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Sample records for desorbed neutral molecules

  1. Molecular surface analysis by laser ionization of desorbed molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Pellin, M.J.; Lykke, K.R.; Wurz, P.; Parker, D.H.

    1992-01-01

    While elemental analysis of surfaces has progressed dramatically over the past ten years, quantitative molecular surface analysis remains difficult. This is particularly true in the analysis of complex materials such as polymers and rubbers which contain a wide compliment of additives and pigments to enhance their material characteristics. For mass spectrometric analysis the difficulty is two fold. First, desorption of surface molecules must be accompanied with minimal fragmentation and collateral surface damage. Second, the desorbed molecules must be ionized for subsequent mass analysis with high efficiency and without significant cracking. This paper focuses on the second of these problems.

  2. Molecular surface analysis by laser ionization of desorbed molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Pellin, M.J.; Lykke, K.R.; Wurz, P.; Parker, D.H.

    1992-07-01

    While elemental analysis of surfaces has progressed dramatically over the past ten years, quantitative molecular surface analysis remains difficult. This is particularly true in the analysis of complex materials such as polymers and rubbers which contain a wide compliment of additives and pigments to enhance their material characteristics. For mass spectrometric analysis the difficulty is two fold. First, desorption of surface molecules must be accompanied with minimal fragmentation and collateral surface damage. Second, the desorbed molecules must be ionized for subsequent mass analysis with high efficiency and without significant cracking. This paper focuses on the second of these problems.

  3. Comparing Vacuum and Extreme Ultraviolet Radiation for Postionization of Laser Desorbed Neutrals from Bacterial Biofilms and Organic Fullerene

    SciTech Connect

    Gaspera, Gerald L.; Takahashi, Lynelle K.; Zhou, Jia; Ahmed, Musahid; Moored, Jerry F.; Hanley, Luke

    2010-12-08

    Vacuum and extreme ultraviolet radiation from 8 - 24 eV generated at a synchrotron was used to postionize laser desorbed neutrals of antibiotic-treated biofilms and a modified fullerene using laser desorption postionization mass spectrometry (LDPI-MS). Results show detection of the parent ion, various fragments, and extracellular material from biofilms using LDPI-MS with both vacuum and extreme ultraviolet photons. Parent ions were observed for both cases, but extreme ultraviolet photons (16-24 eV) induced more fragmentation than vacuum ultraviolet (8-14 eV) photons.

  4. Spin Temperature of Water Molecules Desorbed from the Surfaces of Amorphous Solid Water, Vapor-deposited and Produced from Photolysis of a CH4/O2 Solid Mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hama, T.; Watanabe, N.; Kouchi, A.; Yokoyama, M.

    2011-09-01

    The nuclear-spin temperature of molecules observed in interstellar space or cometary coma is an important key to understanding physical and chemical histories of the molecules. The present Letter reports measurements of nuclear-spin states and rotational temperatures of thermally desorbed H2O molecules from amorphous solid water (ASW) by combining temperature-programmed desorption and resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI). REMPI spectra of desorbed H2O molecules were measured at ~150 K from vapor-deposited ASW at 8 K. The nuclear-spin temperature of desorbed H2O molecules exhibits almost an upper limit to the ortho-to-para ratio of close to 3. No discernible change was observed in the H2O REMPI spectrum, neither after leaving the deposited ASW for 9 days in a vacuum chamber at 8 K, nor in the presence of O2 molecules, nor upon exposure of ASW to vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) photons. Desorbed H2O molecules were also investigated from ASW produced by VUV irradiation of a CH4/O2 mixture at 8 K. The resulting H2O spectrum showed a high nuclear-spin temperature. These results suggest that the nuclear-spin temperatures of gaseous H2O molecules thermally desorbed from ice do not necessarily reflect the surface temperature at which H2O molecules condensed or formed under some laboratory conditions. We discuss the possibility of nuclear-spin conversion of H2O in water ice. The present study advocates the importance of further studies to give an interpretation of nuclear-spin temperatures of molecules observed in interstellar space or cometary coma.

  5. SPIN TEMPERATURE OF WATER MOLECULES DESORBED FROM THE SURFACES OF AMORPHOUS SOLID WATER, VAPOR-DEPOSITED AND PRODUCED FROM PHOTOLYSIS OF A CH{sub 4}/O{sub 2} SOLID MIXTURE

    SciTech Connect

    Hama, T.; Watanabe, N.; Kouchi, A.; Yokoyama, M.

    2011-09-01

    The nuclear-spin temperature of molecules observed in interstellar space or cometary coma is an important key to understanding physical and chemical histories of the molecules. The present Letter reports measurements of nuclear-spin states and rotational temperatures of thermally desorbed H{sub 2}O molecules from amorphous solid water (ASW) by combining temperature-programmed desorption and resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI). REMPI spectra of desorbed H{sub 2}O molecules were measured at {approx}150 K from vapor-deposited ASW at 8 K. The nuclear-spin temperature of desorbed H{sub 2}O molecules exhibits almost an upper limit to the ortho-to-para ratio of close to 3. No discernible change was observed in the H{sub 2}O REMPI spectrum, neither after leaving the deposited ASW for 9 days in a vacuum chamber at 8 K, nor in the presence of O{sub 2} molecules, nor upon exposure of ASW to vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) photons. Desorbed H{sub 2}O molecules were also investigated from ASW produced by VUV irradiation of a CH{sub 4}/O{sub 2} mixture at 8 K. The resulting H{sub 2}O spectrum showed a high nuclear-spin temperature. These results suggest that the nuclear-spin temperatures of gaseous H{sub 2}O molecules thermally desorbed from ice do not necessarily reflect the surface temperature at which H{sub 2}O molecules condensed or formed under some laboratory conditions. We discuss the possibility of nuclear-spin conversion of H{sub 2}O in water ice. The present study advocates the importance of further studies to give an interpretation of nuclear-spin temperatures of molecules observed in interstellar space or cometary coma.

  6. Multiphoton Ionization of Laser-Desorbed Neutral Molecules in a Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-19

    dissociates when irradiated with a gated pulse of light from a continuous wave carbon dioxide laser , forming two fragment ions at m/z = 200 and 171...this manner to laser photodissociation in a unique 3- laser experiment in which a third (gated, continuous- wave (cw) CO) laser has been used to...pathway shown in Figure 1), thus allowing the beam to travel through the center of the cell. Typical UV laser pulse energies were on the order of 50-100

  7. Electron stimulated desorption of the metallic substrate at monolayer coverage: Sensitive detection via 193 nm laser photoionization of neutral aluminum desorbed from CH3O/Al(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, C. E.; Whitten, J. E.; Pellin, M. J.; Gruen, D. M.; Jones, P. L.

    A fortuitous overlap between the gain profile of the 193 nm ArF excimer laser and the Al autoionizing transition (sup 2)S(sub 1/2) (512753/cm) yields to the left (sup 2)P(sup 0)J has been exploited in the direct observation of substrate metal atoms in an electron simulated desorption (ESD) process from the monolayer adsorbate system CH3O/Al(111). The identity of the mass 27 photoion was established as Al(+) by (1) isotopic substitution of C-13 in the methanol employed for methoxy formation, and (2) tunable laser scans utilizing the DJ-2 (J = 3/2, 5/2) intermediate levels at approximately 32436/cm and a 248 nm ionization step. An ESD yield of approximately x 10(exp -6) Al atoms/(electron at 1 keV) was established by comparison with a sputtering experiment in the same apparatus. Velocity distributions measured for the desorbed Al species showed some differences in comparison with methoxy velocity data: a slightly lower peak velocity and a significantly less prominent high-velocity component.

  8. Improved spatial separation of neutral molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kienitz, Jens S.; Długołecki, Karol; Trippel, Sebastian; Küpper, Jochen

    2017-07-01

    We have developed and experimentally demonstrated an improved electrostatic deflector for the spatial separation of molecules according to their dipole-moment-to-mass ratio. The device features a very open structure that allows for significantly stronger electric fields as well as for stronger deflection without molecules crashing into the device itself. We have demonstrated its performance using the prototypical carbonyl sulfide molecule and we discuss opportunities regarding improved quantum-state-selectivity for complex molecules and the deflection of unpolar molecules.

  9. Deceleration of neutral molecules in macroscopic traveling traps

    SciTech Connect

    Osterwalder, Andreas; Meek, Samuel A.; Hammer, Georg; Haak, Henrik; Meijer, Gerard

    2010-05-15

    A decelerator is presented where polar neutral molecules are guided and decelerated using the principle of traveling electric potential wells, such that molecules are confined in stable three-dimensional traps throughout. We compare this decelerator with that of Scharfenberg et al. [Phys. Rev. A 79, 023410 (2009)] and we show that the current decelerator provides a substantially larger phase-space acceptance, even at higher acceleration. The mode of operation is described and experimentally demonstrated by guiding and decelerating CO molecules.

  10. Countercurrent flow absorber and desorber

    DOEpatents

    Wilkinson, W.H.

    1984-10-16

    Countercurrent flow absorber and desorber devices are provided for use in absorption cycle refrigeration systems and thermal boosting systems. The devices have increased residence time and surface area resulting in improved heat and mass transfer characteristics. The apparatuses may be incorporated into open cycle thermal boosting systems in which steam serves both as the refrigerant vapor which is supplied to the absorber section and as the supply of heat to drive the desorber section of the system. 9 figs.

  11. Countercurrent flow absorber and desorber

    DOEpatents

    Wilkinson, William H.

    1984-01-01

    Countercurrent flow absorber and desorber devices are provided for use in absorption cycle refrigeration systems and thermal boosting systems. The devices have increased residence time and surface area resulting in improved heat and mass transfer characteristics. The apparatuses may be incorporated into open cycle thermal boosting systems in which steam serves both as the refrigerant vapor which is supplied to the absorber section and as the supply of heat to drive the desorber section of the system.

  12. Dynamics of neutral molecules stored in a ring

    SciTech Connect

    Crompvoets, Floris M.H.; Bethlem, Hendrick L.; Kuepper, Jochen; Roij, Andre J.A. van; Meijer, Gerard

    2004-06-01

    A decelerated beam of neutral ammonia molecules is injected into an electrostatic storage ring. Electrostatic lenses are used to map the emittance of the decelerator onto the acceptance of the ring. The tangential velocity spread of the package of molecules in the ring is set to less than 1 m/s. The package of molecules can be observed for more than 50 distinct round trips, corresponding to 40 m in circular orbit and almost 0.5 s storage time, sufficiently long for a first investigation of its transversal motion in the ring.

  13. BEAM TRANSPORT AND STORAGE WITH COLD NEUTRAL ATOMS AND MOLECULES

    SciTech Connect

    Walstrom, Peter L.

    2012-05-15

    A large class of cold neutral atoms and molecules is subject to magnetic field-gradient forces. In the presence of a field, hyperfine atomic states are split into several Zeeman levels. The slopes of these curves vs. field are the effective magnetic moments. By means of optical pumping in a field, Zeeman states of neutral lithium atoms and CaH molecules with effective magnetic moments of nearly {+-} one Bohr magneton can be selected. Particles in Zeeman states for which the energy increases with field are repelled by increasing fields; particles in states for which the energy decreases with field are attracted to increasing fields. For stable magnetic confinement, field-repelled states are required. Neutral-particle velocities in the present study are on the order of tens to hundreds of m/s and the magnetic fields needed for transport and injection are on the order of in the range of 0.01-1T. Many of the general concepts of charged-particle beam transport carry over into neutral particle spin-force optics, but with important differences. In general, the role of bending dipoles in charged particle optics is played by quadrupoles in neutral particle optics; the role of quadrupoles is played by sextupoles. The neutralparticle analog of charge-exchange injection into storage rings is the use of lasers to flip the state of particles from field-seeking to field-repelled. Preliminary tracking results for two neutral atom/molecule storage ring configurations are presented. It was found that orbit instabilities limit the confinment time in a racetrack-shaped ring with discrete magnetic elements with drift spaces between them; stable behavior was observed in a toroidal ring with a continuous sextupole field. An alternative concept using a linear sextupole or octupole channel with solenoids on the ends is presently being considered.

  14. Human intestinal absorption--neutral molecules and ionic species.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Michael H

    2014-07-01

    Analysis of percentage human intestinal absorption (%HIA) for 280 drugs shows that an excellent fit can be obtained using only three descriptors for neutral molecules with a SD of 13.9%. Use of descriptors for individual cations and anions does not lead to any better goodness-of-fit. It is noted that diffusion coefficients in water for ionized molecules are almost identical to those for the corresponding neutral molecules. Comparison of equation coefficients for HIA with those for other processes shows that HIA resembles diffusion in water but does not resemble permeation through biological bilayers. It is shown that compound substituent effects on HIA are near those for diffusion but are far away from substituent effects on permeation through a typical bilayer. Calculations indicate that rates of permeation through an unstirred mucosal layer are of the same order as experimental rates of permeation in HIA. It is concluded that for the 280 compound set, diffusion through the unstirred mucosal layer is the rate determining step. The effect on pK(a) in transfer of acids and bases from water to another solvent, and of diffusion past a negative charge in a phase/bilayer is also considered. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  15. 3D-Printed Beam Splitter for Polar Neutral Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Sean D. S.; Osterwalder, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    We describe a macroscopic beam splitter for polar neutral molecules. A complex electrode structure is required for the beam splitter which would be very difficult to produce with traditional manufacturing methods. Instead, we make use of a nascent manufacturing technique: 3D printing of a plastic piece, followed by electroplating. This fabrication method opens a plethora of avenues for research, since 3D printing imposes practically no limitations on possible shapes, and the plating produces chemically robust, conductive construction elements with an almost free choice of surface material. It has the added advantage of dramatically reduced production cost and time. Our beam splitter is an electrostatic hexapole guide that smoothly transforms into two bent quadrupoles. We demonstrate the correct functioning of this device by separating a supersonic molecular beam of ND3 into two correlated fractions. It is shown that this device can be used to implement experiments with differential detection wherein one of the fractions serves as a probe and the other as a reference. Reverse operation would allow the merging of two beams of polar neutral molecules.

  16. Adsorption of methane molecules on neutral titanium Met-Cars

    SciTech Connect

    Sakurai, H.; Castleman, A.W. Jr.

    1999-07-01

    Titanium metallocarbohedrenes (Met-Cars) are observed to adsorb methane molecules at low temperatures. The observed formation of the methane-Ti{sub 8}C{sub 12} cluster complexes provides further direct evidence establishing that stable {ital neutral} titanium Met-Cars are present in copious amounts in the cluster beam. At sufficiently low temperatures, a dominant peak is observed for Ti{sub 8}C{sub 12}(CH{sub 4}){sub 4} along with less intense peaks of other methane-Ti{sub 8}C{sub 12} clusters, which suggests the geometry of titanium Met-Cars may be the tetrahedral cage structure with T{sub d} symmetry. By studying the photoionization efficiency of the methane-Ti{sub 8}C{sub 12} complexes near ionization threshold, their ionization potentials are found to be lower than that of Ti{sub 8}C{sub 12}. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Electron stimulated desorption of the metallic substrate at monolayer coverage: Sensitive detection via 193 nm laser photoionization of neutral aluminum desorbed from CH{sub 3}O/Al(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Young, C.E.; Whitten, J.E.; Pellin, M.J.; Gruen, D.M.; Jones, P.L.

    1992-07-01

    A fortuitous overlap between the gain profile of the 193 nm ArF excimer laser and the Al autoionizing transition {sup 2}S{sub 1/2} (512753 cm{sup {minus}1}) {l_arrow} {sup 2}P{sup 0}J has been exploited in the direct observation of substrate metal atoms in an electron simulated desorption (ESD) process from the monolayer adsorbate system CH{sub 3}O/Al(111). The identity of the mass 27 photoion was established as Al{sup +} by (1) isotopic substitution of {sup 13}C in the methanol employed for methoxy formation, and (2) tunable laser scans utilizing the {sup 2}DJ (J=3/2, 5/2) intermediate levels at {approximately}32436 cm{sup {minus}1} and a 248 nm ionization step. An ESD yield of {approximately}{times}10{sup {minus}6} Al atoms/(electron at 1 keV) was established by comparison with a sputtering experiment in the same apparatus. Velocity distributions measured for the desorbed Al species showed some differences in comparison with methoxy velocity data: a slightly lower peak velocity and a significantly less prominent high-velocity component. 10 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Electron stimulated desorption of the metallic substrate at monolayer coverage: Sensitive detection via 193 nm laser photoionization of neutral aluminum desorbed from CH sub 3 O/Al(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Young, C.E.; Whitten, J.E.; Pellin, M.J.; Gruen, D.M. ); Jones, P.L. )

    1992-01-01

    A fortuitous overlap between the gain profile of the 193 nm ArF excimer laser and the Al autoionizing transition {sup 2}S{sub 1/2} (512753 cm{sup {minus}1}) {l arrow} {sup 2}P{sup 0}J has been exploited in the direct observation of substrate metal atoms in an electron simulated desorption (ESD) process from the monolayer adsorbate system CH{sub 3}O/Al(111). The identity of the mass 27 photoion was established as Al{sup +} by (1) isotopic substitution of {sup 13}C in the methanol employed for methoxy formation, and (2) tunable laser scans utilizing the {sup 2}DJ (J=3/2, 5/2) intermediate levels at {approximately}32436 cm{sup {minus}1} and a 248 nm ionization step. An ESD yield of {approximately}{times}10{sup {minus}6} Al atoms/(electron at 1 keV) was established by comparison with a sputtering experiment in the same apparatus. Velocity distributions measured for the desorbed Al species showed some differences in comparison with methoxy velocity data: a slightly lower peak velocity and a significantly less prominent high-velocity component. 10 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Ion Pairs or Neutral Molecule Adducts? Cooperativity in Hydrogen Bonding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeKock, Roger L.; Schipper, Laura A.; Dykhouse, Stephanie C.; Heeringa, Lee P.; Brandsen, Benjamin M.

    2009-01-01

    We performed theoretical studies on the systems NH[subscript 3] times HF times mH[subscript 2]O, NH[subscript 3] times HCl times mH[subscript 2]O, with m = 0, 1, 2, and 6. The molecules with m = 0 form hydrogen-bonded adducts with little tendency to form an ion-pair structure. The molecule NH[subscript 3] times HCl times H[subscript 2]O cannot be…

  20. Ion Pairs or Neutral Molecule Adducts? Cooperativity in Hydrogen Bonding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeKock, Roger L.; Schipper, Laura A.; Dykhouse, Stephanie C.; Heeringa, Lee P.; Brandsen, Benjamin M.

    2009-01-01

    We performed theoretical studies on the systems NH[subscript 3] times HF times mH[subscript 2]O, NH[subscript 3] times HCl times mH[subscript 2]O, with m = 0, 1, 2, and 6. The molecules with m = 0 form hydrogen-bonded adducts with little tendency to form an ion-pair structure. The molecule NH[subscript 3] times HCl times H[subscript 2]O cannot be…

  1. A Kinetic Study of the Gas Phase Neutral-Neutral Reactions Between Sulfur- and Chlorine-Containing Molecules Present in the Atmosphere of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maffucci, D. M.; Woon, D. E.; Herbst, E.

    2017-05-01

    Using updated electronic structures, we employ a variety of kinetic theories to calculate the reaction rate constants for neutral-neutral chemical reactions between sulfur- and chlorine-containing molecules observed in the atmosphere of Venus.

  2. Neutralization of Pathogenic Fungi with Small-Molecule Immunotherapeutics.

    PubMed

    Chirkin, Egor; Muthusamy, Viswanathan; Mann, Paul; Roemer, Terry; Nantermet, Philippe G; Spiegel, David A

    2017-10-09

    Systemic fungal infections represent an important public health concern, and new antifungal agents are highly desirable. Herein, we describe the design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of a novel class of antifungal compounds called antibody-recruiting molecules targeting fungi (ARM-Fs). Our approach relies on the use of non-peptidic small molecules, which selectively bind fungal cells and recruit endogenous antibodies to their surfaces, resulting in immune-mediated clearance. Using the opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida albicans as a model, we identified a highly specific bifunctional molecule able to mediate the engulfment and phagocytosis of C. albicans cells by human immune cells in biologically relevant functional assays. This work represents a novel therapeutic approach to treating fungal illness with significant potential to complement and/or combine with existing treatment strategies. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Molecule formation in fast neutral winds from protostars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassgold, A. E.; Mamon, G. A.; Huggins, P. J.

    1989-01-01

    A time-dependent chemical model is used to analyze the processes generating and destroying molecules in very high velocity winds from low-mass protostars. CO and SiO are found to be generated in significant quantities despite the persistence of H in atomic form, consistently with recent protostellar wind detections of CO and H I at velocities in excess of 100 km/sec. A moderate mass-loss rate, in conjunction with a temperature distribution that decreases rather rapidly with distance from the protostar, are the conditions for substantial molecule formation.

  4. Improved alternating gradient transport and focusing of neutral molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Kalnins, Juris; Lambertson, Glen; Gould, Harvey

    2001-12-02

    Polar molecules, in strong-field seeking states, can be transported and focused by an alternating sequence of electric field gradients that focus in one transverse direction while defocusing in the other. We show by calculation and numerical simulation, how one may greatly improve the alternating gradient transport and focusing of molecules. We use a new optimized multipole lens design, a FODO lattice beam transport line, and lenses to match the beam transport line to the beam source and the final focus. We derive analytic expressions for the potentials, fields, and gradients that may be used to design these lenses. We describe a simple lens optimization procedure and derive the equations of motion for tracking molecules through a beam transport line. As an example, we model a straight beamline that transports a 560 m/s jet-source beam of methyl fluoride molecules 15 m from its source and focuses it to 2 mm diameter. We calculate the beam transport line acceptance and transmission, for a beam with velocity spread, and estimate the transmitted intensity for specified source conditions. Possible applications are discussed.

  5. Optical Frequency Standards Based on Neutral Atoms and Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riehle, Fritz; Helmcke, Juergen

    The current status and prospects of optical frequency standards based on neutral atomic and molecular absorbers are reviewed. Special attention is given to an optical frequency standard based on cold Ca atoms which are interrogated with a pulsed excitation scheme leading to resolved line structures with a quality factor Q > 10^12. The optical frequency was measured by comparison with PTB's primary clock to be νCa = 455 986 240 494.13 kHz with a total relative uncertainty of 2.5 x10^-13. After a recent recommendation of the International Committee of Weights and Measures (CIPM), this frequency standard now represents one of the most accurate realizations of the length unit.

  6. Absorption machine with desorber-resorber

    DOEpatents

    Biermann, Wendell J.

    1985-01-01

    An absorption refrigeration system utilizing a low temperature desorber and intermediate temperature resorber. The system operates at three temperatures and three pressures to increase the efficiency of the system and is capable of utilizing a lower generator temperature than previously used.

  7. Isotope Effect in Tunneling Ionization of Neutral Hydrogen Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Xu, H.; Atia-Tul-Noor, A.; Hu, B. T.; Kielpinski, D.; Sang, R. T.; Litvinyuk, I. V.

    2016-08-01

    It has been recently predicted theoretically that due to nuclear motion light and heavy hydrogen molecules exposed to strong electric field should exhibit substantially different tunneling ionization rates [O. I. Tolstikhin, H. J. Worner, and T. Morishita, Phys. Rev. A 87, 041401(R) (2013)]. We studied that isotope effect experimentally by measuring relative ionization yields for each species in a mixed H2/D2 gas jet interacting with intense femtosecond laser pulses. In a reaction microscope apparatus, we detected ionic fragments from all contributing channels (single ionization, dissociation, and sequential double ionization) and determined the ratio of total single ionization yields for H2 and D2 . The measured ratio agrees quantitatively with the prediction of the generalized weak-field asymptotic theory in an apparent failure of the frozen-nuclei approximation.

  8. Effective ex vivo neutralization of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in plasma by recombinant immunoglobulin molecules.

    PubMed

    Gauduin, M C; Allaway, G P; Maddon, P J; Barbas, C F; Burton, D R; Koup, R A

    1996-04-01

    We tested the ability of human monoclonal antibodies (immunoglobulin G1b12 [IgG1b12] and 19b) and CD4-based molecules (CD4-IgG2 and soluble CD4 [sCD4]) to neutralize human immunodeficiency virus type 1 directly from the plasma of seropositive donors in an ex vivo neutralization assay. IgG1b12 and CD4-IgG2, at concentrations from 1 to 25 micrograms/ml, were found to be effective at reducing the HIV-1 titer in most plasma samples. When viruses recovered from plasma samples were expanded to produce virus stocks, no correlation between the neutralization sensitivities to IgG1b12 and CD4-IgG2 of the in vitro passaged stocks and those of the ex vivo neutralizations performed directly on the plasma was observed. These differences could be due to changes in neutralization sensitivity that occur after one passage of the virus in vitro, or they could be related to the presence of complement or antibodies in the plasma. Furthermore, differences in expression of adhesion molecules on plasma-derived and phytohemagglutinin-activated peripheral blood mononuclear cell-derived viruses could be involved. These studies suggest that IgG1b12 and CD4-IgG2 have broad and potent neutralizing activity in both in vitro and ex vivo neutralization assays and should be considered for use as potential immunoprophylactic or therapeutic agents.

  9. Internal Energies of Ion-Sputtered Neutral Tryptophan and Thymine Molecules Determined by Vacuum Ultraviolet Photoionization

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jia; Takahashi, Lynelle; Wilson, Kevin R.; Leone, Stephen R.; Ahmed, Musahid

    2010-03-11

    Vacuum ultraviolet photoionization coupled to secondary neutral mass spectrometry (VUV-SNMS) of deposited tryptophan and thymine films are performed at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline. The resulting mass spectra show that while the intensity of the VUV-SNMS signal is lower than the corresponding secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) signal, the mass spectra are significantly simplified in VUV-SNMS. A detailed examination of tryptophan and thymine neutral molecules sputtered by 25 keV Bi3 + indicates that the ion-sputtered parent molecules have ~;;2.5 eV of internal energy. While this internal energy shifts the appearance energy of the photofragment ions for both tryptophan and thymine, it does not change the characteristic photoionizaton efficiency (PIE) curves of thymine versus photon energy. Further analysis of the mass spectral signals indicate that approximately 80 neutral thymine molecules and 400 tryptophan molecules are sputtered per incident Bi3 + ion. The simplified mass spectra and significant characteristic ion contributions to the VUV-SNMS spectra indicate the potential power of the technique for organic molecule surface analysis.

  10. Spectroscopy, manipulation and trapping of neutral atoms, molecules, and other particles using optical nanofibers: a review.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, Michael J; Deasy, Kieran; Frawley, Mary; Kumar, Ravi; Prel, Eugen; Russell, Laura; Truong, Viet Giang; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2013-08-13

    The use of tapered optical fibers, i.e., optical nanofibers, for spectroscopy and the detection of small numbers of particles, such as neutral atoms or molecules, has been gaining interest in recent years. In this review, we briefly introduce the optical nanofiber, its fabrication, and optical mode propagation within. We discuss recent progress on the integration of optical nanofibers into laser-cooled atom and vapor systems, paying particular attention to spectroscopy, cold atom cloud characterization, and optical trapping schemes. Next, a natural extension of this work to molecules is introduced. Finally, we consider several alternatives to optical nanofibers that display some advantages for specific applications.

  11. Spectroscopy, Manipulation and Trapping of Neutral Atoms, Molecules, and Other Particles Using Optical Nanofibers: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Morrissey, Michael J.; Deasy, Kieran; Frawley, Mary; Kumar, Ravi; Prel, Eugen; Russell, Laura; Truong, Viet Giang; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2013-01-01

    The use of tapered optical fibers, i.e., optical nanofibers, for spectroscopy and the detection of small numbers of particles, such as neutral atoms or molecules, has been gaining interest in recent years. In this review, we briefly introduce the optical nanofiber, its fabrication, and optical mode propagation within. We discuss recent progress on the integration of optical nanofibers into laser-cooled atom and vapor systems, paying particular attention to spectroscopy, cold atom cloud characterization, and optical trapping schemes. Next, a natural extension of this work to molecules is introduced. Finally, we consider several alternatives to optical nanofibers that display some advantages for specific applications. PMID:23945738

  12. Ab initio determination of the proton affinities of small neutral and anionic molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeFrees, D. J.; McLean, A. D.

    1986-01-01

    The proton affinity of a molecule in the gas phase is a fundamental measure of its basicity and is the factor controlling the course of many ion-molecule reactions. In this article, ab initio molecular orbital theory at the MP4/6-311 ++ G(3df, 3pd) level of theory is demonstrated to predict proton affinities (PA's) for small neutral and anionic bases to within 2 kcal mol-1. Furthermore, the errors are random, indicating that there are likely no systematic errors in either the experimental or theoretical PA's. Also, this level of theory is used to calibrate less sophisticated theoretical models which are suitable for larger molecules; the MP4/6-311 ++ G(2d, 2p) and MP2/6-311 ++ G(d, p) theoretical models should be particularly useful. A procedure for predicting the vibrational frequencies for anion is proposed and applied to CH3-, NH2-, OH-, and CN-.

  13. Developing Density of Laser-Cooled Neutral Atoms and Molecules in a Linear Magnetic Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasquez, Joe, III; Walstrom, Peter; di Rosa, Michael

    2013-05-01

    In this poster we show that neutral particle injection and accumulation using laser-induced spin flips may be used to form dense ensembles of ultracold magnetic particles, i.e., laser-cooled paramagnetic atoms and molecules. Particles are injected in a field-seeking state, are switched by optical pumping to a field-repelled state, and are stored in the minimum-B trap. The analogous process in high-energy charged-particle accumulator rings is charge-exchange injection using stripper foils. The trap is a linear array of sextupoles capped by solenoids. Particle-tracking calculations and design of our linear accumulator along with related experiments involving 7Li will be presented. We test these concepts first with atoms in preparation for later work with selected molecules. Finally, we present our preliminary results with CaH, our candidate molecule for laser cooling. This project is funded by the LDRD program of Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  14. Novel Desorber for Online Drilling Mud Gas Logging

    PubMed Central

    Lackowski, Marcin; Tobiszewski, Marek; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    This work presents the construction solution and experimental results of a novel desorber for online drilling mud gas logging. The traditional desorbers use mechanical mixing of the liquid to stimulate transfer of hydrocarbons to the gaseous phase that is further analyzed. The presented approach is based on transfer of hydrocarbons from the liquid to the gas bubbles flowing through it and further gas analysis. The desorber was checked for gas logging from four different drilling muds collected from Polish boreholes. The results of optimization studies are also presented in this study. The comparison of the novel desorber with a commercial one reveals strong advantages of the novel one. It is characterized by much better hydrocarbons recovery efficiency and allows reaching lower limits of detection of the whole analytical system. The presented desorber seems to be very attractive alternative over widely used mechanical desorbers. PMID:27127674

  15. Novel Desorber for Online Drilling Mud Gas Logging.

    PubMed

    Lackowski, Marcin; Tobiszewski, Marek; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    This work presents the construction solution and experimental results of a novel desorber for online drilling mud gas logging. The traditional desorbers use mechanical mixing of the liquid to stimulate transfer of hydrocarbons to the gaseous phase that is further analyzed. The presented approach is based on transfer of hydrocarbons from the liquid to the gas bubbles flowing through it and further gas analysis. The desorber was checked for gas logging from four different drilling muds collected from Polish boreholes. The results of optimization studies are also presented in this study. The comparison of the novel desorber with a commercial one reveals strong advantages of the novel one. It is characterized by much better hydrocarbons recovery efficiency and allows reaching lower limits of detection of the whole analytical system. The presented desorber seems to be very attractive alternative over widely used mechanical desorbers.

  16. Properties of clusters in the gas phase: V. Complexes of neutral molecules onto negative ions

    SciTech Connect

    Keesee, R.G.; Lee, N.; Castleman, A.W. Jr.

    1980-09-01

    Ion--molecules association reactions of the form A/sup -/(B)/sub n1/-+B=A/sup -/(B)/sub n/ were studied over a range of temperatures in the gas phase using high pressure mass spectrometry. Enthalpy and entropy changes were determined for the stepwise clustering reactions of (1) sulfur dioxide onto Cl/sup -/, I/sup -/, and NO/sub 2//sup -/ with n ranging from one to three or four, and onto SO/sub 2//sup -/ and SO/sub 3//sup -/ with n equal to one; and (2) carbon dioxide onto Cl/sup -/, I/sup -/, NO/sub 2//sup -/, CO/sub 3//sup -/, and SO/sub 3//sup -/ with n equal to one. From these data and earlier hydration results, the order of the magnitude of the enthalpy changes on the association of the first neutral for a series of negative ions was found to parallel the gas-phase basicity of those anions. For any given ion, the relative order of the addition enthalpies among the neutrals was found to be dependent on the polarizabilities of the neutrals and on the covalency in the ion-neutral bond. Dispersion of charge via covalent bonding was found to affect significantly the succeeding clustering steps.

  17. Interaction of vacuum ultraviolet excimer laser radiation with fused silica: II. Neutral atom and molecule emission

    SciTech Connect

    George, Sharon R.; Langford, S. C.; Dickinson, J. T.

    2010-02-15

    We report mass-resolved time-of-flight measurements of neutral Si, O, and SiO from ultraviolet-grade fused silica during pulsed 157-nm irradiation at fluences well below the threshold for optical breakdown. Although the emission intensities are strongly affected by thermal treatments that affect the density of strained bonds in the lattice, they are not consistently affected by mechanical treatments that alter the density of point defects, such as polishing and abrasion. We propose that the absorption of single 157 nm photons cleave strained bonds to produce defects that subsequently diffuse to the surface. There they react with dangling bonds to release neutral atoms and molecules. Hartree-Fock calculations on clusters containing these defects support the contention that defect interactions can yield emission. More direct emission by the photoelectronic excitation of antibonding chemical states is also supported.

  18. Detection of electrically neutral and nonpolar molecules in ionic solutions using silicon nanowires.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ying-Pin; Chu, Chia-Jung; Tsai, Li-Chu; Su, Ya-Wen; Chen, Pei-Hua; Moodley, Mathew K; Huang, Ding; Chen, Yit-Tsong; Yang, Ying-Jay; Chen, Chii-Dong

    2017-04-21

    We report on a technique that can extend the use of nanowire sensors to the detection of interactions involving nonpolar and neutral molecules in an ionic solution environment. This technique makes use of the fact that molecular interactions result in a change in the permittivity of the molecules involved. For the interactions taking place at the surface of nanowires, this permittivity change can be determined from the analysis of the measured complex impedance of the nanowire. To demonstrate this technique, histidine was detected using different charge polarities controlled by the pH value of the solution. This included the detection of electrically neutral histidine at a sensitivity of 1 pM. Furthermore, it is shown that nonpolar molecules, such as hexane, can also be detected. The technique is applicable to the use of nanowires with and without a surface-insulating oxide. We show that information about the changes in amplitude and the phase of the complex impedance reveals the fundamental characteristics of the molecular interactions, including the molecular field and the permittivity.

  19. Detection of electrically neutral and nonpolar molecules in ionic solutions using silicon nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ying-Pin; Chu, Chia-Jung; Tsai, Li-Chu; Su, Ya-Wen; Chen, Pei-Hua; Moodley, Mathew K.; Huang, Ding; Chen, Yit-Tsong; Yang, Ying-Jay; Chen, Chii-Dong

    2017-04-01

    We report on a technique that can extend the use of nanowire sensors to the detection of interactions involving nonpolar and neutral molecules in an ionic solution environment. This technique makes use of the fact that molecular interactions result in a change in the permittivity of the molecules involved. For the interactions taking place at the surface of nanowires, this permittivity change can be determined from the analysis of the measured complex impedance of the nanowire. To demonstrate this technique, histidine was detected using different charge polarities controlled by the pH value of the solution. This included the detection of electrically neutral histidine at a sensitivity of 1 pM. Furthermore, it is shown that nonpolar molecules, such as hexane, can also be detected. The technique is applicable to the use of nanowires with and without a surface-insulating oxide. We show that information about the changes in amplitude and the phase of the complex impedance reveals the fundamental characteristics of the molecular interactions, including the molecular field and the permittivity.

  20. Influence of internal rotation on exothermic reactions between neutral molecules at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    McCarroll, Ronald

    2009-12-31

    A Langevin-type transition state model is developed to take account of the internal rotation energy in exothermic reactive collisions between neutral molecules. Energy and total angular momentum are both rigorously conserved. Reactive rate coefficients attain a maximum of a few 10(-10) cm(3)/s at temperatures in the range 10-30 K decreasing rapidly at higher temperatures. Results for a representative selection of well-studied systems, Si-O(2), CN-O(2), Si-NO, are in good agreement with experimental observations. At higher temperatures, typically around 100 K or greater, the rate coefficient exhibits a T(-1/3) dependence.

  1. Infrared Action Spectroscopy of Low-Temperature Neutral Gas-Phase Molecules of Arbitrary Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatsyna, Vasyl; Bakker, Daniël J.; Salén, Peter; Feifel, Raimund; Rijs, Anouk M.; Zhaunerchyk, Vitali

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate a technique for IR action spectroscopy that enables measuring IR spectra in a background-free fashion for low-temperature neutral gas-phase molecules of arbitrary structure. The method is exemplified experimentally for N -methylacetamide molecules in the mid-IR spectral range of 1000 - 1800 cm-1 , utilizing the free electron laser FELIX. The technique involves the resonant absorption of multiple mid-IR photons, which induces molecular dissociation. The dissociation products are probed with 10.49 eV vacuum ultraviolet photons and analyzed with a mass spectrometer. We also demonstrate the capability of this method to record, with unprecedented ease, mid-IR spectra for the molecular associates, such as clusters and oligomers, present in a molecular beam. In this way the mass-selected spectra of low-temperature gas-phase dimers and trimers of N -methylacetamide are measured in the full amide I-III range.

  2. Kondo effect in a neutral and stable all organic radical single molecule break junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burzuri, Enrique; Gaudenzi, Rocco; Frisenda, Riccardo; Franco, Carlos; Mas-Torrent, Marta; Rovira, Concepcio; Veciana, Jaume; Alcon, Isaac; Bromley, Stefan T.; van der Zant, Herre S. J.

    Organic radicals are neutral, purely organic molecules exhibiting an intrinsic magnetic moment due to the presence of an unpaired electron in the molecule in its ground state. This property, added to the low spin-orbit coupling makes organic radicals good candidates for molecular spintronics insofar as the radical character is stable in solid state electronic devices. We show that the paramagnetism of the PTM radical molecule, in the shape of a Kondo anomaly is preserved in two- and three-terminal solid-state devices, regardless of mechanical and electrostatic changes. Indeed, our results demonstrate that the Kondo anomaly is robust under electrodes displacement and changes of the electrostatic environment, pointing to a localized orbital in the radical as the source of magnetism. Strong support to this picture is provided by density functional calculations and measurements of the corresponding nonradical specie. We further study polyradical systems, where several unpaired spins interact in the same molecule. This work was supported by the EU FP7 program through project 618082 ACMOL and ERC grant advanced Mols@Mols. It was also supported by the Dutch funding organization NWO (VENI).

  3. Results from VUV Spectroscopy of Neutral Diamondoid Molecules and IR Spectroscopy of the Cationic Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirali, Olivier; Boyé-Peronne, Séverine; Douin, Stéphane; Galue, Hector Alvaro; Oomens, Jos; Garcia, Gustavo; Nahon, Laurent; Vervloet, Michel

    2009-06-01

    Due to their stability, diamond materials are expected to be present in different environments of the interstellar medium. Indeed, nanometer size diamond cristals have been extracted from carbonaceous chondrites and two emission features (observed at 3.43 μm and 3.53 μm) in the spectra of HD 97048 and Elias1 have been assigned to these species. Despite high astrophysical relevance, very few is known about the structural properties and dynamics of the molecular building blocks of larger species : the diamondoid molecules. These molecules consist of sp3 hybridized carbon cages where dangling bonds are terminated by hydrogen atoms. The infrared spectra of neutral molecules conforted the assignment of the 3.43 μm and 3.53 μm emission features to nanometer size diamondoid systems. In order to improve the understanding of the possible process leading to the IR emission features, we recorded the IR spectra of the deshydrogenated cationic species of adamantane, diamantane and triamantane (using Infrared Multi Photon Dissociation technique with the free electron laser FELIX) as well as the VUV spectra of adamantane and diamantane (obtained thanks to the Threshold Photo Electron Photo Ion Coincidence technique at the DESIRS beamline of the synchrotron SOLEIL). We will show the results of these spectra and the preliminary analysis. Saslaw and Gaustad, Nature, 221, 160 (1969) Lewis et al., Nature, 326, 160 (1987) van Kerckhoven et al., Astronomy and Astrophysic, 384, 568 (2002) Pirali et al., The Astrophysical Journal, 661, 919 (2007)

  4. Beams of fast neutral atoms and molecules in low-pressure gas-discharge plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Metel, A. S.

    2012-03-15

    Fast neutral atom and molecule beams have been studied, the beams being produced in a vacuum chamber at nitrogen, argon, or helium pressure of 0.1-10 Pa due to charge-exchange collisions of ions accelerated in the sheath between the glow discharge plasma and a negative grid immersed therein. From a flat grid, two broad beams of molecules with continuous distribution of their energy from zero up to e(U + U{sub c}) (where U is voltage between the grid and the vacuum chamber and U{sub c} is cathode fall of the discharge) are propagating in opposite directions. The beam propagating from the concave surface of a 0.2-m-diameter grid is focused within a 10-mm-diameter spot on the target surface. When a 0.2-m-diameter 0.2-m-high cylindrical grid covered by end disks and composed of parallel 1.5-mm-diameter knitting needles spaced by 4.5 mm is immersed in the plasma, the accelerated ions pass through the gaps between the needles, turn inside the grid into fast atoms or molecules, and escape from the grid through the gaps on its opposite side. The Doppler shift of spectral lines allows for measuring the fast atom energy, which corresponds to the potential difference between the plasma inside the chamber and the plasma produced as a result of charge-exchange collisions inside the cylindrical grid.

  5. Properties of clusters in the gas phase. V - Complexes of neutral molecules onto negative ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keesee, R. G.; Lee, N.; Castleman, A. W., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Ion-molecules association reactions of the form A(-)(B)n-1 + B = A(-)(B)n were studied over a range of temperatures in the gas phase using high pressure mass spectrometry. Enthalpy and entropy changes were determined for the stepwise clustering reactions of (1) sulfur dioxide onto Cl(-), I(-), and NO2(-) with n ranging from one to three or four, and onto SO2(-) and SO3(-) with n equal to one; and (2) carbon dioxide onto Cl(-), I(-), NO2(-), CO3(-), and SO3(-) with n equal to one. From these data and earlier hydration results, the order of the magnitude of the enthalpy changes on the association of the first neutral for a series of negative ions was found to parallel the gas-phase basicity of those anions.

  6. Three-body neutral dissociations of a multiply excited water molecule around the double ionization potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odagiri, Takeshi; Nakano, Motoyoshi; Tanabe, Takehiko; Kumagai, Yoshiaki; Suzuki, Isao H.; Kitajima, Masashi; Kouchi, Noriyuki

    2012-11-01

    The cross sections for emission of two fluorescence photons from a pair of excited fragments in photoexcitation of H2O have been measured as a function of the incident photon energy using the photon-photon coincidence technique. The cross section increased in the range 30-45 eV, i.e. in the vicinity of the double ionization potential of H2O. The increase of the cross section was attributed to three-body neutral dissociations of a water molecule via multiply excited states: H2O** → H(2p) + OH** → H(2p) + H(2p) + O(3P). Some multiply excited states of H2O were also found in the cross section curve around 65 eV.

  7. Experimental evidence of chemical components in the bonding of helium and neon with neutral molecules.

    PubMed

    Cappelletti, David; Bartocci, Alessio; Grandinetti, Felice; Falcinelli, Stefano; Belpassi, Leonardo; Tarantelli, Francesco; Pirani, Fernando

    2015-04-13

    The complexes of helium and neon with gaseous neutral molecules are generally perceived to be van der Waals adducts held together by physical (non-covalent) forces, owing to the combination of size (exchange) repulsion with dispersion/induction attraction. Molecular beam experiments confirm that this is the case for He-CF4 , Ne-CF4 adducts, but revealed that the interaction of He and Ne with CCl4 features an appreciable contribution of chemical components that arise from the anisotropy of the electron density of CCl4 that enhances a charge transfer from Ng (Ng=He, Ne). These findings furnish a novel assay of the bonding capabilities of helium and neon, and invite to revisit the neutral complexes of these elements as systems of chemical relevance. The CCl4 -Ng are also peculiar examples of halogen bonds, a group of interactions of major current concern. Finally, this investigation is a prelude to the development of semi-empirical models for force fields aimed to the unified description of static and dynamical properties of systems of comparable or higher complexity. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Rotational and vibrational population of D2 desorbing from sulfur-covered Pd(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutkowski, M.; Wetzig, D.; Zacharias, H.; Groß, A.

    2002-09-01

    We report rovibrational populations of D2 desorbing recombinatively from sulfur-covered Pd(100). The palladium surface is poisoned with an ordered c(2×2) overlayer corresponding to a coverage of ΘS~0.5 ML. Desorbing D2 molecules are detected with (1+1') REMPI via various B1Σ+u<--X1Σ+g Lyman bands using tunable vacuum ultraviolet laser radiation for the excitation step. Rotational quantum states J''=0-12 in the vibrational ground and J''=0 to 8 in the first vibrational excited state are measured. Experiments are performed for surface temperatures in the range from TS=500-800 K. Rotational energies lower and vibrational energies higher than the corresponding surface temperature are observed. The vibrational energies are higher than those of molecules desorbing from a clean Pd surface. The experimental results are compared with quantum dynamical calculations for the desorption of H2 from a p(2×2) sulfur-covered Pd(100) surface, based on a potential energy surface derived from density functional calculations. While the observed rotational cooling for molecules in the vibrational ground state is reproduced by the calculations, the vibrational effects are underestimated.

  9. On the chemical behavior of C60 hosting H2O and other isoelectronic neutral molecules.

    PubMed

    Galano, Annia; Pérez-González, Adriana; del Olmo, Lourdes; Francisco-Marquez, Misaela; León-Carmona, Jorge Rafael

    2014-08-01

    The density functional theory (DFT) was used to investigate the chemical behavior of C60 hosting neutral guest molecules (NGM). The deformed atoms in molecules (DAM) allowed identifying the regions of electron density depletion and accumulation. The studied NGM are CH4, NH3, H2O, and HF. Based on dipole moment and polarizabilities analyses it is predicted that the NGM@C60 should be more soluble in polar solvents than C60. The deformations on the surface electron density of the fullerenes explain this finding, which might be relevant for further applications of these systems. It was found that the intrinsic reactivity of studied NGM@C60 is only moderately higher than that of C60. This trend is supported by the global reactivity indexes and the frontier orbitals analyses. The free radical scavenging activity of the studied systems, via single electron transfer, was found to be strongly dependent on the chemical nature of the reacting free radical. The presence of the studied NGM inside the C60 influences only to some extent the reactivity of C60 toward free radicals. The distortion of the electron density on the C60 cage, caused by the NGM, is directly related to the electron withdrawing capacity of the later.

  10. A Desorbed Gas Molecular Ionization Mechanism for Arcing Onset in Solar Arrays Immersed in a Low-Density Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galofaro, J.; Vayner, B.; Ferguson, D.; Degroot, W.

    2002-01-01

    Previous experimental studies have hypothesized that the onset of Solar Array Arc (SAA) initiation in low-density space plasmas is caused by a desorbed gas molecular ionization mechanism. Indeed past investigations performed at the NASA Glenn Plasma Interaction Facility tend to not only support the desorbed gas molecular ionization mechanism, but have gone as far as identifying the crucial molecular species that must be present for molecular ion dominated process to occur. When electrical breakdown occurs at a triple junction site on a solar array panel, a quasi-neutral plasma cloud is ejected. Assuming the main component of the expelled plasma cloud by weight is due to water vapor, the fastest process available is due to HO molecules and OH(+) ions, or more succinctly, dissociative molecular-ion dominated recombination processes: H2O(+) + e(-) yields H* + OH*. Recently published spectroscopic observations of solar array arc spectra in ground tests have revealed the well-known molecular OH band (302 to 309nm), as well as the molecular SiH band (387nm peak), and the molecular CH band (432nm peak). Note that the OH band is observed in emission arcs where water vapor is present. Strong atomic lines were also observed for H(sub beta) at 486nm and H(sub alpha) at 656.3nm in prior ground testing. Independent supporting evidence of desorbed gas molecular ionization mechanisms also come from measurements of arc current pulse widths at different capacitances. We will revisit an earlier first order approximation demonstrating the dependence of arc current pulse widths on the square root of the capacitance. The simple arc current pulse width model will be then be used to estimate the temperature of the arc plasma (currently believed to be somewhere in the range of 3 to 5 eV). The current paper then seeks to extend the outlined work by including numerous vacuum chamber measurements obtained with a quadrupole mass spectrometer. A small solar array was mounted inside the vacuum

  11. An equation for the prediction of human skin permeability of neutral molecules, ions and ionic species.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Keda; Abraham, Michael H; Liu, Xiangli

    2017-04-15

    Experimental values of permeability coefficients, as log Kp, of chemical compounds across human skin were collected by carefully screening the literature, and adjusted to 37°C for the effect of temperature. The values of log Kp for partially ionized acids and bases were separated into those for their neutral and ionic species, forming a total data set of 247 compounds and species (including 35 ionic species). The obtained log Kp values have been regressed against Abraham solute descriptors to yield a correlation equation with R(2)=0.866 and SD=0.432 log units. The equation can provide valid predictions for log Kp of neutral molecules, ions and ionic species, with predictive R(2)=0.858 and predictive SD=0.445 log units calculated by the leave-one-out statistics. The predicted log Kp values for Na(+) and Et4N(+) are in good agreement with the observed values. We calculated the values of log Kp of ketoprofen as a function of the pH of the donor solution, and found that log Kp markedly varies only when ketoprofen is largely ionized. This explains why models that neglect ionization of permeants still yield reasonable statistical results. The effect of skin thickness on log Kp was investigated by inclusion of two indicator variables, one for intermediate thickness skin and one for full thickness skin, into the above equation. The newly obtained equations were found to be statistically very close to the above equation. Therefore, the thickness of human skin used makes little difference to the experimental values of log Kp.

  12. Characterization of the gene encoding the polymorphic immunodominant molecule, a neutralizing antigen of Theileria parva

    SciTech Connect

    Toye, P.G.; Metzelaar, M.J.; Wijngaard, P.L.J.

    1995-08-01

    Theileria parva, a tick-transmitted protozoan parasite related to Plasmodium spp., causes the disease East Coast fever, an acute and usually fatal lymphoproliferative disorder of cattle in Africa. Previous studies using sera from cattle that have survived infection identified a polymorphic immunodominant molecule (PIM) that is expressed by both the infective sporozoite stage of the parasite and the intracellular schizont. Here we show that mAb specific for the PIM Ag can inhibit sporozoite invasion of lymphocytes in vitro. A cDNA clone encoding the PIM Ag of the T. parva (Muguga) stock was obtained by using these mAb in a novel eukaryotic expression cloning system that allows isolation of cDNA encoding cytoplasmic or surface Ags. To establish the molecular basis of the polymorphism of PIM, the cDNA of the PIM Ag from a buffalo-derived T. parva stock was isolated and its sequence was compared with that of the cattle-derived Muguga PIM. The two cDNAs showed considerable identity in both the 5{prime} and 3{prime} regions, but there was substantial sequence divergence in the central regions. Several types of repeated sequences were identified in the variant regions. In the Muguga form of the molecule, there were five tandem repeats of the tetrapeptide, QPEP, that were shown, by transfection of a deleted version of the PIM gene, not to react with several anti-PIM mAbs. By isolating and sequencing the genomic version of the gene, we identified two small introns in the 3{prime} region of the gene. Finally, we showed that polyclonal rat Abs against recombinant PIM neutralize sporozoite infectivity in vitro, suggesting that the PIM Ag should be evaluated for its capacity to immunize cattle against East Coast Fever.

  13. The theoretical design of neutral planar tetracoordinate carbon molecules with C(C)(4) substructures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-Xiang; Schleyer, Paul von Ragué

    2002-10-09

    Using a new charge-compensation strategy, we designed neutral molecules with perfectly planar C(C)(4)-type tetracoordinate carbon arrangements (ptC) employing DFT computations. These designs, based on the planar preference of methane dications, replace two remote carbons in spiroalkaplanes by borons or two remote hydrogens by BH(3) groups; the two formally anionic boron units which result compensate the formal double positive charge on the central ptC's. The LUMOs correspond to the "wasted" lone pair HOMOs of the alkaplanes. As compared to the latter, pi occupancies on the central carbon are much smaller (less than 0.7e), and the IPs are much larger. The newly predicted compounds utilize all of the electrons more effectively. There are no lone pairs, and the ptC-C bond lengths are ca. 1.50 A. The Wiberg bond index sums of the ptC's are near 3.2, and the boron sums are close to 4.

  14. Quantum simulation of many-body physics with neutral atoms, molecules, and ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foss-Feig, Michael

    Real materials are extremely complicated, and any attempt to understand their bulk properties must begin with the appropriate choice of an idealized model, or Hamiltonian. There are many situations where such models have furnished a decisive understanding of complex quantum phenomena, such as BCS superconductivity and quantum magnetism. There are also cases, for instance the unconventional superconductivity of doped cuprates or heavy-fermion metals, where even the simplest conceivable models are intractable to current theoretical techniques. A promising route toward understanding the physics of such models is to simulate them directly with a highly controlled quantum system. Ultracold neutral atoms, polar molecules, and ions are in many ways ideally suited to this task. In this thesis, we emphasize how the unique features of particular atomic and molecular systems can be leveraged to access interesting physics in experimentally feasible temperature regimes. In chapter 3, we consider prospects for simulation of the Kondo lattice model using alkaline-earth atoms. In particular, we show how groundstate properties—for instance anomalous mass enhancement—can be probed by looking at far-from equilibrium dynamics, which are a standard diagnostic tool in ultracold atom experiments. Chapter 4 describes a realistic implementation of a bosonic version of the Kondo lattice model, and we show how the Kondo interaction qualitatively changes the superfluid to Mott insulator phase transition. Chapters 5, 6, and 7 are unified through an attempt to understand the effects of dissipation in many-body quantum systems. In chapter 5, our goal is mainly to understand the detrimental effects of two-body reactive collisions on dipolar molecules in a 3D optical lattice. Chapter 6 takes a rather different perspective, and shows that this type of loss naturally induces quantum correlations in the steady state of reactive fermionic molecules or alkaline earth atoms. In chapter 7, we develop

  15. Plume Image Profiling of UV Laser Desorbed Biomolecules

    SciTech Connect

    Merrigan, T. L.; Hunniford, C.A.; McCullough, R. W.; Timson, D. J.; Catney, M.

    2008-12-08

    An experimental system, based upon the techniques of UV and IR laser desorption with time of flight mass spectrometry, has been constructed to enable the production and characterization of neutral biomolecular targets. The feasibility of the laser desorption technique for the purpose of radiation interaction experiments is investigated here. Fluorescent dye tagging and laser induced fluorescence imaging has been used to help characterize the laser produced plumes of biomolecules revealing their spatial density profiles and temporal evolution. Peak target thicknesses of 2x10{sup 12} molecules cm{sup -2} were obtained 30 {mu}s after laser desorption.

  16. Manipulating Neutral Atoms and Molecules by Strong Non-Resonant Laser Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilensky, Mark

    Manipulating neutral particles by laser light has been of great interest during the last decade. The main effort is placed on atom cooling together with atomic beam deceleration, deflection, focusing, mirroring, and related aspects of atom optics. In the present thesis we provide indepth analytical and numerical analysis of the optical shaker approach to non-resonant laser cooling, and propose new methods for deceleration and cooling atoms/molecules in a feedback-controlled bistable cavity. Moreover, application of the latter technique to cooling of a micromechanical object is also proposed and analyzed. In the Introduction we review the current state-of-the-art cooling techniques and provide a brief history of their development. Chapter I presents in-depth analysis of the optical shaker operation; we study the issue of the detection of the dipole force in the far zone, which is the main building block of the optical shaker technique. The effects of the finite response time of the detectors and of the phase modulator are modeled numerically. The thresholds for cooling are estimated analytically and verified numerically. Minimal requirements for the stability of the laser sources are formulated. Perturbation theory analysis of the heating rate of an ensemble of particles embedded in a non-stationary sinusoidal (non-harmonic) potential is provided. In addition, a preliminary study of the adaptive cooling strategy is outlined. Chapter II presents a new method for deceleration of a single particle and cooling of an ensemble of particles in a bistable optical cavity. Optical bistability is achieved by non-linear feedback control of the field incident on the cavity. The technique realizes cavity-induced Sisyphustype cooling mechanism. This approach is rather generic because of its off-resonance nature. The bistable cavity introduces a "dry friction" stopping force, and requires a relatively "bad cavity" for its implementation. We provide an analytical estimate for the

  17. Shapes of cometary isophotes with Maxwellian distribution of initial velocities for neutral molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žáček, P.; Wolf, M.

    2017-10-01

    This paper contains necessary modification of Bessel's equations for the axial cometary syndyne. This correction provides the accurate values of molecular acceleration in a cometary tail and precise values of decay constants for radiating molecules and their lifetimes. In consequence the hypothesis of the predissociation of molecules seems to be useless.

  18. Enzymatic membranes for the selective transport of neutral molecules by electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Perrin, Bernard; Couturier, Roger; Fiaty, Koffi; Charcosset, Catherine; Maïsterrena, Bernard

    2008-06-01

    The active and selective transport of glucose and glycerol was carried out using electrophoresis and artificial enzymatic membranes. These positively charged composite membranes carry, on the face adjacent to the donor compartment of an electrophoresis module, a specific kinase (hexokinase or glycerokinase) and, on the opposite face, an alkaline phosphatase (ALP). Phosphorylation of the neutral substrate (glucose or glycerol) on the donor side by the kinase generates a negatively charged phosphorylated substrate, whose transmembrane migration is promoted by an electric field and by the membrane's positive charge. Dephosphorylation of the phosphorylated substrate by ALP on the opposite face regenerates the neutral substrate, which accumulates in the receiver compartment of the electrophoresis module. Using an electrophoresis module specifically designed for this study, our experiments were carried out enabling glucose and glycerol to be concentrated approximately eight- and twelve-fold, respectively, in 8 h.

  19. Nitrosamine formation in amine scrubbing at desorber temperatures.

    PubMed

    Fine, Nathan A; Goldman, Mark J; Rochelle, Gary T

    2014-01-01

    Amine scrubbing is a thermodynamically efficient and industrially proven method for carbon capture, but amine solvents can nitrosate in the desorber, forming potentially carcinogenic nitrosamines. The kinetics of reactions involving nitrite and monoethanolamine (MEA), diethanolamine (DEA), methylethanolamine (MMEA), and methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) were determined under desorber conditions. The nitrosations of MEA, DEA, and MMEA are first order in nitrite, carbamate species, and hydronium ion. Nitrosation of MDEA, a tertiary amine, is not catalyzed by the addition of CO2 since it cannot form a stable carbamate. Concentrated and CO2 loaded MEA was blended with low concentrations of N-(2-hydroxyethyl) glycine (HeGly), hydroxyethyl-ethylenediamine (HEEDA), and DEA, secondary amines common in MEA degradation. Nitrosamine yield was proportional to the concentration of secondary amine and was a function of CO2 loading and temperature. Blends of tertiary amines with piperazine (PZ) showed n-nitrosopiperazine (MNPZ) yields close to unity, validating the slow nitrosation rates hypothesized for tertiary amines. These results provide a useful tool for estimating nitrosamine accumulation over a range of amine solvents.

  20. Crystal structure of a 2:1 piroxicam–gentisic acid co-crystal featuring neutral and zwitterionic piroxicam molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Horstman, Elizabeth M.; Bertke, Jeffery A.; Woods, Toby J.; Kenis, Paul J. A.

    2016-11-04

    A new 2:1 co-crystal of piroxicam and gentisic acid [systematic name: 4-hydroxy-1,1-dioxo-N-(pyridin-2-yl)-2H-1λ6,2-benzothiazine-3-carboxamide–2-(4-oxido-1,1-dioxo-2H-1λ6,2-benzothiazine-3-amido)pyridin-1-ium–2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 2C15H13N3O4S·C7H6O4] has been synthesized using a microfluidic platform and initially identified using Raman spectroscopy. In the co-crystal, one piroxicam molecule is in its neutral form and an intramolecular O—H...O hydrogen bond is observed. The other piroxicam molecule is zwitterionic (proton transfer from the OH group to the pyridine N atom) and two intramolecular N—H...O hydrogen bonds occur. The gentisic acid molecule shows whole-molecule disorder over two sets of sites in a 0.809(2):0.191(2) ratio. In the crystal, extensive hydrogen bonding between the components forms layers propagating in theabplane.

  1. Termolecular Ion-Molecules Reactions in Titan's Atmosphere. I. Principal Ions with Principal Neutrals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anicich, V.; Milligan, D.; Fairley, D.; McEwan, M.

    1999-01-01

    The FA-SIFT experiment at Canterbury was used to determine some of the principal termolecular ion-molecule reactions that occur in Saturn's satellite Titan's atmosphere. The experiments were performed using both a pure nitrogen bath gas and a pure helium bath gas.

  2. Termolecular Ion-Molecules Reactions in Titan's Atmosphere. I. Principal Ions with Principal Neutrals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anicich, V.; Milligan, D.; Fairley, D.; McEwan, M.

    1999-01-01

    The FA-SIFT experiment at Canterbury was used to determine some of the principal termolecular ion-molecule reactions that occur in Saturn's satellite Titan's atmosphere. The experiments were performed using both a pure nitrogen bath gas and a pure helium bath gas.

  3. Neutralization of solvated protons and formation of noble-gas hydride molecules: Matrix-isolation indications of tunneling mechanisms?

    SciTech Connect

    Khriachtchev, Leonid; Lignell, Antti; Raesaenen, Markku

    2005-08-08

    The (NgHNg){sup +} cations (Ng=Ar and Kr) produced via the photolysis of HF/Ar, HF/Kr, and HBr/Kr solid mixtures are studied, with emphasis on their decay mechanisms. The present experiments provide a large variety of parameters connected to this decay phenomenon, which allows us to reconsider various models for the decay of the (NgHNg){sup +} cations in noble-gas matrices. As a result, we propose that this phenomenon could be explained by the neutralization of the solvated protons by electrons. The mechanism of this neutralization reaction probably involves tunneling of an electron from an electronegative fragment or another trap to the (NgHNg){sup +} cation. The proposed electron-tunneling mechanism should be considered as a possible alternative to the literature models based on tunneling-assisted or radiation-induced diffusion of protons in noble-gas solids. As a novel experimental observation of this work, the efficient formation of HArF molecules occurs at 8 K in a photolyzed HF/Ar matrix. It is probable that the low-temperature formation of HArF involves local tunneling of the H atom to the Ar-F center, which in turn supports the locality of HF photolysis in solid Ar. In this model, the decay of (ArHAr){sup +} ions and the formation of HArF molecules observed at low temperatures are generally unconnected processes; however, the decaying (ArHAr){sup +} ions may contribute to some extent to the formation of HArF molecules.

  4. Arylethynyl receptors for neutral molecules and anions: emerging applications in cellular imaging†

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Calden N.; Naleway, John J.; Haley, Michael M.; Johnson, Darren W.

    2011-01-01

    This critical review will focus on the application of shape-persistent receptors for anions that derive their rigidity and optoelectronic properties from the inclusion of arylethynyl linkages. It will highlight a few of the design strategies involved in engineering selective and sensitive fluorescent probes and how arylacetylenes can offer a design pathway to some of the more desirable properties of a selective sensor. Additionally, knowledge gained in the study of these receptors in organic media often leads to improved receptor design and the production of chromogenic and fluorogenic probes capable of detecting specific substrates among the multitude of ions present in biological systems. In this ocean of potential targets exists a large number of geometrically distinct anions, which present their own problems to the design of receptors with complementary binding for each preferred coordination geometry. Our interest in targeting charged substrates, specifically how previous work on receptors for cations or neutral guests can be adapted to anions, will be addressed. Additionally, we will focus on the design and development of supramolecular arylethynyl systems, their shape-persistence and fluorogenic or chromogenic optoelectronic responses to complexation. We will also examine briefly how the “chemistry in the cuvet” translates into biological media. PMID:20820467

  5. Interactions of neutral and singly charged keV atomic particles with gas-phase adenine molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarado, Fresia; Bari, Sadia; Hoekstra, Ronnie; Schlathölter, Thomas

    2007-07-01

    KeV atomic particles traversing biological matter are subject to charge exchange and screening effects which dynamically change this particle's effective charge. The understanding of the collision cascade along the track thus requires a detailed knowledge of the interaction dynamics of radiobiologically relevant molecules, such as DNA building blocks or water, not only with ionic but also with neutral species. We have studied collisions of keV H+, He+, and C+ ions and H0, He0, and C0 atoms with the DNA base adenine by means of high resolution time-of-flight spectrometry. For H0 and H+ we find qualitatively very similar fragmentation patterns, while for carbon, strong differences are observed when comparing C0 and C+ impact. For collisions with He0 and He+ projectiles, a pronounced delayed fragmentation channel is observed, which has not been reported before.

  6. High-Throughput Screening of Australian Marine Organism Extracts for Bioactive Molecules Affecting the Cellular Storage of Neutral Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Rae, James; Fontaine, Frank; Salim, Angela A.; Lo, Harriet P.; Capon, Robert J.; Parton, Robert G.; Martin, Sally

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian cells store excess fatty acids as neutral lipids in specialised organelles called lipid droplets (LDs). Using a simple cell-based assay and open-source software we established a high throughput screen for LD formation in A431 cells in order to identify small bioactive molecules affecting lipid storage. Screening an n-butanol extract library from Australian marine organisms we identified 114 extracts that produced either an increase or a decrease in LD formation in fatty acid-treated A431 cells with varying degrees of cytotoxicity. We selected for further analysis a non-cytotoxic extract derived from the genus Spongia (Heterofibria). Solvent partitioning, HPLC fractionation and spectroscopic analysis (NMR, MS) identified a family of related molecules within this extract with unique structural features, a subset of which reduced LD formation. We selected one of these molecules, heterofibrin A1, for more detailed cellular analysis. Inhibition of LD biogenesis by heterofibrin A1 was observed in both A431 cells and AML12 hepatocytes. The activity of heterofibrin A1 was dose dependent with 20 µM inhibiting LD formation and triglyceride accumulation by ∼50% in the presence of 50 µM oleic acid. Using a fluorescent fatty acid analogue we found that heterofibrin A1 significantly reduces the intracellular accumulation of fatty acids and results in the formation of distinct fatty acid metabolites in both cultured cells and in embryos of the zebrafish Danio rerio. In summary we have shown using readily accessible software and a relatively simple assay system that we can identify and isolate bioactive molecules from marine extracts, which affect the formation of LDs and the metabolism of fatty acids both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:21857959

  7. High-throughput screening of Australian marine organism extracts for bioactive molecules affecting the cellular storage of neutral lipids.

    PubMed

    Rae, James; Fontaine, Frank; Salim, Angela A; Lo, Harriet P; Capon, Robert J; Parton, Robert G; Martin, Sally

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian cells store excess fatty acids as neutral lipids in specialised organelles called lipid droplets (LDs). Using a simple cell-based assay and open-source software we established a high throughput screen for LD formation in A431 cells in order to identify small bioactive molecules affecting lipid storage. Screening an n-butanol extract library from Australian marine organisms we identified 114 extracts that produced either an increase or a decrease in LD formation in fatty acid-treated A431 cells with varying degrees of cytotoxicity. We selected for further analysis a non-cytotoxic extract derived from the genus Spongia (Heterofibria). Solvent partitioning, HPLC fractionation and spectroscopic analysis (NMR, MS) identified a family of related molecules within this extract with unique structural features, a subset of which reduced LD formation. We selected one of these molecules, heterofibrin A1, for more detailed cellular analysis. Inhibition of LD biogenesis by heterofibrin A1 was observed in both A431 cells and AML12 hepatocytes. The activity of heterofibrin A1 was dose dependent with 20 µM inhibiting LD formation and triglyceride accumulation by ∼50% in the presence of 50 µM oleic acid. Using a fluorescent fatty acid analogue we found that heterofibrin A1 significantly reduces the intracellular accumulation of fatty acids and results in the formation of distinct fatty acid metabolites in both cultured cells and in embryos of the zebrafish Danio rerio. In summary we have shown using readily accessible software and a relatively simple assay system that we can identify and isolate bioactive molecules from marine extracts, which affect the formation of LDs and the metabolism of fatty acids both in vitro and in vivo.

  8. Neutralizing antibody and anti-retroviral drug sensitivities of HIV-1 isolates resistant to small molecule CCR5 inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Pugach, Pavel; Ketas, Thomas J.; Michael, Elizabeth; Moore, John P.

    2008-08-01

    The small molecule CCR5 inhibitors are a new class of drugs for treating infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). They act by binding to the CCR5 co-receptor and preventing its use during HIV-1-cell fusion. Escape mutants can be raised against CCR5 inhibitors in vitro and will arise when these drugs are used clinically. Here, we have assessed the responses of CCR5 inhibitor-resistant viruses to other anti-retroviral drugs that act by different mechanisms, and their sensitivities to neutralizing antibodies (NAbs). The rationale for the latter study is that the resistance pathway for CCR5 inhibitors involves changes in the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Env), which are also targets for NAbs. The escape mutants CC101.19 and D1/85.16 were selected for resistance to AD101 and vicriviroc (VVC), respectively, from the primary R5 HIV-1 isolate CC1/85. Each escape mutant was cross-resistant to other small molecule CCR5 inhibitors (aplaviroc, maraviroc, VVC, AD101 and CMPD 167), but sensitive to protein ligands of CCR5: the modified chemokine PSC-RANTES and the humanized MAb PRO-140. The resistant viruses also retained wild-type sensitivity to the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (RTI) zidovudine, the non-nucleoside RTI nevirapine, the protease inhibitor atazanavir and other attachment and fusion inhibitors that act independently of CCR5 (BMS-806, PRO-542 and enfuvirtide). Of note is that the escape mutants were more sensitive than the parental CC1/85 isolate to a subset of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies and to some sera from HIV-1-infected people, implying that sequence changes in Env that confer resistance to CCR5 inhibitors can increase the accessibility of some NAb epitopes. The need to preserve NAb resistance may therefore be a constraint upon how escape from CCR5 inhibitors occurs in vivo.

  9. Neutralizing antibody and anti-retroviral drug sensitivities of HIV-1 isolates resistant to small molecule CCR5 inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Pugach, Pavel; Ketas, Thomas J.; Michael, Elizabeth; Moore, John P.

    2008-01-01

    The small molecule CCR5 inhibitors are a new class of drugs for treating infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). They act by binding to the CCR5 co-receptor and preventing its use during HIV-1-cell fusion. Escape mutants can be raised against CCR5 inhibitors in vitro and will arise when these drugs are used clinically. Here, we have assessed the responses of CCR5 inhibitor-resistant viruses to other anti-retroviral drugs that act by different mechanisms, and their sensitivities to neutralizing antibodies (NAbs). The rationale for the latter study is that the resistance pathway for CCR5 inhibitors involves changes in the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Env), which are also targets for NAbs. The escape mutants CC101.19 and D1/85.16 were selected for resistance to AD101 and vicriviroc (VVC), respectively, from the primary R5 HIV-1 isolate CC1/85. Each escape mutant was cross resistant to other small molecule CCR5 inhibitors (aplaviroc, maraviroc, VVC, AD101 and CMPD 167), but sensitive to protein ligands of CCR5: the modified chemokine PSC-RANTES and the humanized MAb PRO 140. The resistant viruses also retained wild-type sensitivity to the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (RTI) zidovudine, the non-nucleoside RTI nevirapine, the protease inhibitor atazanavir and other attachment and fusion inhibitors that act independently of CCR5 (BMS-806, PRO-542 and enfuvirtide). Of note is that the escape mutants were more sensitive than the parental CC1/85 isolate to a subset of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies and to some sera from HIV-1-infected people, implying that sequence changes in Env that confer resistance to CCR5 inhibitors can increase the accessibility of some NAb epitopes. The need to preserve NAb resistance may therefore be a constraint upon how escape from CCR5 inhibitors occurs in vivo. PMID:18519143

  10. Adsorption and transport of charged vs. neutral hydrophobic molecules at the membrane of murine erythroleukemia (MEL) cells.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jia; Eckenrode, Heather M; Dai, Hai-Lung; Wilhelm, Michael J

    2015-03-01

    The adsorption and transport of hydrophobic molecules at the membrane surface of pre- and post-DMSO induced differentiated murine erythroleukemia (MEL) cells were examined by time- and wavelength-resolved second harmonic light scattering. Two medium (<600 Da) hydrophobic molecules, cationic malachite green (MG) and neutral bromocresol purple (BCP), were investigated. While it was observed that the MG cation adsorbs onto the surface of the MEL cell, neutral BCP does not. It is suggested that an electrostatic interaction between the opposite charges of the cation and the MEL cell surface is the primary driving force for adsorption. Comparisons of adsorption density and free energy, measured at different pH and cell morphology, indicate that the interaction is predominantly through sialic acid carboxyl groups. MG cation adsorption densities have been determined as (0.6±0.3)×10(6) μm(-2) on the surface of undifferentiated MEL cells, and (1.8±0.5)×10(7) μm(-2) on differentiated MEL cells, while the deduced adsorption free energies are effectively identical (ca. -10.9±0.1 and -10.8±0.1 kcal mol(-1), respectively). The measured MG densities indicate that the total number of surface carboxyl groups is largely conserved following differentiation, and therefore the density of carboxylic groups is much larger on the differentiated cell surface than the undifferentiated one. Finally, in contrast to synthetic liposomes and bacterial membranes, surface adsorbed MG cations are unable to traverse the MEL cell membrane. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Role of Electroosmosis in the Permeation of Neutral Molecules: CymA and Cyclodextrin as an Example

    PubMed Central

    Bhamidimarri, Satya Prathyusha; Prajapati, Jigneshkumar Dahyabhai; van den Berg, Bert; Winterhalter, Mathias; Kleinekathöfer, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    To quantify the flow of small uncharged molecules into and across nanopores, one often uses ion currents. The respective ion-current fluctuations caused by the presence of the analyte make it possible to draw some conclusions about the direction and magnitude of the analyte flow. However, often this flow appears to be asymmetric with respect to the applied voltage. As a possible reason for this asymmetry, we identified the electroosmotic flow (EOF), which is the water transport associated with ions driven by the external transmembrane voltage. As an example, we quantify the contribution of the EOF through a nanopore by investigating the permeation of α-cyclodextrin through CymA, a cyclodextrin-specific channel from Klebsiella oxytoca. To understand the results from electrophysiology on a molecular level, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations are used to detail the effect of the EOF on substrate entry to and exit from a CymA channel in which the N-terminus has been deleted. The combined experimental and computational results strongly suggest that one needs to account for the significant contribution of the EOF when analyzing the penetration of cyclodextrins through the CymA pore. This example study at the same time points to the more general finding that the EOF needs to be considered in translocation studies of neutral molecules and, at least in many cases, should be able to help in discriminating between translocation and binding events. PMID:26840725

  12. Laser-driven acoustic desorption of organic molecules from back-irradiated solid foils.

    SciTech Connect

    Zinovev, A. V.; Veryovkin, I. V.; Moore, J. F.; Pellin, M. J.; Materials Science Division; Mass Think

    2007-11-01

    Laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) from thin metal foils is a promising technique for gentle and efficient volatilization of intact organic molecules from surfaces of solid substrates. Using the single-photon ionization method combined with time-of-flight mass spectrometry, we have examined the neutral component of the desorbed flux in LIAD and compared it to that from direct laser desorption. These basic studies of LIAD, conducted for molecules of various organic dyes (rhodamine B, fluorescein, anthracene, coumarin, BBQ), have demonstrated detection of intact parent molecules of the analyte even at its surface concentrations corresponding to a submonolayer coating. In some cases (rhodamine B, fluorescein, BBQ), the parent molecular ion peak was accompanied by a few fragmentation peaks of comparable intensity, whereas for others, only peaks corresponding to intact parent molecules were detected. At all measured desorbing laser intensities (from 100 to 500 MW/cm{sup 2}), the total amount of desorbed parent molecules depended exponentially on the laser intensity. Translational velocities of the desorbed intact molecules, determined for the first time in this work, were of the order of hundreds of meters per second, less than what has been observed in our experiments for direct laser desorption, but substantially greater than the possible perpendicular velocity of the substrate foil surface due to laser-generated acoustic waves. Moreover, these velocities did not depend on the desorbing laser intensity, which implies the presence of a more sophisticated mechanism of energy transfer than direct mechanical or thermal coupling between the laser pulse and the adsorbed molecules. Also, the total flux of desorbed intact molecules as a function of the total number of desorbing laser pulses, striking the same point on the target, decayed following a power law rather than an exponential function, as would have been predicted by the shake-off model. To summarize, the

  13. MOCCA: A 4k-Pixel Molecule Camera for the Position- and Energy-Resolving Detection of Neutral Molecule Fragments at CSR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamer, L.; Schulz, D.; Enss, C.; Fleischmann, A.; Gastaldo, L.; Kempf, S.; Krantz, C.; Novotný, O.; Schwalm, D.; Wolf, A.

    2016-08-01

    We present the design of MOCCA, a large-area particle detector that is developed for the position- and energy-resolving detection of neutral molecule fragments produced in electron-ion interactions at the Cryogenic Storage Ring at the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg. The detector is based on metallic magnetic calorimeters and consists of 4096 particle absorbers covering a total detection area of 44.8 mathrm {mm} × 44.8 mathrm {mm}. Groups of four absorbers are thermally coupled to a common paramagnetic temperature sensor where the strength of the thermal link is different for each absorber. This allows attributing a detector event within this group to the corresponding absorber by discriminating the signal rise times. A novel readout scheme further allows reading out all 1024 temperature sensors that are arranged in a 32 × 32 square array using only 16+16 current-sensing superconducting quantum interference devices. Numerical calculations taking into account a simplified detector model predict an energy resolution of Δ E_mathrm {FWHM} le 80 mathrm {eV} for all pixels of this detector.

  14. Studies on Ions and Neutrals Desorbed from Solid Surfaces by Ion and Electron Bombardment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-24

    Since 1984 Acknowledging AFOSR Support 1. N. Winograd, "Thin Film Electrodes", in Laboratory Techniques in Electroanalytical Chemistry , P. T. Kissinger...Acknowledging AFOSR Support 1. N. Winograd, "Thin Film Electrodes", in Laboratory Techniques in Electroanalytical Chemistry , P. T. Kissinger, Ed., Marcel

  15. Buffer system for the separation of neutral and charged small molecules using micellar electrokinetic chromatography with mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Goetzinger, Wolfgang K; Cai, Hong

    2005-06-24

    An organic buffer system will be discussed that is suitable for the separation of neutral as well as charged molecules be means of micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC). The buffers are based on the combination of a long chain alkyl acid, such as lauric acid with ammonium hydroxide or an organic base such as tris-hydroxymethylaminomethane (Tris). The resulting buffer system is able to separate neutral compounds based on its micellar properties. These buffers exhibit much reduced conductivity compared to traditional MEKC buffers, such as sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS), which contain inorganic salts. They also have inherent buffer capacity at high pH resulting from the basic buffer component, which in our studies had pK values from about 8-11. The separations that were observed showed high efficiency with plate counts in many cases above 500,000 plates per meter. The reduced conductivity allowed for the application of much higher electric fields, resulting in very fast analysis times. Alternatively, an increase in detection sensitivity could be achieved, as the reduced conductivity allowed for the use of capillaries with lager internal diameters. Combinations of different alkyl acids and organic bases provided for significant flexibility in selectivity tuning. Finally, the fact that the organic micellar buffer systems discussed here do not contain inorganic ions, allows for coupling with mass spectrometric (MS) detection. The possibility of MS detection combined with the high speed in analysis that can be obtained using these organic buffer systems, could make this approach an interesting option for high throughput analysis of combinatorial libraries.

  16. a Thermally Desorbable Miniature Passive Dosimeter for Organic Vapors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Jesus Antonio

    A thermally desorbable miniature passive dosimeter (MPD) for organic vapors has been developed in conformity with theoretical and practical aspects of passive dosimeter design. The device was optimized for low sample loadings resulting from short-term and/or low concentration level exposure. This was accomplished by the use of thermal desorption rather than solvent elution, which provided the GC method with significantly higher sensitivity. Laboratory evaluation of this device for factors critical to the performance of passive dosimeters using benzene as the test vapor included: desorption efficiency (97.2%), capacity (1400 ppm-min), sensitivity (7ng/sample or 0.06 ppmv for 15 minutes sampling) accuracy and precision, concentration level, environmental conditions (i.e., air face velocity, relative humidity) and sample stability during short (15 minutes) and long periods of time (15 days). This device has demonstrated that its overall accuracy meets NIOSH and OSHA requirements for a sampling and analytical method for the exposure concentration range of 0.1 to 50 ppm (v/v) and 15 minutes exposures. It was demonstrated that the MPD operates in accordance with theoretically predicted performance and should be adequate for short-term and/or low concentration exposure monitoring of organic vapors in the workplace. In addition a dynamic vapor exposure evaluation system for passive dosimeters have been validated using benzene as the test vapor. The system is capable of generating well defined short-square wave concentration profiles suitable for the evaluation of passive dosimeters for ceiling exposure monitoring.

  17. Interactions of neutral and singly charged keV atomic particles with gas-phase adenine molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarado, Fresia; Bari, Sadia; Hoekstra, Ronnie; Schlathoelter, Thomas

    2007-07-21

    KeV atomic particles traversing biological matter are subject to charge exchange and screening effects which dynamically change this particle's effective charge. The understanding of the collision cascade along the track thus requires a detailed knowledge of the interaction dynamics of radiobiologically relevant molecules, such as DNA building blocks or water, not only with ionic but also with neutral species. We have studied collisions of keV H{sup +}, He{sup +}, and C{sup +} ions and H{sup 0}, He{sup 0}, and C{sup 0} atoms with the DNA base adenine by means of high resolution time-of-flight spectrometry. For H{sup 0} and H{sup +} we find qualitatively very similar fragmentation patterns, while for carbon, strong differences are observed when comparing C{sup 0} and C{sup +} impact. For collisions with He{sup 0} and He{sup +} projectiles, a pronounced delayed fragmentation channel is observed, which has not been reported before.

  18. Fusion of C3d molecule with neutralization epitope(s) of hepatitis E virus enhances antibody avidity maturation and neutralizing activity following DNA immunization.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shucai; Wang, Chunling; Fang, Xuefeng; Zhai, Lijie; Dong, Chen; Ding, Lei; Meng, Jihong; Wang, Lixin

    2010-08-01

    Previous studies have identified that a hepatits E virus peptide (HEV-p179), spanning amino acids (aa) 439-617 in the 660-aa protein encoded by open reading frame 2(ORF2) of the Chinese epidemic strain (genotype 4), is the minimal size fragment of conformation-dependent neutralization epitope(s). We report here the successful immunization of mice with DNA vaccines expressing the secreted form of HEV-p179 (fused with a human tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) signal sequence) and the tPA-p179-C3d fusion protein (fused with three tandem copies of the murine complement C3d). Analysis of antibody responses in vaccinated mice revealed that immunizations with tPA-p179-C3d3 DNA vaccine dramatically increased both the level and avidity maturation of antibodies against HEV-p179 compared to p179 and tPA-p179 DNA vaccines. In addition, this increased antibody response correlated with neutralizing titers in a PCR-based cell culture neutralization assay. These results indicate that vaccination with C3d conjugated p179 DNA vaccine enhances antibody responses to HEV, and this approach may be applied to overcome the poor immunogenicity of DNA vaccines to generate HEV neutralizing antibodies. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Angular distribution of Rh atoms desorbed from ion-bombarded Rh l brace 100 r brace : Effect of local environment

    SciTech Connect

    Maboudian, R.; Postawa, Z.; El-Maazawi, M.; Garrison, B.J.; Winograd, N. )

    1990-10-15

    Energy-resolved angular distributions of Rh atoms desorbed by 5 keV Ar-ion bombardment of the Rh{l brace}100{r brace} surface are measured with use of a multiphoton resonance ionization technique. The results are shown to be in good agreement with molecular-dynamics simulations of the ion-impact event using the same interaction potential optimized previously to describe desorption from Rh{l brace}111{r brace}. In addition, by analyzing contour plots of the surface potential energy, the trend in the experimental results for Rh{l brace}100{r brace} and those previously published for Rh{l brace}111{r brace} are well explained. Based on this analysis, it is concluded that the peak in the polar-angle distribution of neutral particles desorbed from ion-bombarded single crystals is mainly determined by the relative positions of surface atoms which influence the trajectory of an exiting particle via channeling and blocking. Moreover, the anisotropy of the momentum imparted to the surface atoms in the last collision leads to an enhancement of ejection along certain crystallographic directions.

  20. Neutral gas temperature measurements of high-power-density fluorocarbon plasmas by fitting swan bands of C{sub 2} molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Bai Bo; Sawin, Herbert H.; Cruden, Brett A.

    2006-01-01

    The neutral gas temperature of fluorocarbon plasmas in a remote toroidal transformer-coupled source was measured to be greater than 5000 K, under the conditions of a power density greater than 15 W/cm{sup 3} and pressures above 2 torr. The rovibrational bands of C{sub 2} molecules (swan bands, d {sup 3}{pi}{sub g}{yields}a {sup 3}{pi}{sub u}) were fitted to obtain the rotational temperature that was assumed to equal the translational temperature. This rotational-translational temperature equilibrium assumption was supported by the comparison with the rotational temperature of second positive system of added N{sub 2}. For the same gas mixture, the neutral gas temperature is nearly a linear function of plasma power, since the conduction to chamber wall and convection are the major energy-loss processes, and they are both proportional to neutral gas temperature. The dependence of the neutral gas temperature on O{sub 2} flow rate and pressure can be well represented through the power dependence, under the condition of constant current operation. An Arrhenius type of dependence between the etching rate of oxide film and the neutral gas temperature is observed, maybe indicating the importance of the pyrolytic dissociation in the plasma formation process when the temperature is above 5000 K.

  1. Quantum-chemical calculations and IR spectra of the (F2)MF2 molecules (M = B, Al, Ga, In, Tl) in solid matrices: a new class of very high electron affinity neutral molecules.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuefeng; Andrews, Lester

    2011-03-23

    Electron-deficient group 13 metals react with F(2) to give the compounds MF(2) (M = B, Al, Ga, In, Tl), which combine with F(2) to form a new class of very high electron affinity neutral molecules, (F(2))MF(2), in solid argon and neon. These (F(2))MF(2) fluorine metal difluoride molecules were identified through matrix IR spectra containing new antisymmetric and symmetric M-F stretching modes. The assignments were confirmed through close comparisons with frequency calculations using DFT methods, which were calibrated against the MF(3) molecules observed in all of the spectra. Electron affinities calculated at the CCSD(T) level fall between 7.0 and 7.8 eV, which are in the range of the highest known electron affinities.

  2. Single-molecule magnetic behavior in a neutral terbium(III) complex of a picolinate-based nitronyl nitroxide free radical.

    PubMed

    Coronado, Eugenio; Giménez-Saiz, Carlos; Recuenco, Alejandro; Tarazón, Ana; Romero, Francisco M; Camón, Agustín; Luis, Fernando

    2011-08-15

    The terdentate anionic picolinate-based nitronyl nitroxide (picNN) free radical forms neutral and robust homoleptic complexes with rare earth-metal ions. The nonacoordinated Tb(3+) complex Tb(picNN)(3)·6H(2)O is a single-molecule magnet with an activation energy barrier Δ = 22.8 ± 0.5 K and preexponential factor τ(0) = (5.5 ± 1.1) × 10(-9) s. It shows magnetic hysteresis below 1 K. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  3. Dynamics of alkali ions-neutral molecules reactions: Radio frequency-guided beam experimental cross-sections and direct quasiclassical trajectory studies

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar, J.; Andres, J. de; Lucas, J. M.; Alberti, M.; Huarte-Larranaga, F.; Bassi, D.; Aguilar, A.

    2012-11-27

    Different reactive processes taking place in collisions between alkali ions and neutral i-C{sub 3}H{sub 7}Cl molecules in the low (center of mass frame) energy range have been studied using an octopole radiofrequency guided-ion-beam apparatus developed in our laboratory. Cross-section energy dependences for all these reactions have been obtained in absolute units. Ab initio electronic structure calculations for those colliding systems evolving on the ground single potential surface have given relevant information on the main topological features of the surfaces. For some of the reactions a dynamic study by 'on the fly' trajectories has complemented the available experimental and electronic structure information.

  4. STUDIES OF X-RAY PRODUCTION FOLLOWING CHARGE EXCHANGE RECOMBINATION BETWEEN HIGHLY CHARGED IONS AND NEUTRAL ATOMS AND MOLECULES

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G V; Beiersdorfer, P; Chen, H; Clementson, J; Frankel, M; Gu, M F; Kelley, R L; Kilbourne, C A; Porter, F S; Thorn, D B; Wargelin, B J

    2008-08-28

    We have used microcalorimeters built by the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Electron Beam Ion Trap to measure X-ray emission produced by charge exchange reactions between highly charged ions colliding with neutral helium, hydrogen, and nitrogen gas. Our measurements show the spectral dependence on neutral species and also show the distinct differences between spectra produced by charge exchange reactions and those produced by direct impact excitation. These results are part of an ongoing experimental investigation at the LLNL EBIT facility of charge exchange spectral signatures and can be used to interpret X-ray spectra produced by a variety of laboratory and celestial sources including cometary and planetary atmospheres, the Earth's magnetosheath, the heliosphere, and tokamaks.

  5. Measurement of desorbed products during organic polymer thin film etching by plasma beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kurihara, Kazuaki; Karahashi, Kazuhiro; Egami, Akihiro; Nakamura, Moritaka

    2006-11-15

    The authors investigated the etching characteristics of three kinds of methacrylate polymer films, which have the same main chain but with different side chains, using a plasma beam irradiation apparatus. The polymers are polytbutylmethacrylate, polybenzylmethacrylate, and polycyclohexylmethacrylate. The major desorbed products during nitrogen plasma beam etching were found to be HCN and C{sub 2}N{sub 2} for all methacrylate polymer films. The desorbed products originating from the polymer structure, namely, the main chain and the side chain, were hardly observed. The energy distributions of desorbed products were mainly composed of Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution with a small component of collision cascade distribution for all three polymers and were slightly dependent on the ion energy. It is concluded that chemical sputtering, which can be defined as the production of weakly bound species by ion bombardment, followed by thermal desorption, is the significant ion induced mechanism of organic polymer etching.

  6. Density Functional Theory and Mass Spectrometry of Phthalate Fragmentations Mechanisms: Modeling Hyperconjugated Carbocation and Radical Cation Complexes with Neutral Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeilani, Yassin A.; Cardelino, Beatriz H.; Ibeanusi, Victor M.

    2011-11-01

    This is the first ab initio study of the energetics of the fragmentation mechanisms of phthalate, by mass spectrometry, leading to protonated phthalic anhydride ( m/z 149). Phthalates fragment by two major pathways; namely, the McLafferty + 1 rearrangement and the loss of alkoxy. Both pathways involve a carbonyl oxygen attack to the ortho-carbonyl carbon leading to structures with tetrahedral carbon intermediates that eventually give m/z 149. These pathways were studied by collision induced dissociation (CID) using triple quadrupole mass spectrometry. The proposed McLafferty + 1 pathway proceeds through a distonic M•+, leading to the loss of an allylic-stabilized alkene radical. The McLafferty rearrangement step proceeds through a six-membered ring transition state with a small activation energy ranging 0.4-6.2 kcal/mol; the transfer of a second H from the distonic ion of the rearrangement step proceeds through a radical cation molecule complex. Based on quantum chemical modeling of the cation molecule complexes, two kinds of cation molecule complexes were identified as radical cation molecule complex and hyperconjugated cation molecule complex. This distinction is based on the cation and simplifies future modeling of similar complexes. Optimization of important fragments in these pathways showed cyclized and hydrogen-bonded structures to be favored. An exception was the optimized structure of the protonated phthalic anhydride ( m/z 149) that showed a structure with an open anhydride ring.

  7. Functionalized Collagen Scaffold Neutralizing the Myelin-Inhibitory Molecules Promoted Neurites Outgrowth in Vitro and Facilitated Spinal Cord Regeneration in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Li, Xing; Han, Jin; Zhao, Yannan; Ding, Wenyong; Wei, Jianshu; Han, Sufang; Shang, Xianping; Wang, Bin; Chen, Bing; Xiao, Zhifeng; Dai, Jianwu

    2015-07-01

    Research has demonstrated that many myelin-associated inhibitory molecules jointly contribute to the failure of adult spinal cord regeneration. Therapies comprehensively targeting the multiple inhibitory nature of the injured spinal cord are being concerned. Here, two collagen-binding proteins, CBD-EphA4LBD and CBD-PlexinB1LBD, were constructed, respectively, to neutralize the axon guidance molecules ephrinB3 and sema4D that inhibit the regeneration of nerve fibers. The two neutralizing proteins have proven their ability to specifically bind collagen and to continuously release from collagen scaffolds. They could also promote neurites outgrowth of cerebellar granular neurons and dorsal root ganglion neurons in vitro. Subsequently, the functionalized collagen scaffolds by physically absorbing NEP1-40 and immobilizing CBD-EphA4LBD and CBD-PlexinB1LBD were transplanted into a rat T10 complete spinal cord transection model. Our results showed that rats that received the treatment of transplanting the functionalized collagen scaffold exhibited great advantage on axonal regeneration and locomotion recovery after spinal cord injury.

  8. Small Molecules with Similar Structures Exhibit Agonist, Neutral Antagonist or Inverse Agonist Activity toward Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Hanzawa, Hiroyuki; Nakao, Naoki; Fujino, Masahiro; Imaizumi, Satoshi; Matsuo, Yoshino; Yanagisawa, Hiroaki; Koike, Hiroyuki; Komuro, Issei; Karnik, Sadashiva S.; Saku, Keijiro

    2012-01-01

    Small differences in the chemical structures of ligands can be responsible for agonism, neutral antagonism or inverse agonism toward a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). Although each ligand may stabilize the receptor conformation in a different way, little is known about the precise conformational differences. We synthesized the angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker (ARB) olmesartan, R239470 and R794847, which induced inverse agonism, antagonism and agonism, respectively, and then investigated the ligand-specific changes in the receptor conformation with respect to stabilization around transmembrane (TM)3. The results of substituted cysteine accessibility mapping studies support the novel concept that ligand-induced changes in the conformation of TM3 play a role in stabilizing GPCR. Although the agonist-, neutral antagonist and inverse agonist-binding sites in the AT1 receptor are similar, each ligand induced specific conformational changes in TM3. In addition, all of the experimental data were obtained with functional receptors in a native membrane environment (in situ). PMID:22719858

  9. Conformer-Specific IR Spectroscopy of Laser-Desorbed Sulfonamide Drugs: Tautomeric and Conformational Preferences of Sulfanilamide and its Derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlemann, Thomas; Seidel, Sebastian; Müller, Christian W.

    2017-06-01

    Molecules containing the sulfonamide group R^{1}-SO_2-NHR^{2} have a longstanding history as antimicrobial agents. Even though nowadays they are not commonly used in treating humans anymore, they continue to be studied as effective inhibitors of metalloenzyme carbonic anhydrases. These enzymes are important targets for a variety of diseases, such as, for instance, breast cancer, glaucoma, and obesity. Here we present the results of our laser desorption single-conformation UV and IR study of sulfanilamide (NH_2Ph-SO_2-NHR, R=H), a variety of singly substituted derivatives, and their monohydrated complexes. Depending on the substituent, the sulfonamide group can either adopt an amino or an imino tautomeric form. The form prevalent in the crystal is not necessarily also the tautomeric form we identified in the molecular beam after laser desorbing the sample. Furthermore, we explored the effect of complexation with a single water molecule on the tautomeric and conformational preferences of the sulfonamides. Our conformer-specific IR spectra in the NH and OH stretch region (3200-3750 \\wn) suggest that the intra- and intermolecular interactions governing the structures of the monomers and water complexes are surprisingly diverse. We have undertaken both Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM) and Interacting Quantum Atoms (IQA) analyses of calculated electron densities to quantitatively characterize the nature and strengths of the intra- and intermolecular interactions prevalent in the monomer and water complex structures.

  10. Effect of a nonionic surfactant on biodegradation of slowly desorbing PAHs in contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Bueno-Montes, Marisa; Springael, Dirk; Ortega-Calvo, José-Julio

    2011-04-01

    The influence of the nonionic surfactant Brij 35 on biodegradation of slowly desorbing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was determined in contaminated soils. We employed a soil originated from a creosote-polluted site, and a manufactured gas plant soil that had been treated by bioremediation. The two soils differed in their total content in five indicator 3-, 4-, and 5-ring PAHs (2923 mg kg(-1) and 183 mg kg(-1) in the creosote-polluted and bioremediated soils, respectively) but had a similar content (140 mg kg(-1) vs 156 mg kg(-1)) of slowly desorbing PAHs. The PAHs present in the bioremediated soil were highly recalcitrant. The surfactant at a concentration above its critical micelle concentration enhanced the biodegradation of slowly desorbing PAHs in suspensions of both soils, but it was especially efficient with bioremediated soil, causing a 62% loss of the total PAH content. An inhibition of biodegradation was observed with the high-molecular-weight PAHs pyrene and benzo[a]pyrene in the untreated soil, possibly due to competition effects with other solubilized PAHs present at relatively high concentrations. We suggest that nonionic surfactants may improve bioremediation performance with soils that have previously undergone extensive bioremediation to enrich for a slowly desorbing profile.

  11. Determination of Desorbed Species During Heating of AgI-Mordenite Provided by ORNL

    SciTech Connect

    Croes, Kenneth James; Garino, Terry J.; Mowry, Curtis D.; Nenoff, Tina M.

    2015-12-15

    This study is focused on describing the desorbed off gases due to heating of the AgIMordenite (MOR) produced at ORNL for iodine (I2) gas capture from nuclear fuel aqueous reprocessing. In particular, the interest is for the incorporation of the AgI-MOR into a waste form, which might be the Sandia developed, low temperature sintering, Bi-Si oxide based, Glass Composite Material (GCM). The GCM has been developed as a waste form for the incorporation any oxide based getter material. In the case where iodine may be released during the sintering process of the GCM, additional Ag flake is added as further insurance in total iodine capture and retention. This has been the case for the incorporated ORNL developed AgIMOR. Thermal analysis studies were carried out to determine off gasing processes of ORNL AgIMOR. Independent of sample size, ~7wt% of total water is desorbed by 225°C. This includes both bulk surface and occluded water, and are monitored as H2O and OH. Of that total, ~5.5wt% is surface water which is removed by 125°C, and 1.5wt% is occluded (in zeolite pore) water. Less than ~1 wt% total water continues to desorb, but is completely removed by 500°C. Above 300°C, the detectable remaining desorbing species observed are iodine containing compounds, including I and I2.

  12. ION AND NEUTRAL MOLECULES IN THE W43-MM1(G30.79 FIR 10) INFALLING CLUMP

    SciTech Connect

    Cortes, Paulo C.

    2011-12-20

    The high-mass star-forming clump W43-MM1 has been mapped in N{sub 2}H{sup +}(4 {yields} 3), C{sup 18}O(3 {yields} 2), SiO(8 {yields} 7), and in a single pointing in DCO{sup +}(5 {yields} 4) toward the center of the clump. Column densities from these observations as well as previous HCO{sup +}(4 {yields} 3), H{sup 13}CO{sup +}(4 {yields} 3), HCN(4 {yields} 3), H{sup 13}CN(4 {yields} 3), and CS(7 {yields} 6) data have been derived using the RADEX code; results later have been used to derive chemical abundances at selected points in the MM1 main axis. We compare with chemical models to estimate an evolutionary age of 10{sup 4} years for a remarkable warm hot core inside MM1. We also proposed that the dust temperature derived from the spectral energy distribution fitting in MM1 is not representative of the gas temperature deep inside the clump because dust emission may have become optically thick. By deriving a deuterium fractionation of 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3}, we estimate an electron fraction of X(e) = 6.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8}. Thus, the coupling between the neutral gas and the magnetic field is estimated by computing the ambipolar diffusion Reynolds number R{sub m} = 18 and the wave coupling number W = 110. Considering that the infalling speed is slightly supersonic (M = 1.1) but sub-Alfvenic, we conclude that the MM1 clump has recently been or is in the process of decoupling the field from the neutral fluid. Thus, the MM1 clump appears to be in an intermediate stage of evolution in which a hot core has developed while the envelope is still infalling and not fully decoupled from the ambient magnetic field.

  13. Crystal structure of a 2:1 piroxicam-gentisic acid co-crystal featuring neutral and zwitterionic piroxicam mol-ecules.

    PubMed

    Horstman, Elizabeth M; Bertke, Jeffery A; Woods, Toby J; Kenis, Paul J A

    2016-12-01

    A new 2:1 co-crystal of piroxicam and gentisic acid [systematic name: 4-hy-droxy-1,1-dioxo-N-(pyridin-2-yl)-2H-1λ(6),2-benzo-thia-zine-3-carboxamide-2-(4-oxido-1,1-dioxo-2H-1λ(6),2-benzo-thia-zine-3-amido)-pyridin-1-ium-2,5-di-hydroxy-benzoic acid, 2C15H13N3O4S·C7H6O4] has been synthesized using a microfluidic platform and initially identified using Raman spectroscopy. In the co-crystal, one piroxicam mol-ecule is in its neutral form and an intra-molecular O-H⋯O hydrogen bond is observed. The other piroxicam mol-ecule is zwitterionic (proton transfer from the OH group to the pyridine N atom) and two intra-molecular N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds occur. The gentisic acid mol-ecule shows whole-mol-ecule disorder over two sets of sites in a 0.809 (2):0.191 (2) ratio. In the crystal, extensive hydrogen bonding between the components forms layers propagating in the ab plane.

  14. Renner-Teller Coupling in Open Shell Dihydrides: a Comparison of Theory with Optical Spectra of Neutral and Ionic Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duxbury, G.; Jungen, Ch.; Alijah, A.

    2013-06-01

    The studies of the Renner-Teller coupling in isoelectronic series of the neutral dihydrides, started with the experiments of Dressler and Ramsay on the absorption spectra of NH_{2} and of ND_{2} published in 1959, with a companion paper on the theory by Pople and Longuet Higgins. Subsequently experiments on their ionic counterparts, e.g. H_{2}O+, were carried out, initially using photoelectron spectroscopy. However it was not until the period starting in 1965 to 1980 that methods for calculating the vibronic interaction between the half-states were derived and tested. Complications arise owing the the role of the linear degeneracy of the two half states in the formation of the rovibronic structure, and the effects of the increasing spin-orbit interaction in the series from NH_{2} to SbH_{2}, and H_{2}O+ to H_{2}Se+ in facilitating fragmentation processes. Many of these molecular spectra were considered in great detail, but some, such as that of AsH_{2}, have had a less complete treatment of vibronic interaction, in part since the original study of its electronic spectrum took place in the period from 1966-67 before most of the vibronic coupling methods had been developed developed. We wish to show the interplay between the angular momentum effects caused by the large amplitude motion in a degenerate system, and those caused by a rapidly increasing spin-orbit coupling constant. Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. 251,553(1959) Molec. Phys. 1,372(1958)

  15. Influence of nonlinear sorption kinetics on the slow-desorbing organic contaminant fraction in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Schlebaum, W.; Schraa, G.; Van Riemsdijk, W.H.

    1999-05-01

    Release rates of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) from the soil matrix influence the availability of HOCs in soils or sediments for microbial degradation or removal by physical means (e.g., soil washing or soil venting). In this study it was shown that the initial contaminant concentration influences the desorption rate. This was attributed to the presence of a limited number of high affinity sites that cause nonlinear sorption behavior. The experimental results could be described with a kinetic model composed of two separate compartments. One compartment was described with a Freundlich isotherm and corresponding kinetics and was assumed to represent sorption to high affinity sites. The second compartment was described with a linear sorption isotherm and first-order kinetics. The model was used to simulate the influence of purging strategies on removal of QCB. The simulations showed that after removal of a fast-desorbing fraction, the slow-desorbing fraction could be efficiently removed at very low purging rates. Intermittent purging reduced the total purging time but the simulations showed large fluctuations in the aqueous pentachlorobenzene concentration. For each subsequent purging interval, the purging efficiency decreased due to the nonlinear desorption kinetics of the slow-desorbing fraction of pentachlorobenzene.

  16. Multiple boron-boron bonds in neutral molecules: an insight from the extended transition state method and the natural orbitals for chemical valence scheme.

    PubMed

    Mitoraj, Mariusz P; Michalak, Artur

    2011-03-21

    We have analyzed the character of B═B and B≡B bonds in the neutral molecules of general form: LHB═BHL (2-L) and LB≡BL (3-L), for various ancillary ligands L attached to the boron center, based on a recently developed method that combines the extended transition state scheme with the theory of natural orbitals for chemical valence (ETS-NOCV). In the case of molecules with the B═B bond, 2-L, we have included L = PMe(3), PF(3), PCl(3), PH(3), C(3)H(4)N(2)═C(NHCH)(2), whereas for molecules containing the B≡B connection, 3-L, the following ligands were considered L = CO, PMe(3), PCl(3), (Me(2)NCH(2)CH(2)O)(2)Ge. The results led us to conclude that use of phosphorus ligands leads to strengthening of the B═B bond by 6.4 kcal/mol (for 2-PMe(3)), by 4.4 (for 2-PF(3)) and by 9.2 (for 2-PH(3)), when compared to a molecule developed on the experimental basis, 2-C(3)H(4)N(2) (ΔE(total) = -118.3 kcal/mol). The ETS scheme has shown that all contributions, that is, (i) orbital interaction ΔE(orb), (ii) Pauli repulsion ΔE(Pauli), and (iii) electrostatic stabilization ΔE(elstat), are important in determining the trend in the B═B bond energies, ΔE(total). ETS-NOCV results revealed that both σ(B═B) and π(B═B) contributions are responsible for the changes in ΔE(orb) values. All considered molecules of the type LB≡BL, 3-L, exhibit a stronger B≡B bond when compared to a double B═B connection in 2-L (|ΔE(total)| is lower by 11.8-42.5 kcal/mol, depending on the molecule). The main reason is a lower Pauli repulsion contribution noted for 3-CO, 3-PMe(3), and 3-PCl(3) molecules. In addition, in the case of 3-PMe(3) and 3-PCl(3), the orbital interaction term is more stabilizing; however, the effect is less pronounced compared to the drop in the Pauli repulsion term. In all of the systems with double and triple boron-boron bonds, the electronic factor (ΔE(orb)) dominates over the electrostatic contribution (ΔE(elstat)). Finally, the strongest B

  17. Continuous reduction of cyclic adsorbed and desorbed NO(x) in diesel emission using nonthermal plasma.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, Takuya; Nakaguchi, Harunobu; Kuroki, Tomoyuki; Okubo, Masaaki

    2016-05-05

    Considering the recent stringent regulations governing diesel NO(x) emission, an aftertreatment system for the reduction of NO(x) in the exhaust gas has been proposed and studied. The proposed system is a hybrid method combining nonthermal plasma and NOx adsorbent. The system does not require precious metal catalysts or harmful chemicals such as urea and ammonia. In the present system, NO(x) in diesel emission is treated by adsorption and desorption by adsorbent as well as nonthermal plasma reduction. In addition, the remaining NO(x) in the adsorbent is desorbed again in the supplied air by residual heat. The desorbed NO(x) in air recirculates into the intake of the engine, and this process, i.e., exhaust gas components' recirculation (EGCR) achieves NO(x) reduction. Alternate utilization of two adsorption chambers in the system can achieve high-efficiency NO(x) removal continuously. An experiment with a stationary diesel engine for electric power generation demonstrates an energy efficiency of 154 g(NO2)/kWh for NO(x) removal and continuous NO(x) reduction of 70.3%. Considering the regulation against diesel emission in Japan, i.e., the new regulation to be imposed on vehicles of 3.5-7.5 ton since 2016, the present aftertreatment system fulfills the requirement with only 1.0% of engine power. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. A statistical mechanics investigation about general aspects of wetting transition occurring in nonpolar neutral molecule system with a smooth solid wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shiqi

    2017-09-01

    Classical density functional theory is used to study the general aspects of wetting phenomena occurring in nonpolar neutral molecule system near a flat solid wall. Current cognitions of the wetting behavior are looked at, validated, corrected and extended. Several new observations are made: (i) the present theoretical calculations suggest that over a broad range of the surface potential parameters the pre-wetting transition temperature interval significantly reduces with the wetting temperature, and at the same time a continuous and monotonous increase of the wetting temperature is induced by decreasing the surface potential range and/or relative strength of surface atom versus fluid atom interaction. (ii) There exist lower limit values of both the surface potential range and the relative strength, below which the wetting transition is impossible. (iv) The present theoretical calculations confirm an experimentally found no adsorption occurring in weak surface potential substrates all the way to the relevant critical temperature by showing the impossibility of wetting at bulk critical temperature and its surroundings; moreover, the calculations extend the experimental observation to a wider parameter domain by indicating that the impossibility is not only unique feature of the weak surface potential substrates, but also applies to all situations of the surface potential range and relative strength. (v) With progressive increase of the relative strength and/or progressive decrease of the temperature, the interfacial phase behavior becomes increasingly complex: the (pre-)wetting transition and layering transition (which can be thermodynamically stable, metastable or even situated at supersaturated vapor phase) are intertwined closely; this challenges the popular knowledge that there is no (pre-)wetting for strong substrates for which the pre-wetting is replaced by the layering transitions.

  19. On the SIMS Ionization Probability of Organic Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popczun, Nicholas J.; Breuer, Lars; Wucher, Andreas; Winograd, Nicholas

    2017-06-01

    The prospect of improved secondary ion yields for secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) experiments drives innovation of new primary ion sources, instrumentation, and post-ionization techniques. The largest factor affecting secondary ion efficiency is believed to be the poor ionization probability (α+) of sputtered material, a value rarely measured directly, but estimated to be in some cases as low as 10-5. Our lab has developed a method for the direct determination of α+ in a SIMS experiment using laser post-ionization (LPI) to detect neutral molecular species in the sputtered plume for an organic compound. Here, we apply this method to coronene (C24H12), a polyaromatic hydrocarbon that exhibits strong molecular signal during gas-phase photoionization. A two-dimensional spatial distribution of sputtered neutral molecules is measured and presented. It is shown that the ionization probability of molecular coronene desorbed from a clean film under bombardment with 40 keV C60 cluster projectiles is of the order of 10-3, with some remaining uncertainty arising from laser-induced fragmentation and possible differences in the emission velocity distributions of neutral and ionized molecules. In general, this work establishes a method to estimate the ionization efficiency of molecular species sputtered during a single bombardment event. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  20. On the SIMS Ionization Probability of Organic Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popczun, Nicholas J.; Breuer, Lars; Wucher, Andreas; Winograd, Nicholas

    2017-03-01

    The prospect of improved secondary ion yields for secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) experiments drives innovation of new primary ion sources, instrumentation, and post-ionization techniques. The largest factor affecting secondary ion efficiency is believed to be the poor ionization probability (α+) of sputtered material, a value rarely measured directly, but estimated to be in some cases as low as 10-5. Our lab has developed a method for the direct determination of α+ in a SIMS experiment using laser post-ionization (LPI) to detect neutral molecular species in the sputtered plume for an organic compound. Here, we apply this method to coronene (C24H12), a polyaromatic hydrocarbon that exhibits strong molecular signal during gas-phase photoionization. A two-dimensional spatial distribution of sputtered neutral molecules is measured and presented. It is shown that the ionization probability of molecular coronene desorbed from a clean film under bombardment with 40 keV C60 cluster projectiles is of the order of 10-3, with some remaining uncertainty arising from laser-induced fragmentation and possible differences in the emission velocity distributions of neutral and ionized molecules. In general, this work establishes a method to estimate the ionization efficiency of molecular species sputtered during a single bombardment event.

  1. On the SIMS Ionization Probability of Organic Molecules.

    PubMed

    Popczun, Nicholas J; Breuer, Lars; Wucher, Andreas; Winograd, Nicholas

    2017-03-06

    The prospect of improved secondary ion yields for secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) experiments drives innovation of new primary ion sources, instrumentation, and post-ionization techniques. The largest factor affecting secondary ion efficiency is believed to be the poor ionization probability (α(+)) of sputtered material, a value rarely measured directly, but estimated to be in some cases as low as 10(-5). Our lab has developed a method for the direct determination of α(+) in a SIMS experiment using laser post-ionization (LPI) to detect neutral molecular species in the sputtered plume for an organic compound. Here, we apply this method to coronene (C24H12), a polyaromatic hydrocarbon that exhibits strong molecular signal during gas-phase photoionization. A two-dimensional spatial distribution of sputtered neutral molecules is measured and presented. It is shown that the ionization probability of molecular coronene desorbed from a clean film under bombardment with 40 keV C60 cluster projectiles is of the order of 10(-3), with some remaining uncertainty arising from laser-induced fragmentation and possible differences in the emission velocity distributions of neutral and ionized molecules. In general, this work establishes a method to estimate the ionization efficiency of molecular species sputtered during a single bombardment event. Graphical Abstract .

  2. Binding of atoms and stability of molecules in Hartree and Thomas-Fermi type theories. Part 4: Binding of neutral systems for the Hartree model

    SciTech Connect

    Catto, I.; Lions, P.L. )

    1993-01-01

    This paper is the fourth of a series devoted to the study of the stability of general molecular systems in Thomas-Fermi or Hartree type models. In the preceding part, the authors proved the binding of arbitrary neutral systems for Thomas-Fermi type theories and of planar neutral systems for the Hartree model. In this part, they manage to get rid of this restriction and thus prove the binding and the stability of arbitrary neutral systems for the Hartree model. 23 refs.

  3. Methodologies for Removing/Desorbing and Transporting Particles from Surfaces to Instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Carla J.; Cespedes, Ernesto R.

    2012-12-01

    Explosive trace detection (ETD) continues to be a key technology supporting the fight against terrorist bombing threats. Very selective and sensitive ETD instruments have been developed to detect explosive threats concealed on personnel, in vehicles, in luggage, and in cargo containers, as well as for forensic analysis (e.g. post blast inspection, bomb-maker identification, etc.) in a broad range of homeland security, law enforcement, and military applications. A number of recent studies have highlighted the fact that significant improvements in ETD systems' capabilities will be achieved, not by increasing the selectivity/sensitivity of the sensors, but by improved techniques for particle/vapor sampling, pre-concentration, and transport to the sensors. This review article represents a compilation of studies focused on characterizing the adhesive properties of explosive particles, the methodologies for removing/desorbing these particles from a range of surfaces, and approaches for transporting them to the instrument. The objectives of this review are to summarize fundamental work in explosive particle characterization, to describe experimental work performed in harvesting and transport of these particles, and to highlight those approaches that indicate high potential for improving ETD capabilities.

  4. Effects of flow rate and temperature on thermal desorbability of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and pesticides from Tenax-GC

    SciTech Connect

    Pankow, J.F.; Kristensen, T.J.

    1983-11-01

    One factor limiting adsorption/thermal desorption (ATD) preconcentration techniques is the thermal desorbability of the analyte compounds. The behavior of a set of compounds including polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and several pesticides on 0.110 g of the sorbent Tenax-GC was investigated as a function of desorption temperature and carrier gas flow rate. The recoveries obtained with helium at 11.2 mL/min are as follows: naphthalene, 99 +/- 1; fluorene, 70 +/- 1; ..cap alpha..-BHC, 97 +/- 8; heptachlor, 26 +/- 5; fluoranthene, 99 +/- 1; pyrene, 93 +/- 1; dieldrin, 120 +/- 3; DDD, 60 +/- 2;DDT 20 +/- 1; benzo(k)fluoranthene, 93 +/- 3; perylene, 89 +/- 2; and benzo(ghi)perylene, 88 +/- 5. The desorbing compounds were trapped on a fused silica capillary column at -30/sup 0/C. Excellent resolution and separation number performance was maintained despite the use of high desorption carrier gas flow rates. Estimates were made of the retention volume and desorbing peak width characteristics of several of the compounds on Tenax-GC at the desorption temperatures studied. 5 figures, 3 tables.

  5. Rearrangements of transient neutral molecules in the gas phase. Does the conversion of CCCHO to HCCCO involve oxygen or hydrogen migration?

    PubMed

    Tran, Khoa M; McAnoy, Andrew M; Bowie, John H

    2004-01-01

    Stable (CC13CHO)- may be formed in the chemical ionisation ion source of a VG ZAB 2HF mass spectrometer by the SN2(Si) reaction between Me3SiC[triple bond]C13CHO and F-. Vertical (Franck-Condon) one-electron oxidation of (CC13CHO)- in the first of the tandem collision cells of a VG ZAB 2HF mass spectrometer gives CC13CHO. Some of these neutrals have sufficient excess energy to effect rearrangement to HCC13CO, some of which are energised and to decompose to HCC. and 13CO. Thus the neutral rearrangement exclusively involves H migration: no products from O migration are detected. The corresponding two-electron oxidation of (CC13CHO)- gives mainly unrearranged (CC13CHO)+. A minority of these cations are energised and rearrange by H and O migration to yield (HCC13CHO)+ and (OCC13CHO)+ respectively. All experimental observations are backed up by molecular modelling at the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVDZ//B3LYP/6-31G(d) level of theory.

  6. The First Detections of the Key Prebiotic Molecule PO in Star-forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivilla, V. M.; Fontani, F.; Beltrán, M. T.; Vasyunin, A.; Caselli, P.; Martín-Pintado, J.; Cesaroni, R.

    2016-08-01

    Phosphorus is a crucial element in biochemistry, in particular the P-O bond, which is key in the formation of the backbone of deoxyribonucleic acid. So far, PO has only been detected toward the envelope of evolved stars, but never toward star-forming regions. We report the first detection of PO toward two massive star-forming regions, W51 e1/e2 and W3(OH), using data from the IRAM 30 m telescope. PN has also been detected toward the two regions. The abundance ratio PO/PN is 1.8 and 3 for W51 and W3(OH), respectively. Our chemical model indicates that the two molecules are chemically related and are formed via gas-phase ion-molecule and neutral-neutral reactions during cold collapse. The molecules freeze out onto grains at the end of the collapse and desorb during the warm-up phase once the temperature reaches ˜35 K. Similar abundances of the two species are expected during a period of ˜5 × 104 yr at the early stages of the warm-up phase, when the temperature is in the range 35-90 K. The observed molecular abundances of 10-10 are predicted by the model if a relatively high initial abundance of 5 × 10-9 of depleted phosphorus is assumed.

  7. The bond-forming reactions of atomic dications with neutral molecules: formation of ArNH+ and ArN+ from collisions of Ar2+ with NH3.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Natalie; Kearney, Dominic; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Price, Stephen D

    2004-03-24

    An experimental and computational study has been performed to investigate the bond-forming reactivity between Ar(2+) and NH(3). Experimentally, we detect two previously unobserved bond-forming reactions between Ar(2+) and NH(3) forming ArN(+) and ArNH(+). This is the first experimental observation of a triatomic product ion (ArNH(+)) following a chemical reaction of a rare gas dication with a neutral. The intensity of ArNH(+) was found to decrease with increasing collision energy, with a corresponding increase in the intensity of ArN(+), indicating that ArN(+) is formed by the dissociation of ArNH(+). Key features on the potential energy surface for the reaction were calculated quantum chemically using CASSCF and MRCI methods. The calculated reaction mechanism, which takes place on a singlet surface, involves the initial formation of an Ar-N bond to give Ar-NH(3)(2+). This complexation is followed by proton loss via a transition state, and then loss of the two remaining hydrogen atoms in two subsequent activationless steps to give the products (3)ArN(+) + H(+) + 2H. This calculated pathway supports the sequential formation of ArN(+) from ArNH(+), as suggested by the experimental data. The calculations also indicate that no bond-forming pathway exists on the ground triplet surface for this system.

  8. Generation and characterization of ABBV642, a dual variable domain immunoglobulin molecule (DVD-Ig) that potently neutralizes VEGF and PDGF-BB and is designed for the treatment of exudative age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Ding, Kun; Eaton, Lucia; Bowley, Diana; Rieser, Matthew; Chang, Qing; Harris, Maria C; Clabbers, Anca; Dong, Feng; Shen, Jikui; Hackett, Sean F; Touw, Debra S; Bixby, Jacqueline; Zhong, Suju; Benatuil, Lorenzo; Bose, Sahana; Grinnell, Christine; Preston, Gregory M; Iyer, Ramesh; Sadhukhan, Ramkrishna; Marchie, Susan; Overmeyer, Gary; Ghayur, Tariq; van Riet, Deborah A; Tang, Shibo; Campochario, Peter A; Gu, Jijie

    Exudative age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common cause of moderate and severe vision loss in developed countries. Intraocular injections of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF or VEGF-A)-neutralizing proteins provide substantial benefit, but frequent, long-term injections are needed. In addition, many patients experience initial visual gains that are ultimately lost due to subretinal fibrosis. Preclinical studies and early phase clinical trials suggest that combined suppression of VEGF and platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) provides better outcomes than suppression of VEGF alone, due to more frequent regression of neovascularization (NV) and suppression of subretinal fibrosis. We generated a dual variable domain immunoglobulin molecule, ABBV642 that specifically and potently binds and neutralizes VEGF and PDGF-BB. ABBV642 has been optimized for treatment of exudative AMD based on the following design characteristics: 1) high affinity binding to all VEGF-A isoforms and both soluble and extracellular matrix (ECM)-associated PDGF-BB; 2) potential for extended residence time in the vitreous cavity to decrease the frequency of intraocular injections; 3) rapid clearance from systemic circulation compared with molecules with wild type Fc region for normal FcRn binding, which may reduce the risk of systemic complications; and 4) low risk of potential effector function. The bispecificity of ABBV642 allows for a single injection of a single therapeutic agent, and thus a more streamlined development and regulatory path compared with combination products. In a mouse model of exudative AMD, ABBV642 was observed to be more effective than aflibercept. ABBV642 has potential to improve efficacy with reduced injection frequency in patients with exudative AMD, thereby reducing the enormous disease burden for patients and society.

  9. Why do Hydrates (Solvates) Form in Small Neutral Organic Molecules? Exploring the Crystal Form Landscapes of the Alkaloids Brucine and Strychnine.

    PubMed

    Braun, Doris E; Griesser, Ulrich J

    2016-11-02

    Computational methods were used to generate and explore the crystal structure landscapes of the two alkaloids strychnine and brucine. The computed structures were analyzed and rationalized by correlating the modelling results to a rich pool of available experimental data. Despite their structural similarity, the two compounds show marked differences in the formation of solid forms. For strychnine only one anhydrous form is reported in the literature and two new solvates from 1,4-dioxane were detected in the course of this work. In contrast, 22 solid forms are so far known to exist for brucine, comprising two anhydrates, four hydrates (HyA - HyC and a 5.25-hydrate), twelve solvates (alcohols and acetone) and four heterosolvates (mixed solvates with water and alcohols). For strychnine it is hard to produce any solid form other than the stable anhydrate while the formation of specific solid state forms of brucine is governed by a complex interplay between temperature and relative humidity/water activity and it is rather a challenging to avoid hydrate formation. Differences in crystal packing and the high tendency for brucine to form hydrates are not intuitive from the molecular structure alone, as both molecules have hydrogen bond acceptor groups but lack hydrogen bond donor groups. Only the evaluation of the crystal energy landscapes, in particular the close-packed crystal structures and high-energy open frameworks containing voids of molecular (water) dimensions, allowed us to unravel the diverse solid state behavior of the two alkaloids at a molecular level. In this study we demonstrate that expanding the analysis of anhydrate crystal energy landscapes to higher energy structures and calculating the solvent-accessible volume can be used to estimate non-stoichiometric or channel hydrate (solvate) formation, without explicitly computing the hydrate/solvate crystal energy landscapes.

  10. Desorption of Hot Molecules from Photon Irradiated Interstellar Ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thrower, J. D.; Burke, D. J.; Collings, M. P.; Dawes, A.; Holtom, P. D.; Jamme, F.; Kendall, P.; Brown, W. A.; Clark, I. P.; Fraser, H. J.; McCoustra, M. R. S.; Mason, N. J.; Parker, A. W.

    2008-02-01

    We present experimental measurements of photodesorption from ices of astrophysical relevance. Layers of benzene and water ice were irradiated with a laser tuned to an electronic transition in the benzene molecule. The translational energy of desorbed molecules was measured by time-of-flight (ToF) mass spectrometry. Three distinct photodesorption processes were identified: a direct adsorbate-mediated desorption producing benzene molecules with a translational temperature of around 1200 K, an indirect adsorbate-mediated desorption resulting in water molecules with a translational temperature of around 450 K, and a substrate-mediated desorption of both benzene and water producing molecules with translational temperatures of around 530 and 450 K, respectively. The translational temperature of each population of desorbed molecules is well above the temperature of the ice matrix. The implications for gas-phase chemistry in the interstellar medium are discussed.

  11. Sequence-specific fragmentation of matrix-assisted laser-desorbed protein/peptide ions.

    PubMed

    Brown, R S; Lennon, J J

    1995-11-01

    By utilizing delayed pulsed ion extraction of ions generated via the matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) technique, fast (< 320 ns) metastable ion fragmentation is observed for both peptide and protein analytes in the ion source of a linear time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Small peptides such as the oxidized B chain of bovine insulin exhibit fragmentation at the amide linking bond between peptide residues. Overlapping sequence information is provided by fragmentation from both the C- and N-terminal ends of the peptide (cn-, yn-, and z*n-type fragment ions). Larger proteins can also exhibit a wealth of sequence specific fragment ions in favorable cases. One example is cytochrome c, which undergoes substantial (approximately 80%) fast fragmentation at the amide bonds along the amino acid backbone of the protein. Only amide bond cleavages initiating from the C-terminal end (cn fragments) are observed. The observed fragmentation pattern provides a significant amount of potential sequence information for these molecules. External mass calibration of the intact protonated molecular ions is demonstrated with mass accuracies typically around 100 ppm. Mass accuracies for the observed fragment ions ranged from +/- 0.20 Da for the smaller peptides studied (i.e., oxidized B chain of bovine insulin) to +/- 0.38 Da for the largest protein studied (cytochrome c), based upon the known sequences.

  12. Study of desorbed hydrogen-decrepitated anisotropic Nd-Fe-B powder using x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meisner, G. P.; Panchanathan, V.

    1994-11-01

    The instrinsic magnetic coercivity (H(sub ci)) of Nd-Fe-B-based permanent magnet material is profoundly affected by hydrogen absorbed during the hydrogen decrepitation (HD) process for producing anisotropic powders from bulk anisotropic hot-deformed MAGNEQUENCH (MQ) magnets. Hydrogen (H) content and x-ray diffraction measurements clarify the effects of H and desorption temperature (T(sub d)) on the intrinsic magnetic anisotropy (IMA) of the Nd2Fe14B-type phase and the nature of the intergranular phases, both of which are crucial for high H(sub ci). The Nd-rich intergranular phase disproportionates during HD, initially forming a microcrystalline Nd-hydride phase, possibly Nd2H5. For T(sub d) less than or equal to 220 C, H remains in the Nd2Fe14B-type phase, severely degrading the IMA, which causes a low H(sub ci). For 220 C less than or equal to T(sub d) less than or equal to 250 C, enough H desorbs from the Nd2Fe14B-type phase and the IMA recovers its large prehydrided value, and the microstructure supports a high H(sub ci) less than or equal to 10 kOe in spite of the H disproportionated interfgranular phase. Only for T(sub d) greater than 250 C is H(sub ci) degraded by the microstructure, corresponding to further H desorption and the microcrystalline Nd-hydride phase becoming well-crystallized NdH2. The NdH2 phase decomposes with continued H desorption and at T(sub d) greater than 580 C recombines to reform the Nd-rich intergranular phase of prehydrided MQ material. H is completely desorbed above 580 C and H(sub ci) greater than 11 kOe, nearly that of the prehydrided MQ magnets.

  13. Plasma/Neutral-Beam Etching Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, William; Cohen, Samuel; Cuthbertson, John; Manos, Dennis; Motley, Robert

    1989-01-01

    Energies of neutral particles controllable. Apparatus developed to produce intense beams of reactant atoms for simulating low-Earth-orbit oxygen erosion, for studying beam-gas collisions, and for etching semiconductor substrates. Neutral beam formed by neutralization and reflection of accelerated plasma on metal plate. Plasma ejected from coaxial plasma gun toward neutralizing plate, where turned into beam of atoms or molecules and aimed at substrate to be etched.

  14. Plasma/Neutral-Beam Etching Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, William; Cohen, Samuel; Cuthbertson, John; Manos, Dennis; Motley, Robert

    1989-01-01

    Energies of neutral particles controllable. Apparatus developed to produce intense beams of reactant atoms for simulating low-Earth-orbit oxygen erosion, for studying beam-gas collisions, and for etching semiconductor substrates. Neutral beam formed by neutralization and reflection of accelerated plasma on metal plate. Plasma ejected from coaxial plasma gun toward neutralizing plate, where turned into beam of atoms or molecules and aimed at substrate to be etched.

  15. Correlation between the Mechanical Properties and the Amount of Desorbed Water for Composites Based on Low-Density Polyethylene and Linen Yarn Production Waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lejnieks, J. E.; Kajaks, J. A.; Reihmane, S. A.

    2005-07-01

    The effect of the amount of desorbed water on the mechanical properties of composites based on low-density polyethylene and linen yarn production waste (LW) is analyzed by statistical methods. It is shown that the amount of absorbed water decreases during the desorption process at room temperature both for specimens modified and unmodified with diphenylmethane diisocyanate (DIC.) The most sensitive to the action of water is the elastic modulus, which decreases considerably under the effect of water and is fully restored in the desorption process. The tensile strain also increases with the amount of absorbed water. It is found that the elastic modulus of the unmodified composite correlates linearly with the amount of desorbed water. Between the amount of desorbed water and the tensile strain, as well the specific work of deformation, a negative linear correlation is revealed. After water desorption, all strength and deformation characteristics of both the modified and unmodified composites are fully recovered.

  16. Heavy exotic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yizhuang; Zahed, Ismail

    We briefly review the formation of pion-mediated heavy-light exotic molecules with both charm and bottom, under the general structures of chiral and heavy quark symmetries. The charm isosinglet exotic molecules with JPC = 1++ binds, which we identify as the reported neutral X(3872). The bottom isotriplet exotic with JPC = 1+- binds, and is identified as a mixed state of the reported charged exotics Zb+(10610) and Zb+(10650). The bound bottom isosinglet molecule with JPC = 1++ is a possible neutral Xb(10532) to be observed.

  17. Heavy exotic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yizhuang; Zahed, Ismail

    We briefly review the formation of pion-mediated heavy-light exotic molecules with both charm and bottom, under the general structures of chiral and heavy quark symmetries. The charm isosinglet exotic molecules with JPC = 1++ binds, which we identify as the reported neutral X(3872). The bottom isotriplet exotic with JPC = 1+1 binds, and is identified as a mixed state of the reported charged exotics Zb+(10610) and Zb-(10650). The bound bottom isosinglet molecule with JPC = 1++ is a possible neutral Xb(10532) to be observed.

  18. Extremely slowly desorbing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from soot and soot-like materials: evidence by supercritical fluid extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Michiel T.O. Jonker; Steven B. Hawthorne; Albert A. Koelmans

    2005-10-15

    Combustion-derived PAHs are strongly sorbed to their particulate carrier (i.e., soot, charcoal), and therefore, very slow desorption kinetics of the chemicals might be anticipated. Measurements are however lacking, because conventional methods (Tenax, XAD, gas-purging) fail to accurately determine desorption kinetics due to practical problems. In this study, we used a mild supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) method, which mimics desorption into water and circumvents these problems, to quantify desorption kinetics of 13 native PAHs from pure charcoal, coal, and four types of soot. The results show that generally only very small PAH fractions are released. Desorption behavior was, however, not related to common sorbent/sorbate characteristics. Two-site model-derived 'fast desorbing fractions' were {lt}0.01 in the majority of cases, and for the dominant 'slow sites', the calculated rate constants for desorption into water measured from 10{sup -7} to 10{sup -5} h{sup -1}. These data suggest that desorption of coal and combustion-derived PAHs can be even slower than the 'very slow' desorption observed in sediments. Estimated time scales required for removal of pyrogenic PAHs from these extremely slow sites into water amount to several millennia. Our results imply reduced chemical risks for soot and soot-like materials, casting doubts on current risk assessment procedures and environmental quality standards of pyrogenic PAHs. 41 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  19. Extremely slowly desorbing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from soot and soot-like materials: evidence by supercritical fluid extraction.

    PubMed

    Jonker, Michiel T O; Hawthorne, Steven B; Koelmans, Albert A

    2005-10-15

    Combustion-derived PAHs are strongly sorbed to their particulate carrier (i.e., soot, charcoal), and therefore, very slow desorption kinetics of the chemicals might be anticipated. Measurements are however lacking, because conventional methods (Tenax, XAD, gas-purging) fail to accurately determine desorption kinetics due to practical problems. In this study, we used a mild supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) method, which mimics desorption into water and circumvents these problems, to quantify desorption kinetics of 13 native PAHs from pure charcoal, coal, and four types of soot. The results show that generally only very small PAH fractions are released. Desorption behavior was, however, not related to common sorbent/sorbate characteristics. Two-site model-derived "fast desorbing fractions" were <0.01 in the majority of cases, and for the dominant "slow sites", the calculated rate constants for desorption into water measured from 10(-7) to 10(-5) h(-1). These data suggest that desorption of coal and combustion-derived PAHs can be even slower than the "very slow" desorption observed in sediments. Estimated time scales required for removal of pyrogenic PAHs from these extremely slow sites into water amount to several millennia. Our results imply reduced chemical risks for soot and soot-like materials, casting doubts on current risk assessment procedures and environmental quality standards of pyrogenic PAHs.

  20. Novel cathode interlayers based on neutral alcohol-soluble small molecules with a triphenylamine core featuring polar phosphonate side chains for high-performance polymer light-emitting and photovoltaic devices.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dongcheng; Zhou, Hu; Liu, Ming; Zhao, Wei-Ming; Su, Shi-Jian; Cao, Yong

    2013-04-12

    A new family of neutral alcohol-soluble small molecular materials comprised of electron-rich triphenylamine (TPA) and fluorene featuring phosphonate side chains (FEP) is reported, namely 3TPA-FEP, 2TPA-2FEP and TPA-3FEP, which have different TPA and FEP contents. Due to their good solubility in polar solvents like alcohol, multilayer devices can be fabricated by a wet process from orthogonal solvents. Polymer light-emitting devices with these materials as a cathode interlayer and Al as the cathode show greatly enhanced efficiencies in contrast to control devices without such a cathode interlayer, and their efficiencies are comparable with or even higher than devices with the low work-function metal Ba/Al as the cathode. In addition, high-performance polymer solar cells based on the poly[N-9''-hepta-decanyl-2,7-carbazole-alt-5,5-(4',7'-di-2-thienyl-2',1',3'-benzothiadiazole)] (PCDTBT):[6,6]-phenyl C71 -butyric acid methyl ester (PC71 BM) system are also achieved with power conversion efficiencies of 7.21%, 6.90% and 6.89%, by utilizing 3TPA-FEP, 2TPA-2FEP and TPA-3FEP as the cathode interlayer, respectively. These efficiencies are also much higher than those for control devices without the cathode interlayer. Although TPA is well-known as a hole-transport unit, the current findings indicate that alcohol-soluble TPA-based small molecules are also a promising cathode interlayer for both electron injection and extraction.

  1. A search for pure compounds suitable for use as matrix in spectroscopic studies of radiation-produced radical cations. III. A selection of compounds based on the thermochemistry of hydrogen and proton transfer reactions between neutral molecules and their cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van den Bosch, Ann; Ceulemans, Jan

    A systematic investigation is made of the thermochemistry of hydrogen and proton transfer between neutral molecules and their cations covering the entire organic chemistry, with the aim of selecting those compounds that are suitable for use as matrices in spectroscopic studies of radiation-produced radical cations. Compounds that are characterized by positive reaction enthalpies may be considered promising for use as matrices in such studies. Calculations are based on experimentally determined ionization energies and proton affinities and on carbon-hydrogen bond strengths that are arbitrarily taken as 418 kJ.mol -1 (100 kcal.mol -1). Effects of actual deviations from this value are considered. In the aliphatic series of compounds, reaction enthalpies depend strongly on functional groups present. Marked positive reaction enthalpies are obtained for alkenes, alkadienes, thioethers, mercaptans, iodoalkanes and tertiary amines. Non-aromatic cyclic compounds generally behave as their aliphatic counterparts. Thus, positive reaction enthalpies are generally obtained for unsaturated alicyclic hydrocarbons and cyclic thioethers. Positive reaction enthalpies are also obtained for piperidine, quinuclidine, manxine and derivatives. In the homocyclic aromatic series of compounds, reaction enthalpies are generally positive. Thus, positive reaction enthalpies are obtained for aromatic hydrocarbons, fluoro- and chlorobenzenes, aromatic amines (amino group attached directly to the ring) and halo- and methoxyanilines. In the heterocyclic aromatic series of compounds reaction enthalpies are generally negative. This is for instance the case for a large number of pyridine derivatives, di- and triazines and a number of bi- and tricyclic compounds. Positive reaction enthalpies are however obtained for furan and pyrrole.

  2. Generation and characterization of ABT-981, a dual variable domain immunoglobulin (DVD-Ig(TM)) molecule that specifically and potently neutralizes both IL-1α and IL-1β.

    PubMed

    Lacy, Susan E; Wu, Chengbin; Ambrosi, Dominic J; Hsieh, Chung-Ming; Bose, Sahana; Miller, Renee; Conlon, Donna M; Tarcsa, Edit; Chari, Ravi; Ghayur, Tariq; Kamath, Rajesh V

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin-1 (IL-1) cytokines such as IL-1α, IL-1β, and IL-1Ra contribute to immune regulation and inflammatory processes by exerting a wide range of cellular responses, including expression of cytokines and chemokines, matrix metalloproteinases, and nitric oxide synthetase. IL-1α and IL-1β bind to IL-1R1 complexed to the IL-1 receptor accessory protein and induce similar physiological effects. Preclinical and clinical studies provide significant evidence for the role of IL-1 in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA), including cartilage degradation, bone sclerosis, and synovial proliferation. Here, we describe the generation and characterization of ABT-981, a dual variable domain immunoglobulin (DVD-Ig) of the IgG1/k subtype that specifically and potently neutralizes IL-1α and IL-1β. In ABT-981, the IL-1β variable domain resides in the outer domain of the DVD-Ig, whereas the IL-1α variable domain is located in the inner position. ABT-981 specifically binds to IL-1α and IL-1β, and is physically capable of binding 2 human IL-1α and 2 human IL-1β molecules simultaneously. Single-dose intravenous and subcutaneous pharmacokinetics studies indicate that ABT-981 has a half-life of 8.0 to 10.4 d in cynomolgus monkey and 10.0 to 20.3 d in rodents. ABT-981 exhibits suitable drug-like-properties including affinity, potency, specificity, half-life, and stability for evaluation in human clinical trials. ABT-981 offers an exciting new approach for the treatment of OA, potentially addressing both disease modification and symptom relief as a disease-modifying OA drug.

  3. Laser trapping of neutral particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Steven

    1992-02-01

    The use of lasers for trapping and manipulating electrically neutral particles is reviewed. The underlying physical phenomena are examined, and some applications in physics, chemistry, and biology are discussed. In particular, attention is given to laser cooling of vapors to nearly absolute zero, development of an improved atomic clock, atom interferometry, and optical tweezers capable of manipulating a single DNA molecule.

  4. Equilibrium conditions in laser-desorbed plumes: thermodynamic properties of alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid and protonation of amino acids.

    PubMed

    Kinsel, Gary R; Yao, Daqing; Yassin, Faten H; Marynick, Dennis S

    2006-01-01

    The equilibrium nature of a plume of laser desorbed material is explored through the application of a simple equilibrium model to the ion signals observed in 355 nm laser desorption/ionization mass spectra of mixtures of the MALDI matrix alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (alphaCHCA) with the amino acids glycine, alanine, valine, isoleucine, and phenylalanine. In these studies it is found that there are systematic and predictable increases in the relative yield of protonated amino acid with increases in amino acid gas-phase basicity. In addition, the thermodynamic values extracted from the equilibrium plot are shown to be in good agreement with values obtained from computational investigation of plausible alphaCHCA proton donor species. These results are supportive of a picture wherein the laser-desorbed material is viewed as a dense plume in which facile charge transfer occurs leading, ultimately, to a thermodynamically equilibrated distribution of proton donor and proton acceptor species.

  5. Weak neutral current chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, R.

    1996-07-01

    Metal cluster organic complexes, neither atomic nor solid but in analogy to atomic nuclei and to mesoscopic systems, have unusual dynamics and catalytic properties. Organo-metal clusters as quintessence prebiotic enzymes could have originated the homochirality of the molecules from achiral precursors, controlled from the atomic-nucleus, with the initial product itself serving subsequently as chiral auxiliary transferring and amplifying the chirality in the autocatalytic process now. High resolution spectroscopic studies of diatomic molecules beginning now may lead to upper estimates of the interaction strength of weak neutral currents (WNG) with valence electrons of metal clusters and suggest kinetic pathways to dynamic symmetry breaking in the asymmetric synthesis of chiral molecules. An estimate of 10-5 kT (thousand times larger than for radiolysis) for the parity violating energy (PVE) could be sufficient to run an entropy driven spin-catalyzed asymmetric synthesis. Expect then, wherever there are metal clusters in interstellar dust or under the sea chiral molecular production.

  6. Weak neutral current chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Mohan, R.

    1996-07-01

    Metal cluster organic complexes, neither atomic nor solid but in analogy to atomic nuclei and to mesoscopic systems, have unusual dynamics and catalytic properties. Organo-metal clusters as quintessence prebiotic enzymes could have originated the homochirality of the molecules from achiral precursors, controlled from the atomic-nucleus, with the initial product itself serving subsequently as chiral auxiliary transferring and amplifying the chirality in the autocatalytic process now. High resolution spectroscopic studies of diatomic molecules beginning now may lead to upper estimates of the interaction strength of weak neutral currents (WNG) with valence electrons of metal clusters and suggest kinetic pathways to dynamic symmetry breaking in the asymmetric synthesis of chiral molecules. An estimate of 10{sup {minus}5} kT (thousand times larger than for radiolysis) for the parity violating energy (PVE) could be sufficient to run an entropy driven spin-catalyzed asymmetric synthesis. Expect then, wherever there are metal clusters in interstellar dust or under the sea chiral molecular production. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Quantum dynamics of bond breaking in a dissipative environment: Indirect and direct photodesorption of neutrals from metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saalfrank, Peter; Kosloff, Ronnie

    1996-08-01

    The dynamics of uv/visible laser-induced nonthermal desorption of neutral molecules from metal surfaces are studied by Liouville-von Neumann equations for quantum open systems. A one-dimensional, two-state Gadzuk-Antoniewicz model is adopted, representative for NO/Pt(111). Electronic quenching due to coupling of the adsorbate negative ion resonance to the metal electrons is treated within the Lindblad dynamical semigroup approach. Both indirect (hot-electron mediated) and hypothetical direct (dipole) excitation processes are considered. For the indirect pathways, DIET (single-excitation) and DIMET (multiple-excitation) limits are studied using one- and double-dissipative channel models, respectively. To reproduce experimental desorption yields and desorbate translational energies, we estimate the quenching lifetime for NO/Pt(111) to be less than 5 fs. We also extend previous quantum treatments of photodesorption processes to the case of coordinate-dependent quenching rates. Further, the characteristic scaling laws of desorption yields versus laser fluence are derived for each of the individual excitation pathways. Finally, the possibility to control photoreactivity at surfaces by different, vibration-promoted schemes (surface heating, ir+uv two-photon strategies, use of pulsed uv lasers) is examined.

  8. Experimental Investigations of the Internal Energy of Molecules Evaporated via Laser-induced Acoustic Desorption into a Fourier-transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer (LIAD/FT-ICR)

    PubMed Central

    Shea, Ryan C.; Petzold, Christopher J.; Liu, Ji-ang; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I.

    2008-01-01

    The internal energy of neutral gas-phase organic and biomolecules, evaporated by means of laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) into a Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR), was investigated through several experimental approaches. The desorbed molecules were demonstrated not to undergo degradation during the desorption process by collecting LIAD-evaporated molecules and subjecting them to analysis by electrospray ionization/quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry. Previously established gas-phase basicity (GB) values were remeasured for LIAD-evaporated organic molecules and biomolecules with the use of the bracketing method. No endothermic reactions were observed. The remeasured basicity values are in close agreement with the values reported in the literature. The amount of internal energy deposited during LIAD is concluded to be less than a few kcal/mol. Chemical ionization with a series of proton transfer reagents was employed to obtain a breakdown curve for a protonated dipeptide, val-pro, evaporated by LIAD. Comparison of this breakdown curve with a previously published analogous curve obtained by using substrate-assisted laser desorption (SALD) to evaporate the peptide suggests that the molecules evaporated via LIAD have less internal energy than those evaporated via SALD. PMID:17263513

  9. The neutral upper atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, S. N.

    2002-07-01

    After World War II, Professor S.K. Mitra wrote a comprehensive book called The Upper Atmosphere, which dealt with information available from ground-based and balloon-borne experiments. As a result, topics such as day airglow were investigated and further ground-based experiments using incoherent back-scattering were carried out. These activities resulted in important new information on the ozonosphere. The dramatic discovery of ozone holes forms a new and exciting chapter in the discovery of atmospheric processes. While dealing with the limits of the atmosphere, reference may be made to interstellar molecules whose discovery has raised considerable scientific curiosity. Knowledge on the solar-terrestrial relationship advanced a great deal when more information on solar radiation became available by measuring higher energy photons in the UV, EUV, and even X-ray regime. All this information is incorporated in this volume and presented under the title The Neutral Upper Atmosphere. Link: http://www.wkap.nl/prod/b/0-7923-6434-1

  10. Understanding the site selectivity in small-sized neutral and charged Al(n) (4 ≤ N ≤ 7) clusters using density functional theory based reactivity descriptors: a validation study on water molecule adsorption.

    PubMed

    Das, Susanta; Pal, Sourav; Krishnamurty, Sailaja

    2013-09-12

    Aluminum clusters are now technologically important due to their high catalytic activity. Our present study on the small-sized aluminum clusters applies density functional theory (DFT)-based reactivity descriptors to identify potential sites for adsorption and eventual chemical reaction. Depending on symmetry, susceptibility of various type of reactive sites within a cluster toward an impending electrophilic and/or nucleophilic attack is predicted using the reactivity descriptors. In addition, the study devises general rules as to how the size, shape, and charge of the cluster influences the number of available sites for an electrophilic and/or nucleophilic attack. The predictions by reactivity descriptors are validated by performing an explicit adsorption of water molecule on Al clusters with four atoms. The adsorption studies demonstrate that the most stable water-cluster complex is obtained when the molecule is adsorbed through an oxygen atom on the site with the highest relative electrophilicity.

  11. Energetic neutral particles from Jupiter and Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, A. F.

    1986-01-01

    The Voyager 1 spacecraft has detected energetic neutral particles escaping from the magnetospheres of Jupiter and Saturn. These energetic neutrals are created in charge exchange reactions between radiation belt ions and ambient atoms or molecules in the magnetosphere. If the Io torus is assumed to be the dominant Jovian source region for energetic neutrals, the Voyager observations can be used to infer upper limits to the average ion intensities there below about 200 keV. No readily interpretable in-situ measurements are available in the Io torus at these energies. The middle and outer Jovian magnetospheres may also be a significant source of energetic neutrals. At Saturn, the observed neutral particle count rates are too high to be explained by charge exchange between fast protons and H atoms of the Titan torus. Most of the energetic neutrals may be produced by charge exchanges between heavy ions and a neutral cloud containing H2O in Saturn's inner magnetosphere. If so, the Voyager measurements of energetic neutral fluxes would be the first detected emissions from this region of Saturn's magnetosphere.

  12. Revealing the Effect of Protein Weak Adsorption to Nanoparticles on the Interaction between the Desorbed Protein and its Binding Partner by Surface-Enhanced Infrared Spectroelectrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Zeng, Li; Wu, Lie; Jiang, Xiue

    2017-03-07

    In recent years, the properties of protein corona have attracted intense interest in the field of nanobio interface, but a long-ignored research issue is how the desorbed proteins suffering from conformational change upon weak association with nanoparticles affect their functional properties when further interacting with their downstream protein partners. In this Article, surface-enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopy (SEIRAS) and electrochemical cyclic voltammetry were used to study the adsorption and redox properties of the soluble cytochrome c (cyt c) on 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) self-assembled monolayer (SAM) after weakly binding to and then desorbed from nano-TiO2. For the first time, our study reveals that the weak interaction between cyt c and nano-TiO2 induces the protein to undergo a heterogeneous conformational change. More importantly, the cyt c with a largely unfolded conformation exhibits a weaker interaction with its binding partner mimics than the native-like cyt c but a faster adsorption rate even at a concentration that is much lower than that of native-like cyt c. Correspondingly, the cyt c with a large unfolding shows a greatly positive-shifted formal potential (Ef) relative to the native-like protein possibly due to the disruption of the pocket structure of heme in the vicinity of Met80. These properties could enable the largely unfolded cyt c to undergo a favorable binding but an unavailable electron transfer to cytochrome c oxidase even in the presence of high-concentration native cyt c, probably causing the disruption of electron flow.

  13. A computational study of ultrafast acid dissociation and acid-base neutralization reactions. II. The relationship between the coordination state of solvent molecules and concerted versus sequential acid dissociation.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Patrick; Thomas, Vibin; Iftimie, Radu

    2011-03-07

    We investigate the role played by the coordination state of pre-existing water wires during the dissociation of moderately strong acids by means of first-principles molecular dynamics calculations. By preparing 2,4,6-tricyanophenol (calc. pKa∼0.5) in two different initial states, we are able to observe sequential as well as concerted trajectories of dissociation: On one hand, equilibrium dissociation takes place on a ∼50 ps timescale; proton conduction occurs through three-coordinated water wires in this case, by means of sequential Grotthus hopping. On the other hand, by preparing 2,4,6-tricyanophenol in a hydration state inherited from that of equilibrated phenol (calc. pKa=7.6), the moderately strong acid finds itself in a presolvated state from which dissociation can take place on a ∼1 ps timescale. In this case, concerted dissociation trajectories are observed, which consist of proton translocation through two intervening, four-coordinated, water molecules in 0.1-1.0 ps. The present results suggest that, in general, the mechanism of proton translocation depends on how the excess proton is injected into a hydrogen bond network. In particular, if the initial conditions favour proton release to a fourfold H-bonded water molecule, proton translocation by as much as 6-8 Å can take place on a sub-picosecond timescale.

  14. Kinetics of neutralization of Po-218

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, K.D.

    1987-01-01

    In a well-defined experimental system the neutralization of polonium-218 ions was investigated as a function of the physical and chemical properties of the controlled composition atmosphere. The mobilities of Po/sup +/ and PoO/sub 2//sup +/ are determined by combining experimental results with a computer model of the system. Three neutralization mechanisms were individually studied. The small ion recombination rate has been found to be proportional to the square root of radon concentration. The electron scavenging mechanism is responsible for the neutralization of Po/sup +/ in NO/sub 2/ or H/sub 2/O in nitrogen. When PoO/sub 2//sup +/ is formed, the electron transfer mechanism dominates the neutralization process. The electron is transferred to PoO/sub 2//sup +/ from molecules with lower ionization potentials. The ionization potential of PoO/sub 2//sup +/ is also determined to be 10.44 +/- 0.05 eV.

  15. An autoneutralizing neutral molecular beam gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delmore, J. E.; Appelhans, A. D.; Dahl, D. A.

    1990-01-01

    A high-energy (up to 28 keV) neutral molecular beam gun has been developed and put into routine use that takes advantage of the autoneutralization properties of the sulfur hexafluoride anion for the production of high-energy sulfur hexafluoride neutral molecules. The anions are produced in an electron-capture source, accelerated, and focused in a lens assembly designed to minimize residence time, allowed to drift at their terminal velocity for a suitable distance during which up to 30% auto-eject an electron, and all remaining charged particles are electrostatically skimmed, resulting in a focused neutral beam. Rasterable neutral beams focused to a 5-mm spot size up to 3 m from the source have been produced with beam currents up to 40 pA equivalent. Spot sizes of 1 mm can be produced with intensity levels of a few picoamperes equivalent.

  16. Molecule nanoweaver

    DOEpatents

    Gerald, II; Rex, E [Brookfield, IL; Klingler, Robert J [Glenview, IL; Rathke, Jerome W [Homer Glen, IL; Diaz, Rocio [Chicago, IL; Vukovic, Lela [Westchester, IL

    2009-03-10

    A method, apparatus, and system for constructing uniform macroscopic films with tailored geometric assemblies of molecules on the nanometer scale. The method, apparatus, and system include providing starting molecules of selected character, applying one or more force fields to the molecules to cause them to order and condense with NMR spectra and images being used to monitor progress in creating the desired geometrical assembly and functionality of molecules that comprise the films.

  17. Ion-Ion Neutralization.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-05-31

    Accession No. 3. Recipient’s Catalog Number FGL -TR-82 -0202 b- /- 4. Title (and Subtitle) 5. Type of Report & Period Covered ION-ION NEUTRALIZATION Final...few years under the terms of the grant has been the detailed study of binary ion-ion neutralization reactions involving ions of atmospheric...2TT, England. 1. INTRODUCTION Binary positive-ion negative-ion mutual neutralization viz: A+ + B->C + D (1) can be an important loss process for

  18. ALEX neutral beam probe

    SciTech Connect

    Pourrezaei, K.

    1982-01-01

    A neutral beam probe capable of measuring plasma space potential in a fully 3-dimensional magnetic field geometry has been developed. This neutral beam was successfully used to measure an arc target plasma contained within the ALEX baseball magnetic coil. A computer simulation of the experiment was performed to refine the experimental design and to develop a numerical model for scaling the ALEX neutral beam probe to other cases of fully 3-dimensional magnetic field. Based on this scaling a 30 to 50 keV neutral cesium beam probe capable of measuring space potential in the thermal barrier region of TMX Upgrade was designed.

  19. Laser-induced desorption of organic molecules from front- and back-irradiated metal foils

    SciTech Connect

    Zinovev, Alexander V.; Veryovkin, Igor V.; Pellin, Michael J.

    2009-03-17

    Laser-Induced Acoustic Desorption (LIAD) from thin metal foils is a promising technique for gentle and efficient volatilization of intact organic molecules from surfaces of solid substrates. Using the Single Photon Ionization (SPI) method combined with time-of-flight mass-spectrometry (TOF MS), desorbed flux in LIAD was examined and compared to that from direct laser desorption (LD). Molecules of various organic dyes were used in experiments. Translational velocities of the desorbed intact molecules did not depend on the desorbing laser intensity, which implies the presence of more sophisticated mechanism of energy transfer than the direct mechanical or thermal coupling between the laser pulse and the adsorbed molecules. The results of our experiments indicate that the LIAD phenomenon cannot be described in terms of a simple mechanical shake-off nor the direct laser desorption. Rather, they suggest that multi-step energy transfer processes are involved. Possible qualitative mechanism of LIAD that are based on formation of non-equilibrium energy states in the adsorbate-substrate system are proposed and discussed.

  20. Laser-induced desorption of organic molecules from front- and back-irradiated metal foils.

    SciTech Connect

    Zinovev, A. V.; Veryovkin, I. V.; Pellin, M. J.; Materials Science Division

    2009-01-01

    Laser-Induced Acoustic Desorption (LIAD) from thin metal foils is a promising technique for gentle and efficient volatilization of intact organic molecules from surfaces of solid substrates. Using the Single Photon Ionization (SPI) method combined with time-of-flight mass-spectrometry (TOF MS), desorbed flux in LIAD was examined and compared to that from direct laser desorption (LD). Molecules of various organic dyes were used in experiments. Translational velocities of the desorbed intact molecules did not depend on the desorbing laser intensity, which implies the presence of more sophisticated mechanism of energy transfer than the direct mechanical or thermal coupling between the laser pulse and the adsorbed molecules. The results of our experiments indicate that the LIAD phenomenon cannot be described in terms of a simple mechanical shake-off nor the direct laser desorption. Rather, they suggest that multi-step energy transfer processes are involved. Possible qualitative mechanism of LIAD that are based on formation of non-equilibrium energy states in the adsorbate-substrate system are proposed and discussed.

  1. Interstellar molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townes, C. H.

    1976-01-01

    Progress in the discovery and study of interstellar molecules is summarized. The 36 molecular species thus far identified in interstellar space are listed in several groups which include simple hydrides, oxides, and sulfides, various derivatives of ammonia, molecules involving linear carbon chains, cyanides, and molecules related in structure to formaldehyde, alcohols, or ethers. Several free radicals are described, the discovery of molecules in external galaxies is discussed, and possible mechanisms for molecular formation are noted. Methods for examining relative isotopic abundances by measuring molecules in interstellar clouds are outlined, mechanisms for the excitation of interstellar molecules are reviewed, and values are presented for the C-12/C-13 abundance ratio in a number of interstellar clouds. The detection of interstellar masers is discussed along with pumping mechanisms and masing transitions in H2CO, CH, OH, and SiO. The nature of dense interstellar clouds is examined in terms of several simple and complex cloud models, with emphasis on multiple condensation models.

  2. Suppression of unimolecular decay of laser desorbed peptide and protein ions by entrainment in rarefied supersonic gas jets under weak electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Hieke, Andreas

    2014-01-21

    Unimolecular decay of sample ions imposes a limit on the usable laser fluence in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) ion sources. Traditionally, some modest degree of collisional sample ion cooling has been achieved by connecting MALDI ion sources directly to gas-filled radio frequency (RF) multipoles. It was also discovered in the early 1990s that gas-filled RF multipoles exhibit increased ion transmission efficiency due to collisional ion focusing effects. This unexpected experimental finding was later supported by elementary Monte Carlo simulations. Both experiments and simulations assumed a resting background gas with typical pressures of the order of 1 Pa. However, considerable additional improvements can be achieved if laser desorbed sample ions are introduced immediately after desorption, still within the ion source, in an axisymmetric rarefied supersonic gas jet with peak pressure of the order of 100 Pa and flow velocities >300 m/s, and under weak electric fields. We describe here the design principle and report performance data of an ion source coined “MALDI-2,” which incorporates elements of both rarefied aerodynamics and particle optics. Such a design allows superb suppression of metastable fragmentation due to rapid collisional cooling in <10 μs and nearly perfect injection efficiency into the attached RF ion guide, as numerous experiments have confirmed.

  3. Suppression of unimolecular decay of laser desorbed peptide and protein ions by entrainment in rarefied supersonic gas jets under weak electric fields.

    PubMed

    Hieke, Andreas

    2014-01-21

    Unimolecular decay of sample ions imposes a limit on the usable laser fluence in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) ion sources. Traditionally, some modest degree of collisional sample ion cooling has been achieved by connecting MALDI ion sources directly to gas-filled radio frequency (RF) multipoles. It was also discovered in the early 1990s that gas-filled RF multipoles exhibit increased ion transmission efficiency due to collisional ion focusing effects. This unexpected experimental finding was later supported by elementary Monte Carlo simulations. Both experiments and simulations assumed a resting background gas with typical pressures of the order of 1 Pa. However, considerable additional improvements can be achieved if laser desorbed sample ions are introduced immediately after desorption, still within the ion source, in an axisymmetric rarefied supersonic gas jet with peak pressure of the order of 100 Pa and flow velocities >300 m/s, and under weak electric fields. We describe here the design principle and report performance data of an ion source coined "MALDI-2," which incorporates elements of both rarefied aerodynamics and particle optics. Such a design allows superb suppression of metastable fragmentation due to rapid collisional cooling in <10 μs and nearly perfect injection efficiency into the attached RF ion guide, as numerous experiments have confirmed.

  4. Core excitation and decay in rare gas mono- and multilayers on a metal surface: screening, deexcitation, and desorption of neutrals and ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocker, G.; Feulner, P.; Scheuerer, R.; Zhu, L.; Menzel, D.

    1990-06-01

    In order to investigate the modification of excitation and decay of core holes by condensation and adsorption in the simplest possible cases, as well as the coupling to atomic motion, we have studied the Ar2p and Kr3d excitation regions in Ar and Kr mono- and multilayers on Ru(001). Using synchrotron radiation from BESSY (Berlin), total and Auger electron yields and yields of desorbing ions and neutrals, as function of photon energy, as well as decay electron spectra for specific primary excitations have been measured. The main results are: Multilayers: Energies for resonant core excitations are shifted to higher values by 0.6 to 1 eV compared to free atoms; for Kr, surface (smaller shifts) and bulk excitations can be distinguished. Autoionization and normal Auger spectra are clearly different, as in the gas phase. Besides desorption of neutral atoms as in the valence region, singly and doubly charged ions as well as ionic clusters are desorbed. Monolayers: The shift of resonant excitation energies relative to the gas phase is smaller than for condensed layers. Decay spectra for resonant and non-resonant excitations are identical, as for strongly coupled chemisorbates, proving that charge exchange with the metal is fast compared to core decay. As in the valence region, only neutral atoms desorb. The results shed light on the screening and charge transfer behaviour and on the mechanisms of stimulated desorption which are operative in them.

  5. A DFT study of hydration in neutral and zwitterionic norfloxacin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto Vitorino, Graciela; Barrera, Gustavo D.; Rosa Mazzieri, María; Binning, R. C., Jr.; Bacelo, Daniel E.

    2006-12-01

    Hydration of the fluoroquinolone antibiotic norfloxacin has been examined in B3LYP/6-31+G ∗ calculations. The neutral and zwitterionic forms and their one- and two-water complexes have been optimized both as isolated molecules and within a solvation field simulated by the polarizable continuum model. The explicitly included water molecules are found to affect solvation energies of both neutrals and zwitterions, but overall their inclusion does not improve the average solvated neutral-zwitterion energy separation. The calculated separations of 3-5 kcal/mol are consistent with experimental observations that the two forms coexist in solution under physiological conditions.

  6. Microhydration of Neutral and Charged Acetic Acid.

    PubMed

    Krishnakumar, Parvathi; Maity, Dilip Kumar

    2017-01-19

    A systematic theoretical study has been carried out on the effect of sequential addition of water molecules to neutral and mono positively charged acetic acid molecules by applying first principle based electronic structure theory. Geometry, dipole moment, and polarizability of hydrated clusters of neutral and mono positively charged acetic acid of the type CH3COOH·nH2O (n = 1-8) and [CH3COOH·nH2O](+) (n = 1, 2) are calculated at the ωB97X-D/aug-cc-pVDZ level of theory. Free energies of formation of the hydrated acid clusters, at different temperatures and pressures are determined. Solvent stabilization energy and interaction energy are also calculated at the CCSD(T)/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. It is observed that in the case of neutral acetic acid, proton transfer from the acid molecule to solvent water molecules does not occur even with eight water molecules and the acid molecule remains in the undissociated form. High-energy equilibrium structures showing dissociation of acetic acid are obtained in case of hexahydrated and larger hydrated clusters only. However, dissociation of mono positively charged acetic acid occurs with just two water molecules. Interestingly, it is noted that in the case of dissociation, calculated bond dipole moments of the dissociating bonds of acetic acid in microhydated clusters shows a characteristic feature. IR spectra of CH3COOH·nH2O (n = 1-8) and [CH3COOH·nH2O](+) (n = 1-3) clusters are simulated and compared with the available experimental data.

  7. Equivalent Neutral Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. Timothy; Tang, Wenqing

    1996-01-01

    The definition of equivalent neutral wind and the rationale for using it as the geophysical product of a spaceborne scatterometer are reviewed. The differences between equivalent neutral wind and actual wind, which are caused by atmospheric density stratification, are demonstrated with measurements at selected locations. A method of computing this parameter from ship and buoy measurements is described and some common fallacies in accounting for the effects of atmospheric stratification on wind shear are discussed. The computer code for the model to derive equivalent neutral wind is provided.

  8. Neutralization Assay for Chikungunya Virus Infection: Plaque Reduction Neutralization Test.

    PubMed

    Azami, Nor Azila Muhammad; Moi, Meng Ling; Takasaki, Tomohiko

    2016-01-01

    Neutralization assay is a technique that detects and quantifies neutralizing antibody in serum samples by calculating the percentage of reduction of virus activity, as the concentration of virus used is usually constant. Neutralizing antibody titer is conventionally determined by calculating the percentage reduction in total virus infectivity by counting and comparing number of plaques (localized area of infection due to cytopathic effect) with a standard amount of virus. Conventional neutralizing test uses plaque-reduction neutralization test (PRNT) to determine neutralizing antibody titers against Chikungunya virus (CHIKV). Here we describe the plaque reduction neutralization assay (PRNT) using Vero cell lines to obtain neutralizing antibody titers.

  9. Solar Neutral Particles

    NASA Image and Video Library

    This animation shows a neutral solar particle's path leaving the sun, following the magnetic field lines out to the heliosheath. The solar particle hits a hydrogen atom, stealing its electron, and ...

  10. Ions and neutralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poncet, A.

    After a short presentation of intensity limitations examples due to trapped ions, the processes of ionization and neutralization build up in particle accelerators and storage rings are briefly reviewed. The tolerable limits in neutralization are then assessed at the light of current theories of incoherent and coherent effects driven by ions. Finally the usual antidotes such as clearing electrodes, missing bunch schemes and beam shaking are presented.

  11. Mobius Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckert, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses formation of chemical molecules via Mobius strip intermediates, and concludes that many special physics-chemical properties of the fully closed circular form (1) of polyoma DNA are explainable by this topological feature. (CC)

  12. Interstellar Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Philip M.

    1973-01-01

    Radioastronomy reveals that clouds between the stars, once believed to consist of simple atoms, contain molecules as complex as seven atoms and may be the most massive objects in our Galaxy. (Author/DF)

  13. Modeling Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The molecule modeling method known as Multibody Order (N) Dynamics, or MBO(N)D, was developed by Moldyn, Inc. at Goddard Space Flight Center through funding provided by the SBIR program. The software can model the dynamics of molecules through technology which stimulates low-frequency molecular motions and properties, such as movements among a molecule's constituent parts. With MBO(N)D, a molecule is substructured into a set of interconnected rigid and flexible bodies. These bodies replace the computation burden of mapping individual atoms. Moldyn's technology cuts computation time while increasing accuracy. The MBO(N)D technology is available as Insight II 97.0 from Molecular Simulations, Inc. Currently the technology is used to account for forces on spacecraft parts and to perform molecular analyses for pharmaceutical purposes. It permits the solution of molecular dynamics problems on a moderate workstation, as opposed to on a supercomputer.

  14. Interstellar Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Philip M.

    1973-01-01

    Radioastronomy reveals that clouds between the stars, once believed to consist of simple atoms, contain molecules as complex as seven atoms and may be the most massive objects in our Galaxy. (Author/DF)

  15. Mobius Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckert, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses formation of chemical molecules via Mobius strip intermediates, and concludes that many special physics-chemical properties of the fully closed circular form (1) of polyoma DNA are explainable by this topological feature. (CC)

  16. Organic–inorganic binary mixture matrix for comprehensive laser-desorption ionization mass spectrometric analysis and imaging of medium-size molecules including phospholipids, glycerolipids, and oligosaccharides

    SciTech Connect

    Feenstra, Adam D.; O'Neill, Kelly C.; Yagnik, Gargey B.; Lee, Young Jin

    2016-10-13

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) is a widely adopted, versatile technique, especially in high-throughput analysis and imaging. However, matrix-dependent selectivity of analytes is often a severe limitation. In this work, a mixture of organic 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid and inorganic Fe3O4 nanoparticles is developed as a binary MALDI matrix to alleviate the well-known issue of triacylglycerol (TG) ion suppression by phosphatidylcholine (PC). In application to lipid standards and maize seed cross-sections, the binary matrix not only dramatically reduced the ion suppression of TG, but also efficiently desorbed and ionized a wide variety of lipids such as cationic PC, anionic phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylinositol (PI), and neutral digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG). The binary matrix was also very efficient for large polysaccharides, which were not detected by either of the individual matrices. As a result, the usefulness of the binary matrix is demonstrated in MS imaging of maize seed sections, successfully visualizing diverse medium-size molecules and acquiring high-quality MS/MS spectra for these compounds.

  17. Fundamental studies of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization, using time-of-flight mass spectrometry to identify biological molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Eades, D.; Wruck, D.; Gregg, H.

    1996-11-11

    MALDI MS was developed as a way of getting molecular weight information on small quantities (picomole to femtomole levels) of high-mass, thermally labile macromolecules. While most other analytical MS ionization techniques cause fragmentation, decomposition, or multiple charging, MALDI efficiently places intact macromolecules into the gas phase with little fragmentation or rearrangement. This project had 3 objectives: establish the MALDI capability at LLNL, perform fundamental studies of analyte-matrix interactions, and apply the technique for biochemical research. A retired time-of-flight instrument was adapted for MALDI analyses, relevant parameters influencing the MALDI process were identified for further study (matrix molar absorptivity, sample crystal preparation), and collaborations were established with research groups in the Biology and Biotechnology Research Program at LLNL. In MALDI, the macromolecule of interest is mixed with a high-molar excess (1:100 to 1:10,000) of an organic matrix which readily absorbs energy at the wavelength corresponding to a UV laser. Upon laser irradiation, the matrix absorbs the majority of the energy, causing it to desorb from the surface and gently release the macromolecule into the gas phase with little or no fragmentation. Once in the gas phase, ion-molecule reactions between excited matrix and neutral macromolecules generated ionized analyte species which then can be focused into a MS for detection.

  18. Organic–inorganic binary mixture matrix for comprehensive laser-desorption ionization mass spectrometric analysis and imaging of medium-size molecules including phospholipids, glycerolipids, and oligosaccharides

    DOE PAGES

    Feenstra, Adam D.; Ames Lab., Ames, IA; O'Neill, Kelly C.; ...

    2016-10-13

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) is a widely adopted, versatile technique, especially in high-throughput analysis and imaging. However, matrix-dependent selectivity of analytes is often a severe limitation. In this work, a mixture of organic 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid and inorganic Fe3O4 nanoparticles is developed as a binary MALDI matrix to alleviate the well-known issue of triacylglycerol (TG) ion suppression by phosphatidylcholine (PC). In application to lipid standards and maize seed cross-sections, the binary matrix not only dramatically reduced the ion suppression of TG, but also efficiently desorbed and ionized a wide variety of lipids such as cationic PC, anionic phosphatidylethanolamine (PE)more » and phosphatidylinositol (PI), and neutral digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG). The binary matrix was also very efficient for large polysaccharides, which were not detected by either of the individual matrices. As a result, the usefulness of the binary matrix is demonstrated in MS imaging of maize seed sections, successfully visualizing diverse medium-size molecules and acquiring high-quality MS/MS spectra for these compounds.« less

  19. Enumerating molecules.

    SciTech Connect

    Visco, Donald Patrick, Jr.; Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Roe, Diana C.

    2004-04-01

    This report is a comprehensive review of the field of molecular enumeration from early isomer counting theories to evolutionary algorithms that design molecules in silico. The core of the review is a detail account on how molecules are counted, enumerated, and sampled. The practical applications of molecular enumeration are also reviewed for chemical information, structure elucidation, molecular design, and combinatorial library design purposes. This review is to appear as a chapter in Reviews in Computational Chemistry volume 21 edited by Kenny B. Lipkowitz.

  20. Electron affinities of atoms, molecules and radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christodoulides, A. A.; McCorkle, D. L.; Christophorou, L. G.

    The theoretical, semiempirical and experimental methods employed to determine electron affinities (EAs) of atoms, molecules and radicals, and summarize the EA data obtained by these methods were reviewed. The detailed processes underlying the principles of the experimental methods are discussed very briefly. It is, nonetheless, instructive to recapitulate the definition of EA and those of the related quantities, namely, the vertical detachment energy, VDE, and the vertical attachment energy, VAE. The EA of an atom is defined as the difference in total energy between the ground state of the neutral atom (plus the electron at rest at infinity) and its negative ion. The EA of a molecule is defined as the difference in energy between the neutral molecule plus an electron at rest at infinity and the molecular negative ion when both, the neutral molecules and the negative ion, are in their ground electronic, vibrational and rotational states.

  1. The Development of Sputtered Neutral Mass Spectrometry for the Quantitative Depth Profiling of Compound Semiconductor Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-15

    using a quadrupole mass spectrometer based instrument. Most of the remaining mass peaks observed arise from neutral beam sputtering of the sample...IP by about 4eV.) Furthermore, we do not observe any significant evidence for molecular ions in the SNMS spectrum. Either sputtered neutral molecules...are not ionized in the plasma or they are dissociated into atomic ion and neutral *: fragments by collisions with plasma gas molecules. What we do find

  2. Neutral particle lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craver, Barry Paul

    Neutral particle lithography (NPL) is a high resolution, proximity exposure technique where a broad beam of energetic neutral particles floods a stencil mask and transmitted beamlets transfer the mask pattern to resist on a substrate, such that each feature is printed in parallel, rather than in the serial manner of electron beam lithography. It preserves the advantages of ion beam lithography (IBL), including extremely large depth-of-field, sub-5 nm resist scattering, and the near absence of diffraction, yet is intrinsically immune to charge-related artifacts including line-edge roughness and pattern placement errors due to charge accumulation on the mask and substrate. In our experiments, a neutral particle beam is formed by passing an ion beam (e.g., 30 keV He+) through a high pressure helium gas cell (e.g., 100 mTorr) to convert the ions to energetic neutrals through charge transfer scattering. The resolution of NPL is generally superior to that of IBL for applications involving insulating substrates, large proximity gaps, and ultra-small features. High accuracy stepped exposures with energetic neutral particles, where magnetic or electrostatic deflection is impossible, have been obtained by clamping the mask to the wafer, setting the proximity gap with a suitable spacer, and mechanically inclining the mask/wafer stack relative to the beam. This approach is remarkably insensitive to vibration and thermal drift; nanometer scale image offsets have been obtained with +/-2 nm placement accuracy for experiments lasting over one hour. Using this nanostepping technique, linewidth versus dose curves were obtained, from which the NPL lithographic blur was determined as 4.4+/-1.4 nm (1sigma), which is 2-3 times smaller than the blur of electron beam lithography. Neutral particle lithography has the potential to form high density, periodic patterns with sub-10 nm resolution.

  3. Tautomerism in neutral histidine.

    PubMed

    Bermúdez, Celina; Mata, Santiago; Cabezas, Carlos; Alonso, José L

    2014-10-06

    Histidine is an important natural amino acid, involved in many relevant biological processes, which, because of its physical properties, proved difficult to characterize experimentally in its neutral form. In this work, neutral histidine has been generated in the gas phase by laser ablation of solid samples and its N(ε)H tautomeric form unraveled through its rotational spectrum. The quadrupole hyperfine structure, arising from the existing three (14)N nuclei, constituted a site-specifically probe for revealing the tautomeric form as well as the side chain configuration of this proteogenic amino acid.

  4. Neutral versus polycationic coordination cages: a comparison regarding neutral guest inclusion.

    PubMed

    Szalóki, György; Croué, Vincent; Allain, Magali; Goeb, Sébastien; Sallé, Marc

    2016-08-21

    A neutral self-assembled container synthesized from a concave π-extended tetrathiafulvalene (exTTF) ligand and the cis-Pd(dctfb)2(cod) complex (dctfb = 3,5-dichloro-2,4,6-trifluorobenzene; cod = 1,5-cyclooctadiene) is described. This molecular host exhibits a good binding ability for fused polyaromatic substrates. The corresponding inclusion properties are compared with those of a previously described analogous octacationic cage, offering therefore the opportunity to address the effect of the cavity charge state over the binding of neutral molecules.

  5. Bleach Neutralizes Mold Allergens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Researchers at National Jewish Medical and Research Center have demonstrated that dilute bleach not only kills common household mold, but may also neutralize the mold allergens that cause most mold-related health complaints. The study, published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, is the first to test the effect on allergic…

  6. CO2-Neutral Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goede, Adelbert; van de Sanden, Richard

    2016-06-01

    Mimicking the biogeochemical cycle of System Earth, synthetic hydrocarbon fuels are produced from recycled CO2 and H2O powered by renewable energy. Recapturing CO2 after use closes the carbon cycle, rendering the fuel cycle CO2 neutral. Non-equilibrium molecular CO2 vibrations are key to high energy efficiency.

  7. Beyond Viral Neutralization.

    PubMed

    Lewis, George K; Pazgier, Marzena; Evans, David; Ferrari, Guido; Bournazos, Stylianos; Parsons, Matthew S; Bernard, Nicole F; Finzi, Andrés

    2017-01-13

    It has been known for more than 30 years that Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 (HIV-1) infection drives a very potent B cell response resulting in the production of anti-HIV-1 antibodies targeting several viral proteins, particularly its envelope glycoproteins (Env). Env epitopes are exposed on the surfaces of viral particles and infected cells where they are targets of potentially protective antibodies. These antibodies can interdict infection by neutralization and there is strong evidence suggesting that Fc-mediated effector function can also contribute to protection. Current evidence suggests that Fc-mediated effector function plays a role in protection against infection by broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) and it might be important for protection by non-neutralizing antibodies. Fc-mediated effector function includes diverse mechanisms that include antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), antibody-mediated complement activation (ADC), antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP), antibody-dependent cell-mediated virus inhibition (ADCVI), antibody-mediated trancytosis inhibition, and antibody-mediated virus opsonization. All these functions could be beneficial in fighting viral infections including HIV-1. In this perspective, we discuss the latest developments for ADCC responses discussed at the HIVR4P satellite session on non-neutralizing antibodies, with emphasis on the mechanisms of ADCC resistance employed by HIV-1, the structural basis of epitopes recognized by antibodies that mediate ADCC, NK-cell education and ADCC, and murine models to study ADCC against HIV-1.

  8. Bleach Neutralizes Mold Allergens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Researchers at National Jewish Medical and Research Center have demonstrated that dilute bleach not only kills common household mold, but may also neutralize the mold allergens that cause most mold-related health complaints. The study, published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, is the first to test the effect on allergic…

  9. Modeling thermospheric neutral density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Liying

    Satellite drag prediction requires determination of thermospheric neutral density. The NCAR Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIEGCM) and the global-mean Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIMEGCM) were used to quantify thermospheric neutral density and its variations, focusing on annual/semiannual variation, the effect of using measured solar irradiance on model calculations of solar-cycle variation, and global change in the thermosphere. Satellite drag data and the MSIS00 empirical model were utilized to compare to the TIEGCM simulations. The TIEGCM simulations indicated that eddy diffusion and its annual/semiannual variation is a mechanism for annual/semiannual density variation in the thermosphere. It was found that eddy diffusion near the turbopause can effectively influence thermospheric neutral density. Eddy diffusion, together with annual insolation variation and large-scale circulation, generated global annual/semiannual density variation observed by satellite drag. Using measured solar irradiance as solar input for the TIEGCM improved the solar-cycle dependency of the density calculation shown in F10.7 -based thermospheric empirical models. It has been found that the empirical models overestimate density at low solar activity. The TIEGCM simulations did not show such solar-cycle dependency. Using historic measurements of CO2 and F 10.7, simulations of the global-mean TIMEGCM showed that thermospheric neutral density at 400 km had an average long-term decrease of 1.7% per decade from 1970 to 2000. A forecast of density decrease for solar cycle 24 suggested that thermospheric density will decrease at 400 km from present to the end of solar cycle 24 at a rate of 2.7% per decade. Reduction in thermospheric density causes less atmospheric drag on earth-orbiting space objects. The implication of this long-term decrease of thermospheric neutral density is that it will increase the

  10. Investigating single molecule adhesion by atomic force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Stetter, Frank W S; Kienle, Sandra; Krysiak, Stefanie; Hugel, Thorsten

    2015-02-27

    Atomic force spectroscopy is an ideal tool to study molecules at surfaces and interfaces. An experimental protocol to couple a large variety of single molecules covalently onto an AFM tip is presented. At the same time the AFM tip is passivated to prevent unspecific interactions between the tip and the substrate, which is a prerequisite to study single molecules attached to the AFM tip. Analyses to determine the adhesion force, the adhesion length, and the free energy of these molecules on solid surfaces and bio-interfaces are shortly presented and external references for further reading are provided. Example molecules are the poly(amino acid) polytyrosine, the graft polymer PI-g-PS and the phospholipid POPE (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine). These molecules are desorbed from different surfaces like CH3-SAMs, hydrogen terminated diamond and supported lipid bilayers under various solvent conditions. Finally, the advantages of force spectroscopic single molecule experiments are discussed including means to decide if truly a single molecule has been studied in the experiment.

  11. Investigating Single Molecule Adhesion by Atomic Force Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Stetter, Frank W. S.; Kienle, Sandra; Krysiak, Stefanie; Hugel, Thorsten

    2015-01-01

    Atomic force spectroscopy is an ideal tool to study molecules at surfaces and interfaces. An experimental protocol to couple a large variety of single molecules covalently onto an AFM tip is presented. At the same time the AFM tip is passivated to prevent unspecific interactions between the tip and the substrate, which is a prerequisite to study single molecules attached to the AFM tip. Analyses to determine the adhesion force, the adhesion length, and the free energy of these molecules on solid surfaces and bio-interfaces are shortly presented and external references for further reading are provided. Example molecules are the poly(amino acid) polytyrosine, the graft polymer PI-g-PS and the phospholipid POPE (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine). These molecules are desorbed from different surfaces like CH3-SAMs, hydrogen terminated diamond and supported lipid bilayers under various solvent conditions. Finally, the advantages of force spectroscopic single molecule experiments are discussed including means to decide if truly a single molecule has been studied in the experiment. PMID:25867282

  12. Regulation of Virus Neutralization and the Persistent Fraction by TRIM21

    PubMed Central

    McEwan, W. A.; Hauler, F.; Williams, C. R.; Bidgood, S. R.; Mallery, D. L.; Crowther, R. A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite a central role in immunity, antibody neutralization of virus infection is poorly understood. Here we show how the neutralization and persistence of adenovirus type 5, a prevalent nonenveloped human virus, are dependent upon the intracellular antibody receptor TRIM21. Cells with insufficient amounts of TRIM21 are readily infected, even at saturating concentrations of neutralizing antibody. Conversely, high TRIM21 expression levels decrease the persistent fraction of the infecting virus and allows neutralization by as few as 1.6 antibody molecules per virus. The direct interaction between TRIM21 and neutralizing antibody is essential, as single-point mutations within the TRIM21-binding site in the Fc region of a potently neutralizing antibody impair neutralization. However, infection at high multiplicity can saturate TRIM21 and overcome neutralization. These results provide insight into the mechanism and importance of a newly discovered, effector-driven process of antibody neutralization of nonenveloped viruses. PMID:22647693

  13. Modeling process of the neutral beam re-ionization loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Li-Zhen; Hu, Chun-Dong; Xie, Yuan-Lai; Xie, Ya-Hong; Nbi-team

    2010-07-01

    The basic process of re-ionization loss was studied. In the drift duct there are three processes leading to re-ionization loss: the collision of neutral beam particles with the molecules of background gas, similar collisions with released molecules from the inner wall of the drift duct and the ferret-collisions among particles with different energy of the neutral beam. Mathematical models have been developed and taking EAST-NBI parameters as an example, the re-ionization loss was obtained within these models. The result indicated that in the early stage of the neutral beam injector operation the released gas was quite abundant. The amount of re-ionization loss owing to the released gas can be as high as 60%. In the case of a long-time operation of the neutral beam injector, the total re-ionization loss decreases from 13.7% to 5.7%. Then the reionization loss originating mainly from the collisions between particles of the neutral beam and the background molecules is dominant, covering about 92% of the total re-ionization loss. The drift duct pressure was the decisive factor for neutral beam re-ionization loss.

  14. Carbon neutral hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Zeman, Frank S; Keith, David W

    2008-11-13

    Reducing greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector may be the most difficult aspect of climate change mitigation. We suggest that carbon neutral hydrocarbons (CNHCs) offer an alternative pathway for deep emission cuts that complement the use of decarbonized energy carriers. Such fuels are synthesized from atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and carbon neutral hydrogen. The result is a liquid fuel compatible with the existing transportation infrastructure and therefore capable of a gradual deployment with minimum supply disruption. Capturing the atmospheric CO2 can be accomplished using biomass or industrial methods referred to as air capture. The viability of biomass fuels is strongly dependent on the environmental impacts of biomass production. Strong constraints on land use may favour the use of air capture. We conclude that CNHCs may be a viable alternative to hydrogen or conventional biofuels and warrant a comparable level of research effort and support.

  15. Heterosis or Neutrality?

    PubMed Central

    Watterson, G. A.

    1977-01-01

    Various statistics have been proposed on an ad hoc basis to test whether alleles at a locus are selectively neutral. By considering population models in which selection operates, this paper shows that the population homozygosity is a powerful test statistic for testing departures from neutrality, in the direction of heterozygote advantage or disadvantage. The sample homozygosity plays a similar role when only sample data are available. Some numerical examples are included, showing the application of the test.—An analysis is made of the effect of heterosis on such quantities as the expected number of alleles in the population or sample, the effective number of alleles, the expected homozygosity, and on the population and sample allele frequency distributions generally. PMID:863245

  16. Neutral atom traps.

    SciTech Connect

    Pack, Michael Vern

    2008-12-01

    This report describes progress in designing a neutral atom trap capable of trapping sub millikelvin atom in a magnetic trap and shuttling the atoms across the atom chip from a collection area to an optical cavity. The numerical simulation and atom chip design are discussed. Also, discussed are preliminary calculations of quantum noise sources in Kerr nonlinear optics measurements based on electromagnetically induced transparency. These types of measurements may be important for quantum nondemolition measurements at the few photon limit.

  17. Antihypertensive neutral lipid

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, Fred L.; Blank, Merle L.

    1986-01-01

    The invention relates to the discovery of a class of neutral acetylated ether-linked glycerolipids having the capacity to lower blood pressure in warm-blooded animals. This physiological effect is structure sensitive requiring a long chain alkyl group at the sn-1 position and a short carbon chain acyl group (acetyl or propionyl) at the sn-2 position, and a hydroxyl group at the sn-3 position.

  18. Antihypertensive neutral lipid

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, F.L.; Blank, M.L.

    1984-10-26

    The invention relates to the discovery of a class of neutral acetylated either-linked glycerolipids having the capacity to lower blood presure in warm-blooded animals. This physiological effect is structure sensitive requiring a long chain alkyl group at the sn-1 position and a short carbon chain acyl group (acetyl or propionyl) at the sn-2 position, and a hydroxyl group at the sn-3 position.

  19. Exercise Equipment: Neutral Buoyancy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shackelford, Linda; Valle, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Load Bearing Equipment for Neutral Buoyancy (LBE-NB) is an exercise frame that holds two exercising subjects in position as they apply counter forces to each other for lower extremity and spine loading resistance exercises. Resistance exercise prevents bone loss on ISS, but the ISS equipment is too massive for use in exploration craft. Integrating the human into the load directing, load generating, and motion control functions of the exercise equipment generates safe exercise loads with less equipment mass and volume.

  20. Neutral Buoyancy Simulator Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    A diver tests a secondary camera and maneuvering platform in Marshall's Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS).The secondary camera will be beneficial for recording repairs and other extra vehicular activities (EVA) the astronuats will perform while making repairs on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The maneuvering platform was developed to give the astronauts something to stand on while performing maintenance tasks. These platforms were developed to be mobile so that the astronauts could move them to accommadate different sites.

  1. Neutral particle beam intensity controller

    DOEpatents

    Dagenhart, William K.

    1986-01-01

    A neutral beam intensity controller is provided for a neutral beam generator in which a neutral beam is established by accelerating ions from an ion source into a gas neutralizer. An amplitude modulated, rotating magnetic field is applied to the accelerated ion beam in the gas neutralizer to defocus the resultant neutral beam in a controlled manner to achieve intensity control of the neutral beam along the beam axis at constant beam energy. The rotating magnetic field alters the orbits of ions in the gas neutralizer before they are neutralized, thereby controlling the fraction of neutral particles transmitted out of the neutralizer along the central beam axis to a fusion device or the like. The altered path or defocused neutral particles are sprayed onto an actively cooled beam dump disposed perpendicular to the neutral beam axis and having a central open for passage of the focused beam at the central axis of the beamline. Virtually zero therough 100% intensity control is achieved by varying the magnetic field strength without altering the ion source beam intensity or its species yield.

  2. Neutral particle beam intensity controller

    DOEpatents

    Dagenhart, W.K.

    1984-05-29

    The neutral beam intensity controller is based on selected magnetic defocusing of the ion beam prior to neutralization. The defocused portion of the beam is dumped onto a beam dump disposed perpendicular to the beam axis. Selective defocusing is accomplished by means of a magnetic field generator disposed about the neutralizer so that the field is transverse to the beam axis. The magnetic field intensity is varied to provide the selected partial beam defocusing of the ions prior to neutralization. The desired focused neutral beam portion passes along the beam path through a defining aperture in the beam dump, thereby controlling the desired fraction of neutral particles transmitted to a utilization device without altering the kinetic energy level of the desired neutral particle fraction. By proper selection of the magnetic field intensity, virtually zero through 100% intensity control of the neutral beam is achieved.

  3. THE ORIGIN OF COMPLEX ORGANIC MOLECULES IN PRESTELLAR CORES

    SciTech Connect

    Vastel, C.; Ceccarelli, C.; Lefloch, B.; Bachiller, R.

    2014-11-01

    Complex organic molecules (COMs) have been detected in a variety of environments including cold prestellar cores. Given the low temperatures of these objects, these detections challenge existing models. We report here new observations toward the prestellar core L1544. They are based on an unbiased spectral survey of the 3 mm band at the IRAM 30 m telescope as part of the Large Program ASAI. The observations allow us to provide a full census of the oxygen-bearing COMs in this source. We detected tricarbon monoxide, methanol, acetaldehyde, formic acid, ketene, and propyne with abundances varying from 5 × 10{sup –11} to 6 × 10{sup –9}. The non-LTE analysis of the methanol lines shows that they are likely emitted at the border of the core at a radius of ∼8000 AU, where T ∼ 10 K and n {sub H{sub 2}} ∼2 × 10{sup 4} cm{sup –3}. Previous works have shown that water vapor is enhanced in the same region because of the photodesorption of water ices. We propose that a non-thermal desorption mechanism is also responsible for the observed emission of methanol and COMs from the same layer. The desorbed oxygen and a small amount of desorbed methanol and ethene are enough to reproduce the abundances of tricarbon monoxide, methanol, acetaldehyde, and ketene measured in L1544. These new findings open the possibility that COMs in prestellar cores originate in a similar outer layer rather than in the dense inner cores, as previously assumed, and that their formation is driven by the non-thermally desorbed species.

  4. Neutrality between Government and Religion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mawdsley, Ralph D.

    1996-01-01

    The overall guiding principle of neutrality between government and religion masks a tension that exists between free exercise of religion and establishment of religion. Reviews the development and current status of "Lemon" as a test for neutrality; proposes a new test for neutrality, evenhandedness, that is common to both the Free…

  5. Neutrality between Government and Religion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mawdsley, Ralph D.

    1996-01-01

    The overall guiding principle of neutrality between government and religion masks a tension that exists between free exercise of religion and establishment of religion. Reviews the development and current status of "Lemon" as a test for neutrality; proposes a new test for neutrality, evenhandedness, that is common to both the Free…

  6. Electronic Structure of Small Lanthanide Containing Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafader, Jared O.; Ray, Manisha; Topolski, Josey E.; Chick Jarrold, Caroline

    2016-06-01

    Lanthanide-based materials have unusual electronic properties because of the high number of electronic degrees of freedom arising from partial occupation of 4f orbitals, which make these materials optimal for their utilization in many applications including electronics and catalysis. Electronic spectroscopy of small lanthanide molecules helps us understand the role of these 4f electrons, which are generally considered core-like because of orbital contraction, but are energetically similar to valence electrons. The spectroscopy of small lanthanide-containing molecules is relatively unexplored and to broaden this understanding we have completed the characterization of small cerium, praseodymium, and europium molecules using photoelectron spectroscopy coupled with DFT calculations. The characterization of PrO, EuH, EuO/EuOH, and CexOy molecules have allowed for the determination of their electron affinity, the assignment of numerous anion to neutral state transitions, modeling of anion/neutral structures and electron orbital occupation.

  7. Ultracold neutral plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyon, M.; Rolston, S. L.

    2017-01-01

    By photoionizing samples of laser-cooled atoms with laser light tuned just above the ionization limit, plasmas can be created with electron and ion temperatures below 10 K. These ultracold neutral plasmas have extended the temperature bounds of plasma physics by two orders of magnitude. Table-top experiments, using many of the tools from atomic physics, allow for the study of plasma phenomena in this new regime with independent control over the density and temperature of the plasma through the excitation process. Characteristic of these systems is an inhomogeneous density profile, inherited from the density distribution of the laser-cooled neutral atom sample. Most work has dealt with unconfined plasmas in vacuum, which expand outward at velocities of order 100 m/s, governed by electron pressure, and with lifetimes of order 100 μs, limited by stray electric fields. Using detection of charged particles and optical detection techniques, a wide variety of properties and phenomena have been observed, including expansion dynamics, collective excitations in both the electrons and ions, and collisional properties. Through three-body recombination collisions, the plasmas rapidly form Rydberg atoms, and clouds of cold Rydberg atoms have been observed to spontaneously avalanche ionize to form plasmas. Of particular interest is the possibility of the formation of strongly coupled plasmas, where Coulomb forces dominate thermal motion and correlations become important. The strongest impediment to strong coupling is disorder-induced heating, a process in which Coulomb energy from an initially disordered sample is converted into thermal energy. This restricts electrons to a weakly coupled regime and leaves the ions barely within the strongly coupled regime. This review will give an overview of the field of ultracold neutral plasmas, from its inception in 1999 to current work, including efforts to increase strong coupling and effects on plasma properties due to strong coupling.

  8. Neutralization of acid waters

    SciTech Connect

    Simonin, H.A.

    1988-10-01

    In this article, the author reviews the positive and the negative aspects of liming and its practical application of the problem of acidic deposition. One primary concern is that liming does not mitigate many of the problems that result from acidic deposition. Although lake neutralization is a useful practice, it is not presented as a solution to the acid rain problem. Liming is a means of restoring or protecting a few systems affected by acidic deposition while legislators pass a fair and equitable program to control the source of the problem - excessive emission of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides.

  9. Pulsed field sample neutralization

    DOEpatents

    Appelhans, Anthony D.; Dahl, David A.; Delmore, James E.

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus and method for alternating voltage and for varying the rate of extraction during the extraction of secondary particles, resulting in periods when either positive ions, or negative ions and electrons are extracted at varying rates. Using voltage with alternating charge during successive periods to extract particles from materials which accumulate charge opposite that being extracted causes accumulation of surface charge of opposite sign. Charge accumulation can then be adjusted to a ratio which maintains a balance of positive and negative charge emission, thus maintaining the charge neutrality of the sample.

  10. Neutral beam injection system

    SciTech Connect

    Duesing, G.; Altmann, H.; Falter, H.; Goede, A.; Haange, R.; Hemsworth, R.S.; Kupschus, P.; Stork, D.; Thompson, E.

    1987-01-01

    The development of the neutral injection (NI) system for the Joint European Torus and its status in 1985 are reported. First the system parameters are discussed and the layout is described, followed by a summary of the physics design calculations, the development, production, and testing of the components and the subsystem assembly. The system commissioning is presented, including a description of the function and the realization of the NI test bed. A summary of performance predictions for 80-keV beam heating experiments, and of the experimental evidence on balanced versus coinjection, is presented. The operational experience with the first injector and the plasma physics results obtained so far are summarized.

  11. Trisphenalenyl-based neutral radical molecular conductor.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sushanta K; Itkis, Mikhail E; Tham, Fook S; Reed, Robert W; Oakley, Richard T; Haddon, Robert C

    2008-03-26

    We report the preparation, crystallization, and solid-state characterization of the first member of a new family of tris(1,9-disubstituted phenalenyl)silicon neutral radicals. In the solid state, the radical packs as weak partial pi-dimers with intermolecular carbon...carbon contacts that fall at the van der Waals atomic separation. Magnetic susceptibility measurements indicate approximately 0.7 Curie spins per molecule from room temperature down to 50 K, below which antiferromagnetic coupling becomes apparent; the compound has a room-temperature single-crystal conductivity of sigmaRT = 2.4 x 10(-6) S cm(-1).

  12. Pedestal Fueling Simulations with a Coupled Kinetic-kinetic Plasma-neutral Transport Code

    SciTech Connect

    D.P. Stotler, C.S. Chang, S.H. Ku, J. Lang and G.Y. Park

    2012-08-29

    A Monte Carlo neutral transport routine, based on DEGAS2, has been coupled to the guiding center ion-electron-neutral neoclassical PIC code XGC0 to provide a realistic treatment of neutral atoms and molecules in the tokamak edge plasma. The DEGAS2 routine allows detailed atomic physics and plasma-material interaction processes to be incorporated into these simulations. The spatial pro le of the neutral particle source used in the DEGAS2 routine is determined from the uxes of XGC0 ions to the material surfaces. The kinetic-kinetic plasma-neutral transport capability is demonstrated with example pedestal fueling simulations.

  13. Energy Conservation Tests of a Coupled Kinetic-kinetic Plasma-neutral Transport Code

    SciTech Connect

    Stotler, D. P.; Chang, C. S.; Ku, S. H.; Lang, J.; Park, G.

    2012-08-29

    A Monte Carlo neutral transport routine, based on DEGAS2, has been coupled to the guiding center ion-electron-neutral neoclassical PIC code XGC0 to provide a realistic treatment of neutral atoms and molecules in the tokamak edge plasma. The DEGAS2 routine allows detailed atomic physics and plasma-material interaction processes to be incorporated into these simulations. The spatial pro le of the neutral particle source used in the DEGAS2 routine is determined from the uxes of XGC0 ions to the material surfaces. The kinetic-kinetic plasma-neutral transport capability is demonstrated with example pedestal fueling simulations.

  14. Is /h/ phonetically neutral?

    PubMed

    Robb, Michael P; Chen, Yang

    2009-11-01

    Use of /h/ in the phrase, 'Say /hVC/ again' has been tacitly assumed to provide a neutral phonetic context in which to study the articulatory characteristics of speech either preceding or following /h/ articulation. Yet, assessment of the stability or neutrality of /h/ has gone untested. The current study sought to determine whether articulation of /h/ differs according to sex and language accent, as well as to examine its influence on subsequent vowel articulation. Selected acoustic features of /hVC/ were measured in 40 speakers of American English (AE) and 40 speakers of Mandarin-accented English (MAE). Results of an analysis of /h/ duration revealed no sex differences within each language group, however considerable variation was found according to accented vs unaccented English. Clear sex differences were found for the production of /h/, occurring more often among male speakers regardless of language variety. Considerable variation in production of /h/ was found between language groups. Analysis of vowel formant frequencies immediately following /h/ articulation indicated minimal coarticulatory effects for both AE and MAE speakers. The present results appear to support the suggestion that /h/ is not exclusively sex-linked and may indeed vary according to non-biological factors. In spite of these variations, /h/ articulation appears to have a negligible influence on neighbouring vowel articulation.

  15. Self-Entanglement and the Dissociation of Homonuclear Diatomic Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Gonis, Antonios; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Nicholson, Don M; Stocks, George Malcolm

    2014-01-01

    The concept of self-entanglement is introduced to describe a mixed state or ensemble density as a pure state in an augmented Hilbert space formed by the products of the individual states forming a mixed state (or ensemble). We use this representation of mixed states to show that upon dissociation a neutral homonuclear diatomic molecule will separate into two neutral atoms.

  16. Self-entanglement and the dissociation of homonuclear diatomic molecules

    DOE PAGES

    Gonis, A.; Zhang, X. -G.; Nicholson, D. M.; ...

    2014-01-14

    The concept of self-entanglement is introduced to describe a mixed state or ensemble density as a pure state in an augmented Hilbert space formed by the products of the individual states forming a mixed state (or ensemble). We use this representation of mixed states to show that upon dissociation a neutral homonuclear diatomic molecule will separate into two neutral atoms.

  17. An ultrasensitive universal detector based on neutralizer displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Jagotamoy; Cederquist, Kristin B.; Zaragoza, Alexandre A.; Lee, Paul E.; Sargent, Edward H.; Kelley, Shana O.

    2012-08-01

    Diagnostic technologies that can provide the simultaneous detection of nucleic acids for gene expression, proteins for host response and small molecules for profiling the human metabolome will have a significant advantage in providing comprehensive patient monitoring. Molecular sensors that report changes in the electrostatics of a sensor's surface on analyte binding have shown unprecedented sensitivity in the detection of charged biomolecules, but do not lend themselves to the detection of small molecules, which do not carry significant charge. Here, we introduce the neutralizer displacement assay that allows charge-based sensing to be applied to any class of molecule irrespective of the analyte charge. The neutralizer displacement assay starts with an aptamer probe bound to a neutralizer. When analyte binding occurs the neutralizer is displaced, which results in a dramatic change in the surface charge for all types of analytes. We have tested the sensitivity, speed and specificity of this system in the detection of a panel of molecules: (deoxy)ribonucleic acid, ribonucleic acid, cocaine, adenosine triphosphate and thrombin.

  18. Characterization of Neutral Radicals from a Dissociative Electron Attachment Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhou; Milosavljević, Aleksandar R.; Carmichael, Ian; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2017-08-01

    Despite decades of gas-phase studies on dissociative electron attachment (DEA) to various molecules, as yet there has been no direct detection and characterization of the neutral radical species produced by this process. In this study, we performed stepwise electron spectroscopy to directly measure and characterize the neutrals produced upon zero-electron-energy DEA to the model molecule, carbon tetrachloride (CCl4 ). We observed the direct yield of the trichloromethyl radical (CCl3. ) formed by DEA to CCl4 and measured the appearance energies of all the other neutral species. By combining these experimental findings with high-level quantum chemical calculations, we performed a complete analysis of both the DEA to CCl4 and the subsequent electron-impact ionization of CCl3. . This work paves the way toward a complete experimental characterization of DEA processes, which will lead to a better understanding of the low-energy electron-induced formation of radical species.

  19. Decelerating and Trapping Large Polar Molecules.

    PubMed

    Patterson, David

    2016-11-18

    Manipulating the motion of large polyatomic molecules, such as benzonitrile (C6 H5 CN), presents significant difficulties compared to the manipulation of diatomic molecules. Although recent impressive results have demonstrated manipulation, trapping, and cooling of molecules as large as CH3 F, no general technique for trapping such molecules has been demonstrated, and cold neutral molecules larger than 5 atoms have not been trapped (M. Zeppenfeld, B. G. U. Englert, R. Glöckner, A. Prehn, M. Mielenz, C. Sommer, L. D. van Buuren, M. Motsch, G. Rempe, Nature 2012, 491, 570-573). In particular, extending Stark deceleration and electrostatic trapping to such species remains challenging. Here, we propose to combine a novel "asymmetric doublet state" Stark decelerator with recently demonstrated slow, cold, buffer-gas-cooled beams of closed-shell volatile molecules to realize a general system for decelerating and trapping samples of a broad range of volatile neutral polar prolate asymmetric top molecules. The technique is applicable to most stable volatile molecules in the 100-500 AMU range, and would be capable of producing trapped samples in a single rotational state and at a motional temperature of hundreds of mK. Such samples would immediately allow for spectroscopy of unprecedented resolution, and extensions would allow for further cooling and direct observation of slow intramolecular processes such as vibrational relaxation and Hertz-level tunneling dynamics.

  20. Mind Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Solomon H.

    2011-01-01

    Scientific styles vary tremendously. For me, research is largely about the unfettered pursuit of novel ideas and experiments that can test multiple ideas in a day, not a year, an approach that I learned from my mentor Julius “Julie” Axelrod. This focus on creative conceptualizations has been my métier since working in the summers during medical school at the National Institutes of Health, during my two years in the Axelrod laboratory, and throughout my forty-five years at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Equally important has been the “high” that emerges from brainstorming with my students. Nothing can compare with the eureka moments when, together, we sense new insights and, better yet, when high-risk, high-payoff experiments succeed. Although I have studied many different questions over the years, a common theme emerges: simple biochemical approaches to understanding molecular messengers, usually small molecules. Equally important has been identifying, purifying, and cloning the messengers' relevant biosynthetic, degradative, or target proteins, at all times seeking potential therapeutic relevance in the form of drugs. In the interests of brevity, this Reflections article is highly selective, and, with a few exceptions, literature citations are only of findings of our laboratory that illustrate notable themes. PMID:21543333

  1. Neutral polypropylene laser welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandolfino, Chiara; Lertora, Enrico; Gambaro, Carla

    2016-10-01

    The joining of polymeric materials is a technology used in many industrial applications, from transport to telecommunications and the medical sector. A new technology for the joining of polymers is the laser welding process. In particular, fibre laser welding is a flexible technology which allows high process speed and the realization of good quality joints. Despite its application becoming more widespread in the production of assemblies of high precision, the application of laser technology for the welding of polymers has not been the subject of many studies up to now. This study focused on the welding of neutral polypropylene. The window process parameter was identified, without the use of additives to increase radiation absorption, and a mechanical characterization was conducted in order to evaluate the quality of the joints realized.

  2. Antibody-mediated neutralization of flaviviruses: A reductionist view

    PubMed Central

    Dowd, Kimberly A.; Pierson, Theodore C.

    2011-01-01

    Flaviviruses are a group of ~70 small RNA viruses responsible for significant morbidity and mortality across the globe. Efforts to develop effective vaccines for several clinically important flaviviruses are underway. Antibodies are a significant component of the host’s protective response against flavivirus infection with the potential to contribute to immunity via several distinct mechanisms, including an ability to directly neutralize virus infection. Conversely, virus-reactive antibodies have been implicated in the increased risk of severe clinical manifestations following secondary dengue virus infection. In this review, we will discuss recent progress toward understanding the molecular basis of antibody-mediated neutralization of flaviviruses. Neutralization requires engagement of the virion with a stoichiometry that exceeds a required threshold. From this perspective, we will discuss viral and host factors that impact the number of antibody molecules bound to the virus particle and significantly modulate the potency of neutralizing antibodies. PMID:21255816

  3. Formation of cold ion-neutral clusters using superfluid helium nanodroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falconer, Travis M.; Lewis, William K.; Bemish, Raymond J.; Miller, Roger E.; Glish, Gary L.

    2010-05-01

    A strategy for forming and detecting cold ion-neutral clusters using superfluid helium nanodroplets is described. Sodium cations generated via thermionic emission are directed toward a beam of helium droplets that can also pick up neutral molecules and form a cluster with the captured Na+. The composition of the clusters is determined by mass spectrometric analysis following a desolvation step. It is shown that the polar molecules H2O and HCN are picked up and form ion-neutral clusters with sizes and relative abundances that are in good agreement with those predicted by the statistics used to describe neutral cluster formation in helium droplets. [Na(H2O)n]+ clusters containing six to 43 water molecules were observed, a size range of sodiated water clusters difficult to access in the gas phase. Clusters containing N2 were in lower abundance than expected, suggesting that the desolvation process heats the clusters sufficiently to dissociate those containing nonpolar molecules.

  4. Water dynamics at neutral and ionic interfaces.

    PubMed

    Fenn, Emily E; Wong, Daryl B; Fayer, M D

    2009-09-08

    The orientational dynamics of water at a neutral surfactant reverse micelle interface are measured with ultrafast infrared spectroscopy of the hydroxyl stretch, and the results are compared to orientational relaxation of water interacting with an ionic interface. The comparison provides insights into the influence of a neutral vs. ionic interface on hydrogen bond dynamics. Measurements are made and analyzed for large nonionic surfactant Igepal CO-520reverse micelles (water nanopool with a 9-nm diameter). The results are compared with those from a previous study of reverse micelles of the same size formed with the ionic surfactant Aerosol-OT (AOT). The results demonstrate that the orientational relaxation times for interfacial water molecules in the two types of reverse micelles are very similar (13 ps for Igepal and 18 ps for AOT) and are significantly slower than that of bulk water (2.6 ps). The comparison of water orientational relaxation at neutral and ionic interfaces shows that the presence of an interface plays the dominant role in determining the hydrogen bond dynamics, whereas the chemical nature of the interface plays a secondary role.

  5. Experimental Measurement of Micrometeoroid-Produced Neutrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collette, A.; Sternovsky, Z.; Horanyi, M.; Munsat, T. L.

    2013-12-01

    We describe the first laboratory measurement of vapor produced by simulated micrometeoroid bombardment. Exospheric gas measurements remain one of the outstanding accomplishments of the Apollo era, and are a clear scientific goal for future exploration of airless objects. New in-situ observations of the surface-bounded exosphere (SBE) at Mercury by MESSENGER, and the Moon by LRO/LAMP, have highlighted the uncertainty surrounding the role of micrometeoroid impacts in sustaining planetary SBEs. In a recent series of experiments, the quantity of neutral molecules generated by impacts of simulated micrometeoroids (0.1-1 micron radius, 1-10 km/s speed) was measured in the lab using a fast ionization gauge inside an ultrahigh-vacuum system. The quantity of neutrals released was found to be consistent with a power law N = mv^a in projectile speed v, mass m and exponent a ~ 2.4 We present these experimental results and discuss their implications for the upcoming LADEE mission, which carries both neutral mass and optical spectrometers for exospheric measurements, capable of identifying micrometeoroid-sourced gases.

  6. Neutral evolution of mutational robustness

    PubMed Central

    van Nimwegen, Erik; Crutchfield, James P.; Huynen, Martijn

    1999-01-01

    We introduce and analyze a general model of a population evolving over a network of selectively neutral genotypes. We show that the population’s limit distribution on the neutral network is solely determined by the network topology and given by the principal eigenvector of the network’s adjacency matrix. Moreover, the average number of neutral mutant neighbors per individual is given by the matrix spectral radius. These results quantify the extent to which populations evolve mutational robustness—the insensitivity of the phenotype to mutations—and thus reduce genetic load. Because the average neutrality is independent of evolutionary parameters—such as mutation rate, population size, and selective advantage—one can infer global statistics of neutral network topology by using simple population data available from in vitro or in vivo evolution. Populations evolving on neutral networks of RNA secondary structures show excellent agreement with our theoretical predictions. PMID:10449760

  7. Phase Transitions in a Model of Y-Molecules Abstract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holz, Danielle; Ruth, Donovan; Toral, Raul; Gunton, James

    Immunoglobulin is a Y-shaped molecule that functions as an antibody to neutralize pathogens. In special cases where there is a high concentration of immunoglobulin molecules, self-aggregation can occur and the molecules undergo phase transitions. This prevents the molecules from completing their function. We used a simplified model of 2-Dimensional Y-molecules with three identical arms on a triangular lattice with 2-dimensional Grand Canonical Ensemble. The molecules were permitted to be placed, removed, rotated or moved on the lattice. Once phase coexistence was found, we used histogram reweighting and multicanonical sampling to calculate our phase diagram.

  8. Alkali metal ion storage properties of sulphur and phosphorous molecules encapsulated in nanometer size carbon cylindrical pores

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, Yosuke Sakamoto, Yuki; Song, Hayong; Tashiro, Kosuke; Nishiwaki, Yoshiki; Al-zubaidi, Ayar; Kawasaki, Shinji

    2016-03-15

    We investigated the physical and chemical stabilities of sulfur and phosphorus molecules encapsulated in a mesoporous carbon (MPC) and two kinds of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) having different cylindrical pore diameters. The sublimation temperatures of sulfur molecules encapsulated in MPC and the two kinds of SWCNTs were measured by thermo-gravimetric measurements. It was found that the sublimation temperature of sulfur molecules encapsulated in SWCNTs having mean tube diameter of 1.5 nm is much higher than any other molecules encapsulated in larger pores. It was also found that the capacity fading of lithium-sulfur battery can be diminished by encapsulation of sulfur molecules in SWCNTs. We also investigated the electrochemical properties of phosphorus molecules encapsulated in SWCNTs (P@SWCNTs). It was shown that P@SWCNT can adsorb and desorb both Li and Na ions reversibly.

  9. Neutral Particle Beam Popup Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-01

    LA-11785-MS Neutral Particle Beam Popup Applications PI ApPDi.stnbulion Un^ d PLEASE RETURN TO: BMO TECHNICAL INFORMATION CENTER BALLISTIC...California, the United States Government, or any agency thereof. Accession Number: 3027 Publication Date: Mar 01, 1991 Title: Neutral Particle Beam Popup...11785-MS Report Prepared for: U.S. Dept. of Energy Descriptors, Keywords: NPB Neutral Particle Beam Application Threat Decoy Discrimination Deployment

  10. Transient ion neutralization by electrons.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhelm, H. E.

    1973-01-01

    The nonlinear initial-boundary-value problems describing the lateral neutralization of ion beams for the cases that (1) an auxiliary electric field accelerates the electrons into the ion space, and (2) the electrons are injected into the ion space at a prescribed current density are treated. Analytical solutions are derived which give the position and speed of the neutralization front as a function of time, and the temporal development of the electron density, velocity, and electric fields during the neutralization process.

  11. Transient Photochemistry of Neutral Red.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-07-01

    ascorbic acid system to 50 successive flashes, indicating that no ground state neutral red is permanently converted to leuco dye . Since leuco neutral...complete regeneration of ground state neutral red in this pH range in the present study suggests that formation of leuco dye is not significant. The second...radical disproportionation step is followed by a slower step which converts leuco dye to semireduced radical. Because coupling the two steps

  12. Constraining the Europa Neutral Torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Howard T.; Mitchell, Donald; mauk, Barry; Johnson, Robert E.; clark, george

    2016-10-01

    "Neutral tori" consist of neutral particles that usually co-orbit along with their source forming a toroidal (or partial toroidal) feature around the planet. The distribution and composition of these features can often provide important, if not unique, insight into magnetospheric particles sources, mechanisms and dynamics. However, these features can often be difficult to directly detect. One innovative method for detecting neutral tori is by observing Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENAs) that are generally considered produced as a result of charge exchange interactions between charged and neutral particles.Mauk et al. (2003) reported the detection of a Europa neutral particle torus using ENA observations. The presence of a Europa torus has extremely large implications for upcoming missions to Jupiter as well as understanding possible activity at this moon and providing critical insight into what lies beneath the surface of this icy ocean world. However, ENAs can also be produced as a result of charge exchange interactions between two ionized particles and in that case cannot be used to infer the presence of neutral particle population. Thus, a detailed examination of all possible source interactions must be considered before one can confirm that likely original source population of these ENA images is actually a Europa neutral particle torus. For this talk, we examine the viability that the Mauk et al. (2003) observations were actually generated from a neutral torus emanating from Europa as opposed to charge particle interactions with plasma originating from Io. These results help constrain such a torus as well as Europa source processes.

  13. CO2-neutral fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goede, A. P. H.

    2015-08-01

    The need for storage of renewable energy (RE) generated by photovoltaic, concentrated solar and wind arises from the fact that supply and demand are ill-matched both geographically and temporarily. This already causes problems of overcapacity and grid congestion in countries where the fraction of RE exceeds the 20% level. A system approach is needed, which focusses not only on the energy source, but includes conversion, storage, transport, distribution, use and, last but not least, the recycling of waste. Furthermore, there is a need for more flexibility in the energy system, rather than relying on electrification, integration with other energy systems, for example the gas network, would yield a system less vulnerable to failure and better adapted to requirements. For example, long-term large-scale storage of electrical energy is limited by capacity, yet needed to cover weekly to seasonal demand. This limitation can be overcome by coupling the electricity net to the gas system, considering the fact that the Dutch gas network alone has a storage capacity of 552 TWh, sufficient to cover the entire EU energy demand for over a month. This lecture explores energy storage in chemicals bonds. The focus is on chemicals other than hydrogen, taking advantage of the higher volumetric energy density of hydrocarbons, in this case methane, which has an approximate 3.5 times higher volumetric energy density. More importantly, it allows the ready use of existing gas infrastructure for energy storage, transport and distribution. Intermittent wind electricity generated is converted into synthetic methane, the Power to Gas (P2G) scheme, by splitting feedstock CO2 and H2O into synthesis gas, a mixture of CO and H2. Syngas plays a central role in the synthesis of a range of hydrocarbon products, including methane, diesel and dimethyl ether. The splitting is accomplished by innovative means; plasmolysis and high-temperature solid oxygen electrolysis. A CO2-neutral fuel cycle is

  14. NEUTRAL-BEAM INJECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Kunkel, W.B.

    1980-06-01

    The emphasis in the preceding chapters has been on magnetic confinement of high temperature plasmas. The question of production and heating of such plasmas has been dealt with relatively more briefly. It should not be inferred, however, that these matters must therefore be either trivial or unimportant. A review of the history reveals that in the early days all these aspects of the controlled fusion problem were considered to be on a par, and were tackled simultaneously and with equal vigor. Only the confinement problem turned out to be much more complex than initially anticipated, and richer in challenge to the plasma physicist than the questions of plasma production and heating. On the other hand, the properties of high-temperature plasmas and plasma confinement can only be studied experimentally after the problems of production and of heating to adequate temperatures are solved. It is the purpose of this and the next chapter to supplement the preceding discussions with more detail on two important subjects: neutral-beam injection and radio-frequency heating. These are the major contenders for heating in present and future tokamak and mirror fusion experiments, and even in several proposed reactors. For neutral beams we emphasize here the technology involved, which has undergone a rather remarkable development. The physics of particle and energy deposition in the plasma, and the discussion of the resulting effects on the confined plasma, have been included in previous chapters, and some experimental results are quoted there. Other heating processes of relevance to fusion are mentioned elsewhere in this book, in connection with the experiments where they are used: i.e. ohmic heating, adiabatic compression heating, and alpha-particle heating in Chapter 3 by H.P. Furth; more ohmic heating in Chapter 7, and shock-implosion heating, laser heating, and relativistic-electron beam heating in Chapter 8, both by W. E. Quinn. These methods are relatively straightforward in

  15. Is science metaphysically neutral?

    PubMed

    Fry, Iris

    2012-09-01

    This paper challenges the claim that science is metaphysically neutral upheld by contenders of the separation of peacefully co-existent science and religion and by evolutionary theists. True, naturalistic metaphysical claims can neither be refuted nor proved and are thus distinct from empirical hypotheses. However, metaphysical assumptions not only regulate the theoretical and empirical study of nature, but are increasingly supported by the growing empirical body of science. This historically evolving interaction has contributed to the development of a naturalistic worldview that renounces the necessity of a transcendent god and of purposeful design. The thesis presented here differs not only from the claims of the "separatists" and of evolutionary theists. In pointing to the metaphysical aspects of science, I also criticize the failure of some evolutionary naturalists to distinguish between empirical and metaphysical contentions. Most important, based on the examination of science suggested here, creationists' false accusation that science is only a naturalistic dogma is refuted. Finally, the difficulties involved in the position endorsed here for the public support of evolution are acknowledged, taking into account the high religious profile of the American society and the social and political context in the US and in other countries. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Light desorption from an yttrium neutralizer for Rb and Fr magneto-optical trap loading

    SciTech Connect

    Coppolaro, V.; Papi, N.; Khanbekyan, A.; Marinelli, C.; Mariotti, E. Marmugi, L.; Moi, L.; Corradi, L.; Dainelli, A.; Arikawa, H.; Ishikawa, T.; Sakemi, Y.; Calabrese, R.; Mazzocca, G.; Tomassetti, L.; Ricci, L.

    2014-10-07

    We present here the first evidence of photodesorption induced by low-intensity non-resonant light from an yttrium thin foil, which works as a neutralizer for Rb and Fr ions beam. Neutral atoms are suddenly ejected from the metal surface in a pulsed regime upon illumination with a broadband flash light and then released in the free volume of a pyrex cells. Here atoms are captured by a Magneto-Optical Trap (MOT), which is effectively loaded by the photodesorption. Loading times of the order of the flash rise time are measured. Desorption is also obtained in the continuous regime, by exploiting CW visible illumination of the metallic neutralizer surface. We demonstrate that at lower CW light intensities vacuum conditions are not perturbed by the photodesorption and hence the MOT dynamics remains unaffected, while the trap population increases thanks to the incoming desorbed atoms flux. Even with the Y foil at room temperature and hence with no trapped atoms, upon visible illumination, the number of trapped atoms reaches 10{sup 5}. The experimental data are then analyzed by means of an analytical rate equation model, which allows the analysis of this phenomenon and its dynamics and allows the determination of critical experimental parameters and the test of the procedure in the framework of radioactive Francium trapping. In this view, together with an extensive investigation of the phenomenon with {sup 85}Rb, the first demonstration of the photodesorption-aided loading of a {sup 210}Fr MOT is shown.

  17. Light desorption from an yttrium neutralizer for Rb and Fr magneto-optical trap loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppolaro, V.; Papi, N.; Khanbekyan, A.; Marinelli, C.; Mariotti, E.; Marmugi, L.; Moi, L.; Corradi, L.; Dainelli, A.; Arikawa, H.; Ishikawa, T.; Sakemi, Y.; Calabrese, R.; Mazzocca, G.; Tomassetti, L.; Ricci, L.

    2014-10-01

    We present here the first evidence of photodesorption induced by low-intensity non-resonant light from an yttrium thin foil, which works as a neutralizer for Rb and Fr ions beam. Neutral atoms are suddenly ejected from the metal surface in a pulsed regime upon illumination with a broadband flash light and then released in the free volume of a pyrex cells. Here atoms are captured by a Magneto-Optical Trap (MOT), which is effectively loaded by the photodesorption. Loading times of the order of the flash rise time are measured. Desorption is also obtained in the continuous regime, by exploiting CW visible illumination of the metallic neutralizer surface. We demonstrate that at lower CW light intensities vacuum conditions are not perturbed by the photodesorption and hence the MOT dynamics remains unaffected, while the trap population increases thanks to the incoming desorbed atoms flux. Even with the Y foil at room temperature and hence with no trapped atoms, upon visible illumination, the number of trapped atoms reaches 105. The experimental data are then analyzed by means of an analytical rate equation model, which allows the analysis of this phenomenon and its dynamics and allows the determination of critical experimental parameters and the test of the procedure in the framework of radioactive Francium trapping. In this view, together with an extensive investigation of the phenomenon with 85Rb, the first demonstration of the photodesorption-aided loading of a 210Fr MOT is shown.

  18. Light desorption from an yttrium neutralizer for Rb and Fr magneto-optical trap loading.

    PubMed

    Coppolaro, V; Papi, N; Khanbekyan, A; Marinelli, C; Mariotti, E; Marmugi, L; Moi, L; Corradi, L; Dainelli, A; Arikawa, H; Ishikawa, T; Sakemi, Y; Calabrese, R; Mazzocca, G; Tomassetti, L; Ricci, L

    2014-10-07

    We present here the first evidence of photodesorption induced by low-intensity non-resonant light from an yttrium thin foil, which works as a neutralizer for Rb and Fr ions beam. Neutral atoms are suddenly ejected from the metal surface in a pulsed regime upon illumination with a broadband flash light and then released in the free volume of a pyrex cells. Here atoms are captured by a Magneto-Optical Trap (MOT), which is effectively loaded by the photodesorption. Loading times of the order of the flash rise time are measured. Desorption is also obtained in the continuous regime, by exploiting CW visible illumination of the metallic neutralizer surface. We demonstrate that at lower CW light intensities vacuum conditions are not perturbed by the photodesorption and hence the MOT dynamics remains unaffected, while the trap population increases thanks to the incoming desorbed atoms flux. Even with the Y foil at room temperature and hence with no trapped atoms, upon visible illumination, the number of trapped atoms reaches 10(5). The experimental data are then analyzed by means of an analytical rate equation model, which allows the analysis of this phenomenon and its dynamics and allows the determination of critical experimental parameters and the test of the procedure in the framework of radioactive Francium trapping. In this view, together with an extensive investigation of the phenomenon with (85)Rb, the first demonstration of the photodesorption-aided loading of a (210)Fr MOT is shown.

  19. The Effects of Plasma-Neutral Interactions on Neutral Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, V.; Thayer, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    Plasma-neutral interactions are fundamental to the structure and behavior of the neutral thermosphere. This interaction, primarily through ion-neutral collisions, ties electrodynamics with hydrodynamics requiring a fully coupled ionosphere - thermosphere model to simulate and dissect the sequence of responses that occur in the neutral gas when a change occurs in the ionosphere. In particular, changes in the ion drag force prompt a hydrodynamic response that will alter several properties of the thermosphere, including neutral winds. Here, the fully coupled National Center for Atmospheric Research Thermosphere-Ionosphere Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (NCAR TIEGCM) is used to evaluate how changes in mechanical coupling, through the ion drag force, alter thermosphere properties, with a focus on thermospheric neutral winds. The equatorial thermosphere anomaly (ETA) produces a transient wind system, and a dissection of the hydrodynamic processes responsible for its formation will be used to demonstrate the causal structure in neutral gas response to a change in field-aligned ion drag force. This well-behaved response elucidates processes that must be occurring in other regions of the thermosphere where more significant changes in the ion drag force occur.

  20. Neutralization tests on the SERT 2 spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerslake, W. R.; Domitz, S.

    1979-01-01

    Neutralization test data obtained on the SERT 2 spacecraft are presented. Tests included ion beam neutralization of a thruster by a close (normal design) neutralizer as well as by a distant (1 meter) neutralizer. Parameters affecting neutralization, such as neutralizer bias voltage, neutralizer anode voltage, local spacecraft plasma density, and solar array voltage configuration were varied and changes in plasma potentials were measured. A plasma model is presented as an approximation of observed results.

  1. Laboratory studies of astrophysical molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haiyan

    There is growing evidence that the molecules necessary for the evolution of life on earth arrived from the interstellar medium. The study of these molecules is therefore of great current interest. Two major types of signals from interstellar space, so-called unidentified interstellar infrared emission bands and the diffuse interstellar absorption bands, have intrigued and puzzled astrochemists for decades. This work has been concentrated on how to contribute to an understanding of the origins of these perplexing signals from space and help identify other molecules that may exist in outer space. Matrix isolation spectroscopy (infrared and ultraviolet-visible) combined with theoretical calculations has been employed throughout this research. Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopic measurements, aided by theoretical calculations and 13 C-isotope shifts, have led to the identification of eight heretofore unknown C n S m clusters: C 2 S, C 6 S, C 7 S, C 7 S 2 , C 9 S 2 , C 11 S 2 , C 13 S 2 , and C 15 S 2 . Infrared absorption studies of xenon polycarbon clusters aid in understanding the special electronic structure and reactivity of carbon clusters, which might be associated with the formation mechanism of Buckyball (C 60 ). Reaction of C3 with benzene and ammonia might be involved in the formation of more complex molecular structures, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and biomolecules such as the amino acids. High resolution vibrational and electronic spectra of neutral dibenzo [b,def]chrysene and its ions in 12 K argon matrices have been recorded. Spectral assignments were supported by high level theoretical calculations. A mixture of the neutral and ionic infrared spectra of dibenzo[b,def]chrysene resembles the unidentified IR bands in the reflection nebula NGC 7023. Anharmonic frequency calculations for neutral and cationic naphthalene, phenanthrene and anthracene using density functional theory have been carried out for the first time

  2. Environmental neutralization of polonium-218

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, S.D.; Hopke, P.K.

    1985-01-01

    Previous work has indicated that two mechanisms of neutralization of the singly charged polonium ion exist. Charged Polonium-218 can be neutralized by reacting with oxygen to form a polonium oxide ion with a higher ionization potential than that of the polonium metal and then accepting an electron transferred from a lower ionization potential gas. In this present work, this mechanism has been verified by determining that the polonium oxide has an ionization potential in the range 10.35-10.53 eV. It was also previously reported that /sup 218/Po can be neutralized, in the absence of oxygen, by the scavenging of electrons by a trace gas such as water or nitrogen dioxide and their diffusion to the polonium ion. To verify this second neutralization mechanism, concentrations of nitrogen dioxide in nitrogen in the range of 50 ppb-1 ppm were examined for their ability to neutralize the polonium ion. Complete neutralization of /sup 218/Po was observed at nitrogen dioxide concentrations greater than 700 ppb. For concentrations below 700 ppb, the degree of neutralization was found to increase smoothly with the nitrogen dioxide concentration.

  3. Neutralization of reovirus: the gene responsible for the neutralization antigen

    PubMed Central

    1977-01-01

    The S1 genome segment of reovirus is linked to type specificity as determined by neutralization antibody. This gene segment codes for a minor outer capsid polypeptide (sigma1). Therefore, sigma1 is the peptide responsible for induction of neutralization antibody and confers type specificity. This biologic property of reovirus was defined using hybrid recombinants clones between reovirus types 1 and 3 and 2 and 3. PMID:925604

  4. Neutral and charged clusters in the atmosphere: their importance and potential role in heterogeneous catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Castleman, A.W. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Extensive investigations of the bonding of atmospherically important molecules to various ions have been made, and the results are used to clarify the overall gas-to-particle conversion process involving a single ionic species. Neutral and charged clusters play an important role in atmospheric processes, and an understanding of their states and reactivity is essential in developing a fundamental understanding and basis for assessing the importance of heterogeneous processes. The purpose of this paper is to survey briefly the current knowledge in these various fields and to recommend studies needed for further progress in quantifying aerosol formation and catalytic reactivity. The topics surveyed include clusters between ions and molecules and among neutral molecules, bonding and stability of small neutral-neutral complexes and related charge transfer complexes, and gas-to-particle conversion. 92 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  5. Neutralization of HIV-1: a paradox of humoral proportions.

    PubMed

    Nara, P L; Garrity, R R; Goudsmit, J

    1991-07-01

    The production of immunoglobulin capable of neutralizing the infectivity of a virus represents one of the most remarkable molecular accomplishments of the host's available immune defenses. It should be no surprise that a virus that has existed in the parenchyma of the immune system has evolved as an equally dynamic molecule (i.e., viral envelope) for survival. Neutralizing immunoglobulin (Ig) can best serve the host under conditions where the invading pathogen requires a well-defined cell-free state for establishing an infection or transmission. Evidence for a controlling and therefore protective role of neutralizing Ig against lentiviruses has been defined in natural and experimental infections with equine infectious anemia virus of ungulate members in the family equidae. Rapid replication of the virus immediately after infection and its release in a cell-free state leads to the production of neutralizing Ig and subsequent control of the primary viremia. A similar cause-effect relationship exists in humans between the high-titered viremia, observed shortly after HIV-1 infection, and the subsequent production of neutralizing Ig. Partially controlling this acute stage of viral replication by neutralizing Ig and thus preventing an otherwise acute form of immunosuppression or immune complex disease may be viewed paradoxically as a survival property of the virus. Immunologically mediated control, in a Darwinian sense, selects for viruses that have optimized the parameters of longevity and transmission from host to host. This paradox of neutralization in HIV-1 infection appears to be mediated by the convergence of structural and functional roles of the third variable domain (V3) of the external envelope glycoprotein. During infection or envelope-based vaccination, antibody to this cross-reactive, immuno-dominant epitope dominates the antigenic repertoire. Once this occurs, the host is less able to respond to emerging viruses containing closely related V3 structures

  6. Behavior of molecules on interstellar grains - Application of the Langevin equation and iterative extended Hueckel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aronowitz, S.; Chang, S.

    1980-01-01

    The Langevin equation was used to explore an adsorbate desorption mechanism. Calculations were performed using iterative extended Hueckel on a silica model site with various small adsorbates, e.g., H, CH, OH, NO, CO. It was found that barriers to free traversal from one site to another are substantial (about 3-10 eV). A bootstrap desorption mechanism for some molecules in the process of forming at a site also became apparent from the calculations. The desorption mechanisms appear to be somewhat balanced by a counterforce - the attraction of sites for the newly desorbed molecule. The order of attraction to a silica grain site for the diatomic molecules considered was OH greater than CH greater than CO greater than NO, when these entities were sufficiently distant. The nature of the silica grain and that of the 'cold' desorption mechanism, when considered together, suggest that the abundance of very small grains might be less common than anticipated.

  7. Behavior of Molecules on Interstellar Grains: Application of the Langevin Equation and Iterative Extended Huckel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aronowitz. Sheldon

    1980-01-01

    The Langevin equation was used to explore an adsorbate desorption mechanism. Calculations were performed using iterative extended Huckel on a silica model site with various small adsorbates, e.g., H, CH, OH, NO, CO. It was found that barriers to free traversal from one site to another are substantial (approximately 3 - 10 eV). A bootstrap desorption mechanism for some molecules in the process of forming at a site also became apparent from the calculations. The desorption mechanisms appear to be somewhat balanced by a counterforce--the attraction of sites for the newly desorbed molecule. The order of attraction to a silica grain site for the diatomic molecules considered was OH > CH > CO > NO, when these entities were sufficiently distant. The nature of the silica grain and that of the "cold" desorption mechanism, when considered together, suggest that the abundance of very small grains might be less common than anticipated.

  8. Reversible single spin control of individual magnetic molecule by hydrogen atom adsorption.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liwei; Yang, Kai; Jiang, Yuhang; Song, Boqun; Xiao, Wende; Li, Linfei; Zhou, Haitao; Wang, Yeliang; Du, Shixuan; Ouyang, Min; Hofer, Werner A; Castro Neto, Antonio H; Gao, Hong-Jun

    2013-01-01

    The reversible control of a single spin of an atom or a molecule is of great interest in Kondo physics and a potential application in spin based electronics. Here we demonstrate that the Kondo resonance of manganese phthalocyanine molecules on a Au(111) substrate have been reversibly switched off and on via a robust route through attachment and detachment of single hydrogen atom to the magnetic core of the molecule. As further revealed by density functional theory calculations, even though the total number of electrons of the Mn ion remains almost the same in the process, gaining one single hydrogen atom leads to redistribution of charges within 3d orbitals with a reduction of the molecular spin state from S = 3/2 to S = 1 that directly contributes to the Kondo resonance disappearance. This process is reversed by a local voltage pulse or thermal annealing to desorb the hydrogen atom.

  9. Incomplete Neutralization and Deviation from Sigmoidal Neutralization Curves for HIV Broadly Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Laura E; Falkowska, Emilia; Doores, Katie J; Le, Khoa; Sok, Devin; van Gils, Marit J; Euler, Zelda; Burger, Judith A; Seaman, Michael S; Sanders, Rogier W; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Poignard, Pascal; Wrin, Terri; Burton, Dennis R

    2015-08-01

    The broadly neutralizing HIV monoclonal antibodies (bnMAbs) PG9, PG16, PGT151, and PGT152 have been shown earlier to occasionally display an unusual virus neutralization profile with a non-sigmoidal slope and a plateau at <100% neutralization. In the current study, we were interested in determining the extent of non-sigmoidal slopes and plateaus at <100% for HIV bnMAbs more generally. Using both a 278 panel of pseudoviruses in a CD4 T-cell (U87.CCR5.CXCR4) assay and a panel of 117 viruses in the TZM-bl assay, we found that bnMAbs targeting many neutralizing epitopes of the spike had neutralization profiles for at least one virus that plateaued at <90%. Across both panels the bnMAbs targeting the V2 apex of Env and gp41 were most likely to show neutralization curves that plateaued <100%. Conversely, bnMAbs targeting the high-mannose patch epitopes were less likely to show such behavior. Two CD4 binding site (CD4bs) Abs also showed this behavior relatively infrequently. The phenomenon of incomplete neutralization was also observed in a large peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC)-grown molecular virus clone panel derived from patient viral swarms. In addition, five bnMAbs were compared against an 18-virus panel of molecular clones produced in 293T cells and PBMCs and assayed in TZM-bl cells. Examples of plateaus <90% were seen with both types of virus production with no consistent patterns observed. In conclusion, incomplete neutralization and non-sigmoidal neutralization curves are possible for all HIV bnMAbs against a wide range of viruses produced and assayed in both cell lines and primary cells with implications for the use of antibodies in therapy and as tools for vaccine design.

  10. Incomplete Neutralization and Deviation from Sigmoidal Neutralization Curves for HIV Broadly Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Laura E.; Falkowska, Emilia; Doores, Katie J.; Le, Khoa; Sok, Devin; van Gils, Marit J.; Euler, Zelda; Burger, Judith A.; Seaman, Michael S.; Sanders, Rogier W.; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Poignard, Pascal; Wrin, Terri; Burton, Dennis R.

    2015-01-01

    The broadly neutralizing HIV monoclonal antibodies (bnMAbs) PG9, PG16, PGT151, and PGT152 have been shown earlier to occasionally display an unusual virus neutralization profile with a non-sigmoidal slope and a plateau at <100% neutralization. In the current study, we were interested in determining the extent of non-sigmoidal slopes and plateaus at <100% for HIV bnMAbs more generally. Using both a 278 panel of pseudoviruses in a CD4 T-cell (U87.CCR5.CXCR4) assay and a panel of 117 viruses in the TZM-bl assay, we found that bnMAbs targeting many neutralizing epitopes of the spike had neutralization profiles for at least one virus that plateaued at <90%. Across both panels the bnMAbs targeting the V2 apex of Env and gp41 were most likely to show neutralization curves that plateaued <100%. Conversely, bnMAbs targeting the high-mannose patch epitopes were less likely to show such behavior. Two CD4 binding site (CD4bs) Abs also showed this behavior relatively infrequently. The phenomenon of incomplete neutralization was also observed in a large peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC)-grown molecular virus clone panel derived from patient viral swarms. In addition, five bnMAbs were compared against an 18-virus panel of molecular clones produced in 293T cells and PBMCs and assayed in TZM-bl cells. Examples of plateaus <90% were seen with both types of virus production with no consistent patterns observed. In conclusion, incomplete neutralization and non-sigmoidal neutralization curves are possible for all HIV bnMAbs against a wide range of viruses produced and assayed in both cell lines and primary cells with implications for the use of antibodies in therapy and as tools for vaccine design. PMID:26267277

  11. The neutralization of interferons by antibody. I. Quantitative and theoretical analyses of the neutralization reaction in different bioassay systems.

    PubMed

    Grossberg, S E; Kawade, Y; Kohase, M; Yokoyama, H; Finter, N

    2001-09-01

    The highly specific ability of antibodies to inhibit the biologic activity of cytokines or other therapeutic proteins is widely used in research and a subject of increasing clinical importance. The need exists for a standardized approach to the reporting of neutralizing antibody potency soundly based on theoretical and practical considerations and tested by experimental data. Pursuant to the original studies of Kawade on the theoretical and functional aspects of neutralization of interferons (IFN), experimental data were obtained by different laboratories employing varied methodology to address two hypotheses concerning the nature of IFN neutralization reactions, based on a derived formula that allows expression of neutralizing power as the reduction of 10 laboratory units (LU)/ml to 1 LU/ml, the end point of most bioassays. Two hypotheses are posed: (1) antibody acts to neutralize a fixed amount of biologically active IFN molecules, or (2) antibody reduces IFN activity in a set ratio of added/residual biologically active IFN. The first, or fixed amount, hypothesis relates to the reactivity of high-affinity antibodies neutralizing equimolar amounts of antigen, whereas the second, or constant proportion, hypothesis postulates a reduction in the ratio of total added IFN to residual active IFN molecules, such as a low-affinity antibody might exhibit. Analyses of data of the neutralization of IFN-alpha and IFN-beta are presented, employing human polyclonal antibodies and murine monoclonal antibodies (mAb). The theoretical constructs of Kawade are extended in the Appendix and correlated with new experimental data in the text. The data clearly indicate that the low-antibody affinity, constant proportion hypothesis, rather than the high-antibody affinity, fixed amount hypothesis, is applicable, if the bioassay is sensitive to IFN. The findings presented here and in the following paper (pp. 743-755, this issue) taken together provide the basis for a standardized method of

  12. Vendor neutral archive in PACS.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Tapesh Kumar; Sanjeev

    2012-10-01

    An archive is a location containing a collection of records, documents, or other materials of historical importance. An integral part of Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS) is archiving. When a hospital needs to migrate a PACS vendor, the complete earlier data need to be migrated in the format of the newly procured PACS. It is both time and money consuming. To address this issue, the new concept of vendor neutral archive (VNA) has emerged. A VNA simply decouples the PACS and workstations at the archival layer. This is achieved by developing an application engine that receives, integrates, and transmits the data using the different syntax of a Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine (DICOM) format. Transferring the data belonging to the old PACS to a new one is performed by a process called migration of data. In VNA, a number of different data migration techniques are available to facilitate transfer from the old PACS to the new one, the choice depending on the speed of migration and the importance of data. The techniques include simple DICOM migration, prefetch-based DICOM migration, medium migration, and the expensive non-DICOM migration. "Vendor neutral" may not be a suitable term, and "architecture neutral," "PACS neutral," "content neutral," or "third-party neutral" are probably better and preferred terms. Notwithstanding this, the VNA acronym has come to stay in both the medical IT user terminology and in vendor nomenclature, and radiologists need to be aware of its impact in PACS across the globe.

  13. Nonadiabaticity of cavity-free neutral nitrogen lasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Pengji; Escudero, Juan Carlos; Houard, Aurélien; Sanchis, Alberto; Vera, Javier; Vicéns, Sergio; Liu, Yi; Oliva, Eduardo

    2017-09-01

    We report on a theoretical study of cavity-free lasing of neutral nitrogen molecules in femtosecond laser filaments with a nonadiabatic Maxwell-Bloch model, compared with recent pump-seed experiments. The nonadiabaticity of the lasing process is revealed and it is found that electron-neutral collisions dominate the dipole dephasing rate. Moreover, we show that the asymmetry between forward and backward lasing not only depends on the different amplification lengths but also on the temporal dynamics of electron-neutral collisions. The comparison of the nonadiabatic model with simulations based on the adiabatic approximation (such as radiative transfer equations) explicitly sets a bound on the validity of the latter model for cavity-free nitrogen lasing phenomenon, which holds a unique potential in optical remote sensing applications.

  14. Plasma-neutral interaction processes in the magnetosphere of Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eviatar, Aharon

    1992-01-01

    Models of Saturnian magnetospheric processes are reviewed emphasizing the interaction of charged and neutral particles in the gaseous phase and mentioning the role of solid matter. It is found that interpretations of different Voyager datasets regarding the Saturnian magnetosphere can vary. Specific interactions examined to resolve these discrepancies include charge exchange, ion-atom interchange, isotropizing and thermalizing collisions, and interactions between magnetospheric charged particles and surface layers of the icy satellites. The latter interactions result in sputtering of the surface or atmosphere as well as neutral injections into the magnetosphere. Constraints based on known reaction rates are shown to be useful in analyzing the abundances of the water-group molecules. The composition of the magnetospheric plasma is shown to be related to the differences between the interactions of atomic and molecular plasmas with neutral matter.

  15. High brilliance negative ion and neutral beam source

    DOEpatents

    Compton, Robert N.

    1991-01-01

    A high brilliance mass selected (Z-selected) negative ion and neutral beam source having good energy resolution. The source is based upon laser resonance ionization of atoms or molecules in a small gaseous medium followed by charge exchange through an alkali oven. The source is capable of producing microampere beams of an extremely wide variety of negative ions, and milliampere beams when operated in the pulsed mode.

  16. Cavity sideband cooling of trapped molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalewski, Markus; Vivie-Riedle, Regina de; Morigi, Giovanna; Pinkse, Pepijn W. H.

    2011-09-15

    The efficiency of cavity sideband cooling of trapped molecules is theoretically investigated for the case in which the infrared transition between two rovibrational states is used as a cycling transition. The molecules are assumed to be trapped either by a radiofrequency or optical trapping potential, depending on whether they are charged or neutral, and confined inside a high-finesse optical resonator that enhances radiative emission into the cavity mode. Using realistic experimental parameters and COS as a representative molecular example, we show that in this setup, cooling to the trap ground state is feasible.

  17. Energetic Neutral Atom Precipitation (ENAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinsley, B. A.

    1988-01-01

    The Energetic Neutral Atom Precipitation experiment is scheduled to be flown on the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science (ATLAS 1) NASA mission. The objective of this experiment is to measure very faint emissions at nighttime arising from fluxes of energetic neutral atoms in the thermosphere. These energetic atoms have energies ranging up to about 50 keV, and arise from ions of hydrogen, helium, and oxygen trapped in the inner magnetosphere. Some of these ions become neutralized in charge exchange reactions with neutral hydrogen in the hydrogen geocorona that extends through the region. The ions are trapped on magnetic field lines which cross the equatorial plane at 2 to 6 earth radii distance, and they mirror at a range of heights on these field lines, extending down to the thermosphere at 500 km altitude. The ATLAS 1 measurements will not be of the neutral atoms themselves but of the optical emission produced by those on trajectories that intersect the thermosphere. The ENAP measurements are to be made using the Imaging Spectrometric Observatory (ISO) which is being flown on the ATLAS mission primarily for daytime spectral observations, and the ENAP measurements will all be nighttime measurements because of the faintness of the emissions and the relatively low level of magnetic activity expected.

  18. Reduced neutral XLPE cable design

    SciTech Connect

    Valli, G.F.; Zawadzki, J.A.; Orton, H.E. )

    1990-04-01

    This paper describes the theoretical, laboratory and economic analyses undertaken to determine the optimum metallic concentric neutral design for its single conductor 750 and 500 kcmil aluminum XLPE 15 kV insulated concentric-neutral type feeder cables. The results suggest that reducing the cross-sectional area of this concentric neutral from the currently-recognized industry standard of 20 percent of the central conductor to 7% results in overall present-worth system cost saving of approximately $3 per conductor meter or approximately 22% of the cable first cost. The neutral configuration ultimately chosen to replace the previous standard 37 - number 14 AWG wires was 2 - 1 inch {times} 5 mil tinned copper tapes overlapped by 25%. Line voltage fault test were run in the high-power laboratory on samples with various neutral configurations to confirm they would successfully pass our worst-case fault duty of 10 kA for 20 cycles (i.e., .33 sec) with no reclosing.

  19. Selective neutrality and enzyme kinetics.

    PubMed

    Demetrius, L

    1997-10-01

    This article appeals to a recent theory of enzyme evolution to show that the properties, neutral or adaptive, which characterize the observed allelic variation in natural populations can be inferred from the functional parameters, substrate specificity, and reaction rate. This study delineates the following relations between activity variables, and the forces--adaptive or neutral--determining allelic variation: (1) Enzymes with broad substrate specificity: The observed polymorphism is adaptive; mutations in this class of enzymes can result in increased fitness of the organism and hence be relevant for positive selection. (2) Enzymes with absolute substrate specificity and diffusion-controlled rates: Observed allelic variation will be absolutely neutral; mutations in this class of enzymes will be either deleterious or have no effect on fitness. (3) Enzymes with absolute or group specificity and nondiffusion-controlled rates: Observed variation will be partially neutral; mutants which are selectively neutral may become advantageous under an appropriate environmental condition or different genetic background. We illustrate each of the relations between kinetic properties and evolutionary states with examples drawn from enzymes whose evolutionary dynamics have been intensively studied.

  20. Gas cell neutralizers (Fundamental principles)

    SciTech Connect

    Fuehrer, B.

    1985-06-01

    Neutralizing an ion-beam of the size and energy levels involved in the neutral-particle-beam program represents a considerable extension of the state-of-the-art of neutralizer technology. Many different mediums (e.g., solid, liquid, gas, plasma, photons) can be used to strip the hydrogen ion of its extra electron. A large, multidisciplinary R and D effort will no doubt be required to sort out all of the ''pros and cons'' of these various techniques. The purpose of this particular presentation is to discuss some basic configurations and fundamental principles of the gas type of neutralizer cell. Particular emphasis is placed on the ''Gasdynamic Free-Jet'' neutralizer since this configuration has the potential of being much shorter than other type of gas cells (in the beam direction) and it could operate in nearly a continuous mode (CW) if necessary. These were important considerations in the ATSU design which is discussed in some detail in the second presentation entitled ''ATSU Point Design''.

  1. Physics of Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, D.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Many varieties of molecule have been detected in the Milky Way and in other galaxies. The processes by which these molecules are formed and destroyed are now broadly understood (see INTERSTELLAR CHEMISTRY). These molecules are important components of galaxies in two ways. Firstly, radiation emitted by molecules enables us to trace the presence of diffuse gas, to infer its physical properties and ...

  2. Electron attachment to the phthalide molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Asfandiarov, N. L.; Pshenichnyuk, S. A.; Vorob’ev, A. S.; Nafikova, E. P.; Lachinov, A. N.; Kraikin, V. A.; Modelli, A.

    2015-05-07

    Phthalide, the simplest chain of conductive polymer thin film, was investigated by means of Electron Transmission Spectroscopy, Negative Ion Mass Spectrometry, and density functional theory quantum chemistry. It has been found that formation of gas-phase long-lived molecular anions of phthalide around 0.7 eV takes place through cleavage of a C–O bond of the pentacyclic ring of the parent molecular anion to give a vibrationally excited (electronically more stable) open-ring molecular anion. The energy of the transition state for ring opening of the parent negative ion is calculated to be 0.65 eV above the neutral ground state of the molecule. The energy (2.64 eV) evaluated for the corresponding transition state in the neutral molecule is much higher, so that the process of electron detachment from the anion must lead to a neutral molecule with its initial pentacyclic structure. The average lifetime of the molecular negative ions formed at an electron energy of 0.75 eV and 80 °C is measured to be about 100 μs. The known switching effect of thin phthalide films could stem from the presence of a similar open/closed transition state also in the polymer.

  3. Neutralizing antibodies decrease the envelope fluidity of HIV-1

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, Shinji Monde, Kazuaki; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Kimura, Tetsuya; Maeda, Yosuke; Yusa, Keisuke

    2008-01-05

    For successful penetration of HIV-1, the formation of a fusion pore may be required in order to accumulate critical numbers of fusion-activated gp41 with the help of fluidization of the plasma membrane and viral envelope. An increase in temperature to 40 {sup o}C after viral adsorption at 25 {sup o}C enhanced the infectivity by 1.4-fold. The enhanced infectivity was inhibited by an anti-CXCR4 peptide, T140, and anti-V3 monoclonal antibodies (0.5{beta} and 694/98-D) by post-attachment neutralization, but not by non-neutralizing antibodies (670-30D and 246-D) specific for the C5 of gp120 and cluster I of gp41, respectively. Anti-HLA-II and an anti-HTLV-I gp46 antibody, LAT27, neutralized the molecule-carrying HIV-1{sub C-2(MT-2)}. The anti-V3 antibodies suppressed the fluidity of the HIV-1{sub C-2} envelope, whereas the non-neutralizing antibodies did not. The anti-HLA-II antibody decreased the envelope fluidity of HIV-1{sub C-2(MT-2)}, but not that of HIV-1{sub C-2}. Therefore, fluidity suppression by these antibodies represents an important neutralization mechanism, in addition to inhibition of viral attachment.

  4. Structural basis for endotoxin neutralization by the eosinophil cationic protein.

    PubMed

    Pulido, David; Garcia-Mayoral, Maria Flor; Moussaoui, Mohammed; Velázquez, Diego; Torrent, Marc; Bruix, Marta; Boix, Ester

    2016-11-01

    Acute infection by Gram-negative pathogens can induce an exacerbated immune response that leads to lethal septic shock syndrome. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a major pathogen-associated molecular pattern molecule that can initiate massive and lethal immune system stimulation. Therefore, the development of new and effective LPS-neutralizing agents is a top priority. The eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) is an antimicrobial protein secreted in response to infection, with a remarkable affinity for LPS. In the present study, we demonstrate that ECP is able to neutralize bacterial LPS and inhibit tumor necrosis factor-α production in human macrophages. We also characterized ECP neutralizing activity using progressively truncated LPS mutants, and conclude that the polysaccharide moiety and lipid A portions are required for LPS-mediated neutralization. In addition, we mapped the structural determinants required for the ECP-LPS interaction by nuclear magnetic resonance. Our results show that ECP is able to neutralize LPS and therefore opens a new route for developing novel therapeutic agents based on the ECP structural scaffolding. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  5. Neutral transport in the ALT-I limiter

    SciTech Connect

    Boley, C.D.; Heifetz, D.B.; Post, D.E.; Malinowski, M.E.

    1983-10-01

    The behavior of neutral atoms and molecules in the TEXTOR pump limiter ALT-I has been investigated with the aid of the 2-D Monte Carlo neutral transport code DEGAS. The code incorporates the full set of relevant collision processes (atomic and molecular), and it has a standard wall model which includes fast-neutral reflection and molecular desorption. The limiter was modeled with a 2-D geometry, which included corrections for 3-D effects. Among the quantities predicted by the code which are directly relevant to experiment include the neutral pressure within the plenum and along the duct leading into the plenum, the gettering rates, and the heat flux to the walls of the duct. These have been calculated for a variety of plasma parameters in the inlet, and the behavior with respect to variations of the duct widths has been studied. Because of the presence of the long duct separating the entrance chamber from the plenum, a high probability of ionization generally results, suggesting that a calculation allowing the plasma to adjust to the neutral sources might show a large amount of recycling.

  6. Recombinant human Fab fragments neutralize human type 1 immunodeficiency virus in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Barbas, C F; Björling, E; Chiodi, F; Dunlop, N; Cababa, D; Jones, T M; Zebedee, S L; Persson, M A; Nara, P L; Norrby, E

    1992-01-01

    A panel of 20 recombinant Fab fragments reactive with the surface glycoprotein gp120 of human type 1 immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) were examined for their ability to neutralize MN and IIIB strains of the virus. Neutralization was determined as the ability of the Fab fragments to inhibit infection as measured in both a p24 ELISA and a syncytium-formation assay. One group of closely sequence-related Fab fragments was found to neutralize virus in both assays with a 50% neutralization titer at approximately 1 micrograms/ml. Another Fab neutralized in the p24 ELISA but not in the syncytium assay. The other Fab fragments showed weak or no neutralizing ability. The results imply that virion aggregation or crosslinking of gp120 molecules on the virion surface is not an absolute requirement for HIV-1 neutralization. Further, all of the Fab fragments were shown to be competitive with soluble CD4 for binding to gp120 and yet few neutralized the virus effectively, implying that the mechanism of neutralization in this case may not involve receptor blocking. The observation of a preponderance of high-affinity Fab fragments with poor or no neutralizing ability could have implications for vaccine strategies. PMID:1384050

  7. Simulations of neutralized final focus

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, D.R.; Rose, D.V.; Genoni, T.C.; Yu, S.S.; Barnard, J.J.

    2005-01-18

    In order to drive an inertial fusion target or study high energy density physics with heavy ion beams, the beam radius must be focused to < 3 mm and the pulse length must be compressed to < 10 ns. The conventional scheme for temporal pulse compression makes use of an increasing ion velocity to compress the beam as it drifts and beam space charge to stagnate the compression before final focus. Beam compression in a neutralizing plasma does not require stagnation of the compression, enabling a more robust method. The final pulse shape at the target can be programmed by an applied velocity tilt. In this paper, neutralized drift compression is investigated. The sensitivity of the compression and focusing to beam momentum spread, plasma, and magnetic field conditions is studied with realistic driver examples. Using the 3D particle-in-cell code, we examine issues associated with self-field generation, stability, and vacuum-neutralized transport transition and focusing.

  8. A Re-Examiniation of Phonological Neutralization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dinnsen, D.

    1985-01-01

    Reviews research studies that raise serious questions about phonological neutralization, that is, the merger of a contrast in certain contexts. Some findings cast doubt on the very existence of neutralization and the correctness of the theoretical principles that make assumptions based on neutralization. Reanalyzes neutralization in light of these…

  9. A Re-Examiniation of Phonological Neutralization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dinnsen, D.

    1985-01-01

    Reviews research studies that raise serious questions about phonological neutralization, that is, the merger of a contrast in certain contexts. Some findings cast doubt on the very existence of neutralization and the correctness of the theoretical principles that make assumptions based on neutralization. Reanalyzes neutralization in light of these…

  10. Neutral Hydrogen in the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, F. H.

    2005-06-01

    Neutral atomic hydrogen is an endangered species at the present age of the Universe. When hydrogen is dispersed at low density in the intergalactic medium, the gas is vulnerable to photoionization, and once ionized, the time for recombination exceeds the Hubble time. If hydrogen clouds are confined to sufficient density that they are self-shielding to the ionizing background, they are vulnerable to instability, collapse and star formation, which over time, locks the hydrogen into long lived stars. When neutral clouds do exist after the Epoch of Reionization, they associate closely with galaxies; in these locations, they provide valuable kinematical tracers of the gravitational potentials that bind galaxies and groups.

  11. Electrokinetic concentration of charged molecules

    DOEpatents

    Singh, Anup K.; Neyer, David W.; Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Garguilo, Michael G.

    2002-01-01

    A method for separating and concentrating charged species from uncharged or neutral species regardless of size differential. The method uses reversible electric field induced retention of charged species, that can include molecules and molecular aggregates such as dimers, polymers, multimers, colloids, micelles, and liposomes, in volumes and on surfaces of porous materials. The retained charged species are subsequently quantitatively removed from the porous material by a pressure driven flow that passes through the retention volume and is independent of direction thus, a multi-directional flow field is not required. Uncharged species pass through the system unimpeded thus effecting a complete separation of charged and uncharged species and making possible concentration factors greater than 1000-fold.

  12. RE: Pedagogy--After Neutrality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    I'Anson, John

    2010-01-01

    Within the UK and in many parts of the world, official accounts of what it is to make sense of religion are framed within a rhetorics of neutrality in which such study is premised upon the possibility of dispassionate engagement and analysis. This paper, which is largely theoretical in scope, explores both the affordances and the costs of such an…

  13. Low energy neutral atom imaging

    SciTech Connect

    McComas, D.J.; Funsten, H.O.; Gosling, J.T.; Moore, K.R.; Thomsen, M.F.

    1992-01-01

    Energetic neutral atom (ENA) and low energy neutral atom (LENA) imaging of space plasmas are emerging new technology which promises to revolutionize the way we view and understand large scale space plasma phenomena and dynamics. ENAs and LENAs are produced in the magnetosphere by charge exchange between energetic and plasma ions and cold geocoronal neutrals. While imaging techniques have been previously developed for observing ENAs, with energies above several tens of keV, most of the ions found in the terrestrial magnetosphere have lower energies. We recently suggested that LENAs could be imaged by first converting the neutrals to ions and then electrostatically analyzing them to reject the UV background. In this paper we extend this work to examine in detail the sensor elements needed to make an LENA imager. These elements are (1) a biased collimator to remove the ambient plasma ions and electrons and set the azimuthal field-of-view; (2) a charge modifier to convert a portion of the incident LENAs to ions; (3) an electrostatic analyzer to reject UV light and set the energy passband; and (4) a coincidence detector to measure converted LENAs while rejecting noise and penetrating radiation. We also examine the issue of LENA imager sensitivity and describe ways of optimizing sensitivity in the various sensor components. Finally, we demonstrate in detail how these general considerations are implemented by describing one relatively straightforward design based on a hemispherical electrostatic analyzer.

  14. Photodetachment process for beam neutralization

    DOEpatents

    Fink, Joel H. [Livermore, CA; Frank, Alan M. [Livermore, CA

    1979-02-20

    A process for neutralization of accelerated ions employing photo-induced charge detachment. The process involves directing a laser beam across the path of a negative ion beam such as to effect photodetachment of electrons from the beam ions. The frequency of the laser beam employed is selected to provide the maximum cross-section for the photodetachment process.

  15. Photodetachment process for beam neutralization

    DOEpatents

    Fink, J.H.; Frank, A.M.

    1979-02-20

    A process for neutralization of accelerated ions employing photo-induced charge detachment is disclosed. The process involves directing a laser beam across the path of a negative ion beam such as to effect photodetachment of electrons from the beam ions. The frequency of the laser beam employed is selected to provide the maximum cross-section for the photodetachment process. 2 figs.

  16. MSFC Skylab neutral buoyancy simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The use of a neutral buoyancy simulator for developing extravehicular activity systems and for training astronauts in weightless activities is discussed. The construction of the facility and the operations are described. The types of tests and the training activities conducted in the simulator are reported. Photographs of the components of the simulator and actual training exercises are included.

  17. Dynamics of ultracold neutral plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Lee; Jeon, Byoungseon; Kress, Joel; Gronbech-Jensen, Niels

    2007-03-01

    For an ultracold neutral plasma produced by photoionzation of laser-cooled heavy particles, initial expansion behavior was studied with classical molecular dynamics. To investigate huge particle sets under open boundary condition, the TREE method has been implemented and Rydberg states of low quantum number were studied. We also examined the degree of ion correlation.

  18. Mechanisms of lactone hydrolysis in neutral and alkaline conditions.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Bombarelli, Rafael; Calle, Emilio; Casado, Julio

    2013-07-19

    The neutral and base-catalyzed hydrolysis of nine carboxylic acid esters was studied using a hybrid supermolecule-PCM approach including six explicit water molecules. The molecules studied included two linear esters, four β-lactones, two γ-lactones, and one δ-lactone: ethyl acetate and methyl formate, β-propiolactone, β-butyrolactone, β-isovalerolactone, diketene (4-methyleneoxetan-2-one), γ-butyrolactone, 2(5H)-furanone, and δ-valerolactone. DFT and ab initio methods were used to analyze the features of the various possible hydrolysis mechanisms. For all compounds, reasonable to very good qualitative and quantitative agreement with experimental work was found, and evidence is provided to support long-standing hypotheses regarding the role of solvent molecule as a base catalyst. In addition, novel evidence is presented for the existence of an elimination-addition mechanism in the basic hydrolysis of diketene. A parallel work addresses the acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of lactones.

  19. Hindered and modulated rotational states and spectra of adsorbed diatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Y. T.; Chuu, D. S.; Mei, W. N.

    1996-10-01

    Both vertical and horizontal adsorption configurations of a diatomic molecule were modeled as the rigid rotor with which the spatial motion was confined by a finite conical well. In addition to the polar hindering potential, a sinusoidal azimuthal modulation, which bears the local symmetry of the adsorption site, was incorporated. Eigenfunctions for different models were expressed analytically in terms of the hypergeometric functions, and eigenvalues were solved numerically. We found that the rotational energy levels exhibit oscillatory behavior when plotted as functions of the hindrance angle. This particular phenomenon was interpreted as the occurrence of resonance transmission of the rotor wave function at certain hindrance condition. We also found that the rotational levels were grouped into bands when the azimuthal modulation strength was increased. The solutions were used to calculate the rotational-state distribution of desorbed molecules, and agreement with the previous experiment was obtained.

  20. Hindered and modulated rotational states and spectra of adsorbed diatomic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, Y.T.; Chuu, D.S.; Mei, W.N.

    1996-10-01

    Both vertical and horizontal adsorption configurations of a diatomic molecule were modeled as the rigid rotor with which the spatial motion was confined by a finite conical well. In addition to the polar hindering potential, a sinusoidal azimuthal modulation, which bears the local symmetry of the adsorption site, was incorporated. Eigenfunctions for different models were expressed analytically in terms of the hypergeometric functions, and eigenvalues were solved numerically. We found that the rotational energy levels exhibit oscillatory behavior when plotted as functions of the hindrance angle. This particular phenomenon was interpreted as the occurrence of resonance transmission of the rotor wave function at certain hindrance condition. We also found that the rotational levels were grouped into bands when the azimuthal modulation strength was increased. The solutions were used to calculate the rotational-state distribution of desorbed molecules, and agreement with the previous experiment was obtained. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  1. Transitions of tethered chain molecules under tension.

    PubMed

    Luettmer-Strathmann, Jutta; Binder, Kurt

    2014-09-21

    An applied tension force changes the equilibrium conformations of a polymer chain tethered to a planar substrate and thus affects the adsorption transition as well as the coil-globule and crystallization transitions. Conversely, solvent quality and surface attraction are reflected in equilibrium force-extension curves that can be measured in experiments. To investigate these effects theoretically, we study tethered chains under tension with Wang-Landau simulations of a bond-fluctuation lattice model. Applying our model to pulling experiments on biological molecules we obtain a good description of experimental data in the intermediate force range, where universal features dominate and finite size effects are small. For tethered chains in poor solvent, we observe the predicted two-phase coexistence at transitions from the globule to stretched conformations and also discover direct transitions from crystalline to stretched conformations. A phase portrait for finite chains constructed by evaluating the density of states for a broad range of solvent conditions and tensions shows how increasing tension leads to a disappearance of the globular phase. For chains in good solvents tethered to hard and attractive surfaces we find the predicted scaling with the chain length in the low-force regime and show that our results are well described by an analytical, independent-bond approximation for the bond-fluctuation model for the highest tensions. Finally, for a hard or slightly attractive surface the stretching of a tethered chain is a conformational change that does not correspond to a phase transition. However, when the surface attraction is sufficient to adsorb a chain it will undergo a desorption transition at a critical value of the applied force. Our results for force-induced desorption show the transition to be discontinuous with partially desorbed conformations in the coexistence region.

  2. Return flux of neutral and charged particles in geosynchronous orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, P. D.; Fong, Michael C.; Neier, Karen L.

    1998-10-01

    This paper describes a model for the return flux of neutral and charged particles to a satellite in geosynchronous earth orbit. For neutral particles, the main return flux mechanisms is back-scattering via self-collisions among molecules outgassed or vented from the satellite; whereas for charged particles, the main mechanism is electrostatic re-attraction of ionized outgassed or vented molecules to a negatively charged satellite. Computer codes that simulate spacecraft charging typically contain a 3D charged particle trajectory-tracking procedure that, in principle, could be used for contamination studies. In practice, however, it is difficult to obtain quantitative results on the return flux distribution by this method. This makes such a code impractical to use as an engineering tool for identifying contamination problems reliably and evaluating corrective measures through simulation. To achieve a practical engineering tool, we prose an alternative to the particle tracking technique. We treat the problem for both neutral and charged particles in a unified manner by direct numerical solution to the Boltzmann equation in the BGK approximation. The feasibility of this approach is demonstrated by favorable numerical results presented for the simplified geometry of a spherical spacecraft.

  3. Modeling of localized impulsive injection of neutrals and plasma response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokar, M. Z.

    2017-05-01

    Neutral particles of hydrogen isotopes, released locally and impulsively into the plasma of fusion devices, can significantly affect local plasma properties. A model, allowing to describe self-consistently the spreading of neutrals from the source and their effect on the local and global plasma conditions is developed. It is based on the separation on each flux surface of two zones, the ‘cold’ cloud, comprising neutral molecules injected and atoms generated in collisions of molecules with electrons and ions, and the ‘hot’ environment affected by flows along the magnetic field of newly produced charged particles outward and heat conduction toward the cloud. Computations are done for the conditions of laser induced desorption spectroscopy applied in Ohmically heated plasmas in the TEXTOR tokamak and foreseen for the ITER fusion reactor. In both cases the local plasma state is strongly changed by the desorption pulse, and this effect is increasing with the growing isotope mass. As a result the total number of photons emitted is reduced noticeably, up to 4 times in the case of tritium injection in ITER, and the necessity to take into account the plasma response by interpreting measurements is demonstrated.

  4. Models of neutral cometary atmospheres for the interpretation of spectroscopic observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkachuk, A. Iu.

    1985-07-01

    Various models of neutral cometary atmospheres are compared. It is shown that Haser's formula can be applied to primary molecules. The collision sphere is taken into account in models of secondary molecules, and a model for the neighborhood of the nucleus is examined. Models analogous to those for secondary molecules with allowance for the collision sphere are used for tertiary molecules. Consideration is also given to the Monte Carlo model, and it is noted that this is the only model that can be used in the nonspherically symmetric case.

  5. Analysis of Solar Wind Samples Returned by Genesis Using Laser Post Ionization Secondary Neutral Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veryovkin, I. V.; Calaway, W. F.; Tripa, C. E.; Pellin, M. J.; Burnett, D. S.

    2005-12-01

    A new secondary neutral mass spectrometry (SNMS) instrument implementing laser post ionization (LPI) of ion sputtered and laser desorbed neutral species has been developed and constructed for the specific purpose of quantitative analysis of metallic elements at ultra trace levels in solar wind collector samples returned to Earth by the Genesis Discovery mission. The first LPI SNMS measurements are focusing on determining Al, Ca, Cr, and Mg in these samples. These measurements provide the first concentration and isotopic abundances determinations for several key metallic elements and also elucidate possible fractionation effects between the photosphere and the solar wind compositions. It is now documented that Genesis samples suffered surface contamination both during flight and during the breach of the Sample Return Capsule when it crashed. Since accurate quantitative analysis is compromised by sample contamination, several features have been built into the new LPI SNMS instrument to mitigate this difficulty. A normally-incident, low-energy (<500 eV) ion beam combined with a keV energy ion beam and a desorbing laser beam (both microfocused) enables dual beam analyses. The low-energy ion beam can be used to remove surface contaminant by sputtering with minimum ion beam mixing. This low-energy beam also will be used to perform ion beam milling, while either the microfocused ion or laser beam probes the solar wind elemental compositions as a function of sample depth. Because of the high depth resolution of dual beam analyses, such depth profiles clearly distinguish between surface contaminants and solar wind implanted atoms. In addition, in-situ optical and electron beam imaging for observing and avoiding particulates and scratches on solar wind sample surfaces is incorporated in the new LPI SNMS instrument to further reduce quantification problems. The current status of instrument tests and analyses will be presented. This work is supported by the U. S. Department of

  6. Comparison of a disposable sorptive sampler with thermal desorption in a gas chromatographic inlet, or in a dedicated thermal desorber, to conventional stir bar sorptive extraction-thermal desorption for the determination of micropollutants in water.

    PubMed

    Wooding, Madelien; Rohwer, Egmont R; Naudé, Yvette

    2017-09-01

    The presence of micropollutants in the aquatic environment is a worldwide environmental concern. The diversity of micropollutants and the low concentration levels at which they may occur in the aquatic environment have greatly complicated the analysis and detection of these chemicals. Two sorptive extraction samplers and two thermal desorption methods for the detection of micropollutants in water were compared. A low-cost, disposable, in-house made sorptive extraction sampler was compared to SBSE using a commercial Twister sorptive sampler. Both samplers consisted of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) as a sorptive medium to concentrate micropollutants. Direct thermal desorption of the disposable samplers in the inlet of a GC was compared to conventional thermal desorption using a commercial thermal desorber system (TDS). Comprehensive gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC × GC-TOFMS) was used for compound separation and identification. Ten micropollutants, representing a range of heterogeneous compounds, were selected to evaluate the performance of the methods. The in-house constructed sampler, with its associated benefits of low-cost and disposability, gave results comparable to commercial SBSE. Direct thermal desorption of the disposable sampler in the inlet of a GC eliminated the need for expensive consumable cryogenics and total analysis time was greatly reduced as a lengthy desorption temperature programme was not required. Limits of detection for the methods ranged from 0.0010 ng L(-1) to 0.19 ng L(-1). For most compounds, the mean (n = 3) recoveries ranged from 85% to 129% and the % relative standard deviation (% RSD) ranged from 1% to 58% with the majority of the analytes having a %RSD of less than 30%. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Optical neutrality: invisibility without cloaking.

    PubMed

    Hodges, Reed; Dean, Cleon; Durach, Maxim

    2017-02-15

    We show that it is possible to design an invisible wavelength-sized metal-dielectric metamaterial object without evoking cloaking. Our approach is an extension of the neutral inclusion concept by Zhou and Hu [Phys. Rev. E74, 026607 (2006)PLEEE81063-651X10.1103/PhysRevE.74.026607] to Mie scatterers. We demonstrate that an increase of metal fraction in the metamaterial leads to a transition from dielectric-like to metal-like scattering, which proceeds through invisibility or optical neutrality of the scatterer. Formally this is due to cancellation of multiple scattering orders, similarly to plasmonic cloaking introduced by Alù and Engheta [Phys. Rev. E72, 016623 (2005)PLEEE81063-651X10.1103/PhysRevE.72.016623], but without introduction of the separation of the scatterer into cloak and hidden regions.

  8. Neutral matter in planetary nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinerstein, Harriet L.

    1991-01-01

    A review of current studies of neutral envelopes is presented with particular attention given to the use of the envelopes as test cases for understanding the ionization and thermal structure of photodissociation regions. The study of near-IR H2 emission is discussed with detailed spectra given for a few planetary nebulae, and airborne observations of far-IR atomic lines are discussed. These two methods can discern photodissociation regions with warm gas and UV flux is fairly prominent. The use of resonance-absorption-line spectroscopy is also reviewed with respect to the analysis of the Na D lines, and thereby allows the measurement of integrated columns of material through the shell. The methods provide evidence for the notion that planetary nebulae consist of more than just ionized material; large amounts of neutral and molecular material are being confirmed, which has important implications for the mass-loss episode of the nebulae.

  9. Optimization of Neutral Atom Imagers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shappirio, M.; Coplan, M.; Balsamo, E.; Chornay, D.; Collier, M.; Hughes, P.; Keller, J.; Ogilvie, K.; Williams, E.

    2008-01-01

    The interactions between plasma structures and neutral atom populations in interplanetary space can be effectively studied with energetic neutral atom imagers. For neutral atoms with energies less than 1 keV, the most efficient detection method that preserves direction and energy information is conversion to negative ions on surfaces. We have examined a variety of surface materials and conversion geometries in order to identify the factors that determine conversion efficiency. For chemically and physically stable surfaces smoothness is of primary importance while properties such as work function have no obvious correlation to conversion efficiency. For the noble metals, tungsten, silicon, and graphite with comparable smoothness, conversion efficiency varies by a factor of two to three. We have also examined the way in which surface conversion efficiency varies with the angle of incidence of the neutral atom and have found that the highest efficiencies are obtained at angles of incidence greater then 80deg. The conversion efficiency of silicon, tungsten and graphite were examined most closely and the energy dependent variation of conversion efficiency measured over a range of incident angles. We have also developed methods for micromachining silicon in order to reduce the volume to surface area over that of a single flat surface and have been able to reduce volume to surface area ratios by up to a factor of 60. With smooth micro-machined surfaces of the optimum geometry, conversion efficiencies can be increased by an order of magnitude over instruments like LENA on the IMAGE spacecraft without increase the instruments mass or volume.

  10. Vendor neutral archive in PACS

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Tapesh Kumar; Sanjeev

    2012-01-01

    An archive is a location containing a collection of records, documents, or other materials of historical importance. An integral part of Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS) is archiving. When a hospital needs to migrate a PACS vendor, the complete earlier data need to be migrated in the format of the newly procured PACS. It is both time and money consuming. To address this issue, the new concept of vendor neutral archive (VNA) has emerged. A VNA simply decouples the PACS and workstations at the archival layer. This is achieved by developing an application engine that receives, integrates, and transmits the data using the different syntax of a Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine (DICOM) format. Transferring the data belonging to the old PACS to a new one is performed by a process called migration of data. In VNA, a number of different data migration techniques are available to facilitate transfer from the old PACS to the new one, the choice depending on the speed of migration and the importance of data. The techniques include simple DICOM migration, prefetch-based DICOM migration, medium migration, and the expensive non-DICOM migration. “Vendor neutral” may not be a suitable term, and “architecture neutral,” “PACS neutral,” “content neutral,” or “third-party neutral” are probably better and preferred terms. Notwithstanding this, the VNA acronym has come to stay in both the medical IT user terminology and in vendor nomenclature, and radiologists need to be aware of its impact in PACS across the globe. PMID:23833411

  11. Plasma sources for spacecraft neutralization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, V. A.; Katz, I.; Mandell, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    The principles of the operation of plasma sources for the neutralization of the surface of a spacecraft traveling in the presence of hot plasma are discussed with special attention given to the hollow-cathode-based plasma contactors. Techiques are developed that allow the calculation of the potentials and particle densities in the near environment of a hollow cathode plasma contactor in both the test tank and the LEO environment. The techniques and codes were validated by comparison of calculated and measured results.

  12. Optimization of Neutral Atom Imagers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shappirio, M.; Coplan, M.; Balsamo, E.; Chornay, D.; Collier, M.; Hughes, P.; Keller, J.; Ogilvie, K.; Williams, E.

    2008-01-01

    The interactions between plasma structures and neutral atom populations in interplanetary space can be effectively studied with energetic neutral atom imagers. For neutral atoms with energies less than 1 keV, the most efficient detection method that preserves direction and energy information is conversion to negative ions on surfaces. We have examined a variety of surface materials and conversion geometries in order to identify the factors that determine conversion efficiency. For chemically and physically stable surfaces smoothness is of primary importance while properties such as work function have no obvious correlation to conversion efficiency. For the noble metals, tungsten, silicon, and graphite with comparable smoothness, conversion efficiency varies by a factor of two to three. We have also examined the way in which surface conversion efficiency varies with the angle of incidence of the neutral atom and have found that the highest efficiencies are obtained at angles of incidence greater then 80deg. The conversion efficiency of silicon, tungsten and graphite were examined most closely and the energy dependent variation of conversion efficiency measured over a range of incident angles. We have also developed methods for micromachining silicon in order to reduce the volume to surface area over that of a single flat surface and have been able to reduce volume to surface area ratios by up to a factor of 60. With smooth micro-machined surfaces of the optimum geometry, conversion efficiencies can be increased by an order of magnitude over instruments like LENA on the IMAGE spacecraft without increase the instruments mass or volume.

  13. Neutral depletion versus repletion due to ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Fruchtman, A.; Makrinich, G.; Raimbault, J.-L.; Liard, L.; Rax, J.-M.; Chabert, P.

    2008-05-15

    Recent theoretical analyses which predicted unexpected effects of neutral depletion in both collisional and collisionless plasmas are reviewed. We focus on the depletion of collisionless neutrals induced by strong ionization of a collisionless plasma and contrast this depletion with the effect of strong ionization on thermalized neutrals. The collisionless plasma is analyzed employing a kinetic description. The collisionless neutrals and the plasma are coupled through volume ionization and wall recombination only. The profiles of density and pressure both of the plasma and of the neutral-gas and the profile of the ionization rate are calculated. It is shown that for collisionless neutrals the ionization results in neutral depletion, while when neutrals are thermalized the ionization induces a maximal neutral-density at the discharge center, which we call neutral repletion. The difference between the two cases stems from the relation between the neutral density and pressure. The pressure of the collisionless neutral-gas turns out to be maximal where its density is minimal, in contrast to the case of a thermalized neutral gas.

  14. RNA folding, neutral networks, and the evolution of ribozymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultes, Erik

    2003-03-01

    Natural ribozymes are often represented by molecules having very different nucleotide sequences. This observation implies the existence of paths through sequence space that have permitted the evolutionary drift from an ancestral sequence to each isolate without loss of function. The set of all possible paths neutral for a defined fold and activity compose a ``neutral network." We have demonstrated the close proximity of neutral networks for the HDV self-cleaving ribozyme and the class III self-ligating ribozyme. First, we engineered a single RNA sequence that can assume either of the ribozyme folds and catalyze the two respective reactions (approximately 100 fold faster than the analogous uncatalyzed reactions). Minor variants of this sequence can be highly active for one or the other reaction, with only four nucleotide substitutions separating fully active self-cleaving and ligase ribozymes. We have also shown that these sequences can be accessed from each prototype ribozyme sequence via a series of neutral point mutations involving only one or two changes per step. These data demonstrate that new RNA folds could arise in the course of evolution from pre-existing folds without a need to carry inactive intermediate sequences. This raises the possibility that biological RNAs having no similarity in sequence, structure or function might nonetheless share a common ancestry.

  15. Microbiology neutralization of zearalenone using Lactococcus lactis and Bifidobacterium sp.

    PubMed

    Król, A; Pomastowski, P; Rafińska, K; Railean-Plugaru, V; Walczak, J; Buszewski, B

    2017-08-29

    The aim of the study was to neutralize zearalenone by lactic acid bacteria (LAB) such as Lactococcus lactis and Bifidobacterium sp. and investigate the mechanism of zearalenone (ZEA) binding. Neutralization of ZEA by LAB was confirmed by identification of binding kinetics and spectroscopic studies such as Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). The obtained results showed that the kinetic process of zearalenone binding to L. lactis is not homogeneous but is expressed with an initial rapid stage with about 90% of ZEA biosorption and with a much slower second step. In case of Bifidobacterium sp., the neutralization process is homogeneous; the main stage can be described with about 88% of ZEA biosorption. MALDI-TOF-MS measurements and FTIR analysis confirmed the uptake of zearalenone molecules by bacterial species. Moreover, the assessment of dead and live lactic acid bacteria cells after zearalenone treatment was performed using fluorescence microscopy. Graphical abstract Microbiology neutralization of zearalenone using Lactococcus lactis and Bifidobacterium sp. was confirmed by identification of binding kinetics and spectroscopic studies such as FT-IR spectroscopy and MALDI-TOF-MS spectrometry. The mechanism of ZEA binding was also investigated.

  16. Neutral naturalness with bifundamental gluinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gherghetta, Tony; Nguyen, Minh; Thomas, Zachary

    2016-12-01

    We study constraints on one-loop neutral naturalness at the LHC by considering gluon partners which are required to ameliorate the tuning in the Higgs mass-squared arising at two loops. This is done with a simple orbifold model of folded supersymmetry which not only contains color-neutral stops but also bifundamental gluinos that are charged under the Standard Model color group S U (3 )C and a separate S U (3 )C' group. The bifundamental gluinos reduce the Higgs mass tuning at two loops and maintain naturalness provided the gluinos are lighter than approximately 1.9 TeV for a 5 TeV cutoff scale. Limits from the LHC already forbid bifundamental gluinos below 1.4 TeV, and other noncolored states such as electroweakinos, Z' bosons and dark sector bound states may be probed at future colliders. The search for bifundamental gluinos therefore provides a direct probe of one-loop neutral naturalness that can be fully explored at the LHC.

  17. Identification of intrinsic catalytic activity for electrochemical reduction of water molecules to generate hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Shinagawa, Tatsuya; Takanabe, Kazuhiro

    2015-06-21

    Insufficient hydronium ion activities at near-neutral pH and under unbuffered conditions induce diffusion-limited currents for hydrogen evolution, followed by a reaction with water molecules to generate hydrogen at elevated potentials. The observed constant current behaviors at near neutral pH reflect the intrinsic electrocatalytic reactivity of the metal electrodes for water reduction.

  18. Neutral-current x-distributions

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Friedman, J. I.; Kendall, H. W.; Bogert, D.; Burnstein, R.; Fisk, R.; Fuess, S.; Bofill, J.; Busza, W.; Eldridge, T.; Abolins, M.; Brock, R.; et al.

    1984-06-01

    The role of the semi leptonic neutral current interaction as a probe of nucleon structure is examined. Previous measurements of neutral current x-distributions are reviewed, and new results from the Fermilab - MIT - MSU collaboration are presented.

  19. Ionospheric chemistry. [minor neutrals and ionized constituents of thermosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torr, D. G.

    1979-01-01

    This report deals primarily with progress in the chemistry of minor neutrals and ionized constituents of the thermosphere. Significant progress was made over the last few years in quantitative studies of many chemical processes. This success was primarily due to the advent of multiparameter multisatellite programs which permitted accurate simultaneous measurements to be made of many important parameters. In many cases studies of chemical reactions were made with laboratory-like precision. Rate coefficients have been derived as functions of temperature for a number of important reactions. New information has been acquired on nearly every major process which occurs in the thermosphere, including the recombination rates of all major molecular ions, charge transfer reactions, ion atom interchange reactions, and reactions of neutral and ionized metastable atoms and molecules.

  20. Twist Neutrality and the Diameter of the Nucleosome Core Particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohr, Jakob; Olsen, Kasper

    2012-03-01

    The diameter of the nucleosome core particle is the same for all the eukaryotes. Here we discuss the possibility that this selectiveness is consistent with a propensity for twist neutrality, in particular, for the double helical DNA to stay rotationally neutral when strained. Reorganization of DNA cannot be done without some level of temporal tensile stress, and as a consequence chiral molecules, such as helices, will twist under strain. The requirement that the nucleosome, constituting the nucleosome core particle and linker DNA, has a vanishing strain-twist coupling leads to a requirement for the amount of bending. For the diameter of the coiled DNA we obtain the relatively accurate numerical estimate of 2R=82Å.

  1. Formation of Ultracold Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Cote, Robin

    2016-01-28

    Advances in our ability to slow down and cool atoms and molecules to ultracold temperatures have paved the way to a revolution in basic research on molecules. Ultracold molecules are sensitive of very weak interactions, even when separated by large distances, which allow studies of the effect of those interactions on the behavior of molecules. In this program, we have explored ways to form ultracold molecules starting from pairs of atoms that have already reached the ultracold regime. We devised methods that enhance the efficiency of ultracold molecule production, for example by tuning external magnetic fields and using appropriate laser excitations. We also investigates the properties of those ultracold molecules, especially their de-excitation into stable molecules. We studied the possibility of creating new classes of ultra-long range molecules, named macrodimers, thousand times more extended than regular molecules. Again, such objects are possible because ultra low temperatures prevent their breakup by collision. Finally, we carried out calculations on how chemical reactions are affected and modified at ultracold temperatures. Normally, reactions become less effective as the temperature decreases, but at ultracold temperatures, they can become very effective. We studied this counter-intuitive behavior for benchmark chemical reactions involving molecular hydrogen.

  2. Protein structure and neutral theory of evolution.

    PubMed

    Ptitsyn, O B; Volkenstein, M V

    1986-08-01

    The neutral theory of evolution is extended to the origin of protein molecules. Arguments are presented which suggest that the amino acid sequences of many globular proteins mainly represent "memorized" random sequences while biological evolution reduces to the "editing" these random sequences. Physical requirements for a functional globular protein are formulated and it is shown that many of these requirement do not involve strategical selection of amino acid sequences during biological evolution but are inherent also for typical random sequences. In particular, it is shown that random sequences of polar and amino acid residues can form alpha-helices and beta-strand with lengths and arrangement along the chain similar to those in real globular proteins. These alpha- and beta-regions in random sequences can form three-dimensional folding patterns also similar to those in proteins. The arguments are presented suggesting that even the tight packing of side groups inside protein core do not require very strong biological selection of amino acid sequences either. Thus many structural features of real proteins can exist also in random sequences and the biological selection is needed mainly for the creation of active site of protein and for their stability under physiological conditions.

  3. Neutral beamline with improved ion energy recovery

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Jinchoon

    1984-01-01

    A neutral beamline employing direct energy recovery of unneutralized residual ions is provided which enhances the energy recovery of the full energy ion component of the beam exiting the neutralizer cell, and thus improves the overall neutral beamline efficiency. The unneutralized full energy ions exiting the neutralizer are deflected from the beam path and the electrons in the cell are blocked by a magnetic field applied transverse to the beam direction in the neutral izer exit region. The ions which are generated at essentially ground potential and accelerated through the neutralizer cell by a negative acceleration voltage are collected at ground potential. A neutralizer cell exit end region is provided which allows the magnetic and electric fields acting on the exiting ions to be loosely coupled. As a result, the fractional energy ions exiting the cell are reflected onto and collected at an interior wall of the neutralizer formed by the modified end geometry, and thus do not detract from the energy recovery efficiency of full energy ions exiting the cell. Electrons within the neutralizer are prevented from exiting the neutralizer end opening by the action of crossed fields drift (ExB) and are terminated to a collector collar around the downstream opening of the neutralizer. The correct combination of the extended neutralizer end structure and the magnet region is designed so as to maximize the exit of full energy ions and to contain the fractional energy ions.

  4. The Net Neutrality Debate: The Basics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenfield, Rich

    2006-01-01

    Rich Greenfield examines the basics of today's net neutrality debate that is likely to be an ongoing issue for society. Greenfield states the problems inherent in the definition of "net neutrality" used by Common Cause: "Network neutrality is the principle that Internet users should be able to access any web content they choose and…

  5. Priming Effects for Affective vs. Neutral Faces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Leslie A.; Rabin, Laura; Wyatt, Gwinne; Frohlich, Jonathan; Vardy, Susan B.; Dimitri, Diana

    2005-01-01

    Affective and Neutral Tasks (faces with negative or neutral content, with different lighting and orientation) requiring reaction time judgments of poser identity were administered to 32 participants. Speed and accuracy were better for the Affective than Neutral Task, consistent with literature suggesting facilitation of performance by affective…

  6. On abstract degenerate neutral differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, Eduardo; O'Regan, Donal

    2016-10-01

    We introduce a new abstract model of functional differential equations, which we call abstract degenerate neutral differential equations, and we study the existence of strict solutions. The class of problems and the technical approach introduced in this paper allow us to generalize and extend recent results on abstract neutral differential equations. Some examples on nonlinear partial neutral differential equations are presented.

  7. Ion-beam Plasma Neutralization Interaction Images

    SciTech Connect

    Igor D. Kaganovich; Edward Startsev; S. Klasky; Ronald C. Davidson

    2002-04-09

    Neutralization of the ion beam charge and current is an important scientific issue for many practical applications. The process of ion beam charge and current neutralization is complex because the excitation of nonlinear plasma waves may occur. Computer simulation images of plasma neutralization of the ion beam pulse are presented.

  8. The Net Neutrality Debate: The Basics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenfield, Rich

    2006-01-01

    Rich Greenfield examines the basics of today's net neutrality debate that is likely to be an ongoing issue for society. Greenfield states the problems inherent in the definition of "net neutrality" used by Common Cause: "Network neutrality is the principle that Internet users should be able to access any web content they choose and…

  9. Priming Effects for Affective vs. Neutral Faces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Leslie A.; Rabin, Laura; Wyatt, Gwinne; Frohlich, Jonathan; Vardy, Susan B.; Dimitri, Diana

    2005-01-01

    Affective and Neutral Tasks (faces with negative or neutral content, with different lighting and orientation) requiring reaction time judgments of poser identity were administered to 32 participants. Speed and accuracy were better for the Affective than Neutral Task, consistent with literature suggesting facilitation of performance by affective…

  10. Infrared Luminescence of Chemi- and Photon-Activated Molecules.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    Trainor, J. Chain. ’IC. our*=,. A. Barba, and P. Jouve. J. Mot . Ujmtoso. 6, Plays. 61, 2442 (1675). 80(961). 3C. W. van Rosenberg, Jr,, and 1). W, Trainor... homopolar neutral diatomic molecules which are heteronuclear by virtue of isotopic substitution arise from breakdowns of the Born-Oppenheimer separation of

  11. Ion-Molecule Reactions in Gas Phase Radiation Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Clive

    1981-01-01

    Discusses some aspects of the radiation chemistry of gases, focusing on the ion-molecule and charge neutralization reactions which set study of the gas phase apart. Uses three examples that illustrate radiolysis, describing the radiolysis of (1) oxygen, (2) carbon dioxide, and (3) acetylene. (CS)

  12. Ion-Molecule Reactions in Gas Phase Radiation Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Clive

    1981-01-01

    Discusses some aspects of the radiation chemistry of gases, focusing on the ion-molecule and charge neutralization reactions which set study of the gas phase apart. Uses three examples that illustrate radiolysis, describing the radiolysis of (1) oxygen, (2) carbon dioxide, and (3) acetylene. (CS)

  13. Solvent effect on the spectral properties of Neutral Red

    PubMed Central

    Rauf, Muhammad A; Soliman, Ahmed A; Khattab, Muhammad

    2008-01-01

    Background The study was aimed at investigating the effect of various solvents on the absorption spectra of Neutral Red, a dye belonging to the quinone-imine class of dyes. The solvents chosen for the study were water, ethanol, acetonitrile, acetone, propan-1-ol, chloroform, nitrobenzene, ethyleneglycol, acetic acid, DMSO and DMF. Results The results have shown that the absorption maxima of dyes are dependent on solvent polarity. In non-hydrogen-bond donating solvents, solvation of dye molecules probably occurs via dipole-dipole interactions, whereas in hydrogen-bond donating solvents the phenomenon is more hydrogen bonding in nature. To estimate the contribution of the different variables on the wave number of the Neutral Red dye, regression analyses using the ECW model were compared with the π* scale model. This showed that the unified scale for estimating the solvent effect on the absorption of the Neutral Red dye is more adopted and more applicable than the π* scale model. Conclusion Absorption maxima of dyes are dependent on solvent polarity. Solvation of dye molecules probably occurs via dipole-dipole interactions in non-hydrogen-bond donating solvents, whereas in hydrogen-bond donating solvents the phenomenon is more hydrogen bonding in nature. The unified scale for estimating the solvent effect on the absorption of Neutral Red dye is more adopted and more applicable than the π* scale model. This may be due to complications from both π-π* charge transfer interactions and incomplete complexation of the solute; these effects are averaged out in the derived β and π parameters and thus limit their applicability. PMID:18799016

  14. Heavy exotic molecules with charm and bottom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yizhuang; Zahed, Ismail

    2016-11-01

    We revisit the formation of pion-mediated heavy-light exotic molecules with both charm and bottom and their chiral partners under the general strictures of both heavy-quark and chiral symmetry. The chiral exotic partners with good parity formed using the (0+ ,1+) multiplet are about twice more bound than their primary exotic partners formed using the (0- ,1-) multiplet. The chiral couplings across the multiplets (0± ,1±) cause the chiral exotic partners to unbind, and the primary exotic molecules to be about twice more bound, for J ≤ 1. Our multi-channel coupling results show that only the charm isosinglet exotic molecules with JPC =1++ bind, which we identify as the reported neutral X (3872). Also, the bottom isotriplet exotic with JPC =1+- binds, which we identify as a mixture of the reported charged exotics Zb+ (10610) and Zb+ (10650). The bound isosinglet with JPC =1++ is suggested as a possible neutral Xb (10532) not yet reported.

  15. The status of molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, T. :

    1994-10-01

    This report summarizes the experimental and theoretical status of hadronic molecules, which are weakly-bound states of two or more hadrons. We begin with a brief history of the subject and discuss a few good candidates, and then abstract some signatures for molecules which may be of interest in the classification of possible molecule states. Next we argue that a more general understanding of 2 {yields} 2 hadron-hadron scattering amplitudes will be crucial for molecule searches, and discuss some of our recent work in this area. We conclude with a discussion of a few more recent molecule candidates (notably the f{sub o}(1710)) which are not well established as molecules but satisfy some of the expected signatures.

  16. [Endothelial cell adhesion molecules].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A N; Norkin, I A; Puchin'ian, D M; Shirokov, V Iu; Zhdanova, O Iu

    2014-01-01

    The review presents current data concerning the functional role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules belonging to different structural families: integrins, selectins, cadherins, and the immunoglobulin super-family. In this manuscript the regulatory mechanisms and factors of adhesion molecules expression and distribution on the surface of endothelial cells are discussed. The data presented reveal the importance of adhesion molecules in the regulation of structural and functional state of endothelial cells in normal conditions and in pathology. Particular attention is paid to the importance of these molecules in the processes of physiological and pathological angiogenesis, regulation of permeability of the endothelial barrier and cell transmigration.

  17. Neutral gas dynamics in fireballs

    SciTech Connect

    Stenzel, R. L.; Ionita, C.; Schrittwieser, R.

    2011-06-01

    Fireballs are local discharge phenomena on positively biased electrodes in partially ionized plasmas. Electrons, energized at a double layer, heat neutral gas which expands. The gas pressure exceeds the plasma pressure, hence becomes important to the stability and transport in fireballs. The flow of gas moves the electrode and sensors similar to a mica pendulum. Flow speed and directions are measured. A fireball gun has been developed to partially collimate the flow of hot gas and heat objects in its path. New applications of fireballs are suggested.

  18. Space station neutral external environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehlers, H.; Leger, L.

    1988-01-01

    Molecular contamination levels arising from the external induced neutral environment of the Space Station (Phase 1 configuration) were calculated using the MOLFLUX model. Predicted molecular column densities and deposition rates generally meet the Space Station contamination requirements. In the doubtful cases of deposition due to materials outgassing, proper material selection, generally excluding organic products exposed to the external environment, must be considered to meet contamination requirements. It is important that the Space Station configuration, once defined, is not significantly modified to avoid introducing new unacceptable contamination sources.

  19. Multicusp Trap as Model of Plasma Neutralizer for ITER Neutral Beam Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Belyaev, V.A.; Dubrovin, M.M.; Kosarev, P.M.; Skovoroda, A.A.; Spitsyn, A.V.; Terent'ev, A.A.; Yanchenkov, S.V.; Zhil'tsov, V.A.; Zubarev, V.F.

    2005-01-15

    Increasing the negative ions beam neutralization efficiency in NBI system is rather attractive. It is known, that neutralization efficiency of negative ion beam on plasma is higher than on gas. The model of plasma neutralizer for ITER NBI system - PNX-U facility is described here. Obtained experimental results give that chosen conception is promising and plasma neutralizer allows essential improvement of NBI system.

  20. Kinetic Simulations of Ion Beam Neutralization

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Joseph

    2010-05-21

    Ion beam emission/neutralization is one of the most fundamental problems in spacecraft plasma interactions and electric propulsion. Although ion beam neutralization is readily achieved in experiments, the understanding of the underlying physical process remains at a rather primitive level. No theoretical or simulation models have convincingly explained the detailed neutralization mechanism, and no conclusions have been reached. This paper presents a fully kinetic simulation of ion beam neutralization and plasma beam propagation and discusses the physics of electron-ion coupling and the resulting propagation of a neutralized mesothermal plasma.

  1. Positron-molecule bound states and positive ion production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leventhal, M.; Passner, A.; Surko, C. M.

    1990-01-01

    The interaction was studied of low energy positrons with large molecules such as alkanes. These data provide evidencce for the existence of long lived resonances and bound states of positrons with neutral molecules. The formation process and the nature of these resonances are discussed. The positive ions produced when a positron annihilates with an electron in one of these resonances were observed and this positive ion formation process is discussed. A review is presented of the current state of the understanding of these positron-molecule resonances and the resulting positive ion formation. A number of outstanding issues in this area is also discussed.

  2. FAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF NEUTRAL CORONENE, OVALENE, AND DICORONYLENE

    SciTech Connect

    Mattioda, A. L.; Ricca, A.; Bauschlicher, C. W.; Allamandola, L. J.; Tucker, J. E-mail: Alessandra.Ricca-1@nasa.gov E-mail: Louis.J.Allamandola@nasa.gov

    2009-04-15

    Here we report the first far-IR (FIR) matrix-isolated spectra of the neutral polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules coronene, ovalene, and dicoronylene. The experimental spectra covered the 650-100 cm{sup -1} (15.385-100 {mu}m) range and the theoretical spectra covered the 650-10 cm{sup -1} (15.385-1000 {mu}m) range. The experimentally measured values are in excellent agreement with theoretical values. The fundamental differences between the skeletal or drumhead modes of the FIR and the group vibrational modes of the mid-IR are discussed and detailed descriptions of the FIR vibrational modes are given.

  3. Quantification of low-polar small molecules using room temperature ionic liquids matrix-assisted desorption corona beam ionization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Wu, Yongning; Guo, Bin; Sun, Wenjian; Ding, Li; Chen, Bo

    2012-09-07

    A room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) matrix-assisted desorption corona beam ionization (DCBI) technique was proposed. The quantification of the DCBI method for low-polar small molecules was improved greatly in terms of accuracy and precision. The thermal desorption processes of analytes in different liquid matrices under DCBI interrogation was investigated with thermal imaging and mass spectrometry simultaneously. When in a volatile liquid matrix, the analyte was not only desorbed thermally from the solid residue phase, but also desorbed along with evaporation of the matrix. The varying matrix evaporation speed and unstable sample introduction path clearly influence the quantitative result. With non-volatile RTILs utilized as the matrix in the sample introduction, a micro slow release system (MSRS) is formed to relieve the fluctuation of analyte evaporation. With the RTILs matrix-assisted DCBI-MS technique, dramatic improvement of the quantification precision (RSD from about 20% to less than 3%) for model analytes was achieved. Seventeen small pharmaceutical and four pesticide molecules were detected successfully. With a shared mechanism, other thermal desorption and/or APCI-related ambient ionization techniques may also benefit from the RTILs matrix.

  4. Indirect observation of unobservable interstellar molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbst, E.; Green, S.; Thaddeus, P.; Klemperer, W.

    1977-01-01

    It is suggested that the abundances of neutral non-polar interstellar molecules unobservable by radio astronomy can be systematically determined by radio observation of the protonated ions. As an example, observed N2H(+) column densities are analyzed to infer molecular nitrogen abundances in dense interstellar clouds. The chemistries and expected densities of the protonated ions of O2, C2, CO2, C2H2 and CH4 are then discussed. Microwave transition frequencies fo HCO2(+) and C2H3(+) are estimated, and a preliminary astronomical search for HCO2(+) is described.

  5. Detailed Atomic Structure of Neutral and Near-Neutral Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Oliver, Paul; Hibbert, Alan

    2011-05-11

    This paper highlights the issues which need to be addressed in undertaking accurate calculations of multi-electron atoms and ions, particularly at or near the neutral end of an isoelectronic sequence. We illustrate the processes through two calculations--of transitions in Cl I and Sn II--and discuss the convergence of our results as well as updating previous work. In particular, in the case of Cl I, we propose new identifications of the levels involved in certain transitions which are important in determining the abundance of chlorine in the inter-stellar medium (ISM), while in singly ionised tin, our calculations suggest a re-evaluation of the the abundance of tin in the ISM. We also confirm recent identification of Sn II lines seen in tokamak plasmas.

  6. Enzymatic DNA molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, Gerald F. (Inventor); Breaker, Ronald R. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention discloses deoxyribonucleic acid enzymes--catalytic or enzymatic DNA molecules--capable of cleaving nucleic acid sequences or molecules, particularly RNA, in a site-specific manner, as well as compositions including same. Methods of making and using the disclosed enzymes and compositions are also disclosed.

  7. Molecules between the Stars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verschuur, Gerrit L.

    1987-01-01

    Provides a listing of molecules discovered to date in the vast interstellar clouds of dust and gas. Emphasizes the recent discoveries of organic molecules. Discusses molecular spectral lines, MASERs (microwave amplification by stimulated emission of radiation), molecular clouds, and star birth. (TW)

  8. Molecules between the Stars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verschuur, Gerrit L.

    1987-01-01

    Provides a listing of molecules discovered to date in the vast interstellar clouds of dust and gas. Emphasizes the recent discoveries of organic molecules. Discusses molecular spectral lines, MASERs (microwave amplification by stimulated emission of radiation), molecular clouds, and star birth. (TW)

  9. Porous organic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holst, James R.; Trewin, Abbie; Cooper, Andrew I.

    2010-11-01

    Most synthetic materials that show molecular-scale porosity consist of one-, two- or three-dimensional networks. Porous metal-organic frameworks in particular have attracted a lot of recent attention. By contrast, discrete molecules tend to pack efficiently in the solid state, leaving as little empty space as possible, which leads to non-porous materials. This Perspective discusses recent developments with discrete organic molecules that are porous in the solid state. Such molecules, which may be either crystalline or amorphous, can be categorized as either intrinsically porous (containing permanent covalent cavities) or extrinsically porous (inefficiently packed). We focus on the possible advantages of organic molecules over inorganic or hybrid systems in terms of molecular solubility, choice of components and functionalities, and structural mobility and responsiveness in non-covalent extended solids. We also highlight the potential for 'undiscovered' porous systems among the large number of cage-like organic molecules that are already known.

  10. Single molecule electronic devices.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyunwook; Reed, Mark A; Lee, Takhee

    2011-04-12

    Single molecule electronic devices in which individual molecules are utilized as active electronic components constitute a promising approach for the ultimate miniaturization and integration of electronic devices in nanotechnology through the bottom-up strategy. Thus, the ability to understand, control, and exploit charge transport at the level of single molecules has become a long-standing desire of scientists and engineers from different disciplines for various potential device applications. Indeed, a study on charge transport through single molecules attached to metallic electrodes is a very challenging task, but rapid advances have been made in recent years. This review article focuses on experimental aspects of electronic devices made with single molecules, with a primary focus on the characterization and manipulation of charge transport in this regime. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Cassini INMS Observations of Ions and Neutrals in Saturn's Inner Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, M. E.; Cravens, T. E.; Mandt, K.; Teolis, B. D.; Tokar, R. L.; Smith, H. T.; McNutt, R. L.; Waite, J. H.

    2012-12-01

    The Cassini Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) has measured the low-density particles in Saturn's inner magnetosphere (IM). Planning and implementing INMS observations of neutral molecules and water-group ions near the equatorial plane have steadily improved such that INMS now provides measurements that complement other observations of these low-energy ions and neutrals the IM, providing unambiguous resolution of the water-group ions and in situ, three-dimensional spatial dependence of the neutral densities. INMS measurements of neutrals are viable only in the densest regions, inside of 7 Saturn radii (RS) and within 20,000 km of the equatorial plane. Due to a variable background, the INMS detection limit for neutral water is near 103 molecules/cm3, which is the approximate density near 7 RS. High-energy radiation interferes with neutral observations inside of 3.5 RS. The tendency of H2O molecules to adhere to the walls of the INMS inlet aperture requires long integration times to determine the total volume of H2O molecules. Concurrent INMS measurements of associated volatile molecules such as CO2 determine spatial dependence of the neutral density. In the densest part of the neutral cloud that is outside of the Enceladus plumes and north of Enceladus, INMS measures 105 molecules/cm3. Near the equatorial plane, INMS data show that neutral water density drops a factor of ten from 4.2 RS, just outside the orbit of Enceladus, to 7 RS. This decline, caused by photo-ionization, disassociation by ion impact, and distribution by neutral-neutral collisions, is within the range of results derived from remote observations. INMS observations of azimuthal densities, which are not available from remote observations that average multiple observations, show the expected decline for neutrals that near the orbit of Enceladus but separated azimuthally. INMS can measure only one velocity at a time, restricting INMS measurements to only a small area of velocity phase space at a time

  12. Correlations Between Neutral and Ionized Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, M.; Pilkerton, B.; Moore, T.

    The Low Energy Neutral Atom (LENA) Imager on the IMAGE spacecraft has observed the neutral component of the solar wind (JGR, 106, 24,893, 2001) independently adumbrated by Akasofu and Dessler about forty years ago. Neutral solar wind is formed by solar wind charge exchange with interstellar neutrals, dust and the Earth's exosphere, in addition to any intrinsically neutral component. Here we report the results of a statistical study correlating the solar wind fluxes observed by ACE during late 2000 and throughout 2001 with neutral solar wind fluxes observed by LENA. The average correlation coefficient between the neutral and ionized solar wind is 0.66 with "good" correlations (peak correlation coefficient above 0.80) occurring about 28% of the time. The results are similar to those obtained by in-situ multi-spacecraft correlation studies. In this study, however, IMAGE is almost never in the solar wind or magnetosheath. The slope of the relationship between the neutral solar wind flux and the solar wind flux shows a peak in the upstream direction, but shifted toward higher ecliptic longitudes than the interstellar neutral (ISN) flow direction by about 20 degrees. The estimated peak interstellar neutral upstream density is about 10-2 cm-3.

  13. Ergonomically neutral arm support system

    DOEpatents

    Siminovitch, Michael J; Chung, Jeffrey Y; Dellinges, Steven; Lafever, Robin E

    2005-08-02

    An ergonomic arm support system maintains a neutral position for the forearm. A mechanical support structure attached to a chair or other mounting structure supports the arms of a sitting or standing person. The system includes moving elements and tensioning elements to provide a dynamic balancing force against the forearms. The support structure is not fixed or locked in a rigid position, but is an active dynamic system that is maintained in equipoise by the continuous operation of the opposing forces. The support structure includes an armrest connected to a flexible linkage or articulated or pivoting assembly, which includes a tensioning element such as a spring. The pivoting assembly moves up and down, with the tensioning element providing the upward force that balances the downward force of the arm.

  14. Dynamics of Activated Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Mullin, Amy S.

    2016-11-16

    Experimental studies have been performed to investigate the collisional energy transfer processes of gas-phase molecules that contain large amounts of internal energy. Such molecules are prototypes for molecules under high temperature conditions relevant in combustion and information about their energy transfer mechanisms is needed for a detailed understanding and modeling of the chemistry. We use high resolution transient IR absorption spectroscopy to measure the full, nascent product distributions for collisions of small bath molecules that relax highly vibrationally excited pyrazine molecules with E=38000 cm-1 of vibrational energy. To perform these studies, we developed new instrumentation based on modern IR light sources to expand our experimental capabilities to investigate new molecules as collision partners. This final report describes our research in four areas: the characterization of a new transient absorption spectrometer and the results of state-resolved collision studies of pyrazine(E) with HCl, methane and ammonia. Through this research we have gained fundamental new insights into the microscopic details of relatively large complex molecules at high energy as they undergo quenching collisions and redistribute their energy.

  15. Investigation of Sterilization Mechanism for Geobacillus stearothermophilus Spores with Plasma-Excited Neutral Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Kei; Ikenaga, Noriaki; Sakudo, Noriyuki

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the mechanism of the sterilization with plasma-excited neutral gas that uniformly sterilizes both the space and inner wall of the reactor chamber at atmospheric pressure. Only reactive neutral species such as plasma-excited gas molecules and radicals are separated from the plasma and sent to the reactor chamber for chemical sterilization. The plasma source gas uses humidified mixture of nitrogen and oxygen. Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores and tyrosine which is amino acid are treated by the plasma-excited neutral gas. Shape change of the treated spore is observed by SEM, and chemical modification of the treated tyrosine is analyzed by HPLC. As a result, the surface of the treated spore shows depression. Hydroxylation and nitration of tyrosine are shown after the treatment. For these reasons, we believe that the sterilization with plasma-excited neutral gas results from the deformation of spore structure due to the chemical modification of amino acid.

  16. BEAMS3D Neutral Beam Injection Model

    SciTech Connect

    Lazerson, Samuel

    2014-04-14

    With the advent of applied 3D fi elds in Tokamaks and modern high performance stellarators, a need has arisen to address non-axisymmetric effects on neutral beam heating and fueling. We report on the development of a fully 3D neutral beam injection (NBI) model, BEAMS3D, which addresses this need by coupling 3D equilibria to a guiding center code capable of modeling neutral and charged particle trajectories across the separatrix and into the plasma core. Ionization, neutralization, charge-exchange, viscous velocity reduction, and pitch angle scattering are modeled with the ADAS atomic physics database [1]. Benchmark calculations are presented to validate the collisionless particle orbits, neutral beam injection model, frictional drag, and pitch angle scattering effects. A calculation of neutral beam heating in the NCSX device is performed, highlighting the capability of the code to handle 3D magnetic fields.

  17. Modeling Secondary Neutral Helium in the Heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Hans-Reinhard; Möbius, Eberhard; Wood, Brian E.

    2016-11-01

    An accurate, analytic heliospheric neutral test-particle code for helium atoms from the interstellar medium (ISM) is coupled to global heliospheric models dominated by hydrogen and protons from the solar wind and the ISM. This coupling enables the forward-calculation of secondary helium neutrals from first principles. Secondaries are produced predominantly in the outer heliosheath, upwind of the heliopause, by charge exchange of helium ions with neutral atoms. The forward model integrates the secondary production terms along neutral trajectories and calculates the combined neutral helium phase space density in the innermost heliosphere where it can be related to in-situ observations. The phase space density of the secondary component is lower than that of primary neutral helium, but its presence can change the analysis of primaries and the ISM, and can yield valuable insight into the characteristics of the plasma in the outer heliosheath.

  18. Neutral atom lithography with metastable helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allred, Claire Shean

    In this dissertation we describe our performance of resist assisted neutral atom lithography using a bright beam of metastable 23S1 Helium (He*). Metastable Helium atoms have 20 eV of internal energy making them easy to detect and able to destroy a resist. The He* is produced by a reverse flow DC discharge source and then collimated with the bichromatic force, followed by three optical molasses velocity compression stages. The atoms in the resulting beam have a mean longitudinal velocity of 1125 m/s and a divergence of 1.1 mrad. The typical beam flux is 2 x 109 atoms/mm2s through a 0.1mm diameter aperture 70 cm away from the source. The internal energy of the atoms damages the molecules of a self assembled monolayer (SAM) of nonanethiol. The undisturbed SAM protects a 200 A layer of gold that has been evaporated onto a prepared Silicon wafer from a wet chemical etch. Two methods are used to pattern the He* atoms before they destroy the SAM. First, a Nickel micro mesh was used to protect the SAM. These experiments established an appropriate dosage and etch time for patterning. The samples were analyzed with an atomic force microscope and found to have an edge resolution of 63 nm. Then, patterning was accomplished using the dipole force the atoms experience while traversing a standing wave of lambda = 1083nm light tuned 500MHz below the 23S 1 → 23P2 transition. Depending on the intensity of the light, the He* atoms are focused or channeled into lines separated by lambda/2. The lines cover the entire exposed length of the substrate, about 3 mm. They are about 3 mm long, corresponding to about twice the beam waist of the laser standing wave. Thus there are 6 x 10 3 lines of length 5500lambda. These results agree with our numerical simulations of the experiment.

  19. Lipopolysaccaride Detoxification by Endotoxin Neutralizing Protein

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-01

    than 3 mg/kg). ENP also reduces or eliminates $ - a FLETCHER ET AL.: ENDOTOXIN NEUTRALIZING PROTEIN 153 TABLE 4 Microscopic Pathology of Organs Liver...bUBTITLE S. FUNDING NUMBERS Lipopolysaccharide detoxification by endotoxin neutralizing protein PE- 61153N PR- MR04120 6. AUTHOR(S) Fletcher MA...Lipopolysaccharide Detoxification by Endotoxin Neutralizing Protein MARK A. FLETCHER, M.D., THOMAS M. MCKENNA, PH.D., JERRY L. QCANCE, D.V.M., NORMAN R. WAINWRIGHT

  20. Neutral-beam current drive in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Devoto, R.S.

    1986-01-01

    The theory of neutral-beam current drive in tokamaks is reviewed. Experiments are discussed where neutral beams have been used to drive current directly and also indirectly through neoclassical effects. Application of the theory to an experimental test reactor is described. It is shown that neutral beams formed from negative ions accelerated to 500 to 700 keV are needed for this device.

  1. Neutral Pion Production in MINERvA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palomino, Jose

    2012-03-01

    MINERνA is a neutrino-nucleus scattering experiment employing multiple nuclear targets. The experiment is searching for neutral pion production, both in charged current and neutral current, from coherent, resonant and deep-inelastic processes off these targets. Neutral pions are detected through the 2 photon decay that then produce electromagnetic showers. We will describe how we isolate and reconstruct the electromagnetic showers to calculate the invariant mass of the photon pair.

  2. Water and complex organic molecules in the warm inner regions of solar-type protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutens, A.; Jørgensen, J. K.; Persson, M. V.; Lykke, J. M.; Taquet, V.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Vastel, C.; Wampfler, S. F.

    2015-12-01

    Water and complex organic molecules play an important role in the emergence of Life. They have been detected in different types of astrophysical environments (protostars, prestellar cores, outflows, protoplanetary disks, comets, etc). In particular, they show high abundances towards the warm inner regions of protostars, where the icy grain mantles thermally desorb. Can a part of the molecular content observed in these regions be preserved during the star formation process and incorporated into asteroids and comets, that can deliver it to planetary embryos through impacts? By comparison with cometary studies, interferometric observations of solar-type protostars can help to address this important question. We present recent results obtained with the Plateau de Bure interferometer about water deuteration, glycolaldehyde and ethylene glycol towards the low-mass protostar NGC 1333 IRAS2A.

  3. Infrared spectroscopy of water clusters co-adsorbed with hydrogen molecules on a sodium chloride film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakawa, Koichiro; Fukutani, Katsuyuki

    2016-06-01

    Hydrogen gas containing a trace of water vapor was dosed on a vacuum-evaporated sodium chloride film at 13 K, and water clusters formed on the substrate were investigated by infrared absorption spectroscopy. Absorption bands due to (H2O)n clusters with n = 3-6 and an induced absorption band due to hydrogen were clearly observed. With increasing gas dosage, the intensities of the cluster bands increased linearly while the intensity of the hydrogen band was constant. This suggests that the water clusters were formed in two-dimensional matrices of hydrogen. We found that the water clusters did exist on the surface upon heating even after the hydrogen molecules had desorbed. A further rise of the substrate temperature up to 27 K yielded the formation of larger clusters, (H2O)n with n > 6 . We also discuss the origins of the two bands of the trimer in terms of pseudorotation and a metastable isomer.

  4. Of Molecules and Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brinner, Bonnie

    1992-01-01

    Presents an activity in which models help students visualize both the DNA process and transcription. After constructing DNA, RNA messenger, and RNA transfer molecules; students model cells, protein synthesis, codons, and RNA movement. (MDH)

  5. Single-Molecule Enzymology

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Xiaoliang; Lu, H PETER.

    1999-06-04

    Viewing a movie of an enzyme molecule made from molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, we see incredible details of molecular motions, be it a change of the conformation or the action of a chemical reaction.

  6. Of Molecules and Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brinner, Bonnie

    1992-01-01

    Presents an activity in which models help students visualize both the DNA process and transcription. After constructing DNA, RNA messenger, and RNA transfer molecules; students model cells, protein synthesis, codons, and RNA movement. (MDH)

  7. EFFECTS OF LEAKAGE NEUTRAL PARTICLES ON SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Ohira, Yutaka

    2012-10-20

    In this paper, we investigate effects of neutral particles on shocks propagating into the partially ionized medium. We find that for 120 km s{sup -1} < u {sub sh} < 3000 km s{sup -1} (u {sub sh} is the shock velocity), about 10% of upstream neutral particles leak into the upstream region from the downstream region. Moreover, we investigate how the leakage neutral particles affect the upstream structure of the shock and particle accelerations. Using four-fluid approximations (upstream ions, upstream neutral particles, leakage neutral particles, and pickup ions), we provide analytical solutions of the precursor structure due to leakage neutral particles. It is shown that the upstream flow is decelerated in the precursor region and the shock compression ratio becomes smaller than without leakage neutral particles, but the total compression ratio does not change. Even if leakage of neutral particles is small (a few percent of total upstream particles), this smaller compression ratio of the shock can explain steep gamma-ray spectra from young supernova remnants. Furthermore, leakage neutral particles could amplify the magnetic field and heat the upstream region.

  8. Neutral Vlasov kinetic theory of magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Tronci, Cesare; Camporeale, Enrico

    2015-02-15

    The low-frequency limit of Maxwell equations is considered in the Maxwell-Vlasov system. This limit produces a neutral Vlasov system that captures essential features of plasma dynamics, while neglecting radiation effects. Euler-Poincaré reduction theory is used to show that the neutral Vlasov kinetic theory possesses a variational formulation in both Lagrangian and Eulerian coordinates. By construction, the new model recovers all collisionless neutral models employed in plasma simulations. Then, comparisons between the neutral Vlasov system and hybrid kinetic-fluid models are presented in the linear regime.

  9. Neutrality and curiosity: elements of technique.

    PubMed

    Nersessian, Edward; Silvan, Matthew

    2007-07-01

    In the past three decades, neutrality has come under increasing criticism. The idea that a psychoanalyst can leave himself out of the therapeutic exchange has come to be seen as either an impossible dream or a myth. We propose that examining neutrality through the lens of curiosity allows for a new appreciation of the ongoing and vital importance of this psychoanalytic attitude. Our hypothesis is that curiosity and neutrality are linked, and that to maintain a neutral stance, the analyst must be able to direct a relatively conflict-free curiosity toward the workings of the analysand's mind as well as his own.

  10. Influenza virus antigenicity and broadly neutralizing epitopes.

    PubMed

    Air, Gillian M

    2015-04-01

    A vaccine formulation that would be effective against all strains of influenza virus has long been a goal of vaccine developers, but antibodies after infection or vaccination were seen to be strain specific and there was little evidence of cross-reactive antibodies that neutralized across subtypes. Recently a number of broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies have been characterized. This review describes the different classes of broadly neutralizing antibodies and discusses the potential of their therapeutic use or for design of immunogens that induce a high proportion of broadly neutralizing antibodies.

  11. ION SOURCE WITH SPACE CHARGE NEUTRALIZATION

    DOEpatents

    Flowers, J.W.; Luce, J.S.; Stirling, W.L.

    1963-01-22

    This patent relates to a space charge neutralized ion source in which a refluxing gas-fed arc discharge is provided between a cathode and a gas-fed anode to provide ions. An electron gun directs a controlled, monoenergetic electron beam through the discharge. A space charge neutralization is effected in the ion source and accelerating gap by oscillating low energy electrons, and a space charge neutralization of the source exit beam is effected by the monoenergetic electron beam beyond the source exit end. The neutralized beam may be accelerated to any desired energy at densities well above the limitation imposed by Langmuir-Child' s law. (AEC)

  12. On implicit abstract neutral nonlinear differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Hernández, Eduardo; O’Regan, Donal

    2016-04-15

    In this paper we continue our developments in Hernández and O’Regan (J Funct Anal 261:3457–3481, 2011) on the existence of solutions for abstract neutral differential equations. In particular we extend the results in Hernández and O’Regan (J Funct Anal 261:3457–3481, 2011) for the case of implicit nonlinear neutral equations and we focus on applications to partial “nonlinear” neutral differential equations. Some applications involving partial neutral differential equations are presented.

  13. Polyatomic molecule vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Polyatomic molecule vibrations are analyzed as harmonic vibrations along normal coordinates. The energy eigenvalues are found for linear and nonlinear symmetric triatomic molecules for valence bond models of the potential function with arbitrary coupling coefficients; such models can usually be fitted to observed energy levels with reasonably good accuracy. Approximate normal coordinates for the H2O molecule are discussed. Degenerate vibrational modes such as occur in CO2 are analyzed and expressions for Fermi resonance between close-lying states of the same symmetry are developed. The bending modes of linear triatomic molecules are expressed in terms of Laguerre polynomials in cylindrical coordinates as well as in terms of Hermite polynomials in Cartesian coordinates. The effects of large-amplitude bending such as occur in the C3 molecule are analyzed, along with anharmonic effects, which split the usually degenerate bending mode energy levels. Finally, the vibrational frequencies, degeneracies, and symmetry properties of XY3, X2Y2, and XY4 type molecules are discussed.

  14. Neutralization efficiency estimation in a neutral beam source based on inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Vozniy, O. V.; Yeom, G. Y.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the optimal conditions of neutral beam generation to maintain a high degree of neutralization and focusing during beam energy variation for a neutral beam source based on inductively coupled plasma with a three-grid ion beam acceleration system. The neutral beam energy distribution was estimated by measuring the energy profiles of ions that 'survived' the neutralization after reflection. The energy measurements of the primary and reflected ions showed narrow distribution functions, each with only one peak. At higher beam energies, both the ratio of the ion energy loss to the primary energy and the degree of energy divergence decreased, confirming the precise alignment of the neutral beam. The neutralization efficiency of the neutral beam source with a three-grid acceleration system was found to be affected mainly by the beam angle divergence rather than by the particle translation energy.

  15. Measurement of the velocity of neutral fragments by the "correlated ion and neutral time of flight" method combined with "velocity-map imaging"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthias, F.; Feketeová, L.; Della Negra, R.; Dupasquier, T.; Fillol, R.; Abdoul-Carime, H.; Farizon, B.; Farizon, M.; Märk, T. D.

    2017-08-01

    In the challenging field of imaging molecular dynamics, a novel method has been developed and implemented that allows the measurement of the velocity of neutral fragments produced in collision induced dissociation experiments on an event-by-event basis. This has been made possible by combining a correlated ion and neutral time of flight method with a velocity map imaging technique. This new method relies on a multiparametric correlated detection of the neutral and charged fragments from collision induced dissociation on one single detector. Its implementation on the DIAM device (Device for irradiation of biomolecular clusters) (Dispositif d'Irradiation d'Agrégats bioMoléculaires) allowed us to measure the velocity distribution of water molecules evaporated from collision induced dissociation of mass- and energy-selected protonated water clusters.

  16. Neutral Models of Microbiome Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Qinglong; Sukumaran, Jeet; Wu, Steven; Rodrigo, Allen

    2015-01-01

    There has been an explosion of research on host-associated microbial communities (i.e.,microbiomes). Much of this research has focused on surveys of microbial diversities across a variety of host species, including humans, with a view to understanding how these microbiomes are distributed across space and time, and how they correlate with host health, disease, phenotype, physiology and ecology. Fewer studies have focused on how these microbiomes may have evolved. In this paper, we develop an agent-based framework to study the dynamics of microbiome evolution. Our framework incorporates neutral models of how hosts acquire their microbiomes, and how the environmental microbial community that is available to the hosts is assembled. Most importantly, our framework also incorporates a Wright-Fisher genealogical model of hosts, so that the dynamics of microbiome evolution is studied on an evolutionary timescale. Our results indicate that the extent of parental contribution to microbial availability from one generation to the next significantly impacts the diversity of microbiomes: the greater the parental contribution, the less diverse the microbiomes. In contrast, even when there is only a very small contribution from a constant environmental pool, microbial communities can remain highly diverse. Finally, we show that our models may be used to construct hypotheses about the types of processes that operate to assemble microbiomes over evolutionary time. PMID:26200800

  17. Probing micro-solvation in "numbers": the case of neutral dipeptides in water.

    PubMed

    Takis, Panteleimon G; Papavasileiou, Konstantinos D; Peristeras, Loukas D; Melissas, Vasilios S; Troganis, Anastassios N

    2013-05-21

    How many solvent molecules and in what way do they interact directly with biomolecules? This is one of the most challenging questions regarding a deep understanding of biomolecular functionalism and solvation. We herein present a novel NMR spectroscopic study, achieving for the first time the quantification of the directly interacting water molecules with several neutral dipeptides. Our proposed method is supported by both molecular dynamics simulations and density functional theory calculations, advanced analysis of which allowed the identification of the direct interactions between solute-solvent molecules in the zwitterionic L-alanyl-L-alanine dipeptide-water system. Beyond the quantification of dipeptide-water molecule direct interactions, this NMR technique could be useful for the determination and elucidation of small to moderate bio-organic molecular groups' direct interactions with various polar solvent molecules, shedding light on the biomolecular micro-solvation processes and behaviour in various solvents.

  18. Hydrogen generation by reaction of Si nanopowder with neutral water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Yuki; Matsuda, Shinsuke; Imamura, Kentaro; Kobayashi, Hikaru

    2017-05-01

    Si and its oxide are nonpoisonous materials, and thus, it can be taken for medical effects. We have developed a method of generation of hydrogen by use of reactions of Si nanopowder with water in the neutral pH region. Si nanopowder is fabricated by the simple bead milling method. Si nanopowder reacts with water to generate hydrogen even in cases where pH is set at the neutral region between 7.0 and 8.6. The hydrogen generation rate strongly depends on pH and in the case of pH 8.0, ˜55 ml/g hydrogen which corresponds to that contained in approximately 3 L saturated hydrogen-rich water is generated in 1 h. The reaction rate for hydrogen generation greatly increases with pH, indicating that the reacting species is hydroxide ions. The change of pH after the hydrogen generation reaction is negligibly low compared with that estimated assuming that hydroxide ions are consumed by the reaction. From these results, we conclude the following reaction mechanism: Si nanopowder reacts with hydroxide ions in the rate-determining reaction to form hydrogen molecules, SiO2, and electrons in the conduction band. Then, generated electrons are accepted by water molecules, resulting in production of hydrogen molecules and hydroxide ions. The hydrogen generation rate strongly depends on the crystallite size of Si nanopowder, but not on the size of aggregates of Si nanopowder. The present study shows a possibility to use Si nanopowder for hydrogen generation in the body in order to eliminate hydroxyl radicals which cause various diseases.

  19. Hydrogen generation by reaction of Si nanopowder with neutral water.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yuki; Matsuda, Shinsuke; Imamura, Kentaro; Kobayashi, Hikaru

    2017-01-01

    Si and its oxide are nonpoisonous materials, and thus, it can be taken for medical effects. We have developed a method of generation of hydrogen by use of reactions of Si nanopowder with water in the neutral pH region. Si nanopowder is fabricated by the simple bead milling method. Si nanopowder reacts with water to generate hydrogen even in cases where pH is set at the neutral region between 7.0 and 8.6. The hydrogen generation rate strongly depends on pH and in the case of pH 8.0, ∼55 ml/g hydrogen which corresponds to that contained in approximately 3 L saturated hydrogen-rich water is generated in 1 h. The reaction rate for hydrogen generation greatly increases with pH, indicating that the reacting species is hydroxide ions. The change of pH after the hydrogen generation reaction is negligibly low compared with that estimated assuming that hydroxide ions are consumed by the reaction. From these results, we conclude the following reaction mechanism: Si nanopowder reacts with hydroxide ions in the rate-determining reaction to form hydrogen molecules, SiO2, and electrons in the conduction band. Then, generated electrons are accepted by water molecules, resulting in production of hydrogen molecules and hydroxide ions. The hydrogen generation rate strongly depends on the crystallite size of Si nanopowder, but not on the size of aggregates of Si nanopowder. The present study shows a possibility to use Si nanopowder for hydrogen generation in the body in order to eliminate hydroxyl radicals which cause various diseases.

  20. The Dubious Value of Value Neutrality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balch, Stephen H.

    2006-01-01

    Hard science is properly value neutral. But when that ideological neutrality extends to the whole university, the traditional foundation crumbles. Steve Balch laments the moral vacuum that now substitutes for fundamental principles, because it is impossible to frame a program of education--especially in the humanities and social sciences--without…

  1. 6 CFR 27.305 - Neutral adjudications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Neutral adjudications. 27.305 Section 27.305 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY CHEMICAL FACILITY ANTI-TERRORISM STANDARDS Orders and Adjudications § 27.305 Neutral adjudications. (a) Any facility or other person who...

  2. 6 CFR 27.305 - Neutral adjudications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Neutral adjudications. 27.305 Section 27.305 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY CHEMICAL FACILITY ANTI-TERRORISM STANDARDS Orders and Adjudications § 27.305 Neutral adjudications. (a) Any facility or other person who...

  3. 6 CFR 27.305 - Neutral adjudications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Neutral adjudications. 27.305 Section 27.305 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY CHEMICAL FACILITY ANTI-TERRORISM STANDARDS Orders and Adjudications § 27.305 Neutral adjudications. (a) Any facility or other person who...

  4. 6 CFR 27.305 - Neutral adjudications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Neutral adjudications. 27.305 Section 27.305 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY CHEMICAL FACILITY ANTI-TERRORISM STANDARDS Orders and Adjudications § 27.305 Neutral adjudications. (a) Any facility or other person who...

  5. 6 CFR 27.305 - Neutral adjudications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Neutral adjudications. 27.305 Section 27.305 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY CHEMICAL FACILITY ANTI-TERRORISM STANDARDS Orders and Adjudications § 27.305 Neutral adjudications. (a) Any facility or other person who...

  6. Targets for high power neutral beams

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.

    1980-01-01

    Stopping high-power, long-pulse beams is fast becoming an engineering challenge, particularly in neutral beam injectors for heating magnetically confined plasmas. A brief review of neutral beam target technology is presented along with heat transfer calculations for some selected target designs.

  7. A New Age of Constructivism: "Mode Neutral"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Peter; Smith, Brian; Sherratt, Cathy

    2008-01-01

    This article presents work in progress exploring social constructivism within Mode Neutral, and how various conditions impact upon the student experience. Mode Neutral's three dimensions--curriculum design, the role of the tutor and communication for learning--are affected by the conditions that can vary in any given context. The authors realise…

  8. Types of Neutralization and Types of Delinquency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Jim; Dodder, Richard A.

    1983-01-01

    Neutralization theory was tested with questionnaires administered to a random sample of public high school students (N-298) and institutionalized male delinquents (N-53). Neutralization acceptance technique patterns were similar across subsamples; however, correlations between each technique and each type of delinquency were statistically…

  9. Neutral red staining for plant vacuoles.

    PubMed

    Schwab, Birgit; Hülskamp, Martin

    2010-06-01

    For almost 100 years, neutral red has been used to stain living cells and fixed tissue. It can be used as a general-purpose stain, a pH indicator (turning from red to yellow, as the medium becomes alkaline), or a nuclear stain. In this protocol, neutral red is used to stain plant vacuoles.

  10. Types of Neutralization and Types of Delinquency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Jim; Dodder, Richard A.

    1983-01-01

    Neutralization theory was tested with questionnaires administered to a random sample of public high school students (N-298) and institutionalized male delinquents (N-53). Neutralization acceptance technique patterns were similar across subsamples; however, correlations between each technique and each type of delinquency were statistically…

  11. Neutral-current x-distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Bogert, D.; Burnstein, R.; Fisk, R.; Fuess, S.; Bofill, J.; Busza, W.; Eldridge, T.; Friedman, J.I.; Abolins, M.; Brock, R.

    1984-06-01

    The role of the semi-leptonic neutral current interaction as a probe of nucleon structure is examined. Previous measurements of neutral current x-distributions are reviewed, and new results from the Fermilab - MIT - MSU collaboration are presented. 4 references.

  12. 32 CFR 644.323 - Neutral language.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Neutral language. 644.323 Section 644.323 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal § 644.323 Neutral language. Wherever the words “man”, “men”, or their...

  13. 32 CFR 644.323 - Neutral language.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Neutral language. 644.323 Section 644.323 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal § 644.323 Neutral language. Wherever the words “man”, “men”, or their...

  14. 32 CFR 644.323 - Neutral language.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Neutral language. 644.323 Section 644.323 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal § 644.323 Neutral language. Wherever the words “man”, “men”, or their...

  15. 32 CFR 644.323 - Neutral language.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Neutral language. 644.323 Section 644.323 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal § 644.323 Neutral language. Wherever the words “man”, “men”, or their...

  16. Implications of tritium in neutral beam injectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J; Stewart, L D

    1980-01-01

    Neutral injectors for heating plasmas of D-T burning fusion reactors are subject to tritium contamination. This paper discusses relevant questions and problem areas pertinent to tritium environment, including calculations of tritium contaminations in different neutral injectors, gas handling and pumping systems, and implications on beam line components.

  17. The Source of Saturn's Extended Neutral Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleshman, B. L.; Delamere, P. A.; Bagenal, F.

    2010-12-01

    The Enceladus plumes are largely responsible for the water and its by-products found throughout Saturn's Enceladus plasma-neutral torus. Flybys of Enceladus by the Cassini spacecraft from 2005 to present have revealed a dynamic system, from which varying estimates have been made of the release rate of neutral H2O from Enceladus at 75-1600 kg/s. The rate of fresh ion pick-up near Enceladus has also been observed to vary between flybys. In Fleshman et al. (2010a), we showed that the magnitude of fresh ion pick-up on respective flybys requires a source (possibly in beams) of `hot' electrons at Enceladus. In this work, we build on our understanding of the local interaction by quantifying the degree to which neutrals produced as a by-product of charge exchange contribute to the Saturn's neutral cloud extending from 3 to 10 RS (see also Johnson et al., (2006)). We follow individual ion and neutral trajectories, while accounting for velocity-dependent cross sections. Our aim is to compare the neutral cloud resulting from charge exchange at Enceladus to that resulting from both (1) photodissociation and (2) electron impact dissociation throughout the Enceladus torus. The goal of the study, when compared with neutral cloud observations, is to shed light on which of these mechanisms dominates the neutral cloud morphology at Saturn.

  18. The Dubious Value of Value Neutrality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balch, Stephen H.

    2006-01-01

    Hard science is properly value neutral. But when that ideological neutrality extends to the whole university, the traditional foundation crumbles. Steve Balch laments the moral vacuum that now substitutes for fundamental principles, because it is impossible to frame a program of education--especially in the humanities and social sciences--without…

  19. Efficient laser production of energetic neutral beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mollica, F.; Antonelli, L.; Flacco, A.; Braenzel, J.; Vauzour, B.; Folpini, G.; Birindelli, G.; Schnuerer, M.; Batani, D.; Malka, V.

    2016-03-01

    Laser-driven ion acceleration by intense, ultra-short, laser pulse has received increasing attention in recent years, and the availability of much compact and versatile ions sources motivates the study of laser-driven sources of energetic neutral atoms. We demonstrate the production of a neutral and directional beam of hydrogen and carbon atoms up to 200 keV per nucleon, with a peak flow of 2.7× {{10}13} atom s-1. Laser accelerated ions are neutralized in a pulsed, supersonic argon jet with tunable density between 1.5× {{10}17} cm-3and 6× {{10}18} cm-3. The neutralization efficiency has been measured by a time-of-flight detector for different argon densities. An optimum is found, for which complete neutralization occurs. The neutralization rate can be explained only at high areal densities (>1× {{10}17} cm-2) by single electron charge transfer processes. These results suggest a new perspective for the study of neutral production by laser and open discussion of neutralization at a lower density.

  20. 32 CFR 644.323 - Neutral language.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Neutral language. 644.323 Section 644.323 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal § 644.323 Neutral language. Wherever the words “man”, “men”, or their related...

  1. Ion-Neutral Coupling in Solar Prominences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Holly

    2011-01-01

    Interactions between ions and neutrals in a partially ionized plasma are important throughout heliophysics, including near the solar surface in prominences. Understanding how ion-neutral coupling affects formation, support, structure, and dynamics of prominences will advance our physical understanding of magnetized systems involving a transition from a weakly ionized dense gas to a fully ionized tenuous plasma. We address the fundamental physics of prominence support, which is normally described in terms of a magnetic force on the prominence plasma that balances the solar gravitational force, and the implications for observations. Because the prominence plasma is only partially ionized, it is necessary to consider the support of the both the ionized and neutral components. Support of the neutrals is accomplished through a frictional interaction between the neutral and ionized components of the plasma, and its efficacy depends strongly on the degree of ionization of the plasma. More specifically, the frictional force is proportional to the relative flow of neutral and ion species, and for a sufficiently weakly ionized plasma, this flow must be relatively large to produce a frictional force that balances gravity. A large relative flow, of course, implies significant draining of neutral particles from the prominence. We evaluate the importance of this draining effect for a hydrogen-helium plasma, and consider the observational evidence for cross-field diffusion of neutral prominence material.

  2. Catalytic reactions on neutral Rh oxide clusters more efficient than on neutral Rh clusters.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Akira; Miyajima, Ken; Mafuné, Fumitaka

    2012-03-28

    Gas phase catalytic reactions involving the reduction of N(2)O and oxidation of CO were observed at the molecular level on isolated neutral rhodium clusters, Rh(n) (n = 10-28), using mass spectrometry. Sequential oxygen transfer reactions, Rh(n)O(m-1) + N(2)O → Rh(n)O(m) + N(2) (m = 1, 2, 3,…), were monitored and the rate constant for each reaction step was determined as a function of the cluster size. Oxygen extraction reactions by a CO molecule, Rh(n)O(m) + CO → Rh(n)O(m-1) + CO(2) (m = 1, 2, 3,…), were also observed when a small amount of CO was mixed with the reactant N(2)O gas. The rate constants of the oxygen extraction reactions by CO for m ≥ 4 were found to be two or three orders of magnitude higher than the rate constants for m ≤ 3, which indicates that the catalytic reaction proceeds more efficiently when the reaction cycles turn over around Rh(n)O(m) (m ≥ 4) than around bare Rh(n). Rhodium clusters operate as more efficient catalysts when they are oxidized than non- or less-oxidized rhodium clusters, which is consistent with theoretical and experimental studies on the catalytic CO oxidation reaction on a rhodium surface.

  3. Density functional study of the oxidation of small neutral and charged silver clusters.

    PubMed

    Pereiro, M; Botana, J; Baldomir, D; Serantes, D; Arias, J E

    2010-04-01

    We have studied the energetic and structural stability of the interaction of molecular oxygen with small neutral, anionic and cationic silver clusters, Ag(n) (3 < or = n < or = < 8). The calculations have been carried out using a linear combination of atomic Gaussian-type orbitals within the density functional theory as it is implemented in the demon-ks3.5 code. The O2 molecule has been placed in different positions surrounding the cluster, in order to increase the configurational space of the structural minima. We have found that the oxidized cation and neutral clusters undergo a 2D-3D structural transition even before than the nonoxidized counterparts. Moreover, our results show that the adsorption energies on the cationic and neutral silver oxide clusters manifest an odd-even alternation pattern. Likewise, the average magnetic moment of the O2 radical in the charged and neutral silver environment tends to be greater than the charged and neutral bare diatomic oxygen molecule.

  4. Understanding ultracold polar molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julienne, Paul

    2009-05-01

    The successful production of a dense sample of ultracold ground state KRb polar molecules [1] opens the door to a new era of research with dipolar gases and lattices of such species. This feat was achieved by first associating a K and a Rb atom to make a weakly bound Feshbach molecule and then coherently transferring the population to the ground vibrational level of the molecule. This talk focuses on theoretical issues associated with making and using ultracold polar molecules, using KRb as an example [2]. Full understanding of this species and the processes by which it is made requires taking advantage of accurate molecular potentials [3], ab initio calculations [4], and the properties of the long-range potential. A highly accurate model is available for KRb for all bound states below the ground state separated atom limit and could be constructed for other species. The next step is to develop an understanding of the interactions between polar molecules, and their control in the ultracold domain. Understanding long-range interactions and threshold resonances will be crucial for future work. [1] K.-K. Ni, et al, Science 322, 231(2008). [2] P. S. Julienne, arXiv:0812:1233. [3] Pashov et al., Phys. Rev. A76, 022511 (2007). [4] S. Kotochigova, et al., arXiv:0901.1486.

  5. Neutral molecular cluster formation of sulfuric acid-dimethylamine observed in real time under atmospheric conditions.

    PubMed

    Kürten, Andreas; Jokinen, Tuija; Simon, Mario; Sipilä, Mikko; Sarnela, Nina; Junninen, Heikki; Adamov, Alexey; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M; Duplissy, Jonathan; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C; Franchin, Alessandro; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Heinritzi, Martin; Hutterli, Manuel; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kirkby, Jasper; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Leiminger, Markus; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P; Riccobono, Francesco; Rissanen, Matti P; Rondo, Linda; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Seinfeld, John H; Steiner, Gerhard; Tomé, António; Tröstl, Jasmin; Winkler, Paul M; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Ye, Penglin; Baltensperger, Urs; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Kulmala, Markku; Worsnop, Douglas R; Curtius, Joachim

    2014-10-21

    For atmospheric sulfuric acid (SA) concentrations the presence of dimethylamine (DMA) at mixing ratios of several parts per trillion by volume can explain observed boundary layer new particle formation rates. However, the concentration and molecular composition of the neutral (uncharged) clusters have not been reported so far due to the lack of suitable instrumentation. Here we report on experiments from the Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets chamber at the European Organization for Nuclear Research revealing the formation of neutral particles containing up to 14 SA and 16 DMA molecules, corresponding to a mobility diameter of about 2 nm, under atmospherically relevant conditions. These measurements bridge the gap between the molecular and particle perspectives of nucleation, revealing the fundamental processes involved in particle formation and growth. The neutral clusters are found to form at or close to the kinetic limit where particle formation is limited only by the collision rate of SA molecules. Even though the neutral particles are stable against evaporation from the SA dimer onward, the formation rates of particles at 1.7-nm size, which contain about 10 SA molecules, are up to 4 orders of magnitude smaller compared with those of the dimer due to coagulation and wall loss of particles before they reach 1.7 nm in diameter. This demonstrates that neither the atmospheric particle formation rate nor its dependence on SA can simply be interpreted in terms of cluster evaporation or the molecular composition of a critical nucleus.

  6. Neutral molecular cluster formation of sulfuric acid–dimethylamine observed in real time under atmospheric conditions

    PubMed Central

    Kürten, Andreas; Jokinen, Tuija; Simon, Mario; Sipilä, Mikko; Sarnela, Nina; Junninen, Heikki; Adamov, Alexey; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M.; Duplissy, Jonathan; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C.; Franchin, Alessandro; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Heinritzi, Martin; Hutterli, Manuel; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kirkby, Jasper; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Leiminger, Markus; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P.; Riccobono, Francesco; Rissanen, Matti P.; Rondo, Linda; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Seinfeld, John H.; Steiner, Gerhard; Tomé, António; Tröstl, Jasmin; Winkler, Paul M.; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Ye, Penglin; Baltensperger, Urs; Carslaw, Kenneth S.; Kulmala, Markku; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Curtius, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    For atmospheric sulfuric acid (SA) concentrations the presence of dimethylamine (DMA) at mixing ratios of several parts per trillion by volume can explain observed boundary layer new particle formation rates. However, the concentration and molecular composition of the neutral (uncharged) clusters have not been reported so far due to the lack of suitable instrumentation. Here we report on experiments from the Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets chamber at the European Organization for Nuclear Research revealing the formation of neutral particles containing up to 14 SA and 16 DMA molecules, corresponding to a mobility diameter of about 2 nm, under atmospherically relevant conditions. These measurements bridge the gap between the molecular and particle perspectives of nucleation, revealing the fundamental processes involved in particle formation and growth. The neutral clusters are found to form at or close to the kinetic limit where particle formation is limited only by the collision rate of SA molecules. Even though the neutral particles are stable against evaporation from the SA dimer onward, the formation rates of particles at 1.7-nm size, which contain about 10 SA molecules, are up to 4 orders of magnitude smaller compared with those of the dimer due to coagulation and wall loss of particles before they reach 1.7 nm in diameter. This demonstrates that neither the atmospheric particle formation rate nor its dependence on SA can simply be interpreted in terms of cluster evaporation or the molecular composition of a critical nucleus. PMID:25288761

  7. Sensitive neutralization test for rubella antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Sato, H; Albrecht, P; Krugman, S; Ennis, F A

    1979-01-01

    A modified rubella virus plaque neutralization test for measuring rubella antibody was developed based on the potentiation of the virus-antibody complex by heterologous anti-immunoglobulin. The test is highly sensitive, yielding titers on the average 50 to 100 times higher than the haemagglutination inhibition test or the conventional plaque neutralization test. The sensitivity of this enhanced neutralization test is somewhat limited by the existence of a prozone phenomenon which precludes testing of low-titered sera below a dilution of 1:16. No prozone effect was observed with cerebrospinal fluids. The specificity of the enhanced neutralization test was determined by seroconversion of individuals receiving rubella vaccine. Although the rubella hemagglutination inhibition test remains the test of choice in routine diagnostic and surveillance work, the enhanced rubella neutralization test is particularly useful in monitoring low-level antibody in the cerebrospinal fluid in patients with neurological disorders and in certain instances of vaccine failure. PMID:107192

  8. Neutral depletion and the helicon density limit

    SciTech Connect

    Magee, R. M.; Galante, M. E.; Carr, J. Jr.; Lusk, G.; McCarren, D. W.; Scime, E. E.

    2013-12-15

    It is straightforward to create fully ionized plasmas with modest rf power in a helicon. It is difficult, however, to create plasmas with density >10{sup 20} m{sup −3}, because neutral depletion leads to a lack of fuel. In order to address this density limit, we present fast (1 MHz), time-resolved measurements of the neutral density at and downstream from the rf antenna in krypton helicon plasmas. At the start of the discharge, the neutral density underneath the antenna is reduced to 1% of its initial value in 15 μs. The ionization rate inferred from these data implies that the electron temperature near the antenna is much higher than the electron temperature measured downstream. Neutral density measurements made downstream from the antenna show much slower depletion, requiring 14 ms to decrease by a factor of 1/e. Furthermore, the downstream depletion appears to be due to neutral pumping rather than ionization.

  9. Estimating the stoichiometry of HIV neutralization.

    PubMed

    Magnus, Carsten; Regoes, Roland R

    2010-03-19

    HIV-1 virions infect target cells by first establishing contact between envelope glycoprotein trimers on the virion's surface and CD4 receptors on a target cell, recruiting co-receptors, fusing with the cell membrane and finally releasing the genetic material into the target cell. Specific experimental setups allow the study of the number of trimer-receptor-interactions needed for infection, i.e., the stoichiometry of entry and also the number of antibodies needed to prevent one trimer from engaging successfully in the entry process, i.e., the stoichiometry of (trimer) neutralization. Mathematical models are required to infer the stoichiometric parameters from these experimental data. Recently, we developed mathematical models for the estimations of the stoichiometry of entry [1]. In this article, we show how our models can be extended to investigate the stoichiometry of trimer neutralization. We study how various biological parameters affect the estimate of the stoichiometry of neutralization. We find that the distribution of trimer numbers-which is also an important determinant of the stoichiometry of entry-influences the estimated value of the stoichiometry of neutralization. In contrast, other parameters, which characterize the experimental system, diminish the information we can extract from the data about the stoichiometry of neutralization, and thus reduce our confidence in the estimate. We illustrate the use of our models by re-analyzing previously published data on the neutralization sensitivity [2], which contains measurements of neutralization sensitivity of viruses with different envelope proteins to antibodies with various specificities. Our mathematical framework represents the formal basis for the estimation of the stoichiometry of neutralization. Together with the stoichiometry of entry, the stoichiometry of trimer neutralization will allow one to calculate how many antibodies are required to neutralize a virion or even an entire population of

  10. Estimating the Stoichiometry of HIV Neutralization

    PubMed Central

    Magnus, Carsten; Regoes, Roland R.

    2010-01-01

    HIV-1 virions infect target cells by first establishing contact between envelope glycoprotein trimers on the virion's surface and CD4 receptors on a target cell, recruiting co-receptors, fusing with the cell membrane and finally releasing the genetic material into the target cell. Specific experimental setups allow the study of the number of trimer-receptor-interactions needed for infection, i.e., the stoichiometry of entry and also the number of antibodies needed to prevent one trimer from engaging successfully in the entry process, i.e., the stoichiometry of (trimer) neutralization. Mathematical models are required to infer the stoichiometric parameters from these experimental data. Recently, we developed mathematical models for the estimations of the stoichiometry of entry [1]. In this article, we show how our models can be extended to investigate the stoichiometry of trimer neutralization. We study how various biological parameters affect the estimate of the stoichiometry of neutralization. We find that the distribution of trimer numbers—which is also an important determinant of the stoichiometry of entry—influences the estimated value of the stoichiometry of neutralization. In contrast, other parameters, which characterize the experimental system, diminish the information we can extract from the data about the stoichiometry of neutralization, and thus reduce our confidence in the estimate. We illustrate the use of our models by re-analyzing previously published data on the neutralization sensitivity [2], which contains measurements of neutralization sensitivity of viruses with different envelope proteins to antibodies with various specificities. Our mathematical framework represents the formal basis for the estimation of the stoichiometry of neutralization. Together with the stoichiometry of entry, the stoichiometry of trimer neutralization will allow one to calculate how many antibodies are required to neutralize a virion or even an entire population of

  11. Positronium ions and molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Y. K.

    1990-01-01

    Recent theoretical studies on positronium ions and molecules are discussed. A positronium ion is a three particle system consisting of two electrons in singlet spin state, and a positron. Recent studies include calculations of its binding energy, positron annihilation rate, and investigations of its doubly excited resonant states. A positronium molecule is a four body system consisting of two positrons and two electrons in an overall singlet spin state. The recent calculations of its binding energy against the dissociation into two positronium atoms, and studies of auto-detaching states in positronium molecules are discussed. These auto-dissociating states, which are believed to be part of the Rydberg series as a result of a positron attaching to a negatively charged positronium ion, Ps-, would appear as resonances in Ps-Ps scattering.

  12. Single-Molecule Bioelectronics

    PubMed Central

    Rosenstein, Jacob K.; Lemay, Serge G.; Shepard, Kenneth L.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental techniques which interface single biomolecules directly with microelectronic systems are increasingly being used in a wide range of powerful applications, from fundamental studies of biomolecules to ultra-sensitive assays. Here we review several technologies which can perform electronic measurements of single molecules in solution: ion channels, nanopore sensors, carbon nanotube field-effect transistors, electron tunneling gaps, and redox cycling. We discuss the shared features among these techniques that enable them to resolve individual molecules, and discuss their limitations. Recordings from each of these methods all rely on similar electronic instrumentation, and we discuss the relevant circuit implementations and potential for scaling these single-molecule bioelectronic interfaces to high-throughput arrayed sensing platforms. PMID:25529538

  13. MOLECULES IN {eta} CARINAE

    SciTech Connect

    Loinard, Laurent; Menten, Karl M.; Guesten, Rolf; Zapata, Luis A.; Rodriguez, Luis F.

    2012-04-10

    We report the detection toward {eta} Carinae of six new molecules, CO, CN, HCO{sup +}, HCN, HNC, and N{sub 2}H{sup +}, and of two of their less abundant isotopic counterparts, {sup 13}CO and H{sup 13}CN. The line profiles are moderately broad ({approx}100 km s{sup -1}), indicating that the emission originates in the dense, possibly clumpy, central arcsecond of the Homunculus Nebula. Contrary to previous claims, CO and HCO{sup +} do not appear to be underabundant in {eta} Carinae. On the other hand, molecules containing nitrogen or the {sup 13}C isotope of carbon are overabundant by about one order of magnitude. This demonstrates that, together with the dust responsible for the dimming of {eta} Carinae following the Great Eruption, the molecules detected here must have formed in situ out of CNO-processed stellar material.

  14. Molecules as Automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardelli, Luca

    Molecular biology investigates the structure and function of biochemical systems starting from their basic building blocks: macromolecules. A macromolecule is a large, complex molecule (a protein or a nucleic acid) that usually has inner mutable state and external activity. Informal explanations of biochemical events trace individual macromolecules through their state changes and their interaction histories: a macromolecule is endowed with an identity that is retained through its transformations, even through changes in molecular energy and mass. A macromolecule, therefore, is qualitatively different from the small molecules of inorganic chemistry. Such molecules are stateless: in the standard notation for chemical reactions they are seemingly created and destroyed, and their atomic structure is used mainly for the bookkeeping required by the conservation of mass.

  15. Photochemistry of interstellar molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stief, L. J.

    1971-01-01

    The photochemistry of two diatomic and eight polyatomic molecules is discussed quantitatively. For an interstellar molecule, the lifetime against photodecomposition depends upon the absorption cross section, the quantum yield or probability of dissociation following photon absorption, and the interstellar radiation field. The constant energy density of Habing is used for the unobserved regions of interstellar radiation field, and the field in obscuring clouds is estimated by combining the constant flux with the observed interstellar extinction curve covering the visible and ultraviolet regions. Lifetimes against photodecomposition in the unobscured regions and as a function of increasing optical thickness in obscuring clouds are calculated for the ten species. The results show that, except for CO, all the molecules have comparable lifetimes of less than one hundred years. Thus they can exist only in dense clouds and can never have been exposed to the unobscured radiation. The calculations further show that the lifetimes in clouds of moderate opacity are of the order of one million years.

  16. Single molecule diffraction.

    PubMed

    Spence, J C H; Doak, R B

    2004-05-14

    For solving the atomic structure of organic molecules such as small proteins which are difficult to crystallize, the use of a jet of doped liquid helium droplets traversing a continuous high energy electron beam is proposed as a means of obtaining electron diffraction patterns (serial crystallography). Organic molecules (such as small proteins) within the droplet (and within a vitreous ice jacket) may be aligned by use of a polarized laser beam. Iterative methods for solving the phase problem are indicated. Comparisons with a related plan for pulsed x-ray diffraction from single proteins in a molecular beam are provided.

  17. DNA: An Extensible Molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cluzel, Philippe; Lebrun, Anne; Heller, Christoph; Lavery, Richard; Viovy, Jean-Louis; Chatenay, Didier; Caron, Francois

    1996-02-01

    The force-displacement response of a single duplex DNA molecule was measured. The force saturates at a plateau around 70 piconewtons, which ends when the DNA has been stretched about 1.7 times its contour length. This behavior reveals a highly cooperative transition to a state here termed S-DNA. Addition of an intercalator suppresses this transition. Molecular modeling of the process also yields a force plateau and suggests a structure for the extended form. These results may shed light on biological processes involving DNA extension and open the route for mechanical studies on individual molecules in a previously unexplored range.

  18. Enzyme molecules as nanomotors.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Samudra; Dey, Krishna K; Muddana, Hari S; Tabouillot, Tristan; Ibele, Michael E; Butler, Peter J; Sen, Ayusman

    2013-01-30

    Using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, we show that the diffusive movements of catalase enzyme molecules increase in the presence of the substrate, hydrogen peroxide, in a concentration-dependent manner. Employing a microfluidic device to generate a substrate concentration gradient, we show that both catalase and urease enzyme molecules spread toward areas of higher substrate concentration, a form of chemotaxis at the molecular scale. Using glucose oxidase and glucose to generate a hydrogen peroxide gradient, we induce the migration of catalase toward glucose oxidase, thereby showing that chemically interconnected enzymes can be drawn together.

  19. Neutral dissociation of hydrogen following photoexcitation of HCl at the chlorine K edge

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, D.L.; Arrasate, M.E.; Martin, R.; Vanderford, B.; Lindle, D.W.; Cotter, J.; Neill, P.; Fisher, G.R.; Perera, R.C.; Leung, K.T.; Levin, J.C.; Sellin, I.A.; Simon, M.; Simon, M.; Uehara, Y.; Whitfield, S.B.

    1998-04-01

    Time-of-flight mass spectroscopy was used to study the relaxation dynamics of HCl following photoexcitation in the vicinity of the Cl K edge ({approximately}2.8keV) using monochromatic synchrotron radiation. At the lowest resonant excitation to the 6{sigma}{sup {asterisk}} antibonding orbital, almost half of the excited molecules decay by emission of a neutral H atom, mostly in coincidence with a highly charged Cl{sup n+} ion. The present work demonstrates that neutral-atom emission can be a significant decay channel for excited states with very short lifetimes (1 fs). {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  20. In vitro assay for neutralizing antibody to hepatitis C virus: evidence for broadly conserved neutralization epitopes.

    PubMed

    Bartosch, Birke; Bukh, Jens; Meunier, Jean-Christophe; Granier, Christelle; Engle, Ronald E; Blackwelder, William C; Emerson, Suzanne U; Cosset, François-Loïc; Purcell, Robert H

    2003-11-25

    Our understanding of the humoral immune response to hepatitis C virus (HCV) is limited because the virus can be studied only in humans and chimpanzees and because previously described neutralization assays have not been robust or simple to perform. Nevertheless, epidemiologic and laboratory studies suggested that neutralizing Ab to HCV might be important in preventing infection. We have recently described a neutralization assay based on the neutralization of pseudotyped murine retrovirus constructs bearing HCV envelope glycoproteins on their surface. We have applied the assay to well characterized clinical samples from HCV-infected patients and chimpanzees, confirmed the existence of neutralizing Ab to HCV, and validated most previously reported neutralizations of the virus. We did not find neutralizing anti-HCV in resolving infections but did find relatively high titers (>1:320) of such Ab in chronic infections. Neutralizing Ab was directed not only to epitope(s) in the hypervariable region of the E2 envelope protein but also to one or more epitopes elsewhere in the envelope of the virus. Neutralizing Ab was broadly reactive and could neutralize pseudotype particles bearing the envelope glycoproteins of two different subgenotypes (1a and 1b). The ability to assay neutralizing anti-HCV should permit an assessment of the prospects for successful Ab-mediated passive and active immunoprophylaxis against hepatitis C.

  1. Ultralong-range triatomic Rydberg molecules in an electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilera Fernández, Javier; Schmelcher, Peter; González-Férez, Rosario

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the electronic structure of a triatomic Rydberg molecule formed by a Rydberg atom and two neutral ground-state atoms. Taking into account the s-wave and p-wave interactions, we perform electronic structure calculations and analyze the adiabatic electronic potentials evolving from the Rb (n=35,l≥slant 3) Rydberg degenerate manifold. We hereby focus on three different classes of geometries of the Rydberg molecules, including symmetric, asymmetric and planar configurations. The metamorphosis of these potential energy surfaces in the presence of an external electric field is explored.

  2. Diversity in Biological Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newbury, H. John

    2010-01-01

    One of the striking characteristics of fundamental biological processes, such as genetic inheritance, development and primary metabolism, is the limited amount of variation in the molecules involved. Natural selective pressures act strongly on these core processes and individuals carrying mutations and producing slightly sub-optimal versions of…

  3. Mighty Molecule Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Tom; Rushton, Greg; Bencomo, Marie

    2008-01-01

    As part of the SMATHematics Project: The Wonder of Science, The Power of Mathematics--a collaborative partnership between Kennesaw State University and two local school districts, fifth graders had the opportunity to puzzle out chemical formulas of propane, methanol, and other important molecules. In addition, they explored properties that…

  4. Diversity in Biological Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newbury, H. John

    2010-01-01

    One of the striking characteristics of fundamental biological processes, such as genetic inheritance, development and primary metabolism, is the limited amount of variation in the molecules involved. Natural selective pressures act strongly on these core processes and individuals carrying mutations and producing slightly sub-optimal versions of…

  5. Mighty Molecule Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Tom; Rushton, Greg; Bencomo, Marie

    2008-01-01

    As part of the SMATHematics Project: The Wonder of Science, The Power of Mathematics--a collaborative partnership between Kennesaw State University and two local school districts, fifth graders had the opportunity to puzzle out chemical formulas of propane, methanol, and other important molecules. In addition, they explored properties that…

  6. Disentangling DNA molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vologodskii, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    The widespread circular form of DNA molecules inside cells creates very serious topological problems during replication. Due to the helical structure of the double helix the parental strands of circular DNA form a link of very high order, and yet they have to be unlinked before the cell division. DNA topoisomerases, the enzymes that catalyze passing of one DNA segment through another, solve this problem in principle. However, it is very difficult to remove all entanglements between the replicated DNA molecules due to huge length of DNA comparing to the cell size. One strategy that nature uses to overcome this problem is to create the topoisomerases that can dramatically reduce the fraction of linked circular DNA molecules relative to the corresponding fraction at thermodynamic equilibrium. This striking property of the enzymes means that the enzymes that interact with DNA only locally can access their topology, a global property of circular DNA molecules. This review considers the experimental studies of the phenomenon and analyzes the theoretical models that have been suggested in attempts to explain it. We describe here how various models of enzyme action can be investigated computationally. There is no doubt at the moment that we understand basic principles governing enzyme action. Still, there are essential quantitative discrepancies between the experimental data and the theoretical predictions. We consider how these discrepancies can be overcome.

  7. Single molecules: Thermodynamic limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liphardt, Jan

    2012-09-01

    Technologies aimed at single-molecule resolution of non-equilibrium systems increasingly require sophisticated new ways of thinking about thermodynamics. An elegant extension to standard fluctuation theory grants access to the kinetic intermediate states of these systems -- as DNA-pulling experiments now demonstrate.

  8. Disentangling DNA molecules.

    PubMed

    Vologodskii, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    The widespread circular form of DNA molecules inside cells creates very serious topological problems during replication. Due to the helical structure of the double helix the parental strands of circular DNA form a link of very high order, and yet they have to be unlinked before the cell division. DNA topoisomerases, the enzymes that catalyze passing of one DNA segment through another, solve this problem in principle. However, it is very difficult to remove all entanglements between the replicated DNA molecules due to huge length of DNA comparing to the cell size. One strategy that nature uses to overcome this problem is to create the topoisomerases that can dramatically reduce the fraction of linked circular DNA molecules relative to the corresponding fraction at thermodynamic equilibrium. This striking property of the enzymes means that the enzymes that interact with DNA only locally can access their topology, a global property of circular DNA molecules. This review considers the experimental studies of the phenomenon and analyzes the theoretical models that have been suggested in attempts to explain it. We describe here how various models of enzyme action can be investigated computationally. There is no doubt at the moment that we understand basic principles governing enzyme action. Still, there are essential quantitative discrepancies between the experimental data and the theoretical predictions. We consider how these discrepancies can be overcome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Sweeping molecules with light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutzler, Nicholas R.

    2017-03-01

    Many areas of physics—precision measurements, quantum information, and physical chemistry, to name a few—are starting to benefit from the enormous advantages offered by cold and ultracold polar molecules. Molecules have more states, more interactions, and more chemical properties compared to atoms, which make them exciting to study but difficult to tame. In particular, the powerful techniques of atomic laser cooling cannot be naïvely applied to molecules due to their complicated structure. Developments over the past few years have made directly laser cooled and trapped molecules a reality, and now much effort is focused on making these samples larger, denser, and colder—an important step to realizing many of their exciting applications. A careful experimental and numerical study by Truppe et al (2017 New J. Phys. 19 022001) demonstrates a significant improvement and advance in understanding of one of the most limiting steps in laser cooling and trapping of molecules—slowing them from a molecular beam to a near-standstill, with small enough kinetic energy that they can be loaded into a trap.

  10. Three new 'nonterrestrial' molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaddeus, P.; Guelin, M.; Linke, R. A.

    1981-05-01

    Eight new interstellar lines have been detected from three molecules not previously observed spectroscopically in space or in the laboratory. One is a linear or nearly linear molecule with microwave constants B0 equals 21,337.15 plus or minus 0.06 MHz, D0 equals 21.4 plus or minus 1.5 kHz. This is the thioformyl ion HCS(plus), first identified because B0 and D0 are close to those calculated, and now confirmed by laboratory detection of one of the present lines (Gudeman et al.). The second molecule, also linear or nearly so, has microwave constants B0 equals 10,691,406 plus or minus 0.043 MHz, D0 equals 1.84 plus or minus 0.91 kHz close to those expected for the isoelectronic systems HOCO(plus) and HOCN; a choice between the two cannot be made on the basis of the available astronomical data. The existence of a third molecule is deduced from an unidentified line at 85,338 MHz that has been found in many sources, is fairly intense in several, and may be self-absorbed in Sgr B2.

  11. Algebraic theory of molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iachello, Franco

    1995-01-01

    An algebraic formulation of quantum mechanics is presented. In this formulation, operators of interest are expanded onto elements of an algebra, G. For bound state problems in nu dimensions the algebra G is taken to be U(nu + 1). Applications to the structure of molecules are presented.

  12. Conductance measurement of pyridyl-based single molecule junctions with Cu and Au contacts.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiao-Yi; Peng, Zheng-Lian; Sun, Yan-Yan; Wang, Li-Na; Niu, Zhen-Jiang; Zhou, Xiao-Shun

    2013-11-22

    We studied the conductance of pyridyl-based single molecule junctions with Cu contacts by using an electrochemical jump-to-contact scanning tunneling microscopy break junction (ECSTM-BJ) approach. The single molecule junctions of 4,4'-bipyridine (BPY), 1,2-di(pyridin-4-yl)ethene (BPY-EE) and 1,2-di(pyridin-4-yl)ethane (BPY-EA) bridged with Cu clusters show three sets of conductance values. These values are smaller than the conductance values of single molecule junctions with Au electrodes measured by the traditional scanning tunneling microscopy break junction in acidic or neutral solutions, which can be attributed to the different electronic coupling efficiencies between molecules and electrodes. The consistent conductance of pyridyl-based molecules in acidic and neutral solutions may show that the protonated pyridyl group contacts to the electrode through the deprotonated form.

  13. Rydberg States of Atoms and Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stebbings, R. F.; Dunning, F. B.

    2011-03-01

    List of contributors; Preface; 1. Rydberg atoms in astrophysics A. Dalgarno; 2. Theoretical studies of hydrogen Rydberg atoms in electric fields R. J. Damburg and V. V. Kolosov; 3. Rydberg atoms in strong fields D. Kleppner, Michael G. Littman and Myron L. Zimmerman; 4. Spectroscopy of one- and two-electron Rydberg atoms C. Fabre and S. Haroche; 5. Interaction of Rydberg atoms with blackbody radiation T. F. Gallagher; 6. Theoretical approaches to low-energy collisions of Rydberg atoms with atoms and ions A. P. Hickman, R. E. Olson and J. Pascale; 7. Experimental studies of the interaction of Rydberg atoms with atomic species at thermal energies F. Gounand and J. Berlande; 8. Theoretical studies of collisions of Rydberg atoms with molecules Michio Matsuzawa; 9. Experimental studies of thermal-energy collisions of Rydberg atoms with molecules F. B. Dunning and R. F. Stebbings; 10. High-Rydberg molecules Robert S. Freund; 11. Theory of Rydberg collisions with electrons, ions and neutrals M. R. Flannery; 12. Experimental studies of the interactions of Rydberg atoms with charged particles J. -F. Delpech; 13. Rydberg studies using fast beams Peter M. Koch; Index.

  14. Neutral Supersymmetric Higgs Boson Searches

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Stephen Luke

    2008-07-01

    In some Supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model, including the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM), the coupling of Higgs bosons to b-quarks is enhanced. This enhancement makes the associated production of the Higgs with b-quarks an interesting search channel for the Higgs and Supersymmetry at D0. The identification of b-quarks, both online and offline, is essential to this search effort. This thesis describes the author's involvement in the development of both types of b-tagging and in the application of these techniques to the MSSM Higgs search. Work was carried out on the Level-3 trigger b-tagging algorithms. The impact parameter (IP) b-tagger was retuned and the effects of increased instantaneous luminosity on the tagger were studied. An extension of the IP-tagger to use the z-tracking information was developed. A new b-tagger using secondary vertices was developed and commissioned. A tool was developed to allow the use of large multi-run samples for trigger studies involving b-quarks. Offline, a neural network (NN) b-tagger was trained combining the existing offline lifetime based b-tagging tools. The efficiency and fake rate of the NN b-tagger were measured in data and MC. This b-tagger was internally reviewed and certified by the Collaboration and now provides the official b-tagging for all analyses using the Run IIa dataset at D0. A search was performed for neutral MSSM Higgs bosons decaying to a b{bar b} pair and produced in association with one or more b-quarks. Limits are set on the cross-section times the branching ratio for such a process. The limits were interpreted in various MSSM scenarios. This analysis uses the NN b-tagger and was the first to use this tool. The analysis also relies on triggers using the Level-3 IP b-tagging tool described previously. A likelihood discriminant was used to improve the analysis and a neural network was developed to cross-check this technique. The result of the analysis has been submitted to PRL and

  15. OMG: Open Molecule Generator.

    PubMed

    Peironcely, Julio E; Rojas-Chertó, Miguel; Fichera, Davide; Reijmers, Theo; Coulier, Leon; Faulon, Jean-Loup; Hankemeier, Thomas

    2012-09-17

    Computer Assisted Structure Elucidation has been used for decades to discover the chemical structure of unknown compounds. In this work we introduce the first open source structure generator, Open Molecule Generator (OMG), which for a given elemental composition produces all non-isomorphic chemical structures that match that elemental composition. Furthermore, this structure generator can accept as additional input one or multiple non-overlapping prescribed substructures to drastically reduce the number of possible chemical structures. Being open source allows for customization and future extension of its functionality. OMG relies on a modified version of the Canonical Augmentation Path, which grows intermediate chemical structures by adding bonds and checks that at each step only unique molecules are produced. In order to benchmark the tool, we generated chemical structures for the elemental formulas and substructures of different metabolites and compared the results with a commercially available structure generator. The results obtained, i.e. the number of molecules generated, were identical for elemental compositions having only C, O and H. For elemental compositions containing C, O, H, N, P and S, OMG produces all the chemically valid molecules while the other generator produces more, yet chemically impossible, molecules. The chemical completeness of the OMG results comes at the expense of being slower than the commercial generator. In addition to being open source, OMG clearly showed the added value of constraining the solution space by using multiple prescribed substructures as input. We expect this structure generator to be useful in many fields, but to be especially of great importance for metabolomics, where identifying unknown metabolites is still a major bottleneck.

  16. OMG: Open Molecule Generator

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Computer Assisted Structure Elucidation has been used for decades to discover the chemical structure of unknown compounds. In this work we introduce the first open source structure generator, Open Molecule Generator (OMG), which for a given elemental composition produces all non-isomorphic chemical structures that match that elemental composition. Furthermore, this structure generator can accept as additional input one or multiple non-overlapping prescribed substructures to drastically reduce the number of possible chemical structures. Being open source allows for customization and future extension of its functionality. OMG relies on a modified version of the Canonical Augmentation Path, which grows intermediate chemical structures by adding bonds and checks that at each step only unique molecules are produced. In order to benchmark the tool, we generated chemical structures for the elemental formulas and substructures of different metabolites and compared the results with a commercially available structure generator. The results obtained, i.e. the number of molecules generated, were identical for elemental compositions having only C, O and H. For elemental compositions containing C, O, H, N, P and S, OMG produces all the chemically valid molecules while the other generator produces more, yet chemically impossible, molecules. The chemical completeness of the OMG results comes at the expense of being slower than the commercial generator. In addition to being open source, OMG clearly showed the added value of constraining the solution space by using multiple prescribed substructures as input. We expect this structure generator to be useful in many fields, but to be especially of great importance for metabolomics, where identifying unknown metabolites is still a major bottleneck. PMID:22985496

  17. Neutral recycling effects on ITG turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stotler, D. P.; Lang, J.; Chang, C. S.; Churchill, R. M.; Ku, S.

    2017-08-01

    The effects of recycled neutral atoms on tokamak ion temperature gradient (ITG) driven turbulence have been investigated in a steep edge pedestal, magnetic separatrix configuration, with the full-f edge gryokinetic code XGC1. An adiabatic electron model has been used; hence, the impacts of neutral particles and turbulence on the density gradient are not considered, nor are electromagnetic turbulence effects. The neutral atoms enhance the ITG turbulence, first, by increasing the ion temperature gradient in the pedestal via the cooling effects of charge exchange and, second, by a relative reduction in the E× B shearing rate.

  18. On the neutral points in Rayleigh transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viik, T.

    2017-03-01

    In this paper we consider the dependence of the existence and position of the neutral points on the albedo of single scattering and the optical thickness in a Rayleigh scattering plane-parallel homogeneous atmospheres. We use the Chandrasekhar method of discrete ordinates and the method of approximating the Sobolev resolvent function to solve the vector equation of transfer in l- and r-representation. On the basis of many different models of Rayleigh atmospheres we show the behaviour of the neutral points while the parallel incident flux can be both unpolarized or polarized. Our calculations show with high probability that the maximum number of neutral points in a Rayleigh atmosphere is four.

  19. Discrete Elements Method of Neutral Particle Transport

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-01

    0 ,,S" . K A t - "’.* DISCRETE ELEMENTS METHOD NEUTRAL PARTICLE TRANSPORT ..- DISSERTATION AF. IT/DS/PH/83-5 Kirk A. Mathews LCDR USN D~ Approved for...DISCRETE ELEMENTS METHOD OF NEUTRAL PARTICLE TRANSPORT DISSERTATION Presented to the Faculty of the School of Engineering of the Air Force Institute...o .°. .• . r •.- - DS/PH/83-5 DISCRETE ELEMENTS METHOD OF NEUTRAL PARTICLE TRANSPORT 4 "by Kirk A. Mathews LCDR USN Approved: , Charles J

  20. Neutral particle beams for space defense

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botwin, Robert; Favale, Anthony

    Neutral particle beam (NPB) weapons direct highly focused high energy streams of electrically neutral atomic particles traveling at nearly the speed of light, escaping deflection from the earth's magnetic field and acting on the subatomic structure of a target, destroying it from within. The beam's brief contact with a reentry vehicle produces a nuclear reaction in the latter that yields particle emissions; by detecting and identifying those particles, it becomes possible to effectively distinguish warheads from decoys. Attention is given to the NPB program roles to be played by the Beam Experiment Aboard Rocket and Neutral Particle Beam Integrated Space Experiment projects.

  1. Neutral recycling effects on ITG turbulence

    DOE PAGES

    Stotler, D. P.; Lang, J.; Chang, C. S.; ...

    2017-07-04

    Here, the effects of recycled neutral atoms on tokamak ion temperature gradient (ITG) driven turbulence have been investigated in a steep edge pedestal, magnetic separatrix configuration, with the full-f edge gryokinetic code XGC1. An adiabatic electron model has been used; hence, the impacts of neutral particles and turbulence on the density gradient are not considered, nor are electromagnetic turbulence effects. The neutral atoms enhance the ITG turbulence, first, by increasing the ion temperature gradient in the pedestal via the cooling effects of charge exchange and, second, by a relative reduction in themore » $$E\\times B$$ shearing rate.« less

  2. Evaluation of smallpox vaccines using variola neutralization.

    PubMed

    Damon, Inger K; Davidson, Whitni B; Hughes, Christine M; Olson, Victoria A; Smith, Scott K; Holman, Robert C; Frey, Sharon E; Newman, Frances; Belshe, Robert B; Yan, Lihan; Karem, Kevin

    2009-08-01

    The search for a 'third'-generation smallpox vaccine has resulted in the development and characterization of several vaccine candidates. A significant barrier to acceptance is the absence of challenge models showing induction of correlates of protective immunity against variola virus. In this light, virus neutralization provides one of few experimental methods to show specific 'in vitro' activity of vaccines against variola virus. Here, we provide characterization of the ability of a modified vaccinia virus Ankara vaccine to induce variola virus-neutralizing antibodies, and we provide comparison with the neutralization elicited by standard Dryvax vaccination.

  3. Evaluation of smallpox vaccines using variola neutralization

    PubMed Central

    Damon, Inger K.; Davidson, Whitni B.; Hughes, Christine M.; Olson, Victoria A.; Smith, Scott K.; Holman, Robert C.; Frey, Sharon E.; Newman, Frances; Belshe, Robert B.; Yan, Lihan; Karem, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    The search for a ‘third’-generation smallpox vaccine has resulted in the development and characterization of several vaccine candidates. A significant barrier to acceptance is the absence of challenge models showing induction of correlates of protective immunity against variola virus. In this light, virus neutralization provides one of few experimental methods to show specific ‘in vitro’ activity of vaccines against variola virus. Here, we provide characterization of the ability of a modified vaccinia virus Ankara vaccine to induce variola virus-neutralizing antibodies, and we provide comparison with the neutralization elicited by standard Dryvax vaccination. PMID:19339477

  4. Bacterial invasion reconstructed molecule by molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, James H

    2009-01-01

    We propose to visualize the initial stages of bacterial infection of a human host cell with unmatched spatial and temporal resolution. This work will develop a new capability for the laboratory (super-resolution optical imaging), will test unresolved scientific hypotheses regarding host-pathogen interaction dynamics, and leverages state of the art 3D molecular tracking instrumentation developed recently by our group. There is much to be gained by applying new single molecule tools to the important and familiar problem of pathogen entry into a host cell. For example, conventional fluorescence microscopy has identified key host receptors, such as CD44 and {alpha}5{beta}1 integrin, that aggregate near the site of Salmonella typhimurium infection of human cells. However, due to the small size of the bacteria ({approx} 2 {micro}m) and the diffraction of the emitted light, one just sees a fluorescent 'blob' of host receptors that aggregate at the site of attachment, making it difficult to determine the exact number of receptors present or whether there is any particular spatial arrangement of the receptors that facilitates bacterial adhesion/entry. Using newly developed single molecule based super-resolution imaging methods, we will visualize how host receptors are directed to the site of pathogen adhesion and whether host receptors adopt a specific spatial arrangement for successful infection. Furthermore, we will employ our 3D molecular tracking methods to follow the injection of virulence proteins, or effectors, into the host cell by the pathogen Type III secretion system (TTSS). We expect these studies to provide mechanistic insights into the early events of pathogen infection that have here-to-fore been technically beyond our reach. Our Research Goals are: Goal 1--Construct a super-resolution fluorescence microscope and use this new capability to image the spatial distribution of different host receptors (e.g. CD44, as {alpha}5{beta}1 integrin) at the point of

  5. Neutral-neutral and neutral-ion collision integrals for Y2O3-Ar plasma system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhamale, Gayatri D.; Nath, Swastik; Mathe, Vikas L.; Ghorui, Srikumar

    2017-06-01

    A detailed investigation on the neutral-neutral and neutral-ion collision integrals is reported for Y2O3-Ar plasma, an important system of functional material with unique properties having a wide range of processing applications. The calculated integrals are indispensible pre-requisite for the estimation of transport properties needed in CFD modelling of associated plasma processes. Polarizability plays an important role in determining the integral values. Ambiguity in selecting appropriate polarizability data available in the literature and calculating effective number of electrons in the ionized species contributing to the polarizability are addressed. The integrals are evaluated using Lennard-Jones like phenomenological potential up to (l,s) = (4,4). Used interaction potential is suitable for both neutral-neutral and neutral-ion interactions. For atom-parent ion interactions, contribution coming from the inelastic resonant charge transfer process has been accounted properly together with that coming from the elastic counterpart. A total of 14 interacting species and 60 different interactions are considered. Key contributing factors like basic electronic properties of the interacting species and associated polarizability values are accounted carefully. Adopted methodology is first benchmarked against data reported in the literature and then applied to the Y2O3-Ar plasma system for estimating the collision integrals. Results are presented in the temperature range of 100 K-100 000 K.

  6. Detection of Neutralizing Antibodies against Human Papillomaviruses (HPV) by Inhibition of Gene Transfer Mediated by HPV Pseudovirions

    PubMed Central

    Bousarghin, Latifa; Combita-Rojas, Alba-Lucia; Touzé, Antoine; Mehdaoui, Slimane El; Sizaret, Pierre-Yves; Bravo, Maria-Mercedes; Coursaget, Pierre

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this study was to develop a human papillomavirus (HPV) neutralization assay using HPV pseudovirions generated in vitro. For this purpose, gene transfer efficiency of HPV virus-like particles (VLPs) was improved by using direct interaction between a reporter plasmid and the VLPs. Electron microscopic observation of the interaction between DNA molecules and VLPs revealed that VLPs always interact with a single DNA molecule and that VLPs bind to the end of linearized DNA molecules. An 100-fold improvement in the gene transfer was obtained by simple interaction between a linearized DNA molecule and VLPs. Moreover, direct interaction methods offer the possibility of transferring plasmids a size higher than that of the papillomavirus genome. The approach that we developed to generate HPV-16 and HPV-31 pseudovirions proved to be suitable for testing neutralizing antibodies in human sera both after immunization and after natural infection. PMID:11880418

  7. Neutrality tests for sequences with missing data.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, Luca; Raineri, Emanuele; Ramos-Onsins, Sebastian

    2012-08-01

    Missing data are common in DNA sequences obtained through high-throughput sequencing. Furthermore, samples of low quality or problems in the experimental protocol often cause a loss of data even with traditional sequencing technologies. Here we propose modified estimators of variability and neutrality tests that can be naturally applied to sequences with missing data, without the need to remove bases or individuals from the analysis. Modified statistics include the Watterson estimator θW, Tajima's D, Fay and Wu's H, and HKA. We develop a general framework to take missing data into account in frequency spectrum-based neutrality tests and we derive the exact expression for the variance of these statistics under the neutral model. The neutrality tests proposed here can also be used as summary statistics to describe the information contained in other classes of data like DNA microarrays.

  8. Techniques of Neutralization: A Brain Network Perspective.

    PubMed

    Jantz, Paul B; Morley, Richard H

    2017-10-01

    Sykes and Matza introduced neutralization theory in 1957 to explain how juvenile delinquents retain a positive self-image when engaging in delinquent acts. Since then, aspects of neutralization theory have been incorporated into sociological and criminological theories to explain socially deviant behavior. Functional brain mapping research utilizing advanced magnetic resonance imaging techniques has identified complex, intrinsically organized, large-scale brain networks. Higher order operations commonly attributed to three brain networks (default mode network [DMN], central executive network [CEN], salience network [SN]) align closely with neutralization theory. This article briefly discusses brain networks in general and the DMN, CEN, and SN specifically. It also discusses how these networks are involved when engaging in the use of techniques of neutralization and offers implications for future research.

  9. Ion-Neutral Coupling in Solar Prominence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, H.; DeVore, C. R.; Karpen, J.; Kucera, T.; Antiochos, S.; Kawashima, R.

    2011-01-01

    Coupling between ions and neutrals in magnetized plasmas is fundamentally important to many aspects of heliophysics, including our ionosphere, the solar chromosphere, the solar wind interaction with planetary atmospheres, and the interface between the heliosphere and the interstellar medium. Ion-neutral coupling also plays a major role in the physics of solar prominences. By combining theory, modeling, and observations we are working toward a better understanding of the structure and dynamics of partially ionized prominence plasma. Two key questions are addressed in the present work: 1) what physical mechanism(s) sets the cross-field scale of prominence threads? 2) Are ion-neutral interactions responsible for the vertical flows and structure in prominences? We present initial results from a study investigating what role ion-neutral interactions play in prominence dynamics and structure. This research was supported by NASA.

  10. Binding of atoms and stability of molecules in Hartree and Thomas-Fermi type theories

    SciTech Connect

    Catto, I.; Lions, P.L. )

    1993-01-01

    This paper is the third of a series devoted to the study of the binding of atoms, molecules and ions and of the stability of general molecular systems including molecular ions, in the context of Hartree and Thomas-Fermi type theories. For Thomas-Fermi-von Weizsaecker or Thomas-Fermi-Dirac-von Weizsaecker models, it is proven here that neutral systems can be bound and in view of the results shown in the preceding parts this yields the stability of arbitrary molecules (general neutral molecular systems). For the Hartree and Hartree-Fock models, it is proven that neutral planar systems can be bound and this yields the stability of arbitrary tetraatomic molecules for instance. Various variants and extensions are also considered. 24 refs.

  11. Neutral thermospheric temperature from ion concentration measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breig, E. L.; Donaldson, J. S.; Hanson, W. B.; Hoffman, J. H.; Power, R. A.; Kayser, D. C.; Spencer, N. W.; Wharton, L. E.

    1981-01-01

    A technique for extracting information on neutral temperature from in situ F region measurements of O(+) and H(+) ion concentrations is analyzed and evaluated. Advantage is taken of the condition of charge-exchange equilibrium of these species in the neighborhood of 320 km to infer the associated relative abundances of neutral oxygen and hydrogen. Results are shown to be generally consistent with other concurrent in situ measurements.

  12. Neutral thermospheric temperature from ion concentration measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breig, E. L.; Donaldson, J. S.; Hanson, W. B.; Hoffman, J. H.; Power, R. A.; Kayser, D. C.; Spencer, N. W.; Wharton, L. E.

    1981-01-01

    A technique for extracting information on neutral temperature from in situ F region measurements of O(+) and H(+) ion concentrations is analyzed and evaluated. Advantage is taken of the condition of charge-exchange equilibrium of these species in the neighborhood of 320 km to infer the associated relative abundances of neutral oxygen and hydrogen. Results are shown to be generally consistent with other concurrent in situ measurements.

  13. Nitrogen-neutrality: a step towards sustainability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leip, Adrian; Leach, Allison; Musinguzi, Patrick; Tumwesigye, Trust; Olupot, Giregon; Tenywa, John Stephen; Mudiope, Joseph; Hutton, Olivia; Cordovil, Claudia M. d. S.; Bekunda, Mateete; Galloway, James

    2014-11-01

    We propose a novel indicator measuring one dimension of the sustainability of an entity in modern societies: Nitrogen-neutrality. N-neutrality strives to offset Nr releases an entity exerts on the environment from the release of reactive nitrogen (Nr) to the environment by reducing it and by offsetting the Nr releases elsewhere. N-neutrality also aims to increase awareness about the consequences of unintentional releases of nitrogen to the environment. N-neutrality is composed of two quantified elements: Nr released by an entity (e.g. on the basis of the N footprint) and Nr reduction from management and offset projects (N offset). It includes management strategies to reduce nitrogen losses before they occur (e.g., through energy conservation). Each of those elements faces specific challenges with regard to data availability and conceptual development. Impacts of Nr releases to the environment are manifold, and the impact profile of one unit of Nr release depends strongly on the compound released and the local susceptibility to Nr. As such, N-neutrality is more difficult to conceptualize and calculate than C-neutrality. We developed a workable conceptual framework for N-neutrality which was adapted for the 6th International Nitrogen Conference (N2013, Kampala, November 2013). Total N footprint of the surveyed meals at N2013 was 66 kg N. A total of US 3050 was collected from the participants and used to offset the conference’s N footprint by supporting the UN Millennium Village cluster Ruhiira in South-Western Uganda. The concept needs further development in particular to better incorporate the spatio-temporal variability of impacts and to standardize the methods to quantify the required N offset to neutralize the Nr releases impact. Criteria for compensation projects need to be sharply defined to allow the development of a market for N offset certificates.

  14. ITER neutral beam system US conceptual design

    SciTech Connect

    Purgalis, P.

    1990-09-01

    In this document we present the US conceptual design of a neutral beam system for International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The design incorporates a barium surface conversion D{sup {minus}} source feeding a linear array of accelerator channels. The system uses a dc accelerator with electrostatic quadrupoles for strong focusing. A high voltage power supply that is integrated with the accelerator is presented as an attractive option. A gas neutralizer is used and residual ions exiting the neutralizer are deflected to water-cooled dumps. Cryopanels are located at the accelerator exit to pump excess gas from the source and the neutralizer, and in the ion dump cavity to pump re-neutralized ions and neutralizer gas. All the above components are packaged in compact identical, independent modules which can be removed for remote maintenance. The neutral beam system delivers 75 MW of DO at 1.3 MeV, into three ports with a total of 9 modules arranged in stacks of three modules per port . To increase reliability each module is designed to deliver up to 10 MW; this allows eight modules operating at partial capacity to deliver the required power in the event one module is out of service, and provides 20% excess capacity to improve availability. Radiation protection is provided by shielding and by locating critical components in the source and accelerator 46.5 m from the torus centerline. Neutron shielding in the drift duct and neutralizer provides the added feature of limiting conductance and thus reducing gas flow to and from the torus.

  15. A class of neutral functional differential equations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melvin, W. R.

    1972-01-01

    Formulation and study of the initial value problem for neutral functional differential equations. The existence, uniqueness, and continuation of solutions to this problem are investigated, and an analysis is made of the dependence of the solutions on the initial conditions and parameters, resulting in the derivation of a continuous dependence theorem in which the fundamental mathematical principles underlying the continuous dependence problem for a very general system of nonlinear neutral functional differential equations are separated out.

  16. A Neutral Silicon/Phosphorus Frustrated Lewis Pair.

    PubMed

    Waerder, Benedikt; Pieper, Martin; Körte, Leif A; Kinder, Timo A; Mix, Andreas; Neumann, Beate; Stammler, Hans-Georg; Mitzel, Norbert W

    2015-11-02

    Frustrated Lewis pairs (FLPs) have a great potential for activation of small molecules. Most known FLP systems are based on boron or aluminum atoms as acid functions, few on zinc, and only two on boron-isoelectronic silicenium cation systems. The first FLP system based on a neutral silane, (C2F5)3SiCH2P(tBu)2 (1), was prepared from (C2F5)3SiCl with C2F5 groups of very high electronegativity and LiCH2P(tBu)2. 1 is capable of cleaving hydrogen, and adds CO2 and SO2. Hydrogen splitting was confirmed by H/D scrambling reactions. The structures of 1, its CO2 and SO2 adducts, and a decomposition product with CO2 were elucidated by X-ray diffraction. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Molecules in Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdyugina, Svetlana

    2015-08-01

    Molecules probe cool matter in the Universe and various astrophysical objects. Their ability to sense magnetic fields provides new insights into magnetic properties of these objects. During the past fifteen years we have carried out a theoretical study of molecular magnetic effects such as the Zeeman, Paschen-Back and Hanle effects and their applications for inferring magnetic structures and spatial inhomogeneities on the Sun, cool stars, brown dwarfs, and exoplanets from molecular spectro-polarimetry (e.g., Berdyugina 2011). Here, we present an overview of this study and compare our theoretical predictions with recent laboratory measurements of magnetic properties of some molecules. We present also a new web-based tool to compute molecular magnetic effects and polarized spectra which is supported by the ERC Advanced Grant HotMol.

  18. Single-molecule electrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggeri, Francesca; Zosel, Franziska; Mutter, Natalie; Różycka, Mirosława; Wojtas, Magdalena; Ożyhar, Andrzej; Schuler, Benjamin; Krishnan, Madhavi

    2017-05-01

    Mass and electrical charge are fundamental properties of biological macromolecules. Although molecular mass has long been determined with atomic precision, a direct and precise determination of molecular charge remains an outstanding challenge. Here we report high-precision (<1e) measurements of the electrical charge of molecules such as nucleic acids, and globular and disordered proteins in solution. The measurement is based on parallel external field-free trapping of single macromolecules, permits the estimation of a dielectric coefficient of the molecular interior and can be performed in real time. Further, we demonstrate the direct detection of single amino acid substitution and chemical modifications in proteins. As the electrical charge of a macromolecule strongly depends on its three-dimensional conformation, this kind of high-precision electrometry offers an approach to probe the structure, fluctuations and interactions of a single molecule in solution.

  19. Strange skyrmion molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopeliovich, Vladimir B.; Stern, Boris E.

    1997-05-01

    Composed skyrmions with B=2, strangeness content close to 0.5 and the binding energy of several tens of Mev are described. These skyrmions are obtained starting from the system of two B=1 hedgehogs located in different SU(2) subgroups of SU(3) and have the mass and baryon number distribution of molecular (dipole) type. The quantization of zero modes of skyrmion molecules and physics consequences of their existence are discussed.

  20. Strange skyrmion molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Kopeliovich, Vladimir B.; Stern, Boris E.

    1997-05-20

    Composed skyrmions with B=2, strangeness content close to 0.5 and the binding energy of several tens of Mev are described. These skyrmions are obtained starting from the system of two B=1 hedgehogs located in different SU(2) subgroups of SU(3) and have the mass and baryon number distribution of molecular (dipole) type. The quantization of zero modes of skyrmion molecules and physics consequences of their existence are discussed.

  1. Characterization of dinaphthosulfoxide molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uluçam, Gühergül; Okan, S. Erol; Aktaş, Şaban; Öğretmen, Gül Penbe

    2015-12-01

    Dinaphthosulfoxide has been synthesized, and confirmed by the experimental methods. The geometrical optimization of the two isomers of the molecule in their ground state was studied using density functional theory. Then, NMR and IR spectra were calculated for the optimized configurations. Analyzing the hydroxyl features in the NMR data and that of sulfoxide in IR spectra, the experimental observables are found to be in agreement with the properties of the syn isomer.

  2. The Phobos neutral and ionized torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppe, A. R.; Curry, S. M.; Fatemi, S.

    2016-05-01

    Charged particle sputtering, micrometeoroid impact vaporization, and photon-stimulated desorption are fundamental processes operating at airless surfaces throughout the solar system. At larger bodies, such as Earth's Moon and several of the outer planet moons, these processes generate tenuous surface-bound exospheres that have been observed by a variety of methods. Phobos and Deimos, in contrast, are too gravitationally weak to keep ejected neutrals bound and, thus, are suspected to generate neutral tori in orbit around Mars. While these tori have not yet been detected, the distribution and density of both the neutral and ionized components are of fundamental interest. We combine a neutral Monte Carlo model and a hybrid plasma model to investigate both the neutral and ionized components of the Phobos torus. We show that the spatial distribution of the neutral torus is highly dependent on each individual species (due to ionization rates that span nearly 4 orders of magnitude) and on the location of Phobos with respect to Mars. Additionally, we present the flux distribution of torus pickup ions throughout the Martian system and estimate typical pickup ion fluxes. We find that the predicted pickup ion fluxes are too low to perturb the ambient plasma, consistent with previous null detections by spacecraft around Mars.

  3. Chemistry of sprite discharges through ion-neutral reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraki, Y.; Kasai, Y.; Fukunishi, H.

    2008-02-01

    We estimate the concentration changes, caused by a single streamer in sprites, of ozone and related minor species as odd nitrogen (NOx) and hydrogen (HOx) families in the upper stratosphere and mesosphere. The streamer has an intense electric field and high electron density at its head where a large number of chemically-radical ions and atoms are produced through electron impact on neutral molecules. After propagation of the streamer, the densities of minor species can be perturbed through ion-neutral chemical reactions initiated by the relaxation of these radical products. We evaluate the production rates of ions and atoms using electron kinetics model and assuming the electric field and electron density in the streamer head. We calculate the density variations mainly for NOx, Ox, and HOx species using a one-dimensional model of the neutral and ion composition of the middle atmosphere, including the effect of the sprite streamer. Results at the nighttime condition show that the densities of NO, O3, H, and OH increase suddenly through reactions triggered by firstly produced atomic nitrogen and oxygen, and electrons just after streamer initiation. It is shown that NO and NO2 still remain for 1 h by a certain order of increase with their source-sink balance predominantly around 60 km; for other species, increases in O3, OH, HO2, and H2O2 still remain in the range of 40-70 km. From this affirmative result of long time behavior previously not presented, we emphasize that sprites would have a power to impact on local chemistry at night. We also discuss comparison with previous studies and suggestion for satellite observations.

  4. Chemistry of sprite discharges through ion-neutral reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraki, Y.; Kasai, Y.; Fukunishi, H.

    2008-07-01

    We estimate the concentration changes, caused by streamer discharge in sprites, of ozone and related minor species as odd nitrogen (NOx) and hydrogen (HOx) families in the upper stratosphere and mesosphere. The streamer has an intense electric field and high electron density at its head, where a large number of chemically-radical ions and atoms are produced through electron impact on neutral molecules. After its propagation, densities of minor species can be perturbed through ion-neutral chemical reactions initiated by the relaxation of these radical products. We evaluate the production rates of ions and atoms using an electron kinetics model and by assuming that the electric field and electron density are in the head region. We calculate the density variations mainly for NOx, Ox, and HOx species using a one-dimensional model of the neutral and ion composition of the middle atmosphere, including the effect of the sprite streamer. Results at the nighttime condition show that the densities of NO, O3, H, and OH increase suddenly through reactions triggered by the first atomic nitrogen and oxygen product, and electrons just after streamer initiation. It is shown that NO and NO2 still remain for 1 h by a certain order of increase with their source-sink balance, predominantly around 60 km; for other species, increases in O3, OH, HO2, and H2O2 still remain in the range of 40 70 km. From this affirmative result of long-time behavior previously not presented, we emphasize that sprites would have the power to impact local chemistry at night. We also discuss the consistency with previous theoretical and observational studies, along with future suggestions.

  5. Single Molecule Mechanochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shaowei; Zhang, Yanxing; Ho, Wilson; Wu, Ruqian; Ruqian Wu, Yanxing Zhang Team; Wilson Ho, Shaowei Li Team

    Mechanical forces can be used to trigger chemical reactions through bending and stretching of chemical bonds. Using the reciprocating movement of the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM), mechanical energy can be provided to a single molecule sandwiched between the tip and substrate. When the mechanical pulse center was moved to the outer ring feature of a CO molecule, the reaction rate was significantly increased compared with bare Cu surface and over Au atoms. First, DFT calculations show that the presence of CO makes the Cu cavity more attractive toward H2 Second, H2 prefers the horizontal adsorption geometry in the Cu-Cu and Au-Cu cavities and no hybridization occurs between the antibonding states of H2 and states of Cu atoms. While H2 loses electrons from its bonding state in all three cavities, the filling of its anti-bonding state only occurs in the CO-Cu cavity. Both make the CO-Cu cavity much more effectively to chop the H2 molecule. Work was supported by the National Science Foundation Center for Chemical Innovation on Chemistry at the Space-Time Limit (CaSTL) under Grant No. CHE-1414466.

  6. Photonic Molecule Lasers Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, Denis; Dumont, Joey; Déziel, Jean-Luc; Dubé, Louis J.

    2014-05-01

    Photonic molecules (PMs) formed by coupling two or more optical resonators are ideal candidates for the fabrication of integrated microlasers, photonic molecule lasers. Whereas most calculations on PM lasers have been based on cold-cavity (passive) modes, i.e. quasi-bound states, a recently formulated steady-state ab initio laser theory (SALT) offers the possibility to take into account the spectral properties of the underlying gain transition, its position and linewidth, as well as incorporating an arbitrary pump profile. We will combine two theoretical approaches to characterize the lasing properties of PM lasers: for two-dimensional systems, the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory will obtain the resonant modes of the coupled molecules in an active medium described by SALT. Not only is then the theoretical description more complete, the use of an active medium provides additional parameters to control, engineer and harness the lasing properties of PM lasers for ultra-low threshold and directional single-mode emission. We will extend our recent study and present new results for a number of promising geometries. The authors acknowledge financial support from NSERC (Canada) and the CERC in Photonic Innovations of Y. Messaddeq.

  7. Model molecules mimicking asphaltenes.

    PubMed

    Sjöblom, Johan; Simon, Sébastien; Xu, Zhenghe

    2015-04-01

    Asphalthenes are typically defined as the fraction of petroleum insoluble in n-alkanes (typically heptane, but also hexane or pentane) but soluble in toluene. This fraction causes problems of emulsion formation and deposition/precipitation during crude oil production, processing and transport. From the definition it follows that asphaltenes are not a homogeneous fraction but is composed of molecules polydisperse in molecular weight, structure and functionalities. Their complexity makes the understanding of their properties difficult. Proper model molecules with well-defined structures which can resemble the properties of real asphaltenes can help to improve this understanding. Over the last ten years different research groups have proposed different asphaltene model molecules and studied them to determine how well they can mimic the properties of asphaltenes and determine the mechanisms behind the properties of asphaltenes. This article reviews the properties of the different classes of model compounds proposed and present their properties by comparison with fractionated asphaltenes. After presenting the interest of developing model asphaltenes, the composition and properties of asphaltenes are presented, followed by the presentation of approaches and accomplishments of different schools working on asphaltene model compounds. The presentation of bulk and interfacial properties of perylene-based model asphaltene compounds developed by Sjöblom et al. is the subject of the next part. Finally the emulsion-stabilization properties of fractionated asphaltenes and model asphaltene compounds is presented and discussed.

  8. A new technique for in situ measurement of the composition of neutral gas in interplanetary space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruntman, Michael A.

    1993-01-01

    Neutral atoms in interplanetary space play an important role in many processes relevant to the formation and evolution of the Solar System. An experimental approach is proposed for in situ atom detection based on the conversion of neutral atoms to negative ions at a specially prepared sensitive surface. Negative ions are subsequently analyzed and detected in an essentially noise-free mode. The use of the technique for in situ study of the composition of neutral interstellar atoms is considered. It is shown that interstellar H, D, and O atoms and possibly H2 molecules can be measured by the proposed technique. The experiment can be performed from a high-apogee Earth-orbiting satellite or from a deep space probe. Possible applications of the technique are discussed.

  9. Development of miniaturized, spectroscopically assisted Penning gauges for fractional helium and hydrogen neutral pressure measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Flesch, K.; Kremeyer, T.; Schmitz, O.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Wenzel, U.

    2016-08-18

    Direct measurements of the helium (He) fractional neutral pressure in the neutral gas around fusion devices is challenging because of the small mass difference between the abundant D-2 molecules and the He ash which will be produced by deuterium-tritium fusion. In order to study He exhaust, an in situ Penning gauge system is being developed at UW-Madison that is optimized for good pressure and high spectroscopic sensitivity. There are three different anode geometries that we have studied regarding their vacuum electrostatic fields, light output, and ion current. The light output of the two new anode configurations are at least one order of magnitude above the currently available designs, hence improving the spectroscopic sensitivity at similar total neutral pressure resolution.

  10. Development of miniaturized, spectroscopically assisted Penning gauges for fractional helium and hydrogen neutral pressure measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Flesch, K. Kremeyer, T.; Schmitz, O.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Wenzel, U.

    2016-11-15

    Direct measurements of the helium (He) fractional neutral pressure in the neutral gas around fusion devices is challenging because of the small mass difference between the abundant D{sub 2} molecules and the He ash which will be produced by deuterium-tritium fusion. To study He exhaust, an in situ Penning gauge system is being developed at UW-Madison that is optimized for good pressure and high spectroscopic sensitivity. Three different anode geometries have been studied regarding their vacuum electrostatic fields, light output, and ion current. The light output of the two new anode configurations are at least one order of magnitude above the currently available designs, hence improving the spectroscopic sensitivity at similar total neutral pressure resolution.

  11. A SEARCH FOR CO-EVOLVING ION AND NEUTRAL GAS SPECIES IN PRESTELLAR MOLECULAR CLOUD CORES

    SciTech Connect

    Tassis, Konstantinos; Hezareh, Talayeh; Willacy, Karen

    2012-11-20

    A comparison between the widths of ion and neutral molecule spectral lines has been recently used to estimate the strength of the magnetic field in turbulent star-forming regions. However, the ion (HCO{sup +}) and neutral (HCN) species used in such studies may not be necessarily co-evolving at every scale and density, and thus, may not trace the same regions. Here, we use coupled chemical/dynamical models of evolving prestellar molecular cloud cores including non-equilibrium chemistry, with and without magnetic fields, to study the spatial distribution of HCO{sup +} and HCN, which have been used in observations of spectral line width differences to date. In addition, we seek new ion-neutral pairs that are good candidates for such observations, because they have similar evolution and are approximately co-spatial in our models. We identify three such good candidate pairs: HCO{sup +}/NO, HCO{sup +}/CO, and NO{sup +}/NO.

  12. Development of miniaturized, spectroscopically assisted Penning gauges for fractional helium and hydrogen neutral pressure measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Flesch, K.; Kremeyer, T.; Schmitz, O.; ...

    2016-08-18

    Direct measurements of the helium (He) fractional neutral pressure in the neutral gas around fusion devices is challenging because of the small mass difference between the abundant D-2 molecules and the He ash which will be produced by deuterium-tritium fusion. In order to study He exhaust, an in situ Penning gauge system is being developed at UW-Madison that is optimized for good pressure and high spectroscopic sensitivity. There are three different anode geometries that we have studied regarding their vacuum electrostatic fields, light output, and ion current. The light output of the two new anode configurations are at least onemore » order of magnitude above the currently available designs, hence improving the spectroscopic sensitivity at similar total neutral pressure resolution.« less

  13. Development of miniaturized, spectroscopically assisted Penning gauges for fractional helium and hydrogen neutral pressure measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flesch, K.; Kremeyer, T.; Schmitz, O.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Wenzel, U.

    2016-11-01

    Direct measurements of the helium (He) fractional neutral pressure in the neutral gas around fusion devices is challenging because of the small mass difference between the abundant D2 molecules and the He ash which will be produced by deuterium-tritium fusion. To study He exhaust, an in situ Penning gauge system is being developed at UW-Madison that is optimized for good pressure and high spectroscopic sensitivity. Three different anode geometries have been studied regarding their vacuum electrostatic fields, light output, and ion current. The light output of the two new anode configurations are at least one order of magnitude above the currently available designs, hence improving the spectroscopic sensitivity at similar total neutral pressure resolution.

  14. Single-size thermometric measurements on a size distribution of neutral fullerenes.

    PubMed

    Cauchy, C; Bakker, J M; Huismans, Y; Rouzée, A; Redlich, B; van der Meer, A F G; Bordas, C; Vrakking, M J J; Lépine, F

    2013-05-10

    We present measurements of the velocity distribution of electrons emitted from mass-selected neutral fullerenes, performed at the intracavity free electron laser FELICE. We make use of mass-specific vibrational resonances in the infrared domain to selectively heat up one out of a distribution of several fullerene species. Efficient energy redistribution leads to decay via thermionic emission. Time-resolved electron kinetic energy distributions measured give information on the decay rate of the selected fullerene. This method is generally applicable to all neutral species that exhibit thermionic emission and provides a unique tool to study the stability of mass-selected neutral clusters and molecules that are only available as part of a size distribution.

  15. A coarse-grained kinetic equation for neutral particles in turbulent fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Mekkaoui, A.; Marandet, Y.; Genesio, P.; Rosato, J.; Stamm, R.; Capes, H.; Koubiti, M.; Godbert-Mouret, L.; Catoire, F.

    2012-06-15

    A coarse-grained kinetic equation for neutral particles (atoms, molecules) in magnetized fusion plasmas, valid on time scales large compared to the turbulence correlation time, is presented. This equation includes the effects of plasma density fluctuations, described by gamma statistics, on the transport of neutral particles. These effects have so far been neglected in plasma edge modeling, in spite of the fact that the amplitude of fluctuations can be of order unity. Density fluctuations are shown to have a marked effect on the screening of neutrals and on the spatial localization of the ionization source, in particular at high density. The coarse-grained equations obtained in this work are readily implemented in edge code suites currently used for fusion plasma analysis and future divertor design (ITER, DEMO).

  16. Electrostatic interaction of neutral semi-permeable membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradova, Olga I.; Bocquet, Lyderic; Bogdanov, Artem N.; Tsekov, Roumen; Lobaskin, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    We consider an osmotic equilibrium between bulk solutions of polyelectrolyte bounded by semi-permeable membranes and separated by a thin film of salt-free liquid. Although the membranes are neutral, the counter-ions of the polyelectrolyte molecules permeate into the gap and lead to a steric charge separation. This gives rise to a distance-dependent membrane potential, which translates into a repulsive electrostatic disjoining pressure. From the solution of the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation, we obtain the distribution of the potential and of ions. We then derive an explicit formula for the pressure exerted on the membranes and show that it deviates from the classical van't Hoff expression for the osmotic pressure. This difference is interpreted in terms of a repulsive electrostatic disjoining pressure originating from the overlap of counterion clouds inside the gap. We also develop a simplified theory based on a linearized Poisson-Boltzmann approach. A comparison with simulation of a primitive model for the electrolyte is provided and does confirm the validity of the theoretical predictions. Beyond the fundamental result that the neutral surfaces can repel, this mechanism not only helps to control the adhesion and long-range interactions of living cells, bacteria, and vesicles, but also allows us to argue that electrostatic interactions should play enormous role in determining behavior and functions of systems bounded by semi-permeable membranes.

  17. Neutralizing antibodies against rotavirus produced in transgenically labelled purple tomatoes.

    PubMed

    Juárez, Paloma; Presa, Silvia; Espí, Joaquín; Pineda, Benito; Antón, María T; Moreno, Vicente; Buesa, Javier; Granell, Antonio; Orzaez, Diego

    2012-04-01

    Edible fruits are inexpensive biofactories for human health-promoting molecules that can be ingested as crude extracts or partially purified formulations. We show here the production of a model human antibody for passive protection against the enteric pathogen rotavirus in transgenically labelled tomato fruits. Transgenic tomato plants expressing a recombinant human immunoglobulin A (hIgA_2A1) selected against the VP8* peptide of rotavirus SA11 strain were obtained. The amount of hIgA_2A1 protein reached 3.6 ± 0.8% of the total soluble protein in the fruit of the transformed plants. Minimally processed fruit-derived products suitable for oral intake showed anti-VP8* binding activity and strongly inhibited virus infection in an in vitro virus neutralization assay. In order to make tomatoes expressing hIgA_2A1 easily distinguishable from wild-type tomatoes, lines expressing hIgA_2A1 transgenes were sexually crossed with a transgenic tomato line expressing the genes encoding Antirrhinum majus Rosea1 and Delila transcription factors, which confer purple colour to the fruit. Consequently, transgenically labelled purple tomato fruits expressing hIgA_2A1 have been developed. The resulting purple-coloured extracts from these fruits contain high levels of recombinant anti-rotavirus neutralizing human IgA in combination with increased amounts of health-promoting anthocyanins.

  18. Metabolic Assays for Detection of Neutral Fat Stores.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Jan M; Kokabee, Leila; Wang, Xianhiu; Sun, Yan; Wong, Jason; Conklin, Douglas S

    2015-06-20

    Lipid droplets (LDs) are ubiquitous intracellular structures whose formation, growth, and maintenance are highly regulated (Wang et al., 2013; Ranall et al., 2011; Goodman, 2009). Lipid metabolism and droplet dynamics are of considerable interest to agriculture, biofuel production, viral pathology, nutrition, and cancer biology (Walther and Farese, 2009; Liu et al., 2010). Accumulation of fatty acids and neutral lipids in nonadipose tissues is cytotoxic (Kourtidis et al., 2009). BODIPY 493/503 (4,4-Difluoro-1,3,5,7,8-Pentamethyl-4-Bora-3a,4a-Diaza-s-Indacene) is the standard dye to study LDs within adipocytes. BODIPY 493/503 contains a nonpolar structure that, upon binding to neutral lipid, emits a green fluorescence signal with a narrow wavelength range, making it an ideal fluorophore for multi-labeling experiments. The hydrophobic nature of the dye molecules promotes rapid entry into the nonpolar environment of LDs (Listenberge and Brown, 2007). Gocze and Freeman showed that the lipid fluorescent variability is significantly lower when using BODIPY493/503 compared to Nile Red, suggesting that it may be more specific for the LD (Gocze and Freeman, 1994). Here, we describe a BODIPY 493/503 assay for the detection of neural fat stores in cultured cells (Figure 1) (Wang et al., 2013).

  19. Neutral glycans from sandfish skin can reduce friction of polymers

    PubMed Central

    Vihar, Boštjan; Hanisch, Franz Georg; Baumgartner, Werner

    2016-01-01

    The lizard Scincus scincus, also known as sandfish, can move through aeolian desert sand in a swimming-like manner. A prerequisite for this ability is a special integument, i.e. scales with a very low friction for sand and a high abrasion resistance. Glycans in the scales are causally related to the low friction. Here, we analysed the glycans and found that neutral glycans with five to nine mannose residues are important. If these glycans were covalently bound to acrylic polymers like poly(methyl methacrylate) or acrylic car coatings at a density of approximately one molecule per 4 nm², friction for and adhesion of sand particles could be reduced to levels close to those observed with sandfish scales. This was also found true, if the glycans were isolated from sources other than sandfish scales like plants such as almonds or mistletoe. We speculate that these neutral glycans act as low density spacers separating sand particles from the dense scales thereby reducing van der Waals forces. PMID:27030038

  20. Automated facial coding software outperforms people in recognizing neutral faces as neutral from standardized datasets

    PubMed Central

    Lewinski, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about people’s accuracy of recognizing neutral faces as neutral. In this paper, I demonstrate the importance of knowing how well people recognize neutral faces. I contrasted human recognition scores of 100 typical, neutral front-up facial images with scores of an arguably objective judge – automated facial coding (AFC) software. I hypothesized that the software would outperform humans in recognizing neutral faces because of the inherently objective nature of computer algorithms. Results confirmed this hypothesis. I provided the first-ever evidence that computer software (90%) was more accurate in recognizing neutral faces than people were (59%). I posited two theoretical mechanisms, i.e., smile-as-a-baseline and false recognition of emotion, as possible explanations for my findings. PMID:26441761

  1. Automated facial coding software outperforms people in recognizing neutral faces as neutral from standardized datasets.

    PubMed

    Lewinski, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about people's accuracy of recognizing neutral faces as neutral. In this paper, I demonstrate the importance of knowing how well people recognize neutral faces. I contrasted human recognition scores of 100 typical, neutral front-up facial images with scores of an arguably objective judge - automated facial coding (AFC) software. I hypothesized that the software would outperform humans in recognizing neutral faces because of the inherently objective nature of computer algorithms. Results confirmed this hypothesis. I provided the first-ever evidence that computer software (90%) was more accurate in recognizing neutral faces than people were (59%). I posited two theoretical mechanisms, i.e., smile-as-a-baseline and false recognition of emotion, as possible explanations for my findings.

  2. Comparison of JEV neutralization assay using pseudotyped JEV with the conventional plaque-reduction neutralization test.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hee-Jung; Min, Kyung-Il; Park, Ki Hoon; Choi, Hyo Jung; Kim, Min-Kyoung; Ahn, Chi-Young; Hong, Young-Jin; Kim, Young Bong

    2014-05-01

    We previously reported the development of a neutralization assay system for evaluating Japanese Encephalitis Virus (JEV) neutralizing antibody (NAb) using pseudotyped-JEV (JEV-PV). JEV-PV-based neutralization assay offers several advantages compared with the current standard plaque-reduction neutralization test (PRNT), including simplicity, safety, and speed. To evaluate the suitability of the JEV-PV assay as new replacement neutralization assay, we compared its repeatability, reproducibility, specificity, and correlated its results with those obtained using the PRNT. These analyses showed a close correlation between the results obtained with the JEV-PV assay and the PRNT, using the 50% plaque reduction method as a standard for measuring NAb titers to JEV. The validation results met all analytical acceptance criteria. These results suggest that the JEV-PV assay could serve as a safe and simple method for measuring NAb titer against JEV and could be used as an alternative approach for assaying the potency of JEV neutralization.

  3. Asymmetry between protons and proton holes in gas-phase neutralization reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stillinger, Frank H.; Weber, Thomas A.

    Energy distribution functions have been computed for neutral water molecules produced by reactive collisions of H5O2+ with OH-, and of H3O+ with H3O2-. The potential energy hypersurface was approximated by the polarization model, and 500 classical trajectories were generated by computer for each reaction. The translational and the rotational-vibrational excitation energy distributions differ qualitatively for the two cases, thereby demonstrating an asymmetry under proton, proton-hole interchange between reactant clusters. The mean excitation energies for product molecules of anionic origin are found to be greater in both cases than those of cationic origin.

  4. A magnetic trap for simultaneous confinement of neutral atoms and a non-neutral plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubin, Daniel H. E.

    2002-01-01

    Three methods have been proposed for the simultaneous confinement of neutral atoms and a non-neutral plasma in close proximity [D.H.E. Dubin, Phys. Plasmas 8, 4331 (2001)]. This note discusses one of these methods, in which particles are trapped in an axially-symmetric static magnetic field with a magnetic minimum in a ring around the axis of symmetry. Axial symmetry is required for confinement of the rotating non-neutral plasma, and the magnetic minimum traps the neutral atoms. This trap design may be useful for the production and confinement of cold antihydrogen.

  5. Ion chemistry and N-containing molecules in Titan's upper atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuitton, V.; Yelle, R. V.; McEwan, M. J.

    2007-11-01

    High-energy photons, electrons, and ions initiate ion-neutral chemistry in Titan's upper atmosphere by ionizing the major neutral species (nitrogen and methane). The Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) onboard the Cassini spacecraft performed the first composition measurements of Titan's ionosphere. INMS revealed that Titan has the most compositionally complex ionosphere in the Solar System, with roughly 50 ions at or above the detection threshold. Modeling of the ionospheric composition constrains the density of minor neutral constituents, most of which cannot be measured with any other technique. The species identified with this approach include the most complex molecules identified so far on Titan. This confirms the long-thought idea that a very rich chemistry is actually taking place in this atmosphere. However, it appears that much of the interesting chemistry occurs in the upper atmosphere rather than at lower altitudes. The species observed by INMS are probably the first intermediates in the formation of even larger molecules. As a consequence, they affect the composition of the bulk atmosphere, the composition and optical properties of the aerosols and the flux of condensable material to the surface. In this paper, we discuss the production and loss reactions for the ions and how this affects the neutral densities. We compare our results to neutral densities measured in the stratosphere by other instruments, to production yields obtained in laboratory experiments simulating Titan's chemistry and to predictions of photochemical models. We suggest neutral formation mechanisms and highlight needs for new experimental and theoretical data.

  6. Immunomodulation of the tumor microenvironment by neutralization of Semaphorin 4D

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Elizabeth E; Paris, Mark; Smith, Ernest S; Zauderer, Maurice

    2015-01-01

    Semaphorin 4D is highly expressed at the invasive tumor margin and acts as a guidance molecule, restricting movement of tumoricidal immune cells into the tumor microenvironment. We recently showed that antibody neutralization of SEMA4D augmented activated monocyte and anticancer T-cell tumor penetration and that anti-SEMA4D antibody potentiated other immunomodulatory therapies in murine tumor models. PMID:26587332

  7. Mapping of a dengue virus neutralizing epitope critical for the infectivity of all serotypes: insight into the neutralization mechanism.

    PubMed

    Thullier, P; Demangel, C; Bedouelle, H; Mégret, F; Jouan, A; Deubel, V; Mazié, J C; Lafaye, P

    2001-08-01

    Dengue virus infections are a growing public health concern and strategies to control the spread of the virus are urgently needed. The murine monoclonal antibody 4E11 might be of interest, since it neutralizes dengue viruses of all serotypes by binding to the 296-400 segment of the major dengue virus envelope glycoprotein (DE). When phage-displayed peptide libraries were screened by affinity for 4E11, phage clone C1 was selected with a 50% frequency. C1 shared three of nine residues with DE(306-314) and showed significant reactivity to 4E11 in ELISA. C1-induced antibodies cross-reacted with DE(296-400) in mice, suggesting that it was a structural equivalent of the native epitope of 4E11 on DE. Accordingly, 4E11 bound to the DE(306-314) synthetic peptide and this reaction was inhibited by DE(296-400). Moreover, DE(306-314) could block dengue virus infection of target cells in an in vitro assay. A three-dimensional model of DE revealed that the three amino acids shared by DE(296-400) and C1 were exposed to the solvent and suggested that most of the amino acids comprising the 4E11 epitope were located in the DE(306-314) region. Since 4E11 blocked the binding of DE(296-400) to heparin, which is a highly sulfated heparan sulfate (HSHS) molecule, 4E11 may act by neutralizing the interaction of DE(306-314) with target cell-displayed HSHS. Our data suggest that the DE(306-314) segment is critical for the infectivity of all dengue virus serotypes and that molecules that block the binding of DE(306-314) to HSHS may be antiviral reagents of therapeutic interest.

  8. Negative ions of polyatomic molecules.

    PubMed

    Christophorou, L G

    1980-06-01

    In this paper general concepts relating to, and recent advances in, the study of negative ions of polyatomic molecules area discussed with emphasis on halocarbons. The topics dealt with in the paper are as follows: basic electron attachment processes, modes of electron capture by molecules, short-lived transient negative ions, dissociative electron attachment to ground-state molecules and to "hot" molecules (effects of temperature on electron attachment), parent negative ions, effect of density, nature, and state of the medium on electron attachment, electron attachment to electronically excited molecules, the binding of attached electrons to molecules ("electron affinity"), and the basic and the applied significance of negative-ion studies.

  9. Diamagnetic currents in the neutral He atoms.

    PubMed

    Kato, Takashi; Yamabe, Tokio

    2007-09-06

    The mechanism of the occurrence of intraatomic diamagnetic currents in the neutral He atoms with microscopic sizes is investigated. It is found that most of all electrons can form electron pairs originating from attractive Coulomb interactions between two electrons with opposite spins occupying the 1s atomic orbital in the neutral He atom at 298 K. Intraatomic diamagnetic currents in the neutral He atoms with microscopic sizes can be explained by such electron pairing. The transition temperature Tc(He),(1s) value at which intraatomic diamagnetic currents can disappear in each He atom is estimated. The Tc(He),(1s) values for the neutral He atoms with microscopic sizes are estimated to be much larger than the superconducting transition temperatures Tc,BCS values for the conventional superconductors with macroscopic sizes. This result can be understood from continuous energy levels of electronic states in conventional superconductivity with macroscopic sizes, and from discrete energy levels of electronic states in the neutral He atoms with microscopic sizes. The energy difference between the occupied and unoccupied orbitals decreases with an increase in material size and thus the second-order perturbation effect becomes more important with an increase in material size. Therefore, the mechanism of the occurrence of intraatomic diamagnetic current in the neutral He atoms suggested in this research would not be true for materials with large sizes. The dependence of electronic properties on temperature in the diamagnetic currents in the neutral He atoms with microscopic sizes is studied and compared with that in the conventional superconductivity with macroscopic sizes.

  10. Watching single molecules dance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Amit Dinesh

    Molecular motors convert chemical energy, from ATP hydrolysis or ion flow, into mechanical motion. A variety of increasingly precise mechanical probes have been developed to monitor and perturb these motors at the single molecule level. Several outstanding questions can be best approached at the single molecule level. These include: how far does a motor progress per energy quanta consumed? how does its reaction cycle respond to load? how many productive catalytic cycles can it undergo per diffusional encounter with its track? and what is the mechanical stiffness of a single molecule connection? A dual beam optical trap, in conjunction with in vitro ensemble motility assays, has been used to characterize two members of the myosin superfamily: muscle myosin II and chick brain myosin V. Both move the helical polymer actin, but myosin II acts in large ensembles to drive muscle contraction or cytokinesis, while myosin V acts in small numbers to transport vesicles. An optical trapping apparatus was rendered sufficiently precise to identify a myosin working stroke with 1nm or so, barring systematic errors such as those perhaps due to random protein orientations. This and other light microscopic motility assays were used to characterize myosin V: unlike myosin II this vesicle transport protein moves through many increments of travel while remaining strongly bound to a single actin filament. The step size, stall force, and travel distance of myosin V reveal a remarkably efficient motor capable of moving along a helical track for over a micrometer without significantly spiraling around it. Such properties are fully consistent with the putative role of an organelle transport motor, present in small numbers to maintain movement over long ranges relative to cellular size scales. The contrast between myosin II and myosin V resembles that between a human running on the moon and one walking on earth, where the former allows for faster motion when in larger ensembles but for less

  11. Molecules in crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spackman, Mark A.

    2013-04-01

    Hirshfeld surface analysis has developed from the serendipitous discovery of a novel partitioning of the crystal electron density into discrete molecular fragments, to a suite of computational tools used widely for the identification, analysis and discussion of intermolecular interactions in molecular crystals. The relationship between the Hirshfeld surface and very early ideas on the internal structure of crystals is outlined, and applications of Hirshfeld surface analysis are presented for three molecules of historical importance in the development of modern x-ray crystallography: hexamethylbenzene, hexamethylenetetramine and diketopiperazine.

  12. Improving Neutralization Potency and Breadth by Combining Broadly Reactive HIV-1 Antibodies Targeting Major Neutralization Epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Rui; Louder, Mark K.; Wagh, Kshitij; Bailer, Robert T.; deCamp, Allan; Greene, Kelli; Gao, Hongmei; Taft, Justin D.; Gazumyan, Anna; Liu, Cassie; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Korber, Bette

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The isolation of broadly neutralizing HIV-1 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to distinct epitopes on the viral envelope glycoprotein (Env) provides the potential to use combinations of MAbs for prevention and treatment of HIV-1 infection. Since many of these MAbs have been isolated in the last few years, the potency and breadth of MAb combinations have not been well characterized. In two parallel experiments, we examined the in vitro neutralizing activities of double-, triple-, and quadruple-MAb combinations targeting four distinct epitopes, including the CD4-binding site, the V1V2-glycan region, the V3-glycan supersite, and the gp41 membrane-proximal external region (MPER), using a panel of 125 Env-pseudotyped viruses. All MAb combinations showed substantially improved neutralization breadth compared to the corresponding single MAbs, while the neutralization potency of individual MAbs was maintained. At a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) cutoff of 1 μg/ml per antibody, double-MAb combinations neutralized 89 to 98% of viruses, and triple combinations neutralized 98 to 100%. Overall, the improvement of neutralization breadth was closely predicted by an additive-effect model and explained by complementary neutralization profiles of antibodies recognizing distinct epitopes. Subtle but consistent favorable interactions were observed in some MAb combinations, whereas less favorable interactions were observed on a small subset of viruses that are highly sensitive to V3-glycan MAbs. These data demonstrate favorable in vitro combinations of broadly neutralizing HIV-1 MAbs and suggest that such combinations could have utility for HIV-1 prevention and treatment. IMPORTANCE Over the last 5 years, numerous broadly reactive HIV-1-neutralizing MAbs have been isolated from B cells of HIV-1-infected donors. Each of these MAbs binds to one of the major vulnerable sites (epitopes) on the surface of the viral envelope glycoprotein. Since antibodies to distinct viral epitopes

  13. Improving neutralization potency and breadth by combining broadly reactive HIV-1 antibodies targeting major neutralization epitopes.

    PubMed

    Kong, Rui; Louder, Mark K; Wagh, Kshitij; Bailer, Robert T; deCamp, Allan; Greene, Kelli; Gao, Hongmei; Taft, Justin D; Gazumyan, Anna; Liu, Cassie; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Korber, Bette; Montefiori, David C; Mascola, John R

    2015-03-01

    The isolation of broadly neutralizing HIV-1 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to distinct epitopes on the viral envelope glycoprotein (Env) provides the potential to use combinations of MAbs for prevention and treatment of HIV-1 infection. Since many of these MAbs have been isolated in the last few years, the potency and breadth of MAb combinations have not been well characterized. In two parallel experiments, we examined the in vitro neutralizing activities of double-, triple-, and quadruple-MAb combinations targeting four distinct epitopes, including the CD4-binding site, the V1V2-glycan region, the V3-glycan supersite, and the gp41 membrane-proximal external region (MPER), using a panel of 125 Env-pseudotyped viruses. All MAb combinations showed substantially improved neutralization breadth compared to the corresponding single MAbs, while the neutralization potency of individual MAbs was maintained. At a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) cutoff of 1 μg/ml per antibody, double-MAb combinations neutralized 89 to 98% of viruses, and triple combinations neutralized 98 to 100%. Overall, the improvement of neutralization breadth was closely predicted by an additive-effect model and explained by complementary neutralization profiles of antibodies recognizing distinct epitopes. Subtle but consistent favorable interactions were observed in some MAb combinations, whereas less favorable interactions were observed on a small subset of viruses that are highly sensitive to V3-glycan MAbs. These data demonstrate favorable in vitro combinations of broadly neutralizing HIV-1 MAbs and suggest that such combinations could have utility for HIV-1 prevention and treatment. Over the last 5 years, numerous broadly reactive HIV-1-neutralizing MAbs have been isolated from B cells of HIV-1-infected donors. Each of these MAbs binds to one of the major vulnerable sites (epitopes) on the surface of the viral envelope glycoprotein. Since antibodies to distinct viral epitopes could theoretically

  14. Observed vegetation patterns in tidal environments: neutral vs. non-neutral explanations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belluco, E.; Zillio, T.; Silvestri, S.; Maritan, A.; Marani, M.

    2009-12-01

    The quantitative retrieval of vegetation patterns in tidal environments from high-resolution satellite and airborne sensors has recently been shown to be accurate and repeatable. This makes available unprecedentedly accurate observations of competing species distributions over a broad range of spatial scales. Such distributions are here characterized statistically, suggesting the absence of characteristic scales, as revealed by the power-law form of cluster size pdf's. A competition model based on a neutral approach, serving as a reference null hypothesis, reproduces some of the basic observed system properties. It is, however, shown that the availability of spatially-detailed observations allows the development and application of a non-neutral model, which is seen to capture several observed bio-diversity properties (alpha and beta diversity). The non-neutral model developed, based on cloning and seed dispersal processes, is amenable to analytical solution and yields closed-form characterizations of beta-diversity. The validation of the non-neutral model shows a remarkable agreement with observations within the wide observational range of scales explored (0.5 m - 1000 m). We contend the good agreement of the neutral model with the more limited characterization of beta-diversity typical of the neutral theory to be misleading, as the recruitment rates by propagules and by seed dispersal assumed by the neutral model do not reflect known species characteristics and correspond to averages of those obtained under the more general non-neutral hypothesis. We conclude that non-neutral beta-diversity characterizations are required to describe ecosystem dynamics in the presence of species-dependent properties and to successfully relate the observed patterns to the underlying processes. The hypothesis of neutrality, often fostered by the lack of spatially-detailed data, is no longer a necessity, in view of the recent advances in remote-sensing retrievals of vegetation

  15. VUV state-selected photoionization of thermally-desorbed biomolecules by coupling an aerosol source to an imaging photoelectron/photoion coincidence spectrometer: case of the amino acids tryptophan and phenylalanine.

    PubMed

    Gaie-Levrel, François; Garcia, Gustavo A; Schwell, Martin; Nahon, Laurent

    2011-04-21

    Gas phase studies of biological molecules provide structural and dynamical information on isolated systems. The lack of inter- or intra-molecular interactions facilitates the interpretation of the experimental results through theoretical calculations, and constitutes an informative complement to the condensed phase. However advances in the field are partially hindered by the difficulty of vaporising these systems, most of which are thermally unstable. In this work we present a newly developed aerosol mass thermodesorption setup, which has been coupled to a Velocity Map Imaging (VMI) analyzer operated in coincidence with a Wiley-McLaren Time of Flight spectrometer, using synchrotron radiation as a single photon ionization source. Although it has been previously demonstrated that thermolabile molecules such as amino acids can be produced intact by the aerosol vaporisation technique, we show how its non-trivial coupling to a VMI analyzer plus the use of electron/ion coincidences greatly improves the concept in terms of the amount of spectroscopic and dynamic information that can be extracted. In this manner, we report on the valence shell ionization of two amino acids, tryptophan and phenylalanine, for which threshold photoelectron spectra have been recorded within the first 3 eV above the first ionization energy using synchrotron radiation emitted from the DESIRS beamline located at SOLEIL in France. Their adiabatic ionization energies (IEs) have been measured at 7.40 ± 0.05 and 8.65 ± 0.02 eV, respectively, and their spectra analyzed using existing theoretical data from the literature. The IE values agree well with previously published ones, but are given here with a considerably reduced uncertainty by up to a factor of 5. The photostability of both amino acids is also described in detail, through the measurement of the state-selected fragmentation pathways via the use of threshold electron/ion coincidences (TPEPICO), with appearance energies for the different

  16. Hexagonal boron nitride cover on Pt(111): a new route to tune molecule-metal interaction and metal-catalyzed reactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanhong; Weng, Xuefei; Li, Huan; Li, Haobo; Wei, Mingming; Xiao, Jianping; Liu, Zhi; Chen, Mingshu; Fu, Qiang; Bao, Xinhe

    2015-05-13

    In heterogeneous catalysis molecule-metal interaction is often modulated through structural modifications at the surface or under the surface of the metal catalyst. Here, we suggest an alternative way toward this modulation by placing a two-dimensional (2D) cover on the metal surface. As an illustration, CO adsorption on Pt(111) surface has been studied under 2D hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) overlayer. Dynamic imaging data from surface electron microscopy and in situ surface spectroscopic results under near ambient pressure conditions confirm that CO molecules readily intercalate monolayer h-BN sheets on Pt(111) in CO atmosphere but desorb from the h-BN/Pt(111) interface even around room temperature in ultrahigh vacuum. The interaction of CO with Pt has been strongly weakened due to the confinement effect of the h-BN cover, and consequently, CO oxidation at the h-BN/Pt(111) interface was enhanced thanks to the alleviated CO poisoning effect.

  17. Kinetic Properties of the Neutral Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florinski, V.; Heerikhuisen, J.

    2017-03-01

    Charge-exchange collisions between the solar wind protons and interstellar hydrogen produce a distinctive population of neutral hydrogen streaming radially at nearly the solar-wind speed. This tenuous population, known as the neutral solar wind (NSW) is thought to play a key role in the appearance of the Interplanetary Boundary EXplorer ribbon, a bright circular band in the sky that is the source of neutral hydrogen with energies near 1 keV. According to the leading model of the ribbon, the velocity distribution of NSW hydrogen is imparted on the pickup ions (PUIs) generated via charge exchange with the interstellar protons beyond the heliopause, and in this way controls the stability of the resulting ring distribution of PUIs against hydromagnetic wave generation. In this paper, we examine the velocity distributions of the NSW atoms in the heliosphere and the outer heliosheath regions by following the phase-space trajectories of the Boltzmann equation. It is demonstrated that these distributions are highly anisotropic, with the parallel (radial) temperature greatly exceeding the perpendicular temperature. Ions picked up near 90° from the anisotropic NSW would form a stable ring distribution capable of generating the ribbon flux. We also discuss a second population of neutrals born in charge transfer collisions with interstellar PUIs, the so-called neutralized pickup ion (NPI) component. Their high thermal velocities translate into large parallel velocity spread of the daughter ribbon PUIs, which would adversely affect plasma stability in local interstellar space.

  18. Neutral beamline with improved ion energy recovery

    DOEpatents

    Dagenhart, William K.; Haselton, Halsey H.; Stirling, William L.; Whealton, John H.

    1984-01-01

    A neutral beamline generator with unneutralized ion energy recovery is provided which enhances the energy recovery of the full energy ion component of the beam exiting the neutralizer cell of the beamline. The unneutralized full energy ions exiting the neutralizer are deflected from the beam path and the electrons in the cell are blocked by a magnetic field applied transverse to the beamline in the cell exit region. The ions, which are generated at essentially ground potential and accelerated through the neutralizer cell by a negative acceleration voltage, are collected at ground potential. A neutralizer cell exit end region is provided which allows the magnetic and electric fields acting on the exiting ions to be closely coupled. As a result, the fractional energy ions exiting the cell with the full energy ions are reflected back into the gas cell. Thus, the fractional energy ions do not detract from the energy recovery efficiency of full energy ions exiting the cell which can reach the ground potential interior surfaces of the beamline housing.

  19. Species ages in neutral biodiversity models.

    PubMed

    Chisholm, Ryan A; O'Dwyer, James P

    2014-05-01

    Biogeography seeks to understand the mechanisms that drive biodiversity across long temporal and large spatial scales. Theoretical models of biogeography can be tested by comparing their predictions of quantities such as species ages against empirical estimates. It has previously been claimed that the neutral theory of biodiversity and biogeography predicts species ages that are unrealistically long. Any improved theory of biodiversity must rectify this problem, but first it is necessary to quantify the problem precisely. Here we provide analytical expressions for species ages in neutral biodiversity communities. We analyse a spatially implicit metacommunity model and solve for both the zero-sum and non-zero-sum cases. We explain why our new expressions are, in the context of biodiversity, usually more appropriate than those previously imported from neutral molecular evolution. Because of the time symmetry of the spatially implicit neutral model, our expressions also lead directly to formulas for species persistence times and species lifetimes. We use our new expressions to estimate species ages of forest trees under a neutral model and find that they are about an order of magnitude shorter than those predicted previously but still unrealistically long. In light of our results, we discuss different models of biogeography that may solve the problem of species ages.

  20. Correlations between neutral and ionized solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilkerton, B. M.; Collier, M. R.; Moore, T. E.

    We report results of a statistical study correlating ionized solar wind (ISW) fluxes observed by ACE during late 2000 and throughout 2001 with neutral solar wind (NSW) fluxes observed by IMAGE/LENA over the same period. The average correlation coefficient between the neutral and ionized solar wind is 0.66 with correlations greater than 0.80 occurring about 29% of the time. Correlations appear to be driven by high solar wind flux variability, similar to results obtained by in situ multi-spacecraft correlation studies. In this study, however, IMAGE remains inside the magnetosphere on over 95% of its orbits. As a function of day of year, or equivalently ecliptic longitude, the slope of the relationship between the neutral solar wind flux and the ionized solar wind flux shows an enhancement near the upstream direction, but the symmetry point appears shifted toward higher ecliptic longitudes than the interstellar neutral (ISN) flow direction by about 20°. The estimated peak interstellar neutral upstream density inside of 1 AU is about 7 × 10 -3 cm -3.

  1. Neutralization of H- on vicinal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obreshkov, Boyan; Thumm, Uwe

    2006-05-01

    Experiments [1,2] and theoretical calculations [3] for the neutralization of H- ions on metallic surfaces show a dependence on the surface morphology. The availability of nanostructured metallic surfaces motivates the study of the effects of the surface structure on the neutralization probability of H-. We discuss the results from a theoretical study of the electron charge transfer rate and neutralization probability of H- ions colliding with metal surfaces, based on a generalized Thomas- Fermi approach for the description of the equilibrium electronic structure of the surface [4]. The ion-surface scattering calculations were performed for vicinal surfaces with different step densities at ion collision energies of 1 keV. For the studied range of collision parameters and surface morphologies, our numerical results for the neutralization probability for ``step up'' and ``step down'' scattering are significantly different, and the anion is more efficiently neutralized if the out asymptote of its scattering trajectory crosses vicinal structures in ``step down'' direction. [1] E.Sanchez, L.Guillemot, V.A.Esaulov, Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 28 (1999). [2] T.Hecht et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 2517 (2000). [3] H.Chakaraborty, T.Niederhausen and U.Thumm, Phys. Rev. A 70, 052903 (2004); 69, 052901 (2004). [4] E.Zaremba and H.C.Tso, Phys. Rev. B 59, 2079 (1999).

  2. Infrared thermography and overloaded neutral conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McComb, John; Niebla, Hector E.

    1999-03-01

    Present findings of two recent case studies. One involves transformer failures on three computer-stores within eight hours of their grand opening. The second discusses the findings during an infrared thermography-training course for electric utility engineers of a transformer vault serving an industrial customer. Both of these deal with overloaded neutral conductors. Historically, the average neutral conductor carried only the imbalance of the current between the phases of a three-phase system. This current was typically small in relation to the load being served. In fact, for economic reasons many neutrals were installed smaller than their associated phase conductors. Today however, certain types of loads (non-linear loads such as computers) and certain transformer connections (4 bushing single phase with a collector bus) cause the neutral to have up to three times as much amperage as the phase conductors. This paper will discuss the conditions under which such loading occurs and further investigate steps that can be taken/recommended should an infrared test indicate an overloaded neutral conductor.

  3. BEAMS3D Neutral Beam Injection Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Matthew; Lazerson, Samuel A.

    2014-09-01

    With the advent of applied 3D fields in Tokamaks and modern high performance stellarators, a need has arisen to address non-axisymmetric effects on neutral beam heating and fueling. We report on the development of a fully 3D neutral beam injection (NBI) model, BEAMS3D, which addresses this need by coupling 3D equilibria to a guiding center code capable of modeling neutral and charged particle trajectories across the separatrix and into the plasma core. Ionization, neutralization, charge-exchange, viscous slowing down, and pitch angle scattering are modeled with the ADAS atomic physics database. Elementary benchmark calculations are presented to verify the collisionless particle orbits, NBI model, frictional drag, and pitch angle scattering effects. A calculation of neutral beam heating in the NCSX device is performed, highlighting the capability of the code to handle 3D magnetic fields. Notice: this manuscript has been authored by Princeton University under Contract Number DE-AC02-09CH11466 with the US Department of Energy. The United States Government retains and the publisher, by accepting the article for publication, acknowledges that the United States Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license to publish or reproduce the published form of this manuscript, or allow others to do so, for United States Government purposes.

  4. Quantitative model of antibody- and soluble CD4-mediated neutralization of primary isolates and T-cell line-adapted strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Klasse, P J; Moore, J P

    1996-01-01

    Primary isolates (PI) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are considerably less sensitive than T-cell line-adapted strains to neutralization by soluble CD4 and by most cross-reactive monoclonal antibodies to the viral envelope (Env) glycoprotein, as well as by postinfection and postvaccination sera (J. P. Moore and D. D. Ho, AIDS 9 [suppl. A]:5117-5136, 1995). We developed a quantitative model to explain the neutralization resistance of PI. The factors incorporated into the model are the dissociation constants for the binding of the neutralizing agent to native Env oligomers, the number of outer Env molecules on the viral surface (which decreases by shedding), and the minimum number of Env molecules required for attachment and fusion. We conclude that modest differences in all these factors can, when combined, explain a relative neutralization resistance of PI versus T-cell line-adapted strains that sometimes amounts to several orders of magnitude. The hypothesis that neutralization of HIV is due to the reduction below a minimum number of the Env molecules on a virion available for attachment and fusion is at odds with single- and few-hit neutralization theories. Our analysis of these ideas favors the hypothesis that neutralization of HIV is instead a competitive blocking of interactions with cellular factors, including adsorption receptors. PMID:8648701

  5. Ultra-cold molecule production.

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez-Serrano, Jamie; Chandler, David W.; Strecker, Kevin; Rahn, Larry A.

    2005-12-01

    The production of Ultra-cold molecules is a goal of many laboratories through out the world. Here we are pursuing a unique technique that utilizes the kinematics of atomic and molecular collisions to achieve the goal of producing substantial numbers of sub Kelvin molecules confined in a trap. Here a trap is defined as an apparatus that spatially localizes, in a known location in the laboratory, a sample of molecules whose temperature is below one degree absolute Kelvin. Further, the storage time for the molecules must be sufficient to measure and possibly further cool the molecules. We utilize a technique unique to Sandia to form cold molecules from near mass degenerate collisions between atoms and molecules. This report describes the progress we have made using this novel technique and the further progress towards trapping molecules we have cooled.

  6. Dihydrino molecule identification

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, R.L.; Good, W.R. ); Shaubach, R.M. )

    1994-01-01

    Three sets of heat production and [open quotes]ash[close quotes] identification data are presented. An exothermic reaction is reported wherein the electrons of hydrogen and deuterium atoms are stimulated to relax to quantized potential energy levels below that of the [open quotes]ground state[close quotes] via electrochemical reactants K[sup +] and K[sup +]; Pd[sup 2+] and Li[sup +]; or Pd and O[sub 2] of redox energy resonant with the energy hole that stimulates this transition. Calorimetry of pulsed current and continuous electrolysis of aqueous potassium carbonate (K[sup +]/K[sup +] electrocatalytic couple) at a nickel cathode were performed. The excess output power of 41 W exceeded by a factor >8 the total input power given by the product of the electrolysis voltage and current. The product of the exothermic reaction is atoms having electrons of energy below the ground state, which are predicted to form molecules. The predicted molecules were identified by their lack of reactivity with oxygen, by separation from molecular deuterium by cryofiltration, and by mass spectroscopic analysis. 15 refs., 12 figs., 9 tabs.

  7. Covalent Chemistry beyond Molecules.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Juncong; Zhao, Yingbo; Yaghi, Omar M

    2016-03-16

    Linking molecular building units by covalent bonds to make crystalline extended structures has given rise to metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and covalent organic frameworks (COFs), thus bringing the precision and versatility of covalent chemistry beyond discrete molecules to extended structures. The key advance in this regard has been the development of strategies to overcome the "crystallization problem", which is usually encountered when attempting to link molecular building units into covalent solids. Currently, numerous MOFs and COFs are made as crystalline materials in which the large size of the constituent units provides for open frameworks. The molecular units thus reticulated become part of a new environment where they have (a) lower degrees of freedom because they are fixed into position within the framework; (b) well-defined spatial arrangements where their properties are influenced by the intricacies of the pores; and (c) ordered patterns onto which functional groups can be covalently attached to produce chemical complexity. The notion of covalent chemistry beyond molecules is further strengthened by the fact that covalent reactions can be carried out on such frameworks, with full retention of their crystallinity and porosity. MOFs are exemplars of how this chemistry has led to porosity with designed metrics and functionality, chemically-rich sequences of information within their frameworks, and well-defined mesoscopic constructs in which nanoMOFs enclose inorganic nanocrystals and give them new levels of spatial definition, stability, and functionality.

  8. Commercially available immunoglobulins contain virus neutralizing antibodies against all major genotypes of polyomavirus BK.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, P; Pastrana, D V; Zeng, G; Huang, Y; Shapiro, R; Sood, P; Puttarajappa, C; Berger, M; Hariharan, S; Buck, C B

    2015-04-01

    Neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) form the basis of immunotherapeutic strategies against many important human viral infections. Accordingly, we studied the prevalence, titer, genotype-specificity, and mechanism of action of anti-polyomavirus BK (BKV) NAbs in commercially available human immune globulin (IG) preparations designed for intravenous (IV) use. Pseudovirions (PsV) of genotypes Ia, Ib2, Ic, II, III, and IV were generated by co-transfecting a reporter plasmid encoding luciferase and expression plasmids containing synthetic codon-modified VP1, VP2, and VP3 capsid protein genes into 293TT cells. NAbs were measured using luminometry. All IG preparations neutralized all BKV genotypes, with mean EC50 titers as high as 254 899 for genotype Ia and 6,666 for genotype IV. Neutralizing titers against genotypes II and III were higher than expected, adding to growing evidence that infections with these genotypes are more common than currently appreciated. Batch to batch variation in different lots of IG was within the limits of experimental error. Antibody mediated virus neutralizing was dose dependent, modestly enhanced by complement, genotype-specific, and achieved without effect on viral aggregation, capsid morphology, elution, or host cell release. IG contains potent NAbs capable of neutralizing all major BKV genotypes. Clinical trials based on sound pharmacokinetic principles are needed to explore prophylactic and therapeutic applications of these anti-viral effects, until effective small molecule inhibitors of BKV replication can be developed.

  9. Neutral gas temperature estimates and metastable resonance energy transfer for argon-nitrogen discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Greig, A. Charles, C.; Boswell, R. W.

    2016-01-15

    Rovibrational spectroscopy band fitting of the nitrogen (N{sub 2}) second positive system is a technique used to estimate the neutral gas temperature of N{sub 2} discharges, or atomic discharges with trace amounts of a N{sub 2} added. For mixtures involving argon and N{sub 2}, resonant energy transfer between argon metastable atoms (Ar*) and N{sub 2} molecules may affect gas temperature estimates made using the second positive system. The effect of Ar* resonance energy transfer is investigated here by analyzing neutral gas temperatures of argon-N{sub 2} mixtures, for N{sub 2} percentages from 1% to 100%. Neutral gas temperature estimates are higher than expected for mixtures involving greater than 5% N{sub 2} addition, but are reasonable for argon with less than 5% N{sub 2} addition when compared with an analytic model for ion-neutral charge exchange collisional heating. Additional spatiotemporal investigations into neutral gas temperature estimates with 10% N{sub 2} addition demonstrate that although absolute temperature values may be affected by Ar* resonant energy transfer, spatiotemporal trends may still be used to accurately diagnose the discharge.

  10. Explicit Solvent Simulations of Friction between Brush Layers of Charged and Neutral Bottle-Brush Macromolecules

    SciTech Connect

    Carrillo, Jan-Michael; Brown, W Michael; Dobrynin, Andrey

    2012-01-01

    We study friction between charged and neutral brush layers of bottle-brush macromolecules using molecular dynamics simulations. In our simulations the solvent molecules were treated explicitly. The deformation of the bottle-brush macromolecules under the shear were studied as a function of the substrate separation and shear stress. For charged bottle-brush layers we study effect of the added salt on the brush lubricating properties to elucidate factors responsible for energy dissipation in charged and neutral brush systems. Our simulations have shown that for both charged and neutral brush systems the main deformation mode of the bottle-brush macromolecule is associated with the backbone deformation. This deformation mode manifests itself in the backbone deformation ratio, , and shear viscosity, , to be universal functions of the Weissenberg number W. The value of the friction coefficient, , and viscosity, , are larger for the charged bottle-brush coatings in comparison with those for neutral brushes at the same separation distance, D, between substrates. The additional energy dissipation generated by brush sliding in charged bottle-brush systems is due to electrostatic coupling between bottle-brush and counterion motion. This coupling weakens as salt concentration, cs, increases resulting in values of the viscosity, , and friction coefficient, , approaching corresponding values obtained for neutral brush systems.

  11. Charge Neutralization in the ESEM for Quantitative X-ray Microanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlton, Robert A.; Lyman, Charles E.; Roberts, James E.

    2004-12-01

    Quantitative chemical analysis by energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) in the environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) is difficult. This analysis is complicated by the spread of the electron beam by chamber gas molecules and the necessity for surface charge neutralization. Without charge neutralization, errors in quantitative analysis can range up to 15 20% relative. It is possible to achieve the error expected of traditional EDS, ±5% relative error, using a newly developed surface charge neutralization scheme for the ESEM. Estimates of accuracy and precision are based on studies of the National Bureau of Standards (now National Institutes for Science and Technology) Standard Reference Material 482, a series of certified copper gold alloys. The scheme for charge neutralization requires an independent path to ground at or near the surface of the specimen. The current through the ground path must be maintained at zero by adjusting the voltage on the Gaseous Secondary Electron DetectorTM when the sample chamber is at a gas pressure of 1 2 torr. This procedure forms the exact number of chamber gas positive ions to neutralize negative electrical charge on the specimen surface from electron bombardment.

  12. Cosmic ray synthesis of organic molecules in Titan's atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Capone, L.A.; Dubach, J.; Whitten, R.C.; Prasad, S.S.; Santhanam, K.

    1980-01-01

    The possible synthesis of organic molecules by the absorption of galactic cosmic rays in an N2-CH4-H2 Titan model atmosphere has been studied. The cosmic-ray-induced ionization results in peak electron densities of 2000/cu cm, with NH(+), C3H9(+), and C4H9(+) being among the important positive ions. Details of the ion and neutral chemistry relevant to the production of organic molecules are discussed. The potential importance of N(2D) reactions with CH4 and H2 is also demonstrated. Although the integrated production rate of organic matter due to the absorption of the cosmic ray cascade is much less than that by solar ultraviolet radiation, the production of nitrogen-bearing organic molecules by cosmic rays may be greater.

  13. The Chemistry of Multiply Deuterated Molecules in Protoplanetary Disks: I. The Outer Disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willacy, K.

    2007-01-01

    We present new models of the deuterium chemistry in protoplanetary disks, including, for the first time, multiply deuterated species. We use these models to explore whether observations in combination with models can give us clues as to which desorption processes occur in disks.We find, in common with other authors, that photodesorption can allow strongly bound molecules such as HDO to exist in the gas phase in a layer above the midplane. Models including this process give the best agreement with the observations. In the midplane, cosmic-ray heating can desorb weakly bound molecules such as CO and N2. We find the observations suggest that N2 is gaseous in this region, but that CO must be retained on the grains to account for the observed DCO+/HCO+. This could be achieved by CO having a higher binding energy than N2 (as may be the case when these molecules are accreted onto water ice) or by a smaller cosmic-ray desorption rate for CO than assumed here, as suggested by recent theoretical work. For gaseous molecules the calculated deuteration can be greatly changed by chemical processing in the disk from the input molecular cloud values. On the grains singly deuterated species tend to retain the D/H ratio set in the molecular cloud, whereas multiply deuterated species are more affected by the disk chemistry. Consequently, the D/H ratios observed in comets may be partly set in the parent cloud and partly in the disk, depending on the molecule.

  14. The Chemistry of Multiply Deuterated Molecules in Protoplanetary Disks: I. The Outer Disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willacy, K.

    2007-01-01

    We present new models of the deuterium chemistry in protoplanetary disks, including, for the first time, multiply deuterated species. We use these models to explore whether observations in combination with models can give us clues as to which desorption processes occur in disks.We find, in common with other authors, that photodesorption can allow strongly bound molecules such as HDO to exist in the gas phase in a layer above the midplane. Models including this process give the best agreement with the observations. In the midplane, cosmic-ray heating can desorb weakly bound molecules such as CO and N2. We find the observations suggest that N2 is gaseous in this region, but that CO must be retained on the grains to account for the observed DCO+/HCO+. This could be achieved by CO having a higher binding energy than N2 (as may be the case when these molecules are accreted onto water ice) or by a smaller cosmic-ray desorption rate for CO than assumed here, as suggested by recent theoretical work. For gaseous molecules the calculated deuteration can be greatly changed by chemical processing in the disk from the input molecular cloud values. On the grains singly deuterated species tend to retain the D/H ratio set in the molecular cloud, whereas multiply deuterated species are more affected by the disk chemistry. Consequently, the D/H ratios observed in comets may be partly set in the parent cloud and partly in the disk, depending on the molecule.

  15. When neutral turns significant: brain dynamics of rapidly formed associations between neutral stimuli and emotional contexts.

    PubMed

    Ventura-Bort, Carlos; Löw, Andreas; Wendt, Julia; Dolcos, Florin; Hamm, Alfons O; Weymar, Mathias

    2016-09-01

    The ability to associate neutral stimuli with motivationally relevant outcomes is an important survival strategy. In this study, we used event-related potentials (ERPs) to investigate brain dynamics of associative emotional learning when participants were confronted with multiple heterogeneous information. Participants viewed 144 different objects in the context of 144 different emotional and neutral background scenes. During each trial, neutral objects were shown in isolation and then paired with the background scene. All pairings were presented twice to compare ERPs in response to neutral objects before and after single association. After single pairing, neutral objects previously encoded in the context of emotional scenes evoked a larger P100 over occipital electrodes compared to objects that were previously paired with neutral scenes. Likewise, larger late positive potentials (LPPs) were observed over parieto-occipital electrodes (450-750 ms) for objects previously associated with emotional relative to neutral contexts. The LPP - but not P100 - enhancement was also related to subjective object/context binding. Taken together, our ERP data provide evidence for fast emotional associative learning, as reflected by heightened perceptual and sustained elaborative processing for neutral information previously encountered in emotional contexts. These findings could assist in understanding binding mechanisms in stress and anxiety, as well as in addiction and eating-related disorders. © 2016 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Douglas Discusses 'Cultural Neutrality' in Dissenting Opinion on DeFunis Case: Racial Neutrality is Key.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Lawrence D.

    1974-01-01

    This paper explores some of the implications of Justice William O. Douglas's dissenting opinion in "DeFunis v. Odeggard" for the selection, education, and licensing of educational personnel. Douglas's argument for "cultural neutrality" in law-education selection instruments turns on his argument for racially neutral tests. That is, Douglas's…

  17. Imaging and Manipulating Molecules on a Zeolite Surface with an Atomic Force Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisenhorn, A. L.; Mac Dougall, J. E.; Gould, S. A. C.; Cox, S. D.; Wise, W. S.; Massie, J.; Maivald, P.; Elings, V. B.; Stucky, G. D.; Hansma, P. K.

    1990-03-01

    The adsorption of neutral molecules and ions on the surfaces of zeolites was observed in real time with an atomic force microscope (AFM). Direct imaging of the surface of the zeolite clinoptilolite was possible by using a diluted tert-butyl ammonium chloride solution as a medium. Images of the crystal in different liquids revealed that molecules could be bound to the surface in different ways; neutral molecules of tert-butanol formed an ordered array, whereas tert-butyl ammonium ions formed clusters. These absorbed molecules were not rearranged by the AFM tip when used in an imaging mode. However, when a sufficiently large force was applied, the tip of the AFM could rearrange the tert-butyl ammonium ions on the zeolite surface. This demonstration of molecular manipulation suggests new applications, including biosensors and lithography.

  18. Bacterial production and transformation of dissolved neutral sugars and amino acids in seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jørgensen, L.; Lechtenfeld, O.; Benner, R.; Middelboe, M.; Stedmon, C. A.

    2014-04-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the ocean consists of a heterogeneous mixture of molecules, most of which are of unknown origin. Neutral sugars and amino acids are among the few recognizable biomolecules in DOM, and the molecular composition of these biomolecules is shaped primarily by biological production and degradation processes. This study provides insight into the bioavailability of biomolecules as well as the chemical composition of DOM produced by bacteria. The molecular compositions of neutral sugars and amino acids were investigated in DOM produced by bacteria and in DOM remaining after long-term bacterial degradation. Results from bioassay incubations (32 days) with natural and artificial seawater, indicate that the molecular compositions following bacterial degradation are not strongly influenced by the initial substrate or bacterial community. The molecular composition of neutral sugars released by bacteria was characterized by a high glucose content (47 mol%) and heterogeneous contributions from other neutral sugars (3-14 mol%). DOM remaining after bacterial degradation was characterized by a high galactose content (33 mol%), followed by glucose (22 mol%) and the remaining neutral sugars (7-11 mol%). The ratio of D-amino acids to L-amino acids increased during the experiments as a response to bacterial degradation, and after 32 days the D/L ratios of aspartic acid, glutamic acid, serine and alanine reached around 0.79, 0.32, 0.30 and 0.51 in all treatments, respectively. The striking similarity in neutral sugar and amino acid compositions between natural and artificial seawater samples, suggests that the microbial carbon pump also applies for neutral sugars and amino acids and that bacterially-produced biomolecules persist for long periods in the ocean.

  19. Production and transformation of dissolved neutral sugars and amino acids by bacteria in seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jørgensen, L.; Lechtenfeld, O. J.; Benner, R.; Middelboe, M.; Stedmon, C. A.

    2014-10-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the ocean consists of a heterogeneous mixture of molecules, most of which are of unknown origin. Neutral sugars and amino acids are among the few recognizable biomolecules in DOM, and the molecular composition of these biomolecules is shaped primarily by biological production and degradation processes. This study provides insight into the bioavailability of biomolecules as well as the chemical composition of DOM produced by bacteria. The molecular compositions of combined neutral sugars and amino acids were investigated in DOM produced by bacteria and in DOM remaining after 32 days of bacterial degradation. Results from bioassay incubations with natural seawater (sampled from water masses originating from the surface waters of the Arctic Ocean and the North Atlantic Ocean) and artificial seawater indicate that the molecular compositions following bacterial degradation are not strongly influenced by the initial substrate or bacterial community. The molecular composition of neutral sugars released by bacteria was characterized by a high glucose content (47 mol %) and heterogeneous contributions from other neutral sugars (3-14 mol %). DOM remaining after bacterial degradation was characterized by a high galactose content (33 mol %), followed by glucose (22 mol %) and the remaining neutral sugars (7-11 mol %). The ratio of D-amino acids to L-amino acids increased during the experiments as a response to bacterial degradation, and after 32 days, the D/L ratios of aspartic acid, glutamic acid, serine and alanine reached around 0.79, 0.32, 0.30 and 0.51 in all treatments, respectively. The striking similarity in neutral sugar and amino acid compositions between natural (representing marine semi-labile and refractory DOM) and artificial (representing bacterially produced DOM) seawater samples, suggests that microbes transform bioavailable neutral sugars and amino acids into a common, more persistent form.

  20. Strong and Selective Halide Anion Binding by Neutral Halogen-Bonding [2]Rotaxanes in Wet Organic Solvents.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jason Y C; Bunchuay, Thanthapatra; Beer, Paul D

    2017-04-03

    The design and construction of neutral interlocked host molecules for anion recognition are rare. Using an active-metal template approach, the preparation of a family of neutral halogen bonding (XB) rotaxanes containing two, three and four iodotriazole groups integrated into the macrocycle and axle components is achieved. In spite of the interlocked hosts' neutrality, such rotaxane systems are capable of binding halide anions strongly and selectively in wet organic solvent mixtures. Importantly, halide-binding strength and selectivity can be modulated by varying the number and position of the halogen bond donor iodotriazole groups within the interlocked cavity; the rotaxane containing the largest number of halogen bond donor groups exhibits the highest halide anion-binding affinities. By varying the percentage of water content in the solvent, neutral XB donor-mediated anion-binding strength is also demonstrated to be highly sensitive to solvent polarity. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Edge rotation from momentum transport by neutrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omotani, JT; Newton, SL; Pusztai, I.; Fülöp, T.

    2016-11-01

    Due to their high cross field mobility, neutral atoms can have a strong effect on transport even at the low relative densities found inside the separatrix. We use a charge-exchange dominated model for the neutrals, coupled to neoclassical ions, to calculate momentum transport when it is dominated by the neutrals. We can then calculate self-consistently the radial electric field and predict the intrinsic rotation in an otherwise torque-free plasma. Using a numerical solver for the ion distribution to allow arbitrary collisionality, we investigate the effects of inverse aspect ratio and elongation on plasma rotation. We also calculate the rotation of a trace carbon impurity, to facilitate future comparison to experiments using charge exchange recombination spectroscopy diagnostics.

  2. Determination of exospheric neutral gas temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauersberger, K.; Nier, A. O.; Kayser, D. C.; Potter, W. E.; Engebretson, M. J.

    1976-01-01

    The Atmosphere Explorer satellites (AE-C, -D, and -E) were initially placed into highly elliptical orbits with perigees around 140 km and apogees of 4000 km. As a result of such an orbital geometry, measurements of neutral constituents at high altitudes represent mainly vertical changes in densities. The influence of horizontal density gradients on measurements above 400 km is small. Under geomagnetically quiet conditions, the density profiles can be used to derive scale-height temperatures of the exosphere. The open-source neutral mass spectrometer (OSS) flown on all three AE-satellites measured neutral constituents such as N2, O, and N well above 400 km. The temperatures derived from scale heights show a good agreement among the constituents and the expected close correlation with the F10.7-cm solar flux. Satellites with highly elliptical orbits provide the opportunity to measure simultaneously both densities and temperatures.

  3. Plasma Heating by Neutral Beam Injection

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, R

    2004-03-15

    The additional heating of plasmas by injection of fast neutrals - or Neutral Beam Injection (NBI) - is reviewed. First, the limitations of ohmic heating in tokamaks and the other motivations for using additional heating in fusion machines are discussed. Next, the principle of operation of neutral beam injectors, and state of the art, are outlined. Positive-ion (PNBI) and negative-ion (NNBI) based concepts are discussed. Next, the physical processes by which the beam transfers energy to the plasma, namely ionisation and slowing-down are described. For both, an elementary theory is given and the comparison with experimental results is made. Applications of NBI to heating, current drive and rotation drive are reviewed. The prospects of NBI for ITER are commented.

  4. Methods for neutralizing anthrax or anthrax spores

    SciTech Connect

    Sloan, Mark A; Vivekandanda, Jeevalatha; Holwitt, Eric A; Kiel, Johnathan L

    2013-02-26

    The present invention concerns methods, compositions and apparatus for neutralizing bioagents, wherein bioagents comprise biowarfare agents, biohazardous agents, biological agents and/or infectious agents. The methods comprise exposing the bioagent to an organic semiconductor and exposing the bioagent and organic semiconductor to a source of energy. Although any source of energy is contemplated, in some embodiments the energy comprises visible light, ultraviolet, infrared, radiofrequency, microwave, laser radiation, pulsed corona discharge or electron beam radiation. Exemplary organic semiconductors include DAT and DALM. In certain embodiments, the organic semiconductor may be attached to one or more binding moieties, such as an antibody, antibody fragment, or nucleic acid ligand. Preferably, the binding moiety has a binding affinity for one or more bioagents to be neutralized. Other embodiments concern an apparatus comprising an organic semiconductor and an energy source. In preferred embodiments, the methods, compositions and apparatus are used for neutralizing anthrax spores.

  5. Kinetic Simulations of Ion Beam Neutralization

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, O.; Wang, J.

    2011-05-20

    Full particle PIC simulations are performed to study the neutralization of an ion beam in the cohesionless, mesothermal regime. Simulations further confirmed that neutralization is achieved through interactions between the trapped electrons and the potential well established by the propagation of the beam front along the beam direction and is not through plasma instabilities as previous studies suggested. In the transverse direction, the process is similar to that of the expansion of mesothermal plasma into vacuum. Parametric simulations are also performed to investigate the effects of beam radius and domain boundary condition on the neutralization process. The results suggests that, while the qualitative behavior may be similar in ground tests, quantitative parameters such as the beam potential will be affected significantly by the vacuum chamber because of the limits imposed on the expansion process by the finite chamber space.

  6. Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies for HIV Eradication.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Kathryn E; Barouch, Dan H

    2016-02-01

    Passive transfer of antibodies has long been considered a potential treatment modality for infectious diseases, including HIV. Early efforts to use antibodies to suppress HIV replication, however, were largely unsuccessful, as the antibodies that were studied neutralized only a relatively narrow spectrum of viral strains and were not very potent. Recent advances have led to the discovery of a large portfolio of human monoclonal antibodies that are broadly neutralizing across many HIV-1 subtypes and are also substantially more potent. These antibodies target multiple different epitopes on the HIV envelope, thus allowing for the development of antibody combinations. In this review, we discuss the application of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) for HIV treatment and HIV eradication strategies. We highlight bNAbs that target key epitopes, such as the CD4 binding site and the V2/V3-glycan-dependent sites, and we discuss several bNAbs that are currently in the clinical development pipeline.

  7. Broadly neutralizing antibodies against influenza viruses

    PubMed Central

    Laursen, Nick S.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2014-01-01

    Despite available antivirals and vaccines, influenza infections continue to be a major cause of mortality worldwide. Vaccination generally induces an effective, but strain-specific antibody response. As the virus continually evolves, new vaccines have to be administered almost annually when a novel strain becomes dominant. Furthermore, the sporadic emerging resistance to neuraminidase inhibitors among circulating strains suggests an urgent need for new therapeutic agents. Recently, several cross-reactive antibodies have been described, which neutralize an unprecedented spectrum of influenza viruses. These broadly neutralizing antibodies generally target conserved functional regions on the major influenza surface glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA). The characterization of their neutralization breadth and epitopes on HA could stimulate the development of new antibody-based antivirals and broader influenza vaccines. PMID:23583287

  8. Landau-like states in neutral particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Saikat; Ågren, Hans; Balatsky, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    We show the emergence of a new type of dispersion relation for neutral atoms with an interesting similarity to the spectrum of two-dimensional electrons in an applied perpendicular constant magnetic field. These neutral atoms can be confined in toroidal optical traps and give quasi-Landau spectra. In strong contrast to the equidistant infinitely degenerate Landau levels for charged particles, the spectral gap for such two-dimensional neutral particles increases in particular electric-field configurations. The idea in the paper is motivated by the development in cold atom experiments and builds on the seminal paper of Aharonov and Casher [Phys. Rev. Lett. 53, 319 (1984), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.53.319].

  9. Neutral Beam Injection in the Electric Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourdain, P.-A.; Carter, T. A.; Gauvreau, J.-L.; Grossman, A.; Lafonteese, D. J.; Pace, D. C.; Schmitz, L. W.; Taylor, R. J.; White, A. E.; Yates, T. F.

    2004-11-01

    The Electric Tokamak (ET) at UCLA (Bt=0.25T, R=5m, a=1m, Te(0)=300eV, tau(0)=1s) is now running long shots (5s). A new development program was started last year to include a neutral beam in the daily operations of the machine. As a result, a 10kV neutral beam injector was built to deal with plasma and measurement issues. The design and parameters of the beam are discussed. The source is based on an RF generated plasma, with a single extraction grid providing an accel-decel configuration. Plasma neutralization efficiency is also presented. Co- or counter injection is now possible using a single beam. The construction of a second beam is planned for simultaneous co- and counter injections for toroidal momentum input control. Plasma toroidal and poloidal rotation, particle diffusion and current drive effects will be presented.

  10. Viewing perspective in energetic neutral atom intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yihua; Lui, Anthony T. Y.; Fok, Mei-Ching

    2008-09-01

    Through interspacecraft comparison of energetic neutral oxygen (ENO) intensity from two different vantage points provided by IMAGE and Geotail, Lui et al. (2005) showed that viewing perspective plays a very important role in the observed ENO intensity level during a magnetic storm period. Motivated by the findings of Lui et al. (2005), we investigate how viewing perspective influences energetic neutral atom emissions from a modeling perspective. The main results of this paper are that (1) our simulation results, based upon O+ ion fluxes from the Comprehensive Ring Current Model and the subsequent ENO calculation, reproduce the total differential ENO intensity obtained from two spacecraft to a reasonable degree and (2) further analysis of our results indicates that pitch angle anisotropy in ring current ion flux, a crucial physical quantity in ring current dynamics, is one major contributor to the difference in energetic neutral atom intensity from different viewing perspectives.

  11. Molecules Best Paper Award 2013.

    PubMed

    McPhee, Derek J

    2013-02-05

    Molecules has started to institute a "Best Paper" award to recognize the most outstanding papers in the area of natural products, medicinal chemistry and molecular diversity published in Molecules. We are pleased to announce the second "Molecules Best Paper Award" for 2013.

  12. Linear Ion Trap for the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinckerhoff, William; Arevalo, Ricardo; Danell, Ryan; van Amerom, Friso; Pinnick, Veronica; Li, Xiang; Hovmand, Lars; Getty, Stephanie; Mahaffy, Paul; Goesmann, Fred; Steininger, Harald

    2014-05-01

    The 2018 ExoMars rover mission includes the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) investigation. MOMA will examine the chemical composition of samples acquired from depths of up to two meters below the martian surface, where organics may be protected from radiative and oxidative degradation. When combined with the complement of instruments in the rover's Pasteur Payload, MOMA has the potential to reveal the presence of a wide range of organics preserved in a variety of mineralogical environments, and to begin to understand the structural character and potential origin of those compounds. MOMA includes a linear, or 2D, ion trap mass spectrometer (ITMS) that is designed to analyze molecular composition of (i) gas evolved from pyrolyzed powder samples and separated on a gas chromatograph and (ii) ions directly desorbed from solid samples at Mars ambient pressure using a pulsed laser and a fast-valve capillary ion inlet system. This "dual source" approach gives MOMA unprecedented breadth of detection over a wide range of molecular weights and volatilities. Analysis of nonvolatile, higher-molecular weight organics such as carboxylic acids and peptides even in the presence of significant perchlorate concentrations is enabled by the extremely short (~1 ns) pulses of the desorption laser. Use of the ion trap's tandem mass spectrometry mode permits selective focus on key species for isolation and controlled fragmentation, providing structural analysis capabilities. The flight-like engineering test unit (ETU) of the ITMS, now under construction, will be used to verify breadboard performance with high fidelity, while simultaneously supporting the development of analytical scripts and spectral libraries using synthetic and natural Mars analog samples guided by current results from MSL. ETU campaign data will strongly advise the specifics of the calibration applied to the MOMA flight model as well as the science operational procedures during the mission.

  13. Electron Impact Fragmentation of CH4 Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Ryoji; Oguri, Kazuhiro; Makochekanwa, Casten; Kitajima, Masashi; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2004-09-01

    Absolute electron-molecule impact dissociation cross sections are of interest in many fields of physics and chemistry, plasma etching of microelectronic devices and other industrial applications. However, experimental data on these cross sections is scarce mainly because of the difficulties involved in measuring neutral fragments [1]. Electron impact dissociation of CH4 molecules into the CH3 radicals have been investigated over the energy range 15.0 to 37.0 eV. The experimental procedure involves a dual-electron-beam in a two-stage collision system in conjunction with a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS). This is similar to the threshold-ionization mass spectrometry method [2]. Significant differences, in magnitude up to four times at 100 eV, exist between the only available absolute measurements by Sugai et al. [2] and Moore et al. [3]. Our data shows very close agreement with the Moore et al. data, which which show reasonable consistency with the available CH4 total dissociation data by Winters [3]. [1] L. S. Polak and D. I. Slovetsky, Int. J. Rad. Phys. Chem. 8, 257 (1976). [2] H. Sugai, H. Toyoda and T. Nakano, Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 30, 2912 (1991). [3] H. F. Winters, J. Chem. Phys. 63, 3462 (1975).

  14. A Label as a Hidden Persuader: Chemists' Neutralization Concept.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Hans-Jurgen

    1991-01-01

    Identifies and describes the problems students have with the concept of neutralization. Analysis of over 7,500 students' answers to test questions over neutralization showed that many students understand the concept in its original meaning. Students assumed that in any neutralization reaction a neutral solution is formed, even if a weak acid or…

  15. A Label as a Hidden Persuader: Chemists' Neutralization Concept.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Hans-Jurgen

    1991-01-01

    Identifies and describes the problems students have with the concept of neutralization. Analysis of over 7,500 students' answers to test questions over neutralization showed that many students understand the concept in its original meaning. Students assumed that in any neutralization reaction a neutral solution is formed, even if a weak acid or…

  16. Apparatus for neutralization of accelerated ions

    DOEpatents

    Fink, Joel H.; Frank, Alan M.

    1979-01-01

    Apparatus for neutralization of a beam of accelerated ions, such as hydrogen negative ions (H.sup.-), using relatively efficient strip diode lasers which emit monochromatically at an appropriate wavelength (.lambda. = 8000 A for H.sup.- ions) to strip the excess electrons by photodetachment. A cavity, formed by two or more reflectors spaced apart, causes the laser beams to undergo multiple reflections within the cavity, thus increasing the efficiency and reducing the illumination required to obtain an acceptable percentage (.about. 85%) of neutralization.

  17. Theory of neutral clustering for growing populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houchmandzadeh, Bahram

    2009-11-01

    The spatial distribution of most species in nature is nonuniform. We have shown recently [B. Houchmandzadeh, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 078103 (2008)] on an experimental ecological community of amoeba that the most basic facts of life—birth and death—are enough to cause considerable aggregation which cannot be smoothened by random movements of the organisms. This clustering, termed neutral and always present, is independent of external causes and social interaction. We develop here the theoretical groundwork of this phenomenon by explicitly computing the pair-correlation function and the variance to mean ratio of the above neutral model and its comparison to numerical simulations.

  18. Photoproduction of neutral pions off protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crede, V.; Sparks, N.; Wilson, A.; Anisovich, A. V.; Bacelar, J. C. S.; Bantes, R.; Bartholomy, O.; Bayadilov, D.; Beck, R.; Beloglazov, Y. A.; Castelijns, R.; Dutz, H.; Elsner, D.; Ewald, R.; Frommberger, F.; Funke, Chr.; Gregor, R.; Gridnev, A.; Gutz, E.; Hillert, W.; Hoffmeister, P.; Jaegle, I.; Junkersfeld, J.; Kalinowsky, H.; Kammer, S.; Klein, Frank; Klein, Friedrich; Klempt, E.; Kotulla, M.; Krusche, B.; Löhner, H.; Lopatin, I. V.; Lugert, S.; Menze, D.; Mertens, T.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Metag, V.; Nanova, M.; Nikonov, V. A.; Novinski, D.; Novotny, R.; Ostrick, M.; Pant, L. M.; van Pee, H.; Pfeiffer, M.; Roy, A.; Sarantsev, A. V.; Schadmand, S.; Schmidt, C.; Schmieden, H.; Schoch, B.; Shende, S.; Sokhoyan, V.; Süle, A.; Sumachev, V. V.; Szczepanek, T.; Thoma, U.; Trnka, D.; Varma, R.; Walther, D.; Wendel, Ch.

    2011-11-01

    Photoproduction of neutral pions has been studied with the CBELSA/TAPS detector in the reaction γp→pπ0 for photon energies between 0.85 and 2.50 GeV. The π0 mesons are observed in their dominant neutral decay mode: π0→γγ. For the first time, the differential cross sections cover the very forward region, θc.m.<60∘. A partial-wave analysis of these data within the Bonn-Gatchina framework observes the high-mass resonances G17(2190), D13(2080), and D15(2070).

  19. High-current plasma contactor neutralizer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beattie, J. R.; Williamson, W. S.; Matossian, J. N.; Vourgourakis, E. J.; Burch, J. L.

    1989-01-01

    A plasma-contactor neutralizer system is described, for the stabilizing the Orbiter's potential during flights of the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science missions. The plasma contactor neutralizer will include a Xe plasma source that can provide steady-state ion-emission currents of up to 1.5 A. The Orbiter's potential will be maintained near that of the surrounding space plasma during electron-beam accelerator firings through a combination of ion emission from the Xe plasma source and electron collection from the ambient space plasma. Configuration diagrams and block diagrams are presented along with the performance characteristics of the system.

  20. Plasma precipitation and neutral particle emission at Ganymede

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massetti, S.; Milillo, A.; Mura, A.; Orsini, S.; Plainaki, C.; Mangano, V.

    2012-04-01

    Ganymede, the largest moon of Jupiter is characterized by a tiny magnetosphere produced by an intrinsic magnetic moment; it is linked to the Jovian magnetosphere and embedded in its energetic plasma environment. In addition, since the plasma co-rotating with Jupiter impinges on Ganymede trailing side at subsonic speed, there is no bow-shock formation. Here we present preliminary results of Monte Carlo simulations aimed to evaluate the expected ion precipitation onto the polar caps of Ganymede, by means of the magnetic and electric fields derived by a global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model that realistically describe Ganymede's magnetospheric environment. We discuss precipitation pattern differences between the simulated ion species (H+, O+ and S+) at different energies in the range 10-100 keV. Plasma precipitating onto the surface of Ganymede modifies it both physically (via ion sputtering) and chemically (via radiolysis). Directly sputtered H2O molecules as well as products of H2O decomposition, that may recombine and produce diverse molecules, such as O2 and H2 are released. The yields of these processes have been estimated by means of accurate function that includes the dependence of the release on impacting ion species and energy as well as on the moon's surface temperature. In this study we attempted to isolate the temperature dependent part of this yield function and to assign it exclusively to the chemical processes taking place on ice and to the subsequent release of new molecules. In this way we make a rough preliminary distinction between the sputtering and radiolysis exospheric contributions. In our estimations we take into account also the energy spectra of precipitating plasma. A MonteCarlo model has been used to simulate the neutral density of escaping particles. Here we present results in terms of density and fluxes.