuclide {sup 90}Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Preliminary results show that the irregularity of vasculature and the presence of a necrotic core have a noticeable influence on the deposited dose profiles. Moreover, with a total activity of 5 and 34 MBq for tumor radii of 0.5 and 1.0 cm, respectively, viable tumor cells can receive doses of up to 50 Gy, even if high nonuniformity of the total activity is observed in the tumor. These simulations still require accurate information about antibody characteristics and necrosis sizes but clearly confirm that the use of monoclonal antibodies conjugated to nanoparticles could lead to a considerable enhancement of treatment efficacy against cancer.

  11. Tumor immunization. Improved results after vaccine modified with recombinant interferon gamma.

    PubMed

    Sigal, R K; Lieberman, M D; Reynolds, J V; Williams, N; Ziegler, M M; Daly, J M

    1990-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if a 3-day in vitro culture of the murine neuroblastoma C1300 with 500 U/mL of recombinant interferon gamma resulted in a protective crossreactivity to parent C1300. Twenty A/J mice received either a vaccine of 1 x 10(6) irradiated C1300 tumor cells intradermally or an equivalent inoculum of C1300 that had been incubated in recombinant interferon gamma (C1300*). One week later, all animals were rechallenged with 1 x 10(6) viable C1300. Animals immunized with C1300* had a significantly delayed early tumor incidence that translated into a survival advantage for the group. At the time of tumor rechallenge, a significantly increased level of nonspecific systemic immunity was conferred by the C1300* immunization. Thus, modification of tumor with recombinant interferon gamma before introduction as a vaccine may improve that vaccine's protective capability.

  12. Endoscopic Ultrasonography-Guided Ethanol Ablation for Small Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors: Results of a Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Oh, Dongwook; Lee, Sang Soo; Seo, Dong-Wan; Lee, Sung Koo; Kim, Myung-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS)-guided ethanol ablation is gaining popularity for the treatment of focal pancreatic lesions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety, feasibility, and treatment response after EUS-guided ethanol injection for small pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (p-NETs). Methods This was a retrospective analysis of a prospectively collected database including 11 consecutive patients with p-NETs who underwent EUS-guided ethanol injection. Results EUS-guided ethanol injection was successfully performed in 11 patients with 14 tumors. The final diagnosis was based on histology and clinical signs as follows: 10 non-functioning neuroendocrine tumors and four insulinomas. During follow-up (median, 370 days; range, 152 to 730 days), 10 patients underwent clinical follow-up after treatment, and one patient was excluded because of loss to follow-up. A single treatment session with an injection of 0.5 to 3.8 mL of ethanol resulted in complete responses (CRs) at the 3-month radiologic imaging for seven of 13 tumors (response rate, 53.8%). Multiple treatment sessions performed in three tumors with residual viable enhancing tissue increased the number of tumors with CRs to eight of 13 (response rate, 61.5%). Mild pancreatitis occurred in three of 11 patients. Conclusions EUS-guided ethanol injection appears to be a safe, feasible, and potentially effective method for treating small p-NETs in patients who are poor surgical candidates. PMID:25844345

  13. TNF Neutralization Results in the Delay of Transplantable Tumor Growth and Reduced MDSC Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Atretkhany, Kamar-Sulu N.; Nosenko, Maxim A.; Gogoleva, Violetta S.; Zvartsev, Ruslan V.; Qin, Zhihai; Nedospasov, Sergei A.; Drutskaya, Marina S.

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) represent a heterogeneous population of immature myeloid cells (IMCs) that, under normal conditions, may differentiate into mature macrophages, granulocytes, and dendritic cells. However, under pathological conditions associated with inflammation, cancer, or infection, such differentiation is inhibited leading to IMC expansion. Under the influence of inflammatory cytokines, these cells become MDSCs, acquire immunosuppressive phenotype, and accumulate in the affected tissue, as well as in the periphery. Immune suppressive activity of MDSCs is partly due to upregulation of arginase 1, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-10 and TGF-β. These suppressive factors can enhance tumor growth by repressing T-cell-mediated anti-tumor responses. TNF is a critical factor for the induction, expansion, and suppressive activity of MDSCs. In this study, we evaluated the effects of systemic TNF ablation on tumor-induced expansion of MDSCs in vivo using TNF humanized (hTNF KI) mice. Both etanercept and infliximab treatments resulted in a delayed growth of MCA 205 fibrosarcoma in hTNF KI mice, significantly reduced tumor volume, and also resulted in less accumulated MDSCs in the blood 3 weeks after tumor cell inoculation. Thus, our study uncovers anti-tumor effects of systemic TNF ablation in vivo. PMID:27148266

  14. Evaluation of the results of surgery treatment in patients with benign lung tumors

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri, Reza; Haghi, Seyed Ziaollah; Dalouee, Marziyeh Nouri; Nasiri, Zakiyeh; Rajabnejad, Ata’ollah

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lung tumors are among the common tumors and can be benign or malignant. Benign lung tumors are less common compared to the malignant types. Recognition of the clinical symptoms, types of tumors, paraclinical findings, and treatment approaches can bring better therapeutic results. The present study aims to evaluate the characteristics, diagnosis methods, and therapeutic approaches of different benign lung tumors. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, 32 patients with a diagnosis of benign lung tumor, who had been referred to the Mashhad University of Medical Sciences between 1981 and 2009, were studied. Some of the studied variables were symptoms, the pulmonary location involved, surgery technique, pathology findings, recurrence, and surgery complications. Data were analyzed by SPSS package version 16. Results: The average age of the patients was 51.69 ± 20.5 years. Prevalence of benign lung tumors was equal in both genders. The most common symptom was cough (31.2%); right lung involvement was more common (71.9%), and the most common sampling technique was transbronchial lung biopsy (TBLB) (62.5%); 53.1% of the patients were operated on by thoracotomy and the wedge resection technique. In 78.1% of the patients, no complications occurred after surgery. There was no recurrence. Most operations were performed in one month after the start of the symptoms (68.8%). Conclusions: Benign lung tumors are commonly diagnosed by routine radiography because most of them are asymptomatic. The most common finding in radiography is the presence of mass in the lungs. Transbronchial lung biopsy is a valuable technique to be used for diagnosis. We chose thoracotomy and wedge resection for the treatment of patients. We recommend this approach as a useful method. PMID:25624593

  15. A gene expression signature that distinguishes desmoid tumours from nodular fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Bacac, M; Migliavacca, E; Stehle, J-C; McKee, T; Delorenzi, M; Coindre, J-M; Guillou, L; Stamenkovic, I

    2006-03-01

    Nodular fasciitis (NF) is a rapidly growing cellular mass composed of fibroblasts/myofibroblasts, usually localized in subcutaneous tissues, that typically undergoes fibrosis and almost never recurs. Desmoid tumours (DTs) are rare forms of fibroblastic/myofibroblastic growth that arise in deep soft tissues, display a propensity for local infiltration and recurrence, but fail to metastasize. Given that both entities are primarily fibroblastic/myofibroblastic lesions with overlapping histological features, their gene expression profiles were compared to identify differentially expressed genes that may provide not only potential diagnostic markers, but also clues as to the pathogenesis of each disorder. Differentially expressed transcripts (89 clones displaying increased expression in DTs and 246 clones displaying increased expression in NF) included genes encoding several receptor and non-receptor tyrosine kinases (EPHB3, PTPRF, GNAZ, SYK, LYN, EPHA4, BIRC3), transcription factors (TWIST1, PITX2, EYA2, OAS1, MITF, TCF20), and members of the Wnt signalling pathway (AXIN2, WISP1, SFRP). Remarkably, almost one-quarter of the differentially expressed genes encode proteins associated with inflammation and tissue remodelling, including members of the interferon (IFN), tumour necrosis factor (TNF), and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) signalling pathways as well as metalloproteinases (MMP1, 9, 13, 23), urokinase plasminogen activator (PLAU), and cathepsins. The observations provide the first comparative molecular characterization of desmoid tumours and nodular fasciitis and suggest that selected tyrosine kinases, transcription factors, and members of the Wnt, TGF-beta, IFN, and TNF signalling pathways may be implicated in influencing and distinguishing their fate. PMID:16440290

  16. Next-generation sequencing is highly sensitive for the detection of beta-catenin mutations in desmoid-type fibromatoses.

    PubMed

    Aitken, Sarah J; Presneau, Nadège; Kalimuthu, Sangeetha; Dileo, Palma; Berisha, Fitim; Tirabosco, Roberto; Amary, M Fernanda; Flanagan, Adrienne M

    2015-08-01

    Desmoid-type fibromatoses are locally aggressive and frequently recurrent tumours, and an accurate diagnosis is essential for patient management. The majority of sporadic lesions harbour beta-catenin (CTNNB1) mutations. We used next-generation sequencing to detect CTNNB1 mutations and to compare the sensitivity and specificity of next-generation sequencing with currently employed mutation detection techniques: mutation-specific restriction enzyme digestion and polymerase chain reaction amplification. DNA was extracted from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded needle biopsy or resection tissue sections from 144 patients with sporadic desmoid-type fibromatoses, four patients with syndrome-related desmoid-type fibromatoses and 11 morphological mimics. Two primer pairs were designed for CTNNB1 mutation hotspots. Using ≥10 ng of DNA, libraries were generated by Fluidigm and sequenced on the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine. Next-generation sequencing had a sensitivity of 92.36 % (133/144, 95 % CIs: 86.74 to 96.12 %) and a specificity of 100 % for the detection of CTNNB1 mutations in desmoid-type fibromatoses-like spindle cell lesions. All mutations detected by mutation-specific restriction enzyme digestion were identified by next-generation sequencing. Next-generation sequencing identified additional mutations in 11 tumours that were not detected by mutation-specific restriction enzyme digestion, two of which have not been previously described. Next-generation sequencing is highly sensitive for the detection of CTNNB1 mutations. This multiplex assay has the advantage of detecting additional mutations compared to those detected by mutation-specific restriction enzyme digestion (sensitivity 82.41 %). The technology requires minimal DNA and is time- and cost-efficient.

  17. Treatment of esophageal tumors using high intensity intraluminal ultrasound: first clinical results

    PubMed Central

    Melodelima, David; Prat, Frederic; Fritsch, Jacques; Theillere, Yves; Cathignol, Dominique

    2008-01-01

    Background Esophageal tumors generally bear a poor prognosis. Radical surgery is generally the only curative method available but is not feasible in the majority of patients; palliative therapy with stent placement is generally performed. It has been demonstrated that High Intensity Ultrasound can induce rapid, complete and well-defined coagulation necrosis. Thus, for the treatment of esophageal tumors, we have designed an ultrasound applicator that uses an intraluminal approach to fill up this therapeutic gap. Methods Thermal ablation is performed with water-cooled ultrasound transducers operating at a frequency of 10 MHz. Single lesions extend from the transducer surface up to 10 mm in depth when applying an intensity of 14 W/cm2 for 10s. A lumen inside the therapy applicator provides path for an endoscopic ultrasound imaging probe operating at a frequency of 12 MHz. The mechanical rotation of the applicator around its axis enables treatment of sectorial or cylindrical volumes. This method is thus particularly suitable for esophageal tumors that may develop only on a portion of the esophageal circumference. Previous experiments were conducted from bench to in vivo studies on pig esophagi. Results Here we report clinical results obtained on four patients included in a pilot study. The treatment of esophageal tumors was performed under fluoroscopic guidance and ultrasound imaging. Objective tumor response was obtained in all cases and a complete necrosis of a tumor was obtained in one case. All patients recovered uneventfully and dysphagia improved significantly within 15 days, allowing for resuming a solid diet in three cases. Conclusion This clinical work demonstrated the efficacy of intraluminal high intensity ultrasound therapy for local tumor destruction in the esophagus. PMID:18533990

  18. Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... plants (aflatoxins) Excessive sunlight exposure Genetic problems Obesity Radiation exposure Viruses Types of tumors known to be caused by viruses are: Cervical cancer (human papillomavirus) Hepatocellular carcinoma (hepatitis B and hepatitis C ...

  19. Non-lethal heat treatment of cells results in reduction of tumor initiation and metastatic potential

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yoo-Shin; Lee, Tae Hoon; O'Neill, Brian E.

    2015-08-14

    Non-lethal hyperthermia is used clinically as adjuvant treatment to radiation, with mixed results. Denaturation of protein during hyperthermia treatment is expected to synergize with radiation damage to cause cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Alternatively, hyperthermia is known to cause tissue level changes in blood flow, increasing the oxygenation and radiosensitivity of often hypoxic tumors. In this study, we elucidate a third possibility, that hyperthermia alters cellular adhesion and mechanotransduction, with particular impact on the cancer stem cell population. We demonstrate that cell heating results in a robust but temporary loss of cancer cell aggressiveness and metastatic potential in mouse models. In vitro, this heating results in a temporary loss in cell mobility, adhesion, and proliferation. Our hypothesis is that the loss of cellular adhesion results in suppression of cancer stem cells and loss of tumor virulence and metastatic potential. Our study suggests that the metastatic potential of cancer is particularly reduced by the effects of heat on cellular adhesion and mechanotransduction. If true, this could help explain both the successes and failures of clinical hyperthermia, and suggest ways to target treatments to those who would most benefit. - Highlights: • Non-lethal hyperthermia treatment of cancer cells is shown to cause a reduction in rates of tumor initiation and metastasis. • Dynamic imaging of cells during heat treatment shows temporary changes in cell shape, cell migration, and cell proliferation. • Loss of adhesion may lead to the observed effect, which may disproportionately impact the tumor initiating cell fraction. • Loss or suppression of the tumor initiating cell fraction results in the observed loss of metastatic potential in vivo. • This result may lead to new approaches to synergizing hyperthermia with surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy.

  20. Silencing of Doublecortin-Like (DCL) Results in Decreased Mitochondrial Activity and Delayed Neuroblastoma Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Verissimo, Carla S.; Elands, Rachel; Cheng, Sou; Saaltink, Dirk-Jan; ter Horst, Judith P.; Alme, Maria N.; Pont, Chantal; van de Water, Bob; Håvik, Bjarte; Fitzsimons, Carlos P.; Vreugdenhil, Erno

    2013-01-01

    Doublecortin-like (DCL) is a microtubule-binding protein crucial for neuroblastoma (NB) cell proliferation. We have investigated whether the anti-proliferative effect of DCL knockdown is linked to reduced mitochondrial activity. We found a delay in tumor development after DCL knockdown in vivo in doxycycline-inducible NB tumor xenografts. To understand the mechanisms underlying this tumor growth retardation we performed a series of in vitro experiments in NB cell lines. DCL colocalizes with mitochondria, interacts with the mitochondrial outer membrane protein OMP25/ SYNJ2BP and DCL knockdown results in decreased expression of genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation. Moreover, DCL knockdown decreases cytochrome c oxidase activity and ATP synthesis. We identified the C-terminal Serine/Proline-rich domain and the second microtubule-binding area as crucial DCL domains for the regulation of cytochrome c oxidase activity and ATP synthesis. Furthermore, DCL knockdown causes a significant reduction in the proliferation rate of NB cells under an energetic challenge induced by low glucose availability. Together with our previous studies, our results corroborate DCL as a key player in NB tumor growth in which DCL controls not only mitotic spindle formation and the stabilization of the microtubule cytoskeleton, but also regulates mitochondrial activity and energy availability, which makes DCL a promising molecular target for NB therapy. PMID:24086625

  1. Total enbloc spondylectomy for metastatic high grade spinal tumors: Early results

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Sanganagouda S; Nene, Abhay M

    2016-01-01

    Background: High grade metastatic spinal tumors are most common and are invasive. These patients can succumb to disease progression if not treated timely. Although considered as invasive and morbid, total enbloc spondylectomy (TES) in selected cases has better survival rates. The authors describe the results of TES for high grade metastatic spinal tumors. Materials and Methods: Five patients (four females and one male) underwent TES for solitary metastatic vertebral lesion between November 2012 and January 2014. These patients presented to us with spinal instability, unrelenting severe spinal pain and/or with severe progressive radiculopathy. Average age was 46.2 years (range 39–62 years). After complete investigations, computed tomography scan, magnetic resonance imaging scan and positron emission tomography (PET) scan, it was confirmed that these patients had high grade solitary vertebral metastatic tumor. Results: Average duration of followup was 18 months (range 16–20 months). The average preoperative visual analog scale score of 9.4 (range 9–10) improved to 2 (range 1–4) at last followup. Average blood loss was 1440 mL (range 1000–2000 mL). Average duration of surgery was 198 min (range 180–240 min). Significant pain relief was noticed in each patient in the immediate postoperative period and during followups. These patients attained complete functional activities of daily living with in a month. The imaging showed implants in situ, no recurrence of tumor, and no activity on PET scan at the final followup. Conclusion: The present series shows favorable short term results of TES for solitary, metastatic, high grade vertebral body tumors by a team approach. PMID:27512215

  2. Loss of Sparc in p53-null Astrocytes Promotes Macrophage Activation and Phagocytosis Resulting in Decreased Tumor Size and Tumor Cell Survival.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Stacey L; Schultz, Chad R; Mouzon, Ezekiell; Golembieski, William A; El Naili, Reima; Radakrishnan, Archanna; Lemke, Nancy; Poisson, Laila M; Gutiérrez, Jorge A; Cottingham, Sandra; Rempel, Sandra A

    2015-07-01

    Both the induction of SPARC expression and the loss of the p53 tumor suppressor gene are changes that occur early in glioma development. Both SPARC and p53 regulate glioma cell survival by inverse effects on apoptotic signaling. Therefore, during glioma formation, the upregulation of SPARC may cooperate with the loss of p53 to enhance cell survival. This study determined whether the loss of Sparc in astrocytes that are null for p53 would result in reduced cell survival and tumor formation and increased tumor immunogenicity in an in vivo xenograft brain tumor model. In vitro, the loss of Sparc in p53-null astrocytes resulted in an increase in cell proliferation, but a loss of tumorigenicity. At 7 days after intracranial implantation, Sparc-null tumors had decreased tumor cell survival, proliferation and reduced tumor size. The loss of Sparc promoted microglia/macrophage activation and phagocytosis of tumor cells. Our results indicate that the loss of p53 by deletion/mutation in the early stages of glioma formation may cooperate with the induction of SPARC to potentiate cancer cell survival and escape from immune surveillance.

  3. Obstructive hydrocephalus as a result of giant cell tumor of the thoracic spine: A case report

    PubMed Central

    WEI, CHENG-YU; CHEN, SHUO-TSUNG; TAI, HSU-CHIH; WANG, WEN-BING; CHANG, CHI-CHU; WANG, YAO-CHIN; WEI, LI; KUNG, WOON-MAN

    2016-01-01

    Giant cell tumors (GCTs) are rare bone tumors that account for ~5% of all primary bone tumors. When GCTs occur in the spine, patients usually present with localized pain and neurological symptoms, such as radiating pain or hyperesthesia. In the current report, an unusual case of a GCT of the thoracic spine associated with hydrocephalus is described. A 48-year-old male presented with urinary retention, loss of sensation in the lower limbs and inability to walk. The patient eventually developed hydrocephalus combined with altered consciousness, indicated by an inability to follow simple commands. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging demonstrated the presence of a soft tissue mass at the T2 level, and biopsy examination of the tissue confirmed that it was a GCT. The patient experienced a sudden loss of consciousness due to an acute episode of obstructive hydrocephalus. A ventriculoperitoneal shunting procedure was performed to treat the hydrocephalus, and the patient regained normal consciousness, although the paraplegia persisted. An MR examination performed 30 months following surgery demonstrated that the tumor size was stable, consistent with the slow growth that is characteristic of GCTs. Diagnosis of GCTs may be challenging, and relies on radiographic and histopathologic findings. Although rare, acute hydrocephalus as a result of GCTs should not be excluded from a differential diagnosis. PMID:26870164

  4. Establishment and Results of a Magnetic Resonance Quality Assurance Program for the Pediatric Brain Tumor Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Mulkern, Robert V.; Forbes, Peter; Dewey, Kevin; Osganian, Stravoula; Clark, Maureen; Wong, Sharon; Ramamurthy, Uma; Kun, Larry; Poussaint, Tina Young

    2008-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives: Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is used to assess brain tumor response to therapies and a MR quality assurance program is necessary for multicenter clinical trials employing imaging. This study was performed to determine overall variability of quantitative image metrics measured with the American College of Radiology (ACR) phantom among 11 sites participating in the Pediatric Brain Tumor Consortium (PBTC) Neuroimaging Center (NIC) MR quality assurance (MR QA) program. Materials and Methods An MR QA program was implemented among 11 participating PBTC sites and quarterly evaluations of scanner performance for seven imaging metrics defined by the ACR were sought and subject to statistical evaluation over a 4.5 year period. Overall compliance with the QA program, means, standard deviations and coefficients of variation (CV) for the quantitative imaging metrics were evaluated. Results Quantitative measures of the seven imaging metrics were generally within ACR recommended guidelines for all sites. Compliance improved as the study progressed. Inter-site variabilities as gauged by coefficients of variation (CV) for slice thickness and geometric accuracy, imaging parameters that influence size and/or positioning measurements in tumor studies, were on the order of 10 % and 1% respectively. Conclusion Although challenging to establish, MR QA programs within the context of PBTC multi-site clinical trials when based on the ACR MR phantom program can a) indicate sites performing below acceptable image quality levels and b) establish levels of precision through instrumental variabilities that are relevant to quantitative image analyses, e.g. tumor volume changes. PMID:18692750

  5. Influence of preharvest tumor cell contamination in bone marrow or blood does not predict resultant tumor cell contamination of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor mobilized stem cells.

    PubMed

    Krüger, W; Kröger, N; Tögel, F; Badbaran, A; Renges, H; Gieseking, F; Gutensohn, K; Jänicke, F; Zander, A R

    2001-04-01

    Tumor cell contamination of stem cell collections harvested from breast cancer patients is a common phenomenon described by several investigators but with findings that vary among reports. Although so-called co-mobilization of these cells has been hypothesized, the origin of tumor cell contamination in stem cells is still unknown. A total of 47 G-CSF mobilized stem cell grafts from patients with nodal-positive (n = 30), chemosensitive metastatic (n = 11), and 5 women with inflammatory breast cancer were evaluated for cancer cells by immunocytochemistry. Additionally, 40 bone marrow aspirations and 23 peripheral blood samples collected prior to apheresis and after one to two cycles of conventional chemotherapy were available for examination. Tumor cell contamination of leukapheresis correlated best with preharvest blood state. This was valid when the nominal (positive/negative) presence of tumor cells in blood was compared to the nominal presence of tumor cells in apheresis samples and when the it was correlated to the tumor cell load of apheresis samples (TCL = tumor cells per 10(6) nucleated cells investigated). The correlation between blood and stem cells was better (nominal and quantitative) than that between marrow and stem cells, despite the larger sample size of marrow aspirations. The presence or absence of cancer cells in apheresis samples could not be safely predicted by the presence or absence of tumor cells in marrow or blood alone. Diagnostic specificity seems to improve from a combination of results from marrow and blood analysis. No correlation was found in quantitative analysis of tumor cell contamination between marrow and blood. In conclusion, the results suggest that blood and bone marrow represent different compartments for epithelial cancer cells and that contaminating tumor cells in stem cell harvests may be derived from the blood and/or marrow compartment. The tumor cell contamination of a stem cell harvest cannot be safely predicted by a

  6. [Possibilities for inhibiting tumor-induced angiogenesis: results with multi-target tyrosine kinase inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Török, Szilvia; Döme, Balázs

    2012-03-01

    Functional blood vasculature is essential for tumor progression. The main signalization pathways that play a key role in the survival and growth of tumor vessels originate from the VEGF-, PDGF- and FGF tyrosine kinase receptors. In the past decade, significant results have been published on receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (RTKIs). In this paper, the mechanisms of action and the results so far available of experimental and clinical studies on multi-target antiangiogenic TKIs are discussed. On the one hand, notable achievements have been made recently and these drugs are already used in clinical practice in some patient populations. On the other hand, the optimal combination and dosage of these drugs, selection of the apropriate biomarker and better understanding of the conflicting role of PDGFR and FGFR signaling in angiogenesis remain future challenges. PMID:22403757

  7. Results of fast neutron teletherapy for locally advanced head and neck tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Battermann, J.J.; Breur, K.

    1981-08-01

    An analysis is given of the results of fast neutron therapy for locally advanced tumors of the head and neck region. All patients were treated five times per week with a 14 MeV d + T neutron beam and received dosages of about 19 Gy/sub ntumors were treated in this pilot study, the survival time is rather short for most patients. Only 8 patients are alive at the time of writing. The results of treatment for inoperable malignancies of the major salivary glands are very promising, as initial complete regression was achieved in over 90% (12/13).

  8. Surveillance Strategies for Sarcoma: Results of a Survey of Members of the Musculoskeletal Tumor Society

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background. Surveillance is crucial to oncology, yet there is scant evidence to guide strategies. Purpose. This survey identified sarcoma surveillance strategies for Musculoskeletal Tumor Society (MSTS) members and rationales behind them. Understanding current practice should facilitate studies to generate evidence-based surveillance protocols. Methods. Permission was granted by the Research and Executive Committee of the MSTS to survey members on surveillance strategies. First, the questionnaire requested demographic and clinical practice information. Second, the survey focused on clinicians' specific surveillance soft tissue and bone sarcoma protocols. Results. 20 percent of MSTS members completed the survey. The primary rationale for protocols was training continuation, followed by published guidelines, and finally personal interpretation of the literature. 95% of the respondents believe that additional studies regarding appropriate surveillance protocols are needed. 87% reported patient concerns regarding radiation exposure from surveillance imaging. For soft tissue and bone sarcoma local recurrence, responders identified surgical margin, histologic grade, and tumor size as the most important factors. For metastases, important risk factors identified included histologic grade, tumor size, and histologic type. Protocols demonstrated wide variation. Conclusion. This survey demonstrates that surveillance strategies utilized by MSTS members are not evidence-based, providing rationale for multi-institutional studies. It also confirms the public health issue of excessive radiation exposure. PMID:27478404

  9. Results of d+T fast neutron irradiation on advanced tumors of bladder and rectum

    SciTech Connect

    Battermann, J.J.

    1982-12-01

    From November, 1975 to November, 1981, around 400 patients were irradiated with 14 MeV d+T fast neutrons at the Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital in Amsterdam. Special interest was focused on inoperable tumors of bladder and rectum. During the pilot phase of the study 47 patients were treated, mostly via two parallel opposed ports with dosages that ranged from 18 to more than 22 Gy. Although persistent local control was achieved in 23 patients (48%), 14 patients (29%) died of severe complications. By the introduction of a six field technique, the fatal complication rate could be reduced significantly. Since May 1978 patients were randomized in a three arm trial, using two dose levels on the neutron site. The preliminary results of a group of 91 patients show a similar survival in the three treatment arms with a somewhat better local control rate for high dose neutrons. An attempt was made to estimate RBE values for tumor control and normal tissue reactions by comparing the data for neutron irradiation with the data obtained with photons on a similar group of patients. From the values derived it must be concluded that the gain for neutron irradiation on these tumors in the pelvis will be negligible.

  10. Results of d+T fast neutron irradiation on advanced tumors of bladder and rectum

    SciTech Connect

    Battermann, J.J.

    1982-12-01

    From November, 1975 to November, 1981, around 400 patients were irradiated with 14 MeV d+T fast neutrons at the Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital in Amsterdam. Special interest was focused on inoperable tumors of bladder and rectum. During the pilot phase of the study 47 patients were treated, mostly via two parallel opposed ports with dosages that ranged from 18 to more than 22 Gy. Although persistent local control was achieved in 23 patients (48%), 14 patients (29%) died of severe complications. By the introduction of a six field technique, the fatal complication rate could be reduced significantly. Since May 1978 patients were randomized in a three arm trial, using two dose levels on the neutron site. The preliminary results of a group of 91 patients show a similar survival in the three treatment arms with a somewhat better local control rate for high dose neutrons. An attempt was made to estimate RBE values for tumor control and normal tissue reaction by comparing the data for neutron irradiation with the data obtained with photons on a similar group of patients. From the values derived it must be concluded that the gain for neutron irradiation on these tumors in the pelvis will be negligible.

  11. Implementation and experimental results of 4D tumor tracking using robotic couch

    PubMed Central

    Buzurovic, I.; Yu, Y.; Werner-Wasik, M.; Biswas, T.; Anne, P. R.; Dicker, A. P.; Podder, T. K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This study presents the implementation and experimental results of a novel technique for 4D tumor tracking using a commercially available and commonly used treatment couch and evaluates the tumor tracking accuracy in clinical settings. Methods: Commercially available couch is capable of positioning the patient accurately; however, currently there is no provision for compensating physiological movement using the treatment couch in real-time. In this paper, a real-time couch tracking control technique is presented together with experimental results in tumor motion compensation in four dimensions (superior-inferior, lateral, anterior-posterior, and time). To implement real-time couch motion for tracking, a novel control system for the treatment couch was developed. The primary functional requirements for this novel technique were: (a) the treatment couch should maintain all previous/normal features for patient setup and positioning, (b) the new control system should be used as a parallel system when tumor tracking would be deployed, and (c) tracking could be performed in a single direction and/or concurrently in all three directions of the couch motion (longitudinal, lateral, and vertical). To the authors’ best knowledge, the implementation of such technique to a regular treatment couch for tumor tracking has not been reported so far. To evaluate the performance of the tracking couch, we investigated the mechanical characteristics of the system such as system positioning resolution, repeatability, accuracy, and tracking performance. Performance of the tracking system was evaluated using dosimetric test as an endpoint. To investigate the accuracy of real-time tracking in the clinical setting, the existing clinical treatment couch was replaced with our experimental couch and the linear accelerator was used to deliver 3D conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plans with and without tracking. The results

  12. French brain tumor data bank: methodology and first results on 10,000 cases.

    PubMed

    Bauchet, Luc; Rigau, Valérie; Mathieu-Daudé, Hélène; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Hugues, Delphine; Palusseau, Loreleï; Bauchet, Fabienne; Fabbro, Michel; Campello, Chantal; Capelle, Laurent; Durand, Anne; Trétarre, Brigitte; Frappaz, Didier; Henin, Dominique; Menei, Philippe; Honnorat, Jérome; Segnarbieux, François

    2007-09-01

    This work aims to prospectively record all primary central nervous system tumors (PCNST), in France, for which histological diagnosis is available. The objectives are to create a national registry and a network to perform epidemiological studies, to implement clinical and basic research protocols, and to harmonize the healthcare of patients affected by PCNST. Following a feasibility study, including an estimate of the gross incidence of PCNST (15.8/100,000 person-years) in France, all French neuropathology and neurosurgery departments decided to participate in the program. For each patient, the neurosurgeon and the neuropathologist complete a data file containing socio-demographic, clinical, radiologic and anatomopathologic information. The Tumor Registry from Herault is authorized to compile the data files with personal identifiers. In 2.5 years, 10,093 cases of newly diagnosed PCNST have been recorded. Tumor resections were performed in 75.3%, while biopsies accounted for 24.7%. Histological diagnoses included glioma (49.6%), other neuroepithelial tumors (3.8%), meningioma (30.9%), neurinoma (8.7%), lymphoma (2.9%) and others (4.1%). Cryopreservation was reported for 2,261 PCNST specimens. Clinical and radiological aspects were also recorded. Preliminary results are encouraging and stimulating for the long-term goal of creating a National Registry and a National Network for patients affected by PCNST. To our knowledge, this is the first European databank dedicated to PCNST, with collection of clinical, radiological and histological data (including cryopreservation of the specimen). The creation of this registry and this database may have major clinical and fundamental implications. PMID:17431547

  13. Treatment of Giant Fibroadenoma in Young Women: Results after Tumor Excision without Reconstructive Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hille-Betz, U.; Klapdor, R.; Henseler, H.; Soergel, P.; Länger, F.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Giant fibroadenoma (GFA) of the breast is defined as fibroadenoma larger than 5 cm, usually presenting unilaterally and manifesting as breast asymmetry or deformity of the breast. Material and Methods: A retrospective database search was done of all patients with giant fibroadenoma who underwent surgery for GFA in the breast center of Hanover Medical School between 2007 and 2014; all patients with GFA were followed up. Data were analyzed with regard to tumor and patient characteristics and esthetic outcome. Results: A total of 13 patients with symptomatic GFA underwent surgery between 2007 and 2014. Mean patient age was 21.2 years (range 14–31 years). In 8 of 13 patients the tumor had resulted in breast deformity and/or breast asymmetry. Average size of the mass was 10.2 cm (range 8.5–12 cm) and average weight was 203.6 g (range 151.2–323.5 g). Initial clinical suspicion of GFA was confirmed by ultrasound examination. Preoperative core biopsy revealed fibroadenoma in 8/13 cases, cellular fibroepithelial lesions with a differential diagnosis of benign phyllodes tumor in 3 cases and unspecific histological findings in the remaining 2 cases. Conclusion: Excision was done using an inframammary or periareolar approach without reconstructive plasty. The cosmetic results were good, as were the outcomes on follow-up. We therefore favor this surgical technique to treat giant fibroadenoma of similar size to those described above. PMID:26500369

  14. Preliminary oncological results of endosopic laser surgery in advanced head and neck tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker-Schreyer, Antonio; Sadick, Haneen; Juncker, Cathrine; Bergler, Wolfgang; Hoermann, Karl

    1998-01-01

    Lasersurgery has established itself in the treatment of minor tumors (T1 - T2) of the upper aerodigestive tract. However, advanced carcinomas of the head and neck (T3 - T4) are generally treated with conventional surgical procedures which include pharyngolaryngectomy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the oncological outcome of endoscopic lasersurgery in advanced head and neck tumors and to compare the results with conventional surgical procedures. Between January 1994 to December 1996, 86 patients with advanced squamous cell carcinomas of the larynx and hypopharynx underwent endoscopic lasersurgery instead of pharyngolaryngectomy as a curative measure. Besides the recurrence and survival rate, the necessity of tracheostomy, postoperative complications and the mean duration of hospitalization were documented. The results showed that the recurrence and survival rate were similar or even better after conventional pharyngolaryngectomy, whereas the patients' postoperative rehabilitation was better after lasersurgery. In this contribution the indication for lasersurgical intervention or pharyngolaryngectomy in advanced carcinomas of the head and neck is discussed.

  15. Temozolomide Therapy for Aggressive Pituitary Tumors: Results in a Small Series of Patients from Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Oscar D.; Juárez-Allen, Lea; Christiansen, Silvia B.; Manavela, Marcos; Danilowicz, Karina; Vigovich, Carlos; Gómez, Reynaldo M.

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated results of temozolomide (TMZ) therapy in six patients, aged 34–78 years, presenting aggressive pituitary tumors. In all the patients tested O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) immunoexpression in surgical specimens was absent. Patients received temozolomide 140–320 mg/day for 5 days monthly for at least 3 months. In two patients minimum time for evaluation could not be reached because of death in a 76-year-old man with a malignant prolactinoma and of severe neutro-thrombopenia in a 47-year-old woman with nonfunctioning pituitary adenoma. In two patients (a 34-year-old acromegalic woman and a 39-year-old woman with Nelson's syndrome) no response was observed after 4 and 6 months, respectively, and the treatment was stopped. Conversely, two 52- and 42-year-old women with Cushing's disease had long-term total clinical and radiological remissions which persisted after stopping temozolomide. We conclude that TMZ therapy may be of variable efficacy depending on—until now—incompletely understood factors. Cooperative work on a greater number of cases of aggressive pituitary tumors should be crucial to establish the indications, doses, and duration of temozolomide administration. PMID:26106414

  16. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy for neuroendocrine tumors in Germany: first results of a multi-institutional cancer registry.

    PubMed

    Hörsch, Dieter; Ezziddin, Samer; Haug, Alexander; Gratz, Klaus Friedrich; Dunkelmann, Simone; Krause, Bernd Joachim; Schümichen, Carl; Bengel, Frank M; Knapp, Wolfram H; Bartenstein, Peter; Biersack, Hans-Jürgen; Plöckinger, Ursula; Schwartz-Fuchs, Sabine; Baum, R P

    2013-01-01

    Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy is an effective treatment option for patients with well-differentiated somatostatin receptor-expressing neuroendocrine tumors. However, published data result mainly from retrospective monocentric studies. We initiated a multi-institutional, prospective, board-reviewed registry for patients treated with peptide receptor radionuclide therapy in Germany in 2009. In five centers, 297 patients were registered. Primary tumors were mainly derived from pancreas (117/297) and small intestine (80/297), whereas 56 were of unknown primary. Most tumors were well differentiated with median Ki67 proliferation rate of 5% (range 0.9-70%). Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy was performed using mainly yttrium-90 and/or lutetium-177 as radionuclides in 1-8 cycles. Mean overall survival was estimated at 213 months with follow-up between 1 and 230 months after initial diagnosis, and 87 months with follow-up between 1 and 92 months after start of peptide receptor radionuclide therapy. Median overall survival was not yet reached. Subgroup analysis demonstrated that best results were obtained in neuroendocrine tumors with proliferation rate below 20%. Our results indicate that peptide receptor radionuclide therapy is an effective treatment for well- and moderately differentiated neuroendocrine tumors irrespective of previous therapies and should be regarded as one of the primary treatment options for patients with somatostatin receptor-expressing neuroendocrine tumors.

  17. Small structural differences of targeted anti-tumor toxins result in strong variation of protein expression.

    PubMed

    Gilabert-Oriol, Roger; Thakur, Mayank; Weise, Christoph; Dernedde, Jens; von Mallinckrodt, Benedicta; Fuchs, Hendrik; Weng, Alexander

    2013-09-01

    Targeted anti-tumor toxins consist of a toxic functional moiety that is chemically linked or recombinantly fused to a cell-directing ligand. Ribosome-inactivating proteins (RIPs), especially type I RIPs such as saporin or dianthin, are commonly used as toxin components. Although expression of type I RIP-based fusion proteins is well reported, the achievement of higher protein yields in heterologous expression systems through innovative strategies is of major interest. In the present study, the targeted toxins (his)saporin-EGF (SE) and (his)dianthin-EGF (DE) were expressed as fusion proteins under identical expression conditions. However, the total amount of DE was nearly two-times higher than SE. The identity of the heterologously expressed targeted toxins was confirmed by mass spectrometric studies. Their biological specific activity, monitored in real time, was almost equal. Sequence alignment shows 84% identity and a structural comparison revealed five major differences, two of which affect the secondary structure resulting in a loop (SE) to β-strand (DE) conversion and one introduces a gap in SE (after position 57). In conclusion, these structural variations resulted in different protein expression levels while codon usage and toxicity to bacteria were excluded as a cause. Minor structural differences identified in this study may be considered responsible for the protection of DE from bacterial proteases and therefore may serve as a lead to modify certain domains in type I RIP-based targeted toxins.

  18. Complications of Microwave Ablation for Liver Tumors: Results of a Multicenter Study

    SciTech Connect

    Livraghi, Tito; Meloni, Franca; Solbiati, Luigi; Zanus, Giorgio; Collaboration: For the Collaborative Italian Group using AMICA system

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: New technologies for microwave ablation (MWA) have been conceived, designed to achieve larger areas of necrosis compared with radiofrequency ablation (RFA). The purpose of this study was to report complications by using this technique in patients with focal liver cancer. Methods: Members of 14 Italian centers used a 2.45-GMHz generator delivering energy through a cooled miniature-choke MW antenna and a standardized protocol for follow-up. They completed a questionnaire regarding number and type of deaths, major and minor complications and side effects, and likelihood of their relationship to the procedure. Enrollment included 736 patients with 1.037 lesions: 522 had hepatocellular carcinoma with cirrhosis, 187 had metastases predominantly from colorectal cancer, and 27 had cholangiocellular carcinoma. Tumor size ranged from 0.5 to 10 cm. In 13 centers, the approach used was percutaneous, in 4 videolaparoscopic, and in 3 laparotomic. Results: No deaths were reported. Major complications occurred in 22 cases (2.9%), and minor complications in 54 patients (7.3%). Complications of MWA do not differ from those RFA, both being based on the heat damage. Conclusion: Results of this multicenter study confirmed those of single-center experiences, indicating that MWA is a safe procedure, with no mortality and a low rate of major complications. The low rate of complications was probably due to precautions adopted, knowing in advance possible risk conditions, on the basis of prior RFA experience.

  19. Beauty product-related exposures and childhood brain tumors in seven countries: results from the SEARCH International Brain Tumor Study.

    PubMed

    Efird, J T; Holly, E A; Cordier, S; Mueller, B A; Lubin, F; Filippini, G; Peris-Bonet, R; McCredie, M; Arslan, A; Bracci, P; Preston-Martin, S

    2005-04-01

    Data from 1218 cases of childhood brain tumors (CBT) diagnosed between 1976 and 1994 and 2223 matched controls from the general population were included in an analysis of maternal beauty product exposure and beauty-related employment in 9 centers in 7 countries. A 50% increased odds ratio (OR) [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.0-2.1] for CBT was observed among children of mothers who were exposed via personal use of and/or possible ambient contact with beauty products during the 5 years preceding the index child's birth compared with children of mothers never exposed to beauty products during this time period. Overall maternal personal use of hair-coloring agents in the month before or during the pregnancy of the index child's birth was not associated with CBT (OR = 1.0, CI = 0.83-1.3) or with astroglial (OR = 1.1, CI = 0.85-1.4), PNET (OR = 1.0, CI = 0.71-1.5) and other glial subtypes (OR = 1.0, CI = 0.62-1.0). Similarly, no statistically increased ORs or discernable pattern of risk estimates were observed for period of use or for number of applications per year for maternal personal use of hair-coloring agents overall or by histologic type. Among children born on or after 1980, increased ORs for CBT were associated with maternal non-work-related exposure to any beauty products (OR = 2.6, CI = 1.2-5.9), hair-dyes (OR = 11, CI = 1.2-90), and hair sprays (OR = 3.4, CI = 1.0-11). No overall increased OR for CBT was observed among children of mothers employed in beauty-related jobs during the 5 years preceding the index child's birth compared with those who reported no beauty-related employment. In general, other specific beauty product-related exposures were not associated with increased ORs for CBT. Data from our study provide little evidence of an increased risk for CBT with mothers' exposures to beauty products.

  20. Lost in Translation: Ambiguity in Nerve Sheath Tumor Nomenclature and Its Resultant Treatment Effect

    PubMed Central

    Bernthal, Nicholas M.; Jones, Kevin B.; Monument, Michael J.; Liu, Ting; Viskochil, David; Randall, R. Lor

    2013-01-01

    There is much ambiguity surrounding the diagnosis of nerve sheath tumors, including atypical neurofibroma and low-grade MPNST, and yet, the distinction between these entities designates either benign or malignant behavior and thus carries presumed profound prognostic importance that often guides treatment. This study reviews the diagnostic criteria used to designate atypical neurofibroma from low-grade MPNSTs and reviews existing literature the natural history of each of these tumors to see if the distinction is, in fact, of importance. PMID:24216989

  1. Lost in translation: ambiguity in nerve sheath tumor nomenclature and its resultant treatment effect.

    PubMed

    Bernthal, Nicholas M; Jones, Kevin B; Monument, Michael J; Liu, Ting; Viskochil, David; Randall, R Lor

    2013-05-08

    There is much ambiguity surrounding the diagnosis of nerve sheath tumors, including atypical neurofibroma and low-grade MPNST, and yet, the distinction between these entities designates either benign or malignant behavior and thus carries presumed profound prognostic importance that often guides treatment. This study reviews the diagnostic criteria used to designate atypical neurofibroma from low-grade MPNSTs and reviews existing literature the natural history of each of these tumors to see if the distinction is, in fact, of importance.

  2. Tumor induction following intraoperative radiotherapy: Late results of the National Cancer Institute canine trials

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, M.; Duray, P.; DeLuca, A.; Anderson, W.; Sindelar, W.; Kinsella, T. )

    1990-09-01

    Intraoperative radiotherapy has been employed in human cancer research for over a decade. Since 1979, trials to assess the acute and late toxicity of IORT have been carried out at the National Cancer Institute in an adult dog model in an attempt to establish dose tolerance guidelines for a variety of organs. Of the 170 animals entered on 12 studies with a minimum follow-up of 2 years, 148 dogs received IORT; 22 control animals received only surgery. Animals were sacrificed at designated intervals following IORT, usually at 1, 6, 12, 24, and 60 month intervals. 102 of 148 irradiated dogs were sacrificed less than 24 months; 46 dogs were followed greater than or equal to 24 months after IORT. To date, 34 of the 46 animals have been sacrificed; the 12 remaining animals are to be followed to 5 years. These 12 animals have minimum follow-up of 30 months. In the irradiated group followed for greater than or equal to 24 months, 10 tumors have arisen in 9 animals. One animal developed an incidental spontaneous breast carcinoma outside the IORT port, discovered only at scheduled post-mortem exam. The remaining nine tumors arose within IORT ports. Two tumors were benign neural tumors--a neuroma and a neurofibroma. One animal had a collision tumor comprised of grade I chondrosarcoma adjacent to grade III osteosarcoma arising in lumbar vertebrae. Two other grade III osteosarcomas, one grade III fibrosarcoma, and one grade III malignant fibrous histiocytoma arose in retroperitoneal/paravertebral sites. An embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (sarcoma botryoides) arose within the irradiated urinary bladder of one animal. No sham irradiated controls nor IORT animals sacrificed less than 24 months have developed any spontaneous or radiation-induced tumors. The time range of diagnoses of tumors was 24-58 months. The IORT dose range associated with tumor development was 20-35 Gy.

  3. French brain tumor database: 5-year histological results on 25 756 cases.

    PubMed

    Rigau, Valérie; Zouaoui, Sonia; Mathieu-Daudé, Hélène; Darlix, Amélie; Maran, Aurélie; Trétarre, Brigitte; Bessaoud, Faiza; Bauchet, Fabienne; Attaoua, Redha; Fabbro-Peray, Pascale; Fabbro, Michel; Kerr, Christine; Taillandier, Luc; Duffau, Hugues; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Costes, Valérie; Bauchet, Luc

    2011-11-01

    This work aimed to prospectively record all primary central nervous system tumor (PCNST) cases in France, for which histological diagnosis is available. The objectives were to (i) create a national registry and a network to perform epidemiological studies; (ii) implement clinical and basic research protocols; and (iii) harmonize the health care of patients affected by PCNST. For 5 years, 25 756 cases of newly diagnosed and histologically confirmed PCNST have been recorded. Histological diagnoses included glioma (48.9%), all other neuroepithelial tumors (5%), meningioma (28.8%), nerve sheath tumors (8.4%), lymphoma (3.2%) and others (5.7%). Cryopreservation was reported for 6018 PCNST specimens. Tumor resections (R) were performed in 78% cases, while biopsies accounted for 22%. Median age (MA), sex, percentage R and number of cryopreserved tumors were detailed for each histology; for example, out of 6053 glioblastomas (MA 63 years, male 59.4%, R 62%, 1611 were cryopreserved), and out of 37 atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors (MA 2 years, male 56.8%, R 94%, 17 were cryopreserved). This database or databank dedicated to PCNST cases contains detailed data on clinical, histological and other characteristics, such as the inclusion of data on cryopreserved specimens that are not available in other European registries. Therefore, this is a valuable resource that can be used for planning future epidemiological and clinical research. PMID:21554472

  4. French brain tumor database: 5-year histological results on 25 756 cases.

    PubMed

    Rigau, Valérie; Zouaoui, Sonia; Mathieu-Daudé, Hélène; Darlix, Amélie; Maran, Aurélie; Trétarre, Brigitte; Bessaoud, Faiza; Bauchet, Fabienne; Attaoua, Redha; Fabbro-Peray, Pascale; Fabbro, Michel; Kerr, Christine; Taillandier, Luc; Duffau, Hugues; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Costes, Valérie; Bauchet, Luc

    2011-11-01

    This work aimed to prospectively record all primary central nervous system tumor (PCNST) cases in France, for which histological diagnosis is available. The objectives were to (i) create a national registry and a network to perform epidemiological studies; (ii) implement clinical and basic research protocols; and (iii) harmonize the health care of patients affected by PCNST. For 5 years, 25 756 cases of newly diagnosed and histologically confirmed PCNST have been recorded. Histological diagnoses included glioma (48.9%), all other neuroepithelial tumors (5%), meningioma (28.8%), nerve sheath tumors (8.4%), lymphoma (3.2%) and others (5.7%). Cryopreservation was reported for 6018 PCNST specimens. Tumor resections (R) were performed in 78% cases, while biopsies accounted for 22%. Median age (MA), sex, percentage R and number of cryopreserved tumors were detailed for each histology; for example, out of 6053 glioblastomas (MA 63 years, male 59.4%, R 62%, 1611 were cryopreserved), and out of 37 atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors (MA 2 years, male 56.8%, R 94%, 17 were cryopreserved). This database or databank dedicated to PCNST cases contains detailed data on clinical, histological and other characteristics, such as the inclusion of data on cryopreserved specimens that are not available in other European registries. Therefore, this is a valuable resource that can be used for planning future epidemiological and clinical research.

  5. Mobile spine chordoma: results of 166 patients from the AOSpine Knowledge Forum Tumor database

    PubMed Central

    Gokaslan, Ziya L.; Zadnik, Patricia L.; Sciubba, Daniel M.; Germscheid, Niccole; Goodwin, C. Rory; Wolinsky, Jean-Paul; Bettegowda, Chetan; Groves, Mari L.; Luzzati, Alessandro; Rhines, Laurence D.; Fisher, Charles G.; Varga, Peter Pal; Dekutoski, Mark B.; Clarke, Michelle J.; Fehlings, Michael G.; Quraishi, Nasir A.; Chou, Dean; Reynolds, Jeremy J.; Williams, Richard P.; Kawahara, Norio; Boriani, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Object A chordoma is an indolent primary spinal tumor that has devastating effects on the patient’s life. These lesions are chemoresistant, resistant to conventional radiotherapy, and moderately sensitive to proton therapy; however, en bloc resection remains the preferred treatment for optimizing patient outcomes. While multiple small and largely retrospective studies have investigated the outcomes following en bloc resection of chordomas in the sacrum, there have been few large-scale studies on patients with chordomas of the mobile spine. The goal of this study was to review the outcomes of surgically treated patients with mobile spine chordomas at multiple international centers with respect to local recurrence and survival. This multiinstitutional retrospective study collected data between 1988 and 2012 about prognosis-predicting factors, including various clinical characteristics and surgical techniques for mobile spine chordoma. Tumors were classified according to the Enneking principles and analyzed in 2 treatment cohorts: Enneking-appropriate (EA) and Enneking-inappropriate (EI) cohorts. Patients were categorized as EA when the final pathological assessment of the margin matched the Enneking recommendation; otherwise, they were categorized as EI. Methods Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the data (Student t-test, chi-square, and Fisher exact tests). Recurrence and survival data were analyzed using Kaplan-Meier survival curves, log-rank tests, and multivariate Cox proportional hazard modeling. Results A total of 166 patients (55 female and 111 male patients) with mobile spine chordoma were included. The median patient follow-up was 2.6 years (range 1 day to 22.5 years). Fifty-eight (41%) patients were EA and 84 (59%) patients were EI. The type of biopsy (p < 0.001), spinal location (p = 0.018), and if the patient received adjuvant therapy (p < 0.001) were significantly different between the 2 cohorts. Overall, 58 (35%) patients developed local

  6. Pediatric Fibroblastic and Myofibroblastic Tumors: A Pictorial Review.

    PubMed

    Sargar, Kiran M; Sheybani, Elizabeth F; Shenoy, Archana; Aranake-Chrisinger, John; Khanna, Geetika

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric fibroblastic and myofibroblastic tumors are a relatively common group of soft-tissue proliferations that are associated with a wide spectrum of clinical behavior. These tumors have been divided into the following categories on the basis of their biologic behavior: benign (eg, myositis ossificans, myofibroma, fibromatosis colli), intermediate-locally aggressive (eg, lipofibromatosis, desmoid fibroma), intermediate-rarely metastasizing (eg, inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors, infantile fibrosarcoma, low-grade myofibroblastic sarcoma), and malignant (eg, fibromyxoid sarcoma, adult fibrosarcoma). Imaging has a key role in the evaluation of lesion origin, extent, and involvement with adjacent structures, and in the treatment management and postresection surveillance of these tumors. The imaging findings of these tumors are often nonspecific. However, certain imaging features, such as low or intermediate signal intensity on T2-weighted magnetic resonance images and extension along fascial planes, support the diagnosis of a fibroblastic or myofibroblastic tumor. In addition, certain tumors have characteristic imaging findings (eg, multiple subcutaneous or intramuscular lesions in infantile myofibromatosis, plaquelike growth pattern of Gardner fibroma, presence of adipose tissue in lipofibromatosis) or characteristic clinical manifestations (eg, great toe malformations in fibrodysplasia ossificans fibroma, neonatal torticollis in fibromatosis colli) that suggest the correct diagnosis. Knowledge of the syndrome associations of some of these tumors-for example, the association between familial adenomatous polyposis syndrome and both Gardner fibroma and desmoid fibromatosis, and that between nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome and cardiac fibroma-further facilitate a diagnosis. The recognition of key imaging findings can help guide treatment management and help avoid unnecessary intervention in cases of benign lesions such as myositis ossificans and fibromatosis

  7. END STAGE RENAL DISEASE IN PATIENTS WITH WILMS TUMOR: RESULTS FROM THE NATIONAL WILMS TUMOR STUDY GROUP AND THE U.S. RENAL DATA SYSTEM

    PubMed Central

    Breslow, Norman E.; Grigoriev, Yevgeny A.; Peterson, Susan M.; Collins, Allan J.; Ritchey, Michael L.; Green, Daniel M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To accurately assess the full spectrum of end stage renal disease (ESRD) in Wilms tumor survivors by combining the unique resources of the National Wilms Tumor Study Group (NWTSG) and the U.S. Renal Data System (USRDS), and to confirm preliminary reports of an increased incidence of ESRD in those with the Wilms tumor-aniridia (WAGR) syndrome. Material and Methods: ESRD was ascertained for 5,910 patients enrolled on NWTSG studies during 1969-1994 both by record linkage to USRDS and by direct follow-up. Cumulative ESRD incidence was estimated accounting for inter-current mortality. Results: Ten of 115 cases of ESRD (9%) were ascertained by NWTSG alone, 13 (11%) by USRDS alone and 92 (80%) by both. Cumulative incidence of ESRD at 20 years from diagnosis of unilateral Wilms tumor (WT) was 74% for 17 patients with Deny-Drash syndrome (DDS), 36% for 37 patients with WAGR syndrome, 7% for 125 male patients with hypospadias or cryptorchism (GU anomalies) and 0.6% for 5,347 patients with none of these conditions. The incidence for bilateral Wilms tumor was 50% for DDS (n=6), 90% for WAGR (n=10), 25% for GU anomaly (n=25) and 12% for other patients (n=409). ESRD for patients with WAGR syndrome or GU anomalies tended to occur relatively late, often during or after adolescence. Conclusions: The risk of ESRD is remarkably low for the majority of WT patients. Those with WAGR syndrome or associated GU anomalies, however, are at higher risk and should be screened indefinitely to facilitate prospective management of impaired renal function. PMID:16217371

  8. Localized Hypoxia Results in Spatially Heterogeneous Metabolic Signatures in Breast Tumor Models1

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Lu; Greenwood, Tiffany R; Artemov, Dmitri; Raman, Venu; Winnard, Paul T; Heeren, Ron MA; Bhujwalla, Zaver M; Glunde, Kristine

    2012-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia triggers signaling cascades that significantly affect biologic outcomes such as resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy in breast cancer. Hypoxic regions in solid tumor are spatially heterogeneous. Therefore, delineating the origin and extent of hypoxia in tumors is critical. In this study, we have investigated the effect of hypoxia on different metabolic pathways, such as lipid and choline metabolism, in a human breast cancer model. Human MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells and tumors, which were genetically engineered to express red fluorescent tdTomato protein under hypoxic conditions, were used to investigate hypoxia. Our data were obtained with a novel three-dimensional multimodal molecular imaging platform that combines magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI), and optical imaging of hypoxia and necrosis. A higher concentration of noninvasively detected total choline-containing metabolites (tCho) and lipid CH3 localized in the tdTomato-fluorescing hypoxic regions indicated that hypoxia can upregulate tCho and lipid CH3 levels in this breast tumor model. The increase in tCho under hypoxia was primarily due to elevated phosphocholine levels as shown by in vitro MR spectroscopy. Elevated lipid CH3 levels detected under hypoxia were caused by an increase in mobile MR-detectable lipid droplets, as demonstrated by Nile Red staining. Our findings demonstrate that noninvasive MRSI can help delineate hypoxic regions in solid tumors by means of detecting the metabolic outcome of tumor hypoxia, which is characterized by elevated tCho and lipid CH3. PMID:22952426

  9. Dietary genistein results in larger MNU-induced, estrogen-dependent mammary tumors following ovariectomy of Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Allred, Clinton D; Allred, Kimberly F; Ju, Young H; Clausen, Laura M; Doerge, Daniel R; Schantz, Susan L; Korol, Donna L; Wallig, Matthew A; Helferich, William G

    2004-02-01

    Due to the estrogenic properties of soy-derived isoflavones, many postmenopausal women are using these compounds as a natural alternative to hormone replacement therapy (HRT). How isoflavones impact breast cancer in postmenopausal women is important, because a majority of breast cancer cases occur in this age group. Chemical induction of mammary tumors in female rats has been used to determine that exposure of the mammary gland to soy isoflavones prior to tumor induction is protective against tumor formation. Here we investigate the effect of dietary genistein on mammary tumors that have already formed. The study was designed to determine the action of dietary genistein in a low endogenous estrogen environment as is observed in postmenopausal women. Animals were ovariectomized (OVX) after mammary tumor development and were then placed into one of three treatment groups: positive-control (OVX+ estradiol implant), genistein (OVX+ 750 p.p.m. genistein) and negative-control (OVX alone). Tumors were distinguished as malignant or benign by histopathological examination and were further characterized as either estrogen-dependent or estrogen-independent using immunohistochemistry to identify the presence of both estrogen receptor (ER) alpha and the progesterone receptor (PR). Genistein at 750 p.p.m. increased the weight of estrogen-dependent adenocarcinomas in ovariectomized rats compared with the negative-control animals. Genistein treatment also resulted in a higher percentage of proliferative cells in tumors and increased uterine weights when compared with negative-control animals. Collectively, these effects are probably due to the estrogenic activity of genistein. Plasma genistein concentrations in animals fed the isoflavone-containing diet were at physiological levels relevant to human exposure. Estradiol concentrations in ovariectomized animals not receiving an estradiol supplement were similar to those observed in postmenopausal women. The data suggest that in an

  10. Transurethral En Bloc Resection of Bladder Tumor Using an Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection Technique: Preliminary Results in an Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Morizane, Shuichi; Sejima, Takehiro; Iwamoto, Hideto; Masago, Toshihiko; Honda, Masashi; Ikebuchi, Yuichiro; Matsumoto, Kazuya; Ueki, Masaru; Takenaka, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Background Transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT) technique has been considered the routine method for removing most bladder tumors for decades. In contrast, endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is the gold-standard treatment for gastrointestinal superficial tumors. We investigated the effectiveness and applicability of a new technique for en bloc bladder tumor resection using ESD procedure. Methods Four Landrace Large White Duroc female pigs were anesthetized with isoflurane prior endoscopic resection using a large-caliber prototype fiber bronchoscope. After local infiltration of the submucosa with sodium hyaluronate using an injector needle, a section of the target area (1.0–2.0 cm diameter circular area) was cut with the Dual Knife. Results In total, seven target sections were resected from the pigs. The median size of the resected sections was 1.8 cm (range 1.0–2.5 cm) and the median time taken to perform the resection of one section was 20 min (range 4–35 min). These target sections were completely resected en bloc. Although the small bladder perforations occurred on two occasions, no other short-term complications such as uncontrollable bleeding were observed. Conclusion This procedure is a slightly difficult in the pigs with thin bladder walls. However, this procedure with the slim flexible cystoscope may allow us to be able to remove bladder tumors using only light sedation, especially for cases when small tumor recurrence is observed during routine cystoscopy for the patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer. PMID:27493485

  11. Markov models of breast tumor progression: some age-specific results.

    PubMed

    Duffy, S W; Day, N E; Tabár, L; Chen, H H; Smith, T C

    1997-01-01

    Researchers have noted that mammographic screening has a reduced effect on breast cancer mortality in women in their forties compared to older women. Explanations for this include poorer sensitivity in younger women due to denser breast tissue, as well as more rapid tumor progression, giving a shorter mean sojourn time (the average duration of the preclinical screen-detectable period). To test these hypotheses, we developed a series of Markov-chain models to estimate tumor progression rates and sensitivity. Parameters were estimated using tumor data from the Swedish two-county trial of mammographic screening for breast cancer. The mean sojourn time was shorter in women aged 40-49 compared to women aged 50-59 and 60-69 (2.44, 3.70, and 4.17 years, respectively). Sensitivity was lower in the 40-49 age group compared to the two older groups (83%, 100%, and 100%, respectively). Thus, both rapid progression and poorer sensitivity are associated with the 40-49 age group. We also modeled tumor size, node status, and malignancy grade together with subsequent breast cancer mortality and found that, to achieve a reduction in mortality commensurate with that in women over 50, the interscreening interval for women in their forties should be less than two years. We conclude that Markov models and the use of tumor size, node status, and malignancy grade as surrogates for mortality can be useful in design and analysis of future studies of breast cancer screening.

  12. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) of malignant tumors by photosensitzer photosens: results of 45 clinical cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Victor V.; Chissov, Valery I.; Yakubovskaya, Raisa I.; Aristarkhova, E. I.; Filonenko, E. V.; Belous, T. A.; Vorozhtsov, Georgy N.; Zharkova, Natalia N.; Smirnov, V. V.; Zhitkova, Margarita B.

    1996-01-01

    Photosensitizer Photosens is a mixture of sulphonated Al-phthalocyanines with a different number of substituents per phthalocyanine molecule. In the beginning of 1994, this photosensitizer was approved for clinical trials. Since that time till May 1995, 45 patients with 120 tumors were treated by PDT-Photosens. The main tumor localizations were lung (5/6), head and neck (4/4), esophagus (8/8), stomach (2/2), vulva (2/2), bladder (1/1), breast cancer (3/3), skin (basalioma, melanoma, sarcoma Kaposi, mts breast cancer) (20 patients/94 tumors). The lesions were photoirradiated 48-72 h after intravenous injection of Photosens in doses from 0.5 to 2.0 mg/kg b.w. (1.0 mg/kg b.w., on average). PDT was performed by laser power density from 20 to 1400 mW/sq cm (300 mW/sq.cm, on average), energy density varying from 15 to 200 J/sq cm (100 J/sq.cm, on average). The therapeutical effect of PDT was evaluated histologically, endoscopically, roentgenologically and sonographically 3 - 4 weeks after the treatment. Complete regression of tumors was reached in 56%, significant remission was reached in 34%, and partial remission was observed in 10% of cases. The follow-up of patients with complete tumor regression was to 15 months.

  13. Markov models of breast tumor progression: some age-specific results.

    PubMed

    Duffy, S W; Day, N E; Tabár, L; Chen, H H; Smith, T C

    1997-01-01

    Researchers have noted that mammographic screening has a reduced effect on breast cancer mortality in women in their forties compared to older women. Explanations for this include poorer sensitivity in younger women due to denser breast tissue, as well as more rapid tumor progression, giving a shorter mean sojourn time (the average duration of the preclinical screen-detectable period). To test these hypotheses, we developed a series of Markov-chain models to estimate tumor progression rates and sensitivity. Parameters were estimated using tumor data from the Swedish two-county trial of mammographic screening for breast cancer. The mean sojourn time was shorter in women aged 40-49 compared to women aged 50-59 and 60-69 (2.44, 3.70, and 4.17 years, respectively). Sensitivity was lower in the 40-49 age group compared to the two older groups (83%, 100%, and 100%, respectively). Thus, both rapid progression and poorer sensitivity are associated with the 40-49 age group. We also modeled tumor size, node status, and malignancy grade together with subsequent breast cancer mortality and found that, to achieve a reduction in mortality commensurate with that in women over 50, the interscreening interval for women in their forties should be less than two years. We conclude that Markov models and the use of tumor size, node status, and malignancy grade as surrogates for mortality can be useful in design and analysis of future studies of breast cancer screening. PMID:9709283

  14. Results of multimodal treatment for desmoplastic small round cell tumor of the abdomen and pelvis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuo; Zhang, Yong; Yu, Yong-Hua; Li, Jia

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSRCT) is a rare aggressive malignancy that occurs in a young population with a male predominance. We studied the clinical and pathological characteristics of DSRCT and investigated the effects of multimodal therapy including aggressive surgical resection, induction chemotherapy, and external beam radiotherapy. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed and analyzed our experience with 11 histologically proven cases of DSRCT between March 2004 and October 2014. The clinical information, histological, immunohistochemistry and survival data of the patients were collected. Results: The median age at diagnosis was 31.4 years (range, 14-64 years) and nine (82%) of the patients were males. The most common presenting complaint was abdominal pain (72.7%). Surgical resection was attempted in five patients and included macroscopic total resection in two patients and debulking in three patients. Six patients underwent biopsy only. Eleven patients received multiagent chemotherapy. Five patients (45.5%) received radiotherapy. The median survival of patients who underwent surgical resection was 34.5 months, whereas the patients who underwent biopsy alone was 24.5 months (P<0.05). The median survival was 40.8 months in radiotherapy group, and 19.2 months in non-radiotherapy group (P<0.05). The 3-year progression-free survival rate was 27.2%. The median survival was 29 months, and the median time to local failure was 8.8 months. Cox regression analysis showed surgery and radiotherapy were highly significant in prolonging patients survival. Conclusion: Multimodal therapy consists of combination of surgical resection, chemotherapy and radiotherapy results in improved survival in patients with DSRCT. For unresectable DSRCT, we recommend radiotherapy combined with anthracycline-based chemotherapy. PMID:26309640

  15. Boronated porphyrins in NCT: Results with a new potent tumor localizer

    SciTech Connect

    Kahl, S.B.; Koo, M.S.; Laster, B.H.; Fairchild, R.G.

    1988-01-01

    Several chemical methods are available for the solubilization of boronated porphyrins. We have previously reported the tumor localization of nido carboranyl porphyrins in which the icosahedral carborane cages have been opened to give B/sub 9/C/sub 2/ anions. One of these species has shown tumor boron levels of nearly 50 ..mu..g B/g when delivered by week-long subcutaneous infusions. We report here recent in vivo experiments with a new, highly water-soluble porphyrin based on the hematoporphyrin-type of compound in which aqueous solubility is achieved using the two propionic acid side chains of the ''natural'' porphyrin frame. 7 refs.

  16. Infant Brain Tumors: Incidence, Survival, and the Role of Radiation Based on Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Data

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, Andrew J.; McDonald, Mark W.; Chang, Andrew L.; Esiashvili, Natia

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the incidence of infant brain tumors and survival outcomes by disease and treatment variables. Methods and Materials: The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program November 2008 submission database provided age-adjusted incidence rates and individual case information for primary brain tumors diagnosed between 1973 and 2006 in infants less than 12 months of age. Results: Between 1973 and 1986, the incidence of infant brain tumors increased from 16 to 40 cases per million (CPM), and from 1986 to 2006, the annual incidence rate averaged 35 CPM. Leading histologies by annual incidence in CPM were gliomas (13.8), medulloblastoma and primitive neuroectodermal tumors (6.6), and ependymomas (3.6). The annual incidence was higher in whites than in blacks (35.0 vs. 21.3 CPM). Infants with low-grade gliomas had the highest observed survival, and those with atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors (ATRTs) or primary rhabdoid tumors of the brain had the lowest. Between 1979 and 1993, the annual rate of cases treated with radiation within the first 4 months from diagnosis declined from 20.5 CPM to <2 CPM. For infants with medulloblastoma, desmoplastic histology and treatment with both surgery and upfront radiation were associated with improved survival, but on multivariate regression, only combined surgery and radiation remained associated with improved survival, with a hazard ratio for death of 0.17 compared with surgery alone (p = 0.005). For ATRTs, those treated with surgery and upfront radiation had a 12-month survival of 100% compared with 24.4% for those treated with surgery alone (p = 0.016). For ependymomas survival was higher in patients treated in more recent decades (p = 0.001). Conclusion: The incidence of infant brain tumors has been stable since 1986. Survival outcomes varied markedly by histology. For infants with medulloblastoma and ATRTs, improved survival was observed in patients treated with both surgery and early radiation

  17. T-Cell Tumor Elimination as a Result of T-Cell Receptor-Mediated Activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashwell, Jonathan D.; Longo, Dan L.; Bridges, Sandra H.

    1987-07-01

    It has recently been shown that activation of murine T-cell hybridomas with antigen inhibits their growth in vitro. The ``suicide'' of these neoplastic T cells upon stimulation with antigen suggested the possibility that activation via the antigen-specific receptor could also inhibit the growth of neoplastic T cells in vivo. To test this, mice were subcutaneously inoculated with antigen-specific T-cell hybridomas and then treated intraperitoneally with antigen. Administration of the appropriate antigen immediately after inoculation with the T-cell hybridoma abrogated tumor formation; antigen administered after tumors had become established decreased the tumor burden and, in a substantial fraction of animals, led to long-term survival. The efficacy of antigen therapy was due to both a direct inhibitory effect on tumor growth and the induction of host immunity. These studies demonstrate the utility of cellular activation as a means of inhibiting neoplastic T-cell growth in vivo and provide a rationale for studying the use of less selective reagents that can mimic the activating properties of antigen, such as monoclonal antibodies, in the treatment of T-cell neoplasms of unknown antigen specificity.

  18. Electrotransfer of Plasmid DNA Encoding an Anti-Mouse Endoglin (CD105) shRNA to B16 Melanoma Tumors with Low and High Metastatic Potential Results in Pronounced Anti-Tumor Effects

    PubMed Central

    Dolinsek, Tanja; Sersa, Gregor; Prosen, Lara; Bosnjak, Masa; Stimac, Monika; Razborsek, Urska; Cemazar, Maja

    2015-01-01

    Endoglin overexpression is associated with highly proliferative tumor endothelium and also with some tumors, including melanoma. Its targeting has anti-tumor effectiveness, which can also be obtained by RNA interference. The aim of our study was to explore the anti-tumor effectiveness of endoglin silencing by electrotransfer of plasmid DNA encoding short hairpin RNA against endoglin in two murine B16 melanoma variants with different metastatic potential on cells, spheroids and subcutaneous tumors in mice. The results demonstrate that endoglin silencing with gene electrotransfer reduces the proliferation, survival and migration of melanoma cells and also has anti-tumor effectiveness, as the therapy resulted in a high percentage of tumor cures (23% and 58% on B16F1 and B16F10 tumors, respectively). The effectiveness of the therapy correlated with endoglin expression in melanoma cells; in vitro the effects were more pronounced in B16F1 cells, which express more endoglin than B16F10. However, the opposite was observed in vivo in tumors, where there was a higher expression of endoglin and better anti-tumor effectiveness in the B16F10 tumor. In conclusion, targeting endoglin for the treatment of melanoma seems to be a concept worthy of further exploration due to the increased therapeutic effect of the therapy based on simultaneous vascular targeting and its direct effect on tumor cells. PMID:26712792

  19. Bleomycin in Octaarginine-modified Fusogenic Liposomes Results in Improved Tumor Growth Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Koshkaryev, Alexander; Piroyan, Aleksandr; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2012-01-01

    Bleomycin (BLM) is an example of an anticancer drug that should be delivered into cytosol for its efficient therapeutic action. With this in mind, we developed octaarginine (R8)-modified fusogenic DOPE-liposomes (R8-DOPE-BLM). R8-modification dramatically increased (up to 50-fold) the cell-liposome interaction. R8-DOPE-liposomes were internalized via macropinocytosis and did not end up in the lysosomes. R8-DOPE-BLM led to a significantly stronger cell death and DNA damage in vitro relative to all controls. R8-DOPE-BLM demonstrated a prominent anticancer effect in the BALB/c mice bearing 4T1 tumors. Thus, R8-DOPE-BLM provided efficient intracellular delivery of BLM leading to strong tumor growth inhibition in vivo. PMID:22743614

  20. Bleomycin in octaarginine-modified fusogenic liposomes results in improved tumor growth inhibition.

    PubMed

    Koshkaryev, Alexander; Piroyan, Aleksandr; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2013-07-01

    Bleomycin (BLM) is an example of an anticancer drug that should be delivered into cytosol for its efficient therapeutic action. With this in mind, we developed octaarginine (R8)-modified fusogenic DOPE-liposomes (R8-DOPE-BLM). R8-modification dramatically increased (up to 50-fold) the cell-liposome interaction. R8-DOPE-liposomes were internalized via macropinocytosis and did not end up in the lysosomes. R8-DOPE-BLM led to a significantly stronger cell death and DNA damage in vitro relative to all controls. R8-DOPE-BLM demonstrated a prominent anticancer effect in the BALB/c mice bearing 4T1 tumors. Thus, R8-DOPE-BLM provided efficient intracellular delivery of BLM leading to strong tumor growth inhibition in vivo. PMID:22743614

  1. [Case of ischemic heart disease resulting from persistent diuresis after giant ovarian tumor resection].

    PubMed

    Sata, Naho; Satoh, Masaaki; Seo, Norimasa

    2010-02-01

    A patient with a giant ovarian tumor weighing about 7 kg was successfully removed by operation. However, her ECG demonstrated ischemic changes after the operation. We report a case of ischemic heart disease due to persistent diuresis after giant ovarian tumor resection. A 75-year-old, 56.5 kg, 143.5 cm woman was admitted to our hospital for ovarian tumor resection. The preoperative ECG showed normal sinus rhythm and no ischemic changes. Both general anesthesia and epidural anesthesia were planed. An epidural catheter was inserted at T12-L1. Anesthesia was induced with propofol 100 mg, fentanyl 100 microg and vecuronium 8 mg under 100% oxygen inhalation. General anesthesia was maintained with sevoflurane while epidural anesthesia was achieved using 0.375% ropivacaine 6 ml. During the operation, blood pressure was 90-110/70-80 mmHg, with SaO2, 100% and heart rate, 70-80 beats x min(-1). The content of tumor was suctioned for 30 minutes. Surgery was successfully finished without any other incidence. After extubation, her ECG changed to atrial fibrillation from normal sinus rhythm and showed ST-T depression. And then her systolic blood pressure became 80 mmHg or below, but we found continued diuresis at about 10 ml x kg(-1) x hr(-1) for over 2 hr. The total of 7 unit vasopressin was intermittently given for vasoconstriction and antidiuresis. Her hemodynamic was immediately restored, and ECG turned to normal ST-T. The patient had uneventful postoperative recovery.

  2. Tumor phenotype and breast density in distinct categories of interval cancer: results of population-based mammography screening in Spain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Interval cancers are tumors arising after a negative screening episode and before the next screening invitation. They can be classified into true interval cancers, false-negatives, minimal-sign cancers, and occult tumors based on mammographic findings in screening and diagnostic mammograms. This study aimed to describe tumor-related characteristics and the association of breast density and tumor phenotype within four interval cancer categories. Methods We included 2,245 invasive tumors (1,297 screening-detected and 948 interval cancers) diagnosed from 2000 to 2009 among 645,764 women aged 45 to 69 who underwent biennial screening in Spain. Interval cancers were classified by a semi-informed retrospective review into true interval cancers (n = 455), false-negatives (n = 224), minimal-sign (n = 166), and occult tumors (n = 103). Breast density was evaluated using Boyd’s scale and was conflated into: <25%; 25 to 50%; 50 to 75%; >75%. Tumor-related information was obtained from cancer registries and clinical records. Tumor phenotype was defined as follows: luminal A: ER+/HER2- or PR+/HER2-; luminal B: ER+/HER2+ or PR+/HER2+; HER2: ER-/PR-/HER2+; triple-negative: ER-/PR-/HER2-. The association of tumor phenotype and breast density was assessed using a multinomial logistic regression model. Adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results Forty-eight percent of interval cancers were true interval cancers and 23.6% false-negatives. True interval cancers were associated with HER2 and triple-negative phenotypes (OR = 1.91 (95% CI:1.22-2.96), OR = 2.07 (95% CI:1.42-3.01), respectively) and extremely dense breasts (>75%) (OR = 1.67 (95% CI:1.08-2.56)). However, among true interval cancers a higher proportion of triple-negative tumors was observed in predominantly fatty breasts (<25%) than in denser breasts (28.7%, 21.4%, 11.3% and 14.3%, respectively; <0

  3. Sequential Salinomycin Treatment Results in Resistance Formation through Clonal Selection of Epithelial-Like Tumor Cells12

    PubMed Central

    Kopp, Florian; Hermawan, Adam; Oak, Prajakta Shirish; Ulaganathan, Vijay Kumar; Herrmann, Annika; Elnikhely, Nefertiti; Thakur, Chitra; Xiao, Zhiguang; Knyazev, Pjotr; Ataseven, Beyhan; Savai, Rajkumar; Wagner, Ernst; Roidl, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Acquiring therapy resistance is one of the major obstacles in the treatment of patients with cancer. The discovery of the cancer stem cell (CSC)–specific drug salinomycin raised hope for improved treatment options by targeting therapy-refractory CSCs and mesenchymal cancer cells. However, the occurrence of an acquired salinomycin resistance in tumor cells remains elusive. To study the formation of salinomycin resistance, mesenchymal breast cancer cells were sequentially treated with salinomycin in an in vitro cell culture assay, and the resulting differences in gene expression and salinomycin susceptibility were analyzed. We demonstrated that long-term salinomycin treatment of mesenchymal cancer cells resulted in salinomycin-resistant cells with elevated levels of epithelial markers, such as E-cadherin and miR-200c, a decreased migratory capability, and a higher susceptibility to the classic chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin. The formation of salinomycin resistance through the acquisition of epithelial traits was further validated by inducing mesenchymal-epithelial transition through an overexpression of miR-200c. The transition from a mesenchymal to a more epithelial-like phenotype of salinomycin-treated tumor cells was moreover confirmed in vivo, using syngeneic and, for the first time, transgenic mouse tumor models. These results suggest that the acquisition of salinomycin resistance through the clonal selection of epithelial-like cancer cells could become exploited for improved cancer therapies by antagonizing the tumor-progressive effects of epithelial-mesenchymal transition. PMID:25500079

  4. Bortezomib-induced unfolded protein response increases oncolytic HSV-1 replication resulting in synergistic, anti-tumor effects

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Ji Young; Hurwitz, Brian S; Bolyard, Chelsea; Yu, Jun-Ge; Zhang, Jianying; Selvendiran, Karuppaiyah; Rath, Kellie S; He, Shun; Bailey, Zachary; Eaves, David; Cripe, Timothy P; Parris, Deborah S.; Caligiuri, Michael A.; Yu, Jianhua; Old, Matthew; Kaur, Balveen

    2014-01-01

    Background Bortezomib is an FDA-approved proteasome inhibitor, and oncolytic HSV-1 (oHSV) is a promising therapeutic approach for cancer. We tested the impact of combining bortezomib with oHSV for anti-tumor efficacy. Methods The synergistic interaction between oHSV and bortezomib was calculated using Chou-Talalay analysis. Viral replication was evaluated using plaque assay and immune fluorescence. Western-blot assays were used to evaluate induction of ER stress and unfolded protein response (UPR). Inhibitors targeting Hsp90 were utilized to investigate the mechanism of cell killing. Anti-tumor efficacy in vivo was evaluated using subcutaneous and intracranial tumor xenografts of glioma and head and neck cancer. Survival was analyzed by Kaplan-Meier curves and two-sided log rank test. Results Combination treatment with bortezomib and oHSV, 34.5ENVE, displayed strong synergistic interaction in ovarian cancer, head & neck cancer, glioma, and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) cells. Bortezomib treatment induced ER stress, evident by strong induction of Grp78, CHOP, PERK and IRE1α (western blot analysis) and the UPR (induction of hsp40, 70 and 90). Bortezomib treatment of cells at both sublethal and lethal doses increased viral replication (p value <0.001), but inhibition of Hsp90 ablated this response, reducing viral replication and synergistic cell killing. The combination of bortezomib and 34.5ENVE significantly enhanced anti-tumor efficacy in multiple different tumor models in vivo. Conclusions The dramatic synergy of bortezomib and 34.5ENVE is mediated by bortezomib- induced UPR and warrants future clinical testing in patients. PMID:24815720

  5. Different gap junction-propagated effects on cisplatin transfer result in opposite responses to cisplatin in normal cells versus tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuan; Tao, Liang; Fan, Lixia; Peng, Yuexia; Yang, Kefan; Zhao, Yifan; Song, Qi; Wang, Qin

    2015-01-01

    Previous work has shown that gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) enhances cisplatin (Pt) toxicity in testicular tumor cells but decreases it in non-tumor testicular cells. In this study, these different GJIC-propagated effects were demonstrated in tumor versus non-tumor cells from other organ tissues (liver and lung). The downregulation of GJIC by several different manipulations (no cell contact, pharmacological inhibition, and siRNA suppression) decreased Pt toxicity in tumor cells but enhanced it in non-tumor cells. The in vivo results using xenograft tumor models were consistent with those from the above-mentioned cells. To better understand the mechanism(s) involved, we studied the effects of GJIC on Pt accumulation in tumor and non-tumor cells from the liver and lung. The intracellular Pt and DNA-Pt adduct contents clearly increased in non-tumor cells but decreased in tumor cells when GJIC was downregulated. Further analysis indicated that the opposite effects of GJIC on Pt accumulation in normal versus tumor cells from the liver were due to its different effects on copper transporter1 and multidrug resistance-associated protein2, membrane transporters attributed to intracellular Pt transfer. Thus, GJIC protects normal organs from cisplatin toxicity while enhancing it in tumor cells via its different effects on intracellular Pt transfer. PMID:26215139

  6. Myostatin Neutralization Results in Preservation of Muscle Mass and Strength in Preclinical Models of Tumor-Induced Muscle Wasting.

    PubMed

    Smith, Rosamund C; Cramer, Martin S; Mitchell, Pamela J; Capen, Andrew; Huber, Lysiane; Wang, Rong; Myers, Laura; Jones, Bryan E; Eastwood, Brian J; Ballard, Darryl; Hanson, Jeff; Credille, Kelly M; Wroblewski, Victor J; Lin, Boris K; Heuer, Josef G

    2015-07-01

    Skeletal muscle wasting occurs in a great majority of cancer patients with advanced disease and is associated with a poor prognosis and decreased survival. Myostatin functions as a negative regulator of skeletal muscle mass and has recently become a therapeutic target for reducing the loss of skeletal muscle and strength associated with clinical myopathies. We generated neutralizing antibodies to myostatin to test their potential use as therapeutic agents to attenuate the skeletal muscle wasting due to cancer. We show that our neutralizing antimyostatin antibodies significantly increase body weight, skeletal muscle mass, and strength in non-tumor-bearing mice with a concomitant increase in mean myofiber area. The administration of these neutralizing antibodies in two preclinical models of cancer-induced muscle wasting (C26 colon adenocarcinoma and PC3 prostate carcinoma) resulted in a significant attenuation of the loss of muscle mass and strength with no effect on tumor growth. We also show that the skeletal muscle mass- and strength-preserving effect of the antibodies is not affected by the coadministration of gemcitabine, a common chemotherapeutic agent, in both non-tumor-bearing mice and mice bearing C26 tumors. In addition, we show that myostatin neutralization with these antibodies results in the preservation of skeletal muscle mass following reduced caloric intake, a common comorbidity associated with advanced cancer. Our findings support the use of neutralizing antimyostatin antibodies as potential therapeutics for cancer-induced muscle wasting.

  7. Systemic irradiation for selected stage IV and recurrent pediatric solid tumors: method, toxicity, and preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Wharam, M.D.; Kaizer, H.; Leventhal, B.G.; Munoz, L.; Tutschka, P.J.; Santos, G.W.; Elfenbein, G.J.; Order, S.E.

    1980-02-01

    Eight patients with advanced pediatric solid tumors received either sequential upper and lower half-body irradiation (HBI) (7.5 rad/min to 500 rad total) or total body irradiation (TBI) (7.5 rad/min to 800 rad total) as part of two multimodality treatment regimens. All patients received combination chemotherapy; drugs were determined by the tumor type. The TBI regimen was selected for two patients who had progression of disease with conventional chemotherapy and for two patients with stage IV neuroblastoma. This intensive regimen consisted of bone marrow harvesting, followed by local radiation to gross disease, marrow-ablative chemotherapy, TBI, and re-infusion of the cryopreserved autologous marrow. Significant acute toxicity was followed by hematologic reconstitution in each patient within seven weeks. At this writing, two patients survived, one of whom is disease free two and one half years without maintenance chemotherapy. A less intensive, outpatient regimen was selected for four patients; three had a complete or good partial response to chemotherapy. The fourth patient had tumor-involved bone marrow not responsive to chemotherapy and was therefore ineligible for marrow cryopreservation and TBI. Each of these four patients received HBI after chemotherapy and local radiation to the primary and/or metastatic sites. Acute toxicity was limited to nausea and vomiting. Significant leukopenia and thrombocytopenia occurred in three patients. All four patients were alive 10 to 26 months post HBI. This pilot study demonstrates that chemotherapy can be integrated with local fractionated radiation, and systemic radiation given as HBI or TBI with acceptable toxicity; sufficient bone marrow stem cells can be harvested after conventional chemotherapy and then cryopreserved to permit hematologic reconstitution of the patient who receives marrow ablative therapy.

  8. [Results obtained by intravesical instillation of BCG in superficial bladder tumors].

    PubMed

    Romics, I; Dietmar, B; Christoph, R

    1990-01-01

    The authors carried out immunotherapy in bladder cancer patients in stage pTa-1 G1-2 NoMo. The strain Connaught BCG (120 mg) was instilled weekly for 6 consecutive weeks in 26 patients. Another 13 patients were treated with 150 mg BCG strain Pasteur. The patients were followed average 26 months in the first, 16 months in the second group. The recurring of the tumor were found in 26% and 15% as well. Side effects were experienced more often in the third group. The authors advice the BCG therapy of the superficial bladder cancer.

  9. [Results obtained by intravesical instillation of BCG in superficial bladder tumors].

    PubMed

    Romics, I; Dietmar, B; Christoph, R

    1990-01-01

    The authors carried out immunotherapy in bladder cancer patients in stage pTa-1 G1-2 NoMo. The strain Connaught BCG (120 mg) was instilled weekly for 6 consecutive weeks in 26 patients. Another 13 patients were treated with 150 mg BCG strain Pasteur. The patients were followed average 26 months in the first, 16 months in the second group. The recurring of the tumor were found in 26% and 15% as well. Side effects were experienced more often in the third group. The authors advice the BCG therapy of the superficial bladder cancer. PMID:2405331

  10. A new model of trispecific antibody resulting the cytotoxicity directed against tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Li-Ping; Cheng, Ju-Long; Wang, Xiang-Bin; Zhang, Zhong; Fang, Min; Zhou, Zhi-Yong; Huang, Hua-Liang

    2003-06-01

    Bispecific antibodies (BsAb) with specificity to both tumor cells and CD3 molecule were believed to be promising immunological tools for the therapy with minimal residual diseases by activating cytotoxic T cells. However, without costimulatory molecule CD28, the activated T cells tended to apoptosis. In order to kill tumor cells more efficiently, a recombinant multifunctional single-chain trispecific antibody (scTsAb), which contains anti-ovarian carcinoma (OC) scFv, anti-CD3 scFv and VH domain of anti-CD28 antibody, was constructed and expressed in E. coli BL21 Star strain. The scTsAb showed strong binding avidities to membrane antigen of SK-OV-3 cell, CD3 molecule on Jurkat cell, and recombinant CD28 antigen. It was further demonstrated that this scTsAb could activate peripheral blood T cells to elicit strong cytotoxicity against SK-OV-3 cells. This new type of recombinant scFv antibody set up a new technological platform for T cells based immunotherapy against cancer, especially with the failure on MHC antigen presentation or absence of costimulating signal.

  11. Infliximab enhances the therapeutic effects of 5-fluorouracil resulting in tumor regression in colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fen; Ai, Feiyan; Tian, Li; Liu, Shaojun; Zhao, Lian; Wang, Xiaoyan

    2016-01-01

    Colon cancer (CC) is among the most common malignant diseases with a dismal survival. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) has been identified as a therapeutic target in various cancers, and anti-TNF-α treatment has shown promising effects in different cancer models. However, if TNF-α can be targeted in CC, the therapeutic values of anti-TNF-α treatment in CC remain unknown. Our study indicated that TNF-α is highly expressed in CC cell lines and patient tumor samples. High expression of TNF-α is an independent adverse prognosticator of CC. Targeting the TNF-α by its antibody infliximab induced antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity and enhanced apoptosis leading to cell death. The combination of infliximab with 5-fluorouracil showed better responses in vitro and in vivo than 5-fluorouracil alone. In conclusion, this study identified TNF-α as a target of CC and anti-TNF-α treatment synergized with chemotherapy leading to a better outcome in preclinical models. PMID:27757041

  12. SU-E-J-94: Positioning Errors Resulting From Using Bony Anatomy Alignment for Treating SBRT Lung Tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Frame, C; Ding, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantify patient setups errors based on bony anatomy registration rather than 3D tumor alignment for SBRT lung treatments. Method: A retrospective study was performed for patients treated with lung SBRT and imaged with kV cone beam computed tomography (kV-CBCT) image-guidance. Daily CBCT images were registered to treatment planning CTs based on bony anatomy alignment and then inter-fraction tumor movement was evaluated by comparing shift in the tumor center in the medial-lateral, anterior-posterior, and superior-inferior directions. The PTV V100% was evaluated for each patient based on the average daily tumor displacement to assess the impact of the positioning error on the target coverage when the registrations were based on bony anatomy. Of the 35 patients studied, 15 were free-breathing treatments, 10 used abdominal compression with a stereotactic body frame, and the remaining 10 were performed with BodyFIX vacuum bags. Results: For free-breathing treatments, the range of tumor displacement error is between 1–6 mm in the medial-lateral, 1–13 mm in the anterior-posterior, and 1–7 mm in the superior-inferior directions. These positioning errors lead to 6–22% underdose coverage for PTV - V100% . Patients treated with abdominal compression immobilization showed positional errors of 0–4mm mediallaterally, 0–3mm anterior-posteriorly, and 0–2 mm inferior-superiorly with PTV - V100% underdose ranging between 6–17%. For patients immobilized with the vacuum bags, the positional errors were found to be 0–1 mm medial-laterally, 0–1mm anterior-posteriorly, and 0–2 mm inferior-superiorly with PTV - V100% under dose ranging between 5–6% only. Conclusion: It is necessary to align the tumor target by using 3D image guidance to ensure adequate tumor coverage before performing SBRT lung treatments. The BodyFIX vacuum bag immobilization method has the least positioning errors among the three methods studied when bony anatomy is used for

  13. Bevacizumab Targeting Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma: Results of 89Zr-Bevacizumab PET Imaging in Brain Tumor Models.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Marc H A; Lagerweij, Tonny; Sewing, A Charlotte P; Vugts, Danielle J; van Vuurden, Dannis G; Molthoff, Carla F M; Caretti, Viola; Veringa, Susanna J E; Petersen, Naomi; Carcaboso, Angel M; Noske, David P; Vandertop, W Peter; Wesseling, Pieter; van Dongen, Guus A M S; Kaspers, Gertjan J L; Hulleman, Esther

    2016-09-01

    The role of the VEGF inhibitor bevacizumab in the treatment of diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) is unclear. We aim to study the biodistribution and uptake of zirconium-89 ((89)Zr)-labeled bevacizumab in DIPG mouse models. Human E98-FM, U251-FM glioma cells, and HSJD-DIPG-007-FLUC primary DIPG cells were injected into the subcutis, pons, or striatum of nude mice. Tumor growth was monitored by bioluminescence imaging (BLI) and visualized by MRI. Seventy-two to 96 hours after (89)Zr-bevacizumab injections, mice were imaged by positron emission tomography (PET), and biodistribution was analyzed ex vivo High VEGF expression in human DIPG was confirmed in a publically available mRNA database, but no significant (89)Zr-bevacizumab uptake could be detected in xenografts located in the pons and striatum at an early or late stage of the disease. E98-FM, and to a lesser extent the U251-FM and HSJD-DIPG-007 subcutaneous tumors, showed high accumulation of (89)Zr-bevacizumab. VEGF expression could not be demonstrated in the intracranial tumors by in situ hybridization (ISH) but was clearly present in the perinecrotic regions of subcutaneous E98-FM tumors. The poor uptake of (89)Zr-bevacizumab in xenografts located in the brain suggests that VEGF targeting with bevacizumab has limited efficacy for diffuse infiltrative parts of glial brain tumors in mice. Translating these results to the clinic would imply that treatment with bevacizumab in patients with DIPG is only justified after targeting of VEGF has been demonstrated by (89)Zr-bevacizumab immuno-PET. We aim to confirm this observation in a clinical PET study with patients with DIPG. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(9); 2166-74. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27325687

  14. Focal degeneration of basal cells and the resultant auto-immunoreactions: a novel mechanism for prostate tumor progression and invasion.

    PubMed

    Man, Yan-Gao; Gardner, William A

    2008-01-01

    The development of human prostate cancer is believed to be a multistep process, progressing sequentially from normal, to hyperplasia, to prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN), and to invasive and metastatic lesions. High grade PIN has been generally considered as the direct precursor of invasive lesions, and the progression of PIN is believed to be triggered primarily, if not solely, by the overproduction of proteolytic enzymes predominately by cancer cells, which result in the degradation of the basement membrane. These theories, however, are hard to reconcile with two main facts: (1) only about 30% untreated PIN progress to invasive stage, while none of the current approaches could accurately identify the specific PIN or individuals at greater risk for progression, and (2) results from recent world-wide clinical trials with a wide variety of proteolytic enzyme inhibitors have been very disappointing, casting doubt on the validity of the proteolytic enzyme theory. Since over 90% of prostate cancer-related deaths result from invasion-related illness and the incidence of PIN could be up to 16.5-25% in routine or ultrasound guided prostate biopsy, there is an urgent need to uncover the intrinsic mechanism of prostate tumor invasion. Promoted by the facts that the basal cell population is the source of several tumor suppressors and the absence of the basal cell layer is the most distinct feature of invasive lesions, our recent studies have intended to identify the early alterations of basal cell layers and their impact on tumor invasion using multidisciplinary approaches. Our studies revealed that a subset of pre-invasive tumors contained focal disruptions (the absence of basal cells resulting in a gap greater than the combined size of at least three epithelial cells) in surrounding basal cell layers. Compared to their non-disrupted counterparts, focally disrupted basal cell layers had several unique features: (1) significantly lower proliferation; (2

  15. Haploidentical stem cell transplantation in patients with pediatric solid tumors: preliminary results of a pilot study and analysis of graft versus tumor effects.

    PubMed

    Lang, P; Pfeiffer, M; Müller, I; Schumm, M; Ebinger, M; Koscielniak, E; Feuchtinger, T; Föll, J; Martin, D; Handgretinger, R

    2006-01-01

    Pediatric patients with relapsed metastatic tumors have a poor prognosis and new treatment strategies are warranted. We present preliminary results of a pilot study, evaluating the feasibility and toxicity of transplantation of haploidentical T and B cell depleted grafts with high numbers of NK cells. 6 patients with relapsed metastatic neuroblastomas (n = 4), rhabdomyosarcoma (n = 1) or Ewing's sarcoma (n = 1) after previous autologous transplantation received CD3/CD19 depleted grafts from mismatched family donors with a median number of 16 x 10 (6)/kg stem cells, 167 x 10 (6)/kg Natural Killer cells and only 5.4 x 10 (4)/kg residual T cells. A melphalan-based, reduced intensity conditioning was used. Despite pretransplant chemotherapy, patients entered transplantation with significant tumor burden. Primary engraftment occurred in 6/6 patients. One patient had secondary graft failure. Hematopoietic recovery was rapid (ANC > 0.5 x 10 (9)/L: 11 days (9-12); independence from platelet substitution: 8 days (7-11)). Four patients had acute GvHD grade II, limited chronic GvHD was observed in 2 patients. No transplant-related mortality and only low toxicity occurred. Four patients died from progression, two patients are alive. Overall median survival time is 6 months (2-11) to date. Analysis of posttransplant NK cell function revealed stable cytotoxic activity against K562 targets, whereas activity against neuroblastoma targets was low. Stimulation with cytokines and use of appropriate antibodies clearly enhanced specific lysis in vitro. In summary, these preliminary results indicate the feasibility and low toxicity even in intensively pre-treated patients with neuroblastomas/sarcomas. This approach may form the basis for posttransplant immunomodulation and other therapeutic strategies. Further experience is warranted to evaluate the method.

  16. The selective inhibition of protein phosphatase-1 results in mitotic catastrophe and impaired tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Claudia; De Munter, Sofie; Van Dessel, Nele; Lesage, Bart; Heroes, Ewald; Boens, Shannah; Beullens, Monique; Van Eynde, Aleyde; Bollen, Mathieu

    2015-12-15

    The serine/threonine protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) complex is a key regulator of the cell cycle. However, the redundancy of PP1 isoforms and the lack of specific inhibitors have hampered studies on the global role of PP1 in cell cycle progression in vertebrates. Here, we show that the overexpression of nuclear inhibitor of PP1 (NIPP1; also known as PPP1R8) in HeLa cells culminated in a prometaphase arrest, associated with severe spindle-formation and chromosome-congression defects. In addition, the spindle assembly checkpoint was activated and checkpoint silencing was hampered. Eventually, most cells either died by apoptosis or formed binucleated cells. The NIPP1-induced mitotic arrest could be explained by the inhibition of PP1 that was titrated away from other mitotic PP1 interactors. Consistent with this notion, the mitotic-arrest phenotype could be rescued by the overexpression of PP1 or the inhibition of the Aurora B kinase, which acts antagonistically to PP1. Finally, we demonstrate that the overexpression of NIPP1 also hampered colony formation and tumor growth in xenograft assays in a PP1-dependent manner. Our data show that the selective inhibition of PP1 can be used to induce cancer cell death through mitotic catastrophe. PMID:26542020

  17. The selective inhibition of protein phosphatase-1 results in mitotic catastrophe and impaired tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Claudia; De Munter, Sofie; Van Dessel, Nele; Lesage, Bart; Heroes, Ewald; Boens, Shannah; Beullens, Monique; Van Eynde, Aleyde; Bollen, Mathieu

    2015-12-15

    The serine/threonine protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) complex is a key regulator of the cell cycle. However, the redundancy of PP1 isoforms and the lack of specific inhibitors have hampered studies on the global role of PP1 in cell cycle progression in vertebrates. Here, we show that the overexpression of nuclear inhibitor of PP1 (NIPP1; also known as PPP1R8) in HeLa cells culminated in a prometaphase arrest, associated with severe spindle-formation and chromosome-congression defects. In addition, the spindle assembly checkpoint was activated and checkpoint silencing was hampered. Eventually, most cells either died by apoptosis or formed binucleated cells. The NIPP1-induced mitotic arrest could be explained by the inhibition of PP1 that was titrated away from other mitotic PP1 interactors. Consistent with this notion, the mitotic-arrest phenotype could be rescued by the overexpression of PP1 or the inhibition of the Aurora B kinase, which acts antagonistically to PP1. Finally, we demonstrate that the overexpression of NIPP1 also hampered colony formation and tumor growth in xenograft assays in a PP1-dependent manner. Our data show that the selective inhibition of PP1 can be used to induce cancer cell death through mitotic catastrophe.

  18. Tumor therapy by deprivation of L-methionine: rationale and results.

    PubMed

    Kreis, W

    1979-06-01

    Published reports indicate that normal rodent cells can grow in medium containing either L-methionine or L-homocysteine, whereas malignant rodent cells have an absolute requirement for L-methionine. Our studies with two normal human cell lines (fetal lung fibroblasts and bladder epithelial cells) exhibit equal growth in media containing either L-methionine or L-homocysteine. The same is true for five malignant human cell lines (carcinoma of the cervix [HeLa], adenocarcinoma of the breast [AlAb], acute lymphoblastic leukemia [MOLT-3], Wilms' tumor [SK-NEP-1], and reticulum cell sarcoma [T-77], whereas four other malignant cell lines (adenocarcinoma of the breast [SK-BR-2-III], the two lymphoblastic leukemias [CCRF-HSB-2 and CCRF-SB], and a neuroblastoma [SK-N-MC]) have absolute requirements for L-methionine. Two malignant cell lines, an adenocarcinoma of the lung (A549) and an adenocarcinoma of the pancreas (Capan-1), showed restricted growth under the experimental conditions used. L-Methionlinase (L-methionine-alpha-deamino-gamma-mercaptomethane-lyase, EC 4.4.1.11) at a concentration of 0.1 unit/ml leads to complete growth inhibition of cell cultures of both the normal human fetal lung fibroblasts (F-136-35-56) and the acute lymphoblastic leukemia (CCRF-HSB-2). L-Homocysteine-thiolactone in medium containing L-methioninase could partly "rescue" the normal but not the malignant cells.

  19. Early Significant Tumor Volume Reduction After Radiosurgery in Brain Metastases From Renal Cell Carcinoma Results in Long-Term Survival

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Wook Ha; Kim, Dong Gyu; Han, Jung Ho; Paek, Sun Ha; Chung, Hyun-Tai; Park, Chul-Kee; Kim, Chae-Yong; Kim, Yong Hwy; Kim, Jin Wook; Jung, Hee-Won

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate survival of patients with brain metastasis from renal cell carcinoma (RCC) after radiosurgery. Patients and Methods: Between 1998 and 2010, 46 patients were treated with radiosurgery, and the total number of lesions was 99. The mean age was 58.9 years (range, 33-78 years). Twenty-six patients (56.5%) had a single brain metastasis. The mean tumor volume was 3.0 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.01-35.1 cm{sup 3}), and the mean marginal dose prescribed was 20.8 Gy (range, 12-25 Gy) at the 50% isodose line. A patient was classified into the good-response group when the sum of the volume of the brain metastases decreased to less than 75% of the original volume at a 1-month follow-up evaluation using MRI. Results: As of December 28, 2010, 39 patients (84.8%) had died, and 7 (15.2%) survived. The overall median survival time was 10.0 {+-} 0.4 months (95% confidence interval, 9.1-10.8). After treatment, local tumor control was achieved in 72 (84.7%) of the 85 tumors assessed using MRI after radiosurgery. The good-response group survived significantly longer than the poor-response group (median survival times of 18.0 and 9.0 months, respectively; p = 0.025). In a multivariate analysis, classification in the good-response group was the only independent prognostic factor for longer survival (p = 0.037; hazard ratio = 0.447; 95% confidence interval, 0.209-0.953). Conclusions: Radiosurgery seems to be an effective treatment modality for patients with brain metastases from RCC. The early significant tumor volume reduction observed after radiosurgery seems to result in long-term survival in RCC patients with brain metastases.

  20. Radiofrequency ablation of renal tumors with an expandable multitined electrode: results, complications, and pilot evaluation of cooled pyeloperfusion for collecting system protection.

    PubMed

    Rouvière, Olivier; Badet, Lionel; Murat, François Joseph; Maréchal, Jean Marie; Colombel, Marc; Martin, Xavier; Lyonnet, Denis; Gelet, Albert

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the results of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of renal tumors with an impedance-based system using an expandable multitined electrode. Twenty-two patients (30 tumors) were treated with RFA over a 7-year period, percutaneously (16 tumors) or intraoperatively (14 tumors). Follow-up imaging was performed at 1-3, 6, and 12 months and yearly thereafter. Twenty-seven of 30 tumors (19/22 patients) showed no residual tumor on the first imaging control. Two residual tumors were successfully ablated by a second RFA procedure. Our mean follow-up period was 35 months (range, 3-84 months). Two tumors that had been completely ablated based on imaging criteria recurred 11 and 48 months after RFA. One was treated by partial nephrectomy. The other one was not treated because the patient developed bone metastases. One patient had nephrectomy because of an RFA-induced ureteropelvic junction stricture. Nine patients (11 sessions) had a pyeloperfusion of cooled saline during RFA. None developed symptomatic complications, even though in three patients the ablation zone extended to the closest calyx (3-5 mm from the tumor). We conclude that RFA of renal tumors is promising, but serious complications to the collecting system must be taken into consideration. Prophylactic per-procedural cooling of the collecting system is feasible but needs further assessment.

  1. MTHFR C677T Polymorphism is Associated with Tumor Response to Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy: A Result Based on Previous Reports

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yue; Li, Xingde; Kong, Xiangjun

    2015-01-01

    Background Preoperative chemoradiotherapy (pRCT) followed by surgery has been widely practiced in locally advanced rectal cancer, esophageal cancer, gastric cancer and other cancers. However, the therapy also exerts some severe adverse effects and some of the patients show poor or no response. It is very important to develop biomarkers (e.g., gene polymorphisms) to identify patients who have a higher likelihood of responding to pRCT. Recently, a series of reports have investigated the association of the genetic polymorphisms in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) genes with the tumor response to pRCT; however, the results were inconsistent and inconclusive. Material/Methods A systematic review and meta-analysis was performed by searching relevant studies about the association of MTHFR and EGFR polymorphisms with the tumor regression grade (TRG) in response to pRCT in databases of PubMed, EMBAS, Web of science, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, and Wanfang database up to March 30, 2015. The pooled odds ratios (ORs) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated to assess the strength of the association under 5 genetic models. Results A total of 11 eligible articles were included in the present meta-analysis, of which 8 studies were performed in rectal cancer and 3 studies were performed in esophageal cancer. We finally included 8 included studies containing 839 cases for MTHFR C677T, 5 studies involving 634 cases for MTHFR A1298C, 3 studies containing 340 cases for EGFR G497A, and 4 studies containing 396 cases for EGFR CA repeat. The pooled analysis results indicated that MTHFR C677T might be correlated with the tumor response to pRCT under the recessive model (CC vs. CTTT) in overall analysis (OR=1.426(1.074–1.894), P=0.014), rectal cancer (OR=1.483(1.102–1.996), P=0.009), and TRG 1–2 vs. 3–5 group (OR=1.423(1.046–1.936), P=0.025), while other polymorphism including MTHFR

  2. A Plan to Improve Melanoma Tumor Depth Data Quality in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program.

    PubMed

    Lam, Clara; Dickie, Lois; Adamo, Peggy; Penberthy, Lynne

    2016-01-01

    In light of the recent assessment done for ProstateSpecific Antigen values in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program, it is possible that coding procedures for melanoma tumor depth may have similar quality issues. Potential errors that have been initially identified are implied decimal errors, transcription errors, and incomplete information. Because of the SEER Program's commitment to high data quality standards, various studies are being planned to review and adjudicate incorrect lab values for several different data items in the SEER data collection. PMID:27556846

  3. Phase 1 results from a study of romidepsin in combination with gemcitabine in patients with advanced solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Jones, Suzanne F; Infante, Jeffrey R; Spigel, David R; Peacock, Nancy W; Thompson, Dana S; Greco, F Anthony; McCulloch, William; Burris, Howard A

    2012-07-01

    Romidepsin is a potent histone deacetylase inhibitor; preclinical studies showed potential synergy with the nucleoside analog gemcitabine. This phase 1 trial was conducted to determine the maximum tolerated dose for two schedules of romidepsin plus gemcitabine in patients with advanced solid tumors in which gemcitabine had previously demonstrated clinical activity. The recommended phase 2 dose was 12 mg/m(2) romidepsin plus 800 mg/m(2) gemcitabine on days 1 and 15 every 28 days. Results suggest additive hematologic toxicities of romidepsin plus gemcitabine, but the level of antitumor activity observed warrants more formal trials of this combination to further assess safety and efficacy.

  4. KRAS mutation leads to decreased expression of regulator of calcineurin 2, resulting in tumor proliferation in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Niitsu, H; Hinoi, T; Kawaguchi, Y; Sentani, K; Yuge, R; Kitadai, Y; Sotomaru, Y; Adachi, T; Saito, Y; Miguchi, M; Kochi, M; Sada, H; Shimomura, M; Oue, N; Yasui, W; Ohdan, H

    2016-01-01

    KRAS mutations occur in 30–40% of all cases of human colorectal cancer (CRC). However, to date, specific therapeutic agents against KRAS-mutated CRC have not been developed. We previously described the generation of mouse models of colon cancer with and without Kras mutations (CDX2P-G22Cre;Apcflox/flox; LSL-KrasG12D and CDX2P-G22Cre;Apcflox/flox mice, respectively). Here, the two mouse models were compared to identify candidate genes, which may represent novel therapeutic targets or predictive biomarkers. Differentially expressed genes in tumors from the two mouse models were identified using microarray analysis, and their expression was compared by quantitative reverse transcription–PCR (qRT–PCR) and immunohistochemical analyses in mouse tumors and surgical specimens of human CRC, with or without KRAS mutations, respectively. Furthermore, the functions of candidate genes were studied using human CRC cell lines. Microarray analysis of 34 000 transcripts resulted in the identification of 19 candidate genes. qRT–PCR analysis data showed that four of these candidate genes (Clps, Irx5, Bex1 and Rcan2) exhibited decreased expression in the Kras-mutated mouse model. The expression of the regulator of calcineurin 2 (RCAN2) was also observed to be lower in KRAS-mutated human CRC. Moreover, inhibitory function for cancer cell proliferation dependent on calcineurin was indicated with overexpression and short hairpin RNA knockdown of RCAN2 in human CRC cell lines. KRAS mutations in CRC lead to a decrease in RCAN2 expression, resulting in tumor proliferation due to derepression of calcineurin–nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) signaling. Our findings suggest that calcineurin–NFAT signal may represent a novel molecular target for the treatment of KRAS-mutated CRC. PMID:27526107

  5. Multidisciplinary Oncoplastic Approach Reduces Infection in Chest Wall Resection and Reconstruction for Malignant Chest Wall Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Malahias, Marco N.; Balasubramanian, Balapathiran; Djearaman, Madava G.; Naidu, Babu; Grainger, Melvin F.; Kalkat, Maninder

    2016-01-01

    Background: Management of complex thoracic defects post tumor extipiration is challenging because of the nature of pathology, the radical approach, and the insertion of prosthetic material required for biomechanical stability. Wound complications pose a significant problem that can have detrimental effect on patient outcome. The authors outline an institutional experience of a multidisciplinary thoracic oncoplastic approach to improve outcomes. Methods: Prospectively collected data from 71 consecutive patients treated with chest wall resection and reconstruction were analyzed (2009–2015). The demographic data, comorbidities, operative details, and outcomes with special focus on wound infection were recorded. All patients were managed in a multidisciplinary approach to optimize perioperative surgical planning. Results: Pathology included sarcoma (78%), locally advanced breast cancer (15%), and desmoids (6%), with age ranging from 17 to 82 years (median, 42 years) and preponderance of female patients (n = 44). Chest wall defects were located anterior and anterolateral (77.5%), posterior (8.4%), and apical axillary (10%) with skeletal defect size ranging from 56 to 600 cm2 (mean, 154 cm2). Bony reconstruction was performed using polyprolene mesh, methyl methacrylate prosthesis, and titanium plates. Soft tissue reconstructions depended on size, location, and flap availability and were achieved using regional, distant, and free tissue flaps. The postoperative follow-up ranged from 5 to 70 months (median, 32 months). All flaps survived with good functional and aesthetic outcome, whereas 2 patients experienced surgical site infection (2.8%). Conclusions: Multidisciplinary thoracic oncoplastic maximizes outcome for patients with large resection of chest wall tumors with reduction in surgical site infection and wound complications particularly in association with rigid skeletal chest wall reconstruction. PMID:27536488

  6. Targeting breast cancer stem cells by dendritic cell vaccination in humanized mice with breast tumor: preliminary results

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Phuc Van; Le, Hanh Thi; Vu, Binh Thanh; Pham, Viet Quoc; Le, Phong Minh; Phan, Nhan Lu-Chinh; Trinh, Ngu Van; Nguyen, Huyen Thi-Lam; Nguyen, Sinh Truong; Nguyen, Toan Linh; Phan, Ngoc Kim

    2016-01-01

    Background Breast cancer (BC) is one of the leading cancers in women. Recent progress has enabled BC to be cured with high efficiency. However, late detection or metastatic disease often renders the disease untreatable. Additionally, relapse is the main cause of death in BC patients. Breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) are considered to cause the development of BC and are thought to be responsible for metastasis and relapse. This study aimed to target BCSCs using dendritic cells (DCs) to treat tumor-bearing humanized mice models. Materials and methods NOD/SCID mice were used to produce the humanized mice by transplantation of human hematopoietic stem cells. Human BCSCs were injected into the mammary fat pad to produce BC humanized mice. Both hematopoietic stem cells and DCs were isolated from the human umbilical cord blood, and immature DCs were produced from cultured mononuclear cells. DCs were matured by BCSC-derived antigen incubation for 48 hours. Mature DCs were vaccinated to BC humanized mice with a dose of 106 cells/mice, and the survival percentage was monitored in both treated and untreated groups. Results The results showed that DC vaccination could target BCSCs and reduce the tumor size and prolong survival. Conclusion These results suggested that targeting BCSCs with DCs is a promising therapy for BC. PMID:27499638

  7. Does Local Recurrence of Prostate Cancer After Radiation Therapy Occur at the Site of Primary Tumor? Results of a Longitudinal MRI and MRSI Study

    SciTech Connect

    Arrayeh, Elnasif; Westphalen, Antonio C.; Kurhanewicz, John; Roach, Mack; Jung, Adam J.; Carroll, Peter R.; Coakley, Fergus V.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To determine if local recurrence of prostate cancer after radiation therapy occurs at the same site as the primary tumor before treatment, using longitudinal magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and MR spectroscopic imaging to assess dominant tumor location. Methods and Materials: This retrospective study was HIPAA compliant and approved by our Committee on Human Research. We identified all patients in our institutional prostate cancer database (1996 onward) who underwent endorectal MR imaging and MR spectroscopic imaging before radiotherapy for biopsy-proven prostate cancer and again at least 2 years after radiotherapy (n = 124). Two radiologists recorded the presence, location, and size of unequivocal dominant tumor on pre- and postradiotherapy scans. Recurrent tumor was considered to be at the same location as the baseline tumor if at least 50% of the tumor location overlapped. Clinical and biopsy data were collected from all patients. Results: Nine patients had unequivocal dominant tumor on both pre- and postradiotherapy imaging, with mean pre- and postradiotherapy dominant tumor diameters of 1.8 cm (range, 1-2.2) and 1.9 cm (range, 1.4-2.6), respectively. The median follow-up interval was 7.3 years (range, 2.7-10.8). Dominant recurrent tumor was at the same location as dominant baseline tumor in 8 of 9 patients (89%). Conclusions: Local recurrence of prostate cancer after radiation usually occurs at the same site as the dominant primary tumor at baseline, suggesting supplementary focal therapy aimed at enhancing local tumor control would be a rational addition to management.

  8. Functional results of endoscopic laser surgery in advanced head and neck tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadick, Haneen; Baker-Schreyer, Antonio; Bergler, Wolfgang; Maurer, Joachim; Hoermann, Karl

    1998-01-01

    Functional results following lasersurgery of minor laryngeal carcinomas were very encouraging. The indication for lasersurgical intervention was then extended to larger carcinomas of the larynx and hypopharynx. The purpose of this study was to assess vocal function and swallowing ability after endoscopic lasersurgery and to compare the results with conventional surgical procedures. From January 1994 to December 1996, 72 patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx and hypopharynx were examined prospectively. The patients underwent endoscopic lasersurgery instead of laryngopharyngectomy. The voice quality was evaluated pre- and postoperatively by subjective assessment, registration of voice parameters and sonegraphic classification. The swallowing ability was judged according to individual scores. The necessity of tracheostomy and nasogastric tube were registered and the duration of hospitalization was documented. The results showed that laryngeal phonation and swallowing ability were significantly better 12 months after lasersurgery compared to the preoperative findings whereas the recurrence rate was similar or even better after conventional pharyngolaryngectomy. Lasersurgery as an alternative surgical procedure to laryngectomy enables patients to retain a sufficient voice function and swallowing ability.

  9. Necrosis After Craniospinal Irradiation: Results From a Prospective Series of Children With Central Nervous System Embryonal Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Erin S.; Merchant, Thomas E.; Wu Shengjie; Xiong Xiaoping; Lukose, Renin; Wright, Karen D.; Qaddoumi, Ibrahim; Armstrong, Gregory T.; Broniscer, Alberto; Gajjar, Amar

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: Necrosis of the central nervous system (CNS) is a known complication of craniospinal irradiation (CSI) in children with medulloblastoma and similar tumors. We reviewed the incidence of necrosis in our prospective treatment series. Patients and Methods: Between 1996 and 2009, 236 children with medulloblastoma (n = 185) or other CNS embryonal tumors (n = 51) received postoperative CSI followed by dose-intense cyclophosphamide, vincristine, and cisplatin. Average risk cases (n = 148) received 23.4 Gy CSI, 36 Gy to the posterior fossa, and 55.8 Gy to the primary; after 2003, the treatment was 23.4 Gy CSI and 55.8 Gy to the primary. All high-risk cases (n = 88) received 36-39.6 Gy CSI and 55.8 Gy primary. The primary site clinical target volume margin was 2 cm (pre-2003) or 1 cm (post-2003). With competing risk of death by any cause, we determined the cumulative incidence of necrosis. Results: With a median follow-up of 52 months (range, 4-163 months), eight cases of necrosis were documented. One death was attributed. The median time to the imaging evidence was 4.8 months and to symptoms 6.0 months. The cumulative incidence at 5 years was 3.7% {+-} 1.3% (n = 236) for the entire cohort and 4.4% {+-} 1.5% (n = 196) for infratentorial tumor location. The mean relative volume of infratentorial brain receiving high-dose irradiation was significantly greater for patients with necrosis than for those without: {>=}50 Gy (92.12% {+-} 4.58% vs 72.89% {+-} 1.96%; P=.0337), {>=}52 Gy (88.95% {+-} 5.50% vs 69.16% {+-} 1.97%; P=.0275), and {>=}54 Gy (82.28% {+-} 7.06% vs 63.37% {+-} 1.96%; P=.0488), respectively. Conclusions: Necrosis in patients with CNS embryonal tumors is uncommon. When competing risks are considered, the incidence is 3.7% at 5 years. The volume of infratentorial brain receiving greater than 50, 52, and 54 Gy, respectively, is predictive for necrosis.

  10. Tumor Shrinkage With Lanreotide Autogel 120 mg as Primary Therapy in Acromegaly: Results of a Prospective Multicenter Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bevan, John S.; Petersenn, Stephan; Flanagan, Daniel; Tabarin, Antoine; Prévost, Gaëtan; Maisonobe, Pascal; Clermont, Antoine

    2014-01-01

    Context: Methodological shortcomings often compromise investigations into the effects of primary somatostatin-analog treatment on tumor size in acromegaly. There are also limited data for the long-acting lanreotide formulation. Objective: The aim of the study was to better characterize the effects of primary lanreotide Autogel treatment on tumor size in patients with GH-secreting macroadenomas. Design: PRIMARYS was a 48-week, multicenter, open-label, single-arm study. Setting: The study was conducted at specialist endocrine centers. Patients: Treatment-naïve acromegalic patients with GH-secreting macroadenomas participated in the study. Intervention: Lanreotide Autogel 120 mg was administered sc every 28 days (without dose titration). Outcome Measures: The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients with clinically significant (≥20%) tumor volume reduction (TVR) at week 48/last post-baseline value available using central assessments from three readers. The null hypothesis (H0) for the primary endpoint was that the proportion with TVR was ≤55%. Secondary endpoints included: TVR at other time points, GH and IGF-1, acromegalic symptoms, quality of life (QoL), and safety. Results: Sixty-four of 90 (71.1%) patients completed the study. Clinically significant TVR at 48 weeks/last post-baseline value available was achieved by 62.9% (95% confidence interval, 52.0, 72.9) of 89 patients in the primary analysis (intention-to-treat population; H0 not rejected) and 71.9–75.3% in sensitivity (n = 89) and secondary analyses (n = 63) (H0 rejected). At 12 weeks, 54.1% had clinically significant TVR. Early and sustained improvements also occurred in GH and IGF-1, acromegalic symptoms, and QoL. No patients withdrew due to gastrointestinal intolerance. Conclusions: Primary treatment with lanreotide Autogel, administered at 120 mg (highest available dose) without dose titration, in patients with GH-secreting macroadenomas provides early and sustained reductions in tumor

  11. [Bladder tumor lethality. Results in the autonomous community of Rioja between 1975-1991].

    PubMed

    Fernández Fernández, A; Gil Fabra, J; Fernández Ruíz, M; Angulo Castellanos, M G; Blanco Martín, E; Otero Mauricio, G

    1998-01-01

    Between 1975-1991, a total of 557 cases of bladder carcinoma were identified in the Autonomous Community of La Rioja (CAR) which were followed up to December 1994. The overall lethality was 21.9%. 492 cases with 22.35% lethality were identified in males. In females, however, there was 65 cases with 18.46% lethality. The comparison of males and females lethality resulted in p = 0.525. Lethality between cases diagnosed within each 5-year period analyzed is: 1975-1981: 177 cases, lethality 23.72%. 1982-1986: 168 cases, lethality 30.95%. 1987-1991: 212 cases, lethality 13.20%. Between the first and the second 5-year periods, p = 0.132; between the first and third 5-year periods p = 0.007 and between the second and third 5-year periods p < 0.000. Bladder tumours accounts in CAR for a 22.35% lethality. Lethality is higher in males that in females but the difference is not statistically significant. In the last 5-year period assessed, 1987-1991, a reduction of lethality from bladder neoplasms has been documented.

  12. The treatment of giant cell tumors by curettage and filling with acrylic cement. Long-term functional results.

    PubMed

    Segura, J; Albareda, J; Bueno, A L; Nuez, A; Palanca, D; Seral, F

    1997-01-01

    Curettage and filling with acrylic cement in the treatment of para-articular giant cell tumor (GCT) has multiple advantages as compared to other methods; nonetheless, the possibility of progression in arthrosis is still a drawback. The literature does not report long-term functional results when this method was used. Four cases are presented with a mean long-term follow-up of 13.5 years (minimum 11, maximum 18). Clinical results, evaluated by the Enneking system (18), were excellent, and there were no radiological modifications, so that we believe that this is the method to choose for Campanacci stage I and II GCT (1), and in some stage III cases, as joint function is not compromised in time.

  13. Benign odontogenic tumors versus histochemically related tissues: preliminary results from mid-infrared and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kolmas, Joanna; Prządka, Rafał

    2014-01-01

    Three types of human odontogenic tumors histologically classified as compound composite odontoma, ossifying fibroma, and Pindborg tumor were characterized using mid-infrared spectroscopy (mid-IR) and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (ssNMR). For comparison, human jawbone and dental mineralized tissues such as dentin, enamel, and dental cement were also characterized. The studies focused on the structural properties and chemical composition of pathological tissues versus histochemically related tissues. All analyzed tumors were composed of organic and mineral parts and water. Apatite was found to be the main constituent of the mineral part. Various components (water, structural hydroxyl groups, carbonate ions (CO(3)(2-)), and hydrogen phosphate ions (HPO(4)(2-))) and physicochemical parameters (index of apatite maturity and crystallinity) were examined. The highest organic/mineral ratio was observed in fibrocementoma, a finding that can be explained by the fibrous character of the tumor. The lowest relative HPO(4)(2-) content was found in odontoma. This tumor is characterized by the highest mineral crystallinity index and content of structural hydroxyl groups. The Pindborg tumor mineral portion was found to be poorly crystalline and rich in HPO(4)(2-). The relative CO(3)(2-) content was similar in all samples studied. The results of spectroscopic studies of odontogenic tumors were consistent with the standard histochemical analysis. It was shown that the various techniques of ssNMR and elaborate analysis of the mid-IR spectra, applied together, provide valuable information about calcified benign odontogenic tumors.

  14. An HPV-E6/E7 immunotherapy plus PD-1 checkpoint inhibition results in tumor regression and reduction in PD-L1 expression.

    PubMed

    Rice, A E; Latchman, Y E; Balint, J P; Lee, J H; Gabitzsch, E S; Jones, F R

    2015-09-01

    We have investigated if immunotherapy against human papilloma virus (HPV) using a viral gene delivery platform to immunize against HPV 16 genes E6 and E7 (Ad5 [E1-, E2b-]-E6/E7) combined with programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-1) blockade could increase therapeutic effect as compared to the vaccine alone. Ad5 [E1-, E2b-]-E6/E7 as a single agent induced HPV-E6/E7 cell-mediated immunity. Immunotherapy using Ad5 [E1-, E2b-]-E6/E7 resulted in clearance of small tumors and an overall survival benefit in mice with larger established tumors. When immunotherapy was combined with immune checkpoint blockade, an increased level of anti-tumor activity against large tumors was observed. Analysis of the tumor microenvironment in Ad5 [E1-, E2b-]-E6/E7 treated mice revealed elevated CD8(+) tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs); however, we observed induction of suppressive mechanisms such as programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression on tumor cells and an increase in PD-1(+) TILs. When Ad5 [E1-, E2b-]-E6/E7 immunotherapy was combined with anti-PD-1 antibody, we observed CD8(+) TILs at the same level but a reduction in tumor PD-L1 expression on tumor cells and reduced PD-1(+) TILs providing a mechanism by which combination therapy favors a tumor clearance state and a rationale for pairing antigen-specific vaccines with checkpoint inhibitors in future clinical trials.

  15. Combination of vatalanib and a 20-HETE synthesis inhibitor results in decreased tumor growth in an animal model of human glioma

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Adarsh; Borin, Thaiz F; Iskander, Asm; Varma, Nadimpalli RS; Achyut, Bhagelu R; Jain, Meenu; Mikkelsen, Tom; Guo, Austin M; Chwang, Wilson B; Ewing, James R; Bagher-Ebadian, Hassan; Arbab, Ali S

    2016-01-01

    Background Due to the hypervascular nature of glioblastoma (GBM), antiangiogenic treatments, such as vatalanib, have been added as an adjuvant to control angiogenesis and tumor growth. However, evidence of progressive tumor growth and resistance to antiangiogenic treatment has been observed. To counter the unwanted effect of vatalanib on GBM growth, we have added a new agent known as N-hydroxy-N′-(4-butyl-2 methylphenyl)formamidine (HET0016), which is a selective inhibitor of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) synthesis. The aims of the studies were to determine 1) whether the addition of HET0016 can attenuate the unwanted effect of vatalanib on tumor growth and 2) whether the treatment schedule would have a crucial impact on controlling GBM. Methods U251 human glioma cells (4×105) were implanted orthotopically. Two different treatment schedules were investigated. Treatment starting on day 8 (8–21 days treatment) of the tumor implantation was to mimic treatment following detection of tumor, where tumor would have hypoxic microenvironment and well-developed neovascularization. Drug treatment starting on the same day of tumor implantation (0–21 days treatment) was to mimic cases following radiation therapy or surgery. There were four different treatment groups: vehicle, vatalanib (oral treatment 50 mg/kg/d), HET0016 (intraperitoneal treatment 10 mg/kg/d), and combined (vatalanib and HET0016). Following scheduled treatments, all animals underwent magnetic resonance imaging on day 22, followed by euthanasia. Brain specimens were equally divided for immunohistochemistry and protein array analysis. Results Our results demonstrated a trend that HET0016, alone or in combination with vatalanib, is capable of controlling the tumor growth compared with that of vatalanib alone, indicating attenuation of the unwanted effect of vatalanib. When both vatalanib and HET0016 were administered together on the day of the tumor implantation (0–21 days treatment), tumor

  16. Is Antibiotic Prophylaxis for Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation (RFA) of Primary Liver Tumors Necessary? Results From a Single-Center Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatia, Shivank S.; Echenique, Ana Froud, Tatiana Suthar, Rekha Lawson, Ivy Dalal, Ravi; Yrizarry, Jose Narayanan, Govindarajan

    2015-08-15

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to evaluate need for antibiotic prophylaxis for radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of liver tumors in patients with no significant co-existing risk factors for infection.Materials and MethodsFrom January 2004 to September 2013, 83 patients underwent 123 percutaneous RFA procedures for total of 152 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) lesions. None of the patients had pre-existing biliary enteric anastomosis (BEA) or any biliary tract abnormality predisposing to ascending biliary infection or uncontrolled diabetes mellitus. No pre- or post-procedure antibiotic prophylaxis was provided for 121 procedures. Data for potential risk factors were reviewed retrospectively and analyzed for the frequency of infectious complications, including abscess formation.ResultsOne patient (1/121 (0.8 %) RFA sessions) developed a large segment 5 liver abscess/infected biloma communicating with the gallbladder 7 weeks after the procedure, successfully treated over 10 weeks with IV and PO antibiotic therapy and percutaneous catheter drainage. This patient did not receive any antibiotics prior to RFA. During the procedure, there was inadvertent placement of RFA probe tines into the gallbladder. No other infectious complications were documented.ConclusionThese data suggest that the routine use of prophylactic antibiotics for liver RFA is not necessary in majority of the patients undergoing liver ablation for HCC and could be limited to patients with high-risk factors such as the presence of BEA or other biliary abnormalities, uncontrolled diabetes mellitus, and large centrally located tumors in close proximity to central bile ducts. Larger randomized studies are needed to confirm this hypothesis.

  17. Pineal region tumors: results of radiation therapy and indications for elective spinal irradiation. [/sup 60/Co; x ray

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, B.R.; Griffin, T.W.; Tong, D.Y.K.; Russell, A.H.; Kurtz, J.; Laramore, G.E.; Groudine, M.

    1981-05-01

    Eighteen patients with pineal region tumors seen from November 1960 to November 1978 were reviewed. Thirteen patients treated with radiation therapy received tumor doses in the 4000 to 5500 rad range. The five year survival and five year disease-free survival were 73 and 63% respectively. Spinal cord metastasis occurred in 2 of 13 (15%) patients. Attempts at salvage radiotherapy for these patients were unsuccessful. Computerized tomography (CT) scan provides an excellent method of evaluating the response of pineal region tumors to radiation. Rapid regression of the tumor mass on CT scan reflects the highly radioresponsive nature of germinomas, the tumor type most likely to disseminate throughout the neuraxis. This principle can be exploited to select unbiopsied patients with a high risk of spinal cord metastasis for prophylactic spinal radiation at an early stage of treatment.

  18. Centralized databases available for describing primary brain tumor incidence, survival, and treatment: Central Brain Tumor Registry of the United States; Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results; and National Cancer Data Base.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, F. G.; McCarthy, B. J.; Berger, M. S.

    1999-01-01

    Characteristics of three databases--the Central Brain Tumor Registry of the United States (CBTRUS) database; the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database; and the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB)--containing information on primary brain tumors are discussed. The recently developed population-based CBTRUS database comprises incidence data on all primary brain tumors from 11 collaborating state registries; however, follow-up data are not available. SEER, the population-based gold standard for cancer data, collects incidence and follow-up data on malignant brain tumors only. While not population-based, the NCDB identifies newly diagnosed cases and conducts follow-up on all primary brain tumors from hospitals accredited by the American College of Surgeons. The NCDB is the largest of the three databases and also contains more complete information regarding treatment of these tumors than either the SEER or CBTRUS databases. Additional strengths and limitations of each of these are described, and their judicious use for supporting research, education, and health care planning is encouraged. PMID:11554389

  19. Recurrent angio-fibroma of breast masquerading as phyllodes tumor.

    PubMed

    Chaurasia, Jai K; Alam, Feroz; Shadan, Mariam; Naim, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    A young Indian female presented with a recurring tumor in the right breast masquerading as phyllodes tumor. Patient had history of five times excision and recurrences of the tumor, diagnosed as fibrous phyllodes of the breast. Presently, a well-circumscribed tumor of about 10 cm size, comprising of benign fibrous-angiomatous tissue with evidence of foci of pyogenic vasculitis was observed. Immuno-histochemical markers for the myo-epithelial and epithelial elements excluded the possibility of fibrous phyllodes, inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor, desmoid fibromatosis, and metaplastic carcinoma. The present findings were diagnostic of an inflammatory angio-fibroma of the right breast, not reported in the earlier literature. The observations indicated that the female breast may be susceptible to spontaneous productive and common-antibiotic-resistant focal septic vascular inflammation giving rise to angio-fibromatous proliferation producing a well-defined tumor mass in the breast, distinguishable from the other breast lesions by the connective tissue stains and immuno-histochemical markers. PMID:26458623

  20. Epidermal Platelet-activating Factor Receptor Activation and Ultraviolet B Radiation Result in Synergistic Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha Production

    PubMed Central

    Wolverton, Jay E.; Al-Hassani, Mohammed; Yao, Yongxue; Zhang, Qiwei; Travers, Jeffrey B.

    2010-01-01

    Ultraviolet B radiation (UVB) is a potent stimulator of epidermal cytokine production which has been implicated in photoaggravated dermatoses. In addition to cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), UVB generates bioactive lipids including platelet-activating factor (PAF). Our previous studies have demonstrated that UVB-mediated production of keratinocyte TNF-α is in part due to PAF. The current studies use a human PAF-receptor (PAF-R) negative epithelial cell line transduced with PAF-Rs and PAF–R-deficient mice to demonstrate that activation of the epidermal PAF-R along with UVB irradiation results in a synergistic production of TNF-α. It should be noted that PAF-R effects are mimicked by the protein kinase C (PKC) agonist phorbol myristic acetate, and are inhibited by pharmacological antagonists of the PKC gamma isoenzyme. These studies suggest that concomitant PAF-R activation and UVB irradiation results in a synergistic production of the cytokine TNF-α which is mediated in part via PKC. These studies provide a novel potential mechanism for photosensitivity responses. PMID:19769579

  1. Lobar Hepatocellular Carcinoma with Ipsilateral Portal Vein Tumor Thrombosis Treated with Yttrium-90 Glass Microsphere Radioembolization: Preliminary Results

    PubMed Central

    Pracht, M.; Edeline, J.; Lenoir, L.; Latournerie, M.; Mesbah, H.; Audrain, O.; Rolland, Y.; Clément, B.; Raoul, J. L.; Garin, E.; Boucher, E.

    2013-01-01

    Portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT) is a common complication of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and has a negative impact on prognosis. This characteristic feature led to the rationale of the present trial designed to assess the efficacy and the safety of yttrium-90 glass-microsphere treatment for advanced-stage lobar HCC with ipsilateral PVTT. 18 patients with unresectable lobar HCC and ipsilateral PVTT were treated in our institution with 90Y-microS radioembolization. Patients were evaluated every 3 to 6 months for response, survival, and toxicity. Mean follow-up was 13.0 months (2.2–50.6). Outcomes were: complete response (n = 2), partial response (n = 13), stable disease (n = 1), and progressive disease (n = 2) giving a disease control rate of 88.9%. Four patients were downstaged. Treating lobar hepatocellular carcinoma with ipsilateral portal vein thrombosis with yttrium-90 glass-microsphere radioembolization is safe and efficacious. Further clinical trials are warranted to confirm these results and to compare 90Y-microS with sorafenib, taking into account not only survival but also the possibility of secondary surgery for putative curative intention after downstaging. PMID:23476792

  2. A Multi-Institutional Study of Feasibility, Implementation, and Early Clinical Results With Noninvasive Breast Brachytherapy for Tumor Bed Boost

    SciTech Connect

    Hamid, Subarna; Rocchio, Kathy; Arthur, Douglas; Vera, Robyn; Sha, Sandra; Jolly, Michele; Cavanaugh, Sean; Wooten, Eric; Benda, Rashmi; Greenfield, Brad; Prestidge, Bradley; Ackerman, Scot; Kuske, Robert; Quiet, Coral; Snyder, Margaret; Wazer, David E.

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility, implementation, and early results of noninvasive breast brachytherapy (NIBB) for tumor bed boost with whole breast radiation therapy (WBRT). Methods and Materials: NIBB is a commercially available (AccuBoost, Billerica, MA) mammography-based, brachytherapy system in which the treatment applicators are centered on the planning target volume (PTV) to direct {sup 192}Ir emissions along orthogonal axes. A privacy-encrypted online data registry collected information from 8 independent academic and community-based institutions. Data were from 146 consecutive women with early-stage breast cancer after lumpectomy and WBRT receiving boost with NIBB between July 2007 and March 2010. Toxicity and cosmesis were graded according to the Common Toxicity Criteria (v. 3.0) and the Harvard scale. Median follow-up was 6 months (1-39 months). Results: Grade 1-2 skin toxicity was observed in 64%, 48%, and 21% during the acute (1-3 weeks), intermediate (4-26 weeks), and late-intermediate (>26 weeks) periods. There was no Grade 4 toxicity. At 6 months, for the entire cohort, cosmesis was excellent/good in 62%/38%. The subset receiving NIBB before WBRT had cosmetic scores of 32% and 63%, whereas during WBRT, 58% and 37% were rated as excellent and good, respectively. Breast compression was scored as 'uncomfortable' in 12%, 29%, and 59% when NIBB was delivered before, during, or after WBRT. For each patient, the fraction-to-fraction variability in PTV was low. Skin flash was associated with a higher proportion of excellent cosmesis (58% vs. 42%) relative to having the applicator all within breast tissue. Conclusions: These data indicate that NIBB is feasible and can be consistently implemented in a broad array of practice settings. Preliminary evaluation suggests that NIBB is associated with acceptably mild normal tissue toxicity and favorable early cosmesis. The application of NIBB before WBRT may be associated with better patient tolerance at the

  3. Epidemiology of gastrointestinal stromal tumors in the era of histology codes: results of a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Ma, Grace L; Murphy, James D; Martinez, Maria E; Sicklick, Jason K

    2015-01-01

    To date, all population-based epidemiologic data on gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) in the United States predate the 2001 implementation of GIST-specific histology coding. As such, results from previous studies were limited because of inclusion of non-GIST abdominal or gastrointestinal sarcomas. We used a national cancer registry with modern day histologic codes to gain greater insight into the true epidemiology of GIST in the United States. We identified 6,142 patients diagnosed with GIST between 2001 and 2011 in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database. Incidence, survival, demographic risk factors, and prognostic factors were analyzed. Annual age-adjusted incidence rose from 0.55/100,000 in 2001 to 0.78/100,000 in 2011 and increased with age, peaking among 70- to 79-year-olds (3.06/100,000). GIST was also more common in males than females [rate ratio (RR), 1.35], non-Hispanics than Hispanics (RR, 1.23), and blacks (RR, 2.07) or Asians/Pacific Islanders (RR, 1.50) than whites. The study period had 5-year overall and GIST-specific survival rates of 65% and 79%, respectively. The 5-year overall survival rates for those with localized, regional, and metastatic disease at diagnosis were 77%, 64%, and 41%, respectively. Multivariate analyses demonstrated that older age at diagnosis, male sex, black race, and advanced stage at diagnosis were independent risk factors for worse overall survival. Multivariate analysis also showed the four aforementioned characteristics, along with earlier year of diagnosis, to be independent risk factors for worse GIST-specific survival. As the first population-based, epidemiologic study of histologically confirmed disease, our findings provide a robust representation of GIST in the era of immunohistochemical diagnoses.

  4. Solid tumors of the peritoneum, omentum, and mesentery in children: radiologic-pathologic correlation: from the radiologic pathology archives.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ellen M; Biko, David M; Arzamendi, Aaron M; Meldrum, Jaren T; Stocker, J Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Intraperitoneal solid tumors are far less common in children than in adults, and the histologic spectrum of neoplasms of the peritoneum and its specialized folds in young patients differs from that in older patients. Localized masses may be caused by inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor, Castleman disease, mesenteric fibromatosis, or other mesenchymal masses. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor is a mesenchymal tumor of borderline biologic potential that appears as a solitary circumscribed mass, possibly with central calcification. Castleman disease is an idiopathic lymphoproliferative disorder that appears as a circumscribed, intensely enhancing mass in the mesentery. Mesenteric fibromatosis, or intra-abdominal desmoid tumor, is a benign tumor of mesenchymal origin associated with familial adenomatous polyposis. Mesenteric fibromatosis appears as a mildly enhancing, circumscribed solitary mass without metastases. Diffuse peritoneal disease may be due to desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSRCT), non-Hodgkin lymphoma, or rhabdomyosarcoma. DSRCT is a rare member of the small round blue cell tumor family that causes diffuse peritoneal masses without a visible primary tumor. A dominant mass is typically found in the retrovesical space. Burkitt lymphoma is a pediatric tumor that manifests with extensive disease because of its short doubling time. The bowel and adjacent mesentery are commonly involved. Rhabdomyosarcoma may arise as a primary tumor of the omentum or may spread from a primary tumor in the bladder, prostate, or scrotum. Knowledge of this spectrum of disease allows the radiologist to provide an appropriate differential diagnosis and suggest proper patient management.

  5. Solid tumors of the peritoneum, omentum, and mesentery in children: radiologic-pathologic correlation: from the radiologic pathology archives.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ellen M; Biko, David M; Arzamendi, Aaron M; Meldrum, Jaren T; Stocker, J Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Intraperitoneal solid tumors are far less common in children than in adults, and the histologic spectrum of neoplasms of the peritoneum and its specialized folds in young patients differs from that in older patients. Localized masses may be caused by inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor, Castleman disease, mesenteric fibromatosis, or other mesenchymal masses. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor is a mesenchymal tumor of borderline biologic potential that appears as a solitary circumscribed mass, possibly with central calcification. Castleman disease is an idiopathic lymphoproliferative disorder that appears as a circumscribed, intensely enhancing mass in the mesentery. Mesenteric fibromatosis, or intra-abdominal desmoid tumor, is a benign tumor of mesenchymal origin associated with familial adenomatous polyposis. Mesenteric fibromatosis appears as a mildly enhancing, circumscribed solitary mass without metastases. Diffuse peritoneal disease may be due to desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSRCT), non-Hodgkin lymphoma, or rhabdomyosarcoma. DSRCT is a rare member of the small round blue cell tumor family that causes diffuse peritoneal masses without a visible primary tumor. A dominant mass is typically found in the retrovesical space. Burkitt lymphoma is a pediatric tumor that manifests with extensive disease because of its short doubling time. The bowel and adjacent mesentery are commonly involved. Rhabdomyosarcoma may arise as a primary tumor of the omentum or may spread from a primary tumor in the bladder, prostate, or scrotum. Knowledge of this spectrum of disease allows the radiologist to provide an appropriate differential diagnosis and suggest proper patient management. PMID:25763737

  6. Intravenous injection of Candida-derived mannan results in elevated tumor necrosis factor alpha levels in serum.

    PubMed

    Garner, R E; Hudson, J A

    1996-11-01

    Intravenous injection of Candida albicans into mice produced elevated serum tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) levels. We hypothesized that immunostimulants released in vivo from C. albicans during fungal sepsis might contribute to the elevated levels of TNF-alpha in serum. We tested this hypothesis in mice with C. albicans mannan (CAM). Increased serum TNF-alpha levels were observed following intravenous and intraperitoneal injections of CAM. Injection of CAM into mice resulted in increased serum TNF-alpha concentrations that reached 1,200 pg/ml of blood, compared with 2,400 microg/ml of blood following injection of 10 microg of endotoxin. The response to CAM was concentration dependent, requiring a minimum dose of 20 microg of CAM per g of body weight. Sera from mice were tested 30, 60, 90, and 120 min after intravenous injections with CAM. TNF-alpha concentrations were minimal 30 and 120 min after intravenous injection and maximal 60 and 90 min after CAM injection. The relative distribution of CAM in vivo in decreasing order was determined to be as follows: blood > liver > lung > spleen, 90 min following injection of a single 5-mg dose of CAM. CAM was confirmed as the stimulating substance by utilizing anti-CAM antibodies in vivo to block the response. Rabbit anti-mannan antibodies administered by intraperitoneal injection 24 h before CAM injection significantly suppressed (P < 0.05) the accumulation of TNF-alpha in the sera. Dexamethasone administered to mice before intravenous injection of mannan significantly reduced (40 to 90% reduction; P < 0.05) the concentrations of TNF-alpha in the sera of treated mice. Thus, when in vivo CAM clearance mechanisms are exceeded, sufficient CAM may become available to stimulate TNF-alpha production, making CAM an important part of pathogenesis in Candida sepsis.

  7. Solitary fibrous tumor of the thyroid gland: report of seven cases.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, I; Ayala, E; Caballero, C; De Miguel, C; Matias-Guiu, X; Cubilla, A L; Rosai, J

    2001-11-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor is a soft tissue neoplasm initially described in the pleura but subsequently reported in a wide variety of locations. The clinical behavior is usually benign, but the existence of aggressive cases has been documented both in the pleura and in extrapleural sites. In this report clinical and pathologic features of seven solitary fibrous tumors of the thyroid gland are presented. Patients' ages ranged from 43 to 64 years (mean 52 years), and tumor sizes varied from 2 to 6 cm. Grossly, the tumors were white-tan and well circumscribed. Microscopically, there was a variegated, wavy, storiform, hemangiopericytic or desmoid-like arrangement of spindle cells. Trapped thyroid follicles within the tumor and peripheral jagged tumor infiltration among follicles were common. There was immunohistochemical reactivity for CD34, CD99, and bcl-2, and ultrastructural analysis of one tumor was consistent with a fibroblastic lineage. The differential diagnosis included other benign and malignant mesenchymal tumors of the thyroid, spindle cell follicular adenoma, Riedel's thyroiditis, the spindle cell, and paucicellular variants of anaplastic carcinoma, papillary thyroid carcinoma with exuberant nodular fasciitis-like stroma, and the spindle epithelial tumor with thymus-like differentiation. The cumulative data of 13 cases (comprised of the seven present cases and the six previously reported) suggest a benign clinical behavior for thyroid SFT.

  8. The impact of extracellular matrix on the chemoresistance of solid tumors--experimental and clinical results of hyaluronidase as additive to cytostatic chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, G; Gomar-Höss, C; Sakr, L; Ulsperger, E; Wogritsch, C

    1998-09-11

    Chemoresistance is of outstanding importance for the limited results of chemotherapy in solid tumors. Chemoresistance of multicellular tumor tissues is more pronounced than that of single cells in vivo and in vitro. The enzyme hyaluronidase is able to loosen the cell-cell contact and the interstitial connective tissue and as such, in a number of preclinical and clinical trials, was shown to enhance the efficacy of cytostatic agents. Although proven to be very effective as additive to local chemotherapy, the systemic efficacy is not documented as well. We present a randomized trial done in high-grade astrocytomas with combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy with and without hyaluronidase. After very promising pilot results with systemic hyaluronidase in various tumor entities and also astrocytomas, this randomized study failed to show synergy to chemotherapy and radiation therapy in high-grade astrocytomas concerning survival. The promising preclinical data and the rather well documented activity in therapeutic use as additive to local chemotherapy seem to be an adequate motive to further elucidate the complex manner in which hyaluronidase is active in the interstitial tumor matrix and to obtain more information concerning the optimal route of application, the optimal dosage and the spectrum of tumor entities where it is synergistic with cytostatic chemotherapy and perhaps even radiation therapy.

  9. Real-Time US-CT/MRI Image Fusion for Guidance of Thermal Ablation of Liver Tumors Undetectable with US: Results in 295 Cases

    SciTech Connect

    Mauri, Giovanni Cova, Luca; Beni, Stefano De; Ierace, Tiziana Tondolo, Tania Cerri, Anna; Goldberg, S. Nahum; Solbiati, Luigi

    2015-02-15

    PurposeThis study was designed to assess feasibility of US-CT/MRI fusion-guided ablation in liver tumors undetectable with US.MethodsFrom 2002 to 2012, 295 tumors (162 HCCs and 133 metastases; mean diameter 1.3 ± 0.6 cm, range 0.5–2.5 cm) detectable on contrast-enhanced CT/MRI, but completely undetectable with unenhanced US and either totally undetectable or incompletely conspicuous with contrast-enhanced US (CEUS), were treated in 215 sessions using either internally cooled radiofrequency or microwave with standard ablation protocols, guided by an image fusion system (Virtual Navigation System, Esaote S.p.A., Genova, Italy) that combines US with CT/ MRI images. Correct targeting and successful ablation of tumor were verified after 24 hours with CT or MRI.ResultsA total of 282 of 295 (95.6 %) tumors were correctly targeted with successful ablation achieved in 266 of 295 (90.2 %). Sixteen of 295 (5.4 %) tumors were correctly targeted, but unsuccessfully ablated, and 13 of 295 (4.4 %) tumors were unsuccessfully ablated due to inaccurate targeting. There were no perioperative deaths. Major complications were observed in 2 of the 215 treatments sessions (0.9 %).ConclusionsReal-time virtual navigation system with US-CT/MRI fusion imaging is precise for targeting and achieving successful ablation of target tumors undetectable with US alone. Therefore, a larger population could benefit from ultrasound guided ablation procedures.

  10. Delta-ALA-mediated fluorescence spectroscopy of gastrointestinal tumors: comparison of in vivo and in vitro results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladimirov, B.; Borisova, E.; Avramov, L.

    2007-06-01

    The limitations of standard endoscopy for detection of dysplastic changes of mucosa are significant challenge and initiate development of new photodiagnostic techniques, additional to diagnostic possibilities of standard endoscopic equipment. One of the most widely examined optical modalities is the laser- or light-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS), because of its rapid and highly sensitive response to early biochemical and morphological changes in biological tissues. In the recent study delta-aminolevulinic acid/protoporphyrin IX is used as fluorescent marker for dysplasia and tumor detection in esophagus and stomach. The δ -ALA is administered per os six hours before measurements at dose 20mg/kg weight. High-power light-emitting diode at 405 nm is used as an excitation source. Special opto-mechanical device is built to use the light guide of standard video-endoscopic system. Through endoscopic instrumental channel a fiber is applied to return information about fluorescence to microspectrometer. The fluorescence detected from in vivo tumor sites has very complex spectral origins. It consists of autofluorescence, fluorescence from exogenous fluorophores and re-absorption from the chromophores accumulated in the tissue investigated. Mucosa autofluorescence lies at 450-600 nm region. The fluorescence of PpIX is clearly pronounced at the 630-710 nm region. Deep minima in the tumor fluorescence signals are observed in the region 540-575 nm, related to hemoglobin re-absorption. Such high hemoglobin content is an indication of the tumors vascularization and it is clearly pronounced in all dysplastic and tumor sites investigated. After formalin conservation for in vitro samples hemoglobin absorption is strongly reduced that increases mucous fluorescence signal in green-yellow spectral region. Simultaneously the maxima at 635 nm and 720 nm are reduced.

  11. SU-C-210-06: Quantitative Evaluation of Dosimetric Effects Resulting From Positional Variations of Pancreatic Tumor Volumes

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, S; Sehgal, V; Wei, R; Lawrenson, L; Kuo, J; Hanna, N; Ramsinghani, N; Daroui, P; Al-Ghazi, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to quantify dosimetric effects resulting from variation in pancreatic tumor position assessed by bony anatomy and implanted fiducial markers Methods: Twelve pancreatic cancer patients were retrospectively analyzed for this study. All patients received modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment using fiducial-based Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT) to the intact pancreas. Using daily orthogonal kV and/or Cone beam CT images, the shift needed to co-register the daily pre-treatment images to reference CT from fiducial to bone (Fid-Bone) were recorded as Left-Right (LR), Anterior-Posterior (AP) and Superior-Inferior (SI). The original VMAT plan iso-center was shifted based on KV bone matching positions at 5 evenly spaced fractions. Dose coverage of the planning target volumes (PTVs) (V100%), mean dose to liver, kidney and stomach/duodenum were assessed in the modified plans. Results: A total of 306 fractions were analyzed. The absolute fiducial-bone positional shifts were greatest in the SI direction, (AP = 2.7 ± 3.0, LR = 2.8 ± 2.8, and SI 6.3 ± 7.9 mm, mean ± SD). The V100% was significantly reduced by 13.5%, (Fid-Bone = 95.3 ± 2.0 vs. 82.3 ± 11.8%, p=0.02). This varied widely among patients (Fid-Bone V100% Range = 2–60%), where 33% of patients had a reduction in V100% of more than 10%. The impact on OARs was greatest to the liver (Fid-Bone= 14.6 vs. 16.1 Gy, 10%), and stomach, (Fid-Bone = 23.9 vx. 25.5 Gy, 7%), however was not statistically significant (p=0.10 both). Conclusion: Compared to matching by fiducial markers, matching by bony anatomy would have substantially reduced the PTV coverage by 13.5%. This reinforces the importance of online position verification based on fiducial markers. Hence, implantation of fiducial markers is strongly recommended for pancreatic cancer patients undergoing intensity modulated radiation therapy treatments.

  12. Embolization of metastatic neuroendocrine tumor resulting in clinical manifestations of syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH)

    PubMed Central

    Yarmohammadi, Hooman; Erinjeri, Joseph P.; Brown, Karen T.

    2016-01-01

    Complications after hepatic artery embolization are usually minor and transient. We report a patient with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor with hepatic metastases that repeatedly developed clinical findings of syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) with hyponatremia (sodium less than 130 mEq/L), low plasma osmolarity (lower than 275 mOsm/kg) and high urine osmolarity (above 500 mOsm/kg) after every session of hepatic artery embolization. PMID:25805538

  13. Radiotherapy in Ewing tumors of the vertebrae: Treatment results and local relapse analysis of the Chess 81/86 and EICESS 92 trials

    SciTech Connect

    Schuck, Andreas . E-mail: schuck@uni-muenster.de; Ahrens, Susanne; Schorlemer, Ines von; Kuhlen, Michaela; Paulussen, Michael; Hunold, Andrea; Gosheger, Georg; Winkelmann, Winfried; Dunst, Juergen; Willich, Normann; Juergens, Heribert

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: Treatment results in patients with Ewing tumors of the vertebrae enrolled in the Cooperative Ewing's Sarcoma Study (CESS) 81, 86, and the European Intergroup Cooperative Ewing's Sarcoma Study (EICESS) 92 trials were analyzed with special emphasis on radiation-associated factors. Patients and Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed on 116 patients with primary tumors of the cervical, thoracic, or lumbar vertebrae treated between 1981 and 1999. Furthermore, a relapse analysis was done on those patients who underwent radiotherapy and subsequently had a local recurrence. Results: A total of 64.6% of the patients received definitive radiotherapy; 27.5% of patients had surgery and radiotherapy. Only 4 patients (3.4%) underwent definitive surgery. Twenty-seven patients presented with metastases at diagnosis. 22.4% of the total group developed a local relapse. Among the subgroup with definitive radiotherapy, local recurrence was seen in 17 of 75 patients (22.6%). Event-free survival and survival at 5 years were 47% and 58%, respectively. Of the 14 evaluable patients with a local relapse after radiotherapy, 13 were in-field. No correlation between radiation dose and local control could be found. Conclusion: Surgery with wide resection margins is rarely possible. The results after definitive radiotherapy in vertebral tumors are comparable to those of other tumor sites when definitive radiotherapy is given. Nearly all local relapses after radiotherapy are in-field.

  14. Metabolic Tumor Volume as a Prognostic Imaging-Based Biomarker for Head-and-Neck Cancer: Pilot Results From Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 0522

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, David L.; Harris, Jonathan; Yao, Min; Rosenthal, David I.; Opanowski, Adam; Levering, Anthony; Ang, K. Kian; Trotti, Andy M.; Garden, Adam S.; Jones, Christopher U.; Harari, Paul; Foote, Robert; Holland, John; Zhang, Qiang; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate candidate fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) imaging biomarkers for head-and-neck chemoradiotherapy outcomes in the cooperative group trial setting. Methods and Materials: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) protocol 0522 patients consenting to a secondary FDG-PET/CT substudy were serially imaged at baseline and 8 weeks after radiation. Maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax), SUV peak (mean SUV within a 1-cm sphere centered on SUVmax), and metabolic tumor volume (MTV) using 40% of SUVmax as threshold were obtained from primary tumor and involved nodes. Results: Of 940 patients entered onto RTOG 0522, 74 were analyzable for this substudy. Neither high baseline SUVmax nor SUVpeak from primary or nodal disease were associated with poor treatment outcomes. However, primary tumor MTV above the cohort median was associated with worse local-regional control (hazard ratio 4.01, 95% confidence interval 1.28-12.52, P=.02) and progression-free survival (hazard ratio 2.34, 95% confidence interval 1.02-5.37, P=.05). Although MTV and T stage seemed to correlate (mean MTV 6.4, 13.2, and 26.8 for T2, T3, and T4 tumors, respectively), MTV remained a strong independent prognostic factor for progression-free survival in bivariate analysis that included T stage. Primary MTV remained prognostic in p16-associated oropharyngeal cancer cases, although sample size was limited. Conclusion: High baseline primary tumor MTV was associated with worse treatment outcomes in this limited patient subset of RTOG 0522. Additional confirmatory work will be required to validate primary tumor MTV as a prognostic imaging biomarker for patient stratification in future trials.

  15. Expression of a Mutant p53 Results in an Age-Related Demographic Shift in Spontaneous Lung Tumor Formation in Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Wenrui; Gao, Li; Wu, Xin; Hade, Erinn M.; Gao, Jian-Xin; Ding, Haiming; Barsky, Sanford H.; Otterson, Gregory A.; Villalona-Calero, Miguel A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Mutations in the P53 gene are among the most common genetic abnormalities in human lung cancer. Codon 273 in the sequence-specific DNA binding domain is one of the most frequently mutated sites. Methodology To investigate the role of mutant p53 in lung tumorigenesis, a lung specific p53(273H) transgenic mouse model was developed. Rates of lung cancer formation in the transgenic animals and their littermates were evaluated by necropsy studies performed in progressive age cohorts ranging from 4 to 24 months. In order to establish the influence of other common genetic abnormalities in lung tumor formation in the animals, K-Ras gene mutation and p16INK4a (p16) promoter methylation were evaluated in a total of 281 transgenic mice and 189 non-transgenic littermates. Principal Findings At the age extremes of 4–12 and 22–24 months no differences were observed, with very low prevalence of tumors in animals younger than 12 months, and a relatively high prevalence at age 22 months or older. However, the transgenic mice had a significant higher lung tumor rate than their non-transgenic counterparts during the age of 13–21 months, suggesting an age-related shift in lung tumor formation induced by the lung-specific expression of the human mutant p53. Histopathology suggested a more aggressive nature for the transgenic tumors. Older mice (>13 months) had a significantly higher rate of p16 promoter methylation (17% v 82%). In addition, an age related effect was observed for K-Ras codons 12 or 13 mutations, but not for codon 61 mutations. Conclusions/Significance These results would suggest that the mutant p53(273H) contributes to an acceleration in the development of spontaneous lung tumors in these mice. Combination with other genetic and epigenetic alterations occurring after the age of 13 months is intimately linked to its oncogenic potential. PMID:19440353

  16. Familial adenomatous patients with desmoid tumours show increased expression of miR-34a in serum and high levels in tumours

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Sarah-Jane; Lewis, Amy; Jeffery, Rosemary; Thompson, Hannah; Feakins, Roger; Giannoulatou, Eleni; Yau, Christopher; Lindsay, James O.; Clark, Susan K.; Silver, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is rare affecting 1 in 10,000 people and a subset (10%) are at risk of myofibroblastic desmoid tumours (DTs) after colectomy to prevent cancer. DTs are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The absence of markers to monitor progression and a lack of treatment options are significant limitations to clinical management. We investigated microRNAs (miRNA) levels in DTs and serum using expression array analysis on two independent cohorts of FAP patients (total, n=24). Each comprised equal numbers of patients who had formed DTs (cases) and those who had not (controls). All controls had absence of DTs confirmed by clinical and radiological assessment over at least three years post- colectomy. Technical qPCR validation was performed using an expanded cohort (29 FAP patients; 16 cases and 13 controls). The most significant elevated serum miRNA marker of DTs was miR-34a-5p and in-situ hybridisation (ISH) showed most DTs analysed (5/6) expressed miRNA-34a-5p. Exome sequencing of tumour and matched germline DNA did not detect mutations within the miR-34a-5p transcript sites or 3′-UTR of target genes that would alter functional miRNA activity. In conclusion, miR-34a-5p is a potential circulatory marker and therapy target. A large prospective world-wide multi-centre study is now warranted. PMID:27489864

  17. Does Laparoscopic and Endoscopic Cooperative Surgery for Gastric Submucosal Tumors Preserve Residual Gastric Motility? Results of a Retrospective Single-Center Study

    PubMed Central

    Waseda, Yohei; Doyama, Hisashi; Inaki, Noriyuki; Nakanishi, Hiroyoshi; Yoshida, Naohiro; Tsuji, Shigetsugu; Takemura, Kenichi; Yamada, Shinya; Okada, Toshihide

    2014-01-01

    Background Laparoscopic and endoscopic cooperative surgery (LECS) is a minimally invasive surgical technique used to resect gastric submucosal tumors with intraluminal growth. Endoscopic submucosal dissection is used to determine the appropriate resection line from within the stomach lumen as it minimizes the stomach wall resection area and prevents postoperative stomach deformity. Although LECS is intended to preserve gastric function, few reports have evaluated postoperative residual gastric motility. Therefore, we conducted a retrospective analysis of patients who underwent LECS to determine the effects of LECS on residual gastric motility. Methods Twenty-two patients underwent endoscopy 3 to 12 months after LECS. Patients were evaluated for endoscopic evidence of gastric motility disorder, namely food residue and occurrence/exacerbation of reflux esophagitis. We considered patients with new onset of gastric symptoms and endoscopic evidence of gastric motility disorder to have clinically relevant gastric motility disorder. We described patient characteristics, tumor location, and surgical findings. Results Two of 22 patients developed clinically relevant gastric motility disorder after LECS. In one of these patients, the symptoms were not severe; only one had reduced dietary intake and had lost weight. We identified clinically relevant gastric motility disorder in two patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumors located in the lesser curvature of the stomach. The major axis of these two tumors was 34 mm and 38 mm. Conclusions Many patients did not have clinically relevant gastric motility disorder after LECS. Further investigation is required to identify predisposing factors for gastric motility disorder. PMID:24968310

  18. Ligand stimulation of ErbB4 and a constitutively-active ErbB4 mutant result in different biological responses in human pancreatic tumor cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Mill, Christopher P.; Gettinger, Kathleen L.; Riese, David J.

    2011-02-15

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Indeed, it has been estimated that 37,000 Americans will die from this disease in 2010. Late diagnosis, chemoresistance, and radioresistance of these tumors are major reasons for poor patient outcome, spurring the search for pancreatic cancer early diagnostic and therapeutic targets. ErbB4 (HER4) is a member of the ErbB family of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), a family that also includes the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR/ErbB1/HER1), Neu/ErbB2/HER2, and ErbB3/HER3. These RTKs play central roles in many human malignancies by regulating cell proliferation, survival, differentiation, invasiveness, motility, and apoptosis. In this report we demonstrate that human pancreatic tumor cell lines exhibit minimal ErbB4 expression; in contrast, these cell lines exhibit varied and in some cases abundant expression and basal tyrosine phosphorylation of EGFR, ErbB2, and ErbB3. Expression of a constitutively-dimerized and -active ErbB4 mutant inhibits clonogenic proliferation of CaPan-1, HPAC, MIA PaCa-2, and PANC-1 pancreatic tumor cell lines. In contrast, expression of wild-type ErbB4 in pancreatic tumor cell lines potentiates stimulation of anchorage-independent colony formation by the ErbB4 ligand Neuregulin 1{beta}. These results illustrate the multiple roles that ErbB4 may be playing in pancreatic tumorigenesis and tumor progression.

  19. Development of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in patients undergoing surgery for brain tumors: results from a single center over a 10 year period.

    PubMed

    Smith, Timothy R; Nanney, Allan D; Lall, Rishi R; Graham, Randall B; McClendon, Jamal; Lall, Rohan R; Adel, Joseph G; Zakarija, Anaadriana; Cote, David J; Chandler, James P

    2015-03-01

    Patients who undergo craniotomy for brain neoplasms have a high risk of developing venous thromboembolism (VTE), including deep vein thromboses (DVT) and pulmonary emboli (PE). The reasons for this correlation are not fully understood. This retrospective, single-center review aimed to determine the risk factors for VTE in patients who underwent neurosurgical resection of brain tumors at Northwestern University from 1999 to 2010. Our cohort included 1148 patients, 158 (13.7%) of whom were diagnosed with DVT and 38 (3.3%) of whom were diagnosed with PE. A variety of clinical factors were studied to determine predictors of VTE, including sex, ethnicity, medical co-morbidities, surgical positioning, length of hospital stay, tumor location, and tumor histology. Use of post-operative anticoagulants and hemorrhagic complications were also investigated. A prior history of VTE was found to be highly predictive of post-operative DVT (odds ratio [OR]=7.6, p=0.01), as was the patient's sex (OR=14.2, p<0.001), ethnicity (OR=0.5, p=0.04), post-operative intensive care unit days (OR=0.2, p=0.003), and tumor histology (OR=-0.16, p=0.01). Contrary to reports in the literature, the data collected did not indicate that the administration of post-operative medical prophylaxis for VTE was significant in preventing their formation (OR=-0.14, p=0.76). Hemorrhagic complications were low (2.2%) and resultant neurologic deficit was lower still (0.7%). The study indicates that patients with high-grade primary brain tumors and metastatic lesions should receive aggressive preventative measures in the post-operative period.

  20. Imaging Tumor Perfusion and Oxidative Metabolism in Patients With Head-and-Neck Cancer Using 1- [{sup 11}C]-Acetate PET During Radiotherapy: Preliminary Results

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Aijun; Johansson, Silvia; Turesson, Ingela; Dasu, Alexandru; Soerensen, Jens

    2012-02-01

    Background: A growing body of in vitro evidence links alterations of the intermediary metabolism in cancer to treatment outcome. This study aimed to characterize tumor oxidative metabolism and perfusion in vivo using dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) with 1- [{sup 11}C]-acetate (ACE) during radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Nine patients with head-and-neck cancer were studied. Oxidative metabolic rate (k{sub mono}) and perfusion (rF) of the primary tumors were assessed by dynamic ACE-PET at baseline and after 15, 30, and 55 Gy was delivered. Tumor glucose uptake (Tglu) was evaluated with [{sup 18}F]-fluorodeoxyglucose PET at baseline. Patients were grouped into complete (CR, n = 6) and partial responders (PR, n = 3) to radiotherapy. Results: The 3 PR patients died within a median follow-up period of 33 months. Baseline k{sub mono} was almost twice as high in CR as in PR (p = 0.02) and Tglu was lower in CR than in PR (p = 0.04). k{sub mono} increased during radiotherapy in PR (p = 0.004) but remained unchanged in CR. There were no differences in rF between CR and PR at any dosage. k{sub mono} and rF were coupled in CR (p = 0.001), but not in PR. Conclusions: This study shows that radiosensitive tumors might rely predominantly on oxidative metabolism for their bioenergetic needs. The impairment of oxidative metabolism in radioresistant tumors is potentially reversible, suggesting that therapies targeting the intermediary metabolism might improve treatment outcome.

  1. [Radiation risk of malignant tumors in cosmonauts over life time as a result of participation in interplanetary and orbital missions].

    PubMed

    Shafirkin, A V; Venediktova, V P

    2000-01-01

    The paper considers model concepts of cell blast-transformation and oncogenesis in humans consequent to ionizing irradiation with varying dose rates and lengths of exposure. Presented are data of epidemiologic studies of oncologic risks for different organs and body tissues at different ages in a year since exposure calculated per a unit of absorbed dose (1 cGy). Probability of tumor development in males of different age due to chronic irradiation of various lengths was determined per a dose unit. Based on these data and with regard for possible dose loads on interplanetary and orbital crews, oncologic risk for cosmonauts was calculated in terms of life time. The dependence of radiation-induced oncologic risks on type and duration of space mission, shielding thickness, and solar cycle was analyzed. The authors compare values of the total radiation risk and oncologic risk for cosmonauts launched at various ages. PMID:10732188

  2. Fibroblastic and myofibroblastic tumors of the head and neck: comprehensive imaging-based review with pathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Hourani, Roula; Taslakian, Bedros; Shabb, Nina S; Nassar, Lara; Hourani, Mukbil H; Moukarbel, Roger; Sabri, Alain; Rizk, Toni

    2015-02-01

    Fibroblastic and myofibroblastic tumors of the head and neck are a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by the proliferation of fibroblasts, myofibroblasts, or both. These tumors may be further subclassified on the basis of their behavior as benign, intermediate with malignant potential, or malignant. There are different types of fibroblastic and myofibroblastic tumors that can involve the head and neck including desmoid-type fibromatosis, solitary fibrous tumor, myofibroma/myofibromatosis, nodular fasciitis, nasopharyngeal angiofibroma, fibrosarcoma, dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans, fibromatosis coli, inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor, ossifying fibroma, fibrous histiocytoma, nodular fasciitis, fibromyxoma, hyaline fibromatosis and fibrous hamartoma. Although the imaging characteristics of fibroblastic and myofibroblastic tumors of the head and neck are nonspecific, imaging plays a pivotal role in the noninvasive diagnosis and characterization of these tumors, providing information about the constitution of tumors, their extension and invasion of adjacent structures. Correlation with the clinical history may help limit the differential diagnosis and radiologists should be familiar with the imaging appearance of these tumors to reach an accurate diagnosis.

  3. Five-chlorodeoxycytidine and biomodulators of its metabolism result in fifty to eighty percent cures of advanced EMT-6 tumors when used with fractionated radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Greer, S.; Schwade, J.; Marion, H.S.

    1995-07-15

    The purpose of this investigation was to extend our findings in previous radiation and biochemical studies with five rodent tumors, in which we used one and occasionally two or three irradiations. The extent of control of the EMT-6 mammary adenocarcinoma was determined using fractionated radiation (12 irradiations) over a 3-week period using the radiosensitizer 5-chloro-2{prime}-deoxycytidine (CldC) and biomodulators of its metabolism. Drug and radiation treatments overlapped for 3 weeks. Fifty to 80% cures (usually 70%) were obtained with no apparent morbidity and the same moderate weight loss that occurs with radiation alone. An apparent threefold dose increase effect was obtained with the end point: {open_quotes}days to reach 4 times initial tumor volume.{close_quotes} Increasing the radiation dose threefold (without drugs) resulted in four out of five deaths; increasing the dose twofold (without drugs) resulted in extensive weight loss and hair loss in the entire ventral area and no cures. Increasing the dose of drugs or radiation 1.5-fold, in the complete protocol, did not result in increased morbidity. Comparative studies with Iododeoxyuridine demonstrate the heightened efficacy of CldC. One cannot achieve the same results obtained with CldC and the modulators by merely increasing the dose of radiation. There is a significant window of safety in this approach. The evidence we have obtained with EMT-6, the fifth rodent tumor we have studied with CldC, as well as the demonstrated and proposed reasons for its superior efficacy over 5-Iododeoxyuridine (and 5-Bromodeoxyuridine), drugs in current use, indicate that CldC will allow more aggressive treatment of human tumors with radiation than is now feasible. 50 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Fibroblastic-myofibroblastic tumors in children and adolescents: a clinicopathologic study of 108 examples in 103 patients.

    PubMed

    Coffin, C M; Dehner, L P

    1991-01-01

    A review of over 900 soft tissue tumors in children and adolescents revealed 108 fibroblastic-myofibroblastic tumors in 103 patients from newborn to 20 years of age, which had been accessioned in a 25-year period. Based on clinicopathologic criteria, 82 (76%) were regarded as benign, 14 (13%) as borderline, and 12 (11%) as malignant. The average age at diagnosis for the entire series was 7 years with a male/female ratio of 1.8:1. The most frequent topographic site was the extremities (48, 44%), followed by the trunk (31, 29%) and the head and neck region (27, 25%). Virtually 50% (51 tumors) of cases were diagnosed during the first year of life, and 73 (71%) occurred in the first decade. The known recurrence rate was 16% (17 cases). Fibromatosis of various subtypes accounted for 95% of the histologically benign group. Infantile myofibromatosis was the most frequent form of fibromatosis, followed by aggressive (desmoid) fibromatosis (20 cases, 19%). Ninety percent of infantile myofibromatoses were diagnosed in the first year of life. In contrast, 70% of aggressive fibromatoses occurred in the second decade. Associated conditions included familial desmoid fibromatosis, Gardner syndrome, and previous surgery. The borderline category was represented by the 14 (13% of the series) congenital-infantile fibrosarcomas. All of the 14 (13%) malignant tumors were classic adult-type fibrosarcomas that occurred only in later childhood and adolescence. Fibromatosis colli, fibrous hamartoma of infancy, juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma, Dupuytren-type fibromatosis, infantile digital fibromatosis, juvenile aponeurotic fibroma, unclassified fibromatoses, and fibroma of tendon or nerve sheath constituted the remaining cases.

  5. Cytoplasmic expression of Wilms tumor transcription factor-1 (WT1): a useful immunomarker for young-type fibromatoses and infantile fibrosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Magro, Gaetano; Salvatorelli, Lucia; Vecchio, Giada Maria; Musumeci, Giuseppe; Rita, Alaggio; Parenti, Rosalba

    2014-09-01

    There is increasing evidence that Wilms' tumor transcription factor-1 (WT1) is expressed in the cytoplasm of neoplastic cells from different benign and malignant tumors. Only a few studies on WT1 cytoplasmic immunolocalization are available in pediatric tumors. The aim of the present study was to investigate immunohistochemically the expression and distribution of WT1 in a large series of soft tissue fibroblastic/myofibroblastic lesions occurring in children and adolescents. Notably WT1 was not expressed in nodular fasciitis and desmoid-type (adult) fibromatosis, while it stained diffusely and strongly in several infantile-type fibromatoses, such as fibrous hamartoma of infancy, myofibroma/myofibromatosis, and lipofibromatosis. Interestingly, WT1 cytoplasmic expression was also found in all cases (10/10) of infantile fibrosarcomas examined. The present study shows that a diffuse WT1 cytoplasmic expression is of complementary diagnostic value to conventional myofibroblastic markers (α-smooth muscle actin; desmin) in confirming diagnosis of young-type fibromatoses or infantile fibrosarcoma and in ruling out both desmoid-type fibromatoses and nodular fasciitis. WT1 cytoplasmic expression in infantile fibrosarcoma is a novel finding which could be exploitable as an immunomarker for this tumor. Although highly sensitive, WT1 cytoplasmic immunostaining is not specific for infantile fibrosarcoma, and thus it should be evaluated in the context of a wide immunohistochemical panel when pathologists are dealing with spindle cell lesions of soft tissues in children and adolescents. Accordingly we recommend that a correct diagnosis of fibroblastic/myofibroblastic soft tissue lesion in pediatric patients is usually achieved on the basis of a careful correlation of morphological and immunohistochemical findings in the appropriate clinical context. The different cellular localization of WT1, namely nuclear, cytoplasmic or nucleo-cytoplasmic, in different benign and malignant

  6. Alternative splicing of Wilms tumor suppressor 1 (Wt1) exon 4 results in protein isoforms with different functions.

    PubMed

    Schnerwitzki, Danny; Perner, Birgit; Hoppe, Beate; Pietsch, Stefan; Mehringer, Rebecca; Hänel, Frank; Englert, Christoph

    2014-09-01

    The Wilms tumor suppressor gene Wt1 encodes a zinc finger transcription factor that is essential for development of multiple organs including kidneys, gonads, spleen and heart. In mammals Wt1 comprises 10 exons with two characteristic splicing events: inclusion or skipping of exon 5 and alternative usage of two splice donor sites between exons 9 and 10. Most fish including zebrafish and medaka possess two wt1 paralogs, wt1a and wt1b, both lacking exon 5. Here we have characterized wt1 in guppy, platyfish and the short-lived African killifish Nothobranchius furzeri. All fish except zebrafish show alternative splicing of exon 4 of wt1a but not of wt1b with the wt1a(-exon 4) isoform being the predominant splice variant. With regard to function, Wt1a(+exon 4) showed less dimerization but stimulated transcription more effectively than the Wt1a(-exon 4) isoform. A specific knockdown of wt1a exon 4 in zebrafish was associated with anomalies in kidney development demonstrating a physiological function for Wt1a exon 4. Interestingly, alternative splicing of exon 4 seems to be an early evolutionary event as it is observed in the single wt1 gene of the sturgeon, a species that has not gone through teleost-specific genome duplication. PMID:25014653

  7. Results.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zemsky, Robert; Shaman, Susan; Shapiro, Daniel B.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the Collegiate Results Instrument (CRI), which measures a range of collegiate outcomes for alumni 6 years after graduation. The CRI was designed to target alumni from institutions across market segments and assess their values, abilities, work skills, occupations, and pursuit of lifelong learning. (EV)

  8. Microwave tumor ablation: cooperative academic-industry development of a high-power gas-cooled system with early clinical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brace, Christopher L.; Ziemlewicz, Timothy J.; Schefelker, Rick; Hinshaw, J. L.; Lubner, Meghan G.; Lee, Fred T.

    2013-02-01

    Microwave tumor ablation continues to evolve into a viable treatment option for many cancers. Current systems are poised to supplant radiofrequency ablation as the dominant percutaneous thermal therapy. Here is provided an overview of technical details and early clinical results with a high-powered, gas-cooled microwave ablation system. The system was developed with academic-industry collaboration using federal and private funding. The generator comprises three synchronous channels that each produce up to 140W at 2.45GHz. A mountable power distribution module facilitates CT imaging guidance and monitoring and reduces clutter in the sterile field. Cryogenic carbon-dioxide cools the coaxial applicator, permitting a thin applicator profile (~1.5 mm diameter) and high power delivery. A total of 106 liver tumors were treated (96 malignant, 10 benign) from December 2010 to June 2012 at a single academic institution. Mean tumor size +/- standard deviation was 2.5+/-1.3cm (range 0.5-13.9cm). Treatment time was 5.4+/-3.3min (range 1-20min). Median follow-up was 6 months (range 1-16 months). Technical success was reported in 100% of cases. Local tumor progression was noted in 4/96 (4.3%) of malignancies. The only major complication was a pleural effusion that was treated with thoracentesis. Microwave ablation with this system is an effective treatment for liver cancer. Compared to previous data from the same institution, these results suggest an increased efficacy and equivalent safety to RF ablation. Additional data from the lung and kidney support this conclusion.

  9. Focal degeneration of aged or injured myoepithelial cells and the resultant auto-immunoreactions are trigger factors for breast tumor invasion.

    PubMed

    Man, Yan-gao

    2007-01-01

    The development of breast cancer is believed to be a multi-step process, sequentially progressing from normal to hyperplastic, to in situ, and to invasive stages. The progression from the in situ to invasive stage is believed to be triggered primarily, if not solely, by the overproduction of proteolytic enzymes by cancer cells, which cause degradation of the basement membrane. This theory is consistent with data derived from studies with cell cultures or animal models, while results from recent worldwide clinical trials with a variety of proteolytic enzyme inhibitors have been very disappointing, casting doubt on the validity of the enzyme theory. Based on our recent studies, we propose that breast tumor invasion is triggered by the following mechanisms and events: (1) the predisposition of genetic abnormalities in ME cell replenishment-related genes or other insults results in elevated focal degeneration of ME cells in some individuals; (2) the degradation products of ME cells or diffusible molecules of epithelial cells attract infiltration of immunoreactive cells (IRC) into the affected sites; (3) the direct physical contact between IRC and degenerated ME cells results in the discharge of digestive enzymes from IRC, causing focal disruptions in the ME cell layer; (4) focal disruptions in a given ME cell layer result in a localized loss of tumor suppressors and paracrine inhibitory function, a focal increase of permeability for oxygen, nutrients, and growth factors, and a localized increase of leukocyte infiltration, which facilitate the monoclonal proliferation of tumor progenitors, forming a biologically more aggressive cell cluster overlying the disrupted ME cell layer; (5) the direct physical contact between the newly formed cell cluster and stromal cells stimulates the production of tenascin and other invasion-associated molecules that facilitate tissue remodeling, angiogenesis, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition, providing a favorable micro

  10. Tumor size-related DNA copy number changes occur in solitary fibrous tumors but not in hemangiopericytomas.

    PubMed

    Miettinen, M M; el-Rifai, W; Sarlomo-Rikala, M; Andersson, L C; Knuutila, S

    1997-12-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) presenting in the pleura and other soft tissue sites and hemangiopericytoma (HPC) presenting at various soft tissue sites are mesenchymal tumors that share many histologic and immunohistochemical features. This raises the questions of whether these tumors are related and whether they belong within the spectrum of a single biologic entity. The behavior of both SFTs and HPCs is difficult to predict histologically. The genetic background of both SFTs and HPCs is poorly known, but it could be helpful in the evaluation of malignancy and could give clues to their possible relationship. In this study, we analyzed 15 SFTs and 11 HPCs by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), a powerful molecular cytogenetic tool that can be applied to DNA extracted from formaldehyde-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue. All of these tumors were immunohistochemically similar and showed reactivity for CD34-antigen but not for keratins, desmin, or muscle actins. Only 1 SFT smaller than 10 cm showed DNA copy number changes (a single loss in chromosome 13), but 7 of 8 SFTs larger than 10 cm (including all 4 tumors with more than 4 mitoses per 10 high power fields) showed changes, mostly chromosomal gains in 5q 7, 8, 12, and 18. Four cases showed losses, two of them in chromosome 13 and two others in 20q. These findings suggest that CGH might be useful in the evaluation of malignant transformation in SFT. The most common change, gain of the entire chromosome 8, seen in two cases as the only change, suggests trisomy 8 and parallels a similar finding previously described in other fibrous tumors, such as subsets of desmoid fibromatosis and infantile fibrosarcoma. In contrast, HPCs, including large and mitotically active tumors, showed no DNA copy number changes on CGH. This suggests that HPC is genetically different from SFT.

  11. Development of a single vial kit formulation of [99mTc]-labeled doxorubicin for tumor imaging and treatment response assessment-preclinical evaluation and preliminary human results.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pardeep; Singh, Baljinder; Ghai, Anchal; Hazari, Puja P; Mittal, B R; Mishra, Anil K

    2015-05-30

    The present study describes the successful radiolabeling of [99mTcO(-) 4 ] with doxorubicin, and the resultant product was formulated in to a ready-to-label lyophilized single vial kit preparation for convenient use in a routine clinical setting. The radiolabeled preparation of [99mTc]-doxorubicin exhibited a high radiolabeling efficiency of more than 95.0%, serum stability for up to 24 h, and shelf-life of lyophilized cold kits was more than 6 months. Animal imaging data in tumor-bearing mice demonstrated that [99mTc]-doxorubicin accumulated in the tumor site with high target (tumor) to non-target (contra-lateral thigh) ratio (3.2 ± 0.5). The ratio decreased to 1.2 ± 0.6 indicating a good response on follow up imaging performed after 2 weeks of doxorubicin treatment. [99mTc]-doxorubicin scintigraphic data in human volunteers supported the hepato-renal excretion of the radiotracer as reflected by the increased accumulation of the radiotracer as a function of time in intestine, kidneys, and urinary bladder. Further, imaging in patients (very limited number) indicated that the technique may be useful in the detection of active sarcoma and post treatment (surgery/chemotherapy) remission or absence of the disease. The technique, however, needs validation through further preclinical evaluation and imaging in a larger number of patients. PMID:25968484

  12. Long-term results of adjuvant imatinib mesylate in localized, high-risk, primary gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST): ACOSOG Z9000 (Alliance) intergroup phase 2 trial

    PubMed Central

    DeMatteo, Ronald P.; Ballman, Karla V.; Antonescu, Cristina R.; Corless, Christopher; Kolesnikova, Violetta; von Mehren, Margaret; McCarter, Martin D.; Norton, Jeffrey; Maki, Robert G.; Pisters, Peter W.T.; Demetri, George D.; Brennan, Murray F.; Owzar, Kouros

    2014-01-01

    Objective To conduct the first adjuvant trial of imatinib mesylate for treatment of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). Summary Background Data GIST is the most common sarcoma. While surgical resection has been the mainstay of therapy for localized, primary GIST, postoperative tumor recurrence is common. The KIT proto-oncogene or, less frequently, platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRA) is mutated in GIST; the gene products of both are inhibited by imatinib mesylate. Methods This was a phase II, intergroup trial led by the American College of Surgeons Oncology Group (ACOSOG), registered at ClinicalTrials.gov as NCT00025246. From 09/2001 to 09/2003, we accrued 106 patients who had undergone complete gross tumor removal but were deemed at high risk for recurrence. Patients were prescribed imatinib 400 mg/day for 1 year and followed with serial radiologic evaluation. The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS). Results After a median follow-up of 7.7 years, the 1-, 3-, and 5-year OS rate was 99, 97, and 83%, which compared favorably with a historical 5 year OS rate of 35%. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year RFS rate was 96, 60, and 40%. On univariable analysis, age and mitotic rate were associated with OS. On multivariable analysis, the RFS rate was lower with increasing tumor size, small bowel site, KIT exon 9 mutation, high mitotic rate, and older age. Conclusion Adjuvant imatinib in patients with primary GIST who are at high risk of recurrence prolongs OS compared to that of historical controls. Optimal duration of adjuvant therapy remains undefined. (NCT00025246) PMID:23860199

  13. Altered Notch signaling resulting from expression of a WAMTP1-MAML2 gene fusion in mucoepidermoid carcinomas and benign Warthin's tumors.

    PubMed

    Enlund, Fredrik; Behboudi, Afrouz; Andrén, Ywonne; Oberg, Camilla; Lendahl, Urban; Mark, Joachim; Stenman, Göran

    2004-01-01

    Chromosome translocations in neoplasia commonly result in fusion genes that may encode either novel fusion proteins or normal, but ectopically expressed proteins. Here we report the cloning of a novel fusion gene in a common type of salivary and bronchial gland tumor, mucoepidermoid carcinomas (MEC), as well as in benign Warthin's tumors (WATs). The fusion, which results from a t(11;19)(q21-22;p13) translocation, creates a chimeric gene in which exon 1 of a novel gene of unknown function, designated WAMTP1, is linked to exons 2-5 of the recently identified Mastermind-like Notch coactivator MAML2. In the fusion protein, the N-terminal basic domain of MAML2, which is required for binding to intracellular Notch (Notch ICD), is replaced by an unrelated N-terminal sequence from WAMTP1. Mutation analysis of the N-terminus of WAMTP1-MAML2 identified two regions of importance for nuclear localization (amino acids 11-20) and for colocalization with MAML2 and Notch1 ICD in nuclear granules (amino acids 21-42). Analyses of the Notch target genes HES5 and MASH1 in MEC tumors with and without the WAMTP1-MAML2 fusion revealed upregulation of HES5 and downregulation of MASH1 in fusion positive MECs compared to normal salivary gland tissue and MECs lacking the fusion. These findings suggest that altered Notch signaling plays an important role in the genesis of benign and malignant neoplasms of salivary and bronchial gland origin.

  14. Sinus Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tumors Nasal Deformities Choanal Atresia Epiphora (Excessive Tearing) Disclosure Statement Printer Friendly Sinus Tumors Abtin Tabaee, MD Introduction Tumors of the nose and paranasal sinuses are rare, accounting for fewer than 1% of all tumors. These ...

  15. Solitary fibrous tumor in the round ligament of the liver: a fortunate intraoperative discovery.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Laura; Delpero, Jean-Robert; Chetaille, Bruno; Sarran, Anthony; Perrot, Delphine; Moureau-Zabotto, Laurence; Guiramand, Jérôme; Bertucci, François

    2012-01-01

    Solitary fibrous tumors (SFTs) are mesenchymal neoplasms of fibroblastic origin, most commonly found in the pleura. Numerous extrathoracic locations have been reported during the last 2 decades. Herein, we report the first case of an SFT in the round ligament of the liver. A 46-year-old Caucasian man presented with a 12-month history of abdominal pain. An ultrasonography-guided microbiopsy first revealed a desmoid tumor. After failure of first- and second-line medical treatments (celecoxib and tamoxifen, then imatinib), histological reexamination was suspicious for a low-grade sarcoma. MRI was also suspicious for a malignant process. Hence, surgery was decided. Laparotomy found a huge and well-limited tumor that, unexpectedly, was appended to the round ligament of the liver and free from any other intra-abdominal contact. The tumor was easily removed. Excision was monobloc and macroscopically complete. Histological analysis diagnosed an SFT arising from the round ligament of the liver. No adjuvant treatment was given. Ten months after surgery, the patient is alive without any signs or symptoms of relapse. This is the first report of SFT arising from the round ligament of the liver. It illustrates the difficulty in diagnosing such tumors. Whilst diagnosis of SFT is rare, it should be kept in mind to allow early diagnosis and complete surgical resection, which provide the best chance for recovery.

  16. Intestinal tumor progression is promoted by decreased apoptosis and dysregulated Wnt signaling in Ceacam1-/- mice.

    PubMed

    Leung, N; Turbide, C; Balachandra, B; Marcus, V; Beauchemin, N

    2008-08-21

    The carcinoembryonic antigen cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1) is downregulated in colonic and intestinal hyperplastic lesions as well as in other cancers, where it functions as a tumor suppressor. To investigate the functions of CEACAM1 in the normal intestine and in intestinal tumors, we generated a compound knockout mouse model and examined both Ceacam1(-/-) and Apc(1638N/+):Ceacam1(-/-) mice. Ceacam1(-/-) intestinal cells exhibited a significant decrease in apoptosis, with no change in proliferation or migration, however. Compound Apc(1638N/+):Ceacam1(-/-) mice demonstrated an increase in intestinal tumor multiplicity and tumor progression. Increases in intussusceptions and desmoid lesions were also observed. We have shown that CEACAM1-L associates with beta-catenin by co-immunoprecipitation and colocalization in CEACAM1-L-transfected CT26 and CT51 mouse colon carcinoma cells. Ceacam1(-/-) enterocytes displayed decreased glycogen synthase kinase 3-beta activity with corresponding nuclear localization of beta-catenin. Increased T-cell factor/Lef transcriptional activity was observed in CEACAM1-null CT51 colonic cells and in Caco2 colon cancer cells in which CEACAM1 was downregulated. A significant increased expression in c-Myc and cyclin D1 targets of the Wnt signaling pathway was also revealed in the Ceacam1(-/-) intestine. CEACAM1 therefore actively participates in Wnt signaling in intestinal cells and its downregulation in intestinal tissue contributes to malignancy by augmenting tumor multiplicity and progression.

  17. Atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors: a population-based clinical outcomes study involving 174 patients from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database (1973–2010)

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Christine SM; Mahendraraj, Krishnaraj; Chamberlain, Ronald S

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors (ATRTs) are rare, highly malignant embryonal tumors of the central nervous system (CNS) accounting for 20% of CNS tumors in children under the age of 3. This study examines a large cohort of ATRT patients to determine demographic, clinical, and pathologic factors which impact prognosis and survival. Methods Demographic and clinical data were abstracted on 174 ATRT patients (171 pediatric patients age <20 and 3 adult patients age ≥20) from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database (1973–2010). Standard statistical methodology was used. Results A total of 174 ATRT cases (mean age of 2.84 years) were identified. ATRT had a higher incidence in males (56.3%), Caucasians (59.1%), and children <3 years of age (80.5%), P<0.001. The most common primary sites were the cerebellum (17.8%), ventricles (16.1%), and frontal lobe (12.6%). Mean overall survival was 3.2±0.4 years, while overall and cancer-specific mortality were 63.2% and 56.3%, respectively, P=0.005. Most ATRT cases were treated with surgery alone (58.0%), followed by a combination of surgery and radiation (34.3%), no treatment (6.5%), and radiation alone (1.2%). The use of combination therapy has increased significantly (16.1%) since 2005 (P<0.001), while primary surgical resection and radiation therapy rates remain relatively unchanged. The longest survival was observed among ATRT patients receiving combination therapy (5.9±0.7 years), followed by radiation alone (2.8±1.2 years), and surgery alone (1.9±0.4 years), P<0.001. Multivariable analysis identified only distant metastases (OR =4.6) as independently associated with increased mortality, whereas combination therapy (OR =0.4) was associated with reduced mortality, P<0.005. Conclusion ATRT is a rare and highly aggressive embryonal malignancy of the CNS that presents more often as locoregional tumors >4 cm in male Caucasian children of age <3 years, involving the cerebellum, ventricles, or

  18. Tumor characteristics of ductal carcinoma in situ of breast visualized on [F-18] fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography: Results from a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Fujioka, Tomoyuki; Kubota, Kazunori; Toriihara, Akira; Machida, Youichi; Okazawa, Kaori; Nakagawa, Tsuyoshi; Saida, Yukihisa; Tateishi, Ukihide

    2016-01-01

    AIM To clarify clinicopathological features of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) visualized on [F-18] fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT). METHODS This study retrospectively reviewed 52 consecutive tumors in 50 patients with pathologically proven pure DCIS who underwent [F-18] FDG-PET/CT before surgery. [F-18] FDG-PET/CT was performed after biopsy in all patients. The mean interval from biopsy to [F-18] FDG-PET/CT was 29.2 d. [F-18] FDG uptake by visual analysis and maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) was compared with clinicopathological characteristics. RESULTS [F-18] FDG uptake was visualized in 28 lesions (53.8%) and the mean and standard deviation of SUVmax was 1.63 and 0.90. On univariate analysis, visual analysis and the SUVmax were associated with symptomatic presentation (P = 0.012 and 0.002, respectively), palpability (P = 0.030 and 0.024, respectively), use of core-needle biopsy (CNB) (P = 0.023 and 0.012, respectively), ultrasound-guided biopsy (P = 0.040 and 0.006, respectively), enhancing lesion ≥ 20 mm on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (P = 0.001 and 0.010, respectively), tumor size ≥ 20 mm on histopathology (P = 0.002 and 0.008, respectively). However, [F-18] FDG uptake parameters were not significantly associated with age, presence of calcification on mammography, mass formation on MRI, presence of comedo necrosis, hormone status (estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2), and nuclear grade. The factors significantly associated with visual analysis and SUVmax were symptomatic presentation (P = 0.019 and 0.001, respectively), use of CNB (P = 0.001 and 0.031, respectively), and enhancing lesion ≥ 20 mm on MRI (P = 0.001 and 0.049, respectively) on multivariate analysis. CONCLUSION Although DCIS of breast is generally non-avid tumor, symptomatic and large tumors (≥ 20 mm) tend to be visualized on [F-18] FDG-PET/CT. PMID:27648168

  19. [Study results of primary therapy for head and neck tumors : Highlights of the 2016 ASCO Annual Meeting].

    PubMed

    Gliese, A; Busch, C-J; Knecht, R

    2016-10-01

    At the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) 2016, results of current trials dealing with primary therapy for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) were presented. Current trials investigate in particular therapy regimens for the treatment of locally advanced HNSCC. Concomitant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) remains the standard therapy approach. Current trials focus on sequential chemoradiation with modifications in induction chemotherapy (ICT) or the subsequent CRT schedule. Studies investigating the combination of targeted therapy with the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibody cetuximab and concomitant, sequential, or adjuvant therapy were presented. The most important trials are summarized in this article.

  20. Management of sporadic desmoid-type fibromatosis: a European consensus approach based on patients' and professionals' expertise - a sarcoma patients EuroNet and European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer/Soft Tissue and Bone Sarcoma Group initiative.

    PubMed

    Kasper, B; Baumgarten, C; Bonvalot, S; Haas, R; Haller, F; Hohenberger, P; Moreau, G; van der Graaf, W T A; Gronchi, A

    2015-01-01

    Desmoid-type fibromatosis (DF) is a rare monoclonal, fibroblastic proliferation characterised by a variable and often unpredictable clinical course. It may affect nearly all parts of the body including extremities, trunk and abdomen. Considering the variable clinical presentations, anatomic locations and biological behaviours, an individualised treatment approach is required. No established or evidence-based approach for the treatment of this neoplasm is available as of today. Therefore, we propose a consensus treatment algorithm based on a round table meeting bringing together sarcoma experts from the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Soft Tissue and Bone Sarcoma Group (STBSG) with patient advocates from Sarcoma Patients EuroNet (SPAEN). The aim of the meeting was to develop - for the first time ever - a consensus approach based on professionals' AND patients' expertise. As a fundamental prerequisite, all patients should be discussed in a multidisciplinary setting in centres or professional networks with a specific expertise in the disease.

  1. Spinal tumor

    MedlinePlus

    Tumor - spinal cord ... spinal tumors occur in the nerves of the spinal cord itself. Most often these are ependymomas and other ... gene mutations. Spinal tumors can occur: Inside the spinal cord (intramedullary) In the membranes (meninges) covering the spinal ...

  2. 9:00-9:15. Antiangiogenic Treatment with Endostatin Results in Uncoupling of Blood Flow and Glucose Metabolism in Human Tumors.

    PubMed

    Mullani; Herbst; Abbruzzese; Charnsangavej; Kim; Tran; Barron; Lamki; Gould

    2000-07-01

    Endostatin is a novel antiangiogenic agent currently in phase I trials. In the context of this trial, we are evaluating the use of non-invasive imaging with PET to determine the relationship between tumor blood flow and glucose metabolism in imaged tumors from treated patients.Ten patients have been treated with escalating daily iv Endostatin doses of 30 to 180 mg/m(2). PET images were obtained before the start of therapy and again after 28 days of treatment. Each patient was scanned with Oxygen-15 labeled water for estimation of tumor blood flow and Flourine-18 labeled FDG to estimate tumor metabolic activity. In most cases, two distinct tumor-bearing sites were analyzed in each patient. Thus, a total of 19 tumors were imaged. Regional blood flow and standard uptake values (SUV) were computed at baseline and 28 days post treatment and the percentage change in blood flow and SUV plotted as a function of Endostatin dose.Both blood flow and glucose metabolism in the imaged tumors were observed to increase in patients treated with tumors imaged from patients treated at the 180 mg/m(2)/d dose level. Thus, in patients receiving Endostatin at a dose of 180 mg/m(2)/d, blood flow decreased but glucose metabolism increased. This relationship is displayed in Figure 1 below. PMID:11150754

  3. Standardized evaluation of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes in breast cancer: results of the ring studies of the international immuno-oncology biomarker working group.

    PubMed

    Denkert, Carsten; Wienert, Stephan; Poterie, Audrey; Loibl, Sibylle; Budczies, Jan; Badve, Sunil; Bago-Horvath, Zsuzsanna; Bane, Anita; Bedri, Shahinaz; Brock, Jane; Chmielik, Ewa; Christgen, Matthias; Colpaert, Cecile; Demaria, Sandra; Van den Eynden, Gert; Floris, Giuseppe; Fox, Stephen B; Gao, Dongxia; Ingold Heppner, Barbara; Kim, S Rim; Kos, Zuzana; Kreipe, Hans H; Lakhani, Sunil R; Penault-Llorca, Frederique; Pruneri, Giancarlo; Radosevic-Robin, Nina; Rimm, David L; Schnitt, Stuart J; Sinn, Bruno V; Sinn, Peter; Sirtaine, Nicolas; O'Toole, Sandra A; Viale, Giuseppe; Van de Vijver, Koen; de Wind, Roland; von Minckwitz, Gunter; Klauschen, Frederick; Untch, Michael; Fasching, Peter A; Reimer, Toralf; Willard-Gallo, Karen; Michiels, Stefan; Loi, Sherene; Salgado, Roberto

    2016-10-01

    Multiple independent studies have shown that tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) are prognostic in breast cancer with potential relevance for response to immune-checkpoint inhibitor therapy. Although many groups are currently evaluating TIL, there is no standardized system for diagnostic applications. This study reports the results of two ring studies investigating TIL conducted by the International Working Group on Immuno-oncology Biomarkers. The study aim was to determine the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for evaluation of TIL by different pathologists. A total of 120 slides were evaluated by a large group of pathologists with a web-based system in ring study 1 and a more advanced software-system in ring study 2 that included an integrated feedback with standardized reference images. The predefined aim for successful ring studies 1 and 2 was an ICC above 0.7 (lower limit of 95% confidence interval (CI)). In ring study 1 the prespecified endpoint was not reached (ICC: 0.70; 95% CI: 0.62-0.78). On the basis of an analysis of sources of variation, we developed a more advanced digital image evaluation system for ring study 2, which improved the ICC to 0.89 (95% CI: 0.85-0.92). The Fleiss' kappa value for <60 vs ≥60% TIL improved from 0.45 (ring study 1) to 0.63 in RS2 and the mean concordance improved from 88 to 92%. This large international standardization project shows that reproducible evaluation of TIL is feasible in breast cancer. This opens the way for standardized reporting of tumor immunological parameters in clinical studies and diagnostic practice. The software-guided image evaluation approach used in ring study 2 may be of value as a tool for evaluation of TIL in clinical trials and diagnostic practice. The experience gained from this approach might be applicable to the standardization of other diagnostic parameters in histopathology. PMID:27363491

  4. Standardized evaluation of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes in breast cancer: results of the ring studies of the international immuno-oncology biomarker working group.

    PubMed

    Denkert, Carsten; Wienert, Stephan; Poterie, Audrey; Loibl, Sibylle; Budczies, Jan; Badve, Sunil; Bago-Horvath, Zsuzsanna; Bane, Anita; Bedri, Shahinaz; Brock, Jane; Chmielik, Ewa; Christgen, Matthias; Colpaert, Cecile; Demaria, Sandra; Van den Eynden, Gert; Floris, Giuseppe; Fox, Stephen B; Gao, Dongxia; Ingold Heppner, Barbara; Kim, S Rim; Kos, Zuzana; Kreipe, Hans H; Lakhani, Sunil R; Penault-Llorca, Frederique; Pruneri, Giancarlo; Radosevic-Robin, Nina; Rimm, David L; Schnitt, Stuart J; Sinn, Bruno V; Sinn, Peter; Sirtaine, Nicolas; O'Toole, Sandra A; Viale, Giuseppe; Van de Vijver, Koen; de Wind, Roland; von Minckwitz, Gunter; Klauschen, Frederick; Untch, Michael; Fasching, Peter A; Reimer, Toralf; Willard-Gallo, Karen; Michiels, Stefan; Loi, Sherene; Salgado, Roberto

    2016-10-01

    Multiple independent studies have shown that tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) are prognostic in breast cancer with potential relevance for response to immune-checkpoint inhibitor therapy. Although many groups are currently evaluating TIL, there is no standardized system for diagnostic applications. This study reports the results of two ring studies investigating TIL conducted by the International Working Group on Immuno-oncology Biomarkers. The study aim was to determine the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for evaluation of TIL by different pathologists. A total of 120 slides were evaluated by a large group of pathologists with a web-based system in ring study 1 and a more advanced software-system in ring study 2 that included an integrated feedback with standardized reference images. The predefined aim for successful ring studies 1 and 2 was an ICC above 0.7 (lower limit of 95% confidence interval (CI)). In ring study 1 the prespecified endpoint was not reached (ICC: 0.70; 95% CI: 0.62-0.78). On the basis of an analysis of sources of variation, we developed a more advanced digital image evaluation system for ring study 2, which improved the ICC to 0.89 (95% CI: 0.85-0.92). The Fleiss' kappa value for <60 vs ≥60% TIL improved from 0.45 (ring study 1) to 0.63 in RS2 and the mean concordance improved from 88 to 92%. This large international standardization project shows that reproducible evaluation of TIL is feasible in breast cancer. This opens the way for standardized reporting of tumor immunological parameters in clinical studies and diagnostic practice. The software-guided image evaluation approach used in ring study 2 may be of value as a tool for evaluation of TIL in clinical trials and diagnostic practice. The experience gained from this approach might be applicable to the standardization of other diagnostic parameters in histopathology.

  5. Labial salivary gland tumors.

    PubMed

    Neville, B W; Damm, D D; Weir, J C; Fantasia, J E

    1988-05-15

    A study was conducted on labial salivary gland tumors from four oral pathology laboratories. Of the 103 identified tumors, 87 (84.5%) were from the upper lip, whereas 16 (15.5%) were from the lower lip. Of the 87 upper lip tumors, 80 (92.0%) were benign. Forty-three of these were monomorphic adenomas and 37 were pleomorphic adenomas. Seven malignant tumors of the upper lip were as follows: four adenoid cystic carcinomas, two acinic cell carcinomas, and one adenocarcinoma. Of the 16 lower lip tumors, 15 (93.8%) were malignant. Thirteen of these were mucoepidermoid carcinomas and two were acinic cell carcinomas. The only benign lower lip tumor was an intraductal papilloma. These results confirm the findings of previous investigations, showing that minor salivary gland tumors are much more common in the upper lip than the lower lip, but that lower lip tumors are more likely to be malignant.

  6. THE TUMOR MACROENVIRONMENT: CANCER-PROMOTING NETWORKS BEYOND TUMOR BEDS

    PubMed Central

    Rutkowski, Melanie R.; Svoronos, Nikolaos; Puchalt, Alfredo Perales; Conejo-Garcia, Jose R.

    2015-01-01

    During tumor progression, alterations within the systemic tumor environment, or macroenvironment, result in the promotion of tumor growth, tumor invasion to distal organs, and eventual metastatic disease. Distally produced hormones, commensal microbiota residing within mucosal surfaces, and myeloid cells and even the bone marrow impact the systemic immune system, tumor growth, and metastatic spread. Understanding the reciprocal interactions between the cells and soluble factors within the macroenvironment and the primary tumor will enable the design of specific therapies that have the potential to prevent dissemination and metastatic spread. This chapter will summarize recent findings detailing how the primary tumor and systemic tumor macroenvironment coordinate malignant progression. PMID:26216635

  7. Targeted deletion of the C-terminus of the mouse adenomatous polyposis coli tumor suppressor results in neurologic phenotypes related to schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Loss of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene function results in constitutive activation of the canonical Wnt pathway and represents the main initiating and rate-limiting event in colorectal tumorigenesis. APC is likely to participate in a wide spectrum of biological functions via its different functional domains and is abundantly expressed in the brain as well as in peripheral tissues. However, the neuronal function of APC is poorly understood. To investigate the functional role of Apc in the central nervous system, we analyzed the neurological phenotypes of Apc1638T/1638T mice, which carry a targeted deletion of the 3′ terminal third of Apc that does not affect Wnt signaling. Results A series of behavioral tests revealed a working memory deficit, increased locomotor activity, reduced anxiety-related behavior, and mildly decreased social interaction in Apc1638T/1638T mice. Apc1638T/1638T mice showed abnormal morphology of the dendritic spines and impaired long-term potentiation of synaptic transmission in the hippocampal CA1 region. Moreover, Apc1638T/1638T mice showed abnormal dopamine and serotonin distribution in the brain. Some of these behavioral and neuronal phenotypes are related to symptoms and endophenotypes of schizophrenia. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the C-terminus of the Apc tumor suppressor plays a critical role in cognitive and neuropsychiatric functioning. This finding suggests a potential functional link between the C-terminus of APC and pathologies of the central nervous system. PMID:24678719

  8. E6 and E7 gene silencing results in decreased methylation of tumor suppressor genes and induces phenotype transformation of human cervical carcinoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Long, Jia; Shen, Danbei; Zhou, Wuqing; Zhou, Qiyan; Yang, Jia; Jiang, Mingjun

    2015-01-01

    In SiHa and CaSki cells, E6 and E7-targeting shRNA specifically and effectively knocked down human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 E6 and E7 at the transcriptional level, reduced the E6 and E7 mRNA levels by more than 80% compared with control cells that expressed a scrambled-sequence shRNA. E6 and E7 repression resulted in down-regulation of DNA methyltransferase mRNA and protein expression, decreased DNA methylation and increased mRNA expression levels of tumor suppressor genes, induced a certain apoptosis and inhibited proliferation in E6 and E7 shRNA-infected SiHa and CaSki cells compared with the uninfected cells. Repression of E6 and E7 oncogenes resulted in restoration of DNA methyltransferase suppressor pathways and induced apoptosis in HPV16-positive cervical carcinoma cell lines. Our findings suggest that the potential carcinogenic mechanism of HPV16 through influencing DNA methylation pathway to activate the development of cervical cancer exist, and maybe as a candidate therapeutic strategy for cervical and other HPV-associated cancers. PMID:26329329

  9. The study of tumoral, radiobiological, and general health factors that influence results and complications in a series of 448 oral tongue carcinomas treated exclusively by irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Pernot, M.; Malissard, L.; Hoffstetter, S.; Luporsi, E.; Peiffert, D.; Aletti, P.; Kozminski, P.; Bey, P.

    1994-07-01

    The aim was to study the different factors that influence the results and complications in a series of 448 carcinomas of the oral tongue treated from January 31, 1972 to December 31, 1986, by brachytherapy(Br){+-}neck dissection (181 cases) or combination of external beam irradiation and brachytherapy (EBI + Br) (267 cases). The patients distribution was: 125 T1, 186 T2, 128 T3, 9 T4Tx, 78% NO, and 22% N+. The authors used the guide gutter or plastic tubes technique (Paris system dosimetry). Results at 5 and 10 years are: local control 68% and 64%, locoregional control 58% and 53%, specific survival 45% and 39%, and overall survival 44% and 27%. In the unvariate analysis for local control (LC) and overall survival (OS), they considered the tumoral factors. At 5 years, the LC for T1, T2, T3, are 93%, 65%, and 49%, and the OS 69%, 41%, and 25%, respectively. The lesions of the undersurface of the tongue have a better LC (77%) than other localizations (64%). For general factors, the index of general health condition, age, and sex were not significant for LC, but proved significant for OS. Significant radiobiological factors: the safety margin (expressed by the ratio treated surface on tumoral surface {ge}1.2) is significant for LC and OS. This is the same if the interval between EBI and Br is {le} 20 days. Neither the dose rate, the spacing between the sources, the total dose, nor Br dose were significant, but the last two were adapted according to the infiltration. In the univariate study for grade 2 and 3 complications (tissue and bone), the surface treated (>12 cm{sup 2}), and the dose rate >0.7 Gy/h were significant. The multivariate study showed that the small size of the lesion is the most important factor for local control, with brachytherapy alone for T1T2NO and the number of days between EBI and brachytherapy {le}20 days. For complications, the most important factors are the total dose >80 Gy and a treated surface >12 cm{sup 2}. 37 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  10. Non-surgical organ preservation strategies for locally advanced laryngeal tumors: what is the Italian attitude? Results of a national survey on behalf of AIRO and AIOM.

    PubMed

    Alterio, D; Franco, P; Numico, G; Licitra, L; Cossu Rocca, M; Ferrari, A; Pinto, C; Russi, E G; Ricardi, U; Jereczek Fossa, B A

    2016-07-01

    Chemoradiotherapy is the treatment mostly used as organ preservation (OP) strategy worldwide in advanced laryngo-hypopharyngeal cancer. Due to the not homogeneous results of the literature data regarding the pre-treatment assessment and treatment schedule in this setting of patients, the Italian societies of radiation oncology and medical oncology surveyed (by an online survey) their memberships regarding the Italian attitude on larynx preservation in clinical practice. The survey outline addressed different items such as: demographics (11 items), pre-treatment evaluation (12 items), treatment schedules (10 items) and outcomes (3 items). The survey was filled in by 116 clinical oncologists (64 % radiation and 36 % medical oncologists). Results highlighted that pretreatment evaluation was not homogeneous among the respondents. The treatment of choice for the OP program resulted the concurrent chemoradiotherapy (66 %). Induction chemotherapy was proposed mostly in case of aggressive tumors such as advanced stage (T4 or N3) and/or unfavorable primary sites (hypopharynx). Moreover, after induction chemotherapy, for responders patients most participants (46 %) proposed concurrent chemoradiotherapy, while 18 and 19 % proposed radiotherapy alone or radiotherapy and cetuximab, respectively. For patients with stable disease after induction chemotherapy, the respondents declared to suggest surgery, radiotherapy and cetuximab or radiotherapy alone in 38, 32 and 15 % of cases, respectively. Results of the present survey highlighted the variability of therapeutic approaches offered in clinical practice for patients candidate to a larynx OP program. Analysis of abovementioned results may give the chance to modify some clinical attitudes and create the background for future clinical investigation in this field. PMID:27290695

  11. Neuroimaging of Spinal Tumors.

    PubMed

    Merhemic, Zulejha; Stosic-Opincal, Tatjana; Thurnher, Majda M

    2016-08-01

    Intradural tumors are relatively rare neoplasms; however, when unrecognized in a timely manner, they can result in serious deficits and disability. These tumors lack obvious clinical symptoms until compression of the cord or neurologic deficits occur. The most common intramedullary lesions are ependymomas, astrocytomas, and hemangioblastomas. Meningiomas and nerve sheath tumors (schwannomas and neurofibromas) comprise most intradural-extramedullary tumors. Less common tumors are hemangiopericytoma, paraganglioma, melanocytoma, melanoma, metastases, and lymphoma. MR imaging is the imaging method of choice, helpful for localization and characterization of these lesions before treatment and for follow-up after treatment. PMID:27417401

  12. Lack of Proinflammatory Cytokine Interleukin-6 or Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor-1 Results in a Failure of the Innate Immune Response after Bacterial Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, Lea-Jessica; Tauber, Simone C.; Merres, Julika; Kress, Eugenia; Stope, Matthias B.; Jansen, Sandra; Pufe, Thomas; Brandenburg, Lars-Ove

    2016-01-01

    The most frequent pathogen that causes bacterial meningitis is the Gram-positive bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae. By entering the brain, host cells will be activated and proinflammatory cytokines like interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) are released. The goal of the current study was to examine the interaction between IL-6 and TNFR1 as receptor for TNF-α and the innate immune response in vivo in a model of Streptococcus pneumoniae-induced meningitis. For the experiments IL-6−/−, TNFR1−/−, and TNFR1-IL-6−/− KO mice were used. Our results revealed higher mortality rates and bacterial burden after infection in TNFR1−/−, IL-6−/−, and TNFR1-IL-6−/− mice and a decreased immune response including lower neutrophil infiltration in the meninges of TNFR1−/− and TNFR1-IL-6−/− mice in contrast to IL-6−/− and wild type mice. Furthermore, the increased mortality of TNFR1−/− and TNFR1-IL-6−/− mice correlated with decreased glial cell activation compared to IL-6−/− or wild type mice after pneumococcal meningitis. Altogether, the results show the importance of TNFR1 and IL-6 in the regulation of the innate immune response. The lack of TNFR1 and IL-6 results in higher mortality by weakened immune defence, whereas the lack of TNFR1 results in more severe impairment of the innate immune response than the lack of IL-6 alone. PMID:27057100

  13. Experimental pain ratings and reactivity of cortisol and soluble tumor necrosis factor-α receptor II following a trial of hypnosis: Results of a randomized controlled pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Goodin, Burel R.; Quinn, Noel B.; Kronfli, Tarek; King, Christopher D.; Page, Gayle G.; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer A.; Edwards, Robert R.; Stapleton, Laura M.; McGuire, Lynanne

    2011-01-01

    Objective Current evidence supports the efficacy of hypnosis for reducing the pain associated with experimental stimulation and various acute and chronic conditions; however, the mechanisms explaining how hypnosis exerts its effects remain less clear. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and pro-inflammatory cytokines represent potential targets for investigation given their purported roles in the perpetuation of painful conditions; yet, no clinical trials have thus far examined the influence of hypnosis on these mechanisms. Design Healthy participants, highly susceptible to the effects of hypnosis, were randomized to either a hypnosis intervention or a no-intervention control. Using a cold pressor task, assessments of pain intensity and pain unpleasantness were collected prior to the intervention (Pre) and following the intervention (Post) along with pain-provoked changes in salivary cortisol and the soluble receptor of tumor necrosis factor-α (sTNFαRII). Results Compared to the no-intervention control, data analyses revealed that hypnosis significantly reduced pain intensity and pain unpleasantness. Hypnosis was not significantly associated with suppression of cortisol or sTNFαRII reactivity to acute pain from Pre to Post; however, the effect sizes for these associations were medium-sized. Conclusions Overall, the findings from this randomized controlled pilot study support the importance of a future large-scale study on the effects of hypnosis for modulating pain-related changes of the HPA axis and pro-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:22233394

  14. Brain tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Black, K. L.; Mazziotta, J. C.; Becker, D. P.

    1991-01-01

    Recent advances in experimental tumor biology are being applied to critical clinical problems of primary brain tumors. The expression of peripheral benzodiazepine receptors, which are sparse in normal brain, is increased as much as 20-fold in brain tumors. Experimental studies show promise in using labeled ligands to these receptors to identify the outer margins of malignant brain tumors. Whereas positron emission tomography has improved the dynamic understanding of tumors, the labeled selective tumor receptors with positron emitters will enhance the ability to specifically diagnose and greatly aid in the pretreatment planning for tumors. Modulation of these receptors will also affect tumor growth and metabolism. Novel methods to deliver antitumor agents to the brain and new approaches using biologic response modifiers also hold promise to further improve the management of brain tumors. Images PMID:1848735

  15. In-vivo ablation of liver tumors by high-intensity-focused ultrasound using a toroidal transducer. Results of animal experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melodelima, David; N'Djin, William A.; Battais, Amélie; Chesnais, Sabrina; Rivoire, Michel; Chapelon, Jean-Yves

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate in a rabbit liver tumor model that high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) produced with toroidal-shaped emitters may have a role in treating colorectal liver metastases. The HIFU device was composed of eight ultrasound emitters created by sectioning a single toroidal piezocomposite transducer. Each of the eight emitters was divided into 32 transducers operating at a frequency of 3 MHz. The toroidal transducer has a diameter of 70 mm and a radius of curvature of 70 mm. A 7.5 MHz ultrasound imaging probe (Vermon, Tours, France) was placed in the centre of the device. Using this transducer, single lesions of 7 cm3 were created in 40 seconds. Juxtaposition of single lesions was performed under ultrasound guidance. VX2 tumor segments (25 mg) were implanted into right lateral liver lobes of 45 New Zealand white rabbits. Fifteen rabbits were treated with toroidal HIFU ablation (Group 1). Fifteen rabbits were resected (Group 2). Fifteen rabbits were not treated and formed a control group (Group 3). Group 1 and 3 were compared to evaluate treatment efficacy. Group 1 and 2 were compared to evaluate if the toroidal HIFU treatment increases the risk of tumor dissemination. Total hepatectomy took place 11 days after treatment. The therapeutic response was evaluated with follow-up ultrasound imaging and the corresponding gross pathology and histology. HIFU ablation produced using the toroidal transducer allowed fast and homogeneous tumor treatments. Ablations were visible on sonograms. The VX2 tumors were completely coagulated and were surrounded by ablated liver tissue without secondary thermal lesions in surrounding organs. In the control group tumor volume was 225% higher at the time of autopsy when compared to the volume at the day of the treatment. Tumor dissemination was lower in the HIFU group (25%) compared with resected (67%) and control (38%) groups. Findings of ultrasound imaging, gross pathology and histology supported these

  16. Reliability of tumor volume estimation from MR images in patients with malignant glioma. Results from the American College of Radiology Imaging Network (ACRIN) 6662 Trial.

    PubMed

    Ertl-Wagner, Birgit B; Blume, Jeffrey D; Peck, Donald; Udupa, Jayaram K; Herman, Benjamin; Levering, Anthony; Schmalfuss, Ilona M

    2009-03-01

    Reliable assessment of tumor growth in malignant glioma poses a common problem both clinically and when studying novel therapeutic agents. We aimed to evaluate two software-systems in their ability to estimate volume change of tumor and/or edema on magnetic resonance (MR) images of malignant gliomas. Twenty patients with malignant glioma were included from different sites. Serial post-operative MR images were assessed with two software systems representative of the two fundamental segmentation methods, single-image fuzzy analysis (3DVIEWNIX-TV) and multi-spectral-image analysis (Eigentool), and with a manual method by 16 independent readers (eight MR-certified technologists, four neuroradiology fellows, four neuroradiologists). Enhancing tumor volume and tumor volume plus edema were assessed independently by each reader. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs), variance components, and prediction intervals were estimated. There were no significant differences in the average tumor volume change over time between the software systems (p > 0.05). Both software systems were much more reliable and yielded smaller prediction intervals than manual measurements. No significant differences were observed between the volume changes determined by fellows/neuroradiologists or technologists.Semi-automated software systems are reliable tools to serve as outcome parameters in clinical studies and the basis for therapeutic decision-making for malignant gliomas, whereas manual measurements are less reliable and should not be the basis for clinical or research outcome studies. PMID:18925402

  17. Simvastatin Hydroxy Acid Fails to Attain Sufficient Central Nervous System Tumor Exposure to Achieve a Cytotoxic Effect: Results of a Preclinical Cerebral Microdialysis Study.

    PubMed

    Patel, Yogesh T; Jacus, Megan O; Davis, Abigail D; Boulos, Nidal; Turner, David C; Vuppala, Pradeep K; Freeman, Burgess B; Gilbertson, Richard J; Stewart, Clinton F

    2016-04-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors were potent hits against a mouse ependymoma cell line, but their effectiveness against central nervous system tumors will depend on their ability to cross the blood-brain barrier and attain a sufficient exposure at the tumor. Among 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A inhibitors that had activity in vitro, we prioritized simvastatin (SV) as the lead compound for preclinical pharmacokinetic studies based on its potential for central nervous system penetration as determined from in silico models. Furthermore, we performed systemic plasma disposition and cerebral microdialysis studies of SV (100 mg/kg, p.o.) in a murine model of ependymoma to characterize plasma and tumor extracellular fluid (tECF) pharmacokinetic properties. The murine dosage of SV (100 mg/kg, p.o.) was equivalent to the maximum tolerated dose in patients (7.5 mg/kg, p.o.) based on equivalent plasma exposure of simvastatin acid (SVA) between the two species. SV is rapidly metabolized in murine plasma with 15 times lower exposure compared with human plasma. SVA exposure in tECF was <33.8 ± 11.9 µg/l per hour, whereas the tumor to plasma partition coefficient of SVA was <0.084 ± 0.008. Compared with in vitro washout IC50 values, we did not achieve sufficient exposure of SVA in tECF to suggest tumor growth inhibition; therefore, SV was not carried forward in subsequent preclinical efficacy studies. PMID:26802130

  18. SPECT studies of brain tumors with L-3-( sup 123 I) iodo-alpha-methyl tyrosine: Comparison with PET, 124IMT and first clinical results

    SciTech Connect

    Langen, K.J.; Coenen, H.H.; Roosen, N.; Kling, P.; Muzik, O.; Herzog, H.; Kuwert, T.; Stoecklin, G.F.; Feinendegen, L.E. )

    1990-03-01

    L-3-({sup 123}I)iodo-alpha-methyltyrosine ({sup 123}IMT) like tyrosine has been reported previously to have a high affinity for a transport system in the blood-brain-barrier (BBB). We examined the kinetic behavior of {sup 124}IMT in brain and plasma in two patients with glioblastoma using dynamic positron emission tomography (PET). {sup 124}IMT accumulated in brain and tumor tissue, reaching a maximum after 15 min, with a washout of 20% to 35% at 60 min postinjection. Animal experiments confirmed the accumulation of the intact tracer in murine brain, but there was no incorporation into proteins. SPECT studies with {sup 123}IMT in patients with different types of brain tumors showed increased uptake in 26 of 32 tumors. Although nonspecific uptake in tumors must be considered, the accumulation of IMT in normal brain and in some tumors with intact BBB suggests a specific uptake of IMT. As transport is the main determinant of initial amino acid uptake, {sup 123}IMT appears to be a suitable SPECT tracer of amino acid uptake although it is not incorporated into protein.

  19. Dosimetric results in treatments of neuroblastoma and neuroendocrine tumors with {sup 131}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine with implications for the activity to administer

    SciTech Connect

    Mínguez, Pablo; Genollá, José; Guayambuco, Sonía; Delgado, Alejandro; Fombellida, José Cruz

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: The aim was to investigate whole-body and red marrow absorbed doses in treatments of neuroblastoma (NB) and adult neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) with {sup 131}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine and to propose a simple method for determining the activity to administer when dosimetric data for the individual patient are not available. Methods: Nine NB patients and six NET patients were included, giving in total 19 treatments as four patients were treated twice. Whole-body absorbed doses were determined from dose-rate measurements and planar gamma-camera imaging. For six NB and five NET treatments, red marrow absorbed doses were also determined using the blood-based method. Results: Dosimetric data from repeated administrations in the same patient were consistent. In groups of NB and NET patients, similar whole-body residence times were obtained, implying that whole-body absorbed dose per unit of administered activity could be reasonably well described as a power function of the patient mass. For NB, this functional form was found to be consistent with dosimetric data from previously published studies. The whole-body to red marrow absorbed dose ratio was similar among patients, with values of 1.4 ± 0.6–1.7 ± 0.7 (1 standard deviation) in NB treatments and between 1.5 ± 0.6 and 1.7 ± 0.7 (1 standard deviation) in NET treatments. Conclusions: The consistency of dosimetric results between administrations for the same patient supports prescription of the activity based on dosimetry performed in pretreatment studies, or during the first administration in a fractionated schedule. The expressions obtained for whole-body absorbed doses per unit of administered activity as a function of patient mass for NB and NET treatments are believed to be a useful tool to estimate the activity to administer at the stage when the individual patient biokinetics has not yet been measured.

  20. Tumors of the spine

    PubMed Central

    Ciftdemir, Mert; Kaya, Murat; Selcuk, Esref; Yalniz, Erol

    2016-01-01

    Spine tumors comprise a small percentage of reasons for back pain and other symptoms originating in the spine. The majority of the tumors involving the spinal column are metastases of visceral organ cancers which are mostly seen in older patients. Primary musculoskeletal system sarcomas involving the spinal column are rare. Benign tumors and tumor-like lesions of the musculoskeletal system are mostly seen in young patients and often cause instability and canal compromise. Optimal diagnosis and treatment of spine tumors require a multidisciplinary approach and thorough knowledge of both spine surgery and musculoskeletal tumor surgery. Either primary or metastatic tumors involving the spine are demanding problems in terms of diagnosis and treatment. Spinal instability and neurological compromise are the main and critical problems in patients with tumors of the spinal column. In the past, only a few treatment options aiming short-term control were available for treatment of primary and metastatic spine tumors. Spine surgeons adapted their approach for spine tumors according to orthopaedic oncologic principles in the last 20 years. Advances in imaging, surgical techniques and implant technology resulted in better diagnosis and surgical treatment options, especially for primary tumors. Also, modern chemotherapy drugs and regimens with new radiotherapy and radiosurgery options caused moderate to long-term local and systemic control for even primary sarcomas involving the spinal column. PMID:26925382

  1. Nonepithelial Neoplasms of the Pancreas: Radiologic-Pathologic Correlation, Part 1--Benign Tumors: From the Radiologic Pathology Archives.

    PubMed

    Manning, Maria A; Srivastava, Amogh; Paal, Edina E; Gould, Charles F; Mortele, Koenraad J

    2016-01-01

    Solid and cystic pancreatic neoplasms are being recognized more frequently with increasing utilization and spatial resolution of modern imaging techniques. In addition to the more common primary pancreatic solid (ductal adenocarcinoma) and cystic neoplasms of epithelial origin, nonepithelial neoplasms of the pancreas may appear as well-defined solid or cystic neoplasms. Most of these lesions have characteristic imaging features, such as a well-defined border, which allows differentiation from ductal adenocarcinoma. Solid masses include neurofibroma, ganglioneuroma, leiomyoma, lipoma, and perivascular epithelioid cell tumor (PEComa). Schwannomas and desmoid tumors can be solid or cystic. Cystic tumors include mature cystic teratoma and lymphangioma. Lipoma, PEComa, and mature cystic teratoma can contain fat, and ganglioneuroma and mature cystic teratoma may contain calcification. Although these unusual benign neoplasms are rare, the radiologist should at least consider them in the differential diagnosis of well-defined lesions of the pancreas. The goal of this comprehensive review is to improve understanding of these rare primary pancreatic mesenchymal tumors. PMID:26761535

  2. Chemoradiation for Advanced Head and Neck Cancer: Potential for Improving Results to Match Those of Current Treatment Modalities for Early-Stage Tumors-Long-Term Results of Hyperfractionated Chemoradiation With Carbogen Breathing and Anemia Correction With Erythropoietin

    SciTech Connect

    Villar, Alfonso Martinez, Jose Carlos; Serdio, Jose Luis de

    2008-04-01

    Purpose: To attempt to improve results of chemoradiation for head and neck cancer. Methods and Materials: From March 1996 to April 2007, 98 patients with head and neck cancer (15 Stage III and 83 Stage IV) were treated with a twice-daily hyperfractionated schedule. Eleven patients presented with N0, 11 with N1, 13 with N2A, 17 with N2B, 24 with N2C, and 22 with N3. Each fraction of treatment consisted of 5 mg/m{sup 2} of carboplatin plus 115 cGy with carbogen breathing. Treatment was given 5 days per week up to total doses of 350 mg/m{sup 2} of carboplatin plus 8050 cGy in 7 weeks. Anemia was corrected with erythropoietin. Results: Ninety-six patients tolerated the treatment as scheduled. All patients tolerated the planned radiation dose. Local toxicity remained at the level expected with irradiation alone. Chemotherapy toxicity was moderate. Ninety-seven complete responses were achieved. After 11 years of follow-up (median, 81 months), actuarial locoregional control, cause-specific survival, overall survival, and nodal control rates at 5 and 10 years were, respectively, 83% and 83%, 68% and 68%, 57% and 55%, and 100% and 100%. Median follow-up of disease-free survivors was 80 months. No significant differences in survival were observed between the different subsites or between the pretreatment node status groups (N0 vs. N+, N0 vs. N1, N0 vs. N2A, N0 vs. N2B, N0 vs. N2C, and N0 vs. N3). Conclusions: Improving results of chemoradiation for advanced head and neck cancer up to the level obtained with current treatments for early-stage tumors is a potentially reachable goal.

  3. Vismodegib Exerts Targeted Efficacy Against Recurrent Sonic Hedgehog–Subgroup Medulloblastoma: Results From Phase II Pediatric Brain Tumor Consortium Studies PBTC-025B and PBTC-032

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Giles W.; Orr, Brent A.; Wu, Gang; Gururangan, Sridharan; Lin, Tong; Qaddoumi, Ibrahim; Packer, Roger J.; Goldman, Stewart; Prados, Michael D.; Desjardins, Annick; Chintagumpala, Murali; Takebe, Naoko; Kaste, Sue C.; Rusch, Michael; Allen, Sariah J.; Onar-Thomas, Arzu; Stewart, Clinton F.; Fouladi, Maryam; Boyett, James M.; Gilbertson, Richard J.; Curran, Tom; Ellison, David W.; Gajjar, Amar

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Two phase II studies assessed the efficacy of vismodegib, a sonic hedgehog (SHH) pathway inhibitor that binds smoothened (SMO), in pediatric and adult recurrent medulloblastoma (MB). Patients and Methods Adult patients enrolled onto PBTC-025B and pediatric patients enrolled onto PBTC-032 were treated with vismodegib (150 to 300 mg/d). Protocol-defined response, which had to be sustained for 8 weeks, was confirmed by central neuroimaging review. Molecular tests to identify patterns of response and insensitivity were performed when tissue was available. Results A total of 31 patients were enrolled onto PBTC-025B, and 12 were enrolled onto PBTC-032. Three patients in PBTC-025B and one in PBTC-032, all with SHH-subgroup MB (SHH-MB), exhibited protocol-defined responses. Progression-free survival (PFS) was longer in those with SHH-MB than in those with non-SHH–MB, and prolonged disease stabilization occurred in 41% of patient cases of SHH-MB. Among those with SHH-MB, loss of heterozygosity of PTCH1 was associated with prolonged PFS, and diffuse staining of P53 was associated with reduced PFS. Whole-exome sequencing identified mutations in SHH genes downstream from SMO in four of four tissue samples from nonresponders and upstream of SMO in two of four patients with favorable responses. Conclusion Vismodegib exhibits activity against adult recurrent SHH-MB but not against recurrent non-SHH–MB. Inadequate accrual of pediatric patients precluded conclusions in this population. Molecular analyses support the hypothesis that SMO inhibitor activity depends on the genomic aberrations within the tumor. Such inhibitors should be advanced in SHH-MB studies; however, molecular and genomic work remains imperative to identify target populations that will truly benefit. PMID:26169613

  4. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) receptors: Deficiency in tumor results in scant HBV infection and overexpression in peritumor leads to higher recurrence risk

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Fei; Fan, Qing-Min; Yu, Guo-Feng; Yu, Dan-Dan; Gao, Lu; Sun, Kai; Han, Zhi-Peng; Li, Rong; Yang, Yang; Zhao, Qiu-Dong; Wu, Meng-Chao; Wang, Hong-Yang; Wei, Li-Xin

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a risk factor for hepatocarcinogenesis and recurrence. Here, we sought to characterize intratumoral and peritumoral expression of HBsAg and its specific receptors in HBsAg-positive hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients and further examined their correlation with the recurrence-free survival (RFS). HCC tissue and adjacent normal tissue specimens were acquired from HBsAg-positive patients. The presence of HBsAg and receptors, as well as hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs) were detected by tissue microassay and immunohistochemistry. Necroinflammatory activity was evaluated by HE staining. The mean IOD of HBsAg and HBV DNA in the intratumoral tissues was markedly lower than that in the peritumoral tissues (P < 0.001). Pearson correlation analysis further showed a significant correlation between the expression of HBsAg and NTCP (r = 0.461, P < 0.001) or ASGPR (r = 0.506, P < 0.001) in peritumoral tissues. And the peritumoral HBsAg and receptors presented a positive association with necroinflammatory activity (P < 0.05). Inflammation induced by HBV infection presented a positive association with HPCs activation (P < 0.05). Additionally, due to lack of HBV receptors, HPCs was not preferentially infected with HBV, but activated HPCs had a significant correlation with HBsAg expression in peritumoral tissues, and the peritumoral HPCs activation was associated with RFS of HCC patients, therefore, the overexpression of HBsAg and receptors in peritumor were also with higher recurrence risk (P < 0.05). In conclusion, lack of HBV receptors resulted in scant HBV infection in tumor cells, and overexpression of HBsAg and receptors in peritumor was strongly associated with higher recurrence risk in HCC patients. PMID:26515593

  5. Tumor Types

    MedlinePlus

    ... acoustic neuroma is also known as a schwannoma, vestibular schwannoma, or neurilemmoma. Characteristics Arises from cells that ... multiple CNS tumors, including neurofibromas, multiple meningiomas, bilateral vestibular schwannomas, optic nerve gliomas, and spinal cord tumors. ...

  6. 3'-end sequencing for expression quantification (3SEQ) from archival tumor samples.

    PubMed

    Beck, Andrew H; Weng, Ziming; Witten, Daniela M; Zhu, Shirley; Foley, Joseph W; Lacroute, Phil; Smith, Cheryl L; Tibshirani, Robert; van de Rijn, Matt; Sidow, Arend; West, Robert B

    2010-01-01

    Gene expression microarrays are the most widely used technique for genome-wide expression profiling. However, microarrays do not perform well on formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue (FFPET). Consequently, microarrays cannot be effectively utilized to perform gene expression profiling on the vast majority of archival tumor samples. To address this limitation of gene expression microarrays, we designed a novel procedure (3'-end sequencing for expression quantification (3SEQ)) for gene expression profiling from FFPET using next-generation sequencing. We performed gene expression profiling by 3SEQ and microarray on both frozen tissue and FFPET from two soft tissue tumors (desmoid type fibromatosis (DTF) and solitary fibrous tumor (SFT)) (total n = 23 samples, which were each profiled by at least one of the four platform-tissue preparation combinations). Analysis of 3SEQ data revealed many genes differentially expressed between the tumor types (FDR<0.01) on both the frozen tissue (approximately 9.6K genes) and FFPET (approximately 8.1K genes). Analysis of microarray data from frozen tissue revealed fewer differentially expressed genes (approximately 4.64K), and analysis of microarray data on FFPET revealed very few (69) differentially expressed genes. Functional gene set analysis of 3SEQ data from both frozen tissue and FFPET identified biological pathways known to be important in DTF and SFT pathogenesis and suggested several additional candidate oncogenic pathways in these tumors. These findings demonstrate that 3SEQ is an effective technique for gene expression profiling from archival tumor samples and may facilitate significant advances in translational cancer research.

  7. Secondary EWSR1 Gene Abnormalities in SMARCB1-Deficient Tumors with 22q11-12 Regional Deletions: Potential Pitfalls in Interpreting EWSR1 FISH Results

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shih-Chiang; Zhang, Lei; Sung, Yun-Shao; Chen, Chun-Liang; Kao, Yu-Chien; Agaram, Narasimhan P.; Antonescu, Cristina R.

    2016-01-01

    SMARCB1 inactivation occurs in a variety of tumors, being caused by various genetic mechanisms. Since SMARCB1 and EWSR1 genes are located close to each other on chromosome 22, larger SMARCB1 deletions may encompass the EWSR1 locus. Herein, we report four cases with SMARCB1-deletions showing concurrent EWSR1 gene abnormalities by FISH, which lead initially to misinterpretations as EWSR1-rearranged tumors. Our study group included various morphologies: a poorly differentiated chordoma, an extrarenal rhabdoid tumor, a myoepithelial carcinoma, and a proximal-type epithelioid sarcoma. All cases showed loss of SMARCB1 (INI1) by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and displayed characteristic histologic features for the diagnoses. The SMARCB1 FISH revealed homozygous or heterozygous deletions in three and one case, respectively. The co-hybridized EWSR1 probes demonstrated either unbalanced split signals or heterozygous deletion in two cases each. The former suggested bona fide rearrangement, while the latter resembled an unbalanced translocation. However, all the FISH patterns were quite complex and distinct from the simple and uniform split signals seen in typical EWSR1 rearrangements. We conclude that in the context of 22q11-12 regional alterations present in SMARCB1-deleted tumors, simultaneous EWSR1 involvement may be misinterpreted as equivalent to EWSR1 rearrangement. A detailed clinicopathologic correlation and supplementing the EWSR1 FISH assay with complementary methodology is mandatory for correct diagnosis. PMID:27218413

  8. Secondary EWSR1 gene abnormalities in SMARCB1-deficient tumors with 22q11-12 regional deletions: Potential pitfalls in interpreting EWSR1 FISH results.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shih-Chiang; Zhang, Lei; Sung, Yun-Shao; Chen, Chun-Liang; Kao, Yu-Chien; Agaram, Narasimhan P; Antonescu, Cristina R

    2016-10-01

    SMARCB1 inactivation occurs in a variety of tumors, being caused by various genetic mechanisms. Since SMARCB1 and EWSR1 genes are located close to each other on chromosome 22, larger SMARCB1 deletions may encompass the EWSR1 locus. Herein, we report four cases with SMARCB1-deletions showing concurrent EWSR1 gene abnormalities by FISH, which lead initially to misinterpretations as EWSR1-rearranged tumors. Our study group included various morphologies: a poorly differentiated chordoma, an extrarenal rhabdoid tumor, a myoepithelial carcinoma, and a proximal-type epithelioid sarcoma. All cases showed loss of SMARCB1 (INI1) by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and displayed characteristic histologic features for the diagnoses. The SMARCB1 FISH revealed homozygous or heterozygous deletions in three and one case, respectively. The co-hybridized EWSR1 probes demonstrated either unbalanced split signals or heterozygous deletion in two cases each. The former suggested bona fide rearrangement, while the latter resembled an unbalanced translocation. However, all the FISH patterns were quite complex and distinct from the simple and uniform split signals seen in typical EWSR1 rearrangements. We conclude that in the context of 22q11-12 regional alterations present in SMARCB1-deleted tumors, simultaneous EWSR1 involvement may be misinterpreted as equivalent to EWSR1 rearrangement. A detailed clinicopathologic correlation and supplementing the EWSR1 FISH assay with complementary methodology is mandatory for correct diagnosis. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27218413

  9. Observational study of patients with gastroenteropancreatic and bronchial neuroendocrine tumors in Argentina: Results from the large database of a multidisciplinary group clinical multicenter study

    PubMed Central

    O’CONNOR, JUAN MANUEL; MARMISSOLLE, FABIANA; BESTANI, CLAUDIA; PESCE, VERONICA; BELLI, SUSANA; DOMINICHINI, ENZO; MENDEZ, GUILLERMO; PRICE, PAOLA; GIACOMI, NORA; PAIROLA, ALEJANDRO; LORIA, FERNANDO SÁNCHEZ; HUERTAS, EDUARDO; MARTIN, CLAUDIO; PATANE, KARINA; POLERI, CLAUDIA; ROSENBERG, MOISES; CABANNE, ANA; KUJARUK, MIRTA; CAINO, ANALIA; ZAMORA, VICTOR; MARIANI, JAVIER; DIOCA, MARIANO; PARMA, PATRICIA; PODESTA, GUSTAVO; ANDRIANI, OSCAR; GONDOLESI, GABRIEL; ROCA, ENRIQUE

    2014-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NET) include a spectrum of malignancies arising from neuroendocrine cells throughout the body. The objective of this clinical investigation of retrospectively and prospectively collected data was to describe the prevalence, demographic data, clinical symptoms and methods of diagnosis of NET and the treatment and long-term follow-up of patients with NET. Data were provided by the participating centers and assessed for consistency by internal reviewers. All the cases were centrally evaluated (when necessary) by the pathologists in our group. The tissue samples were reviewed by hematoxylin and eosin and immunohistochemical staining techniques to confirm the diagnosis of NET. In total, 532 cases were documented: 461 gastroenteropancreatic-NET (GEP-NET) and 71 bronchial NET (BNET). All the tumors were immunohistochemically defined according to the World Health Organization (WHO) and European Neuroendocrine Tumor Society criteria. The most common initial symptoms in GEP-NET were abdominal pain, diarrhea, bowel obstruction, flushing, gastrointestinal bleeding and weight loss. The most common tumor types were carcinoid (58.0%), non-functional pancreatic tumor (23.0%), metastatic NET of unknown primary (16.0%) and functional pancreatic tumor (3.0%). Of the BNET, 89.0% were typical and 11.0% atypical carcinoids. Of the patients with GEP-NET, 59.2% had distant metastasis at diagnosis. The locations of the primary tumors in GEP-NET were the small bowel (26.9%), pancreas (25.2%), colon-rectum (12.4%), appendix (7.6%), stomach (6.9%), esophagus (2.8%), duodenum (2.0%) and unknown primary (16.3%). The histological subtypes based on the WHO classification were well-differentiated NET (20.1%), well-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas (66.5%) and poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas (10.3%). Overall, 67.3% of the patients underwent surgery, 41.2% with curative intent and 26.1% for palliative purposes. The 5-year survival rates were 65.1% (95

  10. Brain Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    A brain tumor is a growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, ... cancer cells that grow quickly. Some are primary brain tumors, which start in the brain. Others are ...

  11. Urogenital tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1994-03-01

    An overview is provided for veterinary care of urogenital tumors in companion animals, especially the dog. Neoplasms discussed include tumors of the kidney, urinary bladder, prostate, testis, ovary, vagina, vulva and the canine transmissible venereal tumor. Topics addressed include description, diagnosis and treatment.

  12. Neurologic complications of cardiac tumors.

    PubMed

    Roeltgen, David; Kidwell, Chelsea S

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac tumors are an uncommon cause for neurologic disease, but if undiagnosed can be associated with devastating neurologic consequences. Primary cardiac tumors, both benign and neoplastic, and metastatic tumors occur. Primary cardiac tumors are more likely to be associated with neurologic embolic complications. Metastatic cardiac tumors are more likely to be associated with valvular distraction, arrhythmia, diminished cardiac output and indirect neurological dysfunction. Primary and metastatic cardiac tumors may result in cerebral metastatic disease. Atrial myxoma, a benign primary cardiac tumor, is the most common cardiac tumor associated with neurologic disease, and most commonly causes cerebral embolization and stroke. The use of thrombolytic therapy for these strokes is controversial. Additionally, delayed manifestations, including aneurysm formation and intracranial hemorrhage, are possible. Aneurysm formation has been described as occurring after removal of the primary tumor. The availability of noninvasive cardiac imaging has significantly helped decrease the neurologic morbidity of cardiac tumors and has led to frequent successful intervention. PMID:24365298

  13. Breast Cancers Detected at Screening MR Imaging and Mammography in Patients at High Risk: Method of Detection Reflects Tumor Histopathologic Results.

    PubMed

    Sung, Janice S; Stamler, Sarah; Brooks, Jennifer; Kaplan, Jennifer; Huang, Tammy; Dershaw, D David; Lee, Carol H; Morris, Elizabeth A; Comstock, Christopher E

    2016-09-01

    Purpose To compare the clinical, imaging, and histopathologic features of breast cancers detected at screening magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, screening mammography, and those detected between screening examinations (interval cancers) in women at high risk. Materials and Methods This retrospective institutional review board-approved, HIPAA-compliant review of 7519 women at high risk for breast cancer who underwent screening with MR imaging and mammography between January 2005 and December 2010 was performed to determine the number of screening-detected and interval cancers diagnosed. The need for informed consent was waived. Medical records were reviewed for age, risk factors (family or personal history of breast cancer, BRCA mutation status, history of high-risk lesion or mantle radiation), tumor histopathologic results, and time between diagnosis of interval cancer and most recent screening examination. The χ(2) test and logistic regression methods were used to compare the features of screening MR imaging, screening mammography, and interval cancers. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to calculate P values. Results A total of 18 064 screening MR imaging examinations and 26 866 screening mammographic examinations were performed. Two hundred twenty-two cancers were diagnosed in 219 women, 167 (75%) at MR imaging, 43 (19%) at mammography, and 12 (5%) interval cancers. Median age at diagnosis was 52 years. No risk factors were associated with screening MR imaging, screening mammography, or interval cancer (P > .06). Cancers found at screening MR imaging were more likely to be invasive cancer (118 of 167 [71%]; P < .0001). Of the 43 cancers found at screening mammography, 38 (88%) manifested as calcifications and 28 (65%) were ductal carcinoma in situ. Interval cancers were associated with nodal involvement (P = .005) and the triple-negative subtype (P = .03). Conclusion In women at high risk for breast cancer who underwent screening with mammography and MR

  14. Optimal tumor shrinkage predicts long-term outcome in advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with target therapy: Result from 3 clinical trials of advanced NSCLC by 1 institution.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaobo; Zhang, Yang; Ma, Yuxiang; Zhou, Ting; Zhang, Jianwei; Hong, Shaodong; Sheng, Jin; Zhang, Zhonghan; Yang, Yunpeng; Huang, Yan; Zhang, Li; Zhao, Hongyun

    2016-08-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are used as standard therapies for advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with EGFR mutation positive. Because these targeted therapies could cause tumor necrosis and shrinkage, the purpose of the study is to search for a value of optimal tumor shrinkage as an appropriate indicator of outcome for advanced NSCLC.A total of 88 NSCLC enrollees of 3 clinical trials (IRESSA registration clinical trial, TRUST study and ZD6474 study), who received Gefitinib (250 mg, QD), Erlotinib (150 mg, QD), and ZD6474 (100 mg, QD), respectively, during December 2003 and October 2007, were retrospectively analyzed. The response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (RECIST) were used to identify responders, who had complete response (CR) or partial responses (PR) and nonresponders who had stable disease (SD) or progressive disease (PD). Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis was used to find the optimal tumor shrinkage as an indicator for tumor therapeutic outcome. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses were performed to compare the progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) between responders and nonresponders stratified based on radiologic criteria.Among the 88 NSCLC patients, 26 were responders and 62 were nonresponders based on RECIST 1.0. ROC indicated that 8.32% tumor diameter shrinkage in the sum of the longest tumor diameter (SLD) was the cutoff point of tumor shrinkage outcomes, resulting in 46 responders (≤8.32%) and 42 nonresponders (≥8.32%). Univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses indicated that (1) the responders (≤8.32%) and nonresponders (≥ -8.32%) were significantly different in median PFS (13.40 vs 1.17 months, P < 0.001) and OS (19.80 vs 7.90 months, P < 0.001) and (2) -8.32% in SLD could be used as the optimal threshold for PFS (hazard ratio [HR], 8.11, 95% CI, 3.75 to 17.51, P < 0.001) and OS (HR, 2.36, 95

  15. Use of the Concept of Equivalent Biologically Effective Dose (BED) to Quantify the Contribution of Hyperthermia to Local Tumor Control in Radiohyperthermia Cervical Cancer Trials, and Comparison With Radiochemotherapy Results

    SciTech Connect

    Plataniotis, George A. Dale, Roger G.

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: To express the magnitude of contribution of hyperthermia to local tumor control in radiohyperthermia (RT/HT) cervical cancer trials, in terms of the radiation-equivalent biologically effective dose (BED) and to explore the potential of the combined modalities in the treatment of this neoplasm. Materials and Methods: Local control rates of both arms of each study (RT vs. RT+HT) reported from randomized controlled trials (RCT) on concurrent RT/HT for cervical cancer were reviewed. By comparing the two tumor control probabilities (TCPs) from each study, we calculated the HT-related log cell-kill and then expressed it in terms of the number of 2 Gy fraction equivalents, for a range of tumor volumes and radiosensitivities. We have compared the contribution of each modality and made some exploratory calculations on the TCPs that might be expected from a combined trimodality treatment (RT+CT+HT). Results: The HT-equivalent number of 2-Gy fractions ranges from 0.6 to 4.8 depending on radiosensitivity. Opportunities for clinically detectable improvement by the addition of HT are only available in tumors with an alpha value in the approximate range of 0.22-0.28 Gy{sup -1}. A combined treatment (RT+CT+HT) is not expected to improve prognosis in radioresistant tumors. Conclusion: The most significant improvements in TCP, which may result from the combination of RT/CT/HT for locally advanced cervical carcinomas, are likely to be limited only to those patients with tumors of relatively low-intermediate radiosensitivity.

  16. Tumor-Targeted Nanomedicines

    PubMed Central

    ElBayoumi, Tamer A.; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The efficacy of drug delivery systems can be enhanced by making them target-specific via the attachment of various ligands. We attempted to enhance tumor accumulation and therapeutic effect of doxorubicin-loaded long-circulating PEGylated liposomes (Doxil®, ALZA Corp.) by coupling to their surface the anti-cancer monoclonal antibody 2C5 (mAb 2C5) with nuclesome (NS)-restricted activity, that can recognize the surface of various tumor but not normal cells and specifically targets pharmaceutical carriers to tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. Following earlier in vitro results with various cancer cell lines, the mAb 2C5-liposomes were studied in vivo vs. plain and non-specific IgG-liposomes. Experimental design Antibody coupling to Doxil® was performed via the “post-insertion” technique. Using 111In-labeled liposomes, the tissue biodistribution and pharmacokinetic profile were studied, as well as their accumulation in tumors in mice was followed by the whole-body γ-scintigraphic imaging. Therapeutic efficacy of mAb 2C5-targeted Doxil® vs. non-specific IgG-modified and original Doxil® controls was followed by registering live tumor growth and determining tumor weights upon mice sacrifice. Results mAb2C5 antibody-targeted liposomes demonstrate enhanced accumulation in tumors, and the in vivo therapeutic activity of the mAb 2C5-Doxil® treatment was found to be significantly superior, resulting in final tumor weights of only 25-40% compared to all Doxil® control treatments, when tested against the subcutaneous primary murine tumors of 4T1 and C26 and human PC3 tumor in nude mice. Conclusions Our results demonstrate the remarkable capability of 2C5-targeted Doxil® to specifically deliver its cargo into various tumors significantly increasing the efficacy of therapy. PMID:19276264

  17. Tumor cell metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Garcia, Susana; Lopez-Gonzalez, Jose Sullivan; B´ez-Viveros, José Luis; Aguilar-Cazares, Dolores

    2011-01-01

    Cancer is a genetic disease that is caused by mutations in oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes and stability genes. The fact that the metabolism of tumor cells is altered has been known for many years. However, the mechanisms and consequences of metabolic reprogramming have just begun to be understood. In this review, an integral view of tumor cell metabolism is presented, showing how metabolic pathways are reprogrammed to satisfy tumor cell proliferation and survival requirements. In tumor cells, glycolysis is strongly enhanced to fulfill the high ATP demands of these cells; glucose carbons are the main building blocks in fatty acid and nucleotide biosynthesis. Glutaminolysis is also increased to satisfy NADPH regeneration, whereas glutamine carbons replenish the Krebs cycle, which produces metabolites that are constantly used for macromolecular biosynthesis. A characteristic feature of the tumor microenvironment is acidosis, which results from the local increase in lactic acid production by tumor cells. This phenomenon is attributed to the carbons from glutamine and glucose, which are also used for lactic acid production. Lactic acidosis also directs the metabolic reprogramming of tumor cells and serves as an additional selective pressure. Finally, we also discuss the role of mitochondria in supporting tumor cell metabolism. PMID:22057267

  18. In vivo retargeting of adenovirus type 5 to alphavbeta6 integrin results in reduced hepatotoxicity and improved tumor uptake following systemic delivery.

    PubMed

    Coughlan, Lynda; Vallath, Sabari; Saha, Antonio; Flak, Magdalena; McNeish, Iain A; Vassaux, Georges; Marshall, John F; Hart, Ian R; Thomas, Gareth J

    2009-07-01

    A key impediment to successful cancer therapy with adenoviral vectors is the inefficient transduction of malignant tissue in vivo. Compounding this problem is the lack of cancer-specific targets, coupled with a shortage of corresponding high-efficiency ligands, permitting selective retargeting. The epithelial cell-specific integrin alphavbeta6 represents an attractive target for directed therapy since it is generally not expressed on normal epithelium but is upregulated in numerous carcinomas, where it plays a role in tumor progression. We previously have characterized a high-affinity, alphavbeta6-selective peptide (A20FMDV2) derived from VP1 of foot-and-mouth disease virus. We generated recombinant adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) fiber knob, incorporating A20FMDV2 in the HI loop, for which we validated the selectivity of binding and functional inhibition of alphavbeta6. The corresponding alphavbeta6-retargeted virus Ad5-EGFP(A20) exhibited up to 50-fold increases in coxsackievirus- and-adenovirus-receptor-independent transduction and up to 480-fold-increased cytotoxicity on a panel of alphavbeta6-positive human carcinoma lines compared with Ad5-EGFP(WT). Using an alphavbeta6-positive (DX3-beta6) xenograft model, we observed a approximately 2-fold enhancement in tumor uptake over Ad5-EGFP(WT) following systemic delivery. Furthermore, approximately 5-fold-fewer Ad5-EGFP(A20) genomes were detected in the liver (P = 0.0002), correlating with reduced serum transaminase levels and E1A expression. Warfarin pretreatment, to deplete coagulation factors, did not improve tumor uptake significantly with either virus but did significantly reduce liver sequestration and hepatic toxicity. The ability of Ad5-EGFP(A20) to improve delivery to alphavbeta6, combined with its reduced hepatic tropism and toxicity, highlights its potential as a prototype virus for future clinical investigation.

  19. Trial of photodynamic therapy for the treatment of tumors of the skin, head, and neck, and the results of an experimental study to determine the interrelationships between the tissue effects of ionizing radiation and photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carruth, John A. S.; Barrett, J. M.; Barnes, D. W.; Buchanan, R. B.; Sansom, J. M.

    1993-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) utilizes a tumor-localizing photo-sensitive substance which, when activated by light of an appropriate wavelength, releases cytotoxic substances causing destruction of the malignant tumor with preservation of surrounding normal tissues. In this technique the only drug/light combination which has been used regularly is that of hematoporphyrin derivative (HPD) and red light at a wavelength of 630 nanometers usually produced by a dye or gold vapor laser. This paper describes the results of a pilot/feasibility study using this technique to treat superficial tumors of the skin and head and neck carried out in Southampton between 1983 and 1989. Ethical permission was obtained to treat only patients who had failed all other appropriate treatment modalities and for whom there was no practical alternative therapy. It became apparent that, particularly in the treatment of tumors of the head and neck, PDT would be used as one of the arms in multi-modality treatment programs replacing chemotherapy in established protocols. It was considered essential, therefore, to undertake an experimental study to determine the interrelationship between photodynamic therapy and ionizing radiation and particularly to show that PDT does not have any adverse effects on the healing following radiation therapy.

  20. Pindborg tumor

    PubMed Central

    Caliaperoumal, Santhosh Kumar; Gowri, S.; Dinakar, J.

    2016-01-01

    Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor (CEOT), also known as Pindborg tumor, is a rare odontogenic epithelial neoplasm. So far, nearly 200 cases have been reported in the literature. We are reporting a case of CEOT in a 42-year-old male patient with painless bony swelling in the mandible. The clinical, radiographic, and histopathologic features are discussed with relevant references. PMID:27041911

  1. Hypothalamic tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... occur at any age. They are often more aggressive in adults than in children. In adults, tumors ... The treatment depends on how aggressive the tumor is, and whether it is a glioma or another type of cancer. Treatment may involve combinations of surgery, radiation , ...

  2. Pituitary Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... pituitary is the "master control gland" - it makes hormones that affect growth and the functions of other glands in the body. Pituitary tumors are common, but often they don't cause health ... tumor produces hormones and disrupts the balance of hormones in your ...

  3. pH-sensitive polymeric cisplatin-ion complex with styrene-maleic acid copolymer exhibits tumor-selective drug delivery and antitumor activity as a result of the enhanced permeability and retention effect.

    PubMed

    Saisyo, Atsuyuki; Nakamura, Hideaki; Fang, Jun; Tsukigawa, Kenji; Greish, Khaled; Furukawa, Hiroyuki; Maeda, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    Cisplatin (CDDP) is widely used to treat various cancers. However, its distribution to normal tissues causes serious adverse effects. For this study, we synthesized a complex of styrene-maleic acid copolymer (SMA) and CDDP (SMA-CDDP), which formed polymeric micelles, to achieve tumor-selective drug delivery based on the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. SMA-CDDP is obtained by regulating the pH of the reaction solution of SMA and CDDP. The mean SMA-CDDP particle size was 102.5 nm in PBS according to electrophoretic light scattering, and the CDDP content was 20.1% (w/w). The release rate of free CDDP derivatives from the SMA-CDDP complex at physiological pH was quite slow (0.75%/day), whereas it was much faster at pH 5.5 (4.4%/day). SMA-CDDP thus had weaker in vitro toxicity at pH 7.4 but higher cytotoxicity at pH 5.5. In vivo pharmacokinetic studies showed a 5-fold higher tumor concentration of SMA-CDDP than of free CDDP. SMA-CDDP had more effective antitumor potential but lower toxicity than did free CDDP in mice after i.v. administration. Administration of parental free CDDP at 4 mg/kg×3 caused a weight loss of more than 5%; SMA-CDDP at 60 mg/kg (CDDP equivalent)×3 caused no significant weight change but markedly suppressed S-180 tumor growth. These findings together suggested using micelles of the SMA-CDDP complex as a cancer chemotherapeutic agent because of beneficial properties-tumor-selective accumulation and relatively rapid drug release at the acidic pH of the tumor-which resulted in superior antitumor effects and fewer side effects compared with free CDDP. PMID:26674841

  4. Improved kit formulation for preparation of (99m)Tc-HYNIC-TOC: results of preliminary clinical evaluation in imaging patients with neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Korde, Aruna; Mallia, Madhava; Shinto, Ajit; Sarma, H D; Samuel, Grace; Banerjee, Sharmila

    2014-11-01

    (99m)Tc-HYNIC-TOC is a cost-effective and logistically viable agent for scintigraphy of neuroendocrine tumors overexpressing somatostatin receptors as compared with [(111)In-DTPA-D-Phe(1)] Octreotide (Octreoscan(®)). Several studies have been reported, wherein the efficacy of this agent is demonstrated. In the present article, the authors report the preparation of a single-vial HYNIC-TOC kit suitable for the preparation of 4-5 patient doses (15 mCi/patient) of (99m)Tc-HYNIC-TOC. The kits were tested for sterility and bacterial endotoxins to assure safety of the product. A significant modification in this kit is the inclusion of buffer in the kit itself, unlike in commercially available kits where the buffer solution has to be added during preparation. (99m)Tc-HYNIC-TOC was prepared by adding 20-80 mCi (740-2960 MBq) of freshly eluted Na(99m)TcO4 in 1-3 mL of sterile saline directly into the kit vial and heating the vial in a water bath at 100°C for 20 minutes. The labeling yield and radiochemical purity of (99m)Tc-HYNIC-TOC, prepared using the lyophilized cold kit, were consistently >90%. The kits were evaluated over a period of 9 months and found to be stable when stored at -20°C. Limited clinical studies performed with the (99m)Tc-HYNIC-TOC, formulated using the kit, showed adequate sensitivity and specificity for the detection of gasteroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

  5. Müllerian adenosarcoma of the uterus with low-grade sarcomatous overgrowth characterized by prominent hydropic change resulting in mimicry of a smooth muscle tumor.

    PubMed

    Wu, Roseann I; Schorge, John O; Dal Cin, Paola; Cin, Paola D; Young, Robert H; Oliva, Esther

    2014-11-01

    A 28-y-old woman was found to have a large subserosal uterine mass that was excised and interpreted as a "clear cell leiomyoma." Five years later, the tumor recurred as serosal-based ileal and uterine masses; they were treated by partial ileal resection and hysterectomy. All 3 masses were predominantly characterized by conspicuous edema separating bland cells growing in cords and clusters, with scant to moderately conspicuous clear cytoplasm. The edema was indistinguishable from the hydropic change commonly seen in benign smooth muscle tumors and the cords similar to those often present in them. However, the mass from the hysterectomy specimen had a small, grossly recognizable cystic region, which on microscopic examination was a typical low-grade müllerian adenosarcoma. The stroma of the latter ranged from cellular endometrial-type to edematous and hypocellular similar to that dominating the other specimens. The cellular and edematous regions focally had cords and tubules of sex cord-like type confirmed by inhibin and calretinin positivity. Smooth muscle differentiation was also seen as a "starburst" pattern. This case of adenosarcoma is unusual due to its (1) serosal location, (2) overgrowth of stroma, which differed from typical adenosarcoma with sarcomatous overgrowth by its low-grade nature, (3) hydropic change associated with cords and nests of cells with clear cytoplasm, which prompted the initial specimen to be considered an epithelioid leiomyoma, and (4) prominent smooth muscle metaplasia mostly with a "starburst" morphology. All these features have only rarely been documented in prior müllerian adenosarcomas.

  6. [Adipocytic tumors].

    PubMed

    Stock, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Adipocytic tumors are the most common mesenchymal neoplasms, liposarcoma accounting for approximately 20% of soft tissue sarcomas. The differential diagnosis between benign and malignant tumors is often problematic and represents a significant proportion of consultation cases. The goal of this article is to review liposarcoma subtypes, the main benign adipocytic neoplasms: lipoblastoma, hibernoma, spindle/pleomorphic cell lipoma, chondroid lipoma, as well as non adipocytic neoplasms with a lipomatous component such as lipomatous solitary fibrous tumor, emphasizing on practical differential diagnosis issues, and immunohistochemical and molecular tools allowing their resolution.

  7. Wilms Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... diagnosis, and the condition, or histology , of the cancer cells when observed under a microscope. "Favorable" histology is associated with a good chance of a cure; tumors with "unfavorable" histology are more aggressive and ...

  8. Tumor Markers

    MedlinePlus

    ... types: Germ cell tumors, lymphoma, leukemia, melanoma, and neuroblastoma Tissue analyzed: Blood How used: To assess stage, ... NSE) Cancer types: Small cell lung cancer and neuroblastoma Tissue analyzed: Blood How used: To help in ...

  9. Retrorectal tumors.

    PubMed

    Bullard Dunn, Kelli

    2010-02-01

    Retrorectal or presacral tumors are rare and can be challenging to diagnose and treat. Because the retrorectal space contains multiple embryologic remnants derived from various tissues, the tumors that develop in this space are heterogeneous. Most lesions are benign, but malignant neoplasms are not uncommon. Lesions are classified as congenital, neurogenic, osseous, inflammatory, or miscellaneous. Although treatment depends on diagnosis and anatomic location, most retrorectal lesions will require surgical resection.

  10. Evaluation of Th9 lymphocytes in peripheral blood of rheumatoid arthritis patients and correlation with anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy: results from an in vitro pivotal study.

    PubMed

    Talotta, R; Berzi, A; Atzeni, F; Dell'Acqua, D; Sarzi Puttini, P; Trabattoni, D

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of T helper 9 (Th9) lymphocytes in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and to identify a possible association between the percentage of Th9 and the discontinuation of a biological treatment with an anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) (infliximab). We collected peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 55 consecutive RA outpatients and 10 healthy controls. Among RA patients, 15 were not receiving any immunosuppressive drug, 20 were successfully treated with infliximab and 20 discontinued infliximab because of adverse events or inefficacy and were treated with other biological agents. PBMCs were cultured with/without infliximab 50 mg/L for 18 h, and the percentage of Th9 cells was assessed by means of flow cytometry. Th9 lymphocytes were identified as interferon gamma, interleukin (IL)4-, IL17-, IL9-secreting cluster of differentiation 4 (CD4)+ T cells. Cytometric analysis revealed no significant decrease in the percentage of Th9 cells after infliximab exposure in any of the groups, although it was lower in healthy controls than RA patients either before and after the infliximab stimulation assay. Th9 cells are IL-9-secreting T helper lymphocytes whose role in RA is still poorly known. IL-9 levels are increased in RA patients, in whom this cytokine plays a crucial role. Th9 cells are the major producers of IL-9, and their prevalence is higher in RA patients than in healthy subjects; however our experiment in vitro does not demonstrate an association between Th9 lymphocytes and the response to infliximab. Further studies are required to evaluate the real involvement of Th9 population in the immunogenicity of anti-TNF agents. PMID:27608796

  11. Primary intraosseous hybrid nerve sheath tumor of femur: a hitherto undescribed occurrence in bone with secondary aneurysmal bone cyst formation resulting in pathological fracture.

    PubMed

    Chow, Louis Tsun Cheung

    2015-05-01

    Soft tissue perineurioma besides its pure form may coexist with schwannoma as hybrid nerve sheath tumor (HNST) which occurs in the limbs, head and neck, trunk and occasionally colon but origination in other organ sites has not been reported. We report the first case of primary intraosseous HNST. An 18-year-old man suffered from pathological fracture of his right femur after an impact which was preceded by a similar episode two weeks previously. Plain radiograph revealed a displaced fracture in the superior diaphysis of the right femur where an expansile osteolytic lesion with relatively well defined borders was seen. Histologic examination of the curetted lesion showed a well circumscribed spindle cell neoplasm displaying predominantly storiform but focally whorled patterns. In areas, the cells possessed thin wavy spindle nuclei and delicate elongated bipolar cytoplasmic processes supported in a fibromyxoid stroma. They stained positively for EMA, claudin, CD34, collagen 4 and focally for S100 but negatively for MUC4 and BCL-2, indicative of perineurial differentiation. Situated in the periphery of some of these perineurial whorls are spindle cells bearing plump tapering wavy nuclei and palely eosinophilic cytoplasm with indistinct cell borders. They stained intensely for S100 but negatively for EMA, claudin, CD34, collagen 4, MUC4 and BCL-2, consistent with schwannian differentiation. Focally, these two varieties of cells intimately intermingled with each other. Features of aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) formation were present but no mitotic figures, establishing the final diagnosis of primary intraosseous HNST with secondary ABC formation. The patient remained well 7 months after curettage and internal fixation of his fracture.

  12. Deletion of 43 amino acids in the NH2-terminal half of the large tumor antigen of simian virus 40 results in a non-karyophilic protein capable of transforming established cells.

    PubMed Central

    Fischer-Fantuzzi, L; Vesco, C

    1985-01-01

    We have characterized a simian virus 40 (SV40) mutant, derived from the viral DNA insertion present in simian cell transformants, which carries a deletion affecting the NH2-terminal region of the SV40 large tumor antigen. This mutant protein is 6% smaller than normal, has lost the typical nuclear localization of the SV40 large tumor antigen, and accumulates in the cytoplasm. The deletion begins at nucleotide position 4490 of the SV40 DNA and ends in-frame at nucleotide position 4362. The missing 43 amino acids begin with proline-110 and end with serine-152 of the predicted sequence; they include a cluster of basic residues, presumably important for the viral origin-DNA binding, and most of the phosphorylation sites present in the NH2-terminal half of the molecule. The protein can still be phosphorylated considerably in vivo. This mutant viral genome is replication-defective but has conserved the competence to transform established cells, such as NIH/3T3 cells. Transfection of cloned mutant DNA into such cells resulted in the production of full transformants. Full transformants were not produced in similar transfections carried out in primary rat embryo fibroblasts, although some primary transfectants expressing the non-karyophilic large tumor antigen might be considered minimally transformed. Images PMID:2984671

  13. Mucoepidermoid tumors of the lung.

    PubMed

    Yousem, S A; Hochholzer, L

    1987-09-15

    Mucoepidermoid tumors of lung (MET) are rare tumors derived from the minor salivary gland tissue of the proximal tracheobronchial tree. The authors studied 58 cases of MET confined to the lung and used criteria derived from similar tumors of the salivary glands to separate them into low-grade and high-grade variants. The overwhelming majority of low-grade tumors behaved in a benign fashion, whereas 23% of high-grade tumors resulted in patient death. Prognostic factors which appeared to predict future aggressive behavior included high-grade classification, advanced stage at presentation, and perhaps lymph node metastases.

  14. Wnt5a Suppresses Tumor Formation and Redirects Tumor Phenotype in MMTV-Wnt1 Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Easter, Stephanie L.; Mitchell, Elizabeth H.; Baxley, Sarah E.; Desmond, Renee; Frost, Andra R.; Serra, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    Wnt5a is a non-canonical signaling Wnt that has been implicated in tumor suppression. We previously showed that loss of Wnt5a in MMTV-PyVmT tumors resulted in a switch in tumor phenotype resulting in tumors with increased basal phenotype and high Wnt/β-catenin signaling. The object of this study was to test the hypothesis that Wnt5a can act to inhibit tumors formed by activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. To this end, we characterized tumor and non-tumor mammary tissue from MMTV-Wnt1 and double transgenic MMTV-Wnt1;MMTV-Wnt5a mice. Wnt5a containing mice demonstrated fewer tumors with increased latency when compared to MMTV-Wnt1 controls. Expression of markers for basal-like tumors was down-regulated in the tumors that formed in the presence of Wnt5a indicating a phenotypic switch. Reduced canonical Wnt signaling was detected in double transgenic tumors as a decrease in active β-catenin protein and a decrease in Axin2 mRNA transcript levels. In non-tumor tissues, over-expression of Wnt5a in MMTV-Wnt1 mammary glands resulted in attenuation of phenotypes normally observed in MMTV-Wnt1 glands including hyperbranching and increased progenitor and basal cell populations. Even though Wnt5a could antagonize Wnt/β-catenin signaling in primary mammary epithelial cells in culture, reduced Wnt/β-catenin signaling was not detected in non-tumor MMTV-Wnt1;Wnt5a tissue in vivo. The data demonstrate that Wnt5a suppresses tumor formation and promotes a phenotypic shift in MMTV-Wnt1 tumors. PMID:25401739

  15. Wnt5a suppresses tumor formation and redirects tumor phenotype in MMTV-Wnt1 tumors.

    PubMed

    Easter, Stephanie L; Mitchell, Elizabeth H; Baxley, Sarah E; Desmond, Renee; Frost, Andra R; Serra, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    Wnt5a is a non-canonical signaling Wnt that has been implicated in tumor suppression. We previously showed that loss of Wnt5a in MMTV-PyVmT tumors resulted in a switch in tumor phenotype resulting in tumors with increased basal phenotype and high Wnt/β-catenin signaling. The object of this study was to test the hypothesis that Wnt5a can act to inhibit tumors formed by activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. To this end, we characterized tumor and non-tumor mammary tissue from MMTV-Wnt1 and double transgenic MMTV-Wnt1;MMTV-Wnt5a mice. Wnt5a containing mice demonstrated fewer tumors with increased latency when compared to MMTV-Wnt1 controls. Expression of markers for basal-like tumors was down-regulated in the tumors that formed in the presence of Wnt5a indicating a phenotypic switch. Reduced canonical Wnt signaling was detected in double transgenic tumors as a decrease in active β-catenin protein and a decrease in Axin2 mRNA transcript levels. In non-tumor tissues, over-expression of Wnt5a in MMTV-Wnt1 mammary glands resulted in attenuation of phenotypes normally observed in MMTV-Wnt1 glands including hyperbranching and increased progenitor and basal cell populations. Even though Wnt5a could antagonize Wnt/β-catenin signaling in primary mammary epithelial cells in culture, reduced Wnt/β-catenin signaling was not detected in non-tumor MMTV-Wnt1;Wnt5a tissue in vivo. The data demonstrate that Wnt5a suppresses tumor formation and promotes a phenotypic shift in MMTV-Wnt1 tumors.

  16. Clones from a shooty tobacco crown gall tumor I: deletions, rearrangements and amplifications resulting in irregular T-DNA structures and organizations.

    PubMed

    Peerbolte, R; Leenhouts, K; Hooykaas-van Slogteren, G M; Hoge, J H; Wullems, G J; Schilperoort, R A

    1986-07-01

    Transformed clones from a shooty tobacco crown gall tumor, induced byAgrobacterium tumefaciens strain LBA1501, having a Tn1831 insertion in the auxin locus, were investigated for their T-DNA structure and expression. In addition to clones with the expected phenotype, i.e. phytohormone autonomy, regeneration of non-rooting shoots and octopine synthesis (Aut(+)Reg(+)Ocs(+) 'type I' clones), clones were obtained with an aberrant phenotype. Among these were the Aut(-)Reg(-)Ocs(+) 'type II' clones. Two shooty type I clones and three type II callus clones (all randomly chosen) as well as a rooting shoot regenerated from a type II clone via a high kinetin treatment, all had a T-DNA structure which differed significantly from 'regular' T-DNA structures. No Tn1831 DNA sequences were detected in these clones. The two type I clones were identical: they both contained the same highly truncated T-DNA segments. One TL-DNA segment of approximately 0.7 kb, originating form the left part of the TL-region, was present at one copy per diploid tobacco genome. Another segment with a maximum size of about 7 kb was derived from the right hand part of the TL-region and was present at minimally two copies. Three copies of a truncated TR-DNA segment were detected, probably starting at the right TR-DNA border repeat and ending halfway the regular TR-region. Indications have been obtained that at least some of the T-DNA segments are closely linked, sometimes via intervening plant DNA sequences. The type I clones harbored TL-DNA transcripts 4, 6a/b and 3 as well as TR-DNA transcript 0'. The type II clones harbored three to six highly truncated T-DNA segments, originating from the right part of the TL-region. In addition they had TR-DNA segments, similar to those of the type I clones. On Northern blots TR-DNA transcripts 0' and 1' were detected as well as the TL-DNA transcripts 3 and 6a/b and an 1800 bp hybrid transcript (tr.Y) containing gene 6b sequences. Possible origins of the observed

  17. Superior sulcus tumors (Pancoast tumors).

    PubMed

    Marulli, Giuseppe; Battistella, Lucia; Mammana, Marco; Calabrese, Francesca; Rea, Federico

    2016-06-01

    Superior Sulcus Tumors, frequently termed as Pancoast tumors, are a wide range of tumors invading the apical chest wall. Due to its localization in the apex of the lung, with the potential invasion of the lower part of the brachial plexus, first ribs, vertebrae, subclavian vessels or stellate ganglion, the superior sulcus tumors cause characteristic symptoms, like arm or shoulder pain or Horner's syndrome. The management of superior sulcus tumors has dramatically evolved over the past 50 years. Originally deemed universally fatal, in 1956, Shaw and Paulson introduced a new treatment paradigm with combined radiotherapy and surgery ensuring 5-year survival of approximately 30%. During the 1990s, following the need to improve systemic as well as local control, a trimodality approach including induction concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by surgical resection was introduced, reaching 5-year survival rates up to 44% and becoming the standard of care. Many efforts have been persecuted, also, to obtain higher complete resection rates using appropriate surgical approaches and involving multidisciplinary team including spine surgeon or vascular surgeon. Other potential treatment options are under consideration like prophylactic cranial irradiation or the addition of other chemotherapy agents or biologic agents to the trimodality approach.

  18. Superior sulcus tumors (Pancoast tumors).

    PubMed

    Marulli, Giuseppe; Battistella, Lucia; Mammana, Marco; Calabrese, Francesca; Rea, Federico

    2016-06-01

    Superior Sulcus Tumors, frequently termed as Pancoast tumors, are a wide range of tumors invading the apical chest wall. Due to its localization in the apex of the lung, with the potential invasion of the lower part of the brachial plexus, first ribs, vertebrae, subclavian vessels or stellate ganglion, the superior sulcus tumors cause characteristic symptoms, like arm or shoulder pain or Horner's syndrome. The management of superior sulcus tumors has dramatically evolved over the past 50 years. Originally deemed universally fatal, in 1956, Shaw and Paulson introduced a new treatment paradigm with combined radiotherapy and surgery ensuring 5-year survival of approximately 30%. During the 1990s, following the need to improve systemic as well as local control, a trimodality approach including induction concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by surgical resection was introduced, reaching 5-year survival rates up to 44% and becoming the standard of care. Many efforts have been persecuted, also, to obtain higher complete resection rates using appropriate surgical approaches and involving multidisciplinary team including spine surgeon or vascular surgeon. Other potential treatment options are under consideration like prophylactic cranial irradiation or the addition of other chemotherapy agents or biologic agents to the trimodality approach. PMID:27429965

  19. Superior sulcus tumors (Pancoast tumors)

    PubMed Central

    Battistella, Lucia; Mammana, Marco; Calabrese, Francesca; Rea, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Superior Sulcus Tumors, frequently termed as Pancoast tumors, are a wide range of tumors invading the apical chest wall. Due to its localization in the apex of the lung, with the potential invasion of the lower part of the brachial plexus, first ribs, vertebrae, subclavian vessels or stellate ganglion, the superior sulcus tumors cause characteristic symptoms, like arm or shoulder pain or Horner’s syndrome. The management of superior sulcus tumors has dramatically evolved over the past 50 years. Originally deemed universally fatal, in 1956, Shaw and Paulson introduced a new treatment paradigm with combined radiotherapy and surgery ensuring 5-year survival of approximately 30%. During the 1990s, following the need to improve systemic as well as local control, a trimodality approach including induction concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by surgical resection was introduced, reaching 5-year survival rates up to 44% and becoming the standard of care. Many efforts have been persecuted, also, to obtain higher complete resection rates using appropriate surgical approaches and involving multidisciplinary team including spine surgeon or vascular surgeon. Other potential treatment options are under consideration like prophylactic cranial irradiation or the addition of other chemotherapy agents or biologic agents to the trimodality approach. PMID:27429965

  20. RNAi-mediated Downregulation of Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Receptor (uPAR) and Matrix Metalloprotease-9 (MMP-9) in Human Breast Cancer Cells Results in Decreased Tumor Invasion, Angiogenesis and Growth

    PubMed Central

    Kunigal, Sateesh; Lakka, Sajani S.; Gondi, Christopher S.; Estes, Norman; Rao, Jasti S.

    2007-01-01

    The serine protease urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) plays a significant role in tumor cell invasion and metastasis when bound to its specific receptor, uPAR (also known as CD87). In addition to the uPA-uPAR system, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are involved in tumor cell invasion and metastasis. In this study, we achieved specific inhibition of uPAR and MMP-9 using RNAi technology. We introduced small interfering RNA (siRNA) to downregulate the expression of uPAR and MMP-9 (pUM) in breast cancer cell lines (MDA MB 231 and ZR 75 1). In vitro angiogenesis studies indicated a decrease in the angiogenic potential of the treated cells; in particular, a remarkable decrease was observed in the cells treated with bicistronic construct (pUM) in comparision to the controls. Additionally, bicistronic construct inhibited the formation of capillary-like structures in in vivo models of angiogenesis. Similarly, the invasive potential and migration decreased dramatically when treated with the bicistronic construct as shown by matrigel invasion and migration assays. These results suggest a synergistic effect from the simultaneous downregulation of uPAR and MMP-9. We also assessed the levels of phosphorylated forms of MAPK, ERK, and AKT signaling pathway molecules and found reduction in the levels of these molecules in cells treated with the bicistronic construct as compared to the control cells. Furthermore, targeting both uPAR and MMP-9 totally regressed orthotopic breast tumors in nude mice. In conclusion, our results provide evidence that the simultaneous downregulation of uPAR and MMP-9 using RNAi technology may provide an effective tool for breast cancer therapy. PMID:17657740

  1. Can We Negotiate with a Tumor?

    PubMed Central

    Deschatrette, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Recent progress in deciphering the molecular portraits of tumors promises an era of more personalized drug choices. However, current protocols still follow standard fixed-time schedules, which is not entirely coherent with the common observation that most tumors do not grow continuously. This unpredictability of the increases in tumor mass is not necessarily an obstacle to therapeutic efficiency, particularly if tumor dynamics could be exploited. We propose a model of tumor mass evolution as the integrated result of the dynamics of two linked complex systems, tumor cell population and tumor microenvironment, and show the practical relevance of this nonlinear approach. PMID:25084359

  2. Adding a combination of hydroxycitrate and lipoic acid (METABLOC™) to chemotherapy improves effectiveness against tumor development: experimental results and case report.

    PubMed

    Guais, Adeline; Baronzio, GianFranco; Sanders, Edward; Campion, Frédéric; Mainini, Carlo; Fiorentini, Giammaria; Montagnani, Francesco; Behzadi, Mahsa; Schwartz, Laurent; Abolhassani, Mohammad

    2012-02-01

    Altered metabolism of cancer first highlighted by Otto Warburg has a long history. Although ignored for a considerable amount of time, it is now receiving substantial attention. We recently published results obtained with a combination of two drugs, lipoic acid and hydroxycitrate, targeting metabolic enzymes particularly affected in cancer: ATP citrate lyase and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase. This treatment was as efficient as chemotherapy in the three mouse cancer models that were tested. In this work, we asked if our drug combination could be used in conjunction with standard cytotoxic chemotherapy, in particular cisplatin, to improve basic protocol efficacy. A combination of lipoic acid and hydroxycitrate was administered to mice implanted with syngeneic cancer cells, LL/2 lung carcinoma and MBT-2 bladder carcinoma, concommitantly with classical chemotherapy (cisplatin or methotrexate). We demonstrate that the triple combination lipoic acid + hydroxycitrate + cisplatin or methotrexate is more efficient than cisplatin or methotrexate used individually or the combination of lipoic acid and hydroxycitrate administered alone. Of particular note are the results obtained in the treatment of an 80 year-old female who presented with ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas accompanied by liver metastases. A treatment course using gemcitabine plus α-lipoic acid and hydroxycitrate gave highly promising results. The in vivo data, coupled with the case study results, suggest a possible advantage in using a treatment targeted at cancer metabolism in association with classical chemotherapy. PMID:20931262

  3. LanroNET, a non-interventional, prospective study to assess the resource utilization and cost of lanreotide autogel 120 mg in Polish patients with neuroendocrine tumorsresults of interim analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bednarczuk, Tomasz; Kaminski, Grzegorz; Kos-Kudla, Beata

    2014-01-01

    Aim of the study To examine characteristics and treatment patterns of symptomatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) patients who received lanreotide Autogel 120 mg (ATG120) administered as part of routine clinical practice. Material and methods Lanro-NET is a national, multicenter, non-interventional, observational study in the population of adult patients with symptomatic NETs treated with ATG120 for at least three months before inclusion. Data on demographic and clinical characteristics of the population, dosing interval regimen and aspects of administration were collected prospectively during 12 months. Costs were calculated from the perspective of public payer for the year 2014. Results Fifty-two patients were enrolled in the study. Primary tumors were located predominantly in gastrointestinal tract (51.2%), all tumors were metastatic. The most commonly reported disease symptoms were flushing and diarrhea (55.8% of patients). 86% of patients had undergone surgery, chemotherapy and radioisotope therapy were used in 11.6% and 46.5% of patients, respectively. During the 12-months observation 12 (28%) patients received ATG120 at an extended dosing interval (> 4 weeks), the mean number of days between injections was 31.75 (SD 6.74). The cost of ATG12 was estimated at 4273.17 PLN patient/month. In all patients ATG120 was administered by nurse, 51.6% of injections in out-patient setting, 48.4% – in hospital. Conclusions This study presents the current use of ATG120 in the population of Polish NETs patients in a realistic clinical settings. Finding that 28% of patients could be treated with extended dose intervals supports the potential for ATG120 of reducing treatment burden. PMID:25784845

  4. COSMIC: A Regimen of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy Plus Dose-Escalated, Raster-Scanned Carbon Ion Boost for Malignant Salivary Gland Tumors: Results of the Prospective Phase 2 Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Alexandra D.; Nikoghosyan, Anna V.; Lossner, Karen; Haberer, Thomas; Jäkel, Oliver; Münter, Marc W.; Debus, Jürgen

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and dose-escalated carbon ion (C12) therapy in adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) and other malignant salivary gland tumors (MSGTs) of the head and neck. Patients and Methods: COSMIC (combined treatment of malignant salivary gland tumors with intensity modulated radiation therapy and carbon ions) is a prospective phase 2 trial of 24 Gy(RBE) C12 followed by 50 Gy IMRT in patients with pathologically confirmed MSGT. The primary endpoint is mucositis Common Terminology Criteria grade 3; the secondary endpoints are locoregional control (LC), progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), and toxicity. Toxicity was scored according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3; treatment response was scored according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors 1.1. Results: Between July 2010 and August 2011, 54 patients were accrued, and 53 were available for evaluation. The median follow-up time was 42 months; patients with microscopically incomplete resections (R1, n=20), gross residual disease (R2, n=17), and inoperable disease (n=16) were included. Eighty-nine percent of patients had ACC, and 57% had T4 tumors. The most common primary sites were paranasal sinus (34%), submandibular gland, and palate. At the completion of radiation therapy, 26% of patients experienced grade 3 mucositis, and 20 patients reported adverse events of the ear (38%). The most common observed late effects were grade 1 xerostomia (49%), hearing impairment (25%, 2% ipsilateral hearing loss), and adverse events of the eye (20%), but no visual impairment or loss of vision. Grade 1 central nervous system necrosis occurred in 6%, and 1 grade 4 ICA hemorrhage without neurologic sequelae. The best response was 54% (complete response/partial remission). At 3 years, the LC, PFS, and OS were 81.9%, 57.9%, and 78.4%, respectively. No difference was found regarding resection status. The

  5. Fusion genes in solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Aman, P

    1999-08-01

    Tumor development in different cell types and tissue locations involves many pathways, distinct genes and exogenous factors. Tumor type-specific chromosome rearrangements resulting in fusion genes or promoter swapping are believed to be involved in the early development of many tumor types. They are present in almost all cases of a particular tumor type and cases have been described that carry only tumor type-specific translocations without any signs of other cytogenetic changes. The mechanisms behind chromosome rearrangements in solid tumors are largely unknown. Radiation is an important factor in thyroid carcinomas but no com-$bmon sequence motifs are made out in the break points of solid tumors. The fusion genes found in sarcomas are dominated by the transcription factor type of genes with the TLS/FUS and EWS series of fusion genes as the largest group. More than 50% of papillary thyroid carcinomas carry fusion proteins with tyrosine kinase activity. Rearrangements involving HMGIC, HMGIY, and PLAG1 are common in benign mesenchymal tumors and salivary gland adenomas. Many recurrent tumor translocations show a strict specificity for tumor type. This specificity can most likely be explained by the specific sets of target genes that are deregulated by the fusion gene products. Identification of the downstream target genes is currently the object of intense research and may provide us with information that will help design better diagnostic tools and eventually find a cure for these diseases.

  6. Improving drug delivery to solid tumors: priming the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Khawar, Iftikhar Ali; Kim, Jung Ho; Kuh, Hyo-Jeong

    2015-03-10

    Malignant transformation and growth of the tumor mass tend to induce changes in the surrounding microenvironment. Abnormality of the tumor microenvironment provides a driving force leading not only to tumor progression, including invasion and metastasis, but also to acquisition of drug resistance, including pharmacokinetic (drug delivery-related) and pharmacodynamic (sensitivity-related) resistance. Drug delivery systems exploiting the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect and active targeting moieties were expected to be able to cope with delivery-related drug resistance. However, recent evidence supports a considerable barrier role of tumors via various mechanisms, which results in imperfect or inefficient EPR and/or targeting effect. The components of the tumor microenvironment such as abnormal tumor vascular system, deregulated composition of the extracellular matrix, and interstitial hypertension (elevated interstitial fluid pressure) collectively or cooperatively hinder the drug distribution, which is prerequisite to the efficacy of nanoparticles and small-molecule drugs used in cancer medicine. Hence, the abnormal tumor microenvironment has recently been suggested to be a promising target for the improvement of drug delivery to improve therapeutic efficacy. Strategies to modulate the abnormal tumor microenvironment, referred to here as "solid tumor priming" (vascular normalization and/or solid stress alleviation leading to improvement in blood perfusion and convective molecular movement), have shown promising results in the enhancement of drug delivery and anticancer efficacy. These strategies may provide a novel avenue for the development of new chemotherapeutics and combination chemotherapeutic regimens as well as reassessment of previously ineffective agents. PMID:25526702

  7. Brain tumor (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Brain tumors are classified depending on the exact site of the tumor, the type of tissue involved, benign ... tendencies of the tumor, and other factors. Primary brain tumors can arise from the brain cells, the meninges ( ...

  8. Understanding Brain Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Know About Brain Tumors . What is a Brain Tumor? A brain tumor is an abnormal growth
 ... Tumors” from Frankly Speaking Frankly Speaking About Cancer: Brain Tumors Download the full book Questions to ask ...

  9. Brain Tumor Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Types of Brain Scans X-rays Laboratory Tests DNA Profiling Biopsy Procedure Malignant and Benign Brain Tumors Tumor ... Types of Brain Scans X-rays Laboratory Tests DNA Profiling Biopsy Procedure Malignant and Benign Brain Tumors Tumor ...

  10. Chemotherapy-related neuropathic symptoms and functional impairment in adult survivors of extracranial solid tumors of childhood: Results from the St. Jude Lifetime Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Ness, Kirsten K.; Jones, Kendra E.; Smith, Webb A.; Spunt, Sheri L.; Wilson, Carmen L.; Armstrong, Gregory T.; Srivastava, Deo Kumar; Robison, Leslie L.; Hudson, Melissa M.; Gurney, James G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To ascertain prevalence of peripheral sensory and motor neuropathy; to evaluate impairments in relation to function. Design St. Jude Lifetime Cohort Study, a clinical follow-up study designed to evaluate adverse late effects in adult survivors of childhood cancer. Setting St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital (SJCRH). Participants Eligibility required treatment for an extracranial solid malignancy between 1962 and 2002, age ≥18 years, ≥10 years post-diagnosis, no history of cranial radiation. 531 survivors were included in the evaluation: median age 32 years, median time from diagnosis 25 years. Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures Primary exposure measures were cumulative doses of vinca-alkaloid and platinum-based chemotherapies. Survivors with scores ≥ 1 on the sensory subscale of the modified Total Neuropathy Score were classified with prevalent sensory impairment. Those with sex-specific Z-scores of ≤−1.3 for dorsiflexion strength were classified with prevalent motor impairment. Participants completed the 6-minute walk test (endurance), the timed up and go test (mobility), and the sensory organization test (balance). Results The prevalence of sensory and motor impairment was 20% and 17.5%, respectively. Vinca-alkaloid exposure was associated with an increased risk of motor impairment (adjusted odds ratio (OR)=1.66, 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.04–2.64) without evidence for a dose response. Platinum exposure was associated with increased risk of sensory impairment (adjusted OR= 1.62, 95% CI: 0.97–2.72) without evidence of a dose response. Sensory impairment was associated with poor endurance (OR=1.99, 95% CI: 0.99–4.00) and mobility (OR=1.65, 95% CI: 0.96–2.83). Conclusion Vincristine and cisplatin exposure may increase risk for long-term motor and sensory impairment, respectively. Survivors with sensory impairment are at increased risk for functional performance limitations. PMID:23537607

  11. Correlation in Rectal Cancer Between Clinical Tumor Response After Neoadjuvant Radiotherapy and Sphincter or Organ Preservation: 10-Year Results of the Lyon R 96-02 Randomized Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Ortholan, Cecile; Romestaing, Pascale; Chapet, Olivier; Gerard, Jean Pierre

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate, in rectal cancer, the benefit of a neoadjuvant radiation dose escalation with endocavitary contact radiotherapy (CXRT) in addition to external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). This article provides an update of the Lyon R96-02 Phase III trial. Methods and Materials: A total of 88 patients with T2 to T3 carcinoma of the lower rectum were randomly assigned to neoadjuvant EBRT 39 Gy in 13 fractions (43 patients) vs. the same EBRT with CXRT boost, 85 Gy in three fractions (45 patients). Median follow-up was 132 months. Results: The 10-year cumulated rate of permanent colostomy (CRPC) was 63% in the EBRT group vs. 29% in the EBRT+CXRT group (p < 0.001). The 10-year rate of local recurrence was 15% vs. 10% (p = 0.69); 10-year disease-free survival was 54% vs. 53% (p = 0.99); and 10-year overall survival was 56% vs. 55% (p = 0.85). Data of clinical response (CR) were available for 78 patients (36 in the EBRT group and 42 in the EBRT+CXRT group): 12 patients were in complete CR (1 patient vs. 11 patients), 53 patients had a CR {>=}50% (24 patients vs. 29 patients), and 13 patients had a CR <50% (11 patients vs. 2 patients) (p < 0.001). Of the 65 patients with CR {>=}50%, 9 had an organ preservation procedure (meaning no rectal resection) taking advantage of major CR. The 10-year CRPC was 17% for patients with complete CR, 42% for patients with CR {>=}50%, and 77% for patients with CR <50% (p = 0.014). Conclusion: In cancer of the lower rectum, CXRT increases the complete CR, turning in a significantly higher rate of long-term permanent sphincter and organ preservation.

  12. Brain tumors in infants

    PubMed Central

    Ghodsi, Seyyed Mohammad; Habibi, Zohreh; Hanaei, Sara; Moradi, Ehsan; Nejat, Farideh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Brain tumors in infants have different clinical presentations, anatomical distribution, histopathological diagnosis, and clinical prognosis compared with older children. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis was done in patients <12 months old who were operated on for primary brain tumor in Children's Hospital Medical Center since 2008 to 2014. Results: Thirty-one infants, 20 males and 11 females, with the mean age of 7.13 months (0.5–12) were enrolled. There were 16 supratentorial and 15 infratentorial tumors. The presenting symptoms included increased head circumference (16); bulge fontanel (15); vomiting (15); developmental regression (11); sunset eye (7); seizure (4); loss of consciousness (4); irritability (3); nystagmus (2); visual loss (2); hemiparesis (2); torticollis (2); VI palsy (3); VII, IX, X nerve palsy (each 2); and ptosis (1). Gross total and subtotal resection were performed in 19 and 11 cases, respectively. Fourteen patients needed external ventricular drainage in the perioperative period, from whom four infants required a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. One patient underwent ventriculoperitoneal shunting without tumor resection. The most common histological diagnoses were primitive neuroectodermal tumor (7), followed by anaplastic ependymoma (6) and grade II ependymoma. The rate of 30-day mortality was 19.3%. Eighteen patients are now well-controlled with or without adjuvant therapy (overall survival; 58%), from whom 13 cases are tumor free (disease free survival; 41.9%), 3 cases have residual masses with fixed or decreased size (progression-free survival; 9.6%), and 2 cases are still on chemotherapy. Conclusion: Brain tumors in infants should be treated with surgical resection, followed by chemotherapy when necessary. PMID:26962338

  13. Radiosurgery for Pediatric Brain Tumors.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Erin S; Chao, Samuel T; Angelov, Lilyana; Vogelbaum, Michael A; Barnett, Gene; Jung, Edward; Recinos, Violette R; Mohammadi, Alireza; Suh, John H

    2016-03-01

    The utility of radiosurgery for pediatric brain tumors is not well known. For children, radiosurgery may have an important role for treating unresectable tumors, residual disease, or tumors in the recurrent setting that have received prior radiotherapy. The available evidence demonstrates utility for some children with primary brain tumors resulting in good local control. Radiosurgery can be considered for limited residual disease or focal recurrences. However, the potential toxicities are unique and not insignificant. Therefore, prospective studies need to be performed to develop guidelines for indications and treatment for children and reduce toxicity in this population. PMID:26536284

  14. Brain Tumor Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Types of Tumors Risk Factors Brain Tumor Statistics Brain Tumor Dictionary Webinars Anytime Learning About Us Our Founders Board of Directors Staff ... Types of Tumors Risk Factors Brain Tumor Statistics Brain Tumor Dictionary Webinars Anytime Learning Donate to the ABTA Help advance the understanding ...

  15. Modeling Tumor Invasion: Effects of Native Vascularity and Tumor Metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gawlinski, Edward

    2001-03-01

    A hybrid cellular automaton model is described and used to simulate early tumor growth and examine the roles of host tissue vascular density and tumor metabolism in the ability of a small number of monoclonal transformed cells to develop into an invasive tumor. The model incorporates normal cells, tumor cells, necrotic or empty space, and a random network of native microvessels as components of a cellular automaton state vector. Diffusion of glucose and lactic acid (the latter resulting from the tumor's excessive reliance on anaerobic metabolism) to and from the microvessels, and their utilization or production by cells, is modeled through the solution of differential equations. In this way, the cells and microvessels affect the extracellular concentrations of glucose and acid which, in turn, affect the rules governing the evolution of the automaton's state vector. Simulations of the model demonstrate that: (i) high tumor acid production is favorable for tumor growth and invasion, however for every acid production rate, there exists a range of optimal microvessel densities (leading to a local pH favorable to tumor but not to normal cells) for which growth and invasion is most effective, (ii) at vascular densities below this range, both tumor and normal cells die due to excessively low pH, (iii) for vascular densities above the optimal range the microvessel network is highly efficient at removing acid and therefore the tumor cells lose their advantage over normal cells gained by high local acid concentration. While significant spatial gradients of glucose formed, no regions of detrimentally poor glucose perfusion (for either cell type) were observed, regardless of microvessel density. Depending on metabolic phenotype, a variety of tumor morphologies similar to those clinically observed were realized in the simulations. Lastly, a sharp transition (analogous to that of the adenoma-carcinoma sequence) between states of initial tumor confinement and efficient

  16. Chemoimmunotherapy: reengineering tumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang; Emens, Leisha A

    2013-02-01

    Cancer chemotherapy drugs have long been considered immune suppressive. However, more recent data indicate that some cytotoxic drugs effectively treat cancer in part by facilitating an immune response to the tumor when given at the standard dose and schedule. These drugs induce a form of tumor cell death that is immunologically active, thereby inducing an adaptive immune response specific for the tumor. In addition, cancer chemotherapy drugs can promote tumor immunity through ancillary and largely unappreciated immunologic effects on both the malignant and normal host cells present within the tumor microenvironment. These more subtle immunomodulatory effects are dependent on the drug itself, its dose, and its schedule in relation to an immune-based intervention. The recent approvals of two new immune-based therapies for prostate cancer and melanoma herald a new era in cancer treatment and have led to heightened interest in immunotherapy as a valid approach to cancer treatment. A detailed understanding of the cellular and molecular basis of interactions between chemotherapy drugs and the immune system is essential for devising the optimal strategy for integrating new immune-based therapies into the standard of care for various cancers, resulting in the greatest long-term clinical benefit for cancer patients. PMID:23389507

  17. Neuroimaging of spine tumors.

    PubMed

    Pinter, Nandor K; Pfiffner, Thomas J; Mechtler, Laszlo L

    2016-01-01

    Intramedullary, intradural/extramedullary, and extradural spine tumors comprise a wide range of neoplasms with an even wider range of clinical symptoms and prognostic features. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), commonly used to evaluate the spine in patients presenting with pain, can further characterize lesions that may be encountered on other imaging studies, such as bone scintigraphy or computed tomography (CT). The advantage of the MRI is its multiplane capabilities, superior contrast agent resolution, and flexible protocols that play an important role in assessing tumor location, extent in directing biopsy, in planning proper therapy, and in evaluating therapeutic results. A multimodality approach can be used to fully characterize the lesion and the combination of information obtained from the different modalities usually narrows the diagnostic possibilities significantly. The diagnosis of spinal tumors is based on patient age, topographic features of the tumor, and lesion pattern, as seen at CT and MRI. The shift to high-end imaging incorporating diffusion-weighted imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, whole-body short tau inversion recovery, positron emission tomography, intraoperative and high-field MRI as part of the mainstream clinical imaging protocol has provided neurologists, neuro-oncologists, and neurosurgeons a window of opportunity to assess the biologic behavior of spine neoplasms. This chapter reviews neuroimaging of spine tumors, primary and secondary, discussing routine and newer modalities that can reduce the significant morbidity associated with these neoplasms. PMID:27430436

  18. Imaging Tumor Necrosis with Ferumoxytol

    PubMed Central

    Aghighi, Maryam; Golovko, Daniel; Ansari, Celina; Marina, Neyssa M.; Pisani, Laura; Kurlander, Lonnie; Klenk, Christopher; Bhaumik, Srabani; Wendland, Michael; Daldrup-Link, Heike E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Ultra-small superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (USPIO) are promising contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). USPIO mediated proton relaxation rate enhancement is strongly dependent on compartmentalization of the agent and can vary depending on their intracellular or extracellular location in the tumor microenvironment. We compared the T1- and T2-enhancement pattern of intracellular and extracellular USPIO in mouse models of cancer and pilot data from patients. A better understanding of these MR signal effects will enable non-invasive characterizations of the composition of the tumor microenvironment. Materials and Methods Six 4T1 and six MMTV-PyMT mammary tumors were grown in mice and imaged with ferumoxytol-enhanced MRI. R1 relaxation rates were calculated for different tumor types and different tumor areas and compared with histology. The transendothelial leakage rate of ferumoxytol was obtained by our measured relaxivity of ferumoxytol and compared between different tumor types, using a t-test. Additionally, 3 patients with malignant sarcomas were imaged with ferumoxytol-enhanced MRI. T1- and T2-enhancement patterns were compared with histopathology in a descriptive manner as a proof of concept for clinical translation of our observations. Results 4T1 tumors showed central areas of high signal on T1 and low signal on T2 weighted MR images, which corresponded to extracellular nanoparticles in a necrotic core on histopathology. MMTV-PyMT tumors showed little change on T1 but decreased signal on T2 weighted images, which correlated to compartmentalized nanoparticles in tumor associated macrophages. Only 4T1 tumors demonstrated significantly increased R1 relaxation rates of the tumor core compared to the tumor periphery (p<0.001). Transendothelial USPIO leakage was significantly higher for 4T1 tumors (3.4±0.9x10-3 mL/min/100cm3) compared to MMTV-PyMT tumors (1.0±0.9x10-3 mL/min/100 cm3). Likewise, ferumoxytol imaging in patients

  19. [Tumor surgery].

    PubMed

    Hausamen, J E

    2000-05-01

    Surgery is still the primary therapeutic approach in treatment of tumors in the head and neck area, dating back to the early nineteenth century. More than 150 years ago, hemimaxillectomies and mandibular resections as well as hemiglossectomies were already performed by leading surgeons. The block principle we are now following dates back to Crile, who also established the principle of cervical lymph node dissection. Ablative oncologic surgery has always been closely linked with plastic and reconstructive surgery, rendering radical surgical interventions possible without disfiguring patients. The development of facial reconstructive surgery proceeded in stages, in the first instance as secondary reconstruction using tube pedicled flaps. The change to the concept of primary reconstruction occurred via arterialized skin flaps and myocutaneous flaps to the widely accepted and performed free tissue transfer. Free bone grafting, inaugurated earlier and still representing the majority of bone grafting, has been supplemented for certain reconstructive purposes by free vascularized bone transfer from various donor sites. Although the five-year-survival rate of carcinoma of the oral cavity has remained unchanged in the past 30 years, distinctive improvements in tumor surgery can be recorded. This is primarily based on improved diagnostics such as modern imaging techniques and the refinement of surgical techniques. The DOSAK has worked out distinctive guidelines for effective ablative oncologic surgery. Surgical approaches offering wide exposure and carrying low morbidity play a decisive role in radical resections. For this reason, midfacial degloving offers an essential improvement for the resection of midface tumors, especially from an aesthetic point of view. Tumors situated deep behind the viscerocranium at the skull base can be clearly exposed either through a lateral approach following a temporary osteotomy of the mandibular ramus or a transmandibular, transmaxillar, or

  20. TUMOR CONTAMINATION IN THE BIOPSY PATH OF PRIMARY MALIGNANT BONE TUMORS

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Marcelo Parente; Lima, Pablo Moura de Andrade; de Mello, Roberto José Vieira

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study factors possibly associated with tumor contamination in the biopsy path of primary malignant bone tumors. Method: Thirty-five patients who underwent surgical treatment with diagnoses of osteosarcoma, Ewing's tumor and chondrosarcoma were studied retrospectively. The sample was analyzed to characterize the biopsy technique used, histological type of the tumor, neoadjuvant chemotherapy used, local recurrences and tumor contamination in the biopsy path. Results: Among the 35 patients studied, four cases of contamination occurred (11.43%): one from osteosarcoma, two from Ewing's tumor and one from chondrosarcoma. There was no association between the type of tumor and presence of tumor contamination in the biopsy path (p = 0.65). There was also no association between the presence of tumor contamination and the biopsy technique (p = 0.06). On the other hand, there were associations between the presence of tumor contamination and local recurrence (p = 0.01) and between tumor contamination and absence of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (p = 0.02). Conclusion: Tumor contamination in the biopsy path of primary malignant bone tumors was associated with local recurrence. On the other hand, the histological type of the tumor and the type of biopsy did not have an influence on tumor contamination. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy had a protective effect against this complication. Despite these findings, tumor contamination is a complication that should always be taken into consideration, and removal of the biopsy path is recommended in tumor resection surgery. PMID:27047877

  1. Vaccination with a mixed vaccine of autogenous and allogeneic breast cancer cells and tumor associated antigens CA15-3, CEA and CA125--results in immune and clinical responses in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Jiang, X P; Yang, D C; Elliott, R L; Head, J F

    2000-10-01

    In breast cancer there is often overexpression of the breast cancer antigen CA15-3, the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and the ovarian cancer antigen CA125, which makes them potential target antigens for immunotherapy. In this study, we used a multi-antigen vaccine, which included the following antigens: autologous breast cancer cells (AUTOC), allogeneic breast cancer MCF-7 cells (ALLOC), and the tumor associated antigens CA15-3, CEA and CA125, plus low doses of granulocyte/macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin 2 (IL-2). Forty-two breast cancer patients received weekly subcutaneous vaccination at the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 7th, 11th and 15th weeks. Their lymphocyte proliferative responses to AUTOC, ALLOC, CA15-3, CEA and CA125 were tested in lymphocyte blastogenesis assays (LBA) before and after vaccination. The disease stage and serum CA15-3, CEA and CA125 concentrations were also determined pre- and post-vaccination. We found that the vaccine was safe, and the only major side effects were swelling at the site of injection, muscle pain, and weakness or fatigue. The vaccine induced a significant increase in post-vaccination lymphocyte proliferative responses to AUTOC, CA15-3, CEA and CA125 but not ALLOC, compared to pre-vaccination (p < 0.05, p < 0.01, p < 0.05, p < 0.01 and p > 0.05, respectively, a paired t Test). Computed tomography (CT), ultrasound or bone scan showed evidence of disease improvement in 2 (12%) patients after vaccination. Hepatic metastases were reduced in size and number and some actually disappeared one patient. Metastatic disease in the L5 vertebra and the skull decreased in size and some osteolytic sites completely healed in a second patient. In addition, 7 patients (44%) had stable disease and 7 patients (44%) had disease progression. We did not find vaccination significantly reduced serum tumor markers CA15-3, CEA and CA125 of these breast cancer patients. These results suggest that the vaccine mixture of autologous and

  2. Direct visualization of macrophage-assisted tumor cell intravasation in mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Wyckoff, Jeffrey B; Wang, Yarong; Lin, Elaine Y; Li, Jiu-feng; Goswami, Sumanta; Stanley, E Richard; Segall, Jeffrey E; Pollard, Jeffrey W; Condeelis, John

    2007-03-15

    Although the presence of macrophages in tumors has been correlated with poor prognosis, until now there was no direct observation of how macrophages are involved in hematogenous metastasis. In this study, we use multiphoton microscopy to show, for the first time, that tumor cell intravasation occurs in association with perivascular macrophages in mammary tumors. Furthermore, we show that perivascular macrophages of the mammary tumor are associated with tumor cell intravasation in the absence of local angiogenesis. These results show that the interaction between macrophages and tumor cells lying in close proximity defines a microenvironment that is directly involved in the intravasation of cancer cells in mammary tumors.

  3. [Ultrasonographic study of rectal carcinoid tumors].

    PubMed

    Nomura, M; Fujita, N; Matsunaga, A; Ando, M; Tominaga, G; Noda, Y; Kobayashi, G; Kimura, K; Yuki, T; Ishida, K; Yago, A; Mochizuki, F; Chonan, A

    1996-11-01

    To compare intraluminal ultrasonographic (ILUS) findings with histological findings of rectal carcinoid tumors, 35 patients with rectal carcinoid tumors were reviewed. The results were as follows: 1) The rectal wall was visualized as a seven- or nine-layer structure by means of ILUS in 81% of the patients. 2) The possibility that the thin hyperechoic third layer above the tumor on ILUS corresponds to the muscularis mucosae and fibrointerstitium above the tumor histologically. 3) In cases with relatively high internal echoes, the amount of fibrointerstitium exceeded that of tumor cells histologically. 4) In cases with nonuniform internal echo patterns, tumor cells were separated by thick fibrointerstitium forming nodular nests.

  4. Tumor Treated by Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Young; Kwak, Jae Man; Chung, So Hak; Jung, Gu Hee

    2014-01-01

    Background This study was conducted to examine the clinical usefulness and efficacy of endoscopic curettage on benign bone tumor. Methods Thirty-two patients (20 men and 12 women) with benign bone tumor were included in the study. The patients were aged between five and 76 years; the mean follow-up period was 27.05 months (range, 9.6 to 39.9 months). The primary sites include simple bone cyst (9 cases), fibrous dysplasia (6 cases), enchondroma (5 cases), non-ossifying fibroma (4 cases), bone infarct (3 cases), aneurysmal bone cyst (1 case), chondroblastoma (1 case), osteoblastoma (1 case), intraosseous lipoma (1 case), and Brodie abscess (1 case). A plain radiography was performed to assess the radiological recovery. Radiological outcomes, including local recurrence and bone union, were evaluated as excellent, good, poor, and recurred. Results In our series, there were 27 cases (84.4%) of good or better outcomes, six cases (18.8%) of complications (4 local recurrence, 1 wound infection, and 1 pathologic fracture). Conclusions Our results showed that endoscopic curettage and bone graft had a lower rate of recurrence and a higher cure rate in cases of benign bone tumor. It can, therefore, be concluded that endoscopic curettage and bone graft might be good treatment modalities for benign bone tumors. PMID:24605192

  5. Testicular germ cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Looijenga, Leendert H J

    2014-02-01

    Human germ cell tumors are of interest because of their epidemiology, clinical behavior and pathobiology. Histologically, they are subdivided into various elements, with similarities to embryogenesis. Recent insights resulted in a division of five types of human germ cell tumors. In the context of male germ cells, three are relevant; Type I: teratomas and yolk sac tumors of neonates and infants; Type II: seminomas and nonseminomas of (predominantly) adolescents and adults; and Type III: spermatocytic seminomas of the elderly. Recent studies led to significant increases in understanding of the parameters involved in the earliest pathogenetic steps of human germ cells tumors, in particularly the seminomas and nonseminomas (Type II). In case of a disturbed gonadal physiology, either due to the germ cell itself, or the micro-environment, embryonic germ cells during a specific window of sensitization can be blocked in their maturation, resulting in carcinoma in situ or gonadoblastoma, the precursors of seminomas and nonseminomas. The level of testicularization of the gonad determines the histological composition of the precursor. These insights will allow better definition of individuals at risk to develop a germ cell malignancy, with putative preventive measurements, and allow better selection of scientific approaches to elucidate the pathogenesis. PMID:24683949

  6. Childhood Brain Tumor Epidemiology: A Brain Tumor Epidemiology Consortium Review

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kimberly J.; Cullen, Jennifer; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S.; Ostrom, Quinn T.; Langer, Chelsea E.; Turner, Michelle C.; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; Fisher, James L.; Lupo, Philip J.; Partap, Sonia; Schwartzbaum, Judith A.; Scheurer, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Childhood brain tumors are the most common pediatric solid tumor and include several histological subtypes. Although progress has been made in improving survival rates for some subtypes, understanding of risk factors for childhood brain tumors remains limited to a few genetic syndromes and ionizing radiation to the head and neck. In this report, we review descriptive and analytical epidemiology childhood brain tumor studies from the past decade and highlight priority areas for future epidemiology investigations and methodological work that is needed to advance our understanding of childhood brain tumor causes. Specifically, we summarize the results of a review of studies published since 2004 that have analyzed incidence and survival in different international regions and that have examined potential genetic, immune system, developmental and birth characteristics, and environmental risk factors. PMID:25192704

  7. Intraoperative tumor lysis syndrome in a child with Wilms' tumor.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Mridul; Prakash, Shashi; Pandey, Vaibhav; Pai, Vishal Krishna

    2016-01-01

    Tumor lysis syndrome in an onco-metabolic emergency resulting from massive lysis of rapidly proliferating malignant cells seen commonly in patients with hematological malignancies such as acute lymphocytic leukemia and Burkitt's lymphoma and is quite rare in solid tumors. Spontaneous development of tumor lysis has been described among other trigger factors such as corticosteroid therapy, anesthesia, tumor manipulation during surgery and pyrexia. We describe such a case in a 5-year-old boy posted for excision and staging of a massive Wilms' tumor who developed a hyperkalemic cardiac arrest during the procedure and its subsequent intraoperative and postoperative management. Intraoperative cardiac arrest is a stressful situation for both the anesthesiologist and the surgeon, more so when it involves a child. The aim of this report is to make the anesthesiologist aware of the possibility and occurrence of such a phenomenon in children and be adequately prepared for such an emergency. PMID:26957712

  8. Secondary optic nerve tumors.

    PubMed

    Christmas, N J; Mead, M D; Richardson, E P; Albert, D M

    1991-01-01

    Secondary tumors of the optic nerve are more common than primary optic nerve tumors. The involvement of the optic nerve may arise from direct invasion from intraocular malignancies, from hematopoietic malignancy, from meningeal carcinomatosis, or from distant primary tumors. Orbital tumors rarely invade the optic nerve, and brain tumors involve it only in their late stages.

  9. Tumors of the cerebral aqueduct.

    PubMed

    Ho, K L

    1982-01-01

    Two cases of tumor of the cerebral aqueduct are described. Case 1 is a pilocytic astrocytoma in a 16-year-old girl with a two-year history of intermittent increase of intracranial pressure. The tumor was completely confined within the lumen of the aqueduct. Case 2 is a subependymoma of a 68-year-old man. The tumor extended beyond the aqueduct to the periaqueductal gray matter and produced signs and symptoms suggesting normal pressure hydrocephalus. The literature contains 18 other cases of tumor of the aqueduct: 13 gliomas and five vascular malformations. All, except one, produced clinical manifestations of generalized hydrocephalus lasting from 20 days to six years. The result generally did not correspond to the histologic type of the tumor. Like gliomas of the brainstem in general, those in the aqueduct tend to occur in childhood and adolescence and affect male more than female patients.

  10. Compensatory angiogenesis and tumor refractoriness.

    PubMed

    Gacche, R N

    2015-01-01

    Since the establishment of tumor angiogenesis as a therapeutic target, an excitement in developing the anti-angiogenic agents was resulted in tailoring a humanized monoclonal antibody (Bevacizumab) against vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF): a key factor in recruiting angiogenesis. The past three decades' research in the area of angiogenesis also invented a series of novel and effective anti-angiogenic agents targeting the VEGF signaling axis. Despite the demonstrable clinical benefits of anti-angiogenic therapy, the preclinical and clinical data of the current therapeutic settings clearly indicate the transient efficacy, restoration of tumor progression and aggressive recurrence of tumor invasion after the withdrawal of anti-angiogenic therapy. Therefore, the impact of this therapeutic regime on improving overall survival of patients has been disappointing in clinic. The recent advances in pathophysiology of tumor angiogenesis and related molecular and cellular underpinnings attributed the conspiracy of compensatory angiogenic pathways in conferring evasive and intrinsic tumor resistance to anti-angiogenic agents. The understandings of how these pathways functionally cross-talk for sustaining tumor angiogenesis during VEGF blockade is essential and perhaps may act as a basic prerequisite for designing novel therapeutic strategies to combat the growing arrogance of tumors toward anti-angiogenic agents. The present review offers a discourse on major compensatory angiogenic pathways operating at cellular and molecular levels and their attributes with resistance to anti-angiogenic agents along with strategic opinions on future setting in targeting tumor angiogenesis. PMID:26029827

  11. Imaging probe for tumor malignancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Shotaro; Kizaka-Kondoh, Shinae; Hiraoka, Hasahiro

    2009-02-01

    Solid tumors possess unique microenvironments that are exposed to chronic hypoxic conditions ("tumor hypoxia"). Although more than half a century has passed since it was suggested that tumor hypoxia correlated with poor treatment outcomes and contributed to cancer recurrence, a fundamental solution to this problem has yet to be found. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1) is the main transcription factor that regulates the cellular response to hypoxia. It induces various genes whose functions are strongly associated with malignant alteration of the entire tumor. The cellular changes induced by HIF-1 are extremely important targets of cancer therapy, particularly in therapy against refractory cancers. Imaging of the HIF-1-active microenvironment is therefore important for cancer therapy. To image HIF-1activity in vivo, we developed a PTD-ODD fusion protein, POHA, which was uniquely labeled with near-infrared fluorescent dye at the C-terminal. POHA has two functional domains: protein transduction domain (PTD) and VHL-mediated protein destruction motif in oxygen-dependent degradation (ODD) domain of the alpha subunit of HIF-1 (HIF-1α). It can therefore be delivered to the entire body and remain stabilized in the HIF-1-active cells. When it was intravenously injected into tumor-bearing mice, a tumor-specific fluorescence signal was detected in the tumor 6 h after the injection. These results suggest that POHA can be used an imaging probe for tumor malignancy.

  12. Benign small bowel tumor.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, J M; Melvin, D B; Gray, G; Thorbjarnarson, B

    1975-01-01

    The clinical record and histologic sections of 84 cases of benign small bowel tumor are reviewed. Manifestations of systemic diseases, congenital anomalies, and lesions of either the ileocecal valve or periampullary region were excluded. In the same time span there were 96 small bowel malignancies. Clinical presentation, pathologic findings, management and result are compared to the collected published experience of about 2000 cases. There were 36 leiomyomas, 22 lipomas, 9 angiomas, 6 neurofibromas and 4 fibromas. Thirty-six men and 48 women were affected; the majority in their fifth and sixth decade. Seventy-eight were operative and 6 autopsy diagnoses. The most common symptom was obstruction (42%) followed by hemorrhage (34%) and pain (22%), relative frequency differing for the various specific tumors. There were rarely significant physical findings. A diagnosis of small bowel tumor was made radiologically in 30 patients. Because of the nonspecificity of other signs and symptoms, an acute awareness of the possibility of small bowel tumor is mandatory for preoperative anticipation of the diagnosis. Local resection was performed in all with no deaths or significant postoperative complications. PMID:1078626

  13. Tumors and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    Tumors during pregnancy are rare, but they can happen. Tumors can be either benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer. Malignant ones are. The most common cancers in pregnancy are breast cancer, cervical cancer, lymphoma, and melanoma. ...

  14. Pancreatic islet cell tumor

    MedlinePlus

    Complications of these tumors include: Diabetes Hormone crises (if the tumor releases certain types of hormones) Severe low blood sugar (from insulinomas) Severe ulcers in the stomach and small intestine (from gastrinomas) Spread of the tumor to the liver

  15. Childhood Brain Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    Brain tumors are abnormal growths inside the skull. They are among the most common types of childhood ... still be serious. Malignant tumors are cancerous. Childhood brain and spinal cord tumors can cause headaches and ...

  16. Pathology of eyelid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Pe’er, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    The eyelids are composed of four layers: skin and subcutaneous tissue including its adnexa, striated muscle, tarsus with the meibomian glands, and the palpebral conjunctiva. Benign and malignant tumors can arise from each of the eyelid layers. Most eyelid tumors are of cutaneous origin, mostly epidermal, which can be divided into epithelial and melanocytic tumors. Benign epithelial lesions, cystic lesions, and benign melanocytic lesions are very common. The most common malignant eyelid tumors are basal cell carcinoma in Caucasians and sebaceous gland carcinoma in Asians. Adnexal and stromal tumors are less frequent. The present review describes the more important eyelid tumors according to the following groups: Benign and malignant epithelial tumors, benign and malignant melanocytic tumors, benign and malignant adnexal tumors, stromal eyelid tumors, lymphoproliferative and metastatic tumors, other rare eyelid tumors, and inflammatory and infections lesions that simulate neoplasms. PMID:27146927

  17. [Tumor formation in plants].

    PubMed

    Matveeva, T V; Lutova, L A; Nester, Iu

    2001-09-01

    The data on genetic tumors in plant species and interspecific hybrids, as well as the problems of Agrobacterium-induced tumors are reviewed. The role of the horizontal gene transfer in the induction of genetic tumors is discussed. PMID:11642121

  18. Pathology of eyelid tumors.

    PubMed

    Pe'er, Jacob

    2016-03-01

    The eyelids are composed of four layers: skin and subcutaneous tissue including its adnexa, striated muscle, tarsus with the meibomian glands, and the palpebral conjunctiva. Benign and malignant tumors can arise from each of the eyelid layers. Most eyelid tumors are of cutaneous origin, mostly epidermal, which can be divided into epithelial and melanocytic tumors. Benign epithelial lesions, cystic lesions, and benign melanocytic lesions are very common. The most common malignant eyelid tumors are basal cell carcinoma in Caucasians and sebaceous gland carcinoma in Asians. Adnexal and stromal tumors are less frequent. The present review describes the more important eyelid tumors according to the following groups: Benign and malignant epithelial tumors, benign and malignant melanocytic tumors, benign and malignant adnexal tumors, stromal eyelid tumors, lymphoproliferative and metastatic tumors, other rare eyelid tumors, and inflammatory and infections lesions that simulate neoplasms. PMID:27146927

  19. Overview of Heart Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... the heart. Most heart tumors are metastatic cancer. Did You Know... Noncancerous tumors can be as deadly ... slow the tumor's growth. Resources In This Article Did You Know 1 Did You Know... Table 2 ...

  20. Brain Tumors (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Brain Tumors KidsHealth > For Parents > Brain Tumors Print A ... radiation therapy or chemotherapy, or both. Types of Brain Tumors There are many different types of brain ...

  1. Tumor-associated macrophages (not tumor cells) are the determinants of photosensitizer tumor localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korbelik, Mladen; Krosl, Gorazd

    1995-03-01

    The distribution of Photofrin and several other photosensitizers among major cellular populations contained in solid mouse tumors was examined using flow cytometry. Seven tumor models were included in the analysis: sarcomas EMT6, KHT, RIF, FsaR and FsaN, Lewis lung carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma SCCVII. In all these tumors, the highest photosensitizer levels were found in a subpopulation of tumor associated macrophages consisting of activated cells (as suggested by their increased size, granularity, and the number of interleukin 2 receptors). There was no evidence of selective photosensitizer accumulation in malignant tumor cells. Results consistent with these observations were also obtained with the carcinogen induced squamous cell carcinoma growing in hamster cheek pouch.

  2. Whole tumor antigen vaccination using dendritic cells: comparison of RNA electroporation and pulsing with UV-irradiated tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Benencia, Fabian; Courrèges, Maria C; Coukos, George

    2008-01-01

    Because of the lack of full characterization of tumor associated antigens for solid tumors, whole antigen use is a convenient approach to tumor vaccination. Tumor RNA and apoptotic tumor cells have been used as a source of whole tumor antigen to prepare dendritic cell (DC) based tumor vaccines, but their efficacy has not been directly compared. Here we compare directly RNA electroporation and pulsing of DCs with whole tumor cells killed by ultraviolet (UV) B radiation using a convenient tumor model expressing human papilloma virus (HPV) E6 and E7 oncogenes. Although both approaches led to DCs presenting tumor antigen, electroporation with tumor cell total RNA induced a significantly higher frequency of tumor-reactive IFN-gamma secreting T cells, and E7-specific CD8+ lymphocytes compared to pulsing with UV-irradiated tumor cells. DCs electroporated with tumor cell RNA induced a larger tumor infiltration by T cells and produced a significantly stronger delay in tumor growth compared to DCs pulsed with UV-irradiated tumor cells. We conclude that electroporation with whole tumor cell RNA and pulsing with UV-irradiated tumor cells are both effective in eliciting antitumor immune response, but RNA electroporation results in more potent tumor vaccination under the examined experimental conditions. PMID:18445282

  3. Myoglobin tames tumor growth and spread.

    PubMed

    Flögel, Ulrich; Dang, Chi V

    2009-04-01

    Tumor growth is accompanied by tissue hypoxia, but does this reduced oxygen availability promote further tumor expansion, resulting in a vicious cycle? In this issue of the JCI, Galluzzo et al. report that increasing oxygen tension in tumor cells by ectopically expressing the oxygen-binding hemoprotein myoglobin indeed affects tumorigenesis (see the related article beginning on page 865). Tumors derived from cells transfected with myoglobin grew more slowly, were less hypoxic, and were less metastatic. These results will spur further mechanistic inquiry into the role of hypoxia in tumor expansion. PMID:19348046

  4. Myoglobin tames tumor growth and spread.

    PubMed

    Flögel, Ulrich; Dang, Chi V

    2009-04-01

    Tumor growth is accompanied by tissue hypoxia, but does this reduced oxygen availability promote further tumor expansion, resulting in a vicious cycle? In this issue of the JCI, Galluzzo et al. report that increasing oxygen tension in tumor cells by ectopically expressing the oxygen-binding hemoprotein myoglobin indeed affects tumorigenesis (see the related article beginning on page 865). Tumors derived from cells transfected with myoglobin grew more slowly, were less hypoxic, and were less metastatic. These results will spur further mechanistic inquiry into the role of hypoxia in tumor expansion.

  5. Two Hundred Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    DeMatteo, Ronald P.; Lewis, Jonathan J.; Leung, Denis; Mudan, Satvinder S.; Woodruff, James M.; Brennan, Murray F.

    2000-01-01

    Objective To analyze the outcome of 200 patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) who were treated at a single institution and followed up prospectively. Summary Background Data A GIST is a visceral sarcoma that arises from the gastrointestinal tract. Surgical resection is the mainstay of treatment because adjuvant therapy is unproven. Methods Two hundred patients with malignant GIST were admitted and treated at Memorial Hospital during the past 16 years. Patient, tumor, and treatment variables were analyzed to identify patterns of tumor recurrence and factors that predict survival. Results Of the 200 patients, 46% had primary disease without metastasis, 47% had metastasis, and 7% had isolated local recurrence. In patients with primary disease who underwent complete resection of gross disease (n = 80), the 5-year actuarial survival rate was 54%, and survival was predicted by tumor size but not microscopic margins of resection. Recurrence of disease after resection was predominantly intraabdominal and involved the original tumor site, peritoneum, and liver. Conclusions GISTs are uncommon sarcomas. Tumor size predicts disease-specific survival in patients with primary disease who undergo complete gross resection. Tumor recurrence tends to be intraabdominal. Investigational protocols are indicated to reduce the rate of recurrence after resection and to improve the outcome for patients with GIST. PMID:10636102

  6. Pediatric Odontogenic Tumors.

    PubMed

    Abrahams, Joshua M; McClure, Shawn A

    2016-02-01

    Pediatric odontogenic tumors are rare, and are often associated with impacted teeth. Although they can develop anywhere in the jaws, odontogenic tumors mainly occur in the posterior mandible. This article discusses the diagnosis and treatment of the most common pediatric odontogenic tumors, such as ameloblastoma, keratocystic odontogenic tumor, odontoma, and cementoblastoma.

  7. Tumor heterogeneity and circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chufeng; Guan, Yan; Sun, Yulan; Ai, Dan; Guo, Qisen

    2016-05-01

    In patients with cancer, individualized treatment strategies are generally guided by an analysis of molecular biomarkers. However, genetic instability allows tumor cells to lose monoclonality and acquire genetic heterogeneity, an important characteristic of tumors, during disease progression. Researchers have found that there is tumor heterogeneity between the primary tumor and metastatic lesions, between different metastatic lesions, and even within a single tumor (either primary or metastatic). Tumor heterogeneity is associated with heterogeneous protein functions, which lowers diagnostic precision and consequently becomes an obstacle to determining the appropriate therapeutic strategies for individual cancer patients. With the development of novel testing technologies, an increasing number of studies have attempted to explore tumor heterogeneity by examining circulating tumor cells (CTCs), with the expectation that CTCs may comprehensively represent the full spectrum of mutations and/or protein expression alterations present in the cancer. In addition, this strategy represents a minimally invasive approach compared to traditional tissue biopsies that can be used to dynamically monitor tumor evolution. The present article reviews the potential efficacy of using CTCs to identify both spatial and temporal tumor heterogeneity. This review also highlights current issues in this field and provides an outlook toward future applications of CTCs.

  8. Temperature control in deep tumor treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Sang w.; Liu, Hong; Chen, Wei R.

    2003-10-01

    Tumor cells are more sensitive to temperature increase than normal tissue. Hyperthermia has been used as a potential modality for cancer treatment. Another benefit from the thermal interruption of tumor cells is the immunological reactions, caused by inflammation and other mechanisms, and more interestingly caused by antigen(s) release. The temperature control is crucial both in direct tumor destruction through acute thermal effect and in immune reactions. Low temperature may not achieve the desired tumor cell killing. High temperature could result in over heating of the tumor, hence introducing undesirable damage to surrounding normal tissue. High temperature could completely denature the cell proteins, hence rendering tumor antigen(s) useless in immunological stimulation. A combination of an 805-nm laser and in-situ indocyanine green (ICG) solutions were used in treating rat tumors. Temperature measured at different locations showed that the effective photothermal interaction could reach as deep as 1 cm below the treatment surface and the temperature inside the tumor can be controlled by the laser and dye parameters. Multiple beams were also used to irradiate the tumor. When the tumor is free of ICG, the temperature increase of the tumor was less significant under the laser irradiation with a power density of 0.33 W/cm2; tumor tissue at a depth of 1 cm only experienced a 7°C-temperature increase. However, when the tumor contained ICG solution, the temperature at 1-cm depth experienced more than 15°C-temperature increase. Multiple-fiber irradiation further enhanced the photothermal selectivity. Furthermore, when one fiber was used, the edge of the tumor experienced less impact by the laser beam, while multiple beams resulted in an almost uniform temperature increase over the entire tumor.

  9. Pathogenesis of pituitary tumors.

    PubMed

    Yu, Run; Melmed, Shlomo

    2010-01-01

    Pituitary tumors are common and mostly benign neoplasia which cause excess or deficiency of pituitary hormones and compressive damage to adjacent organs. Oncogene activation [e.g. PTTG (pituitary tumor-transforming gene) and HMGA2], tumor suppressor gene inactivation (e.g. MEN1 and PRKAR1A), epigenetic changes (e.g. methylation) and humoral factors (e.g. ectopic production of stimulating hormones) are all possible pituitary tumor initiators; the micro-environment of pituitary tumors including steroid milieu, angiogenesis and abnormal cell adhesion further promote tumor growth. Senescence, a cellular defence mechanism against malignant transformation, may explain the benign nature of at least some pituitary tumors. We suggest that future research on pituitary tumor pathogenesis should incorporate systems approaches, and address regulatory mechanisms for pituitary cell proliferation, development of new animal models of pituitary tumor and isolation of functional human pituitary tumor cell lines. PMID:20541667

  10. Phyllodes tumor of the breast

    PubMed Central

    Herazo, Fernando; Gil, Monica; Echeverri, Carolina; Ángel, Gonzalo; Borrero, Mauricio; Madrid, Jorge; Jaramillo, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Breast Phyllodes tumors are rare breast tumors present in less than 1% of new cases of breast cancer, usually occurring among middle-aged women (40-50 yrs). Objective: This study shows diagnostic experience, surgical management and follows up of patients with this disease during a period of ten years in a oncology referral center. Methods: Retrospectively, breast cancer registries at the institution were reviewed, identifying 77 patients with Phyllodes tumors between 2002 and 2012, who had been operated on at the Instituto de Cancerología - Clínica Las Américas, in Medellín (Colombia). Clinical and histopathological data belonging to these cases was captured and analyzed and descriptive statistics were used. Results: The follow up median was 22.5 months (IQR: 10.5-60.0), average age was 47.2 yrs (SD: 12.4), mean tumor size was 3.6 cm (SD: 4.6), 88.3% of the patients (68 cases) presented negative margins and none of them received adjuvant chemotherapy. Of the patients with Phyllodes tumors; 33.8% had benign, 31.2% had borderline and 35.0% had malignant tumor. Disease-free survival was 85.8% and overall survival was 94.5%. Discussion: Reported data in this article is in accordance with what has been reported in worldwide literature. In our cohort even the high mean size of the tumors, the risk of local relapse and metastatic disease is low than previously reported in literature. Trials with longer follow up and molecular trials in Phyllodes tumors are necessary to understand the behavior of these tumors in Hispanics population. PMID:26600624

  11. Radiation-induced nitric oxide mitigates tumor hypoxia and radioresistance in a murine SCCVII tumor model

    SciTech Connect

    Nagane, Masaki; Yasui, Hironobu; Yamamori, Tohru; Zhao, Songji; Kuge, Yuji; Tamaki, Nagara; Kameya, Hiromi; Nakamura, Hideo; Fujii, Hirotada; Inanami, Osamu

    2013-08-02

    Highlights: •IR-induced NO increased tissue perfusion and pO{sub 2}. •IR increased NO production in tumors without changes in the mRNA and protein levels of NOS isoforms. •NOS activity assay showed that IR upregulated eNOS activity in tumors. •IR-induced NO decreased tumor hypoxia and altered tumor radiosensitivity. -- Abstract: Tumor hypoxia, which occurs mainly as a result of inadequate tissue perfusion in solid tumors, is a well-known challenge for successful radiotherapy. Recent evidence suggests that ionizing radiation (IR) upregulates nitric oxide (NO) production and that IR-induced NO has the potential to increase intratumoral circulation. However, the kinetics of NO production and the responsible isoforms for NO synthase in tumors exposed to IR remain unclear. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the mechanism by which IR stimulates NO production in tumors and the effect of IR-induced NO on tumor radiosensitivity. Hoechst33342 perfusion assay and electron spin resonance oxymetry showed that IR increased tissue perfusion and pO{sub 2} in tumor tissue. Immunohistochemical analysis using two different hypoxic probes showed that IR decreased hypoxic regions in tumors; treatment with a nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor, L-NAME, abrogated the effects of IR. Moreover, IR increased endothelial NOS (eNOS) activity without affecting its mRNA or protein expression levels in SCCVII-transplanted tumors. Tumor growth delay assay showed that L-NAME decreased the anti-tumor effect of fractionated radiation (10 Gy × 2). These results suggested that IR increased eNOS activity and subsequent tissue perfusion in tumors. Increases in intratumoral circulation simultaneously decreased tumor hypoxia. As a result, IR-induced NO increased tumor radiosensitivity. Our study provides a new insight into the NO-dependent mechanism for efficient fractionated radiotherapy.

  12. Solid Tumor Therapy Using a Cannon and Pawn Combination Strategy.

    PubMed

    Song, Wantong; Tang, Zhaohui; Zhang, Dawei; Wen, Xue; Lv, Shixian; Liu, Zhilin; Deng, Mingxiao; Chen, Xuesi

    2016-01-01

    Nanocarrier-based anti-tumor drugs hold great promise for reducing side effects and improving tumor-site drug retention in the treatment of solid tumors. However, therapeutic outcomes are still limited, primarily due to a lack of drug penetration within most tumor tissues. Herein, we propose a strategy using a nanocarrier-based combination of vascular disrupting agents (VDAs) and cytotoxic drugs for solid tumor therapy. Specifically, combretastatin A-4 (CA4) serves as a "cannon" by eradicating tumor cells at a distance from blood vessels; concomitantly, doxorubicin (DOX) serves as a "pawn" by killing tumor cells in close proximity to blood vessels. This "cannon and pawn" combination strategy acts without a need to penetrate every tumor cell and is expected to eliminate all tumor cells in a solid tumor. In a murine C26 colon tumor model, this strategy proved effective in eradicating greater than 94% of tumor cells and efficiently inhibited tumor growth with a weekly injection. In large solid tumor models (C26 and 4T1 tumors with volumes of approximately 250 mm(3)), this strategy also proved effective for inhibiting tumor growth. These results showing remarkable inhibition of tumor growth provide a valuable therapeutic choice for solid tumor therapy. PMID:27217835

  13. Solid Tumor Therapy Using a Cannon and Pawn Combination Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Song, Wantong; Tang, Zhaohui; Zhang, Dawei; Wen, Xue; Lv, Shixian; Liu, Zhilin; Deng, Mingxiao; Chen, Xuesi

    2016-01-01

    Nanocarrier-based anti-tumor drugs hold great promise for reducing side effects and improving tumor-site drug retention in the treatment of solid tumors. However, therapeutic outcomes are still limited, primarily due to a lack of drug penetration within most tumor tissues. Herein, we propose a strategy using a nanocarrier-based combination of vascular disrupting agents (VDAs) and cytotoxic drugs for solid tumor therapy. Specifically, combretastatin A-4 (CA4) serves as a “cannon” by eradicating tumor cells at a distance from blood vessels; concomitantly, doxorubicin (DOX) serves as a “pawn” by killing tumor cells in close proximity to blood vessels. This “cannon and pawn” combination strategy acts without a need to penetrate every tumor cell and is expected to eliminate all tumor cells in a solid tumor. In a murine C26 colon tumor model, this strategy proved effective in eradicating greater than 94% of tumor cells and efficiently inhibited tumor growth with a weekly injection. In large solid tumor models (C26 and 4T1 tumors with volumes of approximately 250 mm3), this strategy also proved effective for inhibiting tumor growth. These results showing remarkable inhibition of tumor growth provide a valuable therapeutic choice for solid tumor therapy. PMID:27217835

  14. Patient-Derived Tumor Xenografts Are Susceptible to Formation of Human Lymphocytic Tumors.

    PubMed

    Bondarenko, Gennadiy; Ugolkov, Andrey; Rohan, Stephen; Kulesza, Piotr; Dubrovskyi, Oleksii; Gursel, Demirkan; Mathews, Jeremy; O'Halloran, Thomas V; Wei, Jian J; Mazar, Andrew P

    2015-09-01

    Patient-derived xenograft (PDX) tumor models have emerged as a new approach to evaluate the effects of cancer drugs on patients' personalized tumor grafts enabling to select the best treatment for the cancer patient and providing a new tool for oncology drug developers. Here, we report that human tumors engrafted in immunodeficient mice are susceptible to formation of B-and T-cell PDX tumors. We xenografted human primary and metastatic tumor samples into immunodeficient mice and found that a fraction of PDX tumors generated from patients' samples of breast, colon, pancreatic, bladder and renal cancer were histologically similar to lymphocytic neoplasms. Moreover, we found that the first passage of breast and pancreatic cancer PDX tumors after initial transplantation of the tumor pieces from the same human tumor graft could grow as a lymphocytic tumor in one mouse and as an adenocarcinoma in another mouse. Whereas subcutaneous PDX tumors resembling human adenocarcinoma histology were slow growing and non-metastatic, we found that subcutaneous PDX lymphocytic tumors were fast growing and formed large metastatic lesions in mouse lymph nodes, liver, lungs, and spleen. PDX lymphocytic tumors were comprised of B-cells which were Epstein-Barr virus positive and expressed CD45 and CD20. Because B-cells are typically present in malignant solid tumors, formation of B-cell tumor may evolve in a wide range of PDX tumor models. Although PDX tumor models show great promise in the development of personalized therapy for cancer patients, our results suggest that confidence in any given PDX tumor model requires careful screening of lymphocytic markers. PMID:26476081

  15. Patient-Derived Tumor Xenografts Are Susceptible to Formation of Human Lymphocytic Tumors1

    PubMed Central

    Bondarenko, Gennadiy; Ugolkov, Andrey; Rohan, Stephen; Kulesza, Piotr; Dubrovskyi, Oleksii; Gursel, Demirkan; Mathews, Jeremy; O’Halloran, Thomas V.; Wei, Jian J.; Mazar, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    Patient-derived xenograft (PDX) tumor models have emerged as a new approach to evaluate the effects of cancer drugs on patients’ personalized tumor grafts enabling to select the best treatment for the cancer patient and providing a new tool for oncology drug developers. Here, we report that human tumors engrafted in immunodeficient mice are susceptible to formation of B-and T-cell PDX tumors. We xenografted human primary and metastatic tumor samples into immunodeficient mice and found that a fraction of PDX tumors generated from patients’ samples of breast, colon, pancreatic, bladder and renal cancer were histologically similar to lymphocytic neoplasms. Moreover, we found that the first passage of breast and pancreatic cancer PDX tumors after initial transplantation of the tumor pieces from the same human tumor graft could grow as a lymphocytic tumor in one mouse and as an adenocarcinoma in another mouse. Whereas subcutaneous PDX tumors resembling human adenocarcinoma histology were slow growing and non-metastatic, we found that subcutaneous PDX lymphocytic tumors were fast growing and formed large metastatic lesions in mouse lymph nodes, liver, lungs, and spleen. PDX lymphocytic tumors were comprised of B-cells which were Epstein-Barr virus positive and expressed CD45 and CD20. Because B-cells are typically present in malignant solid tumors, formation of B-cell tumor may evolve in a wide range of PDX tumor models. Although PDX tumor models show great promise in the development of personalized therapy for cancer patients, our results suggest that confidence in any given PDX tumor model requires careful screening of lymphocytic markers. PMID:26476081

  16. Patient-Derived Tumor Xenografts Are Susceptible to Formation of Human Lymphocytic Tumors.

    PubMed

    Bondarenko, Gennadiy; Ugolkov, Andrey; Rohan, Stephen; Kulesza, Piotr; Dubrovskyi, Oleksii; Gursel, Demirkan; Mathews, Jeremy; O'Halloran, Thomas V; Wei, Jian J; Mazar, Andrew P

    2015-09-01

    Patient-derived xenograft (PDX) tumor models have emerged as a new approach to evaluate the effects of cancer drugs on patients' personalized tumor grafts enabling to select the best treatment for the cancer patient and providing a new tool for oncology drug developers. Here, we report that human tumors engrafted in immunodeficient mice are susceptible to formation of B-and T-cell PDX tumors. We xenografted human primary and metastatic tumor samples into immunodeficient mice and found that a fraction of PDX tumors generated from patients' samples of breast, colon, pancreatic, bladder and renal cancer were histologically similar to lymphocytic neoplasms. Moreover, we found that the first passage of breast and pancreatic cancer PDX tumors after initial transplantation of the tumor pieces from the same human tumor graft could grow as a lymphocytic tumor in one mouse and as an adenocarcinoma in another mouse. Whereas subcutaneous PDX tumors resembling human adenocarcinoma histology were slow growing and non-metastatic, we found that subcutaneous PDX lymphocytic tumors were fast growing and formed large metastatic lesions in mouse lymph nodes, liver, lungs, and spleen. PDX lymphocytic tumors were comprised of B-cells which were Epstein-Barr virus positive and expressed CD45 and CD20. Because B-cells are typically present in malignant solid tumors, formation of B-cell tumor may evolve in a wide range of PDX tumor models. Although PDX tumor models show great promise in the development of personalized therapy for cancer patients, our results suggest that confidence in any given PDX tumor model requires careful screening of lymphocytic markers.

  17. Modification of tumor response by manipulation of tumor oxygenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qun; Beckers, Jill; Hetzel, Fred W.

    1999-07-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) requires tissue oxygenation during light irradiation. Tumor hypoxia, either pre-existing or induced by PDT during light irradiation, can severely hamper the effectiveness of a PDT treatment. Lowering the light irradiation does rate or fractionating a light dose may improve cell kill of PDT induced hypoxic cells, but will have no effects on pre-existing hypoxic cells. In the current study, we used hyper-oxygenation during PDT to overcome cell hypoxia in PDT. C3H mice with transplanted mammary carcinoma tumor were injected with 12.5 mg/kg Photofrin and irradiated with 630 nm laser light 24 hours later. Tumor oxygenation was manipulated by subjecting the animals to 3 a.t.p. hyperbaric oxygen or normobaric oxygen during PDT light irradiation. The results show a significant improvement in tumor response when PDT was delivered during hyper-oxygenation. With hyper-oxygenation, up to 80% of treated tumors showed no re-growth after 60 days. In comparison, only 20% of tumors treated while animals breathed normal room air, did not re-grow. To quantitatively evaluate the effects of manipulating tumor oxygenation, tumor p02 was measured with microelectrodes positioned in pre-existing hypoxic regions before and during the PDT light irradiation. The results show that hyper-oxygenation may oxygenate pre-existing hypoxic cells and compensate oxygen depletion induced by PDT light irradiation. In conclusion, hyper-oxygenation may provide effective ways to improve PDT treatment efficiency by oxygenating both pre-existing and treatment induced cell hypoxia.

  18. Simulation of Complex Transport of Nanoparticles around a Tumor Using Tumor-Microenvironment-on-Chip

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Bongseop; Ozcelikkale, Altug; Shin, Crystal S.; Park, Kinam; Han, Bumsoo

    2014-01-01

    Delivery of therapeutic agents selectively to tumor tissue, which is referred as “targeted delivery,” is one of the most ardently pursued goals of cancer therapy. Recent advances in nanotechnology enable numerous types of nanoparticles (NPs) whose properties can be designed for targeted delivery to tumors. In spite of promising early results, the delivery and therapeutic efficacy of the majority of NPs are still quite limited. This is mainly attributed to the limitation of currently available tumor models to test these NPs and systematically study the effects of complex transport and pathophysiological barriers around the tumors. In this study, thus, we developed a new in vitro tumor model to recapitulate the tumor microenvironment determining the transport around tumors. This model, named tumor-microenvironment-on-chip (T-MOC), consists of 3-dimensional microfluidic channels where tumor cells and endothelial cells are cultured within extracellular matrix under perfusion of interstitial fluid. Using this T-MOC platform, the transport of NPs and its variation due to tumor microenvironmental parameters have been studied including cut-off pore size, interstitial fluid pressure, and tumor tissue microstructure. The results suggest that T-MOC is capable of simulating the complex transport around the tumor, and providing detailed information about NP transport behavior. This finding confirms that NPs should be designed considering their dynamic interactions with tumor microenvironment. PMID:25194778

  19. A Phase II Study of Synchronous Three-Dimensional Conformal Boost to the Gross Tumor Volume for Patients With Unresectable Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Results of Korean Radiation Oncology Group 0301 Study

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Kwan Ho Ahn, Sung Ja; Pyo, Hong Ryull; Kim, Kyu-Sik; Kim, Young-Chul; Moon, Sung Ho; Han, Ji-Youn; Kim, Heung Tae; Koom, Woong Sub; Lee, Jin Soo

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: We evaluated the efficacy of synchronous three-dimensional (3D) conformal boost to the gross tumor volume (GTV) in concurrent chemoradiotherapy for patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Eligibility included unresectable Stage III NSCLC with no pleural effusion, no supraclavicular nodal metastases, and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance score of 0-1. Forty-nine patients with pathologically proven NSCLC were enrolled. Eighteen patients had Stage IIIA and 31 had Stage IIIB. By using 3D conformal radiotherapy (RT) techniques, a dose of 1.8 Gy was delivered to the planning target volume with a synchronous boost of 0.6 Gy to the GTV, with a total dose of 60 Gy to the GTV and 45 Gy to the planning target volume in 25 fractions during 5 weeks. All patients received weekly chemotherapy consisting of paclitaxel and carboplatin during RT. Results: With a median follow-up of 36.8 months (range, 29.0-45.5 months) for surviving patients, median survival was 28.1 months. One-, 2- and 3-year overall survival rates were 77%, 56.4%, and 43.8%, respectively. Corresponding local progression-free survival rates were 71.2%, 53.7%, and 53.7%. Compliance was 90% for RT and 88% for chemotherapy. Acute esophagitis of Grade 2 or higher occurred in 29 patients. Two patients with T4 lesions died of massive bleeding and hemoptysis during treatment (Grade 5). Overall late toxicity was acceptable. Conclusions: Based on the favorable outcome with acceptable toxicity, the acceleration scheme using 3D conformal GTV boost in this trial is warranted to compare with conventional fractionation in a Phase III trial.

  20. Tumor Volume Changes on 1.5 Tesla Endorectal MRI During Neoadjuvant Androgen Suppression Therapy for Higher-Risk Prostate Cancer and Recurrence in Men Treated Using Radiation Therapy Results of the Phase II CALGB 9682 Study

    SciTech Connect

    D'Amico, Anthony V. Halabi, Susan; Tempany, Clare; Titelbaum, David; Philips, George K.; Loffredo, Marian; McMahon, Elizabeth; Sanford, Ben; Vogelzang, Nicholas J.; Small, Eric J.

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: We prospectively determined whether the change in tumor volume (TV) during 2 months of neoadjuvant androgen suppression therapy (nAST) measured using conventional 1.5 Tesla endorectal magnetic resonance imaging (eMRI) was associated with the risk of recurrence after radiation (RT) and 6 months of AST. Patients and Methods: Between 1997 and 2001, 180 men with clinical stage T1c-T3cN0M0 adenocarcinoma of the prostate were registered. Fifteen were found to be ineligible and the institutional MR radiologist could not assess the TV in 32, leaving 133 for analysis. Multivariable Cox regression analysis was used to assess whether a significant association existed between eMRI-defined TV progression during nAST and time to recurrence adjusting for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level, Gleason score (8 to 10 or 7 vs. 6 or less) and stage (T3 vs. T1-2). Results: After a median follow up of 6.7 years and adjusting for known prognostic factors, there was a significant increase in the risk of PSA failure (HR, 2.3 [95% CI, 1.1-4.5; p = 0.025) in men with eMRI-defined TV progression during nAST. Specifically, adjusted estimates of PSA failure were significantly higher (p = 0.032) in men with, compared with men without, eMRI-defined TV progression reaching 38% vs. 19%, respectively, by 5 years. Conclusion: Eradicating intraprostatic hormone refractory prostate cancer (HRPC) by maximizing local control and randomized trials assessing whether survival is improved when agents active against HRPC are combined with maximal local therapy are needed in men who progress based on eMRI during nAST.

  1. [Chemotherapy of brain tumors].

    PubMed

    Kuratsu, J; Ushio, Y

    1994-10-01

    Despite recent attempts to improve chemotherapeutic approaches for the treatment of malignant gliomas, results remain limited and palliative. The development of effective chemotherapy for tumors of the central nervous system (CNS) is complicated in that the blood-brain barrier (B.B.B.) hampers the penetration of most drugs into the brain and cerebrospinal fluid. The factors governing delivery in the brain are the drug's molecular weight, lipophilicity and degree of ionization. Now the standard therapy for malignant glioma is maximal tumor resection followed by combination radiotherapy plus chemotherapy. Nitrosoureas are representative drugs which easily cross the B.B.B.. It has been shown that nitrosourea compounds have an additive effect to radiotherapy. The toxicity profile of nitrosoureas is leukocytopenia and thrombocytopenia as a dose-limiting factor. Furthermore, the great heterogeneity of malignant glioma tissues offered a rationale for the use of multiple drugs. Many studies were reported to show a substantial advantage for the multidrug regimen over control series utilizing single drugs alone. Despite clear examples of the effectiveness of chemotherapy, we are still far from improving the cure rate for the vast majority of patients with primary malignancies of the CNS. Further improvement in patient survival may depend upon understanding and manipulating the pathways that regulate aberrant growth in these tumors. The development of new anticancer agents, which are sensitive to malignant glioma and can reach a high concentration in glioma tissue, is warranted. PMID:7986118

  2. Targeting tumor acidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshetnyak, Yana K.; Engelman, Donald M.; Andreev, Oleg A.

    2012-02-01

    One of the main features of solid tumors is extracellular acidity, which correlates with tumor aggressiveness and metastatic potential. We introduced novel approach in targeting of acidic tumors, and translocation of cell-impermeable cargo molecules across cellular membrane. Our approach is based on main principle of insertion and folding of a polypeptide in lipid bilayer of membrane. We have identified family of pH Low Insertion Peptides (pHLIPs), which are capable spontaneous insertion and folding in membrane at mild acidic conditions. The affinity of peptides of pHLIP family to membrane at low pH is several times higher than at neutral pH. The process of peptides folding occurs within milliseconds. The energy released in a result of folding (about 2 kcal/mol) could be used to move polar cargo across a membrane, which is a novel concept in drug delivery. pHLIP peptides could be considered as a pH-sensitive single peptide molecular transporters and conjugated with imaging probes for fluorescence, MR, PET and SPECT imaging, they represent a novel in vivo marker of acidity. The work is supported by NIH grants CA133890 and GM073857 to OAA, DME, YRK.

  3. Molecular subtypes of serous borderline ovarian tumor show distinct expression patterns of benign tumor and malignant tumor-associated signatures.

    PubMed

    Curry, Edward W J; Stronach, Euan A; Rama, Nona R; Wang, Yuepeng Y P; Gabra, Hani; El-Bahrawy, Mona A

    2014-03-01

    Borderline ovarian tumors show heterogeneity in clinical behavior. Most have excellent prognosis, although a small percentage show recurrence or progressive disease, usually to low-grade serous carcinoma. The aim of this study was to understand the molecular relationship between these entities and identify potential markers of tumor progression and therapeutic targets. We studied gene expression using Affymetrix HGU133plus2 GeneChip microarrays in 3 low-grade serous carcinomas, 13 serous borderline tumors and 8 serous cystadenomas. An independent data set of 18 serous borderline tumors and 3 low-grade serous carcinomas was used for validation. Unsupervised clustering revealed clear separation of benign and malignant tumors, whereas borderline tumors showed two distinct groups, one clustering with benign and the other with malignant tumors. The segregation into benign- and malignant-like borderline molecular subtypes was reproducible on applying the same analysis to an independent publicly available data set. We identified 50 genes that separate borderline tumors into their subgroups. Functional enrichment analysis of genes that separate borderline tumors to the two subgroups highlights a cell adhesion signature for the malignant-like subset, with Claudins particularly prominent. This is the first report of molecular subtypes of borderline tumors based on gene expression profiling. Our results provide the basis for identification of biomarkers for the malignant potential of borderline ovarian tumor and potential therapeutic targets for low-grade serous carcinoma.

  4. Image based modeling of tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Meghdadi, N; Soltani, M; Niroomand-Oscuii, H; Ghalichi, F

    2016-09-01

    Tumors are a main cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Despite the efforts of the clinical and research communities, little has been achieved in the past decades in terms of improving the treatment of aggressive tumors. Understanding the underlying mechanism of tumor growth and evaluating the effects of different therapies are valuable steps in predicting the survival time and improving the patients' quality of life. Several studies have been devoted to tumor growth modeling at different levels to improve the clinical outcome by predicting the results of specific treatments. Recent studies have proposed patient-specific models using clinical data usually obtained from clinical images and evaluating the effects of various therapies. The aim of this review is to highlight the imaging role in tumor growth modeling and provide a worthwhile reference for biomedical and mathematical researchers with respect to tumor modeling using the clinical data to develop personalized models of tumor growth and evaluating the effect of different therapies.

  5. Image based modeling of tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Meghdadi, N; Soltani, M; Niroomand-Oscuii, H; Ghalichi, F

    2016-09-01

    Tumors are a main cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Despite the efforts of the clinical and research communities, little has been achieved in the past decades in terms of improving the treatment of aggressive tumors. Understanding the underlying mechanism of tumor growth and evaluating the effects of different therapies are valuable steps in predicting the survival time and improving the patients' quality of life. Several studies have been devoted to tumor growth modeling at different levels to improve the clinical outcome by predicting the results of specific treatments. Recent studies have proposed patient-specific models using clinical data usually obtained from clinical images and evaluating the effects of various therapies. The aim of this review is to highlight the imaging role in tumor growth modeling and provide a worthwhile reference for biomedical and mathematical researchers with respect to tumor modeling using the clinical data to develop personalized models of tumor growth and evaluating the effect of different therapies. PMID:27596102

  6. Interaction of MSC with tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Melzer, Catharina; Yang, Yuanyuan; Hass, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Tumor development and tumor progression is not only determined by the corresponding tumor cells but also by the tumor microenvironment. This includes an orchestrated network of interacting cell types (e.g. immune cells, endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and mesenchymal stroma/stem cells (MSC)) via the extracellular matrix and soluble factors such as cytokines, chemokines, growth factors and various metabolites. Cell populations of the tumor microenvironment can interact directly and indirectly with cancer cells by mutually altering properties and functions of the involved partners. Particularly, mesenchymal stroma/stem cells (MSC) play an important role during carcinogenesis exhibiting different types of intercellular communication. Accordingly, this work focusses on diverse mechanisms of interaction between MSC and cancer cells. Moreover, some functional changes and consequences for both cell types are summarized which can eventually result in the establishment of a carcinoma stem cell niche (CSCN) or the generation of new tumor cell populations by MSC-tumor cell fusion. PMID:27608835

  7. Tumor angiogenesis in mice and men.

    PubMed

    Alani, Rhoda M; Silverthorn, Courtney F; Orosz, Kate

    2004-06-01

    Over the past decade much research has focused on understanding the molecular pathways that regulate the development of a tumor-associated vasculature. In 1999, Lyden and colleagues showed that mice deficient in one to three Id1 or Id3 alleles could not support the growth of tumor xenografts due to defects in tumor-associated angiogenesis. Three recently published manuscripts have now re-examined the role of Id genes in the development of a tumor-associated vasculature using more clinically relevant tumor model systems. Remarkably, all three studies have found strikingly different results compared to the original xenograft data published in 1999. Below we review the current understanding of the role of Id genes in the development of a tumor-associated vasculature given the most recent data and suggest ways in which animal tumor model systems might be put to better use to provide more clinically relevant information.

  8. Glomus Tumor of the Hand

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Won; Kwon, Soon Beom; Eo, Su Rak; Kwon, Chan

    2015-01-01

    Background Glomus tumors were first described by Wood in 1812 as painful subcutaneous tubercles. It is an uncommon benign neoplasm involving the glomus body, an apparatus that involves in thermoregulation of cutaneous microvasculature. Glomus tumor constitutes 1%-5% of all hand tumors. It usually occurs at the subungual region and more commonly in aged women. Its classical clinical triad consists of pain, tenderness and temperature intolerance, especially cold sensitivity. This study reviews 15 cases of glomus tumor which were analyzed according to its anatomic location, surgical approach and histologic findings. Methods Fifteen patients with subungual glomus tumors of the hand operated on between January 2006 and March 2013, were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were evaluated preoperatively with standard physical examination including ice cube test and Love's test. Diagnostic imaging consisted of ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. All procedures were performed with tourniquet control under local anesthesia. Eleven patients underwent excision using the transungual approach, 3 patients using the volar approach and 1 patient using the lateral subperiosteal approach. Results Total of 15 cases were reviewed. 11 tumors were located in the nail bed, 3 in the volar pulp and 1 in the radial aspect of the finger tip. After complete excision, patients remained asymptomatic in the immediate postoperative period. In the long term follow up, patients exhibited excellent cosmetic results with no recurrence. Conclusions Accurate diagnosis should be made by physical, radiologic and pathologic examinations. Preoperative localization and complete extirpation is essential in preventing recurrence and subsequent nail deformity. PMID:26015884

  9. [Tumor-induced immunosuppression].

    PubMed

    Paul, S; Calmels, B; Régulier, E

    2002-01-01

    Tumor immunology is based on two essential concepts: immune surveillance, which implicate the host immune reactions against tumor cells, and tumor immune escape, which refers to the tumor-cell evasion process against the host immune system. The notion that a deficit in immune cell functions permits tumor growth has received experimental support with the discovery of several different biochemical defects in T lymphocytes that infiltrate cancers. Furthermore, expression of self-antigens on the tumor surface impose potential barriers to the development of effective immune response. Tumors are able to overcome immune surveillance by changing the polarity of effectors cells, thus down-regulating the proliferation of tumor-specific cytotoxic T cells, or altering the effector compositions of immune cells within the tumor milieu, or both. Understanding the interaction between cancer cells and host immune cells is of importance for clinical applications or immunotherapy in cancer treatment. PMID:11937439

  10. Salivary gland tumors.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, P J; Black, K M

    1985-10-01

    A retrospective review of 643 patients with salivary gland tumors seen between 1958-72 is reported. There were 328 malignant and 375 benign tumors. All patients with malignant tumors were assessed in a multidisciplinary head and neck clinic. The median age for developing malignant tumors was 58 and there was a male to female ratio of 1.2:1. For benign tumors the median age was 46 years and the male to female ratio 0.8:1. Overall the primary tumor was controlled by the first planned treatment in 145 (44%) malignant tumors and in 253 (80%) benign tumors. The five and 10 year actuarial survival for malignant tumors was 59.4% and 45.6% respectively.

  11. Autophagy sensitivity of neuroendocrine lung tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seung-Keun; Kim, Jin-Hwan; Starenki, Dmytro; Park, Jong-In

    2013-12-01

    Neuroendocrine (NE) phenotypes characterize a spectrum of lung tumors, including low-grade typical and intermediate-grade atypical carcinoid, high-grade large-cell NE carcinoma and small cell lung carcinoma. Currently, no effective treatments are available to cure NE lung tumors, demanding identification of biological features specific to these tumors. Here, we report that autophagy has an important role for NE lung tumor cell proliferation and survival. We found that the expression levels of the autophagy marker LC3 are relatively high in a panel of lung tumor cell lines expressing high levels of neuron-specific enolase (NSE), a key NE marker in lung tumors. In response to bafilomycin A1 and chloroquine, NE lung tumor cells exhibited cytotoxicity whereas non-NE lung tumor cells exhibited cytostasis, indicating a distinct role of autophagy for NE lung tumor cell survival. Intriguingly, in certain NE lung tumor cell lines, the levels of processed LC3 (LC3-II) were inversely correlated with AKT activity. When AKT activity was inhibited using AKTi or MK2206, the levels of LC3-II and SQSTM1/p62 were increased. In contrast, torin 1, rapamycin or mTOR knockdown increased p62 levels, suggesting that these two pathways have opposing effects on autophagy in certain NE lung tumors. Moreover, inhibition of one pathway resulted in reduced activity of the other, suggesting that these two pathways crosstalk in the tumors. These results suggest that NE lung tumor cells share a common feature of autophagy and are more sensitive to autophagy inhibition than non-NE lung tumor cells. PMID:24126619

  12. Recent Advances in Targeting Tumor Energy Metabolism with Tumor Acidosis as a Biomarker of Drug Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Akhenblit, Paul J; Pagel, Mark D

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells employ a deregulated cellular metabolism to leverage survival and growth advantages. The unique tumor energy metabolism presents itself as a promising target for chemotherapy. A pool of tumor energy metabolism targeting agents has been developed after several decades of efforts. This review will cover glucose and fatty acid metabolism, PI3K/AKT/mTOR, HIF-1 and glutamine pathways in tumor energy metabolism, and how they are being exploited for treatments and therapies by promising pre-clinical or clinical drugs being developed or investigated. Additionally, acidification of the tumor extracellular microenvironment is hypothesized to be the result of active tumor metabolism. This implies that tumor extracellular pH (pHe) can be a biomarker for assessing the efficacy of therapies that target tumor metabolism. Several translational molecular imaging methods (PET, MRI) for interrogating tumor acidification and its suppression are discussed as well. PMID:26962408

  13. In-situ tumor vaccination: Bringing the fight to the tumor.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Robert H; Campbell, Jean S; Pai, Sara I; Brody, Joshua D; Kohrt, Holbrook E K

    2015-01-01

    After decades of development in the shadow of traditional cancer treatment, immunotherapy has come into the spotlight. Treatment of metastatic tumors with monoclonal antibodies to T cell checkpoints like programed cell death 1 (PD-1) or its ligand, (PD-L1), have resulted in significant clinical responses across multiple tumor types. However, these therapies fail in the majority of patients with solid tumors, in particular those who lack PD1(+)CD8(+) tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes within their tumors. Intratumoral "in situ vaccination" approaches seek to enhance immunogenicity, generate tumor infiltrating lymophcytes (TIL) and drive a systemic anti-tumor immune response, directed against "unvaccinated," disseminated tumors. Given the emerging picture of intratumoral immunotherapy as safe and capable of delivering systemic efficacy, it is anticipated that these approaches will become integrated into future multi-modality therapy.

  14. Tumor size and effectiveness of electrochemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Mali, Barbara; Miklavcic, Damijan; Campana, Luca G.; Cemazar, Maja; Sersa, Gregor; Snoj, Marko; Jarm, Tomaz

    2013-01-01

    Background Electrochemotherapy (ECT) is an effective and safe method for local treatment of tumors. However, relatively large variability in effectiveness of ECT has been observed, which likely results from different treatment conditions and tumor characteristics. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between tumor size and effectiveness of a single-session ECT. Materials and methods A systematic search of various bibliographic databases was performed and nine studies eligible for this study were extracted. Different statistical methods including meta-analysis were applied to analyze the data. Results The results of analysis based on data from 1466 tumors of any histotype show significantly lower effectiveness of ECT on tumors with maximal diameter equal to or larger than 3 cm (complete response (CR) of 33.3%, objective response (OR) of 68.2%) in comparison to smaller tumors (CR% of 59.5%, OR% of 85.7%). The results of meta-analysis indicated that ECT performed on tumors smaller than 3 cm statistically significantly increases the probability of CR by 31.0% and OR by 24.9% on average in comparison to larger tumors. The analysis of raw data about the size and response of tumors showed statistically significant decrease in effectiveness of ECT progressively with increasing tumor diameter. The biggest drop in CR% was detected at tumor diameters as small as 2 cm. Conclusions The standard operating procedures for ECT should be reexamined and refined for the treatment of large tumors. We propose that future clinical trials should include accurate ECT treatment planning and/or multiple ECT cycles, besides a prolonged observation for tumor response evaluation. PMID:23450195

  15. Ablative Tumor Radiation Can Change the Tumor Immune Cell Microenvironment to Induce Durable Complete Remissions

    PubMed Central

    Filatenkov, Alexander; Baker, Jeanette; Mueller, Antonia M.S.; Kenkel, Justin; Ahn, G-One; Dutt, Suparna; Zhang, Nigel; Kohrt, Holbrook; Jensen, Kent; Dejbakhsh-Jones, Sussan; Shizuru, Judith A.; Negrin, Robert N.; Engleman, Edgar G.; Strober, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The goals of the study were to elucidate the immune mechanisms that contribute to desirable complete remissions of murine colon tumors treated with single radiation dose of 30 Gy. This dose is at the upper end of the ablative range used clinically to treat advanced or metastatic colorectal, liver, and non-small cell lung tumors. Experimental design Changes in the tumor immune microenvironment of single tumor nodules exposed to radiation were studied using 21 day (>1 cm in diameter) CT26 and MC38 colon tumors. These are well-characterized weakly immunogenic tumors. Results We found that the high dose radiation transformed the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment resulting in an intense CD8+ T cell tumor infiltrate, and a loss of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). The change was dependent on antigen cross-presenting CD8+ dendritic cells, secretion of IFN-γ, and CD4+ T cells expressing CD40L. Anti-tumor CD8+ T cells entered tumors shortly after radiotherapy, reversed MDSC infiltration, and mediated durable remissions in an IFN-γ dependent manner. Interestingly, extended fractionated radiation regimen did not result in robust CD8+ T cell infiltration. Conclusion For immunologically sensitive tumors, these results indicate that remissions induced by a short course of high dose radiation therapy depend on the development of anti-tumor immunity that is reflected by the nature and kinetics of changes induced in the tumor cell microenvironment. These results suggest that systematic examination of the tumor immune microenvironment may help in optimizing the radiation regimen used to treat tumors by adding a robust immune response. PMID:25869387

  16. Tumors of the submaxillary gland.

    PubMed

    Spiro, R H; Hajdu, S I; Strong, E W

    1976-10-01

    This study reviews a thirty year experience with 217 patients who had a tumor of the submaxillary gland, comprising about 9 per cent of all patients with salivary neoplasms seen during the same period. Most of the tumors were malignant (56 per cent), with adenoid cystic carcinoma predominating, but the histologic type most frequently encountered was benign mixed tumor (43 per cent). Median age was fifty-four years in patients with malignant tumors compared with forty-six years in those with benign tumors, and 58 per cent were women. Asymptomatic swelling was the usual presenting complaint, and the clinical findings are summarized using a staging system recently proposed for patients with parotid tumors. Cervical lymph node metastasis occurred in at least 50 per cent of patients who had an adenocarcinoma or epidermoid, mucoepidermoid, or anaplastic carcinoma. Treatment was surgical and complete gland excision proved adequate in those with benign tumors. Radical neck dissection was performed in conjunction with submaxillary resection in most patients with malignant lesions, but radical en bloc resection was reserved for those few who had extensive or fixed disease. Net determinate "cure" rates at five and ten years (30 and 20 per cent, respectively) are distressingly low and compare unfavorably with those previously reported in patients treated for carcinoma of the parotid. The high local recurrence rate and the greater incidence in the submaxillary gland of more aggressive tumor types which metastasize readily suggest that current treatment should be more radical. It seems reasonable to expect that results might be improved if en bloc resections were more often performed in patients with less advanced disease, possibly in conjuction with intensive postoperative irradiation in selected cases.

  17. Tumor formations in scleractinian corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loya, Y.; Bull, G.; Pichon, M.

    1984-03-01

    A highly localized incidence of skeletal malformations (tumors) in the scleractinian corals Platygyra pini and P. sinensis on an inshore fringing reef at Cockle Bay, Magnetic Island within the Great Barrier Reef province is reported. These tumors are typified by a localized area of increased growth rate resulting in roughly circular protuberances extending up to 4.5 cm above the colony's surface. In both species, similar proportions of their populations carried tumors (24.1 % in P. pini and 18.7 % in P. sinensis). Larger colonies (>80 cm in diameter) are at least 7 times more likely to possess tumors than smaller colonies (<40 cm in diameter). X-radiographs of the skeletal malformations indicate a point of origin, presumably from a single budded polyp with subsequent, localized, accelerated growth. The mean radial growth rate of the tumorous area was 29 % greater than that of the surrounding normal regions. In contrast to the normal tissue, the tumorous tissue exhibited proliferation of cells, atrophied gastrodermal cells and mesenterial filaments which were larger and disordered in structure. The environmental conditions at Cockle Bay are relatively extreme with high turbidity, periodic exposure of the reef flat, abrupt changes in salinity during the wet season and mechanical damage to corals caused by unpredictable cyclonic storms. It is suggested that a combination of environmental stresses coupled with an injury inflicted on the corals are possible stimuli that initiate the development of these abnormal growth through either bacterial attack or the development of an aberrant polyp during tissue repair.

  18. Imaging Tumor Hypoxia to Advance Radiation Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chen-Ting; Boss, Mary-Keara

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Most solid tumors contain regions of low oxygenation or hypoxia. Tumor hypoxia has been associated with a poor clinical outcome and plays a critical role in tumor radioresistance. Recent Advances: Two main types of hypoxia exist in the tumor microenvironment: chronic and cycling hypoxia. Chronic hypoxia results from the limited diffusion distance of oxygen, and cycling hypoxia primarily results from the variation in microvessel red blood cell flux and temporary disturbances in perfusion. Chronic hypoxia may cause either tumor progression or regressive effects depending on the tumor model. However, there is a general trend toward the development of a more aggressive phenotype after cycling hypoxia. With advanced hypoxia imaging techniques, spatiotemporal characteristics of tumor hypoxia and the changes to the tumor microenvironment can be analyzed. Critical Issues: In this review, we focus on the biological and clinical consequences of chronic and cycling hypoxia on radiation treatment. We also discuss the advanced non-invasive imaging techniques that have been developed to detect and monitor tumor hypoxia in preclinical and clinical studies. Future Directions: A better understanding of the mechanisms of tumor hypoxia with non-invasive imaging will provide a basis for improved radiation therapeutic practices. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 313–337. PMID:24329000

  19. Phyllodes Tumor of the Breast

    SciTech Connect

    Belkacemi, Yazid Bousquet, Guilhem; Marsiglia, Hugo; Ray-Coquard, Isabelle; Magne, Nicolas; Malard, Yann; Lacroix, Magalie; Gutierrez, Cristina; Senkus, Elzbieta; Christie, David; Drumea, Karen; Lagneau, Edouard; Kadish, Sidney P.; Scandolaro, Luciano; Azria, David; Ozsahin, Mahmut

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: To better identify prognostic factors for local control and survival, as well as the role of different therapeutic options, for phyllodes tumors, a rare fibroepithelial neoplasm of the breast. Methods and Materials: Data from 443 women treated between 1971 and 2003 were collected from the Rare Cancer Network. The median age was 40 years (range, 12-87 years). Tumors were benign in 284 cases (64%), borderline in 80 cases (18%), and malignant in 79 cases (18%). Surgery consisted of breast-conserving surgery (BCS) in 377 cases (85%) and total mastectomy (TM) in 66 cases (15%). Thirty-nine patients (9%) received adjuvant radiotherapy (RT). Results: After a median follow-up of 106 months, local recurrence (LR) and distant metastases rates were 19% and 3.4%, respectively. In the malignant and borderline group (n = 159), RT significantly decreased LR (p = 0.02), and TM had better results than BCS (p = 0.0019). Multivariate analysis revealed benign histology, negative margins, and no residual disease (no RD) after initial treatment and RT delivery as independent favorable prognostic factors for local control; benign histology and low number of mitosis for disease-free survival; and pathologic tumor size tumor necrosis for overall survival. In the malignant and borderline subgroup multivariate analysis TM was the only favorable independent prognostic factor for disease-free survival. Conclusions: This study showed that phyllodes tumor patients with no RD after treatment have better local control. Benign tumors have a good prognosis after surgery alone. In borderline and malignant tumors, TM had better results than BCS. Thus, in these forms adjuvant RT should be considered according to histologic criteria.

  20. Stages of Pituitary Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... tumors that may spread to bones of the skull or the sinus cavity below the pituitary gland. ... sella (the bone at the base of the skull , where the pituitary gland sits). Recurrent Pituitary Tumors ...

  1. Brain Tumor Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... facts and statistics here include brain and central nervous system tumors (including spinal cord, pituitary and pineal gland ... U.S. living with a primary brain and central nervous system tumor. This year, nearly 17,000 people will ...

  2. Pituitary Tumors: Condition Information

    MedlinePlus

    ... stress. Growth hormone helps control body growth and metabolism. Thyroid-stimulating hormone is involved in growth, body temperature, and heart rate. Nonfunctioning pituitary tumors (also called nonsecretory tumors) do ...

  3. Tumor suppressor ARF

    PubMed Central

    Través, Paqui G.; Luque, Alfonso; Hortelano, Sonsoles

    2012-01-01

    ARF (alternative reading frame) is one of the most important tumor regulator playing critical roles in controlling tumor initiation and progression. Recently, we have demonstrated a novel and unexpected role for ARF as modulator of inflammatory responses. PMID:23162766

  4. Children's Brain Tumor Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... CBTF Justin's Hope Fund Grant Recipients Grants Children’s Brain Tumor Foundation, A non-profit organization, was founded ... and the long term outlook for children with brain and spinal cord tumors through research, support, education, ...

  5. Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... you insights into your child's treatment. LEARN MORE Brain tumors and their treatment can be deadly so ... Cancer Foundation joins the PBTF Read more >> Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation 302 Ridgefield Court, Asheville, NC 28806 ...

  6. American Brain Tumor Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the Ear Canals Read More ABTA News October 5, 2016 Largest American Brain Tumor Association Team Running in Bank of America Chicago Marathon Sunday, October 9 September 21, 2016 American Brain Tumor Association Awards 16 Grants to Support ...

  7. Lung Carcinoid Tumor: Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... for lung carcinoid tumor symptoms Surgery to treat lung carcinoid tumors Surgery is the main treatment for ... often be cured by surgery alone. Types of lung surgery Different operations can be used to treat ( ...

  8. Electric Field Analysis of Breast Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sree, V. Gowri; Udayakumar, K.; Sundararajan, R.

    2011-01-01

    An attractive alternative treatment for malignant tumors that are refractive to conventional therapies, such as surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy, is electrical-pulse-mediated drug delivery. Electric field distribution of tissue/tumor is important for effective treatment of tissues. This paper deals with the electric field distribution study of a tissue model using MAXWELL 3D Simulator. Our results indicate that tumor tissue had lower electric field strength compared to normal cells, which makes them susceptible to electrical-pulse-mediated drug delivery. This difference could be due to the altered properties of tumor cells compared to normal cells, and our results corroborate this. PMID:22295214

  9. Single Unpurified Breast Tumor-Initiating Cells from Multiple Mouse Models Efficiently Elicit Tumors in Immune-Competent Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Kurpios, Natasza A.; Girgis-Gabardo, Adele; Hallett, Robin M.; Rogers, Stephen; Gludish, David W.; Kockeritz, Lisa; Woodgett, James; Cardiff, Robert; Hassell, John A.

    2013-01-01

    The tumor-initiating cell (TIC) frequency of bulk tumor cell populations is one of the criteria used to distinguish malignancies that follow the cancer stem cell model from those that do not. However, tumor-initiating cell frequencies may be influenced by experimental conditions and the extent to which tumors have progressed, parameters that are not always addressed in studies of these cells. We employed limiting dilution cell transplantation of minimally manipulated tumor cells from mammary tumors of several transgenic mouse models to determine their tumor-initiating cell frequency. We determined whether the tumors that formed following tumor cell transplantation phenocopied the primary tumors from which they were isolated and whether they could be serially transplanted. Finally we investigated whether propagating primary tumor cells in different tissue culture conditions affected their resident tumor-initiating cell frequency. We found that tumor-initiating cells comprised between 15% and 50% of the bulk tumor cell population in multiple independent mammary tumors from three different transgenic mouse models of breast cancer. Culture of primary mammary tumor cells in chemically-defined, serum-free medium as non-adherent tumorspheres preserved TIC frequency to levels similar to that of the primary tumors from which they were established. By contrast, propagating the primary tumor cells in serum-containing medium as adherent populations resulted in a several thousand-fold reduction in their tumor-initiating cell fraction. Our findings suggest that experimental conditions, including the sensitivity of the transplantation assay, can dramatically affect estimates of tumor initiating cell frequency. Moreover, conditional on cell culture conditions, the tumor-initiating cell fraction of bulk mouse mammary tumor cell preparations can either be maintained at high or low frequency in vitro thus permitting comparative studies of tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic cancer cells

  10. [Intrapulmonary Solitary Fibrous Tumor].

    PubMed

    Komori, Kazuyuki; Tabata, Toshiharu; Katsumata, Hiroshi; Minowa, Muneo; Fujimura, Shigefumi

    2015-08-01

    We report a case of intrapulmonary solitary fibrous tumor( SFT). A 34-year-old woman was referred to our hospital due to an abnormal shadow on a chest roentgenogram without symptom. Computed tomography showed a circumscribed intrapulmonary tumor with mild uptake on fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography( PET) in the left lower lobe( S6). Frozen examination revealed a mesenchymal tumor. Based on the pathological and immunohistochemical findings, the tumor was diagnosed as intrapulmonary SFT.

  11. [Intrapulmonary Solitary Fibrous Tumor].

    PubMed

    Komori, Kazuyuki; Tabata, Toshiharu; Katsumata, Hiroshi; Minowa, Muneo; Fujimura, Shigefumi

    2015-08-01

    We report a case of intrapulmonary solitary fibrous tumor( SFT). A 34-year-old woman was referred to our hospital due to an abnormal shadow on a chest roentgenogram without symptom. Computed tomography showed a circumscribed intrapulmonary tumor with mild uptake on fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography( PET) in the left lower lobe( S6). Frozen examination revealed a mesenchymal tumor. Based on the pathological and immunohistochemical findings, the tumor was diagnosed as intrapulmonary SFT. PMID:26329708

  12. B7-H1 Expression in Wilms Tumor: Correlation With Tumor Biology and Disease Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Routh, Jonathan C.; Ashley, Richard A.; Sebo, Thomas J.; Lohse, Christine M.; Husmann, Douglas A.; Kramer, Stephen A.; Kwon, Eugene D.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Despite tremendous gains in improving prognosis, 10% of patients with Wilms tumor will ultimately experience disease recurrence. The identification of novel prognostic markers and tumor associated targets for patients at risk could enable clinicians to treat recurrences more aggressively and, thus, optimize outcomes. We have previously shown that tumor expression of the T cell coregulatory ligand B7-H1 portends a poor prognosis for adults with renal cell carcinoma and represents a promising target to improve therapy. We hypothesize that this finding may be true for Wilms tumor. Materials and Methods We identified 81 patients with Wilms tumor treated at 1 institution between 1968 and 2004. Histopathological features, including Wilms tumor B7-H1 expression, were correlated with clinical observations and outcome. Results Tumor recurrences were noted in 22% of patients with Wilms tumor and 14% died. B7-H1 was expressed in 11 tumors (14%) and was more likely to occur in anaplastic Wilms tumor (p = 0.03). Tumor B7-H1 expression was associated with a 2.7-fold increased risk of recurrence, although this difference did not achieve statistical significance (p = 0.06). However, in favorable histology tumors B7-H1 expression was associated with a 3.7-fold increased risk of recurrence (p = 0.03). Conclusions B7-H1 is expressed by Wilms tumor, correlates with tumor biology and is associated with an increased risk of recurrence in patients with favorable histology tumors. B7-H1 may prove useful in identifying high risk patients who could benefit from more aggressive initial treatment regimens, and may represent a promising therapeutic target. Multi-institutional studies to elucidate the role of B7-H1 in the treatment of Wilms tumor are warranted. PMID:18355839

  13. What Is Wilms Tumor?

    MedlinePlus

    ... tumor): In these tumors, the look of the cancer cells varies widely, and the cells’ nuclei (the central parts that contain the DNA) tend to be very large and distorted. This is called anaplasia . The more anaplasia a tumor has, the harder it is to cure. Other types of kidney cancers in children Most ...

  14. Brain and Spinal Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Brain and Spinal Tumors Information Page Synonym(s): Spinal Cord ... en Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What are Brain and Spinal Tumors? Tumors of the brain and ...

  15. Recurrent mixed tumor.

    PubMed

    Batsakis, J G

    1986-01-01

    Recurrence of benign neoplasms can usually be attributed to incomplete excision. Such is the case with benign mixed tumors of salivary glands. Certain histopathologic features of mixed tumors, however, appear to facilitate recurrences. These are: a predominantly myxoid composition, and transcapsular extension by the tumor. Multicentric origin is possible, but it must be regarded as a much lower order of probability.

  16. Fibromatoses: from postsurgical surveillance to combined surgery and radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Miralbell, R; Suit, H D; Mankin, H J; Zuckerberg, L R; Stracher, M A; Rosenberg, A E

    1990-03-01

    The results of management of two groups of patients with musculoaponeurotic (desmoid tumors) and plantar fibromatoses seen at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) during the period 1970-1985 are examined: (a) 26 patients who had had surgical resection for their primary fibromatosis but whose surgical margins were positive and who received no further treatment; and (b) 24 patients who were treated for their primary or recurrent fibromatosis by radiation alone or combined with surgery. For the 26 patients who were only observed, despite the positive surgical margins, 9 have recurred; the actuarial continuous local control rate at 5 years was 68% (a median follow-up of 70 months). Five patients had gross disease left after surgery and all of them failed. Seventeen of 21 patients who had grossly complete resection have local control; the four failures have been salvaged. This result supports the rationale for a no treatment but a thorough and close follow-up policy for patients with positive margins after grossly complete resection of a primary desmoid or fascial fibromatosis. There is no risk of metastasis in these patients and hence the effort toward a conservative policy which defers radiation merits interest and further study. Of the second group, 23 patients were treated for gross disease and one patient for microscopic disease after surgical resection. All of the 10 patients who were treated for primary desmoid tumor have local control. Among the 14 recurrent desmoid tumors there have been five local failures, after treatment by radiation alone or radiation + surgery. Three patients treated by radiation alone are currently scored as incompletely regressed tumors. Accordingly 16 of the 24 patients are scored as local controls without evidence of disease and 19 of the 24 are scored as local control (complete response or partial but stable response).

  17. SU-C-210-01: Are Clinically Relevant Dosimetric Endpoints Significantly Better with Gating of Lung SBRT Vs. ITV-Based Treatment?: Results of a Large Cohort Investigation Analyzing Predictive Dosimetric Indicators as a Function of Tumor Volume and Motion Amplitude

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J; Zhao, B; Ajlouni, M; Movsas, B; Chetty, I.J.

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To quantitatively compare patient internal target volume (ITV)-based plans with retrospectively generated gated plans to evaluate potential dosimetric improvements in lung toxicity from gated radiotherapy. Methods: Evaluation was conducted for 150 stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) treatment plans for 128 early-stage (T1–T3, <5cm) NSCLC patients. PTV margins were: ITV+5 mm (ITV-plan) and GTV+5 mm (Gated-plan). ITV-based and gated treatment plans were compared on the same free-breathing CT. ITV-based plan constraints were used to re-optimize and recalculate new gated plans. Plans were generated for 3 fractionation regimens: 3×18Gy, 4×12Gy (original), and 5×10Gy. Physical dose was converted to equivalent dose in 2Gy fractions (EQD2), which was used to determine mean lung dose (MLD) and percent volume of lung receiving ≥20Gy (V20). MLD and V20 differences between gating and ITV-based plans were analyzed as a function of both three-dimensional (3D) motion and tumor volume. The low dose region, V5, was also evaluated. Results: MLD and V20 differences between gated and ITV-based plans were larger for lower (1.48±1.32Gy and 1.44±1.29%) than for upper lobe tumors (0.89±0.74Gy and 0.92±0.71%) due to smaller tumor motion (2.9±3.4mm) compared to lower lobe tumors (8.1±6.1mm). Average differences of <1–2% were noted in V5 between ITV and gated plans. Dosimetric differences between gating and ITV-based methods increased with increasing tumor motion and decreasing tumor volume. Overall, average MLD (8.04±3.92Gy) and V20 (8.29±4.33%) values for ITV-based plans were already well below clinical guidelines, even for the 3×18Gy dose scheme, for which largest differences were noted relative to gated plans. Similar results were obtained for 5×10Gy and 4×12Gy regimens. Conclusion: Clinically relevant improvement in pulmonary toxicity, based on predictors of radiation pneumonitis (MLD and V20) was not generally observed, though improvement for tumors

  18. Activity of drug-loaded tumor-penetrating microparticles in peritoneal pancreatic tumors.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ze; Tsai, Max; Wang, Jie; Cole, David J; Wientjes, M Guillaume; Au, Jessie L-S

    2014-01-01

    Intraperitoneal (IP) chemotherapy confers significant survival benefits in cancer patients. However, several problems, including local toxicity and ineffectiveness against bulky tumors, have prohibited it from becoming a standard of care. We have developed drug-loaded, polymeric tumor-penetrating microparticles (TPM) to address these problems. Initial studies showed that TPM provides tumor-selective delivery and is effective against ovarian SKOV3 tumors of relatively small size (<50 mg). The present study evaluated whether the TPM activity extends to other tumor types that are more bulky and have different morphologies and disease presentation. We evaluated TPM in mice bearing two IP human pancreatic tumors with different growth characteristics and morphologies (rapidly growing, large and porous Hs766T vs. slowly growing, smaller and densely packed MiaPaCa2), and at different disease stage (early stage with smaller tumors vs. late stage with larger tumors plus peritoneal carcinomatosis). Comparison of treatments with TPM or paclitaxel in Cremophor micelles, at equi-toxic doses, shows, in all tumor types: (a) higher paclitaxel levels in tumors (up to 55-fold) for TPM, (b) greater efficacy for TPM, including significantly longer survival and higher cure rate, and (c) a single dose of TPM was equally efficacious as multiple doses of paclitaxel/Cremophor. The results indicate tumor targeting property and superior antitumor activity of paclitaxel-loaded TPM are generalizable to small and large peritoneal tumors, with or without accompanying carcinomatosis.

  19. [New aspects of tumor pathology of the adrenal glands].

    PubMed

    Saeger, W

    2015-05-01

    In daily routine pathology of the adrenal glands three tumor entities are important: adrenocortical tumors, adrenomedullary tumors and metastases. The differentiation of these three main tumor types can often be difficult structurally but immunostaining enables a definite diagnosis in nearly all cases. Adrenocortical tumors are positive for steroidogenic factor 1 and melan-A and always negative for chromogranin A whereas adrenomedullary tumors express chromogranin A but never keratin. A broad spectrum of antibodies is available for the identification of metastases and even the rare epithelioid angiosarcomas. For adrenocortical tumors, adenomas and carcinomas can be differentiated using three scoring systems and the Ki-67 index in adenomas should not exceed 3%. Using scoring systems and the Ki-67 index approximately 90% of cortical tumors can be differentiated into benign or malignant tumors. For pheochromocytomas two scoring systems are used for differentiating benign and malignant tumors but the results are less dependable.

  20. [Resolution of radiodiagnosis of pharyngeal tumors].

    PubMed

    Ismagulova, E K; Antoniv, V F

    2005-01-01

    The authors show informative value of radiomethods in diagnosis of pharyngeal tumors, analyse resolution of x-ray investigation, computed tomography and ultrasound, present roentgenological semiotics of patients with nasopharyngeal cancer (45 patients), analyse results of x-ray examination of 45 patients with primary laryngopharyngeal tumors. In diagnosis of metastases to the neck lymph nodes ultrasound investigation (159 patients) is used as a screening method and provides additional information about tumor relationships with the major vessels.

  1. Imaging of Neuroendocrine Tumors.

    PubMed

    Öberg, Kjell; Sundin, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) comprise a heterogeneous group of malignancies with a very variable clinical expression and progression. They present unique properties that are important to consider for radiological and nuclear imaging, such as APUD-characteristics (amine precursor uptake and dearboxylation), as well as the expression of somatostatin receptors. The most common localizations are the lungs, gastrointestinal tract and pancreas. The only curative treatment is surgery, but more than 50% present metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis. The systemic treatment includes chemotherapy and targeted agents, as well as peptide receptor radiotherapy. The diagnosis and follow-up of these tumors necessitate a large number of different imaging methods, such as CT, MRI, US, SRS and PET. Ultrasonography offers the possibility to take guided biopsies from different lesions. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy was developed in the 1990s and nowadays presents the standard of care for NETs in most countries. The procedure offers a total body examination and a better staging of the disease. However, it has been replaced in most centers by PET/CT with 68Ga-DOTA-somatostatin analogues with a superior spatial resolution and faster imaging (one-stop procedure). Another tracer used for PET/CT is 18FDG, particularly for high-grade tumors. Other more specific tracers are 18F-L-DOPA, 11C-L-DOPA and 11C-5-hydroxytryptophan, which have demonstrated excellent imaging results. The new targeted agents present a challenge in the evaluation procedure of treatment and, therefore, new imaging techniques and an improvement of currently available techniques are mandatory. PMID:27002535

  2. Tumor-Penetrating Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Teesalu, Tambet; Sugahara, Kazuki N.; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2013-01-01

    Tumor-homing peptides can be used to deliver drugs into tumors. Phage library screening in live mice has recently identified homing peptides that specifically recognize the endothelium of tumor vessels, extravasate, and penetrate deep into the extravascular tumor tissue. The prototypic peptide of this class, iRGD (CRGDKGPDC), contains the integrin-binding RGD motif. RGD mediates tumor-homing through binding to αv integrins, which are selectively expressed on various cells in tumors, including tumor endothelial cells. The tumor-penetrating properties of iRGD are mediated by a second sequence motif, R/KXXR/K. This C-end Rule (or CendR) motif is active only when the second basic residue is exposed at the C-terminus of the peptide. Proteolytic processing of iRGD in tumors activates the cryptic CendR motif, which then binds to neuropilin-1 activating an endocytic bulk transport pathway through tumor tissue. Phage screening has also yielded tumor-penetrating peptides that function like iRGD in activating the CendR pathway, but bind to a different primary receptor. Moreover, novel tumor-homing peptides can be constructed from tumor-homing motifs, CendR elements and protease cleavage sites. Pathologies other than tumors can be targeted with tissue-penetrating peptides, and the primary receptor can also be a vascular “zip code” of a normal tissue. The CendR technology provides a solution to a major problem in tumor therapy, poor penetration of drugs into tumors. The tumor-penetrating peptides are capable of taking a payload deep into tumor tissue in mice, and they also penetrate into human tumors ex vivo. Targeting with these peptides specifically increases the accumulation in tumors of a variety of drugs and contrast agents, such as doxorubicin, antibodies, and nanoparticle-based compounds. Remarkably the drug to be targeted does not have to be coupled to the peptide; the bulk transport system activated by the peptide sweeps along any compound that is present in the

  3. Targeting the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Bournazou, Eirini; Bromberg, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    Persistent JAK-STAT3 signaling is implicated in many aspects of tumorigenesis. Apart from its tumor-intrinsic effects, STAT3 also exerts tumor-extrinsic effects, supporting tumor survival and metastasis. These involve the regulation of paracrine cytokine signaling, alterations in metastatic sites rendering these permissive for the growth of cancer cells and subversion of host immune responses to create an immunosuppressive environment. Targeting this signaling pathway is considered a novel promising therapeutic approach, especially in the context of tumor immunity. In this article, we will review to what extent JAK-STAT3-targeted therapies affect the tumor microenvironment and whether the observed effects underlie responsiveness to therapy. PMID:24058812

  4. Benign ear cyst or tumor

    MedlinePlus

    Osteomas; Exostoses; Tumor - ear; Cysts - ear; Ear cysts; Ear tumors; Bony tumor of the ear canal ... bony tumors of the ear canal (exostoses and osteomas) are caused by excess growth of bone. Repeated ...

  5. Surgical Treatment of Gastric Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Seong-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor is the most common mesenchymal tumor in the gastrointestinal tract and is most frequently developed in the stomach in the form of submucosal tumor. The incidence of gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor is estimated to be as high as 25% of the population when all small and asymptomatic tumors are included. Because gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor is not completely distinguished from other submucosal tumors, a surgical excisional biopsy is recommended for tumors >2 cm. The surgical principles of gastrointestinal stromal tumor are composed of an R0 resection with a normal mucosa margin, no systemic lymph node dissection, and avoidance of perforation, which results in peritoneal seeding even in cases with otherwise low risk profiles. Laparoscopic surgery has been indicated for gastrointestinal stromal tumors <5 cm, and the indication for laparoscopic surgery is expanded to larger tumors if the above mentioned surgical principles can be maintained. A simple exogastric resection and various transgastric resection techniques are used for gastrointestinal stromal tumors in favorable locations (the fundus, body, greater curvature side). For a lesion at the gastroesophageal junction in the posterior wall of the stomach, enucleation techniques have been tried preserve the organ's function. Those methods have a theoretical risk of seeding a ruptured tumor, but this risk has not been evaluated by well-designed clinical trials. While some clinical trials are still on-going, neoadjuvant imatinib is suggested when marginally unresectable or multiorgan resection is anticipated to reduce the extent of surgery and the chance of incomplete resection, rupture or bleeding. PMID:23610714

  6. Tumors of the major and minor salivary glands.

    PubMed

    McKenna, R J

    1984-01-01

    Surgery for salivary gland tumors requires technical skill, competence in head and neck anatomy, and a familiarity with a variety of tumors. Benign salivary tumors at all sites should be 100 percent curable, with a local recurrence rate of less than five percent; these local failures should be curable with further surgery. The majority of parotid tumors are benign. Sixty-two percent of patients with malignant parotid tumors will be alive at five years, 54 percent at 10 years, and 47 percent at 15 years. These survival rates for malignant parotid tumors are better than those for malignant tumors in the submaxillary and minor salivary glands and may be explained in part by the presence of a higher percentage of low-grade malignant tumors in the parotid gland. Since most submaxillary gland tumors are malignant, they are more dangerous than parotid tumors. A total of 80 percent of patients with submaxillary gland tumors die as a result of cancer. Almost all minor salivary gland tumors are malignant; curability relates to size, local extension, histology, and nodal metastases. Forty-five percent are alive at five years, and 21 percent at 15 years. Wide-field radical surgical excision is needed for malignant salivary tumors to minimize local recurrences and treatment failures. Future improvement in treatment results will be made possible by increased awareness of this group of tumors, earlier diagnosis when tumors are still small, more radical extirpation, and greater use of postoperative radiation therapy.

  7. Necessity of Microdissecting Different Tumor Components in Pulmonary Tumor Pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhong; Shen, Shanxiang; Smith, Prudence; Khalil, Farah K.

    2016-01-01

    Microdissection is a useful method in tissue sampling prior to molecular testing. Tumor heterogeneity imposes new challenges for tissue sampling. Different microdissecting methods have been employed in face of such challenge. We improved our microdissection method by separately microdissecting the morphologically different tumor components. This improvement helped the pyrosequencing data analysis of two specimens. One specimen consisted of both adenocarcinoma and neuroendocrine components. When both tumor components were sequenced together for KRAS (Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog) gene mutations, the resulting pyrogram indicated that it was not a wild type, suggesting that it contained KRAS mutation. However, the pyrogram did not match any KRAS mutations and a conclusion could not be reached. After microdissecting and testing the adenocarcinoma and neuroendocrine components separately, it was found that the adenocarcinoma was positive for KRAS G12C mutation and the neuroendocrine component was positive for KRAS G12D mutation. The second specimen consisted of two morphologically different tumor nodules. When microdissected and sequenced separately, one nodule was positive for BRAF (v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1) V600E and the other nodule was wild type at the BRAF codon 600. These examples demonstrate that it is necessary to microdissect morphologically different tumor components for pyrosequencing.

  8. Necessity of Microdissecting Different Tumor Components in Pulmonary Tumor Pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhong; Shen, Shanxiang; Smith, Prudence; Khalil, Farah K.

    2016-01-01

    Microdissection is a useful method in tissue sampling prior to molecular testing. Tumor heterogeneity imposes new challenges for tissue sampling. Different microdissecting methods have been employed in face of such challenge. We improved our microdissection method by separately microdissecting the morphologically different tumor components. This improvement helped the pyrosequencing data analysis of two specimens. One specimen consisted of both adenocarcinoma and neuroendocrine components. When both tumor components were sequenced together for KRAS (Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog) gene mutations, the resulting pyrogram indicated that it was not a wild type, suggesting that it contained KRAS mutation. However, the pyrogram did not match any KRAS mutations and a conclusion could not be reached. After microdissecting and testing the adenocarcinoma and neuroendocrine components separately, it was found that the adenocarcinoma was positive for KRAS G12C mutation and the neuroendocrine component was positive for KRAS G12D mutation. The second specimen consisted of two morphologically different tumor nodules. When microdissected and sequenced separately, one nodule was positive for BRAF (v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1) V600E and the other nodule was wild type at the BRAF codon 600. These examples demonstrate that it is necessary to microdissect morphologically different tumor components for pyrosequencing. PMID:27597976

  9. Necessity of Microdissecting Different Tumor Components in Pulmonary Tumor Pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Qin, Dahui; Zheng, Zhong; Shen, Shanxiang; Smith, Prudence; Khalil, Farah K

    2016-01-01

    Microdissection is a useful method in tissue sampling prior to molecular testing. Tumor heterogeneity imposes new challenges for tissue sampling. Different microdissecting methods have been employed in face of such challenge. We improved our microdissection method by separately microdissecting the morphologically different tumor components. This improvement helped the pyrosequencing data analysis of two specimens. One specimen consisted of both adenocarcinoma and neuroendocrine components. When both tumor components were sequenced together for KRAS (Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog) gene mutations, the resulting pyrogram indicated that it was not a wild type, suggesting that it contained KRAS mutation. However, the pyrogram did not match any KRAS mutations and a conclusion could not be reached. After microdissecting and testing the adenocarcinoma and neuroendocrine components separately, it was found that the adenocarcinoma was positive for KRAS G12C mutation and the neuroendocrine component was positive for KRAS G12D mutation. The second specimen consisted of two morphologically different tumor nodules. When microdissected and sequenced separately, one nodule was positive for BRAF (v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1) V600E and the other nodule was wild type at the BRAF codon 600. These examples demonstrate that it is necessary to microdissect morphologically different tumor components for pyrosequencing. PMID:27597976

  10. [Pediatric retroperitoneal tumors].

    PubMed

    Benicio dos Santos, I; Benicio dos Santos, M

    1980-01-01

    The author has based his work "Retroperitoneals tumors in infancy and childhood" in 65 cases observed at "Hospital Martagao Gesteira", Salvador, Bahia, Brasil. 32 of the retroperitoneals tumors, either intrarenals or extrarenals, observed in infancy and childhood were Wilm's tumor, 22 neuroblastoma, 5 hydronephrosis, 2 multicystic kidney, 1 policystic kidney, 2 pancreatic cyst and 1 biliar cyst. Wilm's tumor had the highest incidence - 32 cases (49,2%); neuroblastoma was in the second place in incidence - 22 (33,8%) of the 65 cases of retroperitoneals tumors studied, were neuroblastoma. As registered by the author in previous paper, the neuroblastoma, on contrary of what is established in the specialized literature, not was: the most frequent abdominal tumors, in infancy and childhood, neither it was also the abdominal pediatric tumor which could match Wilm's tumor in incidence. The plain X ray film of the abdomen, the Excretory Urography, the Cavography and Arteriography, the Radiological Examination of the Stomach and Duodenum, of the Small Intestine and the Colons, contribute in a very important way to establish the topography (retro or intraperitoneal) of the pediatric abdominal tumors. The author emphasizes that the plain X ray film of the abdomen supply important elements for the conclusion concerning the localization of abdominal tumors, from the observation of a simple criterion - the retroperitoneals tumors obliterate the border of kidney, because they are placed in the same plan of the kidney, data which is not pointed out sufficiently by the authors who have studied the subject.

  11. Cartilage-forming tumors.

    PubMed

    Qasem, Shadi A; DeYoung, Barry R

    2014-01-01

    Cartilage-forming tumors as a group are the most common primary bone tumors; this is largely due to the common occurrence of asymptomatic benign lesions such as osteochondroma and enchondroma. The common feature of these tumors is the presence of chondrocytic cells and the formation of cartilaginous tumor matrix. Some of these tumors are true neoplasms while others are hamartomas or developmental abnormalities. The morphologic heterogeneity of these tumors may be explained by a common multipotent mesenchymal cell differentiating along the lines of fetal-adult cartilage maturation. Recently mutations in IDH1 and IDH2 have been detected in a variety of benign and malignant cartilaginous tumors.(1-4.) PMID:24680178

  12. Genital soft tissue tumors.

    PubMed

    Schoolmeester, John K; Fritchie, Karen J

    2015-07-01

    Mesenchymal neoplasms of the vulvovaginal and inguinoscrotal regions are among the most diagnostically challenging specimens in the pathology laboratory owing largely to their unique intersection between general soft tissue tumors and relatively genital-specific mesenchymal tumors. Genital stromal tumors are a unique subset of soft tissue tumors encountered at this location, and this group includes fibroepithelial stromal polyp, superficial (cervicovaginal) myofibroblastoma, cellular angiofibroma, mammary-type myofibroblastoma, angiomyofibroblastoma and aggressive angiomyxoma. Aside from the striking morphologic and immunophenotypic similarity that is seen with these entities, there is evidence that a subset of genital stromal tumors may be linked genetically. This review will focus on simplifying this group of tumors and provide the pathologist or dermatopathologist with practical management information. Smooth muscle tumors of the external genitalia will also be discussed.

  13. Tumor lysis syndrome: A clinical review.

    PubMed

    Mirrakhimov, Aibek E; Voore, Prakruthi; Khan, Maliha; Ali, Alaa M

    2015-05-01

    Tumor lysis syndrome is an oncometabolic emergency resulting from rapid cell death. Tumor lysis syndrome can occur as a consequence of tumor targeted therapy or spontaneously. Clinicians should stratify every hospitalized cancer patient and especially those receiving chemotherapy for the risk of tumor lysis syndrome. Several aspects of prevention include adequate hydration, use of uric acid lowering therapies, use of phosphate binders and minimization of potassium intake. Patients at high risk for the development of tumor lysis syndrome should be monitored in the intensive care unit. Established tumor lysis syndrome should be treated in the intensive care unit by aggressive hydration, possible use of loop diuretics, possible use of phosphate binders, use of uric acid lowering agents and dialysis in refractory cases. PMID:25938028

  14. Tumor-Associated Endothelial Cells Promote Tumor Metastasis by Chaperoning Circulating Tumor Cells and Protecting Them from Anoikis.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Arti; Kumar, Bhavna; Yu, Jun-Ge; Old, Matthew; Teknos, Theodoros N; Kumar, Pawan

    2015-01-01

    Tumor metastasis is a highly inefficient biological process as millions of tumor cells are released in circulation each day and only a few of them are able to successfully form distal metastatic nodules. This could be due to the fact that most of the epithelial origin cancer cells are anchorage-dependent and undergo rapid anoikis in harsh circulating conditions. A number of studies have shown that in addition to tumor cells, activated endothelial cells are also released into the blood circulation from the primary tumors. However, the precise role of these activated circulating endothelial cells (CECs) in tumor metastasis process is not known. Therefore, we performed a series of experiments to examine if CECs promoted tumor metastasis by chaperoning the tumor cells to distal sites. Our results demonstrate that blood samples from head and neck cancer patients contain significantly higher Bcl-2-positive CECs as compared to healthy volunteers. Technically, it is challenging to know the origin of CECs in patient blood samples, therefore we used an orthotopic SCID mouse model and co-implanted GFP-labeled endothelial cells along with tumor cells. Our results suggest that activated CECs (Bcl-2-positive) were released from primary tumors and they co-migrated with tumor cells to distal sites. Bcl-2 overexpression in endothelial cells (EC-Bcl-2) significantly enhanced adhesion molecule expression and tumor cell binding that was predominantly mediated by E-selectin. In addition, tumor cells bound to EC-Bcl-2 showed a significantly higher anoikis resistance via the activation of Src-FAK pathway. In our in vivo experiments, we observed significantly higher lung metastasis when tumor cells were co-injected with EC-Bcl-2 as compared to EC-VC. E-selectin knockdown in EC-Bcl-2 cells or FAK/FUT3 knockdown in tumor cells significantly reversed EC-Bcl-2-mediated tumor metastasis. Taken together, our results suggest a novel role for CECs in protecting the tumor cells in circulation and

  15. Tumor-Associated Endothelial Cells Promote Tumor Metastasis by Chaperoning Circulating Tumor Cells and Protecting Them from Anoikis.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Arti; Kumar, Bhavna; Yu, Jun-Ge; Old, Matthew; Teknos, Theodoros N; Kumar, Pawan

    2015-01-01

    Tumor metastasis is a highly inefficient biological process as millions of tumor cells are released in circulation each day and only a few of them are able to successfully form distal metastatic nodules. This could be due to the fact that most of the epithelial origin cancer cells are anchorage-dependent and undergo rapid anoikis in harsh circulating conditions. A number of studies have shown that in addition to tumor cells, activated endothelial cells are also released into the blood circulation from the primary tumors. However, the precise role of these activated circulating endothelial cells (CECs) in tumor metastasis process is not known. Therefore, we performed a series of experiments to examine if CECs promoted tumor metastasis by chaperoning the tumor cells to distal sites. Our results demonstrate that blood samples from head and neck cancer patients contain significantly higher Bcl-2-positive CECs as compared to healthy volunteers. Technically, it is challenging to know the origin of CECs in patient blood samples, therefore we used an orthotopic SCID mouse model and co-implanted GFP-labeled endothelial cells along with tumor cells. Our results suggest that activated CECs (Bcl-2-positive) were released from primary tumors and they co-migrated with tumor cells to distal sites. Bcl-2 overexpression in endothelial cells (EC-Bcl-2) significantly enhanced adhesion molecule expression and tumor cell binding that was predominantly mediated by E-selectin. In addition, tumor cells bound to EC-Bcl-2 showed a significantly higher anoikis resistance via the activation of Src-FAK pathway. In our in vivo experiments, we observed significantly higher lung metastasis when tumor cells were co-injected with EC-Bcl-2 as compared to EC-VC. E-selectin knockdown in EC-Bcl-2 cells or FAK/FUT3 knockdown in tumor cells significantly reversed EC-Bcl-2-mediated tumor metastasis. Taken together, our results suggest a novel role for CECs in protecting the tumor cells in circulation and

  16. Optical properties of tumor tissues grown on the chorioallantoic membrane of chicken eggs: tumor model to assay of tumor response to photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Norihiro; Kariyama, Yoichiro; Hazama, Hisanao; Ishii, Takuya; Kitajima, Yuya; Inoue, Katsushi; Ishizuka, Masahiro; Tanaka, Tohru; Awazu, Kunio

    2015-12-01

    Herein, the optical adequacy of a tumor model prepared with tumor cells grown on the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of a chicken egg is evaluated as an alternative to the mouse tumor model to assess the optimal irradiation conditions in photodynamic therapy (PDT). The optical properties of CAM and mouse tumor tissues were measured with a double integrating sphere and the inverse Monte Carlo technique in the 350- to 1000-nm wavelength range. The hemoglobin and water absorption bands observed in the CAM tumor tissue (10 eggs and 10 tumors) are equal to that of the mouse tumor tissue (8 animals and 8 tumors). The optical intersubject variability of the CAM tumor tissues meets or exceeds that of the mouse tumor tissues, and the reduced scattering coefficient spectra of CAM tumor tissues can be equated with those of mouse tumor tissues. These results confirm that the CAM tumor model is a viable alternative to the mouse tumor model, especially for deriving optimal irradiation conditions in PDT.

  17. Multiscale tumor spatiokinetic model for intraperitoneal therapy.

    PubMed

    Au, Jessie L-S; Guo, Peng; Gao, Yue; Lu, Ze; Wientjes, Michael G; Tsai, Max; Wientjes, M Guillaume

    2014-05-01

    This study established a multiscale computational model for intraperitoneal (IP) chemotherapy, to depict the time-dependent and spatial-dependent drug concentrations in peritoneal tumors as functions of drug properties (size, binding, diffusivity, permeability), transport mechanisms (diffusion, convection), spatial-dependent tumor heterogeneities (vessel density, cell density, pressure gradient), and physiological properties (peritoneal pressure, peritoneal fluid volume). Equations linked drug transport and clearance on three scales (tumor, IP cavity, whole organism). Paclitaxel was the test compound. The required model parameters (tumor diffusivity, tumor hydraulic conductivity, vessel permeability and surface area, microvascular hydrostatic pressure, drug association with cells) were obtained from literature reports, calculation, and/or experimental measurements. Drug concentration-time profiles in peritoneal fluid and plasma were the boundary conditions for tumor domain and blood vessels, respectively. The finite element method was used to numerically solve the nonlinear partial differential equations for fluid and solute transport. The resulting multiscale model accounted for intratumoral spatial heterogeneity, depicted diffusive and convective drug transport in tumor interstitium and across blood vessels, and provided drug flux and concentration as a function of time and spatial position in the tumor. Comparison of model-predicted tumor spatiokinetics with experimental results (autoradiographic data of 3H-paclitaxel in IP ovarian tumors in mice, 6 h posttreatment) showed good agreement (1% deviation for area under curve and 23% deviations for individual data points, which were several-fold lower compared to the experimental intertumor variations). The computational multiscale model provides a tool to quantify the effects of drug-, tumor-, and host-dependent variables on the concentrations and residence time of IP therapeutics in tumors.

  18. Tumor-Derived CXCL1 Promotes Lung Cancer Growth via Recruitment of Tumor-Associated Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ha; Xu, Junfang; Zheng, Yuanyuan; Cao, Xuetao

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils have a traditional role in inflammatory process and act as the first line of defense against infections. Although their contribution to tumorigenesis and progression is still controversial, accumulating evidence recently has demonstrated that tumor-associated neutrophils (TANs) play a key role in multiple aspects of cancer biology. Here, we detected that chemokine CXCL1 was dramatically elevated in serum from 3LL tumor-bearing mice. In vitro, 3LL cells constitutively expressed and secreted higher level of CXCL1. Furthermore, knocking down CXCL1 expression in 3LL cells significantly hindered tumor growth by inhibiting recruitment of neutrophils from peripheral blood into tumor tissues. Additionally, tumor-infiltrated neutrophils expressed higher levels of MPO and Fas/FasL, which may be involved in TAN-mediated inhibition of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. These results demonstrate that tumor-derived CXCL1 contributes to TANs infiltration in lung cancer which promotes tumor growth. PMID:27446967

  19. [The systematization of APUD tumors].

    PubMed

    Liubenov, T; Terziev, I

    1995-01-01

    The mechanisms involved in neuroendocrine transmission of peptides, underlying the so-called classification of multiple endocrine neoplasms (MEN), are described. Three cases from the clinical practice are followed up where facilitation of the diagnosis and the results of treatment are related to the tumor markers' values.

  20. Dynamic contrast-enhanced CT of head and neck tumors: perfusion measurements using a distributed-parameter tracer kinetic model. Initial results and comparison with deconvolution-based analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisdas, Sotirios; Konstantinou, George N.; Sherng Lee, Puor; Thng, Choon Hua; Wagenblast, Jens; Baghi, Mehran; San Koh, Tong

    2007-10-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the feasibility of a two-compartment distributed-parameter (DP) tracer kinetic model to generate functional images of several physiologic parameters from dynamic contrast-enhanced CT data obtained of patients with extracranial head and neck tumors and to compare the DP functional images to those obtained by deconvolution-based DCE-CT data analysis. We performed post-processing of DCE-CT studies, obtained from 15 patients with benign and malignant head and neck cancer. We introduced a DP model of the impulse residue function for a capillary-tissue exchange unit, which accounts for the processes of convective transport and capillary-tissue exchange. The calculated parametric maps represented blood flow (F), intravascular blood volume (v1), extravascular extracellular blood volume (v2), vascular transit time (t1), permeability-surface area product (PS), transfer ratios k12 and k21, and the fraction of extracted tracer (E). Based on the same regions of interest (ROI) analysis, we calculated the tumor blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV) and mean transit time (MTT) by using a modified deconvolution-based analysis taking into account the extravasation of the contrast agent for PS imaging. We compared the corresponding values by using Bland-Altman plot analysis. We outlined 73 ROIs including tumor sites, lymph nodes and normal tissue. The Bland-Altman plot analysis revealed that the two methods showed an accepted degree of agreement for blood flow, and, thus, can be used interchangeably for measuring this parameter. Slightly worse agreement was observed between v1 in the DP model and BV but even here the two tracer kinetic analyses can be used interchangeably. Under consideration of whether both techniques may be used interchangeably was the case of t1 and MTT, as well as for measurements of the PS values. The application of the proposed DP model is feasible in the clinical routine and it can be used interchangeably for measuring

  1. Are biomechanical changes necessary for tumor progression?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kas, Josef A.; Fritsch, Anatol; Kiessling, Tobias; Nnetu, David K.; Pawlizak, Steve; Wetzel, Franziska; Zink, Mareike

    2011-03-01

    With an increasing knowledge in tumor biology an overwhelming complexity becomes obvious which roots in the diversity of tumors and their heterogeneous molecular composition. Nevertheless in all solid tumors malignant neoplasia, i.e. uncontrolled growth, invasion of adjacent tissues, and metastasis, occurs. Physics sheds some new light on cancer by approaching this problem from a functional, materials perspective. Recent results indicate that all three pathomechanisms require changes in the active and passive cellular biomechanics. Malignant transformation causes cell softening for small deformations which correlates with an increased rate of proliferation and faster cell migration. The tumor cell's ability to strain harden permits tumor growth against a rigid tissue environment. A highly mechanosensitive, enhanced cell contractility is a prerequisite that tumor cells can cross its tumor boundaries and that this cells can migrate through the extracellular matrix. Insights into the biomechanical changes during tumor progression may lead to selective treatments by altering cell mechanics. Such drugs would not cure by killing cancer cells, but slow down tumor progression with only mild side effects and thus may be an option for older and frail patients.

  2. Maximizing Tumor Immunity With Fractionated Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Schaue, Doerthe; Ratikan, Josephine A.; Iwamoto, Keisuke S.; McBride, William H.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Technologic advances have led to increased clinical use of higher-sized fractions of radiation dose and higher total doses. How these modify the pathways involved in tumor cell death, normal tissue response, and signaling to the immune system has been inadequately explored. Here we ask how radiation dose and fraction size affect antitumor immunity, the suppression thereof, and how this might relate to tumor control. Methods and Materials: Mice bearing B16-OVA murine melanoma were treated with up to 15 Gy radiation given in various-size fractions, and tumor growth followed. The tumor-specific immune response in the spleen was assessed by interferon-{gamma} enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay with ovalbumin (OVA) as the surrogate tumor antigen and the contribution of regulatory T cells (Tregs) determined by the proportion of CD4{sup +}CD25{sup hi}Foxp3{sup +} T cells. Results: After single doses, tumor control increased with the size of radiation dose, as did the number of tumor-reactive T cells. This was offset at the highest dose by an increase in Treg representation. Fractionated treatment with medium-size radiation doses of 7.5 Gy/fraction gave the best tumor control and tumor immunity while maintaining low Treg numbers. Conclusions: Radiation can be an immune adjuvant, but the response varies with the size of dose per fraction. The ultimate challenge is to optimally integrate cancer immunotherapy into radiation therapy.

  3. PDT for malignant tumors: a clinical analysis of 152 cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Shi-Zhang; Wang, Yun-Zhen; Li, Xin; Zhang, Changjun; Wang, Jian-Zhao; Zhang, Da-Ren

    1993-03-01

    Hematoporphyrin derivative (HPD) laser photodynamic therapy (PDT) was applied for the patients of 152 cases of malignant tumors, including tumors of the lip, tongue, esophagus, urinary bladder, skin, larynx, vagina, etc. Since early 1981 good results have been obtained.

  4. [BENIGN TUMORS OF MEDIASTINUM: CLINIC, DIAGNOSIS, SURGICAL TREATMENT].

    PubMed

    Kalabukha, I A; Mayetniy, E M

    2015-12-01

    Results of surgical treatment of 18 patients in a thoracic surgery clinic for benign tumors of mediastinum are presented. The symptoms of benign tumors, efficacy of application of welding technologies in operative intervention were analyzed. PMID:27025028

  5. Reduced Glucocorticoid Receptor Expression Predicts Bladder Tumor Recurrence and Progression

    PubMed Central

    Ishiguro, Hitoshi; Kawahara, Takashi; Zheng, Yichun; Netto, George J.; Miyamoto, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess the levels of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression in bladder tumors because the status and its prognostic value remain largely unknown. Methods We immunohistochemically stained for GR in bladder tumor and matched non-neoplastic bladder tissue specimens. Results Overall, GR was positive in 129 (87%) of 149 urothelial tumors, which was significantly (P = .026) lower than in non-neoplastic urothelium (90 [96%] of 94). Forty-two (79%) of 53 low-grade tumors vs 45 (47%) of 96 high-grade carcinomas (P < .001) and 61 (73%) of 84 non–muscle-invasive (NMI) tumors vs 26 (40%) of 65 muscle-invasive (MI) carcinomas (P < .001) were moderately to strongly immunoreactive for GR. Kaplan-Meier and log-rank tests revealed that loss or weak positivity of GR significantly or marginally correlated with recurrence of NMI tumors (P = .025), progression of MI tumors (P = .082), and cancer-specific survival of MI tumors (P = .067). Multivariate analysis identified low GR expression as a strong predictor for recurrence of NMI tumors (P = .034). Conclusions GR expression was downregulated in bladder tumors compared with nonneoplastic bladder tumors and in high-grade/MI tumors compared with low-grade/NMI tumors. Decreased expression of GR, as an independent prognosticator, predicted recurrence of NMI tumors. These results support experimental evidence suggesting an inhibitory role of GR signals in bladder cancer outgrowth. PMID:25015855

  6. Circulating Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Paoletti, Costanza; Hayes, Daniel F

    2016-01-01

    Circulating Tumor Cells (CTC) are shed from primary or secondary tumors. Prior studies have demonstrated that enumeration of CTC is a robust independent prognostic factor of progression free and overall survival in patients with early and metastatic breast cancer. CTC, as well as other circulating tumor markers, have the appealing advantages over tissue biopsy of (1) ease of collection, (2) serial evaluation, and (3) interrogation of the entire tumor burden instead of just a limited part of the tumor. Advances have been recently made in phenotyping and genotyping of CTC, which should provide insights into the predictive role of CTC for sensitivity or resistance to therapies. In addition, CTC phenotypic marker changes during the course of treatment may serve as pharmacodynamic monitoring tools. Therefore, CTC may be considered "liquid biopsies," providing prognostic and predictive clinical information as well as additional understanding of tumor heterogeneity.

  7. [Sarcomas, example of a pathologist network organization].

    PubMed

    Neuville, Agnes; Coindre, Jean-Michel

    2013-12-01

    Sarcomas are rare and heterogeneous with many subtypes explaining the high level of diagnostic difficulty with frequent important therapeutic consequences. In 2009, a national network of pathologists has been set up with the main objective to perform a systematic histological review of every new sarcoma, gastro-intestinal stromal tumor (GIST) and desmoid tumor. We describe the network organization and report the results of the first two years of activity. These results clearly show the interest of this organization for the patients as well as for all pathologists. Moreover, data and material collect allows a better knowledge of these tumors and an improvement of the rules for their diagnostic management.

  8. Selected anti-tumor vaccines merit a place in multimodal tumor therapies

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Eva-Maria; Wunderlich, Roland; Ebel, Nina; Rubner, Yvonne; Schlücker, Eberhard; Meyer-Pittroff, Roland; Ott, Oliver J.; Fietkau, Rainer; Gaipl, Udo S.; Frey, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    Multimodal approaches are nowadays successfully applied in cancer therapy. Primary locally acting therapies such as radiotherapy (RT) and surgery are combined with systemic administration of chemotherapeutics. Nevertheless, the therapy of cancer is still a big challenge in medicine. The treatments often fail to induce long-lasting anti-tumor responses. Tumor recurrences and metastases result. Immunotherapies are therefore ideal adjuncts to standard tumor therapies since they aim to activate the patient's immune system against malignant cells even outside the primary treatment areas (abscopal effects). Especially cancer vaccines may have the potential both to train the immune system against cancer cells and to generate an immunological memory, resulting in long-lasting anti-tumor effects. However, despite promising results in phase I and II studies, most of the concepts finally failed. There are some critical aspects in development and application of cancer vaccines that may decide on their efficiency. The time point and frequency of medication, usage of an adequate immune adjuvant, the vaccine's immunogenic potential, and the tumor burden of the patient are crucial. Whole tumor cell vaccines have advantages compared to peptide-based ones since a variety of tumor antigens (TAs) are present. The master requirements of cell-based, therapeutic tumor vaccines are the complete inactivation of the tumor cells and the increase of their immunogenicity. Since the latter is highly connected with the cell death modality, the inactivation procedure of the tumor cell material may significantly influence the vaccine's efficiency. We therefore also introduce high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) as an innovative inactivation technology for tumor cell-based vaccines and outline that HHP efficiently inactivates tumor cells by enhancing their immunogenicity. Finally studies are presented proving that anti-tumor immune responses can be triggered by combining RT with selected immune

  9. Tumor Vascular Permeability to a Nanoprobe Correlates to Tumor-Specific Expression Levels of Angiogenic Markers

    PubMed Central

    Karathanasis, Efstathios; Chan, Leslie; Karumbaiah, Lohitash; McNeeley, Kathleen; D'Orsi, Carl J.; Annapragada, Ananth V.; Sechopoulos, Ioannis; Bellamkonda, Ravi V.

    2009-01-01

    Background Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor-2 is the major mediator of the mitogenic, angiogenic, and vascular hyperpermeability effects of VEGF on breast tumors. Overexpression of VEGF and VEGF receptor-2 is associated with the degree of pathomorphosis of the tumor tissue and unfavorable prognosis. In this study, we demonstrate that non-invasive quantification of the degree of tumor vascular permeability to a nanoprobe correlates with the VEGF and its receptor levels and tumor growth. Methodology/Principal Findings We designed an imaging nanoprobe and a methodology to detect the intratumoral deposition of a 100 nm-scale nanoprobe using mammography allowing measurement of the tumor vascular permeability in a rat MAT B III breast tumor model. The tumor vascular permeability varied widely among the animals. Notably, the VEGF and VEGF receptor-2 gene expression of the tumors as measured by qRT-PCR displayed a strong correlation to the imaging-based measurements of vascular permeability to the 100 nm-scale nanoprobe. This is in good agreement with the fact that tumors with high angiogenic activity are expected to have more permeable blood vessels resulting in high intratumoral deposition of a nanoscale agent. In addition, we show that higher intratumoral deposition of the nanoprobe as imaged with mammography correlated to a faster tumor growth rate. This data suggest that vascular permeability scales to the tumor growth and that tumor vascular permeability can be a measure of underlying VEGF and VEGF receptor-2 expression in individual tumors. Conclusions/Significance This is the first demonstration, to our knowledge, that quantitative imaging of tumor vascular permeability to a nanoprobe represents a form of a surrogate, functional biomarker of underlying molecular markers of angiogenesis. PMID:19513111

  10. [Retroperitoneal germ cell tumor].

    PubMed

    Borrell Palanca, A; García Garzón, J; Villamón Fort, R; Domenech Pérez, C; Martínez Lorente, A; Gunthner, S; García Sisamón, F

    1999-03-01

    We report a case of retroperitoneal extragonadal germ-cell tumor in an 17 years old patient who presented with aedema and pain in left inferior extremity asociated with hemopthysis caused by pulmonar metastasis, who was treated with chemotherapy and resection of residual mass and pulmonary nodes. Dyagnosis was stableshed by fine neadle aspiration biopsy of the wass. We comment on the difficult of stableshing differential dyagnosis between retroperitoneal extragonadal germ-cell tumor and metastasis of a testicular tumor. Dyagnosis is stableshed by the finding of a histologically malignant germ-cell tumor with normal testis. We considered physical examination and ecographyc exploration enough for a correct dyagnosis.

  11. Radioresistance of Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Kevin; Knisely, Jonathan; Symons, Marc; Ruggieri, Rosamaria

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is frequently used as part of the standard of care treatment of the majority of brain tumors. The efficacy of RT is limited by radioresistance and by normal tissue radiation tolerance. This is highlighted in pediatric brain tumors where the use of radiation is limited by the excessive toxicity to the developing brain. For these reasons, radiosensitization of tumor cells would be beneficial. In this review, we focus on radioresistance mechanisms intrinsic to tumor cells. We also evaluate existing approaches to induce radiosensitization and explore future avenues of investigation. PMID:27043632

  12. Tumor Ablation and Nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Manthe, Rachel L.; Foy, Susan P.; Krishnamurthy, Nishanth; Sharma, Blanka; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2010-01-01

    Next to surgical resection, tumor ablation is a commonly used intervention in the treatment of solid tumors. Tumor ablation methods include thermal therapies, photodynamic therapy, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) producing agents. Thermal therapies induce tumor cell death via thermal energy and include radiofrequency, microwave, high intensity focused ultrasound, and cryoablation. Photodynamic therapy and ROS producing agents cause increased oxidative stress in tumor cells leading to apoptosis. While these therapies are safe and viable alternatives when resection of malignancies is not feasible, they do have associated limitations that prevent their widespread use in clinical applications. To improve the efficacy of these treatments, nanoparticles are being studied in combination with nonsurgical ablation regimens. In addition to better thermal effect on tumor ablation, nanoparticles can deliver anticancer therapeutics that show synergistic anti-tumor effect in the presence of heat and can also be imaged to achieve precision in therapy. Understanding the molecular mechanism of nanoparticle-mediated tumor ablation could further help engineer nanoparticles of appropriate composition and properties to synergize the ablation effect. This review aims to explore the various types of nonsurgical tumor ablation methods currently used in cancer treatment and potential improvements by nanotechnology applications. PMID:20866097

  13. Local hyperthermia treatment of tumors induces CD8+ T cell-mediated resistance against distal and secondary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peisheng; Chen, Lei; Baird, Jason R.; Demidenko, Eugene; Turk, Mary Jo; Hoopes, P. Jack; Conejo-Garcia, Jose R.; Fiering, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Combinatorial use of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) and an alternating magnetic filed (AMF) can induce local hyperthermia in tumors in a controlled and uniform manner. Heating B16 primary tumors at 43°C for 30 minutes activated dendritic cells (DCs) and subsequently CD8+ T cells in the draining lymph node (dLN) and conferred resistance against rechallenge with B16 (but not unrelated Lewis Lung carcinoma) given 7 days post hyperthermia on both the primary tumor side and the contralateral side in a CD8+ T cell-dependent manner. Mice with heated primary tumors also resisted rechallenge given 30 days post hyperthermia. Mice with larger heated primary tumors had greater resistance to secondary tumors. No rechallenge resistance occurred when tumors were heated at 45°C. Our results demonstrate the promising potential of local hyperthermia treatment applied to identified tumors in inducing anti-tumor immune responses that reduce the risk of recurrence and metastasis. PMID:24566274

  14. [CA 125--a tumor marker?].

    PubMed

    Pabst, T; Ludwig, C

    1995-06-17

    Tumor markers are useful tools in monitoring malignancies postoperatively or under hormone-/chemotherapy. In contrast, they usually lack diagnostic relevance and uncritical use may result in confusing situations. We describe three cases of diagnostic determinations of the tumor marker CA 125 resulting in subsequent partially invasive procedures. Based on these three cases, serum CA 125 levels were examined in 49 patients with abdominal diseases. We found CA 125 to be less a tumor product than an unspecific expression of stimulated mesothelial cells of the peritoneum. CA 125 was a marker for ascites (16 of 16 patients) and an indicator of infra-diaphragmatic involvement in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (11 of 12 patients). Furthermore, 5 of 6 patients with inflammatory abdominal diseases showed elevated CA 125 levels, as did 13 of 15 patients with solid abdominal tumors of different histology (all non-ovarian cancer, no ascites). In conclusion, CA 125 remains a good marker for follow-up of ovarian cancer, but should not be used for diagnosis of abdominal processes.

  15. Metastasizing mixed tumor of the parotid gland: a rare tumor with unusually rapid progression in a cardiac transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Sampson, B A; Jarcho, J A; Winters, G L

    1998-11-01

    We report the case of a 69-year-old man who had a mixed tumor (pleomorphic adenoma) removed from his parotid gland 3 years after orthotopic heart transplantation. Two years later, he presented with widely metastatic mixed tumor, which resulted in his death within 6 months. Metastatic mixed tumor is histologically identical to a benign mixed tumor, but it inexplicably metastasizes. Such tumors are rare and have not been reported to date in a transplant recipient. This case illustrates the rapid and aggressive course that malignancies can follow in an immunosuppressed population. Mixed tumors are common salivary neoplasms, so transplant recipients should be carefully followed after resection for evidence of metastatic spread.

  16. Interfractional Variations of Tumor Centroid Position and Tumor Regression during Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Lung Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yanan; Lu, Yufei; Cheng, Siguo; Guo, Wei; Ye, Ke; Zhao, Huiyun; Zheng, Xiaoli; Li, Dingjie; Wang, Shujuan; Yang, Chengliang; Ge, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To determine interfractional changes of lung tumor centroid position and tumor regression during stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials. 34 patients were treated by SBRT in 4-5 fractions to a median dose of 50 Gy. The CT scans acquired for verification were registered with simulation CT scans. The gross target volume (GTV) was contoured on all verification CT scans and compared to the initial GTV in treatment plan system. Results. The mean (±standard deviation, SD) three-dimension vector shift was 5.2 ± 3.1 mm. The mean (±SD) interfractional variations of tumor centroid position were −0.7 ± 4.5 mm in anterior-posterior (AP) direction, 0.2 ± 3.1 mm in superior-inferior (SI) direction, and 0.4 ± 2.4 mm in right-left (RL) direction. Large interfractional variations (≥5 mm) were observed in 5 fractions (3.3%) in RL direction, 16 fractions (10.5%) in SI direction, and 36 fractions (23.5%) in AP direction. Tumor volume did not decrease significantly during lung SBRT. Conclusions. Small but insignificant tumor volume regression was observed during lung SBRT. While the mean interfractional variations of tumor centroid position were minimal in three directions, variations more than 5 mm account for approximately a third of all, indicating additional margin for PTV, especially in AP direction. PMID:25548770

  17. [Study on the tumor microenvironment and tumor vascular normalization in integrative treatment of tumor by Chinese medicine and western medicine].

    PubMed

    You, Jie

    2011-08-01

    Vascular abnormalities inside tumors are important factors resulting in abnormal tumor microenvironment. Microenvironment was closely correlated with the malignant degrees, metastasis, and recurrence of tumors. Besides, the acid environment, oxygen deficiency, and other factors it induced may severely affect the efficacies of routine therapies, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Anti-angiogenesis treatment drugs targeting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) not only antagonize the angiogenesis of tumor vessels, but also promote the vascular normalization inside tumors to some extent, thus reducing interstitial hypertension, improving blood flow inside tumors, and enhancing therapeutic efficacies. Previous clinical and experimental studies have proved that many Chinese herbs show enhancing effects of chemotherapy and radiotherapy in comprehensive treatment of chemotherapy and radiotherapy combination. Meanwhile, recent studies have also proved that many Chinese herbs could fight against tumor vascular angiogenesis, lower serum VEGF concentration, and inhibit expressions of VEGF. Therefore, studying Chinese herbs' mechanisms of anti-tumor from promoting vascular normalization will open up a brand new field for seeking a cut-in point for Chinese medicine therapy in the comprehensive treatment, optimizing a treatment protocols, and further clarifying the roles of Chinese medicine in the comprehensive treatment.

  18. Colorectal cancer-derived tumor spheroids retain the characteristics of original tumors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Hwa; Hong, Jun Hwa; Park, Hwan Ki; Park, Jun Seok; Kim, Bo-Kyung; Lee, Jung-Yi; Jeong, Ji Yun; Yoon, Ghil Suk; Inoue, Masahiro; Choi, Gyu-Seog; Lee, In-Kyu

    2015-10-10

    Primary cultures of cancer cells are useful for developing personalized medicine. In this study, we characterized three lines of three-dimensional (3D) tumor spheroids established directly from tumor tissues of patients with colorectal cancers (CRCs). Each line mainly included EpCAM-positive cells and cells expressing putative cancer stem cell markers such as CD133, CD44, CD24, ALDH1, and LGR5. These characteristic stem cell markers remained identically for months in vitro. Short tandem repeat genotyping suggested that genetic fingerprints of these tumor spheroids were similar to those of the original tumor tissues from which they were derived. Mutational analysis showed that each line had the same mutation profile for APC, KRAS, MLH1, serine-threonine kinase 11, and TP53 as its parental tumor tissue. One line harboring an activating KRAS mutation was resistant to cetuximab while the remaining two lines harboring wild-type KRAS showed different responses to cetuximab. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that xenograft tumors derived from these lines retained the histopathological and mutational patterns of their parental tumors. Collectively, these results clearly showed that 3D tumor spheroids directly generated from tumor tissues of patients with CRCs preserved the characteristics of their parental tumor tissues and could be used for developing personalized medicines for CRCs.

  19. TWEAK mediates anti-tumor effect of tumor-infiltrating macrophage

    SciTech Connect

    Kaduka, Yuki; Takeda, Kazuyoshi . E-mail: ktakeda@med.juntendo.ac.jp; Nakayama, Masafumi; Kinoshita, Katsuyuki; Yagita, Hideo; Okumura, Ko

    2005-06-03

    TWEAK induces diverse cellular responses, including pro-inflammatory chemokine production, migration, proliferation, and cell death through the TWEAK receptor, Fn14. In the present study, we examined the effect of TWEAK or Fn14 expression in tumor cells on tumor outgrowth in vivo. Administration of neutralizing anti-TWEAK mAb significantly reduced the frequency of tumor rejection and shortened the survival of mice intraperitoneally inoculated with TWEAK-sensitive Fn14-expressing tumor cells. Moreover, anti-TWEAK mAb treatment promoted the subcutaneous growth of TWEAK-sensitive Fn14-expressing tumor cells, and this promotion was abolished by the inhibition of macrophage infiltration but not NK cell depletion. In contrast, administration of anti-TWEAK mAb had no apparent effect on the growth of TWEAK-resistant tumor cells, even if tumor cells expressed Fn14. On the other hand, TWEAK expression in tumor cells had no significant effect on subcutaneous tumor growth. These results indicate that TWEAK mediates anti-tumor effect of macrophages in vivo.

  20. Canine parvovirus NS1 protein exhibits anti-tumor activity in a mouse mammary tumor model.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shishir Kumar; Yadav, Pavan Kumar; Gandham, Ravi Kumar; Sahoo, A P; Harish, D R; Singh, Arvind Kumar; Tiwari, A K

    2016-02-01

    Many viral proteins have the ability to kill tumor cells specifically without harming the normal cells. These proteins, on ectopic expression, cause lysis or induction of apoptosis in the target tumor cells. Parvovirus NS1 is one of such proteins, which is known to kill high proliferating tumor cells. In the present study, we assessed the apoptosis inducing ability of canine parvovirus type 2 NS1 protein (CPV2.NS1) in vitro in 4T1 cells, and found it to cause significant cell death due to induction of apoptosis through intrinsic or mitochondrial pathway. Further, we also evaluated the oncolytic activity of CPV2.NS1 protein in a mouse mammary tumor model. The results suggested that CPV2.NS1 was able to inhibit the growth of 4T1 induced mouse mammary tumor as indicated by significantly reduced tumor volume, mitotic, AgNOR and PCNA indices. Further, inhibition of tumor growth was found to be because of induction of apoptosis in the tumor cells, which was evident by a significant increase in the number of TUNEL positive cells. Further, CPV2.NS1 was also able to stimulate the immune cells against the tumor antigens as indicated by the increased CD4+ and CD8+ counts in the blood of CVP2.NS1 treated mice. Further optimization of the delivery of NS1 protein and use of an adjuvant may further enhance its anti-tumor activity.

  1. STING in tumor and host cells cooperatively work for NK cell-mediated tumor growth retardation.

    PubMed

    Takashima, Ken; Takeda, Yohei; Oshiumi, Hiroyuki; Shime, Hiroaki; Okabe, Masaru; Ikawa, Masahito; Matsumoto, Misako; Seya, Tsukasa

    2016-09-30

    An interferon-inducing DNA sensor STING participates in tumor rejection in mouse models. Here we examined what mechanisms contribute to STING-dependent growth retardation of B16 melanoma sublines by NK cells in vivo. The studies were designed using WT and STING KO black mice, and B16D8 (an NK-sensitive melanoma line having STING) and STING KO B16D8 sublines established for this study. The results from tumor-implant studies suggested that STING in host immune cells and tumor cells induced distinct profiles of chemokines including CXCL10, CCL5 and IL-33, and both participated in NK cell infiltration and activation in B16D8 tumor. Spontaneous activation of STING occurs in host-immune and tumor cells of this NK-sensitive tumor, thereby B16D8 tumor growth being suppressed in this model. Our data show that STING induces tumor cytotoxicity by NK cells through tumor and host immune cell network to contribute to innate surveillance and suppression of tumors in vivo. PMID:27608599

  2. Diffusion characteristics of pediatric pineal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, Matthew T; Siddiqui, Adeel; Klimo, Paul; Boop, Frederick A

    2015-01-01

    Background Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) has been shown to be helpful in characterizing tumor cellularity, and predicting histology. Several works have evaluated this technique for pineal tumors; however studies to date have not focused on pediatric pineal tumors. Objective We evaluated the diffusion characteristics of pediatric pineal tumors to confirm if patterns seen in studies using mixed pediatric and adult populations remain valid. Materials and methods This retrospective study was performed after Institutional Review Board approval. We retrospectively evaluated all patients 18 years of age and younger with pineal tumors from a single institution where preoperative diffusion weighted imaging as well as histologic characterization was available. Results Twenty patients (13 male, 7 female) with pineal tumors were identified: seven with pineoblastoma, four with Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor (PNET), two with other pineal tumors, and seven with germ cell tumors including two germinomas, three teratomas, and one mixed germinoma-teratoma. The mean apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values in pineoblastoma (544 ± 65 × 10–6 mm2/s) and pineoblastoma/PNET (595 ± 144 × 10–6 mm2/s) was lower than that of the germ cell tumors (1284 ± 334 × 10–6 mm2/s; p < 0.0001 vs pineoblastoma). One highly cellular germinoma had an ADC value of 694 × 10–6 mm2/s. Conclusion ADC values can aid in differentiation of pineoblastoma/PNET from germ cell tumors in a population of children with pineal masses. PMID:25963154

  3. Benign bone tumors.

    PubMed

    Steffner, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Benign bone lesions are a broad category that demonstrates a spectrum of activities from latent to aggressive. Differentiating the various tumors is important in order to properly determine necessary intervention. This chapter focuses on the presentation, imaging, diagnostic features, and treatment of the most common benign bone tumors in order to help guide diagnosis and management. PMID:25070230

  4. Metastatic pleural tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... persons. Alternative Names Tumor - metastatic pleural Images Pleural space References Arenberg D, Pickens A. Metastatic malignant tumors. In: Mason RJ, Murray JF, Broaddus VC, et al., eds. Murray and Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine . 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2010:chap ...

  5. Skull Base Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz-Ertner, Daniela

    In skull base tumors associated with a low radiosensitivity for conventional radiotherapy (RT), irradiation with proton or carbon ion beams facilitates a safe and accurate application of high tumor doses due to the favorable beam localization properties of these particle beams. Cranial nerves, the brain stem and normal brain tissue can at the same time be optimally spared.

  6. [Metachronous bilateral Wilms' tumor].

    PubMed

    Mambié Meléndez, M; Guibelalde Del Castillo, M; Nieto Del Rincón, N; Rodrigo Jiménez, D; Femenia Reus, A; Román Piñana, J M

    2002-03-01

    Wilms' tumor occurs in 5-10 % of all cases of nephroblastoma. The metachronous form represents 2-3 % of cases. Most (96.2 %) metachronous tumors appear within the first 5 years of the primary tumor. Associated malformations are more common in bilateral cases. Metachronous tumors are a therapeutic challenge. We describe the case of an 11-year-old girl with left hemihypertrophy. The diagnosis was metachronous relapse of Wilms' tumor 7 years after the first diagnosis. The patient received five courses of preoperative chemotherapy and tumorectomy was performed. Because of post-surgical complications, nephrectomy was performed on her only kidney. Since she is anephric, the patient is in chronic renal failure and is dependent on dialysis. Treatment with carboplatin and etoposide was continued after surgery and the patient is currently in complete remission. The appearance of a metachronous Wilms' tumor 5 years after that of the primary tumor is rare. When a contralateral tumour develops, chemotherapy must be given until the size of the tumor is reduced in order to preserve renal function and avoid dialysis. In patients with chronic renal failure caused by bilateral nephrectomy, ongoing treatment with dialysis support can be achieved through the choice of effective drugs and knowledge of their pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics.

  7. VASCULOGENESIS IN VON HIPPEL-LINDAU DISEASE ASSOCIATED TUMORS

    PubMed Central

    Lonser, Russell R.; Frerich, Jason; Huntoon, Kristin; Yang, Chunzhang; Merrill, Marsha; Abdullaev, Ziedulla; Pack, Svetlana; Shively, Sharon; Stamp, Gordon; Zhuang, Zhengping

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Emerging data indicate that von Hippel-Lindau disease (VHL) associated tumors arise from embryologic hemangioblasts that can form vessels (endothelial cells) and blood cells. Nevertheless, the origin of VHL-associated vasculature is not known. To determine the origin of VHL-associated tumor vasculature, we investigated the neoplastic vasculature from VHL patients. METHODS: Microdissected VHL-associated tumor (compared to control non-VHL tissues) vascular features were examined using immunohistochemical staining for CA9, HIF-2a, HIF-1a, CD31 and Factor VIIIa. Origin of tumor vascular elements (tumor versus non-tumor) was assessed by LOH and FISH analysis. Intratumoral vasculogenesis was assessed in vivo using the VHL-deficient UMRC6 renal carcinoma murine xenograft model. RESULTS: We demonstrate that isolated vascular structures and blood vessels within VHL-associated neoplasms (including hemangioblastomas, renal cell carcinoma and pancreatic tumors) are a result of tumor-derived vasculogenesis. Further, similar to hemangioblastomas, other VHL-associated neoplasms possess vascular tissue of tumor origin. Similarly, tumor-derived endothelial cells emerge within implanted VHL deficient UMRC6 renal cell carcinoma murine xenografts. CONCLUSIONS: These findings further establish the embryologic, developmentally arrested, hemangioblast as the tumor cell of origin for VHL-associated hemangioblastomas and indicate that it is also the progenitor cell for other VHL-associated tumors. SECONDARY CATEGORY: Neuropathology & Tumor Biomarkers.

  8. [Circulating "tumor markers" in gastrointestinal tumors].

    PubMed

    Borlinghaus, P; Lamerz, R

    1991-09-01

    Tumor markers (TM) of the neoplastic cell can be divided into non-shedded substances and antigens shedded in blood, urine or other body fluids. For clinicians circulating TM are more important. All relevant circulating TM are not useful in screening of asymptomatic patients because of insufficient sensitivity and specificity. With caution they are useful in the observation of risk groups. Circulating TM have their main significance as additional parameters in monitoring symptomatic patients with malignancies. Several follow up determinations are more important than one single measurement. During follow up of tumor patients TM should not be checked automatically if there are no diagnostic or therapeutical consequences. The clinically most important circulating TM in non-hormone secreting tumors of the gastrointestinal tract are the oncofetal antigens CEA and AFP and antigens defined by monoclonal antibodies e. g. CA 19-9 and CA 72-4. AFP is the primary TM in hepatocellular carcinoma, often elevated in hepatoblastoma and always normal in cholangiocellular carcinoma. CEA is the TM of first choice in patients with colorectal carcinomas and liver metastasis. CA 19-9 is TM of first choice in pancreatic carcinoma and additionally of diagnostic value in cholangiocellular carcinoma and tumors of the bile ducts. In cancer of the stomach CA 19-9 and CEA are secondary TM in combination with CA 72-4 as primary TM. Care should be taken that slight and moderate elevations of TM can be observed in benign diseases of liver, pancreas and bowel.

  9. General Information about Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (Islet Cell Tumors)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Islet Cell Tumors) Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (Islet Cell Tumors) Go ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  10. Modern Brain Tumor Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Barajas, Ramon F.; Cha, Soonmee

    2015-01-01

    The imaging and clinical management of patients with brain tumor continue to evolve over time and now heavily rely on physiologic imaging in addition to high-resolution structural imaging. Imaging remains a powerful noninvasive tool to positively impact the management of patients with brain tumor. This article provides an overview of the current state-of-the art clinical brain tumor imaging. In this review, we discuss general magnetic resonance (MR) imaging methods and their application to the diagnosis of, treatment planning and navigation, and disease monitoring in patients with brain tumor. We review the strengths, limitations, and pitfalls of structural imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging techniques, MR spectroscopy, perfusion imaging, positron emission tomography/MR, and functional imaging. Overall this review provides a basis for understudying the role of modern imaging in the care of brain tumor patients. PMID:25977902

  11. Pediatric genetic ocular tumors

    PubMed Central

    Rouhani, Behnaz; Ramasubramanian, Aparna

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric genetic ocular tumors include malignancies like retinoblastoma and phakomatosis like neurofibromatosis, tuberous sclerosis, von Hippel-Lindau syndrome, and nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. It is important to screen for ocular tumors both for visual prognosis and also for systemic implications. The phakomatosis comprise of multitude of benign tumors that are aysmptomatic but their detection can aid in the diagnosis of the syndrome. Retinoblastoma is the most common malignant intraocular tumor in childhood and with current treatment modalities, the survival is more than 95%. It is transmitted as an autosomal dominant fashion and hence the offsprings of all patients with the germline retinoblastoma need to be screened from birth. This review discusses the various pediatric genetic ocular tumors discussing the clinical manifestation, diagnosis and treatment.

  12. Nanotechnology and tumor microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Kano, Mitsunobu R

    2014-07-01

    Though much progress has been made in the development of anti-tumor chemotherapeutic agents, refractoriness is still a major clinical difficulty because little is known about the non-autonomous mechanisms involved. Abnormal capillary structures in tumors, for example, are well documented, but a thorough characterization of microcirculation, including functional consequences with particular regard to drug delivery and intratumor accumulation, is still required for many kinds of tumor. In this review, we highlight how use of synthesized nanoparticles, themselves a product of emerging nanotechnology, are beginning to open up new perspectives in understanding the functional and therapeutic consequences of capillary structure within tumors. Furthermore, nanoparticles promise exciting new clinical applications. I also stress the urgent necessity of developing clinically relevant tumor models, both in vivo and in vitro.

  13. Zebrafish Germ Cell Tumors.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Angelica; Amatruda, James F

    2016-01-01

    Germ cell tumors (GCTs) are malignant cancers that arise from embryonic precursors known as Primordial Germ Cells. GCTs occur in neonates, children, adolescents and young adults and can occur in the testis, the ovary or extragonadal sites. Because GCTs arise from pluripotent cells, the tumors can exhibit a wide range of different histologies. Current cisplatin-based combination therapies cures most patients, however at the cost of significant toxicity to normal tissues. While GWAS studies and genomic analysis of human GCTs have uncovered somatic mutations and loci that might confer tumor susceptibility, little is still known about the exact mechanisms that drive tumor development, and animal models that faithfully recapitulate all the different GCT subtypes are lacking. Here, we summarize current understanding of germline development in humans and zebrafish, describe the biology of human germ cell tumors, and discuss progress and prospects for zebrafish GCT models that may contribute to better understanding of human GCTs. PMID:27165367

  14. Method of treating tumors

    DOEpatents

    DeNardo, Sally J.; Burke, Patricia A.; DeNardo, Gerald L.; Goodman, Simon; Matzku, legal representative, Kerstin; Matzku, Siegfried

    2006-04-18

    A method of treating tumors, such as prostate tumors, breast tumors, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and the like, includes the sequential steps of administering to the patient at least one dose of an antiangiogenic cyclo-arginine-glycine-aspartic acid-containing pentapeptide (cRGD pentapeptide); administering to the patient an anti-tumor effective amount of a radioimmunotherapeutic agent (RIT); and then administering to the patient at least one additional dose of cRGD pentapeptide. The cRGD pentapeptide is preferably cyclo-(Arg-Gly-Asp-D-Phe-[N-Me]-Val), and the RIT is preferably a radionuclide-labeled chelating agent-ligand complex in which chelating agent is chemically bonded to a tumor-targeting molecule, such as a monoclonal antibody.

  15. Pediatric genetic ocular tumors.

    PubMed

    Rouhani, Behnaz; Ramasubramanian, Aparna

    2014-12-01

    Pediatric genetic ocular tumors include malignancies like retinoblastoma and phakomatosis like neurofibromatosis, tuberous sclerosis, von Hippel-Lindau syndrome, and nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. It is important to screen for ocular tumors both for visual prognosis and also for systemic implications. The phakomatosis comprise of multitude of benign tumors that are aysmptomatic but their detection can aid in the diagnosis of the syndrome. Retinoblastoma is the most common malignant intraocular tumor in childhood and with current treatment modalities, the survival is more than 95%. It is transmitted as an autosomal dominant fashion and hence the offsprings of all patients with the germline retinoblastoma need to be screened from birth. This review discusses the various pediatric genetic ocular tumors discussing the clinical manifestation, diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27625882

  16. Acetate dependence of tumors.

    PubMed

    Comerford, Sarah A; Huang, Zhiguang; Du, Xinlin; Wang, Yun; Cai, Ling; Witkiewicz, Agnes K; Walters, Holly; Tantawy, Mohammed N; Fu, Allie; Manning, H Charles; Horton, Jay D; Hammer, Robert E; McKnight, Steven L; Tu, Benjamin P

    2014-12-18

    Acetyl-CoA represents a central node of carbon metabolism that plays a key role in bioenergetics, cell proliferation, and the regulation of gene expression. Highly glycolytic or hypoxic tumors must produce sufficient quantities of this metabolite to support cell growth and survival under nutrient-limiting conditions. Here, we show that the nucleocytosolic acetyl-CoA synthetase enzyme, ACSS2, supplies a key source of acetyl-CoA for tumors by capturing acetate as a carbon source. Despite exhibiting no gross deficits in growth or development, adult mice lacking ACSS2 exhibit a significant reduction in tumor burden in two different models of hepatocellular carcinoma. ACSS2 is expressed in a large proportion of human tumors, and its activity is responsible for the majority of cellular acetate uptake into both lipids and histones. These observations may qualify ACSS2 as a targetable metabolic vulnerability of a wide spectrum of tumors.

  17. Parotid tumors in children.

    PubMed

    Jaques, D A; Krolls, S O; Chambers, R G

    1976-10-01

    Most salivary gland tumors, both benign and malignant, develop within the parotid glands. Although an overwhelming majority of tumors are reported in the adult population, the parotid glands are also the most frequently involved salivary glands in the pediatric age group. This study represents a combination of case material from the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology and our personal experiences. Of approximately 10,000 salivary gland lesions accessioned in all ages, only 124 tumors occurred in the parotid gland in children less than fifteen years old. There were ninety benign and thirty-four malignant lesions. The two most common benign masses were mixed tumors and vascular lesions. The most common malignancies were the mucoepidermoid and acinic cell carcinomas. We recommended that all solid tumors be removed by parotidectomy.

  18. Enhancement or inhibition of tumor growth by interferon: dependence on treatment protocol.

    PubMed

    Murasko, D M; Fresa, K; Mark, R

    1983-12-15

    MSC cells are tumor cells originally induced in BALB/c mice by Moloney sarcoma virus. In these studies we demonstrated that, although these tumor cells are sensitive in vitro both to lysis by NK or NK-like cells and to the growth-inhibitory effect of murine L-cell interferon (IFN), the growth of the tumor in vivo could be either inhibited or enhanced by IFN. The outcome of in vivo IFN treatment was dependent on the timing and route of IFN administration relative to tumor challenge. IFN given systematically at the same time as tumor challenge resulted in enhancement of primary tumor formation, rate of tumor growth and subsequent progressive tumor growth. In contrast, IFN administered at the site of tumor inoculation on days 1-3 after tumor challenge inhibited tumor formation and growth. Histopathology of tissue sections obtained from the site of tumor challenge confirmed these results. Similar studies performed in mice given 450 rads of X-irradiation showed that IFN could still inhibit tumor growth when administered at the site of tumor inoculation on days 1-3 after tumor challenge. IFN administered simultaneously with tumor challenge, however, did not enhance tumor growth in irradiated mice. These results are consistent with the interpretation that 1) inhibition of MSC-induced tumor growth by IFN has a radioresistant component and 2) the enhancement of MSC-induced tumor formation by IFN is dependent on interaction with a radiosensitive population of cells, possibly lymphoid cells. PMID:6360916

  19. Tumor growth inhibition through targeting liposomally bound curcumin to tumor vasculature.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Goutam; Barui, Sugata; Saha, Soumen; Chaudhuri, Arabinda

    2013-12-28

    Increasing number of Phase I/II clinical studies have demonstrated clinical potential of curcumin for treatment of various types of human cancers. Despite significant anti-tumor efficacies and bio-safety profiles of curcumin, poor systemic bioavailability is retarding its clinical success. Efforts are now being directed toward developing stable formulations of curcumin using various drug delivery systems. To this end, herein we report on the development of a new tumor vasculature targeting liposomal formulation of curcumin containing a lipopeptide with RGDK-head group and two stearyl tails, di-oleyolphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) and cholesterol. We show that essentially water insoluble curcumin can be solubilized in fairly high concentrations (~500 μg/mL) in such formulation. Findings in the Annexin V/Propidium iodide (PI) binding based flow cytometric assays showed significant apoptosis inducing properties of the present curcumin formulation in both endothelial (HUVEC) and tumor (B16F10) cells. Using syngeneic mouse tumor model, we show that growth of solid melanoma tumor can be inhibited by targeting such liposomal formulation of curcumin to tumor vasculature. Results in immunohistochemical staining of the tumor cryosections are consistent with tumor growth inhibition being mediated by apoptosis of tumor endothelial cells. Findings in both in vitro and in vivo mechanistic studies are consistent with the supposition that the presently described liposomal formulation of curcumin inhibits tumor growth by blocking VEGF-induced STAT3 phosphorylation in tumor endothelium. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on inhibiting tumor growth through targeting liposomal formulation of curcumin to tumor vasculatures.

  20. SU-D-201-04: Study On the Impact of Tumor Shape and Size On Drug Delivery to Pancreatic Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Soltani, M; Bazmara, H; Sefidgar, M; Subramaniam, R; Rahmim, A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Drug delivery to solid tumors can be expressed physically using transport phenomena such as convection and diffusion for the drug of interest within extracellular matrices. We aimed to carefully model these phenomena, and to investigate the effect of tumor shape and size on drug delivery to solid tumors in the pancreas. Methods: In this study, multiple tumor geometries as obtained from clinical PET/CT images were considered. An advanced numerical method was used to simultaneously solve fluid flow and solute transport equations. Data from n=45 pancreatic cancer patients with non-resectable locoregional disease were analyzed, and geometrical information from the tumors including size, shape, and aspect ratios were classified. To investigate effect of tumor shape, tumors with similar size but different shapes were selected and analyzed. Moreover, to investigate effect of tumor size, tumors with similar shapes but different sizes, ranging from 1 to 77 cm{sup 3}, were selected and analyzed. A hypothetical tumor similar to one of the analyzed tumors, but scaled to reduce its size below 0.2 cm{sup 3}, was also analyzed. Results: The results showed relatively similar average drug concentration profiles in tumors with different sizes. Generally, smaller tumors had higher absolute drug concentration. In the hypothetical tumor, with volume less than 0.2 cm{sup 3}, the average drug concentration was 20% higher in comparison to its counterparts. For the various real tumor geometries, however, the maximum difference between average drug concentrations was 10% for the smallest and largest tumors. Moreover, the results demonstrated that for pancreatic tumors the shape is not significant. The negligible difference of drug concentration in different tumor shapes was due to the minimum effect of convection in pancreatic tumors. Conclusion: In tumors with different sizes, smaller tumors have higher drug delivery; however, the impact of tumor shape in the case of pancreatic

  1. Angiosarcoma associated with germ cell tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Ulbright, T.M.; Clark, S.A.; Einhorn, L.H.

    1985-03-01

    In two patients with malignant germ cell tumors angiosarcoma developed through two apparently different mechanisms. In one case the angiosarcoma probably developed as a complication of therapeutic radiation, since radiation changes were demonstrated in tissue adjacent to the neoplasm and since the angiosarcoma was not associated with elements of germ cell tumor. The absence of associated germ cell elements does not support the development of the angiosarcoma from a teratoma. In the second case, however, it is likely that the angiosarcoma developed as a result of malignant change within teratomatous foci, since angiosarcomatous elements were intermingled with teratomatous elements and the patient's primary germ cell tumor contained malignant and atypical teratomatous elements as well as prominent vascular proliferation. Malignant change within teratomatous components of germ cell tumors is a phenomenon of increasing importance in this era of effective chemotherapy for germ cell tumors. The development of angiosarcoma as a potential complication of testicular carcinoma has not been reported previously.

  2. The Universal Dynamics of Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Brú, Antonio; Albertos, Sonia; Luis Subiza, José; García-Asenjo, José López; Brú, Isabel

    2003-01-01

    Scaling techniques were used to analyze the fractal nature of colonies of 15 cell lines growing in vitro as well as of 16 types of tumor developing in vivo. All cell colonies were found to exhibit exactly the same growth dynamics—which correspond to the molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) universality class. MBE dynamics are characterized by 1), a linear growth rate, 2), the constraint of cell proliferation to the colony/tumor border, and 3), surface diffusion of cells at the growing edge. These characteristics were experimentally verified in the studied colonies. That these should show MBE dynamics is in strong contrast with the currently established concept of tumor growth: the kinetics of this type of proliferation rules out exponential or Gompertzian growth. Rather, a clear linear growth regime is followed. The importance of new cell movements—cell diffusion at the tumor border—lies in the fact that tumor growth must be conceived as a competition for space between the tumor and the host, and not for nutrients or other factors. Strong experimental evidence is presented for 16 types of tumor, the growth of which cell surface diffusion may be the main mechanism responsible in vivo. These results explain most of the clinical and biological features of colonies and tumors, offer new theoretical frameworks, and challenge the wisdom of some current clinical strategies. PMID:14581197

  3. Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors.

    PubMed

    Durbin, Adam D; Ki, Dong Hyuk; He, Shuning; Look, A Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) are tumors derived from Schwann cells or Schwann cell precursors. Although rare overall, the incidence of MPNST has increased with improved clinical management of patients with the neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) tumor predisposition syndrome. Unfortunately, current treatment modalities for MPNST are limited, with no targeted therapies available and poor efficacy of conventional radiation and chemotherapeutic regimens. Many murine and zebrafish models of MPNST have been developed, which have helped to elucidate the genes and pathways that are dysregulated in MPNST tumorigenesis, including the p53, and the RB1, PI3K-Akt-mTOR, RAS-ERK and Wnt signaling pathways. Preclinical results have suggested that new therapies, including mTOR and ERK inhibitors, may synergize with conventional chemotherapy in human tumors. The discovery of new genome editing technologies, like CRISPR-cas9, and their successful application to the zebrafish model will enable rapid progress in the faithful modeling of MPNST molecular pathogenesis. The zebrafish model is especially suited for high throughput screening of new targeted therapeutics as well as drugs approved for other purposes, which may help to bring enhanced treatment modalities into human clinical trials for this devastating disease. PMID:27165368

  4. Tumors of the Infratemporal Fossa

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Rammohan; Quak, Jasper; Egeler, Saskia; Smeele, Ludi; Waal, Isaac v.d.; Valk, Paul v.d.; Leemans, Rene

    2000-01-01

    Neoplastic processes involving the infratemporal fossa may originate from the tissues in the region, but more often are the result of extension from neighboring structures. Metastatic lesions located in the region are rarely encountered. Because of its concealed localization, tumors may remain unnoticed for some time. Clinical signs and symptoms often arise late, are insidious, and may be mistakenly attributed to other structures. The close proximity of the area to the intracranial structures, the orbit, the paranasal sinuses, the nasopharynx, and the facial area demands careful planning of surgical excision and combined procedures may be called for. Modern imaging techniques have made three-dimensional visualization of the extent of the pathology possible. Treatment depends on the histopathology and staging of the tumor. Several surgical approaches have been developed over the years. Radical tumor excision with preservation of the quality of life remain the ultimate goal for those tumors where surgery is indicated. Experience over a decade with various pathologies is presented. ImagesFigure 1p6-bFigure 2Figure 3 PMID:17171095

  5. Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) Hepatic Arteriography in Chemoembolization for Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Performance Depicting Tumors and Tumor Feeders

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, In Joon; Chung, Jin Wook Yin, Yong Hu; Kim, Hyo-Cheol; Kim, Young Il; Jae, Hwan Jun; Park, Jae Hyung

    2015-10-15

    PurposeThis study was designed to analyze retrospectively the performance of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) hepatic arteriography in depicting tumors and their feeders and to investigate the related determining factors in chemoembolization for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).MethodsEighty-six patients with 142 tumors satisfying the imaging diagnosis criteria of HCC were included in this study. The performance of CBCT hepatic arteriography for chemoembolization per tumor and per patient was evaluated using maximum intensity projection images alone (MIP analysis) or MIP combined with multiplanar reformation images (MIP + MPR analysis) regarding the following three aspects: tumor depiction, confidence of tumor feeder detection, and trackability of tumor feeders. Tumor size, tumor enhancement, tumor location, number of feeders, diaphragmatic motion, portal vein enhancement, and hepatic artery to parenchyma enhancement ratio were regarded as potential determining factors.ResultsTumors were depicted in 125 (88.0 %) and 142 tumors (100 %) on MIP and MIP + MPR analysis, respectively. Imaging performances on MIP and MIP + MPR analysis were good enough to perform subsegmental chemoembolization without additional angiographic investigation in 88 (62.0 %) and 128 tumors (90.1 %) on per-tumor basis and in 43 (50 %) and 73 (84.9 %) on per-patient basis, respectively. Significant determining factors for performance in MIP + MPR analysis on per tumor basis were tumor size (p = 0.030), tumor enhancement (0.005), tumor location (p = 0.001), and diaphragmatic motion (p < 0.001).ConclusionsCBCT hepatic arteriography provided sufficient information for subsegmental chemoembolization by depicting tumors and their feeders in the vast majority of patients. Combined analysis of MIP and MPR images was essential to enhance the performance of CBCT hepatic arteriography.

  6. Cell survival as a determinant of tumor cure for rat 9L subcutaneous tumors following microwave-induced hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Wallen, C A; Michaelson, S M; Wheeler, K T

    1982-01-01

    The relationship of cell survival to tumor cure after local hyperthermia treatment was studied in subcutaneous 9L rat tumors. Tumors weighing 0.2-0.4 g were heated to 42.5, 43.0, 44.0 and 45.0 degrees C by local exposure to 2450 MHz microwaves. Cell survival data was obtained by an in vivo to in vitro colony forming technique and a cell survival curve was constructed for each temperature as a function of exposure duration (0-180 min). Cell survival followed a simple exponential function with an increasingly steeper slope as temperature increased. At 44 degrees C, it was observed that cells from large tumors (1.0-1.4 g) were inactivated at the same rate as those from small tumors. When tumor response was monitored in the small tumors for 90 days following treatment, a direct correlation between the percentage of tumor cures and time at 44 degrees C (0-60 min) was observed; therefore, at 44 degrees C, tumor cure was exponentially related to cell survival in this range. However, when approximately the same cell survival was obtained with 3 other temperature--time regimens, the resulting percentage of tumor cures was not the same. These results indicate that while cell survival is related to tumor cure, it is probably not the primary determinant of tumor response following local hyperthermia in these 9L subcutaneous tumors.

  7. Effect of tumor microenvironmental factors on tumor growth dynamics modeled by correlated colored noises with colored cross-correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idris, Ibrahim Mu'awiyya; Abu Bakar, Mohd Rizam

    2016-07-01

    The effect of non-immunogenic tumor microenvironmental factors on tumor growth dynamics modeled by correlated additive and multiplicative colored noises is investigated. Using the Novikov theorem, Fox approach and Ansatz of Hanggi, an approximate Fokker-Planck equation for the system is obtained and analytic expression for the steady state distribution Pst(x) is derived. Based on the numerical results, we find that fluctuations of microenvironmental factors within the tumor site with parameter θ have a diffusive effect on the tumor growth dynamics, and the tumor response to the microenvironmental factors with parameter α inhibits growth at weak correlation time τ. Moreover, at increasing correlation time τ the inhibitive effect of tumor response α is suppressed and instead a systematic growth promotion is noticed. The result also reveals that the strength of the correlation time τ has a strong influence on the growth effects exerted by the non-immunogenic component of tumor microenvironment on tumor growth.

  8. Three mutant genes cooperatively induce brain tumor formation in Drosophila malignant brain tumor.

    PubMed

    Riede, I

    1996-09-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster strain Malignant Brain Tumor reveals temperature-sensitive transformation of the larval brain tissue. Genetic analysis shows that three gene defects, spzMBT, yetiMBT, and tldMBT, cooperatively induce brain tumor formation. Whereas spz and tld belong to the genes inducing differentiation patterns in the embryo, yeti induces cell overgrowth. spzMBT-, yetiMBT-, and tldMBT-containing animals are larval lethal, whereas Malignant Brain Tumor is kept as a homozygous strain at a permissive temperature. This reveals that this tumor-forming strain is the result of a number of adaptive mutation events.

  9. Radiology of the spine: Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Jeanmart, L.

    1986-01-01

    This book deals with tumors of the spinal cord and various aspects of primary and secondary osseous tumors of the spine. Included in discussion are tumors, chordoma hemangioma, vascular malformation and the terms angioma and hemangiomas.

  10. Tumor suppressor XAF1 induces apoptosis, inhibits angiogenesis and inhibits tumor growth in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Li Ming; Shi, Dong Mei; Dai, Qiang; Cheng, Xiao Jiao; Yao, Wei Yan; Sun, Ping Hu; Ding, Yanfei; Qiao, Min Min; Wu, Yun Lin; Jiang, Shi Hu; Tu, Shui Ping

    2014-07-30

    X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP)-associated factor 1 (XAF1), a XIAP-binding protein, is a tumor suppressor gene. XAF1 was silent or expressed lowly in most human malignant tumors. However, the role of XAF1 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the effect of XAF1 on tumor growth and angiogenesis in hepatocellular cancer cells. Our results showed that XAF1 expression was lower in HCC cell lines SMMC-7721, Hep G2 and BEL-7404 and liver cancer tissues than that in paired non-cancer liver tissues. Adenovirus-mediated XAF1 expression (Ad5/F35-XAF1) significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in HCC cells in dose- and time- dependent manners. Infection of Ad5/F35-XAF1 induced cleavage of caspase -3, -8, -9 and PARP in HCC cells. Furthermore, Ad5/F35-XAF1 treatment significantly suppressed tumor growth in a xenograft model of liver cancer cells. Western Blot and immunohistochemistry staining showed that Ad5/F35-XAF1 treatment suppressed expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which is associated with tumor angiogenesis, in cancer cells and xenograft tumor tissues. Moreover, Ad5/F35-XAF1 treatment prolonged the survival of tumor-bearing mice. Our results demonstrate that XAF1 inhibits tumor growth by inducing apoptosis and inhibiting tumor angiogenesis. XAF1 may be a promising target for liver cancer treatment.

  11. Enhanced Performance of Brain Tumor Classification via Tumor Region Augmentation and Partition

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jun; Huang, Wei; Cao, Shuangliang; Yang, Ru; Yang, Wei; Yun, Zhaoqiang; Wang, Zhijian; Feng, Qianjin

    2015-01-01

    Automatic classification of tissue types of region of interest (ROI) plays an important role in computer-aided diagnosis. In the current study, we focus on the classification of three types of brain tumors (i.e., meningioma, glioma, and pituitary tumor) in T1-weighted contrast-enhanced MRI (CE-MRI) images. Spatial pyramid matching (SPM), which splits the image into increasingly fine rectangular subregions and computes histograms of local features from each subregion, exhibits excellent results for natural scene classification. However, this approach is not applicable for brain tumors, because of the great variations in tumor shape and size. In this paper, we propose a method to enhance the classification performance. First, the augmented tumor region via image dilation is used as the ROI instead of the original tumor region because tumor surrounding tissues can also offer important clues for tumor types. Second, the augmented tumor region is split into increasingly fine ring-form subregions. We evaluate the efficacy of the proposed method on a large dataset with three feature extraction methods, namely, intensity histogram, gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM), and bag-of-words (BoW) model. Compared with using tumor region as ROI, using augmented tumor region as ROI improves the accuracies to 82.31% from 71.39%, 84.75% from 78.18%, and 88.19% from 83.54% for intensity histogram, GLCM, and BoW model, respectively. In addition to region augmentation, ring-form partition can further improve the accuracies up to 87.54%, 89.72%, and 91.28%. These experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is feasible and effective for the classification of brain tumors in T1-weighted CE-MRI. PMID:26447861

  12. Comparison of cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses against pancreatic cancer induced by dendritic cells transfected with total tumor RNA and fusion hybrided with tumor cell

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiang; Li, Hong-Yu; Wang, Di; Shao, Xiao-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a deadly human malignancy. Dendritic cell (DC)-based immunotherapy with whole tumor antigens demonstrates potential efficiency in cancer treatment. Tumor RNA and tumor fusion hybrid cells are sources of whole tumor antigens for preparing DC tumor vaccines. However, the efficacy of these sources in eliciting immune responses against PC has not yet to be directly compared. In the present study, patient-derived PC cells and DCs were fused (DC–tumor hybrids) and primary cultured PC cell-derived total RNA was electroporated into autologous DCs (DC–tumor RNA). The antitumor immune responses induced by DC–tumor hybrids and DC–tumor RNA were compared directly. The results showed that both RNA and hybrid methodologies could induce tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses, but pulsing DCs with total tumor RNA could induce a higher frequency of activated CTLs and T-helper cells than fusing DCs with autologous tumor cells. In addition, DC–tumor RNA triggered stronger autologous tumor cell lysis than DC–tumor hybrids. It could be concluded that DCs pulsed with whole tumor RNA are superior to those fused with tumor cells in priming anti-PC CTL responses. Electroporation with total tumor RNA may be more suitable for DC-based PC vaccination. PMID:25736302

  13. Safety and Efficacy of Transplantation with Allogeneic Skin Tumors to Treat Chemically-Induced Skin Tumors in Mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiwei; Sun, Hua; Zhang, Jianhua; Ge, Chunlei; Dong, Suwei; Li, Zhen; Li, Ruilei; Chen, Xiaodan; Li, Mei; Chen, Yun; Zou, Yingying; Qian, Zhongyi; Yang, Lei; Yang, Jinyan; Zhu, Zhitao; Liu, Zhimin; Song, Xin

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Transplantation with allogeneic cells has become a promising modality for cancer therapy, which can induce graft-versus-tumor (GVT) effect. This study was aimed at assessing the safety, efficacy, and tissue type GVT (tGVT) response of transplantation with allogeneic skin tumors to treat chemically-induced skin tumors in mice. MATERIAL AND METHODS FVB/N and ICR mice were exposed topically to chemicals to induce skin tumors. Healthy ICR mice were transplanted with allogeneic skin tumors from FVB/N mice to test the safety. The tumor-bearing ICR mice were transplanted with, or without, allogeneic skin tumors to test the efficacy. The body weights (BW), body condition scores (BCS), tumor volumes in situ, metastasis tumors, overall survival, and serum cytokines were measured longitudinally. RESULTS Transplantation with no more than 0.03 g allogeneic skin tumors from FVB/N mice to healthy ICR mice was safe. After transplantation with allogeneic skin tumors to treat tumor-bearing mice, it inhibited the growth of tumors slightly at early stage, accompanied by fewer metastatic tumors at 24 days after transplantation (21.05% vs. 47.37%), while there were no statistically significant differences in the values of BW, BCS, tumor volumes in situ, metastasis tumors, and overall survival between the transplanted and non-transplanted groups. The levels of serum interleukin (IL)-2 were significantly reduced in the controls (P<0.05), but not in the recipients, which may be associated with the tGVT response. CONCLUSIONS Our results suggest that transplantation with allogeneic skin tumors is a safe treatment in mice, which can induce short-term tGVT response mediated by IL-2. PMID:27587310

  14. Safety and Efficacy of Transplantation with Allogeneic Skin Tumors to Treat Chemically-Induced Skin Tumors in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhiwei; Sun, Hua; Zhang, Jianhua; Ge, Chunlei; Dong, Suwei; Li, Zhen; Li, Ruilei; Chen, Xiaodan; Li, Mei; Chen, Yun; Zou, Yingying; Qian, Zhongyi; Yang, Lei; Yang, Jinyan; Zhu, Zhitao; Liu, Zhimin; Song, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Background Transplantation with allogeneic cells has become a promising modality for cancer therapy, which can induce graft-versus-tumor (GVT) effect. This study was aimed at assessing the safety, efficacy, and tissue type GVT (tGVT) response of transplantation with allogeneic skin tumors to treat chemically-induced skin tumors in mice. Material/Methods FVB/N and ICR mice were exposed topically to chemicals to induce skin tumors. Healthy ICR mice were transplanted with allogeneic skin tumors from FVB/N mice to test the safety. The tumor-bearing ICR mice were transplanted with, or without, allogeneic skin tumors to test the efficacy. The body weights (BW), body condition scores (BCS), tumor volumes in situ, metastasis tumors, overall survival, and serum cytokines were measured longitudinally. Results Transplantation with no more than 0.03 g allogeneic skin tumors from FVB/N mice to healthy ICR mice was safe. After transplantation with allogeneic skin tumors to treat tumor-bearing mice, it inhibited the growth of tumors slightly at early stage, accompanied by fewer metastatic tumors at 24 days after transplantation (21.05% vs. 47.37%), while there were no statistically significant differences in the values of BW, BCS, tumor volumes in situ, metastasis tumors, and overall survival between the transplanted and non-transplanted groups. The levels of serum interleukin (IL)-2 were significantly reduced in the controls (P<0.05), but not in the recipients, which may be associated with the tGVT response. Conclusions Our results suggest that transplantation with allogeneic skin tumors is a safe treatment in mice, which can induce short-term tGVT response mediated by IL-2. PMID:27587310

  15. Benign follicular tumors*

    PubMed Central

    Tellechea, Oscar; Cardoso, José Carlos; Reis, José Pedro; Ramos, Leonor; Gameiro, Ana Rita; Coutinho, Inês; Baptista, António Poiares

    2015-01-01

    Benign follicular tumors comprise a large and heterogeneous group of neoplasms that share a common histogenesis and display morphological features resembling one or several portions of the normal hair follicle, or recapitulate part of its embryological development. Most cases present it as clinically nondescript single lesions and essentially of dermatological relevance. Occasionally, however, these lesions be multiple and represent a cutaneous marker of complex syndromes associated with an increased risk of visceral neoplasms. In this article, the authors present the microscopic structure of the normal hair follicle as a basis to understand the type and level of differentiation of the various follicular tumors. The main clinicopathological features and differential diagnosis of benign follicular tumors are then discussed, including dilated pore of Winer, pilar sheath acanthoma, trichoadenoma, trichilemmoma, infundibuloma, proliferating trichilemmal cyst/tumor, trichoblastoma and its variants, pilomatricoma, trichodiscoma/fibrofolliculoma, neurofollicular hamartoma and trichofolliculoma. In addition, the main syndromes presenting with multiple follicular tumors are also discussed, namely Cowden, Birt-Hogg-Dubé, Rombo and Bazex-Dupré-Christol syndromes, as well as multiple tumors of follicular infundibulum (infundibulomatosis) and multiple trichoepitheliomas. Although the diagnosis of follicular tumors relies on histological examination, we highlight the importance of their knowledge for the clinician, especially when in presence of patients with multiple lesions that may be the cutaneous marker of a cancer-prone syndrome. The dermatologist is therefore in a privileged position to recognize these lesions, which is extremely important to provide further propedeutic, appropriate referral and genetic counseling for these patients. PMID:26734858

  16. Hormonal relations of radiation-induced tumors of Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Campell, B.R.; Persinger, S.M.; Town, C.D. )

    1989-04-01

    When gamma-irradiated Arabidopsis seed was germinated, tumors appeared on hypocotyls and apical meristems of the resulting plants. Several tumors have been cultured on hormone free medium for over two years since excision from the plants. The tumor lines display a range of phenotypes suggestive of abnormal hormone balance. To determine whether hormone overproduction or hypersensitivity is involved in tumorigenesis, we are measuring hormone levels in the tumor lines and characterizing their response to exogenously supplied growth regulators. Growth of two tumor lines is stimulated by either NAA or BAP, one is stimulated by NAA only, two by BAP only, and one is stimulated by neither. Growth of all lines tested thus far is inhibited by gibberellic acid, ethephon and ACC. The tumor lines appear more sensitive to ACC than normal callus tissue. Most tumors studied to date appear unlikely to have arisen due to increased hormone sensitivity. Experiments are in progress to determine auxin and cytokinin levels in the tumor lines.

  17. Creating a tumor-resistant microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Al-Zoubi, Mazhar; Salem, Ahmed F.; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E.; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Lamb, Rebecca; Hulit, James; Howell, Anthony; Gandara, Ricardo; Sartini, Marina; Arafat, Hwyda; Bevilacqua, Generoso; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Here, we provide the necessary proof of concept, that it is possible to metabolically create a non-permissive or “hostile” stromal microenvironment, which actively prevents tumor engraftment in vivo. We developed a novel genetically engineered fibroblast cell line that completely prevents tumor formation in mice, with a 100% protection rate. No host side effects were apparent. This could represent a viable cellular strategy for preventing and treating a variety of human cancers. More specifically, we examined the autocrine and paracrine effects of the cellular delivery of TNFα on breast cancer tumor growth and cancer metabolism. For this purpose, we recombinantly overexpressed TNFα in human breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231) or human immortalized fibroblasts (hTERT-BJ1). Our results directly show that TNFα functions as a potent tumor suppressor. Remarkably, TNFα-expressing breast cancer cells were viable, without any significant increases in their basal apoptotic rate. However, after 4 weeks post-implantation, TNFα-expressing breast cancer cells failed to form any tumors in xenografted mice (0 tumors/10 injections), ultimately conferring 100% protection against tumorigenesis. Similarly, TNFα-overexpressing fibroblasts were also viable, without any increases in apoptosis. Significantly, complete tumor suppression was obtained by co-injecting TNFα expressing stromal fibroblasts with human breast cancer cells, indicating that paracrine cell-mediated delivery of TNFα can also prevent tumor engraftment and growth (0 tumors/10 injections). Mechanistically, TNFα induced autophagy and mitochondrial dysfunction in both epithelial cancer cells and stromal fibroblasts, preventing energy transfer from the tumor microenvironment, likely “starving” the cancer cells to death. In addition, via qRT-PCR analysis of MDA-MB-231 cells, we observed that TNFα mediated the upregulation of gene transcripts associated with inflammation and senescence [IL-1-β, IL-6, IL-8

  18. Targeting the tumor microenvironment

    SciTech Connect

    Kenny, P.A.; Lee, G.Y.; Bissell, M.J.

    2006-11-07

    Despite some notable successes cancer remains, for the most part, a seemingly intractable problem. There is, however, a growing appreciation that targeting the tumor epithelium in isolation is not sufficient as there is an intricate mutually sustaining synergy between the tumor epithelial cells and their surrounding stroma. As the details of this dialogue emerge, new therapeutic targets have been proposed. The FDA has already approved drugs targeting microenvironmental components such as VEGF and aromatase and many more agents are in the pipeline. In this article, we describe some of the 'druggable' targets and processes within the tumor microenvironment and review the approaches being taken to disrupt these interactions.

  19. Multiple granular cell tumor.

    PubMed

    Jones, J K; Kuo, T T; Griffiths, C M; Itharat, S

    1980-10-01

    Eleven cases of granular cell tumor were reviewed. In two of the cases multiple sites of involvement were seen. The tumor occurred in the oral cavity in both of these cases and each was initially wrongly diagnosed as squamous cell carcinoma. The most common site was the subcutaneous tissue (nine patients) and the tongue was involved in three cases. In one patient the parotid gland was involved. Eight of the patients were females and three were males; seven were black and four were white. The importance of differentiating between squamous cell carcinoma and granular cell tumor is stressed, as is the need for a simple wide surgical excision. PMID:7421377

  20. Myoepithelial Tumors: An Update.

    PubMed

    Jo, Vickie Y

    2015-09-01

    Primary myoepithelial neoplasms of soft tissue are uncommon, and have been increasingly characterized by clinicopathologic and genetic means. Tumors are classified as mixed tumor/chondroid syringoma, myoepithelioma, and myoepithelial carcinoma, and they share morphologic, immunophenotypic, and genetic features with their salivary gland counterparts. However, soft tissue myoepithelial tumors are classified as malignant based on the presence of cytologic atypia, in contrast to the criterion of invasive growth in salivary gland sites. This review discusses the clinicopathologic and morphologic characteristics, distinct variants, and currently known genetic alterations of myoepithelial neoplasms of soft tissue, skin, and bone.

  1. Pazopanib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Progressive Carcinoid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-04

    Atypical Carcinoid Tumor; Foregut Carcinoid Tumor; Hindgut Carcinoid Tumor; Lung Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Midgut Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Regional Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1

  2. Autophagy in tumor Suppression and cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kung, Che-Pei; Budina, Anna; Balaburski, Gregor; Bergenstock, Marika K.; Murphy, Maureen E.

    2011-01-01

    Autophagy is a stress-induced cell survival program whereby cells under metabolic, proteotoxic, or other stress remove dysfunctional organelles and/or misfolded/polyubiquitylated proteins by shuttling them via specialized structures called autophagosomes to the lysosome for degradation. The end result is the release of free amino acids and metabolites for use in cell survival. For tumor cells, autophagy is a double-edged sword: autophagy genes are frequently mono-allelically deleted, silenced, or mutated in human tumors, resulting in an environment of increased oxidative stress that is conducive to DNA damage, genomic instability, and tumor progression. As such, autophagy is tumor suppressive. In contrast, it is important to note that although tumor cells have reduced levels of autophagy, they do not eliminate this pathway completely. Furthermore, the exposure of tumor cells to an environment of increased metabolic and other stresses renders them reliant on basal autophagy for survival. Therefore, autophagy inhibition is an active avenue for the identification of novel anti-cancer therapies. Not surprisingly, the field of autophagy and cancer has experienced an explosion of research in the past 10 years. This review covers the basic mechanisms of autophagy, discusses its role in tumor suppression and cancer therapy, and posits emerging questions for the future. PMID:21967333

  3. Tumor Volume-Adapted Dosing in Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy of Lung Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Trakul, Nicholas; Chang, Christine N.; Harris, Jeremy; Chapman, Christopher; Rao, Aarti; Shen, John; Quinlan-Davidson, Sean; Filion, Edith J.; Wakelee, Heather A.; Colevas, A. Dimitrios; Whyte, Richard I.; and others

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Current stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) protocols for lung tumors prescribe a uniform dose regimen irrespective of tumor size. We report the outcomes of a lung tumor volume-adapted SABR dosing strategy. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the outcomes in 111 patients with a total of 138 primary or metastatic lung tumors treated by SABR, including local control, regional control, distant metastasis, overall survival, and treatment toxicity. We also performed subset analysis on 83 patients with 97 tumors treated with a volume-adapted dosing strategy in which small tumors (gross tumor volume <12 mL) received single-fraction regimens with biologically effective doses (BED) <100 Gy (total dose, 18-25 Gy) (Group 1), and larger tumors (gross tumor volume {>=}12 mL) received multifraction regimens with BED {>=}100 Gy (total dose, 50-60 Gy in three to four fractions) (Group 2). Results: The median follow-up time was 13.5 months. Local control for Groups 1 and 2 was 91.4% and 92.5%, respectively (p = 0.24) at 12 months. For primary lung tumors only (excluding metastases), local control was 92.6% and 91.7%, respectively (p = 0.58). Regional control, freedom from distant metastasis, and overall survival did not differ significantly between Groups 1 and 2. Rates of radiation pneumonitis, chest wall toxicity, and esophagitis were low in both groups, but all Grade 3 toxicities developed in Group 2 (p = 0.02). Conclusion: A volume-adapted dosing approach for SABR of lung tumors seems to provide excellent local control for both small- and large-volume tumors and may reduce toxicity.

  4. Morphogenesis and Complexity of the Tumor Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izquierdo-Kulich, E.; Nieto-Villar, J. M.

    directly proportional to the invasion capacity. The proposed model assumes: i) only interface cells proliferate and invade the host, and ii) the fractal dimension of tumoral cell patterns, can reproduce the Gompertzian growth law. A mathematical model was obtained to describe the relation between the tissue morphology of cervix carcinoma and both dynamic processes of mitosis and apoptosis, and an expression to quantify the tumor aggressiveness, which in this context is associated with the tumor growth rate. The proposed model was applied to Stage III cervix carcinoma in vivo studies. In this study we found that the apoptosis rate was significantly smaller in the tumor tissues and both the mitosis rate and aggressiveness index decrease with Stage III patient's age. These quantitative results correspond to observed behavior in clinical and genetics studies. Finally, the entropy production rate was determined for avascular tumor growth. The proposed formula relates the fractal dimension of the tumor contour with the quotient between mitosis and apoptosis rate, which can be used to characterize the degree of proliferation of tumor cells. The entropy production rate was determined for fourteen tumor cell lines as a physical function of cancer robustness. The entropy production rate is a hallmark that allows us the possibility of prognosis of tumor proliferation and invasion capacities, key factors to improve cancer therapy.

  5. Integrin-mediated active tumor targeting and tumor microenvironment response dendrimer-gelatin nanoparticles for drug delivery and tumor treatment.

    PubMed

    Hu, Guanlian; Zhang, Huiqing; Zhang, Li; Ruan, Shaobo; He, Qin; Gao, Huile

    2015-12-30

    Due to the high morbidity and mortality of cancer, it has become an urgent matter to develop an effective and a safe treatment strategy. Nanoparticles (NP) based drug delivery systems have gained much attention nowadays but they faced a paradoxical issue in delivering drugs into tumors: NP with large size were characterized with weak tumor penetration, meanwhile NP with small size resulted in poor tumor retention. To solve this problem, we proposed a multistage drug delivery system which could intelligently shrink its size from large size to small size in the presence of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) which were highly expressed in tumor tissues, therefore the multistage system could benefit from its large size for better retention effect in tumor and then shrunk to small size to contribute to better penetration efficiency. The multistage drug delivery system, RGD-DOX-DGL-GNP, was constructed by 155.4nm gelatin NP core (the substrate of MMP-2) and surface decorated with doxorubicin (DOX) and RGD peptide conjugated dendritic poly-l-lysine (DGL, 34.3nm in diameter). In vitro, the size of multistage NP could effectively shrink in the presence of MMP-2. Thus, the RGD-DOX-DGL-GNP could penetrate deep into tumor spheroids. In vivo, this multistage drug delivery system showed higher tumor retention and deeper penetration than both DOX-DGL and DOX-GNP. Consequently, RGD-DOX-DGL-GNP successfully combined the advantages of dendrimers and GNP in vivo, resulting in an outstanding anti-tumor effect. In conclusion, the multistage drug delivery system could intelligently shrink from large size to small size in the tumor microenvironment and displayed better retention and penetration efficiency, making it an impressing system for cancer treatment.

  6. Parametric study of different contributors to tumor thermal profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tepper, Michal; Gannot, Israel

    2014-03-01

    Treating cancer is one of the major challenges of modern medicine. There is great interest in assessing tumor development in in vivo animal and human models, as well as in in vitro experiments. Existing methods are either limited by cost and availability or by their low accuracy and reproducibility. Thermography holds the potential of being a noninvasive, low-cost, irradiative and easy-to-use method for tumor monitoring. Tumors can be detected in thermal images due to their relatively higher or lower temperature compared to the temperature of the healthy skin surrounding them. Extensive research is performed to show the validity of thermography as an efficient method for tumor detection and the possibility of extracting tumor properties from thermal images, showing promising results. However, deducing from one type of experiment to others is difficult due to the differences in tumor properties, especially between different types of tumors or different species. There is a need in a research linking different types of tumor experiments. In this research, parametric analysis of possible contributors to tumor thermal profiles was performed. The effect of tumor geometric, physical and thermal properties was studied, both independently and together, in phantom model experiments and computer simulations. Theoretical and experimental results were cross-correlated to validate the models used and increase the accuracy of simulated complex tumor models. The contribution of different parameters in various tumor scenarios was estimated and the implication of these differences on the observed thermal profiles was studied. The correlation between animal and human models is discussed.

  7. CONTRIBUTION OF HOST-DERIVED TISSUE FACTOR TO TUMOR NEOVASCULARIZATION

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Joanne; May, Linda; Milsom, Chloe; Anderson, G. Mark; Weitz, Jeffrey I.; Luyendyk, James P.; Broze, George; Mackman, Nigel; Rak, Janusz

    2010-01-01

    Objective The role of host-derived tissue factor (TF) in tumor growth, angiogenesis and metastasis has hitherto been unclear, and was investigated in this study. Methods We compared tumor growth, vascularity and responses to cyclophosphamide (CTX) of tumors in wild type (wt) mice, or in animals with TF levels reduced by 99% (low-TF mice). Results Global growth rate of three different types of transplantable tumors (LLC, B16F1 and ES teratoma), or metastasis were unchanged in low-TF mice. However, several unexpected tumor/context-specific alterations were observed in these mice, including: (i) reduced tumor blood vessel size in B16F1 tumors; (ii) larger spleen size and greater tolerance to CTX toxicity in the LLC model; (iii) aborted tumor growth after inoculation of TF-deficient tumor cells (ES TF-/-) in low-TF mice. TF-deficient tumor cells grew readily in mice with normal TF levels, and attracted exclusively host-related blood vessels (without vasculogenic mimicry). We postulate that this complementarity may result from tumor-vascular transfer of TF-containing microvesicles, as we observed such transfer using human cancer cells (A431) and mouse endothelial cells, both in vitro and in vivo. Conclusions Our study points to an important, but context-dependent role of host TF in tumor formation, angiogenesis and therapy. PMID:18772494

  8. Motif mimetic of epsin perturbs tumor growth and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yunzhou; Wu, Hao; Rahman, H.N. Ashiqur; Liu, Yanjun; Pasula, Satish; Tessneer, Kandice L.; Cai, Xiaofeng; Liu, Xiaolei; Chang, Baojun; McManus, John; Hahn, Scott; Dong, Jiali; Brophy, Megan L.; Yu, Lili; Song, Kai; Silasi-Mansat, Robert; Saunders, Debra; Njoku, Charity; Song, Hoogeun; Mehta-D’Souza, Padmaja; Towner, Rheal; Lupu, Florea; McEver, Rodger P.; Xia, Lijun; Boerboom, Derek; Srinivasan, R. Sathish; Chen, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Tumor angiogenesis is critical for cancer progression. In multiple murine models, endothelium-specific epsin deficiency abrogates tumor progression by shifting the balance of VEGFR2 signaling toward uncontrolled tumor angiogenesis, resulting in dysfunctional tumor vasculature. Here, we designed a tumor endothelium–targeting chimeric peptide (UPI) for the purpose of inhibiting endogenous tumor endothelial epsins by competitively binding activated VEGFR2. We determined that the UPI peptide specifically targets tumor endothelial VEGFR2 through an unconventional binding mechanism that is driven by unique residues present only in the epsin ubiquitin–interacting motif (UIM) and the VEGFR2 kinase domain. In murine models of neoangiogenesis, UPI peptide increased VEGF-driven angiogenesis and neovascularization but spared quiescent vascular beds. Further, in tumor-bearing mice, UPI peptide markedly impaired functional tumor angiogenesis, tumor growth, and metastasis, resulting in a notable increase in survival. Coadministration of UPI peptide with cytotoxic chemotherapeutics further sustained tumor inhibition. Equipped with localized tumor endothelium–specific targeting, our UPI peptide provides potential for an effective and alternative cancer therapy. PMID:26571402

  9. Regulation of Transport Pathways in Tumor Vessels: Role of Tumor Type and Microenvironment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, Susan K.; Monsky, Wayne L.; Yuan, Fan; Roberts, W. Gregory; Griffith, Linda; Torchilin, Vladimir P.; Jain, Rakesh K.

    1998-04-01

    Novel anti-neoplastic agents such as gene targeting vectors and encapsulated carriers are quite large (approximately 100-300 nm in diameter). An understanding of the functional size and physiological regulation of transvascular pathways is necessary to optimize delivery of these agents. Here we analyze the functional limits of transvascular transport and its modulation by the microenvironment. One human and five murine tumors including mammary and colorectal carcinomas, hepatoma, glioma, and sarcoma were implanted in the dorsal skin-fold chamber or cranial window, and the pore cutoff size, a functional measure of transvascular gap size, was determined. The microenvironment was modulated: (i) spatially, by growing tumors in subcutaneous or cranial locations and (ii) temporally, by inducing vascular regression in hormone-dependent tumors. Tumors grown subcutaneously exhibited a characteristic pore cutoff size ranging from 200 nm to 1.2 μ m. This pore cutoff size was reduced in tumors grown in the cranium or in regressing tumors after hormone withdrawal. Vessels induced in basic fibroblast growth factor-containing gels had a pore cutoff size of 200 nm. Albumin permeability was independent of pore cutoff size. These results have three major implications for the delivery of therapeutic agents: (i) delivery may be less efficient in cranial tumors than in subcutaneous tumors, (ii) delivery may be reduced during tumor regression induced by hormonal ablation, and (iii) permeability to a molecule is independent of pore cutoff size as long as the diameter of the molecule is much less than the pore diameter.

  10. Salmonella overcomes tumor immune tolerance by inhibition of tumor indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase 1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Kuan, Yu-Diao; Lee, Che-Hsin

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decades, Salmonella has been proven capable of inhibiting tumor growth. It can specifically target tumors and due to its facultative anaerobic property, can be more penetrative than other drug therapies. However, the molecular mechanism by which Salmonella inhibits tumor growth is still incompletely known. The antitumor therapeutic effect mediated by Salmonella is associated with an inflammatory immune response at the tumor site and a T cell-dependent immune response. Many tumors have been proven to have a high expression of indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO), which is a rate-limiting enzyme that catalyzes tryptophan to kynurenine, thus causing immune tolerance within the tumor microenvironment. With decreased expression of IDO, increased immune response can be observed, which might be helpful when developing cancer immunotherapy. The expression of IDO was decreased after tumor cells were infected with Salmonella. In addition, Western blot analysis showed that the expression levels of phospho-protein kinase B (P-AKT), phospho-mammalian targets of rapamycin (P-mTOR), and phospho-p70 ribosomal s6 kinase (P-p70s6K) in tumor cells were decreased after Salmonella infection. In conclusion, our results indicate that Salmonella inhibits IDO expression and plays a crucial role in anti-tumor therapy, which might be a promising strategy combined with other cancer treatments. PMID:26517244

  11. ADAM17 in tumor associated leukocytes regulates inflammatory mediators and promotes mammary tumor formation

    PubMed Central

    Chuntova, Pavlina; Brady, Nicholas J.; Witschen, Patrice M.; Kemp, Sarah E.; Nelson, Andrew C.; Walcheck, Bruce; Schwertfeger, Kathryn L.

    2016-01-01

    The presence of inflammatory cells within the tumor microenvironment has been tightly linked to mammary tumor formation and progression. Specifically, interactions between tumor cells and infiltrating macrophages can contribute to the generation of a pro-tumorigenic microenvironment. Understanding the complex mechanisms that drive tumor cell-macrophage cross-talk will ultimately lead to the development of approaches to prevent or treat early stage breast cancers. As described here, we demonstrate that the cell surface protease a disintegrin and metalloproteinase 17 (ADAM17) is expressed by macrophages in mammary tumors and contributes to regulating the expression of pro-inflammatory mediators, including inflammatory cytokines and the inflammatory mediator cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2). Furthermore, we demonstrate that ADAM17 is expressed on leukocytes, including macrophages, within polyoma middle T (PyMT)-derived mammary tumors. Genetic deletion of ADAM17 in leukocytes resulted in decreased onset of mammary tumor growth, which was associated with reduced expression of the Cox-2 within the tumor. These findings demonstrate that ADAM17 regulates key inflammatory mediators in macrophages and that leukocyte-specific ADAM17 is an important promoter of mammary tumor initiation. Understanding the mechanisms associated with early stage tumorigenesis has implications for the development of preventive and/or treatment strategies for early stage breast cancers.

  12. Tumor derived vasculogenesis in von Hippel-Lindau disease-associated tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Zhengping; Frerich, Jason M.; Huntoon, Kristin; Yang, Chunzhang; Merrill, Marsha J.; Abdullaev, Ziedulla; Pack, Svetlana D.; Shively, Sharon B.; Stamp, Gordon; Lonser, Russell R.

    2014-01-01

    von Hippel-Lindau disease (VHL) patients develop highly vascular tumors, including central nervous system hemangioblastomas. It has been hypothesized that the vascular nature of these tumors is the product of reactive angiogenesis. However, recent data indicate that VHL-associated hemangioblastoma neoplastic cells originate from embryologically-arrested hemangioblasts capable of blood and endothelial cell differentiation. To determine the origin of tumor vasculature in VHL-associated hemangioblastomas, we analyzed the vascular elements in tumors from VHL patients. We demonstrate that isolated vascular structures and blood vessels within VHL-associated hemangioblastomas are a result of tumor-derived vasculogenesis. Further, similar to hemangioblastomas, we demonstrate that other VHL-associated lesions possess vascular tissue of tumor origin and that tumor-derived endothelial cells emerge within implanted VHL deficient UMRC6 RCC murine xenografts. These findings further establish the embryologic, developmentally arrested, hemangioblast as the tumor cell of origin for VHL-associated hemangioblastomas and indicate that it is also the progenitor cell for other VHL-associated tumors. PMID:24531117

  13. Salmonella overcomes tumor immune tolerance by inhibition of tumor indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase 1 expression.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Yu-Diao; Lee, Che-Hsin

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decades, Salmonella has been proven capable of inhibiting tumor growth. It can specifically target tumors and due to its facultative anaerobic property, can be more penetrative than other drug therapies. However, the molecular mechanism by which Salmonella inhibits tumor growth is still incompletely known. The antitumor therapeutic effect mediated by Salmonella is associated with an inflammatory immune response at the tumor site and a T cell-dependent immune response. Many tumors have been proven to have a high expression of indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO), which is a rate-limiting enzyme that catalyzes tryptophan to kynurenine, thus causing immune tolerance within the tumor microenvironment. With decreased expression of IDO, increased immune response can be observed, which might be helpful when developing cancer immunotherapy. The expression of IDO was decreased after tumor cells were infected with Salmonella. In addition, Western blot analysis showed that the expression levels of phospho-protein kinase B (P-AKT), phospho-mammalian targets of rapamycin (P-mTOR), and phospho-p70 ribosomal s6 kinase (P-p70s6K) in tumor cells were decreased after Salmonella infection. In conclusion, our results indicate that Salmonella inhibits IDO expression and plays a crucial role in anti-tumor therapy, which might be a promising strategy combined with other cancer treatments.

  14. High rates of chromosome missegregation suppress tumor progression but do not inhibit tumor initiation

    PubMed Central

    Zasadil, Lauren M.; Britigan, Eric M. C.; Ryan, Sean D.; Kaur, Charanjeet; Guckenberger, David J.; Beebe, David J.; Moser, Amy R.; Weaver, Beth A.

    2016-01-01

    Aneuploidy, an abnormal chromosome number that deviates from a multiple of the haploid, has been recognized as a common feature of cancers for >100 yr. Previously, we showed that the rate of chromosome missegregation/chromosomal instability (CIN) determines the effect of aneuploidy on tumors; whereas low rates of CIN are weakly tumor promoting, higher rates of CIN cause cell death and tumor suppression. However, whether high CIN inhibits tumor initiation or suppresses the growth and progression of already initiated tumors remained unclear. We tested this using the ApcMin/+ mouse intestinal tumor model, in which effects on tumor initiation versus progression can be discriminated. ApcMin/+ cells exhibit low CIN, and we generated high CIN by reducing expression of the kinesin-like mitotic motor protein CENP-E. CENP-E+/−;ApcMin/+ doubly heterozygous cells had higher rates of chromosome missegregation than singly heterozygous cells, resulting in increased cell death and a substantial reduction in tumor progression compared with ApcMin/+ animals. Intestinal organoid studies confirmed that high CIN does not inhibit tumor cell initiation but does inhibit subsequent cell growth. These findings support the conclusion that increasing the rate of chromosome missegregation could serve as a successful chemotherapeutic strategy. PMID:27146113

  15. Children's Tumor Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... The Children’s Tumor Foundation and Vice President Biden’s National Cancer Moonshot Initiative Oct 26, 2016, Posted in Collaborations , Latest News , Press Release , Science Foundation President Annette Bakker Participates in Key Meetings Dedicated ...

  16. Brain tumor - primary - adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... tumor, relieve symptoms, and improve brain function or comfort. Surgery is often needed for most primary brain ... and pressure Anticonvulsants to reduce seizures Pain medicines Comfort measures, safety measures, physical therapy, and occupational therapy ...

  17. Brain tumor - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms, and improve brain function or the child's comfort. Surgery is needed for most primary brain tumors. ... Anticonvulsants to reduce or prevent seizures Pain medicines Comfort measures, safety measures, physical therapy, occupational therapy, and ...

  18. Solitary fibrous tumor.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Cem; Kabatas, Serdar; Ozen, Ozlem Isiksacan; Gulsen, Salih; Caner, Hakan; Altinors, Nur

    2009-12-01

    Intracranial solitary fibrous tumors (SFT) are typically dural based, CD34-positive neoplasms of mesenchymal origin. Since they were first described in 1996 at the meninges, fewer than 100 SFT had been reported in both cranial and spinal compartments of the central nervous system. SFT can resemble other spindle cell tumors both radiologically and histopathologically, and differentiation can be best achieved through viewing their ultrastructure and using immunohistochemical techniques. In this report, we present four patients with SFT. Upon diagnosing two patients with SFT located in the cerebellopontine angle and parasagittal areas, we reviewed our pathological files and found two more patients; one having a parasagittal tumor and the other having a convexity tumor, that had been diagnosed with hemangiopericytoma. These tumours proved to be SFT after an immunohistochemical re-examination.

  19. Skin tumors on squirrels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herman, C.M.; Reilly, J.R.

    1955-01-01

    Skin tumors having the gross appearance of previously reported fibromas are reported on gray squirrels from N. Y., Md., Va., N. C., and W. Va. and from a fox squirrel from W. Va. and a porcupine from Pa.

  20. Dinosaurs Got Tumors, Too

    MedlinePlus

    ... Got Tumors, Too Benign facial growth discovered in fossil dating back about 69 million years To use ... discovery is the first ever described in the fossil record and the first to be thoroughly documented ...

  1. Genetics of adrenal tumors.

    PubMed

    Opocher, G; Schiavi, F; Cicala, M V; Patalano, A; Mariniello, B; Boaretto, F; Zovato, S; Pignataro, V; Macino, B; Negro, I; Mantero, F

    2009-06-01

    The impact of genetics and genomics on clinical medicine is becoming more and more important. Endocrinology pioneered the development of molecular medicine, but also the study of adrenal tumors had a great impact in this field. Particularly important was the detection of genetics of tumors derived from the adrenal medulla, as well as that of those derived from the sympathetic and parasympathetic paraganglia. The identification of mutations in one of the several pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma susceptibility genes may indicate a specific clinical management drive. Less well understood is the genetics of adrenal cortex tumors, in particular adrenocortical carcinoma, a rare and particularly aggressive disease. There are only a few examples of hereditary transmission of adrenocortical carcinoma, but the analysis of low penetrance genes by genome wide association study may enable us to discover new genetic mechanisms responsible for adrenocortical-derived tumors. PMID:19471236

  2. [Regression grading in gastrointestinal tumors].

    PubMed

    Tischoff, I; Tannapfel, A

    2012-02-01

    Preoperative neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy is a well-established and essential part of the interdisciplinary treatment of gastrointestinal tumors. Neoadjuvant treatment leads to regressive changes in tumors. To evaluate the histological tumor response different scoring systems describing regressive changes are used and known as tumor regression grading. Tumor regression grading is usually based on the presence of residual vital tumor cells in proportion to the total tumor size. Currently, no nationally or internationally accepted grading systems exist. In general, common guidelines should be used in the pathohistological diagnostics of tumors after neoadjuvant therapy. In particularly, the standard tumor grading will be replaced by tumor regression grading. Furthermore, tumors after neoadjuvant treatment are marked with the prefix "y" in the TNM classification. PMID:22293790

  3. Tumor size and prognosis in patients with Wilms tumor

    PubMed Central

    Provenzi, Valentina Oliveira; Rosa, Rafael Fabiano Machado; Rosa, Rosana Cardoso Manique; Roehe, Adriana Vial; dos Santos, Pedro Paulo Albino; Faulhaber, Fabrízia Rennó Sodero; de Oliveira, Ceres Andréia Vieira; Zen, Paulo Ricardo Gazzola

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Investigate the relationship of the tumor volume after preoperative chemotherapy (TVAPQ) and before preoperative chemotherapy (TVBPQ) with overall survival at two and at five years, and lifetime. METHODS: Our sample consisted of consecutive patients evaluated in the period from 1989 to 2009 in an Onco-Hematology Service. Clinical, histological and volumetric data were collected from the medical records. For analysis, chi-square, Kaplan-Meier, log-rank and Cox regression tests were used. RESULTS: The sample consisted of 32 patients, 53.1% were male with a median age at diagnosis of 43 months. There was a significant association between TVAPQ>500mL and the difference between the TVBPQ and TVAPQ (p=0.015) and histologic types of risk (p=0.008). It was also verified an association between the difference between the TVBPQ and TVAPQ and the predominant stromal tumor (p=0.037). When assessing the TVAPQ of all patients, without a cutoff, there was an association of the variable with lifetime (p=0.013), i.e., for each increase of 10mL in TVAPQ there was an average increase of 2% in the risk of death. CONCLUSIONS: Although our results indicate that the TVAPQ could be considered alone as a predictor of poor prognosis regardless of the cutoff suggested in the literature, more studies are needed to replace the histology and staging by tumor size as best prognostic variable. PMID:25623730

  4. Waking up dormant tumors.

    PubMed

    Tse, Joyce C; Kalluri, Raghu

    2011-06-10

    As appreciation grows for the contribution of the tumor microenvironment to the progression of cancer, new evidence accumulates to support that the participation of stromal cells can extend beyond the local environment. Recently, Elkabets and colleagues demonstrated a systemic interaction between cancer cells and distant bone marrow cells to support the growth of otherwise indolent tumor cells at a secondary site, raising thought-provoking questions regarding the involvement of stromal cells in maintaining metastatic dormancy.

  5. Antibody tumor penetration

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Greg M.; Schmidt, Michael M.; Wittrup, K. Dane

    2009-01-01

    Antibodies have proven to be effective agents in cancer imaging and therapy. One of the major challenges still facing the field is the heterogeneous distribution of these agents in tumors when administered systemically. Large regions of untargeted cells can therefore escape therapy and potentially select for more resistant cells. We present here a summary of theoretical and experimental approaches to analyze and improve antibody penetration in tumor tissue. PMID:18541331

  6. Infrared spectra of thyroid tumor tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstorozhev, G. B.; Skornyakov, I. V.; Butra, V. A.

    2010-07-01

    We used infrared spectroscopy methods to study thyroid tumor tissues removed during surgery. The IR spectra of the surgical material are compared with data from histological examination. We show that in malignant neoplasms, the spectra of proteins in the region of C=O vibrations are different from the spectra of these substances in benign tumors and in tissues outside the pathological focus at a distance >1 cm from the margin of the tumor. The differences in the spectra are due to changes in the supermolecular structure of the proteins, resulting from rearrangement of the system of hydrogen bonds. We identify the spectral signs of malignant pathologies.

  7. Hyperammonemia in anorectic tumor-bearing rats

    SciTech Connect

    Chance, W.T.; Cao, L.; Nelson, J.L.; Foley-Nelson, T.; Fischer, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    Plasma ammonia concentrations were significantly elevated by 150% in anorectic rats bearing methylcholanthrene sarcomas. Assessment of ammonia levels in blood draining these sarcomas indicated nearly a 20-fold increase as compared with venous blood in control rats, suggesting the tumor mass as the source of this increase in ammonia. Infusing increasing concentrations of ammonium salts produced anorexia and alterations in brain amino acids in normal rats that were similar to those observed in anorectic tumor-bearing rats. Therefore, these results suggest that ammonia released by tumor tissue may be an important factor in the etiology of cancer anorexia.

  8. Towards tumor immunodiagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Kotoula, Vassiliki

    2016-01-01

    Immunodiagnostic markers applicable on tissue or cytologic material may be prognostic or predictive of response to immunomodulatory drugs and may also be classified according to whether they are cell-specific or tumor-tissue-specific. Cell-specific markers are evaluated under the microscope as (I) morphological, corresponding to the assessment of tumor infiltrating immune cells on routine hematoxylin & eosin (H&E) sections; and (II) immunophenotypic, including the immunohistochemical (IHC) assessment of markers characteristic for tumor infiltrating immune cells. Tumor-tissue-specific markers are assessed in tissue extracts that may be enriched in neoplastic cells but almost inevitably also contain stromal and immune cells infiltrating the tumor. Such markers include (I) immune-response-related gene expression profiles, and (II) tumor genotype characteristics, as recently assessed with large-scale genotyping methods, usually next generation sequencing (NGS) applications. Herein, we discuss the biological nature of immunodiagnostic markers, their potential clinical relevance and the shortcomings that have, as yet, prevented their clinical application. PMID:27563650

  9. Towards tumor immunodiagnostics.

    PubMed

    Kourea, Helen; Kotoula, Vassiliki

    2016-07-01

    Immunodiagnostic markers applicable on tissue or cytologic material may be prognostic or predictive of response to immunomodulatory drugs and may also be classified according to whether they are cell-specific or tumor-tissue-specific. Cell-specific markers are evaluated under the microscope as (I) morphological, corresponding to the assessment of tumor infiltrating immune cells on routine hematoxylin & eosin (H&E) sections; and (II) immunophenotypic, including the immunohistochemical (IHC) assessment of markers characteristic for tumor infiltrating immune cells. Tumor-tissue-specific markers are assessed in tissue extracts that may be enriched in neoplastic cells but almost inevitably also contain stromal and immune cells infiltrating the tumor. Such markers include (I) immune-response-related gene expression profiles, and (II) tumor genotype characteristics, as recently assessed with large-scale genotyping methods, usually next generation sequencing (NGS) applications. Herein, we discuss the biological nature of immunodiagnostic markers, their potential clinical relevance and the shortcomings that have, as yet, prevented their clinical application. PMID:27563650

  10. Accessory parotid gland tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ramachar, Sreevathsa M.; Huliyappa, Harsha A.

    2012-01-01

    Tumors of accessory parotid gland are considered in the differential diagnosis of a mid cheek mass. Parotidectomy is the procedure of choice. All pathological types of parotid main gland tumors occur in the accessory parotid gland also. Presenting as a mid cheek or infrazygomatic mass, the tumors of this accessory parotid gland are notorious for recurrences, if adequate margins are not achieved. We describe two such cases of such a tumor. 40-year-old male with a slowly progressive mid cheek mass was operated by a mid cheek incision. Histopathology of the tumor was pleomorphic adenoma. Facial nerve paresis recovered complelety in 6 months. A 52-year-old female with progressive mid cheek mass who underwent parotidectomy and neck dissection by a modified Blair's incision was diagnosed with extranodal marginal zone lymphoma with focal transformation to a diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Chemotherapy with CHOP regime was initiated. There was no recurrence at 6 months of follow-up. Lymphoma of accessory parotid gland is a very rare tumor. Standard parotidectomy incision is advocated to prevent damage to facial nerve branches. PMID:23483721

  11. [Endosonography of stomach tumors].

    PubMed

    Nattermann, C; Dancygier, H

    1992-11-01

    Based on own experience and on the published literature we report about indications and efficiency of endosonography (EUS) in gastric tumors. The following conclusions can be drawn at the present time. Submucous tumors can be clearly differentiated from extragastric compressions. Although the endosonographic aspect does not allow to formulate an etiologic diagnosis, EUS findings can give hints regarding the nature of the submucous tumor (e.g. leiomyoma, lipoma, cyst). In 75% of cases malignant submucous tumors can be visualized and a correct preoperative staging can be performed. EUS is of special importance in the description of gastric carcinoma. The pT stage can be correctly determined preoperatively in about 80% (69-92%) of cases. Accompanying inflammation in early gastric cancer can lead to overstaging. The sensitivity for local lymph node metastases reaches about 77% (50-88%). Gastric non-Hodgkin lymphomas can be excellently visualized with EUS. The sensitivity amounts to 90-100% and in about 90% of cases the extent of the tumor can be correctly determined preoperatively. The response to radio-chemotherapy of gastric non-Hodgkin lymphomas can be monitored easily with the method. At the present time EUS is the most sensitive imaging tool in visualizing and staging of gastric tumors. Its main advantage is the exact demonstration of intramural and paragastric alterations. However, despite the use of high ultrasonic frequencies and the excellent demonstration of even tiny details with EUS, biopsies for histologic evaluation are still mandatory, especially when dealing with gastric ulcer.

  12. [Grading of neuroendocrine tumors].

    PubMed

    Saeger, W; Schnabel, P A; Komminoth, P

    2016-07-01

    The current WHO classification of neuroendocrine tumors (NET) differentiates between typical carcinoids (low grade NET), atypical carcinoids (intermediate grade NET) and small cell and large cell carcinomas (high grade NET) according to the prognosis. Neuroendocrine neoplasms (NEN) of the gastrointestinal tract and the pancreas are graded in an identical way. Together with the TNM system this enables a preoperative estimation of the prognosis in biopsies and fine needle aspirates. Well-differentiated tumors are graded into G1 tumors by the number of mitoses, <2 per 10 high-power fields (HPF) and the Ki-67 (index <3 %) and G2 tumors (2-20 mitoses/10 HPF, Ki-67 3-20 %). Discrepancies between the number of mitoses and the Ki-67 index are not uncommon and in these cases the higher value of the two should be applied. The more differentiated tumors of the G3 type have to be differentiated from undifferentiated carcinomas of the small cell type and large cell type with a much poorer prognosis. Prognosis relevant grading of thyroid cancers is achieved by special subtyping so that the G1-G3 system is not applicable. The rare cancers of the parathyroid gland and of the pituitary gland are not graded. Adrenal tumors also have no grading system. The prognosis is dependent on the Ki-67 index and with some reservations on the established scoring systems. PMID:27379621

  13. An increase of B cells in the tumor-bearing state has the potential to induce anti-tumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Ito, O; Harada, M; Takenoyama, M; Sumichika, H; Matsuzaki, G; Nomoto, K

    1996-01-01

    We investigated the role of an increased amount of B cells in the tumor-bearing state. The proportion of B cells increased concomitantly with tumor development in the regional lymph nodes (LN) of BALB/c mice bearing Meth A fibrosarcoma (Meth A). Tumor development was accompanied by an increased level of IgG antibodies against Meth A. CD4+ T cells of the regional LN in the early tumor-bearing stage produced significant levels of interferon-gamma and interleukin-4 in response to in vitro stimulation with coated anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody, whereas such capacities decreased in the late tumor-bearing stage. In a tumor-neutralizing assay, the growth of Meth A was significantly suppressed by a co-inoculation with splenic B cells from BALB/c mice in the late tumor-bearing state. This suppression of Meth A growth was tumor-specific and was abolished by the in vivo depletion of either CD4+ or CD8+ T cells. These findings thus suggest that tumor development was accompanied by an increase of B cells and tumor-specific IgG production, but such kinetic changes were not the result of a preferential activation of Th2 type CD4+ T cells. Furthermore, our results indicate that the increase of B cells in the tumor-bearing state has the potential to induce anti-tumor-specific T cell immunity.

  14. Impact of macrophages on tumor growth characteristics in a murine ocular tumor model.

    PubMed

    Stei, Marta M; Loeffler, Karin U; Kurts, Christian; Hoeller, Tobias; Pfarrer, Christiane; Holz, Frank G; Herwig-Carl, Martina C

    2016-10-01

    Tumor associated macrophages (TAM), mean vascular density (MVD), PAS positive extravascular matrix patterns, and advanced patients' age are associated with a poor prognosis in uveal melanoma. These correlations may be influenced by M2 macrophages and their cytokine expression pattern. Thus, the effect of TAM and their characteristic cytokines on histologic tumor growth characteristics were studied under the influence of age. Ninety five CX3CR1(+/GFP) mice (young 8-12weeks, old 10-12months) received an intravitreal injection of 1 × 10(5) HCmel12 melanoma cells. Subgroups were either systemically macrophage-depleted by Clodronate liposomes (n = 23) or received melanoma cells, which were pre-incubated with the supernatant of M1- or M2-polarized macrophages (n = 26). Eyes were processed histologically/immunohistochemically (n = 75), or for flow cytometry (n = 20) to analyze tumor size, mean vascular density (MVD), extravascular matrix patterns, extracellular matrix (ECM) and the presence/polarization of TAM. Prognostically significant extravascular matrix patterns (parallels with cross-linkings, loops, networks) were found more frequently in tumors of untreated old compared to tumors of untreated young mice (p = 0.024); as well as in tumors of untreated mice compared to tumors of macrophage-depleted mice (p = 0.014). Independent from age, M2-conditioned tumors showed more TAM (p = 0.001), increased collagen IV levels (p = 0.024) and a higher MVD (p = 0.02) than M1-conditioned tumors. Flow cytometry revealed a larger proportion of M2-macrophages in old than in young mice. The results indicate that TAM and their cytokines appear to be responsible for a more aggressive tumor phenotype. Tumor favoring and pro-angiogenic effects can be directly attributed to a M2-dominated tumor microenvironment rather than to age-dependent factors alone. However, an aged immunoprofile with an increased number of M2-macrophages may provide a tumor-favoring basis

  15. Pathway-specific differences between tumor cell lines and normal and tumor tissue cells

    PubMed Central

    Ertel, Adam; Verghese, Arun; Byers, Stephen W; Ochs, Michael; Tozeren, Aydin

    2006-01-01

    Background Cell lines are used in experimental investigation of cancer but their capacity to represent tumor cells has yet to be quantified. The aim of the study was to identify significant alterations in pathway usage in cell lines in comparison with normal and tumor tissue. Methods This study utilized a pathway-specific enrichment analysis of publicly accessible microarray data and quantified the gene expression differences between cell lines, tumor, and normal tissue cells for six different tissue types. KEGG pathways that are significantly different between cell lines and tumors, cell lines and normal tissues and tumor and normal tissue were identified through enrichment tests on gene lists obtained using Significance Analysis of Microarrays (SAM). Results Cellular pathways that were significantly upregulated in cell lines compared to tumor cells and normal cells of the same tissue type included ATP synthesis, cell communication, cell cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, purine, pyrimidine and pyruvate metabolism, and proteasome. Results on metabolic pathways suggested an increase in the velocity nucleotide metabolism and RNA production. Pathways that were downregulated in cell lines compared to tumor and normal tissue included cell communication, cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), and ECM-receptor interaction. Only a fraction of the significantly altered genes in tumor-to-normal comparison had similar expressions in cancer cell lines and tumor cells. These genes were tissue-specific and were distributed sparsely among multiple pathways. Conclusion Significantly altered genes in tumors compared to normal tissue were largely tissue specific. Among these genes downregulation was a major trend. In contrast, cell lines contained large sets of significantly upregulated genes that were common to multiple tissue types. Pathway upregulation in cell lines was most pronounced over metabolic pathways including cell nucleotide metabolism and oxidative phosphorylation. Signaling

  16. Tumor margin detection using optical biopsy techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yan; Liu, Cheng-hui; Li, Jiyou; Li, Zhongwu; Zhou, Lixin; Chen, Ke; Pu, Yang; He, Yong; Zhu, Ke; Li, Qingbo; Alfano, Robert R.

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study is to use the Resonance Raman (RR) and fluorescence spectroscopic technique for tumor margin detection with high accuracy based on native molecular fingerprints of breast and gastrointestinal (GI) tissues. This tumor margins detection method utilizes advantages of RR spectroscopic technique in situ and in real-time to diagnose tumor changes providing powerful tools for clinical guiding intraoperative margin assessments and postoperative treatments. The tumor margin detection procedures by RR spectroscopy were taken by scanning lesion from center or around tumor region in ex-vivo to find the changes in cancerous tissues with the rim of normal tissues using the native molecular fingerprints. The specimens used to analyze tumor margins include breast and GI carcinoma and normal tissues. The sharp margin of the tumor was found by the changes of RR spectral peaks within 2 mm distance. The result was verified using fluorescence spectra with 300 nm, 320 nm and 340 nm excitation, in a typical specimen of gastric cancerous tissue within a positive margin in comparison with normal gastric tissues. This study demonstrates the potential of RR and fluorescence spectroscopy as new approaches with labeling free to determine the intraoperative margin assessment.

  17. A multiphase model for three-dimensional tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Sciumè, G; Shelton, S; Gray, WG; Miller, CT; Hussain, F; Ferrari, M; Decuzzi, P; Schrefler, BA

    2014-01-01

    Several mathematical formulations have analyzed the time-dependent behaviour of a tumor mass. However, most of these propose simplifications that compromise the physical soundness of the model. Here, multiphase porous media mechanics is extended to model tumor evolution, using governing equations obtained via the Thermodynamically Constrained Averaging Theory (TCAT). A tumor mass is treated as a multiphase medium composed of an extracellular matrix (ECM); tumor cells (TC), which may become necrotic depending on the nutrient concentration and tumor phase pressure; healthy cells (HC); and an interstitial fluid (IF) for the transport of nutrients. The equations are solved by a Finite Element method to predict the growth rate of the tumor mass as a function of the initial tumor-to-healthy cell density ratio, nutrient concentration, mechanical strain, cell adhesion and geometry. Results are shown for three cases of practical biological interest such as multicellular tumor spheroids (MTS) and tumor cords. First, the model is validated by experimental data for time-dependent growth of an MTS in a culture medium. The tumor growth pattern follows a biphasic behaviour: initially, the rapidly growing tumor cells tend to saturate the volume available without any significant increase in overall tumor size; then, a classical Gompertzian pattern is observed for the MTS radius variation with time. A core with necrotic cells appears for tumor sizes larger than 150 μm, surrounded by a shell of viable tumor cells whose thickness stays almost constant with time. A formula to estimate the size of the necrotic core is proposed. In the second case, the MTS is confined within a healthy tissue. The growth rate is reduced, as compared to the first case – mostly due to the relative adhesion of the tumor and healthy cells to the ECM, and the less favourable transport of nutrients. In particular, for tumor cells adhering less avidly to the ECM, the healthy tissue is progressively displaced

  18. Tumors of the pineal region.

    PubMed

    Piovan, E; Beltramello, A

    1996-01-01

    The role played by neuroradiologic examinations in the diagnosis of neoformations of the pineal region is considered. Results of reports of literature are compared with the personal experience (40 patients) to draw possible significant conclusions for the diagnosis of the oncological type. First, intrinsic pineal lesions should be separated from those of adjacent structures. Reliable discriminating parameters useful in the differential diagnosis are represented by sex and age. Diagnosis based on biochemistry with markers was shown not to be univocal. A further separation can be based on CT and MRI findings. In particular, teratomas appear as solid tumors with calcification and fat. The latter is depicted on MRI even if minimal. To the contrary, germinomas do not contain fat and are markedly enhancing. Microcysts seem to be more common in tumors originating from parenchymal pineal cells. A reliable differential diagnosis is however possible only for small-sized lesions where identification of the anatomical structure of origin is easier. PMID:8677341

  19. Infratemporal approaches to nasopharyngeal tumors.

    PubMed

    Suárez, C; Garćia, L A; Fernández de Leon, R; Rodrigo, J P; Ruiz, B

    1997-01-01

    Twenty patients with neoplasms originating in the nasopharynx were operated using the infratemporal fossa approach with facial translocation (15 cases), the subtemporal-preauricular infratemporal approach (2 cases), and the transmandibular approach (3 cases). A craniectomy was also required in 14 cases. Fifteen tumors were malignant, while 5 were juvenile angiofibromas with infratemporal and intracranial extensions. Most of the lesions were large and involved multiple areas of the skull base. Tumor excision was total in all but 3 patients. Local flaps were utilized in all patients to seal the operative cavity and consisted of temporalis muscle flaps. The most frequent postoperative complications were wound infections and cerebrospinal leaks. Two patients died as a result of postoperative complications. To date, 1 patient has died from disease and 3 are alive with local or distant disease.

  20. Diversity of dynamics and morphologies of invasive solid tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Yang; Torquato, Salvatore

    2012-03-01

    Complex tumor-host interactions can significantly affect the growth dynamics and morphologies of progressing neoplasms. The growth of a confined solid tumor induces mechanical pressure and deformation of the surrounding microenvironment, which in turn influences tumor growth. In this paper, we generalize a recently developed cellular automaton model for invasive tumor growth in heterogeneous microenvironments [Y. Jiao and S. Torquato, PLoS Comput. Biol. 7, e1002314 (2011)] by incorporating the effects of pressure. Specifically, we explicitly model the pressure exerted on the growing tumor due to the deformation of the microenvironment and its effect on the local tumor-host interface instability. Both noninvasive-proliferative growth and invasive growth with individual cells that detach themselves from the primary tumor and migrate into the surrounding microenvironment are investigated. We find that while noninvasive tumors growing in "soft" homogeneous microenvironments develop almost isotropic shapes, both high pressure and host heterogeneity can strongly enhance malignant behavior, leading to finger-like protrusions of the tumor surface. Moreover, we show that individual invasive cells of an invasive tumor degrade the local extracellular matrix at the tumor-host interface, which diminishes the fingering growth of the primary tumor. The implications of our results for cancer diagnosis, prognosis and therapy are discussed.

  1. Elastic Free Energy Drives the Shape of Prevascular Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Mills, K. L.; Kemkemer, Ralf; Rudraraju, Shiva; Garikipati, Krishna

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that the mechanical environment influences cell functions in health and disease. Here, we address how the mechanical environment influences tumor growth, in particular, the shape of solid tumors. In an in vitro tumor model, which isolates mechanical interactions between cancer tumor cells and a hydrogel, we find that tumors grow as ellipsoids, resembling the same, oft-reported observation of in vivo tumors. Specifically, an oblate ellipsoidal tumor shape robustly occurs when the tumors grow in hydrogels that are stiffer than the tumors, but when they grow in more compliant hydrogels they remain closer to spherical in shape. Using large scale, nonlinear elasticity computations we show that the oblate ellipsoidal shape minimizes the elastic free energy of the tumor-hydrogel system. Having eliminated a number of other candidate explanations, we hypothesize that minimization of the elastic free energy is the reason for predominance of the experimentally observed ellipsoidal shape. This result may hold significance for explaining the shape progression of early solid tumors in vivo and is an important step in understanding the processes underlying solid tumor growth. PMID:25072702

  2. [Enophthalmos in an orbital tumor].

    PubMed

    Szabo, Bianca; Szabo, I; Nicula, Cristina; Popescu, Livia Adriana

    2013-01-01

    Enophtalmus is an unusual sign of the orbital tumors often represented by proptosis. One patient with enophtalmus and intraorbital tumor and aplasy is presented. The treatment of choice of orbital tumor is complete surgical excision and careful follow-up. Considering the more aggressive course followed by recurrent tumor, correct diagnosis and management is essential.