Science.gov

Sample records for destructive overpressure events

  1. Realistic Probability Estimates For Destructive Overpressure Events In Heated Center Wing Tanks Of Commercial Jet Aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Alvares, N; Lambert, H

    2007-02-07

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) identified 17 accidents that may have resulted from fuel tank explosions on commercial aircraft from 1959 to 2001. Seven events involved JP 4 or JP 4/Jet A mixtures that are no longer used for commercial aircraft fuel. The remaining 10 events involved Jet A or Jet A1 fuels that are in current use by the commercial aircraft industry. Four fuel tank explosions occurred in center wing tanks (CWTs) where on-board appliances can potentially transfer heat to the tank. These tanks are designated as ''Heated Center Wing Tanks'' (HCWT). Since 1996, the FAA has significantly increased the rate at which it has mandated airworthiness directives (ADs) directed at elimination of ignition sources. This effort includes the adoption, in 2001, of Special Federal Aviation Regulation 88 of 14 CFR part 21 (SFAR 88 ''Fuel Tank System Fault Tolerance Evaluation Requirements''). This paper addresses SFAR 88 effectiveness in reducing HCWT ignition source probability. Our statistical analysis, relating the occurrence of both on-ground and in-flight HCWT explosions to the cumulative flight hours of commercial passenger aircraft containing HCWT's reveals that the best estimate of HCWT explosion rate is 1 explosion in 1.4 x 10{sup 8} flight hours. Based on an analysis of SFAR 88 by Sandia National Laboratories and our independent analysis, SFAR 88 reduces current risk of historical HCWT explosion by at least a factor of 10, thus meeting an FAA risk criteria of 1 accident in billion flight hours. This paper also surveys and analyzes parameters for Jet A fuel ignition in HCWT's. Because of the paucity of in-flight HCWT explosions, we conclude that the intersection of the parameters necessary and sufficient to result in an HCWT explosion with sufficient overpressure to rupture the HCWT is extremely rare.

  2. [Life events and self-destructive behavior].

    PubMed

    Vizán Ferrero, R; Benítez, M H; Gracia Marco, R; González de Rivera y Revuelta, J L

    1993-01-01

    The role of life events in precipitating self-destructive behaviour, especially in suicide attempts, needs to be studied in this paper the social readjustment rating scale (Holmes and Rahe), in its spanish version, in a sample of 100 suicide attempters are reported. The mean social readjustment index was 255.2 +/- 137.01, which is a higher score than that observed in medical inpatients (180.69 +/- 72.03) in our context. The mean life events index was 8.69 +/- 4.32, higher valves than were recorded in the somatic in patients sample (5.97 +/- 2.99). No sex differences were found in any of the two indexes. The finding of a greater number of unpleasant life events by different researchers is discussed.

  3. Destructive Single-Event Failures in Diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casey, Megan C.; Gigliuto, Robert A.; Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Wilcox, Edward P.; Kim, Hak; Chen, Dakai; Phan, Anthony M.; LaBel, Kenneth A.

    2013-01-01

    In this summary, we have shown that diodes are susceptible to destructive single-event effects, and that these failures occur along the guard ring. By determining the last passing voltages, a safe operating area can be derived. By derating off of those values, rather than by the rated voltage, like what is currently done with power MOSFETs, we can work to ensure the safety of future missions. However, there are still open questions about these failures. Are they limited to a single manufacturer, a small number, or all of them? Is there a threshold rated voltage that must be exceeded to see these failures? With future work, we hope to answer these questions. In the full paper, laser results will also be presented to verify that failures only occur along the guard ring.

  4. Destructive Single-Event Failures in Schottky Diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casey, Megan C.; Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Gigliuto, Robert A.; Wilcox, Edward P.; Phan, Anthony M.; Kim, Hak; Chen, Dakai; LaBel, Kenneth A.

    2014-01-01

    This presentation contains test results for destructive failures in DC-DC converters. We have shown that Schottky diodes are susceptible to destructive single-event effects. Future work will be completed to identify parameter that determines diode susceptibility.

  5. Functional Interrupts and Destructive Failures from Single Event Effect Testing of Point-Of-Load Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Dakai; Phan, Anthony; Kim, Hak; Swonger, James; Musil, Paul; LaBel, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    We show examples of single event functional interrupt and destructive failure in modern POL devices. The increasing complexity and diversity of the design and process introduce hard SEE modes that are triggered by various mechanisms.

  6. Geoarchaelogical documentation of a series of destructive events at Montegibbio Roman villa site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgatti, Lisa; Cervi, Federico; Corsini, Alessandro; Castagnetti, Cristina; Cremonini, Stefano; Guandalini, Francesca; Labate, Donato; Pellegrini, Maurizio; Ronchetti, Francesco

    2010-05-01

    The Italian territory is rich in archaeological heritage, located in hilly, plain or coastal areas. Frequently, it is possible to find only the remains of ancient cultures, villages and sparse houses dating back many centuries. Therefore, no other documentation but the remains themselves can give information about both the existence and the events that eventually determined the end of historical sites, caused either by abandonment or destruction. The causes that can determine the abandonment or the destruction can be various, and may be due to anthropic and/or natural causes, and only in very few cases documents or pictures of these events are preserved. Anthropic causes can be diverse: wrong design and/or building schemes of the structure or of the foundation, wars etc. Natural causes could be variuos as well, and can be related to the environmental context of the site. For example, in mountainous areas the main causes can be landslides, snow avalanches, soil creep affecting the foundations. In plain areas floods are the main process leading to the disruption of hamlets. Along the coast tsunamis are to be considered. Other natural causes could be earthquakes or climate changes. In the Emilian Apennines, near Sassuolo (Modena, Italy), a Roman villa dated from the I century B.C. to the VI century A.D. has been excavated along a gentle slope. The villa can be divided in four different buildings from successive periods. During the first period of life of the villa (I century B.C.-I century A.D.) a destructive event caused the abandonment of this building, whose walls and mosaic floors have been destroyed in a odd way. Which was the cause of this destruction? An earthquake, a human error in construction or a landslide? What makes this question even more interesting is the probable relation of this event with an ancient source (Pliny the Older, Naturalis Historia II, 199) who remembers how in the Modena area a "portentum terrarum" (earthquake) and the collision of two

  7. Over-Pressurized Drums: Their Causes and Mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, Fred; Kuntamukkula, Murty; Quigley, David; Robertson, Janeen; Freshwater, David

    2009-07-10

    Having to contend with bulging or over-pressurized drums is, unfortunately, a common event for people storing chemicals and chemical wastes. (Figure 1) The Department of Energy alone reported over 120 incidents of bulging drums between 1992 and 1999 (1). Bulging drums can be caused by many different mechanisms, represent a number of significant hazards and can be tricky to mitigate. In this article, we will discuss reasons or mechanisms by which drums can become over-pressurized, recognition of the hazards associated with and mitigation of over-pressurized drums, and methods that can be used to prevent drum over-pressurization from ever occurring. Drum pressurization can represent a significant safety hazard. Unless recognized and properly mitigated, improperly manipulated pressurized drums can result in employee exposure, employee injury, and environmental contamination. Therefore, recognition of when a drum is pressurized and knowledge of pressurized drum mitigation techniques is essential.

  8. Toxicology of blast overpressure.

    PubMed

    Elsayed, N M

    1997-07-25

    Blast overpressure (BOP) or high energy impulse noise, is the sharp instantaneous rise in ambient atmospheric pressure resulting from explosive detonation or firing of weapons. Blasts that were once confined to military and to a lesser extent, occupational settings, are becoming more universal as the civilian population is now increasingly at risk of exposure to BOP from terrorist bombings that are occurring worldwide with greater frequency. Exposure to incident BOP waves can cause auditory and non-auditory damage. The primary targets for BOP damage are the hollow organs, ear, lung and gastrointestinal tract. In addition, solid organs such as heart, spleen and brain can also be injured upon exposure. However, the lung is more sensitive to damage and its injury can lead to death. The pathophysiological responses, and mortality have been extensively studied, but little attention, was given to the biochemical manifestations, and molecular mechanism(s) of injury. The injury from BOP has been, generally, attributed to its external physical impact on the body causing internal mechanical damage. However, a new hypothesis has been proposed based on experiments conducted in the Department of Respiratory Research, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, and later in the Department of Occupational Health, University of Pittsburgh. This hypothesis suggests that subtle biochemical changes namely, free radical-mediated oxidative stress occur and contribute to BOP-induced injury. Understanding the etiology of these changes may shed new light on the molecular mechanism(s) of injury, and can potentially offer new strategies for treatment. In this symposium. BOP research involving auditory, non-auditory, physiological, pathological, behavioral, and biochemical manifestations as well as predictive modeling and current treatment modalities of BOP-induced injury are discussed.

  9. Toxicology of blast overpressure.

    PubMed

    Elsayed, N M

    1997-07-25

    Blast overpressure (BOP) or high energy impulse noise, is the sharp instantaneous rise in ambient atmospheric pressure resulting from explosive detonation or firing of weapons. Blasts that were once confined to military and to a lesser extent, occupational settings, are becoming more universal as the civilian population is now increasingly at risk of exposure to BOP from terrorist bombings that are occurring worldwide with greater frequency. Exposure to incident BOP waves can cause auditory and non-auditory damage. The primary targets for BOP damage are the hollow organs, ear, lung and gastrointestinal tract. In addition, solid organs such as heart, spleen and brain can also be injured upon exposure. However, the lung is more sensitive to damage and its injury can lead to death. The pathophysiological responses, and mortality have been extensively studied, but little attention, was given to the biochemical manifestations, and molecular mechanism(s) of injury. The injury from BOP has been, generally, attributed to its external physical impact on the body causing internal mechanical damage. However, a new hypothesis has been proposed based on experiments conducted in the Department of Respiratory Research, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, and later in the Department of Occupational Health, University of Pittsburgh. This hypothesis suggests that subtle biochemical changes namely, free radical-mediated oxidative stress occur and contribute to BOP-induced injury. Understanding the etiology of these changes may shed new light on the molecular mechanism(s) of injury, and can potentially offer new strategies for treatment. In this symposium. BOP research involving auditory, non-auditory, physiological, pathological, behavioral, and biochemical manifestations as well as predictive modeling and current treatment modalities of BOP-induced injury are discussed. PMID:9217311

  10. Characterization of ignition overpressure using band limited temporal moments

    SciTech Connect

    Cap, J.S.

    1994-11-01

    The ignition overpressure event is a transient vibroacoustic environment which occurs when a missile is launched. The environment is often too short to obtain a good estimate of the event using Power Spectral Densities, and Shock Response Spectra are limited in their ability to fully describe the nature of the environment. Sandia National Laboratories has employed band limited temporal moments in an effort to characterize the acceleration response of the components and payloads to the ignition overpressure environment and the related laboratory test inputs. The purpose of this paper will be to show the results of that study.

  11. Effects of Filtering on Experimental Blast Overpressure Measurements.

    PubMed

    Alphonse, Vanessa D; Kemper, Andrew R; Duma, Stefan M

    2015-01-01

    When access to live-fire test facilities is limited, experimental studies of blast-related injuries necessitate the use of a shock tube or Advanced Blast Simulator (ABS) to mimic free-field blast overpressure. However, modeling blast overpressure in a laboratory setting potentially introduces experimental artifacts in measured responses. Due to the high sampling rates required to capture a blast overpressure event, proximity to alternating current (AC-powered electronics) and poorly strain-relieved or unshielded wires can result in artifacts in the recorded overpressure trace. Data in this study were collected for tests conducted on an empty ABS (“Empty Tube”) using high frequency pressure sensors specifically designed for blast loading rates (n=5). Additionally, intraocular overpressure data (“IOP”) were collected for porcine eyes potted inside synthetic orbits located inside the ABS using an unshielded miniature pressure sensor (n=3). All tests were conducted at a 30 psi static overpressure level. A 4th order phaseless low pass Butterworth software filter was applied to the data. Various cutoff frequencies were examined to determine if the raw shock wave parameters values could be preserved while eliminating noise and artifacts. A Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) was applied to each test to examine the frequency spectra of the raw and filtered signals. Shock wave parameters (time of arrival, peak overpressure, positive duration, and positive impulse) were quantified using a custom MATLAB® script. Lower cutoff frequencies attenuated the raw signal, effectively decreasing the peak overpressure and increasing the positive duration. Rise time was not preserved the filtered data. A CFC 6000 filter preserved the remaining shock wave parameters within ±2.5% of the average raw values for the Empty Tube test data. A CFC 7000 filter removed experimental high-frequency artifacts and preserved the remaining shock wave parameters within ±2.5% of the average raw values for

  12. Space Launch System Scale Model Acoustic Test Ignition Overpressure Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nance, Donald; Liever, Peter; Nielsen, Tanner

    2015-01-01

    The overpressure phenomenon is a transient fluid dynamic event occurring during rocket propulsion system ignition. This phenomenon results from fluid compression of the accelerating plume gas, subsequent rarefaction, and subsequent propagation from the exhaust trench and duct holes. The high-amplitude unsteady fluid-dynamic perturbations can adversely affect the vehicle and surrounding structure. Commonly known as ignition overpressure (IOP), this is an important design-to environment for the Space Launch System (SLS) that NASA is currently developing. Subscale testing is useful in validating and verifying the IOP environment. This was one of the objectives of the Scale Model Acoustic Test, conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center. The test data quantifies the effectiveness of the SLS IOP suppression system and improves the analytical models used to predict the SLS IOP environments. The reduction and analysis of the data gathered during the SMAT IOP test series requires identification and characterization of multiple dynamic events and scaling of the event waveforms to provide the most accurate comparisons to determine the effectiveness of the IOP suppression systems. The identification and characterization of the overpressure events, the waveform scaling, the computation of the IOP suppression system knockdown factors, and preliminary comparisons to the analytical models are discussed.

  13. Space Launch System Scale Model Acoustic Test Ignition Overpressure Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nance, Donald K.; Liever, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    The overpressure phenomenon is a transient fluid dynamic event occurring during rocket propulsion system ignition. This phenomenon results from fluid compression of the accelerating plume gas, subsequent rarefaction, and subsequent propagation from the exhaust trench and duct holes. The high-amplitude unsteady fluid-dynamic perturbations can adversely affect the vehicle and surrounding structure. Commonly known as ignition overpressure (IOP), this is an important design-to environment for the Space Launch System (SLS) that NASA is currently developing. Subscale testing is useful in validating and verifying the IOP environment. This was one of the objectives of the Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT), conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The test data quantifies the effectiveness of the SLS IOP suppression system and improves the analytical models used to predict the SLS IOP environments. The reduction and analysis of the data gathered during the SMAT IOP test series requires identification and characterization of multiple dynamic events and scaling of the event waveforms to provide the most accurate comparisons to determine the effectiveness of the IOP suppression systems. The identification and characterization of the overpressure events, the waveform scaling, the computation of the IOP suppression system knockdown factors, and preliminary comparisons to the analytical models are discussed.

  14. Apparatus for reducing shock and overpressure

    DOEpatents

    Walter, C.E.

    1975-01-28

    An apparatus for reducing shock and overpressure is particularly useful in connection with the sequential detonation of a series of nuclear explosives under ground. A coupling and decoupling arrangement between adjacent nuclear explosives in the tubing string utilized to emplace the explosives is able to support lower elements on the string but yields in a manner which absorbs energy when subjected to the shock wave produced upon detonation of one of the explosives. Overpressure is accomodated by an arrangement in the string which provides an additional space into which the pressurized material can expand at a predetermined overpressure. (10 claims)

  15. Apparatus for reducing shock and overpressure

    DOEpatents

    Walter, C.E.

    1975-10-21

    The design is given of an apparatus for reducing shock and overpressure particularly useful in connection with the sequential detonation of a series of nuclear explosives underground. A coupling and decoupling arrangement between adjacent nuclear explosives in the tubing string utilized to emplace the explosives is able to support lower elements on the string but yields in a manner which absorbs energy when subjected to the shock wave produced upon detonation of one of the explosives. Overpressure is accommodated by an arrangement in the string which provides an additional space into which the pressurized material can expand at a predetermined overpressure.

  16. Coping with unfair events constructively or destructively: the effects of overall justice and self-other orientation.

    PubMed

    Bobocel, D Ramona

    2013-09-01

    Drawing on fairness heuristic theory (Lind, 2001, 2002), it was predicted that how employees cope with an unfair event-whether they are more or less forgiving, and whether they are more or less vengeful-will depend jointly on (a) their perceptions of overall organizational justice and (b) the degree to which they focus on their own interests or on the interests of others. Data were collected in a 2-part field survey of 153 employees who reported their responses to a recent unfair event. Hierarchical regression analyses (controlling possible 3rd variable explanations) revealed the 2 predicted 2-way interactions. Perceptions of overall organizational justice (a) facilitated forgiveness among those with strong other-orientation, and (b) suppressed revenge among those with strong self-concern. Together, the data suggest that perceiving one's organization as a fair entity can shape proximal responses to unfair events, simultaneously facilitating constructive responses in some employees, and suppressing destructive responses in other employees. Theoretically, the findings are consistent with the idea that overall justice fulfills psychological needs that are differentially relevant to employees as a function of their chronic attention to others or to themselves, which in turn enables them to cope with unfair events more beneficially. The data have implications for the study of workplace forgiveness and revenge, as well as more broadly for the literatures on organizational justice and workplace mistreatment. PMID:23668596

  17. Coping with unfair events constructively or destructively: the effects of overall justice and self-other orientation.

    PubMed

    Bobocel, D Ramona

    2013-09-01

    Drawing on fairness heuristic theory (Lind, 2001, 2002), it was predicted that how employees cope with an unfair event-whether they are more or less forgiving, and whether they are more or less vengeful-will depend jointly on (a) their perceptions of overall organizational justice and (b) the degree to which they focus on their own interests or on the interests of others. Data were collected in a 2-part field survey of 153 employees who reported their responses to a recent unfair event. Hierarchical regression analyses (controlling possible 3rd variable explanations) revealed the 2 predicted 2-way interactions. Perceptions of overall organizational justice (a) facilitated forgiveness among those with strong other-orientation, and (b) suppressed revenge among those with strong self-concern. Together, the data suggest that perceiving one's organization as a fair entity can shape proximal responses to unfair events, simultaneously facilitating constructive responses in some employees, and suppressing destructive responses in other employees. Theoretically, the findings are consistent with the idea that overall justice fulfills psychological needs that are differentially relevant to employees as a function of their chronic attention to others or to themselves, which in turn enables them to cope with unfair events more beneficially. The data have implications for the study of workplace forgiveness and revenge, as well as more broadly for the literatures on organizational justice and workplace mistreatment.

  18. Visual system degeneration induced by blast overpressure.

    PubMed

    Petras, J M; Bauman, R A; Elsayed, N M

    1997-07-25

    The effect of blast overpressure on visual system pathology was studied in 14 male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 360-432 g. Blast overpressure was simulated using a compressed-air driven shock tube, with the aim of studying a range of overpressures causing sublethal injury. Neither control (unexposed) rats nor rats exposed to 83 kiloPascals (kPa) overpressure showed evidence of visual system pathology. Neurological injury to brain visual pathways was observed in male rats surviving blast overpressure exposures of 104-110 kPa and 129-173 kPa. Optic nerve fiber degeneration was ipsilateral to the blast pressure wave. The optic chiasm contained small numbers of degenerated fibers. Optic tract fiber degeneration was present bilaterally, but was predominantly ipsilateral. Optic tract fiber degeneration was followed to nuclear groups at the level of the midbrain, midbrain-diencephalic junction, and the thalamus where degenerated fibers arborized among the neurons of: (i) the superior colliculus, (ii) pretectal region, and (iii) the lateral geniculate body. The superior colliculus contained fiber degeneration localized principally to two superficial layers (i) the stratum opticum (layer III) and (ii) stratum cinereum (layer II). The pretectal area contained degenerated fibers which were widespread in (i) the nucleus of the optic tract, (ii) olivary pretectal nucleus, (iii) anterior pretectal nucleus, and (iv) the posterior pretectal nucleus. Degenerated fibers in the lateral geniculate body were not universally distributed. They appeared to arborize among neurons of the dorsal and ventral nuclei: the ventral lateral geniculate nucleus (parvocellular and magnocellular parts); and the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus. The axonopathy observed in the central visual pathways and nuclei of the rat brain are consistent with the presence of blast overpressure induced injury to the retina. The orbital cavities of the human skull contain frontally-directed eyeballs for binocular

  19. Simulation Assisted Risk Assessment: Blast Overpressure Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, Scott L.; Gee, Ken; Mathias, Donovan; Olsen, Michael

    2006-01-01

    A probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) approach has been developed and applied to the risk analysis of capsule abort during ascent. The PRA is used to assist in the identification of modeling and simulation applications that can significantly impact the understanding of crew risk during this potentially dangerous maneuver. The PRA approach is also being used to identify the appropriate level of fidelity for the modeling of those critical failure modes. The Apollo launch escape system (LES) was chosen as a test problem for application of this approach. Failure modes that have been modeled and/or simulated to date include explosive overpressure-based failure, explosive fragment-based failure, land landing failures (range limits exceeded either near launch or Mode III trajectories ending on the African continent), capsule-booster re-contact during separation, and failure due to plume-induced instability. These failure modes have been investigated using analysis tools in a variety of technical disciplines at various levels of fidelity. The current paper focuses on the development and application of a blast overpressure model for the prediction of structural failure due to overpressure, including the application of high-fidelity analysis to predict near-field and headwinds effects.

  20. Elastic properties of overpressured and unconsolidated sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Myung W.

    2003-01-01

    Differential pressure affects elastic velocities and Poisson?s ratio of sediments in such a way that velocities increase as differential pressure increases. Overpressured zones in sediments can be detected by observing an increase in Poisson?s ratio with a corresponding drop in elastic velocities. In highly overpressured sands, such as shallow water flow sands, the P-to S-wave velocity ratio (Vp/Vs) is very high, on the order of 10 or higher, due to the unconsolidated and uncemented nature of sediments. In order to predict elastic characteristics of highly overpressured sands, Biot-Gassmann theory by Lee (BGTL) is used with a variable exponent n that depends on differential pressure and the degree of consolidation/compaction. The exponent n decreases as differential pressure and the degree of consolidation increases, and, as n decreases, velocity increases and Vp/Vs decreases. The predicted velocity ratio by BGTL agrees well with the measured velocity ratio at low differential pressure for unconsolidated sediments.

  1. The pathology of primary blast overpressure injury.

    PubMed

    Mayorga, M A

    1997-07-25

    Primary blast injury occurs in civilian and military detonations and from the firing of weapon systems. The pathology of primary blast injury has been reported for the last 70 years and has primarily been limited to descriptions of gross pathology and histology. Commonly accepted tenets have not been confirmed as blast overpressure experiments in enclosures and with multiple detonations have been conducted. Organ systems other than the ear and the lung are playing a greater role in injury definition and research importance. This paper is an overview and update of the current understanding of the pathology of primary blast injury.

  2. Earthquake Rupturing in Fluid-Overpressured Crust: How Common?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibson, Richard H.

    2014-11-01

    Whether or not ruptures nucleate in fluid-overpressured crust ( λ v = P f/ σ v > 0.4) is important because pore-fluids overpressured above hydrostatic lower fault frictional strength and may also vary through the earthquake cycle, acting as an independent variable affecting fault failure. Containment of fluid overpressure is precarious because pressure-dependent activation of faults and fractures allows drainage from overpressured portions of the crust. Discharge of fluids through activated fault-fracture permeability (fault-valve action) decreases overpressure so that subsequent failure depends on the cycling of both overpressure and frictional strength as well as tectonic stress. Geometric and mechanical considerations suggest that fluid overpressures are more likely to develop and be sustained in compressional/transpressional regimes as opposed to extensional/transtensional tectonic settings. On the basis of geophysical observations and force-balance analyses, subduction interface shear zones appear to be strongly but variably overpressured to near-lithostatic levels ( λ v > 0.9) over the full depth range of seismogenic megathrusts. Strong overpressuring at seismogenic depths is also documented in active fold-thrust belts and in areas of ongoing compressional inversion (e.g., northern Honshu) where inherited normal faults are reactivated as steep reverse faults, requiring near-lithostatic overpressures ( λ v → 1.0) at depths of rupture initiation. Evidence for overpressuring around strike-slip faults is less clear but tends to be strongest in areas of transpression. In areas of extensional tectonics coincident with particularly high fluid discharge, there is some evidence of overpressuring concentrated towards the base of the seismogenic zone. In general, because of the limited resolution of geophysical techniques, it is easier to make the case for rupture propagation through overpressured crust than to make a definitive case for the direct involvement of

  3. Rupture threshold characterization of polymer-shelled ultrasound contrast agents subjected to static overpressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitnis, Parag V.; Lee, Paul; Mamou, Jonathan; Allen, John S.; Böhmer, Marcel; Ketterling, Jeffrey A.

    2011-04-01

    Polymer-shelled micro-bubbles are employed as ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) and vesicles for targeted drug delivery. UCA-based delivery of the therapeutic payload relies on ultrasound-induced shell rupture. The fragility of two polymer-shelled UCAs manufactured by Point Biomedical or Philips Research was investigated by characterizing their response to static overpressure. The nominal diameters of Point and Philips UCAs were 3 μm and 2 μm, respectively. The UCAs were subjected to static overpressure in a glycerol-filled test chamber with a microscope-reticule lid. UCAs were reconstituted in 0.1 mL of water and added over the glycerol surface in contact with the reticule. A video-microscope imaged UCAs as glycerol was injected (5 mL/h) to vary the pressure from 2 to 180 kPa over 1 h. Neither UCA population responded to overpressure until the rupture threshold was exceeded, which resulted in abrupt destruction. The rupture data for both UCAs indicated three subclasses that exhibited different rupture behavior, although their mean diameters were not statistically different. The rupture pressures provided a measure of UCA fragility; the Philips UCAs were more resilient than Point UCAs. Results were compared to theoretical models of spherical shells under compression. Observed variations in rupture pressures are attributed to shell imperfections. These results may provide means to optimize polymeric UCAs for drug delivery and elucidate associated mechanisms.

  4. 46 CFR 153.365 - Liquid overpressurization protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Liquid overpressurization protection. 153.365 Section... CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Cargo Venting Systems § 153.365 Liquid overpressurization protection. (a) Except as noted...

  5. 46 CFR 153.365 - Liquid overpressurization protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Liquid overpressurization protection. 153.365 Section... CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Cargo Venting Systems § 153.365 Liquid overpressurization protection. (a) Except as noted...

  6. 46 CFR 153.365 - Liquid overpressurization protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Liquid overpressurization protection. 153.365 Section... CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Cargo Venting Systems § 153.365 Liquid overpressurization protection. (a) Except as noted...

  7. 46 CFR 153.365 - Liquid overpressurization protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Liquid overpressurization protection. 153.365 Section... CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Cargo Venting Systems § 153.365 Liquid overpressurization protection. (a) Except as noted...

  8. 46 CFR 153.365 - Liquid overpressurization protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Liquid overpressurization protection. 153.365 Section... CARGOES SHIPS CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Cargo Venting Systems § 153.365 Liquid overpressurization protection. (a) Except as noted...

  9. Evolution of overpressured and underpressured oil and gas reservoirs, Anadarko Basin of Oklahoma, Texas, and Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Phillip H.; Gianoutsos, Nicholas J.

    2011-01-01

    Departures of resistivity logs from a normal compaction gradient indicate that overpressure previously extended north of the present-day overpressured zone. These indicators of paleopressure, which are strongest in the deep basin, are mapped to the Kansas-Oklahoma border in shales of Desmoinesian age. The broad area of paleopressure has contracted to the deep basin, and today the overpressured deep basin, as determined from drillstem tests, is bounded on the north by strata with near normal pressures (hydrostatic), grading to the northwest to pressures that are less than hydrostatic (underpressured). Thus the pressure regime in the northwest portion of the Anadarko Basin has evolved from paleo-overpressure to present-day underpressure. Using pressure data from drillstem tests, we constructed cross sections and potentiometric maps that illustrate the extent and nature of present-day underpressuring. Downcutting and exposure of Lower Permian and Pennsylvanian strata along, and east of, the Nemaha fault zone in central Oklahoma form the discharge locus where pressure reaches near atmospheric. From east to west, hydraulic head increases by several hundred feet in each rock formation, whereas elevation increases by thousands of feet. The resulting underpressuring of the aquifer-supported oil and gas fields, which also increases from east to west, is a consequence of the vertical separation between surface elevation and hydraulic head. A 1,000-ft thick cap of Permian evaporites and shales isolates the underlying strata from the surface, preventing re-establishment of a normal hydrostatic gradient. Thus, the present-day pressure regime of oil and gas reservoirs, overpressured in the deep basin and underpressured on the northwest flank of the basin, is the result of two distinct geologic events-rapid burial and uplift/erosion-widely separated in time.

  10. Fluid Overpressure and Connections to Seismicity, Cascadia Tertiary Accretionary Prism, Olympic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotman, H.; Mattinson, C. G.

    2010-12-01

    Metamorphic dehydration reactions and fluid movement in accretionary prisms have been linked to the recently discovered episodic tremor and slip (ETS) earthquake events along subduction zones, but prior studies lack the detail to effectively test the hypothesis that fluid flow triggers ETS events. I conducted field work along a 52.5 km transect on the Olympic Peninsula metasedimentary accretionary prism of the Cascadia subduction zone, and collected approximately 40 representative samples of sandstone and mudrock that were buried to 6-15 km. This depth range intersects the 10-50 km depth range of ETS events. My objectives are to quantify the water flow recorded in rocks of the Olympic Peninsula via petrographic, whole rock, and isotopic analyses to test the prediction that water release increases at ~10 km depth, creating fluid overpressure needed to trigger seismicity. I calculated that on the Olympic Peninsula 1 km3 of 50% sandstone and 50% mudrock loses ~105 kg H2O/yr during burial from 6-14 km depth, comparable to the values expected from large-scale fluid budget models. Quartz veins that compose 0.5-1% of the Obstruction Peak site (~14 km burial depth) are important records of fluid flow quantity and origin. δ18O values of +11.8‰ to +15.2‰ indicate that vein H2O originated from metamorphic reactions. Flow recorded by 1 km3 of rock containing 0.5-1% quartz veins is >106 kg H2O/yr, comparable to the values 2 × 107 to 2 × 108 kg H2O/yr modeled at compositionally similar subduction zones to produce fluid overpressure conditions. I observed fibrous quartz veins, which also indicate fluid overpressure conditions were reached and support my H2O flow estimates. Therefore, Olympic Peninsula rocks at depths of ~10-14 km record dehydration and fluid overpressure large enough to trigger subduction zone seismicity.

  11. Propulsion system ignition overpressure for the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, R. S.; Jones, J. H.; Guest, S. H.; Struck, H. G.; Rheinfurth, M. H.; Verferaime, V. S.

    1981-01-01

    Liquid and solid rocket motor propulsion systems create an overpressure wave during ignition, caused by the accelerating gas particles pushing against or displacing the air contained in the launch pad or launch facility and by the afterburning of the fuel-rich gases. This wave behaves as a blast or shock wave characterized by a positive triangular-shaped first pulse and a negative half-sine wave second pulse. The pulse travels up the space vehicle and has the potential of either overloading individual elements or exciting overall vehicle dynamics. The latter effect results from the phasing difference of the wave from one side of the vehicle to the other. This overpressure phasing, or delta P environment, because of its frequency content as well as amplitude, becomes a design driver for certain panels (e.g., thermal shields) and payloads for the Space Shuttle. The history of overpressure effects on the Space Shuttle, the basic overpressure phenomenon, Space Shuttle overpressure environment, scale model overpressure testing, and techniques for suppressing the overpressure environments are considered.

  12. The October 15, 1997 Punitaqui earthquake (Mw=7.1): a destructive event within the subducting Nazca plate in central Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardo, Mario; Comte, Diana; Monfret, Tony; Boroschek, Rubén; Astroza, Maximiliano

    2002-02-01

    The 1943 Illapel seismic gap, central Chile (30-32°S), was partially reactivated in 1997-1998 by two distinct seismic clusters. On July 1997, a swarm of offshore earthquakes occurred on the northern part of the gap, along the coupled zone between Nazca and South American plates. Most of the focal mechanisms computed for these earthquakes show thrust faulting solutions. The July 1997 swarm was followed on October 15, 1997 by the Punitaqui main event (Mw=7.1), which destroyed the majority of adobe constructions in Punitaqui village and its environs. The main event focal mechanism indicates normal faulting with the more vertical plane considered as the active fault. This event is located inland at 68-km depth and it is assumed to be within the oceanic subducted plate, as are most of the more destructive Chilean seismic events. Aftershocks occurred mainly to the north of the Punitaqui mainshock location, in the central-eastern part of the Illapel seismic gap, but at shallower depths, with the two largest showing thrust focal mechanisms. The seismicity since 1964 has been relocated with a master event technique and a Joint Hypocenter Determination (JHD) algorithm, using teleseismic and regional data, along with aftershock data recorded by a temporary local seismic network and strong motion stations. These data show that the 1997 seismic clusters occurred at zones within the Illapel gap where low seismicity was observed during the considered time period. The analysis of P and T axis directions along the subduction zone, using the Harvard Centroid Moment Tensor solutions since 1977, shows that the oceanic slab is in a downdip extensional regime. In contrast, the Punitaqui mainshock is related to compression resulting from the flexure of the oceanic plate, which becomes subhorizontal at depths of about 100 km. Analog strong motion data of the Punitaqui main event show that the greatest accelerations are on the horizontal components. The highest amplitude spectra of the

  13. Manifestations of the 15.11.2006 Kuril Tsunami Consequences on the Central Kuril Islands: the Reconstruction Events of the Destruction of Soil and Coastal Vegetation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, B.; Kopanina, A.; Ivelskaya, T.; Sasorova, E.

    2007-12-01

    The investigation of the Central Kuril Islands (Simushir, Urup, Ketoy) coast was performance by the field survey for the Institute of Marine Geology and Geophysics FEB RAS (Yuzhno-Sakhalinsk) on the vessel "Iskatel-4" to be able find different deposits of the devastating tsunami waves influence on soil and vegetation. There were average run-up heights and inundation areas (tsunami flooding zones): h=6-9 m and 40-60 m (Ketoy); h=7-19 m and 80-300 m (Simushir). The field observation showed destruction of the soil layer. The estimation of water stream velocity for the hydraulic destruction of rocks enabled to receive velocity average mean for the water stream during tsunami dynamic inundation which may be in interval of velocities near 30 -50 m/sec. Field observations of coastal plants in tsunami inundation zones on Urup, Simushir and Ketoy Islands enabled us to recognize the character of destructive influence of tsunami waves to plant structure and essential signs of micro-phytocenoses for ecotopes at different distances from the coastline. Various plant species and vital morphes were found to indicate different reaction on sea waves. The investigation results showed that selected plant species demonstrate the strong response to tsunami wave inundation. We found that the most sensitive species to mechanical and physical- chemical tsunami impact are: Pinus pumila (Pall.) Regel and Phyllodoce aleutica (Spreng.) A. Heller. The character of plant damage shows in breaking of skeletal axes, infringement of root systems, and leaf dying. These findings allow us to use the species as effective indicators of tsunami flooding zone and estimation of tsunami run-up heights. Fulfilled analyzes let us to reconstruct possible events when tsunami hits to coast with specific shore morphology. The wave front at the slightly sloping coast (from coastline to first terrace) is characterized by uniform growth of water level when water moves away soil material (no more 2-3 cm) and micro

  14. Visualization of radiation-induced cell cycle-associated events in tumor cells expressing the fusion protein of Azami Green and the destruction box of human Geminin

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, Mayuko; Ogihara, Yusuke; Miura, Masahiko

    2009-11-20

    Ionizing radiation (IR) influences cell cycle-associated events in tumor cells. We expressed the fusion protein of Azami Green (AG) and the destruction box plus nuclear localization signal of human Geminin, an inhibitor of DNA replication licensing factor, in oral tumor cells. This approach allowed us to visualize G2 arrest in living cells following irradiation. The combination of time-lapse imaging analysis allowed us to observe the nuclear envelope break down (NEBD) at early M phase, and disappearance of fluorescence (DF) at the end of M phase. The duration from NEBD to DF was not much affected in irradiated cells; however, most of daughter cells harbored double-strand breaks. Complete DF was also observed in cells exhibiting abnormal mitosis or cytokinesis. We conclude that the fluorescent Geminin probe could function as a stable cell cycle indicator irrespective of genome integrity.

  15. Coupled Eulerian/Lagrangian Simulation for Overpressure Structural Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Andrew; Pan, Hua; Miller, David; Cogar, John

    2011-06-01

    Accurately modeling blast dynamics is critical in the assessment of structures subjected to blast loading. The current industry standard for modeling blast effects in Lagrangian based Finite Element simulations is CONWEP; tabulated pressure data taken directly from blast events. CONWEP is limited, however, and may not always be physically representative of the blast/structural interaction that occurs in the field. Eulerian hydrocodes provide advantages over CONWEP in that they can capture shock front interaction and model blast surface interfaces with fidelity due to the presence of the working fluid. Eulerian codes, however, break down over larger time scales; whereas, Lagrangian modeling allows for discrete finite elements with definable boundary interfaces that can be tracked out to longer time scales. Hence, a hybrid approach that couples the Eulerian blast modeling with Lagrangian system dynamics is necessary. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate improvements in overpressure structural response modeling using a Coupled Eulerian/Lagrangian algorithm implemented in VelodyneTM. Velodyne results using the Coupled Eulerian/Lagrangian algorithm are compared to results from Eulerian hydrocode simulations and Velodyne simulations using the CONWEP algorithm.

  16. Coupled Euler-La Grange simulation for overpressure structural response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Andrew N.; Miller, David K.; Pan, Hua; Cogar, John

    2012-03-01

    Accurately modeling blast dynamics is critical in the assessment of structures subjected to blast loading. The current industry standard for modeling blast effects in La Grange based finite element simulations is CONWEP; tabulated pressure data taken directly from blast events. CONWEP is limited, however, and may not always be physically representative of the blast/structural interaction that occurs in the field. Euler hydrocodes provide advantages over CONWEP in that they can capture shock front interaction and model blast surface interfaces with fidelity due to the presence of the working fluid. Euler codes, however, break down over larger time scales due to advection; whereas, Lagrange modeling allows for discrete finite elements with definable boundary interfaces that can be tracked out to longer time scales. Hence, a hybrid approach that couples the Euler blast modeling with La Grange system dynamics is necessary. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate improvements for high explosive overpressure structural response modeling specifically with respect COMP-B high explosive acting upon blasted fragments using a Coupled Euler-La Grange algorithm implemented in VelodyneTM. Velodyne results using the Coupled Euler-La Grange algorithm are compared to results from an Euler hydrocode simulation (CTH) and Velodyne simulations using the CONWEP algorithm.

  17. Impact of overpressures on subsurface exploration and reservoir management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukla, P.

    2009-04-01

    The presence of overpressures in the subsurface poses major problems for safety and cost efficient well design, but less well known is their importance for exploration and reservoir development. Overpressures reduce the vertical effective stress (VES, the difference between the vertical stress and fluid pressure) experienced by the sediment. As sediment compaction is primarily an irreversible function of VES, a reduction in VES will halt compaction. Similarly, a reduction in its rate of increase will reduce the rate of porosity loss. Porosity and other key rock properties will therefore reflect changes in vertical effective stress. Any measurement that senses porosity, or seismic velocity (e.g. sonic, density or resistivity logs) will provide a means of estimating overpressures. The reduction of porosity with vertical effective stress is exponential in nature. Consequently, overpressures generated early in the burial history, such as those generated by disequilibrium compaction, will have a greater impact on rock properties than those generated or emplaced during late burial. Indeed, late overpressuring, so-called inflation, may have little or no impact on rock properties and therefore methods for the prediction of overpressures from properties such as seismic velocity will not provide reliable pressure estimates. In order for fluid pressures to rise in a basin, the pressures have to be contained by rocks with sufficiently low permeability. Overpressures are transient and gradually leak away when the generation mechanism ceases to operate. In some areas, such as in parts of the central North Sea and the Middle East, fluid pressures have built up until the failure envelope of the seal is reached, leading to a subsequent loss of the sealing capacity. The failure envelope is usually considered to be determined by the minimum horizontal stress. The failure pressure for the seal systematically increases with depth and this variation will control the maximum pressures

  18. Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test Overpressure Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casiano, M. J.; Alvord, D. A.; McDaniels, D. M.

    2011-01-01

    A summary of the overpressure environment from the 5% Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) and the implications to the full-scale Ares I are presented in this Technical Memorandum. These include the scaled environment that would be used for assessing the full-scale Ares I configuration, observations, and team recommendations. The ignition transient is first characterized and described, the overpressure suppression system configuration is then examined, and the final environment characteristics are detailed. The recommendation for Ares I is to keep the space shuttle heritage ignition overpressure (IOP) suppression system (below-deck IOP water in the launch mount and mobile launcher and also the crest water on the main flame deflector) and the water bags.

  19. Quantum Monte Carlo Simulation of Overpressurized Liquid {sup 4}He

    SciTech Connect

    Vranjes, L.; Boronat, J.; Casulleras, J.; Cazorla, C.

    2005-09-30

    A diffusion Monte Carlo simulation of superfluid {sup 4}He at zero temperature and pressures up to 275 bar is presented. Increasing the pressure beyond freezing ({approx}25 bar), the liquid enters the overpressurized phase in a metastable state. In this regime, we report results of the equation of state and the pressure dependence of the static structure factor, the condensate fraction, and the excited-state energy corresponding to the roton. Along this large pressure range, both the condensate fraction and the roton energy decrease but do not become zero. The roton energies obtained are compared with recent experimental data in the overpressurized regime.

  20. Prediction of Launch Vehicle Ignition Overpressure and Liftoff Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casiano, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    The LAIOP (Launch Vehicle Ignition Overpressure and Liftoff Acoustic Environments) program predicts the external pressure environment generated during liftoff for a large variety of rocket types. These environments include ignition overpressure, produced by the rapid acceleration of exhaust gases during rocket-engine start transient, and launch acoustics, produced by turbulence in the rocket plume. The ignition overpressure predictions are time-based, and the launch acoustic predictions are frequency-based. Additionally, the software can predict ignition overpressure mitigation, using water-spray injection into the rocket exhaust stream, for a limited number of configurations. The framework developed for these predictions is extensive, though some options require additional relevant data and development time. Once these options are enabled, the already extensively capable code will be further enhanced. The rockets, or launch vehicles, can either be elliptically or cylindrically shaped, and up to eight strap-on structures (boosters or tanks) are allowed. Up to four engines are allowed for the core launch vehicle, which can be of two different types. Also, two different sizes of strap-on structures can be used, and two different types of booster engines are allowed. Both tabular and graphical presentations of the predicted environments at the selected locations can be reviewed by the user. The output includes summaries of rocket-engine operation, ignition overpressure time histories, and one-third octave sound pressure spectra of the predicted launch acoustics. Also, documentation is available to the user to help him or her understand the various aspects of the graphical user interface and the required input parameters.

  1. 14 CFR 417.229 - Far-field overpressure blast effects analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Far-field overpressure blast effects... overpressure blast effects analysis. (a) General. A flight safety analysis must establish flight commit criteria that protect the public from any hazard associated with far field blast overpressure effects...

  2. 14 CFR 417.229 - Far-field overpressure blast effects analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Far-field overpressure blast effects... overpressure blast effects analysis. (a) General. A flight safety analysis must establish flight commit criteria that protect the public from any hazard associated with far field blast overpressure effects...

  3. 14 CFR 417.229 - Far-field overpressure blast effects analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Far-field overpressure blast effects... overpressure blast effects analysis. (a) General. A flight safety analysis must establish flight commit criteria that protect the public from any hazard associated with far field blast overpressure effects...

  4. 14 CFR 417.229 - Far-field overpressure blast effects analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Far-field overpressure blast effects... overpressure blast effects analysis. (a) General. A flight safety analysis must establish flight commit criteria that protect the public from any hazard associated with far field blast overpressure effects...

  5. Overpressure Prediction From Seismic Data: Implications on Drilling Safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osinowo, O. O.; Oladunjoye, M. A.; Olayinka, A. I.

    2007-12-01

    High rate of sediment influx into the Niger Delta via river Niger coupled with high rate of basin subsidence, very thick clayey members of Agbada and Akata Formations as well as prevailing presence of growth faults had been identified as the main factors responsible for overpressure generation and preservation in the Niger Delta basin. Analysis of porosity dependent parameters such as interval transit times and interval velocities derived from the seismic records of a field in the Western Niger Delta revealed the presence of overpressured formation at depth of 8670 feet, which is the top of the overpressured zone. The plot of interval transit times against depth gave a positive deflection from normal at the region of overpressure while interval velocity plot gave negative deflection; the ratio of this deviation in both cases is as high as 1.52. Pressure gradient in the upper, normally pressured part of the field was determined to be 0.465 psi/ft., which is within the established normal pressure gradient range in Niger Delta, while the abnormal formation pressure gradient in the overpressured region was determined to be 0.96 psi/ft., and this is also within the published abnormal pressure gradient range of 0.71 to 1.1 psi/ft. in Niger Delta. Formation fracture pressure gradients were determined from the formation pressure information to be 0.66psi/ft. in the upper part of the field and 1.2psi/ft. in the overpressured horizon. Mud weight window (MWW); mud density range necessary to prevent formation kick without initiating hydraulic fracturing was determined to be 10.2 to 12.5lbm/gal in the upper part of the field and 22.1 to 22.63lbm/gal in the overpressured horizon. MWW is indispensable for the selection of the mud pump type, capacity, pumping rate and mud densities at different formation pressure regimes. Overpressure prediction is also requisite for drilling program design, casing design as well as rig capacity choice before spudding. It is necessary to reduce

  6. Thermodynamically consistent model of brittle oil shales under overpressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izvekov, Oleg

    2016-04-01

    The concept of dual porosity is a common way for simulation of oil shale production. In the frame of this concept the porous fractured media is considered as superposition of two permeable continua with mass exchange. As a rule the concept doesn't take into account such as the well-known phenomenon as slip along natural fractures, overpressure in low permeability matrix and so on. Overpressure can lead to development of secondary fractures in low permeability matrix in the process of drilling and pressure reduction during production. In this work a new thermodynamically consistent model which generalizes the model of dual porosity is proposed. Particularities of the model are as follows. The set of natural fractures is considered as permeable continuum. Damage mechanics is applied to simulation of secondary fractures development in low permeability matrix. Slip along natural fractures is simulated in the frame of plasticity theory with Drucker-Prager criterion.

  7. Overpressure and Its Relation to Petroleum Accumulation in Southern Edge of Junggar Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, G.

    2014-12-01

    Abstract: Measured formation pressure, well- log and mud weight data show that there are overpressures in the southern edge of Junggar basin. Vertically, overpressure distribution is not direct ly related to the burial depth, it is mainly controlled by stratigraphic horizons, especially the lower Tertiary Anjihaihe Formation has the most evident control over the overpressures. Horizontally, overpressure occur in the 3 structural belts in southern edge of the basin, but there are differences in the east and in the west : in the eastern part overpressures occur in the Anjihaihe Formation only, while in the western part, they occur not only in the Anjihaihe Formation, but also in the Shawan and Ziniguanzi Formation. Analyzing the relationship between the well test data and overpressures in the southern edge of Junggar basin, it can be found that the distribution of oil and gas reservoirs are closely related to the overpressures. Being affected by faulting, and due to the differences in mechanism of relationship between overpressures and preservation of oil and gas reservoirs, the distribution of overpressures and oil and gas reservoirs cannot be corresponding to one another. As a whole, however, oil and gas would be ready to be reservoired in the normally pressured zone below the moderately abnormal pressured or overpressures zone, which would, therefore, be the favorable target of petroleum exploration; while the overpressured zone with relatively high formation pressure coefficient is unfavorable for oil/ gas reservoiring.

  8. Explosion overpressure test series: General-Purpose Heat Source development: Safety Verification Test program

    SciTech Connect

    Cull, T.A.; George, T.G.; Pavone, D.

    1986-09-01

    The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) is a modular, radioisotope heat source that will be used in radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) to supply electric power for space missions. The first two uses will be the NASA Galileo and the ESA Ulysses missions. The RTG for these missions will contain 18 GPHS modules, each of which contains four /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/-fueled clads and generates 250 W/sub (t)/. A series of Safety Verification Tests (SVTs) was conducted to assess the ability of the GPHS modules to contain the plutonia in accident environments. Because a launch pad or postlaunch explosion of the Space Transportation System vehicle (space shuttle) is a conceivable accident, the SVT plan included a series of tests that simulated the overpressure exposure the RTG and GPHS modules could experience in such an event. Results of these tests, in which we used depleted UO/sub 2/ as a fuel simulant, suggest that exposure to overpressures as high as 15.2 MPa (2200 psi), without subsequent impact, does not result in a release of fuel.

  9. Witnessing Extrasolar Asteroid Destruction?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Siyi; Jura, Michael; Su, Kate; Meng, Huan

    2014-11-01

    40 white dwarfs with excess infrared radiation due to a circumstellar dust disk from tidally disrupted asteroids have been identified. Recently, we identified one dusty white dwarf whose infrared fluxes have been increasing since May 2014. Very likely, it is caused by a recent tidal disruption event of extrasolar asteroid. We propose DDT to follow it up in a timely manner because the flare could dissipate very soon. This proposal provides a unique opportunity to study the destruction of an extrasolar asteroid.

  10. Global variation of sonic boom overpressure due to seasonal changes in atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Hiroshi; Obayashi, Shigeru

    2012-09-01

    Global variation of sonic boom overpressures with the realistic atmospheric gradients was discussed. The atmospheric gradients were estimated by upper-air observational radiosonde data and a simple N-wave was extrapolated through all seasonal atmospheric gradients without winds around the world. Results demonstrated that sonic boom overpressure varies widely with season and geographic position compared to that of the standard atmospheric condition. The results also showed the tendencies of the global variation in overpressure.

  11. Overpressure history of fractures, West Maracaibo Basin, Venezuela

    SciTech Connect

    Vrolijk, P.J.; Pottorf, R.J.; Maze, W.B.

    1996-08-01

    Prediction of density of natural fractures in reservoir rocks requires evaluation of many factors, including the effective stress and thus fluid pressure conditions through time. In this study we use analyses of fluid inclusions in calcite-filled fractures with burial and thermal history models to assess the fluid pressure history and the causes of overpressure in the West Maracaibo Basin. We analyzed abundant oil-filled and rare aqueous fluid inclusions in calcite-filled fractures in the La Luna Formation source rock and in the underlying Cogollo Gp. carbonate reservoir. Our analyses of fluid inclusion homogenization temperatures and fluorescence properties lead us to the interpretation of near-lithostatic paleo-fluid pressures in La Luna Formation and near-lithostatic to hydrostatic fluid pressures in the Cogollo, Gp. fractures. Maturation and expulsion of oil from the La Luna Formation source rock is required to generate the large inferred excess pressures as compaction disequilibrium and thermal expansion of pore fluids from rapid Miocene burial are insufficient to achieve near-lithostatic conditions. This hypothesis is supported by the observation of decreasing paleo- and modern fluid pressures with depth beneath the La Luna Formation. Thus based on the wide occurrence of oil-filled inclusions in calcite-filled fractures and the high fluid pressures associated with trapped oils, we infer extensive rock fracture under overpressured conditions near maximum Miocene burial, during inferred late source rock yield, and during Miocene growth of structural traps.

  12. Membrane characteristics for biological blast overpressure testing using blast simulators.

    PubMed

    Alphonse, Vanessa D; Siva Sai Sujith Sajja, Venkata; Kemper, Andrew R; Rizel, Dave V; Duma, Stefan M; VandeVord, Pamela J

    2014-01-01

    Blast simulators often use passive-rupture membranes to generate shock waves similar to free-field blasts. The purpose of this study was to compare rupture patterns and pressure traces of three distinct membrane materials for biological and biomechanical blast studies. An Advanced Blast Simulator (ABS) located at the Center for Injury Biomechanics at Virginia Tech was used to test membrane characteristics. Acetate, Mylar, and aluminum sheets with different thicknesses were used to obtain pressures between 70–210 kPa. Static pressure was measured inside the tube at the test section using piezoelectric pressure sensors. Peak overpressure, positive duration, and positive impulse were calculated for each test. Rupture patterns and characteristic pressure traces were unique to each membrane type and thickness. Shock wave speed ranged between 1.2-1.8 Mach for static overpressures of 70–210 kPa. Acetate membranes fragmented sending pieces down the tube, but produced ideal (Friedlander) pressure traces. Mylar membranes bulged without fragmenting, but produced less-than-ideal pressure traces. Aluminum membranes did not fragment and produced ideal pressure traces. However, the cost of manufacturing and characterizing aluminum membranes should be considered during membrane selection. This study illustrates the advantages and disadvantages of using Mylar, acetate, and aluminum for passive rupture membranes for blast simulators. PMID:25405432

  13. 46 CFR 39.20-11 - Vapor overpressure and vacuum protection-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Vapor overpressure and vacuum protection-TB/ALL. 39.20... SYSTEMS Design and Equipment § 39.20-11 Vapor overpressure and vacuum protection—TB/ALL. (a) The cargo... psig; (3) Prevent a vacuum in the cargo tank vapor space, whether generated by withdrawal of cargo...

  14. 46 CFR 39.20-11 - Vapor overpressure and vacuum protection-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Vapor overpressure and vacuum protection-TB/ALL. 39.20... SYSTEMS Design and Equipment § 39.20-11 Vapor overpressure and vacuum protection—TB/ALL. (a) The cargo... psig; (3) Prevent a vacuum in the cargo tank vapor space, whether generated by withdrawal of cargo...

  15. 46 CFR 39.20-11 - Vapor overpressure and vacuum protection-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Vapor overpressure and vacuum protection-TB/ALL. 39.20... SYSTEMS Design and Equipment § 39.20-11 Vapor overpressure and vacuum protection—TB/ALL. (a) The cargo... psig; (3) Prevent a vacuum in the cargo tank vapor space, whether generated by withdrawal of cargo...

  16. Development of fluid overpressures in crustal faults and implications for earthquakes mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leclère, Henri; Cappa, Frédéric; Faulkner, Daniel; Armitage, Peter; Blake, Oshaine; Fabbri, Olivier

    2013-04-01

    The development and maintenance of fluid overpressures strongly influence the mechanical behavior of the crust and especially crustal fault zones. The mechanisms allowing fluid pressure build-up are still open questions, and their influence on tectonic and fault weakening processes remain unclear. The determination of the hydraulic and mechanical properties of crustal fault zone elements is a key aspect to improve our understanding of the fluid-tectonic interactions and more particularly the role of fluids in fault mechanics and earthquake triggering. Here we address this question combining geological observations, laboratory experiments and hydromechanical models of an active crustal fault-zone in the Ubaye-Argentera area (southeastern France). Previous studies showed that the fluids located in the fault zone developed overpressures between 7 and 26 MPa, that triggered intense seismic swarms (i.e. 16,000 events in 2003-2004) (Jenatton et al., 2007; Daniel et al., 2011; Leclère et al., 2012). The fault-zone studied here is located in the Argentera external crystalline massif and is connected to regional NW-SE steeply-dipping dextral strike-slip faults with an offset of several kilometers. The fault zone cuts through migmatitic gneisses composed of quartz, K-feldspar, plagioclase, biotite and minor muscovite. It exposes several anastomosed core zones surrounded by damage zones with a pluri-decametric total width. The core zones are made up of centimetric to pluridecimetric phyllosilicate-rich gouge layers while the damage zones are composed of pluri-metric phyllonitic rock derived from mylonite. The permeability and elastic moduli of the host rock, damage zone and fault core were measured from plugs with a diameter of 20 mm and lengths between 26 to 51 mm, using a high-pressure hydrostatic fluid-flow apparatus. Measurements were made with confining pressures ranging from 30 to 210 MPa and using argon pore fluid pressure of 20 MPa. Data show a variation of the

  17. Experimental study of near-field entrainment of moderately overpressured jets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Solovitz, S.A.; Mastin, L.G.; Saffaraval, F.

    2011-01-01

    Particle image velocimetry (PIV) experiments have been conducted to study the velocity flow fields in the developing flow region of high-speed jets. These velocity distributions were examined to determine the entrained mass flow over a range of geometric and flow conditions, including overpressured cases up to an overpressure ratio of 2.83. In the region near the jet exit, all measured flows exhibited the same entrainment up until the location of the first shock when overpressured. Beyond this location, the entrainment was reduced with increasing overpressure ratio, falling to approximately 60 of the magnitudes seen when subsonic. Since entrainment ratios based on lower speed, subsonic results are typically used in one-dimensional volcanological models of plume development, the current analytical methods will underestimate the likelihood of column collapse. In addition, the concept of the entrainment ratio normalization is examined in detail, as several key assumptions in this methodology do not apply when overpressured.

  18. A self-destruction game.

    PubMed

    Raczynski, Stanislaw

    2006-10-01

    A simple model of a self-destructing society is presented. It can be interpreted as a game with two players: the society and its sub-set which tends to destroy the whole society, as well as itself. The main factor taken into account in the model is the progress of science and technology which provides the destruction tools (new weapons and killing techniques), as well as tools the society can use to defend itself. The modeling and simulation tool is discrete-event and can be treated as agent-oriented, though the agent capabilities are rather simple. The simulation experiments show that, in the near future, this progress will become extremely dangerous, and it may result in the total destruction of mankind. For the longer time period, however, the conclusion is not so pessimistic. If the society survives during a certain time interval, then the probability of survival becomes greater for a longer time span.

  19. Single-Event Effect Report for EPC Series eGaN FETs: The Effect of Load Conditions on Destructive SEE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheick, Leif

    2014-01-01

    Recent testing of Enhanced Power Conversion (EPC) eGaN FET devices design for power use has shown that the devices are susceptible to Single-Event Effects (SEE) that degrade or destroy the device. The exact mechanism of the SEE is not known. The testing so far has been in the static condition, in the fully off condition, and with minimal load conditions. These conditions may not be worst case. This report presents the results of a study that tests some of the load conditions for SEE. The EPC2012 and EPC1012 were chosen for the test. The tests were performed the TAMU radiation effects facility in May and June of 2013.

  20. Nonintrusive FBG tube pressure transducers with high overpressure ability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, Indu F.; Hui, Kaleonui J.

    2010-04-01

    Fiber optic sensors offer several advantages over their electrical counterparts, especially for applications in hostile, spark-sensitive environments, because no electrical power is required at the sensors. In addition, the installation of fiber sensors external to fluid carrying conduits facilitates access for troubleshooting and replacement, unlike in-line diaphragm-based sensors. Furthermore, glass fiber pressure sensors have a much higher operating temperature range, which makes them more practical for flammability-prone environments. Multiple fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors can be multiplexed along a single fiber optic cable, as opposed to traditional resistive strain gauges, which require individual shielded metal cabling. Applications for such fiber-optic pressure detection systems include the pressure monitoring of flow in fuel lines and their pressure valves. This paper characterizes the application of FBG sensors, with remote access capability, for the nonintrusive pressure monitoring of different types of metallic pipes. We show that pressure changes smaller than one psi can be detected with a tunable diode laser-based detection system. Standard metal pipes of steel, inconel, copper-nickel alloy and titanium are characterized, and the resilience of FBG sensors to an overpressure of up to 1500 psi is demonstrated.

  1. The development of a cryogenic over-pressure pump

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, M.; Cease, H.; Flaugher, B.; Flores, R.; Lathrop, A.; Garcia, J.; Ruiz, F.

    2014-01-29

    A cryogenic over-pressure pump (OPP) was tested in the prototype telescope liquid nitrogen (LN2) cooling system for the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Project. This OPP consists of a process cylinder (PC), gas generator, and solenoid operated valves (SOVs). It is a positive displacement pump that provided intermittent liquid nitrogen (LN2) flow to an array of charge couple devices (CCDs) for the prototype Dark Energy Camera (DECam). In theory, a heater submerged in liquid would generate the drive gas in a closed loop cooling system. The drive gas would be injected into the PC to displace that liquid volume. However, due to limitations of the prototype closed loop nitrogen system (CCD cooling system) for DECam, a quasiclosed-loop nitrogen system was created. During the test of the OPP, the CCD array was cooled to its designed set point temperature of 173K. It was maintained at that temperature via electrical heaters. The performance of the OPP was captured in pressure, temperature, and flow rate in the CCD LN2 cooling system at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL)

  2. The effects of simulated fire events on the creation and destruction of soil water repellency using vegetation and soil samples from a desert shrub grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Over, T. M.; Pratte, S.; Frost, B.; Blitz, J.

    2010-12-01

    Fire-induced soil water repellency has been shown to interact with aeolian processes to enhance the heterogeneity of arid landscapes. To investigate aspects of these processes, vegetation (black grama grass and creosote bush) and soil samples from a field site in the northern Chihuahuan desert of central New Mexico were prepared and heated to temperatures ranging from 100 to 600 degrees Celsius in a tube furnace for one minute to simulate fire events. The vegetation samples were prepared by drying, grinding, and mixing with a clean sand in different concentrations, and the soil samples were passed through a 2 mm sieve. The samples were tested before and after heating using the molarity of ethanol (MED) drop test to determine the effect of heating to different temperatures on soil water repellency. The results show that some heating enhances repellency but higher temperatures destroy it. Gas chromatography - mass spectrometric analysis of soil extracts was also used to investigate the presence of some molecules that may be associated with soil water repellency before and after the heating experiments.

  3. NASTRAN Analysis Comparison to Shock Tube Tests Used to Simulate Nuclear Overpressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheless, T. K.

    1985-01-01

    This report presents a study of the effectiveness of the NASTRAN computer code for predicting structural response to nuclear blast overpressures. NASTRAN's effectiveness is determined by comparing results against shock tube tests used to simulate nuclear overpressures. Seven panels of various configurations are compared in this study. Panel deflections are the criteria used to measure NASTRAN's effectiveness. This study is a result of needed improvements in the survivability/vulnerability analyses subjected to nuclear blast.

  4. Overpressure and noise due to multiple airbag systems in a passenger car

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickling, Robert; Henning, Peter J.; Newton, Gary, Jr.

    2002-11-01

    Multiple airbag systems in passenger cars can generate overpressure and noise that may be hazardous to human hearing. Overpressure is compression of the air inside a closed compartment caused by deployment of the bags. Noise results from the action of the gas inflating the bags. SAE J247 provides a standard for measuring the combination of overpressure and noise in a passenger compartment. A special microphone has recently been developed that meets this standard, which operates down to a fraction of a hertz. Details of the microphone are given. Little appears to have been published on the overpressure and noise of modern multiple airbag systems, but early results [R. Hickling, ''The noise of the automotive safety air cushion,'' Noise Control Eng., May-June, 110-121 (1976)] provide a basic understanding of the phenomenon. Spectral data shows that peak overpressure occurs at about 2 to 3 Hz. A significant reduction in overpressure and noise can be achieved with an aspirating airbag, originally developed at General Motors, whose outer structure is inflated with gas from the inflator, and whose inner structure draws in air from the passenger compartment through one-way cloth valves. Tests have shown that such bags function well when impacted.

  5. Fluid overpressure estimates from the aspect ratios of mineral veins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philipp, Sonja L.

    2012-12-01

    Several hundred calcite veins and (mostly) normal faults were studied in limestone and shale layers of a Mesozoic sedimentary basin next to the village of Kilve at the Bristol Channel (SW-England). The veins strike mostly E-W (239 measurements), that is, parallel with the associated normal faults. The mean vein dip is 73°N (44 measurements). Field observations indicate that these faults transported the fluids up into the limestone layers. The vein outcrop (trace) length (0.025-10.3 m) and thickness (0.1-28 mm) size distributions are log-normal. Taking the thickness as the dependent variable and the outcrop length as the independent variable, linear regression gives a coefficient of determination (goodness of fit) of R2 = 0.74 (significant with 99% confidence), but natural logarithmic transformation of the thickness-length data increases the coefficient of determination to R2 = 0.98, indicating that nearly all the variation in thickness can be explained in terms of variation in trace length. The geometric mean of the aspect (length/thickness) ratio, 451, gives the best representation of the data set. With 95% confidence, the true geometric mean of the aspect ratios of the veins lies in the interval 409-497. Using elastic crack theory, appropriate elastic properties of the host rock, and the mean aspect ratio, the fluid overpressure (that is, the total fluid pressure minus the normal stress on the fracture plane) at the time of vein formation is estimated at around 18 MPa. From these results, and using the average host rock and water densities, the depth to the sources of the fluids (below the present exposures) forming the veins is estimated at between around 300 m and 1200 m. These results are in agreement to those obtained by independent isotopic studies and indicate that the fluids were of rather local origin, probably injected from sill-like sources (water sills) inside the sedimentary basin.

  6. Fluid Overpressure Distribution and Permeability Structure in the Cascadia Subduction Zone Under Southern Vancouver Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinelli, G. A.; Wada, I.

    2012-12-01

    We develop hydrogeologic models to examine the fluid overpressure distribution in the northern Cascadia subduction zone resulting from dewatering of the subducting Juan de Fuca slab. Anomalous seismic velocities indicative of relatively high Poisson's ratios observed in the subducting crust at subduction zones, such as Cascadia and Nankai, have been interpreted to indicate fluid overpressure (Shelly et al., 2006; Audet et al., 2009; Peacock et al., 2011). In northern Cascadia, the inferred fluid overpressure beneath Vancouver Island disappears farther landward. One of the proposed mechanisms for the distribution of fluid overpressure is the down-dip change in the permeability of the plate boundary fault. In this scenario, permeability is low under Vancouver Island, limiting fluid escape from the slab; permeability increases farther landward, allowing more efficient fluid migration out of the subducting slab (Audet et al., 2009). We test this conceptual hydrogeologic model with numerical models of fluid transport. Our models include fluid sources from porosity loss and mineral dehydration reactions. The volume of dehydration-derived fluid release from the subducting crust is calculated using a thermal model for Cascadia and the thermodynamic calculation code Perple_X. Modeled fluid source magnitudes are highest in a ~50 km wide region of upper oceanic crust under Vancouver Island. The cessation of these fluid sources in the subducting slab further landward combined with fluid flow from the slab contribute to the landward dissipation of fluid overpressure, even in the absence of enhanced fault zone permeability landward of Vancouver Island.

  7. Modeling overpressures in sedimentary basins: Consequences for permeability and rheology of shales, and petroleum expulsion efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Burrus, J.; Schneider, F.; Wolf, S. )

    1994-07-01

    The prediction of overpressures using Institut Francais du Petrole's 2-D numerical model TEMISPACK is applied to several provinces of the world. In the Paris basin, France, normally pressured Liassic shales are shown to have permeabilities around a microdarcy, independently confirmed by laboratory measurements. In contrast, in the Norway section of the North Sea, Williston Basin, Canada, Gulf Coast, and in the Mahakam delta, observed overpressures of 10-50 MPa are consistently modeled with shale permeabilities around 1-10 nanodarcys. This theoretical value fits well with the lowest permeability measured in compacted shales. For these basins, compaction disequilibrium was found to explain most (>85%) of the overpressures. The only exception was the Williston basin in which overpressures observed in the organic-rich Bakken shales are entirely due to hydrocarbon generation. In Mahakam delta, the rheology of shales is nonlinear, i.e., the strength of shales increases rapidly with death. Consequently, shale compaction cannot be described by the linear behavior often assumed in hydrology. In the absence of fault barriers, numerical simulations and geological evidence suggest that overpressured source rocks have low or very low expulsion efficiency, irrespective of their organic content. However, shales with a permeability on the order of a microdarcy do not hinder petroleum migration.

  8. 2-D modeling of gas and overpressure generation in the Venture field (Canada)

    SciTech Connect

    Forbes, P.L.; Ungerer, P. ); Mudford, S. )

    1990-05-01

    Venture field is located in an overpressured zone of gas accumulations in a region that had low sedimentation rates over the last 80 m.y. This could support the hydrocarbon generation, rather than compaction disequilibrium, as the main cause for overpressuring. Study of these accumulations can be done using the IFP (Institut Francais du Petrole) THEMIS model, which integrates compactions, hydraulic fracturation, fluid flows, heat transfer, and formation and migration of hydrocarbons. A single phase basin scale model is constructed first to assess the input parameters related to the fluid-flow reconstruction. The permeability of faults is calibrated to fit the actual pressure distribution through the field. Permeability is found to be very low and allows a fit to the regional distribution of overpressuring. In a second step, a two-phase model, restricted to the field itself, is used to test parameters related to hydrocarbon and source rocks. Gas accumulations are effectively obtained in the reservoir units. Finally, the two-phase model is extended to the regional scale to check the parameters previously assessed. At this scale, the gas and overpressure distributions are found to fit those actually observed. Gas accumulations contribute slightly to overpressuring, which is better accounted for by compaction disequilibrium despite the low sedimentation rates. Generation in or close to the reservoir unit does not contribute significantly to the gas accumulations. However, gas sources are found in the underlying formations.

  9. A study of sonic boom overpressure trends with respect to weight, altitude, Mach number, and vehicle shaping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Needleman, Kathy E.; Mack, Robert J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents and discusses trends in nose shock overpressure generated by two conceptual Mach 2.0 configurations. One configuration was designed for high aerodynamic efficiency, while the other was designed to produce a low boom, shaped-overpressure signature. Aerodynamic lift, sonic boom minimization, and Mach-sliced/area-rule codes were used to analyze and compute the sonic boom characteristics of both configurations with respect to cruise Mach number, weight, and altitude. The influence of these parameters on the overpressure and the overpressure trends are discussed and conclusions are given.

  10. Charts for determining potential minimum sonic-boom overpressures for supersonic cruise aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darden, C. M.

    1981-01-01

    Charts which give an estimation of minimum achievable sonic-boom levels for supersonic cruise aircraft are presented. A minimization method based on modified linear theory was analyzed. Results show several combinations of Mach number, altitude, and aircraft length and weight. Overpressure and impulse values are given for two types of sonic boom signatures for each of these conditions: (1) a flat top or minimum overpressure signature which has a pressure plateau behind the initial shock, and (2) a minimum shock signature which allows a pressure rise after the initial shock. Results are given for the effects of nose shape.

  11. Habitat destruction and the extinction debt revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Loehle, C.

    1996-02-01

    A very important analysis of the problem of habitat destruction concluded that such destruction may lead to an extinction debt, which is the irreversible loss of species following a prolonged transient or delay. An error in interpretation of this model led the authors to apply the results to all types of habitat destruction, but in fact the model applies only to an across-the-board decrease in fecundity, not to disturbances. For repeated, spatially random disturbance, a different model applies. For habitat destruction on regional scales (reduction in ecosystem area without disturbance in remnant areas), one must, in contrast, apply species-area relations based on the distribution of different habitat types (e.g., elevational and rainfall gradients, physiographic and edaphic variability). The error in interpretation of the basic model is presented, followed by clarification of model usage and development of a new model that applies to disturbance events.

  12. 14 CFR 417.229 - Far-field overpressure blast effects analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH SAFETY Flight Safety Analysis § 417.229 Far-field overpressure blast effects analysis. (a) General. A flight safety analysis must establish flight commit... to potential explosions during launch vehicle flight and demonstrate compliance with the public...

  13. 33 CFR 154.814 - Facility requirements for vessel vapor overpressure and vacuum protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... vapor overpressure and vacuum protection. 154.814 Section 154.814 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... vacuum protection. (a) A facility's vapor collection system must have the capacity for collecting cargo... vessel's cargo tanks between 80 percent of the highest setting of any of the vessel's vacuum...

  14. 33 CFR 154.814 - Facility requirements for vessel vapor overpressure and vacuum protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... vapor overpressure and vacuum protection. 154.814 Section 154.814 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... vacuum protection. (a) A facility's vapor collection system must have the capacity for collecting cargo... vessel's cargo tanks between 80 percent of the highest setting of any of the vessel's vacuum...

  15. 33 CFR 154.814 - Facility requirements for vessel vapor overpressure and vacuum protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... vapor overpressure and vacuum protection. 154.814 Section 154.814 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... vacuum protection. (a) A facility's vapor collection system must have the capacity for collecting cargo... vessel's cargo tanks between 80 percent of the highest setting of any of the vessel's vacuum...

  16. 33 CFR 154.814 - Facility requirements for vessel vapor overpressure and vacuum protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... vapor overpressure and vacuum protection. 154.814 Section 154.814 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... vacuum protection. (a) A facility's vapor collection system must have the capacity for collecting cargo... vessel's cargo tanks between 80 percent of the highest setting of any of the vessel's vacuum...

  17. Prediction of sonic boom from experimental near-field overpressure data. Volume 2: Data base construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glatt, C. R.; Reiners, S. J.; Hague, D. S.

    1975-01-01

    A computerized method for storing, updating and augmenting experimentally determined overpressure signatures has been developed. A data base of pressure signatures for a shuttle type vehicle has been stored. The data base has been used for the prediction of sonic boom with the program described in Volume I.

  18. An analysis of the response of Sooty Tern eggs to sonic boom overpressures.

    PubMed

    Ting, Carina; Garrelick, Joel; Bowles, Ann

    2002-01-01

    It has been proposed that sonic booms caused a mass hatching failure of Sooty Terns in the Dry Tortugas in Florida by cracking the eggshells. This paper investigates this possibility analytically, complementing previous empirical studies. The sonic boom is represented as a plane-wave excitation with an N-wave time signature. Two models for the egg are employed. The first model, intended to provide insight, consists of a spherical shell, with the embryo represented as a rigid, concentric sphere and the albumen as an acoustic fluid filling the intervening volume. The substrate is modeled as a doubling of the incident pressure. The second, numerical model includes the egg-shape geometry and air sac. More importantly, the substrate is modeled as a rigid boundary of infinite extent with acoustic diffraction included. The peak shell stress, embryo acceleration, and reactive force are predicted as a function of the peak sonic boom overpressure and compared with damage criteria from the literature. The predicted peak sonic boom overpressure necessary for egg damage is much higher than documented sonic boom overpressures, even for extraordinary operational conditions. Therefore, as with previous empirical studies, it is concluded that it is unlikely that sonic boom overpressures damage avian eggs. PMID:11837961

  19. Relationship between tectonic overpressure, deviatoric stress, driving force, isostasy and gravitational potential energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmalholz, Stefan M.; Medvedev, Sergei; Lechmann, Sarah M.; Podladchikov, Yuri

    2014-05-01

    We present analytical derivations and 2-D numerical simulations that quantify magnitudes of deviatoric stress and tectonic overpressure (i.e. difference between the pressure, or mean stress, and the lithostatic pressure) by relating them to lateral variations in the gravitational potential energy (GPE). These predictions of tectonic overpressure and deviatoric stress associated with GPE differences are independent of rock rheology (e.g. viscous or elastic) and rock strength. We consider a simple situation with lowlands and mountains (plateau). We use a numerical two-layer model consisting of a crust with higher Newtonian viscosity than that in the mantle, and also a three-layer model in which the two-layer lithosphere overlies a much less viscous asthenosphere. Our results (1) explain why estimates for the magnitude of stresses in Tibet, previously published by different authors, vary by a factor of two, (2) are applied to test the validity of the thin sheet approximation, (3) show that the magnitude of the depth-integrated tectonic overpressure is equal to the magnitude of the depth-integrated deviatoric stress if depth-integrated shear stresses on vertical and horizontal planes within the lithosphere are negligible (the thin sheet approximation) and (4) show that under thin sheet approximation tectonic overpressure is required to build and support continental plateaus, such as in Tibet or in the Andes, even if the topography and the crustal root are in isostatic equilibrium. Under thin sheet approximation, the magnitude of the depth-integrated tectonic overpressure is equal to the depth-integrated horizontal deviatoric stress, and both are approximately 3.5 × 1012 N m-1 for Tibet. The horizontal driving force per unit length related to lateral GPE variations around Tibet is composed of the sum of both tectonic overpressure and deviatoric stress, and is approximately 7 × 1012 N m-1. This magnitude exceeds previously published estimates for the force per unit

  20. Generation of tectonic over-pressure inside subducting oceanic lithosphere involving phase-loop of olivine-wadsleyite transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    So, Byung-Dal; Yuen, David A.

    2015-03-01

    We conducted a two-dimensional numerical model to analyze the generation of tectonic over-pressure, which is a positive deviation from lithostatic pressure, for deep slabs which are anchored at the 660 km phase boundary. The formation of the ductile shear zone under a compressional tectonic setting induces tectonic over-pressure. We first propose that an apparent shear zone originated from an elastic heterogeneity in the phase loop, which is the two-phase (i.e., olivine and wadsleyite) coexistence interval around the 410 km boundary within subducting oceanic lithospheres, can cause tectonic over-pressure with a range from 0.3 to 1.5 GPa. This over-pressure significantly impacts the formation of the olivine-wadsleyite phase transition. The flattening of the olivine-wadsleyite interface by over-pressure is well-resolved. Therefore, we argue that the over-pressure should be applied when analyzing the phase boundary within the subducting lithosphere. Our results provide a new insight on the interplay among the phase transition, shear zone formation and tectonic over-pressure.

  1. Generation of Tectonic Over-pressure inside Subducting Slab Involving Phase-Loop of Olivine-Spinel Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    So, B. D.; Yuen, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    We conducted a two-dimensional numerical model to analyze the generation of tectonic over-pressure, which is a positive deviation from lithostatic pressure, for deep slabs which are anchored at the 660 km phase boundary. The formation of the ductile shear zone under a compressional tectonic setting induces tectonic over-pressure. We first propose that an apparent shear zone originated from an elastic heterogeneity in the phase loop, which is the two-phase (i.e., olivine and spinel) coexistence interval around the 410 km boundary within subducting slabs, can cause tectonic over-pressure with a range from 0.3 to 1.5 GPa. This over-pressure significantly impacts the formation of the olivine-spinel phase transition. The flattening of the olivine-spinel interface by over-pressures are well-resolved. Therefore, we argue that the over-pressure should be applied when analyzing the phase boundary within the subducting slab. Our results provide a new insight on the interplay among the phase transition, shear zone formation and tectonic over-pressure. * The draft including the abstract above was submitted on 3rd Aug, 2014 with slight modification.

  2. Effects of Blast Overpressure on Neurons and Glial Cells in Rat Organotypic Hippocampal Slice Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Anna P.; Shah, Alok S.; Aperi, Brandy V.; Budde, Matthew D.; Pintar, Frank A.; Tarima, Sergey; Kurpad, Shekar N.; Stemper, Brian D.; Glavaski-Joksimovic, Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    Due to recent involvement in military conflicts, and an increase in the use of explosives, there has been an escalation in the incidence of blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) among US military personnel. Having a better understanding of the cellular and molecular cascade of events in bTBI is prerequisite for the development of an effective therapy that currently is unavailable. The present study utilized organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHCs) exposed to blast overpressures of 150 kPa (low) and 280 kPa (high) as an in vitro bTBI model. Using this model, we further characterized the cellular effects of the blast injury. Blast-evoked cell death was visualized by a propidium iodide (PI) uptake assay as early as 2 h post-injury. Quantification of PI staining in the cornu Ammonis 1 and 3 (CA1 and CA3) and the dentate gyrus regions of the hippocampus at 2, 24, 48, and 72 h following blast exposure revealed significant time dependent effects. OHCs exposed to 150 kPa demonstrated a slow increase in cell death plateauing between 24 and 48 h, while OHCs from the high-blast group exhibited a rapid increase in cell death already at 2 h, peaking at ~24 h post-injury. Measurements of lactate dehydrogenase release into the culture medium also revealed a significant increase in cell lysis in both low- and high-blast groups compared to sham controls. OHCs were fixed at 72 h post-injury and immunostained for markers against neurons, astrocytes, and microglia. Labeling OHCs with PI, neuronal, and glial markers revealed that the blast-evoked extensive neuronal death and to a lesser extent loss of glial cells. Furthermore, our data demonstrated activation of astrocytes and microglial cells in low- and high-blasted OHCs, which reached a statistically significant difference in the high-blast group. These data confirmed that our in vitro bTBI model is a useful tool for studying cellular and molecular changes after blast exposure. PMID:25729377

  3. Characteristic overpressure-impulse-distance curves for vapour cloud explosions using the TNO Multi-Energy model.

    PubMed

    Díaz Alonso, Fernando; González Ferradás, Enrique; Sánchez Pérez, Juan Francisco; Miñana Aznar, Agustín; Ruiz Gimeno, José; Martínez Alonso, Jesús

    2006-09-21

    A number of models have been proposed to calculate overpressure and impulse from accidental industrial explosions. When the blast is produced by ignition of a vapour cloud, the TNO Multi-Energy model is widely used. From the curves given by this model, data are fitted to obtain equations showing the relationship between overpressure, impulse and distance. These equations, referred herein as characteristic curves, can be fitted by means of power equations, which depend on explosion energy and charge strength. Characteristic curves allow the determination of overpressure and impulse at each distance.

  4. Characteristic overpressure-impulse-distance curves for vapour cloud explosions using the TNO Multi-Energy model.

    PubMed

    Díaz Alonso, Fernando; González Ferradás, Enrique; Sánchez Pérez, Juan Francisco; Miñana Aznar, Agustín; Ruiz Gimeno, José; Martínez Alonso, Jesús

    2006-09-21

    A number of models have been proposed to calculate overpressure and impulse from accidental industrial explosions. When the blast is produced by ignition of a vapour cloud, the TNO Multi-Energy model is widely used. From the curves given by this model, data are fitted to obtain equations showing the relationship between overpressure, impulse and distance. These equations, referred herein as characteristic curves, can be fitted by means of power equations, which depend on explosion energy and charge strength. Characteristic curves allow the determination of overpressure and impulse at each distance. PMID:16704903

  5. Vietnamese Amerasians: Predictors of Distress and Self-Destructive Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bemak, Fred; Chung, Rita Chi-Ying

    1998-01-01

    Pre- and postmigration variables that predict psychological distress and self-destructive behavior for Vietnamese Amerasians (N=169) are examined, and implications for counseling discussed. Results may indicate that observing traumatic events is a greater predictor of psychological distress and self-destructive behavior than actually experiencing…

  6. Flight Demonstration Of Low Overpressure N-Wave Sonic Booms And Evanescent Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haering, Edward A., Jr.; Smolka, James W.; Murray, James E.; Plotkin, Kenneth J.

    2005-01-01

    The recent flight demonstration of shaped sonic booms shows the potential for quiet overland supersonic flight, which could revolutionize air transport. To successfully design quiet supersonic aircraft, the upper limit of an acceptable noise level must be determined through quantitative recording and subjective human response measurements. Past efforts have concentrated on the use of sonic boom simulators to assess human response, but simulators often cannot reproduce a realistic sonic boom sound. Until now, molecular relaxation effects on low overpressure rise time had never been compared with flight data. Supersonic flight slower than the cutoff Mach number, which generates evanescent waves, also prevents loud sonic booms from impacting the ground. The loudness of these evanescent waves can be computed, but flight measurement validation is needed. A novel flight demonstration technique that generates low overpressure N-waves using conventional military aircraft is outlined, in addition to initial quantitative flight data. As part of this demonstration, evanescent waves also will be recorded.

  7. Minimization of sonic-boom parameters in real and isothermal atmospheres. [overpressure and acoustic impedance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darden, C. M.

    1975-01-01

    The procedure for sonic-boom minimization introduced by Seebass and George for an isothermal atmosphere was converted for use in the real atmosphere by means of the appropriate equations for sonic-boom pressure signature advance, ray-tube area, and acoustic impedance. Results of calculations using both atmospheres indicate that except for low Mach numbers or high altitudes, the isothermal atmosphere with a scale height of 7620 m (25 000 ft) gives a reasonable estimate of the values of overpressure, impulse, and characteristic overpressure obtained by using the real atmosphere. The results also show that for aircraft design studies, propagation of a known F-function, or minimization studies at low supersonic Mach numbers, the isothermal approximation is not adequate.

  8. The quantitative assessment of domino effects caused by overpressure. Part I. Probit models.

    PubMed

    Cozzani, Valerio; Salzano, Ernesto

    2004-03-19

    Accidents caused by domino effect are among the more severe that took place in the chemical and process industry. However, a well established and widely accepted methodology for the quantitative assessment of domino accidents contribution to industrial risk is still missing. Hence, available data on damage to process equipment caused by blast waves were revised in the framework of quantitative risk analysis, aiming at the quantitative assessment of domino effects caused by overpressure. Specific probit models were derived for several categories of process equipment and were compared to other literature approaches for the prediction of probability of damage of equipment loaded by overpressure. The results evidence the importance of using equipment-specific models for the probability of damage and equipment-specific damage threshold values, rather than general equipment correlation, which may lead to errors up to 500%. PMID:15072815

  9. Structural consequences of cohesion in gravitational instabilities triggered by fluid overpressure: Analytical derivation and experimental testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourgues, R.; Costa, A. C. G.; Marques, F. O.; Lacoste, A.; Hildenbrand, A.

    2016-06-01

    The critical taper theory of Coulomb wedges has been classically applied to compressive regimes (accretionary prisms/fold-and-thrust belts), and more recently to gravitational instabilities. Following the initial hypothesis of the theory, we provide an alternative expression of the exact solution for a non-cohesive wedge by considering the balance of forces applied to the external surfaces. Then, we use this approach to derive a solution for the case of cohesive wedges. We show that cohesion has conspicuous structural effects, including a minimum length required for sliding and the formation of listric faults. The stabilizing effect of cohesion is accentuated in the foremost thin domain of the wedge, defining a required Minimum Failure Length (MFL), and producing sliding of a rigid mass above the detachment. This MFL decreases with less cohesion, a smaller coefficient of internal friction, larger fluid overpressure ratio, and steeper upper and basal surfaces for the wedge. Listricity of the normal faults depends on the fluid overpressure magnitude within the wedge. For moderate fluid overpressure, normal faults are curved close to the surface, and become straight at depth. In contrast, where fluid overpressure exceeds a critical value corresponding to the fluid pressure required to destabilize the surface of a noncohesive wedge, the state of stress changes and rotates at depth. The faults are straight close to the surface and listric at depth, becoming parallel to the upper surface if the wedge is thick enough. We tested some of these structural effects of a cohesive wedge on gravitational instabilities using analogue models where cohesive material was subjected to pore-fluid pressure. The shape of the faults obtained in the models is consistent with the predictions of the theory.

  10. Prediction of sonic boom from experimental near-field overpressure data. Volume 1: Method and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glatt, C. R.; Hague, D. S.; Reiners, S. J.

    1975-01-01

    A computerized procedure for predicting sonic boom from experimental near-field overpressure data has been developed. The procedure extrapolates near-field pressure signatures for a specified flight condition to the ground by the Thomas method. Near-field pressure signatures are interpolated from a data base of experimental pressure signatures. The program is an independently operated ODIN (Optimal Design Integration) program which obtains flight path information from other ODIN programs or from input.

  11. Role of fluid overpressures in crustal strength and the form of the brittle-ductile transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suppe, J.

    2014-12-01

    The classic crustal strength-depth model of Brace and Kolhstedt (1980) (see figure) based on experimental rock mechanics depends in the brittle regime on the critical assumption of linearly increasing hydrostatic pore-fluid pressures. This leads to a predicted linearly increasing brittle strength that is well established based on deep borehole stress measurements in crystalline crust. In contrast, fluid overpressures are widely documented in orogenic belts based on borehole data, seismic velocity analysis and analysis of veins, in some cases showing complex fault-valve pressure fluctuations between lithostatic and hydrostatic. Typical observed overpressure-depth relationships predict a brittle crustal strength that is approximately constant with depth in contrast with the classic model. This constant-strength behavior below the fluid-retention depth (ZFRD in figure) has been confirmed using deep borehole stress and fluid-pressure measurements (Suppe, 2014). Recent ductile-plastic modeling of disequilibrium compaction suggests that pressure solution promotes further increases in overpressure and weakening, promoting a very prolonged low-strength brittle-ductile transition. Overpressured conditions can be inferred to exist over a substantial fraction of crustal thickness, spanning the brittle-ductile transition, in several tectonic environments, most straightforwardly in shale-rich clastic sedimentary basins built to sea level on oceanic or highly thinned continental crust such as the US Gulf Coast and Niger Delta. These thick accumulations commonly deform into shale-rich plate boundary mountain belts (e.g. Bangladesh/Miyanmar, Makran, Trinidad/Barbados, Gulf of Alaska, southern Taiwan and New Zealand). There is deep geophysical evidence for near lithostatic pore-fluid pressures existing to depths of 20-30km based on Vp, Vs, Vp/Vs and Q observations. We present active examples from Taiwan and New Zealand, combining borehole data and seismic tomography.

  12. Overpressure protection of multiphase oil and gas production flowlines in flat or hilly terrain

    SciTech Connect

    Greaney, P.K.

    1997-05-01

    Long flowlines networking multiple wells to a central facility require overpressure protection if they are incapable of withstanding the maximum shut-in wellhead pressure and if a flowline valve at the central facility can be closed. A main component of this overpressure protection system is a relief valve or set of relief valves on the flowline at the central facility. The relief valves should have set pressures and large enough orifice areas so that no section of the flowline network becomes overpressured, especially the section most remote from the central facility. At the remote section, the pressure is significantly higher than the pressure at the relief valves at the central production facility. Proper application of multiphase hydraulic calculations is critical in determining the relationship between the central facility pressure (relief valve pressure) and the pressure at the remote well during a relief situation. Horizontal flowlines are relatively easy to analyze, but long flowlines in hilly terrain with significant upflow and downflow sections complicate the hydraulic analysis. This paper presents a methodology for determining the relief valve set pressure and orifice area for both flat horizontal flowlines and flowlines in hilly terrain. The methodology consists of simplifying the analysis by substituting worst case steady-state solutions for full transient solutions and by demonstrating that the steady-state solutions are more conservative than the transient ones.

  13. Development of a multimodal blast sensor for measurement of head impact and over-pressurization exposure.

    PubMed

    Chu, Jeffrey J; Beckwith, Jonathan G; Leonard, Daniel S; Paye, Corey M; Greenwald, Richard M

    2012-01-01

    It is estimated that 10-20% of United States soldiers returning from Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) and Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) have suffered at least one instance of blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) with many reporting persistent symptomology and long-term effects. This variation in blast response may be related to the complexity of blast waves and the many mechanisms of injury, including over-pressurization due to the shock wave and potential for blunt impacts to the head from shrapnel or from other indirect impacts (e.g., building, ground, and vehicle). To help differentiate the effects of primary, secondary, and tertiary effects of blast, a custom sensor was developed to simultaneously measure over-pressurization and blunt impact. Moreover, a custom, complementary filter was designed to differentiate the measurements of blunt (low-frequency bandwidth) from over-pressurization (high-frequency bandwidth). The custom sensor was evaluated in the laboratory using a shock tube to simulate shock waves and a drop fixture to simulate head impacts. Both bare sensors and sensor embedded within an ACH helmet coupon were compared to laboratory reference transducers under multiple loading conditions (n = 5) and trials at each condition (n = 3). For all comparative measures, peak magnitude, peak impulse, and cross-correlation measures, R (2) values, were greater than 0.900 indicating excellent agreement of peak measurements and time-series comparisons with laboratory measures. PMID:21994064

  14. The role of pore fluid overpressure in the substrates of advancing salt sheets, ice glaciers, and critical-state wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Gang; Flemings, Peter B.; Hudec, Michael R.; Nikolinakou, Maria A.

    2015-01-01

    Critical-state wedges, ice glaciers, and salt sheets have many geometric and mechanical similarities. Each has a tapering geometry and moves along a basal detachment. Their motions result from the combined effects of internal deformation and basal sliding. Wedge deformation and geometry, basal conditions, and overpressure (pore fluid pressure less hydrostatic pore fluid pressure) development within the substrate interact with each other in this mechanically coupled system. However, the nature of this interaction is poorly understood. In order to investigate this coupled system, we have developed two-dimensional poromechanical finite-element models with porous fluid flow in sediments. We have simulated the advance of a salt sheet wedge across poroelastic sediments in this study. We emphasize that our results have applications beyond salt wedges to both critical-state wedges and ice glaciers. Overpressure develops within the substrate over time during the advance of the wedge. The magnitude of the overpressure influences the wedge geometry and the wedge advance rate. Lower overpressure results in a thicker and steeper wedge geometry, and a slower advance rate, while higher overpressure favors a thinner, wider, and more flattened wedge geometry and a faster advance rate. This study provides key insights into the links between wedge geometry, basal shear stress, and overpressure in substrates.

  15. How can fluid overpressures be developed and maintained in crustal fault zones ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LECLÈRE, H.; Cappa, F.; Faulkner, D. R.; Armitage, P. J.; Blake, O. O.; Fabbri, O.

    2013-12-01

    The presence of fluid overpressure in crustal fault zones is known to play a key role on the stability of faults and it has often been invoked to explain the triggering of earthquakes and the apparent weakness of misoriented faults. However, the mechanisms allowing the development and maintenance of fluid overpressures in fault remain unresolved. We investigate how fluid overpressures can be developed and maintained in complex fault zones with hydraulic and elastic heterogeneities. Here we address this question combining geological observations, laboratory experiments and hydromechanical models of an active crustal fault zone in the Ubaye-Argentera area (southeastern France). The fault zone studied is located in the Argentera external crystalline massif and is connected to regional NW-SE steeply-dipping dextral strike-slip faults with an offset of several kilometers. The fault zone cuts through migmatitic gneisses composed of quartz, K-feldspar, plagioclase, biotite and muscovite. It exposes several anastomosing core zones surrounded by damage zones with a pluri-decametric total width. The core zones are made up of centimetric to pluridecimetric phyllosilicate-rich gouge layers while the damage zones are composed of pluri-metric phyllonitic rock derived from mylonite. The determination of fault structure in the field and its hydraulic and mechanical properties in the lab are key aspects to improve our understanding of the role of fluids in fault mechanics and earthquake triggering. Here, the permeability and elastic moduli of the host rock, damage zone and fault core were measured from natural plugs with a diameter of 20 mm and lengths between 26 to 51 mm, using a high-pressure hydrostatic fluid-flow apparatus. Measurements were made with confining pressures ranging from 30 to 210 MPa and using argon pore fluid pressure of 20 MPa. Data show a reduction of the permeability values of one order of magnitude between host rock and fault damage zone and a decrease of 50

  16. Characterization of the Scale Model Acoustic Test Overpressure Environment using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielsen, Tanner; West, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    The Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) is a 5% scale test of the Space Launch System (SLS), which is currently being designed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The purpose of this test is to characterize and understand a variety of acoustic phenomena that occur during the early portions of lift off, one being the overpressure environment that develops shortly after booster ignition. The pressure waves that propagate from the mobile launcher (ML) exhaust hole are defined as the ignition overpressure (IOP), while the portion of the pressure waves that exit the duct or trench are the duct overpressure (DOP). Distinguishing the IOP and DOP in scale model test data has been difficult in past experiences and in early SMAT results, due to the effects of scaling the geometry. The speed of sound of the air and combustion gas constituents is not scaled, and therefore the SMAT pressure waves propagate at approximately the same speed as occurs in full scale. However, the SMAT geometry is twenty times smaller, allowing the pressure waves to move down the exhaust hole, through the trench and duct, and impact the vehicle model much faster than occurs at full scale. The DOP waves impact portions of the vehicle at the same time as the IOP waves, making it difficult to distinguish the different waves and fully understand the data. To better understand the SMAT data, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was performed with a fictitious geometry that isolates the IOP and DOP. The upper and lower portions of the domain were segregated to accomplish the isolation in such a way that the flow physics were not significantly altered. The Loci/CHEM CFD software program was used to perform this analysis.

  17. BLOOD DESTRUCTION DURING EXERCISE

    PubMed Central

    Broun, G. O.

    1922-01-01

    The following changes have been demonstrated to take place in the blood of dogs during exercise. 1. An increase in the per cent of cells and hemoglobin in the blood of the jugular vein occurs early in the course of exercise. It probably results from a redistribution of red corpuscles, with an increase in their proportion in the peripheral blood. 2. As exercise is continued, there is a definite increase in plasma volume. 3. A coincident decrease both in the total cell volume and the pigment volume during prolonged exercise suggests that blood destruction then occurs. PMID:19868689

  18. Shock destruction armor system

    DOEpatents

    Froeschner, Kenneth E.

    1993-01-01

    A shock destruction armor system is constructed and arranged to destroy the force of impact of a projectile by shock hydrodynamics. The armor system is designed to comprise a plurality of superimposed armor plates each preferably having a thickness less than five times the projectile's diameter and are preferably separated one-from-another by a distance at least equal to one-half of the projectile's diameter. The armor plates are effective to hydrodynamically and sequentially destroy the projectile. The armor system is particularly adapted for use on various military vehicles, such as tanks, aircraft and ships.

  19. An improved probit method for assessment of domino effect to chemical process equipment caused by overpressure.

    PubMed

    Mingguang, Zhang; Juncheng, Jiang

    2008-10-30

    Overpressure is one important cause of domino effect in accidents of chemical process equipments. Damage probability and relative threshold value are two necessary parameters in QRA of this phenomenon. Some simple models had been proposed based on scarce data or oversimplified assumption. Hence, more data about damage to chemical process equipments were gathered and analyzed, a quantitative relationship between damage probability and damage degrees of equipment was built, and reliable probit models were developed associated to specific category of chemical process equipments. Finally, the improvements of present models were evidenced through comparison with other models in literatures, taking into account such parameters: consistency between models and data, depth of quantitativeness in QRA.

  20. Separation, quantitation and isolation of cannabinoids from Cannabis sativa L. by overpressured layer chromatography.

    PubMed

    Oroszlán, P; Verzár-Petri, G; Mincsovics, E; Székely, T

    1987-02-01

    Two overpressured layer chromatography (OPLC) methods have been developed for the separation of neutral and acidic cannabinoids. The first is an adaptation of Korte's well known method to the OPLC system, which improves its reproducibility. The second one is a new technique based on the phenomenon of chromatographic solvent demixing. The eluent itself is also divided into zones. In the alpha-zone the neutral cannabinoids and in the beta-zone the acidic ones are separated. As a result of the good and reproducible separation, there is a possibility to quantitate cannabinoids by densitometry. The on-line version of OPLC proved suitable for the isolation of hemp constituents.

  1. Destructive weighted Poisson cure rate models.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Josemar; de Castro, Mário; Balakrishnan, N; Cancho, Vicente G

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, we develop a flexible cure rate survival model by assuming the number of competing causes of the event of interest to follow a compound weighted Poisson distribution. This model is more flexible in terms of dispersion than the promotion time cure model. Moreover, it gives an interesting and realistic interpretation of the biological mechanism of the occurrence of event of interest as it includes a destructive process of the initial risk factors in a competitive scenario. In other words, what is recorded is only from the undamaged portion of the original number of risk factors.

  2. Identifying potential gas accumulation sites from Oligocene overpressure data in the Qiongdongnan basin, offshore South China

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Funing )

    1993-05-01

    Overpressure in Oligocene formations in southern Qiongdongnan basin, offshore China, can be determined either by actual measurements in wells or by calculations using data derived from well logs and seismic surveys. The overpressure is mainly the result of undercompaction of Oligocene rocks during rapid loading by Pliocene and Quaternary sedimentation and of the subsequent thermal expansion of fluids in the Oligocene strata. Every formation possesses its own normal compaction trend (plot of shale-interval acoustic transit times vs. depth). The actual fluid pressures and potential pressures can be computed by the equilibrium-depth method. This method must be corrected for the thermal expansion of fluid. The pressure corrections are based on shale-interval transit times from well logs, interval velocities interpreted from vertical seismic profile (VSP) surveys, and stacking velocity from sonic log data of nearby wells. Gas generated from source rocks is assumed to have moved vertically from strata of higher hydraulic pressure potential to those of lower potentials and to have moved laterally and accumulated within areas where the contour closures of a gas equipotential hydraulic-pressure surface (U curves) have lower values. In the study area, the vicinity of the Yacheng gas field, the potential maps (U, gas, and V, water, maps) and hydraulic head profiles can be plotted from values derived either from actual pressure measurements or from calculations. These maps and profiles show prospective areas of gas accumulation. 5 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Evaluation of overpressure prediction models for air blast above the triple point.

    PubMed

    Ehrhardt, L; Boutillier, J; Magnan, P; Deck, C; De Mezzo, S; Willinger, R; Cheinet, S

    2016-07-01

    The increase of blast exposures leads to the need for better assessment of the blast threat. Empirical models describing the blast propagation in ideal conditions as free-field or surface detonations are commonly employed, but in some configurations the ground-reflected shock should be treated explicitly. Empirical models permit the prediction of the blast characteristics with the ground-reflected shock. The present study uses some original experimental data to evaluate the accuracy of the predicted overpressure with time regarding the reflected shock characteristics. Three methods are tested. The first method, called method of images (MOI) and linearly adding a virtual ground-symmetrical source blast to the free-field blast, is quick but lacks accuracy regarding the reflected shock characteristics. The second method, based on the LOAD_BLAST_ENHANCED function of the commercial LS-DYNA framework, better captures the reflected shock compared to the MOI, but the overall differences with experimental data are of the same order of magnitude as for the MOI. An original fit is introduced, based on standard physical parameters. The accuracy of this fit on the reflected shock characteristics, and the better match with the overall overpressure time series, shows its potential as a new empirical blast predicting tool.

  4. Tank 48 - Chemical Destruction

    SciTech Connect

    Simner, Steven P.; Aponte, Celia I.; Brass, Earl A.

    2013-01-09

    Small tank copper-catalyzed peroxide oxidation (CCPO) is a potentially viable technology to facilitate the destruction of tetraphenylborate (TPB) organic solids contained within the Tank 48H waste at the Savannah River Site (SRS). A maturation strategy was created that identified a number of near-term development activities required to determine the viability of the CCPO process, and subsequent disposition of the CCPO effluent. Critical activities included laboratory-scale validation of the process and identification of forward transfer paths for the CCPO effluent. The technical documentation and the successful application of the CCPO process on simulated Tank 48 waste confirm that the CCPO process is a viable process for the disposition of the Tank 48 contents.

  5. Development of sediment overpressure and its effect on thermal maturation: Application to the Gulf of Mexico basin

    SciTech Connect

    Mello, U.T.; Karner, G.D.

    1996-09-01

    High sedimentation rates can potentially lead to overpressuring and sediment undercompaction within basins. Sediments with anomalously high porosity, in turn, induce low thermal conductivities and so tend to act as a thermal insulator to the flow of heat. In the Gulf of Mexico basin (Gulf basin), the generation of overpressure is caused mainly by the inability of pore pressure fluids to escape at a rate commensurate with sedimentation. We modeled the generation and dissipation of abnormal sediment pore pressure due to variations in sedimentation rate, facies, formation porosity, and permeability within the Gulf basin using finite-element techniques to solve the differential equations of both heat and fluid transport within compacting sediments. We assume that the porosity-effective stress relationship within the sediment follows a negative exponential steady-state form when the pore pressure is hydrostatic. An important feature of our modeling approach is the assumption that sediments are incapable of significant expansion in response to increasing pore pressure. Sediments are assumed to hydrofracture when the pore pressure approaches the lithostatic pressure, rather than a common assumption of porosity expansion even in lithified sediments. From our modeling, we conclude that significant overpressures have been created (and dissipated) at various times within the Gulf basin and track, in general, the west to east migration of sediment loads deposited since the Cretaceous. Although predicted overpressures of more than 0.75 kpsi (i.e., an equivalent excess hydraulic head of 500 in) of Campanian-Maastrichtian age remain to the present day, the main phase of overpressure development in the Gulf basin is predicted to have occurred during the Miocene-Holocene. Maximum overpressures ({approximately}13.6 kpsi; excess hydraulic head of 9.4 km) are predicted for the present day.

  6. Overpressure isoflurane at caesarean section: a study of arterial isoflurane concentrations.

    PubMed

    McCrirrick, A; Evans, G H; Thomas, T A

    1994-01-01

    In this study we have measured arterial concentrations of isoflurane obtained during Caesarean section in two groups of patients. Patients in group 1 received 1% isoflurane throughout operation, whilst those in group 2 received 2% isoflurane for the first 5 min, 1.5% for the next 5 min and 0.8% thereafter. We found that arterial isoflurane concentrations were significantly greater in group 2 than in group 1 (ANOVA, P < 0.05). Isoflurane concentrations greater than 30 micrograms ml-1 were achieved rapidly in most patients in both groups, but there was a large scatter of results. The isoflurane concentration at which awareness or recall may occur is not known, but an "overpressure" technique as described for patients in group 2 may result in fewer patients being at risk of awareness.

  7. Tectonic overpressure may reconcile the structural and petrological records of the Adula nappe (Central Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pleuger, Jan; Podladchikov, Yuri

    2014-05-01

    accordance with the structural record, the Adula nappe can be restored to maximum depths of up to ca. 60 km. For individual points of the Adula nappe in the restored cross section, corresponding to the sporadic occurences of (ultra)high-pressure rocks, lithostatic pressures are exceeded by petrological peak-pressure data by about 40% to 80%. Such amounts of tectonic overpressure are within the limits of theoretical considerations and numerical modelling results. For the other units comprised in the cross section, and for subsequent tectono-metamorphic stages of the Adula nappe, negligible amounts of overpressure (around 10%) are determined from the restoration. We conclude that (1) the NFP20-East cross section can be kinematically restored by using only structural data, (2) the dilemma mentioned above can be solved by admitting realisting amounts of tectonic overpressure, and (3) significant amounts of overpressure were established only locally and episodically.

  8. Blast traumatic brain injury in the rat using a blast overpressure model.

    PubMed

    Yarnell, Angela M; Shaughness, Michael C; Barry, Erin S; Ahlers, Stephen T; McCarron, Richard M; Grunberg, Neil E

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a serious health concern for civilians and military populations, and blast-induced TBI (bTBI) has become an increasing problem for military personnel over the past 10 years. To understand the biological and psychological effects of blast-induced injuries and to examine potential interventions that may help to prevent, attenuate, and treat effects of bTBI, it is valuable to conduct controlled animal experiments. This unit discusses available paradigms to model traumatic brain injury in animals, with an emphasis on the relevance of these various models to study blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI). This paper describes the detailed methods of a blast overpressure (BOP) paradigm that has been used to conduct experiments with rats to model blast exposure. This particular paradigm models the pressure wave created by explosions, including improvised explosive devices (IEDs).

  9. Simultaneous determination of water-soluble vitamins by over-pressure layer chromatography and photodensitometric detection.

    PubMed

    Postaire, E; Cisse, M; Le Hoang, M D; Pradeau, D

    1991-04-01

    An over-pressure layer chromatographic procedure with photodensitometric detection for the simultaneous determination of water-soluble vitamins in multivitamin pharmaceutical preparations was developed and evaluated. The method uses high-performance TLC (HPTLC) plates with silica gel as the thin-layer, and an n-butanol:pyridine:water mixture (50:35:15, v/v/v) as mobile phase at a rate of 0.25 mL/min for baseline separation. The quantitation was carried out without derivatization (vitamin B1, vitamin B2, vitamin B6, folic acid, nicotinamide, vitamin C) or after spraying ninhydrin reagent (calcium pantothenate) or 4-dimethylaminocinnamaldehyde (vitamin B12, biotin). This was applied to the analysis of multivitamin solutions. Satisfactory relative standard deviations and good recovery were obtained for all the vitamins examined. It was concluded that this method is fast, accurate, specific, and suitable for routine quality control use. PMID:1865338

  10. Suppressed vitrinite reflectance in the Ferron coalbed gas fairway, central Utah: Possible influence of overpressure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Quick, J.C.; Tabet, D.E.

    2003-01-01

    Chemical and thermoplastic properties of coals in the Ferron coalbed methane fairway indicate that coals in the north are of higher rank than coals in the south. Measured vitrinite reflectance does not accurately show this variation of coal rank. Although vitrinite reflectance in the southern and central part of the fairway is consistent with other measures of coal rank, suppressed vitrinite reflectance is observed in the north where methane contents are relatively high. This coincidence of suppressed reflectance and relatively high coalbed methane yields may be significant. We speculate that the suppressed reflectance values result from a burial history where overpressure developed during the early stages of coalification and persisted until recent uplift and cooling; such instances may be diagnostic of prospective coalbed methane targets elsewhere. ?? 2003 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Short-range, overpressure-driven methane migration in coarse-grained gas hydrate reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nole, Michael; Daigle, Hugh; Cook, Ann E.; Malinverno, Alberto

    2016-09-01

    Two methane migration mechanisms have been proposed for coarse-grained gas hydrate reservoirs: short-range diffusive gas migration and long-range advective fluid transport from depth. Herein, we demonstrate that short-range fluid flow due to overpressure in marine sediments is a significant additional methane transport mechanism that allows hydrate to precipitate in large quantities in thick, coarse-grained hydrate reservoirs. Two-dimensional simulations demonstrate that this migration mechanism, short-range advective transport, can supply significant amounts of dissolved gas and is unencumbered by limitations of the other two end-member mechanisms. Short-range advective migration can increase the amount of methane delivered to sands as compared to the slow process of diffusion, yet it is not necessarily limited by effective porosity reduction as is typical of updip advection from a deep source.

  12. Overpressure isoflurane at caesarean section: a study of arterial isoflurane concentrations.

    PubMed

    McCrirrick, A; Evans, G H; Thomas, T A

    1994-01-01

    In this study we have measured arterial concentrations of isoflurane obtained during Caesarean section in two groups of patients. Patients in group 1 received 1% isoflurane throughout operation, whilst those in group 2 received 2% isoflurane for the first 5 min, 1.5% for the next 5 min and 0.8% thereafter. We found that arterial isoflurane concentrations were significantly greater in group 2 than in group 1 (ANOVA, P < 0.05). Isoflurane concentrations greater than 30 micrograms ml-1 were achieved rapidly in most patients in both groups, but there was a large scatter of results. The isoflurane concentration at which awareness or recall may occur is not known, but an "overpressure" technique as described for patients in group 2 may result in fewer patients being at risk of awareness. PMID:8110537

  13. Short-range, overpressure-driven methane migration in coarse-grained gas hydrate reservoirs

    DOE PAGES

    Nole, Michael; Daigle, Hugh; Cook, Ann E.; Malinverno, Alberto

    2016-08-31

    Two methane migration mechanisms have been proposed for coarse-grained gas hydrate reservoirs: short-range diffusive gas migration and long-range advective fluid transport from depth. Herein we demonstrate that short-range fluid flow due to overpressure in marine sediments is a significant additional methane transport mechanism that allows hydrate to precipitate in large quantities in thick, coarse-grained hydrate reservoirs. Two-dimensional simulations demonstrate that this migration mechanism, short-range advective transport, can supply significant amounts of dissolved gas and is unencumbered by limitations of the other two end-member mechanisms. Here, short-range advective migration can increase the amount of methane delivered to sands as compared tomore » the slow process of diffusion, yet it is not necessarily limited by effective porosity reduction as is typical of updip advection from a deep source.« less

  14. Overpressure and hydrocarbon accumulations in Tertiary strata, Gulf Coast of Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Philip H.

    2012-01-01

    Many oil and gas reservoirs in Tertiary strata of southern Louisiana are located close to the interface between a sand-rich, normally pressured sequence and an underlying sand-poor, overpressured sequence. This association, recognized for many years by Gulf Coast explorationists, is revisited here because of its relevance to an assessment of undiscovered oil and gas potential in the Gulf Coast of Louisiana. The transition from normally pressured to highly overpressured sediments is documented by converting mud weights to pressure, plotting all pressure data from an individual field as a function of depth, and selecting a top and base of the pressure transition zone. Vertical extents of pressure transition zones in 34 fields across southern onshore Louisiana range from 300 to 9000 ft and are greatest in younger strata and in the larger fields. Display of pressure transition zones on geologic cross sections illustrates the relative independence of the depth of the pressure transition zone and geologic age. Comparison of the depth distribution of pressure transition zones with production intervals confirms previous findings that production intervals generally overlap the pressure transition zone in depth and that the median production depth lies above the base of the pressure transition zone in most fields. However, in 11 of 55 fields with deep drilling, substantial amounts of oil and gas have been produced from depths deeper than 2000 ft below the base of the pressure transition zone. Mud-weight data in 7 fields show that "local" pressure gradients range from 0.91 to 1.26 psi/ft below the base of the pressure transition zone. Pressure gradients are higher and computed effective stress gradients are negative in younger strata in coastal areas, indicating that a greater potential for fluid and sediment movement exists there than in older Tertiary strata.

  15. Blast induced neurotrauma causes overpressure dependent changes to the DNA methylation equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Zachary S; Grinter, Michael B; De La Torre Campos, Diego; VandeVord, Pamela J

    2015-09-14

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has a high prevalence in our society and often leads to morbidity and mortality. TBI also occurs frequently in a military setting where exposure to blast waves is common. Abnormal gene expression involved with oxidative stress, inflammation and neuronal apoptosis has been well documented following blast induced neurotrauma (BINT). Altered epigenetic transcriptional regulation through DNA methylation has been implicated in the pathology of the injury. Imbalance between DNA methylation and DNA demethylation may lead to altered methylation patterns and subsequent changes in gene transcription. DNA methyltransferase enzymes (DNMT1, DNMT3a, and DNMT3b) are responsible for the addition of methyl groups to DNA, DNA methylation. Whereas the combined function of ten-eleven translocation enzymes (TET1, TET2, and TET3) and thymine-DNA glycosylase (TDG) result in the removal of methyl groups from DNA, DNA demethylation. We used an established rodent model of BINT to assess changes in DNA methylation and demethylation enzymes following injury. Three different blast overpressures were investigated (10, 17 and 23psi). Gene expression was investigated in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus two weeks following injury. We observed DNMT, TET and TDG expression changes between pressure groups and brain regions. The hippocampus was more vulnerable to enzyme expression changes than the prefrontal cortex, which correlated with aberrant DNA methylation. A significant negative correlation was found between global DNA methylation and the magnitude of blast overpressure exposure. Through transcriptional regulation, altered DNA methylation patterns may offer insight into the characteristic outcomes associated with the injury pathology including inflammation, oxidative stress and apoptosis. As such, these enzymes may be important targets to future therapeutic intervention strategies. PMID:26232681

  16. Altered Gene Expression in Cultured Microglia in Response to Simulated Blast Overpressure: Possible Role of Pulse Duration

    PubMed Central

    Kane, Michael J.; Angoa-Pérez, Mariana; Francescutti, Dina M.; Sykes, Catherine E.; Briggs, Denise I.; Leung, Lai Yee; VandeVord, Pamela J.; Kuhn, Donald M.

    2012-01-01

    Blast overpressure has long been known to cause barotrauma to air-filled organs such as lung and middle ear. However, experience in Iraq and Afghanistan is revealing that individuals exposed to explosive munitions can also suffer traumatic brain injury (TBI) even in the absence of obvious external injury. The interaction of a blast shock wave with the brain in the intact cranial vault is extremely complex making it difficult to conclude that a blast wave interacts in a direct manner with the brain to cause injury. In an attempt to “isolate” the shock wave and test its primary effects on cells, we exposed cultured microglia to simulated blast overpressure in a barochamber. Overpressures ranging from 15–45 psi did not change microglial Cox-2 levels or TNF-α secretion nor did they cause cell damage. Microarray analysis revealed increases in expression of a number of microglial genes relating to immune function and inflammatory responses to include Saa3, Irg1, Fas and CxCl10. All changes in gene expression were dependent on pulse duration and were independent of pressure. These results indicate that microglia are mildly activated by blast overpressure and uncover a heretofore undocumented role for pulse duration in this process. PMID:22698585

  17. Inverse modeling of the overpressure distribution in an extension fracture with an arbitrary aperture variation: application to non-feeder dikes in the Miyake-jima Volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusumoto, Shigekazu; Geshi, Nobuo; Gudmundsson, Agust

    2010-05-01

    We derived a solution for the overpressure distribution acting on the walls (surfaces) of an extension fracture (a hydrofracture) with an arbitrary opening-displacement (or aperture) variation. In the proposed model, we assume that the overpressure distribution can be described by Fourier cosine series. We at first present a solution for the forward model giving the fracture aperture when it is opened by an irregular overpressure variation obtained using the Fourier cosine series. Next, by changing the form of the solution for the forward model, we obtain a matrix equation that can be used to estimate the Fourier coefficients to obtain the overpressure distribution from the fracture aperture variation. As simple examples of this inverse analysis, we estimate the overpressure conditions from crack apertures given analytically for two cases, namely, 1) the overpressure in the crack is constant, and 2) the overpressure variation in the crack varies linearly from its center. The estimated overpressure distributions were found to be correct, although a small 'noise' was present. Since the method presented here gives the overpressure distribution as a Fourier series by the aperture data measured at a finite number of points, the overpressure conditions for forming the fracture can be determined for each wavelength. The Fourier coefficient of n = 0 is an important coefficient that gives the average value of the overpressure acting inside the crack. With the exception of n = 0, the Fourier coefficient of n = 1 expresses the longest wavelength component of the irregular overpressure. Thus, because this coefficient including the coefficient of n = 0 gives the longest wavelength component in the irregular overpressure, the component may be an important indicator of the overpressure condition that decides the basic form of the crack. We applied the solution for the inverse analysis to the thickness data of 19 non-feeder dikes exposed in the caldera wall of the Miyake

  18. Overpressure retardation of organic-matter maturation and petroleum generation: A case study from the Yinggehai and Qiongdongnan Basins, South China Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Hao Fang; Sun Yongchuan; Li Sitian; Zhang Qiming

    1995-04-01

    Three superimposed pressure systems developed in the Yinggehai Basin, South China Sea, as indicated by seismic data, well logs, and direct pressure measurements. The organic maturation profile is nonlinear, with three nonparallel segments that correspond to the shallow, normal-pressured system; the intermediate, overpressured system; and the deep, strongly overpressured system respectively. The intermediate and deep overpressured systems have abnormally low R{sub 0} gradients. The organic maturity of these overpressured rocks is significantly lower than the maturity of normal-pressured source rocks in nearby wells with similar thermal histories and does not math the thermal histories of the rocks. Such an organic maturity anomaly is distinctly different from those caused by variation in activation energies, conductivity contrasts, and hydrologic effects, and is confirmed to be the result of overpressure retardation. The degree to which the organi-matter maturation is retarded, expressed as the difference between predicted and measured vitrinite reflectance, increases exponentially with increasing fluid pressure, confirming that pressure increases the activation energies of organi-matter maturation reactions. Overpressure retardation has been proven to be conditional and quite important for clearly understanding petroleum generation, migration, and accumulation in overpressured sedimentary basins.

  19. Pressure Effects Analysis of National Ignition Facility Capacitor Module Events

    SciTech Connect

    Brereton, S; Ma, C; Newton, M; Pastrnak, J; Price, D; Prokosch, D

    1999-11-22

    Capacitors and power conditioning systems required for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) have experienced several catastrophic failures during prototype demonstration. These events generally resulted in explosion, generating a dramatic fireball and energetic shrapnel, and thus may present a threat to the walls of the capacitor bay that houses the capacitor modules. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the ability of the capacitor bay walls to withstand the overpressure generated by the aforementioned events. Two calculations are described in this paper. The first one was used to estimate the energy release during a fireball event and the second one was used to estimate the pressure in a capacitor module during a capacitor explosion event. Both results were then used to estimate the subsequent overpressure in the capacitor bay where these events occurred. The analysis showed that the expected capacitor bay overpressure was less than the pressure tolerance of the walls. To understand the risk of the above events in NIF, capacitor module failure probabilities were also calculated. This paper concludes with estimates of the probability of single module failure and multi-module failures based on the number of catastrophic failures in the prototype demonstration facility.

  20. Flameless thermal destruction of VOCs

    SciTech Connect

    Hohl, H.M.

    1997-04-01

    A new technology controls volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emissions with high destruction efficiencies. This article describes the technology developed by Thermatrix, Inc. of San Jose, CA. The field proven flameless thermal oxidation (FTO) is capable of destroying over 99.99 percent of a wide range of organic air pollution. Topics covered include FTO technology, high destruction efficiencies, VOCs in wastewater from chemical manufacturing; refinery fugitive emissions.

  1. Prevention of Over-Pressurization During Combustion in a Sealed Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.; Niehaus, Justin E.; Olson, Sandra L.; Dietrich, Daniel L.; Ruff, Gary A.; Johnston, Michael C.

    2012-01-01

    The combustion of flammable material in a sealed chamber invariably leads to an initial pressure rise in the volume. The pressure rise is due to the increase in the total number of gaseous moles (condensed fuel plus chamber oxygen combining to form gaseous carbon dioxide and water vapor) and, most importantly, the temperature rise of the gas in the chamber. Though the rise in temperature and pressure would reduce with time after flame extinguishment due to the absorption of heat by the walls and contents of the sealed spacecraft, the initial pressure rise from a fire, if large enough, could lead to a vehicle over-pressure and the release of gas through the pressure relief valve. This paper presents a simple lumped-parameter model of the pressure rise in a sealed chamber resulting from the heat release during combustion. The transient model considers the increase in gaseous moles due to combustion, and heat transfer to the chamber walls by convection and radiation and to the fuel-sample holder by conduction, as a function of the burning rate of the material. The results of the model are compared to the pressure rise in an experimental chamber during flame spread tests as well as to the pressure falloff after flame extinguishment. The experiments involve flame spread over thin solid fuel samples. Estimates of the heat release rate profiles for input to the model come from the assumed stoichiometric burning of the fuel along with the observed flame spread behavior. The sensitivity of the model to predict maximum chamber pressure is determined with respect to the uncertainties in input parameters. Model predictions are also presented for the pressure profile anticipated in the Fire Safety-1 experiment, a material flammability and fire safety experiment proposed for the European Space Agency (ESA) Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV). Computations are done for a range of scenarios including various initial pressures and sample sizes. Based on these results, various

  2. Growth of CdZnTe Crystals the Bridgman Technique with Controlled Overpressures of Cd

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Ching-Hu; Lehoczky, S. L.

    2008-01-01

    Cd(1-x)Zn(x)Te crystals with x = 0.15 and 0.20, were grown in this study by closed-ampoule directional solidification (Bridgman) technique with a controlled Cd overpressure. The growth ampoule was made of quartz with inner diameter from 20 to 40 mm and a tapered length of 2.5 cm at the growth tip. Both unseeded and seeded growths were performed with total material charges up to 400 g. After the loading of starting CdZnTe material, a typical amount of 2 g of Cd was also loaded inside a Cd reservoir basket, which was attached beneath the seal-off cup. The ampoule was sealed off under a vacuum below lxl0(exp -5) Torr. The sealed ampoule was placed inside a 4-zone Bridgman furnace - a Cd reservoir zone with a heat-pipe furnace liner on the top, followed by a hot zone, a booster heating zone and a cold zone at the bottom. The Cd zone was typically 300 to 400 C below the hot zone setting. High resistivity material has been obtained without any intentional dopants but has been reproducibly obtained with In doping. The crystalline and the electrical properties of the crystals will be reported.

  3. Prediction of blast-induced air overpressure: a hybrid AI-based predictive model.

    PubMed

    Jahed Armaghani, Danial; Hajihassani, Mohsen; Marto, Aminaton; Shirani Faradonbeh, Roohollah; Mohamad, Edy Tonnizam

    2015-11-01

    Blast operations in the vicinity of residential areas usually produce significant environmental problems which may cause severe damage to the nearby areas. Blast-induced air overpressure (AOp) is one of the most important environmental impacts of blast operations which needs to be predicted to minimize the potential risk of damage. This paper presents an artificial neural network (ANN) optimized by the imperialist competitive algorithm (ICA) for the prediction of AOp induced by quarry blasting. For this purpose, 95 blasting operations were precisely monitored in a granite quarry site in Malaysia and AOp values were recorded in each operation. Furthermore, the most influential parameters on AOp, including the maximum charge per delay and the distance between the blast-face and monitoring point, were measured and used to train the ICA-ANN model. Based on the generalized predictor equation and considering the measured data from the granite quarry site, a new empirical equation was developed to predict AOp. For comparison purposes, conventional ANN models were developed and compared with the ICA-ANN results. The results demonstrated that the proposed ICA-ANN model is able to predict blast-induced AOp more accurately than other presented techniques. PMID:26433903

  4. Delineating Area of Review in a System with Pre-injection Relative Overpressure

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Cihan, Abdullah; Zhou, Quanlin; Fairweather, Stacey; Spangler, Lee H.

    2014-12-31

    The Class VI permit application for geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) requires delineation of an area of review (AoR), defined as the region surrounding the (GCS) project where underground sources of drinking water (USDWs) may be endangered. The methods for estimating AoR under the Class VI regulation were developed assuming that GCS reservoirs would be in hydrostatic equilibrium with overlying aquifers. Here we develop and apply an approach to estimating AoR for sites with preinjection relative overpressure for which standard AoR estimation methods produces an infinite AoR. The approach we take is to compare brine leakage through a hypothetical open flow path in the base-case scenario (no-injection) to the incrementally larger leakage that would occur in the CO2-injection case. To estimate AoR by this method, we used semi-analytical solutions to single-phase flow equations to model reservoir pressurization and flow up (single) leaky wells located at progressively greater distances from the injection well. We found that the incrementally larger flow rates for hypothetical leaky wells located 6 km and 4 km from the injection well are ~20% and 30% greater, respectively, than hypothetical baseline leakage rates. If total brine leakage is considered, the results depend strongly on how the incremental increase in total leakage is calculated, varying from a few percent to up to 40% greater (at most at early time) than base-case total leakage.

  5. Delineating Area of Review in a System with Pre-injection Relative Overpressure

    DOE PAGES

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Cihan, Abdullah; Zhou, Quanlin; Fairweather, Stacey; Spangler, Lee H.

    2014-12-31

    The Class VI permit application for geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) requires delineation of an area of review (AoR), defined as the region surrounding the (GCS) project where underground sources of drinking water (USDWs) may be endangered. The methods for estimating AoR under the Class VI regulation were developed assuming that GCS reservoirs would be in hydrostatic equilibrium with overlying aquifers. Here we develop and apply an approach to estimating AoR for sites with preinjection relative overpressure for which standard AoR estimation methods produces an infinite AoR. The approach we take is to compare brine leakage through a hypothetical open flowmore » path in the base-case scenario (no-injection) to the incrementally larger leakage that would occur in the CO2-injection case. To estimate AoR by this method, we used semi-analytical solutions to single-phase flow equations to model reservoir pressurization and flow up (single) leaky wells located at progressively greater distances from the injection well. We found that the incrementally larger flow rates for hypothetical leaky wells located 6 km and 4 km from the injection well are ~20% and 30% greater, respectively, than hypothetical baseline leakage rates. If total brine leakage is considered, the results depend strongly on how the incremental increase in total leakage is calculated, varying from a few percent to up to 40% greater (at most at early time) than base-case total leakage.« less

  6. Blast overpressure induced axonal injury changes in rat brainstem and spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Kallakuri, Srinivasu; Purkait, Heena S.; Dalavayi, Satya; VandeVord, Pamela; Cavanaugh, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Blast induced neurotrauma has been the signature wound in returning soldiers from the ongoing wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Of importance is understanding the pathomechansim(s) of blast overpressure (OP) induced axonal injury. Although several recent animal models of blast injury indicate the neuronal and axonal injury in various brain regions, animal studies related to axonal injury in the white matter (WM) tracts of cervical spinal cord are limited. Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess the extent of axonal injury in WM tracts of cervical spinal cord in male Sprague Dawley rats subjected to a single insult of blast OP. Materials and Methods: Sagittal brainstem sections and horizontal cervical spinal cord sections from blast and sham animals were stained by neurofilament light (NF-L) chain and beta amyloid precursor protein immunocytochemistry and observed for axonal injury changes. Results: Observations from this preliminary study demonstrate axonal injury changes in the form of prominent swellings, retraction bulbs, and putative signs of membrane disruptions in the brainstem and cervical spinal cord WM tracts of rats subjected to blast OP. Conclusions: Prominent axonal injury changes following the blast OP exposure in brainstem and cervical spinal WM tracts underscores the need for careful evaluation of blast induced injury changes and associated symptoms. NF-L immunocytochemistry can be considered as an additional tool to assess the blast OP induced axonal injury. PMID:26752889

  7. Impact of reduced near-field entrainment of overpressured volcanic jets on plume development

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saffaraval, Farhad; Solovitz, Stephen A.; Ogden, Darcy E.; Mastin, Larry G.

    2012-01-01

    Volcanic plumes are often studied using one-dimensional analytical models, which use an empirical entrainment ratio to close the equations. Although this ratio is typically treated as constant, its value near the vent is significantly reduced due to flow development and overpressured conditions. To improve the accuracy of these models, a series of experiments was performed using particle image velocimetry, a high-accuracy, full-field velocity measurement technique. Experiments considered a high-speed jet with Reynolds numbers up to 467,000 and exit pressures up to 2.93 times atmospheric. Exit gas densities were also varied from 0.18 to 1.4 times that of air. The measured velocity was integrated to determine entrainment directly. For jets with exit pressures near atmospheric, entrainment was approximately 30% less than the fully developed level at 20 diameters from the exit. At pressures nearly three times that of the atmosphere, entrainment was 60% less. These results were introduced into Plumeria, a one-dimensional plume model, to examine the impact of reduced entrainment. The maximum column height was only slightly modified, but the critical radius for collapse was significantly reduced, decreasing by nearly a factor of two at moderate eruptive pressures.

  8. A proposed biochemical mechanism involving hemoglobin for blast overpressure-induced injury.

    PubMed

    Elsayed, N M; Gorbunov, N V; Kagan, V E

    1997-07-25

    Blast overpressure (BOP) is the abrupt, rapid, rise in atmospheric pressure resulting from explosive detonation, firing of large-caliber weapons, and accidental occupational explosions. Exposure to incident BOP waves causes internal injuries, mostly to the hollow organs, particularly the ears, lungs and gastrointestinal tract. BOP-induced injury used to be considered of military concern because it occurred mostly in military environments during military actions or training, and to a lesser extent during civilian occupational accidents. However, in recent years with the proliferation of indiscriminate terrorist bombings worldwide involving civilians, blast injury has become a societal concern, and the need to understand the biochemical and molecular mechanism(s) of injury, and to find new and effective methods for treatment gained importance. In general, past BOP research has focused on the physiological and pathological manifestations of incapacitation, thresholds of safety, and on predictive modeling. However, we have been studying the molecular mechanism of BOP-induced injury, and recently began to have an insight into that mechanism, and recognize the role of hemoglobin released during hemorrhage in catalyzing free radical reactions leading to oxidative stress. In this report we discuss the biochemical changes observed after BOP exposure in rat blood and lung tissue, and propose a biochemical mechanism for free radical-induced oxidative stress that can potentially complicate the injury. Moreover, we observed that some antioxidants can interact with Hb oxidation products (oxy-, met- and oxoferrylHb) and act as prooxidants that can increase the damage rather than decrease it.

  9. Prediction of blast-induced air overpressure: a hybrid AI-based predictive model.

    PubMed

    Jahed Armaghani, Danial; Hajihassani, Mohsen; Marto, Aminaton; Shirani Faradonbeh, Roohollah; Mohamad, Edy Tonnizam

    2015-11-01

    Blast operations in the vicinity of residential areas usually produce significant environmental problems which may cause severe damage to the nearby areas. Blast-induced air overpressure (AOp) is one of the most important environmental impacts of blast operations which needs to be predicted to minimize the potential risk of damage. This paper presents an artificial neural network (ANN) optimized by the imperialist competitive algorithm (ICA) for the prediction of AOp induced by quarry blasting. For this purpose, 95 blasting operations were precisely monitored in a granite quarry site in Malaysia and AOp values were recorded in each operation. Furthermore, the most influential parameters on AOp, including the maximum charge per delay and the distance between the blast-face and monitoring point, were measured and used to train the ICA-ANN model. Based on the generalized predictor equation and considering the measured data from the granite quarry site, a new empirical equation was developed to predict AOp. For comparison purposes, conventional ANN models were developed and compared with the ICA-ANN results. The results demonstrated that the proposed ICA-ANN model is able to predict blast-induced AOp more accurately than other presented techniques.

  10. Petroleum and aqueous inclusions from deeply buried reservoirs: Experimental simulations and consequences for overpressure estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pironon, Jacques; Bourdet, Julien

    2008-10-01

    Synthetic hydrocarbon and aqueous inclusions have been created in the laboratory batch reactors in order to mimic inclusion formation or re-equilibration in deeply buried reservoirs. Inclusions were synthesized in quartz and calcite using pure water and Mexican dead oil, or n-tetradecane (C 14H 30), at a temperature and pressure of 150 °C and 1 kbar. One-phase hydrocarbon inclusions are frequently observed at standard laboratory conditions leading to homogenization temperatures between 0 and 60 °C. UV epifluorescence of Mexican oil inclusions is not uniform; blue and green-yellow colored inclusions coexist; however, no clear evidence of variations in fluid chemistry were observed. Homogenization temperatures were recorded and the maxima of Th plotted on histograms are in good agreement with expected Th in a range of 6 °C. Broad histograms were reconstructed showing non-symmetrical Th distributions over a 20 °C temperature range centered on the expected Th. This histogram broadening is due to the fragility of the fluid inclusions that were created by re-filling of pre-existing microcavities. Such Th histograms are similar to Th histograms recorded on natural samples from deeply buried carbonate reservoirs. Th values lower than those expected were measured for hydrocarbon inclusions in quartz and calcite, and for aqueous inclusions in calcite. However, the results confirm the ability of fluid inclusions containing two immiscible fluids to lead to PT reconstructions, even in overpressured environments.

  11. A proposed biochemical mechanism involving hemoglobin for blast overpressure-induced injury.

    PubMed

    Elsayed, N M; Gorbunov, N V; Kagan, V E

    1997-07-25

    Blast overpressure (BOP) is the abrupt, rapid, rise in atmospheric pressure resulting from explosive detonation, firing of large-caliber weapons, and accidental occupational explosions. Exposure to incident BOP waves causes internal injuries, mostly to the hollow organs, particularly the ears, lungs and gastrointestinal tract. BOP-induced injury used to be considered of military concern because it occurred mostly in military environments during military actions or training, and to a lesser extent during civilian occupational accidents. However, in recent years with the proliferation of indiscriminate terrorist bombings worldwide involving civilians, blast injury has become a societal concern, and the need to understand the biochemical and molecular mechanism(s) of injury, and to find new and effective methods for treatment gained importance. In general, past BOP research has focused on the physiological and pathological manifestations of incapacitation, thresholds of safety, and on predictive modeling. However, we have been studying the molecular mechanism of BOP-induced injury, and recently began to have an insight into that mechanism, and recognize the role of hemoglobin released during hemorrhage in catalyzing free radical reactions leading to oxidative stress. In this report we discuss the biochemical changes observed after BOP exposure in rat blood and lung tissue, and propose a biochemical mechanism for free radical-induced oxidative stress that can potentially complicate the injury. Moreover, we observed that some antioxidants can interact with Hb oxidation products (oxy-, met- and oxoferrylHb) and act as prooxidants that can increase the damage rather than decrease it. PMID:9217317

  12. Experiments on Dynamic Overpressure Stabilization of Ablative Richtmyer--Meshkov Growth in ICF Targets on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotchev, O. V.; Goncharov, V. N.; Jaanimagi, P. A.; Knauer, J. P.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    2002-11-01

    Dynamic overpressure sets the growth rate of the ablative Richtmyer--Meshkov (RM) instability and the late-time imprint levels in directly driven ICF targets. It leads to temporal oscillations of the perturbed ablation front, which have been predicted analytically and observed experimentally,(Y. Aglitskiy et al.), Phys. Plasmas 9, 2264 (2002). and in 2-D ORCHID simulations. These predictions were verified on OMEGA by measuring the perturbation amplitudes and frequencies directly with an x-ray framing camera through face-on x-ray radiography. Planar plastic targets with variable thickness (20 to 60 μm) and single-mode (λ = 10 to 30 μm) ripples on the front surface were irradiated with 1.5-ns square UV laser pulses at maximum energy. Results clearly indicate a phase reversal in the evolution of the target areal density perturbations, in good agreement with theory and simulation. Nonlinearity in the evolution of the preimposed mode, resulting in an enriched spectrum, was observed for initial amplitudes previously believed to develop linearly with time. Upcoming experiments with a high-resolution, streaked imager, will allow for the detailed recording of the evolution of the RM instability and the competing stabilization effect. This work was supported by the U.S. DOE Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC03-92SF19460.

  13. Overpressure generation by load transfer following shale framework weakening due to smectite diagenesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lahann, R.W.; Swarbrick, R.E.

    2011-01-01

    Basin model studies which have addressed the importance of smectite conversion to illite as a source of overpressure in the Gulf of Mexico have principally relied on a single-shale compaction model and treated the smectite reaction as only a fluid-source term. Recent fluid pressure interpretation and shale petrology studies indicate that conversion of bound water to mobile water, dissolution of load-bearing grains, and increased preferred orientation change the compaction properties of the shale. This results in substantial changes in effective stress and fluid pressure. The resulting fluid pressure can be 1500-3000psi higher than pressures interpreted from models based on shallow compaction trends. Shale diagenesis changes the mineralogy, volume, and orientation of the load-bearing grains in the shale as well as the volume of bound water. This process creates a weaker (more compactable) grain framework. When these changes occur without fluid export from the shale, some of the stress is transferred from the grains onto the fluid. Observed relationships between shale density and calculated effective stress in Gulf of Mexico shelf wells confirm these changes in shale properties with depth. Further, the density-effective stress changes cannot be explained by fluid-expansion or fluid-source processes or by prediagenesis compaction, but are consistent with a dynamic diagenetic modification of the shale mineralogy, texture, and compaction properties during burial. These findings support the incorporation of diagenetic modification of compaction properties as part of the fluid pressure interpretation process. ?? 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. CFD Assessment of Forward Booster Separation Motor Ignition Overpressure on ET XT 718 Ice/Frost Ramp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tejnil, Edward; Rogers, Stuart E.

    2012-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics assessment of the forward booster separation motor ignition over-pressure was performed on the space shuttle external tank X(sub T) 718 ice/frost ramp using the flow solver OVERFLOW. The main objective of this study was the investigation of the over-pressure during solid rocket booster separation and its affect on the local pressure and air-load environments. Delta pressure and plume impingement were investigated as a possible contributing factor to the cause of the debris loss on shuttle missions STS-125 and STS-127. A simplified computational model of the Space Shuttle Launch Vehicle was developed consisting of just the external tank and the solid rocket boosters with separation motor nozzles and plumes. The simplified model was validated by comparison to full fidelity computational model of the Space Shuttle without the separation motors. Quasi steady-state plume solutions were used to calibrate the thrust of the separation motors. Time-accurate simulations of the firing of the booster-separation motors were performed. Parametric studies of the time-step size and the number of sub-iterations were used to find the best converged solution. The computed solutions were compared to previous OVERFLOW steady-state runs of the separation motors with reaction control system jets and to ground test data. The results indicated that delta pressure from the overpressure was small and within design limits, and thus was unlikely to have contributed to the foam losses.

  15. Fluid overpressure along an Oligocene out-of-sequence thrust in the Shimanto Belt, SW Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passelègue, François X.; Fabbri, Olivier; Dubois, Michel; Ventalon, Sandra

    2014-06-01

    Out-of-sequence thrusts (OSTs) exposed in ancient accretionary prisms are considered as fossil analogs of present-day megasplay faults in subduction margins and can provide direct information about the conditions of deformation during thrust activity. In modern as well as in ancient accretionary prisms, first-order megasplay faults or OSTs truncate or merge with faults of lesser importance called second-order OSTs. Structural analysis of the Makinokuchi fault, a branch of an Oligocene to lower Miocene second-order OST in the Tertiary Shimanto Belt of central Kyushu, SW Japan, brings information about the conditions of deformation at the time of thrusting. The studied exposure shows that the fault footwall and, to a much lesser extent, the fault hanging-wall, consist of quartz-cemented syntectonic dilatant hydraulic breccias testifying to pore fluid pressures larger than the least principal stress component. The footwall sandstones are crossed by several centimeters thick quartz veins that merge with the footwall breccias. The continuity between the veins and the breccias suggest that the veins acted as conduits which likely collected fluids from the footwall side sandstones upward and toward the fault. Fluid inclusions indicate that the quartz cementing the breccias and that filling the feeder veins crystallized from similar fluids and under similar pressure and temperature conditions (245-285 °C and 5-8 km depth). These similarities suggest that the fluids responsible for syn-tectonic hydraulic brecciation were collected from the footwall through the conduits. The fluid inclusion trapping temperatures are close to the temperatures expected to be reached along the seismogenic zone. Our analysis shows that fluid overpressures can play a key role in the growth and activity of second-order OSTs in accretionary prisms and suggests that fluids collected along second-order OSTs or splay faults may flow upward along first-order OSTs or megasplay faults.

  16. Pulmonary biochemical and histological alterations after repeated low-level blast overpressure exposures.

    PubMed

    Elsayed, Nabil M; Gorbunov, Nikolai V

    2007-01-01

    Blast overpressure (BOP), also known as high energy impulse noise, is a damaging outcome of explosive detonations and firing of weapons. Exposure to BOP shock waves alone results in injury predominantly to the hollow organ systems such as auditory, respiratory, and gastrointestinal systems. In recent years, the hazards of BOP that once were confined to military and professional settings have become a global societal problem as terrorist bombings and armed conflicts involving both military and civilian populations increased significantly. We have previously investigated the effects of single BOP exposures at different peak pressures. In this study, we examined the effects of repeated exposure to a low-level BOP and whether the number of exposures or time after exposure would alter the injury outcome. We exposed deeply anesthetized rats to simulated BOP at 62 +/- 2 kPa peak pressure. The lungs were examined immediately after one exposure (1 + 0), or 1 h after one (1 + 1), two (2 + 1), or three (3 + 1) consecutive exposures at 3-min interval. In one group of animals, we examined the effects of repeated exposure on lung weight, methemoglobin, transferrin, antioxidants, and lipid peroxidation. In a second group, the lungs were fixed inflated at 25 cm water, sectioned, and examined histologically after one to three repeated exposures, or after one exposure at 1, 6, and 24 h. We found that single BOP exposure causes notable changes after 1 h, and that repeating BOP exposure did not add markedly to the effect of the first one. However, the effects increased significantly with time from 1 to 24 h. These observations have biological and occupational implications, and emphasize the need for protection from low-level BOP, and for prompt treatment within the first hour following BOP exposure. PMID:17060374

  17. Conceptualizing Chronic Self-Destructiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Kathryn

    Self-destructiveness can be viewed in two ways: as performing an act which one knows cognitively is not conducive to one's welfare but nonetheless leads to some pleasurable affect (e.g., overeating, smoking); or not performing an act one knows one should perform but which has some negative affective consequences (e.g., dental checkups, saving…

  18. Community destruction and traumatic stress in post-tsunami Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Frankenberg, Elizabeth; Nobles, Jenna; Sumantri, Cecep

    2012-01-01

    How are individuals affected when the communities they live in change for the worse? This question is central to understanding neighborhood effects, but few study designs generate estimates that can be interpreted causally. We address issues of inference through a natural experiment, examining post-traumatic stress at multiple time points in a population differentially exposed to the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami. The data, from the Study of the Tsunami Aftermath and Recovery, include interviews with over 16,000 Indonesian adults before and after the event. These data are combined with satellite imagery, direct observation, and informant interviews to examine the consequences of community destruction for post-traumatic stress. Using multilevel linear mixed models, we show that community destruction worsens post-traumatic stress, net of rigorous controls for individual experiences of trauma and loss. Furthermore, the effect of community destruction persists over time and extends across a wide range of community types.

  19. Dyke thicknesses follow a Weibull distribution controlled by host-rock strength and magmatic overpressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumbholz, M.; Hieronymus, C.; Burchardt, S.; Troll, V. R.; Tanner, D. C.; Friese, N.

    2012-04-01

    thickness, irrespective of the tectonic setting, type of magmatic sheet intrusion (e.g. regional dykes and inclined sheets), or magma type. Moreover, the Weibull distribution of dyke thickness can be easily explained by the interplay of host-rock strength (i.e. the distribution of weaknesses) and magmatic overpressure.

  20. Chondrule destruction in nebular shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Jacquet, Emmanuel; Thompson, Christopher

    2014-12-10

    Chondrules are millimeter-sized silicate spherules ubiquitous in primitive meteorites, but whose origin remains mysterious. One of the main proposed mechanisms for producing them is melting of solids in shock waves in the gaseous protoplanetary disk. However, evidence is mounting that chondrule-forming regions were enriched in solids well above solar abundances. Given the high velocities involved in shock models, destructive collisions would be expected between differently sized grains after passage of the shock front as a result of differential drag. We investigate the probability and outcome of collisions of particles behind a one-dimensional shock using analytic methods as well as a full integration of the coupled mass, momentum, energy, and radiation equations. Destruction of protochondrules seems unavoidable for solid/gas ratios ε ≳ 0.1, and possibly even for solar abundances because of 'sandblasting' by finer dust. A flow with ε ≳ 10 requires much smaller shock velocities (∼2 versus 8 km s{sup –1}) in order to achieve chondrule-melting temperatures, and radiation trapping allows slow cooling of the shocked fragments. Initial destruction would still be extensive; although re-assembly of millimeter-sized particles would naturally occur by grain sticking afterward, the compositional heterogeneity of chondrules may be difficult to reproduce. We finally note that solids passing through small-scale bow shocks around few kilometer-sized planetesimals might experience partial melting and yet escape fragmentation.

  1. Quantitative assessment of magmatic refill and overpressure in crustal reservoirs by monitoring He isotope composition from volcanic gases: the case of Mt Etna (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paonita, Antonio; Caracausi, Antonio; Martelli, Mauro; Rizzo, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    occurred at all the sampled emissions some months before the onset of eruptions, due to deep magma recharges. This behaviour has been systematic for all the main eruptive phases occurred at Mt Etna since 2001. For most of the events, we quantitatively estimated the rate of magmatic refill during the pre-eruptive recharges of the system, as well as the growth of the overpressure in the deep chamber. Failure of the wall rocks and dike opening is also explained in the case of 2001 eruption, because chamber overpressure overcame the yield strength of rocks. The results suggest that key parameters as the rate of magma inflow and the volume change in deep chamber can be estimated prior to impending eruptions and directly compared to inferences from geodetic signals.

  2. Rat Injury Model under Controlled Field-Relevant Primary Blast Conditions: Acute Response to a Wide Range of Peak Overpressures

    PubMed Central

    Skotak, Maciej; Wang, Fang; Alai, Aaron; Holmberg, Aaron; Harris, Seth; Switzer, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract We evaluated the acute (up to 24 h) pathophysiological response to primary blast using a rat model and helium driven shock tube. The shock tube generates animal loadings with controlled pure primary blast parameters over a wide range and field-relevant conditions. We studied the biomechanical loading with a set of pressure gauges mounted on the surface of the nose, in the cranial space, and in the thoracic cavity of cadaver rats. Anesthetized rats were exposed to a single blast at precisely controlled five peak overpressures over a wide range (130, 190, 230, 250, and 290 kPa). We observed 0% mortality rates in 130 and 230 kPa groups, and 30%, 24%, and 100% mortality rates in 190, 250, and 290 kPa groups, respectively. The body weight loss was statistically significant in 190 and 250 kPa groups 24 h after exposure. The data analysis showed the magnitude of peak-to-peak amplitude of intracranial pressure (ICP) fluctuations correlates well with mortality rates. The ICP oscillations recorded for 190, 250, and 290 kPa are characterized by higher frequency (10–20 kHz) than in other two groups (7–8 kHz). We noted acute bradycardia and lung hemorrhage in all groups of rats subjected to the blast. We established the onset of both corresponds to 110 kPa peak overpressure. The immunostaining against immunoglobulin G (IgG) of brain sections of rats sacrificed 24-h post-exposure indicated the diffuse blood-brain barrier breakdown in the brain parenchyma. At high blast intensities (peak overpressure of 190 kPa or more), the IgG uptake by neurons was evident, but there was no evidence of neurodegeneration after 24 h post-exposure, as indicated by cupric silver staining. We observed that the acute response as well as mortality is a non-linear function over the peak overpressure and impulse ranges explored in this work. PMID:23362798

  3. Jonah field, sublette county, Wyoming: Gas production from overpressured Upper Cretaceous Lance sandstones of the Green River basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Montgomery, S.L.; Robinson, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    Jonah field, located in the northwestern Green River basin, Wyoming, produces gas from overpressured fluvial channel sandstones of the Upper Cretaceous Lance Formation. Reservoirs exist in isolated and amalgamated channel facies 10-100 ft (3-30 m) thick and 150-4000 ft (45-1210 m) wide, deposited by meandering and braided streams. Compositional and paleocurrent studies indicate these streams flowed eastward and had their source area in highlands associated with the Wyoming-Idaho thrust belt to the west. Productive sandstones at Jonah have been divided into five pay intervals, only one of which (Jonah interval) displays continuity across most of the field. Porosities in clean, productive sandstones range from 8 to 12%, with core permeabilities of .01-0.9 md (millidarcys) and in-situ permeabilities as low as 3-20 ??d (microdarcys), as determined by pressure buildup analyses. Structurally, the field is bounded by faults that have partly controlled the level of overpressuring. This level is 2500 ft (758 m) higher at Jonah field than in surrounding parts of the basin, extending to the top part of the Lance Formation. The field was discovered in 1975, but only in the 1990s did the area become fully commercial, due to improvements in fracture stimulation techniques. Recent advances in this area have further increased recoverable reserves and serve as a potential example for future development of tight gas sands elsewhere in the Rocky Mountain region.

  4. Optimal Control of Shock Tube Flow via Water Addition with Application to Ignition Overpressure Mitigation in Launch Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshman, Nathan

    2009-11-01

    Ignition Overpressure (IOP) in launch vehicles occurs at the start of ignition when a steep rise in pressure propagates outward from the rocket nozzle. It is crucial to minimize the overpressure so as to decrease risk of damage to the rocket body. Currently, CFD studies exist on this situation but there are no optimization studies of the water addition as a means to suppress the IOP. The proposed dissertation will use a numerical method to compute an approximate solution for an optimal control problem constrained by the one-dimensional Euler PDEs of fluid dynamics as well as volume fraction conservation. A model for inter-phase transport of mass momentum and energy and fluid interface quantities will be given. The control will be water addition from external nozzles. The adjoint system of equations will be derived and discretized. Necessary optimal conditions will be derived. An SQP method will solve an optimal situation. Predictions will be validated against shock tube experiments at the NPS rocket lab.

  5. Evaluation and detection of overpressures in a Deltaic Basin: The Sisi Field case history, offshore Mahakam, Kutei Basin, Indonesia

    SciTech Connect

    Grosjean, Y. ); Bois, M.; De Pazzis, L. ); Burrus, J. )

    1994-07-01

    Widespread overpressure occurrences in the Mahakama delta area have caused a number of kicks and several blow-outs during earlier exploration. A review of pore pressure indications was conducted in conjunction with an extensive reinterpretation of seismic and well data basin wide. The iso-pressure lines were found to be broadly parallel to the facies change from sandy, delta-front deposits to outer shelf and slope shales, and are not associated with organic matter maturation or clay diagenesis. Overpressures are reached at depths ranging from 1000 m to more than 4000 m, depending on the facies. A 2-D numerical basin model calibrated on observed pressure profiles at wells indicated that the excess pressures were a direct function of the variable drainage efficiency of the formations by interbedded sands. The Sisi discovery located at the eastern, distal extremity of the upper Miocene deltaic sands provided a unique opportunity for a more detailed analysis. A hypothesis of widespread decoupling between reservoir and shale pore pressures was tested against well data during appraisal drilling. D-exponent plots and gas shows were carefully monitored to assess the excess pressures, and quantitative estimates of the shale pore pressures were computed from sonic logs. A regionally consistent calibration was achieved, which confirmed very large discrepancies compared to the pressures measured in interbedded permeable reservoirs. These conclusions have since been generalized to other areas of the basin, where they allowed safer drilling practices to be established as demonstrated by the observed reduction of lost time.

  6. Alteration Behavior of High Burnup Spent Fuel in Salt Brine Under Hydrogen Overpressure and in Presence of Bromide

    SciTech Connect

    Loida, Andreas; Metz, Volker; Kienzler, Bernhard

    2007-07-01

    Recent studies have shown that in the presence of H2 overpressure, which forms due to the corrosion of the Fe based container, the dissolution rate of the spent fuel matrix is slowed down by a factor of about 10, associated with a distinct decrease of concentrations of important radionuclides. However, in a natural salt environment as well as in geological formations with chloride rich groundwater the presence of radiation chemically active impurities such as bromide must be taken in consideration. Bromide is known to react with {beta}/{gamma} radiolysis products, thus counteracting the protective H{sub 2} effect. In the present experiments using high burnup spent fuel, it is observed that during 212 days the matrix dissolution rate was enhanced by a factor of about 10 in the presence of up to 10{sup -3} M bromide and 3.2 bar H{sub 2} overpressure. However, concentrations of matrix bound actinides were found at the same level or below as found under identical conditions, but in the absence of bromide. In the long-term it is expected that the effect of bromide becomes less important, because the decrease of {beta}/{gamma}-activity results in a decrease of oxidative radicals, which react with bromide, while a-activity will dominate the radiation field. (authors)

  7. Enhancing Biopolymer Dynamics through Destruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Jennifer

    2012-02-01

    Microtubules are cytoskeletal filaments that organize intracellular space structurally and through active transport along their lengths. They need to be organized and remodeled quickly during development of differentiated cells or in mitosis. Much work has focused on remodeling from the ends because these long polymers can stochastically disassemble through dynamic instability or be actively disassembled. Microtubule-severing enzymes are a novel class of microtubule regulators that create new ends by cutting the filament. Thus, these proteins add a new dimension to microtubule regulation by their ability to create new microtubule ends. Interestingly, despite their destructive capabilities, severing has the ability to create new microtubule networks in cells. We are interested in the inherent biophysical activities of these proteins and their ability to remodel cellular microtubule networks. Interestingly, despite their destructive capabilities, severing has the ability to create new microtubule networks in cells. We use two-color single molecule total internal reflection fluorescence imaging to visualize purified severing enzymes and microtubules in vitro. We have examined two families of severing enzymes to find that their biophysical activities are distinct giving them different network-regulating abilities.

  8. Extinction events can accelerate evolution.

    PubMed

    Lehman, Joel; Miikkulainen, Risto

    2015-01-01

    Extinction events impact the trajectory of biological evolution significantly. They are often viewed as upheavals to the evolutionary process. In contrast, this paper supports the hypothesis that although they are unpredictably destructive, extinction events may in the long term accelerate evolution by increasing evolvability. In particular, if extinction events extinguish indiscriminately many ways of life, indirectly they may select for the ability to expand rapidly through vacated niches. Lineages with such an ability are more likely to persist through multiple extinctions. Lending computational support for this hypothesis, this paper shows how increased evolvability will result from simulated extinction events in two computational models of evolved behavior. The conclusion is that although they are destructive in the short term, extinction events may make evolution more prolific in the long term.

  9. Extinction Events Can Accelerate Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Lehman, Joel; Miikkulainen, Risto

    2015-01-01

    Extinction events impact the trajectory of biological evolution significantly. They are often viewed as upheavals to the evolutionary process. In contrast, this paper supports the hypothesis that although they are unpredictably destructive, extinction events may in the long term accelerate evolution by increasing evolvability. In particular, if extinction events extinguish indiscriminately many ways of life, indirectly they may select for the ability to expand rapidly through vacated niches. Lineages with such an ability are more likely to persist through multiple extinctions. Lending computational support for this hypothesis, this paper shows how increased evolvability will result from simulated extinction events in two computational models of evolved behavior. The conclusion is that although they are destructive in the short term, extinction events may make evolution more prolific in the long term. PMID:26266804

  10. Indirect Self-Destructiveness and Emotional Intelligence.

    PubMed

    Tsirigotis, Konstantinos

    2016-06-01

    While emotional intelligence may have a favourable influence on the life and psychological and social functioning of the individual, indirect self-destructiveness exerts a rather negative influence. The aim of this study has been to explore possible relations between indirect self-destructiveness and emotional intelligence. A population of 260 individuals (130 females and 130 males) aged 20-30 (mean age of 24.5) was studied by using the Polish version of the chronic self-destructiveness scale and INTE, i.e., the Polish version of the assessing emotions scale. Indirect self-destructiveness has significant correlations with all variables of INTE (overall score, factor I, factor II), and these correlations are negative. The intensity of indirect self-destructiveness differentiates significantly the height of the emotional intelligence and vice versa: the height of the emotional intelligence differentiates significantly the intensity of indirect self-destructiveness. Indirect self-destructiveness has negative correlations with emotional intelligence as well as its components: the ability to recognize emotions and the ability to utilize emotions. The height of emotional intelligence differentiates the intensity of indirect self-destructiveness, and vice versa: the intensity of indirect self-destructiveness differentiates the height of emotional intelligence. It seems advisable to use emotional intelligence in the prophylactic and therapeutic work with persons with various types of disorders, especially with the syndrome of indirect self-destructiveness.

  11. Destruction of chemical warfare agents using metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Mondloch, Joseph E; Katz, Michael J; Isley, William C; Ghosh, Pritha; Liao, Peilin; Bury, Wojciech; Wagner, George W; Hall, Morgan G; DeCoste, Jared B; Peterson, Gregory W; Snurr, Randall Q; Cramer, Christopher J; Hupp, Joseph T; Farha, Omar K

    2015-05-01

    Chemical warfare agents containing phosphonate ester bonds are among the most toxic chemicals known to mankind. Recent global military events, such as the conflict and disarmament in Syria, have brought into focus the need to find effective strategies for the rapid destruction of these banned chemicals. Solutions are needed for immediate personal protection (for example, the filtration and catalytic destruction of airborne versions of agents), bulk destruction of chemical weapon stockpiles, protection (via coating) of clothing, equipment and buildings, and containment of agent spills. Solid heterogeneous materials such as modified activated carbon or metal oxides exhibit many desirable characteristics for the destruction of chemical warfare agents. However, low sorptive capacities, low effective active site loadings, deactivation of the active site, slow degradation kinetics, and/or a lack of tailorability offer significant room for improvement in these materials. Here, we report a carefully chosen metal-organic framework (MOF) material featuring high porosity and exceptional chemical stability that is extraordinarily effective for the degradation of nerve agents and their simulants. Experimental and computational evidence points to Lewis-acidic Zr(IV) ions as the active sites and to their superb accessibility as a defining element of their efficacy. PMID:25774952

  12. Destruction of chemical warfare agents using metal-organic frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondloch, Joseph E.; Katz, Michael J.; Isley, William C., III; Ghosh, Pritha; Liao, Peilin; Bury, Wojciech; Wagner, George W.; Hall, Morgan G.; Decoste, Jared B.; Peterson, Gregory W.; Snurr, Randall Q.; Cramer, Christopher J.; Hupp, Joseph T.; Farha, Omar K.

    2015-05-01

    Chemical warfare agents containing phosphonate ester bonds are among the most toxic chemicals known to mankind. Recent global military events, such as the conflict and disarmament in Syria, have brought into focus the need to find effective strategies for the rapid destruction of these banned chemicals. Solutions are needed for immediate personal protection (for example, the filtration and catalytic destruction of airborne versions of agents), bulk destruction of chemical weapon stockpiles, protection (via coating) of clothing, equipment and buildings, and containment of agent spills. Solid heterogeneous materials such as modified activated carbon or metal oxides exhibit many desirable characteristics for the destruction of chemical warfare agents. However, low sorptive capacities, low effective active site loadings, deactivation of the active site, slow degradation kinetics, and/or a lack of tailorability offer significant room for improvement in these materials. Here, we report a carefully chosen metal-organic framework (MOF) material featuring high porosity and exceptional chemical stability that is extraordinarily effective for the degradation of nerve agents and their simulants. Experimental and computational evidence points to Lewis-acidic ZrIV ions as the active sites and to their superb accessibility as a defining element of their efficacy.

  13. Destruction of chemical warfare agents using metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Mondloch, Joseph E; Katz, Michael J; Isley, William C; Ghosh, Pritha; Liao, Peilin; Bury, Wojciech; Wagner, George W; Hall, Morgan G; DeCoste, Jared B; Peterson, Gregory W; Snurr, Randall Q; Cramer, Christopher J; Hupp, Joseph T; Farha, Omar K

    2015-05-01

    Chemical warfare agents containing phosphonate ester bonds are among the most toxic chemicals known to mankind. Recent global military events, such as the conflict and disarmament in Syria, have brought into focus the need to find effective strategies for the rapid destruction of these banned chemicals. Solutions are needed for immediate personal protection (for example, the filtration and catalytic destruction of airborne versions of agents), bulk destruction of chemical weapon stockpiles, protection (via coating) of clothing, equipment and buildings, and containment of agent spills. Solid heterogeneous materials such as modified activated carbon or metal oxides exhibit many desirable characteristics for the destruction of chemical warfare agents. However, low sorptive capacities, low effective active site loadings, deactivation of the active site, slow degradation kinetics, and/or a lack of tailorability offer significant room for improvement in these materials. Here, we report a carefully chosen metal-organic framework (MOF) material featuring high porosity and exceptional chemical stability that is extraordinarily effective for the degradation of nerve agents and their simulants. Experimental and computational evidence points to Lewis-acidic Zr(IV) ions as the active sites and to their superb accessibility as a defining element of their efficacy.

  14. A new restoration of the NFP20-East cross section and possible tectonic overpressure in the Penninic Adula Nappe (Central Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pleuger, J.; Podladchikov, Y.

    2012-04-01

    The Adula Nappe in the eastern Central Alps is one of the four units in the Alps from which ultrahigh-pressure rocks have been reported. Several very different models for its tectonic history have been published but none of these models is fully satisfactory. In the models of Schmid et al. (1996) and Engi et al. (2001), the main mechanism of exhumation is assumed to be extrusion. The extrusion models require top-to-the-hinterland, i.e. top-to-the-south faulting in the hanging wall of the exhuming nappe for which there is no evidence. Froitzheim et al. (2003) proposed a scenario with two different subduction zones, an internal one in which the South Penninic and Briançonnais domains were subducted, and an external one in which the North Penninc domain and the European margin, including the Adula nappe, were subducted. In this model, the exhumation of the Adula nappe results from the subduction of the overlying sub-Briançonnais and sub-South-Penninic mantle in the internal subduction zone. The Adula nappe would then have been exhumed from below into a top-to-the-north shear zone also affecting the overriding Briançonnais units. The main shortcoming of this model is that otherwise there is little evidence for two Alpine subduction zones. All the models cited above are based on the conversion of peak pressures obtained from geobarometry to depth by assuming lithostatic pressures. This results in a much greater burial depth of the Adula Nappe with respect to the surrounding units which poses major problems when trying to reconcile maximum burial depths of the Penninic nappes with their structural record. We performed a new restoration of the NFP20-East cross section (Schmid et al. 1996) without applying a lithostatic pressure-to-depth conversion but a purely geometrical restoration of deformation events in the Penninic nappe stack. The major constraints on these reconstructions are given by strain estimates for the major deformation phases in the units overlying the

  15. Tank 48 Chemical Destruction - 13237

    SciTech Connect

    Simner, Steven P.; Aponte, Celia I.; Brass, Earl A.

    2013-07-01

    Small tank copper-catalyzed peroxide oxidation (CCPO) is a potentially viable technology to facilitate the destruction of tetraphenylborate (TPB) organic solids contained within the Tank 48H waste at the Savannah River Site (SRS). A maturation strategy was created that identified a number of near-term development activities required to determine the viability of the CCPO process, and subsequent disposition of the CCPO effluent. Critical activities included laboratory scale validation of the process and identification of forward transfer paths for the CCPO effluent. The technical documentation and the successful application of the CCPO process on simulated Tank 48 waste confirm that the CCPO process is a viable process for the disposition of the Tank 48 contents. (authors)

  16. Mediated electrochemical hazardous waste destruction

    SciTech Connect

    Hickman, R.G.; Farmer, J.C.; Wang, F.T.

    1991-08-01

    There are few permitted processes for mixed waste (radioactive plus chemically hazardous) treatment. We are developing electrochemical processes that convert the toxic organic components of mixed waste to water, carbon dioxide, an innocuous anions such as chloride. Aggressive oxidizer ions such as Ag{sup 2+} or Ce{sup +4} are produced at an anode. These can attack the organic molecules directly. They can also attack water which yields hydroxyl free radicals that in turn attack the organic molecules. The condensed (i.e., solid and/or liquid) effluent streams contain the inorganic radionuclide forms. These may be treated with existing technology and prepared for final disposal. Kinetics and the extent of destruction of some toxic organics have been measured. Depending on how the process is operated, coulombic efficiency can be nearly 100%. In addition, hazardous organic materials are becoming very expensive to dispose of and when they are combined with transuranic radioactive elements no processes are presently permitted. Mediated electrochemical oxidation is an ambient-temperature aqueous-phase process that can be used to oxidize organic components of mixed wastes. Problems associated with incineration, such as high-temperature volatilization of radionuclides, are avoided. Historically, Ag (2) has been used as a mediator in this process. Fe(6) and Co(3) are attractive alternatives to Ag(2) since they form soluble chlorides during the destruction of chlorinated solvents. Furthermore, silver itself is a toxic heavy metal. Quantitative data has been obtained for the complete oxidation of ethylene glycol by Fe(6) and Co(3). Though ethylene glycol is a nonhalogenated organic, this data has enabled us to make direct comparisons of activities of Fe(6) and Co(3) with Ag(2). Very good quantitative data for the oxidation of ethylene glycol by Ag(2) had already been collected. 4 refs., 6 figs.

  17. Meteorology: are there trends in hurricane destruction?

    PubMed

    Pielke, Roger A

    2005-12-22

    Since the record impact of Hurricane Katrina, attention has focused on understanding trends in hurricanes and their destructive potential. Emanuel reports a marked increase in the potential destructiveness of hurricanes based on identification of a trend in an accumulated annual index of power dissipation in the North Atlantic and western North Pacific since the 1970s. If hurricanes are indeed becoming more destructive over time, then this trend should manifest itself in more destruction. However, my analysis of a long-term data set of hurricane losses in the United States shows no upward trend once the data are normalized to remove the effects of societal changes.

  18. Laser-induced propagation and destruction of amyloid beta fibrils.

    PubMed

    Yagi, Hisashi; Ozawa, Daisaku; Sakurai, Kazumasa; Kawakami, Toru; Kuyama, Hiroki; Nishimura, Osamu; Shimanouchi, Toshinori; Kuboi, Ryoichi; Naiki, Hironobu; Goto, Yuji

    2010-06-18

    The amyloid deposition of amyloid beta (Abeta) peptides is a critical pathological event in Alzheimer disease (AD). Preventing the formation of amyloid deposits and removing preformed fibrils in tissues are important therapeutic strategies against AD. Previously, we reported the destruction of amyloid fibrils of beta(2)-microglobulin K3 fragments by laser irradiation coupled with the binding of amyloid-specific thioflavin T. Here, we studied the effects of a laser beam on Abeta fibrils. As was the case for K3 fibrils, extensive irradiation destroyed the preformed Abeta fibrils. However, irradiation during spontaneous fibril formation resulted in only the partial destruction of growing fibrils and a subsequent explosive propagation of fibrils. The explosive propagation was caused by an increase in the number of active ends due to breakage. The results not only reveal a case of fragmentation-induced propagation of fibrils but also provide insights into therapeutic strategies for AD.

  19. Destruction of chlorofluorocarbons and halons

    SciTech Connect

    Matchett, J.M.; Miller, K.B.; Purcell, C.W.

    1995-06-01

    The Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer requires the phaseout of ozone-depleting substances in most developed countries by January 1, 1996. Developing, or Article 5, countries have been allowed additional time in which to produce these chemicals. Contrary to the Protocol`s intent, current estimates indicate that production of these chemicals by Article 5 countries could easily equal that of the developed world before their production is required to be eliminated. The Montreal Protocol also requires that used chlorofluorcarbons (CFCs) and halons are disposed of in an environmentally acceptable manner. One mechanism devised by the Montreal Protocol to reduce the amount of ozone-depleting substances that may need to be destroyed is to transfer those chemicals to Article 5 countries. Theoretically, this has the added benefit of also eliminating the need for additional production by those countries. This paper discusses the major issues associated with the disposal/destruction of ozone-depleting substances, including the transfer of these chemicals to Article 5 countries. Potential implications of the barriers to ozone-depleting substance transfer on the viability of the Montreal Protocol will also be discussed.

  20. Self-destructiveness in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Noshpitz, J D

    1994-01-01

    This study is an attempt to formulate the dynamics of the group of adolescents involved in major drug use and other antisocial behavior. As consultant to a drug rehabilitation center for teenagers, the author has had occasion to interview and evaluate a large number of youths whose lives had taken such a turn. Certain aspects of the life style and behavior patterns of these young people show striking similarities. In particular, their behavior evidences the presence of a central self-destructive moiety which can be likened to a negative ego ideal; this acts to shape and to direct their lives. This element in the character structure of these patients is described in clinical and theoretical (developmental) terms, with special address to: a chronic low-grade sense of inner malaise, a tendency to self-blame for whatever goes wrong for family and close friends, feelings of alienation from the larger society around them, behavioral provocativeness in the service of seeking the relief that punishment brings, recurrent gestures of self-mutilation, frequent involvement with cults of devil worship, a record of multiple antisocial acts punctuated by numerous arrests, and repeated suicidal gestures and attempts. The origins of the negative regulatory superego elements which make for this type of psychopathology are explored. PMID:7992866

  1. 9 CFR 51.6 - Destruction of animals; time limit for destruction of animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Destruction of animals; time limit for destruction of animals. 51.6 Section 51.6 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION... ANIMALS DESTROYED BECAUSE OF BRUCELLOSIS Indemnity for Cattle, Bison, and Swine § 51.6 Destruction...

  2. 9 CFR 51.6 - Destruction of animals; time limit for destruction of animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Destruction of animals; time limit for destruction of animals. 51.6 Section 51.6 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION... ANIMALS DESTROYED BECAUSE OF BRUCELLOSIS Indemnity for Cattle, Bison, and Swine § 51.6 Destruction...

  3. 9 CFR 51.6 - Destruction of animals; time limit for destruction of animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Destruction of animals; time limit for destruction of animals. 51.6 Section 51.6 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION... ANIMALS DESTROYED BECAUSE OF BRUCELLOSIS Indemnity for Cattle, Bison, and Swine § 51.6 Destruction...

  4. 9 CFR 51.6 - Destruction of animals; time limit for destruction of animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Destruction of animals; time limit for destruction of animals. 51.6 Section 51.6 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION... ANIMALS DESTROYED BECAUSE OF BRUCELLOSIS Indemnity for Cattle, Bison, and Swine § 51.6 Destruction...

  5. 9 CFR 51.6 - Destruction of animals; time limit for destruction of animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Destruction of animals; time limit for destruction of animals. 51.6 Section 51.6 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION... ANIMALS DESTROYED BECAUSE OF BRUCELLOSIS Indemnity for Cattle, Bison, and Swine § 51.6 Destruction...

  6. 43 CFR 4730.1 - Destruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... OF THE INTERIOR RANGE MANAGEMENT (4000) PROTECTION, MANAGEMENT, AND CONTROL OF WILD FREE-ROAMING HORSES AND BURROS Destruction of Wild Horses or Burros and Disposal of Remains § 4730.1 Destruction. Except as an act of mercy, no wild horse or burro shall be destroyed without the authorization of...

  7. 43 CFR 4730.1 - Destruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... OF THE INTERIOR RANGE MANAGEMENT (4000) PROTECTION, MANAGEMENT, AND CONTROL OF WILD FREE-ROAMING HORSES AND BURROS Destruction of Wild Horses or Burros and Disposal of Remains § 4730.1 Destruction. Except as an act of mercy, no wild horse or burro shall be destroyed without the authorization of...

  8. 43 CFR 4730.1 - Destruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... OF THE INTERIOR RANGE MANAGEMENT (4000) PROTECTION, MANAGEMENT, AND CONTROL OF WILD FREE-ROAMING HORSES AND BURROS Destruction of Wild Horses or Burros and Disposal of Remains § 4730.1 Destruction. Except as an act of mercy, no wild horse or burro shall be destroyed without the authorization of...

  9. 43 CFR 4730.1 - Destruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... OF THE INTERIOR RANGE MANAGEMENT (4000) PROTECTION, MANAGEMENT, AND CONTROL OF WILD FREE-ROAMING HORSES AND BURROS Destruction of Wild Horses or Burros and Disposal of Remains § 4730.1 Destruction. Except as an act of mercy, no wild horse or burro shall be destroyed without the authorization of...

  10. Creative Destruction: Singapore's Speak Good English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubdy, Rani

    2001-01-01

    Attempts to show that the move to stem the popularity of Singlish (Singapore English) is another manifestation of the notion of creative destruction, currently being proposed as a strategy to improve partial destruction of existing economic ideas and structures that rapidly obsolesce with the emergence of new ones. Argues that attempts to replace…

  11. 27 CFR 40.253 - Destruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Destruction. 40.253 Section 40.253 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF... § 40.253 Destruction. When a manufacturer of tobacco products desires to destroy tobacco products...

  12. 27 CFR 40.253 - Destruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Destruction. 40.253 Section 40.253 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... § 40.253 Destruction. When a manufacturer of tobacco products desires to destroy tobacco products...

  13. Self-Destructive Behavior in Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kessel, Greer; Chrisler, Joan C.

    Trichotillomania (hair-pulling) and delicate self-cutting are self-destructive behaviors which utilize the body as a vehicle for self-expression. Like anorexia and bulimia, these behaviors occur primarily in young women. This study compared groups of women college students who engage in these self-destructive behaviors with those who do not. It…

  14. Energetic materials destruction using molten salt

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhye, R.S.; Watkins, B.E.; Pruneda, C.O.; Brummond, W.A.

    1994-04-29

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in conjunction with the Energetic Materials Center is developing methods for the safe and environmentally sound destruction of explosives and propellants as a part of the Laboratory`s ancillary demilitarization mission. LLNL has built a small-scale unit to test the destruction of HE using the Molten Salt Destruction (MSD) Process. In addition to the high explosive HMX, destruction has been carried out on RDX, PETN, ammonium picrate, TNT, nitroguanadine, and TATB. Also destroyed was a liquid gun propellant comprising hydroxyammonium nitrate, triethanolammonium nitrate and water. In addition to these pure components, destruction has been carried out on a number of commonly used formulations, such as LX-10, LX-16, LX-17, and PBX-9404.

  15. Effect of overpressure on the catchment outflow of a tile drainage system: an integrated modeling strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henine, H.; Nedelec, Y.

    2009-04-01

    The effect of agricultural artificial drainage on catchment outflow has been a debate for quite some time. Predicting the drainage impacts on downstream peak flow is complex because it involves different flow media: soil, drainage pipes' network and open channels. This work follows up field experiments carried out in a small subsurface drained catchment. Flow rates and pressure heads were monitored in buried pipe collectors, within the drainage network, at the junction between field collector and main collector, and at the whole catchment outlet. A watertable profile in the drained field was recorded simultaneously to investigating underground flow during pipe pressurization. Several years of data collection showed that pipe pressurization, during intense rainfall events, induced limited or reversed collector discharge and temporary storage of infiltrated water within the field soil while the water table rose. In order to better understand and predict the influence of the temporary pipe pressurization on field drainage discharge during intense rainfall events, this work proposes an integrated modeling strategy. The modeling approach consists in adapting and coupling a 1D Saint-Venant network model, with a 2D Boussinesq shallow watertable model. Two main issues are addressed here. The first one is the ability of both models to cope with pressurized conditions for both buried pipes and watertable above drain. The second issue deals with assessing the effects of topography and network organization on drainage pipe pressurization.

  16. The relationship between attributional style and destructive responses to job dissatisfaction: an exploratory study of internal migrant workers in China

    PubMed Central

    Kwan, Siu-On; Wong, Fu-Keung Daniel

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between attributional style and destructive responses to job dissatisfaction among internal migrant workers in mainland China. Contrary to previous studies conducted in the West, we found that internality of bad events was negatively related to destructive responses to job dissatisfaction. Stability and globality were positively related to destructive responses to job dissatisfaction. We suggest that the concept of interdependent self-construal may explain the unique positive meaning of internality of bad events among Chinese migrant workers. The practical significance of the findings is discussed. PMID:25750811

  17. Influence of fluid overpressure on sliding with or without frontal buttress. Insights from analytical and experimental modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacoste, A.; Vendeville, B.; Mourgues, R.; Loncke, L.

    2009-12-01

    Hydrocarbon cracking can generate gases that migrate upward and may be trapped beneath low-permeability strata. The resulting fluid overpressure reduces shear strength, allowing gravitational sliding of the overlying cover. The driving force is the slope-parallel component of the weight of the cover, whereas the resisting forces are the friction at the base of the cover and the buttressing resistance to shortening downslope. Typically, a slide is bounded by normal faults upslope and thrusts downslope. But, sometimes, the slide is bounded downslope by a creek incision, and no compressional structures are found. We show how these two types of slides markedly differ in terms of mechanics, geometry, and kinematics using both analytical and experimental models. Mourgues et al. (2009) proposed an analytical model for gravity sliding of a laterally continuous sedimentary pile overlying an overpressured horizon. There, sliding can occur only if the driving force can overcome the buttressing resistance downslope, i.e., if the slide has a minimum required length, which depends on the thickness and rheological properties of the cover, and fluid pressure. The predicted length of the slide decreases with increasing pore pressure and decreasing cover thickness (Fig.1A). We ran the same calculation for a set up in which the base of the slope is incised, hence there is no downslope buttress. Unlike the first set up, the sliding sheet length increases with increasing fluid pressure (Fig.1B). We also tested the influence of varying slope angles, cover thicknesses and permeabilities of the décollement layer. The fluid pressure required to trigger sliding decreases where the basal slope and the cover thickness increase. Changes in décollement permeability have only a minor influence. We undertook a series of analogue experiments to check the evolution predicted by the analytical models. Fluids were simulated by compressed air applied at the base of models made of sand and low

  18. Can we infer the magma overpressure threshold before an eruption? Insights from ground deformation time series and numerical modeling of reservoir failure.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albino, F.; Gregg, P. M.; Amelug, F.

    2015-12-01

    Overpressure within a magma chamber is a key parameter to understanding the onset of an eruption. Recent investigations indicate that surface inflation at a volcanic edifice does not always precede eruption (Chaussard and Amelung, 2012; Biggs et al., 2014), suggesting that the overpressure threshold may differ between volcanoes. To understand the failure conditions of a magma reservoir, mechanical models were developed to quantify the range of overpressure affordable in a reservoir for a given situation. Even if the choice of the failure criterion is still debated, most investigators agree that the overpressure required to fail the magma reservoir is at first order a function of the crustal stress field and the shape of the magma reservoir. Radar interferometry (InSAR) provides a large dataset of ground deformation worldwide, but many of these InSAR studies continue to use point or dislocation sources (Mogi, Okada) to explain deformation on volcanoes. Even if these simple solutions often fit the data and estimate the depth and the volume change of the source of deformation, key parameters such as the magma overpressure or the mechanical properties of the rocks cannot be derived. We use mechanical numerical models of reservoir failure combined with ground deformation data. It has been observed that volume change before an eruption can easily range one or two order of magnitude from 1-100x106 m3. The first goal of this study is to understand which parameter(s) control the critical volume changes just before the failure of the reservoir. First, a parametric study is performed to quantify the effect of the geometry of the reservoir (radius, depth), the local stress (compressive/extensive) and even the crust rheology (elastic/viscoelastic). We then compare modeling results with several active volcanoes where long time series of volume change are available: Okmok and Westdahl in Alaska, Sinabung and Agung in Indonesia and Galapagos. For each case, the maximum

  19. Rubidium dimer destruction by a diode laser

    SciTech Connect

    Ban, T.; Aumiler, D.; Pichler, G.

    2005-02-01

    We observed rubidium dimer destruction by excitation of rubidium vapor with diode laser light tuned across the Rb D{sub 2} resonance line in a 2400 GHz tuning interval. The destruction was measured for rubidium atom concentrations in the (1-9)x10{sup 16} cm{sup -3} range, pump beam power up to 43 mW, and with a 5 Torr of the helium buffer gas. We discuss the physical mechanisms involved and specify the molecular pathways which may effectively lead to the observed dimer destruction.

  20. Earthquake Triggering by Fluid Overpressure at Trident and Novarupta Volcanoes, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prejean, S. G.; Thurber, C. H.; Murphy, R. A.; Pesicek, J. D.

    2011-12-01

    In 2008 the region of Trident and Novarupta volcanoes (TN) in the Katmai volcanic cluster, Alaska, experienced a swarm of small shallow earthquakes in association with a series of deep (>25 km) long-period (DLP) earthquakes. We captured the latter half of the swarm with a dense array of 10 temporary broadband seismometers deployed within the larger-scale permanent network of 20 stations. This level of seismic coverage is exceptional for a remote Alaskan volcano. We computed ~100 first motion fault plane solutions for brittle failure earthquakes in the Katmai region. Roughly 30% of the earthquakes located in the TN area have high quality P-wave polarities that are inconsistent with the best fitting double-couple fault plane solutions. We computed full moment tensors for a subset of these events following Julian and Foulger (Bull. Seis. Soc. Am., v.86, 972-980, 1996) based on P-wave amplitudes and P to SH amplitude ratios. Ray parameters and path-averaged Q corrections used in the inversions were derived from three dimensional velocity and attenuation models. Computed fault plane solutions in the TN region are highly diverse, unlike those of some neighboring Katmai area volcanoes. Results suggest that this area is a normal to strike-slip faulting environment where the vertical effective stress and most compressive horizontal effective stress were roughly equal in magnitude at the time of the swarm. Moment tensor results indicate that the majority of these earthquakes have positive isotropic components, indicative of volume increase, and CLVD components with major dipoles directed outward. These moment tensors are similar to those calculated at several geothermal areas globally and are consistent with simultaneous shear faulting and hydraulic fracturing, as water or gas rapidly intrudes into tensile cracks. Taken together, these observations suggest that earthquakes in the 2008 swarm occur on a complex network of normal and strike-slip faults in a high pore pressure

  1. TECHNOLOGIES FOR CFC/HALON DESTRUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report presents an overview of the current status of possible technologies used to destroy chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and halons chemicals implicated in the destruction of the stratospheric ozone layer. The Montreal Protocol an international treaty to control the production a...

  2. Test of Thermal Transport Models through Dynamic Overpressure Stabilization of Ablation-Front Perturbation Growth in Laser-Driven CH Foils

    SciTech Connect

    Gotchev, O.V.; Goncharov, V.N.; Knauer, J.P.; Boehly, T.R.; Collins, T.J.B.; Epstein, R.; Jaanimagi, P.A.; Meyerhofer, D.D.

    2006-03-24

    Heat-flow-induced dynamic overpressure at the perturbed ablation front of an ICF target can stabilize the ablative Richtmyer/Meshkov-like instability and mitigate the subsequent ablative Rayleigh/Taylor (RT) instability. A series of experiments was performed on the OMEGA laser to quantify the dynamic overpressure stabilization during the shock transit. Analysis of the experimental data using hydrocode simulations shows that the observed oscillatory evolution of the ablation-front perturbations depends on Dc, the size of the thermal conduction zone, and the fluid velocity in the blowoff region Vbl that are sensitive to the thermal transport model used. We show that the simulations match the experiment well when the time dependence of the heat-flux inhibition is taken into account using a recently developed nonlocal heat transport model.

  3. A Novel Chemical Nitrate Destruction Process

    SciTech Connect

    Dziewinski, J.; Marczak, S.

    1999-03-01

    Nitrates represent one of the most significant pollutant discharged to the Baltic Sea by the Sliiamae hydrometallurgical plant. This article contains a brief overview of the existing nitrate destruction technologies followed by the description of a new process developed by the authors. The new chemical process for nitrate destruction is cost effective and simple to operate. It converts the nitrate to nitrogen gas which goes to the atmosphere.

  4. A purely structural restoration of the NFP20-East cross section and potential tectonic overpressure in the Adula nappe (central Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pleuger, Jan; Podladchikov, Yuri Y.

    2014-05-01

    Common extrusion-type models for the high- to ultrahigh-pressure Adula nappe require a major normal fault along the top of this unit which is not conveyed in the structural record. This implies that such a normal fault existed but was completely erased during later deformational stages. However, there is evidence that decompression occurred during top-to-the-foreland thrusting. We performed a new, purely structural kinematic restoration of the central part of the NFP20-East cross section in order to estimate the burial depths of individual units without converting petrological pressure data into depth under the assumption that pressures were lithostatic. The results show that pressures within most of the units were close to but somewhat higher than lithostatic for several stages of the tectono-metamorphic history. Only for the maximum burial stage of the Adula nappe, we estimate local tectonic overpressures of 40 to 80% of the lithostatic pressures. Accepting such an amount of overpressure, which is moderate compared to values theoretically possible, the Adula nappe was probably not subducted to subcrustal depth. We propose that the structural record of the Penninic nappe stack is quite complete and suggest that the decay of tectonic overpressure is a feasible explanation for decompression from eclogite- to amphibolite-facies conditions during thrusting. Consequently, exhumation and convergence rates of the Eocene to Oligocene Alps may be smaller than previously assumed.

  5. Empirical confirmation of creative destruction from world trade data.

    PubMed

    Klimek, Peter; Hausmann, Ricardo; Thurner, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    We show that world trade network datasets contain empirical evidence that the dynamics of innovation in the world economy indeed follows the concept of creative destruction, as proposed by J.A. Schumpeter more than half a century ago. National economies can be viewed as complex, evolving systems, driven by a stream of appearance and disappearance of goods and services. Products appear in bursts of creative cascades. We find that products systematically tend to co-appear, and that product appearances lead to massive disappearance events of existing products in the following years. The opposite-disappearances followed by periods of appearances-is not observed. This is an empirical validation of the dominance of cascading competitive replacement events on the scale of national economies, i.e., creative destruction. We find a tendency that more complex products drive out less complex ones, i.e., progress has a direction. Finally we show that the growth trajectory of a country's product output diversity can be understood by a recently proposed evolutionary model of Schumpeterian economic dynamics. PMID:22719989

  6. Empirical confirmation of creative destruction from world trade data.

    PubMed

    Klimek, Peter; Hausmann, Ricardo; Thurner, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    We show that world trade network datasets contain empirical evidence that the dynamics of innovation in the world economy indeed follows the concept of creative destruction, as proposed by J.A. Schumpeter more than half a century ago. National economies can be viewed as complex, evolving systems, driven by a stream of appearance and disappearance of goods and services. Products appear in bursts of creative cascades. We find that products systematically tend to co-appear, and that product appearances lead to massive disappearance events of existing products in the following years. The opposite-disappearances followed by periods of appearances-is not observed. This is an empirical validation of the dominance of cascading competitive replacement events on the scale of national economies, i.e., creative destruction. We find a tendency that more complex products drive out less complex ones, i.e., progress has a direction. Finally we show that the growth trajectory of a country's product output diversity can be understood by a recently proposed evolutionary model of Schumpeterian economic dynamics.

  7. Empirical Confirmation of Creative Destruction from World Trade Data

    PubMed Central

    Klimek, Peter; Hausmann, Ricardo; Thurner, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    We show that world trade network datasets contain empirical evidence that the dynamics of innovation in the world economy indeed follows the concept of creative destruction, as proposed by J.A. Schumpeter more than half a century ago. National economies can be viewed as complex, evolving systems, driven by a stream of appearance and disappearance of goods and services. Products appear in bursts of creative cascades. We find that products systematically tend to co-appear, and that product appearances lead to massive disappearance events of existing products in the following years. The opposite–disappearances followed by periods of appearances–is not observed. This is an empirical validation of the dominance of cascading competitive replacement events on the scale of national economies, i.e., creative destruction. We find a tendency that more complex products drive out less complex ones, i.e., progress has a direction. Finally we show that the growth trajectory of a country’s product output diversity can be understood by a recently proposed evolutionary model of Schumpeterian economic dynamics. PMID:22719989

  8. Matching Analysis of Socially Appropriate and Destructive Behavior in Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoch, John; Symons, Frank J.

    2007-01-01

    This study examined socially appropriate and destructive behavior in unconstrained natural environments using a matching law analysis (MLA) of real time observational data. The participants were two school-age children and one adult with mild to moderate cognitive disabilities. Event lagged sequential analysis (SQA) provided the obtained rates of…

  9. Primary blast causes mild, moderate, severe and lethal TBI with increasing blast overpressures: Experimental rat injury model

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Vikas; Skotak, Maciej; Schuetz, Heather; Heller, Abi; Haorah, James; Chandra, Namas

    2016-01-01

    Injury severity in blast induced Traumatic Brain Injury (bTBI) increases with blast overpressure (BOP) and impulse in dose-dependent manner. Pure primary blast waves were simulated in compressed gas shock-tubes in discrete increments. Present work demonstrates 24 hour survival of rats in 0–450 kPa (0–800 Pa∙s impulse) range at 10 discrete levels (60, 100, 130, 160, 190, 230, 250, 290, 350 and 420 kPa) and determines the mortality rate as a non-linear function of BOP. Using logistic regression model, predicted mortality rate (PMR) function was calculated, and used to establish TBI severities. We determined a BOP of 145 kPa as upper mild TBI threshold (5% PMR). Also we determined 146–220 kPa and 221–290 kPa levels as moderate and severe TBI based on 35%, and 70% PMR, respectively, while BOP above 290 kPa is lethal. Since there are no standards for animal bTBI injury severity, these thresholds need further refinements using histopathology, immunohistochemistry and behavior. Further, we specifically investigated mild TBI range (0–145 kPa) using physiological (heart rate), pathological (lung injury), immuno-histochemical (oxidative/nitrosative and blood-brain barrier markers) as well as blood borne biomarkers. With these additional data, we conclude that mild bTBI occurs in rats when the BOP is in the range of 85–145 kPa. PMID:27270403

  10. Primary blast causes mild, moderate, severe and lethal TBI with increasing blast overpressures: Experimental rat injury model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Vikas; Skotak, Maciej; Schuetz, Heather; Heller, Abi; Haorah, James; Chandra, Namas

    2016-06-01

    Injury severity in blast induced Traumatic Brain Injury (bTBI) increases with blast overpressure (BOP) and impulse in dose-dependent manner. Pure primary blast waves were simulated in compressed gas shock-tubes in discrete increments. Present work demonstrates 24 hour survival of rats in 0–450 kPa (0–800 Pa•s impulse) range at 10 discrete levels (60, 100, 130, 160, 190, 230, 250, 290, 350 and 420 kPa) and determines the mortality rate as a non-linear function of BOP. Using logistic regression model, predicted mortality rate (PMR) function was calculated, and used to establish TBI severities. We determined a BOP of 145 kPa as upper mild TBI threshold (5% PMR). Also we determined 146–220 kPa and 221–290 kPa levels as moderate and severe TBI based on 35%, and 70% PMR, respectively, while BOP above 290 kPa is lethal. Since there are no standards for animal bTBI injury severity, these thresholds need further refinements using histopathology, immunohistochemistry and behavior. Further, we specifically investigated mild TBI range (0–145 kPa) using physiological (heart rate), pathological (lung injury), immuno-histochemical (oxidative/nitrosative and blood-brain barrier markers) as well as blood borne biomarkers. With these additional data, we conclude that mild bTBI occurs in rats when the BOP is in the range of 85–145 kPa.

  11. Development and maintenance of fluid overpressures in crustal fault zones by elastic compaction and implications for earthquake swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leclère, Henri; Cappa, Frédéric; Faulkner, Daniel; Fabbri, Olivier; Armitage, Peter; Blake, Oshaine

    2015-06-01

    The ability of crustal faults to compact and to pressurize pore fluids is examined by combining geological observations, petrophysical measurements (permeability, P and S wave velocities, and porosity), and fully coupled hydromechanical modeling. A strike-slip fault located in the Argentera-Mercantour crystalline massif (southwestern French-Italian Alps) was analyzed in the field. This mature fault belongs to a large active fault system characterized by a recurrent seismic swarm activity (Mw < 4) between 2 and 12 km depth. The studied exposure corresponds to a 50 m thick anastomosing fault composed of three types of rock: host-rock gneiss, damage-zone phyllonite, and core zone gouge. Laboratory measurements made at effective pressures ranging from 10 to 190 MPa show that the studied fault differs from the classical model and has a high-porosity, high-permeability, and low-rigidity core zone surrounded by a low-porosity, low-permeability, and high-rigidity damage zone with respect to the host rock. The hydraulic and elastic properties are controlled by different microstructures such as foliation, microcracks, and pores developed during the exhumation history of the massif and the reactivation of inherited low-friction mylonitic foliation. Hydromechanical modeling is then used to investigate the spatio-temporal evolution of the fluid overpressures across the fault zone elements in response to elastic compaction. Models demonstrate that fluid pressure can be developed and maintained temporally in the studied fault zone. This study concludes on the key role played by the hydromechanical properties of faults during compaction and provides an explanation for seismic swarm triggering and maintenance.

  12. Primary blast causes mild, moderate, severe and lethal TBI with increasing blast overpressures: Experimental rat injury model.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Vikas; Skotak, Maciej; Schuetz, Heather; Heller, Abi; Haorah, James; Chandra, Namas

    2016-01-01

    Injury severity in blast induced Traumatic Brain Injury (bTBI) increases with blast overpressure (BOP) and impulse in dose-dependent manner. Pure primary blast waves were simulated in compressed gas shock-tubes in discrete increments. Present work demonstrates 24 hour survival of rats in 0-450 kPa (0-800 Pa∙s impulse) range at 10 discrete levels (60, 100, 130, 160, 190, 230, 250, 290, 350 and 420 kPa) and determines the mortality rate as a non-linear function of BOP. Using logistic regression model, predicted mortality rate (PMR) function was calculated, and used to establish TBI severities. We determined a BOP of 145 kPa as upper mild TBI threshold (5% PMR). Also we determined 146-220 kPa and 221-290 kPa levels as moderate and severe TBI based on 35%, and 70% PMR, respectively, while BOP above 290 kPa is lethal. Since there are no standards for animal bTBI injury severity, these thresholds need further refinements using histopathology, immunohistochemistry and behavior. Further, we specifically investigated mild TBI range (0-145 kPa) using physiological (heart rate), pathological (lung injury), immuno-histochemical (oxidative/nitrosative and blood-brain barrier markers) as well as blood borne biomarkers. With these additional data, we conclude that mild bTBI occurs in rats when the BOP is in the range of 85-145 kPa. PMID:27270403

  13. Microfractures due to overpressures caused by thermal cracking in well-sealed upper Devonian reservoirs, deep Alberta basin

    SciTech Connect

    Marquez, X.M.; Mountjoy, E.W.

    1996-04-01

    Microfractures (<1 mm in width) filled with reservoir bitumen occur and crosscut all sedimentary and diagenetic phases in the upper 200 m of the partially to completely dolomitized Upper Devonian (Leduc Formation) Strachan buildup and other buildups in the deep Alberta basin. They display three patterns: (1) subhorizontal, extending from intraskeletal pores and subvertical fractures, (2) radial around vugs and molds, and (3) random in the matrix. Subhorizontal microfracturing is the most common, and radial is the least common. Overpressuring by thermal cracking of crude oil to gas during burial can produce most of the characteristics exhibited by these microfractures: their association with all pore types, bitumen fillings, and relatively late diagenetic timing. Microfractures are restricted to isolated buildups below depths of about 3800 m in the Alberta basin. The lack of microfractures in adjacent gas-bearing and updip buildups along the Rimbey-Meadowbrook reef trend is likely because of the connection of these buildups to a regional conduit system in the underlying Cooking Lake platform, preventing them from developing sufficient pressures. Thermal cracking of crude oil to gas during burial is also indicated by finely and coarsely deformed lamellar textures of the reservoir bitumen that fills the microfractures in the Strachan buildup. This thermal cracking took place during the Late Cretaceous when the buildup was buried deeper than about 3500 m; however, tectonic compression occurred immediately west of these areas during the Late Cretaceous and early Tertiary Laramide orogeny, modifying the stress field. Suprahydrostatic (abnormal) pressures generated during thermal cracking of oil in conjunction with Laramide tectonic compression probably created the microfractures in isolated and effectively scaled reservoirs.

  14. Entropic destruction of a moving heavy quarkonium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadafan, Kazem Bitaghsir; Tabatabaei, Seyed Kamal

    2016-07-01

    Recently it has been shown that the peak of the quarkonium entropy at the deconfinement transition is related to the emergent entropic force which destructs the quarkonium. Using the AdS/CFT correspondence, we consider dissociation of a moving heavy quarkonium by entropic force. For larger distance of quark and antiquark, the entropy of moving quarkonium increases, monotonically. We find that the entropic force destructs the moving quarkonium easier than the static case. By considering the Maxwell charge, we study the effect of the medium on the destruction of heavy quarkonium. It is shown that the quarkonium dissociates easier in the medium. Our results imply that the quarkonium dissociates easier when it moves orthogonal to the plasma wind rather than parallel.

  15. Weapons of mass destruction. Research report

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, M.W.

    1997-04-01

    The policy of mutual destruction limited the use of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) during the Cold War but has much less significance in today`s global environment not only because of multiple regional instability and motivation to acquire, but also increased availability of resources and technologies to build WMD. Proliferation of weapons of mass destruction is a preeminent security threat in the 1990`s. The US has policies and strategies to stem WMD proliferation and to counter the effects of their use. This paper will identify ways to deter threats of WMD against the United States through counterproliferation strategies of counterforce, active defense, and passive defense. Discussion includes aspects which challenge US interests and place greater burden on policymakers. These include politics, economics, technology and the global mindset.

  16. 27 CFR 24.235 - Taxpayment or destruction of spirits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Spirits § 24.235 Taxpayment or destruction of... of tax procedures of 27 CFR 19.522(c). (b) Destruction of spirits. The proprietor who wants to..., the proposed date and method of destruction, and the reason for destruction. Spirits may not...

  17. Protein destruction by atmospheric pressure glow discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, X. T.; Shi, J. J.; Chen, H. L.; Kong, M. G.

    2007-01-01

    It is well established that atmospheric pressure glow discharges are capable of bacterial inactivation. Much less known is their ability to destruct infectious proteins, even though surgical instruments are often contaminated by both bacteria and proteinaceous matters. In this letter, the authors present a study of protein destruction using a low-temperature atmospheric dielectric-barrier discharge jet. Clear evidences of protein removal are presented with data of several complimentary experiments using scanning electron microscopy, electron dispersive x-ray analysis, electrophoresis, laser-induced fluorescence microscopy, and protein reduction kinetics. Considerable degradation is observed of protein fragments that remain on their substrate surface after plasma treatment.

  18. Self-destructive behavior in battered children.

    PubMed

    Green, A H

    1978-05-01

    Fifty-nine physically abused children demonstrated a significantly higher incidence of self-destructive behavior than two control groups of nonabused children, one neglected and one normal. The self-destructive behavior, including suicide attempts and self-mutilation, was potentiated by interrelated variables operating in the abused child and his environment. Often enhanced by the ego deficits and impaired impulse control of the abused children, this behavior seemed to represent a learned pattern originating in early traumatic experiences with hostile primary objects.

  19. Overpressure Contact Printing

    SciTech Connect

    Guo,Q.; Teng,X.; Yang,H.

    2004-09-15

    This paper describes a new method of using elastometric stamps in the fabrication of patterned self-assembled monolayers and nanoparticles. By applying load on top of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) stamps, we showed that new structure arrays of various materials could be generated on silicon wafer and metal substrates through the controlled deformation of elastometric stamps. The feature sizes of the patterns generated by this technique have been shown to be up to an order of a magnitude smaller than those on the stamps. The created patterns also may not exist on the original masters; thus, this approah can be unique in making patterns at a reduced size that can sometimes be hard to fabricate otherwise.

  20. Method for non-destructive testing

    DOEpatents

    Akers, Douglas W.

    2011-08-30

    Non-destructive testing method may include providing a source material that emits positrons in response to bombardment of the source material with photons. The source material is exposed to photons. The source material is positioned adjacent the specimen, the specimen being exposed to at least some of the positrons emitted by the source material. Annihilation gamma rays emitted by the specimen are detected.

  1. Effects of mild TBI from repeated blast overpressure on the expression and extinction of conditioned fear in rats.

    PubMed

    Genovese, R F; Simmons, L P; Ahlers, S T; Maudlin-Jeronimo, E; Dave, J R; Boutte, A M

    2013-12-19

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are pressing medical issues for the Warfighter. Symptoms of mTBI can overlap with those of PTSD, suggesting the possibility of a causal or mediating role of mTBI in PTSD. To address whether mTBI can exacerbate the neurobiological processes associated with traumatic stress, we evaluated the impact of mTBI from a blast overpressure (BOP) on the expression of a conditioned fear. In the rat, conditioned fear models are used to evaluate the emotional conditioning processes that are known to become dysfunctional in PTSD. Rats were first trained on a variable interval (VI), food maintained, operant conditioning task that established a general measure of performance. Inescapable electric shock (IES) was paired with an audio-visual conditioned stimulus (CS) and followed 1day later by three daily exposures to BOP (75kPa). Subsequently, the CS alone was presented once every 7days for 2months, beginning 4days following the last BOP. The CS was presented during the VI sessions allowing a concurrent measure of performance. Treatment groups (n=10, each group) received IES+BOP, IES+sham-BOP, sham-IES+BOP or sham-IES+sham-BOP. As expected, pairing the CS with IES produced a robust conditioned fear that was quantified by a suppression of responding on the VI. BOP significantly decreased the expression of the conditioned fear. No systematic short- or long-term performance deficits were observed on the VI from BOP. These results show that mTBI from BOP can affect the expression of a conditioned fear and suggests that BOP caused a decrease in inhibitory behavioral control. Continued presentation of the CS produced progressively less response suppression in both fear conditioned treatments, consistent with extinction of the conditioned fear. Taken together, these results show that mTBI from BOP can affect the expression of a conditioned fear but not necessarily in a manner that increases the conditioned fear or

  2. Petroleum potential and over-pressuring in the molassic deposits of the south-eastern part of the South Adriatic Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Gjoka, M.; Dulaj, A.

    1995-08-01

    The southeastern portion of the South Adriatic basin extends onshore in Albania and is filled with a sequence of interbedded clays, sandstones and siltstones of Cenozoic age accumulated under turbiditic, slope, shelf, deltaic and, rarely, continental depositional conditions. Geochemical data suggest a fairly uniform vertical and lateral distribution of organic matter, with TOC values ranging from 0.1 to 0.4 wt%. Average organic matter content is 0.28 wt%. Kerogen is predominantly gas-prone, Type IIIa (Huminite-Inertinite) and IIIb (Inertinite-Huminite), and is thermally immature to marginally mature, even at depths of 6000 m. Vitrinite reflectance (Ro) values range from 0.3 to 0.5; the average geothermal gradient of the region is about 16{degrees}C/100 m. Three main gas zones can be recognized in the Pliocene to Middle Miocene (Serravallian) sequence: (1) a biogenic gas zone at depths of 1200-1500 m; (2) a mixed biogenic-thermogenic zone between 1500 and 4500-W m, and, (3) a thermogenic gas zone below 4500-5000 m. Gas is indigenous and has migrated into the sandstone reservoirs from adjacent shales (syngenetic) or deeper sources (syngenetic-long migration). Gas fields discovered to date are associated with crestal culminations and with the eastern flank of structures. The normal hydrostatic gradient for the Neogene sediments is 0.437 Psi/ft, but overpressures have been encountered in numerous wells and are considered a regional phenomenon. The top of the overpressures crosses stratigraphic boundaries. The gradient is gradual and seem to increase in sequences with sandstone content of 15 to 20%. Steep pressure gradients are found on flanks and plunges of structures. Overpressuring is attributed to the very high sedimentation rate (760 m per million year) during the Neogene and resulting undercompacted shales.

  3. Solar power satellite system definition study. Part 2, volume 8: SPS launch vehicle ascent and entry sonic overpressure and noise effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Recoverable launch vehicle concepts for the Solar Power Satellite program were identified. These large launch vehicles are powered by proposed engines in the F-1 thrust level class. A description of the candidate launch vehicles and their operating mode was provided. Predictions of the sonic over pressures during ascent and entry for both types of vehicles, and prediction of launch noise levels in the vicinity of the launch site were included. An overall assessment and criteria for sonic overpressure and noise levels was examined.

  4. Freon destruction in a nanosecond corona discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Akhmedzhanov, R.A.; Vikharev, A.L.; Gorbachev, A.M.

    1995-12-31

    One of the main reasons for destruction of the ozone layer is high content of freon in the Earth atmosphere. The life time of chlorofluorocarbons (CFC) in the stratosphere is tens of years, therefore, along with abandonment of the use of CFC compositions. of importance is the search for efficient ways to purify both industrial gaseous wastes and the atmosphere proper from pollution. Among various purification methods the most promising seems to be the method based on freon destruction during processes of dissociative electron attachment. Freon molecules in this case are destroyed selectively mainly at the stage of plasma decay by cold electrons, for which the constant of dissociative attachment is especially high (k{sub a} = 10{sup -7} - 10{sup -9}cm{sup 3}/s). By that, as the source of electrons we propose using nanosecond discharges with a high level of the reduced electric field, E/N, when the main share of the pulse energy goes into ionization, and gas heating is insignificant. These requirements are best met by the use of barrier and pulse corona discharge, which are widely employed for ozone generation and purification of gaseous wastes. Plasma of such discharges is composed of chaotically arising nanosecond microdischarges. The possibility to purify atmosphere from freons directly by means of a nanosecond microwave discharge produced the troposphere by ground-based sources is also studied. An important problem for the said applications, along with estimation of efficiency of freon destruction is determination of chemical composition of the products that appear at the post-discharge stage as the result of plasma chemical reaction. This presentation gives results of experimental studies of freon destruction in a pulse-periodic nanosecond corona discharge.

  5. Molten salt destruction of base hydrolysate

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, B.E.; Kanna, R.L.; Chambers, R.D.; Upadhye, R.S.; Promeda, C.O.

    1996-10-01

    There is a great need for alternatives to open burn/open detonation of explosives and propellants from dismantled munitions. LANL has investigated the use of base hydrolysis for the demilitarization of explosives. Hydrolysates of Comp B, Octol, Tritonal, and PBXN-109 were processed in the pilot molten salt unit (in building 191). NOx and CO emissions were found to be low, except for CO from PBXN-109 processing. This report describes experimental results of the destruction of the base hydrolysates.

  6. [Self-destructive behavior in African adolescents].

    PubMed

    Sylla, A; Ndiaye, M; Sylla, O; Gueye, M

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze self-destructive behavior in adolescents in Senegal. Based on four case reports the authors stress the central importance of family breakdown in the process leading to this behavior as opposed to the first descriptions implicating an offense against the honor of the group. The vulnerability of teenagers in the absence of structural initiation is also advanced. Systematic intervention may be recommended in such cases.

  7. Sonic-boom measurements in the focus region during the ascent of Apollo 17. [maximum positive overpressure, positive impulse, signature duration, and bow-shock rise time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, H. R.; Hilton, D. A.

    1974-01-01

    Sonic-boom pressure signatures recorded during the ascent phase of Apollo 17 are presented. The measurements were obtained onboard six U.S. Navy ships positioned along the ground track of the spacecraft vehicle in the area of expected focus resulting from the flight path and acceleration of the vehicle. Tracings of the measured signatures are presented along with values of the maximum positive overpressure, positive impulse, signature duration, and bowshock rise time. Also included are brief descriptions of the ships and their location, the deployment of the sonic-boom instrumentation, flight profiles and operating conditions for the launch vehicle and spacecraft, surface-weather and sea-state information at the measuring sites, and high-altitude weather information for the general measurement areas. Comparisons of the measured and predicted sonic-boom overpressures for the Apollo 17 mission are presented. The measured data are also compared with data from the Apollo 15 and 16 missions and data from flight test programs of various aircraft.

  8. Mechanical study of the Chartreuse Fold-and-Thrust Belt: relationships between fluids overpressure and decollement within the Toarcian source-rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthelon, Josselin; Sassi, William; Burov, Evgueni

    2016-04-01

    Many source-rocks are shale and constitute potential detachment levels in Fold-and-Thrust Belts (FTB): the toarcian Schistes-Cartons in the French Chartreuse FTB for example. Their mechanical properties can change during their burial and thermal maturation, as for example when large amount of hydrocarbon fluids are generated. A structural reconstruction of the Chartreuse FTB geo-history places the Toarcian Formation as the major decollement horizon. In this work, a mechanical analysis integrating the fluids overpressuring development is proposed to discuss on the validity of the structural interpretation. At first, an analogue of the Chartreuse Toarcian Fm, the albanian Posidonia Schist, is documented as it can provide insights on its initial properties and composition of its kerogen content. Laboratory characterisation documents the vertical evolution of the mineralogical, geochemical and mechanical parameters of this potential decollement layer. These physical parameters (i.e. Total Organic Carbon (TOC), porosity/permeability relationship, friction coefficient) are used to address overpressure buildup in the frontal part of the Chartreuse FTB with TEMISFlow Arctem Basin modelling approach (Faille et al, 2014) and the structural emplacement of the Chartreuse thrust units using the FLAMAR thermo-mechanical model (Burov et al, 2014). The hydro-mechanical modeling results highlight the calendar, distribution and magnitude of the overpressure that developed within the source-rock in the footwall of a simple fault-bend fold structure localized in the frontal part of the Chartreuse FTB. Several key geological conditions are required to create an overpressure able to fracture the shale-rocks and induce a significant change in the rheological behaviour: high TOC, low permeability, favourable structural evolution. These models highlight the importance of modeling the impact of a diffuse natural hydraulic fracturing to explain fluids propagation toward the foreland within

  9. 9 CFR 51.25 - Proof of destruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Indemnity for Sheep, Goats, and Horses § 51.25 Proof of destruction. The Veterinarian in Charge will accept any of the following documents as proof of destruction: (a) A postmortem report; (b) A meat...

  10. 7 CFR 160.9 - Destructively distilled wood turpentine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Destructively distilled wood turpentine. 160.9 Section... REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS FOR NAVAL STORES General § 160.9 Destructively distilled wood turpentine. The designation “destructively distilled wood turpentine” shall refer to the kind of spirits of...

  11. 7 CFR 160.9 - Destructively distilled wood turpentine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Destructively distilled wood turpentine. 160.9 Section... REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS FOR NAVAL STORES General § 160.9 Destructively distilled wood turpentine. The designation “destructively distilled wood turpentine” shall refer to the kind of spirits of...

  12. 7 CFR 160.9 - Destructively distilled wood turpentine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Destructively distilled wood turpentine. 160.9 Section... REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS FOR NAVAL STORES General § 160.9 Destructively distilled wood turpentine. The designation “destructively distilled wood turpentine” shall refer to the kind of spirits of...

  13. 7 CFR 160.9 - Destructively distilled wood turpentine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Destructively distilled wood turpentine. 160.9 Section... REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS FOR NAVAL STORES General § 160.9 Destructively distilled wood turpentine. The designation “destructively distilled wood turpentine” shall refer to the kind of spirits of...

  14. 7 CFR 160.9 - Destructively distilled wood turpentine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Destructively distilled wood turpentine. 160.9 Section... REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS FOR NAVAL STORES General § 160.9 Destructively distilled wood turpentine. The designation “destructively distilled wood turpentine” shall refer to the kind of spirits of...

  15. Facing towards or Turning away from Destructive Narcissism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn, Denis; Skogstad, Helga

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a detailed theoretical discussion of destructive narcissism in relation to Freud and Rosenfeld and later theorists. In destructive narcissism, the destructiveness is itself idealised and overrides "the vital functions which serve the purpose of self-preservation" (Freud, S., 1914, "On narcissism" S.E. 14: 87)--a feature which…

  16. 32 CFR 644.494 - Donation, abandonment or destruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Donation, abandonment or destruction. 644.494... Land) § 644.494 Donation, abandonment or destruction. (a) General. Improvements may be abandoned... from its sale, or that abandonment or destruction is required by military necessity, or...

  17. 32 CFR 644.494 - Donation, abandonment or destruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Donation, abandonment or destruction. 644.494... Land) § 644.494 Donation, abandonment or destruction. (a) General. Improvements may be abandoned... from its sale, or that abandonment or destruction is required by military necessity, or...

  18. 32 CFR 644.494 - Donation, abandonment or destruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Donation, abandonment or destruction. 644.494... Land) § 644.494 Donation, abandonment or destruction. (a) General. Improvements may be abandoned... from its sale, or that abandonment or destruction is required by military necessity, or...

  19. 32 CFR 644.494 - Donation, abandonment or destruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Donation, abandonment or destruction. 644.494... Land) § 644.494 Donation, abandonment or destruction. (a) General. Improvements may be abandoned... from its sale, or that abandonment or destruction is required by military necessity, or...

  20. 32 CFR 644.494 - Donation, abandonment or destruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Donation, abandonment or destruction. 644.494... Land) § 644.494 Donation, abandonment or destruction. (a) General. Improvements may be abandoned... from its sale, or that abandonment or destruction is required by military necessity, or...

  1. 21 CFR 884.4500 - Obstetric fetal destructive instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Obstetric fetal destructive instrument. 884.4500... Devices § 884.4500 Obstetric fetal destructive instrument. (a) Identification. An obstetric fetal destructive instrument is a device designed to crush or pull the fetal body to facilitate the delivery of...

  2. FIRST 100 T NON-DESTRUCTIVE MAGNET

    SciTech Connect

    J. R. SIMS; ET AL

    1999-10-01

    The first 100 T non-destructive (100 T ND) magnet and power supplies as currently designed are described. This magnet will be installed as part of the user facility research equipment at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL) Pulsed Field Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The 100 T ND magnet will provide a 100 T pulsed field of 5 ms duration (above 90% of full field) in a 15 mm diameter bore once per hour. Magnet operation will be non-destructive. The magnet will consist of a controlled power outer coil set which produces a 47 T platform field in a 225 mm diameter bore. Located within the outer coil set will be a 220 mm outer diameter capacitor powered insert coil. Using inertial energy storage a synchronous motor/generator will provide ac power to a set of seven ac-dc converters rated at 64 MW/80 MVA each. These converters will energize three independent coil circuits to create 170 MJ of field energy in the outer coil set at the platform field of 47 T. The insert will then be energized to produce the balance of the 100 T peak field using a 2.3 MJ, 18 kV (charged to 15 kV), 14.4 mF capacitor bank controlled with solid-state switches. The magnet will be the first of its kind and the first non-destructive, reusable 100 T pulsed magnet. The operation of the magnet will be described along with special features of its design and construction.

  3. Mechanisms of tissue destruction following cryosurgery.

    PubMed Central

    Whittaker, D. K.

    1984-01-01

    Destruction of diseased tissue in situ by means of freezing is well established in many branches of surgery. The tissues are apparently unaltered at thaw but progressive necrosis ensues. There is controversy as to whether tissue death is principally due to the direct effects of freezing or to subsequent ischaemia. Studies at the ultrastructural level show that ice-crystals are formed within the cells during cryosurgery, that resultant cell damage is osmotic rather than mechanical and that microcirculatory changes are secondary in terms of the chronological development of tissue necrosis. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:6435496

  4. Anode materials for electrochemical waste destruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molton, Peter M.; Clarke, Clayton

    1990-01-01

    Electrochemical Oxidation (ECO) offers promise as a low-temperature, atmospheric pressure method for safe destruction of hazardous organic chemical wastes in water. Anode materials tend to suffer corrosion in the intensely oxidizing environment of the ECO cell. There is a need for cheaper, more resistant materials. In this experiment, a system is described for testing anode materials, with examples of several common anodes such as stainless steel, graphite, and platinized titanium. The ECO system is simple and safe to operate and the experiment can easily be expanded in scope to study the effects of different solutions, temperatures, and organic materials.

  5. D.H. Lawrence and modern destructiveness.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, D

    1980-01-01

    This article discusses twentieth century societal destructiveness as reflected in four key prose works by D.H. Lawrence--the novels Sons and Lovers, Women in Love, Lady Chatterley's Lover and the early travel book Twilight in Italy. Sons and Lovers, which projects the young Lawrence persona's struggle between life and death, partly accounts for a deepening sensitivity to life and death in modern society in Lawrence's subsequent works. It is seen that Lawrence's writings depict the perilous trends today towards the mechanization of our fundamental being, and the resultant life-threatening qualities of sensationalism and reduction of the individual inner life. PMID:7008281

  6. Controlling weapons of mass destruction through the rule of law

    SciTech Connect

    Tanzman, E.A.

    1995-08-08

    Many who speak of the end of the Cold War emphasize the improvement in international relations when they speak of the momentous consequences of this event. According to this image, the half century since Trinity has been a period of sparse international communication during which the Eastern and Western blocs hibernated in their isolated dens of security alliances. The emphasis in the phrase ``Cold War`` was on the word ``cold,`` and relations with the former Communist regimes are now ``warm`` by comparison. It is equally valid to consider what has happened to the word ``was` in this highly descriptive phrase. While meaningful international dialogue was in a state of relative lethargy during much of the last fifty years, the military establishments of the Great Powers were actively engaged in using as much force as possible in their efforts to control world affairs, short of triggering a nuclear holocaust. Out of these military postures a tense peace ironically emerged, but the terms by which decisions were made about controlling weapons of mass destruction (i.e., nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons) were the terms of war. The thesis of this paper is that the end of the Cold War marks a shift away from reliance on military might toward an international commitment to controlling weapons,of mass destruction through the ``rule of law.`` Rawls wrote that ``legal system is a coercive order of public rules addressed to rational persons for the purpose of regulating their conduct and providing the framework for social cooperation. The regular and impartial administration of public rules, becomes the rule of law when applied to the legal system.`` Inparticular, Rawls identifies as part of this system of public rules those laws that aim to prevent free riders on the economic system and those that aim to correct such externalities as environmental pollution.``

  7. Longitudinal confocal microscopy imaging of solid tumor destruction following adoptive T cell transfer.

    PubMed

    Schietinger, Andrea; Arina, Ainhoa; Liu, Rebecca B; Wells, Sam; Huang, Jianhua; Engels, Boris; Bindokas, Vytas; Bartkowiak, Todd; Lee, David; Herrmann, Andreas; Piston, David W; Pittet, Mikael J; Lin, P Charles; Zal, Tomasz; Schreiber, Hans

    2013-11-01

    A fluorescence-based, high-resolution imaging approach was used to visualize longitudinally the cellular events unfolding during T cell-mediated tumor destruction. The dynamic interplay of T cells, cancer cells, cancer antigen loss variants, and stromal cells-all color-coded in vivo-was analyzed in established, solid tumors that had developed behind windows implanted on the backs of mice. Events could be followed repeatedly within precisely the same tumor region-before, during and after adoptive T cell therapy-thereby enabling for the first time a longitudinal in vivo evaluation of protracted events, an analysis not possible with terminal imaging of surgically exposed tumors. T cell infiltration, stromal interactions, and vessel destruction, as well as the functional consequences thereof, including the elimination of cancer cells and cancer cell variants were studied. Minimal perivascular T cell infiltrates initiated vascular destruction inside the tumor mass eventually leading to macroscopic central tumor necrosis. Prolonged engagement of T cells with tumor antigen-crosspresenting stromal cells correlated with high IFNγ cytokine release and bystander elimination of antigen-negative cancer cells. The high-resolution, longitudinal, in vivo imaging approach described here will help to further a better mechanistic understanding of tumor eradication by T cells and other anti-cancer therapies. PMID:24482750

  8. Longitudinal confocal microscopy imaging of solid tumor destruction following adoptive T cell transfer

    PubMed Central

    Schietinger, Andrea; Arina, Ainhoa; Liu, Rebecca B; Wells, Sam; Huang, Jianhua; Engels, Boris; Bindokas, Vytas; Bartkowiak, Todd; Lee, David; Herrmann, Andreas; Piston, David W; Pittet, Mikael J; Lin, P Charles; Zal, Tomasz; Schreiber, Hans

    2013-01-01

    A fluorescence-based, high-resolution imaging approach was used to visualize longitudinally the cellular events unfolding during T cell-mediated tumor destruction. The dynamic interplay of T cells, cancer cells, cancer antigen loss variants, and stromal cells—all color-coded in vivo—was analyzed in established, solid tumors that had developed behind windows implanted on the backs of mice. Events could be followed repeatedly within precisely the same tumor region—before, during and after adoptive T cell therapy—thereby enabling for the first time a longitudinal in vivo evaluation of protracted events, an analysis not possible with terminal imaging of surgically exposed tumors. T cell infiltration, stromal interactions, and vessel destruction, as well as the functional consequences thereof, including the elimination of cancer cells and cancer cell variants were studied. Minimal perivascular T cell infiltrates initiated vascular destruction inside the tumor mass eventually leading to macroscopic central tumor necrosis. Prolonged engagement of T cells with tumor antigen-crosspresenting stromal cells correlated with high IFNγ cytokine release and bystander elimination of antigen-negative cancer cells. The high-resolution, longitudinal, in vivo imaging approach described here will help to further a better mechanistic understanding of tumor eradication by T cells and other anti-cancer therapies. PMID:24482750

  9. Complementary Electromagnetic Non-Destructive Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Gui Yun; Wilson, John; Morozov, Maxim

    2011-06-01

    The use of non-destructive evaluation (NDE) for defect detection and failure prediction in structures and specimens is widespread in energy industries, aimed at ageing power plants and pipelines, material degradation, fatigue and radiation damage, etc. At present there are no suitable electromagnetic NDE methods for the measurement and characterization of material degradation, in irradiated samples in particular, which is very important and timely for the nuclear power industry in the UK. This paper reports recent developments in the field of electromagnetic (EM) NDE at Newcastle University, including pulsed eddy current (PEC), pulsed magnetic flux leakage (PMFL), magnetic Barkhausen emission (MBE) and magneto-acoustic emission (MAE). As different EM methods have different strengths, an integrative EM framework is introduced. Case studies through the second round robin tests organized by the Universal Network for Magnetic Non-Destructive Evaluation (UNMNDE), representing eighteen leading research groups worldwide in the area of electromagnetic NDE, are reported. Twelve samples with different ageing times and rolling reduction ratios were tested using different magnetic methods among the UNMNDE members. Based on the studies, the complementary characteristics of electromagnetic techniques for NDE are discussed.

  10. At the cutting edge of VOC destruction

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    Of the 189 substances named as Hazardous Air Pollutants under Title 3 of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, approximately 160 are classified as volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Stationary sources producing as little as 10 tons per year of any listed substance or 25 tons per year of any combination of listed substances are subject to Title 5 permitting regulations. This shifts the focus from larger installations and means that cost-effective VOC control must be made available for sources producing flows under 5,000 cfm at concentrations less than 500 ppm. And, the VOCs must be controlled without producing high NO{sub x} emissions. In response to this need, Alzeta Corp., with support from the Gas Research Institute (GRI), has developed and is testing the Edge Plus+ family of VOC abatement devices. The systems are specially designed for low flows and low concentrations and can be configured to destroy virtually all types of VOCS. The gas-fired systems use thermal destruction units that provide greater than 99.99% destruction and removal efficiency (DRE) over a wide range of concentrations and operating conditions, thus assuring compliance with all existing and proposed regulations. They also produce less than 10 ppm NO{sub x} and CO (less than 0.01 lbs./MMbtu input).

  11. EFFLUENT TREATMENT FACILITY PEROXIDE DESTRUCTION CATALYST TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    HALGREN DL

    2008-07-30

    The 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) main treatment train includes the peroxide destruction module (PDM) where the hydrogen peroxide residual from the upstream ultraviolet light/hydrogen peroxide oxidation unit is destroyed. Removal of the residual peroxide is necessary to protect downstream membranes from the strong oxidizer. The main component of the PDM is two reaction vessels utilizing granular activated carbon (GAC) as the reaction media. The PDM experienced a number of operability problems, including frequent plugging, and has not been utilized since the ETF changed to groundwater as the predominant feed. The unit seemed to be underperforming in regards to peroxide removal during the early periods of operation as well. It is anticipated that a functional PDM will be required for wastewater from the vitrification plant and other future streams. An alternate media or methodology needs to be identified to replace the GAC in the PDMs. This series of bench scale tests is to develop information to support an engineering study on the options for replacement of the existing GAC method for peroxide destruction at the ETF. A number of different catalysts will be compared as well as other potential methods such as strong reducing agents. The testing should lead to general conclusions on the viability of different catalysts and identify candidates for further study and evaluation.

  12. Non-Inflammatory Destructive Periodontal Disease

    PubMed Central

    José Ricardo Kina; Yumi Umeda Suzuki, Thaís; Fumico Umeda Kina, Eunice; Kina, Juliana; Kina, Mônica

    2016-01-01

    Background: Non-Inflammatory Destructive Periodontal Disease (NIDPD), is a severe destructive periodontal disease, that is characterized by the attachment loss and alveolar bone loss, without signs of the gingival inflammation, and the periodontal pocket development. Objective: Despite the fact that various cases of NIDPD have been reported; their etiology and disease evolution is still indefinite, and therefore, are open for discussion. Method: An NIDPD case was studied in order to demonstrate features of the disease, and discuss the possible etiology and treatment. Results: In this clinical case, the etiology of NIDPD seems to be an association of endogenous opportunist bacteria with anatomical aspects, occlusion pattern, emotional stress and mouth breathing condition. Conclusion: In spite of all cases described in the literature are comparable and may have similar etiology as related in this clinical case, additional research is needed to identify and clarify the role of the etiologic factors which determine the disease. PMID:27053968

  13. Abnormal organic-matter maturation in the Yinggehai Basin, South China Sea: Implications for hydrocarbon expulsion and fluid migration from overpressured systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hao, F.; Li, S.; Dong, W.; Hu, Z.; Huang, B.

    1998-01-01

    Three superimposed pressure systems are present in the Yinggehai Basin, South China Sea. A number of commercial, thermogenic gas accumulations have been found in an area in which shale diapirs occur. Because the reservoir intervals are shallow and very young, they must have filled with gas rapidly. The thick (up to 17 km) Tertiary and Quaternary sedimentary succession is dominated by shales, and is not disrupted by major faulting in the study area, a factor which seems to have had an important effect on both hydrocarbon generation and fluid migration. Organic-matter maturation in the deepest, most overpressured compartment has been significantly retarded as a result of the combined effects of excess pressure, the presence of large volumes of water, and the retention of generated hydrocarbons. This retardation is indicated by both kerogen-related parameters (vitrinite reflectance and Rock-Eval T(max)); and also by parameters based on the analysis of soluble organic matter (such as the C15+ hydrocarbon content, and the concentration of isoprenoid hydrocarbons relative to adjacent normal alkanes). In contrast to this, organic-matter maturation in shallow, normally-pressured strata in the diapiric area has been enhanced by hydrothermal fluid flow, which is clearly not topography-driven in origin. As a result, the hydrocarbon generation 'window' in the basin is considerably wider than could be expected from traditional geochemical modelling. These two unusual and contrasting anomalies in organic-matter maturation, together with other lines of evidence, suggest that there was a closed fluid system in the overpressured compartment until shale diapirs developed. The diapirs developed as a result of the intense overpressuring, and their growth was triggered by regional extensional stresses. They served as conduits through which fluids (both water and hydrocarbons) retained in the closed system could rapidly migrate. Fluid migration led to the modification of the thermal

  14. The ongoing dome emplacement and destruction cyclic process at Popocatépetl volcano, Central Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Vazquez, Angel; De la Cruz-Reyna, Servando; Mendoza-Rosas, Ana Teresa

    2016-09-01

    The ongoing eruptive activity of Popocatépetl volcano has been characterized by emplacement and subsequent destruction of a succession of lava domes. Between the onset of the current eruption in 1994 and the time of this submission, 38 episodes of lava dome formation and removal have been identified. Each dome has showed particular features related to the magma extrusion process. Among other manifestations, dome-emplacement events have been usually accompanied by relatively low-intensity, protracted explosions referred to as exhalations. After variable times of residence, emplacements have ended in partial or total destruction of the domes by strong vulcanian explosions that produced sizeable ash plumes, with most of them also ejecting incandescent debris onto the volcano flanks. Here, we present a detailed account for the observed activity related to the domes' growth and destruction, related seismic monitoring signals, and morphological features of the domes based on 19 years of visual observations and image analysis. We then discuss a model for the process of dome growth and destruction and its hazard implications.

  15. Detecting Macroevolutionary Self-Destruction from Phylogenies.

    PubMed

    Bromham, Lindell; Hua, Xia; Cardillo, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    Phylogenetic analyses have lent support to the concept of lineage selection: that biological lineages can have heritable traits that influence their capacity to persist and diversify, and thereby affect their representation in biodiversity. While many discussions have focused on "positive" lineage selection, where stably heritable properties of lineages enhance their diversification rate, there are also intriguing examples that seem to represent "negative" lineage selection, where traits reduce the likelihood that a lineage will persist or speciate. In this article, we test whether a particular pattern of negative lineage selection is detectable from the distributions of the trait on a phylogeny. "Self-destructive" traits are those that arise often but then disappear again because they confer either a raised extinction rate or they are prone to a high rate of trait loss. For such a trait, the reconstructed origins will tend to be dispersed across the tips of the phylogeny, rather than defining large clades of related lineages that all share the trait. We examine the utility of four possible measures of "tippiness" as potential indicators of macroevolutionary self-destruction, applying them to phylogenies on which trait evolution has been simulated under different combinations of parameters for speciation, extinction, trait gain, and trait loss. We use an efficient simulation approach that starts with the required number of tips with and without the trait and uses a model to work "backwards" to construct different possible trees that result in that set of tips. We then apply these methods to a number of case studies: salt tolerance in grasses, color polymorphism in birds of prey, and selfing in nightshades. We find that the relative age of species, measured from tip length, can indicate a reduced speciation rate but does not identify traits that increase the extinction rate or the trait loss rate. We show that it is possible to detect cases of macroevolutionary self-destruction

  16. Detecting Macroevolutionary Self-Destruction from Phylogenies.

    PubMed

    Bromham, Lindell; Hua, Xia; Cardillo, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    Phylogenetic analyses have lent support to the concept of lineage selection: that biological lineages can have heritable traits that influence their capacity to persist and diversify, and thereby affect their representation in biodiversity. While many discussions have focused on "positive" lineage selection, where stably heritable properties of lineages enhance their diversification rate, there are also intriguing examples that seem to represent "negative" lineage selection, where traits reduce the likelihood that a lineage will persist or speciate. In this article, we test whether a particular pattern of negative lineage selection is detectable from the distributions of the trait on a phylogeny. "Self-destructive" traits are those that arise often but then disappear again because they confer either a raised extinction rate or they are prone to a high rate of trait loss. For such a trait, the reconstructed origins will tend to be dispersed across the tips of the phylogeny, rather than defining large clades of related lineages that all share the trait. We examine the utility of four possible measures of "tippiness" as potential indicators of macroevolutionary self-destruction, applying them to phylogenies on which trait evolution has been simulated under different combinations of parameters for speciation, extinction, trait gain, and trait loss. We use an efficient simulation approach that starts with the required number of tips with and without the trait and uses a model to work "backwards" to construct different possible trees that result in that set of tips. We then apply these methods to a number of case studies: salt tolerance in grasses, color polymorphism in birds of prey, and selfing in nightshades. We find that the relative age of species, measured from tip length, can indicate a reduced speciation rate but does not identify traits that increase the extinction rate or the trait loss rate. We show that it is possible to detect cases of macroevolutionary self-destruction

  17. Hypergolic Propellant Destruction Evaluation Cost Benefit Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessel, Kurt

    2010-01-01

    At space vehicle launch sites such as Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB), Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) and Kennedy Space Center (KSC), toxic vapors and hazardous liquid wastes result from the handling of commodities (hypergolic fuels and oxidizers), most notably from transfer operations where fuel and oxidizer are transferred from bulk storage tanks or transfer tankers to space launch vehicles. During commodity transfer at CCAFS and KSC, wet chemical scrubbers (typically containing four scrubbing towers) are used to neutralize fuel saturated vapors from vent systems on tanks and tanker trailers. For fuel vapors, a citric acid solution is used to scrub out most of the hydrazine. Operation of both the hypergolic fuel and oxidizer vapor scrubbers generates waste scrubber liquor. Currently, scrubber liquor from the fuel vapor scrubber is considered non-hazardous. The scrubber liquor is defined as spent citric acid scrubber solution; the solution contains complexed hydrazine I methylhydrazine and is used to neutralize nonspecification hypergolic fuel generated by CCAFS and KSC. This project is a collaborative effort between Air Force Space Command (AFSPC), Space and Missile Center (SMC), the CCAFS, and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to evaluate microwave destruction technology for the treatment of non-specification hypergolic fuel generated at CCAFS and KSC. The project will capitalize on knowledge gained from microwave treatment work being accomplished by AFSPC and SMC at V AFB. This report focuses on the costs associated with the current non-specification hypergolic fuel neutralization process (Section 2.0) as well as the estimated costs of operating a mobile microwave unit to treat non-specification hypergolic fuel (Section 3.0), and compares the costs for each (Section 4.0).The purpose of this document is to assess the costs associated with waste hypergolic fuel. This document will report the costs associated with the current fuel

  18. NON-DESTRUCTIVE FLAW DETECTION APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Stateman, M.J.; Holloway, H.R.

    1957-12-17

    An apparatus is described for the non-destructive detection of flaws in electrical conducting articles. The particular feature of the detection apparatus is that a flaw in the front or back of the test article will not be masked by signals caused by the passage of the end and front of the article through the detection apparatus. The present invention alleviates the above problem by mounting detection coils on directly opposite sides of the test passageway so that the axes of the pickup coils are perpendicular to the axis of an energizing coil through which the article is passed. A flaw in the article will cause a change in the voltage induced in one pickup coil, but passage of the end or front of the article will not produce unequal signals. The signals are compared in appropriate electrical circuitry to actuate a recorder only when unequal signals are present, indicating the presence of a flaw.

  19. Vertebral destruction due to abdominal aortic aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez Viseu Pinheiro, J.F.; Blanco Blanco, J.F.; Pescador Hernández, D.; García García, F.J.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Low back pain is a common cause of medical consultation, and usually supposes a non-malignant prognostic. Presentation of case We report an atypical appearance of low back pain associated to shock and pulsatile abdominal mass that made us diagnose an abdominal aortic aneurysm as reason of vertebral lysis and pain. Discusion Surgical repair of contained AAA should be directed to secondary re-rupture prevention, with an approximate survival near to 100% at selected patients for elective surgery. Consequently, orthopedic surgery for back spine stabilization has to be elective in those cases when vertebral destruction is above 30% and clinic is directly related to spine instability. Conclusion We should consider AAA as other cause of low back pain and routinely examine the abdomen and seek complementary imaging proves when risk factors for AAA are present. PMID:25569196

  20. Accountability and feedback, part IV: destructive feedback.

    PubMed

    Harolds, Jay A

    2013-04-01

    There are times that feedback is destructive rather than helpful to the employee and the organization. Occasionally, this is deliberate, such as when a boss does not like someone for reasons that have nothing to do with his/her performance as an employee, or his/her character. More often, it is inadvertent. This could be due to erroneous information from others or the leader's failure to take the time to adequately observe or supervise others. It could also be due to a lack of understanding of the individual's communication style, or failure to take into account age, cultural, religious, or sex differences. This article addresses some of these issues and what to do about it.

  1. Molten salt destruction of energetic waste materials

    DOEpatents

    Brummond, W.A.; Upadhye, R.S.; Pruneda, C.O.

    1995-07-18

    A molten salt destruction process is used to treat and destroy energetic waste materials such as high explosives, propellants, and rocket fuels. The energetic material is pre-blended with a solid or fluid diluent in safe proportions to form a fluid fuel mixture. The fuel mixture is rapidly introduced into a high temperature molten salt bath. A stream of molten salt is removed from the vessel and may be recycled as diluent. Additionally, the molten salt stream may be pumped from the reactor, circulated outside the reactor for further processing, and delivered back into the reactor or cooled and circulated to the feed delivery system to further dilute the fuel mixture entering the reactor. 4 figs.

  2. Molten salt destruction of energetic waste materials

    DOEpatents

    Brummond, William A.; Upadhye, Ravindra S.; Pruneda, Cesar O.

    1995-01-01

    A molten salt destruction process is used to treat and destroy energetic waste materials such as high explosives, propellants, and rocket fuels. The energetic material is pre-blended with a solid or fluid diluent in safe proportions to form a fluid fuel mixture. The fuel mixture is rapidly introduced into a high temperature molten salt bath. A stream of molten salt is removed from the vessel and may be recycled as diluent. Additionally, the molten salt stream may be pumped from the reactor, circulated outside the reactor for further processing, and delivered back into the reactor or cooled and circulated to the feed delivery system to further dilute the fuel mixture entering the reactor.

  3. Non-destructive testing method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Akers, Douglas W.

    2011-10-04

    Non-destructive testing apparatus may comprise a photon source and a source material that emits positrons in response to bombardment of the source material with photons. The source material is positionable adjacent the photon source and a specimen so that when the source material is positioned adjacent the photon source it is exposed to photons produced thereby. When the source material is positioned adjacent the specimen, the specimen is exposed to at least some of the positrons emitted by the source material. A detector system positioned adjacent the specimen detects annihilation gamma rays emitted by the specimen. Another embodiment comprises a neutron source and a source material that emits positrons in response to neutron bombardment.

  4. Transformational Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denning, Peter J.; Hiles, John E.

    2006-01-01

    Transformational Events is a new pedagogic pattern that explains how innovations (and other transformations) happened. The pattern is three temporal stages: an interval of increasingly unsatisfactory ad hoc solutions to a persistent problem (the "mess"), an offer of an invention or of a new way of thinking, and a period of widespread adoption and…

  5. Maintenance Event

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-07-22

    Time:  08:00 am - 08:30 am EDT Event Impact:  Science Directorate websites will ... outage Thursday morning, 7/24, to perform upgrades to the web environment and are expected to be down for about 30 minutes. ...

  6. Worse than enemies. The CEO's destructive confidant.

    PubMed

    Sulkowicz, Kerry J

    2004-02-01

    The CEO is often the most isolated and protected employee in the organization. Few leaders, even veteran CEOs, can do the job without talking to someone about their experiences, which is why most develop a close relationship with a trusted colleague, a confidant to whom they can tell their thoughts and fears. In his work with leaders, the author has found that many CEO-confidant relationships function very well. The confidants keep their leaders' best interests at heart. They derive their gratification vicariously, through the help they provide rather than through any personal gain, and they are usually quite aware that a person in their position can potentially abuse access to the CEO's innermost secrets. Unfortunately, almost as many confidants will end up hurting, undermining, or otherwise exploiting CEOs when the executives are at their most vulnerable. These confidants rarely make the headlines, but behind the scenes they do enormous damage to the CEO and to the organization as a whole. What's more, the leader is often the last one to know when or how the confidant relationship became toxic. The author has identified three types of destructive confidants. The reflector mirrors the CEO, constantly reassuring him that he is the "fairest CEO of them all." The insulator buffers the CEO from the organization, preventing critical information from getting in or out. And the usurper cunningly ingratiates himself with the CEO in a desperate bid for power. This article explores how the CEO-confidant relationship plays out with each type of adviser and suggests ways CEOs can avoid these destructive relationships.

  7. Destruction of Interstellar Dust in Evolving Supernova Remnant Shock Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, Jonathan D.; Dwek, Eli; Jones, Anthony P.

    2015-01-01

    Supernova generated shock waves are responsible for most of the destruction of dust grains in the interstellar medium (ISM). Calculations of the dust destruction timescale have so far been carried out using plane parallel steady shocks, however that approximation breaks down when the destruction timescale becomes longer than that for the evolution of the supernova remnant (SNR) shock. In this paper we present new calculations of grain destruction in evolving, radiative SNRs. To facilitate comparison with the previous study by Jones et al. (1996), we adopt the same dust properties as in that paper. We find that the efficiencies of grain destruction are most divergent from those for a steady shock when the thermal history of a shocked gas parcel in the SNR differs significantly from that behind a steady shock. This occurs in shocks with velocities 200 km s(exp -1) for which the remnant is just beginning to go radiative. Assuming SNRs evolve in a warm phase dominated ISM, we find dust destruction timescales are increased by a factor of approximately 2 compared to those of Jones et al. (1996), who assumed a hot gas dominated ISM. Recent estimates of supernova rates and ISM mass lead to another factor of approximately 3 increase in the destruction timescales, resulting in a silicate grain destruction timescale of approximately 2-3 Gyr. These increases, while not able resolve the problem of the discrepant timescales for silicate grain destruction and creation, are an important step towards understanding the origin, and evolution of dust in the ISM.

  8. Dry-heat destruction of lipopolysaccharide: dry-heat destruction kinetics.

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, K; Harrison, S J

    1978-01-01

    Dry-heat destruction kinetics of lipopolysaccharides from Escherichia coli, Serratia marcescens, and Salmonella typhosa at 170 to 250 degrees C are described. The destruction rate seems to follow the second order and can be linearized by the equation, log y = a + b . -10cx. Because c is the slope, 1/c = D3. Both a and b are constant at a given temperature and are linear functions of temperature. The D(3)170, D(3)190, D(3)210, D(3)230, and D(3)250 values for E. coli lipopolysaccharide are 251, 99.4, 33.3, 12.3, and 4.99 min, respectively, with a z value of 46.4 min. The D values for lipopolysaccharides from S. marcescens and S. typhosa are not significantly different from those from E. coli lipopolysaccharide. PMID:103502

  9. NON-DESTRUCTIVE SOIL CARBON ANALYZER.

    SciTech Connect

    Wielopolski, Lucian; Hendrey, G.; Orion, I.; Prior, S.; Rogers, H.; Runion, B.; Torbert, A.

    2004-02-01

    This report describes the feasibility, calibration, and safety considerations of a non-destructive, in situ, quantitative, volumetric soil carbon analytical method based on inelastic neutron scattering (INS). The method can quantify values as low as 0.018 gC/cc, or about 1.2% carbon by weight with high precision under the instrument's configuration and operating conditions reported here. INS is safe and easy to use, residual soil activation declines to background values in under an hour, and no radiological requirements are needed for transporting the instrument. The labor required to obtain soil-carbon data is about 10-fold less than with other methods, and the instrument offers a nearly instantaneous rate of output of carbon-content values. Furthermore, it has the potential to quantify other elements, particularly nitrogen. New instrumentation was developed in response to a research solicitation from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE LAB 00-09 Carbon Sequestration Research Program) supporting the Terrestrial Carbon Processes (TCP) program of the Office of Science, Biological and Environmental Research (BER). The solicitation called for developing and demonstrating novel techniques for quantitatively measuring changes in soil carbon. The report includes raw data and analyses of a set of proof-of-concept, double-blind studies to evaluate the INS approach in the first phase of developing the instrument. Managing soils so that they sequester massive amounts of carbon was suggested as a means to mitigate the atmospheric buildup of anthropogenic CO{sub 2}. Quantifying changes in the soils' carbon stocks will be essential to evaluating such schemes and documenting their performance. Current methods for quantifying carbon in soil by excavation and core sampling are invasive, slow, labor-intensive and locally destroy the system being observed. Newly emerging technologies, such as Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy and Near-Infrared Spectroscopy, offer soil

  10. Pore destruction resulting from mechanical thermal expression

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, S.A.; Wheeler, R.A.; Hoadley, A.F.A.

    2007-07-01

    Mechanical thermal expression (MTE) is a dewatering technology ideally suited for the dewatering of internally porous biomaterials. For such materials, the combined application of temperature and compressive force in the MTE process enhances the collapse of the porous structure, resulting in effective water removal. In this article, a comparison of the dewatering of titanium dioxide, which is an ideal incompressible, non-porous material, and lignite, which is a porous plant-based biomaterial, is presented. The comparison is based on the parameters critical to dewatering, namely the material compressibility and the permeability. With the aid of mercury porosimetry results, a detailed discussion of the pore destruction of lignite resulting from MTE processing is presented. It is illustrated that there is a well-defined relationship between the pore size distribution after MTE dewatering and the MTE temperature and pressure. The discussion is extended to an investigation of the effects of MTE processing conditions on the effective and noneffective porosity. The effective porosity is defined as the interconnected porosity, which contributes to flow through the compressed matrix, while the non-effective porosity is the remaining porosity, which does not contribute to flow. It is illustrated that there is a linear relationship in both the effective and non-effective porosity with the total porosity. The linear relationship is independent of the processing conditions. It is also shown that MTE processing collapses the effective and non-effective pores at roughly the same rate.

  11. The preventive destruction of a hazardous asteroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrova, A. G.; Galushina, T. Yu.; Prishchepenko, A. B.; Kholshevnikov, K. V.; Chechetkin, V. M.

    2016-06-01

    One means of countering a hazardous asteroid is discussed: destruction of the object using a nuclear charge. Explosion of such an asteroid shortly before its predicted collision would have catastrophic consequences, with numerous highly radioactive fragments falling onto the Earth. The possibility of exploding the asteroid several years before its impact is also considered. Such an approach is made feasible because the vast majority of hazardous objects pass by the Earth several times before colliding with it. Computations show that, in the 10 years following the explosion, only a negligible number of fragments fall onto the Earth, whose radioactivity has substantially reduced during this time. In most cases, none of these fragments collides with the Earth. Thus, this proposed method for eliminating a threat from space is reasonable in at least two cases: when it is not possible to undergo a soft removal of the object from the collisional path, and to destroy objects that are continually returning to near-Earth space and require multiple removals from hazardous orbits.

  12. Destruction of propellant magazine, November 1982

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tozer, N. H.

    1984-08-01

    Details on the destruction of a propellant magazine are given. The properties of single base propellants are discussed. Although single base propellants have been around for one hundred years, production of this type of propellant in Australia only commenced during World War 2 when appropriate plant and know how were provided under the Lend Lease Scheme. Most of the single base propellants made at Mulwala Explosives Factory have been of the IMR type i.e., single perforated tubular granules with their surface coated with DNT for use in small to medium calibre ammunition. Since production started at Mulwala Explosives Factory in 1944 some fourteen different versions of style of propellant have been manufactured. Four versions only were made up until 1957 and these were identified with an IMR type number matching the US propellants from which they were copied. New varieties introduced since 1957 have been identified with an AR aeries number commencing with AR2001 - the original Australian 7.62 mm rifle propellant.

  13. Detection of weapons of mass destruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjorkholm, Paul J.

    2003-07-01

    High Energy X-ray cargo screening is a mature technology that has proven its value in the detection of contraband material hidden within cargo including fully loaded sea containers. To date high energy screening has been largely applied to manifest verification and to drug detection. However, the dramatic change in world terrorism has altered the application. Now it is essential that weapons of mass destruction (WMD"s) be interdicted with incredibly high accuracy. The implication of a missed detection has gone from loss of revenue or the lowering of the street price of drugs to potentially stopping, at least for some significant time, most world commerce. Screening containers with high energy x-rays (~250+ mm of steel penetration) is capable of detecting all nuclear threats at a fraction of the strategically important mass. The screening operation can be automated so that no human decisions are required with very low false alarms. Finally, the goal of 100% inspection of cargo inbound to the United States from the twenty largest international ports is an achievable goal with hardware costs in the area of that already spent on airport security.

  14. Ductile shear zones can induce hydraulically over-pressured fractures in deep hot-dry rock reservoirs: a new target for geothermal exploration?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrank, C. E.; Karrech, A.; Regenauer-Lieb, K.

    2014-12-01

    It is notoriously difficult to create and maintain permeability in deep hot-dry rock (HDR) geothermal reservoirs with engineering strategies. However, we predict that long-lived, slowly deforming HDR reservoirs likely contain hydraulically conductive, over-pressured fracture systems, provided that (a) the underlying lower crust and/or mantle are not entirely depleted of fluids and (b) the fracture system has not been drained into highly permeable overlying rocks. Such fracture systems could be targeted for the extraction of geothermal energy. Our prediction hinges on the notion that polycrystalline creep through matter transfer by a liquid phase (dissolution-precipitation creep) is a widespread mechanism for extracting fluids from the lower crust and mantle. Such processes - where creep cavities form during the slow, high-temperature deformation of crystalline solids, e.g., ceramics, metals, and rocks - entail the formation of (intergranular) fluid-assisted creep fractures. They constitute micron-scale voids formed along grain boundaries due to incompatibilities arising from diffusion or dislocation creep. Field and laboratory evidence suggest that the process leading to creep fractures may generate a dynamic permeability in the ductile crust, thus extracting fluids from this domain. We employed an elasto-visco-plastic material model that simulates creep fractures with continuum damage mechanics to model the slow contraction of high-heat-producing granites overlain by sedimentary rocks in 2D. The models suggest that deformation always leads to the initiation of a horizontal creep-damage front in the lower crust. This front propagates upwards towards the brittle-ductile transition (BDT) during protracted deformation where it collapses into highly damaged brittle-ductile shear zones. If the BDT is sufficiently shallow or finite strain sufficiently large, these shear zones trigger brittle faults emerging from their tips, which connect to the sub-horizontal damage

  15. 9 CFR 54.7 - Procedures for destruction of animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Procedures for destruction of animals. 54.7 Section 54.7 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT... SCRAPIE Scrapie Indemnification Program § 54.7 Procedures for destruction of animals. (a)...

  16. 9 CFR 54.7 - Procedures for destruction of animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Procedures for destruction of animals. 54.7 Section 54.7 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT... SCRAPIE Scrapie Indemnification Program § 54.7 Procedures for destruction of animals. (a)...

  17. 9 CFR 54.7 - Procedures for destruction of animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Procedures for destruction of animals. 54.7 Section 54.7 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT... SCRAPIE Scrapie Indemnification Program § 54.7 Procedures for destruction of animals. (a)...

  18. 9 CFR 54.7 - Procedures for destruction of animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Procedures for destruction of animals. 54.7 Section 54.7 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT... SCRAPIE Scrapie Indemnification Program § 54.7 Procedures for destruction of animals. (a)...

  19. 27 CFR 25.221 - Voluntary destruction of beer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... beer. 25.221 Section 25.221 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Voluntary Destruction § 25.221 Voluntary destruction of beer. (a) On brewery premises. (1) A brewer may destroy, at the brewery, beer on which the tax has...

  20. 27 CFR 25.221 - Voluntary destruction of beer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... beer. 25.221 Section 25.221 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL BEER Voluntary Destruction § 25.221 Voluntary destruction of beer. (a) On brewery premises. (1) A brewer may destroy, at the brewery, beer on which the tax has...

  1. 27 CFR 25.221 - Voluntary destruction of beer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... beer. 25.221 Section 25.221 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Voluntary Destruction § 25.221 Voluntary destruction of beer. (a) On brewery premises. (1) A brewer may destroy, at the brewery, beer on which the tax has...

  2. 27 CFR 25.221 - Voluntary destruction of beer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... beer. 25.221 Section 25.221 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL BEER Voluntary Destruction § 25.221 Voluntary destruction of beer. (a) On brewery premises. (1) A brewer may destroy, at the brewery, beer on which the tax has...

  3. 50 CFR 28.43 - Destruction of dogs and cats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Destruction of dogs and cats. 28.43 Section 28.43 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... VIOLATIONS OF PARTS 25, 26, AND 27 Impoundment Procedures § 28.43 Destruction of dogs and cats. Dogs and...

  4. 50 CFR 28.43 - Destruction of dogs and cats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Destruction of dogs and cats. 28.43 Section 28.43 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... VIOLATIONS OF PARTS 25, 26, AND 27 Impoundment Procedures § 28.43 Destruction of dogs and cats. Dogs and...

  5. 50 CFR 28.43 - Destruction of dogs and cats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Destruction of dogs and cats. 28.43 Section 28.43 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... VIOLATIONS OF PARTS 25, 26, AND 27 Impoundment Procedures § 28.43 Destruction of dogs and cats. Dogs and...

  6. 19 CFR 191.44 - Destruction under Customs supervision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Destruction under Customs supervision. 191.44 Section 191.44 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) DRAWBACK Rejected Merchandise § 191.44 Destruction under...

  7. 19 CFR 191.25 - Destruction under Customs supervision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Destruction under Customs supervision. 191.25 Section 191.25 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) DRAWBACK Manufacturing Drawback § 191.25 Destruction under...

  8. 9 CFR 54.7 - Procedures for destruction of animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Procedures for destruction of animals. 54.7 Section 54.7 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT... SCRAPIE Scrapie Indemnification Program § 54.7 Procedures for destruction of animals. (a)...

  9. 27 CFR 25.221 - Voluntary destruction of beer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... beer. 25.221 Section 25.221 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Voluntary Destruction § 25.221 Voluntary destruction of beer. (a) On brewery premises. (1) A brewer may destroy, at the brewery, beer on which the tax has...

  10. Destructive Leadership: The Hatfield and McCoy Feud

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparks, George; Wolf, Patricia; Zurick, Andryce M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the phenomenon of destructive leadership using the historical case study of the feud between the Hatfields and McCoys. The characteristics of destructive leadership as well as the consequences of this leadership style are reviewed, examined and analyzed. Utilizing a case from history to shine light on a contemporary problem,…

  11. 19 CFR 147.46 - Voluntary abandonment or destruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Voluntary abandonment or destruction. 147.46 Section 147.46 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Voluntary abandonment or destruction. At any time before or within 3 months after the closing date of...

  12. 19 CFR 147.46 - Voluntary abandonment or destruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Voluntary abandonment or destruction. 147.46 Section 147.46 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Voluntary abandonment or destruction. At any time before or within 3 months after the closing date of...

  13. 19 CFR 147.46 - Voluntary abandonment or destruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Voluntary abandonment or destruction. 147.46 Section 147.46 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Voluntary abandonment or destruction. At any time before or within 3 months after the closing date of...

  14. 19 CFR 147.46 - Voluntary abandonment or destruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Voluntary abandonment or destruction. 147.46 Section 147.46 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Voluntary abandonment or destruction. At any time before or within 3 months after the closing date of...

  15. 19 CFR 147.46 - Voluntary abandonment or destruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Voluntary abandonment or destruction. 147.46 Section 147.46 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Voluntary abandonment or destruction. At any time before or within 3 months after the closing date of...

  16. 27 CFR 24.294 - Destruction of wine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Destruction of wine. 24..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Removal, Return and Receipt of Wine Removals Without Payment of Tax § 24.294 Destruction of wine. (a) General. Wine on bonded wine premises may be destroyed on or off...

  17. Willingness to pay for defense against weapons of mass destruction.

    PubMed

    Mulvaney, J M; LaBarre, D; Pastel, R; Landauer, M

    2001-12-01

    A survey assessed the willingness to pay for defense against weapons of mass destruction. The results were evaluated according to the benefit to society. The results indicated preferences for increased spending on intelligence gathering, training, and equipment. We concluded that the United States is spending less for weapons of mass destruction defense than the sample population was willing to pay.

  18. 50 CFR 28.43 - Destruction of dogs and cats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Destruction of dogs and cats. 28.43 Section 28.43 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... VIOLATIONS OF PARTS 25, 26, AND 27 Impoundment Procedures § 28.43 Destruction of dogs and cats. Dogs and...

  19. 21 CFR 884.4500 - Obstetric fetal destructive instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Obstetric fetal destructive instrument. 884.4500 Section 884.4500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... destructive instrument is a device designed to crush or pull the fetal body to facilitate the delivery of...

  20. 49 CFR 15.19 - Destruction of SSI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Destruction of SSI. 15.19 Section 15.19... Destruction of SSI. (a) DOT. Subject to the requirements of the Federal Records Act (5 U.S.C. 105), including... essential transactions, DOT destroys SSI when no longer needed to carry out the agency's function. (b)...

  1. 49 CFR 1520.19 - Destruction of SSI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Destruction of SSI. 1520.19 Section 1520.19... SECURITY INFORMATION § 1520.19 Destruction of SSI. (a) DHS. Subject to the requirements of the Federal... agency's policies, decisions, and essential transactions, DHS destroys SSI when no longer needed to...

  2. 27 CFR 479.24 - Destructive device determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2012-04-01 2010-04-01 true Destructive device determination. 479.24 Section 479.24 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION MACHINE GUNS, DESTRUCTIVE...

  3. 27 CFR 479.24 - Destructive device determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Destructive device determination. 479.24 Section 479.24 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION MACHINE GUNS, DESTRUCTIVE...

  4. 27 CFR 479.24 - Destructive device determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Destructive device determination. 479.24 Section 479.24 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION MACHINE GUNS, DESTRUCTIVE...

  5. 27 CFR 479.24 - Destructive device determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Destructive device determination. 479.24 Section 479.24 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION MACHINE GUNS, DESTRUCTIVE...

  6. 27 CFR 479.24 - Destructive device determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Destructive device determination. 479.24 Section 479.24 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION MACHINE GUNS, DESTRUCTIVE...

  7. 25 CFR 43.8 - Destruction of records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Destruction of records. 43.8 Section 43.8 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION MAINTENANCE AND CONTROL OF STUDENT RECORDS IN BUREAU SCHOOLS § 43.8 Destruction of records. This part does not prevent educational institutions...

  8. 25 CFR 43.8 - Destruction of records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Destruction of records. 43.8 Section 43.8 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EDUCATION MAINTENANCE AND CONTROL OF STUDENT RECORDS IN BUREAU SCHOOLS § 43.8 Destruction of records. This part does not prevent educational institutions...

  9. 50 CFR 28.43 - Destruction of dogs and cats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Destruction of dogs and cats. 28.43 Section 28.43 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... VIOLATIONS OF PARTS 25, 26, AND 27 Impoundment Procedures § 28.43 Destruction of dogs and cats. Dogs and...

  10. 10 CFR 52.10 - Attacks and destructive acts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Attacks and destructive acts. 52.10 Section 52.10 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND APPROVALS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS General Provisions § 52.10 Attacks and destructive acts. Neither an applicant for a license to...

  11. 10 CFR 52.10 - Attacks and destructive acts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Attacks and destructive acts. 52.10 Section 52.10 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND APPROVALS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS General Provisions § 52.10 Attacks and destructive acts. Neither an applicant for a license to...

  12. 10 CFR 52.10 - Attacks and destructive acts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Attacks and destructive acts. 52.10 Section 52.10 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND APPROVALS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS General Provisions § 52.10 Attacks and destructive acts. Neither an applicant for a license to...

  13. 10 CFR 52.10 - Attacks and destructive acts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Attacks and destructive acts. 52.10 Section 52.10 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND APPROVALS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS General Provisions § 52.10 Attacks and destructive acts. Neither an applicant for a license to...

  14. 10 CFR 52.10 - Attacks and destructive acts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Attacks and destructive acts. 52.10 Section 52.10 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES, CERTIFICATIONS, AND APPROVALS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS General Provisions § 52.10 Attacks and destructive acts. Neither an applicant for a license to...

  15. Self-Destructive Behavior in People with Dissociative Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saxe, Glenn N.; Chawla, Neharika; Van der Kolk, Bessel

    2002-01-01

    Study assesses self-destructive behavior in a group of inpatients who have dissociative disorders compared to those who report few dissociative symptoms. Results reveal that these patients more frequently engage in self-destructive behaviors, use more methods of self-injury, and begin to injure themselves at an earlier age then patients who do not…

  16. Self-destructive behavior in the substance abuser.

    PubMed

    Galanter, M; Castaneda, R

    1985-06-01

    This article considers some of the psychophysiologic mechanisms that underlie the driven, apparently self-destructive behavior of addicted persons. The authors review the available literature on the association between suicidal behavior and substance abuse. These issues are discussed in the context of the epidemiology and phenomenology of self-destructive behavior.

  17. Horseradish Peroxidase Inactivation: Heme Destruction and Influence of Polyethylene Glycol

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Liang; Luo, Siqiang; Huang, Qingguo; Lu, Junhe

    2013-01-01

    Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) mediates efficient conversion of many phenolic contaminants and thus has potential applications for pollution control. Such potentially important applications suffer however from the fact that the enzyme becomes quickly inactivated during phenol oxidation and polymerization. The work here provides the first experimental data of heme consumption and iron releases to support the hypothesis that HRP is inactivated by heme destruction. Product of heme destruction is identified using liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry. The heme macrocycle destruction involving deprivation of the heme iron and oxidation of the 4-vinyl group in heme occurs as a result of the reaction. We also demonstrated that heme consumption and iron releases resulting from HRP destruction are largely reduced in the presence of polyethylene glycol (PEG), providing the first evidence to indicate that heme destruction is effectively suppressed by co-dissolved PEG. These findings advance a better understanding of the mechanisms of HRP inactivation. PMID:24185130

  18. [Immune molecules and the mechanism of joint destruction].

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Noriko

    2016-05-01

    Inflammation and joint destruction are the major symptom of rheumatoid arthritis(RA).Inflammation leads to osteoclast differentiation, resulting in bone destruction. Immune-related molecules such as inflammatory cytokines not only exacerbate inflammation but also bone destruction in RA. In vivo analysis using animal models of RA has contributed to the identification of synovial fibroblasts as a major osteoclastogenic cell type and a synergy between a novel Th17 subset and synovial fibroblasts as one of the primary axes in the joint destruction. Increasing numbers of immune-regulating factors including immune-complexes have been identified as new bone-regulating factors and are attractive therapeutic targets for bone destruction in RA.

  19. Manipulation of self-destruction in three retarded children.

    PubMed

    Lovaas, O I; Simmons, J Q

    1969-01-01

    The study attempted to isolate some of the environmental conditions that controlled the self-destructive behavior of three severely retarded and psychotic children. In the extinction study subjects were placed in a room where they were allowed to hurt themselves, isolated from interpersonal contact. They eventually ceased to hurt themselves in that situation, the rate of self-destruction falling gradually over successive days. In the punishment study, subjects were administered painful electric shock contingent on the self-destructive behavior. (1) The self-destructive behavior was immediately suppressed. (2) The behavior recurred when shock was removed. (3) The suppression was selective, both across physical locales and interpersonal situations, as a function of the presence of shock. (4) Generalized effects on other, non-shock behaviors, appeared in a clinically desirable direction. Finally, a study was reported where self-destructive behavior increased when certain social attentions were given contingent upon that behavior. PMID:16795215

  20. VOC Destruction by Catalytic Combustion Microturbine

    SciTech Connect

    Tom Barton

    2009-03-10

    This project concerned the application of a catalytic combustion system that has been married to a micro-turbine device. The catalytic combustion system decomposes the VOC's and transmits these gases to the gas turbine. The turbine has been altered to operate on very low-level BTU fuels equivalent to 1.5% methane in air. The performance of the micro-turbine for VOC elimination has some flexibility with respect to operating conditions, and the system is adaptable to multiple industrial applications. The VOC source that was been chosen for examination was the emissions from coal upgrading operations. The overall goal of the project was to examine the effectiveness of a catalytic combustion based system for elimination of VOCs while simultaneously producing electrical power for local consumption. Project specific objectives included assessment of the feasibility for using a Flex-Microturbine that generates power from natural gas while it consumes VOCs generated from site operations; development of an engineering plan for installation of the Flex-Microturbine system; operation of the micro-turbine through various changes in site and operation conditions; measurement of the VOC destruction quantitatively; and determination of the required improvements for further studies. The micro-turbine with the catalytic bed worked effectively to produce power on levels of fuel much lower than the original turbine design. The ability of the device to add or subtract supplemental fuel to augment the amount of VOC's in the inlet air flow made the device an effective replacement for a traditional flare. Concerns about particulates in the inlet flow and the presence of high sulfur concentrations with the VOC mixtures was identified as a drawback with the current catalytic design. A new microturbine design was developed based on this research that incorporates a thermal oxidizer in place of the catalytic bed for applications where particulates or contamination would limit the lifetime of

  1. Cryogenic Storage Tank Non-Destructive Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arens, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the work in non-destructive evaluation (NDE) of cryogenic storage tanks. Four large cryogenic tanks, constructed in 1965 with perlite insulation in the annular regions, are of concern. The construction of the tanks, two Liquid Oxygen (LOX) and two Liquid Hydrogen (LH2), are described. The loss rate for the LOX tank at Pad A is slightly higher than that for the one at Pad B. The concerns for the LH2 tank at Pad B are that there is a significantly higher boil-off rate than that at Pad A, that there is mold growth, indicative of increased heat flow, that there is a long down-time needed for repairs, and that 3 of 5 full thermal cycles have been used on the Pad B LH2 tank. The advantages and disadvantages of thermal imaging are given. A detailed description of what is visible of the structures in the infra-red is given and views of the thermal images are included. Missing Perlite is given as the probable cause of the cold spot on the Pad B LH2 tank. There is no indications of problematic cold regions on the Pad A LH2 tank, as shown by the thermal images given in the presentation. There is definite indication of a cold region on the Pad A LOX tank. There is however concerns with thermal imaging, as thermal images can be significantly effected by environmental conditions, image differences on similar days but with different wind speeds. Other effects that must be considered include ambient temperature, humidity levels/dew, and cloud reflections

  2. PROCESSING ALTERNATIVES FOR DESTRUCTION OF TETRAPHENYLBORATE

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, D; Thomas Peters, T; Samuel Fink, S

    2007-02-27

    Two processes were chosen in the 1980's at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to decontaminate the soluble High Level Waste (HLW). The In Tank Precipitation (ITP) process (1,2) was developed at SRS for the removal of radioactive cesium and actinides from the soluble HLW. Sodium tetraphenylborate was added to the waste to precipitate cesium and monosodium titanate (MST) was added to adsorb actinides, primarily uranium and plutonium. Two products of this process were a low activity waste stream and a concentrated organic stream containing cesium tetraphenylborate and actinides adsorbed on monosodium titanate (MST). A copper catalyzed acid hydrolysis process was built to process (3, 4) the Tank 48H cesium tetraphenylborate waste in the SRS's Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Operation of the DWPF would have resulted in the production of benzene for incineration in SRS's Consolidated Incineration Facility. This process was abandoned together with the ITP process in 1998 due to high benzene in ITP caused by decomposition of excess sodium tetraphenylborate. Processing in ITP resulted in the production of approximately 1.0 million liters of HLW. SRS has chosen a solvent extraction process combined with adsorption of the actinides to decontaminate the soluble HLW stream (5). However, the waste in Tank 48H is incompatible with existing waste processing facilities. As a result, a processing facility is needed to disposition the HLW in Tank 48H. This paper will describe the process for searching for processing options by SRS task teams for the disposition of the waste in Tank 48H. In addition, attempts to develop a caustic hydrolysis process for in tank destruction of tetraphenylborate will be presented. Lastly, the development of both a caustic and acidic copper catalyzed peroxide oxidation process will be discussed.

  3. NITRATE DESTRUCTION LITERATURE SURVEY AND EVALUATION CRITERIA

    SciTech Connect

    Steimke, J.

    2011-02-01

    This report satisfies the initial phase of Task WP-2.3.4 Alternative Sodium Recovery Technology, Subtask 1; Develop Near-Tank Nitrate/Nitrite Destruction Technology. Some of the more common anions in carbon steel waste tanks at SRS and Hanford Site are nitrate which is corrosive, and nitrite and hydroxide which are corrosion inhibitors. At present it is necessary to periodically add large quantities of 50 wt% caustic to waste tanks. There are three primary reasons for this addition. First, when the contents of salt tanks are dissolved, sodium hydroxide preferentially dissolves and is removed. During the dissolution process the concentration of free hydroxide in the tank liquid can decrease from 9 M to less than 0.2 M. As a result, roughly half way through the dissolution process large quantities of sodium hydroxide must be added to the tank to comply with requirements for corrosion control. Second, hydroxide is continuously consumed by reaction with carbon dioxide which occurs naturally in purge air used to prevent buildup of hydrogen gas inside the tanks. The hydrogen is generated by radiolysis of water. Third, increasing the concentration of hydroxide increases solubility of some aluminum compounds, which is desirable in processing waste. A process that converts nitrate and nitrite to hydroxide would reduce certain costs. (1) Less caustic would be purchased. (2) Some of the aluminum solid compounds in the waste tanks would become more soluble so less mass of solids would be sent to High Level Vitrification and therefore it would be not be necessary to make as much expensive high level vitrified product. (3) Less mass of sodium would be fed to Saltstone at SRS or Low Level Vitrification at Hanford Site so it would not be necessary to make as much low level product. (4) At SRS less nitrite and nitrate would be sent to Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) so less formic acid would be consumed there and less hydrogen gas would be generated. This task involves

  4. Operation Hardtack. Project 1. 9. Loading on buried simulated structures in high-overpressure regions. Report for April-October 1958

    SciTech Connect

    Bultmann, E.H.; McDonough, G.F.; Sinnamon, G.K.

    1984-10-31

    The objective of this project was to study some of the factors affecting the transmission of air-blast-induced pressure through soil and the loading produced on buried structures by such pressures in the high-pressure region (approximately 250 psi). Factors studied were: (1) the attenuation of pressure in a sand deposit when the water table is a few feet below the ground surface; (2) the effect of duration of positive phase of blast on the pressure transmitted through such a soil; (3) the effect of structure flexibility on the pressure acting on structures buried in such a soil; and (4) the relationship between horizontal and vertical pressures in such a soil. The project employed 43 devices, each a rigid cylinder having one rigid end and one deformable-diaphragm end. The devices were buried at depths ranging from 0 to 20 feet at each of two locations at the Eniwetok Proving Ground. The locations were chosen to give a predicted ground surface overpressure of about 250 psi from each of two shots, Cactus and Koa.

  5. Identification of victims in extreme events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talipova, Yu.; Polukhina, O.

    2009-04-01

    Catastrophic natural disasters including tsunami events are increased the frequency in last years. One of very important problems here is the identification of personality of the victims. Due to difficult identification of the dead bodies lied into water for a long time the analysis of tooth-jaw system is proposed to apply because teeth are extremely stable to the destructive actions of environment. The method of identification of the age, sex and race of victims based on the mathematic model of pattern recognition and collected database is described. Some examples from extreme sea wave events are analyzed.

  6. Axon Self-Destruction: New Links among SARM1, MAPKs, and NAD+ Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gerdts, Josiah; Summers, Daniel W; Milbrandt, Jeffrey; DiAntonio, Aaron

    2016-02-01

    Wallerian axon degeneration is a form of programmed subcellular death that promotes axon breakdown in disease and injury. Active degeneration requires SARM1 and MAP kinases, including DLK, while the NAD+ synthetic enzyme NMNAT2 prevents degeneration. New studies reveal that these pathways cooperate in a locally mediated axon destruction program, with NAD+ metabolism playing a central role. Here, we review the biology of Wallerian-type axon degeneration and discuss the most recent findings, with special emphasis on critical signaling events and their potential as therapeutic targets for axonopathy. PMID:26844829

  7. Events diary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-01-01

    as Imperial College, the Royal Albert Hall, the Royal College of Art, the Natural History and Science Museums and the Royal Geographical Society. Under the heading `Shaping the future together' BA2000 will explore science, engineering and technology in their wider cultural context. Further information about this event on 6 - 12 September may be obtained from Sandra Koura, BA2000 Festival Manager, British Association for the Advancement of Science, 23 Savile Row, London W1X 2NB (tel: 0171 973 3075, e-mail: sandra.koura@britassoc.org.uk ). Details of the creating SPARKS events may be obtained from creating.sparks@britassoc.org.uk or from the website www.britassoc.org.uk . Other events 3 - 7 July, Porto Alegre, Brazil VII Interamerican conference on physics education: The preparation of physicists and physics teachers in contemporary society. Info: IACPE7@if.ufrgs.br or cabbat1.cnea.gov.ar/iacpe/iacpei.htm 27 August - 1 September, Barcelona, Spain GIREP conference: Physics teacher education beyond 2000. Info: www.blues.uab.es/phyteb/index.html

  8. Construction and destruction of some North American cratons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, D. B.; Humphreys, G.

    2015-12-01

    Construction histories of Archean cratons remain poorly understood; their destruction is even less clear because of, by definition, its rarity. By assembling geophysical and geochemical data in 3-D lithosphere models, a clearer understanding of the geometry of major structures within the Rae, Slave and Wyoming cratons of central North America is now possible. Little evidence exists of subducted slabs similar to modern oceanic lithosphere in these construction histories whereas underthrusting and wedging of proto-continental lithosphere is inferred from multiple dipping discontinuities. Archean continental building blocks may resemble the modern lithosphere of Ontong-Java-Hikurangi oceanic plateau. Radiometric dating of xenoliths provides estimates of rock types and ages at depth beneath sparse kimberlite occurrences. These ages can be correlated to surface rocks. The 3.6-2.6 Ga Rae, Slave and Wyoming cratons comprise smaller continental terranes that 'cratonized' during a granitic bloom at 2.61-2.55 ga. Cratonization probably represents the final differentiation of early crust into a relatively homogeneous, uniformly thin (35-42 km), tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite crust with pyroxenite layers near the Moho atop depleted lithospheric mantle. Peak thermo-tectonic events at 1.86-1.7 Ga broadly metasomatized, mineralized and recrystallized mantle and lower crustal rocks, apparently making mantle peridotite more 'fertile' and conductive by introducing or concentrating sulfides or graphite throughout the lithosphere at 80-120 km depths. This metasomatism may have also weakened the lithosphere or made it more susceptible to tectonic or chemical erosion. The arrival of the subducted Shatsky Rise conjugate at the Wyoming craton at 65-75 Ma appears to have eroded and displaced the thus weakened base of the craton below 140-160 km. This replaced old refertilized continental mantle with new depleted oceanic mantle. Is this the same craton?

  9. Thermodynamic Profiles of the Destructive June 2012 Derecho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.; Novakovskaia, E.; Bosse, J.; Ware, R.; Stillman, D.; Sloop, C.; Blanchette, L.; Demoz, B.; Nelson, M.; Cooper, L.; Czarnetzki, A.; Reehorst, A.

    2012-12-01

    The June 2012 mid-Atlantic and Midwest Derecho was one of the most destructive and deadly fast-moving severe thunderstorm events in North American history. The derecho produced wind gusts approaching 100 miles per hour as it traveled more than 600 miles across large sections of the Midwestern United States, the central Appalachians and the Mid-Atlantic States on the afternoon and evening of June 29, 2012 and into the early morning of June 30, 2012. It produced hurricane-like impacts with little warning, resulting in more than 20 deaths, widespread damage and millions of power outages across the entire affected region. We present continuous temperature and moisture profiles observed by microwave radiometers, and derived forecast indices, along the storm path at locations in Iowa, Ohio and Maryland, providing unique perspective on the evolution of this historic storm. For example, an extreme CAPE value of 5,000 J/kg was derived from radiometer observations at Germantown, Maryland ten hours before storm passage, and 80 knot Wind Index (WINDEX) was derived seven hours before passage. The Germantown radiometer is operated as part of the Earth Networks Boundary Layer Network (BLN) for continuous thermodynamic monitoring of the planetary boundary layer up to 30,000 feet. The BLN uses Radiometrics microwave profilers providing continuous temperature and humidity soundings with radiosonde-equivalent observation accuracy, and unique liquid soundings. This case study illustrates the promise for severe storm forecast improvement based on continuous monitoring of temperature and moisture in the boundary layer and above.

  10. Weapons of Mass Destruction Technology Evaluation and Training Range

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Larry Young

    2009-05-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has a long history for providing technology evaluation and training for military and other federal level Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) response agencies. Currently there are many federal organizations and commercial companies developing technologies related to detecting, assessing, mitigating and protecting against hazards associated with a WMD event. Unfortunately, very few locations exist within the United States where WMD response technologies are realistically field tested and evaluated using real chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and explosive materials. This is particularly true with biological and radiological hazards. Related to this lack of adequate WMD, multi-hazard technology testing capability is the shortage of locations where WMD response teams can train using actual chemical, biological, and radiological material or highly realistic simulates. In response to these technology evaluation and training needs, the INL has assembled a consortium of subject matter experts from existing programs and identified dedicated resources for the purpose of establishing an all-hazards, WMD technology evaluation and training range. The author describes the challenges associated with creating the all-hazards WMD technology evaluation and training range and lists the technical, logistical and financial benefits of an all-hazards technology evaluation and training range. Current resources and capabilities for conducting all-hazard technology evaluation and training at the INL are identified. Existing technology evaluation and training programs at the INL related to radiological, biological and chemical hazards are highlighted, including successes and lessons learned. Finally, remaining gaps in WMD technology evaluation and training capabilities are identified along with recommendations for closing those gaps.

  11. Frequency of egg and nestling destruction by female brown-headed cowbirds at grassland nests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Granfors, Diane A.; Pietz, Pamela J.; Joyal, Lisa A.

    2001-01-01

    Researchers have suggested that Brown-headed Cowbirds (Molothrus ater) destroy nest contents of potential hosts to induce renesting and thus enhance future opportunities for parasitism. Although cowbird destruction of passerine nests has been witnessed and surmised, few data are available on frequency of those events. We used miniature video-cameras at nests of grassland passerines and documented partial or complete destruction of eggs or nestlings by cowbirds at 7 of 132 nests monitored with cameras. At least three of the seven cases appeared to be attempts to totally destroy the nest contents; those cowbirds did not appear to be motivated by food or an intent to parasitize the nest. Three cases probably were associated with parasitism, but two involved egg removal late in incubation and the third was unusually destructive. Cowbirds were responsible for 24% of egg losses and 5% of nestling losses caused by predators. The importance of cowbirds as an agent of egg and nestling loss undoubtedly varies among sites and years, but it should not be overlooked.

  12. Destructive spondylarthropathy in hemodialyzed patients. A new syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kuntz, D; Naveau, B; Bardin, T; Drueke, T; Treves, R; Dryll, A

    1984-04-01

    Spinal radiologic lesions suggestive of destructive spondylarthropathy were found in 10 patients on long-term hemodialysis. These lesions were characterized by severe narrowing of the intervertebral disc, associated with erosions and geodes of the adjacent vertebral plates without osteophytosis. In 9 of the 10 patients the lesions were located in the cervical spine, and in 1 patient, in the lumbar spine. Microbial spondylitis, degenerative disc disease, and destructive spondylarthropathy of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease were each, in turn, ruled out. The finding of apatite crystals by transmission electron microscopy in 1 disc specimen suggests that these crystals may be associated with destructive vertebral disc lesions in dialysis patients.

  13. Some social contexts of self-destructive behavior.

    PubMed

    Edelson, S M; Taubman, M T; Lovaas, O I

    1983-06-01

    This study investigated the social context of self-injurious behavior in autistic, schizophrenic, and mentally retarded children residing in a state hospital. Social interactions between subjects and staff were recorded along with subjects' self-destructive behavior. The results showed a substantial increase in self-destructive behavior following the staff's presentation of demands, denials, and punishments in 19 of the 20 subjects. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that self-injurious behavior is a social behavior, which is determined by persons in the environment. In addition, the self-destructive behavior of one subject may have been largely self-stimulatory in nature.

  14. Chronic self-destructive behavior in normative and delinquent adolescents.

    PubMed

    Dolin, I H; Kelly, D B; Beasley, T M

    1992-03-01

    The Chronic Self-Destructiveness Scale (CSDS) and the Psychopathic Deviate and Hypomania scales of the MMPI were administered to 112 delinquent adolescents and to 141 high-school students. Both male and female delinquents reported significantly higher levels of chronic self-destructiveness. Significant positive correlations between the CSDS and the MMPI scales were found for all groups. The results indicate that delinquent males have high levels of chronic self-destructiveness attributable to these personality variables; however, other cultural variables may intervene. The results for delinquent females were similar to those of high-school males. Thus, these findings raise questions about societal influences and the definitions of delinquent behavior.

  15. Thermal destruction of vessels with liquid upon heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zverev, V. G.; Goldin, V. D.; Svetashkov, A. A.

    2016-04-01

    A new engineering technique of calculating the heating and thermal destruction of vessels containing liquid under extreme thermal loading conditions is offered. The heating of the shell and the internal vessel volume is described on the basis of the thermodynamic approach. The pressure growth in a vessel is a result of gas heating and liquid evaporation. Stresses within the shell and its destruction conditions are determined, which allows predicting the critical time of destruction upon heating. The calculation and experimental data for pressure growth inside the vessel are in good agreement.

  16. Tank 50H Tetraphenylborate Destruction Results

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, T.B.

    2003-10-03

    We conducted several scoping tests with both Tank 50H surrogate materials (KTPB and phenol) as well as with actual Tank 50H solids. These tests examined whether we could destroy the tetraphenylborate in the surrogates or actual Tank 50H material either by use of Fenton's Reagent or by hydrolysis (in Tank 50H conditions at a maximum temperature of 50 degrees C) under a range of conditions. The results of these tests showed that destruction of the solids occurred only under a minority of conditions. (1)Using Fenton's Reagent and KTPB as the Tank 50H surrogate, no reaction occurred at pH ranges greater than 9. (2)Using Fenton's Reagent and phenol as the Tank 50H surrogate, no reaction occurred at a pH of 14. (3)Using Fenton's Reagent and actual Tank 50H slurry, a reaction occurred at a pH of 9.5 in the presence of ECC additives. (4)Using Fenton's Reagent and actual Tank 50H slurry, after a thirty three day period, all attempts at hydrolysis (at pH 14) were too slow to be viable. This happened even in the case of higher temperature (50 degrees C) and added (100 ppm) copper. Tank 50H is scheduled to return to HLW Tank Farm service with capabilities of transferring and receiving salt supernate solutions to and from the Tank Farms and staging feed for the Saltstone Facility. Before returning Tank 50H to Tank Farm service as a non-organic tank, less than 5 kg of TPB must remain in Tank 50H. Recently, camera inspections in Tank 50H revealed two large mounds of solid material, one in the vicinity of the B5 Riser Transfer Pump and the other on the opposite side of the tank. Personnel sampled and analyzed this material to determine its composition. The sample analysis indicated presence of a significant quantity of organics in the solid material. This quantity of organic material exceeds the 5 kg limit for declaring only trace amounts of organic material remain in Tank 50H. Additionally, these large volumes of solids, calculated as approximately 61K gallons, present other

  17. Low-density lipoprotein receptor–related protein 5 governs Wnt-mediated osteoarthritic cartilage destruction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Wnt ligands bind to low-density lipoprotein receptor–related protein (LRP) 5 or 6, triggering a cascade of downstream events that include β-catenin signaling. Here we explored the roles of LRP5 in interleukin 1β (IL-1β)- or Wnt-mediated osteoarthritic (OA) cartilage destruction in mice. Methods The expression levels of LRP5, type II collagen, and catabolic factors were determined in mouse articular chondrocytes, human OA cartilage, and mouse experimental OA cartilage. Experimental OA in wild-type, Lrp5 total knockout (Lrp5-/-) and chondrocyte-specific knockout (Lrp5fl/fl;Col2a1-cre) mice was caused by aging, destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM), or intra-articular injection of collagenase. The role of LRP5 was confirmed in vitro by small interfering RNA–mediated knockdown of Lrp5 or in Lrp5-/- cells treated with IL-1β or Wnt proteins. Results IL-1β treatment increased the expression of LRP5 (but not LRP6) via JNK and NF-κB signaling. LRP5 was upregulated in human and mouse OA cartilage, and Lrp5 deficiency in mice inhibited cartilage destruction. Treatment with IL-1β or Wnt decreased the level of Col2a1 and increased those of Mmp3 or Mmp13, whereas Lrp5 knockdown ameliorated these effects. In addition, we found that the functions of LRP5 in arthritic cartilage were subject to transcriptional activation by β-catenin. Moreover, Lrp5-/- and Lrp5fl/fl;Col2a1-cre mice exhibited decreased cartilage destruction (and related changes in gene expression) in response to experimental OA. Conclusions Our findings indicate that LRP5 (but not LRP6) plays an essential role in Wnt/β-catenin-signaling-mediated OA cartilage destruction in part by regulating the expression levels of type II collagen, MMP3, and MMP13. PMID:24479426

  18. A Bayesian destructive weighted Poisson cure rate model and an application to a cutaneous melanoma data.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Josemar; Cancho, Vicente G; de Castro, Mário; Balakrishnan, N

    2012-12-01

    In this article, we propose a new Bayesian flexible cure rate survival model, which generalises the stochastic model of Klebanov et al. [Klebanov LB, Rachev ST and Yakovlev AY. A stochastic-model of radiation carcinogenesis--latent time distributions and their properties. Math Biosci 1993; 113: 51-75], and has much in common with the destructive model formulated by Rodrigues et al. [Rodrigues J, de Castro M, Balakrishnan N and Cancho VG. Destructive weighted Poisson cure rate models. Technical Report, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, São Carlos-SP. Brazil, 2009 (accepted in Lifetime Data Analysis)]. In our approach, the accumulated number of lesions or altered cells follows a compound weighted Poisson distribution. This model is more flexible than the promotion time cure model in terms of dispersion. Moreover, it possesses an interesting and realistic interpretation of the biological mechanism of the occurrence of the event of interest as it includes a destructive process of tumour cells after an initial treatment or the capacity of an individual exposed to irradiation to repair altered cells that results in cancer induction. In other words, what is recorded is only the damaged portion of the original number of altered cells not eliminated by the treatment or repaired by the repair system of an individual. Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods are then used to develop Bayesian inference for the proposed model. Also, some discussions on the model selection and an illustration with a cutaneous melanoma data set analysed by Rodrigues et al. [Rodrigues J, de Castro M, Balakrishnan N and Cancho VG. Destructive weighted Poisson cure rate models. Technical Report, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, São Carlos-SP. Brazil, 2009 (accepted in Lifetime Data Analysis)] are presented.

  19. NON-DESTRUCTIVE TESTING METHODS FOR GEOTHERMAL PIPING.

    SciTech Connect

    BERNDT,M.L.

    2001-03-23

    Non-destructive testing is a key component of optimized plant inspection and maintenance programs. Risk based inspection, condition based maintenance and reliability centered maintenance systems all require detection, location and sizing of defects or flaws by non-destructive methods. Internal damage of geothermal piping by corrosion and erosion-corrosion is an ongoing problem requiring inspection and subsequent maintenance decisions to ensure safe and reliable performance. Conventional manual ultrasonic testing to determine remaining wall thickness has major limitations, particularly when damage is of a random and localized nature. Therefore, it is necessary to explore alternative non-destructive methods that offer potential benefits in terms of accurate quantification of size, shape and location of damage, probability of detection, ability to use on-line over long ranges, and economics. A review of non-destructive methods and their applicability to geothermal piping was performed. Based on this, ongoing research will concentrate on long range guided wave and dynamic methods.

  20. Senseless demolition in progress, showing destruction of perfectly decent and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Senseless demolition in progress, showing destruction of perfectly decent and recyclable mill building. Problem exacerbated by high value of scrap iron. - Phoenix Iron Company, Rolling Mill, North of French Creek, west of Fairview Avenue, Phoenixville, Chester County, PA

  1. Non-Destructive Classification Approaches for Equilibrated Ordinary Chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Righter, K.; Harrington, R.; Schroeder, C.; Morris, R. V.

    2013-09-01

    In order to compare a few non-destructive classification techniques with the standard approaches, we have characterized a group of chondrites from the Larkman Nunatak region using magnetic susceptibility and Mössbauer spectroscopy.

  2. [Mechanism of bone destruction and the contribution of T lymphocytes].

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Noriko

    2016-06-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), one of the most common autoimmune diseases, is characterized by inflammation and bone destruction in the joints. Abnormal activation of the immune system leads to RANKL-dependent osteoclast differentiation, which ultimately results in bone destruction in RA. A newly identified Th17 subset induces osteoclastogenesis potently by upregulating RANKL on synovial fibroblasts, indicating a synergy between T-synovial fibroblast plays a primary role in the bone destruction. Immune-regulating factors, such as CTLA-4 highly expressed on regulatory T cells, are identified as new bone-regulating factors and can be attractive therapeutic targets for bone destruction in RA. The mechanism by which T cells contribute to the RA pathogenesis will help understand the etiology of RA and develop therapeutic approach against it.

  3. A Treatment Program for a Self-Destructive Child

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Richard L.; Howard, Gail A.

    1971-01-01

    The treatment program for the modification of self-destructive behavior of an institutionalized mentally retarded boy who needed constant physical restraints employed a variety of approaches and emphasized the development of an interpersonal relationship. (KW)

  4. Self-destructive behavior in hospitalized medical and surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Kellner, C H; Best, C L; Roberts, J M; Bjorksten, O

    1985-06-01

    This article reviews the literature and presents data from the Psychiatric Consultation Service of the Medical University of South Carolina on self-destructive behavior in hospitalized medical and surgical patients. Fatal suicide attempts are rare and usually occur in patients with severe, painful chronic illnesses, psychosis, or dementia. Less overt forms of self-destructive behavior include refusal of medical treatment and uncooperative behavior.

  5. Significant Tsunami Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunbar, P. K.; Furtney, M.; McLean, S. J.; Sweeney, A. D.

    2014-12-01

    Tsunamis have inflicted death and destruction on the coastlines of the world throughout history. The occurrence of tsunamis and the resulting effects have been collected and studied as far back as the second millennium B.C. The knowledge gained from cataloging and examining these events has led to significant changes in our understanding of tsunamis, tsunami sources, and methods to mitigate the effects of tsunamis. The most significant, not surprisingly, are often the most devastating, such as the 2011 Tohoku, Japan earthquake and tsunami. The goal of this poster is to give a brief overview of the occurrence of tsunamis and then focus specifically on several significant tsunamis. There are various criteria to determine the most significant tsunamis: the number of deaths, amount of damage, maximum runup height, had a major impact on tsunami science or policy, etc. As a result, descriptions will include some of the most costly (2011 Tohoku, Japan), the most deadly (2004 Sumatra, 1883 Krakatau), and the highest runup ever observed (1958 Lituya Bay, Alaska). The discovery of the Cascadia subduction zone as the source of the 1700 Japanese "Orphan" tsunami and a future tsunami threat to the U.S. northwest coast, contributed to the decision to form the U.S. National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program. The great Lisbon earthquake of 1755 marked the beginning of the modern era of seismology. Knowledge gained from the 1964 Alaska earthquake and tsunami helped confirm the theory of plate tectonics. The 1946 Alaska, 1952 Kuril Islands, 1960 Chile, 1964 Alaska, and the 2004 Banda Aceh, tsunamis all resulted in warning centers or systems being established.The data descriptions on this poster were extracted from NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) global historical tsunami database. Additional information about these tsunamis, as well as water level data can be found by accessing the NGDC website www.ngdc.noaa.gov/hazard/

  6. Destruction of XM-46 (aka LGP-1846) using the Molten Salt Destruction Process

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhye, R.S.; Watkins, B.E.

    1994-03-01

    The experimental work done on the destruction of the liquid gun propellant XM-46 (or LGP-1846) using the Molten Salt Destruction (MSD) Process at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for the US Army is described in this report. The current methods of disposal of large quantities of high explosives (HE), propellants and wastes containing energetic materials by open burning or open detonation (OB/OD), or by incineration, are becoming undesirable. LLNL is developing MSD as an alternative to OB/OD and incineration of energetic materials. A series of 18 continuous experimental runs were made wherein a solution of XM-46 and water was injected into a bed of molten salt comprising the carbonates of sodium, potassium and lithium, along with air. The results from these experiments, described in detail in the main body of this report, show that: XM-46 can be safely and completely destroyed in a bed of molten salt at temperatures well below those needed for incineration. Under optimum operating conditions, less than 1% of the chemically bound nitrogen in the XM-46 is converted to NO{sub x}, and less than 1% carbon is converted to CO. There exist, however, a number of technical uncertainties: We need to understand better why nitrates build up in the salt bath, and what we can do to reduce this amount. We need to understand the mechanism of XM-46 oxidation and ways to minimize the formation of CO and NO{sub x}. In addition, we would like to find out ways by which a more concentrated solution of XM-46 can be introduced into the reactor, so as to increase the throughputs.

  7. A Novel Closed-Head Model of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Using Focal Primary Overpressure Blast to the Cranium in Mice.

    PubMed

    Guley, Natalie H; Rogers, Joshua T; Del Mar, Nobel A; Deng, Yunping; Islam, Rafiqul M; D'Surney, Lauren; Ferrell, Jessica; Deng, Bowei; Hines-Beard, Jessica; Bu, Wei; Ren, Huiling; Elberger, Andrea J; Marchetta, Jeffrey G; Rex, Tonia S; Honig, Marcia G; Reiner, Anton

    2016-02-15

    Mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) from focal head impact is the most common form of TBI in humans. Animal models, however, typically use direct impact to the exposed dura or skull, or blast to the entire head. We present a detailed characterization of a novel overpressure blast system to create focal closed-head mild TBI in mice. A high-pressure air pulse limited to a 7.5 mm diameter area on the left side of the head overlying the forebrain is delivered to anesthetized mice. The mouse eyes and ears are shielded, and its head and body are cushioned to minimize movement. This approach creates mild TBI by a pressure wave that acts on the brain, with minimal accompanying head acceleration-deceleration. A single 20-psi blast yields no functional deficits or brain injury, while a single 25-40 psi blast yields only slight motor deficits and brain damage. By contrast, a single 50-60 psi blast produces significant visual, motor, and neuropsychiatric impairments and axonal damage and microglial activation in major fiber tracts, but no contusive brain injury. This model thus reproduces the widespread axonal injury and functional impairments characteristic of closed-head mild TBI, without the complications of systemic or ocular blast effects or head acceleration that typically occur in other blast or impact models of closed-skull mild TBI. Accordingly, our model provides a simple way to examine the biomechanics, pathophysiology, and functional deficits that result from TBI and can serve as a reliable platform for testing therapies that reduce brain pathology and deficits.

  8. Understanding the densification process of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O x round wires with overpressure processing and its effect on critical current density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matras, M. R.; Jiang, J.; Larbalestier, D. C.; Hellstrom, E. E.

    2016-10-01

    Overpressure (OP) processing increases the critical current density ({{\\boldsymbol{J}}}{{C}}) of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O x (2212) round wires by shrinking the surrounding Ag matrix around the 2212 filaments, driving them close to full density and greatly increasing the 2212 grain connectivity. Indeed densification is vital for attaining the highest {{\\boldsymbol{J}}}{{C}}. Here, we investigate the time and temperature dependence of the wire densification. We find that the wire diameter decreases by 3.8 ± 0.3% after full heat treatment at 50 atm and 100 atm OP. At 50 atm OP pressure, the filaments start densifying above 700 °C and reach a 3.30 ± 0.07% smaller diameter after 2 h at 820 °C, which is below the melting point of 2212 powder. The densification is homogeneous and does not change the filament shape before melting. The growth of non-superconducting phases is observed at 820 °C, suggesting that time should be minimized at high temperature prior to melting the 2212 powder. Study of an open-ended 2.2 m long wire sample shows that full densification and the high OP {{\\boldsymbol{J}}}{{C}} ({{\\boldsymbol{J}}}{{C}} varies by about 3.1 times over the 2.2 m long wire) is reached about 1 m from the open ends, thus showing that coil-length wires can be protected from leaky seals by adding at least 1 m of sacrificial wire at each end.

  9. A Novel Closed-Head Model of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Caused by Primary Overpressure Blast to the Cranium Produces Sustained Emotional Deficits in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Heldt, Scott A.; Elberger, Andrea J.; Deng, Yunping; Guley, Natalie H.; Del Mar, Nobel; Rogers, Joshua; Choi, Gy Won; Ferrell, Jessica; Rex, Tonia S.; Honig, Marcia G.; Reiner, Anton

    2014-01-01

    Emotional disorders are a common outcome from mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) in humans, but their pathophysiological basis is poorly understood. We have developed a mouse model of closed-head blast injury using an air pressure wave delivered to a small area on one side of the cranium, to create mild TBI. We found that 20-psi blasts in 3-month-old C57BL/6 male mice yielded no obvious behavioral or histological evidence of brain injury, while 25–40 psi blasts produced transient anxiety in an open field arena but little histological evidence of brain damage. By contrast, 50–60 psi blasts resulted in anxiety-like behavior in an open field arena that became more evident with time after blast. In additional behavioral tests conducted 2–8 weeks after blast, 50–60 psi mice also demonstrated increased acoustic startle, perseverance of learned fear, and enhanced contextual fear, as well as depression-like behavior and diminished prepulse inhibition. We found no evident cerebral pathology, but did observe scattered axonal degeneration in brain sections from 50 to 60 psi mice 3–8 weeks after blast. Thus, the TBI caused by single 50–60 psi blasts in mice exhibits the minimal neuronal loss coupled to “diffuse” axonal injury characteristic of human mild TBI. A reduction in the abundance of a subpopulation of excitatory projection neurons in basolateral amygdala enriched in Thy1 was, however, observed. The reported link of this neuronal population to fear suppression suggests their damage by mild TBI may contribute to the heightened anxiety and fearfulness observed after blast in our mice. Our overpressure air blast model of concussion in mice will enable further studies of the mechanisms underlying the diverse emotional deficits seen after mild TBI. PMID:24478749

  10. A novel closed-head model of mild traumatic brain injury caused by primary overpressure blast to the cranium produces sustained emotional deficits in mice.

    PubMed

    Heldt, Scott A; Elberger, Andrea J; Deng, Yunping; Guley, Natalie H; Del Mar, Nobel; Rogers, Joshua; Choi, Gy Won; Ferrell, Jessica; Rex, Tonia S; Honig, Marcia G; Reiner, Anton

    2014-01-01

    Emotional disorders are a common outcome from mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) in humans, but their pathophysiological basis is poorly understood. We have developed a mouse model of closed-head blast injury using an air pressure wave delivered to a small area on one side of the cranium, to create mild TBI. We found that 20-psi blasts in 3-month-old C57BL/6 male mice yielded no obvious behavioral or histological evidence of brain injury, while 25-40 psi blasts produced transient anxiety in an open field arena but little histological evidence of brain damage. By contrast, 50-60 psi blasts resulted in anxiety-like behavior in an open field arena that became more evident with time after blast. In additional behavioral tests conducted 2-8 weeks after blast, 50-60 psi mice also demonstrated increased acoustic startle, perseverance of learned fear, and enhanced contextual fear, as well as depression-like behavior and diminished prepulse inhibition. We found no evident cerebral pathology, but did observe scattered axonal degeneration in brain sections from 50 to 60 psi mice 3-8 weeks after blast. Thus, the TBI caused by single 50-60 psi blasts in mice exhibits the minimal neuronal loss coupled to "diffuse" axonal injury characteristic of human mild TBI. A reduction in the abundance of a subpopulation of excitatory projection neurons in basolateral amygdala enriched in Thy1 was, however, observed. The reported link of this neuronal population to fear suppression suggests their damage by mild TBI may contribute to the heightened anxiety and fearfulness observed after blast in our mice. Our overpressure air blast model of concussion in mice will enable further studies of the mechanisms underlying the diverse emotional deficits seen after mild TBI. PMID:24478749

  11. Estimating density and vertical stress magnitudes using hydrocarbon exploration data in the onshore Northern Niger Delta Basin, Nigeria: Implication for overpressure prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adewole, E. O.; Macdonald, D. I. M.; Healy, D.

    2016-11-01

    Different techniques for predicting density have been driven by the generally poor resolution with depth, and the lack of good quality density data for quantitative formation evaluation studies. The accuracy of most empirical methods is sometimes affected by the methodological uncertainty, but mainly influenced by the reliability of the input data. The benefits of using different methods in density prediction were demonstrated on the basis of a pore pressure prediction study from the Northern Niger Delta Basin (NNDB). The assessment of three density prediction methods (Wyllie, Gardner and Bellotti & Giacca) shows that the Wyllie's method is the preferred choice for the density prediction in the study area because it has the lowest Least Squares Misfit (LSM) error of 0.0019. The vertical stress gradients (constrained from densities) vary vertically with depth from 19 MPa/km (near the surface) to 25.7 MPa/km (at 4 km depth) and laterally between wells, particularly at the top of high magnitude overpressures (at 3.5 km) from 23.6 MPa/km to 25.0 MPa/km. The differences in the vertical stress gradients are consistent with the density variations observed in the area, and they have implications for the predicted pore pressures. We found there to be an increase in pressure gradient from the top to the bottom of wells, which is consistent with data from 87 wells in the area of study. We have therefore been able to identify three main pressure magnitudes in the area of study: (i) low pressure (close to hydrostatic pressure), (ii) abnormal pressure (a little above hydrostatic) and (iii) high pressure (far above hydrostatic).

  12. The Children's War: Their Reactions to Devastating Events.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atwood, Joan D.; Donnelly, Joseph W.

    2002-01-01

    A thorough review of the literature reveals that there is little or no information on children's psychological reactions to devastating events, such as the Oklahoma City bombing, the Gulf War, or the recent destruction of the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. This article explores children's psychological reactions in light of Piagetian theory.…

  13. Weapons of mass destruction in the developing world. What are the operational options. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Minner, D.K.

    1992-06-19

    The proliferation in quantity and quality of weapons of mass destruction serve as a threat of great consequence to U.S. operational forces. Operational options for action are explored within the national military strategy concepts of forward presence, deterrence, and crisis/regional contingency response. Three questions and associated issues related to operational art are posed for each concept: (1) what condition must be produced to achieve the strategic goal, (2) what events will most likely result in the desired condition, and (3) how should resources be applied to produce those events. The resulting analysis offers the following conclusions: (1) complementary efforts by all instruments of national power--political, diplomatic, economic, and military--are necessary; (2) knowledge, training, and equipment are the first line of defense; (3) persuasion as well as confrontation is necessary; (4) effective deterrence requires capability, credibility, and communication; and (5) training and weapons for retaliation-in-kind remain the final alternative.

  14. The destructive negative binomial cure rate model with a latent activation scheme.

    PubMed

    Cancho, Vicente G; Bandyopadhyay, Dipankar; Louzada, Francisco; Yiqi, Bao

    2013-07-01

    A new flexible cure rate survival model is developed where the initial number of competing causes of the event of interest (say lesions or altered cells) follow a compound negative binomial (NB) distribution. This model provides a realistic interpretation of the biological mechanism of the event of interest as it models a destructive process of the initial competing risk factors and records only the damaged portion of the original number of risk factors. Besides, it also accounts for the underlying mechanisms that leads to cure through various latent activation schemes. Our method of estimation exploits maximum likelihood (ML) tools. The methodology is illustrated on a real data set on malignant melanoma, and the finite sample behavior of parameter estimates are explored through simulation studies.

  15. Photochemical destruction of cyanide in landfill leachate

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, B.R.; Podsiadlik, D.H.; Hartlund, J.L.; Gaines, W.A.; Kalis, E.M.

    1998-11-01

    The Allen Park Clay Mine Landfill, owned by Ford, produces a leachate that occasionally contains cyanide at levels marginally below the discharge limit. The form of the cyanide in the leachate was found to be iron-cyanide complexes that resist oxidation by a conventional treatment method, alkaline oxidation. Furthermore, the leachate also was found to contain a relatively large amount of organics which would exert additional demand for oxidizing agents (e.g., chlorine). A study was performed to determine what treatment technology could be employed in the event treatment becomes necessary because of potential changes in the leachate characteristics and/or discharge limits. In this study, among several chemical oxidation methods, ultraviolet (UV) irradiation with or without ozone was investigated as a treatment option. The following are the primary findings: (1) UV irradiation alone was effective for removing the iron-cyanide complex in both the leachate and the clean water; (2) the demand for UV or ozone by chemical oxygen demand was relatively low for this leachate; (3) ozone alone was not effective for removing the iron-cyanide complex; and (4) UV irradiation alone and UV irradiation with ozone resulted in the same removal for total cyanide in clean-water experiments, but the UV irradiation alone left some free cyanide whereas the UV irradiation with ozone did not.

  16. National Defense University's Influence on U.S. National Security Policy: Case Study about the Center for the Study of Weapons of Mass Destruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rondeau, Ann E.

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation touches on a series of events leading to an aspect of United States public policy dealing with weapons of mass destruction (WMD). After exploring the literature that describes the understanding of public policy, this paper uses the case study method to understand why and how a single research center and a particular set of…

  17. Creating Special Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    deLisle, Lee

    2009-01-01

    "Creating Special Events" is organized as a systematic approach to festivals and events for students who seek a career in event management. This book looks at the evolution and history of festivals and events and proceeds to the nuts and bolts of event management. The book presents event management as the means of planning, organizing, directing,…

  18. Investigation of the Destruction Lifetime of Martian Atmospheric Methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chizek, Malynda; Murphy, J. R.; Haberle, R. M.; Kahre, M. A.

    2010-10-01

    The announcement of recent detections of Martian methane [1,2,3,4] resulted in many questions, including "how is it being destroyed so quickly?" The expected destruction mechanism, photochemistry, has a lifetime of 350 Earth years in the Martian atmosphere [3,5] which is about 600 times longer than the 0.6 Earth year lifetime estimated from the observations [1]. No mechanism has yet been identified to answer this question, but a few possibilities have been proposed including surface reactions with peroxide or perchlorate [1]. The sparse number of methane detections provide little constraint on the destruction mechanism. NASA Ames GCM [6] simulations provide a tool to investigate the gas abundance as well as the destruction lifetime needed to produce the observations. Previous work simulating the gas abundance has shown that the source magnitude required to produce the observed abundance is at least an order of magnitude larger than estimated by [1],[5,7]. Destruction lifetime will be investigated considering the availability of the gas within the boundary layer for an interaction with a chemical on the surface. As the destruction mechanism may be dependent on the temperature or dust column abundance, sensitivity to these quantities will be investigated. This work is funded by New Mexico Space Grant. [1] Mumma, et al., Science, 2009 [2] Krasnopolsky, et al., Icarus, 2004 [3] Formisano, et al., Science, 2004 [4] Fonti and Marzo, A&A, 2010 [5] Lefevre and Forget, Nature, 2009 [6] Kahre et al., JGR, 2006 [7] Chizek et al., DPS, 2009

  19. Hamster and murine models of severe destructive Lyme arthritis.

    PubMed

    Munson, Erik; Nardelli, Dean T; Du Chateau, Brian K; Callister, Steven M; Schell, Ronald F

    2012-01-01

    Arthritis is a frequent complication of infection in humans with Borrelia burgdorferi. Weeks to months following the onset of Lyme borreliosis, a histopathological reaction characteristic of synovitis including bone, joint, muscle, or tendon pain may occur. A subpopulation of patients may progress to a chronic, debilitating arthritis months to years after infection which has been classified as severe destructive Lyme arthritis. This arthritis involves focal bone erosion and destruction of articular cartilage. Hamsters and mice are animal models that have been utilized to study articular manifestations of Lyme borreliosis. Infection of immunocompetent LSH hamsters or C3H mice results in a transient synovitis. However, severe destructive Lyme arthritis can be induced by infecting irradiated hamsters or mice and immunocompetent Borrelia-vaccinated hamsters, mice, and interferon-gamma- (IFN-γ-) deficient mice with viable B. burgdorferi. The hamster model of severe destructive Lyme arthritis facilitates easy assessment of Lyme borreliosis vaccine preparations for deleterious effects while murine models of severe destructive Lyme arthritis allow for investigation of mechanisms of immunopathology.

  20. Src inhibitor reduces permeability without disturbing vascularization and prevents bone destruction in steroid-associated osteonecrotic lesions in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    He, Yi-Xin; Liu, Jin; Guo, Baosheng; Wang, Yi-Xiang; Pan, Xiaohua; Li, Defang; Tang, Tao; Chen, Yang; Peng, Songlin; Bian, Zhaoxiang; Liang, Zicai; Zhang, Bao-Ting; Lu, Aiping; Zhang, Ge

    2015-01-01

    To examine the therapeutic effect of Src inhibitor on the VEGF mediating vascular hyperpermeability and bone destruction within steroid-associated osteonecrotic lesions in rabbits. Rabbits with high risk for progress to destructive repair in steroid-associated osteonecrosis were selected according to our published protocol. The selected rabbits were systemically administrated with either Anti-VEGF antibody (Anti-VEGF Group) or Src inhibitor (Src-Inhibition Group) or VEGF (VEGF-Supplement Group) or a combination of VEGF and Src inhibitor (Supplement & Inhibition Group) or control vehicle (Control Group) for 4 weeks. At 0, 2 and 4 weeks after administration, in vivo dynamic MRI, micro-CT based-angiography, histomorphometry and immunoblotting were employed to evaluate the vascular and skeletal events in different groups. The incidence of the destructive repair in the Anti-VEGF Group, Src-Inhibition Group and Supplement & Inhibition Group was all significantly lower than that in the Control Group. The angiogenesis was promoted in VEGF-Supplement Group, Src-Inhibition Group and Supplement & Inhibition Group, while the hyperpermeability was inhibited in Anti-VEGF Group, Src-Inhibition Group and Supplement & Inhibition Group. The trabecular structure was improved in Src-Inhibition Group and Supplement & Inhibition Group. Src inhibitor could reduce permeability without disturbing vascularization and prevent destructive repair in steroid-associated osteonecrosis. PMID:25748225

  1. Bacterially induced bone destruction: mechanisms and misconceptions.

    PubMed Central

    Nair, S P; Meghji, S; Wilson, M; Reddi, K; White, P; Henderson, B

    1996-01-01

    Normal bone remodelling requires the coordinated regulation of the genesis and activity of osteoblast and osteoclast lineages. Any interference with these integrated cellular systems can result in dysregulation of remodelling with the consequent loss of bone matrix. Bacteria are important causes of bone pathology in common conditions such as periodontitis, dental cysts, bacterial arthritis, and osteomyelitis. It is now established that many of the bacteria implicated in bone diseases contain or produce molecules with potent effects on bone cells. Some of these molecules, such as components of the gram-positive cell walls (lipoteichoic acids), are weak stimulators of bone resorption in vitro, while others (PMT, cpn60) are as active as the most active mammalian osteolytic factors such as cytokines like IL-1 and TNF. The complexity of the integration of bone cell lineage development means that there are still question marks over the mechanism of action of many well-known bone-modulatory molecules such as parathyroid hormone. The key questions which must be asked of the now-recognized bacterial bone-modulatory molecules are as follows: (i) what cell population do they bind to, (ii) what is the nature of the receptor and postreceptor events, and (iii) is their action direct or dependent on the induction of secondary extracellular bone-modulating factors such as cytokines, eicosanoids, etc. In the case of LPS, this ubiquitous gram-negative polymer probably binds to osteoblasts or other cells in bone through the CD14 receptor and stimulates them to release cytokines and eicosanoids which then induce the recruitment and activation of osteoclasts. This explains the inhibitor effects of nonsteroidal and anticytokine agents on LPS-induced bone resorption. However, other bacterial factors such as the potent toxin PMT may act by blocking the normal maturation pathway of the osteoblast lineage, thus inducing dysregulation in the tightly regulated process of resorption and

  2. Assessment of disinfectants in explosive destruction system for biological agent destruction : LDRD final report FY04.

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, Blake Alexander; Didlake, John E. Jr.; Bradshaw, Robert W.; Crooker, Paul J.; Buffleben, George M.

    2005-01-01

    Treatment systems that can neutralize biological agents are needed to mitigate risks from novel and legacy biohazards. Tests with Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus steurothemophilus spores were performed in a 190-liter, 1-112 lb TNT equivalent rated Explosive Destruction System (EDS) system to evaluate its capability to treat and destroy biological agents. Five tests were conducted using three different agents to kill the spores. The EDS was operated in steam autoclave, gas fumigation and liquid decontamination modes. The first three tests used EDS as an autoclave, which uses pressurized steam to kill the spores. Autoclaving was performed at 130-140 deg C for up to 2-hours. Tests with chlorine dioxide at 750 ppm concentration for 1 hour and 10% (vol) aqueous chlorine bleach solution for 1 hour were also performed. All tests resulted in complete neutralization of the bacterial spores based on no bacterial growth in post-treatment incubations. Explosively opening a glass container to expose the bacterial spores for treatment with steam was demonstrated and could easily be done for chlorine dioxide gas or liquid bleach.

  3. Childhood sexual abuse, dissociation, and adult self-destructive behavior.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Srednicki, O

    2001-01-01

    Female college students reporting a history of childhood sexual abuse (N=175) and not reporting a history of childhood sexual abuse (N=260) were compared on indices of six self-destructive behaviors, including drug use, alcohol abuse, binge eating, self-mutilation, risky sex, and suicidality. The samples were also compared on two measures of dissociation, the Trauma Symptom Checklist dissociation subscale and the Dissociative Experiences Scale. The CSA group had significantly higher mean scores on all the indices of self-destructive behavior except self-mutilation (where the mean difference approached significance), and on both measures of dissociation. One or both dissociation measures were related significantly to each index of self-destructive behavior except binge eating. Multiple regression mediation analyses provided support for the hypothesis that dissociation mediates the relationships between CSA and both drug use and alcohol abuse. Dissociation also explained significant variability when added to the regressions of risky sex and suicidality on CSA.

  4. [Role of microorganisms in the destruction of spodumene].

    PubMed

    Karavaĭko, G I; Krutsko, V S; Mel'nikova, E O; Avakian, Z A; Ostroushko, Iu I

    1980-01-01

    A broad spectrum of microorganisms has been shown to be involved in the destruction of spodumene, a typical mineral of lithium pegmatites. The following microorganisms are most active: the microscopic fungi Penicillium notatum and Aspergillus niger, the thiobacilli Thiobacillus thiooxidans, and the so-called "silicate" slime forming bacterium Bacillus micilaginosus n. sp. siliceus. Spodumene destruction is accompanied with lithium, aluminium and silicon being transferred into solution. The activity of this process depends on the microbial species, the pH of the medium, and some other factors. Lithium and aluminium are extracted best of all at acid pH values whereas silicon at alkaline pH values. Possible mechanisms for spodumene destruction by microorganisms are discussed.

  5. Massive Black Hole Implicated in Stellar Destruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-01-01

    New results from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and the Magellan telescopes suggest that a dense stellar remnant has been ripped apart by a black hole a thousand times as massive as the Sun. If confirmed, this discovery would be a cosmic double play: it would be strong evidence for an intermediate mass black hole, which has been a hotly debated topic, and would mark the first time such a black hole has been caught tearing a star apart. This scenario is based on Chandra observations, which revealed an unusually luminous source of X-rays in a dense cluster of old stars, and optical observations that showed a peculiar mix of elements associated with the X-ray emission. Taken together, a case can be made that the X-ray emission is produced by debris from a disrupted white dwarf star that is heated as it falls towards a massive black hole. The optical emission comes from debris further out that is illuminated by these X-rays. The intensity of the X-ray emission places the source in the "ultraluminous X-ray source" or ULX category, meaning that it is more luminous than any known stellar X-ray source, but less luminous than the bright X-ray sources (active galactic nuclei) associated with supermassive black holes in the nuclei of galaxies. The nature of ULXs is a mystery, but one suggestion is that some ULXs are black holes with masses between about a hundred and several thousand times that of the Sun, a range intermediate between stellar-mass black holes and supermassive black holes located in the nuclei of galaxies. This ULX is in a globular cluster, a very old and crowded conglomeration of stars. Astronomers have suspected that globular clusters could contain intermediate-mass black holes, but conclusive evidence for this has been elusive. "Astronomers have made cases for stars being torn apart by supermassive black holes in the centers of galaxies before, but this is the first good evidence for such an event in a globular cluster," said Jimmy Irwin of the University

  6. 27 CFR 25.223 - Destruction of beer off brewery premises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Destruction of beer off... TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Voluntary Destruction § 25.223 Destruction of beer off brewery premises. (a) Destruction without supervision. A brewer may destroy beer...

  7. 27 CFR 25.223 - Destruction of beer off brewery premises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Destruction of beer off... TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL BEER Voluntary Destruction § 25.223 Destruction of beer off brewery premises. (a) Destruction without supervision. A brewer may destroy beer...

  8. 27 CFR 25.223 - Destruction of beer off brewery premises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Destruction of beer off... TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Voluntary Destruction § 25.223 Destruction of beer off brewery premises. (a) Destruction without supervision. A brewer may destroy beer...

  9. 27 CFR 25.223 - Destruction of beer off brewery premises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Destruction of beer off... TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL BEER Voluntary Destruction § 25.223 Destruction of beer off brewery premises. (a) Destruction without supervision. A brewer may destroy beer...

  10. 27 CFR 25.223 - Destruction of beer off brewery premises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Destruction of beer off... TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Voluntary Destruction § 25.223 Destruction of beer off brewery premises. (a) Destruction without supervision. A brewer may destroy beer...

  11. 41 CFR 109-45.902 - Findings justifying abandonment or destruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... abandonment or destruction. 109-45.902 Section 109-45.902 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal... UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL 45-SALE, ABANDONMENT, OR DESTRUCTION OF PERSONAL PROPERTY 45.9-Abandonment or Destruction of Personal Property § 109-45.902 Findings justifying abandonment or destruction....

  12. 41 CFR 109-45.902 - Findings justifying abandonment or destruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... abandonment or destruction. 109-45.902 Section 109-45.902 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal... UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL 45-SALE, ABANDONMENT, OR DESTRUCTION OF PERSONAL PROPERTY 45.9-Abandonment or Destruction of Personal Property § 109-45.902 Findings justifying abandonment or destruction....

  13. 41 CFR 109-45.902 - Findings justifying abandonment or destruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... abandonment or destruction. 109-45.902 Section 109-45.902 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal... UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL 45-SALE, ABANDONMENT, OR DESTRUCTION OF PERSONAL PROPERTY 45.9-Abandonment or Destruction of Personal Property § 109-45.902 Findings justifying abandonment or destruction....

  14. 41 CFR 109-45.902 - Findings justifying abandonment or destruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... abandonment or destruction. 109-45.902 Section 109-45.902 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal... UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL 45-SALE, ABANDONMENT, OR DESTRUCTION OF PERSONAL PROPERTY 45.9-Abandonment or Destruction of Personal Property § 109-45.902 Findings justifying abandonment or destruction....

  15. 41 CFR 109-45.902 - Findings justifying abandonment or destruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... abandonment or destruction. 109-45.902 Section 109-45.902 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal... UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL 45-SALE, ABANDONMENT, OR DESTRUCTION OF PERSONAL PROPERTY 45.9-Abandonment or Destruction of Personal Property § 109-45.902 Findings justifying abandonment or destruction....

  16. Habitat destruction and metacommunity size in pen shell communities.

    PubMed

    Munguia, Pablo; Miller, Thomas E

    2008-11-01

    1. In spatially structured communities, habitat destruction can have two effects: first, a main effect that occurs because of the loss of habitat area within a larger region, and a secondary effect due to changes in the spatial arrangement of local communities. Changes to the spatial arrangement can, in turn, affect the migration and extinction rates within local communities. 2. Our study involved the experimental destruction of entire local communities within larger regions in natural marine microcosms. Large and small arrays of dead pen shells were created in a shallow bay in north Florida, and the colonization by both encrusting and motile species on this empty substrate were followed through time. After most species had become established, half of the large arrays were perturbed to create small arrays by removal of half the shells, simulating habitat destruction. 3. After 48 days of further community development, comparisons of the large arrays, reduced arrays and original small arrays suggested that the mechanisms by which habitat destruction affects diversity could depend upon the size of the region affected and the natural history of the species being studied. 4. Habitat destruction reduced the diversity of motile species to a level lower than that found in the undisturbed small arrays, suggesting that the species that assembled in the original large metacommunities negatively influenced the species that occurred ultimately in the converted small arrays. 5. With sessile species, habitat destruction created richness levels that were intermediate to those of small and large arrays. The initial predestruction richness appears to have had a positive effect; because sessile species cannot disperse as adults, they may not respond to significant shifts in metacommunity size later in succession. Initial metacommunity size may be important for allowing individuals to select appropriate habitats before they settle. PMID:18637972

  17. Periodontium destruction associated with oncology therapy. Five case reports

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, W.E.

    1987-08-01

    Radiation treatment to the head and neck and cytotoxic chemotherapy can produce deleterious side effects to the periodontium that are generally transient in nature, reversible, and do not result in permanently visible defects. However, combinations of the malignant disease itself, the direct and indirect effects of medical therapy and associated oral infections, along with local trauma can lead to periodontal tissue destruction with resulting permanent architectural defects. Five case reports illustrate destructive alterations of the periodontium that were associated with oncology therapy. Proposed guidelines for periodontal treatment of compromised individuals undergoing oncology therapies are suggested.

  18. Product acceptance environmental and destructive testing for reliability.

    SciTech Connect

    Dvorack, Michael A.; Kerschen, Thomas J.; Collins, Elmer W.

    2007-08-01

    To determine whether a component is meeting its reliability requirement during production, acceptance sampling is employed in which selected units coming off the production line are subjected to additional environmental and/or destructive tests that are within the normal environment space to which the component is expected to be exposed throughout its life in the Stockpile. This report describes what these tests are and how they are scored for reliability purposes. The roles of screens, Engineering Use Only tests, and next assembly product acceptance testing are also discussed, along with both the advantages and disadvantages of environmental and destructive testing.

  19. Photolytic destruction of oxalate in aqueous mixed waste

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, F.T.; Lum, B.Y.

    1995-03-01

    In aqueous plutonium processing, residual oxalic acid can be destroyed (oxalate kill) by UV light with hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) in 1 M HCl solutions. By controlling the amount of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, the oxalate kill process will not affect the chloride concentration. In nitric acid solutions, UV light alone can destroy the oxalic acid. However, with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, the rate of destruction is faster. After the destruction of oxalic acid, the acidic solutions may be reusable without further purification process.

  20. Preservation of cochlear function after extensive labyrinthine destruction.

    PubMed

    Bumsted, R M; Dolan, K D; Sadé, J; McCabe, B F

    1977-01-01

    Four ears are presented with extensive destruction of the bony and membranous labyrinth with the loss of caloric function but with retention of hearing. Fourteen similar cases described previously in the literature are reviewed. Our cases are unique in that hearing was preserved after surgical removal of the disease in the inner ear itself. We are unaware of any previous well-documented reports showing such extensive destruction of the pars superior portion of the labyrinth with the preservation of hearing. Possible explanations and theoretical implications are discussed.

  1. Mechanisms of CFR composites destruction studying with pulse acoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petronyuk, Y. S.; Morokov, E. S.; Levin, V. M.; Ryzhova, T. B.; Chernov, A. V.

    2016-05-01

    Non-destructive inspection of carbon-fiber-reinforced (CFR) composites applied in aerospace industry attracts a wide attention. In the paper, high frequency focused ultrasound (50-100 MHz) has been applied to study the bulk microstructure of the CFR material and mechanisms of its destruction under the mechanical loading. It has been shown impulse acoustic microscopy provides detecting the areas of adhesion loss at millimeter and micron level. Behavior of the CFR laminate structure fabricated by prepreg or infusion technology has been investigated under the tensile and impact loading.

  2. Formation and destruction rates of interstellar H2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jura, M.

    1974-01-01

    In the model of Hollenbach et al. (1971), hydrogen molecules are formed on grains. Molecular hydrogen is destroyed by absorption of radiation in the Lyman bands. A study has been conducted regarding the formation and destruction rates of molecular hydrogen. The ultraviolet radiation field has been calculated to determine the rate of molecular hydrogen destruction resulting from absorption in the Lyman bands. An estimate of an upper limit for the molecular hydrogen formation rate is obtained from observations involving stars in which very little molecular hydrogen is observed.

  3. Self-destructive behavior in patients with dissociative disorders.

    PubMed

    Saxe, Glenn N; Chawla, Neharika; Van der Kolk, Bessel

    2002-01-01

    Highrates of self-injury have been reported in patients with dissociative disorders, yet no prior study has directly compared these patients with other psychiatric patients. The present study assesses self-destructive behavior in a group of inpatients who have dissociative disorders compared to those who report few dissociative symptoms. These patients more frequently engage in self-destructive behaviors, use more methods of self-injury, and begin to injure themselves at an earlier age then patients who do not dissociate. Results have important implications for understanding the relationship between dissociation, childhood trauma, and self-injury and for assessment and treatment of patients with dissociative disorders.

  4. Assessing Special Events.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neff, Bonita Dostal

    Special events defined as being "newsworthy events" are becoming a way of American life. They are also a means for making a lot of money. Examples of special events that are cited most frequently are often the most minor of events; e.g., the open house, the new business opening day gala, or a celebration of some event in an organization. Little…

  5. Event Segmentation Ability Uniquely Predicts Event Memory

    PubMed Central

    Sargent, Jesse Q.; Zacks, Jeffrey M.; Hambrick, David Z.; Zacks, Rose T.; Kurby, Christopher A.; Bailey, Heather R.; Eisenberg, Michelle L.; Beck, Taylor M.

    2013-01-01

    Memory for everyday events plays a central role in tasks of daily living, autobiographical memory, and planning. Event memory depends in part on segmenting ongoing activity into meaningful units. This study examined the relationship between event segmentation and memory in a lifespan sample to answer the following question: Is the ability to segment activity into meaningful events a unique predictor of subsequent memory, or is the relationship between event perception and memory accounted for by general cognitive abilities? Two hundred and eight adults ranging from 20 to 79 years old segmented movies of everyday events and attempted to remember the events afterwards. They also completed psychometric ability tests and tests measuring script knowledge for everyday events. Event segmentation and script knowledge both explained unique variance in event memory above and beyond the psychometric measures, and did so as strongly in older as in younger adults. These results suggest that event segmentation is a basic cognitive mechanism, important for memory across the lifespan. PMID:23942350

  6. Investigations of emergency destruction methods for recovered, explosively configured, chemical warfare munitions: Interim emergency destruction methods - evaluation report

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, M.R.; Cooper, P.W.; Kipp, M.E.

    1995-07-01

    At the request of the U.S. Army Non-Stockpile Chemical Material Office, the Sandia Explosives Containment System Design Team investigated mature destruction systems for destroying recovered chemical warfare munitions (CWM). The goal of the investigations was to identify and examine available techniques for the destruction of recovered CWM. The result of this study is a recommendation for an interim solution, a solution for use on any munitions found while an optimal, long-term solution is developed. Sandia is also performing the long-term solution study to develop a system that destroys CWM, contains the blast and fragments, and destroys the chemical agent without insult to the environment.

  7. 9 CFR 51.29 - Destruction of animals; time limit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Destruction of animals; time limit. 51.29 Section 51.29 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COOPERATIVE CONTROL AND ERADICATION OF LIVESTOCK OR POULTRY DISEASES ANIMALS...

  8. 9 CFR 50.7 - Destruction of animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Destruction of animals. 50.7 Section 50.7 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COOPERATIVE CONTROL AND ERADICATION OF LIVESTOCK OR POULTRY DISEASES ANIMALS DESTROYED BECAUSE...

  9. 9 CFR 53.4 - Destruction of animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Destruction of animals. 53.4 Section 53.4 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... animals. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, animals infected with or exposed...

  10. 9 CFR 51.29 - Destruction of animals; time limit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Destruction of animals; time limit. 51.29 Section 51.29 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COOPERATIVE CONTROL AND ERADICATION OF LIVESTOCK OR POULTRY DISEASES ANIMALS...

  11. 9 CFR 50.7 - Destruction of animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Destruction of animals. 50.7 Section 50.7 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COOPERATIVE CONTROL AND ERADICATION OF LIVESTOCK OR POULTRY DISEASES ANIMALS DESTROYED BECAUSE...

  12. 9 CFR 51.29 - Destruction of animals; time limit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Destruction of animals; time limit. 51.29 Section 51.29 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COOPERATIVE CONTROL AND ERADICATION OF LIVESTOCK OR POULTRY DISEASES ANIMALS...

  13. 9 CFR 51.29 - Destruction of animals; time limit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Destruction of animals; time limit. 51.29 Section 51.29 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COOPERATIVE CONTROL AND ERADICATION OF LIVESTOCK OR POULTRY DISEASES ANIMALS...

  14. 9 CFR 53.4 - Destruction of animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Destruction of animals. 53.4 Section 53.4 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... animals. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, animals infected with or exposed...

  15. 9 CFR 50.7 - Destruction of animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Destruction of animals. 50.7 Section 50.7 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COOPERATIVE CONTROL AND ERADICATION OF LIVESTOCK OR POULTRY DISEASES ANIMALS DESTROYED BECAUSE...

  16. 9 CFR 50.7 - Destruction of animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Destruction of animals. 50.7 Section 50.7 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COOPERATIVE CONTROL AND ERADICATION OF LIVESTOCK OR POULTRY DISEASES ANIMALS DESTROYED BECAUSE...

  17. 9 CFR 53.4 - Destruction of animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Destruction of animals. 53.4 Section 53.4 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... animals. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, animals infected with or exposed...

  18. 9 CFR 53.4 - Destruction of animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Destruction of animals. 53.4 Section 53.4 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... animals. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, animals infected with or exposed...

  19. 19 CFR 191.37 - Destruction under Customs supervision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Destruction under Customs supervision. 191.37 Section 191.37 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Customs supervision. A claimant may destroy merchandise and obtain unused merchandise drawback...

  20. 9 CFR 53.4 - Destruction of animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Destruction of animals. 53.4 Section 53.4 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... animals. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, animals infected with or exposed...

  1. 9 CFR 50.7 - Destruction of animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Destruction of animals. 50.7 Section 50.7 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COOPERATIVE CONTROL AND ERADICATION OF LIVESTOCK OR POULTRY DISEASES ANIMALS DESTROYED BECAUSE...

  2. 9 CFR 51.29 - Destruction of animals; time limit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Destruction of animals; time limit. 51.29 Section 51.29 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COOPERATIVE CONTROL AND ERADICATION OF LIVESTOCK OR POULTRY DISEASES ANIMALS...

  3. Destruction of the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect by Disorder

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Laughlin, R. B.

    1985-07-01

    It is suggested that Hall steps in the fractional quantum Hall effect are physically similar to those in the ordinary quantum Hall effect. This proposition leads to a simple scaling diagram containing a new type of fixed point, which is identified with the destruction of the fractional states by disorder. 15 refs., 3 figs.

  4. 9 CFR 53.5 - Disinfection or destruction of materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Disinfection or destruction of materials. 53.5 Section 53.5 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COOPERATIVE CONTROL AND ERADICATION OF LIVESTOCK OR POULTRY DISEASES...

  5. 9 CFR 53.5 - Disinfection or destruction of materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Disinfection or destruction of materials. 53.5 Section 53.5 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COOPERATIVE CONTROL AND ERADICATION OF LIVESTOCK OR POULTRY DISEASES...

  6. 9 CFR 53.5 - Disinfection or destruction of materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Disinfection or destruction of materials. 53.5 Section 53.5 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COOPERATIVE CONTROL AND ERADICATION OF LIVESTOCK OR POULTRY DISEASES...

  7. 9 CFR 53.5 - Disinfection or destruction of materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Disinfection or destruction of materials. 53.5 Section 53.5 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COOPERATIVE CONTROL AND ERADICATION OF LIVESTOCK OR POULTRY DISEASES...

  8. 9 CFR 53.5 - Disinfection or destruction of materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Disinfection or destruction of materials. 53.5 Section 53.5 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COOPERATIVE CONTROL AND ERADICATION OF LIVESTOCK OR POULTRY DISEASES...

  9. Education in Somalia: History, Destruction, and Calls for Reconstruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdi, Ali A.

    1998-01-01

    Traces the history of education in Somalia: in precolonial traditional Somalia; during colonial rule by Italy; under civilian rule, 1960-69; and under military rule, 1969-90. Describes the total destruction of the education system since the 1991 collapse of the state, widespread illiteracy and adolescent involvement in thuggery, and the urgent…

  10. Mannose-6-phosphate regulates destruction of lipid-linked oligosaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ningguo; Shang, Jie; Huynh, Dang; Manthati, Vijaya L.; Arias, Carolina; Harding, Heather P.; Kaufman, Randal J.; Mohr, Ian; Ron, David; Falck, John R.; Lehrman, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    Mannose-6-phosphate (M6P) is an essential precursor for mannosyl glycoconjugates, including lipid-linked oligosaccharides (LLO; glucose3mannose9GlcNAc2-P-P-dolichol) used for protein N-glycosylation. In permeabilized mammalian cells, M6P also causes specific LLO cleavage. However, the context and purpose of this paradoxical reaction are unknown. In this study, we used intact mouse embryonic fibroblasts to show that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress elevates M6P concentrations, leading to cleavage of the LLO pyrophosphate linkage with recovery of its lipid and lumenal glycan components. We demonstrate that this M6P originates from glycogen, with glycogenolysis activated by the kinase domain of the stress sensor IRE1-α. The apparent futility of M6P causing destruction of its LLO product was resolved by experiments with another stress sensor, PKR-like ER kinase (PERK), which attenuates translation. PERK's reduction of N-glycoprotein synthesis (which consumes LLOs) stabilized steady-state LLO levels despite continuous LLO destruction. However, infection with herpes simplex virus 1, an N-glycoprotein-bearing pathogen that impairs PERK signaling, not only caused LLO destruction but depleted LLO levels as well. In conclusion, the common metabolite M6P is also part of a novel mammalian stress-signaling pathway, responding to viral stress by depleting host LLOs required for N-glycosylation of virus-associated polypeptides. Apparently conserved throughout evolution, LLO destruction may be a response to a variety of environmental stresses. PMID:21737679

  11. DESTRUCTIVE EXAMINATION OF SHIPPING PACKAGE 9975-06100

    SciTech Connect

    Daugherty, W.

    2014-11-07

    Destructive and non-destructive examinations have been performed on specified components of shipping package 9975-06100. This package was selected for examination based on several characteristics: - This was the first destructively examined package in which the fiberboard assembly was fabricated from softwood fiberboard. - The package contained a relatively high heat load to contribute to internal temperature, which is a key environmental factor for fiberboard degradation. - The package has been stored in the middle or top of a storage array since its receipt in K- Area, positions that would contribute to increased service temperatures. No significant changes were observed for attributes that were measured during both field surveillance and destructive examination. Except for the axial gap, all observations and test results met identified criteria, or were collected for information and trending purposes. The axial gap met the 1 inch maximum criterion during field surveillance, but was just over the criterion during SRNL measurements. When re-measured at a later date, it again met the criterion. The bottom of the lower fiberboard assembly and the drum interior had two small stains at matching locations, suggestive of water intrusion. However, the fiberboard assembly did not contain any current evidence of excess moisture. No evidence of a degraded condition was found in this package. Despite exposure to the elevated temperatures of this higher-then-average wattage package, properties of the fiberboard and O-rings are consistent with those of new packages.

  12. Optimizing the Treatment of Acute Duct-Destructive Pancreatitis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhakiev, Bazylbek S.; Karsakbayev, Uteugali G.; Kelimberdiev, Mersaid S.; ?uhamedgalieva, Bodagoz M.; K?nonenko, Aleksander F.

    2016-01-01

    The search for new methods for treating duct-destructive pancreatitis is a relevant problem. Endogenous intoxication and oxidative stress that accompany acute pancreatitis often progress even after surgery, which forces one to search for additional possibilities of preventing these severe consequences. This research studied the effect of small…

  13. Lawmakers, Lawbreakers: The Problems of Library Record Destruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiegand, Shirley A.; Wiegand, Wayne A.

    1994-01-01

    Examines laws regarding the retention and destruction of library records. Issues librarians need to address are suggested, including a definition of public records, who determines what records can be destroyed, and penalties for violations; and a sidebar discusses the need for retention of historical records from public libraries. (LRW)

  14. Music as a Treatment Channel of Adolescent Destructivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehtonen, Kimmo; Shaughnessy, Michael F.

    A young person showing strong destructive symptoms often has too much hatred toward adults, other authorities, and society for the "voice of reason" to penetrate or reach some fixed point in his or her psyche. Music, however, activates emotions raising problems of the real field of life to be dealt with in symbolic form. This paper discusses the…

  15. Combating the Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Bonnie

    1997-01-01

    Reveals the growing threat posed to all countries by the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. Discusses the international effort combating this proliferation including the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, Strategic Arms Reduction Treaties, Biological Weapons Convention, and Chemical Weapons Convention. Also considers regional arms…

  16. Destructive Leadership Behaviors and Workplace Attitudes in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woestman, Daniel S.; Wasonga, Teresa Akinyi

    2015-01-01

    The study investigated destructive leadership behaviors (DLBs) and their influence on K-12 workplace attitudes (subordinate consideration for leaving their job, job satisfaction, and levels of stress). Quantitative survey method was used to gather data from experienced professional educators. Analyses of data show that the practice of DLB exists…

  17. 32 CFR 2400.31 - Destruction of classified information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Destruction of classified information. 2400.31 Section 2400.31 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY REGULATIONS TO IMPLEMENT E.O. 12356; OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY INFORMATION SECURITY PROGRAM Safeguarding §...

  18. Longitudinal relations between constructive and destructive conflict and couples' sleep.

    PubMed

    El-Sheikh, Mona; Kelly, Ryan J; Koss, Kalsea J; Rauer, Amy J

    2015-06-01

    We examined longitudinal relations between interpartner constructive (negotiation) and destructive (psychological and physical aggression) conflict strategies and couples' sleep over 1 year. Toward explicating processes of effects, we assessed the intervening role of internalizing symptoms in associations between conflict tactics and couples' sleep. Participants were 135 cohabiting couples (M age = 37 years for women and 39 years for men). The sample included a large representation of couples exposed to economic adversity. Further, 68% were European American and the remainder were primarily African American. At Time 1 (T1), couples reported on their conflict and their mental health (depression, anxiety). At T1 and Time 2, sleep was examined objectively with actigraphs for 7 nights. Three sleep parameters were derived: efficiency, minutes, and latency. Actor-partner interdependence models indicated that husbands' use of constructive conflict forecasted increases in their own sleep efficiency as well as their own and their wives' sleep duration over time. Actor and partner effects emerged, and husbands' and wives' use of destructive conflict strategies generally predicted worsening of some sleep parameters over time. Several mediation and intervening effects were observed for destructive conflict strategies. Some of these relations reveal that destructive conflict is associated with internalizing symptoms, which in turn are associated with some sleep parameters longitudinally. These findings build on a small, albeit growing, literature linking sleep with marital functioning, and illustrate that consideration of relationship processes including constructive conflict holds promise for gaining a better understanding of factors that influence the sleep of men and women.

  19. 9 CFR 51.25 - Proof of destruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Proof of destruction. 51.25 Section 51.25 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COOPERATIVE CONTROL AND ERADICATION OF LIVESTOCK OR POULTRY DISEASES ANIMALS DESTROYED BECAUSE OF...

  20. 27 CFR 26.207 - Destruction of marks and brands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... brands. 26.207 Section 26.207 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE... Products Coming Into the United States From the Virgin Islands § 26.207 Destruction of marks and brands. The marks, brands, and serial numbers required by this part to be placed on barrels, casks, or...

  1. 27 CFR 26.207 - Destruction of marks and brands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... brands. 26.207 Section 26.207 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE... Products Coming Into the United States From the Virgin Islands § 26.207 Destruction of marks and brands. The marks, brands, and serial numbers required by this part to be placed on barrels, casks, or...

  2. 27 CFR 26.41 - Destruction of marks and brands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... brands. 26.41 Section 26.41 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE... Products Coming Into the United States From Puerto Rico § 26.41 Destruction of marks and brands. The marks, brands, and serial numbers required by this part to be placed on barrels, casks, or similar...

  3. 27 CFR 26.41 - Destruction of marks and brands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... brands. 26.41 Section 26.41 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE... Products Coming Into the United States From Puerto Rico § 26.41 Destruction of marks and brands. The marks, brands, and serial numbers required by this part to be placed on barrels, casks, or similar...

  4. 15 CFR 721.3 - Destruction or disposal of records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Destruction or disposal of records. 721.3 Section 721.3 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION...

  5. 28 CFR 115.89 - Data storage, publication, and destruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Data storage, publication, and destruction. 115.89 Section 115.89 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Adult Prisons and Jails Data Collection and Review §...

  6. 28 CFR 115.89 - Data storage, publication, and destruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Data storage, publication, and destruction. 115.89 Section 115.89 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Adult Prisons and Jails Data Collection and Review §...

  7. 28 CFR 115.89 - Data storage, publication, and destruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Data storage, publication, and destruction. 115.89 Section 115.89 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Adult Prisons and Jails Data Collection and Review §...

  8. Implications of Sensory Stimulation in Self-Destructive Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edelson, Stephen M.

    1984-01-01

    The author extends the self stimulatory theory of self destructive behavior in autistic, schizophrenic, and mentally retarded individuals to suggest that damage of the skin's nerve structure lowers the tactile sensory threshold for physical input and enables individuals to obtain sensory stimulation by repeatedly depressing the damaged area. (CL)

  9. Self-destructive behavior on an inpatient ward.

    PubMed

    Kroll, J L

    1978-06-01

    Suicidal and self-destructive behavior on a psychiatric inpatient service are said to be related to the degree of staff demoralization and dissension. Staff factors that may permit or encourage self-destructive acts include poor communications, staff disagreements, scapegoating of patients, poor staff judgment, staff self-preoccupation, and reversal of staff-patient roles. However, it is also possible that a major contributory factor is not individual patient or staff psychopathology, but rather the destruction of the underlying traditions and values of the ward which occurs at times of major change. The thesis is presented that the ritualization of ward values, when operative, provides a coherent world-view which renders the therapeutic activities, and life itself, meaningful, and that such ritualization can provide a framework of stability in times of critical staff turnover. Without such tradition and ritualization, however, therapeutic activities become hollow and meaningless, and fail to provide self-destructive patients a reason to view their life more positively.

  10. Childhood Sexual Abuse, Dissociation, and Adult Self-Destructive Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez-Srednicki, Ofelia

    2001-01-01

    Female college students reporting a history of childhood sexual abuse and not reporting a history of childhood sexual abuse were compared on indices of six self-destructive behaviors, including drug use, alcohol abuse, binge eating, self-mutilation, risky sex, and suicidality. The CSA group had significantly higher mean scores on all the indices…

  11. Suicide and Self-Destruction among American Indian Youths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Philip A.

    1987-01-01

    Examines adolescent and young adult suicides, suicide attempts, and self-destructive behavior among the general population, American Indians, and Indians of New Mexico. Describes prevention and intervention efforts undertaken to lower suicide rates on one reservation. Contains 30 references. (SV)

  12. Electrochemical organic destruction in support of Hanford tank waste pretreatment

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, W.E.; Surma, J.E.; Gervais, K.L.; Buehler, M.F.; Pillay, G.; Schmidt, A.J.

    1994-10-01

    The US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, has 177 underground storage tanks that contain approximately 61 million gallons of radioactive waste. The current cleanup strategy is to retrieve the waste and separate components into high-level and low-level waste. However, many of the tanks contain organic compounds that create concerns associated with tank safety and efficiency of anticipated separation processes. Therefore, a need exists for technologies that can safely and efficiently destroy organic compounds. Laboratory-scale studies conducted during FY 93 have shown proof-of-principle for electrochemical destruction of organics. Electrochemical oxidation is an inherently safe technology and shows promise for treating Hanford complexant concentrate aqueous/ slurry waste. Therefore, in support of Hanford tank waste pretreatment needs, the development of electrochemical organic destruction (ECOD) technology has been undertaken. The primary objective of this work is to develop an electrochemical treatment process for destroying organic compounds, including tank waste complexants. Electroanalytical analyses and bench-scale flow cell testing will be conducted to evaluate the effect of anode material and process operating conditions on the rate of organic destruction. Cyclic voltammetry will be used to identify oxygen overpotentials for the anode materials and provide insight into reaction steps for the electrochemical oxidation of complexants. In addition, a bench-scale flow cell evaluation will be conducted to evaluate the influence of process operating conditions and anode materials on the rate and efficiency of organic destruction using the nonradioactive a Hanford tank waste simulant.

  13. Destruction of Hazardous Industrial Chemicals Using an Arcjet Plasma Torch*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleddermann, C. B.; Snyder, H. R.; Gahl, J. M.

    1996-10-01

    A small-scale thermal plasma torch has been used for the disposal of hazardous industrial chemicals including alcohols, ketones, and chlorinated hydrocarbons. The plasma jet is operated at currents up to 200 Amperes and waste flow rates up to 600 ml/hr. Argon is used as the plasma gas with oxygen added to the reactor to alter the reaction chemistry. Destruction of the waste and by-product formation are monitored using a residual gas analyzer, and the temperature of the plasma plume is measured using an enthalpy probe. The by-products of the destruction of acetone are primarily carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and small amounts of hydrocarbons. Adding oxygen to the reactor increases the production of carbon dioxide and significantly decreases the amount of acetone in the exhaust gases. This reactor has achieved greater than 99 percent destruction efficiency for acetone when oxygen is added to the reaction mixture at an arcjet current of 75 Amperes, with similar destruction efficiencies observed for ethanol and trichloroethylene. *Supported by the U.S. DOE through the WERC program administered by New Mexico State University.

  14. Cell-mediated destruction of cells grown on artificial capillaries.

    PubMed

    Zwilling, B S; Clayman, D A

    1978-11-01

    This investigation was designed to determine the conditions required to assess cell-mediated destruction of target L-cells grown on artificial capillaries. In control cultures that contained L-cells alone, solid nodules with a diameter of 1 mm as well as dense cellular growth could be visually observed by the 12th day of culture. Alloimmune spleen cells from both immunized and normal C57BL/10 mice were shown to be capable of destroying tritiated thymidine-labeled L-cells growing on artificial capillaries. The destruction of target cells grown as monolayers in capillary culture correlated well with monolayer cultures incubated in 16-mm plastic tissue culture wells. When target cells were grown in capillary culture for 5 days before the addition of effector cells, significant destruction by normal effector cells was not observed until the 15th day of culture whereas that mediated by immune cells was observed by the 7th day. The possible effects of cell-culturing conditions on the kinetics of cell-mediated destruction in capillary chambers are discussed.

  15. Event-Based Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.

    1992-01-01

    Suggests that an event-based science curriculum can provide the framework for deciding what to retain in an overloaded science curriculum. Provides examples of current events and the science concepts explored related to the event. (MDH)

  16. Non-destructive measurement of soil liquefaction density change by crosshole radar tomography, Treasure Island, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kayen, Robert E.; Barnhardt, Walter A.; Ashford, Scott; Rollins, Kyle

    2000-01-01

    A ground penetrating radar (GPR) experiment at the Treasure Island Test Site [TILT] was performed to non-destructively image the soil column for changes in density prior to, and following, a liquefaction event. The intervening liquefaction was achieved by controlled blasting. A geotechnical borehole radar technique was used to acquire high-resolution 2-D radar velocity data. This method of non-destructive site characterization uses radar trans-illumination surveys through the soil column and tomographic data manipulation techniques to construct radar velocity tomograms, from which averaged void ratios can be derived at 0.25 - 0.5m pixel footprints. Tomograms of void ratio were constructed through the relation between soil porosity and dielectric constant. Both pre- and post-blast tomograms were collected and indicate that liquefaction related densification occurred at the site. Volumetric strains estimated from the tomograms correlate well with the observed settlement at the site. The 2-D imagery of void ratio can serve as high-resolution data layers for numerical site response analysis.

  17. Investigation of carbon tetrachloride destruction by copper acetate.

    PubMed

    Chien, Yi-Chi

    2012-01-01

    Halogenated synthetic organic compounds are used in a wide variety of pesticides, solvents, refrigerants, fire retardants, and paints that cause extensive pollution to the air, surface water, groundwater, and soils. Carbon tetrachloride (CCl) is a typical halogenated synthetic organic compound that has been suspected to be toxic and carcinogenic and to cause ozone depletion. In the present work, molecular-level destruction of CCl by copper acetate was investigated by extended X-ray absorption fine structural spectra, X-ray absorption near-edge spectra, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction spectroscopy. Experimentally, the Cl species dissociated from CCl were abstracted by copper species and formed CuCl. At 473 to 533 K, reaction products (copper chloride) aggregated on the surfaces of CuO, which might cause the obstruction of further CCl destruction. Due to the insertion of Cl species into the matrix of CuO, the bond distances of Cu-O and Cu-(O)-Cu were increased by 0.3 to 0.4 Å and 0.3 to 0.6 Å, respectively. However, at 603 K, because 79.5% of the Cu was in the CCl destruction solid products, the coordination number of Cu-(O)-Cu increased to 5.6. Molecular level investigations are a key to identifying the mechanisms of the CCl destruction process. In addition, identification of the molecular characteristics of the products may help in safe disposal of the toxic substances. The success of this study paved the way for the destruction of halogenated organic compounds by copper acetate. PMID:22370408

  18. A life cycle assessment of destruction of ammunition.

    PubMed

    Alverbro, K; Björklund, A; Finnveden, G; Hochschorner, E; Hägvall, J

    2009-10-30

    The Swedish Armed Forces have large stocks of ammunition that were produced at a time when decommissioning was not considered. This ammunition will eventually become obsolete and must be destroyed, preferably with minimal impact on the environment and in a safe way for personnel. The aim of this paper is to make a comparison of the environmental impacts in a life cycle perspective of three different methods of decommissioning/destruction of ammunition, and to identify the environmental advantages and disadvantages of each of these destruction methods: open detonation; static kiln incineration with air pollution control combined with metal recycling, and a combination of incineration with air pollution control, open burning, recovery of some energetic material and metal recycling. Data used are for the specific processes and from established LCA databases. Recycling the materials in the ammunition and minimising the spread of airborne pollutants during incineration were found to be the most important factors affecting the life cycle environmental performance of the compared destruction methods. Open detonation with or without metal recycling proved to be the overall worst alternative from a life cycle perspective. The results for the static kiln and combination treatment indicate that the kind of ammunition and location of the destruction plant might determine the choice of method, since the environmental impacts from these methods are of little difference in the case of this specific grenade. Different methods for destruction of ammunition have previously been discussed from a risk and safety perspective. This is however to our knowledge the first study looking specifically on environmentally aspect in a life cycle perspective.

  19. PEROXIDE DESTRUCTION TESTING FOR THE 200 AREA EFFLUENT TREATMENT FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    HALGREN DL

    2010-03-12

    The hydrogen peroxide decomposer columns at the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) have been taken out of service due to ongoing problems with particulate fines and poor destruction performance from the granular activated carbon (GAC) used in the columns. An alternative search was initiated and led to bench scale testing and then pilot scale testing. Based on the bench scale testing three manganese dioxide based catalysts were evaluated in the peroxide destruction pilot column installed at the 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility. The ten inch diameter, nine foot tall, clear polyvinyl chloride (PVC) column allowed for the same six foot catalyst bed depth as is in the existing ETF system. The flow rate to the column was controlled to evaluate the performance at the same superficial velocity (gpm/ft{sup 2}) as the full scale design flow and normal process flow. Each catalyst was evaluated on peroxide destruction performance and particulate fines capacity and carryover. Peroxide destruction was measured by hydrogen peroxide concentration analysis of samples taken before and after the column. The presence of fines in the column headspace and the discharge from carryover was generally assessed by visual observation. All three catalysts met the peroxide destruction criteria by achieving hydrogen peroxide discharge concentrations of less than 0.5 mg/L at the design flow with inlet peroxide concentrations greater than 100 mg/L. The Sud-Chemie T-2525 catalyst was markedly better in the minimization of fines and particle carryover. It is anticipated the T-2525 can be installed as a direct replacement for the GAC in the peroxide decomposer columns. Based on the results of the peroxide method development work the recommendation is to purchase the T-2525 catalyst and initially load one of the ETF decomposer columns for full scale testing.

  20. A reaction-transport-mechanical approach to modeling the interrelationships among gas generation, overpressuring, and fracturing: Implications for the Upper Cretaceous natural gas reservoirs of the Piceance Basin, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, D.F.; Tuncay, K.; Park, A.; Comer, J.B.; Ortoleva, P.

    2000-04-01

    Predicting reservoir characteristics in tight-gas sandstone reservoirs, such as those of the Upper Cretaceous units of the Piceance basin, is difficult due to the interactions of multiple processes acting on sediments during basin development. To better understand the dynamics of these systems, a forward numerical model, which accounts for compaction, fracturing, hydrocarbon generation, and multiphase flow (BasinRTM) is used in a one-dimensional simulation of the US Department of Energy's Multiwell Experiment (MWX) site in the Piceance basin. Of particular interest is the effect of gas generation on the dynamics of the system. Comparisons of predicted present-day and observed reservoir characteristics show that the simulation generally captures the observed patterns. Analysis of the simulated history of the MWX site shows that rheologic properties constrain the distribution of fractures, whereas the fracture dynamics are controlled by the dynamics of the stress and fluid pressure histories. Results suggest that gas generation is not necessary to induce fracturing: however, by contributing to overpressure it has two important implications: (1) during maximum burial, gas saturation in one unit affects fracturing in other units, thereby contributing to the creation of flow conduits through which gas may migrate and (2) gas saturation helps sustain overpressure during uplift and erosion, allowing fractures to remain open.

  1. Geological evidence for fluid overpressure, hydraulic fracturing and strong heating during maturation and migration of hydrocarbons in Mesozoic rocks of the northern Neuquén Basin, Mendoza Province, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanella, Alain; Cobbold, Peter R.; Ruffet, Gilles; Leanza, Hector A.

    2015-10-01

    In the northern Neuquén Basin of Argentina (especially in Mendoza Province), there is strong geological evidence for fluid overpressure in the past. The evidence takes the form of bitumen veins and bedding-parallel veins of fibrous calcite ('beef'). Such veins are widespread in the fold-and-thrust belt of the Malargűe area, where bitumen mining has been active for a century or so. So as to collect information on the development of fluid overpressure in this part of the Neuquén Basin, several old mines were visited and studied in the Malargűe area. Here the bitumen veins have intruded mainly the Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous Mendoza Group, but also the Late Cretaceous Neuquén Group. The veins have the forms of bedding-parallel sills or dykes and they are especially thick within anticlines, forming saddle-reefs in several places. Beef veins are also numerous in the Malargűe area. They contain bitumen and therefore seem to have formed at the same time as the bitumen veins. Near many outcrops of bitumen and beef, we have found fine-grained volcanic intrusive bodies. The best examples are from the La Valenciana syncline. According to 39Ar-40Ar dating, these bodies are mainly of Mid-Miocene age. More generally, volcanism, deformation and maturation of source rocks seem to have reached a climax in Miocene times, when the subducting Pacific slab became relatively flat.

  2. Destructive effect of polystyrene sulfonate on the structure of hemoproteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saburova, E. A.; Basova, L. V.; Dybovskaya, Yu. N.; Sukhorukov, B. I.

    2006-08-01

    The mechanism of the destruction of horse heart hemoglobin (Hb) and spermwhale muscle myoglobin (Mb), two hem-containing proteins, by polystyrene sulfonate, an anionic polyelectrolyte, was studied. Measurements of the optical absorption of the prostetic group of the hem in the visible spectrum and of the circular dichroism in the absorption bands of the peptide groups and aromatic amino acid residues demonstrated that the compact structure of both proteins experiences destruction in the presence of polystyrene sulfonate (PSS) at PSS concentrations ten times as low as that of the protein (in wt %) and that the content of α-helix structure in Hb and Mb decreases from 81% in the native state to 43% in their complexes with PSS. The distinctions in the mechanisms of the destruction of Hb and Mb by PSS were found to be as follows: (1) in contrast to Mb, Hb forms insoluble complexes with PSS at low PSS concentrations and (2) Mb-PSS solutions at Mb-to-PSS ratios >1 were found to contain free hems (that absorb at 397 nm), a feature not observed for Hb; the kinetics of the destruction of both the proteins by the polyelectrolyte was demonstrated to be a two-stage process. The first stage of the destruction of Hb (τ ≈ 24.5 s) was found to be four times as slow as that of Mb (τ ≈ 6 s); the second (slow) stage had a halftime of ˜6 h for both the proteins under study. To determine the localization of regions at the protein molecule surface that are capable of binding polyelectrolyte molecules, the distribution of the electrostatic potential over the surface of the Hb and Mb molecules was numerically calculated with the help of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation at pH 6.2 and an ionic strength of 100 mmol/l. Based on experimental and theoretical studies of the mechanism of the interaction of the polyelectrolyte with the proteins, the structural-functional properties of proteins responsible for their destruction by the polyelectrolyte are determined.

  3. Testing of shelter design and industrial hardening concepts at the Mill Race event. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Tansley, R.S.; Zaccor, J.V.

    1982-01-01

    The report presents the results of the experiments conducted for the Federal Emergency Management Agency at the MILL RACE high explosive test. The MILL RACE event provides a simulated nuclear weapon airblast and ground motion environment to demonstrate, using full-scale structures and test objects, the validity and practicality of a number of blast upgrading and industrial hardening concepts that will support current Civil Defense planning. The design, construction, and objectives of each of the experiments are described and illustrated, and the test data and conclusions are presented. The experiments included host area and key worker shelters, expedient shelters, and industrial hardening experiments at the 2, 20, and 40 psi peak overpressure levels.

  4. Pressure Wave Propagation along the Décollement of the Nankai Accretionary Wedge: Implications for Aseismic Slip Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, A.; Appold, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic and hydrologic observations of the Nankai subduction zone made by the Ocean Drilling Program suggest that pore fluid pressures within the accretionary wedge décollement are highly overpressured to near lithostatic values below depths of 2 km beneath the sea floor as a result of sediment diagenesis and dehydration of the subducting oceanic plate. This overpressured zone is also observed to discharge pulses of high fluid pressure that migrate up-dip along the décollement at rates of 1's of km/day. These high pressure pulses along the décollement may cause large enough reductions in the local effective stress to account for aseismic slip events that have been found to propagate also at rates of 1's of km/day. Because elevated fluid pressure and correspondingly decreased effective stress can lead to a dilation of porosity, the pressure waves may become effective agents of fluid transport that can travel more quickly than fluids flowing in the background Darcian flow regime. The purpose of the present study was to seek theoretical confirmation that pressure waves are able to travel quickly enough to account for the seismic and hydrological observations documented. This confirmation was sought through a transient one-dimensional numerical solution to the differential fluid mass conservation equation for an elastic porous medium. Results of the numerical simulations show that when overpressures at depths greater than 2 km in the décollement exceed lithostatic pressure by at least 3%, pressure waves are formed that migrate up-dip at rates fast enough to account for aseismic slip over a broad range of geologic conditions. Pressure waves spawned from these depths in the décollement may travel fast enough to account for aseismic slip when overpressures there are as low as 99% of lithostatic pressure, but require low specific storage of 3×10-6 m-1, high sensitivity of permeability to effective stress, low permeability no higher than about 10-21 m2 at depths below

  5. Destructive Interactions Between Mitigation Strategies and the Causes of Unexpected Failures in Natural Hazard Mitigation Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, S. J.; Fearnley, C. J.

    2013-12-01

    Large investments in the mitigation of natural hazards, using a variety of technology-based mitigation strategies, have proven to be surprisingly ineffective in some recent natural disasters. These failures reveal a need for a systematic classification of mitigation strategies; an understanding of the scientific uncertainties that affect the effectiveness of such strategies; and an understanding of how the different types of strategy within an overall mitigation system interact destructively to reduce the effectiveness of the overall mitigation system. We classify mitigation strategies into permanent, responsive and anticipatory. Permanent mitigation strategies such as flood and tsunami defenses or land use restrictions, are both costly and 'brittle': when they malfunction they can increase mortality. Such strategies critically depend on the accuracy of the estimates of expected hazard intensity in the hazard assessments that underpin their design. Responsive mitigation strategies such as tsunami and lahar warning systems rely on capacities to detect and quantify the hazard source events and to transmit warnings fast enough to enable at risk populations to decide and act effectively. Self-warning and voluntary evacuation is also usually a responsive mitigation strategy. Uncertainty in the nature and magnitude of the detected hazard source event is often the key scientific obstacle to responsive mitigation; public understanding of both the hazard and the warnings, to enable decision making, can also be a critical obstacle. Anticipatory mitigation strategies use interpretation of precursors to hazard source events and are used widely in mitigation of volcanic hazards. Their critical limitations are due to uncertainties in time, space and magnitude relationships between precursors and hazard events. Examples of destructive interaction between different mitigation strategies are provided by the Tohoku 2011 earthquake and tsunami; recent earthquakes that have impacted

  6. Non-destructive techniques based on eddy current testing.

    PubMed

    García-Martín, Javier; Gómez-Gil, Jaime; Vázquez-Sánchez, Ernesto

    2011-01-01

    Non-destructive techniques are used widely in the metal industry in order to control the quality of materials. Eddy current testing is one of the most extensively used non-destructive techniques for inspecting electrically conductive materials at very high speeds that does not require any contact between the test piece and the sensor. This paper includes an overview of the fundamentals and main variables of eddy current testing. It also describes the state-of-the-art sensors and modern techniques such as multi-frequency and pulsed systems. Recent advances in complex models towards solving crack-sensor interaction, developments in instrumentation due to advances in electronic devices, and the evolution of data processing suggest that eddy current testing systems will be increasingly used in the future.

  7. [Molecular mechanisms of bone destruction in rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Nanki, Toshihiro

    2007-04-01

    Osteoclast in the synovium of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) plays an important role for bone destruction of the affected joints. The osteoclast is differentiated from macrophage-like synoviocyte, which is migrated from peripheral blood monocytes. In the RA synovium, receptor activator of NF-kappaB ligand (RANKL) which is expressed by T cells and fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) which is expressed by FLS induce the differentiation into osteoclast from macrophage-like synoviocyte. TNF-alpha, interleukin (IL) -1, IL-6, and IL-17 which are expressed by macrophages, FLS, and/or T cells in the synovium enhance the differentiation and activation of the osteoclast. Thus, such synovial cells contribute osteoclastgenesis and bone destruction.

  8. Evidence for midwinter chemical ozone destruction over Antartica

    SciTech Connect

    Voemel, H.; Hoffmann, D.J.; Oltmans, S.J.; Harris, J.M.

    1995-09-01

    Two ozone profiles on June 15 and June 19, obtained over McMurdo, Antartica, showed a strong depletion in stratospheric ozone, and a simultaneous profile of water vapor on June 19 showed the first clear signs of dehydration. The observation of Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSCs) beginning with the first sounding showing ozone depletion, the indication of rehydration layers, which could be a sign for recent dehydration, and trajectory calculations indicate that the observed low ozone was not the result of transport from lower latitudes. during this time the vortex was strongly distorted, transporting PSC processed air well into sunlit latitudes where photochemical ozone destruction may have occurred. The correlation of ozone depletion and dehydration indicates that water ice PSCs provided the dominant surface for chlorine activation. An analysis of the time when the observed air masses could have formed type II PSCs for the first time limits the time scale for the observed ozone destruction to about 4 days.

  9. Grain destruction in a supernova remnant shock wave

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, John C.; Gaetz, Terrance J.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Williams, Brian J.; Blair, William P.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Sankrit, Ravi

    2013-12-01

    Dust grains are sputtered away in the hot gas behind shock fronts in supernova remnants (SNRs), gradually enriching the gas phase with refractory elements. We have measured emission in C IV λ1550 from C atoms sputtered from dust in the gas behind a non-radiative shock wave in the northern Cygnus Loop. Overall, the intensity observed behind the shock agrees approximately with predictions from model calculations that match the Spitzer 24 μm and the X-ray intensity profiles. Thus, these observations confirm the overall picture of dust destruction in SNR shocks and the sputtering rates used in models. However, there is a discrepancy in that the C IV intensity 10'' behind the shock is too high compared with the intensities at the shock and 25'' behind it. Variations in the density, hydrogen neutral fraction, and the dust properties over parsec scales in the pre-shock medium limit our ability to test dust destruction models in detail.

  10. Infrared Thermography for Temperature Measurement and Non-Destructive Testing

    PubMed Central

    Usamentiaga, Rubèn; Venegas, Pablo; Guerediaga, Jon; Vega, Laura; Molleda, Julio; Bulnes, Francisco G.

    2014-01-01

    The intensity of the infrared radiation emitted by objects is mainly a function of their temperature. In infrared thermography, this feature is used for multiple purposes: as a health indicator in medical applications, as a sign of malfunction in mechanical and electrical maintenance or as an indicator of heat loss in buildings. This paper presents a review of infrared thermography especially focused on two applications: temperature measurement and non-destructive testing, two of the main fields where infrared thermography-based sensors are used. A general introduction to infrared thermography and the common procedures for temperature measurement and non-destructive testing are presented. Furthermore, developments in these fields and recent advances are reviewed. PMID:25014096

  11. Non-destructive Faraday imaging of dynamically controlled ultracold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajdacz, Miroslav; Pedersen, Poul L.; Mørch, Troels; Hilliard, Andrew J.; Arlt, Jan; Sherson, Jacob F.

    2013-08-01

    We describe an easily implementable method for non-destructive measurements of ultracold atomic clouds based on dark field imaging of spatially resolved Faraday rotation. The signal-to-noise ratio is analyzed theoretically and, in the absence of experimental imperfections, the sensitivity limit is found to be identical to other conventional dispersive imaging techniques. The dependence on laser detuning, atomic density, and temperature is characterized in a detailed comparison with theory. Due to low destructiveness, spatially resolved images of the same cloud can be acquired up to 2000 times. The technique is applied to avoid the effect of shot-to-shot fluctuations in atom number calibration, to demonstrate single-run vector magnetic field imaging and single-run spatial imaging of the system's dynamic behavior. This demonstrates that the method is a useful tool for the characterization of static and dynamically changing properties of ultracold atomic clouds.

  12. Non-destructive Faraday imaging of dynamically controlled ultracold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajdacz, Miroslav; Pedersen, Poul; Mørch, Troels; Hilliard, Andrew; Arlt, Jan; Sherson, Jacob

    2013-05-01

    We investigate non-destructive measurements of ultra-cold atomic clouds based on dark field imaging of spatially resolved Faraday rotation. In particular, we pursue applications to dynamically controlled ultracold atoms. The dependence of the Faraday signal on laser detuning, atomic density and temperature is characterized in a detailed comparison with theory. In particular the destructivity per measurement is extremely low and we illustrate this by imaging the same cloud up to 2000 times. The technique is applied to avoid the effect of shot-to-shot fluctuations in atom number calibration. Adding dynamic changes to system parameters, we demonstrate single-run vector magnetic field imaging and single-run spatial imaging of the system's dynamic behavior. The method can be implemented particularly easily in standard imaging systems by the insertion of an extra polarizing beam splitter. These results are steps towards quantum state engineering using feedback control of ultracold atoms.

  13. Non-destructive Faraday imaging of dynamically controlled ultracold atoms.

    PubMed

    Gajdacz, Miroslav; Pedersen, Poul L; Mørch, Troels; Hilliard, Andrew J; Arlt, Jan; Sherson, Jacob F

    2013-08-01

    We describe an easily implementable method for non-destructive measurements of ultracold atomic clouds based on dark field imaging of spatially resolved Faraday rotation. The signal-to-noise ratio is analyzed theoretically and, in the absence of experimental imperfections, the sensitivity limit is found to be identical to other conventional dispersive imaging techniques. The dependence on laser detuning, atomic density, and temperature is characterized in a detailed comparison with theory. Due to low destructiveness, spatially resolved images of the same cloud can be acquired up to 2000 times. The technique is applied to avoid the effect of shot-to-shot fluctuations in atom number calibration, to demonstrate single-run vector magnetic field imaging and single-run spatial imaging of the system's dynamic behavior. This demonstrates that the method is a useful tool for the characterization of static and dynamically changing properties of ultracold atomic clouds. PMID:24007051

  14. Non-destructive Faraday imaging of dynamically controlled ultracold atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Gajdacz, Miroslav; Pedersen, Poul L.; Mørch, Troels; Hilliard, Andrew J.; Arlt, Jan; Sherson, Jacob F.

    2013-08-15

    We describe an easily implementable method for non-destructive measurements of ultracold atomic clouds based on dark field imaging of spatially resolved Faraday rotation. The signal-to-noise ratio is analyzed theoretically and, in the absence of experimental imperfections, the sensitivity limit is found to be identical to other conventional dispersive imaging techniques. The dependence on laser detuning, atomic density, and temperature is characterized in a detailed comparison with theory. Due to low destructiveness, spatially resolved images of the same cloud can be acquired up to 2000 times. The technique is applied to avoid the effect of shot-to-shot fluctuations in atom number calibration, to demonstrate single-run vector magnetic field imaging and single-run spatial imaging of the system's dynamic behavior. This demonstrates that the method is a useful tool for the characterization of static and dynamically changing properties of ultracold atomic clouds.

  15. Non-destructive Faraday imaging of dynamically controlled ultracold atoms.

    PubMed

    Gajdacz, Miroslav; Pedersen, Poul L; Mørch, Troels; Hilliard, Andrew J; Arlt, Jan; Sherson, Jacob F

    2013-08-01

    We describe an easily implementable method for non-destructive measurements of ultracold atomic clouds based on dark field imaging of spatially resolved Faraday rotation. The signal-to-noise ratio is analyzed theoretically and, in the absence of experimental imperfections, the sensitivity limit is found to be identical to other conventional dispersive imaging techniques. The dependence on laser detuning, atomic density, and temperature is characterized in a detailed comparison with theory. Due to low destructiveness, spatially resolved images of the same cloud can be acquired up to 2000 times. The technique is applied to avoid the effect of shot-to-shot fluctuations in atom number calibration, to demonstrate single-run vector magnetic field imaging and single-run spatial imaging of the system's dynamic behavior. This demonstrates that the method is a useful tool for the characterization of static and dynamically changing properties of ultracold atomic clouds.

  16. Mechanochemical destruction of halogenated organic pollutants: A critical review.

    PubMed

    Cagnetta, Giovanni; Robertson, John; Huang, Jun; Zhang, Kunlun; Yu, Gang

    2016-08-01

    Many tons of intentionally produced obsolete halogenated persistent organic pollutants (POPs), are stored worldwide in stockpiles, often in an unsafe manner. These are a serious threat to the environment and to human health due to their ability to migrate and accumulate in the biosphere. New technologies, alternatives to combustion, are required to destroy these substances, hopefully to their complete mineralization. In the last 20 years mechanochemical destruction has shown potential to achieve pollutant degradation, both of the pure substances and in contaminated soils. This capability has been tested for many halogenated pollutants, with various reagents, and under different milling conditions. In the present paper, a review of the published work in this field is followed by a critique of the state of the art of POPs mechanochemical destruction and its applicability to full-scale halogenated waste treatment.

  17. Non-destructive examination system of vitreous body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Takuma; Gong, Jin; Watanabe, Yosuke; Kabir, M. Hasnat; Masato, Makino; Furukawa, Hidemitsu; Nishitsuka, Koichi

    2014-04-01

    Eyeball plays a quite important role in acquiring the vision. Vitreous body occupies the largest part of the eyeball and consists of biological, elastic, transparent, gel materials. In the present medical examination, the non-destructive examination method of the vitreous body has not been well established. Here, we focus on an application of dynamic light scattering to this topic. We tried to apply our lab-made apparatus, scanning microscopic light scattering (SMILS), which was specially designed for observing the nanometer-scale network structure in gel materials. In order to examine the vitreous body using SMILS method, a commercial apparatus, nano Partica (Horiba Co. Ltd.) was also customized. We analyzed vitreous body using both the SMILS and the customized nano Partica. We successfully examined the vitreous bodies of healthy pigs in non-destructive way.

  18. Coral poaching worsens tsunami destruction in Sri Lanka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernando, H. J. S.; McCulley, J. L.; Mendis, S. G.; Perera, K.

    Observations of the trail of destruction of the Sumatra tsunami of 26 December 2004 indicate remarkable, small-scale spatial variations, of the order of a few kilometers, of water inundation and destruction in southwestern Sri Lanka [Shiermeier, 2005; Liu et al., 2005] that are much smaller than the tsunami wavelength of ˜100 km.For example, the town of Peraliya, was awash with an approximately 1.5-km water inundation from a wave of 10 m in height; the inundation there carried the passenger train Samudra Devi (the “Ocean Queen”) inland some 50 m, killing 1700 people. Yet,˜3 km south, in Hikkaduwa, there was a mere 2-3 m wave height, 50-m inundation and no deaths.

  19. Grain Destruction in a Supernova Remnant Shock Wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raymond, John C.; Ghavamian, Parviz; Williams, Brian J.; Blair, William P.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Gaetz, Terrance J.; Sankrit, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    Dust grains are sputtered away in the hot gas behind shock fronts in supernova remnants, gradually enriching the gas phase with refractory elements. We have measured emission in C IV (lambda)1550 from C atoms sputtered from dust in the gas behind a non-radiative shock wave in the northern Cygnus Loop. Overall, the intensity observed behind the shock agrees approximately with predictions from model calculations that match the Spitzer 24 micron and the X-ray intensity profiles. Thus these observations confirm the overall picture of dust destruction in SNR shocks and the sputtering rates used in models. However, there is a discrepancy in that the CIV intensity 10'' behind the shock is too high compared to the intensities at the shock and 25'' behind it. Variations in the density, hydrogen neutral fraction and the dust properties over parsec scales in the pre- shock medium limit our ability to test dust destruction models in detail.

  20. Hospital planning for weapons of mass destruction incidents.

    PubMed

    Perry, R W; Lindell, M K

    2006-01-01

    As terrorists attacks increase in frequency, hospital disaster plans need to be scrutinized to ensure that they take into account issues unique to weapons of mass destruction. This paper reports a review of the literature addressing hospital experiences with such incidents and the planning lessons thus learned. Construction of hospital disaster plans is examined as an ongoing process guided by the disaster planning committee. Hospitals are conceived as one of the components of a larger community disaster planning efforts, with specific attention devoted to defining important linkages among response organizations. This includes the public health authorities, political authorities, prehospital care agencies, and emergency management agencies. A review is completed of six special elements of weapons of mass destruction incidents that should be addressed in hospital disaster plans: incident command, hospital security, patient surge, decontamination, mental health consequences, and communications. The paper closes with a discussion of the importance of training and exercises in maintaining and improving the disaster plan.

  1. Mandibular destructive radiolucent lesion: The first sign of multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Fregnani, Eduardo-Rodrigues; Leite, Amanda-Almeida; Parahyba, Claudia-Joffily; Nesrallah, Ana-Cristina-Alo; Ramos-Perez, Flávia-Maria-de Moraes

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of a mandibular lesion as the first sign of multiple myeloma (MM) is uncommon. This report describes a case of MM diagnosed because of a mandibular lesion. A 62-year-old woman presented a destructive radiolucent lesion in the right mandibular ramus. The lesion caused rupture of the anterior cortical bone and extended from the retromolar area to the coronoid process. An incisional biopsy was performed. Histopathological examination revealed numerous pleomorphic plasma cells, some with binucleated nuclei. The tumor cells showed kappa light-chain restriction. Bone marrow biopsy showed findings of massive infiltration of neoplastic plasma cells, besides lesions in the vertebrae. The diagnosis of MM was established. The patient underwent autologous hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. Currently, the patient is under regular follow up after 40 months of initial treatment. In conclusion, MM should be considered in the differential diagnosis of destructive mandibular lesions. Key words:Mandible, multiple myeloma, radiolucent lesion. PMID:27703618

  2. Challenges of cervical reconstruction for destructive spondyloarthropathy in renal osteodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Elder, Benjamin D; Petteys, Rory J; Sciubba, Daniel M; Wolinsky, Jean-Paul

    2016-08-01

    Patients with end stage renal disease on hemodialysis may present with destructive spondyloarthropathy of the spine, most commonly in the subaxial cervical and lumbar spine, often with severe stenosis and instability. However, surgical management of these patients is challenging due to a high pseudarthrosis rate, poor bone quality, and medical frailty. We present a 49-year-old man on hemodialysis who presented with C4-C5 vertebral body destruction and a focal kyphotic deformity with myelopathy. The patient underwent a 360 degree decompression and reconstructive procedure that resulted in posterior instrumentation failure. Several salvage techniques were used in order to adequately stabilize the spine while preserving the patient's remaining cervical motion. PMID:27052255

  3. Non-Destructive Techniques Based on Eddy Current Testing

    PubMed Central

    García-Martín, Javier; Gómez-Gil, Jaime; Vázquez-Sánchez, Ernesto

    2011-01-01

    Non-destructive techniques are used widely in the metal industry in order to control the quality of materials. Eddy current testing is one of the most extensively used non-destructive techniques for inspecting electrically conductive materials at very high speeds that does not require any contact between the test piece and the sensor. This paper includes an overview of the fundamentals and main variables of eddy current testing. It also describes the state-of-the-art sensors and modern techniques such as multi-frequency and pulsed systems. Recent advances in complex models towards solving crack-sensor interaction, developments in instrumentation due to advances in electronic devices, and the evolution of data processing suggest that eddy current testing systems will be increasingly used in the future. PMID:22163754

  4. Boby-Vortex Interaction, Sound Generation and Destructive Interference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, Hsiao C.

    2000-01-01

    It is generally recognized that interaction of vortices with downstream blades is a major source of noise production. To analyze this problem numerically, a two-dimensional model of inviscid flow together with the method of matched asymptotic expansions is proposed. The method of matched asymptotic expansions is used to match the inner region of incompressible flow to the outer region of compressible flow. Because of incompressibility, relatively simple numerical methods are available to treat multiple vortices and multiple bodies of arbitrary shape. Disturbances from vortices and bodies propagate outward as sound waves. Due to their interactions, either constructive or destructive interference may result. When it is destructive, the combined sound intensity can be reduced, sometimes substantially. In addition, an analytical solution to sound generation by the cascade-vonex interaction is given.

  5. Implications of sensory stimulation in self-destructive behavior.

    PubMed

    Edelson, S M

    1984-09-01

    The self-stimulatory and social theories of self-destructive behavior of autistic, schizophrenic, and mentally retarded individuals were examined. The self-stimulatory theory states that self-destructive individuals obtain a form of sensory stimulation or reinforcement from the behavior itself. An extension of this theory, which is also presented in this paper, explains specifically how these individuals acquire sensory stimulation from such deviant behavior. By damaging the nerve structure of the skin, the tactile sensory threshold for physical input is lowered. This increase in the skin's sensitivity enables individuals to obtain sensory stimulation by repeatedly depressing the damaged area. In addition, I have proposed that the behavior may initially be a form of self-stimulation but subsequently may be operantly reinforced by the caretaker's concern for the individual.

  6. Method and apparatus for low temperature destruction of halogenated hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Reagen, William Kevin; Janikowski, Stuart Kevin

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus for decomposing halogenated hydrocarbons are provided. The halogenated hydrocarbon is mixed with solvating agents and maintained in a predetermined atmosphere and at a predetermined temperature. The mixture is contacted with recyclable reactive material for chemically reacting with the recyclable material to create dehalogenated hydrocarbons and halogenated inorganic compounds. A feature of the invention is that the process enables low temperature destruction of halogenated hydrocarbons.

  7. Non-destructive metallurgical analysis of astrolabes utilizing synchrotron radiation.

    SciTech Connect

    Newbury, B.; Stephenson, B.; Almer, J. D.; Notis, M.; Haeffner, D. R.; Slade Cargill, G., III

    2002-05-22

    From the experiments performed it is possible to determine a wide range of information about the metallurgy of the astrolabes studied. It was found that different brass alloys were used for components that were cast and those that were mechanically deformed. Chemical composition, forming history, and thickness measurements are all determined non-destructively, illustrating that this technique could be useful for many applications with metal artifact analysis where non-intrusive methods are required.

  8. Destruction of public and governmental experiments of GMO in Europe.

    PubMed

    Kuntz, Marcel

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to compile the destruction of GMO trials from academic or governmental research institutes in Europe, in a factual manner and to highlight their main characteristics. About 80 acts of vandalism against academic or governmental research on GMOs are identified, mainly in 4 countries; namely France, Germany, the United Kingdom and Switzerland. Examples are also provided for Italy and Belgium. The general conclusions that can be drawn from these acts are also discussed. PMID:22825391

  9. LSP Composite Susbtrate Destructive Evaluation Test Assessment Manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovach, Daniel J.; Erickson, Grant J.

    2013-01-01

    This document specifies the processes to perform post-strike destructive damage evaluation of tested CFRP panels.It is recognized that many factors besides lightning damage protection are involved in the selection of an appropriate Lightning Strike Protection (LSP) for a particular system (e.g., cost, weight, corrosion resistance, shielding effectiveness, etc.). This document strives primarily to address the standardized generation of damage protection performance data.

  10. Destruction of Pacific Corals by the Sea Star Acanthaster planci.

    PubMed

    Chesher, R H

    1969-07-18

    Acanthaster planci, a coral predator, is undergoing a population explosion in many areas of the Pacific Ocean. Data on feeding rates, population movements, and stages of infestation were collected along coral reefs of Guam and Palau. Direct observations on destruction of Guam's coral reefs indicate that narrow, fringing reefs may be killed as rapidly as 1 kilometer per month. In a 2(1/2)-year period, 90 percent of the coral was killed along 38 kilometers of Guam's shoreline.

  11. Dust Destruction Rates and Lifetimes in the Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Temim, Tea; Dwek, Eli; Tchernyshyov, Kirill; Boyer, Martha L.; Meixner, Margaret; Gall, Christa; Roman-Duval, Julia

    2015-01-01

    The nature, composition, abundance, and size distribution of dust in galaxies is determined by the rate at which it is created in the different stellar sources and destroyed by interstellar shocks. Because of their extensive wavelength coverage, proximity, and nearly face-on geometry, the Magellanic Clouds (MCs) provide a unique opportunity to study these processes in great detail. In this paper we use the complete sample of supernova remnants (SNRs) in the MCs to calculate the lifetime and destruction efficiencies of silicate and carbon dust in these galaxies. We find dust lifetimes of 22+/-13 Myr (30+/-17 Myr) for silicate (carbon) grains in the LMC, and 54 +/- 32 Myr (72 +/- 43 Myr) for silicate (carbon) grains in the SMC. The significantly shorter lifetimes in the MCs, as compared to the Milky Way, are explained as the combined effect of their lower total dust mass, and the fact that the dust-destroying isolated SNe in the MCs seem to be preferentially occurring in regions with higher than average dust-to-gas (D2G) mass ratios. We also calculate the supernova rate and the current star formation rate in the MCs, and use them to derive maximum dust injection rates by asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and core collapse supernovae (CCSNe). We find that the injection rates are an order of magnitude lower than the dust destruction rates by the SNRs. This supports the conclusion that, unless the dust destruction rates have been considerably overestimated, most of the dust must be reconstituted from surviving grains in dense molecular clouds. More generally, we also discuss the dependence of the dust destruction rate on the local D2G mass ratio and the ambient gas density and metallicity, as well as the application of our results to other galaxies and dust evolution models.

  12. DUST DESTRUCTION RATES AND LIFETIMES IN THE MAGELLANIC CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Temim, Tea; Dwek, Eli; Boyer, Martha L.; Tchernyshyov, Kirill; Meixner, Margaret; Gall, Christa; Roman-Duval, Julia

    2015-02-01

    The dust budget in galaxies depends on the rate at which dust grains are created in different stellar sources and destroyed by interstellar shocks. Because of their extensive wavelength coverage, proximity, and nearly face-on geometry, the Magellanic Clouds (MCs) provide a unique opportunity to study these processes in great detail. In this paper, we use the complete sample of supernova remnants (SNRs) in the MCs to calculate the lifetimes and destruction efficiencies of silicate and carbon dust. We find dust lifetimes of 22 ± 13 Myr (30 ± 17 Myr) for silicate (carbon) grains in the LMC, and 54 ± 32 Myr (72 ± 43 Myr) for silicate (carbon) grains in the SMC. The corresponding dust destruction rates are 2.3 × 10{sup –2} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} (5.9 × 10{sup –3} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}) and 3.0 × 10{sup –3} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} (5.6 × 10{sup –4} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}) for silicate (carbon) grains in the LMC and SMC, respectively. The significantly shorter lifetimes in the MCs, as compared to the Milky Way, are explained as the combined effect of their lower total dust mass and preferentially higher dust-to-gas (D2G) mass ratios in the vicinity of the SNRs. We find that the maximum dust injection rates by asymptotic giant branch stars and core collapse supernovae are an order of magnitude lower than the dust destruction rates by the SNRs, suggesting that most of the dust may be reconstituted in dense molecular clouds. We also discuss the dependence of the dust destruction rate on the local D2G mass ratio, ambient gas density, and metallicity, as well as the application of our results to other galaxies and dust evolution models.

  13. [Symptomatic and evolutive characteristics of articular destruction noted in chondrocalcinosis].

    PubMed

    Villiaumey, J; Larget-Piet, B; Menza, C D; Rotterdam, M

    1975-04-01

    Referring to 17 personal observations, the authors endeavour to clarify the main clinical and radiological traits of the destructive arthropathies occuring in patients suffering from diffuse, articular chondrocalcinosis. These arthropathies appear to be relatively frequent and older, obese women suffering from demineralization are more readily affected. The knees, coxo-femoral joints and the shoulders are principally concerned, and to a lesser extent the wrists, the trapezo-metacarpal joints and even the spine. The lesions can be polyarticular and symmetrical, be grouped in more or less random oligoarticular combinations or may occur in only a single joint space. Clinically, these destructive arthropathies give rise to severe pain and very marked functional impotence. The joints are swollen without any signs of inflammation. The joint movements are painful, stiff, and limited. Axial deviations are frequent. Radiologically, the lesions occur throughout the cartilage sheath, the inter-chondrial bone, and in the underlying epiphysary bone, in the form of massive geodes and massives loss of tissue substance. On the other hand, the process of reconstruction is very limited. In the patients studied, chondrocalcinosis was proved by the very characteristic pictures of calcic incrustations of the cartilage sheath and the fibro-cartilages, by the discovery of micro-crystals of calcium pyrophosphate in the articular fluid or, at biopsy, by the thickness of the synovial fluid. This chondrocalcinosis was primary in the cases. These destructive lesions were easily distinguishable from nervous or diabetic osteo-arthropathies, and from tumoral, infectious, rheumatic, or vascular changes. Thus, chondrocalcinosis is among the most common causes of osteo-articular destruction. It should be looked for systematically in all patients with lytic arthropathies of unknown etiology.

  14. Destruction of public and governmental experiments of GMO in Europe.

    PubMed

    Kuntz, Marcel

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to compile the destruction of GMO trials from academic or governmental research institutes in Europe, in a factual manner and to highlight their main characteristics. About 80 acts of vandalism against academic or governmental research on GMOs are identified, mainly in 4 countries; namely France, Germany, the United Kingdom and Switzerland. Examples are also provided for Italy and Belgium. The general conclusions that can be drawn from these acts are also discussed.

  15. IET. Aerial view of snaptran destructive experiment in 1964. Camera ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    IET. Aerial view of snaptran destructive experiment in 1964. Camera facing north. Test cell building (TAN-624) is positioned away from coupling station. Weather tower in right foreground. Divided duct just beyond coupling station. Air intake structure on south side of shielded control room. Experiment is on dolly at coupling station. Date: 1964. INEEL negative no. 64-1736 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  16. System and method for high precision isotope ratio destructive analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bushaw, Bruce A; Anheier, Norman C; Phillips, Jon R

    2013-07-02

    A system and process are disclosed that provide high accuracy and high precision destructive analysis measurements for isotope ratio determination of relative isotope abundance distributions in liquids, solids, and particulate samples. The invention utilizes a collinear probe beam to interrogate a laser ablated plume. This invention provides enhanced single-shot detection sensitivity approaching the femtogram range, and isotope ratios that can be determined at approximately 1% or better precision and accuracy (relative standard deviation).

  17. From the Magic of Light to the Destruction of Night

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posch, Thomas

    2012-09-01

    Life on the Earth depends on the light from the Sun. Humans generally have a very positive attitude towards light. This paper discusses the 'magic of light' - i.e. our dependence on and even addiction to light - and how it gradually led to the destruction of natural darkness by means of excessive artificial illumination. Furthermore, we develop a theory of the aesthetic value of natural nightscapes, which we illustrate by masterpieces from the history of painting.

  18. Animal models of self-destructive behavior and suicide.

    PubMed

    Crawley, J N; Sutton, M E; Pickar, D

    1985-06-01

    In this article we have addressed selected aspects of animal models that may have ramifications in our understanding of suicide and human self-destructive behavior. It should be kept in mind that these human behaviors have many determinants. In considering animal models, we do not propose that similar behaviors necessarily have the same causation nor that a particular experimental manipulation that produces a behavioral syndrome in one species will produce that response in another species. Even if environmental conditions or the resulting behaviors vary for different species, the biochemical intermediaries may be similar. The simplification inherent in the laboratory modeling of an aspect of human behavior should not mean that the complexity of the human syndrome be forgotten. However, if a simple explanation can account for the production of a particular behavioral syndrome in animals, it can help to structure our thoughts regarding the etiology of the behavior in humans. The ethologic observations discussed in this article may help to place human self-destructive behavior in a continuum with that of animals in the wild. Although care should be given to drawing direct parallels, the clear conclusion is that humans are not alone in exhibiting self-initiated behaviors that ultimately produce self-harm or death. Whereas laboratory models have been extensively used for modeling psychiatric illnesses or for producing specific pharmacologic manipulations of the CNS, surprisingly little attention has been given to the modeling of self-destructive behaviors themselves. Emphasis on self-destructive behaviors, as well as on their biologic and genetic underpinnings, represent an important future direction for work on animal models in psychiatry.

  19. Non-Destructive Testing for Control of Radioactive Waste Package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plumeri, S.; Carrel, F.

    2015-10-01

    Characterization and control of radioactive waste packages are important issues in the management of a radioactive waste repository. Therefore, Andra performs quality control inspection on radwaste package before disposal to ensure the compliance of the radwast characteristics with Andra waste disposal specifications and to check the consistency between Andra measurements results and producer declared properties. Objectives of this quality control are: assessment and improvement of producer radwaste packages quality mastery, guarantee of the radwaste disposal safety, maintain of the public confidence. To control radiological characteristics of radwaste package, non-destructive passive methods (gamma spectrometry and neutrons counting) are commonly used. These passive methods may not be sufficient, for instance to control the mass of fissile material contained inside radwaste package. This is particularly true for large concrete hull of heterogeneous radwaste containing several actinides mixed with fission products like 137Cs. Non-destructive active methods, like measurement of photofission delayed neutrons, allow to quantify the global mass of actinides and is a promising method to quantify mass of fissile material. Andra has performed different non-destructive measurements on concrete intermediate-level short lived nuclear waste (ILW-SL) package to control its nuclear material content. These tests have allowed Andra to have a first evaluation of the performance of photofission delayed neutron measurement and to identify development needed to have a reliable method, especially for fissile material mass control in intermediate-level long lived waste package.

  20. Suicide and the continuum of self-destructive behavior.

    PubMed

    Firestone, R W; Seiden, R H

    1990-03-01

    Suicide and self-destructive behavior are strongly influenced by a negative thought process, referred to here as the "voice." The voice process represents a well-integrated pattern of thoughts, attitudes, and beliefs, antithetical to self and hostile toward others, that is at the core of a patient's self-limitations and self-defeating actions. The voice varies along a continuum of intensity ranging from mild self-criticism to angry self-attacks and even suicidal thoughts. Self-destructive behavior similarly exists on a continuum ranging from self-denial to accident proneness, drug abuse, alcoholism, and other self-defeating behaviors, culminating in actual bodily harm. The two processes, cognitive and behavioral, parallel each other, and suicide represents the acting out of the extreme end of the continuum. The authors provide a chart depicting the levels of increasing suicidal intent along the continuum. The chart identifies specific negative thoughts and injunctions typically reported by persons who attempt suicide, neurotic patients, and "normal" subjects. Understanding where an individual can be placed on the continuum of self-destructive thoughts and actions can assist clinicians in their diagnoses and help pinpoint those students who are more at risk for suicide.

  1. [Antibacterial therapy in surgery of patients with acute destructive appendicitis].

    PubMed

    Bezrodnyĭ, B H; Kolosovych, I V; Iovitsa, A V; Martynovych, L D; Sydorenko, R A; Sysak, O M

    2012-01-01

    Character of microflora of exsudate of abdominals and mucosis microflora of vermicular appendix is studied for patients with the destructive forms of appendicitis with the purpose of development of variants of antibacterial therapy at surgical treatment of patients with acute appendicitis. The patients with the destructive forms of appendicitis, which were on treatment in a municipal clinical hospital N 4 Kyiv for period 2004-2010. An Inflammatory-destructive process in an appendix is conditioned by both aerobic (Escherichia coli - 46,6 %, Enterobacter - 4,2 %, Citrobacter - 4,2 %, Klebsiella - 3,3 %, Pseudomonas aeruginosa - 5,8 %, Staphylococcus - 4,2 %) and anaerobic microorganisms (Bacteroides - 100 %) and increase Candida - 17,5 %. Antibacterial therapy is effective at 46,7 % patients with acute appendicitis. At 49,6 % patients acute appendicitis develops on a background dysbiotic intestinal disturbances. Clinically the effective charts of empiric antibacterial monotherapy 6 days it is been: Moxifloxacini intravenously 400 mgs one time in twenty-four hours during, Ertapenemi for a 1 g one time in twenty-four hours intravenously and combined - Aztreonami for a 1 g twice in twenty-four hours and of Clindamycini for 600 mgs twice in twenty-four hours, intramuscular during; Cefepimumi for a 1 g twice in twenty-four hours and of Clindamycini for 600 mgs twice in twenty-four hours, intramuscular.

  2. On the nature of the fragment environment created by the range destruction or random failure of solid rocket motor casings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eck, M.; Mukunda, M.

    1988-01-01

    Given here are predictions of fragment velocities and azimuths resulting from the Space Transportation System Solid Rocket Motor range destruct, or random failure occurring at any time during the 120 seconds of Solid Rocket Motor burn. Results obtained using the analytical methods described showed good agreement between predictions and observations for two specific events. It was shown that these methods have good potential for use in predicting the fragmentation process of a number of generically similar casing systems. It was concluded that coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian calculational methods of the type described here provide a powerful tool for predicting Solid Rocket Motor response.

  3. Cycles of edifice growth and destruction at Tharsis Tholus, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platz, T.; McGuire, P. C.; Münn, S.; Cailleau, B.; Dumke, A.; Neukum, G.; Procter, J. N.

    2009-04-01

    Tharsis Tholus, approx. 800 km to the ENE of Ascraeus Mons, is unique among Martian volcanoes as it is structurally divided into sectors suggesting a complex volcano-tectonic evolution [1-3]. The objective of this study was 1) to identify cycles of edifice growth and destruction and causes of instability, 2) to estimate the mineralogical composition of rocks and loose deposits, 3) to provide a time frame of volcanic activity, and 4) to characterize eruptive styles at Tharsis Tholus. The edifice has a planar extension of 155 km (NW-SE) by 125 km (NE-SW) with an elevation up to 9000 m on the west flank. The volcano exhibits a strong relief and can be subdivided into five major sectors: north flank, west flank, east flank, south flank, and the central caldera. The slopes vary from <1° up to 27°. The volcano is partly buried by lava flows, presumably originating from the Tharsis Montes. As a result, the original basement surface is unknown. However, to the east of the volcano, the tips of a large buried impact-crater rim are still preserved. Using the approximate extension of 41×47 km of the impact-crater rim, a rim height of about 500 m results [4], with the basement being at 500 m altitude. The visible edifice volume is approximately 31.1×10³ km³, however, if a basal horizontal plane at 500 m is assumed, an edifice volume of >50×10³ km³ results. The structure of the edifice indicates at least four large deformation events. The central and most prominent structure of the volcano is its central caldera. It is bordered by a well-preserved system of concentric normal faults. The maximum subsidence of the caldera floor is 3000 m; the collapse volume is calculated at approx. 2160 km³. The caldera (36.7×38.9 km) has an elliptic shape oriented NW-SE. The flanks of the volcano are characterized by four large scarps oriented radially from the central caldera. The arcuate shapes of the scarps and their orientations suggest voluminous collapses of the western and

  4. Episodes, events, and models

    PubMed Central

    Khemlani, Sangeet S.; Harrison, Anthony M.; Trafton, J. Gregory

    2015-01-01

    We describe a novel computational theory of how individuals segment perceptual information into representations of events. The theory is inspired by recent findings in the cognitive science and cognitive neuroscience of event segmentation. In line with recent theories, it holds that online event segmentation is automatic, and that event segmentation yields mental simulations of events. But it posits two novel principles as well: first, discrete episodic markers track perceptual and conceptual changes, and can be retrieved to construct event models. Second, the process of retrieving and reconstructing those episodic markers is constrained and prioritized. We describe a computational implementation of the theory, as well as a robotic extension of the theory that demonstrates the processes of online event segmentation and event model construction. The theory is the first unified computational account of event segmentation and temporal inference. We conclude by demonstrating now neuroimaging data can constrain and inspire the construction of process-level theories of human reasoning. PMID:26578934

  5. 33 CFR 154.828 - Vapor recovery and vapor destruction units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... line; and (3) Alarm and shut down when a flame is detected on the flame arrester or detonation arrester. (d) When a vapor destruction unit shuts down or has a flame-out condition the vapor destruction...

  6. Dome growth behavior at Soufriere Hills Volcano, Montserrat, revealed by relocation of volcanic event swarms, 1995-1996

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rowe, C.A.; Thurber, C.H.; White, R.A.

    2004-01-01

    We have relocated a subset of events from the digital waveform catalogue of ???17,000 volcanic microearthquakes recorded between July 1995 and February 1996 at Soufriere Hills Volcano (SHV), Montserrat, using a cross-correlation-based phase repicking technique with a joint location method. Hypocenters were estimated for 3914 earthquakes having five or more corrected P-wave picks. The seismic source region collapsed to a volume of ???1 km3 from an initial ???100 km3. Relocated events represent 36 swarms, each containing nearly identical waveforms, having source dimensions of 10 to 100 m in diameter and spatial separations on the order of 500 m or less. Each swarm occurred over a span of several hours to a few days.Triggered data appear to miss between 65% and 98% of the events that occur within these swarms, based on review of helicorder records. Visual estimates of summit dome growth show a rough correspondence between episodes of intense swarming and increases in extruded magma, although dome observations are too sparse to make a direct comparison for this time period. The limited depth range over which dome-growth-related events occur is consistent with a dynamic model of cyclic plug extrusion behavior in the shallow conduit, governed by magma supply rate, overpressure buildup and physical properties of the magma and conduit geometry. Seismic sources may occur in locally overpressured regions that result from microlite formation in a zone of rapid decompression; we propose that this zone exists in the vicinity of a detachment plane associated with the cyclic plug extrusion. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The global event system

    SciTech Connect

    Winans, J.

    1994-03-02

    The support for the global event system has been designed to allow an application developer to control the APS event generator and receiver boards. This is done by the use of four new record types. These records are customized and are only supported by the device support modules for the APS event generator and receiver boards. The use of the global event system and its associated records should not be confused with the vanilla EPICS events and the associated event records. They are very different.

  8. 19 CFR 158.43 - Abandonment or destruction of merchandise in bond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Abandonment or destruction of merchandise in bond..., OR EXPORTED Destroyed, Abandoned, or Exported Merchandise § 158.43 Abandonment or destruction of... for abandonment or destruction of merchandise in bond with the port director on Customs From...

  9. 41 CFR 109-45.902-2 - Abandonment or destruction without notice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Abandonment or... UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL 45-SALE, ABANDONMENT, OR DESTRUCTION OF PERSONAL PROPERTY 45.9-Abandonment or Destruction of Personal Property § 109-45.902-2 Abandonment or destruction without notice. The head of...

  10. 19 CFR 158.43 - Abandonment or destruction of merchandise in bond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Abandonment or destruction of merchandise in bond..., OR EXPORTED Destroyed, Abandoned, or Exported Merchandise § 158.43 Abandonment or destruction of... for abandonment or destruction of merchandise in bond with the port director on Customs From...

  11. 41 CFR 109-45.902-2 - Abandonment or destruction without notice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Abandonment or... UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL 45-SALE, ABANDONMENT, OR DESTRUCTION OF PERSONAL PROPERTY 45.9-Abandonment or Destruction of Personal Property § 109-45.902-2 Abandonment or destruction without notice. The head of...

  12. 19 CFR 158.43 - Abandonment or destruction of merchandise in bond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Abandonment or destruction of merchandise in bond..., OR EXPORTED Destroyed, Abandoned, or Exported Merchandise § 158.43 Abandonment or destruction of... for abandonment or destruction of merchandise in bond with the port director on Customs From...

  13. 41 CFR 109-45.902-2 - Abandonment or destruction without notice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Abandonment or... UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL 45-SALE, ABANDONMENT, OR DESTRUCTION OF PERSONAL PROPERTY 45.9-Abandonment or Destruction of Personal Property § 109-45.902-2 Abandonment or destruction without notice. The head of...

  14. 41 CFR 109-45.902-2 - Abandonment or destruction without notice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Abandonment or... UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL 45-SALE, ABANDONMENT, OR DESTRUCTION OF PERSONAL PROPERTY 45.9-Abandonment or Destruction of Personal Property § 109-45.902-2 Abandonment or destruction without notice. The head of...

  15. 19 CFR 158.43 - Abandonment or destruction of merchandise in bond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Abandonment or destruction of merchandise in bond..., OR EXPORTED Destroyed, Abandoned, or Exported Merchandise § 158.43 Abandonment or destruction of... for abandonment or destruction of merchandise in bond with the port director on Customs From...

  16. 41 CFR 109-45.902-2 - Abandonment or destruction without notice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Abandonment or... UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL 45-SALE, ABANDONMENT, OR DESTRUCTION OF PERSONAL PROPERTY 45.9-Abandonment or Destruction of Personal Property § 109-45.902-2 Abandonment or destruction without notice. The head of...

  17. 19 CFR 158.43 - Abandonment or destruction of merchandise in bond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Abandonment or destruction of merchandise in bond..., OR EXPORTED Destroyed, Abandoned, or Exported Merchandise § 158.43 Abandonment or destruction of... for abandonment or destruction of merchandise in bond with the port director on Customs From...

  18. Vaccine Adverse Events

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Home Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Safety & Availability ( ... Center for Biologics Evaluation & Research Vaccine Adverse Events Vaccine Adverse Events Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ...

  19. DESTRUCTIVE EXAMINATION OF SHIPPING PACKAGE 9975-00600

    SciTech Connect

    Daugherty, W

    2007-10-29

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) stores packages containing plutonium (Pu) materials in the K-Area Complex (KAC). The Pu materials are packaged per the DOE 3013 Standard and stored within Model 9975 shipping packages in KAC. The KAC facility DSA (Document Safety Analysis) [1] credits the Model 9975 package to perform several safety functions, including criticality, impact resistance, containment, and fire resistance to ensure the plutonium materials remain in a safe configuration during normal and accident conditions. The Model 9975 package is expected to perform its safety function for at least 12 years from initial packaging. The DSA recognizes the degradation potential for the materials of package construction over time in the KAC storage environment and requires an assessment of materials performance to validate the assumptions of the analysis and ultimately predict service life. As part of the comprehensive Model 9975 package surveillance program [2-3], destructive examination of package 9975-00600 was performed following field surveillance in accordance with Reference [4]. Field surveillance of the Model 9975 package in KAC included nondestructive examination of the drum, fiberboard, lead shield and containment vessels [5]. Results of the field surveillance are provided in Attachment 1. Destructive and non-destructive examinations have been performed on specified components of shipping package 9975-00600. For those attributes that were also measured during the field surveillance, no significant changes were observed. Three conditions were identified that do not meet inspection criteria. These conditions are subject to additional investigation and disposition by the Surveillance Program Authority. The conditions include: (1) The lead shield was covered with a white corrosion layer; (2) The lead shield height dimension exceeded drawing requirements; and (3) Fiberboard thermal conductivity in the axial direction exceeded the specified range. The Surveillance

  20. Role of PTPα in the destruction of periodontal connective tissues.

    PubMed

    Rajshankar, Dhaarmini; Sima, Corneliu; Wang, Qin; Goldberg, Stephanie R; Kazembe, Mwayi; Wang, Yongqiang; Glogauer, Michael; Downey, Gregory P; McCulloch, Christopher A

    2013-01-01

    IL-1β contributes to connective tissue destruction in part by up-regulating stromelysin-1 (MMP-3), which in fibroblasts is a focal adhesion-dependent process. Protein tyrosine phosphatase-α (PTPα) is enriched in and regulates the formation of focal adhesions, but the role of PTPα in connective tissue destruction is not defined. We first examined destruction of periodontal connective tissues in adult PTPα(+/+) and PTPα(-/-) mice subjected to ligature-induced periodontitis, which increases the levels of multiple cytokines, including IL-1β. Three weeks after ligation, maxillae were processed for morphometry, micro-computed tomography and histomorphometry. Compared with unligated controls, there was ∼1.5-3 times greater bone loss as well as 3-fold reduction of the thickness of the gingival lamina propria and 20-fold reduction of the amount of collagen fibers in WT than PTPα(-/-) mice. Immunohistochemical staining of periodontal tissue showed elevated expression of MMP-3 at ligated sites. Second, to examine mechanisms by which PTPα may regulate matrix degradation, human MMP arrays were used to screen conditioned media from human gingival fibroblasts treated with vehicle, IL-1β or TNFα. Although MMP-3 was upregulated by both cytokines, only IL-1β stimulated ERK activation in human gingival fibroblasts plated on fibronectin. TIRF microscopy and immunoblotting analyses of cells depleted of PTPα activity with the use of various mutated constructs or with siRNA or PTPα(KO) and matched wild type fibroblasts were plated on fibronectin to enable focal adhesion formation and stimulated with IL-1β. These data showed that the catalytic and adaptor functions of PTPα were required for IL-1β-induced focal adhesion formation, ERK activation and MMP-3 release. We conclude that inflammation-induced connective tissue degradation involving fibroblasts requires functionally active PTPα and in part is mediated by IL-1β signaling through focal adhesions.

  1. Technical area status report for waste destruction and stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Dalton, J.D.; Harris, T.L.; DeWitt, L.M.

    1993-08-01

    The Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) was established by the Department of Energy (DOE) to direct and coordinate waste management and site remediation programs/activities throughout the DOE complex. In order to successfully achieve the goal of properly managing waste and the cleanup of the DOE sites, the EM was divided into five organizations: the Office of Planning and Resource Management (EM-10); the Office of Environmental Quality Assurance and Resource Management (EM-20); the Office of Waste Operations (EM-30); the Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40); and the Office of Technology and Development (EM-50). The mission of the Office of Technology Development (OTD) is to develop treatment technologies for DOE`s operational and environmental restoration wastes where current treatment technologies are inadequate or not available. The Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP) was created by OTD to assist in the development of treatment technologies for the DOE mixed low-level wastes (MLLW). The MWIP has established five Technical Support Groups (TSGs) whose purpose is to identify, evaluate, and develop treatment technologies within five general technical areas representing waste treatment functions from initial waste handling through generation of final waste forms. These TSGs are: (1) Front-End Waste Handling, (2) Physical/Chemical Treatment, (3) Waste Destruction and Stabilization, (4) Second-Stage Destruction and Offgas Treatment, and (5) Final Waste Forms. This report describes the functions of the Waste Destruction and Stabilization (WDS) group. Specifically, the following items are discussed: DOE waste stream identification; summary of previous efforts; summary of WDS treatment technologies; currently funded WDS activities; and recommendations for future activities.

  2. Destruction thresholds of echogenic liposomes with clinical diagnostic ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Smith, Denise A B; Porter, Tyrone M; Martinez, Janet; Huang, Shaoling; MacDonald, Robert C; McPherson, David D; Holland, Christy K

    2007-05-01

    Echogenic liposomes (ELIP) are submicron-sized phospholipid vesicles that contain both gas and fluid. With antibody conjugation and drug incorporation, these liposomes can be used as novel targeted diagnostic and therapeutic ultrasound contrast agents. The utility of liposomes for contrast depends upon their stability in an acoustic field, whereas the use of liposomes for drug delivery requires the liberation of encapsulated gas and drug payload at the desired treatment site. The objective of this study was twofold: (1) to characterize the stability of liposome echogenicity after reconstitution and (2) to quantitate the acoustic destruction thresholds of liposomes as a function of peak rarefactional pressure (P(r)), pulse duration (PD) and pulse repetition frequency (PRF). The liposomes were insonified in an anechoic sample chamber using a Philips HDI 5000 diagnostic ultrasound scanner with a L12-5 linear array. Liposome stability was evaluated with 6.9-MHz fundamental and 4.5-MHz harmonic B-mode pulses at various P(r) at a fixed PRF. Liposome destruction thresholds were determined using 6.0-MHz Doppler pulses, by varying the PD with a fixed PRF of 1.25 kHz and by varying the PRF with a fixed PD of 3.33 micros. Videos or freeze-captured images were acquired during each insonation experiment and analyzed for echogenicity in a fixed region of interest as a function of time. An initial increase in echogenicity was observed for fundamental and harmonic B-mode imaging pulses. The threshold for acoustically driven diffusion of gas out of the liposomes using 6.0-MHz Doppler pulses was weakly dependent upon PRF and PD. The rapid fragmentation thresholds, however, were highly dependent upon PRF and PD. The quantification of acoustic destruction thresholds of ELIP is an important first step in their development as diagnostic and drug delivery agents.

  3. DESTRUCTIVE EXAMINATION OF SHIPPING PACKAGE 9975-02168

    SciTech Connect

    Daugherty, W.

    2010-11-18

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) stores packages containing plutonium (Pu) materials in the K-Area Complex (KAC). The Pu materials are packaged per the DOE 3013 Standard and stored within Model 9975 shipping packages in KAC. The KAC facility DSA (Document Safety Analysis) credits the Model 9975 package to perform several safety functions, including criticality prevention, impact resistance, containment, and fire resistance to ensure the plutonium materials remain in a safe configuration during normal and accident conditions. The Model 9975 package is expected to perform its safety function for at least 12 years from initial packaging. The DSA recognizes the degradation potential for the materials of package construction over time in the KAC storage environment and requires an assessment of materials performance to validate the assumptions of the analysis and ultimately predict service life. As part of the comprehensive Model 9975 package surveillance program, destructive examination of package 9975-02028 was performed following field surveillance in accordance with Reference. Field surveillance of the Model 9975 package in KAC included nondestructive examination of the drum, fiberboard, lead shield and containment vessels. Results of the field surveillance are provided in Attachment 1. Destructive and non-destructive examinations have been performed on specified components of shipping package 9975-02168. For those attributes that were also measured during the field surveillance, no significant changes were observed. Two conditions were identified that do not meet inspection criteria. These conditions are subject to additional investigation and disposition by the Surveillance Program Authority. The conditions include: (1) The lead shield was covered with a white corrosion layer, and (2) Fiberboard thermal conductivity in the axial direction exceeded the specified range. The Surveillance Program Authority was notified of these conditions and will document the findings

  4. DESTRUCTIVE EXAMINATION OF SHIPPING PACKAGE 9975-03431

    SciTech Connect

    Daugherty, W.

    2012-05-30

    Destructive and non-destructive examinations have been performed on specified components of shipping package 9975-03431. For those attributes that were also measured during the field surveillance, no significant changes were observed. All observations and test results met identified criteria, or were collected for information and trending purposes. Except for modest corrosion of the lead shield (which is typical of these packages following several years service), no evidence of a degraded condition was found in this package. The Savannah River Site (SRS) stores packages containing plutonium (Pu) materials in the KArea Complex (KAC). The Pu materials are packaged per the DOE 3013 Standard and stored within Model 9975 shipping packages in KAC. The KAC facility DSA (Document Safety Analysis) credits the Model 9975 package to perform several safety functions, including criticality prevention, impact resistance, containment, and fire resistance to ensure the plutonium materials remain in a safe configuration during normal and accident conditions. The Model 9975 package is expected to perform its safety function for at least 12 years from initial packaging. The DSA recognizes the degradation potential for the materials of package construction over time in the KAC storage environment and requires an assessment of materials performance to validate the assumptions of the analysis and ultimately predict service life. As part of the comprehensive Model 9975 package surveillance program, destructive examination of package 9975-03431 was performed following field surveillance in accordance with Reference. Field surveillance of the Model 9975 package in KAC included nondestructive examination of the drum, fiberboard, lead shield and containment vessels. Results of the field surveillance are provided in Attachment 1.

  5. DESTRUCTIVE EXAMINATION OF SHIPPING PACKAGE 9975-02028

    SciTech Connect

    Daugherty, W.; Stefek, T.

    2009-12-30

    Destructive and non-destructive examinations have been performed on specified components of shipping package 9975-02028. For those attributes that were also measured during the field surveillance, no significant changes were observed. Four conditions were identified that do not meet inspection criteria. These conditions are subject to additional investigation and disposition by the Surveillance Program Authority. The conditions include: (1) The lead shield was covered with a white corrosion layer; (2) The lead shield height exceeds drawing requirements; (3) Mold was observed on the lower fiberboard subassembly; and (4) Fiberboard thermal conductivity in the axial direction exceeded the specified range. The Surveillance Program Authority was notified of these conditions and will document the disposition by surveillance report. All other observations and test results met identified criteria, or were collected for information and trending purposes. The Savannah River Site (SRS) stores packages containing plutonium (Pu) materials in the K-Area Complex (KAC). The Pu materials are packaged per the DOE 3013 Standard and stored within Model 9975 shipping packages in KAC. The KAC facility DSA (Document Safety Analysis) credits the Model 9975 package to perform several safety functions, including criticality prevention, impact resistance, containment, and fire resistance to ensure the plutonium materials remain in a safe configuration during normal and accident conditions. The Model 9975 package is expected to perform its safety function for at least 12 years from initial packaging. The DSA recognizes the degradation potential for the materials of package construction over time in the KAC storage environment and requires an assessment of materials performance to validate the assumptions of the analysis and ultimately predict service life. As part of the comprehensive Model 9975 package surveillance program, destructive examination of package 9975-02028 was performed

  6. Lateral Orbital Wall Destruction Due to Pilonidal Sinus.

    PubMed

    Karadağ, Emine Çiğdem; Toy, Hatice; Tosun, Zekeriya

    2016-07-01

    Pilonidal sinus is a chronic inflammatory disease commonly observed in the sacrococcygeal region. The authors report a patient of a pilonidal sinus in a rare location-the lateral orbital region. The authors' patient was misdiagnosed with an epidermal cyst, and the subsequent incomplete excision of the sinus tract led a pilonidal sinus with a high morbidity resulting in the destruction of bone tissue in the lateral orbital wall. It was, therefore, crucial to accurately diagnose and treat before the infection progressed through the bone and caused osteomyelitis. PMID:27391513

  7. Solar Processes for the Destruction of Hazardous Chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, D. M.

    1993-06-01

    Solar technologies are being developed to address a wide range of environmental problems. Sunlight plays a role in the passive destruction of hazardous substances in soil, water, and air. Development of processes that use solar energy to remediate environmental problems or to treat process wastes is underway in laboratories around the world. This paper reviews progress in understanding the role of solar photochemistry in removing man-made chemicals from the environment, and developing technology that uses solar photochemistry for this purpose in an efficient manner.

  8. Progressive osseous destruction as a complication of HIV-periodontitis.

    PubMed

    SanGiacomo, T R; Tan, P M; Loggi, D G; Itkin, A B

    1990-10-01

    A pathologic condition is described, characterized by rampant necrosis of gingival mucosa, periodontium, and related osseous structures associated with systemic infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). It is believed that this condition is an extension beyond the normal clinical course of HIV-periodontitis (HIV-P) and manifests itself in three progressive stages: (1) HIV-associated gingivitis, (2) HIV-P, and (3) an extension of HIV-P to osseous necrosis. Two cases of osseous destruction attending HIV-P are reported, one of which led to initial diagnosis of HIV infection. They represent the final stage of disease progression with localized necrosis of gingiva, periodontium, and alveolar bone.

  9. Potential techniques for non-destructive evaluation of cable materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillen, Kenneth T.; Clough, Roger L.; Mattson, Bengt; Stenberg, Bengt; Oestman, Erik

    This paper describes the connection between mechanical degradation of common cable materials, in radiation and elevated temperature environments, and density increases caused by the oxidation which leads to this degradation. Two techniques based on density changes are suggested as potential non-destructive evaluation (NDE) procedures which may be applicable to monitoring the mechanical condition of cable materials in power plant environments. The first technique is direct measurement of density changes, via a density gradient column, using small shavings removed from the surface of cable jackets at selected locations. The second technique is computed X-ray tomography, utilizing a portable scanning device.

  10. Large geodes in rheumatoid arthritis without joint destruction.

    PubMed

    Rabar, Didier; Crozes, Philippe; Lernoud, Murielle; Meignan, Francis

    2002-12-01

    Although subchondral geodes are a well-known radiological feature of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), large geodes are uncommon. Progressive bone damage with pathological fractures has been reported. We report the case of a 49-year-old man with seropositive RA in whom large, rapidly progressive geodes in the wrists, hands, and feet contrasted with the absence of joint destruction, good functional tolerance, and moderate abnormalities of markers for inflammation. The location and rapid progression of the cyst-like lesions in this patient were highly unusual.

  11. Cold shivering activity after unilateral destruction of the vestibular apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuzmina, G. I.

    1980-01-01

    The bioelectric activity of muscles (flexors and extensors of the forelimbs and hindlimbs) during cold shivering after unilateral destruction of the vestibular apparatus. It was found, that unilateral delabyrinthing produces bilateral facilitation of cold shivering in the flexor extremities more pronounced on the ipsilateral side. In the extensor muscles there was an absence of bioelectric activity both before and after delabyrinthing. Enhancement of cold shivering in the flexor extremities following intervention was evidently conditioned by removal of the inhibiting effect of the vestibulary apparatus on the function of special centers.

  12. APPARATUS FOR NON-DESTRUCTIVE INSPECTION OF CANTILEVERED MEMBERS

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, E.R.; Mahoney, C.H.; Lay, C.R.

    1961-10-24

    An apparatus for non-destructive inspection of cantilevered members, such as compressor blades, is described. The member under inspection is vibrated with a regulated source of air under pressure. The amplitude of vibration of the member is maintained at its natural frequency. The frequency of vibration of the member is measured. An indication of an excessive decay or erratic shifting in the measured frequency above an allowable hysteretic decay is provided as an indication of a fault in the member. The member is vibrated for a selected test period. (AEC)

  13. Thermal Destruction of Riboflavin in Different Aggregate States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astanov, S.; Sharipov, M. Z.; Faizullaev, A. R.; Kurtaliev, E. N.; Nizomov, N.

    2014-03-01

    The influence of temperature on the spectroscopic properties of powders and aqueous solutions of riboflavin was studied using NMR, linear dichroism, IR and UV absorption spectroscopy, and luminescence. It was found that exposure of riboflavin powders over a wide temperature range (290-423 K) did not change significantly its properties and spectral characteristics. The absorbance and fluorescence of aqueous solutions of riboflavin decreased under the same conditions due to riboflavin thermal destruction. The fraction of destroyed molecules in aqueous solutions of riboflavin was in the range 4-28% and depended on the drug concentration and thermal conditions.

  14. Destructive discovertebral degenerative disease of the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Charran, A K; Tony, G; Lalam, R; Tyrrell, P N M; Tins, B; Singh, J; Eisenstein, S M; Balain, B; Trivedi, J M; Cassar-Pullicino, V N

    2012-09-01

    The uncommon variant of degenerative hip joint disease, termed rapidly progressive osteoarthritis, and highlighted by severe joint space loss and osteochondral disintegration, is well established. We present a similar unusual subset in the lumbar spine termed destructive discovertebral degenerative disease (DDDD) with radiological features of vertebral malalignment, severe disc resorption, and "bone sand" formation secondary to vertebral fragmentation. Co-existing metabolic bone disease is likely to promote the development of DDDD of the lumbar spine, which presents with back pain and sciatica due to nerve root compression by the "bone sand" in the epidural space. MRI and CT play a complimentary role in making the diagnosis.

  15. Destructive fat tissue engineering using photodynamic and selective photothermal effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuchin, Valery V.; Yanina, Irina Yu.; Simonenko, Georgy V.

    2009-02-01

    Destructive fat tissue engineering could be realized using the optical method, which provides reduction of regional or site-specific accumulations of subcutaneous adipose tissue on the cell level. We hypothesize that light irradiation due to photodynamic and selective photothermal effects may lead to fat cell lypolytic activity (the enhancement of lipolysis of cell triglycerides due to expression of lipase activity and cell release of free fat acids (FFAs) due to temporal cell membrane porosity), and cell delayed killing due to apoptosis caused by the induced fat cell stress and/or limited cell necrosis.

  16. Deterring weapons of mass destruction terrorism. Master`s thesis

    SciTech Connect

    LeHardy, F.A.

    1997-12-01

    This thesis examines terrorist acts involving the use of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) against unsuspecting civilians by the Aum Shinrikyo and Rajneesh cults. The proliferation of WMD (i.e., nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons) has created a concern that terrorists might use WMD. Despite obvious signs, these groups were not identified as terrorists until after they committed terrorist attacks. This thesis identifies common characteristics of terrorists that have used WMD in the past and generates indicators of non-state actors that might commit WMD terrorism in the future.

  17. Diffusion Dynamics and Creative Destruction in a Simple Classical Model

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The article explores the impact of the diffusion of new methods of production on output and employment growth and income distribution within a Classical one‐sector framework. Disequilibrium paths are studied analytically and in terms of simulations. Diffusion by differential growth affects aggregate dynamics through several channels. The analysis reveals the non‐steady nature of economic change and shows that the adaptation pattern depends both on the innovation's factor‐saving bias and on the extent of the bias, which determines the strength of the selection pressure on non‐innovators. The typology of different cases developed shows various aspects of Schumpeter's concept of creative destruction. PMID:27642192

  18. Non-destructive characterization using pulsed fast-thermal neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Womble, P. C.; Schultz, F. J.; Vourvopoulos, G.

    1995-05-01

    Explosives, illicit drugs, and other contraband materials contain various chemical elements in quantities and ratios that differentiate them from each other and from innocuous substances. Furthermore, the major chemical elements in coal can provide information about various parameters of importance to the coal industry. In both examples, the non-destructive identification of chemical elements can be performed using pulsed fast-thermal neutrons that, through nuclear reactions, excite the nuclei of the various elements. This technique is being currently developed for the dismantling of nuclear weapons classified as trainers, and for the on-line coal bulk analysis.

  19. Psychosis, aggression, and self-destructive behavior in hospitalized adolescents.

    PubMed

    Delga, I; Heinssen, R K; Fritsch, R C; Goodrich, W; Yates, B T

    1989-04-01

    The authors studied the history of aggressive and self-destructive behaviors in psychotic and nonpsychotic hospitalized adolescents (N = 137). A multidimensional measure of self- and other-directed aggression was retrospectively applied to each patient's social and developmental history. Nonsignificant gender and diagnostic differences were obtained on ratings of violence and suicide. Broader definitions of internal and external aggression yielded nonsignificant diagnostic differences, but gender differences were observed on both internal and external aggression measures. Females displayed greater internal aggression, and males reported higher external aggression scores. These results, compared to those of other investigators, suggest the importance of social and cultural variables in understanding adolescent psychosis and aggression.

  20. Wave field features of shallow vertical discontinuity and their application in non-destructive detection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liu, J.; Xia, J.; Luo, Y.; Chen, C.; Li, X.; Huang, Y.

    2007-01-01

    The geotechnical integrity of critical infrastructure can be seriously compromised by the presence of fractures or crevices. Non-destructive techniques to accurately detect fractures in critical infrastructure such as dams and highways could be of significant benefit to the geotechnical industry. This paper investigates the application of shallow seismic and georadar methods to the detection of a vertical discontinuity using numerical simulations. The objective is to address the kinematical analysis of a vertical discontinuity, determine the resulting wave field characteristics, and provide the basis for determining the existence of vertical discontinuities based on the recorded signals. Simulation results demonstrate that: (1) A reflection from a vertical discontinuity produces a hyperbolic feature on a seismic or georadar profile; (2) In order for a reflection from a vertical discontinuity to be produced, a reflecting horizon below the discontinuity must exist, the offset between source and receiver (x0) must be non-zero, on the same side of the vertical discontinuity; (3) The range of distances from the vertical discontinuity where a reflection event is observed is proportional to its length and to x0; (4) Should the vertical crevice (or fracture) pass through a reflecting horizon, dual hyperbolic features can be observed on the records, and this can be used as a determining factor that the vertical crevice passes through the interface; and (5) diffractions from the edges of the discontinuity can be recorded with relatively smaller amplitude than reflections and their ranges are not constrained by the length of discontinuity. If the length of discontinuity is short enough, diffractions are the dominant feature. Real-world examples show that the shallow seismic reflection method and the georadar method are capable of recording the hyperbolic feature, which can be interpreted as vertical discontinuity. Thus, these methods show some promise as effective non-destructive