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Sample records for desorbed neutral molecules

  1. Velocity distributions of photochemically desorbed molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Frank M.; Ho, W.

    1994-05-01

    The standard picture of desorption induced by electronic transitions (DIET) is analyzed for high excited state quenching rates. Simple dynamical considerations are found to explain the velocity distributions characterizing a large number of photodesorption and electron stimulated desorption systems. Without invoking any thermalization processes, the model predicts a Maxwell-Boltzmann velocity distribution, thus providing a theoretical justification for this distribution's widespread use as an empirical fitting formula for velocity distributions of nonthermally desorbed species.

  2. Comparing Vacuum and Extreme Ultraviolet Radiation for Postionization of Laser Desorbed Neutrals from Bacterial Biofilms and Organic Fullerene

    SciTech Connect

    Gaspera, Gerald L.; Takahashi, Lynelle K.; Zhou, Jia; Ahmed, Musahid; Moored, Jerry F.; Hanley, Luke

    2010-12-08

    Vacuum and extreme ultraviolet radiation from 8 - 24 eV generated at a synchrotron was used to postionize laser desorbed neutrals of antibiotic-treated biofilms and a modified fullerene using laser desorption postionization mass spectrometry (LDPI-MS). Results show detection of the parent ion, various fragments, and extracellular material from biofilms using LDPI-MS with both vacuum and extreme ultraviolet photons. Parent ions were observed for both cases, but extreme ultraviolet photons (16-24 eV) induced more fragmentation than vacuum ultraviolet (8-14 eV) photons.

  3. Evaluating the Translational Temperature of Molecules Laser-desorbed after Online Concentration Using Multiphoton Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Miura, Shuhei; Uchimura, Tomohiro

    2016-01-01

    We describe a new technique for evaluating the translational temperature of molecules by applying online concentration via analyte adsorption/laser desorption, which is a sample-introduction technique for resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (REMPI-TOFMS). In the present study, analyte molecules were adsorbed via a narrowed capillary tip once, and then the flow of the carrier gas containing the analyte was stopped. After laser desorption, the ion signals induced by REMPI were monitored. Finally, the translational temperature could be calculated from the velocity distribution of the desorbed molecules by applying a Maxwell distribution. PMID:27682410

  4. A prototype storage ring for neutral molecules.

    PubMed

    Crompvoets, F M; Bethlem, H L; Jongma, R T; Meijer, G

    2001-05-10

    The ability to cool and manipulate atoms with light has yielded atom interferometry, precision spectroscopy, Bose-Einstein condensates and atom lasers. The extension of controlled manipulation to molecules is expected to be similarly rewarding, but molecules are not as amenable to manipulation by light owing to a far more complex energy-level spectrum. However, time-varying electric and magnetic fields have been successfully used to control the position and velocity of ions, suggesting that these schemes can also be used to manipulate neutral particles having an electric or magnetic dipole moment. Although the forces exerted on neutral species are many orders of magnitude smaller than those exerted on ions, beams of neutral dipolar molecules have been successfully slowed down in a series of pulsed electric fields and subsequently loaded into an electrostatic trap. Here we extend the scheme to include a prototype electrostatic storage ring made of a hexapole torus with a circumference of 80 cm. After injection, decelerated bunches of deuterated ammonia molecules, each containing about 106 molecules in a single quantum state and with a translational temperature of 10 mK, travel up to six times around the ring. Stochastic cooling might provide a means to increase the phase-space density of the stored molecules in the storage ring, and we expect this to open up new opportunities for molecular spectroscopy and studies of cold molecular collisions.

  5. Associative Electron Stimulated Desorption of Neutral CO Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šutara, F.; Matolín, V.

    2001-11-01

    The Electron Stimulated Desorption (ESD) of neutral CO molecules was studied on polycrystalline Ni surface. Combined ESD and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) measurements were used to observe the variations of neutral ESD yield in dependence on CO coverage, containing direct information about the cross section for ESD of neutral CO molecules in relation to various CO adsorption states. The results show evidence of ESD of neutral CO molecules from dissociative adsorption states. The cross section for this associative ESD process is relatively high in comparison with the CO ESD cross section for molecular CO adsorption.

  6. Electron stimulated desorption of the metallic substrate at monolayer coverage: Sensitive detection via 193 nm laser photoionization of neutral aluminum desorbed from CH3O/Al(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, C. E.; Whitten, J. E.; Pellin, M. J.; Gruen, D. M.; Jones, P. L.

    A fortuitous overlap between the gain profile of the 193 nm ArF excimer laser and the Al autoionizing transition (sup 2)S(sub 1/2) (512753/cm) yields to the left (sup 2)P(sup 0)J has been exploited in the direct observation of substrate metal atoms in an electron simulated desorption (ESD) process from the monolayer adsorbate system CH3O/Al(111). The identity of the mass 27 photoion was established as Al(+) by (1) isotopic substitution of C-13 in the methanol employed for methoxy formation, and (2) tunable laser scans utilizing the DJ-2 (J = 3/2, 5/2) intermediate levels at approximately 32436/cm and a 248 nm ionization step. An ESD yield of approximately x 10(exp -6) Al atoms/(electron at 1 keV) was established by comparison with a sputtering experiment in the same apparatus. Velocity distributions measured for the desorbed Al species showed some differences in comparison with methoxy velocity data: a slightly lower peak velocity and a significantly less prominent high-velocity component.

  7. Deceleration of neutral molecules in macroscopic traveling traps

    SciTech Connect

    Osterwalder, Andreas; Meek, Samuel A.; Hammer, Georg; Haak, Henrik; Meijer, Gerard

    2010-05-15

    A decelerator is presented where polar neutral molecules are guided and decelerated using the principle of traveling electric potential wells, such that molecules are confined in stable three-dimensional traps throughout. We compare this decelerator with that of Scharfenberg et al. [Phys. Rev. A 79, 023410 (2009)] and we show that the current decelerator provides a substantially larger phase-space acceptance, even at higher acceleration. The mode of operation is described and experimentally demonstrated by guiding and decelerating CO molecules.

  8. Dynamics of neutral molecules stored in a ring

    SciTech Connect

    Crompvoets, Floris M.H.; Bethlem, Hendrick L.; Kuepper, Jochen; Roij, Andre J.A. van; Meijer, Gerard

    2004-06-01

    A decelerated beam of neutral ammonia molecules is injected into an electrostatic storage ring. Electrostatic lenses are used to map the emittance of the decelerator onto the acceptance of the ring. The tangential velocity spread of the package of molecules in the ring is set to less than 1 m/s. The package of molecules can be observed for more than 50 distinct round trips, corresponding to 40 m in circular orbit and almost 0.5 s storage time, sufficiently long for a first investigation of its transversal motion in the ring.

  9. BEAM TRANSPORT AND STORAGE WITH COLD NEUTRAL ATOMS AND MOLECULES

    SciTech Connect

    Walstrom, Peter L.

    2012-05-15

    A large class of cold neutral atoms and molecules is subject to magnetic field-gradient forces. In the presence of a field, hyperfine atomic states are split into several Zeeman levels. The slopes of these curves vs. field are the effective magnetic moments. By means of optical pumping in a field, Zeeman states of neutral lithium atoms and CaH molecules with effective magnetic moments of nearly {+-} one Bohr magneton can be selected. Particles in Zeeman states for which the energy increases with field are repelled by increasing fields; particles in states for which the energy decreases with field are attracted to increasing fields. For stable magnetic confinement, field-repelled states are required. Neutral-particle velocities in the present study are on the order of tens to hundreds of m/s and the magnetic fields needed for transport and injection are on the order of in the range of 0.01-1T. Many of the general concepts of charged-particle beam transport carry over into neutral particle spin-force optics, but with important differences. In general, the role of bending dipoles in charged particle optics is played by quadrupoles in neutral particle optics; the role of quadrupoles is played by sextupoles. The neutralparticle analog of charge-exchange injection into storage rings is the use of lasers to flip the state of particles from field-seeking to field-repelled. Preliminary tracking results for two neutral atom/molecule storage ring configurations are presented. It was found that orbit instabilities limit the confinment time in a racetrack-shaped ring with discrete magnetic elements with drift spaces between them; stable behavior was observed in a toroidal ring with a continuous sextupole field. An alternative concept using a linear sextupole or octupole channel with solenoids on the ends is presently being considered.

  10. Countercurrent flow absorber and desorber

    DOEpatents

    Wilkinson, William H.

    1984-01-01

    Countercurrent flow absorber and desorber devices are provided for use in absorption cycle refrigeration systems and thermal boosting systems. The devices have increased residence time and surface area resulting in improved heat and mass transfer characteristics. The apparatuses may be incorporated into open cycle thermal boosting systems in which steam serves both as the refrigerant vapor which is supplied to the absorber section and as the supply of heat to drive the desorber section of the system.

  11. Countercurrent flow absorber and desorber

    DOEpatents

    Wilkinson, W.H.

    1984-10-16

    Countercurrent flow absorber and desorber devices are provided for use in absorption cycle refrigeration systems and thermal boosting systems. The devices have increased residence time and surface area resulting in improved heat and mass transfer characteristics. The apparatuses may be incorporated into open cycle thermal boosting systems in which steam serves both as the refrigerant vapor which is supplied to the absorber section and as the supply of heat to drive the desorber section of the system. 9 figs.

  12. Deep superconducting magnetic traps for neutral atoms and molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, J. G. E.; Michniak, R. A.; Nguyen, S. V.; Campbell, W. C.; Egorov, D.; Maxwell, S. E.; van Buuren, L. D.; Doyle, J. M.

    2004-01-01

    We describe the design, construction and performance of three realizations of a high-field superconducting magnetic trap for neutral atoms and molecules. Each of these traps utilizes a pair of coaxial coils in the anti-Helmholtz geometry and achieves depths greater than 4 T, allowing it to capture magnetic atoms and molecules cooled in a cryogenic buffer gas. Achieving this depth requires that the repulsive force between the coils (which can exceed 30 metric tons) be contained. We also describe additional features of the traps, including the elimination of trapped fluxes from the coils and the integration of the coils into a cryogenic vacuum environment suitable for producing cold atoms and molecules.

  13. Ion Pairs or Neutral Molecule Adducts? Cooperativity in Hydrogen Bonding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeKock, Roger L.; Schipper, Laura A.; Dykhouse, Stephanie C.; Heeringa, Lee P.; Brandsen, Benjamin M.

    2009-01-01

    We performed theoretical studies on the systems NH[subscript 3] times HF times mH[subscript 2]O, NH[subscript 3] times HCl times mH[subscript 2]O, with m = 0, 1, 2, and 6. The molecules with m = 0 form hydrogen-bonded adducts with little tendency to form an ion-pair structure. The molecule NH[subscript 3] times HCl times H[subscript 2]O cannot be…

  14. Optical Frequency Standards Based on Neutral Atoms and Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riehle, Fritz; Helmcke, Juergen

    The current status and prospects of optical frequency standards based on neutral atomic and molecular absorbers are reviewed. Special attention is given to an optical frequency standard based on cold Ca atoms which are interrogated with a pulsed excitation scheme leading to resolved line structures with a quality factor Q > 10^12. The optical frequency was measured by comparison with PTB's primary clock to be νCa = 455 986 240 494.13 kHz with a total relative uncertainty of 2.5 x10^-13. After a recent recommendation of the International Committee of Weights and Measures (CIPM), this frequency standard now represents one of the most accurate realizations of the length unit.

  15. Isotope Effect in Tunneling Ionization of Neutral Hydrogen Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Xu, H.; Atia-Tul-Noor, A.; Hu, B. T.; Kielpinski, D.; Sang, R. T.; Litvinyuk, I. V.

    2016-08-01

    It has been recently predicted theoretically that due to nuclear motion light and heavy hydrogen molecules exposed to strong electric field should exhibit substantially different tunneling ionization rates [O. I. Tolstikhin, H. J. Worner, and T. Morishita, Phys. Rev. A 87, 041401(R) (2013)]. We studied that isotope effect experimentally by measuring relative ionization yields for each species in a mixed H2/D2 gas jet interacting with intense femtosecond laser pulses. In a reaction microscope apparatus, we detected ionic fragments from all contributing channels (single ionization, dissociation, and sequential double ionization) and determined the ratio of total single ionization yields for H2 and D2 . The measured ratio agrees quantitatively with the prediction of the generalized weak-field asymptotic theory in an apparent failure of the frozen-nuclei approximation.

  16. Isotope Effect in Tunneling Ionization of Neutral Hydrogen Molecules.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Xu, H; Atia-Tul-Noor, A; Hu, B T; Kielpinski, D; Sang, R T; Litvinyuk, I V

    2016-08-19

    It has been recently predicted theoretically that due to nuclear motion light and heavy hydrogen molecules exposed to strong electric field should exhibit substantially different tunneling ionization rates [O. I. Tolstikhin, H. J. Worner, and T. Morishita, Phys. Rev. A 87, 041401(R) (2013)]. We studied that isotope effect experimentally by measuring relative ionization yields for each species in a mixed H_{2}/D_{2} gas jet interacting with intense femtosecond laser pulses. In a reaction microscope apparatus, we detected ionic fragments from all contributing channels (single ionization, dissociation, and sequential double ionization) and determined the ratio of total single ionization yields for H_{2} and D_{2}. The measured ratio agrees quantitatively with the prediction of the generalized weak-field asymptotic theory in an apparent failure of the frozen-nuclei approximation. PMID:27588855

  17. Isotope Effect in Tunneling Ionization of Neutral Hydrogen Molecules.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Xu, H; Atia-Tul-Noor, A; Hu, B T; Kielpinski, D; Sang, R T; Litvinyuk, I V

    2016-08-19

    It has been recently predicted theoretically that due to nuclear motion light and heavy hydrogen molecules exposed to strong electric field should exhibit substantially different tunneling ionization rates [O. I. Tolstikhin, H. J. Worner, and T. Morishita, Phys. Rev. A 87, 041401(R) (2013)]. We studied that isotope effect experimentally by measuring relative ionization yields for each species in a mixed H_{2}/D_{2} gas jet interacting with intense femtosecond laser pulses. In a reaction microscope apparatus, we detected ionic fragments from all contributing channels (single ionization, dissociation, and sequential double ionization) and determined the ratio of total single ionization yields for H_{2} and D_{2}. The measured ratio agrees quantitatively with the prediction of the generalized weak-field asymptotic theory in an apparent failure of the frozen-nuclei approximation.

  18. Effective ex vivo neutralization of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in plasma by recombinant immunoglobulin molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Gauduin, M C; Allaway, G P; Maddon, P J; Barbas, C F; Burton, D R; Koup, R A

    1996-01-01

    We tested the ability of human monoclonal antibodies (immunoglobulin G1b12 [IgG1b12] and 19b) and CD4-based molecules (CD4-IgG2 and soluble CD4 [sCD4]) to neutralize human immunodeficiency virus type 1 directly from the plasma of seropositive donors in an ex vivo neutralization assay. IgG1b12 and CD4-IgG2, at concentrations from 1 to 25 micrograms/ml, were found to be effective at reducing the HIV-1 titer in most plasma samples. When viruses recovered from plasma samples were expanded to produce virus stocks, no correlation between the neutralization sensitivities to IgG1b12 and CD4-IgG2 of the in vitro passaged stocks and those of the ex vivo neutralizations performed directly on the plasma was observed. These differences could be due to changes in neutralization sensitivity that occur after one passage of the virus in vitro, or they could be related to the presence of complement or antibodies in the plasma. Furthermore, differences in expression of adhesion molecules on plasma-derived and phytohemagglutinin-activated peripheral blood mononuclear cell-derived viruses could be involved. These studies suggest that IgG1b12 and CD4-IgG2 have broad and potent neutralizing activity in both in vitro and ex vivo neutralization assays and should be considered for use as potential immunoprophylactic or therapeutic agents. PMID:8642690

  19. Absorption machine with desorber-resorber

    DOEpatents

    Biermann, Wendell J.

    1985-01-01

    An absorption refrigeration system utilizing a low temperature desorber and intermediate temperature resorber. The system operates at three temperatures and three pressures to increase the efficiency of the system and is capable of utilizing a lower generator temperature than previously used.

  20. Processes with neutral hydrogen and deuterium molecules relevant to edge plasma in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadez, I.; Markelj, S.; Rupnik, Z.; Pelicon, P.

    2008-07-01

    Detailed understanding and characterization of plasma-wall interaction and edge plasma in present tokamaks and future fusion reactors is becoming more and more important due to the ITER project. Involved processes determine the physical and chemical sputtering of the wall material, fuel retention in exposed material, edge plasma properties, disruption phenomena etc. Neutral hydrogen atoms and molecules are present in the edge plasma. They are continuously generated by ion recombination on the wall of the fusion reactor and on the other plasma facing components and subsequently reemitted in the plasma. Neutral molecules are especially important for plasma detachment in tokamak divertors. The interaction of excited neutral molecules with the walls and their importance for the edge plasma is still not well understood since there are not many experimental studies of relevant processes. Moreover, spectroscopic results from tokamak edge plasma are dominated by processes involving ions and electrons, so that direct evidence of the influence of neutrals is difficult to extract. Direct correlation of the observed phenomena to the processes with neutrals is mainly possible by numerical simulations. We have constructed a set-up for vibrational spectroscopy of hydrogen molecules (H_2 and D_2) that is based on the properties of the dissociative electron attachment in hydrogen in order to facilitate dedicated experimental studies of relevant processes with hydrogen molecules. For the same purpose we also developed a technique for in-situ hydrogen depth profiling on the samples exposed to the controlled hydrogen atmosphere. This is done by Ion Beam Analytical (IBA) method ERAD (Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis), utilizing 4.2 MeV probing beam of ^7Li^2+ ions. A short description of experimental techniques and results on chemical erosion of graphite layers, production of vibrationally excited hydrogen molecules on tungsten and isotope exchange on tungsten are to be presented in

  1. Ion-Atom and Ion-Molecule Hybrid Systems: Ion-Neutral Chemistry at Ultralow Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberle, Pascal; Dörfler, Alexander D.; von Planta, Claudio; Ravi, Krishnamurthy; Haas, Dominik; Zhang, Dong; van de Meerakker, Sebastiaan Y. T.; Willitsch, Stefan

    2015-09-01

    The study of chemical reactions between ions and neutral species at very low energies reveals precise informations about the dynamics of collisions and fine details of intermolecular interactions. Here, we report progress towards the development of next- generation experiments for the investigation of cold ion-neutral reactions. First, we present a new ’’dynamic” hybrid ion-atom trap which enables the study of collisions with a superior energy resolution accessing a regime in which quantum scattering resonances may become observable. Second, we discuss and numerically characterize the concept and properties of a hybrid trap for cold neutral molecules and molecular ions which paves the way for the study of ion-molecule reactions in the millikelvin regime.

  2. Internal Energies of Ion-Sputtered Neutral Tryptophan and Thymine Molecules Determined by Vacuum Ultraviolet Photoionization

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jia; Takahashi, Lynelle; Wilson, Kevin R.; Leone, Stephen R.; Ahmed, Musahid

    2010-03-11

    Vacuum ultraviolet photoionization coupled to secondary neutral mass spectrometry (VUV-SNMS) of deposited tryptophan and thymine films are performed at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline. The resulting mass spectra show that while the intensity of the VUV-SNMS signal is lower than the corresponding secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) signal, the mass spectra are significantly simplified in VUV-SNMS. A detailed examination of tryptophan and thymine neutral molecules sputtered by 25 keV Bi3 + indicates that the ion-sputtered parent molecules have ~;;2.5 eV of internal energy. While this internal energy shifts the appearance energy of the photofragment ions for both tryptophan and thymine, it does not change the characteristic photoionizaton efficiency (PIE) curves of thymine versus photon energy. Further analysis of the mass spectral signals indicate that approximately 80 neutral thymine molecules and 400 tryptophan molecules are sputtered per incident Bi3 + ion. The simplified mass spectra and significant characteristic ion contributions to the VUV-SNMS spectra indicate the potential power of the technique for organic molecule surface analysis.

  3. Global molecular identification from graphs. Neutral and ionized main-group diatomic molecules.

    PubMed

    James, Bryan; Caviness, Ken; Geach, Jonathan; Walters, Chris; Hefferlin, Ray

    2002-01-01

    Diophantine equations and inequalities are presented for main-group closed-shell diatomic molecules. Specifying various bond types (covalent, dative, ionic, van der Waals) and multiplicities, it becomes possible to identify all possible molecules. While many of the identified species are probably unstable under normal conditions, they are interesting and present a challenge for computational or experimental analysis. Ionized molecules with net charges of -1, 1, and 2 are also identified. The analysis applies to molecules with atoms from periods 2 and 3 but can be generalized by substituting isovalent atoms. When closed-shell neutral diatomics are positioned in the chemical space (with axes enumerating the numbers of valence electrons of the free atoms), it is seen that they lie on a few parallel isoelectronic series.

  4. Spectroscopy, Manipulation and Trapping of Neutral Atoms, Molecules, and Other Particles Using Optical Nanofibers: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Morrissey, Michael J.; Deasy, Kieran; Frawley, Mary; Kumar, Ravi; Prel, Eugen; Russell, Laura; Truong, Viet Giang; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2013-01-01

    The use of tapered optical fibers, i.e., optical nanofibers, for spectroscopy and the detection of small numbers of particles, such as neutral atoms or molecules, has been gaining interest in recent years. In this review, we briefly introduce the optical nanofiber, its fabrication, and optical mode propagation within. We discuss recent progress on the integration of optical nanofibers into laser-cooled atom and vapor systems, paying particular attention to spectroscopy, cold atom cloud characterization, and optical trapping schemes. Next, a natural extension of this work to molecules is introduced. Finally, we consider several alternatives to optical nanofibers that display some advantages for specific applications. PMID:23945738

  5. Identification of neutralization and diagnostic epitopes on PIM, the polymorphic immunodominant molecule of Theileria parva.

    PubMed Central

    Toye, P; Nyanjui, J; Goddeeris, B; Musoke, A J

    1996-01-01

    The polymorphic immunodominant molecule (PIM) of Theileria parva is expressed by the schizont and sporozoite stages of the parasite. We have recently cloned the cDNA encoding the PIM antigen from two stocks of the parasite: the cattle-derived T. parva (Muguga) stock and a buffalo-derived stock. The cDNAs were used in transient-transfection assays to assess the reactivity of the antigen with monoclonal antibodies (MAb) previously raised against schizont-infected cells and used for parasite strain identification. We demonstrate that 19 of the 25 MAb are specific for PIM. Antibody reactivities with deletion mutants of a fusion protein containing PIM and Pepscan analysis of the Muguga version of the molecule with 13 of the MAb indicate that there are at least 10 different epitopes throughout the molecule. None of the MAb react with a tetrapeptide repeat present in the central region of the molecule, probably because of an inability of BALB/c mice to produce antibodies to this repeat. In contrast, sera from infected cattle react strongly with the repeat region, suggesting that this region alone may be useful as a diagnostic reagent. Previous studies showed that MAb to PIM inhibit sporozoite infectivity of bovine lymphocytes in vitro, which suggests that the antigen may be useful in immunizing cattle against T. parva infection. Pepscan analysis revealed that sera from infected cattle reacted with peptides recognized by the neutralizing MAb, as did sera from cattle inoculated with a PIM-containing recombinant protein. The latter sera did not, however, neutralize sporozoite infectivity in vitro. These results will be useful in exploiting the strain identification, diagnostic, and immunizing potentials of this family of antigens. PMID:8613398

  6. Kondo effect in a neutral and stable all organic radical single molecule break junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burzuri, Enrique; Gaudenzi, Rocco; Frisenda, Riccardo; Franco, Carlos; Mas-Torrent, Marta; Rovira, Concepcio; Veciana, Jaume; Alcon, Isaac; Bromley, Stefan T.; van der Zant, Herre S. J.

    Organic radicals are neutral, purely organic molecules exhibiting an intrinsic magnetic moment due to the presence of an unpaired electron in the molecule in its ground state. This property, added to the low spin-orbit coupling makes organic radicals good candidates for molecular spintronics insofar as the radical character is stable in solid state electronic devices. We show that the paramagnetism of the PTM radical molecule, in the shape of a Kondo anomaly is preserved in two- and three-terminal solid-state devices, regardless of mechanical and electrostatic changes. Indeed, our results demonstrate that the Kondo anomaly is robust under electrodes displacement and changes of the electrostatic environment, pointing to a localized orbital in the radical as the source of magnetism. Strong support to this picture is provided by density functional calculations and measurements of the corresponding nonradical specie. We further study polyradical systems, where several unpaired spins interact in the same molecule. This work was supported by the EU FP7 program through project 618082 ACMOL and ERC grant advanced Mols@Mols. It was also supported by the Dutch funding organization NWO (VENI).

  7. Cytosine neutral molecules and cation-radicals in the gas-phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolken, Jill K.; Yao, Chunxiang; Turecek, Frantisek; Polce, Michael J.; Wesdemiotis, Chrys

    2007-11-01

    Gas-phase cytosine molecules and cation-radicals represent a complex system of several nearly isoenergetic tautomers within each group. Computational methods differ in ordering the relative enthalpies of neutral cytosine tautomers. At our highest level of theory, CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ calculations find an enol form, anti-2-hydroxy-4-aminopyrimidine (2), to be the most stable neutral tautomer in the gas-phase, followed by its rotamer, syn-2-hydroxy-4-aminopyrimidine (3), the canonical oxo-form, 4-amino-1,2-dihydropyrimidin-2(1H)-one (1), imino-forms, 2-oxo-4-iminodihydro(1H,3H)pyrimidine (4 and 5), and another oxo-form, 4-amino-dihydropyrimidin-2(3H)-one (6). Other tautomers, such as anti-anti, syn-syn and syn-anti-2-hydroxy-4-iminodihydro(3H,4H)pyrimidines (7-9), are less stable. The adiabatic ionization energies of the major cytosine tautomers have been calculated to be 8.71, 8.64, 8.62, 8.58, 8.64, and 8.31 eV for 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6, respectively. Cytosine cation-radicals show very close relative energies that increase in the order of 6+ (most stable) <2+ [approximate] 3+ < 4+ [approximate] 7+ [approximate] 1+ < 5+. In addition, distonic ions having radical centers at C-5 (10+) and C-6 (11+ are found as low-energy isomers of 1+-7+. Metastable cytosine cation-radicals undergo ring-cleavage dissociations by eliminations of CO (major) and HNCO (minor). The energetics of these and other higher-energy dissociations, including the pertinent transition states, have been established by high-level ab initio and density functional theory calculations and plausible mechanisms have been proposed. Collisional neutralization of cytosine cation-radicals with trimethylamine and dimethyldisulfide as electron donors forms stable molecules that are detected as cation-radicals following collisional reionization. The dissociations observed upon neutralization-reionization mainly include ring-cleavages followed by loss of NCO, HNCO, and formation of C2H3N, C2H2N, and CO neutral

  8. Novel Desorber for Online Drilling Mud Gas Logging

    PubMed Central

    Lackowski, Marcin; Tobiszewski, Marek; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    This work presents the construction solution and experimental results of a novel desorber for online drilling mud gas logging. The traditional desorbers use mechanical mixing of the liquid to stimulate transfer of hydrocarbons to the gaseous phase that is further analyzed. The presented approach is based on transfer of hydrocarbons from the liquid to the gas bubbles flowing through it and further gas analysis. The desorber was checked for gas logging from four different drilling muds collected from Polish boreholes. The results of optimization studies are also presented in this study. The comparison of the novel desorber with a commercial one reveals strong advantages of the novel one. It is characterized by much better hydrocarbons recovery efficiency and allows reaching lower limits of detection of the whole analytical system. The presented desorber seems to be very attractive alternative over widely used mechanical desorbers. PMID:27127674

  9. Novel Desorber for Online Drilling Mud Gas Logging.

    PubMed

    Lackowski, Marcin; Tobiszewski, Marek; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    This work presents the construction solution and experimental results of a novel desorber for online drilling mud gas logging. The traditional desorbers use mechanical mixing of the liquid to stimulate transfer of hydrocarbons to the gaseous phase that is further analyzed. The presented approach is based on transfer of hydrocarbons from the liquid to the gas bubbles flowing through it and further gas analysis. The desorber was checked for gas logging from four different drilling muds collected from Polish boreholes. The results of optimization studies are also presented in this study. The comparison of the novel desorber with a commercial one reveals strong advantages of the novel one. It is characterized by much better hydrocarbons recovery efficiency and allows reaching lower limits of detection of the whole analytical system. The presented desorber seems to be very attractive alternative over widely used mechanical desorbers. PMID:27127674

  10. Properties of clusters in the gas phase. V - Complexes of neutral molecules onto negative ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keesee, R. G.; Lee, N.; Castleman, A. W., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Ion-molecules association reactions of the form A(-)(B)n-1 + B = A(-)(B)n were studied over a range of temperatures in the gas phase using high pressure mass spectrometry. Enthalpy and entropy changes were determined for the stepwise clustering reactions of (1) sulfur dioxide onto Cl(-), I(-), and NO2(-) with n ranging from one to three or four, and onto SO2(-) and SO3(-) with n equal to one; and (2) carbon dioxide onto Cl(-), I(-), NO2(-), CO3(-), and SO3(-) with n equal to one. From these data and earlier hydration results, the order of the magnitude of the enthalpy changes on the association of the first neutral for a series of negative ions was found to parallel the gas-phase basicity of those anions.

  11. Bifunctional small molecules are biomimetic catalysts for silica synthesis at neutral pH.

    PubMed

    Roth, Kristian M; Zhou, Yan; Yang, Wenjun; Morse, Daniel E

    2005-01-12

    Silicatein is an enzyme isolated from the biosilica produced by the marine demosponge, Tethya aurantia. Once isolated from the sponge, silicatein can be used in vitro to catalyze the hydrolysis and direct polycondensation of a wide variety of alkoxide, ionic, and organometallic precursors to the corresponding chalcogens at standard temperature and pressure and neutral pH. On the basis of these results, an array of small molecules that mimic the unique physiochemical environment found in the enzyme active site was investigated for catalytic activity in the formation of silica from silicon alkoxides at neutral pH. The most successful of these biomimetic catalysts (cysteamine) was used to encapsulate firefly luciferase, green and blue fluorescent proteins (GFP, BFP), and Escherichia coli cells expressing GFP in silica matrixes. The benign conditions required for the catalysis of synthesis of these silica composites does not impair the activities of the encapsulated enzyme, fluorescent proteins, or live cells as shown by fluorescence measurements. In conjunction with microcontact printing, this biomimetically catalyzed encapsulation method has been used to produce patterned functional arrays of silica nanoparticulate composite materials.

  12. Experimental evidence of chemical components in the bonding of helium and neon with neutral molecules.

    PubMed

    Cappelletti, David; Bartocci, Alessio; Grandinetti, Felice; Falcinelli, Stefano; Belpassi, Leonardo; Tarantelli, Francesco; Pirani, Fernando

    2015-04-13

    The complexes of helium and neon with gaseous neutral molecules are generally perceived to be van der Waals adducts held together by physical (non-covalent) forces, owing to the combination of size (exchange) repulsion with dispersion/induction attraction. Molecular beam experiments confirm that this is the case for He-CF4 , Ne-CF4 adducts, but revealed that the interaction of He and Ne with CCl4 features an appreciable contribution of chemical components that arise from the anisotropy of the electron density of CCl4 that enhances a charge transfer from Ng (Ng=He, Ne). These findings furnish a novel assay of the bonding capabilities of helium and neon, and invite to revisit the neutral complexes of these elements as systems of chemical relevance. The CCl4 -Ng are also peculiar examples of halogen bonds, a group of interactions of major current concern. Finally, this investigation is a prelude to the development of semi-empirical models for force fields aimed to the unified description of static and dynamical properties of systems of comparable or higher complexity. PMID:25755007

  13. Experimental evidence of chemical components in the bonding of helium and neon with neutral molecules.

    PubMed

    Cappelletti, David; Bartocci, Alessio; Grandinetti, Felice; Falcinelli, Stefano; Belpassi, Leonardo; Tarantelli, Francesco; Pirani, Fernando

    2015-04-13

    The complexes of helium and neon with gaseous neutral molecules are generally perceived to be van der Waals adducts held together by physical (non-covalent) forces, owing to the combination of size (exchange) repulsion with dispersion/induction attraction. Molecular beam experiments confirm that this is the case for He-CF4 , Ne-CF4 adducts, but revealed that the interaction of He and Ne with CCl4 features an appreciable contribution of chemical components that arise from the anisotropy of the electron density of CCl4 that enhances a charge transfer from Ng (Ng=He, Ne). These findings furnish a novel assay of the bonding capabilities of helium and neon, and invite to revisit the neutral complexes of these elements as systems of chemical relevance. The CCl4 -Ng are also peculiar examples of halogen bonds, a group of interactions of major current concern. Finally, this investigation is a prelude to the development of semi-empirical models for force fields aimed to the unified description of static and dynamical properties of systems of comparable or higher complexity.

  14. Efficient neutralization and disruption of rhinovirus by chimeric ICAM-1/immunoglobulin molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, S; Casasnovas, J M; Staunton, D E; Springer, T A

    1993-01-01

    The intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) is used as a cellular receptor by 90% of human rhinoviruses (HRVs). Chimeric immunoadhesin molecules containing extracellular domains of ICAM-1 and constant regions of immunoglobulins (Igs) were designed in order to determine the effect of increased valency, Ig isotype, and number of ICAM-1 domains on neutralization and disruption of rhinovirus structure. These immunoadhesins include ICAM-1 amino-terminal domains 1 and 2 fused to the hinge and constant domains of the heavy chains of IgA1, IgM, and IgG1 (IC1-2D/IgA, -/IgM, and -/IgG). In addition, all five extracellular domains were fused to IgA1 (IC1-5D/IgA). Immunoadhesins were compared with soluble forms of ICAM-1 containing five and two domains (sICAM-1 and ICI-2D, respectively) in assays of HRV binding, infectivity, and conformation. In prevention of HRV plaque formation, IC1-5D/IgA was 200 times and IC1-2D/IgM and IC1-2D/IgA were 25 and 10 times more effective, respectively, than ICAM-1. The same chimeras were highly effective in inhibiting binding of rhinovirus to cells and disrupting the conformation of the virus capsid, as demonstrated by generation of approximately 65S particles. The results show that the number of ICAM-1 domains and a flexible Ig hinge are important factors contributing to the efficacy of neutralization. The higher efficiency of chimeras that bound bivalently in disrupting HRV was attributed to higher binding avidity. The IC1-5D/IgA immunoadhesin was effective at nanomolar concentrations, making it feasible therapy for rhinovirus infection. Images PMID:8098781

  15. Cross-Linking Poly(lactic acid) Film Surface by Neutral Hyperthermal Hydrogen Molecule Bombardment.

    PubMed

    Du, Wangli; Shao, Hong; He, Zhoukun; Tang, Changyu; Liu, Yu; Shen, Tao; Zhu, Yan; Lau, Woon-ming; Hui, David

    2015-12-16

    Constructing a dense cross-linking layer on a polymer film surface is a good way to improve the water resistance of poly(lactic acid) (PLA). However, conventional plasma treatments have failed to achieve the aim as a result of the unavoidable surface damage arising from the charged species caused by the uncontrolled high energy coming from colliding ions and electrons. In this work, we report a modified plasma method called hyperthermal hydrogen-induced cross-linking (HHIC) technology to construct a dense cross-linking layer on PLA film surfaces. This method produces energy-controlled neutral hyperthermal hydrogen, which selectively cleaves C-H bonds by molecule collision from the PLA film without breaking other bonds (e.g., C-C bonds in the polymer backbone), and results in subsequent cross-linking of the carbon radicals generated from the organic molecules. The formation of a dense cross-linking layer can serve as a barrier layer to significantly improve both the hydrophobicity and water vapor barrier property of the PLA film. Because of the advantage of selective cleavage of C-H bonds by HHIC treatment, the original physical properties (e.g., mechanical strength and light transmittance) of the PLA films are well-preserved. PMID:26594874

  16. Infrared Action Spectroscopy of Low-Temperature Neutral Gas-Phase Molecules of Arbitrary Structure.

    PubMed

    Yatsyna, Vasyl; Bakker, Daniël J; Salén, Peter; Feifel, Raimund; Rijs, Anouk M; Zhaunerchyk, Vitali

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate a technique for IR action spectroscopy that enables measuring IR spectra in a background-free fashion for low-temperature neutral gas-phase molecules of arbitrary structure. The method is exemplified experimentally for N-methylacetamide molecules in the mid-IR spectral range of 1000-1800  cm^{-1}, utilizing the free electron laser FELIX. The technique involves the resonant absorption of multiple mid-IR photons, which induces molecular dissociation. The dissociation products are probed with 10.49 eV vacuum ultraviolet photons and analyzed with a mass spectrometer. We also demonstrate the capability of this method to record, with unprecedented ease, mid-IR spectra for the molecular associates, such as clusters and oligomers, present in a molecular beam. In this way the mass-selected spectra of low-temperature gas-phase dimers and trimers of N-methylacetamide are measured in the full amide I-III range.

  17. Cross-Linking Poly(lactic acid) Film Surface by Neutral Hyperthermal Hydrogen Molecule Bombardment.

    PubMed

    Du, Wangli; Shao, Hong; He, Zhoukun; Tang, Changyu; Liu, Yu; Shen, Tao; Zhu, Yan; Lau, Woon-ming; Hui, David

    2015-12-16

    Constructing a dense cross-linking layer on a polymer film surface is a good way to improve the water resistance of poly(lactic acid) (PLA). However, conventional plasma treatments have failed to achieve the aim as a result of the unavoidable surface damage arising from the charged species caused by the uncontrolled high energy coming from colliding ions and electrons. In this work, we report a modified plasma method called hyperthermal hydrogen-induced cross-linking (HHIC) technology to construct a dense cross-linking layer on PLA film surfaces. This method produces energy-controlled neutral hyperthermal hydrogen, which selectively cleaves C-H bonds by molecule collision from the PLA film without breaking other bonds (e.g., C-C bonds in the polymer backbone), and results in subsequent cross-linking of the carbon radicals generated from the organic molecules. The formation of a dense cross-linking layer can serve as a barrier layer to significantly improve both the hydrophobicity and water vapor barrier property of the PLA film. Because of the advantage of selective cleavage of C-H bonds by HHIC treatment, the original physical properties (e.g., mechanical strength and light transmittance) of the PLA films are well-preserved.

  18. Infrared Action Spectroscopy of Low-Temperature Neutral Gas-Phase Molecules of Arbitrary Structure.

    PubMed

    Yatsyna, Vasyl; Bakker, Daniël J; Salén, Peter; Feifel, Raimund; Rijs, Anouk M; Zhaunerchyk, Vitali

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate a technique for IR action spectroscopy that enables measuring IR spectra in a background-free fashion for low-temperature neutral gas-phase molecules of arbitrary structure. The method is exemplified experimentally for N-methylacetamide molecules in the mid-IR spectral range of 1000-1800  cm^{-1}, utilizing the free electron laser FELIX. The technique involves the resonant absorption of multiple mid-IR photons, which induces molecular dissociation. The dissociation products are probed with 10.49 eV vacuum ultraviolet photons and analyzed with a mass spectrometer. We also demonstrate the capability of this method to record, with unprecedented ease, mid-IR spectra for the molecular associates, such as clusters and oligomers, present in a molecular beam. In this way the mass-selected spectra of low-temperature gas-phase dimers and trimers of N-methylacetamide are measured in the full amide I-III range. PMID:27661721

  19. Characterization of the gene encoding the polymorphic immunodominant molecule, a neutralizing antigen of Theileria parva

    SciTech Connect

    Toye, P.G.; Metzelaar, M.J.; Wijngaard, P.L.J.

    1995-08-01

    Theileria parva, a tick-transmitted protozoan parasite related to Plasmodium spp., causes the disease East Coast fever, an acute and usually fatal lymphoproliferative disorder of cattle in Africa. Previous studies using sera from cattle that have survived infection identified a polymorphic immunodominant molecule (PIM) that is expressed by both the infective sporozoite stage of the parasite and the intracellular schizont. Here we show that mAb specific for the PIM Ag can inhibit sporozoite invasion of lymphocytes in vitro. A cDNA clone encoding the PIM Ag of the T. parva (Muguga) stock was obtained by using these mAb in a novel eukaryotic expression cloning system that allows isolation of cDNA encoding cytoplasmic or surface Ags. To establish the molecular basis of the polymorphism of PIM, the cDNA of the PIM Ag from a buffalo-derived T. parva stock was isolated and its sequence was compared with that of the cattle-derived Muguga PIM. The two cDNAs showed considerable identity in both the 5{prime} and 3{prime} regions, but there was substantial sequence divergence in the central regions. Several types of repeated sequences were identified in the variant regions. In the Muguga form of the molecule, there were five tandem repeats of the tetrapeptide, QPEP, that were shown, by transfection of a deleted version of the PIM gene, not to react with several anti-PIM mAbs. By isolating and sequencing the genomic version of the gene, we identified two small introns in the 3{prime} region of the gene. Finally, we showed that polyclonal rat Abs against recombinant PIM neutralize sporozoite infectivity in vitro, suggesting that the PIM Ag should be evaluated for its capacity to immunize cattle against East Coast Fever.

  20. Probing Dynamics from Within in Negative Ions, Neutral Molecules and van der Waals Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrah, Nora

    2006-05-01

    We have investigated with unprecedented levels of detail, processes and phenomena involving photodetachment of negative ions and photoionization of molecules and van der Waals clusters using the brightness, spectral resolution, tunability and polarization of the Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Photodetachment of negative ions exhibit structure and processes differing substantially from corresponding processes in neutral and positive ions, owing to the dominance of correlation in both the initial and final states. We will report on investigations carried out in inner-valence CN^- molecules giving rise to absolute double photodetachment cross sections as well as on fragmentation of negative ions clusters. We will also present absolute inner-shell photodetachment of atoms leading to multi-Auger decay [1] and discuss threshold laws [2] and PCI effects [3]. The measurements were conducted using collinear photon-ion spectroscopy. The evolution of inner-shell photoionization of clusters, as a function of photon energy, will be presented and compared to analogous measurements in atoms. The measurements were conducted using angle resolved two-dimensional photoelectron spectroscopy. Molecular fragmentation results using an ion imaging detector will briefly be presented. [1] R. C. Bilodeau, J. D. Bozek, G. D. Ackerman, N. D. Gibson, C. W.Walter, A. Aguilar, G. Turri, I. Dumitriu and N. Berrah, PRA 72, 050701(R), 2005. [2] R. C. Bilodeau, J. D. Bozek, N. D. Gibson, C. W. Walter, G. D. Ackerman, I. Dumitriu, and N. Berrah, Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 083001 (2005). [3] R. C. Bilodeau, J. D. Bozek, A. Agular, G. D. Ackerman, and N. Berrah, (in press PRA brief report).

  1. A Desorbed Gas Molecular Ionization Mechanism for Arcing Onset in Solar Arrays Immersed in a Low-Density Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galofaro, J.; Vayner, B.; Ferguson, D.; Degroot, W.

    2002-01-01

    Previous experimental studies have hypothesized that the onset of Solar Array Arc (SAA) initiation in low-density space plasmas is caused by a desorbed gas molecular ionization mechanism. Indeed past investigations performed at the NASA Glenn Plasma Interaction Facility tend to not only support the desorbed gas molecular ionization mechanism, but have gone as far as identifying the crucial molecular species that must be present for molecular ion dominated process to occur. When electrical breakdown occurs at a triple junction site on a solar array panel, a quasi-neutral plasma cloud is ejected. Assuming the main component of the expelled plasma cloud by weight is due to water vapor, the fastest process available is due to HO molecules and OH(+) ions, or more succinctly, dissociative molecular-ion dominated recombination processes: H2O(+) + e(-) yields H* + OH*. Recently published spectroscopic observations of solar array arc spectra in ground tests have revealed the well-known molecular OH band (302 to 309nm), as well as the molecular SiH band (387nm peak), and the molecular CH band (432nm peak). Note that the OH band is observed in emission arcs where water vapor is present. Strong atomic lines were also observed for H(sub beta) at 486nm and H(sub alpha) at 656.3nm in prior ground testing. Independent supporting evidence of desorbed gas molecular ionization mechanisms also come from measurements of arc current pulse widths at different capacitances. We will revisit an earlier first order approximation demonstrating the dependence of arc current pulse widths on the square root of the capacitance. The simple arc current pulse width model will be then be used to estimate the temperature of the arc plasma (currently believed to be somewhere in the range of 3 to 5 eV). The current paper then seeks to extend the outlined work by including numerous vacuum chamber measurements obtained with a quadrupole mass spectrometer. A small solar array was mounted inside the vacuum

  2. State specific velocity distribution of hydrogen isotopes desorbing from Pd(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröter, L.; Trame, Chr.; David, R.; Zacharias, H.

    Velocity distributions of recombinatively desorbing hydrogen molecules and their isotopic variants HD and D 2 have been determined with internal state selection using resonantly enhanced (VUV + UV) two-photon ionization spectroscopy. In the experiments the surface temperature of the permeation source is kept constant at various temperatures between 440 and 770 K. The velocity distributions of molecules desorbed from a clean Pd(100) surface are found to be Maxwell-Boltzmann like, but an isotope effect of the average kinetic energy is observed. The kinetic energy of hydrogen molecules agrees with that expected for molecules in thermal equilibrium with the surface. For deuterium molecules the average kinetic energy < Ekin> is about 10-30 meV higher than expected for molecules in a thermal equilibrium at T s. Within the experimental error bars no significant dependence of the average kinetic energies on the rovibrational states is detected. Preadsorption of sulfur leads to a non-Maxwell-Boltzmann velocity distribution with a significantly enhanced average kinetic energy.

  3. Manipulating Neutral Atoms and Molecules by Strong Non-Resonant Laser Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilensky, Mark

    Manipulating neutral particles by laser light has been of great interest during the last decade. The main effort is placed on atom cooling together with atomic beam deceleration, deflection, focusing, mirroring, and related aspects of atom optics. In the present thesis we provide indepth analytical and numerical analysis of the optical shaker approach to non-resonant laser cooling, and propose new methods for deceleration and cooling atoms/molecules in a feedback-controlled bistable cavity. Moreover, application of the latter technique to cooling of a micromechanical object is also proposed and analyzed. In the Introduction we review the current state-of-the-art cooling techniques and provide a brief history of their development. Chapter I presents in-depth analysis of the optical shaker operation; we study the issue of the detection of the dipole force in the far zone, which is the main building block of the optical shaker technique. The effects of the finite response time of the detectors and of the phase modulator are modeled numerically. The thresholds for cooling are estimated analytically and verified numerically. Minimal requirements for the stability of the laser sources are formulated. Perturbation theory analysis of the heating rate of an ensemble of particles embedded in a non-stationary sinusoidal (non-harmonic) potential is provided. In addition, a preliminary study of the adaptive cooling strategy is outlined. Chapter II presents a new method for deceleration of a single particle and cooling of an ensemble of particles in a bistable optical cavity. Optical bistability is achieved by non-linear feedback control of the field incident on the cavity. The technique realizes cavity-induced Sisyphustype cooling mechanism. This approach is rather generic because of its off-resonance nature. The bistable cavity introduces a "dry friction" stopping force, and requires a relatively "bad cavity" for its implementation. We provide an analytical estimate for the

  4. Plume Image Profiling of UV Laser Desorbed Biomolecules

    SciTech Connect

    Merrigan, T. L.; Hunniford, C.A.; McCullough, R. W.; Timson, D. J.; Catney, M.

    2008-12-08

    An experimental system, based upon the techniques of UV and IR laser desorption with time of flight mass spectrometry, has been constructed to enable the production and characterization of neutral biomolecular targets. The feasibility of the laser desorption technique for the purpose of radiation interaction experiments is investigated here. Fluorescent dye tagging and laser induced fluorescence imaging has been used to help characterize the laser produced plumes of biomolecules revealing their spatial density profiles and temporal evolution. Peak target thicknesses of 2x10{sup 12} molecules cm{sup -2} were obtained 30 {mu}s after laser desorption.

  5. Radical Ions of Cycloparaphenylenes: Size Dependence Contrary to the Neutral Molecules.

    PubMed

    Fujitsuka, Mamoru; Tojo, Sachiko; Iwamoto, Takahiro; Kayahara, Eiichi; Yamago, Shigeru; Majima, Tetsuro

    2014-07-01

    Cycloparaphenylenes (CPPs) have attracted wide attention because of their interesting properties owing to distorted and strained aromatic systems and radially oriented p orbitals. For application of CPPs, information on their charged states (radical cation and radical anion) is essential. Here, we measured absorption spectra of the radical cations and the radical anions of CPPs with various ring sizes over a wide spectral region by means of radiation chemical methods. The peak position of the near-IR bands for both the radical cation and the radical anion shifted to lower energies with an increase in the ring size. This trend is contrary to what is observed for transitions between the HOMO and LUMO of the neutral CPP. The observed spectra of the CPP radical ions were reasonably assigned based on time-dependent density functional theory. These results indicate that the next HOMO and the next LUMO levels are important in the electronic transitions of radical ions. PMID:26279550

  6. Arylethynyl receptors for neutral molecules and anions: emerging applications in cellular imaging†

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Calden N.; Naleway, John J.; Haley, Michael M.; Johnson, Darren W.

    2011-01-01

    This critical review will focus on the application of shape-persistent receptors for anions that derive their rigidity and optoelectronic properties from the inclusion of arylethynyl linkages. It will highlight a few of the design strategies involved in engineering selective and sensitive fluorescent probes and how arylacetylenes can offer a design pathway to some of the more desirable properties of a selective sensor. Additionally, knowledge gained in the study of these receptors in organic media often leads to improved receptor design and the production of chromogenic and fluorogenic probes capable of detecting specific substrates among the multitude of ions present in biological systems. In this ocean of potential targets exists a large number of geometrically distinct anions, which present their own problems to the design of receptors with complementary binding for each preferred coordination geometry. Our interest in targeting charged substrates, specifically how previous work on receptors for cations or neutral guests can be adapted to anions, will be addressed. Additionally, we will focus on the design and development of supramolecular arylethynyl systems, their shape-persistence and fluorogenic or chromogenic optoelectronic responses to complexation. We will also examine briefly how the “chemistry in the cuvet” translates into biological media. PMID:20820467

  7. High-Throughput Screening of Australian Marine Organism Extracts for Bioactive Molecules Affecting the Cellular Storage of Neutral Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Rae, James; Fontaine, Frank; Salim, Angela A.; Lo, Harriet P.; Capon, Robert J.; Parton, Robert G.; Martin, Sally

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian cells store excess fatty acids as neutral lipids in specialised organelles called lipid droplets (LDs). Using a simple cell-based assay and open-source software we established a high throughput screen for LD formation in A431 cells in order to identify small bioactive molecules affecting lipid storage. Screening an n-butanol extract library from Australian marine organisms we identified 114 extracts that produced either an increase or a decrease in LD formation in fatty acid-treated A431 cells with varying degrees of cytotoxicity. We selected for further analysis a non-cytotoxic extract derived from the genus Spongia (Heterofibria). Solvent partitioning, HPLC fractionation and spectroscopic analysis (NMR, MS) identified a family of related molecules within this extract with unique structural features, a subset of which reduced LD formation. We selected one of these molecules, heterofibrin A1, for more detailed cellular analysis. Inhibition of LD biogenesis by heterofibrin A1 was observed in both A431 cells and AML12 hepatocytes. The activity of heterofibrin A1 was dose dependent with 20 µM inhibiting LD formation and triglyceride accumulation by ∼50% in the presence of 50 µM oleic acid. Using a fluorescent fatty acid analogue we found that heterofibrin A1 significantly reduces the intracellular accumulation of fatty acids and results in the formation of distinct fatty acid metabolites in both cultured cells and in embryos of the zebrafish Danio rerio. In summary we have shown using readily accessible software and a relatively simple assay system that we can identify and isolate bioactive molecules from marine extracts, which affect the formation of LDs and the metabolism of fatty acids both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:21857959

  8. Neutralizing antibody and anti-retroviral drug sensitivities of HIV-1 isolates resistant to small molecule CCR5 inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Pugach, Pavel; Ketas, Thomas J.; Michael, Elizabeth; Moore, John P.

    2008-08-01

    The small molecule CCR5 inhibitors are a new class of drugs for treating infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). They act by binding to the CCR5 co-receptor and preventing its use during HIV-1-cell fusion. Escape mutants can be raised against CCR5 inhibitors in vitro and will arise when these drugs are used clinically. Here, we have assessed the responses of CCR5 inhibitor-resistant viruses to other anti-retroviral drugs that act by different mechanisms, and their sensitivities to neutralizing antibodies (NAbs). The rationale for the latter study is that the resistance pathway for CCR5 inhibitors involves changes in the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Env), which are also targets for NAbs. The escape mutants CC101.19 and D1/85.16 were selected for resistance to AD101 and vicriviroc (VVC), respectively, from the primary R5 HIV-1 isolate CC1/85. Each escape mutant was cross-resistant to other small molecule CCR5 inhibitors (aplaviroc, maraviroc, VVC, AD101 and CMPD 167), but sensitive to protein ligands of CCR5: the modified chemokine PSC-RANTES and the humanized MAb PRO-140. The resistant viruses also retained wild-type sensitivity to the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (RTI) zidovudine, the non-nucleoside RTI nevirapine, the protease inhibitor atazanavir and other attachment and fusion inhibitors that act independently of CCR5 (BMS-806, PRO-542 and enfuvirtide). Of note is that the escape mutants were more sensitive than the parental CC1/85 isolate to a subset of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies and to some sera from HIV-1-infected people, implying that sequence changes in Env that confer resistance to CCR5 inhibitors can increase the accessibility of some NAb epitopes. The need to preserve NAb resistance may therefore be a constraint upon how escape from CCR5 inhibitors occurs in vivo.

  9. Adsorption and transport of charged vs. neutral hydrophobic molecules at the membrane of murine erythroleukemia (MEL) cells.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jia; Eckenrode, Heather M; Dai, Hai-Lung; Wilhelm, Michael J

    2015-03-01

    The adsorption and transport of hydrophobic molecules at the membrane surface of pre- and post-DMSO induced differentiated murine erythroleukemia (MEL) cells were examined by time- and wavelength-resolved second harmonic light scattering. Two medium (<600 Da) hydrophobic molecules, cationic malachite green (MG) and neutral bromocresol purple (BCP), were investigated. While it was observed that the MG cation adsorbs onto the surface of the MEL cell, neutral BCP does not. It is suggested that an electrostatic interaction between the opposite charges of the cation and the MEL cell surface is the primary driving force for adsorption. Comparisons of adsorption density and free energy, measured at different pH and cell morphology, indicate that the interaction is predominantly through sialic acid carboxyl groups. MG cation adsorption densities have been determined as (0.6±0.3)×10(6) μm(-2) on the surface of undifferentiated MEL cells, and (1.8±0.5)×10(7) μm(-2) on differentiated MEL cells, while the deduced adsorption free energies are effectively identical (ca. -10.9±0.1 and -10.8±0.1 kcal mol(-1), respectively). The measured MG densities indicate that the total number of surface carboxyl groups is largely conserved following differentiation, and therefore the density of carboxylic groups is much larger on the differentiated cell surface than the undifferentiated one. Finally, in contrast to synthetic liposomes and bacterial membranes, surface adsorbed MG cations are unable to traverse the MEL cell membrane. PMID:25660095

  10. Sarcomere neutralization in inherited cardiomyopathy: small-molecule proof-of-concept to correct hyper-Ca2+-sensitive myofilaments.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Brian R; Martindale, Joshua; Metzger, Joseph M

    2016-07-01

    The sarcomere is the functional unit of the heart. Alterations in sarcomere activation lead to disease states such as hypertrophic and restrictive cardiomyopathy (HCM/RCM). Mutations in many of the sarcomeric genes are causal for HCM/RCM. In most cases, these mutations result in increased Ca(2+) sensitivity of the sarcomere, giving rise to altered systolic and diastolic function. There is emerging evidence that small-molecule sarcomere neutralization is a potential therapeutic strategy for HCM/RCM. To pursue proof-of-concept, W7 was used here because of its well-known Ca(2+) desensitizer biochemical effects at the level of cardiac troponin C. Acute treatment of adult cardiac myocytes with W7 caused a dose-dependent (1-10 μM) decrease in contractility in a Ca(2+)-independent manner. Alkalosis was used as an in vitro experimental model of acquired heightened Ca(2+) sensitivity, resulting in increased live cell contractility and decreased baseline sarcomere length, which were rapidly corrected with W7. As an inherited cardiomyopathy model, R193H cardiac troponin I (cTnI) transgenic myocytes showed significant decreased baseline sarcomere length and slowed relaxation that were rapidly and dose-dependently corrected by W7. Langendorff whole heart pacing stress showed that R193H cTnI transgenic hearts had elevated end-diastolic pressures at all pacing frequencies compared with hearts from nontransgenic mice. Acute treatment with W7 rapidly restored end-diastolic pressures to normal values in R193H cTnI hearts, supporting a sarcomere intrinsic mechanism of dysfunction. The known off-target effects of W7 notwithstanding, these results provide further proof-of-concept that small-molecule-based sarcomere neutralization is a potential approach to remediate hyper-Ca(2+)-sensitive sarcomere function. PMID:27199134

  11. MOCCA: A 4k-Pixel Molecule Camera for the Position- and Energy-Resolving Detection of Neutral Molecule Fragments at CSR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamer, L.; Schulz, D.; Enss, C.; Fleischmann, A.; Gastaldo, L.; Kempf, S.; Krantz, C.; Novotný, O.; Schwalm, D.; Wolf, A.

    2016-08-01

    We present the design of MOCCA, a large-area particle detector that is developed for the position- and energy-resolving detection of neutral molecule fragments produced in electron-ion interactions at the Cryogenic Storage Ring at the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg. The detector is based on metallic magnetic calorimeters and consists of 4096 particle absorbers covering a total detection area of 44.8 mathrm {mm} × 44.8 mathrm {mm}. Groups of four absorbers are thermally coupled to a common paramagnetic temperature sensor where the strength of the thermal link is different for each absorber. This allows attributing a detector event within this group to the corresponding absorber by discriminating the signal rise times. A novel readout scheme further allows reading out all 1024 temperature sensors that are arranged in a 32 × 32 square array using only 16+16 current-sensing superconducting quantum interference devices. Numerical calculations taking into account a simplified detector model predict an energy resolution of Δ E_mathrm {FWHM} le 80 mathrm {eV} for all pixels of this detector.

  12. Thermal desorber treats oily sand for L. A. Port Authority

    SciTech Connect

    Krukowski, J.

    1994-04-01

    A thermal desorber outfitted with protective ceramic tiles is treating highly abrasive sand contaminated with marine diesel fuel. The desorption unit, designed by Clean-Up Technology and built by Tarmac, is processing as much as 1,000 tons of soil a day at California's San Pedro Harbor. The Los Angeles Port Authority chose the thermal cleanup method because of its speed. The units is reducing petroleum hydrocarbon concentrations from as high as 30,000 parts per million (ppm) down to an average 71 ppm (based on EPA method 8015M), well within the job's specification of 1,000 ppm. Total polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons must be reduced to 1 milligram per kilogram; the unit is cleaning to non-detect. The 300,000 tons of treated material will be used as fill for a new container facility at the port.

  13. Buffer system for the separation of neutral and charged small molecules using micellar electrokinetic chromatography with mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Goetzinger, Wolfgang K; Cai, Hong

    2005-06-24

    An organic buffer system will be discussed that is suitable for the separation of neutral as well as charged molecules be means of micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC). The buffers are based on the combination of a long chain alkyl acid, such as lauric acid with ammonium hydroxide or an organic base such as tris-hydroxymethylaminomethane (Tris). The resulting buffer system is able to separate neutral compounds based on its micellar properties. These buffers exhibit much reduced conductivity compared to traditional MEKC buffers, such as sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS), which contain inorganic salts. They also have inherent buffer capacity at high pH resulting from the basic buffer component, which in our studies had pK values from about 8-11. The separations that were observed showed high efficiency with plate counts in many cases above 500,000 plates per meter. The reduced conductivity allowed for the application of much higher electric fields, resulting in very fast analysis times. Alternatively, an increase in detection sensitivity could be achieved, as the reduced conductivity allowed for the use of capillaries with lager internal diameters. Combinations of different alkyl acids and organic bases provided for significant flexibility in selectivity tuning. Finally, the fact that the organic micellar buffer systems discussed here do not contain inorganic ions, allows for coupling with mass spectrometric (MS) detection. The possibility of MS detection combined with the high speed in analysis that can be obtained using these organic buffer systems, could make this approach an interesting option for high throughput analysis of combinatorial libraries. PMID:16038325

  14. Scaling of plane-wave Born cross sections for electron-impact excitation of neutral atoms and molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2015-09-01

    We review the scaling of plane-wave Born cross sections for electron-impact excitation of neutral atoms and molecules. The scaling method is applied to integrated cross sections for electric dipole-allowed transitions. As introduced in the BEB scaling model for ionization cross sections, this scaling replaces the incident electron energy T in the first-order PWB cross sections by T + B + E , where B is the ionization energy, or the binding energy, of the target electron, and E is the excitation energy. Note in a generic form, first-order PWB cross sections are defined as σPWB = (4 πa02 R / T) GOSPWB (T) , where a0 is the Bohr radius, R is the Rydberg energy, and GOS is the Bethe generalized oscillator strength. In the scaling, though two approaches, computational and experimental have been applied, the latter is presented at this meeting in which the Bethe GOS is replaced by the apparent GOS determined by the experiments. Representative examples show that an simple improvement scaled by T + B + E extends the usage of the Born-Bethe approximation into the intermediate region, thereby bridging the gap between the two regions categorized conventionally as slow and fast collisions.

  15. Yields and Time-of-Flight Spectra of Neutral High-Rydberg Fragments at the K Edges of the CO2 Molecule.

    PubMed

    Kivimäki, Antti; Stråhlman, Christian; Wasowicz, Tomasz J; Kettunen, J A; Richter, Robert

    2016-06-30

    We have studied the production of neutral fragments in high-Rydberg (HR) states at the C 1s and O 1s edges of the CO2 molecule by performing two kinds of experiments. First, the yields of neutral HR fragments were measured indirectly by ionizing such fragments in a static electric field and by collecting resulting singly charged positive ions as a function of the photon energy. Such measurements reveal not only excitations below the core ionization thresholds but also thresholds for single core-hole and shakeup photoionization. Second, we obtained the mass spectra of neutral HR fragments at selected photon energies by exploiting pulsed field ionization; they show atomic fragments C(HR) and O(HR). We discuss dissociation pathways leading to the production of neutral HR fragments in core excitation and ionization of CO2.

  16. Yields and Time-of-Flight Spectra of Neutral High-Rydberg Fragments at the K Edges of the CO2 Molecule.

    PubMed

    Kivimäki, Antti; Stråhlman, Christian; Wasowicz, Tomasz J; Kettunen, J A; Richter, Robert

    2016-06-30

    We have studied the production of neutral fragments in high-Rydberg (HR) states at the C 1s and O 1s edges of the CO2 molecule by performing two kinds of experiments. First, the yields of neutral HR fragments were measured indirectly by ionizing such fragments in a static electric field and by collecting resulting singly charged positive ions as a function of the photon energy. Such measurements reveal not only excitations below the core ionization thresholds but also thresholds for single core-hole and shakeup photoionization. Second, we obtained the mass spectra of neutral HR fragments at selected photon energies by exploiting pulsed field ionization; they show atomic fragments C(HR) and O(HR). We discuss dissociation pathways leading to the production of neutral HR fragments in core excitation and ionization of CO2. PMID:27276338

  17. a Thermally Desorbable Miniature Passive Dosimeter for Organic Vapors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Jesus Antonio

    A thermally desorbable miniature passive dosimeter (MPD) for organic vapors has been developed in conformity with theoretical and practical aspects of passive dosimeter design. The device was optimized for low sample loadings resulting from short-term and/or low concentration level exposure. This was accomplished by the use of thermal desorption rather than solvent elution, which provided the GC method with significantly higher sensitivity. Laboratory evaluation of this device for factors critical to the performance of passive dosimeters using benzene as the test vapor included: desorption efficiency (97.2%), capacity (1400 ppm-min), sensitivity (7ng/sample or 0.06 ppmv for 15 minutes sampling) accuracy and precision, concentration level, environmental conditions (i.e., air face velocity, relative humidity) and sample stability during short (15 minutes) and long periods of time (15 days). This device has demonstrated that its overall accuracy meets NIOSH and OSHA requirements for a sampling and analytical method for the exposure concentration range of 0.1 to 50 ppm (v/v) and 15 minutes exposures. It was demonstrated that the MPD operates in accordance with theoretically predicted performance and should be adequate for short-term and/or low concentration exposure monitoring of organic vapors in the workplace. In addition a dynamic vapor exposure evaluation system for passive dosimeters have been validated using benzene as the test vapor. The system is capable of generating well defined short-square wave concentration profiles suitable for the evaluation of passive dosimeters for ceiling exposure monitoring.

  18. Llama-Derived Single Domain Antibodies to Build Multivalent, Superpotent and Broadened Neutralizing Anti-Viral Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Hultberg, Anna; Temperton, Nigel J.; Rosseels, Valérie; Koenders, Mireille; Gonzalez-Pajuelo, Maria; Schepens, Bert; Ibañez, Lorena Itatí; Vanlandschoot, Peter; Schillemans, Joris; Saunders, Michael; Weiss, Robin A.; Saelens, Xavier; Melero, José A.; Verrips, C. Theo; Van Gucht, Steven; de Haard, Hans J.

    2011-01-01

    For efficient prevention of viral infections and cross protection, simultaneous targeting of multiple viral epitopes is a powerful strategy. Llama heavy chain antibody fragments (VHH) against the trimeric envelope proteins of Respiratory Syncytial Virus (Fusion protein), Rabies virus (Glycoprotein) and H5N1 Influenza (Hemagglutinin 5) were selected from llama derived immune libraries by phage display. Neutralizing VHH recognizing different epitopes in the receptor binding sites on the spikes with affinities in the low nanomolar range were identified for all the three viruses by viral neutralization assays. By fusion of VHH with variable linker lengths, multimeric constructs were made that improved neutralization potencies up to 4,000-fold for RSV, 1,500-fold for Rabies virus and 75-fold for Influenza H5N1. The potencies of the VHH constructs were similar or better than best performing monoclonal antibodies. The cross protection capacity against different viral strains was also improved for all three viruses, both by multivalent (two or three identical VHH) and biparatopic (two different VHH) constructs. By combining a VHH neutralizing RSV subtype A, but not subtype B with a poorly neutralizing VHH with high affinity for subtype B, a biparatopic construct was made with low nanomolar neutralizing potency against both subtypes. Trivalent anti-H5N1 VHH neutralized both Influenza H5N1 clade1 and 2 in a pseudotype assay and was very potent in neutralizing the NIBRG-14 Influenza H5N1 strain with IC50 of 9 picomolar. Bivalent and biparatopic constructs against Rabies virus cross neutralized both 10 different Genotype 1 strains and Genotype 5. The results show that multimerization of VHH fragments targeting multiple epitopes on a viral trimeric spike protein is a powerful tool for anti-viral therapy to achieve “best-in-class” and broader neutralization capacity. PMID:21483777

  19. Determination of the translational, rotational and vibrational degree of freedom for H 2 and D 2 desorbing from vanadium(1 0 0) + O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleispach, D.; Winkler, A.

    2003-07-01

    The rotational, vibrational and translational energy distribution for hydrogen (deuterium) molecules desorbing from a vanadium(1 0 0) + O surface have been determined using resonance enhanced multi-photon ionization time-of-flight spectroscopy. The translational energy has been found to be hyper-thermal for all selected internal states. However, the translational energy Ekin for molecules in v=1 is smaller than for those in the vibrational state v=0. The influence of the rotational states J on the translational energy is more complex: for low J-states Ekin increases with J, whereas for high J-states Ekin decreases with increasing J. We have also measured the population of the individual rotational and vibrational states of the desorbing H 2 (D 2) molecules: In both cases the first excited vibrational state is overpopulated. The population of the J-states is hyper-thermal for low and high J but sub-thermal for medium J.

  20. Neutral gas temperature measurements of high-power-density fluorocarbon plasmas by fitting swan bands of C{sub 2} molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Bai Bo; Sawin, Herbert H.; Cruden, Brett A.

    2006-01-01

    The neutral gas temperature of fluorocarbon plasmas in a remote toroidal transformer-coupled source was measured to be greater than 5000 K, under the conditions of a power density greater than 15 W/cm{sup 3} and pressures above 2 torr. The rovibrational bands of C{sub 2} molecules (swan bands, d {sup 3}{pi}{sub g}{yields}a {sup 3}{pi}{sub u}) were fitted to obtain the rotational temperature that was assumed to equal the translational temperature. This rotational-translational temperature equilibrium assumption was supported by the comparison with the rotational temperature of second positive system of added N{sub 2}. For the same gas mixture, the neutral gas temperature is nearly a linear function of plasma power, since the conduction to chamber wall and convection are the major energy-loss processes, and they are both proportional to neutral gas temperature. The dependence of the neutral gas temperature on O{sub 2} flow rate and pressure can be well represented through the power dependence, under the condition of constant current operation. An Arrhenius type of dependence between the etching rate of oxide film and the neutral gas temperature is observed, maybe indicating the importance of the pyrolytic dissociation in the plasma formation process when the temperature is above 5000 K.

  1. Peptides Designed To Spatially Depict the Epstein-Barr Virus Major Virion Glycoprotein gp350 Neutralization Epitope Elicit Antibodies That Block Virus-Neutralizing Antibody 72A1 Interaction with the Native gp350 Molecule

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, Jerome E.; Coinçon, Mathieu; Leblond, Valérie; Hu, Jing; Fang, Janey M.; Sygusch, Jurgen

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is the etiologic agent of infectious mononucleosis and the root cause of B-cell lymphoproliferative disease in individuals with a weakened immune system, as well as a principal cofactor in nasopharyngeal carcinoma, various lymphomas, and other cancers. The EBV major virion surface glycoprotein gp350 is viewed as the best vaccine candidate to prevent infectious mononucleosis in healthy EBV-naive persons and EBV-related cancers in at-risk individuals. Previous epitope mapping of gp350 revealed only one dominant neutralizing epitope, which has been shown to be the target of the monoclonal antibody 72A1. Computer modeling of the 72A1 antibody interaction with the gp350 amino terminus was used to identify gp350 amino acids that could form strong ionic, electrostatic, or hydrogen bonds with the 72A1 antibody. Peptide DDRTTLQLAQNPVYIPETYPYIKWDN (designated peptide 2) and peptide GSAKPGNGSYFASVKTEMLGNEID (designated peptide 3) were designed to spatially represent the gp350 amino acids predicted to interact with the 72A1 antibody paratope. Peptide 2 bound to the 72A1 antibody and blocked 72A1 antibody recognition of the native gp350 molecule. Peptide 2 and peptide 3 were recognized by human IgG and shown to elicit murine antibodies that could target gp350 and block its recognition by the 72A1 antibody. This work provides a structural mapping of the interaction between the EBV-neutralizing antibody 72A1 and the major virion surface protein gp350. gp350 mimetic peptides that spatially depict the EBV-neutralizing epitope would be useful as a vaccine to focus the immune system exclusively to this important virus epitope. IMPORTANCE The production of virus-neutralizing antibodies targeting the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) major surface glycoprotein gp350 is important for the prevention of infectious mononucleosis and EBV-related cancers. The data presented here provide the first in silico map of the gp350 interaction with a virus-blocking monoclonal

  2. Dynamics of alkali ions-neutral molecules reactions: Radio frequency-guided beam experimental cross-sections and direct quasiclassical trajectory studies

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar, J.; Andres, J. de; Lucas, J. M.; Alberti, M.; Huarte-Larranaga, F.; Bassi, D.; Aguilar, A.

    2012-11-27

    Different reactive processes taking place in collisions between alkali ions and neutral i-C{sub 3}H{sub 7}Cl molecules in the low (center of mass frame) energy range have been studied using an octopole radiofrequency guided-ion-beam apparatus developed in our laboratory. Cross-section energy dependences for all these reactions have been obtained in absolute units. Ab initio electronic structure calculations for those colliding systems evolving on the ground single potential surface have given relevant information on the main topological features of the surfaces. For some of the reactions a dynamic study by 'on the fly' trajectories has complemented the available experimental and electronic structure information.

  3. STUDIES OF X-RAY PRODUCTION FOLLOWING CHARGE EXCHANGE RECOMBINATION BETWEEN HIGHLY CHARGED IONS AND NEUTRAL ATOMS AND MOLECULES

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G V; Beiersdorfer, P; Chen, H; Clementson, J; Frankel, M; Gu, M F; Kelley, R L; Kilbourne, C A; Porter, F S; Thorn, D B; Wargelin, B J

    2008-08-28

    We have used microcalorimeters built by the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Electron Beam Ion Trap to measure X-ray emission produced by charge exchange reactions between highly charged ions colliding with neutral helium, hydrogen, and nitrogen gas. Our measurements show the spectral dependence on neutral species and also show the distinct differences between spectra produced by charge exchange reactions and those produced by direct impact excitation. These results are part of an ongoing experimental investigation at the LLNL EBIT facility of charge exchange spectral signatures and can be used to interpret X-ray spectra produced by a variety of laboratory and celestial sources including cometary and planetary atmospheres, the Earth's magnetosheath, the heliosphere, and tokamaks.

  4. Functionalized Collagen Scaffold Neutralizing the Myelin-Inhibitory Molecules Promoted Neurites Outgrowth in Vitro and Facilitated Spinal Cord Regeneration in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Li, Xing; Han, Jin; Zhao, Yannan; Ding, Wenyong; Wei, Jianshu; Han, Sufang; Shang, Xianping; Wang, Bin; Chen, Bing; Xiao, Zhifeng; Dai, Jianwu

    2015-07-01

    Research has demonstrated that many myelin-associated inhibitory molecules jointly contribute to the failure of adult spinal cord regeneration. Therapies comprehensively targeting the multiple inhibitory nature of the injured spinal cord are being concerned. Here, two collagen-binding proteins, CBD-EphA4LBD and CBD-PlexinB1LBD, were constructed, respectively, to neutralize the axon guidance molecules ephrinB3 and sema4D that inhibit the regeneration of nerve fibers. The two neutralizing proteins have proven their ability to specifically bind collagen and to continuously release from collagen scaffolds. They could also promote neurites outgrowth of cerebellar granular neurons and dorsal root ganglion neurons in vitro. Subsequently, the functionalized collagen scaffolds by physically absorbing NEP1-40 and immobilizing CBD-EphA4LBD and CBD-PlexinB1LBD were transplanted into a rat T10 complete spinal cord transection model. Our results showed that rats that received the treatment of transplanting the functionalized collagen scaffold exhibited great advantage on axonal regeneration and locomotion recovery after spinal cord injury.

  5. Cooperative effect of water molecules in the self-catalyzed neutral hydrolysis of isocyanic acid: a comprehensive theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xi-Guang; Sun, Xiao-Ming; Wu, Xiao-Peng; Geng, Song; Ren, Yi; Wong, Ning-Bew; Li, Wai-Kee

    2011-08-01

    The detailed reaction mechanism for the water-assisted hydrolysis of isocyanic acid, HNCO + (n + 1) H(2)O → CO(2) + NH(3) + nH(2)O (n = 0-6), taking place in the gas phase, has been investigated. All structures were optimized and characterized at the MP2/6-31 + G level of theory, and then re-optimized at MP2/6-311++G. The seven explicit water molecules participating in the hydrolysis can be divided into two groups, one directly involved in the proton relay, and the other located in the vicinity of the substrate playing the cooperative role by engaging in hydrogen-bonding to HN = C = O. Two possible reaction pathways, the addition of water molecule across the C = N bond or across the C = O bond, are discussed, and the former is proved to be more favorable energetically. Our calculations suggest that, in the most kinetically favorable pathway for the titled hydrolysis, three water molecules are directly participating in the hydrogen transfer via an eight-membered cyclic transition state, while the other four water molecules catalyze the hydrolysis of HN = C = O by forming three eight-membered cooperative loops near the substrate. This strain-free hydrogen-bond network leads to the best estimated rate-determining activation energy of 24.9 kJ mol(-1) at 600 K, in excellent agreement with the gas-phase kinetic experimental result, 25.8 kJ mol(-1). PMID:21161555

  6. ION AND NEUTRAL MOLECULES IN THE W43-MM1(G30.79 FIR 10) INFALLING CLUMP

    SciTech Connect

    Cortes, Paulo C.

    2011-12-20

    The high-mass star-forming clump W43-MM1 has been mapped in N{sub 2}H{sup +}(4 {yields} 3), C{sup 18}O(3 {yields} 2), SiO(8 {yields} 7), and in a single pointing in DCO{sup +}(5 {yields} 4) toward the center of the clump. Column densities from these observations as well as previous HCO{sup +}(4 {yields} 3), H{sup 13}CO{sup +}(4 {yields} 3), HCN(4 {yields} 3), H{sup 13}CN(4 {yields} 3), and CS(7 {yields} 6) data have been derived using the RADEX code; results later have been used to derive chemical abundances at selected points in the MM1 main axis. We compare with chemical models to estimate an evolutionary age of 10{sup 4} years for a remarkable warm hot core inside MM1. We also proposed that the dust temperature derived from the spectral energy distribution fitting in MM1 is not representative of the gas temperature deep inside the clump because dust emission may have become optically thick. By deriving a deuterium fractionation of 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3}, we estimate an electron fraction of X(e) = 6.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8}. Thus, the coupling between the neutral gas and the magnetic field is estimated by computing the ambipolar diffusion Reynolds number R{sub m} = 18 and the wave coupling number W = 110. Considering that the infalling speed is slightly supersonic (M = 1.1) but sub-Alfvenic, we conclude that the MM1 clump has recently been or is in the process of decoupling the field from the neutral fluid. Thus, the MM1 clump appears to be in an intermediate stage of evolution in which a hot core has developed while the envelope is still infalling and not fully decoupled from the ambient magnetic field.

  7. Measurement of desorbed products during organic polymer thin film etching by plasma beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kurihara, Kazuaki; Karahashi, Kazuhiro; Egami, Akihiro; Nakamura, Moritaka

    2006-11-15

    The authors investigated the etching characteristics of three kinds of methacrylate polymer films, which have the same main chain but with different side chains, using a plasma beam irradiation apparatus. The polymers are polytbutylmethacrylate, polybenzylmethacrylate, and polycyclohexylmethacrylate. The major desorbed products during nitrogen plasma beam etching were found to be HCN and C{sub 2}N{sub 2} for all methacrylate polymer films. The desorbed products originating from the polymer structure, namely, the main chain and the side chain, were hardly observed. The energy distributions of desorbed products were mainly composed of Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution with a small component of collision cascade distribution for all three polymers and were slightly dependent on the ion energy. It is concluded that chemical sputtering, which can be defined as the production of weakly bound species by ion bombardment, followed by thermal desorption, is the significant ion induced mechanism of organic polymer etching.

  8. Renner-Teller Coupling in Open Shell Dihydrides: a Comparison of Theory with Optical Spectra of Neutral and Ionic Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duxbury, G.; Jungen, Ch.; Alijah, A.

    2013-06-01

    The studies of the Renner-Teller coupling in isoelectronic series of the neutral dihydrides, started with the experiments of Dressler and Ramsay on the absorption spectra of NH_{2} and of ND_{2} published in 1959, with a companion paper on the theory by Pople and Longuet Higgins. Subsequently experiments on their ionic counterparts, e.g. H_{2}O+, were carried out, initially using photoelectron spectroscopy. However it was not until the period starting in 1965 to 1980 that methods for calculating the vibronic interaction between the half-states were derived and tested. Complications arise owing the the role of the linear degeneracy of the two half states in the formation of the rovibronic structure, and the effects of the increasing spin-orbit interaction in the series from NH_{2} to SbH_{2}, and H_{2}O+ to H_{2}Se+ in facilitating fragmentation processes. Many of these molecular spectra were considered in great detail, but some, such as that of AsH_{2}, have had a less complete treatment of vibronic interaction, in part since the original study of its electronic spectrum took place in the period from 1966-67 before most of the vibronic coupling methods had been developed developed. We wish to show the interplay between the angular momentum effects caused by the large amplitude motion in a degenerate system, and those caused by a rapidly increasing spin-orbit coupling constant. Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. 251,553(1959) Molec. Phys. 1,372(1958)

  9. Effect of a nonionic surfactant on biodegradation of slowly desorbing PAHs in contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Bueno-Montes, Marisa; Springael, Dirk; Ortega-Calvo, José-Julio

    2011-04-01

    The influence of the nonionic surfactant Brij 35 on biodegradation of slowly desorbing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was determined in contaminated soils. We employed a soil originated from a creosote-polluted site, and a manufactured gas plant soil that had been treated by bioremediation. The two soils differed in their total content in five indicator 3-, 4-, and 5-ring PAHs (2923 mg kg(-1) and 183 mg kg(-1) in the creosote-polluted and bioremediated soils, respectively) but had a similar content (140 mg kg(-1) vs 156 mg kg(-1)) of slowly desorbing PAHs. The PAHs present in the bioremediated soil were highly recalcitrant. The surfactant at a concentration above its critical micelle concentration enhanced the biodegradation of slowly desorbing PAHs in suspensions of both soils, but it was especially efficient with bioremediated soil, causing a 62% loss of the total PAH content. An inhibition of biodegradation was observed with the high-molecular-weight PAHs pyrene and benzo[a]pyrene in the untreated soil, possibly due to competition effects with other solubilized PAHs present at relatively high concentrations. We suggest that nonionic surfactants may improve bioremediation performance with soils that have previously undergone extensive bioremediation to enrich for a slowly desorbing profile.

  10. Determination of Desorbed Species During Heating of AgI-Mordenite Provided by ORNL

    SciTech Connect

    Croes, Kenneth James; Garino, Terry J.; Mowry, Curtis D.; Nenoff, Tina M.

    2015-12-15

    This study is focused on describing the desorbed off gases due to heating of the AgIMordenite (MOR) produced at ORNL for iodine (I2) gas capture from nuclear fuel aqueous reprocessing. In particular, the interest is for the incorporation of the AgI-MOR into a waste form, which might be the Sandia developed, low temperature sintering, Bi-Si oxide based, Glass Composite Material (GCM). The GCM has been developed as a waste form for the incorporation any oxide based getter material. In the case where iodine may be released during the sintering process of the GCM, additional Ag flake is added as further insurance in total iodine capture and retention. This has been the case for the incorporated ORNL developed AgIMOR. Thermal analysis studies were carried out to determine off gasing processes of ORNL AgIMOR. Independent of sample size, ~7wt% of total water is desorbed by 225°C. This includes both bulk surface and occluded water, and are monitored as H2O and OH. Of that total, ~5.5wt% is surface water which is removed by 125°C, and 1.5wt% is occluded (in zeolite pore) water. Less than ~1 wt% total water continues to desorb, but is completely removed by 500°C. Above 300°C, the detectable remaining desorbing species observed are iodine containing compounds, including I and I2.

  11. Multiple boron-boron bonds in neutral molecules: an insight from the extended transition state method and the natural orbitals for chemical valence scheme.

    PubMed

    Mitoraj, Mariusz P; Michalak, Artur

    2011-03-21

    We have analyzed the character of B═B and B≡B bonds in the neutral molecules of general form: LHB═BHL (2-L) and LB≡BL (3-L), for various ancillary ligands L attached to the boron center, based on a recently developed method that combines the extended transition state scheme with the theory of natural orbitals for chemical valence (ETS-NOCV). In the case of molecules with the B═B bond, 2-L, we have included L = PMe(3), PF(3), PCl(3), PH(3), C(3)H(4)N(2)═C(NHCH)(2), whereas for molecules containing the B≡B connection, 3-L, the following ligands were considered L = CO, PMe(3), PCl(3), (Me(2)NCH(2)CH(2)O)(2)Ge. The results led us to conclude that use of phosphorus ligands leads to strengthening of the B═B bond by 6.4 kcal/mol (for 2-PMe(3)), by 4.4 (for 2-PF(3)) and by 9.2 (for 2-PH(3)), when compared to a molecule developed on the experimental basis, 2-C(3)H(4)N(2) (ΔE(total) = -118.3 kcal/mol). The ETS scheme has shown that all contributions, that is, (i) orbital interaction ΔE(orb), (ii) Pauli repulsion ΔE(Pauli), and (iii) electrostatic stabilization ΔE(elstat), are important in determining the trend in the B═B bond energies, ΔE(total). ETS-NOCV results revealed that both σ(B═B) and π(B═B) contributions are responsible for the changes in ΔE(orb) values. All considered molecules of the type LB≡BL, 3-L, exhibit a stronger B≡B bond when compared to a double B═B connection in 2-L (|ΔE(total)| is lower by 11.8-42.5 kcal/mol, depending on the molecule). The main reason is a lower Pauli repulsion contribution noted for 3-CO, 3-PMe(3), and 3-PCl(3) molecules. In addition, in the case of 3-PMe(3) and 3-PCl(3), the orbital interaction term is more stabilizing; however, the effect is less pronounced compared to the drop in the Pauli repulsion term. In all of the systems with double and triple boron-boron bonds, the electronic factor (ΔE(orb)) dominates over the electrostatic contribution (ΔE(elstat)). Finally, the strongest B

  12. Statistical ortho-to-para ratio of water desorbed from ice at 10 kelvin.

    PubMed

    Hama, Tetsuya; Kouchi, Akira; Watanabe, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    The anomalously low ortho-to-para ratios (OPRs) exhibited by gaseous water in space have been used to determine the formation temperature (<50 kelvin) of ice on cold interstellar dust. This approach assumes that the OPR of water desorbed from ice is related to the ice formation temperature on the dust. However, we report that water desorbed from ice at 10 kelvin shows a statistical high-temperature OPR of 3, even when the ice is produced in situ by hydrogenation of O2, a known formation process of interstellar water. This invalidates the assumed relation between OPR and temperature. The necessary reinterpretation of the low OPRs will help elucidate the chemical history of interstellar water from molecular clouds and processes in the early solar system, including comet formation.

  13. Influence of nonlinear sorption kinetics on the slow-desorbing organic contaminant fraction in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Schlebaum, W.; Schraa, G.; Van Riemsdijk, W.H.

    1999-05-01

    Release rates of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) from the soil matrix influence the availability of HOCs in soils or sediments for microbial degradation or removal by physical means (e.g., soil washing or soil venting). In this study it was shown that the initial contaminant concentration influences the desorption rate. This was attributed to the presence of a limited number of high affinity sites that cause nonlinear sorption behavior. The experimental results could be described with a kinetic model composed of two separate compartments. One compartment was described with a Freundlich isotherm and corresponding kinetics and was assumed to represent sorption to high affinity sites. The second compartment was described with a linear sorption isotherm and first-order kinetics. The model was used to simulate the influence of purging strategies on removal of QCB. The simulations showed that after removal of a fast-desorbing fraction, the slow-desorbing fraction could be efficiently removed at very low purging rates. Intermittent purging reduced the total purging time but the simulations showed large fluctuations in the aqueous pentachlorobenzene concentration. For each subsequent purging interval, the purging efficiency decreased due to the nonlinear desorption kinetics of the slow-desorbing fraction of pentachlorobenzene.

  14. Spectroscopic and computational investigations on the origin of charge transfer between included neutral guest molecules and a functionalized anionic layered host.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Dipak; Tummanapelli, Anil Kumar

    2016-08-10

    Layered double hydroxides (LDHs) or anionic clays are an important class of ion-exchange materials, well known for drug and gene delivery and several other applications including catalysis, bioactive nanocomposite, electroactive and photoactive materials. Their structure is based on positively charged brucite-like inorganic sheets with the interlamellar space being occupied by charge-compensating exchangeable anions. In spite of having a vast scope many of the applications of LDHs are restricted as their host-guest chemistry is limited to ion-exchange reactions. Recently we have shown for the first time that charge-transfer interactions can be used as a driving force for the insertion of neutral guest molecules (ortho- and para-chloranil) within the galleries of an Mg-Al LDH by forming a charge-transfer complex with aniline pre-intercalated as p-aminobenzoate anion. Here, we have performed quantum chemical calculations in combination with molecular dynamics simulations to elucidate the nature of interactions, arrangement and the evaluation of electronic and Raman spectral signatures of the chloranil charge-transfer complex included within the galleries of the Mg-Al LDH. The natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis has been used to understand the nature and origin of the unidirectional charge-transfer that lead to the unusual insertion of chloranil in the galleries of the Mg-Al LDH. The NBO analysis reveals that a considerable amount of electronic charge redistribution occurs from the p-aminobenzoate to the chloranil during latter's insertion within the LDH galleries with a very negligible amount of back donation. This work is expected to pave the way for understanding the host-guest chemistry and targeted and controlled delivery of poorly soluble drugs. PMID:27461409

  15. Photo-desorbed species produced by the UV/EUV irradiation of an H2O:CO2:NH3 ice mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.-J.; Nuevo, M.; Chu, C.-C.; Fan, Y.-G.; Yih, T.-S.; Ip, W.-H.; Fung, H.-S.; Wu, C.-Y. R.

    2011-05-01

    An H2O:CO2:NH3 = 1:1:1 ice mixture, used as a model mixture for cometary and interstellar ices, was irradiated with ultraviolet (UV)/extreme ultraviolet (EUV) photons in the broad 4-20 eV (62-310 nm) energy range at 16 K. The desorbed species were detected in situ by mass spectrometry during photo-irradiation, and a quartz microbalance was used as a substrate to measure the mass of material remaining on the surface. The total mass desorption for this H2O:CO2:NH3 = 1:1:1 ice mixture at 16 K was measured to be 1.8 × 10-18 μg photon-1, which is comparable to the 1.5 × 10-18 μg photon-1 measured for pure H2O ice irradiated under the same conditions. The main desorbed species produced during the photolysis of the ices were H2, NH2•, OH•, CO, and O2, along with the starting components H2O, NH3, and CO2. We also tentatively assigned minor mass peaks to larger species such as OCN•/OCN-, HNCO, CH4, H2CO, CH3OH, and HCOOH. This result supports the scenario in which complex organic molecules can be formed in cometary and/or astrophysical ices and desorbed to the gas phase, and helps to better understand the photochemical processes occurring at the surface of Solar System icy bodies such as comets, as well as in cold astrophysical environments such as star-forming regions and protostars.

  16. LIF-imaging and gas-phase diagnostics of laser desorbed MALDI-matrix plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Puretzky, A.A.; Geohegan, D.B.

    1997-07-01

    The first gated LIF-imaging and absorption spectroscopy has been performed on laser desorbed plumes from organic crystals which are commonly used as MALDI (Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization) matrices. These plasma diagnostic techniques, including ion probe measurements were employed to investigate the desorbed products, densities, fractional ionization, and velocity distributions of the plume of ejecta which is typically employed as the main desorption product in the mass spectrometry analysis of large biomolecules. Ultraviolet pulsed 193-nm and 248-nm irradiation of 3-hydroxypicolinic acid (3-HPA) crystals were studied to understand the effect of very different gas-phase absorption cross sections measured here for this material. In both cases, LIF imaging revealed two plume components: a fast (maximum {approximately} 0.1 cm/{micro}s) low-intensity component which appear to be 3-HPA fragments, and a slower component of 3-HPA expanding at 0.05 cm/{micro}s. In the case of ArF-laser irradiation, optical absorption spectroscopy indicated a breaking of the intramolecular hydrogen bond in the gas-phase matrix material.

  17. Continuous reduction of cyclic adsorbed and desorbed NO(x) in diesel emission using nonthermal plasma.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, Takuya; Nakaguchi, Harunobu; Kuroki, Tomoyuki; Okubo, Masaaki

    2016-05-01

    Considering the recent stringent regulations governing diesel NO(x) emission, an aftertreatment system for the reduction of NO(x) in the exhaust gas has been proposed and studied. The proposed system is a hybrid method combining nonthermal plasma and NOx adsorbent. The system does not require precious metal catalysts or harmful chemicals such as urea and ammonia. In the present system, NO(x) in diesel emission is treated by adsorption and desorption by adsorbent as well as nonthermal plasma reduction. In addition, the remaining NO(x) in the adsorbent is desorbed again in the supplied air by residual heat. The desorbed NO(x) in air recirculates into the intake of the engine, and this process, i.e., exhaust gas components' recirculation (EGCR) achieves NO(x) reduction. Alternate utilization of two adsorption chambers in the system can achieve high-efficiency NO(x) removal continuously. An experiment with a stationary diesel engine for electric power generation demonstrates an energy efficiency of 154 g(NO2)/kWh for NO(x) removal and continuous NO(x) reduction of 70.3%. Considering the regulation against diesel emission in Japan, i.e., the new regulation to be imposed on vehicles of 3.5-7.5 ton since 2016, the present aftertreatment system fulfills the requirement with only 1.0% of engine power.

  18. Continuous reduction of cyclic adsorbed and desorbed NO(x) in diesel emission using nonthermal plasma.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, Takuya; Nakaguchi, Harunobu; Kuroki, Tomoyuki; Okubo, Masaaki

    2016-05-01

    Considering the recent stringent regulations governing diesel NO(x) emission, an aftertreatment system for the reduction of NO(x) in the exhaust gas has been proposed and studied. The proposed system is a hybrid method combining nonthermal plasma and NOx adsorbent. The system does not require precious metal catalysts or harmful chemicals such as urea and ammonia. In the present system, NO(x) in diesel emission is treated by adsorption and desorption by adsorbent as well as nonthermal plasma reduction. In addition, the remaining NO(x) in the adsorbent is desorbed again in the supplied air by residual heat. The desorbed NO(x) in air recirculates into the intake of the engine, and this process, i.e., exhaust gas components' recirculation (EGCR) achieves NO(x) reduction. Alternate utilization of two adsorption chambers in the system can achieve high-efficiency NO(x) removal continuously. An experiment with a stationary diesel engine for electric power generation demonstrates an energy efficiency of 154 g(NO2)/kWh for NO(x) removal and continuous NO(x) reduction of 70.3%. Considering the regulation against diesel emission in Japan, i.e., the new regulation to be imposed on vehicles of 3.5-7.5 ton since 2016, the present aftertreatment system fulfills the requirement with only 1.0% of engine power. PMID:26844402

  19. Neutralizer optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Michael J.; Mohajeri, Kayhan

    1991-01-01

    The preliminary results of a test program to optimize a neutralizer design for 30 cm xenon ion thrusters are discussed. The impact of neutralizer geometry, neutralizer axial location, and local magnetic fields on neutralizer performance is discussed. The effect of neutralizer performance on overall thruster performance is quantified, for thruster operation in the 0.5-3.2 kW power range. Additionally, these data are compared to data published for other north-south stationkeeping (NSSK) and primary propulsion xenon ion thruster neutralizers.

  20. Methodologies for Removing/Desorbing and Transporting Particles from Surfaces to Instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Carla J.; Cespedes, Ernesto R.

    2012-12-01

    Explosive trace detection (ETD) continues to be a key technology supporting the fight against terrorist bombing threats. Very selective and sensitive ETD instruments have been developed to detect explosive threats concealed on personnel, in vehicles, in luggage, and in cargo containers, as well as for forensic analysis (e.g. post blast inspection, bomb-maker identification, etc.) in a broad range of homeland security, law enforcement, and military applications. A number of recent studies have highlighted the fact that significant improvements in ETD systems' capabilities will be achieved, not by increasing the selectivity/sensitivity of the sensors, but by improved techniques for particle/vapor sampling, pre-concentration, and transport to the sensors. This review article represents a compilation of studies focused on characterizing the adhesive properties of explosive particles, the methodologies for removing/desorbing these particles from a range of surfaces, and approaches for transporting them to the instrument. The objectives of this review are to summarize fundamental work in explosive particle characterization, to describe experimental work performed in harvesting and transport of these particles, and to highlight those approaches that indicate high potential for improving ETD capabilities.

  1. Laser neutralization

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, O.G.

    1986-06-17

    Laser photodetachment of the excess electron to neutralize relativistic ions offers many advantages over the more conventional collisional methods using gases or thin foils as the neutralization agents. Probably the two most important advantages of laser photodetachment are the generation of a compact and low divergence beam, and the production of intense neutral beams at very high efficiency (approximately 90%). The high intensities or high current densities of the neutral beam result from the fixed maximum divergence that can be added to the beam by photodetachment of the charge using laser intensity of fixed wavelength and incident angle. The high neutralization efficiency is possible because there is no theoretical maximum to the neutralization efficiency, although higher efficiencies require higher laser powers and, therefore, costs. Additional advantages include focusability of the laser light onto the ion beam to maximize its efficacy. There certainly is no residual gas left in the particle beam path as is typical with gas neutralizers. The photodetachment process leaves the neutral atoms in the ground state so there is no excited state fluorescence to interfere with the subsequent beam sensing. Finally, since the beams to be neutralized are very high powered, for a large range of neutralization efficiencies the neutral beam can be increased more by increasing the power to the laser neutralizer than by adding an equal amount of power to the primary accelerator. 26 figs.

  2. Neutral atom, molecule and edge-plasma modeling for ITER. Final progress report for period January 15, 1995 - February 14, 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Ruzic, David N.

    1999-05-10

    Over the past three years, eleven refereed journal publications [1-11] have resulted in part from this grant. These can be arranged into three categories: (1) Erosion/redeposition calculations of current machines and proposed designs, (2) Analysis of proposed long-pulse or burning plasma operating regimes, and (3) Analysis of neutral behavior in current experiments. Each paper is listed below along with a very short synopsis of the importance or significance of the work in each category. Since refereed work in significant journals is the purest distillation of written results, the entire papers are included after these brief descriptions.

  3. Neutralization of inhibitory molecule NG2 improves synaptic transmission, retrograde transport, and locomotor function after spinal cord injury in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Petrosyan, Hayk A; Hunanyan, Arsen S; Alessi, Valentina; Schnell, Lisa; Levine, Joel; Arvanian, Victor L

    2013-02-27

    NG2 belongs to the family of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans that are upregulated after spinal cord injury (SCI) and are major inhibitory factors restricting the growth of fibers after SCI. Neutralization of NG2's inhibitory effect on axon growth by anti-NG2 monoclonal antibodies (NG2-Ab) has been reported. In addition, recent studies show that exogenous NG2 induces a block of axonal conduction. In this study, we demonstrate that acute intraspinal injections of NG2-Ab prevented an acute block of conduction by NG2. Chronic intrathecal infusion of NG2-Ab improved the following deficits induced by chronic midthoracic lateral hemisection (HX) injury: (1) synaptic transmission to lumbar motoneurons, (2) retrograde transport of fluororuby anatomical tracer from L5 to L1, and (3) locomotor function assessed by automated CatWalk gait analysis. We collected data in an attempt to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the NG2-Ab-induced improvement of synaptic transmission in HX-injured spinal cord. These data showed the following: (1) that chronic NG2-Ab infusion improved conduction and axonal excitability in chronically HX-injured rats, (2) that antibody treatment increased the density of serotonergic axons with ventral regions of spinal segments L1-L5, (3) and that NG2-positive processes contact nodes of Ranvier within the nodal gap at the location of nodal Na(+) channels, which are known to be critical for propagation of action potentials along axons. Together, these results demonstrate that treatment with NG2-Ab partially improves both synaptic and anatomical plasticity in damaged spinal cord and promotes functional recovery after HX SCI. Neutralizing antibodies against NG2 may be an excellent way to promote axonal conduction after SCI. PMID:23447612

  4. The First Detections of the Key Prebiotic Molecule PO in Star-forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivilla, V. M.; Fontani, F.; Beltrán, M. T.; Vasyunin, A.; Caselli, P.; Martín-Pintado, J.; Cesaroni, R.

    2016-08-01

    Phosphorus is a crucial element in biochemistry, in particular the P-O bond, which is key in the formation of the backbone of deoxyribonucleic acid. So far, PO has only been detected toward the envelope of evolved stars, but never toward star-forming regions. We report the first detection of PO toward two massive star-forming regions, W51 e1/e2 and W3(OH), using data from the IRAM 30 m telescope. PN has also been detected toward the two regions. The abundance ratio PO/PN is 1.8 and 3 for W51 and W3(OH), respectively. Our chemical model indicates that the two molecules are chemically related and are formed via gas-phase ion-molecule and neutral-neutral reactions during cold collapse. The molecules freeze out onto grains at the end of the collapse and desorb during the warm-up phase once the temperature reaches ˜35 K. Similar abundances of the two species are expected during a period of ˜5 × 104 yr at the early stages of the warm-up phase, when the temperature is in the range 35-90 K. The observed molecular abundances of 10-10 are predicted by the model if a relatively high initial abundance of 5 × 10-9 of depleted phosphorus is assumed.

  5. Venom neutralization by purified bioactive molecules: Synthetic peptide derivatives of the endogenous PLA(2) inhibitory protein PIP (a mini-review).

    PubMed

    Thwin, Maung-Maung; Samy, Ramar Perumal; Satyanarayanajois, Seetharama D; Gopalakrishnakone, Ponnampalam

    2010-12-15

    Envenomation due to snakebite constitutes a significant public health problem in tropical and subtropical countries. Antivenom therapy is still the mainstay of treatment for snake envenomation, and yet despite recent research focused on the prospects of using antivenom adjuncts to aid in serotherapy, no new products have emerged so far for therapeutic use. Various methodologies including molecular biology, crystallography, functional and morphological approaches, etc., are employed in the search for such inhibitors with a view to generate molecules that can stop partially or completely the activities of toxic phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)) and snake venom metalloproteinase (SvMPs) enzymes at the molecular level. Herein, both natural and synthetic inhibitors derived from a variety of sources including medicinal plants, mammals, marine animals, fungi, bacteria, and from the venom and blood of snakes have been briefly reviewed. Attention has been focused on the snake serum-based phospholipase A(2) inhibitors (PLIs), particularly on the PLI derived from python snake serum (PIP), highlighting the potential of the natural product, PIP, or possible derivatives of it, as a complementary treatment to serotherapy against the inflammation and/or muscle-damaging activity of snake venoms. The data indicate a more efficient pathway for inhibition and blocking the activity of PLA(2)s and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), thus representing a feasible complementary treatment for snakebites. Such information may be helpful for interfering on the biological processes that these molecules are involved in human inflammatory-related diseases, and also for the development of new drugs for treatment of snake envenomation.

  6. Graphene and graphite, low-temperature catalysts producing weakly-excited hydrogen molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenig, Wilhelm; Roman, Tanglaw

    2014-08-01

    A model for the low-temperature catalysis of hydrogen molecules on graphene and graphite, relevant for interstellar chemistry, is proposed: hydrogen atoms are either chemisorbed at the edges, or physisorbed on graphene and transported to a chemisorbed state at the edges. A second atom can then produce a molecule via a hot atom or an Eley-Rideal process. Since much of the energy is needed to desorb the molecule from the tightly-bound chemisorbed state, the desorbing molecules have only low internal excitation energy, in agreement with astronomical observations.

  7. Time-resolved measurements of desorbed gas during 1-MeV K+ pulsedbeam deposition in a stainless steel target

    SciTech Connect

    Bieniosek, F.M.; Prost, L.R.; Seidl, P.A.; Molvik, A.W.; KireeffCovo, M.

    2007-01-01

    Measurements were made of the density, species and velocity of the desorbed gas cloud on intense K{sup +} beam bombardment of a stainless steel target. RGA measurements indicate that the gas cloud consists of predominantly H{sub 2}. Energy analyzer measurements of doubly-ionized beam ions show that the ratio of hydrogen gas production to beam density was approximately 3000 at normal incidence. Optical measurements of the evolution of the gas cloud during the beam pulse show a distribution with an average expansion velocity of about 0.5 mm/{micro}s. Comparison is made with a simple model of the gas cloud behavior.

  8. Plasma/Neutral-Beam Etching Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, William; Cohen, Samuel; Cuthbertson, John; Manos, Dennis; Motley, Robert

    1989-01-01

    Energies of neutral particles controllable. Apparatus developed to produce intense beams of reactant atoms for simulating low-Earth-orbit oxygen erosion, for studying beam-gas collisions, and for etching semiconductor substrates. Neutral beam formed by neutralization and reflection of accelerated plasma on metal plate. Plasma ejected from coaxial plasma gun toward neutralizing plate, where turned into beam of atoms or molecules and aimed at substrate to be etched.

  9. A Modified LBM Model for Simulating Gas Seepage in Fissured Coal Considering Klinkenberg Effects and Adsorbability-Desorbability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Yun-Liang; Teng, Gui-Rong; Zhang, Ze

    2010-01-01

    A modified Lattice-Boltzmann method is proposed by considering the Klinkenberg effect and adsorbability-desorbability for the purpose of simulating methane gas seepage in fissured coal. The results show that the Klinkenberg effect has a little influence on methane gas seepage in fissured coal, so it can be neglected in engineering computations for simplicity. If both the Klinkenberg effect and the adsorbability-desorbability are considered, the Klinkenberg influence on gas pressure decreases as the Darcy coefficient increases. It is found by gas drainage simulations that near a drainage hole, the effect of adsorption and desorption cannot be neglected, and the location of the drainage hole has a great influence on drainage efficient λ when the hole is just located at the mid-zone of the coal seam, λ is 0.691808; when the hole is excursion down to 1.0 m from the mid-zone of coal seam, λ decreases to 0.668631; when the hole is excursion up or down to 2.0 m from the mid-zone of coal seam, λ decreases to 0.632917. The simulations supply an effective approach for optimizing the gas drainage hole location.

  10. The First Detections of the Key Prebiotic Molecule PO in Star-forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivilla, V. M.; Fontani, F.; Beltrán, M. T.; Vasyunin, A.; Caselli, P.; Martín-Pintado, J.; Cesaroni, R.

    2016-08-01

    Phosphorus is a crucial element in biochemistry, in particular the P‑O bond, which is key in the formation of the backbone of deoxyribonucleic acid. So far, PO has only been detected toward the envelope of evolved stars, but never toward star-forming regions. We report the first detection of PO toward two massive star-forming regions, W51 e1/e2 and W3(OH), using data from the IRAM 30 m telescope. PN has also been detected toward the two regions. The abundance ratio PO/PN is 1.8 and 3 for W51 and W3(OH), respectively. Our chemical model indicates that the two molecules are chemically related and are formed via gas-phase ion–molecule and neutral–neutral reactions during cold collapse. The molecules freeze out onto grains at the end of the collapse and desorb during the warm-up phase once the temperature reaches ˜35 K. Similar abundances of the two species are expected during a period of ˜5 × 104 yr at the early stages of the warm-up phase, when the temperature is in the range 35–90 K. The observed molecular abundances of 10‑10 are predicted by the model if a relatively high initial abundance of 5 × 10‑9 of depleted phosphorus is assumed.

  11. Neutral Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller-Wodarg, I. C. F.; Strobel, D. F.; Moses, J. I.; Waite, J. H.; Crovisier, J.; Yelle, R. V.; Bougher, S. W.; Roble, R. G.

    This paper summarizes the understanding of aeronomy of neutral atmospheres in the solar system, discussing most planets as well as Saturn's moon Titan and comets. The thermal structure and energy balance is compared, highlighting the principal reasons for discrepancies amongst the atmospheres, a combination of atmospheric composition, heliocentric distance and other external energy sources not common to all. The composition of atmospheres is discussed in terms of vertical structure, chemistry and evolution. The final section compares dynamics in the upper atmospheres of most planets and highlights the importance of vertical dynamical coupling as well as magnetospheric forcing in auroral regions, where present. It is shown that a first order understanding of neutral atmospheres has emerged over the past decades, thanks to the combined effects of spacecraft and Earth-based observations as well as advances in theoretical modeling capabilities. Key gaps in our understanding are highlighted which ultimately call for a more comprehensive programme of observation and laboratory measurements.

  12. Neutral Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller-Wodarg, I. C. F.; Strobel, D. F.; Moses, J. I.; Waite, J. H.; Crovisier, J.; Yelle, R. V.; Bougher, S. W.; Roble, R. G.

    2008-08-01

    This paper summarizes the understanding of aeronomy of neutral atmospheres in the solar system, discussing most planets as well as Saturn’s moon Titan and comets. The thermal structure and energy balance is compared, highlighting the principal reasons for discrepancies amongst the atmospheres, a combination of atmospheric composition, heliocentric distance and other external energy sources not common to all. The composition of atmospheres is discussed in terms of vertical structure, chemistry and evolution. The final section compares dynamics in the upper atmospheres of most planets and highlights the importance of vertical dynamical coupling as well as magnetospheric forcing in auroral regions, where present. It is shown that a first order understanding of neutral atmospheres has emerged over the past decades, thanks to the combined effects of spacecraft and Earth-based observations as well as advances in theoretical modeling capabilities. Key gaps in our understanding are highlighted which ultimately call for a more comprehensive programme of observation and laboratory measurements.

  13. Generation and characterization of ABT-981, a dual variable domain immunoglobulin (DVD-IgTM) molecule that specifically and potently neutralizes both IL-1α and IL-1β

    PubMed Central

    Lacy, Susan E; Wu, Chengbin; Ambrosi, Dominic J; Hsieh, Chung-Ming; Bose, Sahana; Miller, Renee; Conlon, Donna M; Tarcsa, Edit; Chari, Ravi; Ghayur, Tariq; Kamath, Rajesh V

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin-1 (IL-1) cytokines such as IL-1α, IL-1β, and IL-1Ra contribute to immune regulation and inflammatory processes by exerting a wide range of cellular responses, including expression of cytokines and chemokines, matrix metalloproteinases, and nitric oxide synthetase. IL-1α and IL-1β bind to IL-1R1 complexed to the IL-1 receptor accessory protein and induce similar physiological effects. Preclinical and clinical studies provide significant evidence for the role of IL-1 in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA), including cartilage degradation, bone sclerosis, and synovial proliferation. Here, we describe the generation and characterization of ABT-981, a dual variable domain immunoglobulin (DVD-Ig) of the IgG1/k subtype that specifically and potently neutralizes IL-1α and IL-1β. In ABT-981, the IL-1β variable domain resides in the outer domain of the DVD-Ig, whereas the IL-1α variable domain is located in the inner position. ABT-981 specifically binds to IL-1α and IL-1β, and is physically capable of binding 2 human IL-1α and 2 human IL-1β molecules simultaneously. Single-dose intravenous and subcutaneous pharmacokinetics studies indicate that ABT-981 has a half-life of 8.0 to 10.4 d in cynomolgus monkey and 10.0 to 20.3 d in rodents. ABT-981 exhibits suitable drug-like-properties including affinity, potency, specificity, half-life, and stability for evaluation in human clinical trials. ABT-981 offers an exciting new approach for the treatment of OA, potentially addressing both disease modification and symptom relief as a disease-modifying OA drug. PMID:25764208

  14. Extremely slowly desorbing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from soot and soot-like materials: evidence by supercritical fluid extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Michiel T.O. Jonker; Steven B. Hawthorne; Albert A. Koelmans

    2005-10-15

    Combustion-derived PAHs are strongly sorbed to their particulate carrier (i.e., soot, charcoal), and therefore, very slow desorption kinetics of the chemicals might be anticipated. Measurements are however lacking, because conventional methods (Tenax, XAD, gas-purging) fail to accurately determine desorption kinetics due to practical problems. In this study, we used a mild supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) method, which mimics desorption into water and circumvents these problems, to quantify desorption kinetics of 13 native PAHs from pure charcoal, coal, and four types of soot. The results show that generally only very small PAH fractions are released. Desorption behavior was, however, not related to common sorbent/sorbate characteristics. Two-site model-derived 'fast desorbing fractions' were {lt}0.01 in the majority of cases, and for the dominant 'slow sites', the calculated rate constants for desorption into water measured from 10{sup -7} to 10{sup -5} h{sup -1}. These data suggest that desorption of coal and combustion-derived PAHs can be even slower than the 'very slow' desorption observed in sediments. Estimated time scales required for removal of pyrogenic PAHs from these extremely slow sites into water amount to several millennia. Our results imply reduced chemical risks for soot and soot-like materials, casting doubts on current risk assessment procedures and environmental quality standards of pyrogenic PAHs. 41 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  15. Extremely slowly desorbing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from soot and soot-like materials: evidence by supercritical fluid extraction.

    PubMed

    Jonker, Michiel T O; Hawthorne, Steven B; Koelmans, Albert A

    2005-10-15

    Combustion-derived PAHs are strongly sorbed to their particulate carrier (i.e., soot, charcoal), and therefore, very slow desorption kinetics of the chemicals might be anticipated. Measurements are however lacking, because conventional methods (Tenax, XAD, gas-purging) fail to accurately determine desorption kinetics due to practical problems. In this study, we used a mild supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) method, which mimics desorption into water and circumvents these problems, to quantify desorption kinetics of 13 native PAHs from pure charcoal, coal, and four types of soot. The results show that generally only very small PAH fractions are released. Desorption behavior was, however, not related to common sorbent/sorbate characteristics. Two-site model-derived "fast desorbing fractions" were <0.01 in the majority of cases, and for the dominant "slow sites", the calculated rate constants for desorption into water measured from 10(-7) to 10(-5) h(-1). These data suggest that desorption of coal and combustion-derived PAHs can be even slower than the "very slow" desorption observed in sediments. Estimated time scales required for removal of pyrogenic PAHs from these extremely slow sites into water amount to several millennia. Our results imply reduced chemical risks for soot and soot-like materials, casting doubts on current risk assessment procedures and environmental quality standards of pyrogenic PAHs. PMID:16295852

  16. Dynamics of the photoinduced desorption of nitric oxide molecules from the surface of pure and modified platinum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khubezhov, S. A.; Silaev, I. V.; Demeev, Z. S.; Ramonova, A. V.; Kaloeva, A. G.; Tvauri, I. V.; Grigorkina, G. S.; Kibizov, D. D.; Ashkhotov, O. G.; Ogura, S.; Sekiba, D.; Fukutani, K.; Magkoev, T. T.

    2016-07-01

    The distribution of NO molecules desorbed from a Pt(111) surface due to valence electron excitation over rotational energy levels N( J) is analyzed using a simple impulse-induced model. A linear dependence is found between ln N( J) and ( E r )1/2, where E r is the rotational energy of the desorbed molecules. The lifetime of the excited state and the critical time of residence in the excited state estimated using this dependence are found to be close to one another (~10-15 s). The frequency and amplitude of the tilting vibrations of the adsorbed molecules in the excited state are estimated.

  17. MALDI mechanism of dihydroxybenzoic acid isomers: desorption of neutral matrix and analyte.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chi Wei; Lee, Chih Hao; Lin, Yu-Jiun; Lee, Yuan Tseh; Ni, Chi Kung

    2013-05-01

    Angular resolved velocity distributions of laser desorbed neutral matrices (dihydroxybenzoic acids, DHB) and analytes (tryptophan) embedded in these matrices were investigated at 322 nm by a modified crossed molecular beam apparatus. Desorbed ions generated from MALDI were measured by a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Desorptions of neutral matrix and analyte from 2,3-DHB, 2,4-DHB, 2,5-DHB, 2,6-DHB, and 3,5--DHB at 322 nm have similar properties, but the ion intensities are in the order 2,3DHB ≅ 2,6-DHB > 2,5-DHB ≅ 2,4-DHB > 3,5-DHB. It indicates that the combination of various parameters related to neutral species, including absorption coefficient, sublimation energy, contact of analyte and matrix in crystal, and plume dynamics of desorbed species are not crucial in the determination of MALDI process for DHB isomers. The difference of matrix activity of DHB isomers at this wavelength must result from the other properties, like the excited state lifetime, proton affinity, gas-phase basicity, acidity, ionization energy, or the other properties related to the primary reactions in ion generation.

  18. Quantum dynamics of bond breaking in a dissipative environment: Indirect and direct photodesorption of neutrals from metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saalfrank, Peter; Kosloff, Ronnie

    1996-08-01

    The dynamics of uv/visible laser-induced nonthermal desorption of neutral molecules from metal surfaces are studied by Liouville-von Neumann equations for quantum open systems. A one-dimensional, two-state Gadzuk-Antoniewicz model is adopted, representative for NO/Pt(111). Electronic quenching due to coupling of the adsorbate negative ion resonance to the metal electrons is treated within the Lindblad dynamical semigroup approach. Both indirect (hot-electron mediated) and hypothetical direct (dipole) excitation processes are considered. For the indirect pathways, DIET (single-excitation) and DIMET (multiple-excitation) limits are studied using one- and double-dissipative channel models, respectively. To reproduce experimental desorption yields and desorbate translational energies, we estimate the quenching lifetime for NO/Pt(111) to be less than 5 fs. We also extend previous quantum treatments of photodesorption processes to the case of coordinate-dependent quenching rates. Further, the characteristic scaling laws of desorption yields versus laser fluence are derived for each of the individual excitation pathways. Finally, the possibility to control photoreactivity at surfaces by different, vibration-promoted schemes (surface heating, ir+uv two-photon strategies, use of pulsed uv lasers) is examined.

  19. Chemical reaction dynamics of Rydberg atoms with neutral molecules: a comparison of molecular-beam and classical trajectory results for the H(n)+D2-->HD+D(n') reaction.

    PubMed

    Song, Hui; Dai, Dongxu; Wu, Guorong; Wang, Chia Chen; Harich, Steven A; Hayes, Michael Y; Wang, Xiuyan; Gerlich, Dieter; Yang, Xueming; Skodje, Rex T

    2005-08-15

    Recent molecular-beam experiments have probed the dynamics of the Rydberg-atom reaction, H(n)+D2-->HD+D(n) at low collision energies. It was discovered that the rotationally resolved product distribution was remarkably similar to a much more limited data set obtained at a single scattering angle for the ion-molecule reaction H++D2-->D++HD. The equivalence of these two problems would be consistent with the Fermi-independent-collider model (electron acting as a spectator) and would provide an important new avenue for the study of ion-molecule reactions. In this work, we employ a classical trajectory calculation on the ion-molecule reaction to facilitate a more extensive comparison between the two systems. The trajectory simulations tend to confirm the equivalence of the ion+molecule dynamics to that for the Rydberg-atom+molecule system. The theory reproduces the close relationship of the two experimental observations made previously. However, some differences between the Rydberg-atom experiments and the trajectory simulations are seen when comparisons are made to a broader data set. In particular, the angular distribution of the differential cross section exhibits more asymmetry in the experiment than in the theory. The potential breakdown of the classical model is discussed. The role of the "spectator" Rydberg electron is addressed and several crucial issues for future theoretical work are brought out. PMID:16229577

  20. Chemical reaction dynamics of Rydberg atoms with neutral molecules: a comparison of molecular-beam and classical trajectory results for the H(n)+D2-->HD+D(n') reaction.

    PubMed

    Song, Hui; Dai, Dongxu; Wu, Guorong; Wang, Chia Chen; Harich, Steven A; Hayes, Michael Y; Wang, Xiuyan; Gerlich, Dieter; Yang, Xueming; Skodje, Rex T

    2005-08-15

    Recent molecular-beam experiments have probed the dynamics of the Rydberg-atom reaction, H(n)+D2-->HD+D(n) at low collision energies. It was discovered that the rotationally resolved product distribution was remarkably similar to a much more limited data set obtained at a single scattering angle for the ion-molecule reaction H++D2-->D++HD. The equivalence of these two problems would be consistent with the Fermi-independent-collider model (electron acting as a spectator) and would provide an important new avenue for the study of ion-molecule reactions. In this work, we employ a classical trajectory calculation on the ion-molecule reaction to facilitate a more extensive comparison between the two systems. The trajectory simulations tend to confirm the equivalence of the ion+molecule dynamics to that for the Rydberg-atom+molecule system. The theory reproduces the close relationship of the two experimental observations made previously. However, some differences between the Rydberg-atom experiments and the trajectory simulations are seen when comparisons are made to a broader data set. In particular, the angular distribution of the differential cross section exhibits more asymmetry in the experiment than in the theory. The potential breakdown of the classical model is discussed. The role of the "spectator" Rydberg electron is addressed and several crucial issues for future theoretical work are brought out.

  1. Experimental Investigations of the Internal Energy of Molecules Evaporated via Laser-induced Acoustic Desorption into a Fourier-transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer (LIAD/FT-ICR)

    PubMed Central

    Shea, Ryan C.; Petzold, Christopher J.; Liu, Ji-ang; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I.

    2008-01-01

    The internal energy of neutral gas-phase organic and biomolecules, evaporated by means of laser-induced acoustic desorption (LIAD) into a Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR), was investigated through several experimental approaches. The desorbed molecules were demonstrated not to undergo degradation during the desorption process by collecting LIAD-evaporated molecules and subjecting them to analysis by electrospray ionization/quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry. Previously established gas-phase basicity (GB) values were remeasured for LIAD-evaporated organic molecules and biomolecules with the use of the bracketing method. No endothermic reactions were observed. The remeasured basicity values are in close agreement with the values reported in the literature. The amount of internal energy deposited during LIAD is concluded to be less than a few kcal/mol. Chemical ionization with a series of proton transfer reagents was employed to obtain a breakdown curve for a protonated dipeptide, val-pro, evaporated by LIAD. Comparison of this breakdown curve with a previously published analogous curve obtained by using substrate-assisted laser desorption (SALD) to evaporate the peptide suggests that the molecules evaporated via LIAD have less internal energy than those evaporated via SALD. PMID:17263513

  2. Neutral-particle-beam production and injection

    SciTech Connect

    Post, D.; Pyle, R.

    1982-07-01

    This paper is divided into two sections: the first is a discussion of the interactions of neutral beams with confined plasmas, the second is concerned with the production and diagnosis of the neutral beams. In general we are dealing with atoms, molecules, and ions of the isotopes of hydrogen, but some heavier elements (for example, oxygen) will be mentioned. The emphasis will be on single-particle collisions; selected atomic processes on surfaces will be included.

  3. Numerical Analysis on Optimization of a Fin and Tube Type Adsorber/Desorber Heat Exchanger using ACF/C2H5OH Pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kariya, Keishi; Kuwahara, Ken; Koyama, Shigeru

    This study deals with a two dimensional numerical analysis of the fin and tube type adsorber/desorber heat exchanger design such as fin height, fin pitch, fin thickness and tube diameter effect on the performance of closed adsorption cooling system with activated carbon fiber (ACF) of type A-20, which has relatively higher surface area, and ethanol pair. The simulation results show that the fin tube diameter is effective on the performance of the heat exchanger. It is also found that the cycle COP can be optimized in the condition of fin pitch 4.5mm and fin height 20mm, respectively when other parameters are fixed.

  4. Slow beams of massive molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deachapunya, S.; Fagan, P. J.; Major, A. G.; Reiger, E.; Ritsch, H.; Stefanov, A.; Ulbricht, H.; Arndt, M.

    2008-02-01

    Slow beams of neutral molecules are of great interest for a wide range of applications, from cold chemistry through precision measurements to tests of the foundations of quantum mechanics. We report on the quantitative observation of thermal beams of perfluorinated macromolecules with masses up to 6000 amu, reaching velocities down to 11 m/s. Such slow, heavy and neutral molecular beams are of importance for a new class of experiments in matter-wave interferometry and we also discuss the requirements for further manipulation and cooling schemes with molecules in this unprecedented mass range.

  5. Europa's Neutral Gas Torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauk, B. H.; Mitchell, D. G.; McEntire, R. W.; Paranicas, C. P.; Roelof, E. C.; Williams, D. J.; Krimigis, S. M.; Lagg, A.

    2004-05-01

    In-situ energetic ion measurements from the Galileo spacecraft and remote energetic neutral atom (ENA) images from the Cassini spacecraft have been previously interpreted as revealing an unexpectedly massive torus of gas co-orbiting with Jupiter's moon Europa (Lagg et al., 2003; Mauk et al., 2003). Here we report on the results of detailed modeling of the ENA emission process from the Europa regions. Updates to the distribution and composition of the trapped energetic ion populations are included in the models, as are considerations of the partitioning of the gas products into multiple atomic and molecular species. Comparisons between the models and the Cassini observations reveal a torus with a total gas content equal to (0.5 +/- 0.2) E34 atoms plus molecules. This value is higher than, but within a factor of 3 of, an estimate inferred from a prediction of gas densities derived from Voyager plasma measurements and modeling of the interaction between the plasmas and the gases assumed to be emanating from Europa (Schreier et al., 1993). Lagg, A., N. Krupp, J. Woch, and D. J. Williams, Geophys. Res. Lett., 30, DOI 10.1029/2003GL017214, 2003. Mauk, B. H., D. G. Mitchell, S. M. Krimigs, E. C. Roelof, and C. P. Paranicas, Nature, 241, 920, 2003. Schreier, S., A. Eviatar, V. M. Vasyliunas, and J. D. Richardson, J. Geophys. Res., 98, 21231, 1993.

  6. Molecule nanoweaver

    DOEpatents

    Gerald, II; Rex E.; Klingler, Robert J.; Rathke, Jerome W.; Diaz, Rocio; Vukovic, Lela

    2009-03-10

    A method, apparatus, and system for constructing uniform macroscopic films with tailored geometric assemblies of molecules on the nanometer scale. The method, apparatus, and system include providing starting molecules of selected character, applying one or more force fields to the molecules to cause them to order and condense with NMR spectra and images being used to monitor progress in creating the desired geometrical assembly and functionality of molecules that comprise the films.

  7. Neutral beam monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Fink, Joel H.

    1981-08-18

    Method and apparatus for monitoring characteristics of a high energy neutral beam. A neutral beam is generated by passing accelerated ions through a walled cell containing a low energy neutral gas, such that charge exchange neutralizes the high energy ion beam. The neutral beam is monitored by detecting the current flowing through the cell wall produced by low energy ions which drift to the wall after the charge exchange. By segmenting the wall into radial and longitudinal segments various beam conditions are further identified.

  8. A computational study of ultrafast acid dissociation and acid-base neutralization reactions. II. The relationship between the coordination state of solvent molecules and concerted versus sequential acid dissociation.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Patrick; Thomas, Vibin; Iftimie, Radu

    2011-03-01

    We investigate the role played by the coordination state of pre-existing water wires during the dissociation of moderately strong acids by means of first-principles molecular dynamics calculations. By preparing 2,4,6-tricyanophenol (calc. pKa∼0.5) in two different initial states, we are able to observe sequential as well as concerted trajectories of dissociation: On one hand, equilibrium dissociation takes place on a ∼50 ps timescale; proton conduction occurs through three-coordinated water wires in this case, by means of sequential Grotthus hopping. On the other hand, by preparing 2,4,6-tricyanophenol in a hydration state inherited from that of equilibrated phenol (calc. pKa=7.6), the moderately strong acid finds itself in a presolvated state from which dissociation can take place on a ∼1 ps timescale. In this case, concerted dissociation trajectories are observed, which consist of proton translocation through two intervening, four-coordinated, water molecules in 0.1-1.0 ps. The present results suggest that, in general, the mechanism of proton translocation depends on how the excess proton is injected into a hydrogen bond network. In particular, if the initial conditions favour proton release to a fourfold H-bonded water molecule, proton translocation by as much as 6-8 Å can take place on a sub-picosecond timescale.

  9. A computational study of ultrafast acid dissociation and acid-base neutralization reactions. II. The relationship between the coordination state of solvent molecules and concerted versus sequential acid dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, Patrick; Thomas, Vibin; Iftimie, Radu

    2011-03-01

    We investigate the role played by the coordination state of pre-existing water wires during the dissociation of moderately strong acids by means of first-principles molecular dynamics calculations. By preparing 2,4,6-tricyanophenol (calc. pKa˜0.5) in two different initial states, we are able to observe sequential as well as concerted trajectories of dissociation: On one hand, equilibrium dissociation takes place on a ˜50 ps timescale; proton conduction occurs through three-coordinated water wires in this case, by means of sequential Grotthus hopping. On the other hand, by preparing 2,4,6-tricyanophenol in a hydration state inherited from that of equilibrated phenol (calc. pKa = 7.6), the moderately strong acid finds itself in a presolvated state from which dissociation can take place on a ˜1 ps timescale. In this case, concerted dissociation trajectories are observed, which consist of proton translocation through two intervening, four-coordinated, water molecules in 0.1-1.0 ps. The present results suggest that, in general, the mechanism of proton translocation depends on how the excess proton is injected into a hydrogen bond network. In particular, if the initial conditions favour proton release to a fourfold H-bonded water molecule, proton translocation by as much as 6-8 Å can take place on a sub-picosecond timescale.

  10. Kinetics of neutralization of Po-218

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, K.D.

    1987-01-01

    In a well-defined experimental system the neutralization of polonium-218 ions was investigated as a function of the physical and chemical properties of the controlled composition atmosphere. The mobilities of Po/sup +/ and PoO/sub 2//sup +/ are determined by combining experimental results with a computer model of the system. Three neutralization mechanisms were individually studied. The small ion recombination rate has been found to be proportional to the square root of radon concentration. The electron scavenging mechanism is responsible for the neutralization of Po/sup +/ in NO/sub 2/ or H/sub 2/O in nitrogen. When PoO/sub 2//sup +/ is formed, the electron transfer mechanism dominates the neutralization process. The electron is transferred to PoO/sub 2//sup +/ from molecules with lower ionization potentials. The ionization potential of PoO/sub 2//sup +/ is also determined to be 10.44 +/- 0.05 eV.

  11. On neutral plasma oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Shadwick, B.A.; Morrison, P.J.

    1993-06-01

    We examine the conditions for the existence of spectrally stable neutral modes in a Vlasov-Poisson plasma and show that for stable equilibria of systems that have unbounded spatial domain, the only possible neutral modes are those with phase velocities that correspond to stationary inflection points of the equilibrium distribution function. It is seen that these neutral modes can possess positive or negative free energy.

  12. Desorption induced by electronic transitions (DIET) of neutral fragments from chemisorbed biological molecular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdoul-Carime, H.; Dugal, P. C.; Sanche, L.

    2000-04-01

    Low-energy electron stimulated desorption of neutral fragments from oligomers chemisorbed onto a gold surface is investigated within the 1-30 eV range. The oligonucleotides are anchored to the surface via a sulfur-bound technique similar to the procedure used in molecular self-assemblies. We show that under electron impact the dissociation of DNA bases occurs, leading to the production of CN, OCN and/or H 2NCN neutral species, which are the most intense observable yields. The incident electron energy dependence of these desorbed neutral species exhibits typical signatures of dissociative electron attachment initiated by the formation of shape and core-excited resonances below 20 eV, whereas usually non-resonant processes (i.e. dipolar dissociation or dissociative ionization) become predominant above 20 eV.

  13. ALEX neutral beam probe

    SciTech Connect

    Pourrezaei, K.

    1982-01-01

    A neutral beam probe capable of measuring plasma space potential in a fully 3-dimensional magnetic field geometry has been developed. This neutral beam was successfully used to measure an arc target plasma contained within the ALEX baseball magnetic coil. A computer simulation of the experiment was performed to refine the experimental design and to develop a numerical model for scaling the ALEX neutral beam probe to other cases of fully 3-dimensional magnetic field. Based on this scaling a 30 to 50 keV neutral cesium beam probe capable of measuring space potential in the thermal barrier region of TMX Upgrade was designed.

  14. Search for neutral leptons

    SciTech Connect

    Perl, M.L.

    1984-12-01

    At present we know of three kinds of neutral leptons: the electron neutrino, the muon neutrino, and the tau neutrino. This paper reviews the search for additional neutral leptons. The method and significance of a search depends upon the model used for the neutral lepton being sought. Some models for the properties and decay modes of proposed neutral leptons are described. Past and present searches are reviewed. The limits obtained by some completed searches are given, and the methods of searches in progress are described. Future searches are discussed. 41 references.

  15. Computational study on Kerr constants of neutral and ionized gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, M.; Kumada, A.; Hidaka, K.

    2015-08-01

    In order to quantitatively examine the measurement capability of Poisson's field using electro-optic Kerr-effect (EOKE), Kerr constants of neutral molecules and ions are examined by means of first principle calculations. We have systematically computed Kerr constants of neutral molecules and ions of several molecular symmetry groups, with consistent theory level and basis sets. Computed Kerr constants of neutral molecules (N2, CO2, SF6, and CF3I) ranging across two orders of magnitudes are within 50% error of the experimental values, which are comparable to the scattering between experimental values itself. The results show that SF6 has smaller Kerr constant due to its high molecular symmetry compared to those of N2 and CO2. In contrast, CF3I has large Kerr constant due to its permanent dipole. Computed Kerr constants for anions are larger by two orders of magnitude than those of neutral molecules, probably due to the shielding effect. For cations, the opposite holds true; however, due to anisotropic polarizability, computed Kerr constants for some cations are comparable to neutral molecules, while others show smaller values. The ratio of Kerr constants of ions to those of neutral molecules are at most 102; EOKE is valid for measuring electric field in weakly ionized gas whose ionization degree is smaller than 10-3.

  16. Laser-induced desorption of organic molecules from front- and back-irradiated metal foils

    SciTech Connect

    Zinovev, Alexander V.; Veryovkin, Igor V.; Pellin, Michael J.

    2009-03-17

    Laser-Induced Acoustic Desorption (LIAD) from thin metal foils is a promising technique for gentle and efficient volatilization of intact organic molecules from surfaces of solid substrates. Using the Single Photon Ionization (SPI) method combined with time-of-flight mass-spectrometry (TOF MS), desorbed flux in LIAD was examined and compared to that from direct laser desorption (LD). Molecules of various organic dyes were used in experiments. Translational velocities of the desorbed intact molecules did not depend on the desorbing laser intensity, which implies the presence of more sophisticated mechanism of energy transfer than the direct mechanical or thermal coupling between the laser pulse and the adsorbed molecules. The results of our experiments indicate that the LIAD phenomenon cannot be described in terms of a simple mechanical shake-off nor the direct laser desorption. Rather, they suggest that multi-step energy transfer processes are involved. Possible qualitative mechanism of LIAD that are based on formation of non-equilibrium energy states in the adsorbate-substrate system are proposed and discussed.

  17. Laser-induced desorption of organic molecules from front- and back-irradiated metal foils.

    SciTech Connect

    Zinovev, A. V.; Veryovkin, I. V.; Pellin, M. J.; Materials Science Division

    2009-01-01

    Laser-Induced Acoustic Desorption (LIAD) from thin metal foils is a promising technique for gentle and efficient volatilization of intact organic molecules from surfaces of solid substrates. Using the Single Photon Ionization (SPI) method combined with time-of-flight mass-spectrometry (TOF MS), desorbed flux in LIAD was examined and compared to that from direct laser desorption (LD). Molecules of various organic dyes were used in experiments. Translational velocities of the desorbed intact molecules did not depend on the desorbing laser intensity, which implies the presence of more sophisticated mechanism of energy transfer than the direct mechanical or thermal coupling between the laser pulse and the adsorbed molecules. The results of our experiments indicate that the LIAD phenomenon cannot be described in terms of a simple mechanical shake-off nor the direct laser desorption. Rather, they suggest that multi-step energy transfer processes are involved. Possible qualitative mechanism of LIAD that are based on formation of non-equilibrium energy states in the adsorbate-substrate system are proposed and discussed.

  18. Neutrality in Language Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wee, Lionel

    2010-01-01

    The unavoidability of language makes it critical that language policies appeal to some notion of language neutrality as part of their rationale, in order to assuage concerns that the policies might otherwise be unduly discriminatory. However, the idea of language neutrality is deeply ideological in nature, since it is not only an attempt to treat…

  19. Calculations of neutral transport in the PDX divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heifetz, D. B.; Petravic, M.; Post, D. E.; Lieberson-Heifetz, S.

    1984-05-01

    Neutral particle transport during a typical beam-heated PDX diverted discharge was modeled using the multidimensional code DEGAS. Plasma parameters were taken from probe measurements, and were assumed not to change during the calculations. A realistic plasma/divertor geometry was included in the model, along with a simple particle recycling scheme. Calculated results were compared with the experimentally measured neutral pressures. Without any pumping in the device, the computed pressures were found to be higher than those measured by a factor of approximately two. Introducing a simple pumping model for wall absorption, wherein 10% of the absorbed neutral particles were assumed not to desorb, reduced the calculated pressures to about the measured values. However the pressure was observed to monotonically increase during the discharge, whereas the model results peaked in mid-discharge. One possible explanation of the disagreement is that the saturation of the device walls increases during the discharge, so that the fraction of particles pumped decreases with time. Reduction of the permanently absorbed fraction from 10 to 4% during the course of the discharge caused the calculated pressure to monotonically increase.

  20. Mobius Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckert, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses formation of chemical molecules via Mobius strip intermediates, and concludes that many special physics-chemical properties of the fully closed circular form (1) of polyoma DNA are explainable by this topological feature. (CC)

  1. Interstellar Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Philip M.

    1973-01-01

    Radioastronomy reveals that clouds between the stars, once believed to consist of simple atoms, contain molecules as complex as seven atoms and may be the most massive objects in our Galaxy. (Author/DF)

  2. Interstellar molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D.

    1987-09-01

    Some 70 different molecular species have so far been detected variously in diffuse interstellar clouds, dense interstellar clouds, and circumstellar shells. Only simple (diatomic and triatomic) species exist in diffuse clouds because of the penetration of destructive UV radiations, whereas more complex (polyatomic) molecules survive in dense clouds as a result of the shielding against this UV radiation provided by dust grains. A current list of interstellar molecules is given together with a few other molecular species that have so far been detected only in circumstellar shells. Also listed are those interstellar species that contain rare isotopes of several elements. The gas phase ion chemistry is outlined via which the observed molecules are synthesized, and the process by which enrichment of the rare isotopes occurs in some interstellar molecules is described.

  3. Modeling Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The molecule modeling method known as Multibody Order (N) Dynamics, or MBO(N)D, was developed by Moldyn, Inc. at Goddard Space Flight Center through funding provided by the SBIR program. The software can model the dynamics of molecules through technology which stimulates low-frequency molecular motions and properties, such as movements among a molecule's constituent parts. With MBO(N)D, a molecule is substructured into a set of interconnected rigid and flexible bodies. These bodies replace the computation burden of mapping individual atoms. Moldyn's technology cuts computation time while increasing accuracy. The MBO(N)D technology is available as Insight II 97.0 from Molecular Simulations, Inc. Currently the technology is used to account for forces on spacecraft parts and to perform molecular analyses for pharmaceutical purposes. It permits the solution of molecular dynamics problems on a moderate workstation, as opposed to on a supercomputer.

  4. Enumerating molecules.

    SciTech Connect

    Visco, Donald Patrick, Jr.; Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Roe, Diana C.

    2004-04-01

    This report is a comprehensive review of the field of molecular enumeration from early isomer counting theories to evolutionary algorithms that design molecules in silico. The core of the review is a detail account on how molecules are counted, enumerated, and sampled. The practical applications of molecular enumeration are also reviewed for chemical information, structure elucidation, molecular design, and combinatorial library design purposes. This review is to appear as a chapter in Reviews in Computational Chemistry volume 21 edited by Kenny B. Lipkowitz.

  5. Neutralization Assay for Chikungunya Virus Infection: Plaque Reduction Neutralization Test.

    PubMed

    Azami, Nor Azila Muhammad; Moi, Meng Ling; Takasaki, Tomohiko

    2016-01-01

    Neutralization assay is a technique that detects and quantifies neutralizing antibody in serum samples by calculating the percentage of reduction of virus activity, as the concentration of virus used is usually constant. Neutralizing antibody titer is conventionally determined by calculating the percentage reduction in total virus infectivity by counting and comparing number of plaques (localized area of infection due to cytopathic effect) with a standard amount of virus. Conventional neutralizing test uses plaque-reduction neutralization test (PRNT) to determine neutralizing antibody titers against Chikungunya virus (CHIKV). Here we describe the plaque reduction neutralization assay (PRNT) using Vero cell lines to obtain neutralizing antibody titers.

  6. Solar Neutral Particles

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation shows a neutral solar particle's path leaving the sun, following the magnetic field lines out to the heliosheath. The solar particle hits a hydrogen atom, stealing its electron, and ...

  7. Evaluation of a Fin and Tube Type Adsorber/Desorber Heat Exchanger using =ACF/C2H5OH Pair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kariya, Keishi; Makimoto, Naoya; Kuwahara, Ken; Koyama, Shigeru

    This study deals with the experiment to clarify the characteristics of adsorption refrigeration system employing activated carbon fiber (ACF) and ethanol pair and to evaluate the performance of adsorber/desorber heat exchanger defined by two kind of index to the system performance. The experiments are carried out by varying system running parameters such as regeneration temperature for adsorber, ethanol temperature in the evaporator, pre-heating/cooling cycle time, adsorption/desorption cycle time. Regeneration temperature for adsorber is from 60 to 90 °C and ethanol temperature is from 0 to 20 °C and pre-heating/cooling cycle time is 60 and 120 second and adsorption/desorption cycle time is from 120 to 300 second. Results show that the system can be operated with regeneration temperature of 60 °C and the system performance improves with increase of ethanol temperature. It is also found that the system performance is affected by regeneration temperature for adsorber and the pre-heating/cooling cycle time and adsorption/desorption cycle time.

  8. Consideration on the broad quantification range of gaseous reduced sulfur compounds with the combined application of gas chromatography and thermal desorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ki-Hyun

    2011-07-01

    In this work, the dynamic range of gas chromatography (GC) combined with a thermal desorber (TD) was investigated through a series of calibration experiments. To this end, standard gases of reduced sulfur compounds (RSC: H 2S, CH 3SH, DMS, CS 2 and DMDS) covering a relatively wide concentration range (2-100 nmol mol -1 (or ppb)) were analyzed by regulating sample loading range from 40 to 1200 mL (3.3-4900 pmol). It shows that the upper limits of GC-TD quantification are far higher than those of GC alone, although the cold trap unit in a TD suffers from breakthrough after a dose of RSC (e.g., 500 (DMDS) to 1600 pmol (H 2S)). Its quantification uncertainties tend to grow systematically with decreases in standard concentrations and sample loading volume, especially with H 2S. According to this study, the use of TD generally reduces the absolute detectability of GC by about one order of magnitude. Such reduction caused by TD application can be compensated efficiently with similar magnitude through the magnification of sample supply. Moreover, the TD system allows to increase sample volume (up to 3 orders of magnitude or above), it can ultimately help extend the practical range of RSC qualification in a fairly reliable manner.

  9. Suppression of unimolecular decay of laser desorbed peptide and protein ions by entrainment in rarefied supersonic gas jets under weak electric fields.

    PubMed

    Hieke, Andreas

    2014-01-21

    Unimolecular decay of sample ions imposes a limit on the usable laser fluence in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) ion sources. Traditionally, some modest degree of collisional sample ion cooling has been achieved by connecting MALDI ion sources directly to gas-filled radio frequency (RF) multipoles. It was also discovered in the early 1990s that gas-filled RF multipoles exhibit increased ion transmission efficiency due to collisional ion focusing effects. This unexpected experimental finding was later supported by elementary Monte Carlo simulations. Both experiments and simulations assumed a resting background gas with typical pressures of the order of 1 Pa. However, considerable additional improvements can be achieved if laser desorbed sample ions are introduced immediately after desorption, still within the ion source, in an axisymmetric rarefied supersonic gas jet with peak pressure of the order of 100 Pa and flow velocities >300 m/s, and under weak electric fields. We describe here the design principle and report performance data of an ion source coined "MALDI-2," which incorporates elements of both rarefied aerodynamics and particle optics. Such a design allows superb suppression of metastable fragmentation due to rapid collisional cooling in <10 μs and nearly perfect injection efficiency into the attached RF ion guide, as numerous experiments have confirmed. PMID:25669372

  10. Suppression of unimolecular decay of laser desorbed peptide and protein ions by entrainment in rarefied supersonic gas jets under weak electric fields.

    PubMed

    Hieke, Andreas

    2014-01-21

    Unimolecular decay of sample ions imposes a limit on the usable laser fluence in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) ion sources. Traditionally, some modest degree of collisional sample ion cooling has been achieved by connecting MALDI ion sources directly to gas-filled radio frequency (RF) multipoles. It was also discovered in the early 1990s that gas-filled RF multipoles exhibit increased ion transmission efficiency due to collisional ion focusing effects. This unexpected experimental finding was later supported by elementary Monte Carlo simulations. Both experiments and simulations assumed a resting background gas with typical pressures of the order of 1 Pa. However, considerable additional improvements can be achieved if laser desorbed sample ions are introduced immediately after desorption, still within the ion source, in an axisymmetric rarefied supersonic gas jet with peak pressure of the order of 100 Pa and flow velocities >300 m/s, and under weak electric fields. We describe here the design principle and report performance data of an ion source coined "MALDI-2," which incorporates elements of both rarefied aerodynamics and particle optics. Such a design allows superb suppression of metastable fragmentation due to rapid collisional cooling in <10 μs and nearly perfect injection efficiency into the attached RF ion guide, as numerous experiments have confirmed.

  11. Suppression of unimolecular decay of laser desorbed peptide and protein ions by entrainment in rarefied supersonic gas jets under weak electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Hieke, Andreas

    2014-01-21

    Unimolecular decay of sample ions imposes a limit on the usable laser fluence in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) ion sources. Traditionally, some modest degree of collisional sample ion cooling has been achieved by connecting MALDI ion sources directly to gas-filled radio frequency (RF) multipoles. It was also discovered in the early 1990s that gas-filled RF multipoles exhibit increased ion transmission efficiency due to collisional ion focusing effects. This unexpected experimental finding was later supported by elementary Monte Carlo simulations. Both experiments and simulations assumed a resting background gas with typical pressures of the order of 1 Pa. However, considerable additional improvements can be achieved if laser desorbed sample ions are introduced immediately after desorption, still within the ion source, in an axisymmetric rarefied supersonic gas jet with peak pressure of the order of 100 Pa and flow velocities >300 m/s, and under weak electric fields. We describe here the design principle and report performance data of an ion source coined “MALDI-2,” which incorporates elements of both rarefied aerodynamics and particle optics. Such a design allows superb suppression of metastable fragmentation due to rapid collisional cooling in <10 μs and nearly perfect injection efficiency into the attached RF ion guide, as numerous experiments have confirmed.

  12. Fundamental studies of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization, using time-of-flight mass spectrometry to identify biological molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Eades, D.; Wruck, D.; Gregg, H.

    1996-11-11

    MALDI MS was developed as a way of getting molecular weight information on small quantities (picomole to femtomole levels) of high-mass, thermally labile macromolecules. While most other analytical MS ionization techniques cause fragmentation, decomposition, or multiple charging, MALDI efficiently places intact macromolecules into the gas phase with little fragmentation or rearrangement. This project had 3 objectives: establish the MALDI capability at LLNL, perform fundamental studies of analyte-matrix interactions, and apply the technique for biochemical research. A retired time-of-flight instrument was adapted for MALDI analyses, relevant parameters influencing the MALDI process were identified for further study (matrix molar absorptivity, sample crystal preparation), and collaborations were established with research groups in the Biology and Biotechnology Research Program at LLNL. In MALDI, the macromolecule of interest is mixed with a high-molar excess (1:100 to 1:10,000) of an organic matrix which readily absorbs energy at the wavelength corresponding to a UV laser. Upon laser irradiation, the matrix absorbs the majority of the energy, causing it to desorb from the surface and gently release the macromolecule into the gas phase with little or no fragmentation. Once in the gas phase, ion-molecule reactions between excited matrix and neutral macromolecules generated ionized analyte species which then can be focused into a MS for detection.

  13. 'Escentric' molecules.

    PubMed

    Schön, Geza

    2008-06-01

    Can a fragrance be revolutionary? In this commentary, the creation of two unusual, extravagant fine fragrances, 'escentric01' and 'molecule01', is described. In response to the fantasy components found in release notes of many recent perfume launches, both center around a single real fragrance raw material, the transparent woody aroma chemical 'Iso E Super' (1+2). The perfume 'escentric01' contains 65% of it, accompanied by Trisamber (3), red pepper, lime oil, incense and musks, while 'molecule01' consists exclusively of 'Iso E Super' (1+2). The elegant woody note lives here its own eccentric life--the revolution starts.

  14. Observing single-molecule chemical reactions on metal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emory, Steven R.; Ambrose, W. Patrick; Goodwin, Peter M.; Keller, Richard A.

    2001-06-01

    We report on the study of the photodecomposition of single Rhodamine 6G (R6G) dye molecules adsorbed on silver nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were immobilized and spatially isolated on polylysine-derivatized glass coverslips, and confocal laser microspectroscopy was used to obtain surface-enhanced Raman scatters (SERS) spectra from individual R6G molecules. The photodecomposition of these molecules was observed with 150-ms temporal resolution. The photoproduct was identified as graphitic carbon based on the appearance of bread SERS vibrational bands at 1592 cm-1 and 1340 cm-1 observed in both bulk and averaged single-molecule photoproduct spectra. In contrast, when observed at the single-molecule level, the photoproduct yielded sharp SERS spectra. The inhomogeneous broadening of the bulk SERS spectra is due to a variety of photoproducts in different surface orientations and is a characteristic of ensemble-averaged measurement of disordered systems. These single-molecule studies indicate a photodecomposition pathway by which the R6G molecule desorbs from the metal surface, an excited-state photoreaction occurs, and the R6G photoproduct(s) readsorbs to the surface. A SERS spectrum is obtained when either the intact R6G or the R6G photoproduct(s) are adsorbed on a SERS-active site. This work further illustrates the power of single-molecule spectroscopy (SMS) to reveal unique behaviors of single molecules that are not discernable with bulk measurements.

  15. Observing single molecule chemical reactions on metal nanoparticles.

    SciTech Connect

    Emory, S. R.; Ambrose, W. Patrick; Goodwin, P. M.; Keller, Richard A.

    2001-01-01

    We report the study of the photodecomposition of single Rhodamine 6G (R6G) dye molecules adsorbed on silver nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were immobilized and spatially isolated on polylysine-derivatized glass coverslips, and confocal laser microspectroscopy was used to obtain surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra from individual R6G molecules. The photodecomposition of these molecules was observed with 150-ms temporal resolution. The photoproduct was identified as graphitic carbon based on the appearance of broad SERS vibrational bands at 1592 cm{sup -1} and 1340 cm{sup -1} observed in both bulk and averaged single-molecule photoproduct spectra. In contrast, when observed at the single-molecule level, the photoproduct yielded sharp SERS spectra. The inhomogeneous broadening of the bulk SERS spectra is due to a variety of photoproducts in different surface orientations and is a characteristic of ensemble-averaged measurements of disordered systems. These single-molecule studies indicate a photodecomposition pathway by which the R6G molecule desorbs from the metal surface, an excited-state photoreaction occurs, and the R6G photoproduct(s) readsorbs to the surface. A SERS spectrum is obtained when either the intact R6G or the R6G photoproduct(s) are adsorbed on a SERS-active site. This work further illustrates the power of single-molecule spectroscopy (SMS) to reveal unique behaviors of single molecules that are not discernable with bulk measurements.

  16. Midplane Neutral Density Profiles in NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stotler, D. P.; Scotti, F.; Bell, R. E.; Leblanc, B. P.; Raman, R.

    2013-10-01

    The experimental determination of neutral densities in tokamak plasmas from line radiation is only accurate in the narrow region in which both the excitation rate and neutral density are significant; elsewhere the result is dominated by noise. We propose an alternative, simulation based inversion procedure utilizing tools developed in the validation of the DEGAS 2 Monte Carlo neutral transport code against Gas Puff Imaging camera data. Here, the Balmer- β emission rate recorded by an absolutely calibrated tangentially viewing camera is used to quantify a simulated, ad hoc neutral gas source at the vacuum vessel wall. This procedure yields absolute radial profiles of deuterium atoms and molecules at midplane. The validity of this characterization of the gas source is confirmed by the similarity of the shapes of the simulated and observed light emission profiles. We also compare the resulting neutral pressures at the vessel walls with data from midplane micro-ion gauges. This work supported by US DOE contracts DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  17. Tautomerism in neutral histidine.

    PubMed

    Bermúdez, Celina; Mata, Santiago; Cabezas, Carlos; Alonso, José L

    2014-10-01

    Histidine is an important natural amino acid, involved in many relevant biological processes, which, because of its physical properties, proved difficult to characterize experimentally in its neutral form. In this work, neutral histidine has been generated in the gas phase by laser ablation of solid samples and its N(ε)H tautomeric form unraveled through its rotational spectrum. The quadrupole hyperfine structure, arising from the existing three (14)N nuclei, constituted a site-specifically probe for revealing the tautomeric form as well as the side chain configuration of this proteogenic amino acid.

  18. High-energy collision-induced dissociation of [M+Na]+ ions desorbed by fast atom bombardment of ceramides isolated from the starfish Distolasterias nipon.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Ji Sun; Park, Taeseong; Bang, Geul; Lee, Chulhyun; Rho, Jung-Rae; Kim, Young Hwan

    2013-02-01

    Ten ceramides and four cerebrosides were extracted from the starfish Distolasterias nipon by solvent extraction, silica gel column chromatography and reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Structural identification was conducted using tandem mass spectrometry of monosodiated ions desorbed by fast atom bombardment. The complete structures of four cerebrosides were determined by a previously reported method. The high-energy collision-induced dissociation (CID) spectral characteristics of ceramides with various structures depend on the number and positions of double bonds on both the N-acyl and sphingoid chains, the presence of a hydroxyl group or a double bond at the C-4 position of the sphingoid chain and the presence of an α-hydroxy group on the N-acyl chain. The high-energy CID of the monosodiated ion, [M+Na](+), of each ceramide molecular species generated abundant ions, providing information on the composition of the fatty acyl chains and sphingoid long-chain bases. Each homologous ion series along the fatty acyl group and aliphatic chain of the sphingoid base was used for locating the double-bond positions of both chains and hydroxyl groups on the sphingoid base chain. The double-bond positions were also confirmed by the m/z values of abundant allylic even- and odd-electron ions, and the intensity ratio of the T ion peak relative to the O ion peak. This technique could determine the complete structures of ceramides and cerebrosides in an extract mixture and has great potential for determining other sphingolipids isolated from various biological sources.

  19. A superconducting NbN detector for neutral nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marksteiner, Markus; Divochiy, Alexander; Sclafani, Michele; Haslinger, Philipp; Ulbricht, Hendrik; Korneev, Alexander; Semenov, Alexander; Gol'tsman, Gregory; Arndt, Markus

    2009-11-01

    We present a proof-of-principle study of superconducting single photon detectors (SSPD) for the detection of individual neutral molecules/nanoparticles at low energies. The new detector is applied to characterize a laser desorption source for biomolecules and allows retrieval of the arrival time distribution of a pulsed molecular beam containing the amino acid tryptophan, the polypeptide gramicidin as well as insulin, myoglobin and hemoglobin. We discuss the experimental evidence that the detector is actually sensitive to isolated neutral particles.

  20. CO2-Neutral Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goede, Adelbert; van de Sanden, Richard

    2016-06-01

    Mimicking the biogeochemical cycle of System Earth, synthetic hydrocarbon fuels are produced from recycled CO2 and H2O powered by renewable energy. Recapturing CO2 after use closes the carbon cycle, rendering the fuel cycle CO2 neutral. Non-equilibrium molecular CO2 vibrations are key to high energy efficiency.

  1. Bleach Neutralizes Mold Allergens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Researchers at National Jewish Medical and Research Center have demonstrated that dilute bleach not only kills common household mold, but may also neutralize the mold allergens that cause most mold-related health complaints. The study, published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, is the first to test the effect on allergic…

  2. Walking molecules.

    PubMed

    von Delius, Max; Leigh, David A

    2011-07-01

    Movement is intrinsic to life. Biologists have established that most forms of directed nanoscopic, microscopic and, ultimately, macroscopic movements are powered by molecular motors from the dynein, myosin and kinesin superfamilies. These motor proteins literally walk, step by step, along polymeric filaments, carrying out essential tasks such as organelle transport. In the last few years biological molecular walkers have inspired the development of artificial systems that mimic aspects of their dynamics. Several DNA-based molecular walkers have been synthesised and shown to walk directionally along a track upon sequential addition of appropriate chemical fuels. In other studies, autonomous operation--i.e. DNA-walker migration that continues as long as a complex DNA fuel is present--has been demonstrated and sophisticated tasks performed, such as moving gold nanoparticles from place-to-place and assistance in sequential chemical synthesis. Small-molecule systems, an order of magnitude smaller in each dimension and 1000× smaller in molecular weight than biological motor proteins or the walker systems constructed from DNA, have also been designed and operated such that molecular fragments can be progressively transported directionally along short molecular tracks. The small-molecule systems can be powered by light or chemical fuels. In this critical review the biological motor proteins from the kinesin, myosin and dynein families are analysed as systems from which the designers of synthetic systems can learn, ratchet concepts for transporting Brownian substrates are discussed as the mechanisms by which molecular motors need to operate, and the progress made with synthetic DNA and small-molecule walker systems reviewed (142 references). PMID:21416072

  3. Electronic Structure of Small Lanthanide Containing Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafader, Jared O.; Ray, Manisha; Topolski, Josey E.; Chick Jarrold, Caroline

    2016-06-01

    Lanthanide-based materials have unusual electronic properties because of the high number of electronic degrees of freedom arising from partial occupation of 4f orbitals, which make these materials optimal for their utilization in many applications including electronics and catalysis. Electronic spectroscopy of small lanthanide molecules helps us understand the role of these 4f electrons, which are generally considered core-like because of orbital contraction, but are energetically similar to valence electrons. The spectroscopy of small lanthanide-containing molecules is relatively unexplored and to broaden this understanding we have completed the characterization of small cerium, praseodymium, and europium molecules using photoelectron spectroscopy coupled with DFT calculations. The characterization of PrO, EuH, EuO/EuOH, and CexOy molecules have allowed for the determination of their electron affinity, the assignment of numerous anion to neutral state transitions, modeling of anion/neutral structures and electron orbital occupation.

  4. Between detection and neutralization.

    SciTech Connect

    Snell, Mark Kamerer; Green, Mary Wilson; Adams, Douglas Glenn; Pritchard, Daniel Allison

    2005-08-01

    Security system analytical performance analysis is generally based on the probability of system effectiveness. The probability of effectiveness is a function of the probabilities of interruption and neutralization. Interruption occurs if the response forces are notified in sufficient time to engage the adversary. Neutralization occurs if the adversary attack is defeated after the security forces have actively engaged the adversary. Both depend upon communications of data. This paper explores details of embedded communications functions that are often assumed to be inconsequential. It is the intent of the authors to bring focus to an issue in security system modeling that, if not well understood, has the potential to be a deciding factor in the overall system failure or effectiveness.

  5. Neutral particle beam intensity controller

    DOEpatents

    Dagenhart, William K.

    1986-01-01

    A neutral beam intensity controller is provided for a neutral beam generator in which a neutral beam is established by accelerating ions from an ion source into a gas neutralizer. An amplitude modulated, rotating magnetic field is applied to the accelerated ion beam in the gas neutralizer to defocus the resultant neutral beam in a controlled manner to achieve intensity control of the neutral beam along the beam axis at constant beam energy. The rotating magnetic field alters the orbits of ions in the gas neutralizer before they are neutralized, thereby controlling the fraction of neutral particles transmitted out of the neutralizer along the central beam axis to a fusion device or the like. The altered path or defocused neutral particles are sprayed onto an actively cooled beam dump disposed perpendicular to the neutral beam axis and having a central open for passage of the focused beam at the central axis of the beamline. Virtually zero therough 100% intensity control is achieved by varying the magnetic field strength without altering the ion source beam intensity or its species yield.

  6. Antihypertensive neutral lipid

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, F.L.; Blank, M.L.

    1984-10-26

    The invention relates to the discovery of a class of neutral acetylated either-linked glycerolipids having the capacity to lower blood presure in warm-blooded animals. This physiological effect is structure sensitive requiring a long chain alkyl group at the sn-1 position and a short carbon chain acyl group (acetyl or propionyl) at the sn-2 position, and a hydroxyl group at the sn-3 position.

  7. Antihypertensive neutral lipid

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, Fred L.; Blank, Merle L.

    1986-01-01

    The invention relates to the discovery of a class of neutral acetylated ether-linked glycerolipids having the capacity to lower blood pressure in warm-blooded animals. This physiological effect is structure sensitive requiring a long chain alkyl group at the sn-1 position and a short carbon chain acyl group (acetyl or propionyl) at the sn-2 position, and a hydroxyl group at the sn-3 position.

  8. Neutral atom traps.

    SciTech Connect

    Pack, Michael Vern

    2008-12-01

    This report describes progress in designing a neutral atom trap capable of trapping sub millikelvin atom in a magnetic trap and shuttling the atoms across the atom chip from a collection area to an optical cavity. The numerical simulation and atom chip design are discussed. Also, discussed are preliminary calculations of quantum noise sources in Kerr nonlinear optics measurements based on electromagnetically induced transparency. These types of measurements may be important for quantum nondemolition measurements at the few photon limit.

  9. Exercise Equipment: Neutral Buoyancy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shackelford, Linda; Valle, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Load Bearing Equipment for Neutral Buoyancy (LBE-NB) is an exercise frame that holds two exercising subjects in position as they apply counter forces to each other for lower extremity and spine loading resistance exercises. Resistance exercise prevents bone loss on ISS, but the ISS equipment is too massive for use in exploration craft. Integrating the human into the load directing, load generating, and motion control functions of the exercise equipment generates safe exercise loads with less equipment mass and volume.

  10. Neutral Buoyancy Simulator Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    A diver tests a secondary camera and maneuvering platform in Marshall's Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS).The secondary camera will be beneficial for recording repairs and other extra vehicular activities (EVA) the astronuats will perform while making repairs on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The maneuvering platform was developed to give the astronauts something to stand on while performing maintenance tasks. These platforms were developed to be mobile so that the astronauts could move them to accommadate different sites.

  11. Neutral cloud and heavy ion inner torus at Saturn

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.E.; Pospieszalska, M.K.; Sittler, E.C. Jr.; Cheng, A.F.; Lanzerotti, L.J.

    1989-02-01

    Voyager plasma data are used in conjunction with laboratory data on water molecule sputter-yields and energy distributions to calculate the morphology of the Saturn neutral water molecule and dissociated water molecule-product torus coexisting with the E-ring and icy satellites of this planet. Plasma production rates determined for this cloud exhibit a structure with distance from Saturn as well as from the orbit plane; this suggests a lack of equilibrium for the heavy ion plasma at less than 7 planet radii. Attention is given to the possibility that the Saturn E-ring may be a precipitate of the neutral cloud that is initiated by low-energy ion-molecule reactions. 61 references.

  12. Neutral particle beam intensity controller

    DOEpatents

    Dagenhart, W.K.

    1984-05-29

    The neutral beam intensity controller is based on selected magnetic defocusing of the ion beam prior to neutralization. The defocused portion of the beam is dumped onto a beam dump disposed perpendicular to the beam axis. Selective defocusing is accomplished by means of a magnetic field generator disposed about the neutralizer so that the field is transverse to the beam axis. The magnetic field intensity is varied to provide the selected partial beam defocusing of the ions prior to neutralization. The desired focused neutral beam portion passes along the beam path through a defining aperture in the beam dump, thereby controlling the desired fraction of neutral particles transmitted to a utilization device without altering the kinetic energy level of the desired neutral particle fraction. By proper selection of the magnetic field intensity, virtually zero through 100% intensity control of the neutral beam is achieved.

  13. The Origin of Complex Organic Molecules in Prestellar Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vastel, C.; Ceccarelli, C.; Lefloch, B.; Bachiller, R.

    2014-11-01

    Complex organic molecules (COMs) have been detected in a variety of environments including cold prestellar cores. Given the low temperatures of these objects, these detections challenge existing models. We report here new observations toward the prestellar core L1544. They are based on an unbiased spectral survey of the 3 mm band at the IRAM 30 m telescope as part of the Large Program ASAI. The observations allow us to provide a full census of the oxygen-bearing COMs in this source. We detected tricarbon monoxide, methanol, acetaldehyde, formic acid, ketene, and propyne with abundances varying from 5 × 10-11 to 6 × 10-9. The non-LTE analysis of the methanol lines shows that they are likely emitted at the border of the core at a radius of ~8000 AU, where T ~ 10 K and n H_2 ~2 × 104 cm-3. Previous works have shown that water vapor is enhanced in the same region because of the photodesorption of water ices. We propose that a non-thermal desorption mechanism is also responsible for the observed emission of methanol and COMs from the same layer. The desorbed oxygen and a small amount of desorbed methanol and ethene are enough to reproduce the abundances of tricarbon monoxide, methanol, acetaldehyde, and ketene measured in L1544. These new findings open the possibility that COMs in prestellar cores originate in a similar outer layer rather than in the dense inner cores, as previously assumed, and that their formation is driven by the non-thermally desorbed species.

  14. THE ORIGIN OF COMPLEX ORGANIC MOLECULES IN PRESTELLAR CORES

    SciTech Connect

    Vastel, C.; Ceccarelli, C.; Lefloch, B.; Bachiller, R.

    2014-11-01

    Complex organic molecules (COMs) have been detected in a variety of environments including cold prestellar cores. Given the low temperatures of these objects, these detections challenge existing models. We report here new observations toward the prestellar core L1544. They are based on an unbiased spectral survey of the 3 mm band at the IRAM 30 m telescope as part of the Large Program ASAI. The observations allow us to provide a full census of the oxygen-bearing COMs in this source. We detected tricarbon monoxide, methanol, acetaldehyde, formic acid, ketene, and propyne with abundances varying from 5 × 10{sup –11} to 6 × 10{sup –9}. The non-LTE analysis of the methanol lines shows that they are likely emitted at the border of the core at a radius of ∼8000 AU, where T ∼ 10 K and n {sub H{sub 2}} ∼2 × 10{sup 4} cm{sup –3}. Previous works have shown that water vapor is enhanced in the same region because of the photodesorption of water ices. We propose that a non-thermal desorption mechanism is also responsible for the observed emission of methanol and COMs from the same layer. The desorbed oxygen and a small amount of desorbed methanol and ethene are enough to reproduce the abundances of tricarbon monoxide, methanol, acetaldehyde, and ketene measured in L1544. These new findings open the possibility that COMs in prestellar cores originate in a similar outer layer rather than in the dense inner cores, as previously assumed, and that their formation is driven by the non-thermally desorbed species.

  15. Neutrality between Government and Religion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mawdsley, Ralph D.

    1996-01-01

    The overall guiding principle of neutrality between government and religion masks a tension that exists between free exercise of religion and establishment of religion. Reviews the development and current status of "Lemon" as a test for neutrality; proposes a new test for neutrality, evenhandedness, that is common to both the Free Exercise and…

  16. Self-Entanglement and the Dissociation of Homonuclear Diatomic Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Gonis, Antonios; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Nicholson, Don M; Stocks, George Malcolm

    2014-01-01

    The concept of self-entanglement is introduced to describe a mixed state or ensemble density as a pure state in an augmented Hilbert space formed by the products of the individual states forming a mixed state (or ensemble). We use this representation of mixed states to show that upon dissociation a neutral homonuclear diatomic molecule will separate into two neutral atoms.

  17. Pedestal Fueling Simulations with a Coupled Kinetic-kinetic Plasma-neutral Transport Code

    SciTech Connect

    D.P. Stotler, C.S. Chang, S.H. Ku, J. Lang and G.Y. Park

    2012-08-29

    A Monte Carlo neutral transport routine, based on DEGAS2, has been coupled to the guiding center ion-electron-neutral neoclassical PIC code XGC0 to provide a realistic treatment of neutral atoms and molecules in the tokamak edge plasma. The DEGAS2 routine allows detailed atomic physics and plasma-material interaction processes to be incorporated into these simulations. The spatial pro le of the neutral particle source used in the DEGAS2 routine is determined from the uxes of XGC0 ions to the material surfaces. The kinetic-kinetic plasma-neutral transport capability is demonstrated with example pedestal fueling simulations.

  18. Energy Conservation Tests of a Coupled Kinetic-kinetic Plasma-neutral Transport Code

    SciTech Connect

    Stotler, D. P.; Chang, C. S.; Ku, S. H.; Lang, J.; Park, G.

    2012-08-29

    A Monte Carlo neutral transport routine, based on DEGAS2, has been coupled to the guiding center ion-electron-neutral neoclassical PIC code XGC0 to provide a realistic treatment of neutral atoms and molecules in the tokamak edge plasma. The DEGAS2 routine allows detailed atomic physics and plasma-material interaction processes to be incorporated into these simulations. The spatial pro le of the neutral particle source used in the DEGAS2 routine is determined from the uxes of XGC0 ions to the material surfaces. The kinetic-kinetic plasma-neutral transport capability is demonstrated with example pedestal fueling simulations.

  19. Pulsed field sample neutralization

    DOEpatents

    Appelhans, Anthony D.; Dahl, David A.; Delmore, James E.

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus and method for alternating voltage and for varying the rate of extraction during the extraction of secondary particles, resulting in periods when either positive ions, or negative ions and electrons are extracted at varying rates. Using voltage with alternating charge during successive periods to extract particles from materials which accumulate charge opposite that being extracted causes accumulation of surface charge of opposite sign. Charge accumulation can then be adjusted to a ratio which maintains a balance of positive and negative charge emission, thus maintaining the charge neutrality of the sample.

  20. Solar Wind - Mars Interactions: Energetic Neutral Atom Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, Erena; Yau, Andrew; Brackbill, Jerry

    2012-10-01

    We study the energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) that are formed by charge exchange between solar wind ions and neutral particles in the Martian atmosphere. Mars Global Surveyor has shown that Mars has no notable global intrinsic magnetic field. Consequently, the neutral particles in the Martian atmosphere are unshielded from the flow of energetic solar wind protons. There results extensive production of energetic neutral hydrogen atoms (H-ENAs). In our study, we use a 3D hybrid (kinetic ions, fluid electrons), quasi-neutral, particle-in-cell (PIC) plasma simulation to investigate the production of H-ENAs due to collisions with neutral oxygen (O, O) and nitrogen (N) molecules in the near-space environment of Mars. A detailed chemical model that comprises multi-species reactions, such as ionization by photons, electron recombination, particle collisions, and charge exchange, is self-consistently included in the simulation. These chemical interactions, which take place between ions, atoms, and molecules in the martian exosphere and ionosphere, control the production of the H-ENAs. What is presented is a ``work in progress'' highlighting the ionospheric chemical and physical model as we work towards our goal of computing the flux of escaping H-ENAs due to charge exchange.

  1. An ultrasensitive universal detector based on neutralizer displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Jagotamoy; Cederquist, Kristin B.; Zaragoza, Alexandre A.; Lee, Paul E.; Sargent, Edward H.; Kelley, Shana O.

    2012-08-01

    Diagnostic technologies that can provide the simultaneous detection of nucleic acids for gene expression, proteins for host response and small molecules for profiling the human metabolome will have a significant advantage in providing comprehensive patient monitoring. Molecular sensors that report changes in the electrostatics of a sensor's surface on analyte binding have shown unprecedented sensitivity in the detection of charged biomolecules, but do not lend themselves to the detection of small molecules, which do not carry significant charge. Here, we introduce the neutralizer displacement assay that allows charge-based sensing to be applied to any class of molecule irrespective of the analyte charge. The neutralizer displacement assay starts with an aptamer probe bound to a neutralizer. When analyte binding occurs the neutralizer is displaced, which results in a dramatic change in the surface charge for all types of analytes. We have tested the sensitivity, speed and specificity of this system in the detection of a panel of molecules: (deoxy)ribonucleic acid, ribonucleic acid, cocaine, adenosine triphosphate and thrombin.

  2. Alkali metal ion storage properties of sulphur and phosphorous molecules encapsulated in nanometer size carbon cylindrical pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Yosuke; Sakamoto, Yuki; Song, Hayong; Tashiro, Kosuke; Nishiwaki, Yoshiki; Al-zubaidi, Ayar; Kawasaki, Shinji

    2016-03-01

    We investigated the physical and chemical stabilities of sulfur and phosphorus molecules encapsulated in a mesoporous carbon (MPC) and two kinds of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) having different cylindrical pore diameters. The sublimation temperatures of sulfur molecules encapsulated in MPC and the two kinds of SWCNTs were measured by thermo-gravimetric measurements. It was found that the sublimation temperature of sulfur molecules encapsulated in SWCNTs having mean tube diameter of 1.5 nm is much higher than any other molecules encapsulated in larger pores. It was also found that the capacity fading of lithium-sulfur battery can be diminished by encapsulation of sulfur molecules in SWCNTs. We also investigated the electrochemical properties of phosphorus molecules encapsulated in SWCNTs (P@SWCNTs). It was shown that P@SWCNT can adsorb and desorb both Li and Na ions reversibly.

  3. Antihypertensive neutral lipid

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, F.L.; Blank, M.L.

    1986-06-17

    A method is described for treating a warm-blooded animal comprising administering to the animal a neutral glycerolipid with a 12 to 20 carbon alkyl group at the sn-1 position, a short carbon chain acyl group at the sn-2 position and a hydroxyl group at the sn-3 position in an amount sufficient to lower the arterial blood pressure of the animal. A method is also described for treating a warm-blooded animal comprising administering a composition consisting essentially of a 1-alkyl-2-acetyl (or propionyl)-sn glycerol in combination with a 1-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, wherein the 1-alkyl groups contain 12 to 20 carbon atoms, dissolved in an inert pharmaceutically acceptable solvent in amounts sufficient to lower the arterial blood pressure of the animal.

  4. Transient ion neutralization by electrons.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhelm, H. E.

    1973-01-01

    The nonlinear initial-boundary-value problems describing the lateral neutralization of ion beams for the cases that (1) an auxiliary electric field accelerates the electrons into the ion space, and (2) the electrons are injected into the ion space at a prescribed current density are treated. Analytical solutions are derived which give the position and speed of the neutralization front as a function of time, and the temporal development of the electron density, velocity, and electric fields during the neutralization process.

  5. Chemistry of carotenoid neutral radicals.

    PubMed

    Ligia Focsan, A; Magyar, Adam; Kispert, Lowell D

    2015-04-15

    Proton loss from the carotenoid radical cations (Car(+)) to form neutral radicals (#Car) was investigated by numerous electrochemical, EPR, ENDOR and DFT studies described herein. The radical cation and neutral radicals were formed in solution electrochemically and stabilized on solid silica-alumina and MCM-41 matrices. Carotenoid neutral radicals were recently identified in Arabidopsis thaliana plant and photosystem II samples. Deprotonation at the terminal ends of a zeaxanthin radical cation could provide a secondary photoprotection pathway which involves quenching excited state chlorophyll by the long-lived zeaxanthin neutral radicals formed. PMID:25687648

  6. Constraining the Europa Neutral Torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Howard T.; Mitchell, Donald; mauk, Barry; Johnson, Robert E.; clark, george

    2016-10-01

    "Neutral tori" consist of neutral particles that usually co-orbit along with their source forming a toroidal (or partial toroidal) feature around the planet. The distribution and composition of these features can often provide important, if not unique, insight into magnetospheric particles sources, mechanisms and dynamics. However, these features can often be difficult to directly detect. One innovative method for detecting neutral tori is by observing Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENAs) that are generally considered produced as a result of charge exchange interactions between charged and neutral particles.Mauk et al. (2003) reported the detection of a Europa neutral particle torus using ENA observations. The presence of a Europa torus has extremely large implications for upcoming missions to Jupiter as well as understanding possible activity at this moon and providing critical insight into what lies beneath the surface of this icy ocean world. However, ENAs can also be produced as a result of charge exchange interactions between two ionized particles and in that case cannot be used to infer the presence of neutral particle population. Thus, a detailed examination of all possible source interactions must be considered before one can confirm that likely original source population of these ENA images is actually a Europa neutral particle torus. For this talk, we examine the viability that the Mauk et al. (2003) observations were actually generated from a neutral torus emanating from Europa as opposed to charge particle interactions with plasma originating from Io. These results help constrain such a torus as well as Europa source processes.

  7. A proposed neutral line signature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doxas, I.; Speiser, T. W.; Dusenbery, P. B.; Horton, W.

    1992-01-01

    An identifying signature is proposed for the existence and location of the neutral line in the magnetotail. The signature, abrupt density, and temperature changes in the Earthtail direction, was first discovered in test particle simulations. Such temperature variations have been observed in ISEE data (Huang et. al. 1992), but their connection to the possible existence of a neutral line in the tail has not yet been established. The proposed signature develops earlier than the ion velocity space ridge of Martin and Speiser (1988), but can only be seen by spacecraft in the vicinity of the neutral line, while the latter can locate a neutral line remotely.

  8. Interference-effects in the laser-induced desorption of small molecules from surfaces: a model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiel, S.; Klüner, T.; Freund, H.-J.

    1998-09-01

    A diabatic treatment of laser-induced desorption of small molecules from surfaces is considered to be an essential step of the theoretical quantum mechanical simulation of a DIET process on an ab initio basis. The consequences of this treatment are investigated especially with respect to the resulting velocity distributions of the desorbing species. The distributions of NO desorbing from nickel oxide surfaces are characterised by a bimodal structure. In our calculations the diabatic coupling between several investigated two-state systems is introduced via the off-diagonal elements of the Hamiltonian, which determines the time evolution of the quantum system. This procedure is the basis for a discussion of the experimentally observed features in the velocity distributions in terms of a coherent diabatic picture.

  9. NEUTRAL-BEAM INJECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Kunkel, W.B.

    1980-06-01

    The emphasis in the preceding chapters has been on magnetic confinement of high temperature plasmas. The question of production and heating of such plasmas has been dealt with relatively more briefly. It should not be inferred, however, that these matters must therefore be either trivial or unimportant. A review of the history reveals that in the early days all these aspects of the controlled fusion problem were considered to be on a par, and were tackled simultaneously and with equal vigor. Only the confinement problem turned out to be much more complex than initially anticipated, and richer in challenge to the plasma physicist than the questions of plasma production and heating. On the other hand, the properties of high-temperature plasmas and plasma confinement can only be studied experimentally after the problems of production and of heating to adequate temperatures are solved. It is the purpose of this and the next chapter to supplement the preceding discussions with more detail on two important subjects: neutral-beam injection and radio-frequency heating. These are the major contenders for heating in present and future tokamak and mirror fusion experiments, and even in several proposed reactors. For neutral beams we emphasize here the technology involved, which has undergone a rather remarkable development. The physics of particle and energy deposition in the plasma, and the discussion of the resulting effects on the confined plasma, have been included in previous chapters, and some experimental results are quoted there. Other heating processes of relevance to fusion are mentioned elsewhere in this book, in connection with the experiments where they are used: i.e. ohmic heating, adiabatic compression heating, and alpha-particle heating in Chapter 3 by H.P. Furth; more ohmic heating in Chapter 7, and shock-implosion heating, laser heating, and relativistic-electron beam heating in Chapter 8, both by W. E. Quinn. These methods are relatively straightforward in

  10. CO2-neutral fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goede, A. P. H.

    2015-08-01

    The need for storage of renewable energy (RE) generated by photovoltaic, concentrated solar and wind arises from the fact that supply and demand are ill-matched both geographically and temporarily. This already causes problems of overcapacity and grid congestion in countries where the fraction of RE exceeds the 20% level. A system approach is needed, which focusses not only on the energy source, but includes conversion, storage, transport, distribution, use and, last but not least, the recycling of waste. Furthermore, there is a need for more flexibility in the energy system, rather than relying on electrification, integration with other energy systems, for example the gas network, would yield a system less vulnerable to failure and better adapted to requirements. For example, long-term large-scale storage of electrical energy is limited by capacity, yet needed to cover weekly to seasonal demand. This limitation can be overcome by coupling the electricity net to the gas system, considering the fact that the Dutch gas network alone has a storage capacity of 552 TWh, sufficient to cover the entire EU energy demand for over a month. This lecture explores energy storage in chemicals bonds. The focus is on chemicals other than hydrogen, taking advantage of the higher volumetric energy density of hydrocarbons, in this case methane, which has an approximate 3.5 times higher volumetric energy density. More importantly, it allows the ready use of existing gas infrastructure for energy storage, transport and distribution. Intermittent wind electricity generated is converted into synthetic methane, the Power to Gas (P2G) scheme, by splitting feedstock CO2 and H2O into synthesis gas, a mixture of CO and H2. Syngas plays a central role in the synthesis of a range of hydrocarbon products, including methane, diesel and dimethyl ether. The splitting is accomplished by innovative means; plasmolysis and high-temperature solid oxygen electrolysis. A CO2-neutral fuel cycle is

  11. Laboratory studies of astrophysical molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haiyan

    There is growing evidence that the molecules necessary for the evolution of life on earth arrived from the interstellar medium. The study of these molecules is therefore of great current interest. Two major types of signals from interstellar space, so-called unidentified interstellar infrared emission bands and the diffuse interstellar absorption bands, have intrigued and puzzled astrochemists for decades. This work has been concentrated on how to contribute to an understanding of the origins of these perplexing signals from space and help identify other molecules that may exist in outer space. Matrix isolation spectroscopy (infrared and ultraviolet-visible) combined with theoretical calculations has been employed throughout this research. Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopic measurements, aided by theoretical calculations and 13 C-isotope shifts, have led to the identification of eight heretofore unknown C n S m clusters: C 2 S, C 6 S, C 7 S, C 7 S 2 , C 9 S 2 , C 11 S 2 , C 13 S 2 , and C 15 S 2 . Infrared absorption studies of xenon polycarbon clusters aid in understanding the special electronic structure and reactivity of carbon clusters, which might be associated with the formation mechanism of Buckyball (C 60 ). Reaction of C3 with benzene and ammonia might be involved in the formation of more complex molecular structures, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and biomolecules such as the amino acids. High resolution vibrational and electronic spectra of neutral dibenzo [b,def]chrysene and its ions in 12 K argon matrices have been recorded. Spectral assignments were supported by high level theoretical calculations. A mixture of the neutral and ionic infrared spectra of dibenzo[b,def]chrysene resembles the unidentified IR bands in the reflection nebula NGC 7023. Anharmonic frequency calculations for neutral and cationic naphthalene, phenanthrene and anthracene using density functional theory have been carried out for the first time

  12. Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    This is a cutaway illustration of the Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC ). The MSFC NBS provided an excellent environment for testing hardware to examine how it would operate in space and for evaluating techniques for space construction and spacecraft servicing. Here, engineers, designers, and astronauts performed various tests to develop basic concepts, preliminary designs, final designs, and crew procedures. The NBS was constructed of welded steel with polyester-resin coating. The water tank was 75-feet (22.9- meters) in diameter, 40-feet (12.2-meters) deep, and held 1.32 million gallons of water. Since it opened for operation in 1968, the NBS had supported a number of successful space missions, such as the Skylab, Solar Maximum Mission Satellite, Marned Maneuvering Unit, Experimental Assembly of Structures in Extravehicular Activity/Assembly Concept for Construction of Erectable Space Structures (EASE/ACCESS), the Hubble Space Telescope, and the Space Station. The function of the MSFC NBS was moved to the larger simulator at the Johnson Space Center and is no longer operational.

  13. Light desorption from an yttrium neutralizer for Rb and Fr magneto-optical trap loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppolaro, V.; Papi, N.; Khanbekyan, A.; Marinelli, C.; Mariotti, E.; Marmugi, L.; Moi, L.; Corradi, L.; Dainelli, A.; Arikawa, H.; Ishikawa, T.; Sakemi, Y.; Calabrese, R.; Mazzocca, G.; Tomassetti, L.; Ricci, L.

    2014-10-01

    We present here the first evidence of photodesorption induced by low-intensity non-resonant light from an yttrium thin foil, which works as a neutralizer for Rb and Fr ions beam. Neutral atoms are suddenly ejected from the metal surface in a pulsed regime upon illumination with a broadband flash light and then released in the free volume of a pyrex cells. Here atoms are captured by a Magneto-Optical Trap (MOT), which is effectively loaded by the photodesorption. Loading times of the order of the flash rise time are measured. Desorption is also obtained in the continuous regime, by exploiting CW visible illumination of the metallic neutralizer surface. We demonstrate that at lower CW light intensities vacuum conditions are not perturbed by the photodesorption and hence the MOT dynamics remains unaffected, while the trap population increases thanks to the incoming desorbed atoms flux. Even with the Y foil at room temperature and hence with no trapped atoms, upon visible illumination, the number of trapped atoms reaches 105. The experimental data are then analyzed by means of an analytical rate equation model, which allows the analysis of this phenomenon and its dynamics and allows the determination of critical experimental parameters and the test of the procedure in the framework of radioactive Francium trapping. In this view, together with an extensive investigation of the phenomenon with 85Rb, the first demonstration of the photodesorption-aided loading of a 210Fr MOT is shown.

  14. Light desorption from an yttrium neutralizer for Rb and Fr magneto-optical trap loading.

    PubMed

    Coppolaro, V; Papi, N; Khanbekyan, A; Marinelli, C; Mariotti, E; Marmugi, L; Moi, L; Corradi, L; Dainelli, A; Arikawa, H; Ishikawa, T; Sakemi, Y; Calabrese, R; Mazzocca, G; Tomassetti, L; Ricci, L

    2014-10-01

    We present here the first evidence of photodesorption induced by low-intensity non-resonant light from an yttrium thin foil, which works as a neutralizer for Rb and Fr ions beam. Neutral atoms are suddenly ejected from the metal surface in a pulsed regime upon illumination with a broadband flash light and then released in the free volume of a pyrex cells. Here atoms are captured by a Magneto-Optical Trap (MOT), which is effectively loaded by the photodesorption. Loading times of the order of the flash rise time are measured. Desorption is also obtained in the continuous regime, by exploiting CW visible illumination of the metallic neutralizer surface. We demonstrate that at lower CW light intensities vacuum conditions are not perturbed by the photodesorption and hence the MOT dynamics remains unaffected, while the trap population increases thanks to the incoming desorbed atoms flux. Even with the Y foil at room temperature and hence with no trapped atoms, upon visible illumination, the number of trapped atoms reaches 10(5). The experimental data are then analyzed by means of an analytical rate equation model, which allows the analysis of this phenomenon and its dynamics and allows the determination of critical experimental parameters and the test of the procedure in the framework of radioactive Francium trapping. In this view, together with an extensive investigation of the phenomenon with (85)Rb, the first demonstration of the photodesorption-aided loading of a (210)Fr MOT is shown. PMID:25296799

  15. Light desorption from an yttrium neutralizer for Rb and Fr magneto-optical trap loading

    SciTech Connect

    Coppolaro, V.; Papi, N.; Khanbekyan, A.; Marinelli, C.; Mariotti, E. Marmugi, L.; Moi, L.; Corradi, L.; Dainelli, A.; Arikawa, H.; Ishikawa, T.; Sakemi, Y.; Calabrese, R.; Mazzocca, G.; Tomassetti, L.; Ricci, L.

    2014-10-07

    We present here the first evidence of photodesorption induced by low-intensity non-resonant light from an yttrium thin foil, which works as a neutralizer for Rb and Fr ions beam. Neutral atoms are suddenly ejected from the metal surface in a pulsed regime upon illumination with a broadband flash light and then released in the free volume of a pyrex cells. Here atoms are captured by a Magneto-Optical Trap (MOT), which is effectively loaded by the photodesorption. Loading times of the order of the flash rise time are measured. Desorption is also obtained in the continuous regime, by exploiting CW visible illumination of the metallic neutralizer surface. We demonstrate that at lower CW light intensities vacuum conditions are not perturbed by the photodesorption and hence the MOT dynamics remains unaffected, while the trap population increases thanks to the incoming desorbed atoms flux. Even with the Y foil at room temperature and hence with no trapped atoms, upon visible illumination, the number of trapped atoms reaches 10{sup 5}. The experimental data are then analyzed by means of an analytical rate equation model, which allows the analysis of this phenomenon and its dynamics and allows the determination of critical experimental parameters and the test of the procedure in the framework of radioactive Francium trapping. In this view, together with an extensive investigation of the phenomenon with {sup 85}Rb, the first demonstration of the photodesorption-aided loading of a {sup 210}Fr MOT is shown.

  16. Neutralization tests on the SERT 2 spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerslake, W. R.; Domitz, S.

    1979-01-01

    Neutralization test data obtained on the SERT 2 spacecraft are presented. Tests included ion beam neutralization of a thruster by a close (normal design) neutralizer as well as by a distant (1 meter) neutralizer. Parameters affecting neutralization, such as neutralizer bias voltage, neutralizer anode voltage, local spacecraft plasma density, and solar array voltage configuration were varied and changes in plasma potentials were measured. A plasma model is presented as an approximation of observed results.

  17. Neutral point detection by satellites. [magnetospheric neutral sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schindler, K.; Ness, N. F.

    1974-01-01

    The concept of a neutral point depends on the physical phenomena described. The regions with B less than about 1 gamma detected by Schindler and Ness may be interpreted as neutral regions for the ion-tearing process. The assumption of the presence of a multiple neutral point structure (with temporal variations) is still the most promising interpretation of the Explorer 34 data. Alternatives suggested by Russell lead to difficulties. Nevertheless, the final answer can come only from multiple satellite systems. A 1-day displacement of the day count in the data discussed by Schindler and Ness is corrected.

  18. Energetic Neutral Atom Production due to Charge Exchange at Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, Erena

    2008-05-01

    An energetic neutral atom (ENA) is formed in a charge exchange process where an energetic ion picks up an electron from a neutral particle. Mars, having no notable global intrinsic magnetic field, cannot shield the neutral particles in its atmosphere from the flow of energetic solar wind protons. Consequently, an extensive production of energetic hydrogen atoms (H-ENAs) occurs. In this study a 3D hybrid (kinetic ions, fluid electrons) quasi-neutral particle-in-cell (PIC) plasma simulation is being developed to investigate the production of H-ENAs due to collisions with atomic oxygen (O) and neutral nitrogen molecules (N2) in the transition region of the Martian near-space environment. In order to better study the interaction between Mars' exosphere and ionosphere, multi-species reactions such as ionization by photons, electron recombination and charge exchange are self-consisitently included in the simulation model. The major ions included are exospheric solar wind protons and the planetary O2^+, CO2^+, O^+, and N2^+ ions. The motion of the precipitating particles in the atmosphere is followed, and collisions with atmospheric ions and neutrals (O, CO2, N2) are governed by a Monte Carlo ``collision-by-collision'' algorithm. What is presented is a ``work in progress'' as we work towards our goal of computing the flux of escaping H-ENAs due to charge exchange with O and N2.

  19. Environmental neutralization of polonium-218

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, S.D.; Hopke, P.K.

    1985-01-01

    Previous work has indicated that two mechanisms of neutralization of the singly charged polonium ion exist. Charged Polonium-218 can be neutralized by reacting with oxygen to form a polonium oxide ion with a higher ionization potential than that of the polonium metal and then accepting an electron transferred from a lower ionization potential gas. In this present work, this mechanism has been verified by determining that the polonium oxide has an ionization potential in the range 10.35-10.53 eV. It was also previously reported that /sup 218/Po can be neutralized, in the absence of oxygen, by the scavenging of electrons by a trace gas such as water or nitrogen dioxide and their diffusion to the polonium ion. To verify this second neutralization mechanism, concentrations of nitrogen dioxide in nitrogen in the range of 50 ppb-1 ppm were examined for their ability to neutralize the polonium ion. Complete neutralization of /sup 218/Po was observed at nitrogen dioxide concentrations greater than 700 ppb. For concentrations below 700 ppb, the degree of neutralization was found to increase smoothly with the nitrogen dioxide concentration.

  20. Positional nystagmus showing neutral points.

    PubMed

    Hiruma, Kiyoshi; Numata, Tsutomu

    2004-01-01

    We encountered patients who had their static direction-changing positional nystagmus canceled at about 20-30 degrees yaw head rotation from the supine position. This nystagmus was also canceled when the head was rotated 180 degrees from this position. We call these head positions neutral points. At the neutral points, the cupula of the horizontal semicircular canal of the affected ear is positioned vertical to the gravitational plane and no deflection of the cupula occurs. The positional nystagmus observed (except the neutral points) was thought to occur due to a "heavy cupula" or "light cupula", which may be determined by the specific gravity of its endolymph.

  1. Neutral current interactions in MINOS

    SciTech Connect

    Sousa, Alexandre; /Oxford U.

    2007-07-01

    The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) long-baseline experiment has been actively collecting beam data since 2005, having already accumulated 3 x 10{sup 20} protons-on-target (POT). The several million neutrinos per year observed at the Near detector may improve the existing body of knowledge of neutrino cross-sections and the Near-Far comparison of the observed energy spectrum neutral current events constrains oscillations into sterile neutrinos. MINOS capabilities of observing neutral current neutrino events are described and the employed methodology for event selection is discussed, along with preliminary results obtained. An outlook on the expected neutral current related contributions from MINOS is also presented.

  2. [Neutral Medical Claim Management Committee].

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Mitsuru

    2013-03-01

    The Ibaraki Medical Association established the Committee for Alternative Dispute Resolution called the Neutral Medical Claim Management Committee in 2006. Among 64 claims presented to the committee, 29 were settled through mediation or consultation. Patients were generally satisfied that their claims were considered fairly by the committee and that they were able to talk directly with healthcare professionals. However, some did not consider the committee to be completely neutral. The healthcare professionals involved rated the committee highly because they felt that the processes were neutral and no emotional aspects were involved. PMID:23617190

  3. Adsorption of polar molecules on krypton clusters.

    PubMed

    Rosso, A; Pokapanich, W; Ohrwall, G; Svensson, S; Björneholm, O; Tchaplyguine, M

    2007-08-28

    The formation process of binary clusters has been studied using synchrotron based core level photoelectron spectroscopy. Free neutral krypton clusters have been produced by adiabatic expansion and doped with chloromethane molecules using the pickup technique. The comparison between the integrated intensities, linewidths, and level shifts of the cluster features of pure krypton and of chloromethane-krypton clusters has been used to obtain information about the cluster geometry. We have shown that most of the chloromethane molecules remain on the surface of the clusters.

  4. Incomplete Neutralization and Deviation from Sigmoidal Neutralization Curves for HIV Broadly Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Laura E; Falkowska, Emilia; Doores, Katie J; Le, Khoa; Sok, Devin; van Gils, Marit J; Euler, Zelda; Burger, Judith A; Seaman, Michael S; Sanders, Rogier W; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Poignard, Pascal; Wrin, Terri; Burton, Dennis R

    2015-08-01

    The broadly neutralizing HIV monoclonal antibodies (bnMAbs) PG9, PG16, PGT151, and PGT152 have been shown earlier to occasionally display an unusual virus neutralization profile with a non-sigmoidal slope and a plateau at <100% neutralization. In the current study, we were interested in determining the extent of non-sigmoidal slopes and plateaus at <100% for HIV bnMAbs more generally. Using both a 278 panel of pseudoviruses in a CD4 T-cell (U87.CCR5.CXCR4) assay and a panel of 117 viruses in the TZM-bl assay, we found that bnMAbs targeting many neutralizing epitopes of the spike had neutralization profiles for at least one virus that plateaued at <90%. Across both panels the bnMAbs targeting the V2 apex of Env and gp41 were most likely to show neutralization curves that plateaued <100%. Conversely, bnMAbs targeting the high-mannose patch epitopes were less likely to show such behavior. Two CD4 binding site (CD4bs) Abs also showed this behavior relatively infrequently. The phenomenon of incomplete neutralization was also observed in a large peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC)-grown molecular virus clone panel derived from patient viral swarms. In addition, five bnMAbs were compared against an 18-virus panel of molecular clones produced in 293T cells and PBMCs and assayed in TZM-bl cells. Examples of plateaus <90% were seen with both types of virus production with no consistent patterns observed. In conclusion, incomplete neutralization and non-sigmoidal neutralization curves are possible for all HIV bnMAbs against a wide range of viruses produced and assayed in both cell lines and primary cells with implications for the use of antibodies in therapy and as tools for vaccine design. PMID:26267277

  5. Incomplete Neutralization and Deviation from Sigmoidal Neutralization Curves for HIV Broadly Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Laura E; Falkowska, Emilia; Doores, Katie J; Le, Khoa; Sok, Devin; van Gils, Marit J; Euler, Zelda; Burger, Judith A; Seaman, Michael S; Sanders, Rogier W; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Poignard, Pascal; Wrin, Terri; Burton, Dennis R

    2015-08-01

    The broadly neutralizing HIV monoclonal antibodies (bnMAbs) PG9, PG16, PGT151, and PGT152 have been shown earlier to occasionally display an unusual virus neutralization profile with a non-sigmoidal slope and a plateau at <100% neutralization. In the current study, we were interested in determining the extent of non-sigmoidal slopes and plateaus at <100% for HIV bnMAbs more generally. Using both a 278 panel of pseudoviruses in a CD4 T-cell (U87.CCR5.CXCR4) assay and a panel of 117 viruses in the TZM-bl assay, we found that bnMAbs targeting many neutralizing epitopes of the spike had neutralization profiles for at least one virus that plateaued at <90%. Across both panels the bnMAbs targeting the V2 apex of Env and gp41 were most likely to show neutralization curves that plateaued <100%. Conversely, bnMAbs targeting the high-mannose patch epitopes were less likely to show such behavior. Two CD4 binding site (CD4bs) Abs also showed this behavior relatively infrequently. The phenomenon of incomplete neutralization was also observed in a large peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC)-grown molecular virus clone panel derived from patient viral swarms. In addition, five bnMAbs were compared against an 18-virus panel of molecular clones produced in 293T cells and PBMCs and assayed in TZM-bl cells. Examples of plateaus <90% were seen with both types of virus production with no consistent patterns observed. In conclusion, incomplete neutralization and non-sigmoidal neutralization curves are possible for all HIV bnMAbs against a wide range of viruses produced and assayed in both cell lines and primary cells with implications for the use of antibodies in therapy and as tools for vaccine design.

  6. Identification and evaluation of neutral sphingomyelinase 2 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Hun; Kim, Sung Hyun; Ahn, Kyong Hoon; Kim, Seok Kyun; Choi, Jong Min; Ji, Jung Eun; Won, Jong Hoon; Park, Yang Hui; Lim, Chaemin; Kim, Sanghee; Kim, Dae Kyong

    2011-02-01

    Sphingomyelinase catalyzes the hydrolysis of sphingomyelin to generate ceramide, an important molecule involved in the regulation of various cellular responses. In this study, we partially purified the neutral sphingomyelinase2 (nSMase2) and identified the inhibitors, D-lyxophytosphingosine and D-arabino-phytosphingosine, which have an inhibitory effect on nSMase2 in a concentration-dependent manner. A Dixon plot of each phytosphingosines revealed their probable inhibitory pattern, i.e., apparent competitive inhibition. These compounds did not inhibit the Mg(2+)-independent neutral SMase activity, although the known nSMase2 inhibitor, GW4869, showed inhibitory effects on Mg(2+)-independent neutral SMase activity. Further, the two phytosphingosines specifically inhibited the ceramide generation regulated by nSMase2.

  7. Physics of Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, D.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Many varieties of molecule have been detected in the Milky Way and in other galaxies. The processes by which these molecules are formed and destroyed are now broadly understood (see INTERSTELLAR CHEMISTRY). These molecules are important components of galaxies in two ways. Firstly, radiation emitted by molecules enables us to trace the presence of diffuse gas, to infer its physical properties and ...

  8. Reconstruction of NSTX midplane neutral density profiles from visible imaging data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stotler, D. P.; Scotti, F.; Bell, R. E.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Raman, R.

    2015-08-01

    The experimental determination of neutral densities in tokamak plasmas from line radiation is only accurate in the narrow region in which both the excitation rate and neutral density are significant. We describe an alternative procedure using the DEGAS 2 Monte Carlo neutral transport code to invert light emission data obtained from a tangentially viewing camera, yielding absolute radial profiles of deuterium atoms and molecules at midplane. That the neutral source in these simulations can be adequately characterized as a uniform flux at the vacuum vessel wall is demonstrated by the similarity of the shapes of the simulated and observed brightness profiles. A second test is obtained by comparing the resulting neutral pressures at the vessel walls with data from midplane micro-ion gauges. We also show that the simulated camera image is insensitive to variations in the spatial distribution of the neutral source.

  9. Electron attachment to the phthalide molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Asfandiarov, N. L.; Pshenichnyuk, S. A.; Vorob’ev, A. S.; Nafikova, E. P.; Lachinov, A. N.; Kraikin, V. A.; Modelli, A.

    2015-05-07

    Phthalide, the simplest chain of conductive polymer thin film, was investigated by means of Electron Transmission Spectroscopy, Negative Ion Mass Spectrometry, and density functional theory quantum chemistry. It has been found that formation of gas-phase long-lived molecular anions of phthalide around 0.7 eV takes place through cleavage of a C–O bond of the pentacyclic ring of the parent molecular anion to give a vibrationally excited (electronically more stable) open-ring molecular anion. The energy of the transition state for ring opening of the parent negative ion is calculated to be 0.65 eV above the neutral ground state of the molecule. The energy (2.64 eV) evaluated for the corresponding transition state in the neutral molecule is much higher, so that the process of electron detachment from the anion must lead to a neutral molecule with its initial pentacyclic structure. The average lifetime of the molecular negative ions formed at an electron energy of 0.75 eV and 80 °C is measured to be about 100 μs. The known switching effect of thin phthalide films could stem from the presence of a similar open/closed transition state also in the polymer.

  10. High brilliance negative ion and neutral beam source

    DOEpatents

    Compton, Robert N.

    1991-01-01

    A high brilliance mass selected (Z-selected) negative ion and neutral beam source having good energy resolution. The source is based upon laser resonance ionization of atoms or molecules in a small gaseous medium followed by charge exchange through an alkali oven. The source is capable of producing microampere beams of an extremely wide variety of negative ions, and milliampere beams when operated in the pulsed mode.

  11. Electrokinetic concentration of charged molecules

    DOEpatents

    Singh, Anup K.; Neyer, David W.; Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Garguilo, Michael G.

    2002-01-01

    A method for separating and concentrating charged species from uncharged or neutral species regardless of size differential. The method uses reversible electric field induced retention of charged species, that can include molecules and molecular aggregates such as dimers, polymers, multimers, colloids, micelles, and liposomes, in volumes and on surfaces of porous materials. The retained charged species are subsequently quantitatively removed from the porous material by a pressure driven flow that passes through the retention volume and is independent of direction thus, a multi-directional flow field is not required. Uncharged species pass through the system unimpeded thus effecting a complete separation of charged and uncharged species and making possible concentration factors greater than 1000-fold.

  12. Neutral and Non-Neutral Evolution of Drosophila Mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Rand, D. M.; Dorfsman, M.; Kann, L. M.

    1994-01-01

    To test hypotheses of neutral evolution of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), nucleotide sequences were determined for 1515 base pairs of the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 5 (ND5) gene in the mitochondrial DNA of 29 lines of Drosophila melanogaster and 9 lines of its sibling species Drosophila simulans. In contrast to the patterns for nuclear genes, where D. melanogaster generally exhibits much less nucleotide polymorphism, the number of segregating sites was slightly higher in a global sample of nine ND5 sequences in D. melanogaster (s = 8) than in the nine lines of D. simulans (s = 6). When compared to variation at nuclear loci, the mtDNA variation in D. melanogaster does not depart from neutral expectations. The ND5 sequences in D. simulans, however, show fewer than half the number of variable sites expected under neutrality when compared to sequences from the period locus. While this reduction in variation is not significant at the 5% level, HKA tests with published restriction data for mtDNA in D. simulans do show a significant reduction of variation suggesting a selective sweep of variation in the mtDNA in this species. Tests of neutral evolution based on the ratios of synonymous and replacement polymorphism and divergence are generally consistent with neutral expectations, although a significant excess of amino acid polymorphism within both species is localized in one region of the protein. The rate of mtDNA evolution has been faster in D. melanogaster than in D. simulans and the population structure of mtDNA is distinct in these species. The data reveal how different rates of mtDNA evolution between species and different histories of neutral and adaptive evolution within species can compromise historical inferences in population and evolutionary biology. PMID:7851771

  13. Neutralizing antibodies decrease the envelope fluidity of HIV-1

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, Shinji Monde, Kazuaki; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Kimura, Tetsuya; Maeda, Yosuke; Yusa, Keisuke

    2008-01-05

    For successful penetration of HIV-1, the formation of a fusion pore may be required in order to accumulate critical numbers of fusion-activated gp41 with the help of fluidization of the plasma membrane and viral envelope. An increase in temperature to 40 {sup o}C after viral adsorption at 25 {sup o}C enhanced the infectivity by 1.4-fold. The enhanced infectivity was inhibited by an anti-CXCR4 peptide, T140, and anti-V3 monoclonal antibodies (0.5{beta} and 694/98-D) by post-attachment neutralization, but not by non-neutralizing antibodies (670-30D and 246-D) specific for the C5 of gp120 and cluster I of gp41, respectively. Anti-HLA-II and an anti-HTLV-I gp46 antibody, LAT27, neutralized the molecule-carrying HIV-1{sub C-2(MT-2)}. The anti-V3 antibodies suppressed the fluidity of the HIV-1{sub C-2} envelope, whereas the non-neutralizing antibodies did not. The anti-HLA-II antibody decreased the envelope fluidity of HIV-1{sub C-2(MT-2)}, but not that of HIV-1{sub C-2}. Therefore, fluidity suppression by these antibodies represents an important neutralization mechanism, in addition to inhibition of viral attachment.

  14. Neutral transport in the ALT-I limiter

    SciTech Connect

    Boley, C.D.; Heifetz, D.B.; Post, D.E.; Malinowski, M.E.

    1983-10-01

    The behavior of neutral atoms and molecules in the TEXTOR pump limiter ALT-I has been investigated with the aid of the 2-D Monte Carlo neutral transport code DEGAS. The code incorporates the full set of relevant collision processes (atomic and molecular), and it has a standard wall model which includes fast-neutral reflection and molecular desorption. The limiter was modeled with a 2-D geometry, which included corrections for 3-D effects. Among the quantities predicted by the code which are directly relevant to experiment include the neutral pressure within the plenum and along the duct leading into the plenum, the gettering rates, and the heat flux to the walls of the duct. These have been calculated for a variety of plasma parameters in the inlet, and the behavior with respect to variations of the duct widths has been studied. Because of the presence of the long duct separating the entrance chamber from the plenum, a high probability of ionization generally results, suggesting that a calculation allowing the plasma to adjust to the neutral sources might show a large amount of recycling.

  15. Energetic Neutral Atom Precipitation (ENAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinsley, B. A.

    1988-01-01

    The Energetic Neutral Atom Precipitation experiment is scheduled to be flown on the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science (ATLAS 1) NASA mission. The objective of this experiment is to measure very faint emissions at nighttime arising from fluxes of energetic neutral atoms in the thermosphere. These energetic atoms have energies ranging up to about 50 keV, and arise from ions of hydrogen, helium, and oxygen trapped in the inner magnetosphere. Some of these ions become neutralized in charge exchange reactions with neutral hydrogen in the hydrogen geocorona that extends through the region. The ions are trapped on magnetic field lines which cross the equatorial plane at 2 to 6 earth radii distance, and they mirror at a range of heights on these field lines, extending down to the thermosphere at 500 km altitude. The ATLAS 1 measurements will not be of the neutral atoms themselves but of the optical emission produced by those on trajectories that intersect the thermosphere. The ENAP measurements are to be made using the Imaging Spectrometric Observatory (ISO) which is being flown on the ATLAS mission primarily for daytime spectral observations, and the ENAP measurements will all be nighttime measurements because of the faintness of the emissions and the relatively low level of magnetic activity expected.

  16. 46 CFR 502.404 - Neutrals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... resolution proceeding. A neutral shall have no official, financial, or personal conflict of interest with... Dispute Resolution § 502.404 Neutrals. (a) A neutral may be a permanent or temporary officer or employee... Maritime Commission Dispute Resolution Specialist will seek to provide a neutral in dispute...

  17. 46 CFR 502.404 - Neutrals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... resolution proceeding. A neutral shall have no official, financial, or personal conflict of interest with... Dispute Resolution § 502.404 Neutrals. (a) A neutral may be a permanent or temporary officer or employee... Maritime Commission Dispute Resolution Specialist will seek to provide a neutral in dispute...

  18. 46 CFR 502.404 - Neutrals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... resolution proceeding. A neutral shall have no official, financial, or personal conflict of interest with... Dispute Resolution § 502.404 Neutrals. (a) A neutral may be a permanent or temporary officer or employee... Maritime Commission Dispute Resolution Specialist will seek to provide a neutral in dispute...

  19. 46 CFR 502.404 - Neutrals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... resolution proceeding. A neutral shall have no official, financial, or personal conflict of interest with... Dispute Resolution § 502.404 Neutrals. (a) A neutral may be a permanent or temporary officer or employee... Maritime Commission Dispute Resolution Specialist will seek to provide a neutral in dispute...

  20. 46 CFR 502.404 - Neutrals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... resolution proceeding. A neutral shall have no official, financial, or personal conflict of interest with... Dispute Resolution § 502.404 Neutrals. (a) A neutral may be a permanent or temporary officer or employee... Maritime Commission Dispute Resolution Specialist will seek to provide a neutral in dispute...

  1. A Re-Examiniation of Phonological Neutralization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dinnsen, D.

    1985-01-01

    Reviews research studies that raise serious questions about phonological neutralization, that is, the merger of a contrast in certain contexts. Some findings cast doubt on the very existence of neutralization and the correctness of the theoretical principles that make assumptions based on neutralization. Reanalyzes neutralization in light of these…

  2. PDX neutral beam reionization losses

    SciTech Connect

    Kugel, H.W.; Dylla, H.F.; Eubank, H.P.; Kozub, T.A.; Moore, R.; Schilling, G.; Stuart, L.D.; Von Halle, A.; Williams, M.D.

    1982-04-01

    Reionization losses for 1.5 MW H /sup 0/ and 2 MW D /sup 0/ neutral beams injected into the PDX tokamak were studied using pressure gauges, phototransistors, thermocouples, surface shielding, and surface sample analysis. Considerable outgassing of conventionally prepared 304 SS ducts occurred during initial injections and gradually decreased with the cumulative absorption of beam power. Reionization power losses are presently about 5% in the ducts and about 12% total for a beamline including the duct. Present duct pressures are attributed primarily to gas from the ion source and neutralizer with much smaller contributions from residual wall desorption. Physical mechanisms for the observed duct outgassing are discussed.

  3. ATF neutral beam injection system

    SciTech Connect

    Menon, M.M.; Morris, R.N.; Edmonds, P.H.

    1985-01-01

    The Advanced Toroidal Facility is a stellarator torsatron being built at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to investigate improved plasma confinement schemes. Plasmas heating will be carried out predominantly by means of neutral beam injection. This paper describes the basic parameters of the injection system. Numerical calculations were done to optimize the aiming of the injectors. The results of these calculations and their implications on the neutral power to the machine are elaborated. The effects of improving the beam optics and altering the focal length on the power transmitted to the plasma are discussed.

  4. Photostability of Organic Molecules in Circumstellar Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monfredini, T.; Wolf, W.; Mendoza, E.; Rocco, M. L.; Lago, A.; Boechat-Roberty, H. M.

    2014-10-01

    Aromatic Infrared Bands, the footprint of molecules like neutral and ionic Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs), have been observed in several astrophysical environments.We present the experimental results of the photoionization and photodissociation of the methyl-benzene (or toluene) molecule, a basic unit for the methylated PAHs, using synchrotron radiation at C1s resonance, ˜ 285 eV (soft X-ray) and time-of-flight mass-spectrometry. Absolute photoionization and photodissociation cross sections have been determined. Then the ionization and destruction rates and half-life of the toluene molecule were also obtained for the X-ray photon flux of the pre-planetary nebula CRL 618.

  5. MSFC Skylab neutral buoyancy simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The use of a neutral buoyancy simulator for developing extravehicular activity systems and for training astronauts in weightless activities is discussed. The construction of the facility and the operations are described. The types of tests and the training activities conducted in the simulator are reported. Photographs of the components of the simulator and actual training exercises are included.

  6. Photodetachment process for beam neutralization

    DOEpatents

    Fink, J.H.; Frank, A.M.

    1979-02-20

    A process for neutralization of accelerated ions employing photo-induced charge detachment is disclosed. The process involves directing a laser beam across the path of a negative ion beam such as to effect photodetachment of electrons from the beam ions. The frequency of the laser beam employed is selected to provide the maximum cross-section for the photodetachment process. 2 figs.

  7. Photodetachment process for beam neutralization

    DOEpatents

    Fink, Joel H. [Livermore, CA; Frank, Alan M. [Livermore, CA

    1979-02-20

    A process for neutralization of accelerated ions employing photo-induced charge detachment. The process involves directing a laser beam across the path of a negative ion beam such as to effect photodetachment of electrons from the beam ions. The frequency of the laser beam employed is selected to provide the maximum cross-section for the photodetachment process.

  8. RE: Pedagogy--After Neutrality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    I'Anson, John

    2010-01-01

    Within the UK and in many parts of the world, official accounts of what it is to make sense of religion are framed within a rhetorics of neutrality in which such study is premised upon the possibility of dispassionate engagement and analysis. This paper, which is largely theoretical in scope, explores both the affordances and the costs of such an…

  9. Self-neutralized ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Salvadori, M. C.; Teixeira, F. S.; Nikolaev, A.; Savkin, K. P.; Oks, E. M.; Spaedtke, P.; Yu, K. M.; Brown, I. G.

    2011-10-15

    A vacuum arc ion source provides high current beams of metal ions that have been used both for accelerator injection and for ion implantation, and in both of these applications the degree of space charge neutralization of the beam is important. In accelerator injection application, the beam from the ion source may be accelerated further (post-acceleration), redirected by a bending magnet(s), or focused with magnetic or electrostatic lenses, and knowledge of the beam space charge is needed for optimal design of the optical elements. In ion implantation application, any build-up of positive charge in the insulating targets must be compensated by a simultaneous flux of cold electrons so as to provide overall charge neutrality of the target. We show that in line-of-sight ion implantation using a vacuum arc ion source, the high current ion beam carries along its own background sea of cold electrons, and this copious source of electrons provides a ''self-neutralizing'' feature to the beam. Here we describe experiments carried out in order to demonstrate this effect, and we provide an analysis showing that the beam is space-charge-neutralized to a very high degree.

  10. Hindered and modulated rotational states and spectra of adsorbed diatomic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, Y.T.; Chuu, D.S.; Mei, W.N.

    1996-10-01

    Both vertical and horizontal adsorption configurations of a diatomic molecule were modeled as the rigid rotor with which the spatial motion was confined by a finite conical well. In addition to the polar hindering potential, a sinusoidal azimuthal modulation, which bears the local symmetry of the adsorption site, was incorporated. Eigenfunctions for different models were expressed analytically in terms of the hypergeometric functions, and eigenvalues were solved numerically. We found that the rotational energy levels exhibit oscillatory behavior when plotted as functions of the hindrance angle. This particular phenomenon was interpreted as the occurrence of resonance transmission of the rotor wave function at certain hindrance condition. We also found that the rotational levels were grouped into bands when the azimuthal modulation strength was increased. The solutions were used to calculate the rotational-state distribution of desorbed molecules, and agreement with the previous experiment was obtained. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  11. Chemical evolution of life making molecules in extreme environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumdar, Liton; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Das, Ankan; Chakrabarti, Sonali

    In the past, theoretical modelling to explain abundances of different life making molecules (bases of DNA, RNA, amino acids, sugars etc.) in extreme environments are carried out by several authors. However, rate coefficients for formation of these molecules are largely unknown till date, and only educated guesses were used, which occasionally gave rise to inaccuracy in predicting the final abundance. Till now, no life making (pre-biotic) molecules have been observed in ISM with full confidence. The aim of this paper is to find out empirical rate coefficients for the formation of these life making molecules by using quantum chemical theory and use these rates into our newly developed hydro-chemical model to find out chemical evolution and final abundances during the collapsing phase of a proto-star. We find that significant amount of various species which are important for life could be produced during the collapsing phase of a proto-star, which might have clues for the origin of life on earth. We simulate production of these life making molecules from the scratch. Formation of these molecules via successive neutral-neutral, radical-radical/ion-molecular reactions are extensively studied. Time evolution and depth variation of biologically important species are discussed. Formation routes of these life making molecules depend highly on abundances of reactive species and rate coefficients involved in the reactions. Presence of grains, change chemical abundances of several gas phase species. We carried out a comparative study between different gas phase pathways available for synthesis of different life making molecules. In spite of highly abundant neutral reactive species, production of one of the bases of DNA (adenine) is noticed to be dominated by the ion-molecular reaction pathways. Both the neutral-neutral radical-radical pathways are found to be significantly contributing to the formation of alanine. Formation of glycine mainly follows radical-radical pathways

  12. Identification of intrinsic catalytic activity for electrochemical reduction of water molecules to generate hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Shinagawa, Tatsuya; Takanabe, Kazuhiro

    2015-06-21

    Insufficient hydronium ion activities at near-neutral pH and under unbuffered conditions induce diffusion-limited currents for hydrogen evolution, followed by a reaction with water molecules to generate hydrogen at elevated potentials. The observed constant current behaviors at near neutral pH reflect the intrinsic electrocatalytic reactivity of the metal electrodes for water reduction.

  13. The influence of blobs on neutral particles in the scrape-off layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thrysøe, Alexander S.; Tophøj, Laust E. H.; Naulin, Volker; Rasmussen, Jens Juul; Madsen, Jens; Nielsen, Anders H.

    2016-04-01

    Interactions between plasma and neutrals are investigated with particular attention to the influence of large amplitude blob structures that mediate a significant particle and energy transport through the scrape-off layer (SOL). We perform a statistical analysis of the mean-field approximation for plasma parameters in the SOL, and this approximation is shown to be poor in a SOL with a high level of fluctuations, as the plasma fields are strongly correlated. A 1D neutral fluid model which account for both cold and hot neutrals is formulated and the effects of blobs on the ionization in the SOL and edge are investigated. Simulations suggest that neutrals originating from dissociation of hydrogen molecules only fuel in the outermost edge region of the plasma, whereas hot neutrals from charge exchange collisions penetrate deep into the bulk plasma. The results are recovered in a simplified 2D model.

  14. Measurement of plasma production and neutralization in gas neutralizers

    SciTech Connect

    Maor, D.; Meron, M.; Johnson, B.; Jones, K.; Agagu, A.; Hu, B.

    1986-06-17

    In order to satisfy the need of experimental data for the designing of gas neutralizers we have started a project aimed at measuring all relevant cross sections for the charge exchange of H/sup -/, H/sup 0/ and H/sup +/ projectiles, as well as the cross sections for the production of ions in the target. The expected results of these latter measurements are shown schematically.

  15. Small Molecules Take A Big Step Against Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Beilhartz, Greg L; Tam, John; Melnyk, Roman A

    2015-12-01

    Effective treatment of Clostridium difficile infections demands a shift away from antibiotics towards toxin-neutralizing agents. Work by Bender et al., using a drug that attenuates toxin action in vivo without affecting bacterial survival, demonstrates the exciting potential of small molecules as a new modality in the fight against C. difficile. PMID:26547239

  16. Ion-Molecule Reactions in Gas Phase Radiation Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Clive

    1981-01-01

    Discusses some aspects of the radiation chemistry of gases, focusing on the ion-molecule and charge neutralization reactions which set study of the gas phase apart. Uses three examples that illustrate radiolysis, describing the radiolysis of (1) oxygen, (2) carbon dioxide, and (3) acetylene. (CS)

  17. Rocket Experiment For Neutral Upwelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenward, D. R.; Lessard, M.

    2015-12-01

    Observations from the CHAMP satellite from 2004 show relatively small scale heating in the thermosphere. Several different mechanisms have been proposed to explain this phenomenon. The RENU 2 rocket mission includes a suite of 14 instruments which will acquire data to help understand processes involved in neutral upwelling in the cusp. Neutral, ion, and electron measurements will be made to provide an assessment of the upwelling process. SUPERDarn measurements of large- scale Joule heating in the cusp during overflight will also be acquired. Small-scale data which could possibly be associated with Alfvén waves, will be acquired using onboard electric field measurements. In-situ measurement of precipitating electrons and all other measurements will be used in thermodynamic and electrodynamic models for comparison to the observed upwelling.

  18. Sq Currents and Neutral Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The relationship between ionospheric dynamo currents and neutral winds is examined using the Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Electrodynamic General Circulation Model (TIME-GCM). The simulation is run for May and June 2009 with variable neutral winds but with constant solar and magnetospheric energy inputs, which ensures that day-to-day changes in the solar quiet (Sq) current system arise only from lower atmospheric forcing. The intensity and focus position of the simulated Sq current system exhibit large day-to-day variability, as is also seen in ground magnetometer data. We show how the day-to-day variation of the Sq current system relate to variable winds at various altitudes, latitudes, and longitudes.

  19. Neutral depletion versus repletion due to ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Fruchtman, A.; Makrinich, G.; Raimbault, J.-L.; Liard, L.; Rax, J.-M.; Chabert, P.

    2008-05-15

    Recent theoretical analyses which predicted unexpected effects of neutral depletion in both collisional and collisionless plasmas are reviewed. We focus on the depletion of collisionless neutrals induced by strong ionization of a collisionless plasma and contrast this depletion with the effect of strong ionization on thermalized neutrals. The collisionless plasma is analyzed employing a kinetic description. The collisionless neutrals and the plasma are coupled through volume ionization and wall recombination only. The profiles of density and pressure both of the plasma and of the neutral-gas and the profile of the ionization rate are calculated. It is shown that for collisionless neutrals the ionization results in neutral depletion, while when neutrals are thermalized the ionization induces a maximal neutral-density at the discharge center, which we call neutral repletion. The difference between the two cases stems from the relation between the neutral density and pressure. The pressure of the collisionless neutral-gas turns out to be maximal where its density is minimal, in contrast to the case of a thermalized neutral gas.

  20. Optimization of Neutral Atom Imagers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shappirio, M.; Coplan, M.; Balsamo, E.; Chornay, D.; Collier, M.; Hughes, P.; Keller, J.; Ogilvie, K.; Williams, E.

    2008-01-01

    The interactions between plasma structures and neutral atom populations in interplanetary space can be effectively studied with energetic neutral atom imagers. For neutral atoms with energies less than 1 keV, the most efficient detection method that preserves direction and energy information is conversion to negative ions on surfaces. We have examined a variety of surface materials and conversion geometries in order to identify the factors that determine conversion efficiency. For chemically and physically stable surfaces smoothness is of primary importance while properties such as work function have no obvious correlation to conversion efficiency. For the noble metals, tungsten, silicon, and graphite with comparable smoothness, conversion efficiency varies by a factor of two to three. We have also examined the way in which surface conversion efficiency varies with the angle of incidence of the neutral atom and have found that the highest efficiencies are obtained at angles of incidence greater then 80deg. The conversion efficiency of silicon, tungsten and graphite were examined most closely and the energy dependent variation of conversion efficiency measured over a range of incident angles. We have also developed methods for micromachining silicon in order to reduce the volume to surface area over that of a single flat surface and have been able to reduce volume to surface area ratios by up to a factor of 60. With smooth micro-machined surfaces of the optimum geometry, conversion efficiencies can be increased by an order of magnitude over instruments like LENA on the IMAGE spacecraft without increase the instruments mass or volume.

  1. Plasma sources for spacecraft neutralization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, V. A.; Katz, I.; Mandell, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    The principles of the operation of plasma sources for the neutralization of the surface of a spacecraft traveling in the presence of hot plasma are discussed with special attention given to the hollow-cathode-based plasma contactors. Techiques are developed that allow the calculation of the potentials and particle densities in the near environment of a hollow cathode plasma contactor in both the test tank and the LEO environment. The techniques and codes were validated by comparison of calculated and measured results.

  2. Analysis of Solar Wind Samples Returned by Genesis Using Laser Post Ionization Secondary Neutral Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veryovkin, I. V.; Calaway, W. F.; Tripa, C. E.; Pellin, M. J.; Burnett, D. S.

    2005-12-01

    A new secondary neutral mass spectrometry (SNMS) instrument implementing laser post ionization (LPI) of ion sputtered and laser desorbed neutral species has been developed and constructed for the specific purpose of quantitative analysis of metallic elements at ultra trace levels in solar wind collector samples returned to Earth by the Genesis Discovery mission. The first LPI SNMS measurements are focusing on determining Al, Ca, Cr, and Mg in these samples. These measurements provide the first concentration and isotopic abundances determinations for several key metallic elements and also elucidate possible fractionation effects between the photosphere and the solar wind compositions. It is now documented that Genesis samples suffered surface contamination both during flight and during the breach of the Sample Return Capsule when it crashed. Since accurate quantitative analysis is compromised by sample contamination, several features have been built into the new LPI SNMS instrument to mitigate this difficulty. A normally-incident, low-energy (<500 eV) ion beam combined with a keV energy ion beam and a desorbing laser beam (both microfocused) enables dual beam analyses. The low-energy ion beam can be used to remove surface contaminant by sputtering with minimum ion beam mixing. This low-energy beam also will be used to perform ion beam milling, while either the microfocused ion or laser beam probes the solar wind elemental compositions as a function of sample depth. Because of the high depth resolution of dual beam analyses, such depth profiles clearly distinguish between surface contaminants and solar wind implanted atoms. In addition, in-situ optical and electron beam imaging for observing and avoiding particulates and scratches on solar wind sample surfaces is incorporated in the new LPI SNMS instrument to further reduce quantification problems. The current status of instrument tests and analyses will be presented. This work is supported by the U. S. Department of

  3. [Endothelial cell adhesion molecules].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A N; Norkin, I A; Puchin'ian, D M; Shirokov, V Iu; Zhdanova, O Iu

    2014-01-01

    The review presents current data concerning the functional role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules belonging to different structural families: integrins, selectins, cadherins, and the immunoglobulin super-family. In this manuscript the regulatory mechanisms and factors of adhesion molecules expression and distribution on the surface of endothelial cells are discussed. The data presented reveal the importance of adhesion molecules in the regulation of structural and functional state of endothelial cells in normal conditions and in pathology. Particular attention is paid to the importance of these molecules in the processes of physiological and pathological angiogenesis, regulation of permeability of the endothelial barrier and cell transmigration.

  4. Positron-molecule bound states and positive ion production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leventhal, M.; Passner, A.; Surko, C. M.

    1990-01-01

    The interaction was studied of low energy positrons with large molecules such as alkanes. These data provide evidencce for the existence of long lived resonances and bound states of positrons with neutral molecules. The formation process and the nature of these resonances are discussed. The positive ions produced when a positron annihilates with an electron in one of these resonances were observed and this positive ion formation process is discussed. A review is presented of the current state of the understanding of these positron-molecule resonances and the resulting positive ion formation. A number of outstanding issues in this area is also discussed.

  5. Neutral-current x-distributions

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Friedman, J. I.; Kendall, H. W.; Bogert, D.; Burnstein, R.; Fisk, R.; Fuess, S.; Bofill, J.; Busza, W.; Eldridge, T.; Abolins, M.; Brock, R.; et al.

    1984-06-01

    The role of the semi leptonic neutral current interaction as a probe of nucleon structure is examined. Previous measurements of neutral current x-distributions are reviewed, and new results from the Fermilab - MIT - MSU collaboration are presented.

  6. Probing neutral atmospheric collision complexes with anion photoelectron imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarrold, Caroline

    Photodetachment of anionic precursors of neutral collision complexes offers a way to probe the effects of symmetry-breaking collision events on the electronic structure of normally transparent molecules. We have measured the anion photoelectron imaging (PEI) spectra of a series of O2- X complexes, where X is a volatile organic molecule with atmospheric relevance, to determine how the electronic properties of various X molecules affect the low-lying electronic structure of neutral O2 undergoing O2 - X collisons. The study was motivated by the catalog of vibrational and electronic absorption lines induced by O2 - O2, O2 - N2, and other collisions. The energies of electronic features observed in the anion PEI spectra of O2- X (X = hexane, hexene, isoprene and benzene) relative to O2- PEI spectroscopic features indicate that photodetachment of the anion does indeed access a repulsive part of the O2 - X potential. In addition, the spectra of the various complexes show an interesting variation in the intensities of transitions to the excited O2(1Δg) . X and O2(1Σg+) . X states relative to the ground O2(3Σg-) . X state. With X = non-polar species such as hexane, the relative intensities of transitions to the triplet and singlet states of O2 . X are very similar to those of isolated O2, while the relative intensity of the singlet band decreases and becomes lower in energy relative to the triplet band for X = polar molecules. A significant enhancement in the intensities of the singlet bands is observed for complexes with X = isoprene and benzene, both of which have low-lying triplet states. The role of the triplet states in isoprene and benzene, and the implications for induced electronic absorption in O2 undergoing collisions with these molecules, are explored. National Science Foundation NSF CHE 1265991.

  7. Protein structure and neutral theory of evolution.

    PubMed

    Ptitsyn, O B; Volkenstein, M V

    1986-08-01

    The neutral theory of evolution is extended to the origin of protein molecules. Arguments are presented which suggest that the amino acid sequences of many globular proteins mainly represent "memorized" random sequences while biological evolution reduces to the "editing" these random sequences. Physical requirements for a functional globular protein are formulated and it is shown that many of these requirement do not involve strategical selection of amino acid sequences during biological evolution but are inherent also for typical random sequences. In particular, it is shown that random sequences of polar and amino acid residues can form alpha-helices and beta-strand with lengths and arrangement along the chain similar to those in real globular proteins. These alpha- and beta-regions in random sequences can form three-dimensional folding patterns also similar to those in proteins. The arguments are presented suggesting that even the tight packing of side groups inside protein core do not require very strong biological selection of amino acid sequences either. Thus many structural features of real proteins can exist also in random sequences and the biological selection is needed mainly for the creation of active site of protein and for their stability under physiological conditions.

  8. Electron attenuation in free, neutral ethane clusters.

    PubMed

    Winkler, M; Myrseth, V; Harnes, J; Børve, K J

    2014-10-28

    The electron effective attenuation length (EAL) in free, neutral ethane clusters has been determined at 40 eV kinetic energy by combining carbon 1s x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and theoretical lineshape modeling. More specifically, theory is employed to form model spectra on a grid in cluster size (N) and EAL (λ), allowing N and λ to be determined by optimizing the goodness-of-fit χ(2)(N, λ) between model and observed spectra. Experimentally, the clusters were produced in an adiabatic-expansion setup using helium as the driving gas, spanning a range of 100-600 molecules in mean cluster size. The effective attenuation length was determined to be 8.4 ± 1.9 Å, in good agreement with an independent estimate of 10 Å formed on the basis of molecular electron-scattering data and Monte Carlo simulations. The aggregation state of the clusters as well as the cluster temperature and its importance to the derived EAL value are discussed in some depth. PMID:25362297

  9. Electron attenuation in free, neutral ethane clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Winkler, M.; Harnes, J.; Børve, K. J.; Myrseth, V.

    2014-10-28

    The electron effective attenuation length (EAL) in free, neutral ethane clusters has been determined at 40 eV kinetic energy by combining carbon 1s x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and theoretical lineshape modeling. More specifically, theory is employed to form model spectra on a grid in cluster size (N) and EAL (λ), allowing N and λ to be determined by optimizing the goodness-of-fit χ{sup 2}(N, λ) between model and observed spectra. Experimentally, the clusters were produced in an adiabatic-expansion setup using helium as the driving gas, spanning a range of 100–600 molecules in mean cluster size. The effective attenuation length was determined to be 8.4 ± 1.9 Å, in good agreement with an independent estimate of 10 Å formed on the basis of molecular electron-scattering data and Monte Carlo simulations. The aggregation state of the clusters as well as the cluster temperature and its importance to the derived EAL value are discussed in some depth.

  10. Electron attenuation in free, neutral ethane clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, M.; Myrseth, V.; Harnes, J.; Børve, K. J.

    2014-10-01

    The electron effective attenuation length (EAL) in free, neutral ethane clusters has been determined at 40 eV kinetic energy by combining carbon 1s x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and theoretical lineshape modeling. More specifically, theory is employed to form model spectra on a grid in cluster size (N) and EAL (λ), allowing N and λ to be determined by optimizing the goodness-of-fit χ2(N, λ) between model and observed spectra. Experimentally, the clusters were produced in an adiabatic-expansion setup using helium as the driving gas, spanning a range of 100-600 molecules in mean cluster size. The effective attenuation length was determined to be 8.4 ± 1.9 Å, in good agreement with an independent estimate of 10 Å formed on the basis of molecular electron-scattering data and Monte Carlo simulations. The aggregation state of the clusters as well as the cluster temperature and its importance to the derived EAL value are discussed in some depth.

  11. Electron attenuation in free, neutral ethane clusters.

    PubMed

    Winkler, M; Myrseth, V; Harnes, J; Børve, K J

    2014-10-28

    The electron effective attenuation length (EAL) in free, neutral ethane clusters has been determined at 40 eV kinetic energy by combining carbon 1s x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and theoretical lineshape modeling. More specifically, theory is employed to form model spectra on a grid in cluster size (N) and EAL (λ), allowing N and λ to be determined by optimizing the goodness-of-fit χ(2)(N, λ) between model and observed spectra. Experimentally, the clusters were produced in an adiabatic-expansion setup using helium as the driving gas, spanning a range of 100-600 molecules in mean cluster size. The effective attenuation length was determined to be 8.4 ± 1.9 Å, in good agreement with an independent estimate of 10 Å formed on the basis of molecular electron-scattering data and Monte Carlo simulations. The aggregation state of the clusters as well as the cluster temperature and its importance to the derived EAL value are discussed in some depth.

  12. Analysis of Titan's neutral upper atmosphere from Cassini Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, J.; Yelle, R. V.; Vuitton, V.; Waite, J. H.; Kasprzak, W. T.; Gell, D. A.; Niemann, H. B.; Müller-Wodarg, I. C. F.; Borggren, N.; Fletcher, G. G.; Patrick, E. L.; Raaen, E.; Magee, B. A.

    2009-04-01

    In this paper we present an in-depth study of the distributions of various neutral species in Titan's upper atmosphere, between 950 and 1500 km for abundant species (N 2, CH 4, H 2) and between 950 and 1200 km for other minor species. Our analysis is based on a large sample of Cassini/INMS (Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer) measurements in the CSN (Closed Source Neutral) mode, obtained during 15 close flybys of Titan. To untangle the overlapping cracking patterns, we adopt Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) to determine simultaneously the densities of different species. Except for N 2, CH 4, H 2 and 40Ar (as well as their isotopes), all species present density enhancements measured during the outbound legs. This can be interpreted as a result of wall effects, which could be either adsorption/desorption of these molecules or heterogeneous surface chemistry of the associated radicals on the chamber walls. In this paper, we provide both direct inbound measurements assuming ram pressure enhancement only and abundances corrected for wall adsorption/desorption based on a simple model to reproduce the observed time behavior. Among all minor species of photochemical interest, we have firm detections of C 2H 2, C 2H 4, C 2H 6, CH 3C 2H, C 4H 2, C 6H 6, CH 3CN, HC 3N, C 2N 2 and NH 3 in Titan's upper atmosphere. Upper limits are given for other minor species. The globally averaged distributions of N 2, CH 4 and H 2 are each modeled with the diffusion approximation. The N 2 profile suggests an average thermospheric temperature of 151 K. The CH 4 and H 2 profiles constrain their fluxes to be 2.6×10 cms and 1.1×10 cms, referred to Titan's surface. Both fluxes are significantly higher than the Jeans escape values. The INMS data also suggest horizontal/diurnal variations of temperature and neutral gas distribution in Titan's thermosphere. The equatorial region, the ramside, as well as the nightside hemisphere of Titan appear to be warmer and present some evidence for the depletion

  13. Indirect observation of unobservable interstellar molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbst, E.; Green, S.; Thaddeus, P.; Klemperer, W.

    1977-01-01

    It is suggested that the abundances of neutral non-polar interstellar molecules unobservable by radio astronomy can be systematically determined by radio observation of the protonated ions. As an example, observed N2H(+) column densities are analyzed to infer molecular nitrogen abundances in dense interstellar clouds. The chemistries and expected densities of the protonated ions of O2, C2, CO2, C2H2 and CH4 are then discussed. Microwave transition frequencies fo HCO2(+) and C2H3(+) are estimated, and a preliminary astronomical search for HCO2(+) is described.

  14. Priming Effects for Affective vs. Neutral Faces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Leslie A.; Rabin, Laura; Wyatt, Gwinne; Frohlich, Jonathan; Vardy, Susan B.; Dimitri, Diana

    2005-01-01

    Affective and Neutral Tasks (faces with negative or neutral content, with different lighting and orientation) requiring reaction time judgments of poser identity were administered to 32 participants. Speed and accuracy were better for the Affective than Neutral Task, consistent with literature suggesting facilitation of performance by affective…

  15. Neutral beamline with improved ion energy recovery

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Jinchoon

    1984-01-01

    A neutral beamline employing direct energy recovery of unneutralized residual ions is provided which enhances the energy recovery of the full energy ion component of the beam exiting the neutralizer cell, and thus improves the overall neutral beamline efficiency. The unneutralized full energy ions exiting the neutralizer are deflected from the beam path and the electrons in the cell are blocked by a magnetic field applied transverse to the beam direction in the neutral izer exit region. The ions which are generated at essentially ground potential and accelerated through the neutralizer cell by a negative acceleration voltage are collected at ground potential. A neutralizer cell exit end region is provided which allows the magnetic and electric fields acting on the exiting ions to be loosely coupled. As a result, the fractional energy ions exiting the cell are reflected onto and collected at an interior wall of the neutralizer formed by the modified end geometry, and thus do not detract from the energy recovery efficiency of full energy ions exiting the cell. Electrons within the neutralizer are prevented from exiting the neutralizer end opening by the action of crossed fields drift (ExB) and are terminated to a collector collar around the downstream opening of the neutralizer. The correct combination of the extended neutralizer end structure and the magnet region is designed so as to maximize the exit of full energy ions and to contain the fractional energy ions.

  16. Ion-beam Plasma Neutralization Interaction Images

    SciTech Connect

    Igor D. Kaganovich; Edward Startsev; S. Klasky; Ronald C. Davidson

    2002-04-09

    Neutralization of the ion beam charge and current is an important scientific issue for many practical applications. The process of ion beam charge and current neutralization is complex because the excitation of nonlinear plasma waves may occur. Computer simulation images of plasma neutralization of the ion beam pulse are presented.

  17. On abstract degenerate neutral differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, Eduardo; O'Regan, Donal

    2016-10-01

    We introduce a new abstract model of functional differential equations, which we call abstract degenerate neutral differential equations, and we study the existence of strict solutions. The class of problems and the technical approach introduced in this paper allow us to generalize and extend recent results on abstract neutral differential equations. Some examples on nonlinear partial neutral differential equations are presented.

  18. The Net Neutrality Debate: The Basics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenfield, Rich

    2006-01-01

    Rich Greenfield examines the basics of today's net neutrality debate that is likely to be an ongoing issue for society. Greenfield states the problems inherent in the definition of "net neutrality" used by Common Cause: "Network neutrality is the principle that Internet users should be able to access any web content they choose and use any…

  19. Molecules between the Stars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verschuur, Gerrit L.

    1987-01-01

    Provides a listing of molecules discovered to date in the vast interstellar clouds of dust and gas. Emphasizes the recent discoveries of organic molecules. Discusses molecular spectral lines, MASERs (microwave amplification by stimulated emission of radiation), molecular clouds, and star birth. (TW)

  20. Enzymatic DNA molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, Gerald F. (Inventor); Breaker, Ronald R. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention discloses deoxyribonucleic acid enzymes--catalytic or enzymatic DNA molecules--capable of cleaving nucleic acid sequences or molecules, particularly RNA, in a site-specific manner, as well as compositions including same. Methods of making and using the disclosed enzymes and compositions are also disclosed.

  1. Polyatomic molecules under intense femtosecond laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Konar, Arkaprabha; Shu, Yinan; Lozovoy, Vadim V; Jackson, James E; Levine, Benjamin G; Dantus, Marcos

    2014-12-11

    Interaction of intense laser pulses with atoms and molecules is at the forefront of atomic, molecular, and optical physics. It is the gateway to powerful new tools that include above threshold ionization, high harmonic generation, electron diffraction, molecular tomography, and attosecond pulse generation. Intense laser pulses are ideal for probing and manipulating chemical bonding. Though the behavior of atoms in strong fields has been well studied, molecules under intense fields are not as well understood and current models have failed in certain important aspects. Molecules, as opposed to atoms, present confounding possibilities of nuclear and electronic motion upon excitation. The dynamics and fragmentation patterns in response to the laser field are structure sensitive; therefore, a molecule cannot simply be treated as a "bag of atoms" during field induced ionization. In this article we present a set of experiments and theoretical calculations exploring the behavior of a large collection of aryl alkyl ketones when irradiated with intense femtosecond pulses. Specifically, we consider to what extent molecules retain their molecular identity and properties under strong laser fields. Using time-of-flight mass spectrometry in conjunction with pump-probe techniques we study the dynamical behavior of these molecules, monitoring ion yield modulation caused by intramolecular motions post ionization. The set of molecules studied is further divided into smaller sets, sorted by type and position of functional groups. The pump-probe time-delay scans show that among positional isomers the variations in relative energies, which amount to only a few hundred millielectronvolts, influence the dynamical behavior of the molecules despite their having experienced such high fields (V/Å). High level ab initio quantum chemical calculations were performed to predict molecular dynamics along with single and multiphoton resonances in the neutral and ionic states. We propose the

  2. Nonlinear neutral inclusions: assemblages of coated ellipsoids

    PubMed Central

    Bolaños, Silvia Jiménez; Vernescu, Bogdan

    2015-01-01

    The problem of determining nonlinear neutral inclusions in (electrical or thermal) conductivity is considered. Neutral inclusions, inserted in a matrix containing a uniform applied electric field, do not disturb the field outside the inclusions. The well-known Hashin-coated sphere construction is an example of a neutral inclusion. In this paper, we consider the problem of constructing neutral inclusions from nonlinear materials. In particular, we discuss assemblages of coated ellipsoids. The proposed construction is neutral for a given applied field. PMID:26064633

  3. Kinetic Simulations of Ion Beam Neutralization

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Joseph

    2010-05-21

    Ion beam emission/neutralization is one of the most fundamental problems in spacecraft plasma interactions and electric propulsion. Although ion beam neutralization is readily achieved in experiments, the understanding of the underlying physical process remains at a rather primitive level. No theoretical or simulation models have convincingly explained the detailed neutralization mechanism, and no conclusions have been reached. This paper presents a fully kinetic simulation of ion beam neutralization and plasma beam propagation and discusses the physics of electron-ion coupling and the resulting propagation of a neutralized mesothermal plasma.

  4. Space station neutral external environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehlers, H.; Leger, L.

    1988-01-01

    Molecular contamination levels arising from the external induced neutral environment of the Space Station (Phase 1 configuration) were calculated using the MOLFLUX model. Predicted molecular column densities and deposition rates generally meet the Space Station contamination requirements. In the doubtful cases of deposition due to materials outgassing, proper material selection, generally excluding organic products exposed to the external environment, must be considered to meet contamination requirements. It is important that the Space Station configuration, once defined, is not significantly modified to avoid introducing new unacceptable contamination sources.

  5. Neutral gas dynamics in fireballs

    SciTech Connect

    Stenzel, R. L.; Ionita, C.; Schrittwieser, R.

    2011-06-01

    Fireballs are local discharge phenomena on positively biased electrodes in partially ionized plasmas. Electrons, energized at a double layer, heat neutral gas which expands. The gas pressure exceeds the plasma pressure, hence becomes important to the stability and transport in fireballs. The flow of gas moves the electrode and sensors similar to a mica pendulum. Flow speed and directions are measured. A fireball gun has been developed to partially collimate the flow of hot gas and heat objects in its path. New applications of fireballs are suggested.

  6. Advanced neutral-beam technology

    SciTech Connect

    Berkner, K.H.

    1980-09-01

    Extensive development will be required to achieve the 50- to 75-MW, 175- to 200-keV, 5- to 10-sec pulses of deuterium atoms envisioned for ETF and INTOR. Multi-megawatt injector systems are large (and expansive); they consist of large vacuum tanks with many square meters of cryogenic pumping panels, beam dumps capable of dissipating several megawatts of un-neutralized beam, bending magnets, electrical power systems capable of fast turnoff with low (capacity) stored energy, and, of course, the injector modules (ion sources and accelerators). The technology requirements associated with these components are described.

  7. Linking ultracold polar molecules.

    PubMed

    Avdeenkov, A V; Bohn, John L

    2003-01-31

    We predict that pairs of polar molecules can be weakly bound together in an ultracold environment, provided that a dc electric field is present. The field that links the molecules together also strongly influences the basic properties of the resulting dimer, such as its binding energy and predissociation lifetime. Because of their long-range character, these dimers will be useful in disentangling cold collision dynamics of polar molecules. As an example, we estimate the microwave photoassociation yield for OH-OH cold collisions.

  8. Cassini INMS Observations of Ions and Neutrals in Saturn's Inner Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, M. E.; Cravens, T. E.; Mandt, K.; Teolis, B. D.; Tokar, R. L.; Smith, H. T.; McNutt, R. L.; Waite, J. H.

    2012-12-01

    The Cassini Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) has measured the low-density particles in Saturn's inner magnetosphere (IM). Planning and implementing INMS observations of neutral molecules and water-group ions near the equatorial plane have steadily improved such that INMS now provides measurements that complement other observations of these low-energy ions and neutrals the IM, providing unambiguous resolution of the water-group ions and in situ, three-dimensional spatial dependence of the neutral densities. INMS measurements of neutrals are viable only in the densest regions, inside of 7 Saturn radii (RS) and within 20,000 km of the equatorial plane. Due to a variable background, the INMS detection limit for neutral water is near 103 molecules/cm3, which is the approximate density near 7 RS. High-energy radiation interferes with neutral observations inside of 3.5 RS. The tendency of H2O molecules to adhere to the walls of the INMS inlet aperture requires long integration times to determine the total volume of H2O molecules. Concurrent INMS measurements of associated volatile molecules such as CO2 determine spatial dependence of the neutral density. In the densest part of the neutral cloud that is outside of the Enceladus plumes and north of Enceladus, INMS measures 105 molecules/cm3. Near the equatorial plane, INMS data show that neutral water density drops a factor of ten from 4.2 RS, just outside the orbit of Enceladus, to 7 RS. This decline, caused by photo-ionization, disassociation by ion impact, and distribution by neutral-neutral collisions, is within the range of results derived from remote observations. INMS observations of azimuthal densities, which are not available from remote observations that average multiple observations, show the expected decline for neutrals that near the orbit of Enceladus but separated azimuthally. INMS can measure only one velocity at a time, restricting INMS measurements to only a small area of velocity phase space at a time

  9. Detailed Atomic Structure of Neutral and Near-Neutral Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Oliver, Paul; Hibbert, Alan

    2011-05-11

    This paper highlights the issues which need to be addressed in undertaking accurate calculations of multi-electron atoms and ions, particularly at or near the neutral end of an isoelectronic sequence. We illustrate the processes through two calculations--of transitions in Cl I and Sn II--and discuss the convergence of our results as well as updating previous work. In particular, in the case of Cl I, we propose new identifications of the levels involved in certain transitions which are important in determining the abundance of chlorine in the inter-stellar medium (ISM), while in singly ionised tin, our calculations suggest a re-evaluation of the the abundance of tin in the ISM. We also confirm recent identification of Sn II lines seen in tokamak plasmas.

  10. Interlocked molecules: Aqueous assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Linyi; Zhao, Yanli

    2015-12-01

    The quantitative self-assembly of mechanically interlocked molecules in water, instead of organic solvents, opens up the possibility of such systems being used in a biological context where their functions can be interfaced with biomolecular systems.

  11. Single-Molecule Enzymology

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Xiaoliang; Lu, H PETER.

    1999-06-04

    Viewing a movie of an enzyme molecule made from molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, we see incredible details of molecular motions, be it a change of the conformation or the action of a chemical reaction.

  12. Of Molecules and Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brinner, Bonnie

    1992-01-01

    Presents an activity in which models help students visualize both the DNA process and transcription. After constructing DNA, RNA messenger, and RNA transfer molecules; students model cells, protein synthesis, codons, and RNA movement. (MDH)

  13. Pressure-Induced Conductivity in a Neutral Nonplanar Spin-Localized Radical.

    PubMed

    Souto, Manuel; Cui, HengBo; Peña-Álvarez, Miriam; Baonza, Valentín G; Jeschke, Harald O; Tomic, Milan; Valentí, Roser; Blasi, Davide; Ratera, Imma; Rovira, Concepció; Veciana, Jaume

    2016-09-14

    There is a growing interest in the development of single-component molecular conductors based on neutral organic radicals that are mainly formed by delocalized planar radicals, such as phenalenyl or thiazolyl radicals. However, there are no examples of systems based on nonplanar and spin-localized C-centered radicals exhibiting electrical conductivity due to their large Coulomb energy (U) repulsion and narrow electronic bandwidth (W) that give rise to a Mott insulator behavior. Here we present a new type of nonplanar neutral radical conductor attained by linking a tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) donor unit to a neutral polychlorotriphenylmethyl radical (PTM) with the important feature that the TTF unit enhances the overlap between the radical molecules as a consequence of short intermolecular S···S interactions. This system becomes semiconducting upon the application of high pressure thanks to increased electronic bandwidth and charge reorganization opening the way to develop a new family of neutral radical conductors. PMID:27281384

  14. Helicobacter pylori cytotoxin: importance of native conformation for induction of neutralizing antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Manetti, R; Massari, P; Burroni, D; de Bernard, M; Marchini, A; Olivieri, R; Papini, E; Montecucco, C; Rappuoli, R; Telford, J L

    1995-01-01

    We have attempted to express the Helicobacter pylori vacuolating cytotoxin in Escherichia coli. Although the 95-kDa VacA polypeptide was expressed abundantly, it completely lacked any biological activity. In addition, this material failed to induce neutralizing antibodies after immunization of rabbits. In contrast, highly purified high-molecular-mass cytotoxin from the supernatant of H. pylori cultures was active in a HeLa cell assay and effectively induced a neutralizing response in rabbits. Neutralizing sera were shown to contain a high proportion of antibodies which recognized conformational epitopes found only on the native toxin. The data indicate that toxin-neutralizing epitopes are conformational and that potential vaccines based on the cytotoxin may benefit from the use of the intact molecule. PMID:7591088

  15. Investigation of Sterilization Mechanism for Geobacillus stearothermophilus Spores with Plasma-Excited Neutral Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Kei; Ikenaga, Noriaki; Sakudo, Noriyuki

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the mechanism of the sterilization with plasma-excited neutral gas that uniformly sterilizes both the space and inner wall of the reactor chamber at atmospheric pressure. Only reactive neutral species such as plasma-excited gas molecules and radicals are separated from the plasma and sent to the reactor chamber for chemical sterilization. The plasma source gas uses humidified mixture of nitrogen and oxygen. Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores and tyrosine which is amino acid are treated by the plasma-excited neutral gas. Shape change of the treated spore is observed by SEM, and chemical modification of the treated tyrosine is analyzed by HPLC. As a result, the surface of the treated spore shows depression. Hydroxylation and nitration of tyrosine are shown after the treatment. For these reasons, we believe that the sterilization with plasma-excited neutral gas results from the deformation of spore structure due to the chemical modification of amino acid.

  16. Inter- and intraclade neutralization of human immunodeficiency virus type 1: genetic clades do not correspond to neutralization serotypes but partially correspond to gp120 antigenic serotypes.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, J P; Cao, Y; Leu, J; Qin, L; Korber, B; Ho, D D

    1996-01-01

    We have studied genetic variation among clades A through E of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) at the levels of antibody binding to gp120 molecules and virus neutralization. We are unable to identify neutralization serotypes that correspond to the genetic clades. Instead, we observe that inter- and intraclade neutralization of primary isolates by HIV-1-positive sera is generally weak and sporadic; some sera show a reasonable degree of neutralization breadth and potency whereas others are relatively sensitive to neutralization, but no consistent pattern was found. However, a few sera were able to neutralize across clades with significant potency, an observation which may have implications for the feasibility of a broadly effective HIV-1 vaccine involving humoral immunity. Serological assays measuring anti-gp120 antibody binding also failed to identify serotypes that correspond precisely to the genetic clades, but some indications of clade-specific binding were observed, notably with sera from clades B and E. A representative protein for each clade (A through E) was selected on the basis of its specificity, defined as high seroreactivity with sera from individuals infected with virus of that clade and lower reactivity with sera from individuals infected with viruses from other clades. The seroreactivity patterns against these five proteins could be used to predict the genotype of the infecting virus with moderate success. PMID:8523556

  17. SIGNIFICANCE OF BIVALENCE OF ANTIBODY IN VIRAL NEUTRALIZATION

    PubMed Central

    Rosenstein, Robert W.; Nisonoff, Alfred; Uhr, Jonathan W.

    1971-01-01

    The role of bivalence of antibody in its capacity to neutralize virus was studied with rabbit antibodies to the bacteriophage, φX174. Univalent Fab or Fab' fragments of IgG isolated from antiviral antisera obtained early in the immunization schedule had virtually no activity compared to that of the intact IgG. When the antibodies were isolated from antisera of the same rabbits several months later, the univalent fragments and IgG were essentially equal in activity. The results are interpreted on the basis that an IgG molecule, because of its bivalence, has a higher effective combining affinity (avidity) than a univalent fragment. After prolonged immunization, however, the affinity of univalent antibody becomes sufficiently high that it exceeds a threshold value, above which further increase in affinity, through bivalence, is no longer significant. The results could explain the variability in relative effectiveness of univalent antibodies observed in previous studies. These data, and the fact that F(ab')2 fragments from either "early" or "late" antisera were as effective as IgG, indicate that fragment Fc is not a significant factor in neutralization. No differences in dissociation from the virus of univalent antibody from early and late antisera could be demonstrated by dilution at temperatures up to 47°C. The attachment at sites of neutralization on the virus appears to be functionally almost irreversible in this system. PMID:5166611

  18. Ergonomically neutral arm support system

    DOEpatents

    Siminovitch, Michael J; Chung, Jeffrey Y; Dellinges, Steven; Lafever, Robin E

    2005-08-02

    An ergonomic arm support system maintains a neutral position for the forearm. A mechanical support structure attached to a chair or other mounting structure supports the arms of a sitting or standing person. The system includes moving elements and tensioning elements to provide a dynamic balancing force against the forearms. The support structure is not fixed or locked in a rigid position, but is an active dynamic system that is maintained in equipoise by the continuous operation of the opposing forces. The support structure includes an armrest connected to a flexible linkage or articulated or pivoting assembly, which includes a tensioning element such as a spring. The pivoting assembly moves up and down, with the tensioning element providing the upward force that balances the downward force of the arm.

  19. Neutral Hydrogen in Arp 158

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Mansie G.; Simpson, Caroline E.; Gottesman, Stephen T.; Malphrus, Benjamin K.

    2004-09-01

    We present 21 cm observations of Arp 158. We have performed a study of the neutral hydrogen (H I) to help us understand the overall formation and evolution of this system. This is a disturbed system with distinct optical knots connected by a linear structure embedded in luminous material. There is also a diffuse spray to the southeast. The H I seems to be made up of three distinct, kinematically separate systems. Arp 158 bears a certain optical resemblance to NGC 520 (Arp 157), which has been identified as a mid-stage merger. From our 21 cm observations of Arp 158, we also see a comparable H I content with NGC 520. These similarities suggest that Arp 158 is also an intermediate-stage merger.

  20. After treatment ends: neutral time.

    PubMed

    Hurt, G J; McQuellon, R P; Barrett, R J

    1994-01-01

    For persons diagnosed with cancer, the remission period may be marked by increased anxiety and distress. While the medical team may view remission as an eagerly anticipated milestone, the decreased medical surveillance during this time can cause a heightened fear of recurrence for the patient. One author has called this period of remission "neutral time," a time characterized by uncertainty. The safety signal hypothesis, developed by Martin Seligman, may help to explain the anxiety experienced by some patients during the remission period. Because cancer is frequently a silent disease with no overt symptoms, patients in remission often have no safety signal to indicate that the disease will not return. A case study is presented and discussed in light of these two concepts.

  1. An accessible heavy neutral lepton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chao-Hsi

    1982-09-01

    In the SUL(2) ⊗ SUR(2) ⊗ UB-L(1) model, an accessible heavy neutral lepton may exist owing to the mixing of generations. Based on a rough estimate, it is pointed out that the most hopeful experiments to observe this lepton are ν-production in an emulsion (because the track of a particle with lifetime 10-11-10-13 s could be seen) and e-production. The author thanks Professor J.D. Bjorken, Professor He Zuo-Xiu, Professor R.E. Mashark, Professor S.J. Chang, Professor Zhu Cong-Yuan and Professor M. Dine for helpful discussions and comments. He would like to thank the referee for valuable comments.

  2. High Resolution Neutral Atom Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucay, Igal; Castillo-Garza, Rodrigo; Stratis, Georgios; Raizen, Mark

    2015-03-01

    We are developing a high resolution neutral atom microscope based on metastable atom electron spectroscopy (MAES). When a metastable atom of a noble gas is near a solid, a surface electron will tunnel to an empty energy level of the metastable atom, thereby ejecting the excited electron from the atom. The emitted electrons carry information regarding the local topography and electronic, magnetic, and chemical structures of most hard materials. Furthermore, using a chromatic aberration corrected magnetic hexapole lens we expect to attain a spatial resolution below 10 nm. We will use this microscope to investigate how local phenomena can give rise to macroscopic effects in materials that cannot be probed using a scanning tunneling microscope, namely insulating transition metal oxides.

  3. Phenomenology of neutral heavy leptons

    SciTech Connect

    Kalyniak, P.; Melo, I.

    1997-02-01

    We continue our previous work on the flavor-conserving leptonic decays of the Z boson with neutral heavy leptons (NHL`s) in the loops by considering box, vertex, and self-energy diagrams for the muon decay. By inclusion of these loops (they contribute to the input parameter M{sub W}), we can probe the full parameter space spanned by the so-called flavor-conserving mixing parameters ee{sub mix},{mu}{mu}{sub mix},{tau}{tau}{sub mix}. We show that only two diagrams from each class (box, vertex, and self-energy) are important; further, after renormalization only two box diagrams {open_quotes}survive{close_quotes} as dominant. We compare the results of our analysis with the existing work in this field and conclude that flavor-conserving decays have certain advantages over traditionally considered flavor-violating ones. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  4. Phenomenology of neutral heavy leptons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalyniak, Pat; Melo, I.

    1997-02-01

    We continue our previous work on the flavor-conserving leptonic decays of the Z boson with neutral heavy leptons (NHL's) in the loops by considering box, vertex, and self-energy diagrams for the muon decay. By inclusion of these loops (they contribute to the input parameter MW), we can probe the full parameter space spanned by the so-called flavor-conserving mixing parameters eemix,μμmix,ττmix. We show that only two diagrams from each class (box, vertex, and self-energy) are important; further, after renormalization only two box diagrams ``survive'' as dominant. We compare the results of our analysis with the existing work in this field and conclude that flavor-conserving decays have certain advantages over traditionally considered flavor-violating ones.

  5. [Advances in the development of neutralizing therapies for sepsis].

    PubMed

    Florencia Henning, María; Garda, Horacio; Bakás, Laura

    2006-01-01

    Lipopolisaccharide (LPS), also called endotoxin, is the major component of the external membrane in Gram negative bacteria. This molecule is released to circulation by the bacteria, producing a large variety of toxic and pro-inflammatory effects which are associated with lipid A as well as with sepsis pathogenesis. Many physiological phenomena produced by LPS arise from this molecule's capacity to activate cells in the host immune system such as monocytes, macrophages and polymorphonuclear leukocytes. This process leads to a local inflammation, and it is beneficial for the host. However, if the amount of LPS released exceeds the critical concentration threshold an augmented release of inflammatory cytokines as TNF-alpha, and interleukines (IL) produce a severe sepsis. This fact led us to find therapeutical alternatives able to neutralize circulating endotoxin. This work is focused on the experimental results obtained in vivo and in vitro using synthetic proteins and peptides in order to neutralize LPS, and on future perpectives in this research area that offer the use of lipoprotein and in particular apolipoprotein A-I and mutants or peptides derived from this protein.

  6. Infrared spectroscopy of water clusters co-adsorbed with hydrogen molecules on a sodium chloride film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakawa, Koichiro; Fukutani, Katsuyuki

    2016-06-01

    Hydrogen gas containing a trace of water vapor was dosed on a vacuum-evaporated sodium chloride film at 13 K, and water clusters formed on the substrate were investigated by infrared absorption spectroscopy. Absorption bands due to (H2O)n clusters with n = 3-6 and an induced absorption band due to hydrogen were clearly observed. With increasing gas dosage, the intensities of the cluster bands increased linearly while the intensity of the hydrogen band was constant. This suggests that the water clusters were formed in two-dimensional matrices of hydrogen. We found that the water clusters did exist on the surface upon heating even after the hydrogen molecules had desorbed. A further rise of the substrate temperature up to 27 K yielded the formation of larger clusters, (H2O)n with n > 6 . We also discuss the origins of the two bands of the trimer in terms of pseudorotation and a metastable isomer.

  7. Atomic force microscopy electrostatic nanolithography on self-assembled monolayer of organo-mercaptan molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reagan, Michael A.; Juhl, Shane; Umemura, Kazuo

    2005-03-01

    We report a novel technique for manipulating SAM molecules at the nanoscale. An initial stage, the AFM probe induces local modification of the self-assembled monolayer involving cleavage of the sulfur-metal bond. This leads to depressions appearing on the surface's topography images followed by the removal (diffusion) of the desorbed specie. It is known from the macroscopic scale electrochemical experiments that oxidative desorption of the organo-mercaptans from the gold surface takes place at potentials greater than +0.8 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) in aqueous KOH solutions. This corresponds to about -3.9 V in the absolute potential scale. A weak positive bias of the metal substrate is expected to result in the dissociative electron transfer from the mercaptan to the gold, taking place in the surface region localized near the scanning probe tip, where the water can be condensed from the ambient environment forming a nanoscale electrochemical cell.

  8. BEAMS3D Neutral Beam Injection Model

    SciTech Connect

    Lazerson, Samuel

    2014-04-14

    With the advent of applied 3D fi elds in Tokamaks and modern high performance stellarators, a need has arisen to address non-axisymmetric effects on neutral beam heating and fueling. We report on the development of a fully 3D neutral beam injection (NBI) model, BEAMS3D, which addresses this need by coupling 3D equilibria to a guiding center code capable of modeling neutral and charged particle trajectories across the separatrix and into the plasma core. Ionization, neutralization, charge-exchange, viscous velocity reduction, and pitch angle scattering are modeled with the ADAS atomic physics database [1]. Benchmark calculations are presented to validate the collisionless particle orbits, neutral beam injection model, frictional drag, and pitch angle scattering effects. A calculation of neutral beam heating in the NCSX device is performed, highlighting the capability of the code to handle 3D magnetic fields.

  9. Molecular clock on a neutral network.

    PubMed

    Raval, Alpan

    2007-09-28

    The number of fixed mutations accumulated in an evolving population often displays a variance that is significantly larger than the mean (the overdispersed molecular clock). By examining a generic evolutionary process on a neutral network of high-fitness genotypes, we establish a formalism for computing all cumulants of the full probability distribution of accumulated mutations in terms of graph properties of the neutral network, and use the formalism to prove overdispersion of the molecular clock. We further show that significant overdispersion arises naturally in evolution when the neutral network is highly sparse, exhibits large global fluctuations in neutrality, and small local fluctuations in neutrality. The results are also relevant for elucidating aspects of neutral network topology from empirical measurements of the substitution process.

  10. Neutral Vlasov kinetic theory of magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Tronci, Cesare; Camporeale, Enrico

    2015-02-15

    The low-frequency limit of Maxwell equations is considered in the Maxwell-Vlasov system. This limit produces a neutral Vlasov system that captures essential features of plasma dynamics, while neglecting radiation effects. Euler-Poincaré reduction theory is used to show that the neutral Vlasov kinetic theory possesses a variational formulation in both Lagrangian and Eulerian coordinates. By construction, the new model recovers all collisionless neutral models employed in plasma simulations. Then, comparisons between the neutral Vlasov system and hybrid kinetic-fluid models are presented in the linear regime.

  11. EFFECTS OF LEAKAGE NEUTRAL PARTICLES ON SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Ohira, Yutaka

    2012-10-20

    In this paper, we investigate effects of neutral particles on shocks propagating into the partially ionized medium. We find that for 120 km s{sup -1} < u {sub sh} < 3000 km s{sup -1} (u {sub sh} is the shock velocity), about 10% of upstream neutral particles leak into the upstream region from the downstream region. Moreover, we investigate how the leakage neutral particles affect the upstream structure of the shock and particle accelerations. Using four-fluid approximations (upstream ions, upstream neutral particles, leakage neutral particles, and pickup ions), we provide analytical solutions of the precursor structure due to leakage neutral particles. It is shown that the upstream flow is decelerated in the precursor region and the shock compression ratio becomes smaller than without leakage neutral particles, but the total compression ratio does not change. Even if leakage of neutral particles is small (a few percent of total upstream particles), this smaller compression ratio of the shock can explain steep gamma-ray spectra from young supernova remnants. Furthermore, leakage neutral particles could amplify the magnetic field and heat the upstream region.

  12. Neutralization of Chlamydia trachomatis in cell culture.

    PubMed Central

    Howard, L V

    1975-01-01

    Neutralization of Chlamydia trachomatis was assayed by the decrease in inclusion-forming units in baby hamster kidney cells grown in culture. Five percent fresh guinea pig sera increased neutralization titers of rabbit antisera 100- to 1,000-fold but had no effect when normal rabbit sera were tested. Neutralization of a type A or B trachoma isolate was strain specific. Neutralization by human eye secretions and sera also was demonstrated when guinea pig sera were included in the test. All of the six human sera tested showed strain specificity against types A or B, in agreement with typing by the fluorescent antibody technique. PMID:1091549

  13. ION SOURCE WITH SPACE CHARGE NEUTRALIZATION

    DOEpatents

    Flowers, J.W.; Luce, J.S.; Stirling, W.L.

    1963-01-22

    This patent relates to a space charge neutralized ion source in which a refluxing gas-fed arc discharge is provided between a cathode and a gas-fed anode to provide ions. An electron gun directs a controlled, monoenergetic electron beam through the discharge. A space charge neutralization is effected in the ion source and accelerating gap by oscillating low energy electrons, and a space charge neutralization of the source exit beam is effected by the monoenergetic electron beam beyond the source exit end. The neutralized beam may be accelerated to any desired energy at densities well above the limitation imposed by Langmuir-Child' s law. (AEC)

  14. Photochemistry of interstellar molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stief, L. J.

    1971-01-01

    The photochemistry of two diatomic and eight polyatomic molecules is discussed quantitatively. For an interstellar molecule, the lifetime against photodecomposition depends upon the absorption cross section, the quantum yield or probability of dissociation following photon absorption, and the interstellar radiation field. The constant energy density of Habing is used for the unobserved regions of interstellar radiation field, and the field in obscuring clouds is estimated by combining the constant flux with the observed interstellar extinction curve covering the visible and ultraviolet regions. Lifetimes against photodecomposition in the unobscured regions and as a function of increasing optical thickness in obscuring clouds are calculated for the ten species. The results show that, except for CO, all the molecules have comparable lifetimes of less than one hundred years. Thus they can exist only in dense clouds and can never have been exposed to the unobscured radiation. The calculations further show that the lifetimes in clouds of moderate opacity are of the order of one million years.

  15. MOLECULES IN {eta} CARINAE

    SciTech Connect

    Loinard, Laurent; Menten, Karl M.; Guesten, Rolf; Zapata, Luis A.; Rodriguez, Luis F.

    2012-04-10

    We report the detection toward {eta} Carinae of six new molecules, CO, CN, HCO{sup +}, HCN, HNC, and N{sub 2}H{sup +}, and of two of their less abundant isotopic counterparts, {sup 13}CO and H{sup 13}CN. The line profiles are moderately broad ({approx}100 km s{sup -1}), indicating that the emission originates in the dense, possibly clumpy, central arcsecond of the Homunculus Nebula. Contrary to previous claims, CO and HCO{sup +} do not appear to be underabundant in {eta} Carinae. On the other hand, molecules containing nitrogen or the {sup 13}C isotope of carbon are overabundant by about one order of magnitude. This demonstrates that, together with the dust responsible for the dimming of {eta} Carinae following the Great Eruption, the molecules detected here must have formed in situ out of CNO-processed stellar material.

  16. Atomic branching in molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, Ernesto; Rodríguez-Velázquez, Juan A.; Randić, Milan

    A graph theoretic measure of extended atomic branching is defined that accounts for the effects of all atoms in the molecule, giving higher weight to the nearest neighbors. It is based on the counting of all substructures in which an atom takes part in a molecule. We prove a theorem that permits the exact calculation of this measure based on the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the adjacency matrix of the graph representing a molecule. The definition of this measure within the context of the Hückel molecular orbital (HMO) and its calculation for benzenoid hydrocarbons are also studied. We show that the extended atomic branching can be defined using any real symmetric matrix, as well as any Hermitian (self-adjoint) matrix, which permits its calculation in topological, geometrical, and quantum chemical contexts.

  17. Probing micro-solvation in "numbers": the case of neutral dipeptides in water.

    PubMed

    Takis, Panteleimon G; Papavasileiou, Konstantinos D; Peristeras, Loukas D; Melissas, Vasilios S; Troganis, Anastassios N

    2013-05-21

    How many solvent molecules and in what way do they interact directly with biomolecules? This is one of the most challenging questions regarding a deep understanding of biomolecular functionalism and solvation. We herein present a novel NMR spectroscopic study, achieving for the first time the quantification of the directly interacting water molecules with several neutral dipeptides. Our proposed method is supported by both molecular dynamics simulations and density functional theory calculations, advanced analysis of which allowed the identification of the direct interactions between solute-solvent molecules in the zwitterionic L-alanyl-L-alanine dipeptide-water system. Beyond the quantification of dipeptide-water molecule direct interactions, this NMR technique could be useful for the determination and elucidation of small to moderate bio-organic molecular groups' direct interactions with various polar solvent molecules, shedding light on the biomolecular micro-solvation processes and behaviour in various solvents.

  18. Structure and dynamics of supercooled water in neutral confinements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klameth, F.; Vogel, M.

    2013-04-01

    We perform molecular dynamics simulations to study the structure and dynamics of liquid water in neutral nanopores, which are generated by pinning a suitable subset of water molecules in an equilibrium configuration of a bulk system. It is found that such neutral confinement does not disturb the structure of water, in particular, the local tetrahedral order, while it imposes a pronounced spatial inhomogeneity on the dynamics of water. Specifically, when the pore wall is approached, hopping motion sets in and water dynamics slows down. We show that the logarithm of the correlation time is an exponential function of the distance to the wall, indicating a tremendous gradient of water mobility across the confinement. Upon cooling, the length scale associated with this exponential distance dependence and, thus, the range of the wall effect increases, at least down to the critical temperature of mode coupling theory, Tc. Also, the temperature dependence of water dynamics varies across the pore, i.e., fragility is high in the pore center, while it is low near the pore wall. Due to all these effects, time-temperature superposition is violated. Our observations for a neutral confinement reveal that specific interactions at hydrophilic or hydrophobic walls are not the main cause of spatially inhomogeneous dynamics of confined water. In view of similarities with the behavior of Lennard-Jones liquids in neutral confinements, one may rather speculate that the effects observed for confined water are general and result from the existence of a static contribution to the energy landscape, which is imprinted by an immobile environment.

  19. Single Molecule Manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiang, Ching-Hwa

    2011-10-01

    Single-molecule manipulation studies open a door for a close-up investigation of complex biological interactions at the molecular level. In these studies, single biomolecules are pulled while their force response is being monitored. The process is often nonequilibrium, and interpretation of the results has been challenging. We used the atomic force microscope to pull proteins and DNA, and determined the equilibrium properties of the molecules using the recently derived nonequilibrium work theorem. I will present applications of the technique in areas ranging from fundamental biological problems such as DNA mechanics, to complex medical processes such as the mechanical activation of von Willebrand Factor, a key protein in blood coagulation.

  20. Plasmonic nanostructures: artificial molecules.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Brandl, Daniel W; Nordlander, Peter; Halas, Naomi J

    2007-01-01

    This Account describes a new paradigm for the relationship between the geometry of metallic nanostructures and their optical properties. While the interaction of light with metallic nanoparticles is determined by their collective electronic or plasmon response, a compelling analogy exists between plasmon resonances of metallic nanoparticles and wave functions of simple atoms and molecules. Based on this insight, an entire family of plasmonic nanostructures, artificial molecules, has been developed whose optical properties can be understood within this picture: nanoparticles (nanoshells, nanoeggs, nanomatryushkas, nanorice), multi-nanoparticle assemblies (dimers, trimers, quadrumers), and a nanoparticle-over-metallic film, an electromagnetic analog of the spinless Anderson model. PMID:17226945

  1. Neutral Beams from Blazar Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atoyan, Armen M.; Dermer, Charles D.

    2003-03-01

    We treat the production of neutrons, photons, and neutrinos through photomeson interactions of relativistic protons with ambient photons in the compact inner jets of blazars. Internal synchrotron and external isotropic radiation due to scattered optical/UV accretion-disk radiation are considered as target photon fields. Protons are assumed to be accelerated to a maximum energy limited by the size scale and magnetic field of the jet, and by competing energy losses. We characterize the conditions when the photomeson interactions of ultrarelativistic protons become effective, and show that the presence of the external radiation field makes possible strong energy losses for protons with energies Ep>~1015 eV. Without this component, effective energy losses of protons begin at Ep>~1018 eV, and would rapidly disappear with expansion of the blob. We develop a model describing the production and escape of neutrons from a comoving spherical blob, which continue to interact with the ambient external radiation field on the parsec-scale broad-line region (BLR). Neutrons may carry ~10% of the overall energy of the accelerated protons with Ep>~1015 eV outside the BLR. Ultra-high-energy gamma rays produced by photomeson interaction of neutrons outside the blob can also escape the BLR. The escaping neutrons, gamma rays, and neutrinos form a collimated neutral beam with a characteristic opening angle θ~1/Γ, where Γ is the bulk Lorentz factor of the inner jet. Energy and momentum is deposited in the extended jet from the decay of neutrons at distances ld(En)~(En/1017eV) kpc, and through pair-production attenuation of gamma rays with energies Eγ>~1015 eV which propagate to ~10-100 kpc distances. In this scenario, neutral beams of ultra-high-energy gamma rays and neutrons can be the reason for straight extended jets, such as in Pictor A. Fluxes of neutrinos detectable with kilometer-scale neutrino telescopes are predicted from flat-spectrum radio quasars such as 3C 279.

  2. Modelling the Neutral Sodium Tails of Comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkett, K. S.; Jones, G. H.; Coates, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    Neutral sodium is typically easy to detect in active comets around perihelion, due to the very high efficiency of the sodium D transition, and at some comets a distinct neutral sodium tail is observed. The first distinct neutral sodium tail images were apparent in comet Hale-Bopp (C/1995 O1) data taken using CoCam [Cremonese et al, 1997], but since this initial detection similar features have been observed at a number of near-Sun comets using the SOHO/LASCO coronagraph. An understanding of the distribution and evolution of neutral cometary sodium may best be developed using a combination of spectra and images in different filters at multiple times throughout a comet's orbit. At present the source of neutral sodium in comets is unknown, primarily because the evolution of neutral cometary sodium is difficult to intuitively predict due to the Swings and Greenstein effects. Several authors [review presented in Cremonese et al, 1999] have suggested various combinations of sources of neutral sodium in the nuclear region, near-nuclear region, dust tail and ion tail. In order to understand the wide variety of cometary observations of neutral sodium available we have developed the first fully three dimensional, heliocentric distance dependent, versatile Monte Carlo neutral sodium tail model (initially based on a model developed by [Brown et al, 1998]). Our model is known as COMPASS (Cometary Orbital Motion at Perihelion: an Adaptable Sodium Simulation), and incorporates the unintuitive variation in radiation pressure influences on sodium atoms with different heliocentric velocities. We present the initial results of a comparison between COMPASS and observational data. We have found good agreement between the overall morphology of the neutral sodium tail imaged at comet Hale-Bopp and COMPASS, and have begun to extend the study to other comets of interest. We also present a comparison between simulated COMPASS spectra and observations. The versatility of COMPASS allows it to

  3. Neutralization efficiency estimation in a neutral beam source based on inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Vozniy, O. V.; Yeom, G. Y.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the optimal conditions of neutral beam generation to maintain a high degree of neutralization and focusing during beam energy variation for a neutral beam source based on inductively coupled plasma with a three-grid ion beam acceleration system. The neutral beam energy distribution was estimated by measuring the energy profiles of ions that 'survived' the neutralization after reflection. The energy measurements of the primary and reflected ions showed narrow distribution functions, each with only one peak. At higher beam energies, both the ratio of the ion energy loss to the primary energy and the degree of energy divergence decreased, confirming the precise alignment of the neutral beam. The neutralization efficiency of the neutral beam source with a three-grid acceleration system was found to be affected mainly by the beam angle divergence rather than by the particle translation energy.

  4. Neutral molecular cluster formation of sulfuric acid-dimethylamine observed in real time under atmospheric conditions.

    PubMed

    Kürten, Andreas; Jokinen, Tuija; Simon, Mario; Sipilä, Mikko; Sarnela, Nina; Junninen, Heikki; Adamov, Alexey; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M; Duplissy, Jonathan; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C; Franchin, Alessandro; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Heinritzi, Martin; Hutterli, Manuel; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kirkby, Jasper; Laaksonen, Ari; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Leiminger, Markus; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mathot, Serge; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud P; Riccobono, Francesco; Rissanen, Matti P; Rondo, Linda; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Seinfeld, John H; Steiner, Gerhard; Tomé, António; Tröstl, Jasmin; Winkler, Paul M; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Ye, Penglin; Baltensperger, Urs; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Kulmala, Markku; Worsnop, Douglas R; Curtius, Joachim

    2014-10-21

    For atmospheric sulfuric acid (SA) concentrations the presence of dimethylamine (DMA) at mixing ratios of several parts per trillion by volume can explain observed boundary layer new particle formation rates. However, the concentration and molecular composition of the neutral (uncharged) clusters have not been reported so far due to the lack of suitable instrumentation. Here we report on experiments from the Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets chamber at the European Organization for Nuclear Research revealing the formation of neutral particles containing up to 14 SA and 16 DMA molecules, corresponding to a mobility diameter of about 2 nm, under atmospherically relevant conditions. These measurements bridge the gap between the molecular and particle perspectives of nucleation, revealing the fundamental processes involved in particle formation and growth. The neutral clusters are found to form at or close to the kinetic limit where particle formation is limited only by the collision rate of SA molecules. Even though the neutral particles are stable against evaporation from the SA dimer onward, the formation rates of particles at 1.7-nm size, which contain about 10 SA molecules, are up to 4 orders of magnitude smaller compared with those of the dimer due to coagulation and wall loss of particles before they reach 1.7 nm in diameter. This demonstrates that neither the atmospheric particle formation rate nor its dependence on SA can simply be interpreted in terms of cluster evaporation or the molecular composition of a critical nucleus.

  5. The status of neutral currents

    SciTech Connect

    Zwirner, F.

    1987-11-01

    The situation of particle physics today is quite puzzling. On the one hand, the Standard Model (SM) of strong and electroweak interactions is consistent with all confirmed experimental data but theoretically rather unsatisfactory. On the other hand, none of the many theoretical speculations which try to go beyond the SM has (yet) received the slightest experimental support. The solution to this dilemma can only come from new data: either from the detection of a new particle threshold at high energy colliders, or from the appearance of some small discrepancy in high-precision experiments. A crucial sector for testing the SM and its extensions is that of neutral currents (NC), where an impressive amount of data has been collected in recent years. While waiting for the next generation of experiments, it is certainly useful to take stock of our knowledge, determining the NC parameters as precisely as we can and putting limits on possible deviations from the SM. The present talk contains the results of a recent analysis along these lines: the first part illustrates how a set of 'model-independent' parameters can be extracted from the available NC data, the second part particularizes the analysis to the SM and to some superstring-inspired models with an additional Z' in their low-energy spectrum. 27 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Neutral Models of Microbiome Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Qinglong; Sukumaran, Jeet; Wu, Steven; Rodrigo, Allen

    2015-01-01

    There has been an explosion of research on host-associated microbial communities (i.e.,microbiomes). Much of this research has focused on surveys of microbial diversities across a variety of host species, including humans, with a view to understanding how these microbiomes are distributed across space and time, and how they correlate with host health, disease, phenotype, physiology and ecology. Fewer studies have focused on how these microbiomes may have evolved. In this paper, we develop an agent-based framework to study the dynamics of microbiome evolution. Our framework incorporates neutral models of how hosts acquire their microbiomes, and how the environmental microbial community that is available to the hosts is assembled. Most importantly, our framework also incorporates a Wright-Fisher genealogical model of hosts, so that the dynamics of microbiome evolution is studied on an evolutionary timescale. Our results indicate that the extent of parental contribution to microbial availability from one generation to the next significantly impacts the diversity of microbiomes: the greater the parental contribution, the less diverse the microbiomes. In contrast, even when there is only a very small contribution from a constant environmental pool, microbial communities can remain highly diverse. Finally, we show that our models may be used to construct hypotheses about the types of processes that operate to assemble microbiomes over evolutionary time. PMID:26200800

  7. Algebraic theory of molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iachello, Franco

    1995-01-01

    An algebraic formulation of quantum mechanics is presented. In this formulation, operators of interest are expanded onto elements of an algebra, G. For bound state problems in nu dimensions the algebra G is taken to be U(nu + 1). Applications to the structure of molecules are presented.

  8. Diversity in Biological Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newbury, H. John

    2010-01-01

    One of the striking characteristics of fundamental biological processes, such as genetic inheritance, development and primary metabolism, is the limited amount of variation in the molecules involved. Natural selective pressures act strongly on these core processes and individuals carrying mutations and producing slightly sub-optimal versions of…

  9. Halley's polymeric organic molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huebner, W. F.; Boice, D. C.; Korth, A.

    1989-01-01

    The detection of polymeric organic compounds in the mass spectrum of Comet Halley obtained with the Positive Ion Cluster Composition analyzer on Giotto are examined. It is found that, in addition to polyoxymethylene, other polymers and complex molecules may exist in the comet. It is suggested that polymerized hydrogen cyanide may be a source for the observed CN and NH2 jets.

  10. Mighty Molecule Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Tom; Rushton, Greg; Bencomo, Marie

    2008-01-01

    As part of the SMATHematics Project: The Wonder of Science, The Power of Mathematics--a collaborative partnership between Kennesaw State University and two local school districts, fifth graders had the opportunity to puzzle out chemical formulas of propane, methanol, and other important molecules. In addition, they explored properties that…

  11. The Dubious Value of Value Neutrality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balch, Stephen H.

    2006-01-01

    Hard science is properly value neutral. But when that ideological neutrality extends to the whole university, the traditional foundation crumbles. Steve Balch laments the moral vacuum that now substitutes for fundamental principles, because it is impossible to frame a program of education--especially in the humanities and social sciences--without…

  12. Ion-Neutral Coupling in Solar Prominences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Holly

    2011-01-01

    Interactions between ions and neutrals in a partially ionized plasma are important throughout heliophysics, including near the solar surface in prominences. Understanding how ion-neutral coupling affects formation, support, structure, and dynamics of prominences will advance our physical understanding of magnetized systems involving a transition from a weakly ionized dense gas to a fully ionized tenuous plasma. We address the fundamental physics of prominence support, which is normally described in terms of a magnetic force on the prominence plasma that balances the solar gravitational force, and the implications for observations. Because the prominence plasma is only partially ionized, it is necessary to consider the support of the both the ionized and neutral components. Support of the neutrals is accomplished through a frictional interaction between the neutral and ionized components of the plasma, and its efficacy depends strongly on the degree of ionization of the plasma. More specifically, the frictional force is proportional to the relative flow of neutral and ion species, and for a sufficiently weakly ionized plasma, this flow must be relatively large to produce a frictional force that balances gravity. A large relative flow, of course, implies significant draining of neutral particles from the prominence. We evaluate the importance of this draining effect for a hydrogen-helium plasma, and consider the observational evidence for cross-field diffusion of neutral prominence material.

  13. 6 CFR 27.305 - Neutral adjudications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Neutral adjudications. 27.305 Section 27.305 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY CHEMICAL FACILITY ANTI-TERRORISM STANDARDS Orders and Adjudications § 27.305 Neutral adjudications. (a) Any facility or other person who...

  14. 6 CFR 27.305 - Neutral adjudications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Neutral adjudications. 27.305 Section 27.305 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY CHEMICAL FACILITY ANTI-TERRORISM STANDARDS Orders and Adjudications § 27.305 Neutral adjudications. (a) Any facility or other person who...

  15. 6 CFR 27.305 - Neutral adjudications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Neutral adjudications. 27.305 Section 27.305 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY CHEMICAL FACILITY ANTI-TERRORISM STANDARDS Orders and Adjudications § 27.305 Neutral adjudications. (a) Any facility or other person who...

  16. 6 CFR 27.305 - Neutral adjudications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Neutral adjudications. 27.305 Section 27.305 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY CHEMICAL FACILITY ANTI-TERRORISM STANDARDS Orders and Adjudications § 27.305 Neutral adjudications. (a) Any facility or other person who...

  17. 32 CFR 644.323 - Neutral language.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Neutral language. 644.323 Section 644.323 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal § 644.323 Neutral language. Wherever the words “man”, “men”, or their...

  18. 32 CFR 644.323 - Neutral language.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Neutral language. 644.323 Section 644.323 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal § 644.323 Neutral language. Wherever the words “man”, “men”, or their...

  19. Efficient laser production of energetic neutral beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mollica, F.; Antonelli, L.; Flacco, A.; Braenzel, J.; Vauzour, B.; Folpini, G.; Birindelli, G.; Schnuerer, M.; Batani, D.; Malka, V.

    2016-03-01

    Laser-driven ion acceleration by intense, ultra-short, laser pulse has received increasing attention in recent years, and the availability of much compact and versatile ions sources motivates the study of laser-driven sources of energetic neutral atoms. We demonstrate the production of a neutral and directional beam of hydrogen and carbon atoms up to 200 keV per nucleon, with a peak flow of 2.7× {{10}13} atom s-1. Laser accelerated ions are neutralized in a pulsed, supersonic argon jet with tunable density between 1.5× {{10}17} cm-3and 6× {{10}18} cm-3. The neutralization efficiency has been measured by a time-of-flight detector for different argon densities. An optimum is found, for which complete neutralization occurs. The neutralization rate can be explained only at high areal densities (>1× {{10}17} cm-2) by single electron charge transfer processes. These results suggest a new perspective for the study of neutral production by laser and open discussion of neutralization at a lower density.

  20. Targets for high power neutral beams

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.

    1980-01-01

    Stopping high-power, long-pulse beams is fast becoming an engineering challenge, particularly in neutral beam injectors for heating magnetically confined plasmas. A brief review of neutral beam target technology is presented along with heat transfer calculations for some selected target designs.

  1. Topologies for neutral functional differential equations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melvin, W. R.

    1973-01-01

    Bounded topologies are considered for functional differential equations of the neutral type in which present dynamics of the system are influenced by its past behavior. A special bounded topology is generated on a collection of absolutely continuous functions with essentially bounded derivatives, and an application to a class of nonlinear neutral functional differential equations due to Driver (1965) is presented.

  2. Types of Neutralization and Types of Delinquency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Jim; Dodder, Richard A.

    1983-01-01

    Neutralization theory was tested with questionnaires administered to a random sample of public high school students (N-298) and institutionalized male delinquents (N-53). Neutralization acceptance technique patterns were similar across subsamples; however, correlations between each technique and each type of delinquency were statistically…

  3. 6 CFR 27.305 - Neutral adjudications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Neutral adjudications. 27.305 Section 27.305 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY CHEMICAL FACILITY ANTI-TERRORISM STANDARDS Orders and Adjudications § 27.305 Neutral adjudications. (a) Any facility or other person who...

  4. Rydberg States of Atoms and Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stebbings, R. F.; Dunning, F. B.

    2011-03-01

    List of contributors; Preface; 1. Rydberg atoms in astrophysics A. Dalgarno; 2. Theoretical studies of hydrogen Rydberg atoms in electric fields R. J. Damburg and V. V. Kolosov; 3. Rydberg atoms in strong fields D. Kleppner, Michael G. Littman and Myron L. Zimmerman; 4. Spectroscopy of one- and two-electron Rydberg atoms C. Fabre and S. Haroche; 5. Interaction of Rydberg atoms with blackbody radiation T. F. Gallagher; 6. Theoretical approaches to low-energy collisions of Rydberg atoms with atoms and ions A. P. Hickman, R. E. Olson and J. Pascale; 7. Experimental studies of the interaction of Rydberg atoms with atomic species at thermal energies F. Gounand and J. Berlande; 8. Theoretical studies of collisions of Rydberg atoms with molecules Michio Matsuzawa; 9. Experimental studies of thermal-energy collisions of Rydberg atoms with molecules F. B. Dunning and R. F. Stebbings; 10. High-Rydberg molecules Robert S. Freund; 11. Theory of Rydberg collisions with electrons, ions and neutrals M. R. Flannery; 12. Experimental studies of the interactions of Rydberg atoms with charged particles J. -F. Delpech; 13. Rydberg studies using fast beams Peter M. Koch; Index.

  5. OMG: Open Molecule Generator

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Computer Assisted Structure Elucidation has been used for decades to discover the chemical structure of unknown compounds. In this work we introduce the first open source structure generator, Open Molecule Generator (OMG), which for a given elemental composition produces all non-isomorphic chemical structures that match that elemental composition. Furthermore, this structure generator can accept as additional input one or multiple non-overlapping prescribed substructures to drastically reduce the number of possible chemical structures. Being open source allows for customization and future extension of its functionality. OMG relies on a modified version of the Canonical Augmentation Path, which grows intermediate chemical structures by adding bonds and checks that at each step only unique molecules are produced. In order to benchmark the tool, we generated chemical structures for the elemental formulas and substructures of different metabolites and compared the results with a commercially available structure generator. The results obtained, i.e. the number of molecules generated, were identical for elemental compositions having only C, O and H. For elemental compositions containing C, O, H, N, P and S, OMG produces all the chemically valid molecules while the other generator produces more, yet chemically impossible, molecules. The chemical completeness of the OMG results comes at the expense of being slower than the commercial generator. In addition to being open source, OMG clearly showed the added value of constraining the solution space by using multiple prescribed substructures as input. We expect this structure generator to be useful in many fields, but to be especially of great importance for metabolomics, where identifying unknown metabolites is still a major bottleneck. PMID:22985496

  6. OMG: Open Molecule Generator.

    PubMed

    Peironcely, Julio E; Rojas-Chertó, Miguel; Fichera, Davide; Reijmers, Theo; Coulier, Leon; Faulon, Jean-Loup; Hankemeier, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Computer Assisted Structure Elucidation has been used for decades to discover the chemical structure of unknown compounds. In this work we introduce the first open source structure generator, Open Molecule Generator (OMG), which for a given elemental composition produces all non-isomorphic chemical structures that match that elemental composition. Furthermore, this structure generator can accept as additional input one or multiple non-overlapping prescribed substructures to drastically reduce the number of possible chemical structures. Being open source allows for customization and future extension of its functionality. OMG relies on a modified version of the Canonical Augmentation Path, which grows intermediate chemical structures by adding bonds and checks that at each step only unique molecules are produced. In order to benchmark the tool, we generated chemical structures for the elemental formulas and substructures of different metabolites and compared the results with a commercially available structure generator. The results obtained, i.e. the number of molecules generated, were identical for elemental compositions having only C, O and H. For elemental compositions containing C, O, H, N, P and S, OMG produces all the chemically valid molecules while the other generator produces more, yet chemically impossible, molecules. The chemical completeness of the OMG results comes at the expense of being slower than the commercial generator. In addition to being open source, OMG clearly showed the added value of constraining the solution space by using multiple prescribed substructures as input. We expect this structure generator to be useful in many fields, but to be especially of great importance for metabolomics, where identifying unknown metabolites is still a major bottleneck. PMID:22985496

  7. OMG: Open Molecule Generator.

    PubMed

    Peironcely, Julio E; Rojas-Chertó, Miguel; Fichera, Davide; Reijmers, Theo; Coulier, Leon; Faulon, Jean-Loup; Hankemeier, Thomas

    2012-09-17

    Computer Assisted Structure Elucidation has been used for decades to discover the chemical structure of unknown compounds. In this work we introduce the first open source structure generator, Open Molecule Generator (OMG), which for a given elemental composition produces all non-isomorphic chemical structures that match that elemental composition. Furthermore, this structure generator can accept as additional input one or multiple non-overlapping prescribed substructures to drastically reduce the number of possible chemical structures. Being open source allows for customization and future extension of its functionality. OMG relies on a modified version of the Canonical Augmentation Path, which grows intermediate chemical structures by adding bonds and checks that at each step only unique molecules are produced. In order to benchmark the tool, we generated chemical structures for the elemental formulas and substructures of different metabolites and compared the results with a commercially available structure generator. The results obtained, i.e. the number of molecules generated, were identical for elemental compositions having only C, O and H. For elemental compositions containing C, O, H, N, P and S, OMG produces all the chemically valid molecules while the other generator produces more, yet chemically impossible, molecules. The chemical completeness of the OMG results comes at the expense of being slower than the commercial generator. In addition to being open source, OMG clearly showed the added value of constraining the solution space by using multiple prescribed substructures as input. We expect this structure generator to be useful in many fields, but to be especially of great importance for metabolomics, where identifying unknown metabolites is still a major bottleneck.

  8. Trimeric Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-Anchored HCDR3 of Broadly Neutralizing Antibody PG16 Is a Potent HIV-1 Entry Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lihong; Wang, Weiming; Yang, Lifei; Ren, Huanhuan; Kimata, Jason T.

    2013-01-01

    PG9 and PG16 are two quaternary-structure-specific broadly neutralizing antibodies with unique HCDR3 subdomains. Previously, we showed that glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored HCDR3 subdomains (GPI-HCDR3) can be targeted to lipid rafts of the plasma membrane, bind to the epitope recognized by HCDR3 of PG16, and neutralize diverse HIV-1 isolates. In this study, we further developed trimeric GPI-HCDR3s and demonstrated that trimeric GPI-HCDR3 (PG16) dramatically improves anti-HIV-1 neutralization, suggesting that a stoichiometry of recognition of 3 or 2 HCDR3 molecules (PG16) to 1 viral spike is possible. PMID:23152526

  9. Neutral depletion and the helicon density limit

    SciTech Connect

    Magee, R. M.; Galante, M. E.; Carr, J. Jr.; Lusk, G.; McCarren, D. W.; Scime, E. E.

    2013-12-15

    It is straightforward to create fully ionized plasmas with modest rf power in a helicon. It is difficult, however, to create plasmas with density >10{sup 20} m{sup −3}, because neutral depletion leads to a lack of fuel. In order to address this density limit, we present fast (1 MHz), time-resolved measurements of the neutral density at and downstream from the rf antenna in krypton helicon plasmas. At the start of the discharge, the neutral density underneath the antenna is reduced to 1% of its initial value in 15 μs. The ionization rate inferred from these data implies that the electron temperature near the antenna is much higher than the electron temperature measured downstream. Neutral density measurements made downstream from the antenna show much slower depletion, requiring 14 ms to decrease by a factor of 1/e. Furthermore, the downstream depletion appears to be due to neutral pumping rather than ionization.

  10. Beta-galactosidase and selective neutrality. [amino acid composition of proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmquist, R.

    1979-01-01

    Three hypotheses to explain the amino acid composition of proteins are inconsistent (about 10 to the minus 9th) with the experimental data for beta-galactosidase from Escherichia coli. The exceptional length of this protein, 1021 residues, permits rigorous tests of these hypotheses without complication from statistical artifacts. Either this protein is not at compositional equilibrium, which is unlikely from knowledge about other proteins, or the evolution of this protein and its coding gene have not been selectively neutral. However, the composition of approximately 60% of the molecule is consistent with either a selectively neutral or nonneutral evolutionary process.

  11. Bacterial invasion reconstructed molecule by molecule

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, James H

    2009-01-01

    We propose to visualize the initial stages of bacterial infection of a human host cell with unmatched spatial and temporal resolution. This work will develop a new capability for the laboratory (super-resolution optical imaging), will test unresolved scientific hypotheses regarding host-pathogen interaction dynamics, and leverages state of the art 3D molecular tracking instrumentation developed recently by our group. There is much to be gained by applying new single molecule tools to the important and familiar problem of pathogen entry into a host cell. For example, conventional fluorescence microscopy has identified key host receptors, such as CD44 and {alpha}5{beta}1 integrin, that aggregate near the site of Salmonella typhimurium infection of human cells. However, due to the small size of the bacteria ({approx} 2 {micro}m) and the diffraction of the emitted light, one just sees a fluorescent 'blob' of host receptors that aggregate at the site of attachment, making it difficult to determine the exact number of receptors present or whether there is any particular spatial arrangement of the receptors that facilitates bacterial adhesion/entry. Using newly developed single molecule based super-resolution imaging methods, we will visualize how host receptors are directed to the site of pathogen adhesion and whether host receptors adopt a specific spatial arrangement for successful infection. Furthermore, we will employ our 3D molecular tracking methods to follow the injection of virulence proteins, or effectors, into the host cell by the pathogen Type III secretion system (TTSS). We expect these studies to provide mechanistic insights into the early events of pathogen infection that have here-to-fore been technically beyond our reach. Our Research Goals are: Goal 1--Construct a super-resolution fluorescence microscope and use this new capability to image the spatial distribution of different host receptors (e.g. CD44, as {alpha}5{beta}1 integrin) at the point of

  12. Single-molecule electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, A.; Shera, E.B.

    1995-09-15

    A novel method for the detection and identification of single molecules in solution has been devised, computer simulated, and experimentally achieved. The technique involves the determination of electrophoretic velocities by measuring the time required for individual molecules to travel a fixed distance between two laser beams. Computer simulations of the process were performed before-hand in order to estimate the experimental feasibility of the method and to determine the optimum values for the various experimental parameters. Examples of the use of the technique for the ultrasensitive detection and identification of rhodamine-6G, a mixture of DNA restriction fragments, and a mixture of proteins in aqueous solution are presented. 20 refs., 8 figs.

  13. Cometary Parent Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Paul

    1990-12-01

    We propose to use HRS observations of a suitable target-of-opportunity comet to study two outstanding problems related to the composition of the volatile component of the cometary nucleus. These problems concern two species, CO and S2, which have been observed in the cometary coma and identified as "parent" molecules sublimating directly from the nucleus. Both of these molecules have their principal fluorescent emissions in the vaccuum ultraviolet. The high spectral resolution will allow the determination of the rotational temperature of CO, which is diagnostic of the source temperature and the excitation mechanism of the observed emission. The determination of the abundance of both CO and S2 in the primarily water ice of the nucleus can serve to constrain current models of comet formation in the primordial solar nebula.

  14. Modeling Neutral Hydrogen in the Heliospheric Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heerikhuisen, J.; Pogorelov, N.

    2009-05-01

    Observational data of neutral atoms provides us with a 1 AU picture of the neutral atom flux in the heliosphere. The large mean free paths of neutrals allow us to infer properties of their distant source, as well as the properties of the intermediary medium. Energetic neutral hydrogen, for example, travels on almost straight trajectories, so that the particles observed coming from a particular direction were created from energetic protons along that line of sight. Similarly, low energy interstellar atoms are attenuated and deflected as they enter the heliosphere, and this deflection tells us something about the structure of the heliospheric interface. Of course, to infer quantitative features of the global heliosphere from neutral atom observations at 1 AU, we need accurate models that capture the 3D structure of the heliosphere. We will present an advanced MHD-neutral model of the heliosphere which is 3D, employs kinetic neutral Hydrogen, and incorporates a suprathermal tail on the solar wind proton distribution to approximate pick-up ions. We will demonstrate that with the help of such a model, we can test various hypotheses regarding the heliospheric boundary via forward modeling and comparison with data.

  15. Modeling Neutral Hydrogen in the Heliospheric Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heerikhuisen, Jacob; Pogorelov, Nikolai; Brand, Pontus

    2010-03-01

    Observational data of neutral atoms provides us with a 1 AU picture of the neutral atom flux in the heliosphere. The large mean free paths of neutrals allow us to infer properties of their distant source, as well as the properties of the intermediary medium. Energetic neutral hydrogen, for example, travels on almost straight trajectories, so that the particles observed coming from a particular direction were created from energetic protons along that line of sight. Similarly, low energy interstellar atoms are attenuated and deflected as they enter the heliosphere, and this deflection tells us something about the structure of the heliospheric interface. Of course, to infer quantitative features of the global heliosphere from neutral atom observations at 1 AU, we need accurate models that capture the 3D structure of the heliosphere. In this paper we present our MHD-plasma/kinetic-neutral model of the heliospheric interface that uses a Lorentzian distribution function to approximate a suprathermal tail on the solar wind proton distribution due to pick-up ions. We investigate the effect the k parameter of the Lorentzian function has on the overall solution and the flux of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs). ENA fluxes are also compared to ``pre-IBEX'' spacecraft data.

  16. Photonic Molecule Lasers Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, Denis; Dumont, Joey; Déziel, Jean-Luc; Dubé, Louis J.

    2014-05-01

    Photonic molecules (PMs) formed by coupling two or more optical resonators are ideal candidates for the fabrication of integrated microlasers, photonic molecule lasers. Whereas most calculations on PM lasers have been based on cold-cavity (passive) modes, i.e. quasi-bound states, a recently formulated steady-state ab initio laser theory (SALT) offers the possibility to take into account the spectral properties of the underlying gain transition, its position and linewidth, as well as incorporating an arbitrary pump profile. We will combine two theoretical approaches to characterize the lasing properties of PM lasers: for two-dimensional systems, the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory will obtain the resonant modes of the coupled molecules in an active medium described by SALT. Not only is then the theoretical description more complete, the use of an active medium provides additional parameters to control, engineer and harness the lasing properties of PM lasers for ultra-low threshold and directional single-mode emission. We will extend our recent study and present new results for a number of promising geometries. The authors acknowledge financial support from NSERC (Canada) and the CERC in Photonic Innovations of Y. Messaddeq.

  17. 46 CFR 120.376 - Grounded distribution systems (Neutral grounded).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... distribution system having a neutral bus or conductor must have the neutral grounded. (c) The neutral or each... generator is connected to the bus, except the neutral of an emergency power generation system must be... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Grounded distribution systems (Neutral grounded)....

  18. 46 CFR 120.376 - Grounded distribution systems (Neutral grounded).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... distribution system having a neutral bus or conductor must have the neutral grounded. (c) The neutral or each... generator is connected to the bus, except the neutral of an emergency power generation system must be... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Grounded distribution systems (Neutral grounded)....

  19. 46 CFR 120.376 - Grounded distribution systems (Neutral grounded).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... distribution system having a neutral bus or conductor must have the neutral grounded. (c) The neutral or each... generator is connected to the bus, except the neutral of an emergency power generation system must be... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Grounded distribution systems (Neutral grounded)....

  20. Neutral Supersymmetric Higgs Boson Searches

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Stephen Luke

    2008-07-01

    In some Supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model, including the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM), the coupling of Higgs bosons to b-quarks is enhanced. This enhancement makes the associated production of the Higgs with b-quarks an interesting search channel for the Higgs and Supersymmetry at D0. The identification of b-quarks, both online and offline, is essential to this search effort. This thesis describes the author's involvement in the development of both types of b-tagging and in the application of these techniques to the MSSM Higgs search. Work was carried out on the Level-3 trigger b-tagging algorithms. The impact parameter (IP) b-tagger was retuned and the effects of increased instantaneous luminosity on the tagger were studied. An extension of the IP-tagger to use the z-tracking information was developed. A new b-tagger using secondary vertices was developed and commissioned. A tool was developed to allow the use of large multi-run samples for trigger studies involving b-quarks. Offline, a neural network (NN) b-tagger was trained combining the existing offline lifetime based b-tagging tools. The efficiency and fake rate of the NN b-tagger were measured in data and MC. This b-tagger was internally reviewed and certified by the Collaboration and now provides the official b-tagging for all analyses using the Run IIa dataset at D0. A search was performed for neutral MSSM Higgs bosons decaying to a b{bar b} pair and produced in association with one or more b-quarks. Limits are set on the cross-section times the branching ratio for such a process. The limits were interpreted in various MSSM scenarios. This analysis uses the NN b-tagger and was the first to use this tool. The analysis also relies on triggers using the Level-3 IP b-tagging tool described previously. A likelihood discriminant was used to improve the analysis and a neural network was developed to cross-check this technique. The result of the analysis has been submitted to PRL and

  1. Evaluation of smallpox vaccines using variola neutralization.

    PubMed

    Damon, Inger K; Davidson, Whitni B; Hughes, Christine M; Olson, Victoria A; Smith, Scott K; Holman, Robert C; Frey, Sharon E; Newman, Frances; Belshe, Robert B; Yan, Lihan; Karem, Kevin

    2009-08-01

    The search for a 'third'-generation smallpox vaccine has resulted in the development and characterization of several vaccine candidates. A significant barrier to acceptance is the absence of challenge models showing induction of correlates of protective immunity against variola virus. In this light, virus neutralization provides one of few experimental methods to show specific 'in vitro' activity of vaccines against variola virus. Here, we provide characterization of the ability of a modified vaccinia virus Ankara vaccine to induce variola virus-neutralizing antibodies, and we provide comparison with the neutralization elicited by standard Dryvax vaccination.

  2. Neutral particle beams for space defense

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botwin, Robert; Favale, Anthony

    Neutral particle beam (NPB) weapons direct highly focused high energy streams of electrically neutral atomic particles traveling at nearly the speed of light, escaping deflection from the earth's magnetic field and acting on the subatomic structure of a target, destroying it from within. The beam's brief contact with a reentry vehicle produces a nuclear reaction in the latter that yields particle emissions; by detecting and identifying those particles, it becomes possible to effectively distinguish warheads from decoys. Attention is given to the NPB program roles to be played by the Beam Experiment Aboard Rocket and Neutral Particle Beam Integrated Space Experiment projects.

  3. Fast Neutral Pressure Measurements in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    R. Raman; H.W. Kugel; T. Provost; R. Gernhardt; T.R. Jarboe; M.G. Bell

    2002-08-06

    Several fast neutral pressure gauges have been installed on NSTX [National Spherical Torus Experiment] to measure the vessel and divertor pressure during inductive and coaxial helicity injected (CHI) plasma operations. Modified, PDX [Poloidal Divertor Experiment]-type Penning gauges have been installed on the upper and lower divertors. Neutral pressure measurements during plasma operations from these and from two shielded fast Micro ion gauges at different toroidal locations on the vessel mid-plane are described. A new unshielded ion gauge, referred to as the In-vessel Neutral Pressure (INP) gauge is under development.

  4. Density functional theory study of neutral, singly, and multiply charged Polycylcic Aromatic Hydrocarbon molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zettergren, Henning; Holm, Anne I. S.; Johansson, Henrik; Cederquist, Henrik

    2012-11-01

    We have studied multiply ionization for a range of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their charge dependent stabilities with respect to H-, H+-, C2H2- and C2H2+-emissions by means of Density Functional Theory. The adiabatic dissociation energies reveal information about the competition between these channels as functions of PAH charge state and provide predictions of the thermodynamical stability limits, while the sequences of ionization energies may e.g. be used to extract absolute ionization cross sections of astrophysical relevance.

  5. Ion-Neutral Coupling in Solar Prominence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, H.; DeVore, C. R.; Karpen, J.; Kucera, T.; Antiochos, S.; Kawashima, R.

    2011-01-01

    Coupling between ions and neutrals in magnetized plasmas is fundamentally important to many aspects of heliophysics, including our ionosphere, the solar chromosphere, the solar wind interaction with planetary atmospheres, and the interface between the heliosphere and the interstellar medium. Ion-neutral coupling also plays a major role in the physics of solar prominences. By combining theory, modeling, and observations we are working toward a better understanding of the structure and dynamics of partially ionized prominence plasma. Two key questions are addressed in the present work: 1) what physical mechanism(s) sets the cross-field scale of prominence threads? 2) Are ion-neutral interactions responsible for the vertical flows and structure in prominences? We present initial results from a study investigating what role ion-neutral interactions play in prominence dynamics and structure. This research was supported by NASA.

  6. Neutralized transport of high intensity beams

    SciTech Connect

    Henestroza, E.; Yu, S.S.; Eylon, S.; Roy, P.K.; Anders, A.; Sharp, W.; Efthimion, P.; Gilson, E.; Welch, D.; Rose, D.

    2003-05-01

    The NTX experiment at the Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory is exploring the performance of neutralized final focus systems for high perveance heavy ion beams. A converging ion beam at the exit of the final focus magnetic system is injected into a neutralized drift section. The neutralization is provided by a metal arc source and an RF plasma source. Effects of a ''plasma plug'', where electrons are extracted from a localized plasma in the upstream end of the drift section, and are then dragged along by the ion potential, as well as the ''volumetric plasma'', where neutralization is provided by the plasma laid down along the ion path, are both studied and their relative effects on the beam spot size are compared. Comparisons with 3-D PIC code predictions will also be presented.

  7. Development of miniaturized, spectroscopically assisted Penning gauges for fractional helium and hydrogen neutral pressure measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flesch, K.; Kremeyer, T.; Schmitz, O.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Wenzel, U.

    2016-11-01

    Direct measurements of the helium (He) fractional neutral pressure in the neutral gas around fusion devices is challenging because of the small mass difference between the abundant D2 molecules and the He ash which will be produced by deuterium-tritium fusion. To study He exhaust, an in situ Penning gauge system is being developed at UW-Madison that is optimized for good pressure and high spectroscopic sensitivity. Three different anode geometries have been studied regarding their vacuum electrostatic fields, light output, and ion current. The light output of the two new anode configurations are at least one order of magnitude above the currently available designs, hence improving the spectroscopic sensitivity at similar total neutral pressure resolution.

  8. Electrophoretic mobilities of neutral analytes and electroosmotic flow markers in aqueous solutions of Hofmeister salts.

    PubMed

    Křížek, Tomáš; Kubíčková, Anna; Hladílková, Jana; Coufal, Pavel; Heyda, Jan; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2014-03-01

    Small neutral organic compounds have traditionally the role of EOF markers in electrophoresis, as they are expected to have zero electrophoretic mobility in external electric fields. The BGE contains, however, ions that have unequal affinities to the neutral molecules, which in turn results in their mobilization. In this study we focused on two EOF markers-thiourea and DMSO, as well as on N-methyl acetamide (NMA) as a model of the peptide bond. By means of CE and all atom molecular dynamics simulations we explored mobilization of these neutral compounds in large set of Hofmeister salts. Employing a statistical mechanics approach, we were able to reproduce by simulations the experimental electrophoretic mobility coefficients. We also established the role of the chemical composition of marker and the BGE on the measured electrophoretic mobility coefficient. For NMA, we interpreted the results in terms of the relative affinities of cations versus anions to the peptide bond.

  9. Single-size thermometric measurements on a size distribution of neutral fullerenes.

    PubMed

    Cauchy, C; Bakker, J M; Huismans, Y; Rouzée, A; Redlich, B; van der Meer, A F G; Bordas, C; Vrakking, M J J; Lépine, F

    2013-05-10

    We present measurements of the velocity distribution of electrons emitted from mass-selected neutral fullerenes, performed at the intracavity free electron laser FELICE. We make use of mass-specific vibrational resonances in the infrared domain to selectively heat up one out of a distribution of several fullerene species. Efficient energy redistribution leads to decay via thermionic emission. Time-resolved electron kinetic energy distributions measured give information on the decay rate of the selected fullerene. This method is generally applicable to all neutral species that exhibit thermionic emission and provides a unique tool to study the stability of mass-selected neutral clusters and molecules that are only available as part of a size distribution.

  10. Thermal stability of uranyl complexes with neutral oxygen-containing organic bases

    SciTech Connect

    Kobets, L.V.

    1987-03-01

    The thermal stability of uranyl chloride, nitrate, and oxalate with a series of neutral oxygen-containing organic ligands is discussed. It was found that the temperatures of removal of chlorine are higher than the stripping of the first molecule of the base in complexes UO/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/ x 2L. This is an indication of greater strength of the bonds of the Cl/sup -/ ions to the uranyl group in comparison with the investigated bases. It was shown that the temperatures of removal of a mole of neutral ligands depend little on the nature of the anions and exhibit a correlation with the donor capacity of the bases: Ac < TBP < DMFA similarly ordered DMSO < TBPO similarly ordered PyO. The chemistry of the decomposition of the complexes and the strength of the binding of the acido- and neutral ligands in them are discussed.

  11. A SEARCH FOR CO-EVOLVING ION AND NEUTRAL GAS SPECIES IN PRESTELLAR MOLECULAR CLOUD CORES

    SciTech Connect

    Tassis, Konstantinos; Hezareh, Talayeh; Willacy, Karen

    2012-11-20

    A comparison between the widths of ion and neutral molecule spectral lines has been recently used to estimate the strength of the magnetic field in turbulent star-forming regions. However, the ion (HCO{sup +}) and neutral (HCN) species used in such studies may not be necessarily co-evolving at every scale and density, and thus, may not trace the same regions. Here, we use coupled chemical/dynamical models of evolving prestellar molecular cloud cores including non-equilibrium chemistry, with and without magnetic fields, to study the spatial distribution of HCO{sup +} and HCN, which have been used in observations of spectral line width differences to date. In addition, we seek new ion-neutral pairs that are good candidates for such observations, because they have similar evolution and are approximately co-spatial in our models. We identify three such good candidate pairs: HCO{sup +}/NO, HCO{sup +}/CO, and NO{sup +}/NO.

  12. Modeling the neutral sodium tails of comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkett, K.; Jones, G.; Coates, A.

    2014-07-01

    Neutral sodium is typically easy to detect in active comets around perihelion, due to the very high efficiency of the sodium D transition, and, at some comets, a distinct neutral sodium tail is observed. The first distinct neutral sodium tail images were apparent in C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp) data taken using CoCam [1], but, since this initial detection, similar features have been observed at near-Sun comets using the LASCO coronagraph on SOHO. A full picture of the distribution and evolution of neutral cometary sodium may best be established using a combination of spectra and images in different filters at multiple times throughout the orbit. The high efficiency of the sodium D transition has allowed it to be detected in systems, even if the column density of sodium is extremely low. In these instances it is sometimes possible to determine some of the system's characteristics from the sodium emission detection, such as in Io's plasma torus [2] and Enceladus's plume [3,4]. It is hoped that a similar approach may be applied to the active cometary environment, but, at present, the production of neutral sodium is unknown. Various authors [5--9, thorough review presented in 10] have suggested various combinations of sources of neutral sodium in the nuclear region, near-nuclear region, dust tail, and ion tail. The morphology and evolution of the neutral cometary sodium tail are difficult to intuitively predict due to the Swings and Greenstein effects. In order to understand the wide variety of cometary observations of neutral sodium available we have developed the first fully three-dimensional, heliocentric-distance-dependent, versatile Monte Carlo neutral sodium tail model, which incorporates the unintuitive variation in radiation pressure influences on sodium atoms with different heliocentric velocities. Our model was initially based on that of Brown et al [7]. We present preliminary results from this model. We have found initial agreement with the overall morphology and

  13. Chemistry of sprite discharges through ion-neutral reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraki, Y.; Kasai, Y.; Fukunishi, H.

    2008-07-01

    We estimate the concentration changes, caused by streamer discharge in sprites, of ozone and related minor species as odd nitrogen (NOx) and hydrogen (HOx) families in the upper stratosphere and mesosphere. The streamer has an intense electric field and high electron density at its head, where a large number of chemically-radical ions and atoms are produced through electron impact on neutral molecules. After its propagation, densities of minor species can be perturbed through ion-neutral chemical reactions initiated by the relaxation of these radical products. We evaluate the production rates of ions and atoms using an electron kinetics model and by assuming that the electric field and electron density are in the head region. We calculate the density variations mainly for NOx, Ox, and HOx species using a one-dimensional model of the neutral and ion composition of the middle atmosphere, including the effect of the sprite streamer. Results at the nighttime condition show that the densities of NO, O3, H, and OH increase suddenly through reactions triggered by the first atomic nitrogen and oxygen product, and electrons just after streamer initiation. It is shown that NO and NO2 still remain for 1 h by a certain order of increase with their source-sink balance, predominantly around 60 km; for other species, increases in O3, OH, HO2, and H2O2 still remain in the range of 40 70 km. From this affirmative result of long-time behavior previously not presented, we emphasize that sprites would have the power to impact local chemistry at night. We also discuss the consistency with previous theoretical and observational studies, along with future suggestions.

  14. Chemistry of sprite discharges through ion-neutral reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraki, Y.; Kasai, Y.; Fukunishi, H.

    2008-02-01

    We estimate the concentration changes, caused by a single streamer in sprites, of ozone and related minor species as odd nitrogen (NOx) and hydrogen (HOx) families in the upper stratosphere and mesosphere. The streamer has an intense electric field and high electron density at its head where a large number of chemically-radical ions and atoms are produced through electron impact on neutral molecules. After propagation of the streamer, the densities of minor species can be perturbed through ion-neutral chemical reactions initiated by the relaxation of these radical products. We evaluate the production rates of ions and atoms using electron kinetics model and assuming the electric field and electron density in the streamer head. We calculate the density variations mainly for NOx, Ox, and HOx species using a one-dimensional model of the neutral and ion composition of the middle atmosphere, including the effect of the sprite streamer. Results at the nighttime condition show that the densities of NO, O3, H, and OH increase suddenly through reactions triggered by firstly produced atomic nitrogen and oxygen, and electrons just after streamer initiation. It is shown that NO and NO2 still remain for 1 h by a certain order of increase with their source-sink balance predominantly around 60 km; for other species, increases in O3, OH, HO2, and H2O2 still remain in the range of 40-70 km. From this affirmative result of long time behavior previously not presented, we emphasize that sprites would have a power to impact on local chemistry at night. We also discuss comparison with previous studies and suggestion for satellite observations.

  15. Formation, stability, and reactivity studies of neutral iron sulfide clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Shi; Wang, Zhechen; Bernstein, Elliot

    2014-03-01

    Different methods are used to generate neutral iron sulfide clusters to study their formation, stability, and reactivity, employing a time of flight mass spectrometer (TOFMS) with VUV (118 nm) radiation single photon ionization (SPI). Neutral FemSn (m = 1-4, n = 1-6), and hydrogen containing FemSnHx (x >0, n > m) clusters are generated by the reaction of seeded H2S in a helium carrier gas with laser ablated iron metal within a supersonic nozzle. The observed strong signal of association products Fe2S2(SH)0,1 M (M = CO, C2H4, C3H6) suggest that the Fe2S2(SH)0,1 clusters have the high activity for interactions with these small molecules. In order to avoid the effect for reactivity from hydrogen containing clusters, pure FemSnclusters are generated through laser ablation of a mixed iron/sulfur target in the presence of a pure helium carrier gas. (FeS)m (m = 1-4) is observed to be the most stable series. Reaction of CO and H2 on neutral (FeS)1,2clusters is farther investigated both experimentally and theoretically. A size dependent reactivity of iron sulfide clusters toward CO is characterized. The reaction FeS + CO --> Fe + OCS is found for the FeS cluster. Products Fe2S 213COH2 and Fe2S 213COH4 are identified for reactions of 13CO and H2 on Fe2S2 clusters: this suggests that the Fe2S2 cluster has a high catalytic activity for hydrogenation reactions of CO to form formaldehyde and methanol. DFT calculations are performed to explore the potential energy surfaces for the two reactions: Fe2S2 + CO + 2H2 --> Fe2S2 + CH3OH; and Fe2S2 + CO + H2 --> Fe2S2 + CH2O.

  16. Primary interstellar neutrals in the heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Hans R.; Moebius, Eberhard; Bzowski, Maciej; Kubiak, Marzena; Pogorelov, Nikolai; Heerikhuisen, Jacob

    Among other accomplishments, IBEX has detected direct interstellar helium and oxygen. With the help of a 3D MHD/kinetic hydrogen background heliosphere model by Pogorelov and Heerikhuisen, the distributions of primary interstellar neutrals throughout the heliosphere are calculated, identifying contributions from direct and indirect particle trajectories. The results are converted into expected fluxes at IBEX. The comparison of these fluxes to the measurements characterizes the density of neutrals in the pristine interstellar medium, and their filtration in the heliosphere.

  17. Nitrogen-neutrality: a step towards sustainability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leip, Adrian; Leach, Allison; Musinguzi, Patrick; Tumwesigye, Trust; Olupot, Giregon; Tenywa, John Stephen; Mudiope, Joseph; Hutton, Olivia; Cordovil, Claudia M. d. S.; Bekunda, Mateete; Galloway, James

    2014-11-01

    We propose a novel indicator measuring one dimension of the sustainability of an entity in modern societies: Nitrogen-neutrality. N-neutrality strives to offset Nr releases an entity exerts on the environment from the release of reactive nitrogen (Nr) to the environment by reducing it and by offsetting the Nr releases elsewhere. N-neutrality also aims to increase awareness about the consequences of unintentional releases of nitrogen to the environment. N-neutrality is composed of two quantified elements: Nr released by an entity (e.g. on the basis of the N footprint) and Nr reduction from management and offset projects (N offset). It includes management strategies to reduce nitrogen losses before they occur (e.g., through energy conservation). Each of those elements faces specific challenges with regard to data availability and conceptual development. Impacts of Nr releases to the environment are manifold, and the impact profile of one unit of Nr release depends strongly on the compound released and the local susceptibility to Nr. As such, N-neutrality is more difficult to conceptualize and calculate than C-neutrality. We developed a workable conceptual framework for N-neutrality which was adapted for the 6th International Nitrogen Conference (N2013, Kampala, November 2013). Total N footprint of the surveyed meals at N2013 was 66 kg N. A total of US 3050 was collected from the participants and used to offset the conference’s N footprint by supporting the UN Millennium Village cluster Ruhiira in South-Western Uganda. The concept needs further development in particular to better incorporate the spatio-temporal variability of impacts and to standardize the methods to quantify the required N offset to neutralize the Nr releases impact. Criteria for compensation projects need to be sharply defined to allow the development of a market for N offset certificates.

  18. Neutral hydrogen survey of andromeda galaxy.

    PubMed

    Brundage, W D; Kraus, J D

    1966-07-22

    A neutral hydrogen survey of the Andromeda galaxy (M31) has been conducted with the 260-foot (80m) Ohio State University radio telescope. The neutral hydrogen is concentrated in the spiral arm regions, with but relatively small amounts near the center of the galaxy. Similar deficiencies have been found near the center of M33 and our galaxy, suggesting similar evolutionary processes in the three galaxies.

  19. A class of neutral functional differential equations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melvin, W. R.

    1972-01-01

    Formulation and study of the initial value problem for neutral functional differential equations. The existence, uniqueness, and continuation of solutions to this problem are investigated, and an analysis is made of the dependence of the solutions on the initial conditions and parameters, resulting in the derivation of a continuous dependence theorem in which the fundamental mathematical principles underlying the continuous dependence problem for a very general system of nonlinear neutral functional differential equations are separated out.

  20. Watching single molecules dance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Amit Dinesh

    Molecular motors convert chemical energy, from ATP hydrolysis or ion flow, into mechanical motion. A variety of increasingly precise mechanical probes have been developed to monitor and perturb these motors at the single molecule level. Several outstanding questions can be best approached at the single molecule level. These include: how far does a motor progress per energy quanta consumed? how does its reaction cycle respond to load? how many productive catalytic cycles can it undergo per diffusional encounter with its track? and what is the mechanical stiffness of a single molecule connection? A dual beam optical trap, in conjunction with in vitro ensemble motility assays, has been used to characterize two members of the myosin superfamily: muscle myosin II and chick brain myosin V. Both move the helical polymer actin, but myosin II acts in large ensembles to drive muscle contraction or cytokinesis, while myosin V acts in small numbers to transport vesicles. An optical trapping apparatus was rendered sufficiently precise to identify a myosin working stroke with 1nm or so, barring systematic errors such as those perhaps due to random protein orientations. This and other light microscopic motility assays were used to characterize myosin V: unlike myosin II this vesicle transport protein moves through many increments of travel while remaining strongly bound to a single actin filament. The step size, stall force, and travel distance of myosin V reveal a remarkably efficient motor capable of moving along a helical track for over a micrometer without significantly spiraling around it. Such properties are fully consistent with the putative role of an organelle transport motor, present in small numbers to maintain movement over long ranges relative to cellular size scales. The contrast between myosin II and myosin V resembles that between a human running on the moon and one walking on earth, where the former allows for faster motion when in larger ensembles but for less

  1. Neutral glycans from sandfish skin can reduce friction of polymers.

    PubMed

    Vihar, Boštjan; Hanisch, Franz Georg; Baumgartner, Werner

    2016-03-01

    The lizardScincus scincus, also known as sandfish, can move through aeolian desert sand in a swimming-like manner. A prerequisite for this ability is a special integument, i.e. scales with a very low friction for sand and a high abrasion resistance. Glycans in the scales are causally related to the low friction. Here, we analysed the glycans and found that neutral glycans with five to nine mannose residues are important. If these glycans were covalently bound to acrylic polymers like poly(methyl methacrylate) or acrylic car coatings at a density of approximately one molecule per 4 nm², friction for and adhesion of sand particles could be reduced to levels close to those observed with sandfish scales. This was also found true, if the glycans were isolated from sources other than sandfish scales like plants such as almonds or mistletoe. We speculate that these neutral glycans act as low density spacers separating sand particles from the dense scales thereby reducing van der Waals forces. PMID:27030038

  2. Cryosorption Pumps for a Neutral Beam Injector Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dremel, M.; Mack, A.; Day, C.; Jensen, H.

    2006-04-01

    We present the experiences of the manufacturing and the operating of a system of two identical cryosorption pumps used in a neutral beam injector test facility for fusion reactors. Calculated and measured heat loads of the cryogenic liquid helium and liquid nitrogen circuits of the cryosorption pumps are discussed. The design calculations concerning the thermo-hydraulics of the helium circuit are compared with experiences from the operation of the cryosorption pumps. Both cryopumps are integrated in a test facility of a neutral beam injector that will be used to heat the plasma of a nuclear fusion reactor with a beam of deuterium or hydrogen molecules. The huge gas throughput into the vessel of the test facility results in challenging needs on the cryopumping system. The developed cryosorption pumps are foreseen to pump a hydrogen throughput of 20 - 30 mbarṡl/s. To establish a mean pressure of several 10-5 mbar in the test vessel a pumping speed of about 350 m3/s per pump is needed. The pressure conditions must be maintained over several hours pumping without regeneration of the cryopanels, which necessitates a very high pumping capacity. A possibility to fulfill these requirements is the use of charcoal coated cryopanels to pump the gasloads by adsorption. For the cooling of the cryopanels, liquid helium at saturation pressure is used and therefore a two-phase forced flow in the cryopump system must be controlled.

  3. Electrostatic interaction of neutral semi-permeable membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradova, Olga I.; Bocquet, Lyderic; Bogdanov, Artem N.; Tsekov, Roumen; Lobaskin, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    We consider an osmotic equilibrium between bulk solutions of polyelectrolyte bounded by semi-permeable membranes and separated by a thin film of salt-free liquid. Although the membranes are neutral, the counter-ions of the polyelectrolyte molecules permeate into the gap and lead to a steric charge separation. This gives rise to a distance-dependent membrane potential, which translates into a repulsive electrostatic disjoining pressure. From the solution of the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation, we obtain the distribution of the potential and of ions. We then derive an explicit formula for the pressure exerted on the membranes and show that it deviates from the classical van't Hoff expression for the osmotic pressure. This difference is interpreted in terms of a repulsive electrostatic disjoining pressure originating from the overlap of counterion clouds inside the gap. We also develop a simplified theory based on a linearized Poisson-Boltzmann approach. A comparison with simulation of a primitive model for the electrolyte is provided and does confirm the validity of the theoretical predictions. Beyond the fundamental result that the neutral surfaces can repel, this mechanism not only helps to control the adhesion and long-range interactions of living cells, bacteria, and vesicles, but also allows us to argue that electrostatic interactions should play enormous role in determining behavior and functions of systems bounded by semi-permeable membranes.

  4. Electrostatic interaction of neutral semi-permeable membranes.

    PubMed

    Vinogradova, Olga I; Bocquet, Lyderic; Bogdanov, Artem N; Tsekov, Roumen; Lobaskin, Vladimir

    2012-01-21

    We consider an osmotic equilibrium between bulk solutions of polyelectrolyte bounded by semi-permeable membranes and separated by a thin film of salt-free liquid. Although the membranes are neutral, the counter-ions of the polyelectrolyte molecules permeate into the gap and lead to a steric charge separation. This gives rise to a distance-dependent membrane potential, which translates into a repulsive electrostatic disjoining pressure. From the solution of the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation, we obtain the distribution of the potential and of ions. We then derive an explicit formula for the pressure exerted on the membranes and show that it deviates from the classical van't Hoff expression for the osmotic pressure. This difference is interpreted in terms of a repulsive electrostatic disjoining pressure originating from the overlap of counterion clouds inside the gap. We also develop a simplified theory based on a linearized Poisson-Boltzmann approach. A comparison with simulation of a primitive model for the electrolyte is provided and does confirm the validity of the theoretical predictions. Beyond the fundamental result that the neutral surfaces can repel, this mechanism not only helps to control the adhesion and long-range interactions of living cells, bacteria, and vesicles, but also allows us to argue that electrostatic interactions should play enormous role in determining behavior and functions of systems bounded by semi-permeable membranes.

  5. Neutral glycans from sandfish skin can reduce friction of polymers

    PubMed Central

    Vihar, Boštjan; Hanisch, Franz Georg; Baumgartner, Werner

    2016-01-01

    The lizard Scincus scincus, also known as sandfish, can move through aeolian desert sand in a swimming-like manner. A prerequisite for this ability is a special integument, i.e. scales with a very low friction for sand and a high abrasion resistance. Glycans in the scales are causally related to the low friction. Here, we analysed the glycans and found that neutral glycans with five to nine mannose residues are important. If these glycans were covalently bound to acrylic polymers like poly(methyl methacrylate) or acrylic car coatings at a density of approximately one molecule per 4 nm², friction for and adhesion of sand particles could be reduced to levels close to those observed with sandfish scales. This was also found true, if the glycans were isolated from sources other than sandfish scales like plants such as almonds or mistletoe. We speculate that these neutral glycans act as low density spacers separating sand particles from the dense scales thereby reducing van der Waals forces. PMID:27030038

  6. Molecules in crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spackman, Mark A.

    2013-04-01

    Hirshfeld surface analysis has developed from the serendipitous discovery of a novel partitioning of the crystal electron density into discrete molecular fragments, to a suite of computational tools used widely for the identification, analysis and discussion of intermolecular interactions in molecular crystals. The relationship between the Hirshfeld surface and very early ideas on the internal structure of crystals is outlined, and applications of Hirshfeld surface analysis are presented for three molecules of historical importance in the development of modern x-ray crystallography: hexamethylbenzene, hexamethylenetetramine and diketopiperazine.

  7. Dynamics of solvation and rotational relaxation in neutral Brij 35 and Brij 58 micelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarty, Debdeep; Hazra, Partha; Chakraborty, Anjan; Sarkar, Nilmoni

    2004-07-01

    Solvation dynamics of Coumarin 480 (C-480) and Coumarin 490 (C-490) in neutral polyoxyethylene (23) lauryl ether (Brij 35) and polyoxyethylene (20) cetyl ether (Brij 58) micelles is severely retarded compared to pure water. The solvation dynamics is biexponential in all these micelles. The fast component of the solvation dynamics arises due to the water molecules present in the palisade layer of the micelles. The slow nanosecond component in solvation dynamics may arise due to the hydrogen bonding of water molecules with the polar part of micelles. The rotational relaxations in all these micelles are bimodal and comprising of a picosecond and a nanosecond component.

  8. Neutral particle kinetics in fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Tendler, M.; Heifetz, D.

    1986-05-01

    The theory of neutral particle kinetics treats the transport of mass, momentum, and energy in a plasma due to neutral particles which themselves are unaffected by magnetic fields. This transport affects the global power and particle balances in fusion devices, as well as profile control and plasma confinement quality, particle and energy fluxes onto device components, performance of pumping systems, and the design of diagnostics and the interpretation of their measurements. This paper reviews the development of analytic, numerical, and Monte Carlo methods of solving the time-independent Boltzmann equation describing neutral kinetics. These models for neutral particle behavior typically use adaptations of techniques developed originally for computing neutron transport, due to the analogy between the two phenomena, where charge-exchange corresponds to scattering and ionization to absorption. Progress in the field depends on developing multidimensional analytic methods, and obtaining experimental data for the physical processes of wall reflection, the neutral/plasma interaction, and for processes in fusion devices which are directly related to neutral transport, such as H/sub ..cap alpha../ emission rates, plenum pressures, and charge-exchange emission spectra.

  9. The Phobos neutral and ionized torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppe, A. R.; Curry, S. M.; Fatemi, S.

    2016-05-01

    Charged particle sputtering, micrometeoroid impact vaporization, and photon-stimulated desorption are fundamental processes operating at airless surfaces throughout the solar system. At larger bodies, such as Earth's Moon and several of the outer planet moons, these processes generate tenuous surface-bound exospheres that have been observed by a variety of methods. Phobos and Deimos, in contrast, are too gravitationally weak to keep ejected neutrals bound and, thus, are suspected to generate neutral tori in orbit around Mars. While these tori have not yet been detected, the distribution and density of both the neutral and ionized components are of fundamental interest. We combine a neutral Monte Carlo model and a hybrid plasma model to investigate both the neutral and ionized components of the Phobos torus. We show that the spatial distribution of the neutral torus is highly dependent on each individual species (due to ionization rates that span nearly 4 orders of magnitude) and on the location of Phobos with respect to Mars. Additionally, we present the flux distribution of torus pickup ions throughout the Martian system and estimate typical pickup ion fluxes. We find that the predicted pickup ion fluxes are too low to perturb the ambient plasma, consistent with previous null detections by spacecraft around Mars.

  10. Characterization of elusive neutrals and ions by neutralization-reionization mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Fura, A.

    1992-01-01

    Neutralization-reionization mass spectrometry (NRMS) provides a dilute gas phase environment where a variety of neutral species can be produced and characterized. In NRMS fast neutrals are produced from mass-selected precursor ions. The neutrals can undergo isomerization or dissociation by using a low ionization-energy target for neutralization or by angular resolution. The neutrals are reionized to positive or negative ions that are mass analyzed and detected. Angular resolution is used here to obtain NR spectra of isomeric butenes and N-hexenes. A study of oxirane produced an energy surface of five isomers, showing C-C favored over C-O bond rupture. [center dot]CH[sub 2]CH[sub 2]O[center dot], [sup +]CH[sub 2]CH[sub 2]O[center dot], and the oxirane cation represent bound structures, as do [center dot]CH[sub 2]CH[sub 2]O[sup [minus

  11. Automated facial coding software outperforms people in recognizing neutral faces as neutral from standardized datasets

    PubMed Central

    Lewinski, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about people’s accuracy of recognizing neutral faces as neutral. In this paper, I demonstrate the importance of knowing how well people recognize neutral faces. I contrasted human recognition scores of 100 typical, neutral front-up facial images with scores of an arguably objective judge – automated facial coding (AFC) software. I hypothesized that the software would outperform humans in recognizing neutral faces because of the inherently objective nature of computer algorithms. Results confirmed this hypothesis. I provided the first-ever evidence that computer software (90%) was more accurate in recognizing neutral faces than people were (59%). I posited two theoretical mechanisms, i.e., smile-as-a-baseline and false recognition of emotion, as possible explanations for my findings. PMID:26441761

  12. Comparison of JEV neutralization assay using pseudotyped JEV with the conventional plaque-reduction neutralization test.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hee-Jung; Min, Kyung-Il; Park, Ki Hoon; Choi, Hyo Jung; Kim, Min-Kyoung; Ahn, Chi-Young; Hong, Young-Jin; Kim, Young Bong

    2014-05-01

    We previously reported the development of a neutralization assay system for evaluating Japanese Encephalitis Virus (JEV) neutralizing antibody (NAb) using pseudotyped-JEV (JEV-PV). JEV-PV-based neutralization assay offers several advantages compared with the current standard plaque-reduction neutralization test (PRNT), including simplicity, safety, and speed. To evaluate the suitability of the JEV-PV assay as new replacement neutralization assay, we compared its repeatability, reproducibility, specificity, and correlated its results with those obtained using the PRNT. These analyses showed a close correlation between the results obtained with the JEV-PV assay and the PRNT, using the 50% plaque reduction method as a standard for measuring NAb titers to JEV. The validation results met all analytical acceptance criteria. These results suggest that the JEV-PV assay could serve as a safe and simple method for measuring NAb titer against JEV and could be used as an alternative approach for assaying the potency of JEV neutralization.

  13. Ultra-cold molecule production.

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez-Serrano, Jamie; Chandler, David W.; Strecker, Kevin; Rahn, Larry A.

    2005-12-01

    The production of Ultra-cold molecules is a goal of many laboratories through out the world. Here we are pursuing a unique technique that utilizes the kinematics of atomic and molecular collisions to achieve the goal of producing substantial numbers of sub Kelvin molecules confined in a trap. Here a trap is defined as an apparatus that spatially localizes, in a known location in the laboratory, a sample of molecules whose temperature is below one degree absolute Kelvin. Further, the storage time for the molecules must be sufficient to measure and possibly further cool the molecules. We utilize a technique unique to Sandia to form cold molecules from near mass degenerate collisions between atoms and molecules. This report describes the progress we have made using this novel technique and the further progress towards trapping molecules we have cooled.

  14. Efficient pathway to neutralization of multiply charged ions produced in Auger processes.

    PubMed

    Stumpf, V; Kolorenč, P; Gokhberg, K; Cederbaum, L S

    2013-06-21

    After core ionization of an atom or molecule by an x-ray photon, multiply charged ions are produced in the Auger decay process. These ions tend to neutralize their charge when embedded in an environment. We demonstrate that, depending on the atom or molecule and its neighbors, electron transfer mediated decay (ETMD) provides a particularly efficient neutralization pathway for the majority of the ions produced by Auger decay. The mechanism is rather general. As a showcase example, we conducted an ab initio study of the NeKr2 cluster after core ionization of the Ne atom. This example has been chosen because it is amenable to both ab initio calculations and coincidence experiments. We find that even for frozen nuclei, the neutralization rate can be as fast as 0.130  ps(-1). We also show that nuclear dynamics may increase the rate by about an order of magnitude. The generality of the mechanism makes this neutralization pathway important in weakly bonded environments.

  15. Cosmic ray synthesis of organic molecules in Titan's atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capone, L. A.; Dubach, J.; Whitten, R. C.; Prasad, S. S.; Santhanam, K.

    1980-01-01

    The possible synthesis of organic molecules by the absorption of galactic cosmic rays in an N2-CH4-H2 Titan model atmosphere has been studied. The cosmic-ray-induced ionization results in peak electron densities of 2000/cu cm, with NH(+), C3H9(+), and C4H9(+) being among the important positive ions. Details of the ion and neutral chemistry relevant to the production of organic molecules are discussed. The potential importance of N(2D) reactions with CH4 and H2 is also demonstrated. Although the integrated production rate of organic matter due to the absorption of the cosmic ray cascade is much less than that by solar ultraviolet radiation, the production of nitrogen-bearing organic molecules by cosmic rays may be greater.

  16. Melatonin: a multitasking molecule.

    PubMed

    Reiter, Russel J; Tan, Dun-Xian; Fuentes-Broto, Lorena

    2010-01-01

    Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) has revealed itself as an ubiquitously distributed and functionally diverse molecule. The mechanisms that control its synthesis within the pineal gland have been well characterized and the retinal and biological clock processes that modulate the circadian production of melatonin in the pineal gland are rapidly being unravelled. A feature that characterizes melatonin is the variety of mechanisms it employs to modulate the physiology and molecular biology of cells. While many of these actions are mediated by well-characterized, G-protein coupled melatonin receptors in cellular membranes, other actions of the indole seem to involve its interaction with orphan nuclear receptors and with molecules, for example calmodulin, in the cytosol. Additionally, by virtue of its ability to detoxify free radicals and related oxygen derivatives, melatonin influences the molecular physiology of cells via receptor-independent means. These uncommonly complex processes often make it difficult to determine specifically how melatonin functions to exert its obvious actions. What is apparent, however, is that the actions of melatonin contribute to improved cellular and organismal physiology. In view of this and its virtual absence of toxicity, melatonin may well find applications in both human and veterinary medicine.

  17. Modeling Neutral Densities Downstream of a Gridded Ion Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soulas, George C.

    2010-01-01

    The details of a model for determining the neutral density downstream of a gridded ion thruster are presented. An investigation of the possible sources of neutrals emanating from and surrounding a NEXT ion thruster determined that the most significant contributors to the downstream neutral density include discharge chamber neutrals escaping through the perforated grids, neutrals escaping from the neutralizer, and vacuum facility background neutrals. For the neutral flux through the grids, near- and far-field equations are presented for rigorously determining the neutral density downstream of a cylindrical aperture. These equations are integrated into a spherically-domed convex grid geometry with a hexagonal array of apertures for determining neutral densities downstream of the ion thruster grids. The neutrals escaping from an off-center neutralizer are also modeled assuming diffuse neutral emission from the neutralizer keeper orifice. Finally, the effect of the surrounding vacuum facility neutrals is included and assumed to be constant. The model is used to predict the neutral density downstream of a NEXT ion thruster with and without neutralizer flow and a vacuum facility background pressure. The impacts of past simplifying assumptions for predicting downstream neutral densities are also examined for a NEXT ion thruster.

  18. Imaging and manipulating molecules on a zeolite surface with an atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Weisenhorn, A.L.; MacDougall, J.E.; Gould, S.A.C.; Cox, S.D.; Wise, W.S.; Stucky, G.D.; Hansma, P.K. ); Massie, J.; Maivald, P.; Elings, V.B. )

    1990-03-16

    The adsorption of neutral molecules and ions on the surfaces of zeolites was observed in real time with an atomic force microscope (AFM). Direct imaging of the surface of the zeolite clinoptilolite was possible by using a diluted tert-butyl ammonium chloride solution as a medium. Images of the crystal in different liquids revealed that molecules could be bound to the surface in different ways; neutral molecules of tert-butanol formed an ordered array, whereas tert-butyl ammonium ions formed clusters. These absorbed molecules were not rearranged by the AFM tip when used in an imaging mode. However, when a sufficiently large force was applied, the tip of the AFM could rearrange the tert-butyl ammoniium ions on the zeolite surface. This demonstration of molecular manipulation suggests new applications, including biosensors and lithography. 31 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Molecules Best Paper Award 2013.

    PubMed

    McPhee, Derek J

    2013-02-05

    Molecules has started to institute a "Best Paper" award to recognize the most outstanding papers in the area of natural products, medicinal chemistry and molecular diversity published in Molecules. We are pleased to announce the second "Molecules Best Paper Award" for 2013.

  20. Role of neutral gas in scrape-off layer of tokamak plasma in the presence of finite electron temperature and its gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisai, N.; Kaw, P. K.

    2016-09-01

    The role of neutral gas molecules in the Scrape-off Layer (SOL) region of tokamak plasma is important as it is expected to modify the plasma turbulence. Two-dimensional model has been used that consists of electron continuity, molecular ion continuity, quasi-neutrality, electron energy, and neutral molecular gas continuity equations in the presence of electron impact molecular ionizations and other non-ionizing collisions. The growth rate obtained from these equations has been presented using linear theory. It is observed that the growth rate increases with the neutral gas ionization coefficients. The nonlinear equations are solved numerically in the presence and absence of the neutral gas molecules. Radial profiles of plasma density, electron temperature, and electric field have been obtained. It is found that the neutral gas reduces electric fields. More significant reduction of the poloidal electric field has been found by the neutral gas. Time series obtained from the numerical data has been analyzed. A strong decrease in fluctuation of the plasma density, electron temperature, and potential has been found at the outer region the SOL plasma in the presence of the gas molecules.

  1. Quantitative model of antibody- and soluble CD4-mediated neutralization of primary isolates and T-cell line-adapted strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Klasse, P J; Moore, J P

    1996-01-01

    Primary isolates (PI) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are considerably less sensitive than T-cell line-adapted strains to neutralization by soluble CD4 and by most cross-reactive monoclonal antibodies to the viral envelope (Env) glycoprotein, as well as by postinfection and postvaccination sera (J. P. Moore and D. D. Ho, AIDS 9 [suppl. A]:5117-5136, 1995). We developed a quantitative model to explain the neutralization resistance of PI. The factors incorporated into the model are the dissociation constants for the binding of the neutralizing agent to native Env oligomers, the number of outer Env molecules on the viral surface (which decreases by shedding), and the minimum number of Env molecules required for attachment and fusion. We conclude that modest differences in all these factors can, when combined, explain a relative neutralization resistance of PI versus T-cell line-adapted strains that sometimes amounts to several orders of magnitude. The hypothesis that neutralization of HIV is due to the reduction below a minimum number of the Env molecules on a virion available for attachment and fusion is at odds with single- and few-hit neutralization theories. Our analysis of these ideas favors the hypothesis that neutralization of HIV is instead a competitive blocking of interactions with cellular factors, including adsorption receptors. PMID:8648701

  2. Neutralization of adenoviruses: kinetics, stoichiometry, and mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Wohlfart, C

    1988-01-01

    Kinetic curves for neutralization of adenovirus type 2 with anti-hexon serum revealed no lag periods even when the serum was highly diluted or when the temperature was lowered to 4 degrees C, thus indicating a single-hit mechanism. Multiplicity curves determined with anti-hexon serum displayed a linear correlation between the degree of neutralization and dilution of antiserum. Neutralization values experimentally obtained under steady-state conditions fully fitted a single-hit model based on Poisson calculations. Quantitation of the amount of 125I-labeled type-specific anti-hexon antibodies needed for full neutralization of adenovirus showed that 1.4 antibodies were attached per virion under such conditions. Virions already attached to HeLa cells at 4 degrees C were, to a large extent, neutralizable by anti-hexon serum, whereas anti-fiber and anti-penton base antisera were negative. It is suggested that adenovirus may be neutralized by two pathways: aggregation of the virions (extracellular neutralization) as performed by anti-fiber antibodies and blocking of virion entrance from the acidic endosomes into the cytoplasm (intracellular neutralization). The latter effect could be obtained by (i) covering of the penton bases, as performed by anti-penton base antibodies, thereby preventing interaction between the penton bases and the endosomal membrane, which results in trapping of virions within endosomes, and (ii) inhibition of the low-pH-induced conformational change of the viral capsid, which seems to occur in the endosomes and is necessary for proper exposure of the penton bases, as performed by anti-hexon antibodies. Images PMID:3373570

  3. New applications of ORNL neutral beam injectors

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, C. C.; Peng, Yueng Kay Martin

    1998-01-01

    The injection of energetic hydrogen and deuterium atoms has been used to heat plasmas in various fusion experimental devices including tokamaks, mirrors, and stellarators. The neutral beam injection is a proven plasma heating technique for increasing plasma densities, temperatures, and pressures. For this fusion endeavor, scientists at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have developed multimegawatt neutral beam injectors. Various ORNL injectors have been used for studying properties of beam-heated plasmas in Oak Ridge Tokamak (ORMAK), Impurity Study Experiment-B (ISX-B), Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF), Princeton Large Torus (PLT), and Princeton Divertor Experiment (PDX) in the United States and in Small Tight Aspect Ratio Tokamak (START) in the United Kingdom. By using a 30-cm and 100-A ion source, each ORNL neutral beam injector is capable of injecting >1.5 MW of hydrogen atoms at 50-keV for a pulse length up to 0.5 s. For increasing plasma densities and raising plasma temperatures in START, one such injector was installed and commissioned during 1995. The initial goal was to provide an injected neutral beam power of more than 0.5 MW at a beam energy of 40 keV for 20 ms. Addition of a getter pump has allowed the beam power to be raised to 1 MW at 33 keV. Recent experiments have demonstrated that neutral beam heating can play a big role in raising plasma pressures to a record volume-average beta value over 30%. ORNL neutral beam injectors have been approved for plasma heating experiments on both the TJ-II stellarator at CIEMAT, Spain, and the Mega-Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST) at Culham Science Centre (Culham). Two proven ORNL NE injectors are being installed at the TJ-II facility. Additional ORNL beam equipment is being used to implement two 5-s NE injectors at the MAST facility. In this paper, we report and discuss the progress and plans for these neutral beam activities.

  4. The Chemistry of Multiply Deuterated Molecules in Protoplanetary Disks: I. The Outer Disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willacy, K.

    2007-01-01

    We present new models of the deuterium chemistry in protoplanetary disks, including, for the first time, multiply deuterated species. We use these models to explore whether observations in combination with models can give us clues as to which desorption processes occur in disks.We find, in common with other authors, that photodesorption can allow strongly bound molecules such as HDO to exist in the gas phase in a layer above the midplane. Models including this process give the best agreement with the observations. In the midplane, cosmic-ray heating can desorb weakly bound molecules such as CO and N2. We find the observations suggest that N2 is gaseous in this region, but that CO must be retained on the grains to account for the observed DCO+/HCO+. This could be achieved by CO having a higher binding energy than N2 (as may be the case when these molecules are accreted onto water ice) or by a smaller cosmic-ray desorption rate for CO than assumed here, as suggested by recent theoretical work. For gaseous molecules the calculated deuteration can be greatly changed by chemical processing in the disk from the input molecular cloud values. On the grains singly deuterated species tend to retain the D/H ratio set in the molecular cloud, whereas multiply deuterated species are more affected by the disk chemistry. Consequently, the D/H ratios observed in comets may be partly set in the parent cloud and partly in the disk, depending on the molecule.

  5. Forces in molecules.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Trujillo, Jesús; Cortés-Guzmán, Fernando; Fang, De-Chai; Bader, Richard F W

    2007-01-01

    Chemistry is determined by the electrostatic forces acting within a collection of nuclei and electrons. The attraction of the nuclei for the electrons is the only attractive force in a molecule and is the force responsible for the bonding between atoms. This is the attractive force acting on the electrons in the Ehrenfest force and on the nuclei in the Feynman force, one that is countered by the repulsion between the electrons in the former and by the repulsion between the nuclei in the latter. The virial theorem relates these forces to the energy changes resulting from interactions between atoms. All bonding, as signified by the presence of a bond path, has a common origin in terms of the mechanics determined by the Ehrenfest, Feynman and virial theorems. This paper is concerned in particular with the mechanics of interaction encountered in what are classically described as 'nonbonded interactions'--are atoms that 'touch' bonded or repelling one another?

  6. Molecules in the Spotlight

    SciTech Connect

    Cryan, James

    2010-01-26

    SLAC has just unveiled the world's first X-ray laser, the LCLS. This machine produces pulses of X-rays that are ten billion times brighter than those from conventional sources. One of the goals of this machine is to make movies of chemical reactions, including reactions necessary for life and reactions that might power new energy technologies. This public lecture will show the first results from the LCLS. As a first target, we have chosen nitrogen gas, the main component of the air we breathe. Using the unprecedented power of the LCLS X-rays as a blasting torch, we have created new forms of this molecule and with unique electronic arrangements. Please share with us the first insights from this new technology.

  7. Forces in molecules.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Trujillo, Jesús; Cortés-Guzmán, Fernando; Fang, De-Chai; Bader, Richard F W

    2007-01-01

    Chemistry is determined by the electrostatic forces acting within a collection of nuclei and electrons. The attraction of the nuclei for the electrons is the only attractive force in a molecule and is the force responsible for the bonding between atoms. This is the attractive force acting on the electrons in the Ehrenfest force and on the nuclei in the Feynman force, one that is countered by the repulsion between the electrons in the former and by the repulsion between the nuclei in the latter. The virial theorem relates these forces to the energy changes resulting from interactions between atoms. All bonding, as signified by the presence of a bond path, has a common origin in terms of the mechanics determined by the Ehrenfest, Feynman and virial theorems. This paper is concerned in particular with the mechanics of interaction encountered in what are classically described as 'nonbonded interactions'--are atoms that 'touch' bonded or repelling one another? PMID:17328425

  8. Observed vegetation patterns in tidal environments: neutral vs. non-neutral explanations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belluco, E.; Zillio, T.; Silvestri, S.; Maritan, A.; Marani, M.

    2009-12-01

    The quantitative retrieval of vegetation patterns in tidal environments from high-resolution satellite and airborne sensors has recently been shown to be accurate and repeatable. This makes available unprecedentedly accurate observations of competing species distributions over a broad range of spatial scales. Such distributions are here characterized statistically, suggesting the absence of characteristic scales, as revealed by the power-law form of cluster size pdf's. A competition model based on a neutral approach, serving as a reference null hypothesis, reproduces some of the basic observed system properties. It is, however, shown that the availability of spatially-detailed observations allows the development and application of a non-neutral model, which is seen to capture several observed bio-diversity properties (alpha and beta diversity). The non-neutral model developed, based on cloning and seed dispersal processes, is amenable to analytical solution and yields closed-form characterizations of beta-diversity. The validation of the non-neutral model shows a remarkable agreement with observations within the wide observational range of scales explored (0.5 m - 1000 m). We contend the good agreement of the neutral model with the more limited characterization of beta-diversity typical of the neutral theory to be misleading, as the recruitment rates by propagules and by seed dispersal assumed by the neutral model do not reflect known species characteristics and correspond to averages of those obtained under the more general non-neutral hypothesis. We conclude that non-neutral beta-diversity characterizations are required to describe ecosystem dynamics in the presence of species-dependent properties and to successfully relate the observed patterns to the underlying processes. The hypothesis of neutrality, often fostered by the lack of spatially-detailed data, is no longer a necessity, in view of the recent advances in remote-sensing retrievals of vegetation

  9. Commercially available immunoglobulins contain virus neutralizing antibodies against all major genotypes of polyomavirus BK.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, P; Pastrana, D V; Zeng, G; Huang, Y; Shapiro, R; Sood, P; Puttarajappa, C; Berger, M; Hariharan, S; Buck, C B

    2015-04-01

    Neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) form the basis of immunotherapeutic strategies against many important human viral infections. Accordingly, we studied the prevalence, titer, genotype-specificity, and mechanism of action of anti-polyomavirus BK (BKV) NAbs in commercially available human immune globulin (IG) preparations designed for intravenous (IV) use. Pseudovirions (PsV) of genotypes Ia, Ib2, Ic, II, III, and IV were generated by co-transfecting a reporter plasmid encoding luciferase and expression plasmids containing synthetic codon-modified VP1, VP2, and VP3 capsid protein genes into 293TT cells. NAbs were measured using luminometry. All IG preparations neutralized all BKV genotypes, with mean EC50 titers as high as 254 899 for genotype Ia and 6,666 for genotype IV. Neutralizing titers against genotypes II and III were higher than expected, adding to growing evidence that infections with these genotypes are more common than currently appreciated. Batch to batch variation in different lots of IG was within the limits of experimental error. Antibody mediated virus neutralizing was dose dependent, modestly enhanced by complement, genotype-specific, and achieved without effect on viral aggregation, capsid morphology, elution, or host cell release. IG contains potent NAbs capable of neutralizing all major BKV genotypes. Clinical trials based on sound pharmacokinetic principles are needed to explore prophylactic and therapeutic applications of these anti-viral effects, until effective small molecule inhibitors of BKV replication can be developed.

  10. Explicit Solvent Simulations of Friction between Brush Layers of Charged and Neutral Bottle-Brush Macromolecules

    SciTech Connect

    Carrillo, Jan-Michael; Brown, W Michael; Dobrynin, Andrey

    2012-01-01

    We study friction between charged and neutral brush layers of bottle-brush macromolecules using molecular dynamics simulations. In our simulations the solvent molecules were treated explicitly. The deformation of the bottle-brush macromolecules under the shear were studied as a function of the substrate separation and shear stress. For charged bottle-brush layers we study effect of the added salt on the brush lubricating properties to elucidate factors responsible for energy dissipation in charged and neutral brush systems. Our simulations have shown that for both charged and neutral brush systems the main deformation mode of the bottle-brush macromolecule is associated with the backbone deformation. This deformation mode manifests itself in the backbone deformation ratio, , and shear viscosity, , to be universal functions of the Weissenberg number W. The value of the friction coefficient, , and viscosity, , are larger for the charged bottle-brush coatings in comparison with those for neutral brushes at the same separation distance, D, between substrates. The additional energy dissipation generated by brush sliding in charged bottle-brush systems is due to electrostatic coupling between bottle-brush and counterion motion. This coupling weakens as salt concentration, cs, increases resulting in values of the viscosity, , and friction coefficient, , approaching corresponding values obtained for neutral brush systems.

  11. Behavior of molecules and molecular ions near a field emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gault, Baptiste; Saxey, David W.; Ashton, Michael W.; Sinnott, Susan B.; Chiaramonti, Ann N.; Moody, Michael P.; Schreiber, Daniel K.

    2016-03-01

    The cold emission of particles from surfaces under intense electric fields is a process which underpins a variety of applications including atom probe tomography (APT), an analytical microscopy technique with near-atomic spatial resolution. Increasingly relying on fast laser pulsing to trigger the emission, APT experiments often incorporate the detection of molecular ions emitted from the specimen, in particular from covalently or ionically bonded materials. Notably, it has been proposed that neutral molecules can also be emitted during this process. However, this remains a contentious issue. To investigate the validity of this hypothesis, a careful review of the literature is combined with the development of new methods to treat experimental APT data, the modeling of ion trajectories, and the application of density-functional theory simulations to derive molecular ion energetics. It is shown that the direct thermal emission of neutral molecules is extremely unlikely. However, neutrals can still be formed in the course of an APT experiment by dissociation of metastable molecular ions. This work is a partial contribution of the US Government and therefore is not subject to copyright in the United States.

  12. Linear Ion Trap for the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinckerhoff, William; Arevalo, Ricardo; Danell, Ryan; van Amerom, Friso; Pinnick, Veronica; Li, Xiang; Hovmand, Lars; Getty, Stephanie; Mahaffy, Paul; Goesmann, Fred; Steininger, Harald

    2014-05-01

    The 2018 ExoMars rover mission includes the Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA) investigation. MOMA will examine the chemical composition of samples acquired from depths of up to two meters below the martian surface, where organics may be protected from radiative and oxidative degradation. When combined with the complement of instruments in the rover's Pasteur Payload, MOMA has the potential to reveal the presence of a wide range of organics preserved in a variety of mineralogical environments, and to begin to understand the structural character and potential origin of those compounds. MOMA includes a linear, or 2D, ion trap mass spectrometer (ITMS) that is designed to analyze molecular composition of (i) gas evolved from pyrolyzed powder samples and separated on a gas chromatograph and (ii) ions directly desorbed from solid samples at Mars ambient pressure using a pulsed laser and a fast-valve capillary ion inlet system. This "dual source" approach gives MOMA unprecedented breadth of detection over a wide range of molecular weights and volatilities. Analysis of nonvolatile, higher-molecular weight organics such as carboxylic acids and peptides even in the presence of significant perchlorate concentrations is enabled by the extremely short (~1 ns) pulses of the desorption laser. Use of the ion trap's tandem mass spectrometry mode permits selective focus on key species for isolation and controlled fragmentation, providing structural analysis capabilities. The flight-like engineering test unit (ETU) of the ITMS, now under construction, will be used to verify breadboard performance with high fidelity, while simultaneously supporting the development of analytical scripts and spectral libraries using synthetic and natural Mars analog samples guided by current results from MSL. ETU campaign data will strongly advise the specifics of the calibration applied to the MOMA flight model as well as the science operational procedures during the mission.

  13. The Multiphoton Multiple Ionization of Molecules.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatherly, P. A.

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. The multiphoton multiple ionization of a number of molecular systems has been studied using the picosecond laser facility at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. The laser produced 0.6ps pulses at 600nm, and 6ps at 248nm when used in conjunction with an excimer laser. The focused intensity in each case was >=q10 ^{15}W/cm^2 . A time of flight mass spectrometer designed and built at Reading University was capable of ion kinetic energy measurement, permitting the molecular dissociation dynamics to be investigated. One major question approached concerned the mode of multiphoton ionization of xenon. Specifically, does the ionization proceed in a sequential (single electron) or a collective (many electron) manner? To this end, experiments were performed with the isoelectronic molecule hydrogen iodide. The results, which were interpreted in terms of a Coulomb explosion mechanism, demonstrated the process to be sequential, rather than collective. Similar experiments on the isoelectronic pair, nitrogen and carbon monoxide tended to confirm this conclusion. These molecules were also studied at a number of laser wavelengths and pulse widths. Although the wavelength was found to have a minimal effect, the pulse width was of great importance. The results for hydrogen and deuterium contrasted with these results for other molecules, in that the energies could not be reconciled with a Coulomb explosion mechanism. Rather, dissociative autoionization or neutral dissociation followed by ionization of the atoms were considered to be the dominant processes. Finally, the existence of high energy protons (~eq100eV) from residual hydrocarbons in the vacuum chamber lead to a study of the alkanes from butane to dodecane. At 600nm, 0.6ps pulse width, the fragment energies were found to vary linearly with carbon chain length. At 248nm, 5ps though, only low energy protons were observed, independent of chain length.

  14. Femtosecond Isomerization Dynamics in the Ethylene Molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkacem, Ali

    2009-05-01

    The ethylene molecule plays a fundamental and prototypical role for the understanding of photo-isomerizaton processes and particularly for ultrafast energy conversion through nonadiabatic transitions and state crossing via conical intersections. We have developed a high power femtosecond laser based pump-probe system to study femtosecond isomerization dynamics in various model molecules. By focusing 25-mJ laser pulses into a 5-cm-long xenon-filled gas cell, we can deliver about 10^9 photons per harmonic per pulse onto a target gas, with the photons ranging in energy from 8 to 40 eV. In this talk I will present the results of our studies of the dynamics in the excited ethylene cation (C2H4^+) using a high intensity high harmonic source. The dynamics in the excited ethylene cation leads, among other channels, to isomerization to the ethyledene configuration (CH3CH^+), which is predicted to be a transient configuration for electronic relaxation. With an intense femtosecond EUV pulse as pump, and a NIR (near infra-red) pulse as probe, we measure a time scale of 45±10 fs for formation of the transient ethylidene configuration (lifetime of 60±15 fs ) through detection of the NIR-induced fragmentation to CH3^+ and CH^+. Also, a H2-stretch transient configuration (believed to succeed ethylidene), yielding H2^+, is found to be populated after 100±10 fs. These studies were also extended to excited state dynamics in the neutral ethylene using a recently developed split mirror technique enabling XUV pump - XUV probe capability. In order to achieve this we optimized our high harmonic system for high power in order to produce a very intense source of high harmonics that allows multiphoton (XUV) absorption by a single molecule. In particular, we were able to measure two-photon double-ionization of Ethelyne and argon and three-photon double ionization of neon.

  15. Observation of ultralong range Rydberg molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaffer, James

    2009-05-01

    In 1934, Enrico Fermi described the scattering of a low energy electron from a neutral atom by using the ideas of scattering length and pseudopotential. Although the long range potential for an electron-atom interaction is always attractive, Fermi realized that the s-wave scattering length that characterizes the low energy collision can be either positive or negative. For a positive scattering length, the wavefunction of the electron is shifted away from the atom, the electron is repelled; whereas for a negative scattering length, the wavefunction of the electron is shifted to the atom, the electron is attracted. Based on Fermi's approach, Greene and co-workers predicted a novel molecular binding mechanism where a low energy Rydberg electron is scattered from a ground state atom in the case of negative scattering length. In this situation, the interaction between the electron and ground state atom is attractive and results in the formation of bound states of the ground state atom and the Rydberg atom. Molecules bound by electron scattering can have an internuclear separation of several thousand Bohr radii and are very different from molecules formed by 2 Rydberg atoms where the binding is the result of multipolar forces between the atoms alone. In this talk, we present experimental data on the observation of these exotic molecular states for Rb Rydberg atoms in S states for principal quantum numbers n between 34 and 40. The spectroscopic results for the vibrational ground and first excited state of the dimer Rb(5S)-Rb(nS) are presented and the s-wave scattering length for electron-Rb(5S) scattering in the low energy regime where the kinetic energy is less than 100 meV. Finally, we discuss and present data on the lifetimes and decay mechanisms of these molecules in a magnetic trap.

  16. Species ages in neutral biodiversity models.

    PubMed

    Chisholm, Ryan A; O'Dwyer, James P

    2014-05-01

    Biogeography seeks to understand the mechanisms that drive biodiversity across long temporal and large spatial scales. Theoretical models of biogeography can be tested by comparing their predictions of quantities such as species ages against empirical estimates. It has previously been claimed that the neutral theory of biodiversity and biogeography predicts species ages that are unrealistically long. Any improved theory of biodiversity must rectify this problem, but first it is necessary to quantify the problem precisely. Here we provide analytical expressions for species ages in neutral biodiversity communities. We analyse a spatially implicit metacommunity model and solve for both the zero-sum and non-zero-sum cases. We explain why our new expressions are, in the context of biodiversity, usually more appropriate than those previously imported from neutral molecular evolution. Because of the time symmetry of the spatially implicit neutral model, our expressions also lead directly to formulas for species persistence times and species lifetimes. We use our new expressions to estimate species ages of forest trees under a neutral model and find that they are about an order of magnitude shorter than those predicted previously but still unrealistically long. In light of our results, we discuss different models of biogeography that may solve the problem of species ages.

  17. BEAMS3D Neutral Beam Injection Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Matthew; Lazerson, Samuel A.

    2014-09-01

    With the advent of applied 3D fields in Tokamaks and modern high performance stellarators, a need has arisen to address non-axisymmetric effects on neutral beam heating and fueling. We report on the development of a fully 3D neutral beam injection (NBI) model, BEAMS3D, which addresses this need by coupling 3D equilibria to a guiding center code capable of modeling neutral and charged particle trajectories across the separatrix and into the plasma core. Ionization, neutralization, charge-exchange, viscous slowing down, and pitch angle scattering are modeled with the ADAS atomic physics database. Elementary benchmark calculations are presented to verify the collisionless particle orbits, NBI model, frictional drag, and pitch angle scattering effects. A calculation of neutral beam heating in the NCSX device is performed, highlighting the capability of the code to handle 3D magnetic fields. Notice: this manuscript has been authored by Princeton University under Contract Number DE-AC02-09CH11466 with the US Department of Energy. The United States Government retains and the publisher, by accepting the article for publication, acknowledges that the United States Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license to publish or reproduce the published form of this manuscript, or allow others to do so, for United States Government purposes.

  18. Neutral beamline with improved ion energy recovery

    DOEpatents

    Dagenhart, William K.; Haselton, Halsey H.; Stirling, William L.; Whealton, John H.

    1984-01-01

    A neutral beamline generator with unneutralized ion energy recovery is provided which enhances the energy recovery of the full energy ion component of the beam exiting the neutralizer cell of the beamline. The unneutralized full energy ions exiting the neutralizer are deflected from the beam path and the electrons in the cell are blocked by a magnetic field applied transverse to the beamline in the cell exit region. The ions, which are generated at essentially ground potential and accelerated through the neutralizer cell by a negative acceleration voltage, are collected at ground potential. A neutralizer cell exit end region is provided which allows the magnetic and electric fields acting on the exiting ions to be closely coupled. As a result, the fractional energy ions exiting the cell with the full energy ions are reflected back into the gas cell. Thus, the fractional energy ions do not detract from the energy recovery efficiency of full energy ions exiting the cell which can reach the ground potential interior surfaces of the beamline housing.

  19. Focusing and neutralization of intense beams

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Simon S.; Anders, Andre; Bieniosek, F.M.; Eylon, Shmuel; Henestroza, Enrique; Roy, Prabir; Shuman, Derek; Waldron, William; Sharp, William; Rose, Dave; Welch, Dale; Efthimion, Philip; Gilson, Eric

    2003-05-01

    In heavy ion inertial confinement fusion systems, intense beams of ions must be transported from the exit of the final focus magnet system through the target chamber to hit millimeter spot sizes on the target. Effective plasma neutralization of intense ion beams through the target chamber is essential for the viability of an economically competitive heavy ion fusion power plant. The physics of neutralized drift has been studied extensively with PIC simulations. To provide quantitative comparisons of theoretical predictions with experiment, the Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory has completed the construction and has begun experimentation with the NTX (Neutralized Transport Experiment) as shown in Figure 1. The experiment consists of 3 phases, each with physics issues of its own. Phase 1 is designed to generate a very high brightness potassium beam with variable perveance, using a beam aperturing technique. Phase 2 consists of magnetic transport through four pulsed quadrupoles. Here, beam tuning as well as the effects of phase space dilution through higher order nonlinear fields must be understood. In Phase 3, a converging ion beam at the exit of the magnetic section is transported through a drift section with plasma sources for beam neutralization, and the final spot size is measured under various conditions of neutralization. In this paper, we present first results from all 3 phases of the experiment.

  20. COMSOL Modeling of Transport of Neutral Radicals to Substrate Surfaces Located Downstream from an Atmospheric Pressure Weakly Ionized Plasma Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Rokibul; Lekobou, William; Wemlinger, Erik; Pedrow, Patrick

    2012-10-01

    An Atmospheric Pressure Weakly Ionized Plasma (APWIP) Reactor generates a significant number of charged particles and neutral radicals. In our work the carrier gas is argon and the precursor molecule is acetylene. The APWIP is generated by corona discharges associated with an array of high voltage metal needles facing a grounded metal screen. Neutral radical transport downstream from the grounded screen to the substrate via diffusion and convection will be modeled with COMSOL, a finite element software package. Substrates will include objects with various shapes and characteristic dimensions that range from nanometers to centimeters. After the model is validated against canonical problems with known solutions, thin film deposition rates will be compared with experimentally measured results. Substrate geometries will include discs, spheres, fibers and highly porous surfaces such as those found on asphalt road surfaces. A single generic neutral radical will be used to represent the entire family of neutral radicals resulting from acetylene bond scission by free electron impact.

  1. Production and transformation of dissolved neutral sugars and amino acids by bacteria in seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jørgensen, L.; Lechtenfeld, O. J.; Benner, R.; Middelboe, M.; Stedmon, C. A.

    2014-10-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the ocean consists of a heterogeneous mixture of molecules, most of which are of unknown origin. Neutral sugars and amino acids are among the few recognizable biomolecules in DOM, and the molecular composition of these biomolecules is shaped primarily by biological production and degradation processes. This study provides insight into the bioavailability of biomolecules as well as the chemical composition of DOM produced by bacteria. The molecular compositions of combined neutral sugars and amino acids were investigated in DOM produced by bacteria and in DOM remaining after 32 days of bacterial degradation. Results from bioassay incubations with natural seawater (sampled from water masses originating from the surface waters of the Arctic Ocean and the North Atlantic Ocean) and artificial seawater indicate that the molecular compositions following bacterial degradation are not strongly influenced by the initial substrate or bacterial community. The molecular composition of neutral sugars released by bacteria was characterized by a high glucose content (47 mol %) and heterogeneous contributions from other neutral sugars (3-14 mol %). DOM remaining after bacterial degradation was characterized by a high galactose content (33 mol %), followed by glucose (22 mol %) and the remaining neutral sugars (7-11 mol %). The ratio of D-amino acids to L-amino acids increased during the experiments as a response to bacterial degradation, and after 32 days, the D/L ratios of aspartic acid, glutamic acid, serine and alanine reached around 0.79, 0.32, 0.30 and 0.51 in all treatments, respectively. The striking similarity in neutral sugar and amino acid compositions between natural (representing marine semi-labile and refractory DOM) and artificial (representing bacterially produced DOM) seawater samples, suggests that microbes transform bioavailable neutral sugars and amino acids into a common, more persistent form.

  2. Bacterial production and transformation of dissolved neutral sugars and amino acids in seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jørgensen, L.; Lechtenfeld, O.; Benner, R.; Middelboe, M.; Stedmon, C. A.

    2014-04-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the ocean consists of a heterogeneous mixture of molecules, most of which are of unknown origin. Neutral sugars and amino acids are among the few recognizable biomolecules in DOM, and the molecular composition of these biomolecules is shaped primarily by biological production and degradation processes. This study provides insight into the bioavailability of biomolecules as well as the chemical composition of DOM produced by bacteria. The molecular compositions of neutral sugars and amino acids were investigated in DOM produced by bacteria and in DOM remaining after long-term bacterial degradation. Results from bioassay incubations (32 days) with natural and artificial seawater, indicate that the molecular compositions following bacterial degradation are not strongly influenced by the initial substrate or bacterial community. The molecular composition of neutral sugars released by bacteria was characterized by a high glucose content (47 mol%) and heterogeneous contributions from other neutral sugars (3-14 mol%). DOM remaining after bacterial degradation was characterized by a high galactose content (33 mol%), followed by glucose (22 mol%) and the remaining neutral sugars (7-11 mol%). The ratio of D-amino acids to L-amino acids increased during the experiments as a response to bacterial degradation, and after 32 days the D/L ratios of aspartic acid, glutamic acid, serine and alanine reached around 0.79, 0.32, 0.30 and 0.51 in all treatments, respectively. The striking similarity in neutral sugar and amino acid compositions between natural and artificial seawater samples, suggests that the microbial carbon pump also applies for neutral sugars and amino acids and that bacterially-produced biomolecules persist for long periods in the ocean.

  3. Neutral Site Planning Project, Final Report. Volume I: Neutral Site Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Providence School Dept., RI.

    This report documents the process, findings, and support data of the Neutral Site Planning Project (NSPP) regarding a proposed magnet school program in Providence, Rhode Island. The need for a neutral site school that is accessible to a substantial number of students from different racial/ethnic backgrounds in Providence is discussed and an…

  4. When neutral turns significant: brain dynamics of rapidly formed associations between neutral stimuli and emotional contexts.

    PubMed

    Ventura-Bort, Carlos; Löw, Andreas; Wendt, Julia; Dolcos, Florin; Hamm, Alfons O; Weymar, Mathias

    2016-09-01

    The ability to associate neutral stimuli with motivationally relevant outcomes is an important survival strategy. In this study, we used event-related potentials (ERPs) to investigate brain dynamics of associative emotional learning when participants were confronted with multiple heterogeneous information. Participants viewed 144 different objects in the context of 144 different emotional and neutral background scenes. During each trial, neutral objects were shown in isolation and then paired with the background scene. All pairings were presented twice to compare ERPs in response to neutral objects before and after single association. After single pairing, neutral objects previously encoded in the context of emotional scenes evoked a larger P100 over occipital electrodes compared to objects that were previously paired with neutral scenes. Likewise, larger late positive potentials (LPPs) were observed over parieto-occipital electrodes (450-750 ms) for objects previously associated with emotional relative to neutral contexts. The LPP - but not P100 - enhancement was also related to subjective object/context binding. Taken together, our ERP data provide evidence for fast emotional associative learning, as reflected by heightened perceptual and sustained elaborative processing for neutral information previously encountered in emotional contexts. These findings could assist in understanding binding mechanisms in stress and anxiety, as well as in addiction and eating-related disorders. PMID:27337689

  5. Detection of neutralizing antibodies against Bluetongue virus serotype 8 by an optimized plasma neutralization test.

    PubMed

    Worwa, Gabriella; Chaignat, Valérie; Feldmann, Julia; Thür, Barbara

    2013-03-01

    The neutralization test is used commonly for quantifying neutralizing antibodies and for distinguishing among different virus serotypes (serotyping). Due to the co-circulation of multiple serotypes of Bluetongue virus (BTV), the neutralization test has become an important surveillance method in Europe. However, the existence of different protocols makes test standardization and interpretation of results difficult. The current paper describes the development of a neutralization test using plasma and addresses the factors critical for detection of neutralizing antibodies against BTV serotype 8 (BTV-8), such as virus propagation, stability of virus infectivity and origin of the BTV-8 strain. The results indicated that animals exposed to the Northern European BTV-8 strain developed low neutralizing antibody titers, particularly after vaccination and experimental infection. Although clearly ELISA-positive, these samples often yielded false negative results when tested by the neutralization test using the OIE recommended virus concentration of 100 TCID₅₀/50 μl. The sensitivity of the neutralization test could be improved significantly with retained specificity by using a reduced TCID₅₀ and the homologous European BTV-8 strain instead of the South African reference strain.

  6. Broadly neutralizing antibodies against influenza viruses

    PubMed Central

    Laursen, Nick S.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2014-01-01

    Despite available antivirals and vaccines, influenza infections continue to be a major cause of mortality worldwide. Vaccination generally induces an effective, but strain-specific antibody response. As the virus continually evolves, new vaccines have to be administered almost annually when a novel strain becomes dominant. Furthermore, the sporadic emerging resistance to neuraminidase inhibitors among circulating strains suggests an urgent need for new therapeutic agents. Recently, several cross-reactive antibodies have been described, which neutralize an unprecedented spectrum of influenza viruses. These broadly neutralizing antibodies generally target conserved functional regions on the major influenza surface glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA). The characterization of their neutralization breadth and epitopes on HA could stimulate the development of new antibody-based antivirals and broader influenza vaccines. PMID:23583287

  7. Landau-like states in neutral particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Saikat; Ågren, Hans; Balatsky, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    We show the emergence of a new type of dispersion relation for neutral atoms with an interesting similarity to the spectrum of two-dimensional electrons in an applied perpendicular constant magnetic field. These neutral atoms can be confined in toroidal optical traps and give quasi-Landau spectra. In strong contrast to the equidistant infinitely degenerate Landau levels for charged particles, the spectral gap for such two-dimensional neutral particles increases in particular electric-field configurations. The idea in the paper is motivated by the development in cold atom experiments and builds on the seminal paper of Aharonov and Casher [Phys. Rev. Lett. 53, 319 (1984), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.53.319].

  8. Methods for neutralizing anthrax or anthrax spores

    DOEpatents

    Sloan, Mark A; Vivekandanda, Jeevalatha; Holwitt, Eric A; Kiel, Johnathan L

    2013-02-26

    The present invention concerns methods, compositions and apparatus for neutralizing bioagents, wherein bioagents comprise biowarfare agents, biohazardous agents, biological agents and/or infectious agents. The methods comprise exposing the bioagent to an organic semiconductor and exposing the bioagent and organic semiconductor to a source of energy. Although any source of energy is contemplated, in some embodiments the energy comprises visible light, ultraviolet, infrared, radiofrequency, microwave, laser radiation, pulsed corona discharge or electron beam radiation. Exemplary organic semiconductors include DAT and DALM. In certain embodiments, the organic semiconductor may be attached to one or more binding moieties, such as an antibody, antibody fragment, or nucleic acid ligand. Preferably, the binding moiety has a binding affinity for one or more bioagents to be neutralized. Other embodiments concern an apparatus comprising an organic semiconductor and an energy source. In preferred embodiments, the methods, compositions and apparatus are used for neutralizing anthrax spores.

  9. Neutral-beam-injection systems for reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Pyle, R.V.

    1983-06-01

    Increasing effort is being put into engineering designs of reactors and reactor-like magnetic confinement experiments. A central question concerns the methods of heating, fueling, and maintaining the plasmas, functions that primarily are now performed by neutral beams. Planning in the USA does not include the use of neutral beams on tokamaks in the 1990's and beyond. Tandem mirrors, however, will use energetic beams (sloshing ion beams) in the end plugs to produce electrostatic potentials that will confine plasma ions. These systems will be based on the production, acceleration, transport, and neutralization of negative hydrogen-ion (D/sup -/), multiampere beams with energies of 200-to 500-keV. In addition, lower-energy D and T beams may be used. These systems must operate steady state, with high reliability, and be compatible with radiation from a D-T burning plasma.

  10. The control of powerful neutral beams

    SciTech Connect

    Theil, E.; Jacobson, V.

    1986-05-02

    While significant progress has been made in the development of neutral beams for the heating and sustaining of plasmas in large fusion experiments, the control of such devices has largely been a matter of hardware interlocks and operator experience. The need for computer-assisted control becomes more evident, however, with the initiation of multi-beamline experiments. This paper describes a software system that incorporates simple mathematical models coupled to Kalman filters for control of the high power (6 to 8 MW) beams currently under development at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Neutral Beam Engineering Test Facility. Among the principal features of the system are: reduction of a large number of operator variables to just a few (usually one or two); the ability to describe most of the major neutral beams in use and under development; a foundation resting on statistical data analysis and control system principles rather than rules-of-thumb.

  11. Kinetic Simulations of Ion Beam Neutralization

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, O.; Wang, J.

    2011-05-20

    Full particle PIC simulations are performed to study the neutralization of an ion beam in the cohesionless, mesothermal regime. Simulations further confirmed that neutralization is achieved through interactions between the trapped electrons and the potential well established by the propagation of the beam front along the beam direction and is not through plasma instabilities as previous studies suggested. In the transverse direction, the process is similar to that of the expansion of mesothermal plasma into vacuum. Parametric simulations are also performed to investigate the effects of beam radius and domain boundary condition on the neutralization process. The results suggests that, while the qualitative behavior may be similar in ground tests, quantitative parameters such as the beam potential will be affected significantly by the vacuum chamber because of the limits imposed on the expansion process by the finite chamber space.

  12. Comparative in vitro and in vivo assessment of toxin neutralization by anti-tetanus toxin monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Yousefi, Mehdi; Khosravi-Eghbal, Roya; Reza Mahmoudi, Ahmad; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Rabbani, Hodjatallah; Shokri, Fazel

    2014-01-01

    Tetanus is caused by the tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT), a 150 kDa single polypeptide molecule which is cleaved into an active two-chain molecule composed of a 50 kDa N-terminal light (L) and a 100 kDa C-terminal heavy (H) chains. Recently, extensive effort has focused on characterization of TeNT binding receptors and toxin neutralization by monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Toxin binding inhibition and neutralization is routinely assessed either in vitro by the ganglioside GT1b binding inhibition assay or in vivo using an animal model. These two assay systems have never been compared. In the present study, we report characterization of eleven mAbs against different parts of TeNT. The toxin inhibitory and neutralization activity of the mAbs was assessed in vitro and in vivo respectively. Our data demonstrated that seven mAbs bind to fragment C of the heavy chain, two mAbs react with the light chain, one mAb recognizes both chains and one mAb reacts with neither light chain nor fragment C. Six fragment C specific mAbs were able to inhibit TeNT binding to GT1b ganglioside in vitro but three failed to neutralize the toxin in vivo. One in vitro inhibitory mAb (1F3E3) was found to synergize with the in vivo neutralizing mAbs to reduce toxin lethal activity in vivo. Sequencing of the immunoglobulin heavy and light chain variable region genes revealed that the three in vivo neutralizing mAbs were derived from a common origin. Altogether, our data suggests that fragment C specific mAbs contribute to toxin neutralization in both systems, though some of the GT1b binding inhibitory mAbs may not be able to neutralize TeNT in vivo.

  13. Geranyl diphosphate synthase molecules, and nucleic acid molecules encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Croteau, Rodney Bruce; Burke, Charles Cullen

    2008-06-24

    In one aspect, the present invention provides isolated nucleic acid molecules that each encode a geranyl diphosphate synthase protein, wherein each isolated nucleic acid molecule hybridizes to a nucleic acid molecule consisting of the sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO:1 under conditions of 5.times.SSC at 45.degree. C. for one hour. The present invention also provides isolated geranyl diphosphate synthase proteins, and methods for altering the level of expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase protein in a host cell.

  14. 46 CFR 120.376 - Grounded distribution systems (Neutral grounded).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION Power Sources and Distribution Systems § 120.376 Grounded distribution systems... distribution system having a neutral bus or conductor must have the neutral grounded. (c) The neutral or each... generator is connected to the bus, except the neutral of an emergency power generation system must...

  15. A Label as a Hidden Persuader: Chemists' Neutralization Concept.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Hans-Jurgen

    1991-01-01

    Identifies and describes the problems students have with the concept of neutralization. Analysis of over 7,500 students' answers to test questions over neutralization showed that many students understand the concept in its original meaning. Students assumed that in any neutralization reaction a neutral solution is formed, even if a weak acid or…

  16. Electron-excited molecule interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Christophorou, L.G. Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN . Dept. of Physics)

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the limited but significant knowledge to date on electron scattering from vibrationally/rotationally excited molecules and electron scattering from and electron impact ionization of electronically excited molecules is briefly summarized and discussed. The profound effects of the internal energy content of a molecule on its electron attachment properties are highlighted focusing in particular on electron attachment to vibrationally/rotationally and to electronically excited molecules. The limited knowledge to date on electron-excited molecule interactions clearly shows that the cross sections for certain electron-molecule collision processes can be very different from those involving ground state molecules. For example, optically enhanced electron attachment studies have shown that electron attachment to electronically excited molecules can occur with cross sections 10{sup 6} to 10{sup 7} times larger compared to ground state molecules. The study of electron-excited molecule interactions offers many experimental and theoretical challenges and opportunities and is both of fundamental and technological significance. 54 refs., 15 figs.

  17. Organic Molecules in Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Zita

    2015-08-01

    Carbonaceous meteorites are primitive samples from the asteroid belt, containing 3-5wt% organic carbon. The exogenous delivery of organic matter by carbonaceous meteorites may have contributed to the organic inventory of the early Earth. The majority (>70%) of the meteoritic organic material consist of insoluble organic matter (IOM) [1]. The remaining meteoritic organic material (<30%) consists of a rich organic inventory of soluble organic compounds, including key compounds important in terrestrial biochemistry [2-4]. Different carbonaceous meteorites contain soluble organic molecules with different abundances and distributions, which may reflect the extension of aqueous alteration or thermal metamorphism on the meteorite parent bodies. Extensive aqueous alteration on the meteorite parent body may result on 1) the decomposition of α-amino acids [5, 6]; 2) synthesis of β- and γ-amino acids [2, 6-9]; 3) higher relative abundances of alkylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) [6, 10]; and 4) higher L-enantiomer excess (Lee) value of isovaline [6, 11, 12].The soluble organic content of carbonaceous meteorites may also have a contribution from Fischer-Tropsch/Haber-Bosch type gas-grain reactions after the meteorite parent body cooled to lower temperatures [13, 14].The analysis of the abundances and distribution of the organic molecules present in meteorites helps to determine the physical and chemical conditions of the early solar system, and the prebiotic organic compounds available on the early Earth.[1] Cody and Alexander (2005) GCA 69, 1085. [2] Cronin and Chang (1993) in: The Chemistry of Life’s Origin. pp. 209-258. [3] Martins and Sephton (2009) in: Amino acids, peptides and proteins in organic chemistry. pp. 1-42. [4] Martins (2011) Elements 7, 35. [5] Botta et al. (2007) MAPS 42, 81. [6] Martins et al. (2015) MAPS, in press. [7] Cooper and Cronin (1995) GCA 59, 1003. [8] Glavin et al. (2006) MAPS. 41, 889. [9] Glavin et al. (2011) MAPS 45, 1948. [10

  18. Polymeric liquid membrane electrodes incorporated with undecylcalix[4]- resorcinarene for screening of neutral forms of diaminobenzene isomers.

    PubMed

    Kurzatkowska, Katarzyna; Radecka, Hanna; Dehaen, Wim; Wasowicz, Michal; Grzybowska, Izabela; Radecki, Jerzy

    2007-08-01

    The PVC supported liquid membrane electrodes incorporated with undecylcalix[4]resorcinarene (UDC[4]Rene) generates a cationic potentiometric response after stimulation by neutral (unprotonated) form of diaminobenzene isomers. The potentiometric signals were generated upon the formation of supramolecular complex between the UDC[4]Rene (host) and diaminobenzene (guest) at the organic-aqueous interface. In this paper for the first time we report the generation of cationic potential signal by electrode incorporated with host molecule possessing oxygen as a heteroatom, after stimulation with neutral guest containing nitrogen in its structure We also broaden the family of receptor molecules, which are able to generate charge separation at the organic/aqueous interface after interaction with uncharged molecules. The results obtained confirm the possibility of applying this potentiometric method for the screening of diaminobenzene isomers identified recently as allergens and endocrine disrupting chemicals. PMID:17979643

  19. Neutral naturalness from orbifold Higgs models.

    PubMed

    Craig, Nathaniel; Knapen, Simon; Longhi, Pietro

    2015-02-13

    We present a general class of natural theories in which the Higgs boson is a pseudo-Goldstone boson in an orbifolded gauge theory. The symmetry protecting the Higgs boson at low energies is an accidental global symmetry of the quadratic action, rather than a full continuous symmetry. The lightest degrees of freedom protecting the weak scale carry no standard model (SM) quantum numbers and interact with visible matter principally through the Higgs portal. This opens the door to the systematic study of "neutral naturalness": natural theories with SM-neutral states that are as yet untested by the LHC.

  20. Photoproduction of neutral pions off protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crede, V.; Sparks, N.; Wilson, A.; Anisovich, A. V.; Bacelar, J. C. S.; Bantes, R.; Bartholomy, O.; Bayadilov, D.; Beck, R.; Beloglazov, Y. A.; Castelijns, R.; Dutz, H.; Elsner, D.; Ewald, R.; Frommberger, F.; Funke, Chr.; Gregor, R.; Gridnev, A.; Gutz, E.; Hillert, W.; Hoffmeister, P.; Jaegle, I.; Junkersfeld, J.; Kalinowsky, H.; Kammer, S.; Klein, Frank; Klein, Friedrich; Klempt, E.; Kotulla, M.; Krusche, B.; Löhner, H.; Lopatin, I. V.; Lugert, S.; Menze, D.; Mertens, T.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Metag, V.; Nanova, M.; Nikonov, V. A.; Novinski, D.; Novotny, R.; Ostrick, M.; Pant, L. M.; van Pee, H.; Pfeiffer, M.; Roy, A.; Sarantsev, A. V.; Schadmand, S.; Schmidt, C.; Schmieden, H.; Schoch, B.; Shende, S.; Sokhoyan, V.; Süle, A.; Sumachev, V. V.; Szczepanek, T.; Thoma, U.; Trnka, D.; Varma, R.; Walther, D.; Wendel, Ch.

    2011-11-01

    Photoproduction of neutral pions has been studied with the CBELSA/TAPS detector in the reaction γp→pπ0 for photon energies between 0.85 and 2.50 GeV. The π0 mesons are observed in their dominant neutral decay mode: π0→γγ. For the first time, the differential cross sections cover the very forward region, θc.m.<60∘. A partial-wave analysis of these data within the Bonn-Gatchina framework observes the high-mass resonances G17(2190), D13(2080), and D15(2070).

  1. High-current plasma contactor neutralizer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beattie, J. R.; Williamson, W. S.; Matossian, J. N.; Vourgourakis, E. J.; Burch, J. L.

    1989-01-01

    A plasma-contactor neutralizer system is described, for the stabilizing the Orbiter's potential during flights of the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science missions. The plasma contactor neutralizer will include a Xe plasma source that can provide steady-state ion-emission currents of up to 1.5 A. The Orbiter's potential will be maintained near that of the surrounding space plasma during electron-beam accelerator firings through a combination of ion emission from the Xe plasma source and electron collection from the ambient space plasma. Configuration diagrams and block diagrams are presented along with the performance characteristics of the system.

  2. Neutral Beam Ion Confinement in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    D.S. Darrow; E.D. Fredrickson; S.M. Kaye; S.S. Medley; and A.L. Roquemore

    2001-07-24

    Neutral-beam (NB) heating in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) began in September 2000 using up to 5 MW of 80 keV deuterium (D) beams. An initial assessment of beam ion confinement has been made using neutron detectors, a neutral particle analyzer (NPA), and a Faraday cup beam ion loss probe. Preliminary neutron results indicate that confinement may be roughly classical in quiescent discharges, but the probe measurements do not match a classical loss model. MHD activity, especially reconnection events (REs) causes substantial disturbance of the beam ion population.

  3. Theory of neutral clustering for growing populations.

    PubMed

    Houchmandzadeh, Bahram

    2009-11-01

    The spatial distribution of most species in nature is nonuniform. We have shown recently [B. Houchmandzadeh, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 078103 (2008)] on an experimental ecological community of amoeba that the most basic facts of life--birth and death--are enough to cause considerable aggregation which cannot be smoothened by random movements of the organisms. This clustering, termed neutral and always present, is independent of external causes and social interaction. We develop here the theoretical groundwork of this phenomenon by explicitly computing the pair-correlation function and the variance to mean ratio of the above neutral model and its comparison to numerical simulations. PMID:20365019

  4. Theory of neutral clustering for growing populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houchmandzadeh, Bahram

    2009-11-01

    The spatial distribution of most species in nature is nonuniform. We have shown recently [B. Houchmandzadeh, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 078103 (2008)] on an experimental ecological community of amoeba that the most basic facts of life—birth and death—are enough to cause considerable aggregation which cannot be smoothened by random movements of the organisms. This clustering, termed neutral and always present, is independent of external causes and social interaction. We develop here the theoretical groundwork of this phenomenon by explicitly computing the pair-correlation function and the variance to mean ratio of the above neutral model and its comparison to numerical simulations.

  5. PDX neutral-beam reionization losses

    SciTech Connect

    Kugel, H.W.; Dylla, H.F.; Eubank, H.P.; Kozub, T.A.; Moore, R.; Schilling, G.; Stewart, L.D.; von Halle, A.; Williams, M.D.

    1982-02-01

    Reionization losses for 1.5 MW H/sup 0/ and 2 MW D/sup 0/ neutral beams injected into the PDX tokamak were studied using pressure gauges, photo-transistors, thermocouples, surface shielding, and surface sample analysis. Considerable outgassing of conventionally prepared 304SS ducts occurred during initial injections and gradually decreased with the cumulative absorption of beam power. Reionization power losses are presently about 5% in the ducts and about 12% total for a beamline including the duct. Present duct pressures are attributed primarily to gas from the ion source and neutralizer with much smaller contributions from residual wall desorption. Physical mechanisms for the observed duct outgassing are discussed.

  6. Apparatus for neutralization of accelerated ions

    DOEpatents

    Fink, Joel H.; Frank, Alan M.

    1979-01-01

    Apparatus for neutralization of a beam of accelerated ions, such as hydrogen negative ions (H.sup.-), using relatively efficient strip diode lasers which emit monochromatically at an appropriate wavelength (.lambda. = 8000 A for H.sup.- ions) to strip the excess electrons by photodetachment. A cavity, formed by two or more reflectors spaced apart, causes the laser beams to undergo multiple reflections within the cavity, thus increasing the efficiency and reducing the illumination required to obtain an acceptable percentage (.about. 85%) of neutralization.

  7. Weak neutral currents and collapse initiated supernova

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J.R.

    1993-03-19

    Since 1974 the neutrino processes mediated by neutral currents have been a part of supernova (SN) modeling calculations. In this report only present day SN calculations will be discussed. First I will give brief description of the SN computer model and an outline of the explosion process as depicted by that model. Then I will discuss the role weak neutral current (WNC) processes play in this explosion process. Finally, I will discus inelastic scattering of tau neutrinos by heavy elements in WNC or Earth as a mechanism for measuring the mass of tau neutrino.

  8. Neutral reactors on shunt compensated EHV lines

    SciTech Connect

    Atmuri, S.R.; Thallam, R.S.; Gerlach, D.W.; Lundquist, T.G.; Selin, D.A.

    1994-12-31

    This paper examines the applications of a neutral reactor in limiting resonance overvoltages induced on deenergized conductors due to parallel energized circuits and stuck breaker conditions. These applications are demonstrated through the planned 243 mile long Mead-Phoenix 500 kV line running on the same right of way as the existing Mead-Liberty 345 kV line. Reducing the secondary arc current during single pole reclosing is also examined. In addition to its applications, a procedure for sizing, rating and protection of the neutral reactor is explained.

  9. Brownian dynamics simulation of peeling a strongly-adsorbed polymer molecule from a frictionless substrate.

    PubMed

    Iliafar, Sara; Vezenov, Dmitri; Jagota, Anand

    2013-02-01

    We used brownian dynamics to study the peeling of a polymer molecule, represented by a freely jointed chain, from a frictionless surface in an implicit solvent with parameters representative of single-stranded DNA adsorbed on graphite. For slow peeling rates, simulations match the predictions of an equilibrium statistical thermodynamic model. We show that deviations from equilibrium peeling forces are dominated by a combination of Stokes (viscous) drag forces acting on the desorbed section of the chain and a finite rate of hopping over a desorption barrier. Characteristic velocities separating equilibrium and nonequilibrium regimes are many orders of magnitude higher than values accessible in force spectroscopy experiments. Finite probe stiffness resulted in disappearance of force spikes due to desorption of individual links predicted by the statistical thermodynamic model under displacement control. Probe fluctuations also masked sharp transitions in peeling force between blocks of distinct sequences, indicating limitation in the ability of single-molecule force spectroscopy to distinguish small differences in homologous molecular structures.

  10. Single molecule tracking

    DOEpatents

    Shera, E.B.

    1987-10-07

    A detection system is provided for identifying individual particles or molecules having characteristic emission in a flow train of the particles in a flow cell. A position sensitive sensor is located adjacent the flow cell in a position effective to detect the emissions from the particles within the flow cell and to assign spatial and temporal coordinates for the detected emissions. A computer is then enabled to predict spatial and temporal coordinates for the particle in the flow train as a function of a first detected emission. Comparison hardware or software then compares subsequent detected spatial and temporal coordinates with the predicted spatial and temporal coordinates to determine whether subsequently detected emissions originate from a particle in the train of particles. In one embodiment, the particles include fluorescent dyes which are excited to fluoresce a spectrum characteristic of the particular particle. Photons are emitted adjacent at least one microchannel plate sensor to enable spatial and temporal coordinates to be assigned. The effect of comparing detected coordinates with predicted coordinates is to define a moving sample volume which effectively precludes the effects of background emissions. 3 figs.

  11. Single molecule tracking

    DOEpatents

    Shera, E. Brooks

    1988-01-01

    A detection system is provided for identifying individual particles or molecules having characteristic emission in a flow train of the particles in a flow cell. A position sensitive sensor is located adjacent the flow cell in a position effective to detect the emissions from the particles within the flow cell and to assign spatial and temporal coordinates for the detected emissions. A computer is then enabled to predict spatial and temporal coordinates for the particle in the flow train as a function of a first detected emission. Comparison hardware or software then compares subsequent detected spatial and temporal coordinates with the predicted spatial and temporal coordinates to determine whether subsequently detected emissions originate from a particle in the train of particles. In one embodiment, the particles include fluorescent dyes which are excited to fluoresce a spectrum characteristic of the particular particle. Photones are emitted adjacent at least one microchannel plate sensor to enable spatial and temporal coordinates to be assigned. The effect of comparing detected coordinates with predicted coordinates is to define a moving sample volume which effectively precludes the effects of background emissions.

  12. Electrochromic Graphene Molecules

    DOE PAGES

    Ji, Zhiqiang; Doorn, Stephen K.; Sykora, Milan

    2015-03-13

    Polyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, also called Graphene Molecules (GMs), with chemical composition C132H36(COOH)2 were synthesized in-situ on the surface of transparent nanocrystaline indium tin oxide (nc-ITO) electrodes. Their electronic structure was studied electrochemically and spectro-electrochemically. Variations in the potential applied onto the nc-ITO/GM electrodes induce only small changes in the observed current but they produce dramatic changes in the absorption of the GMs, which are associated with their oxidation and reduction. Analysis of the absorption changes using modified Nernst equation is used to determine standard potentials associated with the individual charge transfer processes. For the GMs prepared here these were foundmore » to be E1,ox 0 = 0.77± 0.01 V and E2,ox 0 = 1.24 ± 0.02 V vs. NHE for the first and second oxidation and E1,red 0 = -1.50 ± 0.04 V for the first reduction. The charge transfer processes are found to be non-ideal. The non-ideality factors associated with the oxidation and reduction processes suggest presence of strong interactions between the GM redox centers. Under the conditions of potential cycling GMs show rapid (seconds) color change with high contrast and stability. An electrochromic application is demonstrated wherein the GMs are used as the optically active component.« less

  13. Strongly interacting ultracold polar molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadway, Bryce; Yan, Bo

    2016-08-01

    This paper reviews recent advances in the study of strongly interacting systems of dipolar molecules. Heteronuclear molecules feature large and tunable electric dipole moments, which give rise to long-range and anisotropic dipole-dipole interactions. Ultracold samples of dipolar molecules with long-range interactions offer a unique platform for quantum simulations and the study of correlated many-body physics. We provide an introduction to the physics of dipolar quantum gases, both electric and magnetic, and summarize the multipronged efforts to bring dipolar molecules into the quantum regime. We discuss in detail the recent experimental progress in realizing and studying strongly interacting systems of polar molecules trapped in optical lattices, with particular emphasis on the study of interacting spin systems and non-equilibrium quantum magnetism. Finally, we conclude with a brief discussion of the future prospects for studies of strongly interacting dipolar molecules.

  14. Strongly interacting ultracold polar molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadway, Bryce; Yan, Bo

    2016-08-01

    This paper reviews recent advances in the study of strongly interacting systems of dipolar molecules. Heteronuclear molecules feature large and tunable electric dipole moments, which give rise to long-range and anisotropic dipole–dipole interactions. Ultracold samples of dipolar molecules with long-range interactions offer a unique platform for quantum simulations and the study of correlated many-body physics. We provide an introduction to the physics of dipolar quantum gases, both electric and magnetic, and summarize the multipronged efforts to bring dipolar molecules into the quantum regime. We discuss in detail the recent experimental progress in realizing and studying strongly interacting systems of polar molecules trapped in optical lattices, with particular emphasis on the study of interacting spin systems and non-equilibrium quantum magnetism. Finally, we conclude with a brief discussion of the future prospects for studies of strongly interacting dipolar molecules.

  15. Aromatic molecules as spintronic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Ojeda, J. H.; Orellana, P. A.; Laroze, D.

    2014-03-14

    In this paper, we study the spin-dependent electron transport through aromatic molecular chains attached to two semi-infinite leads. We model this system taking into account different geometrical configurations which are all characterized by a tight binding Hamiltonian. Based on the Green's function approach with a Landauer formalism, we find spin-dependent transport in short aromatic molecules by applying external magnetic fields. Additionally, we find that the magnetoresistance of aromatic molecules can reach different values, which are dependent on the variations in the applied magnetic field, length of the molecules, and the interactions between the contacts and the aromatic molecule.

  16. Spatial calibration of a tokamak neutral beam diagnostic using in situ neutral beam emission

    SciTech Connect

    Chrystal, C.; Burrell, K. H.; Pace, D. C.; Grierson, B. A.

    2015-10-15

    Neutral beam injection is used in tokamaks to heat, apply torque, drive non-inductive current, and diagnose plasmas. Neutral beam diagnostics need accurate spatial calibrations to benefit from the measurement localization provided by the neutral beam. A new technique has been developed that uses in situ measurements of neutral beam emission to determine the spatial location of the beam and the associated diagnostic views. This technique was developed to improve the charge exchange recombination (CER) diagnostic at the DIII-D tokamak and uses measurements of the Doppler shift and Stark splitting of neutral beam emission made by that diagnostic. These measurements contain information about the geometric relation between the diagnostic views and the neutral beams when they are injecting power. This information is combined with standard spatial calibration measurements to create an integrated spatial calibration that provides a more complete description of the neutral beam-CER system. The integrated spatial calibration results are very similar to the standard calibration results and derived quantities from CER measurements are unchanged within their measurement errors. The methods developed to perform the integrated spatial calibration could be useful for tokamaks with limited physical access.

  17. Spatial calibration of a tokamak neutral beam diagnostic using in situ neutral beam emission.

    PubMed

    Chrystal, C; Burrell, K H; Grierson, B A; Pace, D C

    2015-10-01

    Neutral beam injection is used in tokamaks to heat, apply torque, drive non-inductive current, and diagnose plasmas. Neutral beam diagnostics need accurate spatial calibrations to benefit from the measurement localization provided by the neutral beam. A new technique has been developed that uses in situ measurements of neutral beam emission to determine the spatial location of the beam and the associated diagnostic views. This technique was developed to improve the charge exchange recombination (CER) diagnostic at the DIII-D tokamak and uses measurements of the Doppler shift and Stark splitting of neutral beam emission made by that diagnostic. These measurements contain information about the geometric relation between the diagnostic views and the neutral beams when they are injecting power. This information is combined with standard spatial calibration measurements to create an integrated spatial calibration that provides a more complete description of the neutral beam-CER system. The integrated spatial calibration results are very similar to the standard calibration results and derived quantities from CER measurements are unchanged within their measurement errors. The methods developed to perform the integrated spatial calibration could be useful for tokamaks with limited physical access.

  18. Neutralization escape mutants define a dominant immunogenic neutralization site on hepatitis A virus

    SciTech Connect

    Stapleton, J.T.; Lemon, S.M.

    1987-02-01

    Hepatitis A virus is an hepatotrophic human picornavirus which demonstrates little antigenic variability. To topologically map immunogenic sites on hepatitis A virus which elicit neutralizing antibodies, eight neutralizing monoclonal antibodies were evaluated in competition immunoassays employing radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies and HM-175 virus. Whereas two antibodies (K3-4C8 and K3-2F2) bound to intimately overlapping epitopes, the epitope bound by a third antibody (B5-B3) was distinctly different as evidenced by a lack of competition between antibodies for binding to the virus. The other five antibodies variably blocked the binding of both K3-4C8-K3-2F2 and B5-B3, suggesting that these epitopes are closely spaced and perhaps part of a single neutralization immunogenic site. Several combinations of monoclonal antibodies blocked the binding of polyclonal human convalescent antibody by greater than 96%, indicating that the neutralization epitopes bound by these antibodies are immunodominant in humans. Spontaneously arising HM-175 mutants were selected for resistance to monoclonal antibody-mediated neutralization. Neutralization resistance was associated with reduced antibody binding. These results suggest that hepatitis A virus may differ from poliovirus in possessing a single, dominant neutralization immunogenic site and therefore may be a better candidate for synthetic peptide or antiidiotype vaccine development.

  19. A Single VHH-Based Toxin-Neutralizing Agent and an Effector Antibody Protect Mice against Challenge with Shiga Toxins 1 and 2

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Jacqueline M.; Mukherjee, Jean; Leysath, Clinton E.; Debatis, Michelle; Ofori, Kwasi; Baldwin, Karen; Boucher, Courtney; Peters, Rachel; Beamer, Gillian; Sheoran, Abhineet; Bedenice, Daniela; Tzipori, Saul

    2013-01-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is a major cause of severe food-borne disease worldwide, and two Shiga toxins, Stx1 and Stx2, are primarily responsible for the serious disease consequence, hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS). Here we report identification of a panel of heavy-chain-only antibody (Ab) VH (VHH) domains that neutralize Stx1 and/or Stx2 in cell-based assays. VHH heterodimer toxin-neutralizing agents containing two linked Stx1-neutralizing VHHs or two Stx2-neutralizing VHHs were generally much more potent at Stx neutralization than a pool of the two-component monomers tested in cell-based assays and in vivo mouse models. We recently reported that clearance of toxins can be promoted by coadministering a VHH-based toxin-neutralizing agent with an antitag monoclonal antibody (MAb), called the “effector Ab,” that indirectly decorates each toxin molecule with four Ab molecules. Decoration occurs because the Ab binds to a common epitopic tag present at two sites on each of the two VHH heterodimer molecules that bind to each toxin molecule. Here we show that coadministration of effector Ab substantially improved the efficacy of Stx toxin-neutralizing agents to prevent death or kidney damage in mice following challenge with Stx1 or Stx2. A single toxin-neutralizing agent consisting of a double-tagged VHH heterotrimer—one Stx1-specific VHH, one Stx2-specific VHH, and one Stx1/Stx2 cross-specific VHH—was effective in preventing all symptoms of intoxication from Stx1 and Stx2 when coadministered with effector Ab. Overall, the availability of simple, defined, recombinant proteins that provide cost-effective protection against HUS opens up new therapeutic approaches to managing disease. PMID:24082082

  20. Dynamics of evolutionary radiation under ecological neutrality.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takanori Mizuno; Chiba, Satoshi

    2016-10-01

    The most spectacular phenomenon of evolutionary biota is the explosive radiation that occurs in depauperate environments in which there are fewer competitors and predators, such as oceanic islands and crater lakes. Adaptation to divergent niches has been proposed as a major cause for this accelerated speciation. Here, we show that neutral mutation, genetic drift, and neutral community dynamics are sufficient to lead to radiation. In addition, these processes yield overshooting dynamics with a decline in species richness in the later stages of radiation. We constructed an ecologically neutral model for a community on an island with a uniform environment. For the speciation process, we introduced a null model with minimal assumptions in which the incompatibilities between alleles in different lineages evolve by a random accumulation of mutations via genetic drift. Our simulations showed that the speciation rate, extinction rate and genetic variation of the species colonizing the island rapidly increased to a sharp peak followed by a decrease that approached zero. Because the extinction rate reached a peak later than the speciation rate, the species richness initially increased, but declined in the later stage, exhibiting "overshooting". The highest species richness was found for the largest island at the largest initial population size. Accordingly, speciation is accelerated by the large population size of depauperate biota, whereas it is decelerated with increasing species richness from the decreasing population size. Explosive radiation without ecological divergence can occur in depauperate environments via neutral stochastic processes. PMID:27297287

  1. OGO-6 neutral atmospheric composition experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taeusch, D. R.

    1973-01-01

    The continued analysis of data obtained from the neutral atmospheric composition experiment flown on OGO-V6 is discussed. The effort was directed toward the study of five specific areas of interest for which the OGO-V6 data were especially useful.

  2. Absence of neutral alkali atoms in rhodizite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donnay, G.; Thorpe, A.N.; Senftle, F.E.; Sioda, R.

    1966-01-01

    The formula CsB12Be4Al4O28 has been proposed by others for the mineral rhodizite. Electron-spin-resonance and magnetic susceptibility measurements prove the absence of neutral cesium atoms. An ionic formula CsB11Be4Al4O 26(OH)2is proposed.

  3. Separation of Acids, Bases, and Neutral Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Megumi; Mah, Helen M.; Sgarbi, Paulo W. M.; Lall, Manjinder S.; Ly, Tai Wei; Browne, Lois M.

    2003-01-01

    Separation of Acids, Bases, and Neutral Compounds requires the following software, which is available for free download from the Internet: Netscape Navigator, version 4.75 or higher, or Microsoft Internet Explorer, version 5.0 or higher; Chime plug-in, version compatible with your OS and browser (available from MDL); and Flash player, version 5 or higher (available from Macromedia).

  4. The neutral and ion tori of Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, John D.; Smith, Howard T.

    2016-10-01

    The magnetosphere of Saturn is dominated by a large neutral close derived mainly from Enceladus.This cloud is ionized to form the plasma torus. We use a self-consistent model to find the neutralcloud and plasma densities and composition and show how changing source rates modify these parameters.

  5. Ion Acoustic Waves in Ultracold Neutral Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, J.; McQuillen, P.; Killian, T. C.

    2010-08-06

    We photoionize laser-cooled atoms with a laser beam possessing spatially periodic intensity modulations to create ultracold neutral plasmas with controlled density perturbations. Laser-induced fluorescence imaging reveals that the density perturbations oscillate in space and time, and the dispersion relation of the oscillations matches that of ion acoustic waves, which are long-wavelength, electrostatic, density waves.

  6. If It's Neutral, It's Not Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strate, Lance

    2012-01-01

    Taking a media ecology perspective, this article argues that technology cannot be neutral, because it is a form of change, and it has an inherent bias based on the properties of its materials and methods. Additionally, the application of a technology is an intrinsic part of the technology itself, as is technique, instructions, software, or…

  7. The LIPSS search for light neutral bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Andrei Afanasev; Oliver K. Baker; Kevin Beard; George Biallas; James Boyce; Minarni Minarni; Roopchan Ramdon; Michelle D. Shinn; Penny Slocum

    2009-07-01

    An overview is presented of the LIPSS experimental search for very light neutral bosons using laser light from Jefferson Lab's Free Electron Laser. This facility provides very high power beams of photons over a large optical range, particularly at infrared wavelengths. Data has been collected in several experimental runs during the course of the past three years, most recently in the Fall of 2009.

  8. Semiconductor etching by hyperthermal neutral beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minton, Timothy K. (Inventor); Giapis, Konstantinos P. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An at-least dual chamber apparatus and method in which high flux beams of fast moving neutral reactive species are created, collimated and used to etch semiconductor or metal materials from the surface of a workpiece. Beams including halogen atoms are preferably used to achieve anisotropic etching with good selectivity at satisfactory etch rates. Surface damage and undercutting are minimized.

  9. CP Violation, Neutral Currents, and Weak Equivalence

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Fitch, V. L.

    1972-03-23

    Within the past few months two excellent summaries of the state of our knowledge of the weak interactions have been presented. Correspondingly, we will not attempt a comprehensive review but instead concentrate this discussion on the status of CP violation, the question of the neutral currents, and the weak equivalence principle.

  10. TPX Neutral Beam Injection System design

    SciTech Connect

    von Halle, A.; Bowen, O.N.; Edwards, J.W.

    1993-11-01

    The existing Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor Neutral Beam system is proposed to be modified for long pulse operation on the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX). Day one of TPX will call for one TFTR beamline modified for 1000 second pulse lengths oriented co-directional to the plasma current. The system design will be capable of accommodating an additional co-directional and a single counter directional beamline. For the TPX conceptual design, every attempt was made to use existing Neutral Beam hardware, plant facilities, auxiliary systems, service infrastructure, and control systems. This paper describes the moderate modifications required to the power systems, the ion sources, and the beam impinged surfaces of the ion dumps, the calorimeters, the various beam scrapers, and the neutralizers. Also described are the minimal modifications required to the vacuum, cryogenic, and gas systems and the major modification of replacing the beamline-torus duct in its entirety. Operational considerations for Neutral Beam subsystems over 1000 second pulse lengths will be explored including proposed operating scenarios for full steady state operation.

  11. Neutralization of rainwater acidity at Kanpur, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Sheo Prasad; Sharma, Mukesh

    2010-07-01

    Particulate matter (PM) levels show significant seasonal variability and this can influence the neutralization of rainwater acidity. Months were grouped in two periods: monsoon (July to October) and non-monsoon (November to June) for studying the seasonal variability in PM and rainwater composition. To clearly establish the cause effect relationship of acid rain neutralization, a two tier model was proposed involving source apportionment of particulates at two levels: (i) ambient air and (ii) rainwater particulate interaction. For modelling purpose, PM10 (n = 100), soil (n = 4) and rainwater (n = 83) samples were collected at Kanpur, India during 2000-2002. The collected samples were analysed for metals and water soluble ion composition to employ factor analysis for source identification. Knowledge of statistical correlation and chemistry fundamentals were combined to estimate the sources for acid rain neutralization. NH4+ was a dominating ion responsible for neutralizing the acidity of rainwater in monsoon period and Ca2+ was dominating in non-monsoon period. Components of secondary particles (SO42- and NO3-) showed affinity with NH4+, signifying the major role that ammonia can play if present in excess of stoichiometric requirements.

  12. Method of purifying neutral organophosphorus extractants

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Gatrone, Ralph C.; Chiarizia, Renato

    1988-01-01

    A method for removing acidic contaminants from neutral mono and bifunctional organophosphorous extractants by contacting the extractant with a macroporous cation exchange resin in the H.sup.+ state followed by contact with a macroporous anion exchange resin in the OH.sup.- state, whereupon the resins take up the acidic contaminants from the extractant, purifying the extractant and improving its extraction capability.

  13. Diagnostics for neutral-beam-heated tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Goldston, R.J.

    1982-12-01

    Diagnostic techniques for neutral-beam-heated tokamak plasmas fall into three categories: (1) magnetic diagnostics for measurements of gross stored energy, (2) profile diagnostics for measurements of stored thermal and beam energy, impurity content and plasma rotation, and (3) fast time resolution diagnostics to study MHD fluctuations and micro-turbulence.

  14. CP violation in neutral kaon decays

    SciTech Connect

    Buchalla, G.

    1997-05-01

    A brief review of the theoretical status of CP violation in decays of neutral kaons is presented. We focus on three important topics: {epsilon}, {epsilon}`/{epsilon} and K{sub L}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{anti {nu}}.

  15. VUV state-selected photoionization of thermally-desorbed biomolecules by coupling an aerosol source to an imaging photoelectron/photoion coincidence spectrometer: case of the amino acids tryptophan and phenylalanine.

    PubMed

    Gaie-Levrel, François; Garcia, Gustavo A; Schwell, Martin; Nahon, Laurent

    2011-04-21

    Gas phase studies of biological molecules provide structural and dynamical information on isolated systems. The lack of inter- or intra-molecular interactions facilitates the interpretation of the experimental results through theoretical calculations, and constitutes an informative complement to the condensed phase. However advances in the field are partially hindered by the difficulty of vaporising these systems, most of which are thermally unstable. In this work we present a newly developed aerosol mass thermodesorption setup, which has been coupled to a Velocity Map Imaging (VMI) analyzer operated in coincidence with a Wiley-McLaren Time of Flight spectrometer, using synchrotron radiation as a single photon ionization source. Although it has been previously demonstrated that thermolabile molecules such as amino acids can be produced intact by the aerosol vaporisation technique, we show how its non-trivial coupling to a VMI analyzer plus the use of electron/ion coincidences greatly improves the concept in terms of the amount of spectroscopic and dynamic information that can be extracted. In this manner, we report on the valence shell ionization of two amino acids, tryptophan and phenylalanine, for which threshold photoelectron spectra have been recorded within the first 3 eV above the first ionization energy using synchrotron radiation emitted from the DESIRS beamline located at SOLEIL in France. Their adiabatic ionization energies (IEs) have been measured at 7.40 ± 0.05 and 8.65 ± 0.02 eV, respectively, and their spectra analyzed using existing theoretical data from the literature. The IE values agree well with previously published ones, but are given here with a considerably reduced uncertainty by up to a factor of 5. The photostability of both amino acids is also described in detail, through the measurement of the state-selected fragmentation pathways via the use of threshold electron/ion coincidences (TPEPICO), with appearance energies for the different

  16. Electrochromic Graphene Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Zhiqiang; Doorn, Stephen K.; Sykora, Milan

    2015-03-13

    Polyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, also called Graphene Molecules (GMs), with chemical composition C132H36(COOH)2 were synthesized in-situ on the surface of transparent nanocrystaline indium tin oxide (nc-ITO) electrodes. Their electronic structure was studied electrochemically and spectro-electrochemically. Variations in the potential applied onto the nc-ITO/GM electrodes induce only small changes in the observed current but they produce dramatic changes in the absorption of the GMs, which are associated with their oxidation and reduction. Analysis of the absorption changes using modified Nernst equation is used to determine standard potentials associated with the individual charge transfer processes. For the GMs prepared here these were found to be E1,ox 0 = 0.77± 0.01 V and E2,ox 0 = 1.24 ± 0.02 V vs. NHE for the first and second oxidation and E1,red 0 = -1.50 ± 0.04 V for the first reduction. The charge transfer processes are found to be non-ideal. The non-ideality factors associated with the oxidation and reduction processes suggest presence of strong interactions between the GM redox centers. Under the conditions of potential cycling GMs show rapid (seconds) color change with high contrast and stability. An electrochromic application is demonstrated wherein the GMs are used as the optically active component.

  17. Selectionism and Neutralism in Molecular Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Nei, Masatoshi

    2006-01-01

    Charles Darwin proposed that evolution occurs primarily by natural selection, but this view has been controversial from the beginning. Two of the major opposing views have been mutationism and neutralism. Early molecular studies suggested that most amino acid substitutions in proteins are neutral or nearly neutral and the functional change of proteins occurs by a few key amino acid substitutions. This suggestion generated an intense controversy over selectionism and neutralism. This controversy is partially caused by Kimura's definition of neutrality, which was too strict (|2Ns| ≤ 1). If we define neutral mutations as the mutations that do not change the function of gene products appreciably, many controversies disappear because slightly deleterious and slightly advantageous mutations are engulfed by neutral mutations. The ratio of the rate of nonsynonymous nucleotide substitution to that of synonymous substitution is a useful quantity to study positive Darwinian selection operating at highly variable genetic loci, but it does not necessarily detect adaptively important codons. Previously, multigene families were thought to evolve following the model of concerted evolution, but new evidence indicates that most of them evolve by a birth-and-death process of duplicate genes. It is now clear that most phenotypic characters or genetic systems such as the adaptive immune system in vertebrates are controlled by the interaction of a number of multigene families, which are often evolutionarily related and are subject to birth-and-death evolution. Therefore, it is important to study the mechanisms of gene family interaction for understanding phenotypic evolution. Because gene duplication occurs more or less at random, phenotypic evolution contains some fortuitous elements, though the environmental factors also play an important role. The randomness of phenotypic evolution is qualitatively different from allele frequency changes by random genetic drift. However, there is

  18. Selectionism and neutralism in molecular evolution.

    PubMed

    Nei, Masatoshi

    2005-12-01

    Charles Darwin proposed that evolution occurs primarily by natural selection, but this view has been controversial from the beginning. Two of the major opposing views have been mutationism and neutralism. Early molecular studies suggested that most amino acid substitutions in proteins are neutral or nearly neutral and the functional change of proteins occurs by a few key amino acid substitutions. This suggestion generated an intense controversy over selectionism and neutralism. This controversy is partially caused by Kimura's definition of neutrality, which was too strict (|2Ns|< or =1). If we define neutral mutations as the mutations that do not change the function of gene products appreciably, many controversies disappear because slightly deleterious and slightly advantageous mutations are engulfed by neutral mutations. The ratio of the rate of nonsynonymous nucleotide substitution to that of synonymous substitution is a useful quantity to study positive Darwinian selection operating at highly variable genetic loci, but it does not necessarily detect adaptively important codons. Previously, multigene families were thought to evolve following the model of concerted evolution, but new evidence indicates that most of them evolve by a birth-and-death process of duplicate genes. It is now clear that most phenotypic characters or genetic systems such as the adaptive immune system in vertebrates are controlled by the interaction of a number of multigene families, which are often evolutionarily related and are subject to birth-and-death evolution. Therefore, it is important to study the mechanisms of gene family interaction for understanding phenotypic evolution. Because gene duplication occurs more or less at random, phenotypic evolution contains some fortuitous elements, though the environmental factors also play an important role. The randomness of phenotypic evolution is qualitatively different from allele frequency changes by random genetic drift. However, there is

  19. Compact Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer with Ion Drifts, Temperatures and Neutral Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paschalidis, Nikolaos

    2016-07-01

    In situ measurements of atmospheric neutral and ion composition and density, temperatures, ion drifts and neutral winds, are in high demand to study the dynamics of the ionosphere-theremosphere-mesosphere system. This paper presents a compact Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) with impended ion drifts and temperature, and neutral winds capability for in situ measurements of ions and neutrals H, He, N, O, N2, O2. The mass resolution M/dM is approximately 10 at an incoming energy range of 0-20eV. The goal is to resolve ion drifts in the range 0 to 3000m/sec with a resolution better than 50m/sec, and neutral winds in the range of 0 to 1000m/sec with similar resolution. For temperatures the goal is to cover a dynamic range of 0 to 5000K. The INMS is based on front end optics for ions and neutrals, pre acceleration, gated time of flight, top hat ESA, MCP detectors and compact electronics. The instrument is redundant for ions and neutrals with the ion and neutral sensor heads on opposite sides and with full electronics in the middle. The ion front end includes RPA for temperature scanning and neutral front end includes angular modulation and thermionic ionization and ion blocking grids. The electronics include fast electric gating, TOF electronics, TOF binning and C&DH digital electronics. The data package includes 400 mass bins each for ions and neutrals and key housekeeping data for instrument health and calibration. The data sampling can be commanded from 0.1 to 10 sec with 1sec nominal setting. The instrument has significant onboard storage capability and a data compression scheme. The mass spectrometer version of the instrument has been flown on the Exocube mission. The instrument occupied 1.5U volume, weighed only 560 g and required nominal power of 1.6W The ExoCube mission was designed to acquire global knowledge of in-situ densities of [H], [He], [O] and H+, He+, O+ in the upper ionosphere and lower exosphere in combination with incoherent scatter radar and

  20. A field-ionization neutral detector - FIND. [neutral particle mass spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtis, C. C.; Hsieh, K. C.; Fan, C. Y.; Swanson, L. W.

    1975-01-01

    The field ionization neutral detector FIND operates according to the following principle: Neutral atoms are attracted toward the field ionization tips since they are polarized by the electric field of the tips. The atoms are singly ionized and repelled by the positive potential of the tips toward the detector situated behind a grid at ground potential. The ions deposit in the detector their kinetic energies, typically 26 keV, corresponding to the potential difference between the ionization region and the detector. Laboratory results show that FIND can have the resolution, sensitivities and durability required to perform in situ measurements of neutral H and He fluxes in interplanetary space, cometary halos and exospheres.

  1. Results on intense beam focusing and neutralization from the neutralized beam experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, P.K.; Yu, S.S.; Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Anders, A.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Greenway, W.G.; Logan, B.G.; Waldron, W.L.; Vanecek, D.L.; Welch, D.R.; Rose, D.V.; Davidson, R.C.; Efthimion, P.C.; Gilson, E.P.; Sefkow, A.B.; Sharp, W.M.

    2003-10-31

    We have demonstrated experimental techniques to provide active neutralization for space-charge dominated beams as well as to prevent uncontrolled ion beam neutralization by stray electrons. Neutralization is provided by a localized plasma injected from a cathode arc source. Unwanted secondary electrons produced at the wall by halo particle impact are suppressed using a radial mesh liner that is positively biased inside a beam drift tube. We present measurements of current transmission, beam spot size as a function of axial position, beam energy and plasma source conditions. Detailed comparisons with theory are also presented.

  2. Identification of a Neutralizing Epitope within Antigenic Domain 5 of Glycoprotein B of Human Cytomegalovirus

    PubMed Central

    Wiegers, Anna-Katharina; Sticht, Heinrich; Winkler, Thomas H.; Britt, William J.

    2014-01-01

    antibodies and hence an interesting molecule for intervention strategies, e.g., vaccination. Mapping the target structures of neutralizing antibodies induced by naturally occurring HCMV infection can aid in defining the properties required for a protective capacity of vaccine antigens. The data presented here extend our knowledge of neutralizing epitopes within gB to include AD-5. Collectively, our data will contribute to optimal vaccine design and development of antibody-based therapies. PMID:25320309

  3. Transferable Atomic Multipole Machine Learning Models for Small Organic Molecules.

    PubMed

    Bereau, Tristan; Andrienko, Denis; von Lilienfeld, O Anatole

    2015-07-14

    Accurate representation of the molecular electrostatic potential, which is often expanded in distributed multipole moments, is crucial for an efficient evaluation of intermolecular interactions. Here we introduce a machine learning model for multipole coefficients of atom types H, C, O, N, S, F, and Cl in any molecular conformation. The model is trained on quantum-chemical results for atoms in varying chemical environments drawn from thousands of organic molecules. Multipoles in systems with neutral, cationic, and anionic molecular charge states are treated with individual models. The models' predictive accuracy and applicability are illustrated by evaluating intermolecular interaction energies of nearly 1,000 dimers and the cohesive energy of the benzene crystal.

  4. Featured Molecules: Sucrose and Vanillin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, William F.; Wildman, Randall J.

    2003-04-01

    The WebWare molecules of the month for April relate to the sense of taste. Apple Fool, the JCE Classroom Activity, mentions sucrose and vanillin and their use as flavorings. Fully manipulable (Chime) versions of these and other molecules are available at Only@JCE Online.

  5. Proregenerative Properties of ECM Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Plantman, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    After traumatic injuries to the nervous system, regrowing axons encounter a complex microenvironment where mechanisms that promote regeneration compete with inhibitory processes. Sprouting and axonal regrowth are key components of functional recovery but are often counteracted by inhibitory molecules. This review covers extracellular matrix molecules that support neuron axonal outgrowth. PMID:24195084

  6. Micro-Kelvin cold molecules.

    SciTech Connect

    Strecker, Kevin E.; Chandler, David W.

    2009-10-01

    We have developed a novel experimental technique for direct production of cold molecules using a combination of techniques from atomic optical and molecular physics and physical chemistry. The ability to produce samples of cold molecules has application in a broad spectrum of technical fields high-resolution spectroscopy, remote sensing, quantum computing, materials simulation, and understanding fundamental chemical dynamics. Researchers around the world are currently exploring many techniques for producing samples of cold molecules, but to-date these attempts have offered only limited success achieving milli-Kelvin temperatures with low densities. This Laboratory Directed Research and Development project is to develops a new experimental technique for producing micro-Kelvin temperature molecules via collisions with laser cooled samples of trapped atoms. The technique relies on near mass degenerate collisions between the molecule of interest and a laser cooled (micro-Kelvin) atom. A subset of collisions will transfer all (nearly all) of the kinetic energy from the 'hot' molecule, cooling the molecule at the expense of heating the atom. Further collisions with the remaining laser cooled atoms will thermally equilibrate the molecules to the micro-Kelvin temperature of the laser-cooled atoms.

  7. Loosely-Bound Diatomic Molecules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balfour, W. J.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses concept of covalent bonding as related to homonuclear diatomic molecules. Article draws attention to the existence of bound rare gas and alkaline earth diatomic molecules. Summarizes their molecular parameters and offers spectroscopic data. Strength and variation with distance of interatomic attractive forces is given. (Author/SA)

  8. Time-Resolved Optical Spectroscopy of Tunnel Coupled Lateral Quantum Dot Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermannstädter, C.; Beirne, G. J.; Wang, L.; Rastelli, A.; Schmidt, O. G.; Michler, P.

    2007-04-01

    The two laterally coupled quantum dots, also referred to as lateral quantum dot molecules, exhibit a characteristic photoluminescence spectrum consisting of six dominant emission lines that are due to neutral and charged excitonic as well as biexcitonic recombination. All of these lines are found to originate from the same single quantum emitter following photon statistics measurements. Using a parallel electric field we are able to control the quantum coupling between the dots. This control manifests itself as an ability to reversibly switch the relative intensities of the two neutral excitonic transitions, which results in a possible application of the molecules as tunable single-photon emitters. To further investigate the exact origin of the photoluminescence lines we have also investigated the decay times of the molecule emission.

  9. An Ion-Neutral Collision Database for Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stancil, Phillip

    Collisions between ions and neutral atoms and molecules play an important role in a variety of astrophysical, atmospheric, and stellar-spheric gaseous and plasma environments. For example, charge transfer data, at the total and internal-state-specific level, are crucial for determining elemental ionization balances, the temperature balance, and ion emission spectra. Likewise, scattering- angle-dependent elastic and related transport cross sections describe the interaction of ion and neutral fluids largely controlling the rates of energy and momentum transfer, such as in ambipolar diffusion. As a consequence, most plasma/spectral modeling codes (e.g., Xstar, Cloudy, Chianti) require the input of large datasets of collisional information. Unfortunately, the available data are of a diverse nature in quality, energy or temperature coverage, state-specificity, format, and source documentation, or are completely unavailable in the literature. Further, such a lack of ion-neutral collision data, or data of poor quality, can lead to errors in astrophysical models and synthetic spectra and their related deductions. We propose here to address many of these issues with a significant update and extension of the existing Charge Transfer Database for Astrophysics which was funded from 1999- 2002 by the NASA AISRP program. The update of the charge transfer database will include i) the addition of new theoretical data computed in the past decade by our group, ii) the addition of new experimental and theoretical data from the literature with an emphasis on the post-2002 period, iii) data evaluations to produce recommended cross sections and rate coefficients, iv) facilities to generate approximate collisional data from semi-empirical models when data are completely lacking, v) conversion of all data into a format suitable for a relational database, vi) converters to facilitate exchange/export of data to other databases/users (e.g, XSAMS, uaDB, VAMDC), and vii) the development of a

  10. Enzyme molecules in solitary confinement.

    PubMed

    Liebherr, Raphaela B; Gorris, Hans H

    2014-09-12

    Large arrays of homogeneous microwells each defining a femtoliter volume are a versatile platform for monitoring the substrate turnover of many individual enzyme molecules in parallel. The high degree of parallelization enables the analysis of a statistically representative enzyme population. Enclosing individual enzyme molecules in microwells does not require any surface immobilization step and enables the kinetic investigation of enzymes free in solution. This review describes various microwell array formats and explores their applications for the detection and investigation of single enzyme molecules. The development of new fabrication techniques and sensitive detection methods drives the field of single molecule enzymology. Here, we introduce recent progress in single enzyme molecule analysis in microwell arrays and discuss the challenges and opportunities.

  11. Molecule-hugging graphene nanopores.

    PubMed

    Garaj, Slaven; Liu, Song; Golovchenko, Jene A; Branton, Daniel

    2013-07-23

    It has recently been recognized that solid-state nanopores in single-atomic-layer graphene membranes can be used to electronically detect and characterize single long charged polymer molecules. We have now fabricated nanopores in single-layer graphene that are closely matched to the diameter of a double-stranded DNA molecule. Ionic current signals during electrophoretically driven translocation of DNA through these nanopores were experimentally explored and theoretically modeled. Our experiments show that these nanopores have unusually high sensitivity (0.65 nA/Å) to extremely small changes in the translocating molecule's outer diameter. Such atomically short graphene nanopores can also resolve nanoscale-spaced molecular structures along the length of a polymer, but do so with greatest sensitivity only when the pore and molecule diameters are closely matched. Modeling confirms that our most closely matched pores have an inherent resolution of ≤ 0.6 nm along the length of the molecule. PMID:23836648

  12. Cold molecules, collisions and reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecker Denschlag, Johannes

    2016-05-01

    I will report on recent experiments of my group where we have been studying the formation of ultracold diatomic molecules and their subsequent inelastic/reactive collisions. For example, in one of these experiments we investigate collisions of triplet Rb2 molecules in the rovibrational ground state. We observe fast molecular loss and compare the measured loss rates to predictions based on universality. In another set of experiments we investigate the formation of (BaRb)+ molecules after three-body recombination of a single Ba+ ion with two Rb atoms in an ultracold gas of Rb atoms. Our investigations indicate that the formed (BaRb)+ molecules are weakly bound and that several secondary processes take place ranging from photodissociation of the (BaRb)+ molecule to reactive collisions with Rb atoms. I will explain how we can experimentally distinguish these processes and what the typical reaction rates are. Support from the German Research foundation DFG and the European Community is acknowledged.

  13. Plasma polymerization chemistry of unsaturated hydrocarbons: neutral species identification by mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillon, X.; Houssiau, L.

    2014-08-01

    Radio frequency discharges ignited in low-pressure and pure hydrocarbon gases were investigated by mass spectrometry. The plasma process was applied to four unsaturated monomers: styrene C8H8, benzene C6H6, ethylene C2H4 and acetylene C2H2. The remote mass spectrometer location restricted species identification to neutral closed-shell molecules in their respective plasmas. Among the peaks in the mass spectra, those directly due to neutrals produced in the plasma were determined following a successful two-step methodology. Firstly, the use of low electron impact energy limited the fragmentation and strongly simplified the cracking patterns. Secondly, attribution of peaks directly due to neutrals was confirmed or ruled out by systematically measuring their appearance potential. In the case of styrene, not less than 48 new molecules were detected. The discussion of the observed stable by-products in each discharge suggested several radicals responsible for their production. Comparing the set of species among the four plasmas showed that the repeated addition of intermediates with one or two carbon atoms and with low H content dominated the chemistry. Under our conditions of intermediate to high W/FM (power over mass flow ratio), the gas-phase plasma polymerization then preferentially occurred through significant fragmentation and recombination. Finally, the measured appearance potentials during plasma provided estimation for the threshold ionization energy of several highly unsaturated hydrocarbons, useful for modeling.

  14. Applications and implications of neutral versus non-neutral markers in molecular ecology.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Heather; Freeland, Joanna R

    2011-01-01

    The field of molecular ecology has expanded enormously in the past two decades, largely because of the growing ease with which neutral molecular genetic data can be obtained from virtually any taxonomic group. However, there is also a growing awareness that neutral molecular data can provide only partial insight into parameters such as genetic diversity, local adaptation, evolutionary potential, effective population size, and taxonomic designations. Here we review some of the applications of neutral versus adaptive markers in molecular ecology, discuss some of the advantages that can be obtained by supplementing studies of molecular ecology with data from non-neutral molecular markers, and summarize new methods that are enabling researchers to generate data from genes that are under selection.

  15. Repeating collisions in an optical trap and the evaluation of spin-dependent interactions among neutral particles

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z. B.; Chen, Z. F.; He, Y. Z.; Bao, C. G.

    2010-09-15

    A dynamic process of repeating collisions of a pair of trapped neutral particles with weak spin-dependent interaction is designed and studied. A related theoretical derivation and numerical calculation have been performed to study the inherent coordinate-spin and momentum-spin correlations. Because of the repeating collisions, the effect of the weak interaction can be accumulated and enlarged, and therefore can be eventually detected. Numerical results suggest that the Cr-Cr interaction, which has not yet been completely clarified, could thereby be determined. The design can be used in general to determine various interactions among neutral atoms and molecules, in particular for the determination of very weak forces.

  16. Detection and differentiation of neutral organic compounds by 19F NMR with a tungsten calix[4]arene imido complex.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanchuan; Swager, Timothy M

    2013-12-18

    Fluorinated tungsten calix[4]arene imido complexes were synthesized and used as receptors to detect and differentiate neutral organic compounds. It was found that the binding of specific neutral organic molecules to the tungsten centers induces an upfield shift of the fluorine atom appended on the arylimido group, the extent of which is highly dependent on electronic and steric properties. We demonstrate that the specific bonding and size-selectivity of calix[4]arene tungsten-imido complex combined with (19)F NMR spectroscopy is a powerful new method for the analysis of complex mixtures.

  17. Neutral O2 and Ion O2+ Sources from Rings into the Inner Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elrod, M. K.; Johnson, R. E.; Cassidy, T. A.; Wilson, R. J.; Tseng, W.; Ip, W.

    2009-12-01

    The primary source of neutral O2 for Saturn’s magnetosphere is due to solar UV photons protons that produce O2 from H2O ice decomposition over the main rings as well as the tenuous F and G rings resulting in a tenuous O2 atmosphere (Johnson et. al. 2006). The O2 atmosphere is very thin to the point of being nearly collisionless. Our model of the atmosphere predict that as it interacts with the ring particles, the O2 is adsorbed and desorbed from the rings causing changes in the trajectories, which in turn, allows for a distribution of O2 from the rings throughout the magnetosphere (Tokar et. al. 2005; Tseng et. al. 2009). Predominately through photo-ionization and ion-exchange these O2 neutrals from the ice grains become a source for O2+ ions in the inner magnetosphere. Once the O2 becomes ionized to become O2+ the ions then follow the field lines. The ions interact with the ice particles in the rings to stick to the ring particles effectively reducing the ion density. As a result the ion density is greater over the Cassini Division and the area between the F and G ring where the optical depth due to the ice grain is less. Accordingly, the neutral O2 densities would tend to be high over the higher optical depth of the B and A main rings where the source rates are higher. Models of the neutral densities have shown high densities over the main rings, with a tail through the magnetosphere. Analysis of the CAPS (Cassini Plasma Spectrometer) data from the Saturn Orbit Insertion (SOI) in 2004 shows a peak in density over the Cassini Division and a higher peak in O2+ ion density between the F and G rings. References: Johnson, R.E., J.G. Luhmann, R.L. Tokar, M. Bouhram, J.J. Berthelier, E.C. Siler, J.F. Cooper, T.W. Hill, H.T. Smith, M. Michael, M. Liu, F.J. Crary, D.T. Young, "Production, Ionization and Redistribution of O2 Saturn's Ring Atmosphere" Icarus 180, 393-402 (2006).(pdf) Tokar, R.L., and 12 colleagues, 2005. Cassini Observations of the Thermal Plasma in the

  18. Molecules within molecules: Recognition through self-assembly

    PubMed Central

    Hof, Fraser; Rebek, Julius

    2002-01-01

    Synthetic molecular receptors that completely surround their target molecules can be created through the use of noncovalent interactions. These molecular capsules selectively sequester guest molecules from the influence of bulk solvent and other molecules on the basis of size, shape, and chemical complementarity. This reversible isolation spawns unique behavior within the confines of the host; the catalysis of chemical reactions and the stabilization of reactive species are possible outcomes that have been recently demonstrated. Compartmentalization of reagents can also have a dramatic effect on reactions that take place outside of the capsule, producing nonlinear kinetics in relatively simple reaction systems. PMID:11880604

  19. Molecules in Laboratory and in Interstellar Space?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thimmakondu, Venkatesan S.

    2016-06-01

    In this talk, the quantum chemistry of astronomically relevant molecules will be outlined with an emphasis on the structures and energetics of C_7H_2 isomers, which are yet to be identified in space. Although more than 100's of isomers are possible for C_7H_2, to date only 6 isomers had been identified in the laboratory. The equilibrium geometries of heptatriynylidene (1), cyclohepta-1,2,3,4-tetraen-6-yne (2), and heptahexaenylidene (3), which we had investigated theoretically will be discussed briefly. While 1 and 3 are observed in the laboratory, 2 is a hypothetical molecule. The theoretical data may be useful for the laboratory detection of 2 and astronomical detection of 2 and 3. THIS WORK IS SUPPORTED BY A RESEARCH GRANT (YSS/2015/00099) FROM SERB, DST, GOVERNMENT OF INDIA. Apponi, A. P.; McCarthy, M. C.; Gottlieb, C. A.; Thaddeus, P. Laboratory Detection of Four New Cumulene Carbenes: H_2C_7, H_2C_8, H_2C_9, and D_2C10, Astrophys. J. 2000, 530, 357-361 Ball, C. D; McCarthy, M. C.; Thaddeus, P. Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy of the Linear Carbon Chains HC_7H, HC_9H, HC11H, and HC13H. J. Chem. Phys. 2000, 112, 10149-10155 Dua, S.; Blanksby, S. J.; Bowie, J. H. Formation of Neutral C_7H_2 Isomers from Four Isomeric C_7H_2 Radical Anion Precursors in the Gas Phase. J. Phys. Chem. A, 2000, 104, 77-85. Thimmakondu, V. S. The equilibrium geometries of heptatriynylidene, cyclohepta-1,2,3,4-tetraen-6-yne, and heptahexaenylidene, Comput. Theoret. Chem. 2016, 1079, 1-10

  20. Studies of atmospheric molecules by multiphoton spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, P.M.

    1991-10-01

    Carbon dioxide presents a great challenge to spectroscopy because of its propensity toward dissociation in all of its excited states. Multiphoton ionization spectroscopy is usually not applicable to the study of dissociating molecules because the dissociation competes effectively with ionization, resulting in no signal. We reasoned, however, that with high enough laser fluence, ionization could compete with dissociation in the longer lived states, exposing them for study from the continuous spectral background resulting from rapidly dissociating states. We describe the various spectroscopic and photophysical effects found through the multiphoton ionization and multiphoton photoelectron spectra. A recently developed variant of threshold ionization spectroscopy, usually called ZEKE, has shown a great deal of usefulness in providing the same information as traditional photoelectron spectroscopy but with higher resolution and much better signal-to-noise when using standard laboratory lasers. Threshold ionization techniques locate the states of an ion by scanning a light source across the ionization continuum of a neutral and somehow detecting when electrons are produced with no kinetic energy. We chose to develop our capabilities in threshold ionization spectroscopy using aromatic molecules because of their importance and because their electronic structure allows a pump-probe type of excitation scheme which avoids the use of vacuum ultraviolet laser beams. Among aromatics, the azines are noted for their small S{sub 1}-T{sub 1} energy gap which give them unique and interesting photophysical properties. We have continued our work on the multiphoton spectrum of metastable nitrogen produced by an electric discharge in supersonic beam. We have been able to assign more of the lines and simulated their rotational structure but many peaks remain unassigned.

  1. Study of electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity into neutral plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Nath, G. Rout, R. K.

    2015-07-31

    The major portion of the bulk plasma in magnetospheric space, interplanetary plasma belts and the solar winds contain neutral particles. Evidently these neutral particles undergo binary collisions with the charged particles and among themselves so as to contribute significantly to the transport and diffusion process in a singly charged electron – ion magnetoplasma. The effects of the neutral particles collisions on various diffusion transport coefficients are studied for magnetised electron-ion plasma and appropriately modified coefficients are derived analytically. The results reveal that these coefficients increase significantly owing to the effect of the charge -neutral and neutral-neutral collisions.

  2. Neutralizer options for high energy H/sup -/ beams

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, J.H.

    1986-10-01

    A neutralizer converts a negative ion beam into a neutral beam, but it also increases the beamline cost, weight and size while reducing its output power, efficiency and possibly the reliability of the entire system. In addition it scatters the newly formed neutrals, altering the beam current density distribution, causing the beam divergence to get larger and the brightness to go down. In the following, the role of neutralizers for hydrogen ion beams is reviewed, and the problems encountered over a range of beam energies are discussed. Consideration is given to enhancing the goals of the neutral beam application, be they the highest neutral fraction, optimum overall efficiency or maximum beam brightness, etc.

  3. The production of low-energy neutral oxygen beams by grazing-incidence neutralization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albridge, R. G.; Haglund, R. F.; Tolk, N. H.; Daech, A. F.

    1987-01-01

    The Vanderbilt University neutral oxygen facility produces beams of low-energy neutral oxygen atoms by means of grazing-incidence collisions between ion beams and metal surfaces. Residual ions are reflected by applied electric fields. This method can utilize initial ion beams of either O(+) or O2(+) since a very large percentage of molecular oxygen ions are dissociated when they undergo grazing-incidence neutralization. The method of neutralization is applicable to low-energy beams and to all ions. Particular emphasis is on O and N2 beams for simulation of the low Earth orbit space environment. Since the beam is a pure O-neutral beam and since measurements of the interaction of the beam with solid surfaces are made spectroscopically, absolute reaction rates can be determined. The technique permits the beams to be used in conjunction with electron and photon irradiation for studies of synergistic effects. Comparisons of optical spectra of Kapton excited by 2.5-keV O, O(+), and O2(+) show significant differences. Optical spectra of Kapton excited by neutral oxygen beams of less than 1 keV have been recorded.

  4. Monte Carlo model of neutral-particle transport in diverted plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Heifetz, D.; Post, D.; Petravic, M.; Weisheit, J.; Bateman, G.

    1981-11-01

    The transport of neutral atoms and molecules in the edge and divertor regions of fusion experiments has been calculated using Monte-Carlo techniques. The deuterium, tritium, and helium atoms are produced by recombination in the plasma and at the walls. The relevant collision processes of charge exchange, ionization, and dissociation between the neutrals and the flowing plasma electrons and ions are included, along with wall reflection models. General two-dimensional wall and plasma geometries are treated in a flexible manner so that varied configurations can be easily studied. The algorithm uses a pseudo-collision method. Splitting with Russian roulette, suppression of absorption, and efficient scoring techniques are used to reduce the variance. The resulting code is sufficiently fast and compact to be incorporated into iterative treatments of plasma dynamics requiring numerous neutral profiles. The calculation yields the neutral gas densities, pressures, fluxes, ionization rates, momentum transfer rates, energy transfer rates, and wall sputtering rates. Applications have included modeling of proposed INTOR/FED poloidal divertor designs and other experimental devices.

  5. Monte-Carlo model of neutral-particle transport in diverted plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Heifetz, D.; Post, D.; Petravic, M.; Weisheit, J.; Bateman, G.

    1982-05-01

    The transport of neutral atoms and molecules in the edge and divertor regions of fusion experiments has been calculated using Monte-Carlo techniques. The deuterium, tritium, and helium atoms are produced by recombination at the walls. The relevant collision processes of charge exchange, ionization, and dissociation between the neutrals and the flowing plasma electrons and ions are included, along with wall-reflection models. General two-dimensional wall and plasma geometries are treated in a flexible manner so that varied configurations can be easily studied. The algorithm uses a pseudocollision method. Splitting with Russian roulette, suppression of absorption, and efficient scoring techniques are used to reduce the variance. The resulting code is sufficiently fast and compact to be incorporated into iterative treatments of plasma dynamics requiring numerous neutral profiles. The calculation yields the neutral gas densities, pressures, fluxes, ionization rates, momentum-transfer rates, energy-transfer rates, and wall-sputtering rates. Applications have included modeling of proposed INTOR/FED poloidal divertor designs and other experimental devices.

  6. Study of near surface Nitrogen vacancy center (NV-) neutralization in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Abu Naim Rakib; Newell, Arthur; Dowdell, Dontray; Santamore, Deborah

    The performance of nitrogen vacancy based sensors strongly depends on the population of NV- near the diamond surface. The magnetic sensing capabilities of NV-diamonds are diminished as the NV-becomes neutralized and turns into NV,0whereNV0 represents the neutralized charge state of NV-. A theoretical calculation is performed to obtain the electron transfer rate between the NV- and surface molecules using the Marcus theory of electron transfer where reorganization energy and electronic wave function coupling are considered. The electronic wave function coupling is determined using the density functional theory method. Band structure simulation is also performed to confirm the NV-neutralization at the surface due to surface termination. The electron transfer rate is investigated for various surface terminations (hydrogen, oxygen). Moreover, an investigation of the stability of the NV- at different depths relative to the surface is conducted. This work provides the ratio of NV- to (NV0 + NV-) at equilibrium, which demonstrates the effect of surface termination and contamination on NV-neutralization and also depicts surface properties of NV-diamonds. National Science Foundation(NSF Grant: DMR-1505641).

  7. The Space Station neutral gas environment and the concomitant requirements for monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carignan, George

    1988-01-01

    At 340 km, for typical conditions, the neutral atmospheric density is several times 10E8/cc and is thus more abundant than the ionized component by several factors of 10. At that altitude, the principal series is atomic oxygen with 10 percent N2, and 1 percent He, and trace amounts of O2, H, N, NO, and Ar. The constituent densities are highly variable with local time, latitude, and geophysical indices. The physical interaction with surfaces at orbital velocity leads to large buildup of density on forward faces and great depletions in the wakes of objects. Chemical reactions lead to major modifications in constituent densities as in the case of the conversion of most colliding oxygen atoms to oxygen bearing molecules. The neutral environment about an orbiting body is thus a complex product of many variables even without a source of neutral contaminants. The addition of fluxes of gases emanating from the orbiting vehicle, as will be the case for the Space Station, with the associated physical and chemical interactions adds another level of complexity to the character of the environment and mandates a sophisticated measurement capability if the neutral environment is to be quantitatively characterized.

  8. Fast Neutral Pressure Gauges in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    R. Raman; H.W. Kugel; R. Gernhardt; T. Provost; T.R. Jarboe; V. Soukhanovskii

    2004-04-26

    Successful operation in NSTX of two prototype fast-response micro ionization gauges during plasma operations has motivated us to install five gauges at different toroidal and poloidal locations to measure the edge neutral pressure and its dependence on the type of discharge (L-mode, H-mode, CHI) and the fueling method and location. The edge neutral pressure is also used as an input to the transport analysis codes TRANSP and DEGAS-2. The modified PDX-type Penning gauges are well suited for pressure measurements in the NSTX divertor where the toroidal field is relatively high. Behind the NSTX outer divertor plates where the field is lower, an unshielded fast ion gauge of a new design has been installed. This gauge was developed after laboratory testing of several different designs in a vacuum chamber with applied magnetic fields.

  9. Low-energy neutral-atom spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Voss, D.E.; Cohen, S.A.

    1982-04-01

    The design, calibration, and performance of a low energy neutral atom spectrometer are described. Time-of-flight analysis is used to measure the energy spectrum of charge-exchange deuterium atoms emitted from the PLT tokamak plasma in the energy range from 20 to 1000 eV. The neutral outflux is gated on a 1 ..mu..sec time scale by a slotted rotating chopper disc, supported against gravity in vacuum by magnetic levitation, and is detected by secondary electron emission from a Cu-Be plate. The energy dependent detection efficiency has been measured in particle beam experiments and on the tokamak so that the diagnostic is absolutely calibrated, allowing quantitative particle fluxes to be determined with 200 ..mu..sec time resolution. In addition to its present application as a plasma diagnostic, the instrument is capable of making a wide variety of measurements relevant to atomic and surface physics.

  10. EDITORIAL: Negative ion based neutral beam injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemsworth, R. S.

    2006-06-01

    It is widely recognized that neutral beam injection (NBI), i.e. the injection of high energy, high power, beams of H or D atoms, is a flexible and reliable system that has been the main heating system on a large variety of fusion devices, and NBI has been chosen as one of the three heating schemes of the International Tokomak Reactor (ITER). To date, all the NBI systems but two have been based on the neutralization (in a simple gas target) of positive hydrogen or deuterium ions accelerated to <100 keV/nucleon. Above that energy the neutralization of positive ions falls to unacceptably low values, and higher energy neutral beams have to be created by the neutralization of accelerated negative ions (in a simple gas target), as this remains high (approx60%) up to >1 MeV/nucleon. Unfortunately H- and D- are difficult to create, and the very characteristic that makes them attractive, the ease with which the electron is detached from the ion, means that it is difficult to create high concentrations or fluxes of them, and it is difficult to avoid substantial, collisional, losses in the extraction and acceleration processes. However, there has been impressive progress in negative ion sources and accelerators over the past decade, as demonstrated by the two pioneering, operational, multi-megawatt, negative ion based, NBI systems at LHD (180 keV, H0) and JT-60U (500 keV, D0), both in Japan. Nevertheless, the system proposed for ITER represents a substantial technological challenge as an increase is required in beam energy, to 1 MeV, D0, accelerated ion (D-) current, to 40 A, accelerated current density, 200 A m-2 of D-, and pulse length, to 1 h. At the Fourth IAEA Technical Meeting on Negative Ion Based Neutral Beam Injectors, hosted by the Consorzio RFX, Padova, Italy, 9-11 May 2005, the status of the R&D aimed at the realization of the injectors for ITER was presented. Because of the importance of this development to the success of the ITER project, participants at that

  11. Quasi-Neutral Theory of Epidemic Outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Oscar A.; Muñoz, Miguel A.

    2011-01-01

    Some epidemics have been empirically observed to exhibit outbreaks of all possible sizes, i.e., to be scale-free or scale-invariant. Different explanations for this finding have been put forward; among them there is a model for “accidental pathogens” which leads to power-law distributed outbreaks without apparent need of parameter fine tuning. This model has been claimed to be related to self-organized criticality, and its critical properties have been conjectured to be related to directed percolation. Instead, we show that this is a (quasi) neutral model, analogous to those used in Population Genetics and Ecology, with the same critical behavior as the voter-model, i.e. the theory of accidental pathogens is a (quasi)-neutral theory. This analogy allows us to explain all the system phenomenology, including generic scale invariance and the associated scaling exponents, in a parsimonious and simple way. PMID:21760930

  12. The Neutralization of Ion-Rocket Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Harold R.

    1961-01-01

    The experimental ion-beam behavior obtained without neutralizers is compared with both simple collision theory and plasma-wave theory. This comparison indicates that plasma waves play an important part in beam behavior, although the present state of plasma-wave theory does not permit more than a qualitative comparison. The theories of immersed-emitter and electron-trap neutralizer operation are discussed; and, to the extent permitted by experimental data, the theory is compared with experimental results. Experimental data are lacking completely at the present time for operation in space. The results that might be expected in space and the means of simulating such operation in Earth-bound facilities, however, are discussed.

  13. Political neutrality and international cooperation in medicine.

    PubMed Central

    Merskey, H

    1978-01-01

    International cooperation is an integral part of furthering medical and scientific progress. Many specilist societies exist for that purpose and have written into their constitutions that such cooperation and coordination is their aim. They hope to achieve their aims by exchange, in all languages, of information and by so doing strengthen the relations between individual physicians and scentists as well as between corporate professional bodies from different countries. However, at the same time emphasis is laid on the political neutrality of such organsations. Increasingly, this 'neutrality' is being questioned as doctors and scientists become aware of abuse and distortion of their profession taking place in other countries. H Merskey highlights the problems and offers his opinion on the ethics of maintaining these professional relationships with colleagues abroad who are involved in such abuse and distortion. PMID:671475

  14. Single Molecule Electronics and Devices

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsui, Makusu; Taniguchi, Masateru

    2012-01-01

    The manufacture of integrated circuits with single-molecule building blocks is a goal of molecular electronics. While research in the past has been limited to bulk experiments on self-assembled monolayers, advances in technology have now enabled us to fabricate single-molecule junctions. This has led to significant progress in understanding electron transport in molecular systems at the single-molecule level and the concomitant emergence of new device concepts. Here, we review recent developments in this field. We summarize the methods currently used to form metal-molecule-metal structures and some single-molecule techniques essential for characterizing molecular junctions such as inelastic electron tunnelling spectroscopy. We then highlight several important achievements, including demonstration of single-molecule diodes, transistors, and switches that make use of electrical, photo, and mechanical stimulation to control the electron transport. We also discuss intriguing issues to be addressed further in the future such as heat and thermoelectric transport in an individual molecule. PMID:22969345

  15. Flavor changing neutral currents and a Z'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valencia, German

    2013-03-01

    We consider a non-universal Z' that affects primarily the third generation fermions as an example of new physics associated with the top-quark. We first discuss constraints on the mass and coupling strength of such a Z'. We then turn our attention to the flavor changing neutral currents (FCNC) present in the model. We discuss the experimental constraints and their implications. We propose an ansatz to understand the smallness of the FCNC in terms of the CKM matrix.

  16. Neutralization of HIV by Milk Expressed Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaocong; Pollock, Daniel; Duval, Mark; Lewis, Christopher; Joseph, Kristin; Meade, Harry; Cavacini, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Background In some areas of the world mother-to-child transmission of HIV remains a significant problem in part due to widespread breastfeeding which is essential due to scarce supply of a safe replacement, protection conferred by breast milk against many enteric illnesses, and cultural norms. We propose that sustained, adequate levels of protective antibodies in breast milk will prevent transmission of HIV. Methods The HIV neutralizing human monoclonal antibody b12 (IgG1) has been expressed as an IgA2 in CHO cells and shown to retain full immunoreactivity and neutralizing activity as the parental IgG1. The expression plasmids containing the b12 heavy and light chains were also used to construct milk specific expression vectors using the GTC goat β-casein expression vector to direct expression of linked genes to the mammary gland with subsequent secretion into the milk. Female transgenic mice were generated and following parturition, their milk was tested for antibody immunoreactivity with gp120 and neutralization of HIV. Results When compared to CHO derived b12 IgA2 (or IgG1), immunoreactivity was retained. When tested for neutralization, milk derived b12 IgA2 was at least comparable to CHO derived antibody and in some cases superior to CHO derived antibody. Furthermore, milk that expressed b12 IgA2 was significantly more effective at mediating antibody dependent cell killing. Conclusions These results suggest it is possible to achieve functional HIV-specific mAb in the milk of transgenic mice and further investigations are warranted to explore ways for inducing this type of antibody response in the breast milk of HIV infected women. PMID:23269241

  17. Power threshold for neutral beam current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Politzer, P.A. ); Porter, G.D. )

    1989-10-02

    For fully noninductive current drive in tokamaks using neutral beams, there is a power and density threshold condition, setting a minimum value for P{sup 3/2}/n{sup 2}. If this condition is not met, stationary state cannot occur, and a tokamak discharge will collapse. This is a consequence of the coupling between current and electron temperature, or between current drive efficiency and energy confinement time. 4 figs.

  18. Neutral beam source commercialization study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    King, H.J.

    1980-06-01

    The basic tasks of this Phase II project were to: generate a set of design drawings suitable for quantity production of sources of this design; fabricate a functional neutral beam source incorporating as many of the proposed design changes as proved feasible; and document the procedures and findings developed during the contract. These tasks have been accomplished and represent a demonstrated milestone in the industrialization of this complete device.

  19. The neutral surface layer above rough surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smedman, Ann-Sofi; Sahlee, Erik

    2014-05-01

    It is generally accepted that turbulent fluxes (momentum and scalar fluxes) are approx. constant with height above horizontal surfaces with low roughness. But what will happen when the roughness sub-layer is large as found over cities, forests and rough seas? In a study of the kinematic structure of the near neutral atmospheric surface layer, Högström, Hunt and Smedman, 2002, it was demonstrated that a model with detached eddies from above the surface layer impinging on to the surface (Hunt and Morison, 2000) could explain some of the observed features in the neutral atmospheric boundary layer. Thus the detached eddy model proved successful in explaining the dynamic structure of the near neutral atmospheric surface layer, especially the shape of the spectra of the wind components and scalars and corresponding fluxes. Here we make the hypothesis that the detached-eddy model can also be used to explain the experimental results related to the 3-dimensional turbulence structure above rough surfaces. Measurements are taken both over land (grass and forest) and over sea (Baltic Sea and hurricane Fabian in the Atlantic) above the roughness sub-layer. Analysis of the turbulence structure shows a striking similarity between the different sites. Hunt, J.C.R and Morrison, J.F., 2000: Eddy structure in turbulent boundary layers, Euro. J. Mech. B-Fluids, 19, 673-694. Högström, U., Hunt, J.C.R., and Smedman, A., 2002: Theory and measurements for turbulence spectra and variances in the atmospheric neutral surface layer, Bound.-Layer Meteorol., 103,101-124.

  20. Retrocyclins neutralize bacterial toxins by potentiating their unfolding.

    PubMed

    Kudryashova, Elena; Seveau, Stephanie; Lu, Wuyuan; Kudryashov, Dmitri S

    2015-04-15

    Defensins are a class of immune peptides with a broad range of activities against bacterial, fungal and viral pathogens. Besides exerting direct anti-microbial activity via dis-organization of bacterial membranes, defensins are also able to neutralize various unrelated bacterial toxins. Recently, we have demonstrated that in the case of human α- and β-defensins, this later ability is achieved through exploiting toxins' marginal thermodynamic stability, i.e. defensins act as molecular anti-chaperones unfolding toxin molecules and exposing their hydrophobic regions and thus promoting toxin precipitation and inactivation [Kudryashova et al. (2014) Immunity 41, 709-721]. Retrocyclins (RCs) are humanized synthetic θ-defensin peptides that possess unique cyclic structure, differentiating them from α- and β-defensins. Importantly, RCs are more potent against some bacterial and viral pathogens and more stable than their linear counterparts. However, the mechanism of bacterial toxin inactivation by RCs is not known. In the present study, we demonstrate that RCs facilitate unfolding of bacterial toxins. Using differential scanning fluorimetry (DSF), limited proteolysis and collisional quenching of internal tryptophan fluorescence, we show that hydrophobic regions of toxins normally buried in the molecule interior become more exposed to solvents and accessible to proteolytic cleavage in the presence of RCs. The RC-induced unfolding of toxins led to their precipitation and abrogated activity. Toxin inactivation by RCs was strongly diminished under reducing conditions, but preserved at physiological salt and serum concentrations. Therefore, despite significant structural diversity, α-, β- and θ-defensins employ similar mechanisms of toxin inactivation, which may be shared by anti-microbial peptides from other families.

  1. Atomic Transition Probabilities for Neutral Cerium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawler, J. E.; den Hartog, E. A.; Wood, M. P.; Nitz, D. E.; Chisholm, J.; Sobeck, J.

    2009-10-01

    The spectra of neutral cerium (Ce I) and singly ionized cerium (Ce II) are more complex than spectra of other rare earth species. The resulting high density of lines in the visible makes Ce ideal for use in metal halide (MH) High Intensity Discharge (HID) lamps. Inclusion of cerium-iodide in a lamp dose can improve both the Color Rendering Index and luminous efficacy of a MH-HID lamp. Basic spectroscopic data including absolute atomic transition probabilities for Ce I and Ce II are needed for diagnosing and modeling these MH-HID lamps. Recent work on Ce II [1] is now being augmented with similar work on Ce I. Radiative lifetimes from laser induced fluorescence measurements [2] on neutral Ce are being combined with emission branching fractions from spectra recorded using a Fourier transform spectrometer. A total of 14 high resolution spectra are being analyzed to determine branching fractions for 2000 to 3000 lines from 153 upper levels in neutral Ce. Representative data samples and progress to date will be presented. [4pt] [1] J. E. Lawler, C. Sneden, J. J. Cowan, I. I. Ivans, and E. A. Den Hartog, Astrophys. J. Suppl. Ser. 182, 51-79 (2009). [0pt] [2] E. A. Den Hartog, K. P. Buettner, and J. E. Lawler, J. Phys. B: Atomic, Molecular & Optical Physics 42, 085006 (7pp) (2009).

  2. Theory of ion neutralization near the surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshiaki, Muda; Teruo, Hanawa

    1980-07-01

    A one-electron model calculation of the probability of ion neutralization near the surface with an adatom has been made within the model as proposed by Bloss and Hone for ISS. Interaction of the ion with band states of the substrate ("direct resonance neutralization") is treated accurately within the model. The results show that (1) the neutralization probability N critically depends on the orbital energy ɛ0 of the ion with respect to the Fermi level EF: For ɛ0 > EF as in alkali ions on metals, the survival rate Ps = 1 - N is very high (≈1), and for ɛ0 < EF as in noble gas ions on metals, Ps is very small (10 -1-10 -4). (2) In the latter case, Ps versus {1}/{v} shows a relationship like Psα exp(- v0/ v) accompanied by a weak oscillation around it in the case of finite bandwidth, where v is the incident ion velocity. (3) The probability Ps varies by more than one order of magnitude for different substrates (bandwidth and position of the band relative to ɛ 0 have been varied), in agreement with the recent experimental feature. (4) Convergence of Ps with the number of atoms in the substrate is very slow, that is, the behavior of Ps versus {1}/{v} differs strongly for different sizes of the substrate.

  3. Antibody neutralization of retargeted measles viruses.

    PubMed

    Lech, Patrycja J; Pappoe, Roland; Nakamura, Takafumi; Tobin, Gregory J; Nara, Peter L; Russell, Stephen J

    2014-04-01

    The measles virus (MV) vaccine lineage is a promising oncolytic but prior exposure to the measles vaccine or wild-type MV strains limits treatment utility due to the presence of anti-measles antibodies. MV entry can be redirected by displaying a polypeptide ligand on the Hemagglutinin (H) C-terminus. We hypothesized that retargeted MV would escape neutralization by monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) recognizing the H receptor-binding surface and be less susceptible to neutralization by human antisera. Using chimeric H proteins, with and without mutations that ablate MV receptor binding, we show that retargeted MVs escape mAbs that target the H receptor-binding surface by virtue of mutations that ablate infection via SLAM and CD46. However, C-terminally displayed domains do not mediate virus entry in the presence of human antibodies that bind to the underlying H domain. In conclusion, utility of retargeted oncolytic measles viruses does not extend to evasion of human serum neutralization.

  4. Solar-Driven Neutral Density Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blum, P.; Gangopadhyay, P.; Ogawa, H. S.; Judge, D. L.

    1993-01-01

    Interstellar neutral hydrogen atoms flowing into the solar system are attracted by the solar gravitational force, repelled by solar hydrogen Ly-alpha radiation pressure, and are ionized, primarily, through charge exchange with the solar wind protons. The solar cycle variation of the radiation pressure causes the net central solar force to fluctuate between attraction and repulsion resulting in the modulation of the neutral hydrogen density about the usual time independent model. The calculation presented here shows that the time dependent downstream density is strongly modulated by a large number of travelling neutral density waves. The waves possess a continuous range of wavelengths as is to be expected for a Maxwellian gas subjected to several eleven year cycle variations during its journey through the solar system. The amplitudes of the density modulation were found to be quite large. The backscattered glow was found to depend on the position of the detector and the phase of the solar cycle. At the most favorable condition a deviation of the order of 25% from the time dependent glow might be observed.

  5. Novel registration technique to register neutral zone

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Kaushal Kishor; Singh, Saumyendra Vikram; Vero, Nugotsov; Alvi, Habib Ahmed; Chand, Pooran; Singh, Kamleshwar; Goel, Prachi

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The three dimensional volume of complete dentures optimally occupies an edentulous space that is substantial, in the light of the progressive changes that accompany edentulism and functional dynamics. The paper discusses current knowledge of neutral zone registration and presents a novel technique for this registration. Material and methods Fabricate maxillary and mandibular occlusal rims over conventional record bases using high fusing impression compound. Register the maxillary and mandibular neutral zone separately by swallowing method and after try in of complete denture; remove the wax apical to the tooth surfaces and recording will be completed with putty and light body impression material. Results Complete dentures are a biomechanical device that must be designed in harmony with normal neuromuscular function to get stability and proper function. Improper teeth positioning and polished surface contour will result in compromised stability of denture. Conclusions This article describes a preview of facio-lingual positioning of denture teeth along with a novel approach of recording the neutral zone with an elastomeric impression material. PMID:25737865

  6. Neutral behavior of shared polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Andrew G.

    1997-01-01

    Several cases have been described in the literature where genetic polymorphism appears to be shared between a pair of species. Here we examine the distribution of times to random loss of shared polymorphism in the context of the neutral Wright–Fisher model. Order statistics are used to obtain the distribution of times to loss of a shared polymorphism based on Kimura’s solution to the diffusion approximation of the Wright–Fisher model. In a single species, the expected absorption time for a neutral allele having an initial allele frequency of ½ is 2.77 N generations. If two species initially share a polymorphism, that shared polymorphism is lost as soon as either of two species undergoes fixation. The loss of a shared polymorphism thus occurs sooner than loss of polymorphism in a single species and has an expected time of 1.7 N generations. Molecular sequences of genes with shared polymorphism may be characterized by the count of the number of sites that segregate in both species for the same nucleotides (or amino acids). The distribution of the expected numbers of these shared polymorphic sites also is obtained. Shared polymorphism appears to be more likely at genetic loci that have an unusually large number of segregating alleles, and the neutral coalescent proves to be very useful in determining the probability of shared allelic lineages expected by chance. These results are related to examples of shared polymorphism in the literature. PMID:9223256

  7. Neutral color semitransparent microstructured perovskite solar cells.

    PubMed

    Eperon, Giles E; Burlakov, Victor M; Goriely, Alain; Snaith, Henry J

    2014-01-28

    Neutral-colored semitransparent solar cells are commercially desired to integrate solar cells into the windows and cladding of buildings and automotive applications. Here, we report the use of morphological control of perovskite thin films to form semitransparent planar heterojunction solar cells with neutral color and comparatively high efficiencies. We take advantage of spontaneous dewetting to create microstructured arrays of perovskite "islands", on a length-scale small enough to appear continuous to the eye yet large enough to enable unattenuated transmission of light between the islands. The islands are thick enough to absorb most visible light, and the combination of completely absorbing and completely transparent regions results in neutral transmission of light. Using these films, we fabricate thin-film solar cells with respectable power conversion efficiencies. Remarkably, we find that such discontinuous films still have good rectification behavior and relatively high open-circuit voltages due to the inherent rectification between the n- and p-type charge collection layers. Furthermore, we demonstrate the ease of "color-tinting" such microstructured perovksite solar cells with no reduction in performance, by incorporation of a dye within the hole transport medium.

  8. Resolving metal-molecule interfaces at single-molecule junctions

    PubMed Central

    Komoto, Yuki; Fujii, Shintaro; Nakamura, Hisao; Tada, Tomofumi; Nishino, Tomoaki; Kiguchi, Manabu

    2016-01-01

    Electronic and structural detail at the electrode-molecule interface have a significant influence on charge transport across molecular junctions. Despite the decisive role of the metal-molecule interface, a complete electronic and structural characterization of the interface remains a challenge. This is in no small part due to current experimental limitations. Here, we present a comprehensive approach to obtain a detailed description of the metal-molecule interface in single-molecule junctions, based on current-voltage (I-V) measurements. Contrary to conventional conductance studies, this I-V approach provides a correlated statistical description of both, the degree of electronic coupling across the metal-molecule interface, and the energy alignment between the conduction orbital and the Fermi level of the electrode. This exhaustive statistical approach was employed to study single-molecule junctions of 1,4-benzenediamine (BDA), 1,4-butanediamine (C4DA), and 1,4-benzenedithiol (BDT). A single interfacial configuration was observed for both BDA and C4DA junctions, while three different interfacial arrangements were resolved for BDT. This multiplicity is due to different molecular adsorption sites on the Au surface namely on-top, hollow, and bridge. Furthermore, C4DA junctions present a fluctuating I-V curve arising from the greater conformational freedom of the saturated alkyl chain, in sharp contrast with the rigid aromatic backbone of both BDA and BDT. PMID:27221947

  9. Nonsequential double ionization of molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Prauzner-Bechcicki, Jakub S.; Sacha, Krzysztof; Zakrzewski, Jakub; Eckhardt, Bruno

    2005-03-01

    Double ionization of diatomic molecules by short linearly polarized laser pulses is analyzed. We consider the final stage of the ionization process, that is the decay of a highly excited two electron molecule, which is formed after rescattering. The saddles of the effective adiabatic potential energy close to which simultaneous escape of electrons takes place are identified. Numerical simulations of the ionization of molecules show that the process can be dominated by either sequential or nonsequential events. In order to increase the ratio of nonsequential to sequential ionizations very short laser pulses should be applied.

  10. Quantum transport through aromatic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Ojeda, J. H.; Rey-González, R. R.; Laroze, D.

    2013-12-07

    In this paper, we study the electronic transport properties through aromatic molecules connected to two semi-infinite leads. The molecules are in different geometrical configurations including arrays. Using a nearest neighbor tight-binding approach, the transport properties are analyzed into a Green's function technique within a real-space renormalization scheme. We calculate the transmission probability and the Current-Voltage characteristics as a function of a molecule-leads coupling parameter. Our results show different transport regimes for these systems, exhibiting metal-semiconductor-insulator transitions and the possibility to employ them in molecular devices.

  11. Relative Sizes of Organic Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This computer graphic depicts the relative complexity of crystallizing large proteins in order to study their structures through x-ray crystallography. Insulin is a vital protein whose structure has several subtle points that scientists are still trying to determine. Large molecules such as insuline are complex with structures that are comparatively difficult to understand. For comparison, a sugar molecule (which many people have grown as hard crystals in science glass) and a water molecule are shown. These images were produced with the Macmolecule program. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

  12. Organic heterocyclic molecules become superalkalis.

    PubMed

    Reddy, G Naaresh; Giri, Santanab

    2016-09-21

    An organic molecule which behaves like a superalkali has been designed from an aromatic heterocyclic molecule, pyrrole. Using first-principles calculation and a systematic two-step approach, we can have superalkali molecules with a low ionization energy, even lower than that of Cs. Couple cluster (CCSD) calculation reveals that a new heterocycle, C3N2(CH3)5 derived from a well-known aromatic heterocycle, pyrrole (C4H5N) has an ionization energy close to 3.0 eV. A molecular dynamics calculation on C3N2(CH3)5 reveals that the structure is dynamically stable. PMID:27530344

  13. Neutral and charged clusters in the atmosphere - Their importance and potential role in heterogeneous catalysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castleman, A. W., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    An assessment is presented of current knowledge concerning the role and importance of neutral and charged clusters in atmospheric heterogeneous catalysis, with a view to the recommendation of future studies needed for progress in the quantification of aerosol formation and catalytic reactivity. It is established that nucleation from the gaseous to the aerosol state commences via the formation of clusters among molecules participating in the phase-transformation process. Nucleation may proceed in some cases by way of the formation of prenucleation embryos, which then evolve through the energy barrier and undergo phase transformation. In other cases, cluster-cluster interaction among neutral particles or stagewise building of alternate-sign ion clusters may be important in the gas-to-particle conversion process.

  14. Transition-Metal-Catalyzed Redox-Neutral and Redox-Green C-H Bond Functionalization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongli; Huang, Hanmin

    2016-08-01

    Transition-metal-catalyzed C-H bond functionalization has become one of the most promising strategies to prepare complex molecules from simple precursors. However, the utilization of environmentally unfriendly oxidants in the oxidative C-H bond functionalization reactions reduces their potential applications in organic synthesis. This account describes our recent efforts in the development of a redox-neutral C-H bond functionalization strategy for direct addition of inert C-H bonds to unsaturated double bonds and a redox-green C-H bond functionalization strategy for realization of oxidative C-H functionalization with O2 as the sole oxidant, aiming to circumvent the problems posed by utilizing environmentally unfriendly oxidants. In principle, these redox-neutral and redox-green strategies pave the way for establishing new environmentally benign transition-metal-catalyzed C-H bond functionalization strategies.

  15. Mobility enhancement of organic field-effect transistor based on guanine trap-neutralizing layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wei; Zheng, Yifan; Yu, Junsheng; Taylor, André D.; Katz, Howard E.

    2016-10-01

    We introduced a nucleic acid component guanine as a trap-neutralizing layer between silicon dioxide gate dielectric and a pentacene semiconducting layer to obtain increased field-effect mobility in organic field-effect transistors (OFETs). A tripling of the field-effect mobility, from 0.13 to 0.42 cm2/V s, was achieved by introducing a 2 nm guanine layer. By characterizing the surface morphology of pentacene films grown on guanine, we found that the effect of guanine layer on the topography of pentacene film was not responsible for the mobility enhancement of the OFETs. The increased field-effect mobility was mainly attributed to the hydrogen bonding capacity of otherwise unassociated guanine molecules, which enabled them to neutralize trapping sites on the silicon dioxide surface.

  16. Effects of humidity on sterilization of Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores with plasma-excited neutral gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Kei; Ikenaga, Noriaki; Sakudo, Noriyuki

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the effects of relative humidity on the sterilization process using a plasma-excited neutral gas that uniformly sterilizes both the space and inner wall of the reactor chamber at atmospheric pressure. Only reactive neutral species such as plasma-excited gas molecules and radicals were separated from the plasma and sent to the reactor chamber for chemical sterilization. The plasma source gas is nitrogen mixed with 0.1% oxygen, and the relative humidity in the source gas is controlled by changing the mixing ratio of water vapor. The relative humidity near the sample in the reactor chamber is controlled by changing the sample temperature. As a result, the relative humidity near the sample should be kept in the range from 60 to 90% for the sterilization of Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores. When the relative humidity in the source gas increases from 30 to 90%, the sterilization effect is enhanced by the same degree.

  17. Transition-Metal-Catalyzed Redox-Neutral and Redox-Green C-H Bond Functionalization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongli; Huang, Hanmin

    2016-08-01

    Transition-metal-catalyzed C-H bond functionalization has become one of the most promising strategies to prepare complex molecules from simple precursors. However, the utilization of environmentally unfriendly oxidants in the oxidative C-H bond functionalization reactions reduces their potential applications in organic synthesis. This account describes our recent efforts in the development of a redox-neutral C-H bond functionalization strategy for direct addition of inert C-H bonds to unsaturated double bonds and a redox-green C-H bond functionalization strategy for realization of oxidative C-H functionalization with O2 as the sole oxidant, aiming to circumvent the problems posed by utilizing environmentally unfriendly oxidants. In principle, these redox-neutral and redox-green strategies pave the way for establishing new environmentally benign transition-metal-catalyzed C-H bond functionalization strategies. PMID:27258190

  18. Ground Levels and Ionization Energies for the Neutral Atoms

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 111 Ground Levels and Ionization Energies for the Neutral Atoms (Web, free access)   Data for ground state electron configurations and ionization energies for the neutral atoms (Z = 1-104) including references.

  19. 1. NEUTRAL BUOYANCY SIMULATOR BUILDING (NBS) EXTERIOR ELEVATION LOOKING NORTH; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. NEUTRAL BUOYANCY SIMULATOR BUILDING (NBS) EXTERIOR ELEVATION LOOKING NORTH; TANK BUILDING TO LEFT, CONTROL ROOM ETC. TO RIGHT OF CONNECTING BAY. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Neutral Buoyancy Simulator Facility, Rideout Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  20. 67. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE NEUTRALIZER BUILDING, LOOKING AT CONDENSERS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    67. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE NEUTRALIZER BUILDING, LOOKING AT CONDENSERS, NEUTRALIZERS AND STORAGE TANKS, APRIL 11, 1919. - United States Nitrate Plant No. 2, Reservation Road, Muscle Shoals, Muscle Shoals, Colbert County, AL