Science.gov

Sample records for desy scientific annual

  1. Operation of the Free-Electron Laser at DESY and First Scientific Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldhaus, Josef

    2007-01-01

    The free-electron laser at DESY in Hamburg (FLASH) is the first free-electron laser built for the vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) and soft X-ray region. It started user operation in summer 2005 and has been operated routinely for scientific experiments at 32 nm wavelength providing up to 150 pulses per second with GW peak power and a pulse duration between 20 and 50 fs. Recently also shorter wavelengths at 25.5 nm and ˜13 nm have been used for experiments. The FEL beam can be switched between four experimental stations by movable mirrors. A synchronised optical laser system is available for pump-probe experiments. Diagnostics has been implemented to monitor the pulse energy and its timing with respect to the optical laser. The current status of the facility is reviewed and examples of first user experiments are presented.

  2. Scientific Directory 1977 and Annual Bibliography 1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Institutes of Health, (DHEW), Bethesda, MD. Div. of Scientific Reports.

    The Scientific Directory and Annual Bibliography of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) is intended for reference use by research workers in the biomedical sciences. It presents a broad outline of NIH organizational structure, the professional staff, and their scientific and technical publications covering work done at NIH. The volume also…

  3. Centrally managed tapes at DESY

    SciTech Connect

    Hell, O.

    1994-12-31

    Tapes at DESY are managed by the computer center and thus offer virtually unlimited storage space to the DESY computer center users. This paper describes the most recent version of the DESY tape management system, its predecessors having been in service for many years.

  4. Physics of Space: the 43d Annual Student Scientific Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharova, P. E.; Kuznetsov, E. D.; Ostrovskii, A. B.; Salii, S. V.; Sobolev, A. M.; Kholshevnikov, K. V.; Shustov, B. M.

    2014-02-01

    The 43d annual student scientific conference "Physics of Space" aims to overcome the gap between modern scientific research and basic education in astronomy. The main purpose of the conference is to introduce the students to modern problems and directions of scientific research. The working languages of the conference are Russian and English.

  5. Physics of Space: the 41st Annual Student Scientific Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharova, P. E.; Kuznetsov, E. D.; Ostrovskii, A. B.; Salii, S. V.; Sobolev, A. M.; Kholshevnikov, K. V.; Shustov, B. M.

    2012-01-01

    The 41st annual student scientific conference "Physics of Space" aims to overcome the gap between modern scientific research and basic education in astronomy. The main purpose of the conference is to introduce the students to modern problems and directions of scientific research. The working languages of the conference are Russian and English.

  6. The FLASHForward facility at DESY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aschikhin, A.; Behrens, C.; Bohlen, S.; Dale, J.; Delbos, N.; di Lucchio, L.; Elsen, E.; Erbe, J.-H.; Felber, M.; Foster, B.; Goldberg, L.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gruse, J.-N.; Hidding, B.; Hu, Zhanghu; Karstensen, S.; Knetsch, A.; Kononenko, O.; Libov, V.; Ludwig, K.; Maier, A. R.; Martinez de la Ossa, A.; Mehrling, T.; Palmer, C. A. J.; Pannek, F.; Schaper, L.; Schlarb, H.; Schmidt, B.; Schreiber, S.; Schwinkendorf, J.-P.; Steel, H.; Streeter, M.; Tauscher, G.; Wacker, V.; Weichert, S.; Wunderlich, S.; Zemella, J.; Osterhoff, J.

    2016-01-01

    The FLASHForward project at DESY is a pioneering plasma-wakefield acceleration experiment that aims to produce, in a few centimetres of ionised hydrogen, beams with energy of order GeV that are of quality sufficient to be used in a free-electron laser. The plasma is created by ionising a gas in a gas cell with a multi-TW laser system. The plasma wave will be driven by high-current-density electron beams from the FLASH linear accelerator. The laser system can also be used to provide optical diagnostics of the plasma and electron beams due to the <30 fs synchronisation between the laser and the driving electron beam. The project will explore both external and internal witness-beam injection techniques. The operation parameters of the experiment are discussed, as well as the scientific programme.

  7. ATR National Scientific User Facility 2013 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, Julie A.; Robertson, Sarah

    2015-03-01

    This is the 2013 Annual Report for the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility. This report includes information on university-run research projects along with a description of the program and the capabilities offered researchers.

  8. Scientific Library to Hold Annual Winter Video Series | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    The Scientific Library is getting ready for its Annual Winter Video Series. Beginning on Monday, January 9 and concluding on Friday, February 17, the Winter Video Series will consist of two different PBS programs, each with three episodes.

  9. TCGA Third Annual Scientific Symposium - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    Monday, May 12 - Tuesday, May 13, 2014 National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Md. This open scientific meeting will consist of collaborative workshops, poster sessions, and plenary sessions. Registration is now open.

  10. Progress in Scientific and Technical Communications, 1968 Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Council for Science and Technology, Washington, DC. Committee on Scientific and Technical Information.

    This sixth annual report describes progress achieved by the Federal Government in improving the communication of scientific and technical information to support and enhance national science and technology. Included in the report are details regarding the scientific and technical activities of individual Federal Agencies, such as the Atomic Energy…

  11. Accelerating scientific discovery : 2007 annual report.

    SciTech Connect

    Beckman, P.; Dave, P.; Drugan, C.

    2008-11-14

    As a gateway for scientific discovery, the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) works hand in hand with the world's best computational scientists to advance research in a diverse span of scientific domains, ranging from chemistry, applied mathematics, and materials science to engineering physics and life sciences. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science, researchers are using the IBM Blue Gene/L supercomputer at the ALCF to study and explore key scientific problems that underlie important challenges facing our society. For instance, a research team at the University of California-San Diego/ SDSC is studying the molecular basis of Parkinson's disease. The researchers plan to use the knowledge they gain to discover new drugs to treat the disease and to identify risk factors for other diseases that are equally prevalent. Likewise, scientists from Pratt & Whitney are using the Blue Gene to understand the complex processes within aircraft engines. Expanding our understanding of jet engine combustors is the secret to improved fuel efficiency and reduced emissions. Lessons learned from the scientific simulations of jet engine combustors have already led Pratt & Whitney to newer designs with unprecedented reductions in emissions, noise, and cost of ownership. ALCF staff members provide in-depth expertise and assistance to those using the Blue Gene/L and optimizing user applications. Both the Catalyst and Applications Performance Engineering and Data Analytics (APEDA) teams support the users projects. In addition to working with scientists running experiments on the Blue Gene/L, we have become a nexus for the broader global community. In partnership with the Mathematics and Computer Science Division at Argonne National Laboratory, we have created an environment where the world's most challenging computational science problems can be addressed. Our expertise in high-end scientific computing enables us to provide guidance for applications

  12. Detector developments at DESY.

    PubMed

    Wunderer, Cornelia B; Allahgholi, Aschkan; Bayer, Matthias; Bianco, Laura; Correa, Jonathan; Delfs, Annette; Göttlicher, Peter; Hirsemann, Helmut; Jack, Stefanie; Klyuev, Alexander; Lange, Sabine; Marras, Alessandro; Niemann, Magdalena; Pithan, Florian; Reza, Salim; Sheviakov, Igor; Smoljanin, Sergej; Tennert, Maximilian; Trunk, Ulrich; Xia, Qingqing; Zhang, Jiaguo; Zimmer, Manfred; Das, Dipayan; Guerrini, Nicola; Marsh, Ben; Sedgwick, Iain; Turchetta, Renato; Cautero, Giuseppe; Giuressi, Dario; Menk, Ralf; Khromova, Anastasiya; Pinaroli, Giovanni; Stebel, Luigi; Marchal, Julien; Pedersen, Ulrik; Rees, Nick; Steadman, Paul; Sussmuth, Mark; Tartoni, Nicola; Yousef, Hazem; Hyun, HyoJung; Kim, KyungSook; Rah, Seungyu; Dinapoli, Roberto; Greiffenberg, Dominic; Mezza, Davide; Mozzanica, Aldo; Schmitt, Bernd; Shi, Xintian; Krueger, Hans; Klanner, Robert; Schwandt, Joem; Graafsma, Heinz

    2016-01-01

    With the increased brilliance of state-of-the-art synchrotron radiation sources and the advent of free-electron lasers (FELs) enabling revolutionary science with EUV to X-ray photons comes an urgent need for suitable photon imaging detectors. Requirements include high frame rates, very large dynamic range, single-photon sensitivity with low probability of false positives and (multi)-megapixels. At DESY, one ongoing development project - in collaboration with RAL/STFC, Elettra Sincrotrone Trieste, Diamond, and Pohang Accelerator Laboratory - is the CMOS-based soft X-ray imager PERCIVAL. PERCIVAL is a monolithic active-pixel sensor back-thinned to access its primary energy range of 250 eV to 1 keV with target efficiencies above 90%. According to preliminary specifications, the roughly 10 cm × 10 cm, 3.5k × 3.7k monolithic sensor will operate at frame rates up to 120 Hz (commensurate with most FELs) and use multiple gains within 27 µm pixels to measure 1 to ∼100000 (500 eV) simultaneously arriving photons. DESY is also leading the development of the AGIPD, a high-speed detector based on hybrid pixel technology intended for use at the European XFEL. This system is being developed in collaboration with PSI, University of Hamburg, and University of Bonn. The AGIPD allows single-pulse imaging at 4.5 MHz frame rate into a 352-frame buffer, with a dynamic range allowing single-photon detection and detection of more than 10000 photons at 12.4 keV in the same image. Modules of 65k pixels each are configured to make up (multi)megapixel cameras. This review describes the AGIPD and the PERCIVAL concepts and systems, including some recent results and a summary of their current status. It also gives a short overview over other FEL-relevant developments where the Photon Science Detector Group at DESY is involved.

  13. Annual scientific meeting--American Headache Society Washington 2011--highlights.

    PubMed

    Purdy, R Allan

    2012-05-01

    The 53rd Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Headache Society was held in Washington from June 2 to 5, 2011. Important clinical and basic science information was presented at this meeting. This is a review of the highlights of that meeting dealing in many areas of headache medicine. Once again, this meeting, which is the premier scientific meeting of the American Headache Society, provided lots of new and exciting information about multiple facets of migraine headache and other disorders.

  14. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility 2010 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Mary Catherine Thelen; Todd R. Allen

    2011-05-01

    This is the 2010 ATR National Scientific User Facility Annual Report. This report provides an overview of the program for 2010, along with individual project reports from each of the university principal investigators. The report also describes the capabilities offered to university researchers here at INL and at the ATR NSUF partner facilities.

  15. The 21st Annual Prostate Cancer Foundation Scientific Retreat report.

    PubMed

    Miyahira, Andrea K; Simons, Jonathan W; Soule, Howard R

    2015-08-01

    The 21st Annual Prostate Cancer Foundation (PCF) Scientific Retreat was held from October 23-25, 2014, in Carlsbad, CA. This event is the world's foremost scientific meeting focusing on prostate cancer and brings together leading basic, translational and clinical researchers in prostate cancer and other diverse disciplines to discuss the newest findings most likely to advance the understanding of prostate cancer and the clinical care of prostate cancer patients. This year's meeting highlighted themes including: (i) research integrity and standards for scientific reproducibility; (ii) prostate cancer disparities; (iii) mechanisms and models of prostate cancer progression and dormancy; (iv) mechanisms of therapeutic resistance; and (v) advancements in precision medicine treatments, treatment models, and predictive and prognostic biomarkers.

  16. The DESI instrument control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honscheid, K.; Elliott, A. E.; Beaufore, L.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Castander, F.; daCosta, L.; Fausti, A.; Kent, S.; Kirkby, D.; Neilsen, E.; Reil, K.; Serrano, S.; Slozar, A.

    2016-08-01

    The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) , a new instrument currently under construction for the Mayall 4m telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory, will consist of a wide-field optical corrector with a 3.2 degree diameter field of view, a focal plane with 5,000 robotically controlled fiber positioners and 10 fiber fed broadband spectrographs. This article describes the design of the DESI instrument control system (ICS). The ICS coordinates fiber positioner operations, interfaces to the Mayall telescope control system, monitors operating conditions, reads out the 30 spectrograph CCDs and provides observer support and data quality monitoring.

  17. The 23rd Annual Prostate Cancer Foundation Scientific Retreat report.

    PubMed

    Miyahira, Andrea K; Soule, Howard R

    2017-07-01

    The 23rd Annual Prostate Cancer Foundation (PCF) Scientific Retreat was convened October 27-29, 2016, in Carlsbad, CA. This event focuses on the latest advances in basic, translational, and clinical prostate cancer research with the greatest promise for advancing our understanding of prostate cancer biology and improving patient outcomes and quality of life. Themes highlighted at this year's meeting included: i) targeting DNA repair deficiency in prostate cancer; ii) optimizing the use of Radium-223 and bone-targeting agents; iii) advances in cancer immunotherapeutic approaches; iv) targeting developmental pathways in prostate cancer; v) advances in circulating tumor DNA technology and applications; vi) precision survivorship; and vii) novel treatments and treatment strategies in prostate cancer. This article reviews the key advances discussed at the Retreat for the purpose of disseminating this knowledge to accelerate the development of new treatments and improved outcomes for men suffering with prostate cancer. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. The 20th Annual Prostate Cancer Foundation Scientific Retreat report.

    PubMed

    Miyahira, Andrea K; Simons, Jonathan W; Soule, Howard R

    2014-06-01

    The 20th Annual Prostate Cancer Foundation (PCF) Scientific Retreat was held from October 24 to 26, 2013, in National Harbor, Maryland. This event is held annually for the purpose of convening a diverse group of leading experimental and clinical researchers from academia, industry, and government to present and discuss critical and emerging topics relevant to prostate cancer (PCa) biology, and the diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of PCa patients, with a focus on results that will lend to treatments for the most life-threatening stages of this disease. The themes that were highlighted at this year's event included: (i) mechanisms of PCa initiation and progression: cellular origins, neurons and neuroendocrine PCa, long non-coding RNAs, epigenetics, tumor cell metabolism, tumor-immune interactions, and novel molecular mechanisms; (ii) advancements in precision medicine strategies and predictive biomarkers of progression, survival, and drug sensitivities, including the analysis of circulating tumor cells and cell-free tumor DNA-new methods for liquid biopsies; (iii) new treatments including epigenomic therapy and immunotherapy, discovery of new treatment targets, and defining and targeting mechanisms of resistance to androgen-axis therapeutics; and (iv) new experimental and clinical epidemiology methods and techniques, including PCa population studies using patho-epidemiology.

  19. The 22nd annual prostate cancer foundation scientific retreat report.

    PubMed

    Miyahira, Andrea K; Simons, Jonathan W; Soule, Howard R

    2016-09-01

    The 22nd Annual Prostate Cancer Foundation (PCF) Scientific Retreat was convened in Washington, D.C. from October 8 to 10, 2015. This event is the foremost scientific conference in the world focusing on basic, translational, and clinical prostate cancer research with the highest potential for accelerating the understanding of prostate cancer biology and improving the lives and outcomes of prostate cancer patients. Topics highlighted during the 2015 Retreat included: (i) new strategies and treatments for localized high-risk, hormone-naïve, oligometastatic, castrate-resistant, and treatment-refractory prostate cancer settings; (ii) the biology and genomics of tumor heterogeneity and tumor evolution; (iii) new understandings on the mechanisms and targeting of oncogenic drivers of prostate cancer; (iv) bioengineering of novel therapies and drug delivery methods; (v) innovative approaches to tumor immunotherapy; (vi) emerging molecular imaging technologies with improved sensitivity and specificity; and (vii) advancements in prognostic and predictive biomarkers and precision medicine strategies. Prostate 76:1037-1052, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Novel Aspects of the DESI Data Acquisition System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaufore, Lucas; Honscheid, Klaus; Elliott, Ann; Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) will measure the effect of dark energy on the expansion of the universe. It will obtain optical spectra for tens of millions of galaxies and quasars, constructing a 3-dimensional map spanning the nearby universe to 10 billion light years. The survey will be conducted on the Mayall 4-meter telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory starting in 2018. In order to achieve these scientific goals the DESI collaboration is building a high throughput spectrograph capable of observing thousands of spectra simultaneously. In this presentation we discuss the DESI instrument control and data acquisition system that is currently being developed to operate the 5,000 fiber positioners in the focal plane, the 10 spectrographs each with three CDD cameras and every other aspect of the instrument. Special emphasis will be given to novel aspects of the design including the use of inexpensive Linux-based microcontrollers such as the Raspberry PI to control a number of DESI hardware components.

  1. The DESI fiber positioner system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubnell, Michael; Ameel, Jon; Besuner, Robert W.; Gershkovich, Irena; Heetderks, Henry D.; Hoerler, Philipp; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Heetderks, Henry D.; Silber, Joseph H.; Tarlé, Gregory; Weaverdyck, Curtis

    2016-08-01

    The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) is under construction to measure the expansion history of the Universe using the baryon acoustic oscillation technique. A new prime focus corrector for the KPNO Mayall telescope will deliver light to 5,000 fiber optic positioners feeding ten broad-band spectrographs. The positioners have eccentric axis kinematics. Actuation is provided by two 4mm diameter DC brushless gear-motors. An attached electronics board accepts a DC voltage for power and CAN messages for communications and drives the two motors. The positioner accepts the ferrulized and polished fiber and provides a mechanically safe path through its internal mechanism. Positioning is rapid and accurate with typical RMS errors of less than 5 μm.

  2. ATR National Scientific User Facility 2015 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sarah Robertson; James Lane; Doug Copsey

    2015-09-01

    This is the 2015 Annual Report for the Nuclear Science User Facility. This report includes information on university-run research projects along with a description of the program and the capabilities offered researchers.

  3. Salt Tolerance of Desorption Electrospray Ionization (DESI)

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Ayanna U.; Talaty, Nari; Cooks, R G; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2007-01-01

    Suppression of ion intensity in the presence of high salt matrices is common in most mass spectrometry ionization techniques. Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) is an ionization method that exhibits salt tolerance, and this is investigated. DESI analysis was performed on three different drug mixtures in the presence of 0, 0.2, 2, 5, 10, and 20% NaCl:KCl weight by volume from seven different surfaces. At physiological concentrations individual drugs in each mixture were observed with each surface. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) was used to provide additional confirmation for select compounds. Multiple stage experiments, to MS5, were performed for select compounds. Even in the absence of added salt, the benzodiazepine containing mixture yielded sodium and potassium adducts of carbamazepine which masked the ions of interest. These adducts were eliminated by adding 0.1% 7M ammonium acetate to the standard methanol:water (1:1) spray solvent. Comparison of the salt tolerance of DESI with that of electrospray ionization (ESI) demonstrated much better signal/noise characteristics for DESI in this study. The salt tolerance of DESI was also studied by performing limit of detection and dynamic range experiments. Even at a salt concentration significantly above physiological concentrations, select surfaces were effective in providing spectra that allowed the ready identification of the compounds of interest. The already high salt tolerance of DESI can be optimized further by appropriate choices of surface and spray solution.

  4. National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center 2007 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hules, John A.; Bashor, Jon; Wang, Ucilia; Yarris, Lynn; Preuss, Paul

    2008-10-23

    This report presents highlights of the research conducted on NERSC computers in a variety of scientific disciplines during the year 2007. It also reports on changes and upgrades to NERSC's systems and services aswell as activities of NERSC staff.

  5. Abstracts from the 2017 American College of Medical Toxicology (ACMT) Annual Scientific Meeting.

    PubMed

    2017-03-01

    These are the abstracts of the 2017 American College of Medical Toxicology (ACMT) Annual Scientific Meeting. Included here are 120 abstracts that will be presented in March 2017, including research studies from around the globe and the ToxIC collaboration, clinically significant case reports describing new toxicologic phenomena, and encore presentations from other scientific meetings.

  6. The DESI Wide Field Corrector Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Doel, Peter; Sholl, Michael J.; Liang, Ming; Brooks, David; Flaugher, Brenna; Gutierrez, Gaston; Kent, Stephen; Lampton, Michael; Miller, Timothy; Sprayberry, David

    2014-01-01

    The Dark Energy Spectroscopic instrument (DESI) is a 5000 fiber multi-object spectrometer system under development for installation on the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO) Kitt Peak 4m telescope (the Mayall telescope). DESI is designated to perform a 14,000° (square) galaxy and Quasi-Stellar Object (QSO) redshift survey to improve estimates of the dark energy equation of state. The survey design imposes numerous constraints on a prime focus corrector design, including field of view, geometrical blur, stability, fiber injection efficiency, zenith angle, mass and coast. The DESI baseline wide-field optical design described herein provides a 3.2 diameter field of view with six 0.8-1.14m diameter lenses and an integral atmospheric dispersion compensator.

  7. Institute for Scientific Computing Research Annual Report: Fiscal Year 2004

    SciTech Connect

    Keyes, D E

    2005-02-07

    Large-scale scientific computation and all of the disciplines that support and help to validate it have been placed at the focus of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) by the Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) program of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) initiative of the Office of Science of the Department of Energy (DOE). The maturation of computational simulation as a tool of scientific and engineering research is underscored in the November 2004 statement of the Secretary of Energy that, ''high performance computing is the backbone of the nation's science and technology enterprise''. LLNL operates several of the world's most powerful computers--including today's single most powerful--and has undertaken some of the largest and most compute-intensive simulations ever performed. Ultrascale simulation has been identified as one of the highest priorities in DOE's facilities planning for the next two decades. However, computers at architectural extremes are notoriously difficult to use efficiently. Furthermore, each successful terascale simulation only points out the need for much better ways of interacting with the resulting avalanche of data. Advances in scientific computing research have, therefore, never been more vital to LLNL's core missions than at present. Computational science is evolving so rapidly along every one of its research fronts that to remain on the leading edge, LLNL must engage researchers at many academic centers of excellence. In Fiscal Year 2004, the Institute for Scientific Computing Research (ISCR) served as one of LLNL's main bridges to the academic community with a program of collaborative subcontracts, visiting faculty, student internships, workshops, and an active seminar series. The ISCR identifies researchers from the academic community for computer science and computational science collaborations with LLNL and hosts them for short- and

  8. The New Hyperspectral Sensor Desis on the Multi-Payload Platform Muses Installed on the Iss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, R.; Avbelj, J.; Carmona, E.; Eckardt, A.; Gerasch, B.; Graham, L.; Günther, B.; Heiden, U.; Ickes, J.; Kerr, G.; Knodt, U.; Krutz, D.; Krawczyk, H.; Makarau, A.; Miller, R.; Perkins, R.; Walter, I.

    2016-06-01

    The new hyperspectral instrument DLR Earth Sensing Imaging Spectrometer (DESIS) will be developed and integrated in the Multi-User-System for Earth Sensing (MUSES) platform installed on the International Space Station (ISS). The DESIS instrument will be launched to the ISS mid of 2017 and robotically installed in one of the four slots of the MUSES platform. After a four month commissioning phase the operational phase will last at least until 2020. The MUSES / DESIS system will be commanded and operated by the publically traded company TBE (Teledyne Brown Engineering), which initiated the whole program. TBE provides the MUSES platform and the German Aerospace Center (DLR) develops the instrument DESIS and establishes a Ground Segment for processing, archiving, delivering and calibration of the image data mainly used for scientific and humanitarian applications. Well calibrated and harmonized products will be generated together with the Ground Segment established at Teledyne. The article describes the Space Segment consisting of the MUSES platform and the instrument DESIS as well as the activities at the two (synchronized) Ground Segments consisting of the processing methods, product generation, data calibration and product validation. Finally comments to the data policy are given.

  9. Institute for Scientific Computing Research Fiscal Year 2002 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Keyes, D E; McGraw, J R; Bodtker, L K

    2003-03-11

    The Institute for Scientific Computing Research (ISCR) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is jointly administered by the Computing Applications and Research Department (CAR) and the University Relations Program (URP), and this joint relationship expresses its mission. An extensively externally networked ISCR cost-effectively expands the level and scope of national computational science expertise available to the Laboratory through CAR. The URP, with its infrastructure for managing six institutes and numerous educational programs at LLNL, assumes much of the logistical burden that is unavoidable in bridging the Laboratory's internal computational research environment with that of the academic community. As large-scale simulations on the parallel platforms of DOE's Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASCI) become increasingly important to the overall mission of LLNL, the role of the ISCR expands in importance, accordingly. Relying primarily on non-permanent staffing, the ISCR complements Laboratory research in areas of the computer and information sciences that are needed at the frontier of Laboratory missions. The ISCR strives to be the ''eyes and ears'' of the Laboratory in the computer and information sciences, in keeping the Laboratory aware of and connected to important external advances. It also attempts to be ''feet and hands, in carrying those advances into the Laboratory and incorporating them into practice. In addition to conducting research, the ISCR provides continuing education opportunities to Laboratory personnel, in the form of on-site workshops taught by experts on novel software or hardware technologies. The ISCR also seeks to influence the research community external to the Laboratory to pursue Laboratory-related interests and to train the workforce that will be required by the Laboratory. Part of the performance of this function is interpreting to the external community appropriate (unclassified) aspects of the Laboratory's own contributions

  10. The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI)

    SciTech Connect

    Flaugher, Brenna

    1998-03-01

    The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) is a Stage IV ground-based dark energy experiment that will study baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) and the growth of structure through redshift-space distortions with a wide-area galaxy and quasar spectroscopic redshift survey. The DESI instrument consists of a new wide- eld (3.2 deg. linear eld of view) corrector plus a multi-object spectrometer with up to 5000 robotically positioned optical bers and will be installed at prime focus on the Mayall 4m telescope at Kitt Peak, Arizona. The bers feed 10 three-arm spectrographs producing spectra that cover a wavelength range from 360-980 nm and have resolution of 2000-5500 depending on the wavelength. The DESI instrument is designed for a 14,000 sq. deg. multi-year survey of targets that trace the evolution of dark energy out to redshift 3.5 using the redshifts of luminous red galaxies (LRGs), emission line galaxies (ELGs) and quasars. DESI is the successor to the successful Stage-III BOSS spectroscopic redshift survey and complements imaging surveys such as the Stage-III Dark Energy Survey (DES, currently operating) and the Stage-IV Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST, planned start early in the next decade.

  11. GROUND MOTION ACTIVITIES AT DESY - AN OVERVIEW.

    SciTech Connect

    MONTAG,C.

    2002-09-02

    Ground motion studies have been performed at DESY for more than a decade, covering beam motion in the two-ring e-p collider NEW, luminosity preservation in Linear Colliders, and active stabilization methods. An overview of past and present activities will be given.

  12. Publication Rates of Presentations at Annual Scientific Meetings of the Turkish Neurosurgical Society.

    PubMed

    Eksi, Murat Sakir; Kaplan, Sumeyye Coruh; Yilmaz, Baran; Akakin, Akin; Toktas, Zafer Orkun; Konya, Deniz; Kilic, Turker

    2017-01-01

    National and international society meetings are suitable mediums at which diverse research topics from basic, clinical and translational sciences can be presented to an audience of peers. In this study, our purpose was to evaluate publication rates of presentations in the last recent four years" annual scientific meetings of Turkish Neurosurgical Society (TNS). Abstracts of both podium and poster presentations were retrieved from the congress booklets of TNS. Study timeline included TNS annual scientific meetings of 2011, 2012, 2013, and 2014. Abstract titles and author names of the abstracts were searched in Pubmed/MEDLINE and Google Scholar databases. In total, 3105 presentations to an audience took place in the annual scientific meetings of TNS organized between 2011 and 2014. Acceptance rate of these studies by peer-reviewed scientific journals was 326 (10.5%). In sub-analysis, there were 2408 electronic posters (148 accepted, 6.1%), 195 poster presentations with discussion (44 accepted, 22.6%), and 502 podium presentations (134 accepted, 26.7%). Acceptance rate of podium presentations in annual scientific meeting of TNS is at comparable levels with similar organizations on the world. However, the rate is lower for poster presentations.

  13. Scientific Library Will Hold 16th Annual Book and Media Swap | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    The Scientific Library has begun collecting materials for the 16th Annual Book and Media Swap and will continue to do so through Tuesday, October 25. Opening day for the Swap is Wednesday, October 26, and the event will continue through Wednesday, November 30.

  14. Scientific Library Will Hold 16th Annual Book and Media Swap | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    The Scientific Library has begun collecting materials for the 16th Annual Book and Media Swap and will continue to do so through Tuesday, October 25. Opening day for the Swap is Wednesday, October 26, and the event will continue through Wednesday, November 30.

  15. Status of the OLYMPUS Experiment at DESY

    SciTech Connect

    Kohl, M.

    2011-10-24

    The OLYMPUS experiment at DESY, Hamburg, Germany will definitively determine the effect of two-photon exchange in elastic lepton-proton scattering by precisely measuring the ratio of positron-proton to electron-proton elastic unpolarized cross sections. In this paper, the physics motivation is summarized, aspects of the experimental setup are discussed and the current status and timeline of the project are reviewed.

  16. Highlights of the 16th annual scientific sessions of the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The 16th Annual Scientific Sessions of the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (SCMR) took place in San Francisco, USA at the end of January 2013. With a faculty of experts from across the world, this congress provided a wealth of insight into cutting-edge research and technological development. This review article intends to provide a highlight of what represented the most significant advances in the field of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) during this year’s meeting. PMID:23870663

  17. DESI focal plate mechanical integration and cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, A. R.; Besuner, R. W.; Claybaugh, T. M.; Silber, J. H.

    2016-08-01

    The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) is under construction to measure the expansion history of the Universe using the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation technique[1]. The spectra of 40 million galaxies over 14000 sq. deg will be measured during the life of the experiment. A new prime focus corrector for the KPNO Mayall telescope will deliver light to 5000 fiber optic positioners. The fibers in turn feed ten broad-band spectrographs. This paper describes the mechanical integration of the DESI focal plate and the thermal system design. The DESI focal plate is comprised of ten identical petal assemblies. Each petal contains 500 robotic fiber positioners. Each petal is a complete, self-contained unit, independent from the others, with integrated power supply, controllers, fiber routing, and cooling services. The major advantages of this scheme are: (1) supports installation and removal of complete petal assemblies in-situ, without disturbing the others, (2) component production, assembly stations, and test procedures are repeated and parallelizable, (3) a complete, full-scale prototype can be built and tested at an early date, (4) each production petal can be surveyed and tested as a complete unit, prior to integration, from the fiber tip at the focal surface to the fiber slit at the spectrograph. The ten petal assemblies will be installed in a single integration ring, which is mounted to the DESI corrector. The aluminum integration ring attaches to the steel corrector barrel via a flexured steel adapter, isolating the focal plate from differential thermal expansions. The plate scale will be kept stable by conductive cooling of the petal assembly. The guider and wavefront sensors (one per petal) will be convectively cooled by forced flow of air. Heat will be removed from the system at ten liquid-cooled cold plates, one per petal, operating at ambient temperature. The entire focal plate structure is enclosed in an insulating shroud, which serves as a thermal barrier

  18. The NAF: National analysis facility at DESY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haupt, Andreas; Kemp, Yves

    2010-04-01

    Within the framework of a broad collaboration among German particle physicists, the strategic Helmholtz Alliance "Physics a the Terascale", an analysis facility has been set up at DESY. The facility is intended to provide the best possible analysis infrastructure for researches of the ATLAS, CMS, LHCb and ILC experiments and also for theory researchers. In a first part of the contribution, we will present the concept of the NAF and its place in the existing distributed grid landscape of the experiments. In a second part, the building blocks of the NAF will be detailed with an emphasis on technical implementations of some parts: - Usage of VOMS for separating grid resources between collaboration-wide and NAF-specific resources. - interactive and batch cluster and integration with PROOF. - usage of grid proxies to access work group servers and AFS. - the usage and operation of Lustre for fast data access. A special focus is the seamless integration of the facility into the two geographically separated DESY sites and its implications. In a third part, the experience of running the facility for one year will be reported.

  19. 5 CFR 630.301 - Annual leave accrual and accumulation-Senior Executive Service, Senior-Level, and Scientific and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...-Senior Executive Service, Senior-Level, and Scientific and Professional Employees. 630.301 Section 630... LEAVE Annual Leave § 630.301 Annual leave accrual and accumulation—Senior Executive Service, Senior... the full pay period, and who— (1) Holds a position in the Senior Executive Service (SES) which...

  20. 5 CFR 630.301 - Annual leave accrual and accumulation-Senior Executive Service, Senior-Level, and Scientific and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...-Senior Executive Service, Senior-Level, and Scientific and Professional Employees. 630.301 Section 630... LEAVE Annual Leave § 630.301 Annual leave accrual and accumulation—Senior Executive Service, Senior... the full pay period, and who— (1) Holds a position in the Senior Executive Service (SES) which is...

  1. Report of the Annual Scientific Sessions of the American College of Cardiology (ACC), Washington DC.

    PubMed

    Hiro, Takafumi

    2017-05-25

    The 66(th)Annual Scientific Sessions and Expo of the American College of Cardiology (ACC) were held at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center, Washington DC, from March 17(th)to 19(th), 2017. This meeting offered 23 Late-Breaking Clinical Trial (LBCT) presentations, 17 Featured Clinical Research presentations with and without LBCT, and 2,572 abstracts presented in oral and poster sessions by over 2,000 experts. This report presents the highlights of this meeting, including the opening showcase, several important LBCTs and some international joint symposiums.

  2. Data Processing for the Space-Based Desis Hyperspectral Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmona, E.; Avbelj, J.; Alonso, K.; Bachmann, M.; Cerra, D.; Eckardt, A.; Gerasch, B.; Graham, L.; Günther, B.; Heiden, U.; Kerr, G.; Knodt, U.; Krutz, D.; Krawcyk, H.; Makarau, A.; Miller, R.; Müller, R.; Perkins, R.; Walter, I.

    2017-05-01

    The German Aerospace Center (DLR) and Teledyne Brown Engineering (TBE) have established a collaboration to develop and operate a new space-based hyperspectral sensor, the DLR Earth Sensing Imaging Spectrometer (DESIS). DESIS will provide spacebased hyperspectral data in the VNIR with high spectral resolution and near-global coverage. While TBE provides the platform and infrastructure for operation of the DESIS instrument on the International Space Station, DLR is responsible for providing the instrument and the processing software. The DESIS instrument is equipped with novel characteristics for an imaging spectrometer such high spectral resolution (2.55 nm), a mirror pointing unit or a CMOS sensor operated in rolling shutter mode. We present here an overview of the DESIS instrument and its processing chain, emphasizing the effect of the novel characteristics of DESIS in the data processing and final data products. Furthermore, we analyse in more detail the effect of the rolling shutter on the DESIS data and possible mitigation/correction strategies.

  3. 50th Annual Scientific Meeting of the British Society for Haematology.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Angela E

    2010-08-01

    The 50th Annual Scientific Meeting of the British Society for Haematology was notable, not only for its golden anniversary, but also because it coincided with the eruption of the Icelandic volcano, Eyjafjallajökull, and the ensuing travel chaos. In total, 28 speakers from overseas were unable to reach Edinburgh, including a significant number of British speakers who were stranded. However, owing to the superb efforts of the conference organisers and Edinburgh International Conference Centre staff, teleconferencing equipment was installed and all speakers were contacted and able to give their talks on time. The program, consisting of simultaneous sessions and plenary lectures, covered not only recent advances in clinical and laboratory hematology, but also reflected on the contribution of British hematology to the international arena over the past 50 years.

  4. Abstracts for the ninth annual scientific conference of the Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) association

    SciTech Connect

    Fernhoff, P.M.

    1996-03-29

    The Ninth Annual Scientific Conference of the Prader-Willi Syndrome (PWS) Association (USA) met in Atlanta on July 20, 1994. The 17 papers which were presented ranged from those which explored the molecular origins of PWS to those that studied the most effective medical, behavioral, and nutritional management of affected children and adults. Several important messages emerged. The first was that although most patients with PWS have an interstitial deletion of 15q11q13 of paternal origin, and a smaller percentage of patients have maternal disomy, there can be several other morphologic alterations of chromosome 15 which cause PWS. As our understanding of these changes at the molecular level improves, we will better understand the nature of these unusual rearrangements. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  5. Commentary on 19th annual scientific meeting of the Society for Neuro-Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Jalali, Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    The Society for Neuro-Oncology (SNO) is the premier organization dedicated to the cause of central nervous system (CNS) tumors. Although it is primarily located in North America, it attracts considerable memberships from all over the world with truly multi-disciplinary representations from not only neuro-oncology, neurosurgery, radiation oncology, medical oncology and basic scientists, but also in recent years from imaging, psychology, epidemiology, public health and industry, etc. SNO annual meetings are very much looked forward to with presentations of the latest cutting edge data as well as several educational sessions for trainees and updates for senior members too. The meeting is unique in the way that almost the entire scientific agenda is based on submitted abstracts with very few invited lectures. PMID:25810579

  6. [Analysis of the annual open Russian competition for the best scientific student work in medical science].

    PubMed

    Grachev, S V; Mikheeva, L V; Voronov, D A; L'vov, A N; Sharkova, Iu V; Luginina, E V

    2000-01-01

    For over 5 years, the I. M. Sechenov Moscow Medical Academy has been the basic Institute for holding the open Russian competition for the best scientific student work in medical sciences. The Academy has developed a methodological basis of this competition, which allowed the practical use of its organizational forms by the areas of informational support, evaluation of works, awards, office work. The authors' skills in presentation have become an original educational component in addition to usual expert estimation of works and afforded to obtain knowledge of progress in basic science and different problems in the organization of researches. The original competition organizing system has raised the popularity of the competition and the annual number of participants from different medical institutes and stimulated youth's interest in researches.

  7. Teaming Up for Women's Health: The 2015 American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists Annual Clinical and Scientific Meeting.

    PubMed

    Breitkopf, Daniel M; Demosthenes, Lauren D; Phelan, Sharon T

    2015-11-01

    63rd Annual Clinical and Scientific Meeting of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, 2-6 May, 2015, San Francisco, CA, USA. In response to major practice changes in obstetrics and gynecology (OB/GYN), the 2015 Annual Clinical and Scientific Meeting of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists responded with modification of the program organization, methods of presenting the information (debates, hands on, flip classrooms) and increased emphasis on current clinical research. The Presidential Program covered broad themes of changes in healthcare technology, teamwork in OB/GYN practice and the importance of advocating for patients. Over 400 abstracts representing a broad range of clinical and basic science research were presented. Changes in the Annual Clinical and Scientific Meeting should allow the membership to be more prepared and pro-active as the practice of OB/GYN evolves.

  8. Hydroforming of Tesla Cavities at Desy

    SciTech Connect

    W. Singer; H. Kaiser; X. Singer; I. Gonin; I. Zhelezov; T. Khabibullin; P. Kneisel; K. Saito

    2000-07-01

    Since several years the development of seamless niobium cavity fabrication by hydro forming is being pursued at DESY. This technique offers the possibility of lower cost of fabrication and perhaps better rf performance of the cavities because of the elimination of electron-beam welds, which in the standard fabrication technique have sometimes lead to inferior cavity performance due to defects. Several single cell 1300 MHz cavities have been formed from high purity seamless niobium tubes, which are under computer control expanded with internal pressure while simultaneously being swaged axially. The seamless tubes have been made by either back extrusion and flow forming or by spinning or deep drawing. Standard surface treatment techniques such as high temperature post purification, buffered chemical polishing (BCP), electropolishing (EP) and high pressure ultra pure water rinsing (HPR) have been applied to these cavities. The cavities exhibited high Q - values of 2 x 10{sup 10} at 2K and residual resistances as low as 3 n{Omega} after the removal of a surface layer of app. 100 {micro}m by BCP. Surprisingly, even at high gradients up to the maximum measured values of E{sub acc} {approx} 33 MV/m the Q-value did not decrease in the absence of field emission as often observed. After electropolishing of additional 100 {micro}m one of the cavities reached an accelerating gradient of E{sub acc} {ge} 42 MV/m.

  9. The Gas Attenuator of FLASH at DESY

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, Ulrich; Tiedtke, Kai

    2007-01-19

    FLASH (Free electron LASer at Hamburg) as a part of the Deutsches Elektronen Synchroton DESY is the first Free Electron Laser (FEL) user facility for VUV and soft X-ray coherent light experiments. The SASE (Self Amplification by Stimulated Emission) process generates ultra short coherent radiation pulses on the femtosecond time scale with peak powers in the GW range. Several experiments need reliable means to reduce the FEL intensity over many orders of magnitude without changing the photon beam characteristics. Since a reduction of the FEL intensity by variation of machine parameters is not appropriate, a windowless gas-filled cell in combination with differential pumping units is used for attenuating the FEL radiation. This attenuator is placed in the beamline in outside the experimental hall. The total length of the gas cell is 15 m and the maximum gas pressure, which can be handled by the differential pumping units, is about 0.1 mbar. The attenuation range of Nitrogen covers at least 5 orders of magnitude in the spectral range of 19 to 120 nm due to its large absorption cross section. Between 19 and 9 nm and for shorter wavelengths Xenon and Krypton can be used, respectively.

  10. Publication bias in papers presented to the Australian Orthopaedic Association Annual Scientific Meeting.

    PubMed

    Harris, Ian A; Mourad, Mohamed S; Kadir, Agus; Solomon, Michael J; Young, Jane M

    2006-06-01

    The selective publication of articles based on factors, such as positive outcome, statistical significance and study size is known as publication bias. If publication bias is present, any clinical decision based on a review of the published work will also be biased. Publication bias has been shown in various specialties, based on review of publication rates for abstracts presented at major scientific meetings. This study was conducted to investigate publication bias in orthopaedics. Abstracts presented at the 1998 Australian Orthopaedic Association Annual Scientific Meeting were reviewed independently by two reviewers. Details of sample size, study setting, country of origin, outcome and study type were recorded for each abstract. Publication within 5 years was ascertained by electronic searching of Medline and Embase databases and direct author contact. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify predictors of publication. The overall publication rate was 31%. Publication was more likely if the study was a laboratory study, rather than a clinical study (odds ratio (OR), 3.45; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.69-7.01, P < 0.001). Sample size, country of origin, study type, statistical significance and positive outcome were not significantly associated with publication. According to this study, laboratory studies were significantly more likely to be published than clinical studies. In contrast to previous studies, publication bias due to the selective publication of papers with a positive outcome or those reporting statistical significance was not found.

  11. Canadian Association of Radiologists Annual Scientific Meetings: How Many Abstracts Go on to Publication?

    PubMed

    Dressler, Danielle; Leswick, David

    2015-05-01

    To determine the percentage of abstracts presented at the Canadian Association of Radiologists (CAR) annual scientific meetings that go on to publication. Records of previous CAR meetings from the years 2005-2011 were obtained. An Internet search was performed to determine which abstracts went on to publication. Abstracts were assessed according to exhibit category (Resident Award Papers), educational institution, publishing journal, and time to publication. Of the 402 abstracts presented, 112 (28%) were published. Overall, an average of 37% of Radiologists-In-Training Presentations, 34% of Scientific Exhibits, and 20% of Educational Exhibits went on to publication. The University of British Columbia and University of Ottawa published the largest number of abstracts (66 and 62, respectively) from the years 2005-2011. The University of Montreal had the largest percentage of abstracts published (42%). The range of publishing journals was wide, but the top publisher was the Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal (27%). Eighty-three percent of abstracts were published within 3 years of being presented. In total, 28% of all the abstracts presented at the CAR conferences between 2005 and 2011 were published. Further exploration into the reasons and barriers for abstracts not being published may be a next step in future research. Copyright © 2015 Canadian Association of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Abstracts from the 32nd Annual Scientific Meeting of the Canadian Geriatrics Society Quebec City, April 2012

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The opinions expressed in the abstracts are those of the authors and are not to be construed as the opinion of the publisher (Canadian Geriatrics Society) or the organizers of the 32nd Annual Scientific Meeting of the Canadian Geriatrics Society. Although the publisher (Canadian Geriatrics Society) has made every effort to accurately reproduce the abstracts, the Canadian Geriatrics Society and the 32nd Annual Scientific Meeting of the Canadian Geriatrics Society assumes no responsibility and/or liability for any errors and/or omissions in any abstract as published.

  13. Tenth annual scientific conference of the Prader-Willi Syndrome Association (USA), July 19, 1995, Seattle, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Holm, V.A.; Hudgins, L.; Cassidy, S.B. |

    1996-09-06

    Each year for the last 10 years, scientists conducting research on Prader-Willi syndrome have come together to exchange information during a scientific conference held in conjunction with the annual Prader-Willi Syndrome Association (USA) meeting. Presentations based on submitted abstracts encompass such varied fields as genetics, endocrinology, pediatrics, nutrition, psychology, psychiatry, and education. This year`s scientific conference was held in Seattle, Washington, on July 19, 1995, in conjunction with the 14th PWSA (USA) meeting held July 20-23. Seventeen reports were presented at the scientific meeting, the abstracts of which follow.

  14. DESI systems engineering: throughput and signal-to-noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besuner, Robert W.; Sholl, Michael J.

    2016-08-01

    The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) is a fiber-fed multi-object spectroscopic instrument under construction to measure the expansion history of the Universe using the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation technique. Management of light throughput and noise in all elements of the instrument is key to achieving the high-level DESI science requirements over the planned survey area and depth within the planned survey duration. The DESI high-level science requirements flow down to instrument performance requirements on system throughput and operational efficiency. Signal-to-noise requirements directly affect minimum required exposure time per field, which dictates the pace and duration of the entire survey. The need to maximize signal (light throughput) and to minimize noise contributions and time overhead due to reconfigurations between exposures drives the instrument subsystem requirements and technical implementation. Throughput losses, noise contributors, and interexposure reconfiguration time are budgeted, tracked, and managed as DESI Systems Engineering resources. Current best estimates of throughput losses and noise contributions from each individual element of the instrument are tracked together in a master budget to calculate overall margin on completing the survey within the allotted time. That budget is a spreadsheet accessible to the entire DESI project.

  15. 1992 annual report on scientific programs: A broad research program on the sciences of complexity

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    In 1992 the Santa Fe Institute hosted more than 100 short- and long-term research visitors who conducted a total of 212 person-months of residential research in complex systems. To date this 1992 work has resulted in more than 50 SFI Working Papers and nearly 150 publications in the scientific literature. The Institute`s book series in the sciences of complexity continues to grow, now numbering more than 20 volumes. The fifth annual complex systems summer school brought nearly 60 graduate students and postdoctoral fellows to Santa Fe for an intensive introduction to the field. Research on complex systems-the focus of work at SFI-involves an extraordinary range of topics normally studied in seemingly disparate fields. Natural systems displaying complex adaptive behavior range upwards from DNA through cells and evolutionary systems to human societies. Research models exhibiting complex behavior include spin glasses, cellular automata, and genetic algorithms. Some of the major questions facing complex systems researchers are: (1) explaining how complexity arises from the nonlinear interaction of simple components; (2) describing the mechanisms underlying high-level aggregate behavior of complex systems (such as the overt behavior of an organism, the flow of energy in an ecology, the GNP of an economy); and (3) creating a theoretical framework to enable predictions about the likely behavior of such systems in various conditions.

  16. Overview of the 78th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Japanese Circulation Society.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masafumi

    2014-01-01

    The 78(th)Annual Scientific Meeting of the Japanese Circulation Society was held in Tokyo on March 21-23, 2014. The main theme was "Cardiology in the Information Era: From Bench to Community". Because of technological advancements, including computer networking, a vast amount of information from basic and clinical research is being generated in a short time period. This information has great potential to contribute to human health, and some of the results are presented. However, we must remain vigilant, for there are many risks inherent in information generation. To ensure high-quality information, we need to obtain enough knowledge to focus on not only the medicine, but also ethics, and methodology. Moreover, we need to train the specialists, establish economic support, and create a regulatory framework. More than 15,000 people, including paramedical specialists, attended this meeting. The most popular sessions included those on "Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation for Aortic Stenosis", "Diabetes Mellitus", "Atrial Fibrillation", "Pulmonary Hypertension", and "Diuretics To Treat Heart Failure". Even in rather small sessions, attendees participated in discussion, identified opportunities to expand or start research, and were able to update their clinical knowledge. The meeting was successfully completed with a discussion of the future of cardiology.

  17. The 1992 annual report on scientific programs: A broad research program on the sciences of complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    In 1992 the Santa Fe Institute hosted more than 100 short- and long-term research visitors who conducted a total of 212 person-months of residential research in complex systems. To date this 1992 work has resulted in more than 50 SFI Working Papers and nearly 150 publications in the scientific literature. The Institute's book series in the sciences of complexity continues to grow, now numbering more than 20 volumes. The fifth annual complex systems summer school brought nearly 60 graduate students and postdoctoral fellows to Santa Fe for an intensive introduction to the field. Research on complex systems - the focus of work at SFI - involves an extraordinary range of topics normally studied in seemingly disparate fields. Natural systems displaying complex adaptive behavior range upwards from DNA through cells and evolutionary systems to human societies. Research models exhibiting complex behavior include spin glasses, cellular automata, and genetic algorithms. Some of the major questions facing complex systems researchers are: (1) explaining how complexity arises from the nonlinear interaction of simple components; (2) describing the mechanisms underlying high-level aggregate behavior of complex systems (such as the overt behavior of an organism, the flow of energy in an ecology, and the Gross National Product (GNP) of an economy); and (3) creating a theoretical framework to enable predictions about the likely behavior of such systems in various conditions.

  18. The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI): The NOAO DECam Legacy Imaging Survey and DESI Target Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlegel, David J.; Blum, Robert D.; Castander, Francisco Javier; Dey, Arjun; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Foucaud, Sebastien; Honscheid, Klaus; James, David; Lang, Dustin; Levi, Michael; Moustakas, John; Myers, Adam D.; Newman, Jeffrey; Nord, Brian; Nugent, Peter E.; Patej, Anna; Reil, Kevin; Rudnick, Gregory; Rykoff, Eli S.; Ford Schlafly, Eddie; Stark, Casey; Valdes, Francisco; Walker, Alistair R.; Weaver, Benjamin; DECam Legacy Survey Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The DECam Legacy Survey will conduct a 3-band imaging survey of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) extragalactic footprint. The Dark Energy Camera (DECam) will be used to image the 6700 square degree footprint overlapping SDSS in the region -20 < Dec < +30 deg, to depths of g=24.7, r=23.9, z=23.0. The survey will be conducted from Fall 2014 through Spring 2017, with periodic data releases beginning in March 2015. These releases will include catalogs constructed with the Tractor-based multi-wavelength forced photometry applied to the DECam and WISE satellite data.The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) will observe 24 million galaxies and quasars in a 14,000 square degree extragalactic footprint. The targeting in that footprint will be provided by a combination of these DECam data, the MOSAIC camera on the Mayall 4-meter, and the 90Prime camera on the Bok Telescope.

  19. Progress on the fabrication of the DESI corrector optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Timothy N.; Doel, Peter; Brooks, David; Sholl, Michael J.; Levi, Michael E.

    2016-08-01

    The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) is under construction to measure the expansion history of the Universe using the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation technique. The spectra of 40 million galaxies over 14000 square degrees will be measured during the life of the experiment. A new prime focus corrector for the Kitt Peak National Observatory Mayall telescope will deliver light to 5000 fiber optic positioners. The fibers in turn feed ten broad-band spectrographs. We will describe the status of the DESI corrector optics, a series of 0.8 to 1.1-meter fused silica and borosilicate lenses currently being fabricated to demanding requirements. We will describe the specs for lenses that are finished or underway, including surface figure, homogeneity, and other parameters; the current schedule for lens production; and a comparison against DESI corrector requirements.

  20. Direct Analysis of Pharmaceutical Drugs Using Nano-DESI MS

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso-Palacios, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Counterfeit pharmaceutical drugs imply an increasing threat to the global public health. It is necessary to have systems to control the products that reach the market and to detect falsified medicines. In this work, molecules in several pharmaceutical tablets were directly analyzed using nanospray desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (nano-DESI MS). Nano-DESI is an ambient surface sampling technique which enables sampling of molecules directly from the surface of the tablets without any sample pretreatment. Both the active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) and some excipients were detected in all analyzed tablets. Principal component analysis was used to analyze mass spectral features from different tablets showing strong clustering between tablets with different APIs. The obtained results suggest nano-DESI MS as future tool for forensic analysis to discern APIs present in unknown tablet samples. PMID:27766177

  1. Annual report to Congress, fiscal year 1997. A report by the Scientific Advisory Board of the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program: Annual report number 6

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-01

    Section 2904(h) of Title 10, United States Code, requires that an annual report of the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) Scientific Advisory Board (SAB) be submitted to Congress no later than March 15 of each year. The Annual Report is required to describe the actions of the SAB during the preceding year and to provide any recommendations, including recommendations related to projects, programs, information exchange, and additional legislation within the scope of SERDP. This is the sixth Annual Report of the SERDP SAB and includes SAB activities and Program recommendations during FY97. Specifically, SERDP should focus on research that is: essential for the solution of major defense mission-readiness related problems; scientifically plausible; focused on areas where progress under other program sponsorship in DoD and/or other agencies is not sufficient or satisfactory; catalytic in nature to initiate, organize, and accelerate essential research in partnership with the Federal and private sector; and provides sufficient proof-of-principle demonstrations to attract follow-on Research Development Test and Engineering (RDT and E) support.

  2. National Society of Black Physicists XXV Annual Day of Scientific Lectures and 21st Annual Meeting - NSBP '98: The Next Generation/12th Annual National Conference of Black Physics Students - NCPBS '98: Physics/Life in Motion

    SciTech Connect

    MacKellar, Alan

    1999-02-28

    The 12th Annual National Conference of Black Physics Students (NCBPS) was held jointly with the Annual Meeting of the National Society of Black Physicists (NSBP) March 4-8, 1998 in Lexington, Ky. The Proceedings consists of scientific talks and abstracts given by NSBP members and students attending the NCBPS meeting. One joint session of general scientific interest was held, with NCBPS students, NSBP members, and about 75 high school students from the state of Kentucky present. NCBPS session included ''How to get into Graduate School'', ''How to Survive in Graduate School'', and a Panel on ''Opportunities for Physics Graduates.'' The report by AIP: ''Survey of Participants of the 12th Annual NCBPS'' is included in the Proceedings.

  3. NCI's Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium 1st Annual Scientific Symposium | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    On behalf of the National Cancer Institute and the Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research, you are invited to the First Annual CPTAC Scientific Symposium on Wednesday, November 13, 2013. The purpose of this symposium, which consists of plenary and poster sessions, is for investigators from CPTAC community and beyond to share and discuss novel biological discoveries, analytical methods, and translational approaches using CPTAC data.

  4. Coupling of Ultrafast LC with Mass Spectrometry by DESI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yi; Liu, Yong; Helmy, Roy; Chen, Hao

    2014-10-01

    Recently we reported a desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) interface to combine liquid chromatography (LC) with mass spectrometry (MS) using a new LC eluent splitting strategy through a tiny orifice on LC capillary tube [ J. Am. Soc. Mass Spectrom. 25, 286 (2014)]. The interface introduces negligible dead volume and back pressure, thereby allowing "near real-time" MS detection, fast LC elution, and online MS-directed purification. This study further evaluates the LC/DESI-MS performance with focus of using ultra-fast LC. Using a monolithic C18 column, metabolites in urine can be separated within 1.6 min and can be online collected for subsequent structure elucidation (e.g., by NMR, UV, IR) in a recovery yield up to 99%. Using a spray solvent with alkaline pH, negative ions could be directly generated for acidic analytes (e.g., ibuprofen) in acidic LC eluent by DESI, offering a novel protocol to realize "wrong-way around" ionization for LC/MS analysis. In addition, DESI-MS is found to be compatible with ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) for the first time.

  5. Fieldbus Device Drivers for Accelerator Control at DESY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Honggong

    In order to interface the DESY fieldbus adapter, SEDAC (SErial Data Acquisition and Control system), a full duplex device driver was developed for the Windows NT, Linux, VxWorks, and Solaris operating systems. Detailed driver development issues as well as a common user interface will be presented, along with a comparison of the device drivers among the different operating systems. In particular, we shall present benchmark results concerning general performance as well as ease of development.

  6. Review of the 25th annual scientific meeting of the International Society for Biological Therapy of Cancer.

    PubMed

    Balwit, James M; Kalinski, Pawel; Sondak, Vernon K; Coulie, Pierre G; Jaffee, Elizabeth M; Gajewski, Thomas F; Marincola, Francesco M

    2011-05-12

    Led by key opinion leaders in the field, the 25th Annual Meeting of the International Society for Biological Therapy of Cancer (iSBTc, recently renamed the Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer, SITC) provided a scientific platform for ~500 attendees to exchange cutting-edge information on basic, clinical, and translational research in cancer immunology and immunotherapy. The meeting included keynote addresses on checkpoint blockade in cancer therapy and recent advances in therapeutic vaccination against cancer induced by Human Papilloma Virus 16. Participants from 29 countries interacted through oral presentations, panel discussions, and posters on topics that included dendritic cells and cancer, targeted therapeutics and immunotherapy, innate/adaptive immune interplay in cancer, clinical trial endpoints, vaccine combinations, countering negative regulation, immune cell trafficking to tumor microenvironment, and adoptive T cell transfer. In addition to the 50 oral presentations and >180 posters on these topics, a new SITC/iSBTc initiative to create evidence-based Cancer Immunotherapy Guidelines was announced. The SITC/iSBTc Biomarkers Taskforce announced the release of recommendations on immunotherapy biomarkers and a highly successful symposium on Immuno-Oncology Biomarkers that took place on the campus of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) immediately prior to the Annual Meeting. At the Annual Meeting, the NIH took the opportunity to publicly announce the award of the U01 grant that will fund the Cancer Immunotherapy Trials Network (CITN). In summary, the Annual Meeting gathered clinicians and scientists from academia, industry, and regulatory agencies from around the globe to interact and exchange important scientific advances related to tumor immunobiology and cancer immunotherapy.

  7. Review of the 25th annual scientific meeting of the International Society for Biological Therapy of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Led by key opinion leaders in the field, the 25th Annual Meeting of the International Society for Biological Therapy of Cancer (iSBTc, recently renamed the Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer, SITC) provided a scientific platform for ~500 attendees to exchange cutting-edge information on basic, clinical, and translational research in cancer immunology and immunotherapy. The meeting included keynote addresses on checkpoint blockade in cancer therapy and recent advances in therapeutic vaccination against cancer induced by Human Papilloma Virus 16. Participants from 29 countries interacted through oral presentations, panel discussions, and posters on topics that included dendritic cells and cancer, targeted therapeutics and immunotherapy, innate/adaptive immune interplay in cancer, clinical trial endpoints, vaccine combinations, countering negative regulation, immune cell trafficking to tumor microenvironment, and adoptive T cell transfer. In addition to the 50 oral presentations and >180 posters on these topics, a new SITC/iSBTc initiative to create evidence-based Cancer Immunotherapy Guidelines was announced. The SITC/iSBTc Biomarkers Taskforce announced the release of recommendations on immunotherapy biomarkers and a highly successful symposium on Immuno-Oncology Biomarkers that took place on the campus of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) immediately prior to the Annual Meeting. At the Annual Meeting, the NIH took the opportunity to publicly announce the award of the U01 grant that will fund the Cancer Immunotherapy Trials Network (CITN). In summary, the Annual Meeting gathered clinicians and scientists from academia, industry, and regulatory agencies from around the globe to interact and exchange important scientific advances related to tumor immunobiology and cancer immunotherapy. PMID:21569425

  8. The alignment and assembly of the DESI prime focus corrector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, David; Doel, Peter; Besuner, Robert; Flaugher, Brenna; Gallo, Giuseppe; Gutierrez, Gaston; Kent, Stephen; Lampton, Michael; Levi, Michael; Liang, Ming; Miller, Timothy N.; Sprayberry, David; Stefanik, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI), which is currently under construction, is designed to measure the expansion history of the Universe using the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation technique. The spectra of 40 million galaxies over 14000 sq deg will be measured during the life of the experiment. A new prime focus corrector for the KPNO Mayall telescope will deliver light to 5000 fibre optic positioners. The fibres in turn feed ten broad-band spectrographs. The prime focus corrector for DESI consists of six lenses that range in diameter from 0.80 - 1.14 meters and from 83 - 237 kg in weight. The alignment of the large lenses of the optical corrector poses a significant challenge as in order to meet the fibre throughput requirements they have to be aligned to within a tolerance of 50 micrometres. This paper details the design for the cells that will hold the lenses and the alignment and assembly procedure for the mounting of the lenses into the cells and into the complete barrel assembly. This is based on the experience obtained from the alignment of the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) instrument which was successfully assembled and aligned by the same team and we include in the paper the lessons learnt and design modifications that will be implemented on the DESI system.

  9. Faster, More Reproducible DESI-MS for Biological Tissue Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillner, Jocelyn; Wu, Vincen; Jones, Emrys A.; Pringle, Steven D.; Karancsi, Tamas; Dannhorn, Andreas; Veselkov, Kirill; McKenzie, James S.; Takats, Zoltan

    2017-10-01

    A new, more robust sprayer for desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) mass spectrometry imaging is presented. The main source of variability in DESI is thought to be the uncontrolled variability of various geometric parameters of the sprayer, primarily the position of the solvent capillary, or more specifically, its positioning within the gas capillary or nozzle. If the solvent capillary is off-center, the sprayer becomes asymmetrical, making the geometry difficult to control and compromising reproducibility. If the stiffness, tip quality, and positioning of the capillary are improved, sprayer reproducibility can be improved by an order of magnitude. The quality of the improved sprayer and its potential for high spatial resolution imaging are demonstrated on human colorectal tissue samples by acquisition of images at pixel sizes of 100, 50, and 20 μm, which corresponds to a lateral resolution of 40-60 μm, similar to the best values published in the literature. The high sensitivity of the sprayer also allows combination with a fast scanning quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer. This provides up to 30 times faster DESI acquisition, reducing the overall acquisition time for a 10 mm × 10 mm rat brain sample to approximately 1 h. Although some spectral information is lost with increasing analysis speed, the resulting data can still be used to classify tissue types on the basis of a previously constructed model. This is particularly interesting for clinical applications, where fast, reliable diagnosis is required. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  10. Modulators for the S-band test linac at DESY

    SciTech Connect

    Bieler, M.; Choroba, S.; Hameister, J.; Lewin, H.

    1995-07-05

    The development of adequate modulators for high peak power klystrons is one of the focus points for linear collider R&D programs. For the DESY/THD S-band linear collider study 150 MW rf-pulse power at 50 Hz repetition rate and 3 {mu}s pulse duration is required [1]. Two different modulator schemes are under investigation. One is the conventional line type pulser, using a pulse forming network and a step up transformer, the other one is a hard tube pulser, using a dc power source at the full klystron voltage and a switch tube. This paper is focused on the modulator development for the S-band Test Linac at DESY. After a short overview over the test linac and a brief description of the 150 MW S-band klystron the circuitry of the line type pulse (LTP) is given. A hard tube pulser (HTP), which switches the high voltage directly from a storage capacitor to the klystron, has been built up at DESY. Circuitry and the results of the commissioning of the switch tube are reported. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  11. Modulators for the S-band test linac at DESY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieler, M.; Choroba, S.; Hameister, J.; Lewin, H.-Ch.

    1995-07-01

    The development of adequate modulators for high peak power klystrons is one of the focus points for linear collider R&D programs. For the DESY/THD S-band linear collider study 150 MW rf-pulse power at 50 Hz repetition rate and 3 μs pulse duration is required [1]. Two different modulator schemes are under investigation. One is the conventional line type pulser, using a pulse forming network and a step up transformer, the other one is a hard tube pulser, using a dc power source at the full klystron voltage and a switch tube. This paper is focused on the modulator development for the S-band Test Linac at DESY. After a short overview over the test linac and a brief description of the 150 MW S-band klystron the circuitry of the line type pulse (LTP) is given. A hard tube pulser (HTP), which switches the high voltage directly from a storage capacitor to the klystron, has been built up at DESY. Circuitry and the results of the commissioning of the switch tube are reported.

  12. Faster, More Reproducible DESI-MS for Biological Tissue Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillner, Jocelyn; Wu, Vincen; Jones, Emrys A.; Pringle, Steven D.; Karancsi, Tamas; Dannhorn, Andreas; Veselkov, Kirill; McKenzie, James S.; Takats, Zoltan

    2017-06-01

    A new, more robust sprayer for desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) mass spectrometry imaging is presented. The main source of variability in DESI is thought to be the uncontrolled variability of various geometric parameters of the sprayer, primarily the position of the solvent capillary, or more specifically, its positioning within the gas capillary or nozzle. If the solvent capillary is off-center, the sprayer becomes asymmetrical, making the geometry difficult to control and compromising reproducibility. If the stiffness, tip quality, and positioning of the capillary are improved, sprayer reproducibility can be improved by an order of magnitude. The quality of the improved sprayer and its potential for high spatial resolution imaging are demonstrated on human colorectal tissue samples by acquisition of images at pixel sizes of 100, 50, and 20 μm, which corresponds to a lateral resolution of 40-60 μm, similar to the best values published in the literature. The high sensitivity of the sprayer also allows combination with a fast scanning quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer. This provides up to 30 times faster DESI acquisition, reducing the overall acquisition time for a 10 mm × 10 mm rat brain sample to approximately 1 h. Although some spectral information is lost with increasing analysis speed, the resulting data can still be used to classify tissue types on the basis of a previously constructed model. This is particularly interesting for clinical applications, where fast, reliable diagnosis is required.

  13. How to write research papers and grants: 2011 Asian Pacific Society for Respirology Annual Scientific Meeting Postgraduate Session.

    PubMed

    Eastwood, Peter R; Naughton, Matthew T; Calverley, Peter; Zeng, Guangqiao; Beasley, Richard; Robinson, Bruce; Lee, Y C Gary

    2012-07-01

    This review article summarizes the content of a series of interrelated workshop presentations from the Annual Scientific Meeting of the Asian Pacific Society of Respirology held in Shanghai in November, 2011. The article describes tips and strategies for writing research papers and research grant applications and includes discussion of: the role of pulmonologists in research; the debates around the use of the journal impact factor; tips for writing manuscripts and publishing research in high-impact journals; how journals assess manuscripts and the most common reasons editors reject manuscripts; how to write grant applications and what grant panels look for in successful proposals; and how to undertake research in resource-limited countries.

  14. 15th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Society for Biological Therapy. 26-29 October 2000, Seattle, Washington, USA.

    PubMed

    Dillman, R O

    2001-01-01

    The 15th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Society for Biological Therapy (SBT) was held at the Four Seasons Olympic Hotel in Seattle, USA. The meeting was organised on behalf of the society by John A Thompson from the University of Washington (Seattle, USA), Michael B Widmer of Immunex Corp. (Seattle, USA) and Bernard A Fox from the Earle A Chiles Research Institute (Portland, Oregon, USA). The purpose of the organisation, which was founded in 1984 and currently has 300 members, is to bring together those diverse individuals actively investigating biologicals and biological response modifiers in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer, including clinicians and basic scientists from industry, government and academia.

  15. An Evaluation of the North Carolina Annual Report on School Violence: Scientific Realism in Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carruthers, William L.; Stacey, Dennis

    To analyze perceptions of what constitutes a safe school. different perceptions of what constitutes a safe school, an assessment of the first 4 years of North Carolina's Annual Report on School Violence (ARSV) is reported here. The ARSV is a collection of data on specific acts of violence occurring on school property. Data on acts of violence were…

  16. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication (24th, Austin, Texas, October 16-18, 1997).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication.

    Based on the theme of connections in technical and scientific communication, this proceedings presents 47 papers delivered at the 1997 annual meeting of the Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication (CPTSC). Papers in the proceedings are divided into 10 sections: (1) Theoretical Connections; (2) Legal and Ethical Connections;…

  17. 1993 Annual report on scientific programs: A broad research program on the sciences of complexity

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    This report provides a summary of many of the research projects completed by the Santa Fe Institute (SFI) during 1993. These research efforts continue to focus on two general areas: the study of, and search for, underlying scientific principles governing complex adaptive systems, and the exploration of new theories of computation that incorporate natural mechanisms of adaptation (mutation, genetics, evolution).

  18. Institute for Scientific Computing Research Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Keyes, D; McGraw, J

    2004-02-12

    The University Relations Program (URP) encourages collaborative research between Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the University of California campuses. The Institute for Scientific Computing Research (ISCR) actively participates in such collaborative research, and this report details the Fiscal Year 2003 projects jointly served by URP and ISCR.

  19. Nye County Nuclear Waste Repository Project Office independent scientific investigations program annual report, May 1997--April 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-01

    This annual summary report, prepared by the Nye County Nuclear Waste Repository Project Office (NWRPO), summarizes the activities that were performed during the period from May 1, 1997 to April 30, 1998. These activities were conducted in support of the Independent Scientific Investigation Program (ISIP) of Nye County at the Yucca Mountain Site (YMS). The Nye County NWRPO is responsible for protecting the health and safety of the Nye County residents. NWRPO`s on-site representative is responsible for designing and implementing the Independent Scientific Investigation Program (ISIP). Major objectives of the ISIP include: Investigating key issues related to conceptual design and performance of the repository that can have major impact on human health, safety, and the environment; identifying areas not being addressed adequately by the Department of Energy (DOE). Nye County has identified several key scientific issues of concern that may affect repository design and performance which were not being adequately addressed by DOE. Nye County has been conducting its own independent study to evaluate the significance of these issues. This report summarizes the results of monitoring from two boreholes and the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) tunnel that have been instrumented by Nye County since March and April of 1995. The preliminary data and interpretations presented in this report do not constitute and should not be considered as the official position of Nye County. The ISIP presently includes borehole and tunnel instrumentation, monitoring, data analysis, and numerical modeling activities to address the concerns of Nye County.

  20. Nye County nuclear waste repository project office independent scientific investigations program. Summary annual report, May 1996--April 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    This annual summary report, prepared by Multimedia Environmental Technology, Inc. (MET) on behalf of Nye County Nuclear Waste Project Office, summarizes the activities that were performed during the period from May 1, 1996 to April 30, 1997. These activities were conducted in support of the Independent Scientific Investigation Program (ISIP) of Nye County at the Yucca Mountain Site (YMS). The Nye County NWRPO is responsible for protecting the health and safety of the Nye County residents. NWRPO`s on-site representative is responsible for designing and implementing the Independent Scientific Investigation Program (ISIP). Major objectives of the ISIP include: (1) Investigating key issues related to conceptual design and performance of the repository that can have major impact on human health, safety, and the environment. (2) Identifying areas not being addressed adequately by DOE Nye County has identified several key scientific issues of concern that may affect repository design and performance which were not being adequately addressed by DOE. Nye County has been conducting its own independent study to evaluate the significance of these issues.

  1. Fiber system design for the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppett, Claire; Sharples, Ray; Edelstein, Jerry; Schmoll, Jürgen; Bramall, David; Fagrelius, Parker

    2016-08-01

    The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) is under construction to measure the expansion history of the Universe using the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation technique. The spectra of 40 million galaxies over 14000 sq deg will be measured during the life of the experiment. A new prime focus corrector for the KPNO Mayall telescope will deliver light to 5000 fiber optic positioners. The fibers in turn feed ten broad-band spectrographs. We will describe the Fiber Systems design with specific emphasis on novel approaches and essential elements that lead to exceptional performance.

  2. Institute for scientific computing research;fiscal year 1999 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Keyes, D

    2000-03-28

    Large-scale scientific computation, and all of the disciplines that support it and help to validate it, have been placed at the focus of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory by the Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI). The Laboratory operates the computer with the highest peak performance in the world and has undertaken some of the largest and most compute-intensive simulations ever performed. Computers at the architectural extremes, however, are notoriously difficult to use efficiently. Even such successes as the Laboratory's two Bell Prizes awarded in November 1999 only emphasize the need for much better ways of interacting with the results of large-scale simulations. Advances in scientific computing research have, therefore, never been more vital to the core missions of the Laboratory than at present. Computational science is evolving so rapidly along every one of its research fronts that to remain on the leading edge, the Laboratory must engage researchers at many academic centers of excellence. In FY 1999, the Institute for Scientific Computing Research (ISCR) has expanded the Laboratory's bridge to the academic community in the form of collaborative subcontracts, visiting faculty, student internships, a workshop, and a very active seminar series. ISCR research participants are integrated almost seamlessly with the Laboratory's Center for Applied Scientific Computing (CASC), which, in turn, addresses computational challenges arising throughout the Laboratory. Administratively, the ISCR flourishes under the Laboratory's University Relations Program (URP). Together with the other four Institutes of the URP, it must navigate a course that allows the Laboratory to benefit from academic exchanges while preserving national security. Although FY 1999 brought more than its share of challenges to the operation of an academic-like research enterprise within the context of a national security laboratory, the results declare the challenges well met and well

  3. The European XFEL Free Electron Laser at DESY

    ScienceCinema

    Weise, Hans [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Germany

    2016-07-12

    The European X-ray Free-Electron laser Facility (XFEL) is going to be built in an international collaboration at the Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Germany, and the Technical Design Report was published in 2006. The official project is expected for summer 2007. This new facility will offer photon beams at wavelengths as short as 1 angstrom with highest peak brilliance being more than 100 million times higher than present day synchrotron radiation sources. The radiation has a high degree of transverse coherence and the pulse duration is reduced from {approx}100 picoseconds (typ. for SR light sources) down to the {approx}10 femtosecond time domain. The overall layout of the XFEL will be described. This includes the envisaged operation parameters for the linear accelerator using superconducting TESLA technology. The complete design is based on the actually operated FLASH free-electron laser at DESY. Experience with the operation during first long user runs at wavelengths from 30 to 13 nm will be described in detail.

  4. Scientific overview: CSCI-CITAC Annual General Meeting and Young Investigator's Forum 2013.

    PubMed

    Antoun, Ghadi; Keow, Jonathan; Ram, Véronique D; Thornton, Christina; Wang, Xin; Yoon, Ju-Yoon

    2014-08-01

    The 2013 joint Canadian Society of Clinician Investigators (CSCI)-Clinical Investigator Trainee Association of Canada/Association des cliniciens-chercheurs en formation du Canada (CITAC/ACCFC) annual general meeting(AGM) was held in Ottawa, September 2013. The symposium focused on "Applications of the 'omics' to Clinical Practice", with presentations from Drs. William T. Gibson (University of British Columbia), Julie Ho (University of Manitoba) and David Hwang (University of Toronto), discussing topics of genome, proteome and the microbiome, respectively. Other highlights from the 2013 AGM include presentations by Dr. Salim Yusuf (McMaster University, 2013 CSCI-RCPSC Henry Friesen Award winner), Dr. Gary Lewis (University of Toronto, 2013 CSCI Distinguished Scientist Award winner) and Dr. Michael Taylor (University of Toronto, 2013 Joe Doupe Award winner). The CSCI/CITAC/Friends of CIHR Joint Symposium consisted of presentations from Drs. John Bell (University of Ottawa), Dan Drucker (University of Toronto) and Heather J. Dean (University of Manitoba). Finally, the meeting ended with the presentation "The Power of an Idea to Bring Ideas to Power" by Dr. Harvey V. Fineberg (President, U.S. Institute of Medicine), the winner of the 2013 Henry Friesen International Prize. Also presented at the conference was research by clinician investigator (CI) trainees from across Canada; ie., those enrolled in MD/MSc, MD/PhD or Clinician Investigator Program(CIP) programs. Canadian trainees' research extended beyond the pillar of biomedical research, covering the spectrum between basic and clinical research, with a focus on the causes of significant morbidity and mortality for Canadians, including cancers, infectious diseases and other maladies. It is this research that we have summarized in this review.

  5. 1991 Annual report on scientific programs: A broad research program on the sciences of complexity

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    1991 was continued rapid growth for the Santa Fe Institute (SFI) as it broadened its interdisciplinary research into the organization, evolution and operation of complex systems and sought deeply the principles underlying their dynamic behavior. Research on complex systems--the focus of work at SFI--involves an extraordinary range of topics normally studied in seemingly disparate fields. Natural systems displaying complex behavior range upwards from proteins and DNA through cells and evolutionary systems to human societies. Research models exhibiting complexity include nonlinear equations, spin glasses, cellular automata, genetic algorithms, classifier systems, and an array of other computational models. Some of the major questions facing complex systems researchers are: (1) explaining how complexity arises from the nonlinear interaction of simples components, (2) describing the mechanisms underlying high-level aggregate behavior of complex systems (such as the overt behavior of an organism, the flow of energy in an ecology, the GNP of an economy), and (3) creating a theoretical framework to enable predictions about the likely behavior of such systems in various conditions. The importance of understanding such systems in enormous: many of the most serious challenges facing humanity--e.g., environmental sustainability, economic stability, the control of disease--as well as many of the hardest scientific questions--e.g., protein folding, the distinction between self and non-self in the immune system, the nature of intelligence, the origin of life--require deep understanding of complex systems.

  6. 1991 Annual report on scientific programs: A broad research program on the sciences of complexity

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    1991 was continued rapid growth for the Santa Fe Institute (SFI) as it broadened its interdisciplinary research into the organization, evolution and operation of complex systems and sought deeply the principles underlying their dynamic behavior. Research on complex systems--the focus of work at SFI--involves an extraordinary range of topics normally studied in seemingly disparate fields. Natural systems displaying complex behavior range upwards from proteins and DNA through cells and evolutionary systems to human societies. Research models exhibiting complexity include nonlinear equations, spin glasses, cellular automata, genetic algorithms, classifier systems, and an array of other computational models. Some of the major questions facing complex systems researchers are: (1) explaining how complexity arises from the nonlinear interaction of simples components, (2) describing the mechanisms underlying high-level aggregate behavior of complex systems (such as the overt behavior of an organism, the flow of energy in an ecology, the GNP of an economy), and (3) creating a theoretical framework to enable predictions about the likely behavior of such systems in various conditions. The importance of understanding such systems in enormous: many of the most serious challenges facing humanity--e.g., environmental sustainability, economic stability, the control of disease--as well as many of the hardest scientific questions--e.g., protein folding, the distinction between self and non-self in the immune system, the nature of intelligence, the origin of life--require deep understanding of complex systems.

  7. CPTSC 2001: Managing Change and Growth in Technical and Scientific Communication. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication (28th, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, October 11-13, 2001).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maylath, Bruce, Ed.

    This proceedings presents 43 papers delivered at the 2001 annual meeting of the Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication (CPTSC). Papers in the proceedings include the following: "Act IV: On Being Less Invisible" (Bill Karis); "Building a Community of Professional Communicators by Mapping Needs and Assets"…

  8. Publication rates of manuscript presentations at the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons Annual Scientific Conference between 1999 and 2008.

    PubMed

    Roukis, Thomas S

    2011-01-01

    Publication is the ultimate desired end point of scientific research. However, oral manuscript presentations of research studies are often referenced in textbooks, journal articles, and industry white papers, and, as a result, influence treatment care plans. No data exist for the actual publication rate of podiatric foot and ankle surgery oral manuscript presentations. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the actual publication rates of oral manuscript presentations at the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS) Annual Scientific Conference over 10 years. Print or electronic media for the ACFAS Annual Scientific Conference official program between 1999 and 2008 were obtained. Each year's official program was hand searched for any oral manuscript presentation, and, when identified, the title and authors were individually searched through electronic internet-based search engines to determine whether an oral manuscript presentation had been followed by publication of a full-text article. Additionally, pertinent journals were hand searched for potential articles. A total of 67.5% (139/206) oral manuscript presentations were ultimately published in 1 of 12 medical journals in a mean of 14.5 months. All journals except one (91.7%) represented peer-reviewed journals. The publication rate of oral manuscript presentations at the ACFAS Annual Scientific Conference is similar to or greater than orthopaedic subspecialties, including foot and ankle surgery, publication rates. Based on the above, attendees of the ACFAS Annual Scientific Conference should be aware that the majority of oral manuscript material presented at the ACFAS Annual Scientific Conference can be considered as accurate because they survive the rigors of the peer-review process more than two thirds of the time.

  9. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication (18th, Cincinnati, Ohio, October 10-12, 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zappen, James P., Ed.; Katz, Susan, Ed.

    Based on the theme of issues, questions, and controversies in program development and review, this proceedings presents papers delivered at the annual meeting of the Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication (CPTSC). Papers in the proceedings are divided into four sections: Benchmarks for Quality: Developing Criteria for…

  10. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication (14th, Orlando, Florida, October 7-9, 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geonetta, Sam C., Ed.

    Based on the notion of "reaching out," this proceedings presents papers from the annual meeting of the Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication. Papers in the proceedings are: "Southern Tech's Technical Writing Certificate" (William S. Pfeiffer); "Reach Out and Quack Someone" (Daniel R. Jones);…

  11. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication (17th, San Diego, California, October 11-13, 1990).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zappen, James P., Ed.; Katz, Susan, Ed.

    Based on the theme of assessment, this proceedings presents papers and discussions from the annual meeting of the Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication (CPTSC). Three papers in the proceedings discussing curricula are: "Model(s) for Educating Professional Communicators" (Marilyn M. Cooper); "Summary of…

  12. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication (19th, Boise, Idaho, October 8-10, 1992).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riordan, Daniel G., Ed.

    Based on the theme of broadening the base of academic, industrial and professional connections, this proceedings presents papers delivered at the annual meeting of the Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication (CPTSC). Papers in the proceedings are divided into four sections: Models for Connecting Academia, Industries, and the…

  13. Clinically relevant variants - identifying, collecting, interpreting, and disseminating: the 2013 annual scientific meeting of the Human Genome Variation Society.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Christine M; Sunyaev, Shamil R; Greenblatt, Marc S; Oetting, William S

    2014-04-01

    The dramatic advances in genetic sequencing technologies used in research laboratories are now entering the clinic, and applications of whole-genome and whole-exome sequencing to disease diagnosis, predisposition, and treatment will soon be commonplace. However, the standards and methods for identifying clinically relevant variants are currently being debated and defined. Multiple agencies worldwide have recognized that we have reached an exciting and critical transition point into the clinic, and many important issues are being discussed that impact how genetic variation data in the clinic will be interpreted and used. The 2013 annual scientific meeting of the Human Genome Variation Society (HGVS) had as its main theme the discovery, interpretation, and dissemination of clinically relevant DNA variants. The meeting featured the continuously developing technology of databasing genetic variation and computational tools for allelic variant discovery. Attention was given to curating and integrating these data with clinical findings, including approaches to distinguish between functional alleles underlying clinical phenotypes and benign sequence variants and making data sources interoperable and functional for clinical diagnostic utility, citing examples in specific diseases.

  14. Detecting Cheatgrass on the Colorado Plateau using Landsat data: A tutorial for the DESI software

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kokaly, Raymond F.

    2011-01-01

    Invasive plant species disrupt native ecosystems and cause economic harm to public lands. In this report, an example of applying the Detection of Early Season Invasives software to mapping cheatgrass infestations is given. A discussion of each step of the DESI process is given, including selection of Landsat images. Tutorial data, covering a semi-arid area in southern Utah, are distributed with this report. Tips on deriving the inputs required to run DESI are provided. An approach for evaluating and adjusting detection parameters by examining interim products of DESI is discussed.

  15. The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) instrument mechanism control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coker, Carl T.; Pappalardo, Daniel; Pogge, Richard; Martini, Paul; Derwent, Mark; O'Brien, Thomas P.; Honscheid, Klaus

    2016-08-01

    The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) is under construction to measure the expansion history of the Universe using the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation technique. The spectra of 40 million galaxies over 14,000 sq deg will be measured during the life of the experiment. A new prime focus corrector for the KPNO Mayall telescope will deliver light to 5,000 fiber optic positioners. The fibers in turn feed ten broad-band spectrographs. We present the design details of the instrument mechanism control systems for the spectrographs. Each spectrograph has a stand-alone mechanism control box that operates the unit's four remotely-operated mechanisms (two shutters and two Hartmannn doors), and provides a suite of temperature and humidity sensors. Each control box is highly modular, and is operated by a dedicated on-board Linux computer to provide all of the control and monitoring functions. We describe our solution for integrating a number of network-connected devices within each unit spectrograph, and describe the basic software architecture.

  16. Integration and testing of the DESI spectrograph prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perruchot, S.; Secroun, A.; Blanc, P.-E.; Ronayette, S.; Régal, X.; Castagnoli, G.; Le Van Suu, A.; Ealet, A.; Cuby, J.-G.; Elliot, A.; Honscheid, K.; Jelinsky, P.

    2016-08-01

    The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) is under construction to measure the expansion history of the Universe using the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation probe. The KPNO Mayall telescope will deliver light to 5000 fibers feeding ten broadband spectrographs. A consortium of Aix-Marseille University (AMU) and CNRS laboratories (LAM, OHP and CPPM) together with the WINLIGHT Systems company (Pertuis-France) has committed to integrate and validate the performance requirements of the full spectrographs, equipped with their cryostats, shutters and other mechanisms. An AIT plan has been defined and dedicated test equipment has been designed and implemented. This equipment simulates the fiber input illumination from the telescope, and offers a variety of continuum and line sources. Flux levels are adjustable and can illuminate one or several fibers along the test slit. It is fully remotely controlled and interfaced to the Instrument Control System. Specific analysis tools have also been developed to verify and monitor the performance and stability of the spectrographs. All these developments are described in details.

  17. Transport of DESY 1.3 GHZ Cryomodule at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    McGee, M.W.; Arkan, T.; Borissov, E.; Leibfritz, J.; Schappert, W.; Barbanotti, S.; /LASA, Segrate /INFN, Milan

    2009-05-01

    In an exchange of technology agreement, Deutsches Elektron-Synchrotron (DESY) Laboratory in Hamburg Germany has provided a 1.3 GHz cryomodule 'kit' to Fermilab. The cryomodule components (qualified dressed cavities, cold mass parts, vacuum vessel, etc.) sent from Germany in pieces were assembled at Fermilab's Cryomodule Assembly Facility (CAF). The cavity string was assembled at CAF-MP9 Class 10 cleanroom and then transported to CAF-ICB cold mass assembly area via a flatbed air ride truck. Finite Element Analysis (FEA) studies were implemented to define location of instrumentation for initial cold mass transport, providing modal frequencies and shapes. Subsequently, the fully assembled cryomodule was transported to the SRF Accelerator Test Facility at New Muon Lab (NML). Internal geophones (velocity sensors) were attached during the coldmass assembly for transport (warm) and operational (cold) measurements. A description of the isolation system that maintained alignment during transport and protected fragile components is provided. Shock and vibration measurement results of each transport and modal analysis are discussed.

  18. The DESI shutter with integrated fiber illumination system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derwent, Mark A.; O'Brien, Thomas P.; Pappalardo, Daniel P.; Martini, Paul; Coker, Carl T.; Pogge, Richard W.

    2016-08-01

    The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) is under construction to measure the expansion history of the Universe using the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation technique. The spectra of 40 million galaxies over 14,000 sq deg will be measured during the life of the experiment. A new prime focus corrector for the KPNO Mayall telescope will deliver light to 5000 fiber optic positioners. The fibers in turn feed ten broad-band spectrographs. We describe the unique shutter design that incorporates a fiber illumination system into the shutter blade. When activated, the fiber illumination system directs intense 430-480nm wavelength light at the instrument's fiber slit in order to back-illuminate the telescope's focal plane and verify the location of the robotic fiber positioners. The back-illumination is typically active during science exposure read-outs and therefore requires the shutter to attenuate light by a factor of at least 107. This paper describes how we have integrated the fiber illumination system into the shutter blade, as well as incorporated an inflatable seal around the shutter aperture to achieve the light attenuation requirement. We also present lab results that characterize the fiber illumination and shutter attenuation. Finally, we discuss the control scheme that executes exposure and fiber illumination modes, and meets the shutter timing requirements.

  19. Communication architecture system for fiber positioning of DESI spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaci, Karim; Glez-de-Rivera, Guillermo; Lopez-Colino, Fernando; Martinez-Garcia, M. Sofia; Masa, Jose L.; Garrido, Javier; Sanchez, Justo; Prada, Francisco

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a design proposal for controlling the five thousand fiber positioners within the focal plate of the DESI instrument. Each of these positioners is a robot which allows positioning its optic fiber with a resolution within the range of few microns. The high number and density of these robots poses a challenge for handling the communication from a central control device to each of these five thousand. Furthermore, an additional restriction applies as the required time to communicate to every robot of its position must be smaller than a second. Additionally. a low energy consumption profile is also desired. Both wireless and wired communication protocols have been evaluated, proposing single-technology-based architectures and hybrid ones (a combination of them). Among the wireless solutions, ZigBee and CyFi have been considered. Using simulation tools these wireless protocols have been discarded as they do not allow an efficient communication. The studied wired protocols comprise I2C, CAN and Ethernet. The best solution found is a hybrid multilayer architecture combining both Ethernet and I2C. A 100 Mbps Ethernet based network is used to communicate the central control unit with ten management boards. Each of these boards is a low-cost, low-power embedded device that manages a thirty six degrees sector of the sensing plate. Each of these boards receives the positioning data for five hundred robots and communicate with each one through a fast mode plus I2C bus. This proposal allows to communicate the positioning information for all five thousand robots in 350 ms total.

  20. Full publication of papers presented at the 1995 through 1999 European Association of Plastic Surgeons annual scientific meetings: a systemic bibliometric analysis.

    PubMed

    van der Steen, Lydia P E; Hage, J Joris; Loonen, Martijn P J; Kon, Moshe

    2004-07-01

    From the multitude of oral presentations at major medical meetings, the most informative and highest-quality studies make it to full publication in peer-reviewed journals. The rate of publication may be regarded as an indicator of the scientific level of the meeting. Study of the publication rates of consecutive annual meetings allows for the evaluation of the consistency of the scientific level of these meetings and for comparison with publication rates of other meetings in the same field of interest. To grade how useful any publication is to other authors, one can furthermore measure how frequently they cite it in their own publications. Finally, the time lag between oral presentation and full publication is of importance to both its authors and the audience at the meeting. The main objectives of this study were to determine the publication rate of papers of various fields of interest as presented at five consecutive annual meetings of the European Association of Plastic Surgeons (EURAPS) and the time lag between these presentations and their publication. The authors compared their overall findings to those reported for other surgical specialties. Moreover, they identified and classified the journals in which the full publications appeared as an indicator of the scientific value of the meeting. They conclude that a greater than average number of papers presented at the 1995 through 1999 annual EURAPS meetings went on to full publication in peer-reviewed journals. Among these journals, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery was the best source for information presented at the meetings. Although approximately 90 percent of the publications appeared before 3 years had passed after a meeting, additional publications may be expected to appear even more than 6 years after the meeting. Given the high publication rate and the high average normalized impact factor of the journals in which the presentations appeared, the five studied EURAPS meetings overall had high scientific

  1. Don't Miss the Meeting: Arthroscopy Association of North America Annual Scientific Meeting Reveals Timely and Unique Content.

    PubMed

    Lubowitz, James H; Brand, Jefferson C; Provencher, Matthew T; Rossi, Michael J

    2017-04-01

    The Annual Meeting of the Arthroscopy Association of North America (AANA) is notable for timely presentation of innovative research and development. In addition, much of what is presented at the Annual Meeting is never published in Arthroscopy journal. Readers are encouraged to attend the AANA meeting to keep up with the discussion and debate. Copyright © 2017 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Proceedings of the 24th Day of Scientific lectures and 20th Annual Meeting of the National Society of Black Physicists

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, K.H; Carwell, H.V.

    1999-11-29

    The National Society of Black Physicists will hold its Twentieth annual meeting and its XXIIII Day of Scientific Lectures at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory on March 27th - 30th, 1997. The meeting provides a major opportunity for African American physicists and students to present their current research and discuss issues germane to the constituency. It is therefore crucial to have the broadest cross-section of the membership at each meeting. The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory was chosen as the site of the 20th annual meeting because of its historical significance to Physics (being one of the first national laboratories in the United States) and the laboratories continuing support of the goals and objectives of the society.

  3. 5 CFR 630.301 - Annual leave accrual and accumulation-Senior Executive Service, Senior-Level, and Scientific and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... legal authority, for planning, monitoring, developing, evaluating, and rewarding employee performance...-Level and Scientific or Professional) or 10 U.S.C. 1607(a) (Intelligence Senior Level), shall accumulate...

  4. 5 CFR 630.301 - Annual leave accrual and accumulation-Senior Executive Service, Senior-Level, and Scientific and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... legal authority, for planning, monitoring, developing, evaluating, and rewarding employee performance...-Level and Scientific or Professional) or 10 U.S.C. 1607(a) (Intelligence Senior Level), shall accumulate...

  5. 5 CFR 630.301 - Annual leave accrual and accumulation-Senior Executive Service, Senior-Level, and Scientific and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... legal authority, for planning, monitoring, developing, evaluating, and rewarding employee performance...-Level and Scientific or Professional) or 10 U.S.C. 1607(a) (Intelligence Senior Level), shall accumulate...

  6. Abstracts for the 59th Annual Scientific Meeting (November 2011) by American Society of Cytopathology (ASC) at Baltimore, MD, USA

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    These are peer-reviewed poster-platform submissions finalized by the Scientific Program Committee. A total of 153 abstracts (14 Platforms [PP1 through PP14] & 139 Posters [1 through 139]) were selected from 161 submissions to be considered for presentation during November 4 – 8, 2011, at the Hilton Baltimore Hotel, to pathologists, cytopathologists, cytotechnologists, residents, fellows, students, and other members of cytopathology-related medical and scientific fields.

  7. Qualitative analysis of seized cocaine samples using desorption electrospray ionization- mass spectrometry (DESI-MS).

    PubMed

    Stojanovska, Natasha; Tahtouh, Mark; Kelly, Tamsin; Beavis, Alison; Fu, Shanlin

    2015-05-01

    Desorption electrospray ionization - mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) is a useful technique for the qualitative analysis of compounds found in seized drug material. In this study, DESI-MS was utilized in the screening analysis of illicit cocaine samples. The technique was also applied to the geographical origin determination of these samples. The limit of detection was determined to be 24.3 µg (or 3.47 µg/mm(2) ) and the analysis time was less than 1 minute per sample. The intra-day and inter-day precision for the detection of cocaine was 11 % and 42 %, respectively; therefore the quantitative data provided by DESI-MS was limited in its use for accurate determination of cocaine concentration in a sample. Using the quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) mass spectrometer, the presence of cocaine and impurities detected were confirmed by accurate tandem MS data. The qualitative chemical profiles obtained using DESI-MS were compared to two popular analysis techniques, GC-MS and LC-MS. The effects of a range of adulterants including caffeine, procaine, levamisole, lignocaine, paracetamol, and atropine on the detectability of cocaine were also investigated. It was found that the addition of these adulterants in a cocaine sample did not prevent the detection of the analyte itself (there was slight enhancement in some samples), which was useful in drug detection. The detection of truxillines in the seized samples by DESI-MS aided in the preliminary determination of geographical origin, i.e., Bolivian, Peruvian or Colombian leaf origin. The application of DESI-MS to the qualitative analysis and screening of seized cocaine samples demonstrates the potential and applicability of the technique to the fast chemical profiling of illicit samples. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. 2006 CSEP Annual Scientific Conference, Halifax, Nova Scotia, 1-4 November 2006. Pediatric exercise physiology symposium: a tribute to Oded Bar-Or. Introduction.

    PubMed

    Klentrou, Panagiota Nota

    2008-04-01

    Dr. Oded Bar-Or was a pioneer in the study of children's physical activity, exercise, and health. His diverse research interests led to numerous scientific explorations on thermoregulation, aerobic and anaerobic capacity, physical activity, economy of movement, obesity, neuromuscular diseases, asthma, cystic fibrosis (CF), and many more. To commemorate the extraordinary contributions that Dr. Bar-Or made to the study of exercise and youth, a symposium on pediatric exercise physiology was held at the CSEP's 2006 Annual Meeting in Halifax. The papers in the following pages include the four papers presented by international colleagues in his memory.

  9. Meeting report: British Society for Research on Ageing (BSRA) annual scientific meeting 2012, Aston University, Birmingham, 3rd to 4th July 2012

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The focus of the British Society for Research on Ageing (BSRA) annual scientific meeting 2012 was aging mechanisms and mitigants. The themes covered included epigenetics, stem cells and regeneration, aging pathways and molecules, the aging bladder and bowel, as well as updates from the New Dynamics of Ageing (NDA) programme. The topics incorporated new directions for staple aging research in caloric restriction (CR), inflammation, immunesenescence, neurodegeneration, homeostasis and stress resistance, as well as newer research areas such as bioengineering of tissues, including the internal anal sphincter and thymus. PMID:24472617

  10. Forensic applications of desorption electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (DESI-MS).

    PubMed

    Morelato, Marie; Beavis, Alison; Kirkbride, Paul; Roux, Claude

    2013-03-10

    Desorption electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) is an emerging analytical technique that enables in situ mass spectrometric analysis of specimens under ambient conditions. It has been successfully applied to a large range of forensically relevant materials. This review assesses and highlights forensic applications of DESI-MS including the analysis and detection of illicit drugs, explosives, chemical warfare agents, inks and documents, fingermarks, gunshot residues and drugs of abuse in urine and plasma specimens. The minimal specimen preparation required for analysis and the sensitivity of detection achieved offer great advantages, especially in the field of forensic science. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Social media: a tool to spread information: a case study analysis of twitter conversation at the Cardiac Society of Australia & New Zealand 61st annual scientific meeting 2013.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Caleb; Inglis, Sally C; Newton, Phillip J; Cripps, Peter J S; MacDonald, Peter S; Davidson, Patricia M

    2014-01-01

    The World Wide Web has changed the way in which people communicate and consume information. More importantly, this innovation has increased the speed and spread of information. There has been recent increase in the percentage of cardiovascular professionals, including journals and associations using Twitter to engage with others and exchange ideas. Evaluating the reach and impact in scientific meetings is important in promoting the use of social media. This study evaluated Twitter use during the recent 61st Annual Scientific Meeting at the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand. During the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand 2013 61st Annual Scientific Meeting Symplur was used to curate conversations that were publicly posted with the hashtag #CSANZ2013. The hashtag was monitored with analysis focused on the influencers, latest tweets, tweet statistics, activity comparisons, and tweet activity during the conference. Additionally, Radian6 social media listening software was used to collect data. A summary is provided. There were 669 total tweets sent from 107 unique Twitter accounts during 8th August 9 a.m. to 11th August 1 p.m. This averaged nine tweets per hour and six tweets per participant. This assisted in the sharing of ideas and disseminating the findings and conclusions from presenters at the conference with a total 1,432,573 potential impressions in Twitter users tweet streams. This analysis of Twitter conversations during a recent scientific meeting highlights the significance and place of social media within research dissemination and collaboration. Researchers and clinicians should consider using this technology to enhance timely communication of findings. The potential to engage with consumers and enhance shared decision-making should be explored further.

  12. A Report on the 30th Annual Conference of the International Association of Scientific and Technological University Libraries (IATUL)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tripathi, Manorama

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The paper aims to report on the 30th IATUL Annual Conference held in Leuven, Belgium, 1-4 June, 2009. Design/methodology/approach: The paper summarises the major themes of the conference as well as giving some specific details of developments at the Indira Gandhi National Open University in India, which supplement the author's…

  13. A Report on the 30th Annual Conference of the International Association of Scientific and Technological University Libraries (IATUL)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tripathi, Manorama

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The paper aims to report on the 30th IATUL Annual Conference held in Leuven, Belgium, 1-4 June, 2009. Design/methodology/approach: The paper summarises the major themes of the conference as well as giving some specific details of developments at the Indira Gandhi National Open University in India, which supplement the author's…

  14. The annual meeting of the European Society for Vascular Surgery--the scientific contents over the years.

    PubMed

    Bergqvist, D

    2008-07-01

    to analyze the presentations given at the annual meeting of European Society for Vascular Surgery: topic, geographical distribution, later publication. Three six-year periods from 1989 have been evaluated. case series dominates but randomized trials have increased somewhat. Papers on animal experiments and basic science have decreased. The most frequently reported diseases have been aortic aneurysm, carotid artery problems, lower extremity ischaemia and with an increasing number of papers on venous disease. Around two thirds of the presentations have been later published as full papers in European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, but as many as one quarter has not been published. Geographical origin has varied over time with a decrease in the UK dominance. The presentations at the Annual meeting of European Society for Vascular Surgery contribute substantially to the contents of the Society Journal but a large proportion of the presentations never appear in print. Northern Europe dominates when papers per population unit is counted.

  15. [The impact of the annual scientific meetings of the Israel Society of Rheumatology as measured by publication rates of the abstracts in peer-reviewed journals].

    PubMed

    Perez, Shira; Hashkes, Philip J; Uziel, Yosef

    2004-04-01

    We aimed to examine the impact and quality of the research presented in the Israel Society of Rheumatology (ISR) annual scientific meetings by measuring publication rates of the abstracts in peer-reviewed journals and investigating the factors that influenced publication. We examined the outcome of all 79 abstracts submitted to the ISR for the 1998-2000 annual meetings. A MEDLINE search of all abstracts, by authors, topics and keywords was performed. Senior authors of abstracts not found to be published in this search were interviewed regarding publication and factors influencing submission. We described the effect of variable factors on the rate of publication. As of September 2002, 63 (80%) abstracts were published in peer-reviewed journals or are currently in-press. Most abstracts were published in prominent journals (with a high impact factor). The majority of the abstracts (61%) were published in rheumatologic journals, 65% of the studies originated from tertiary centers and 19% of the studies were multicenter. The most common diseases studied were antiphospholipid syndrome (20%), systemic lupus erythematosus (19%) and inflammatory arthritis (18%). Most of the studies were of disease pathogenesis (35%) and clinical manifestations (33%). The most common study designs were basic science (34%). An overall 57% of the studies reported "positive" results and 9% reported "negative" results. None of the factors studied were associated with publication or non-publication. The main cause cited by authors for not publishing their abstract was lack of time to prepare a full paper or a desire to further expand the study. Within this group of 16 authors of abstracts, 11 authors still plan to submit a paper. The ISR annual meetings have an important clinical scientific impact as measured by the high rate of abstracts published as full length articles in leading peer-reviewed journals.

  16. Studies for a beam trajectory monitor for TTF-FEL at DESY

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Ute Carina

    1997-06-01

    A beam trajectory monitor for the FEL at the TESLA test facility at DESY has been proposed for the reconstruction of the electron beam trajectory by observing the spontaneous undulator radiation along the beam using the pinhole camera principle. Simulations for this concept have been performed and results are presented here.

  17. Conversion rates of abstracts presented at the Urological Society of Australia and New Zealand (USANZ) Annual Scientific Meeting into full-text journal articles.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Peter D; Chalasani, Venu; Woo, Henry H

    2012-08-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? It is well known that the transition of a presented abstract in a scientific meeting to a journal article improves the quality of the meeting and prevents an abstract being incorporated into meta-analyses or practice guidelines without proper appraisal. This is the first analysis of USANZ Annual Scientific Meeting abstracts' conversion to full publication. With relatively low publication rates compared to other international meetings, this review identifies the need for mechanisms to encourage USANZ researchers to convert their abstracts into published articles. The numbers and characteristics of the abstracts presented at the Annual Scientific Meetings (ASM) of the Urological Society of Australia and New Zealand (USANZ) that are converted to peer-reviewed publications have not previously been analysed and published. We undertook a review of all abstracts presented at the USANZ ASM from 2005 to 2009. A PubMed search was performed between 15 June and 15 July 2012, using a search algorithm to identify the full-text publications of the presented abstracts. Correlation between abstract characteristics and publication rate was then examined to distinguish the predictors for publications. Of 614 abstracts that were presented at USANZ ASM between 2005 and 2009, 183 papers were published, giving a publication rate of 29.80%. The papers were predominantly published in urological journals and were more likely to be published if they were presented by an international author or were retrospective studies or if basic science research. The mean (SD) time to publication was 14.46 (13.89) months and the mean Impact Factor of journals where papers were published was 2.90. The overall publication rate was relatively low compared with other urological meetings held in America and Europe. USANZ has a challenge of encouraging higher-quality research from the authors to further enhance its publication rate and consequently the

  18. ProtoDESI: risk reduction experiment for the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagrelius, Parker; Baltay, Charles; Bebek, Christopher; Besuner, Robert; Castander, Francisco J.; Dey, Arjun; Buckley-Geer, Elizabeth; Elliott, Ann; Emmet, William; Flaugher, Brenna; Gershkovich, Irena; Honscheid, Klaus; Joyce, Dick; Kent, Stephen; Marshall, Robert; Probst, Ronald; Rabinowitz, David; Reil, Kevin; Schlegel, David; Schubnell, Michael; Serrano, Santiago; Silber, Joseph; Sprayberry, David; Tarle, Greg

    2016-08-01

    The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) is under construction to measure the expansion history of the Universe using the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation technique. The spectra of 40 million galaxies over 14,000 sq. deg. will be measured during the life of the experiment. A new prime focus corrector for the KPNO Mayall telescope will deliver light to 5000 fiber optic positioners. The fibers in turn feed ten broad-band spectrographs. We describe the ProtoDESI experiment, planned for installation and commissioning at the Mayall telescope in the fall of 2016, which will test the fiber positioning system for DESI. The ProtoDESI focal plate, consisting of 10 fiber positioners, illuminated fiducials, and a guide, focus and alignment (GFA) sensor module, will be installed behind the existing Mosaic prime focus corrector. A Fiber View Camera (FVC) will be mounted to the lower surface of the primary mirror cell and a subset of the Instrument Control System (ICS) will control the ProtoDESI subsystems, communicate with the Telescope Control System (TCS), and collect instrument monitoring data. Short optical fibers from the positioners will be routed to the back of the focal plane where they will be imaged by the Fiber Photometry Camera (FPC) or back-illuminated by a LED system. Target objects will be identified relative to guide stars, and using the GFA in a control loop with the ICS/TCS system, the guide stars will remain stable on pre-identified GFA pixels. The fiber positioners will then be commanded to the target locations and placed on the targets iteratively, using the FVC to centroid on back-illuminated fibers and fiducials to make corrective delta motions. When the positioners are aligned with the targets on-sky, the FPC will measure the intensities from the positioners' fibers which can then be dithered to look for intensity changes, indicating how well the fibers were initially positioned on target centers. The final goal is to operate ProtoDESI on the Mayall

  19. Nutritional value of raw and autoclaved kabuli and desi chickpeas (Cicer arietinum L.) for growing chickens.

    PubMed

    Viveros, A; Brenes, A; Elices, R; Arija, I; Canales, R

    2001-05-01

    1. Two experiments were carried out to determine the effect of inclusion of raw (kabuli and desi) and autoclaved (desi) chickpea seeds in wheat-based starter diets in chickens grown to 28 d of age on the performance, digestive organ sizes, nitrogen-corrected apparent metabolisable energy (AMEn), ileal apparent protein and starch digestibilities (APD and ASD) and intestinal alpha-amylase and trypsin activities. 2. In the first experiment, diets were formulated to contain 0, 150, 300 and 450 g/kg of raw kabuli chickpea seeds. Increasing the proportion of seed in the diet negatively influenced body weight gain, food intake and food efficiency. The relative weights of the pancreas, liver and gizzard and the relative lengths of duodenum, jejunum, ileum and caeca were increased significantly when the chickpea seeds were included in the diets. Correspondingly, APD, ASD, alpha-amylase and trypsin activities and AMEn were reduced significantly when the chickpea seed was incorporated in the diets. 3. In the 2nd experiment, diets were formulated to contain 75 and 150 g/kg of raw and autoclaved desi chickpea seeds. Weight gain and food intake of the chicks given desi chickpea diets were significantly reduced compared with those fed on the control diet. Increasing the proportion of seed in the diet negatively influenced body weight gain, food intake and food efficiency. Moreover, a significant increment in the relative weights of liver and pancreas, and in the relative lengths of duodenum, ileum and caeca was observed when the concentration of chickpea seeds in the diets was increased. Feeding autoclaved seeds significantly increased the weight gains and the food intakes. However, food efficiency was not modified by the autoclaving. Relative weights of gizzard and liver and relative lengths of ileum were decreased significantly by the inclusion of autoclaved desi chickpea in the diet. 4. We concluded that the inclusion of kabuli (up to 450 g/kg) and desi (up to 150 g

  20. DESI then MALDI mass spectrometry imaging of lipid and protein distributions in single tissue sections

    PubMed Central

    Eberlin, Livia S; Liu, Xioahui; Ferreira, Christina R.; Santagata, Sandro; Agar, Nathalie Y.R.; Cooks, R. Graham

    2011-01-01

    Imaging mass spectrometry (MS) is a powerful technique for mapping the spatial distributions of a wide range of chemical compounds simultaneously from a tissue section. Co-localization of the distribution of individual molecular species including particular lipids and proteins, and correlation with the morphological features of a single tissue section is highly desirable for comprehensive tissue analysis and disease diagnosis. We now report on the use, in turn, of desorption electrospray ionization (DESI), matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) and then optical microscopy to image lipid and protein distributions in a single tissue section. This is possible through the use of histologically compatible DESI solvent systems, which allow for sequential analyses of the same section by DESI then MALDI. Hematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) staining was performed on the same section after removal of the MALDI matrix. This workflow allowed chemical information to be unambiguously matched to histological features in mouse brain tissue sections. The lipid sulfatide(24:1), detected at m/z 888.8 by DESI imaging, was co-localized with the protein MBP isoform 8, detected at m/z 14117 by MALDI imaging, in regions corresponding to the corpus callosum substructure of the mouse brain, as confirmed in the H&E images. Correlation of lipid and protein distributions with histopathological features was also achieved for human brain cancer samples. Higher tumor cell density was observed in regions demonstrating higher relative abundances of oleic acid, detected by DESI imaging at m/z 281.4, and the protein calcyclin, detected by MALDI at m/z 10085, for a human glioma sample. Since correlation between molecular signatures and disease state can be achieved, we expect that this methodology will significantly enhance the value of MS imaging in molecular pathology for diagnosis. PMID:21975048

  1. "Loops and Legs in Quantum Field Theory", 12th DESY Workshop on Elementary Particle Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The bi-annual international conference "Loops and Legs in Quantum Field Theory" has been held at Weimar, Germany, from April 27 to May 02, 2014. It has been the 12th conference of this series, started in 1992. The main focus of the conference are precision calculations of multi- loop and multi-leg processes in elementary particle physics for processes at present and future high-energy facilities within and beyond the Standard Model. At present many physics questions studied deal with processes at the LHC and future facilities like the ILC. A growing number of contributions deals with important developments in the field of computational technologies and algorithmic methods, including large-scale computer algebra, efficient methods to compute large numbers of Feynman diagrams, analytic summation and integration methods of various kinds, new related function spaces, precise numerical methods and Monte Carlo simulations. The present conference has been attended by more than 110 participants from all over the world, presenting more than 75 contributions, most of which have been written up for these pro- ceedings. The present volume demonstrates in an impressive way the enormous development of the field during the last few years, reaching the level of 5-loop calculations in QCD and a like- wise impressive development in massive next-to-leading order and next-to-next-to-leading order processes. Computer algebraic and numerical calculations require terabyte storage and many CPU years, even after intense parallelization, to obtain state-of-the-art theoretical predictions. The city of Weimar gave a suitable frame to the conference, with its rich history, especially in literature, music, arts, and architecture. Goethe, Schiller, Wieland, Herder, Bach and Liszt lived there and created many of their masterpieces. The many young participants signal that our field is prosperous and faces an exciting future. The conference hotel "Kaiserin Augusta" offered a warm hospitality and

  2. Publication rates of poster presentations at the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons annual scientific conference between 1999 and 2008.

    PubMed

    Abicht, Bradley P; Donnenwerth, Michael P; Borkosky, Sara L; Plovanich, Elizabeth J; Roukis, Thomas S

    2012-01-01

    Publication is the desired end point of scientific research. Ultimately, it is desired that research presented in poster format at a scientific conference will be developed into a report and become published in a peer-reviewed scientific journal. Moreover, poster presentations of research studies are often referenced and, as a result, influence treatment care plans. No data exist for the actual publication rate of podiatric foot and ankle surgery poster presentations. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to determine the actual publication rates of poster presentations at the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS) annual scientific conference (ASC) during a 10-year period. Print or electronic media for the ACFAS ASC official program from 1999 to 2008 were obtained. Each year's official program was manually searched for any poster presentation and, when identified, the authors and title were individually searched using Internet-based search engines to determine whether a poster presentation had been followed by publication. Of the 825 posters, 198 (24%) poster presentations were ultimately published in 1 of 32 medical journals within a weighted mean of 17.6 months. Of the 32 journals, 25 (78.1%) represented peer-reviewed journals. The publication rate of poster presentations at the ACFAS ASC was less than that of oral manuscripts presented at the same meeting during the same period and was also less than the orthopedic subspecialty poster presentation publication rates. Therefore, attendees of the ACFAS ASC should be aware that only a few of the posters presented at the ACFAS ASC will be valid because they will not survive the rigors of publication 76% of the time. Additionally, more stringent selection criteria should be used so that the selected poster presentations can ultimately withstand the publication process. Copyright © 2012 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Symposium highlights and synopses of the scientific program: the Sixth Annual Mid-Atlantic Healthcare Informatics Symposium.

    PubMed

    Vito, D; Diltz, M; Porter, M; White, P; Luberti, A

    2014-01-01

    As the bar to actively participate in one's own health is consistently lowered through technology, patients are helping to evolve traditional workflows to make data more accessible at the point of care. This growing trend of patient engagement and personalized medicine was the focus of the 2013 Mid-Atlantic Healthcare Informatics Symposium in Philadelphia, PA on April 26, 2013. The conference, presented annually by the Center for Bio-medical Informatics (CBMi) at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, featured plenary sessions, panel discussions, and paper presentations on a range of topics, including patient engagement and personalized medicine; using data and analytics to optimize patient care; nursing informatics; and the future of biomedical informatics.

  4. Publication rate of scientific papers presented at the XXVI Annual Convention of National Neonatology Forum (NEOCON 2006).

    PubMed

    Singh, Archana; Solanki, Priyanka; Mishra, Devendra

    2015-01-01

    To document the publication rate of papers presented at the Annual Convention of National Neonatology Forum of India (NNF), and study the factors associated with their subsequent publication. All papers presented at the NEOCON 2006, the XXVI annual convention of NNF at Varanasi, India, were searched for subsequent full publication, by an internet-based search using Pubmed, Google Scholar and Indmed. Publication of the presented paper was looked for in English language, peer-reviewed, indexed journals over the next five years (1st January 2007 to 31st December, 2011). The full published papers were compared with the abstract and differences noted. One hundred and two papers and posters were presented at the conference and 14 (13.7 %) of these were published in the next five years. None was published in any un-indexed journal. The highest percentage of paper publication was from the Award paper category (83.3 %) and least from Innovation category (none). The only factor significantly associated with subsequent publication was presentation as an Award paper (P < 0.001). On comparison of the presented abstracts and the published papers, there was a change in authors in 78.5 %, title in 42.8 %, and the data in 35.7 %. The subsequent publication of conference abstracts as a full-paper is sub-optimal in the field of neonatology. Further research is needed to identify the factors responsible for the poor subsequent publication, and efforts need to be made to address them both at the institutional and the researchers' level.

  5. 14th Annual Meeting of the Safety Pharmacology Society: threading through scientific sessions for originality and novelty.

    PubMed

    Cavero, Icilio

    2015-06-01

    The Annual Meeting of the Safety Pharmacology (SP) Society is a yearly event designed to keep attendees abreast of how to best identify and mitigate organ function liabilities of candidate drugs selected for clinical assessment. Heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) effects of candidate drugs in dogs/monkeys have satisfactory human translation. Mechanism-designed assays offer opportunities for innovative approaches to identify chemotherapeutic-induced peripheral neuropathy (PN). SP has a large array of methodologies to determine safety on eye functions. Video-tracking analysis of zebrafish swimming behavior accurately profiles drugs for high-level brain function liabilities. Available in vitro and in vivo assays can identify, and determine physiological and pharmacological mechanisms of, candidate drug-induced emesis. Ad hoc Working Groups have already finalized protocols for testing the comprehensive in vitro arrhythmia assay (CiPA), an innovative paradigm for assessing mechanisms conferring candidate drug proarrhythmic liabilities. The good concordance of non-clinical and clinical Phase I BP and HR effects of candidate drugs support the use of dog/monkey models for clinical outcome. Drug liabilities (e.g., PN, nausea, vomiting, etc.) affecting non-vital organs/systems require the same degree of SP attention given to vital functions as they can dramatically reduce patient quality of life.

  6. Test Sequence for Superconducting XFEL Cavities in the Accelerator Module Test Facility (AMTF) at DESY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaffran, J.; Petersen, B.; Reschke, D.; Swierblewski, J.

    The European XFEL is a new research facility currently under construction at DESY in the Hamburg area in Germany. From 2016 onwards, it will generate extremely intense X-ray flashes that will be used by researchers from all over the world. The main part of the superconducting European XFEL linear accelerator consists of 100 accelerator modules with 800 RF-cavities inside. The accelerator modules, superconducting magnets and cavities will be tested in the accelerator module test facility (AMTF) at DESY. This paper gives an overview of the test sequences for the superconducting cavities, applied in the preparation area and at the two cryostats (XATC) of the AMTF-hall, and describes the complete area. In addition it summarizes the tests and lessons learnt until the middle of 2014.

  7. Improved DESI-MS Performance using Edge Sampling and aRotational Sample Stage

    SciTech Connect

    Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2008-01-01

    The position of the surface to be analyzed relative to the sampling orifice or capillary into the mass spectrometer has been known to dramatically affect the observed signal levels in desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESIMS). In analyses of sample spots on planar surfaces, DESI-MS signal intensities as much as five times greater were routinely observed when the bottom of the sampling capillary was appropriately positioned beneath the surface plane ( edge sampling") compared to when the capillary just touched the surface. To take advantage of the optimum "edge sampling" geometry and to maximize the number of samples that could be analyzed in this configuration, a rotational sample stage was integrated into a typical DESI-MS setup. The rapid quantitative determination of caffeine in two diet sport drinks (Diet Turbo Tea, Speed Stack Grape) spiked with an isotopically labeled internal standard demonstrated the utility of this approach.

  8. Stray light assessment and mitigation for the DESI front-end optical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Timothy N.; Lampton, Michael; Besuner, Robert W.; Sholl, Michael J.; Liang, Ming; Ellis, Scott

    2016-08-01

    The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) is under construction to measure the expansion history of the Universe, using the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation technique and the growth of structure using redshift-space distortions (RSD). The spectra of 40 million galaxies over 14000 square degrees will be measured during the life of the experiment. A new prime focus corrector for the KPNO Mayall telescope will deliver light to 5000 fiber optic positioners. The fibers in turn feed ten broad-band spectrographs. We will describe modeling and mitigation of stray light within the front end of DESI, consisting of the Mayall telescope and the corrector assembly. This includes the creation of a stray light model, quantitative analysis of the unwanted light at the corrector focal surface, identification of the main scattering sources, and a description of mitigation strategies to remove the sources.

  9. Molecular architecture of DesI: a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of desosamine.

    PubMed

    Burgie, E Sethe; Holden, Hazel M

    2007-08-07

    Desosamine is a 3-(dimethylamino)-3,4,6-trideoxyhexose found, for example, in such macrolide antibiotics as erthyromycin, azithromycin, and clarithromycin. The efficacies of these macrolide antibiotics are markedly reduced in the absence of desosamine. In the bacterium Streptomyces venezuelae, six enzymes are required for the production of dTDP-desosamine. The focus of this X-ray crystallographic analysis is the third enzyme in the pathway, a PLP-dependent aminotransferase referred to as DesI. The structure of DesI was solved in complex with its product, dTDP-4-amino-4,6-dideoxyglucose, to a nominal resolution of 2.1 A. Each subunit of the dimeric enzyme contains 12 alpha-helices and 14 beta-strands. Three cis-peptides are observed in each subunit, Phe 330, Pro 332, and Pro 339. The two active sites of the enzyme are located in clefts at the subunit/subunit interface. Electron density corresponding to the bound product clearly demonstrates a covalent bond between the amino group of the product and C-4' of the PLP cofactor. Interestingly, there are no hydrogen-bonding interactions between the protein and the dideoxyglucosyl group of the product (within 3.2 A). The only other sugar-modifying aminotransferase whose structure is known in the presence of product is PseC from Helicobacter pylori. This enzyme, as opposed to DesI, catalyzes amino transfer to the axial position of the sugar. A superposition of the two active sites for these proteins reveals that the major differences in ligand binding occur in the orientations of the deoxyglucosyl and phosphoryl groups. Indeed, the nearly 180 degrees difference in hexose orientation explains the equatorial versus axial amino transfer exhibited by DesI and PseC, respectively.

  10. DESI-MS/MS of Chemical Warfare Agents and Related Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Agostino, Paul A.

    Solid phase microextraction (SPME) fibers were used to headspace ­sample chemical warfare agents and their hydrolysis products from glass vials and glass vials containing spiked media, including Dacron swabs, office carpet, paper and fabric. The interface of the Z-spray source was modified to permit safe introduction of the SPME fibers for desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometric (DESI-MS) analysis. A "dip and shoot" method was also developed for the rapid sampling and DESI-MS analysis of chemical warfare agents and their hydrolysis products in liquid samples. Sampling was performed by simply dipping fused silica, stainless steel or SPME tips into the organic or aqueous samples. Replicate analyses were completed within several minutes under ambient conditions with no sample pre-treatment, resulting in a significant increase in sample throughput. The developed sample handling and analysis method was applied to the determination of chemical warfare agent content in samples containing unknown chemical and/or biological warfare agents. Ottawa sand was spiked with sulfur mustard, extracted with water and autoclaved to ensure sterility. Sulfur mustard was completely hydrolysed during the extraction/autoclave step and thiodiglycol was identified by DESI-MS, with analyses generally being completed within 1 min using the "dip and shoot" method.

  11. An advanced draft genome assembly of a desi type chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.).

    PubMed

    Parween, Sabiha; Nawaz, Kashif; Roy, Riti; Pole, Anil K; Venkata Suresh, B; Misra, Gopal; Jain, Mukesh; Yadav, Gitanjali; Parida, Swarup K; Tyagi, Akhilesh K; Bhatia, Sabhyata; Chattopadhyay, Debasis

    2015-08-11

    Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) is an important pulse legume crop. We previously reported a draft genome assembly of the desi chickpea cultivar ICC 4958. Here we report an advanced version of the ICC 4958 genome assembly (version 2.0) generated using additional sequence data and an improved genetic map. This resulted in 2.7-fold increase in the length of the pseudomolecules and substantial reduction of sequence gaps. The genome assembly covered more than 94% of the estimated gene space and predicted the presence of 30,257 protein-coding genes including 2230 and 133 genes encoding potential transcription factors (TF) and resistance gene homologs, respectively. Gene expression analysis identified several TF and chickpea-specific genes with tissue-specific expression and displayed functional diversification of the paralogous genes. Pairwise comparison of pseudomolecules in the desi (ICC 4958) and the earlier reported kabuli (CDC Frontier) chickpea assemblies showed an extensive local collinearity with incongruity in the placement of large sequence blocks along the linkage groups, apparently due to use of different genetic maps. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based mining of intra-specific polymorphism identified more than four thousand SNPs differentiating a desi group and a kabuli group of chickpea genotypes.

  12. An advanced draft genome assembly of a desi type chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Parween, Sabiha; Nawaz, Kashif; Roy, Riti; Pole, Anil K.; Venkata Suresh, B.; Misra, Gopal; Jain, Mukesh; Yadav, Gitanjali; Parida, Swarup K.; Tyagi, Akhilesh K.; Bhatia, Sabhyata; Chattopadhyay, Debasis

    2015-01-01

    Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) is an important pulse legume crop. We previously reported a draft genome assembly of the desi chickpea cultivar ICC 4958. Here we report an advanced version of the ICC 4958 genome assembly (version 2.0) generated using additional sequence data and an improved genetic map. This resulted in 2.7-fold increase in the length of the pseudomolecules and substantial reduction of sequence gaps. The genome assembly covered more than 94% of the estimated gene space and predicted the presence of 30,257 protein-coding genes including 2230 and 133 genes encoding potential transcription factors (TF) and resistance gene homologs, respectively. Gene expression analysis identified several TF and chickpea-specific genes with tissue-specific expression and displayed functional diversification of the paralogous genes. Pairwise comparison of pseudomolecules in the desi (ICC 4958) and the earlier reported kabuli (CDC Frontier) chickpea assemblies showed an extensive local collinearity with incongruity in the placement of large sequence blocks along the linkage groups, apparently due to use of different genetic maps. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based mining of intra-specific polymorphism identified more than four thousand SNPs differentiating a desi group and a kabuli group of chickpea genotypes. PMID:26259924

  13. The DESI Experiment Part I: Science,Targeting, and Survey Design

    SciTech Connect

    Aghamousa, Amir; et al.

    2016-10-31

    DESI (Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument) is a Stage IV ground-based dark energy experiment that will study baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) and the growth of structure through redshift-space distortions with a wide-area galaxy and quasar redshift survey. To trace the underlying dark matter distribution, spectroscopic targets will be selected in four classes from imaging data. We will measure luminous red galaxies up to $z=1.0$. To probe the Universe out to even higher redshift, DESI will target bright [O II] emission line galaxies up to $z=1.7$. Quasars will be targeted both as direct tracers of the underlying dark matter distribution and, at higher redshifts ($ 2.1 < z < 3.5$), for the Ly-$\\alpha$ forest absorption features in their spectra, which will be used to trace the distribution of neutral hydrogen. When moonlight prevents efficient observations of the faint targets of the baseline survey, DESI will conduct a magnitude-limited Bright Galaxy Survey comprising approximately 10 million galaxies with a median $z\\approx 0.2$. In total, more than 30 million galaxy and quasar redshifts will be obtained to measure the BAO feature and determine the matter power spectrum, including redshift space distortions.

  14. Microtomography using synchrotron radiation at DESY: current status and future developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckmann, Felix; Donath, Tilman; Dose, Thomas; Lippmann, Thomas; Martins, Rene V.; Metge, Joachim; Schreyer, Andreas

    2004-10-01

    The X-ray microtomography system which is operated at the Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor HASYLAB of the Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY in Hamburg, Germany, is presented. At the DORIS storage ring synchrotron radiation at the wiggler beamlines BW2, W2, and BW5 was used to run the microtomography apparatus as a user experiment. The development of tomography scanning techniques to investigate samples which are larger than the field of view of the X-ray detector is demonstrated for dental implants using the photon energy of 90 keV at the high energy beamline BW5. In cooperation with DESY the GKSS Research Center is setting up the high energy beamline HARWI-2 at the DORIS storage ring of DESY. This beamline will allow for tomography experiments using monochromatic X-rays from 20 to 200 keV with a beam size of 70×10 mm2. Furthermore the GKSS is operating a neutron radiography facility GENRA at the research reactor Geesthacht FRG, Geesthacht, Germany. It is intended to extend this facility by a tomography station. The combination of synchrotron radiation based microtomography with neutron tomography will allow for the development of new techniques to give new insight in the 3-dim. behavior of samples especially in materials science.

  15. Detection of saccharides by reactive desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) using modified phenylboronic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yun; Chen, Hao

    2010-01-01

    We have reported previously a method for the detection of sugars via in-situ derivatization with phenylboronic acid PhB(OH)2 using reactive desorption electrospray ionization (DESI, Chen et al., Chem. Commun. (2006) 597-599). The present study describes an improved method that employs modified phenylboronic acids including 3-nitrophenylboronic acid and N-methyl-4-pyridineboronic acid iodide. In contrast to using PhB(OH)2, enhanced sensitivity of using 3-nitrophenylboronic acid was observed due to the stabilization of the resulting boronate ester anion by the electron-withdrawing nitro group and the limit of detections (LODs) for glucose in water using 3-nitrophenylbornic acid and phenylboronic acid were determined to be 0.11 mM and 0.40 mM, respectively. In the case of N-methyl-4-pyridineboronic acid iodide, the corresponding LOD is 6.9 [mu]M and the higher sensitivity obtained is attributed to the efficient ionization of both the reactive DESI reagent and reaction product since the precursor acid with a quaternary ammonium group is pre-charged. In this case, additional important features are found: (i) unlike using phenylboronic acid or 3-nitrophenylbornic acid, the experiment, performed in the positive ion mode, is applicable to neutral and acidic saccharide solutions, facilitating the analysis of biological fluids without the need to adjust pH; (ii) simply by changing the spray solvent from water to acetonitrile, the method can be used for direct glucose analyses of both urine and serum samples via online desalting, due to the low solubility of salts of these biofluids in the sprayed organic solvent; (iii) in comparison with other sugar derivatizing reagents such as the Girard's reagent T, the N-methyl-4-pyridineboronic acid iodide shows higher reactivity in the reactive DESI; and (iv) the ions of saccharide DESI reaction products undergo extensive ring or glycosidic bond cleavage upon CID, a feature that might be useful in the structure elucidation of

  16. Differential response of kabuli and desi chickpea genotypes toward inoculation with PGPR in different soils

    PubMed Central

    Imran, Asma; Mirza, Muhammad S.; Shah, Tariq M.; Malik, Kauser A.; Hafeez, Fauzia Y.

    2015-01-01

    Pakistan is among top three chickpea producing countries but the crop is usually grown on marginal lands without irrigation and fertilizer application which significantly hampers its yield. Soil fertility and inoculation with beneficial rhizobacteria play a key role in nodulation and yield of legumes. Four kabuli and six desi chickpea genotypes were, therefore, evaluated for inoculation response with IAA-producing Ochrobactrum ciceri Ca-34T and nitrogen fixing Mesorhizobium ciceri TAL-1148 in single and co-inoculation in two soils. The soil type 1 was previously unplanted marginal soil having low organic matter, P and N contents compared to soil type 2 which was a fertile routinely legume-cultivated soil. The effect of soil fertility status was pronounced and fertile soil on average, produced 31% more nodules, 62% more biomass and 111% grain yield than marginal soil. Inoculation either with O. ciceri alone or its co-inoculation with M. ciceri produced on average higher nodules (42%), biomass (31%), grains yield (64%) and harvest index (72%) in both chickpea genotypes over non-inoculated controls in both soils. Soil 1 showed maximum relative effectiveness of Ca-34T inoculation for kabuli genotypes while soil 2 showed for desi genotypes except B8/02. Desi genotype B8/02 in soil type 1 and Pb-2008 in soil type 2 showed significant yield increase as compared to respective un-inoculated controls. Across bacterial inoculation treatments, grain yield was positively correlated to growth and yield contributing parameters (r = 0.294* to 0.838*** for desi and r = 0.388* to 0.857** for kabuli). PCA and CAT-PCA analyses clearly showed a site-specific response of genotype x bacterial inoculation. Furthermore, the inoculated bacterial strains were able to persist in the rhizosphere showing colonization on root and within nodules. Present study shows that plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) inoculation should be integrated with national chickpea breading program in

  17. Critical Interfaces for Engineers and Scientists, 4 Appraisals. Proceedings of the Annual Joint Meeting of the Engineering Manpower Commission of Engineers Joint Council and the Scientific Manpower Commission, New York, May 18, 1967.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alden, John D.

    Contained in this booklet are the speeches given at the annual joint meeting of the Engineering Manpower Commission and the Scientific Manpower Commission. Each dealt with some problem aspect of the engineer-scientist interface. The presentation by Rear Admiral W. C. Hushing of the U. S. Navy was entitled "The Impact of High Performance Science…

  18. Science, Technology, and Communication: Program Design in the Past, Present, and Future. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication (26th, Santa Fe, New Mexico, October 14-16, 1999).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rude, Carolyn, Ed.

    Based on the theme of the past, present, and future of science, technology, and communication programs, this proceedings presents 49 papers delivered at the 1999 annual meeting of the Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication (CPTSC). Papers in the proceedings are divided into 12 subsections: The Shape of Programs: Past,…

  19. The Ecology, the Environment, and the Evolution of Technical Communication. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication (25th, Lewes, Delaware, October 15-17, 1998).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication.

    This proceedings presents 40 papers delivered at the 1998 annual meeting of the Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication (CPTSC). Papers in the proceedings are divided into sections on the Ecology of Technology; Environmental Shifts; and Evolving Perspectives. Representative papers in the proceedings include: "Mixing Oil…

  20. The Changing Contexts of Aging: Opportunities and Challenges in the New Millennium. Program Abstracts. Annual Scientific Meeting of the Gerontological Society of America (51st, Philadelphia, PA, November 20-24, 1998).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    The Gerontologist, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This special issue of "The Gerontologist" contains session by session abstracts from the society's 51st Annual Scientific Meeting. Abstracts are arranged numerically by the number of the session in which they appeared and in the order of presentation within each session. There are a total of 391 sessions. Session topics are not provided; and there…

  1. New Perspectives on Aging in the Post Genome Era. Program Abstracts. Annual Scientific Meeting of the Gerontological Society of America (52nd, San Francisco, California, November 19-23, 1999).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Vernon L., Ed.

    1999-01-01

    This special issue of "The Gerontologist" contains session-by-session abstracts from the society's 52nd Annual Scientific Meeting. Abstracts are arranged numerically by session number and in the order of presentation within each session. There are a total of 375 sessions. An index of participants is provided with references to their…

  2. Models for Strategic Program Development. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication (27th, Menomonie, Wisconsin, October 19-21, 2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maylath, Bruce, Ed.

    This document presents 48 papers delivered at the 2000 annual meeting of the Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication (CPTSC). Papers in the proceedings are divided into 14 subsections: (1) Keynote Presentation: "Global Classroom Project (T. K. Herrington); (2) Opening Session Address: "What Industry Looks for in…

  3. Optical fiber termination method for the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppett, Claire; Edelstein, Jerry; Ishikawa, Yuzo; Meghrouni-Brown, Zakios; Fagrelius, Parker

    2016-08-01

    The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) is under construction to measure the expansion history of the Universe using the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation technique. The spectra of 40 million galaxies over 14000 sq deg will be measured during the life of the experiment. A new prime focus corrector for the KPNO Mayall telescope will deliver light to 5000 fiber optic positioners. The fibers in turn feed ten broad-band spectrographs. We will describe the method we use to optically terminate the fibers which offers many advantages over methods that have been used in the past.

  4. Analysis of DESY-Flash LLRF Measurements for the ILC Heavy Beam Loading Test

    SciTech Connect

    Cancelo, Gustavo; Chase, Brian; Davidsaver, Michael; Carwardine, J.; Simrock, Stefan; Ayvazyan, Valeri; Grecki, Mariusz; Matsumoto, Toshihiro; Michizono, Shinichiro; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2009-06-01

    In September 2008 the DESY-FLASH accelerator was run with up to 550, 3 nano-coulomb bunches at 5 Hz repetition rate. This test is part of a longer-term study aimed at validating ILC parameters by operation as close as possible to ILC beam currents and RF gradients. The present paper reports on the analysis that has been done in order to understand the RF control system performance during this test. Actual klystron power requirements and beam stability are evaluated with heavy beam loading conditions. Results include suggested improvements for upcoming tests in 2009.

  5. Blotting Assisted by Heating and Solvent Extraction for DESI-MS Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabral, Elaine C.; Mirabelli, Mario F.; Perez, Consuelo J.; Ifa, Demian R.

    2013-06-01

    Imprints of potato sprout ( Solanum tuberosum L.), gingko leaves (Gingko biloba L. ) and strawberries (Fragaria x ananassa Duch. ) were successfully imaged by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) on TLC plates through blotting assisted by heating and/or solvent extraction. Ion images showing the distribution of significant compounds such as glycoalkaloid toxins in potato sprout, ginkgolic acids and flavonoids in ginkgo leaves, and sugars and anthocyanidin in strawberry were obtained. Practical implications of this work include analysis of a wide range of irregular or soft materials by different imprinting conditions without requiring the addition of matrices or use of specific kinds of surfaces.

  6. Analysis of metabolic changes in plant pathosystems by imprint imaging DESI-MS.

    PubMed

    Tata, Alessandra; Perez, Consuelo J; Hamid, Tanam S; Bayfield, Mark A; Ifa, Demian R

    2015-04-01

    The response of plants to microbial pathogens is based on the production of secondary metabolites. The complexity of plant-pathogen interactions makes their understanding a challenging task for metabolomic studies requiring powerful analytical approaches. In this paper, the ability of ambient mass spectrometry to provide a snapshot of plant metabolic response to pathogen invasion was tested. The fluctuations of glycoalkaloids present in sprouted potatoes infected by the phytopathogen Pythium ultimum were monitored by imprint imaging desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS). After 8 d from the inoculation, a decrease of the relative abundance of potato glycoalkaloids α-solanine (m/z 706) and α-chaconine (m/z 722) was observed, whereas the relative intensity of solanidine (m/z 398), solasodenone (m/z 412), solanaviol (m/z 430), solasodiene (m/z 396), solaspiralidine (m/z 428), γ-solanine/γ-chaconine (m/z 560) , β-solanine (m/z 706), and β-chaconine (m/z 722) increased. The progression of the disease, expressed by the development of brown necrotic lesions on the potato, led to the further decrease of all the glycoalkaloid metabolites. Therefore, the applicability of imprint imaging DESI-MS in studying the plant metabolic changes in a simple pathosystem was demonstrated with minimal sample preparation.

  7. Analysis of Metabolic Changes in Plant Pathosystems by Imprint Imaging DESI-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tata, Alessandra; Perez, Consuelo J.; Hamid, Tanam S.; Bayfield, Mark A.; Ifa, Demian R.

    2015-04-01

    The response of plants to microbial pathogens is based on the production of secondary metabolites. The complexity of plant-pathogen interactions makes their understanding a challenging task for metabolomic studies requiring powerful analytical approaches. In this paper, the ability of ambient mass spectrometry to provide a snapshot of plant metabolic response to pathogen invasion was tested. The fluctuations of glycoalkaloids present in sprouted potatoes infected by the phytopathogen Pythium ultimum were monitored by imprint imaging desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS). After 8 d from the inoculation, a decrease of the relative abundance of potato glycoalkaloids α-solanine ( m/z 706) and α-chaconine ( m/z 722) was observed, whereas the relative intensity of solanidine ( m/z 398), solasodenone ( m/z 412), solanaviol ( m/z 430), solasodiene ( m/z 396), solaspiralidine ( m/z 428), γ-solanine/γ-chaconine ( m/z 560) , β-solanine ( m/z 706), and β-chaconine ( m/z 722) increased. The progression of the disease, expressed by the development of brown necrotic lesions on the potato, led to the further decrease of all the glycoalkaloid metabolites. Therefore, the applicability of imprint imaging DESI-MS in studying the plant metabolic changes in a simple pathosystem was demonstrated with minimal sample preparation.

  8. SINBAD-The accelerator R&D facility under construction at DESY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorda, U.; Assmann, R.; Brinkmann, R.; Flöttmann, K.; Hartl, I.; Hüning, M.; Kärtner, F.; Fallahi, A.; Marchetti, B.; Nie, Y.; Osterhoff, J.; Schlarb, H.; Zhu, J.; Maier, A. R.

    2016-09-01

    The SINBAD facility (Short INnovative Bunches and Accelerators at DESY) is a long-term dedicated accelerator research and development facility currently under construction at DESY. It will be located in the premises of the old DORIS accelerator complex and host multiple independent experiments cost-effectively accessing the same central infrastructure like a central high power laser. With the removal of the old DORIS accelerator being completed, the refurbishment of the technical infrastructure is currently starting up. The presently ongoing conversion of the area into the SINBAD facility and the currently foreseen layout is described. The first experiment will use a compact S-band linac for the production of ultra-short bunches at hundred MeV. Once established, one of the main usages will be to externally inject electrons into a laser-driven plasma wakefield accelerator to boost the energy to GeV-level while maintaining a usable beam quality, ultimately aiming to drive an FEL. The second experiment already under planning is the setup of an attosecond radiation source with advanced technology. Further usage of the available space and infrastructure is revised and national and international collaborations are being established.

  9. DESI and other Dark Energy experiments in the era of neutrino mass measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Font-Ribera, Andreu; McDonald, Patrick; Mostek, Nick; Reid, Beth A.; Seo, Hee-Jong; Slosar, Anže E-mail: PVMcDonald@lbl.gov E-mail: BAReid@lbl.gov E-mail: anze@bnl.gov

    2014-05-01

    We present Fisher matrix projections for future cosmological parameter measurements, including neutrino masses, Dark Energy, curvature, modified gravity, the inflationary perturbation spectrum, non-Gaussianity, and dark radiation. We focus on DESI and generally redshift surveys (BOSS, HETDEX, eBOSS, Euclid, and WFIRST), but also include CMB (Planck) and weak gravitational lensing (DES and LSST) constraints. The goal is to present a consistent set of projections, for concrete experiments, which are otherwise scattered throughout many papers and proposals. We include neutrino mass as a free parameter in most projections, as it will inevitably be relevant — DESI and other experiments can measure the sum of neutrino masses to ∼ 0.02 eV or better, while the minimum possible sum is ∼ 0.06 eV. We note that constraints on Dark Energy are significantly degraded by the presence of neutrino mass uncertainty, especially when using galaxy clustering only as a probe of the BAO distance scale (because this introduces additional uncertainty in the background evolution after the CMB epoch). Using broadband galaxy power becomes relatively more powerful, and bigger gains are achieved by combining lensing survey constraints with redshift survey constraints. We do not try to be especially innovative, e.g., with complex treatments of potential systematic errors — these projections are intended as a straightforward baseline for comparison to more detailed analyses.

  10. The National Analysis Facility at DESY - status and use cases by the participating experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aplin, S.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Haupt, A.; Kemp, Y.; Langenbruch, C.; Leffhalm, K.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.; Stadie, H.

    2011-12-01

    The German National Analysis Facility (NAF) was set up at DESY, starting end of 2007 in the context of the Helmholtz Alliance "Physics at the Terascale". The NAF complements the DESY and the German Grid resources, and hence offers users from the German HEP institutes the best possible environment for data analysis. In the first part, the key aspects and components of the NAF are briefly presented with an emphasis on recent improvements. In the second part, the use cases of the three participating LHC experiments, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb, will be presented. Differences and commonalities in the usage of the NAF will be shown. Special emphasis will be placed on the usage of PROOF, whose usage on the NAF has been pioneered by CMS. It is now adapted by ATLAS. The third part will concentrate on how the NAF was used for detector optimisation studies in the preparation of one of the ILC Lol's (ILD 2009), as well as how CALICE uses the NAF for the analysis of their data taken in several test beam experiments performed for detector R & D. Finally, future developments of the NAF are presented.

  11. Advances in Large Grain/Single Crystal SC Resonators at DESY

    SciTech Connect

    W. Singer; A. Brinkmann; A. Ermakov; J. Iversen; G. Kreps; A. Matheisen; D. Proch; D. Reschke; X. Singer; M. Spiwek; H. We; P. Kneisel; M. Pekeler

    2007-08-01

    The main aim of the DESY large grain R&D program is to check whether this option is reasonable to apply for fabrication of ca. 1'000 XFEL cavities. Two aspects are being pursued. On one hand the basic material investigation, on the other hand the material availability, fabrication and preparation procedure. Several single cell large grain cavities of TESLA shape have been fabricated and tested. The best accelerating gradients of 41 MV/m was measured on electropolished cavity. First large grain nine-cell cavities worldwide have been produced under contract of DESY with ACCEL Instruments Co. All three cavities fulfil the XFEL specification already in first RF test after only BCP (Buffered Chemical Polishing) treatment and 800 degrees C annealing. Accelerating gradient of 27 - 29 MV/m was reached. A fabrication method of single crystal cavity of ILC like shape was proposed. A single cell single crystal cavity was build at the company ACCEL. Accelerating gradient of 37.5 MV/m reached after only 112 microns BCP and in situ baking 120 degrees C for 6 hrs with the quality factor higher as 2x1010. The developed method can be extended on fabrication of multi cell single crystal cavities.

  12. HPTLC/DESI-MS Imaging of Tryptic Protein Digests Separated in Two Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Pasilis, Sofie P; Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary J; Schulz, Michael; Schorcht, Susanne

    2008-01-01

    Desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) was demonstrated as a method to detect and identify peptides from two-dimensional separations of cytochrome c and myoglobin tryptic digests on ProteoChrom HPTLC Cellulose sheets. Data-dependent tandem mass spectra were acquired during lane scans across the TLC plates. Peptides and the corresponding proteins were identified using a protein database search software. Two-dimensional distributions of identified peptides were mapped for each separated protein digest. Sequence coverages for cytochrome c and myoglobin were 81% and 74%, respectively. These compared well to those determined using the more standard HPLC/ESI-MS/MS approach (89% and 84%, respectively). Preliminary results show that use of more sensitive instrumentation has the potential for improved detection of peptides with low Rf values and improvement in sequence coverage. However, less multiple charging and more sodiation were seen in HPTLC/DESI-MS spectra relative to HPLC/ESI-MS spectra, which can affect peptide identification by MS/MS. Methods to increase multiple charging and reduce the extent of sodiation are currently under investigation.

  13. Effect of salinity on growth and yield of Desi and Kabuli chickpea cultivars.

    PubMed

    Sohrabi, Yousef; Heidari, Gholamreza; Esmailpoor, Behrooz

    2008-02-15

    To evaluate the effects of different level of Na salinity (0, 3, 6 and 9 dS m(-1)) on growth, yield and yield component of Kabuli (Hashem and Jam) and Desi (Kaka and Pirooz) chickpea cultivars a factorial experiment based on randomized complete block design with four replications was carried out in Research Greenhouse of Mokrian Agricultural Extension Center near Mahabad, Iran at 2006. Seeds of four chickpea cultivars were grown under 0, 3, 6 and 9 dS m(-1) levels of salinity until maturity. Salinity reduced the plant growth, flower, pod and seed number and seed weight. As increase in salinity, the undesirable effect of Na+ was more pronounced and reached the highest value at 9 dS m(-1) in all cultivars. Four chickpea cultivar have different responses to salinity and the Kabuli cultivars seemed to have a greater capacity for salt tolerance compared to Desi cultivars. Hahshem cultivar has the highest salinity tolerance among all cultivars.

  14. DESI and other Dark Energy experiments in the era of neutrino mass measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Font-Ribera, Andreu; McDonald, Patrick; Mostek, Nick; Reid, Beth A.; Seo, Hee-Jong; Slosar, Anže

    2014-05-19

    Here we present Fisher matrix projections for future cosmological parameter measurements, including neutrino masses, Dark Energy, curvature, modified gravity, the inflationary perturbation spectrum, non-Gaussianity, and dark radiation. We focus on DESI and generally redshift surveys (BOSS, HETDEX, eBOSS, Euclid, and WFIRST), but also include CMB (Planck) and weak gravitational lensing (DES and LSST) constraints. The goal is to present a consistent set of projections, for concrete experiments, which are otherwise scattered throughout many papers and proposals. We include neutrino mass as a free parameter in most projections, as it will inevitably be relevant $-$ DESI and other experiments can measure the sum of neutrino masses to ~ 0.02 eV or better, while the minimum possible sum is 0.06 eV. We note that constraints on Dark Energy are significantly degraded by the presence of neutrino mass uncertainty, especially when using galaxy clustering only as a probe of the BAO distance scale (because this introduces additional uncertainty in the background evolution after the CMB epoch). Using broadband galaxy power becomes relatively more powerful, and bigger gains are achieved by combining lensing survey constraints with redshift survey constraints. Finally, we do not try to be especially innovative, e.g., with complex treatments of potential systematic errors $-$ these projections are intended as a straightforward baseline for comparison to more detailed analyses.

  15. DESI and other Dark Energy experiments in the era of neutrino mass measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Font-Ribera, Andreu; McDonald, Patrick; Mostek, Nick; ...

    2014-05-19

    Here we present Fisher matrix projections for future cosmological parameter measurements, including neutrino masses, Dark Energy, curvature, modified gravity, the inflationary perturbation spectrum, non-Gaussianity, and dark radiation. We focus on DESI and generally redshift surveys (BOSS, HETDEX, eBOSS, Euclid, and WFIRST), but also include CMB (Planck) and weak gravitational lensing (DES and LSST) constraints. The goal is to present a consistent set of projections, for concrete experiments, which are otherwise scattered throughout many papers and proposals. We include neutrino mass as a free parameter in most projections, as it will inevitably be relevant $-$ DESI and other experiments can measuremore » the sum of neutrino masses to ~ 0.02 eV or better, while the minimum possible sum is 0.06 eV. We note that constraints on Dark Energy are significantly degraded by the presence of neutrino mass uncertainty, especially when using galaxy clustering only as a probe of the BAO distance scale (because this introduces additional uncertainty in the background evolution after the CMB epoch). Using broadband galaxy power becomes relatively more powerful, and bigger gains are achieved by combining lensing survey constraints with redshift survey constraints. Finally, we do not try to be especially innovative, e.g., with complex treatments of potential systematic errors $-$ these projections are intended as a straightforward baseline for comparison to more detailed analyses.« less

  16. A chromosomal genomics approach to assess and validate the desi and kabuli draft chickpea genome assemblies.

    PubMed

    Ruperao, Pradeep; Chan, Chon-Kit Kenneth; Azam, Sarwar; Karafiátová, Miroslava; Hayashi, Satomi; Cížková, Jana; Saxena, Rachit K; Simková, Hana; Song, Chi; Vrána, Jan; Chitikineni, Annapurna; Visendi, Paul; Gaur, Pooran M; Millán, Teresa; Singh, Karam B; Taran, Bunyamin; Wang, Jun; Batley, Jacqueline; Doležel, Jaroslav; Varshney, Rajeev K; Edwards, David

    2014-08-01

    With the expansion of next-generation sequencing technology and advanced bioinformatics, there has been a rapid growth of genome sequencing projects. However, while this technology enables the rapid and cost-effective assembly of draft genomes, the quality of these assemblies usually falls short of gold standard genome assemblies produced using the more traditional BAC by BAC and Sanger sequencing approaches. Assembly validation is often performed by the physical anchoring of genetically mapped markers, but this is prone to errors and the resolution is usually low, especially towards centromeric regions where recombination is limited. New approaches are required to validate reference genome assemblies. The ability to isolate individual chromosomes combined with next-generation sequencing permits the validation of genome assemblies at the chromosome level. We demonstrate this approach by the assessment of the recently published chickpea kabuli and desi genomes. While previous genetic analysis suggests that these genomes should be very similar, a comparison of their chromosome sizes and published assemblies highlights significant differences. Our chromosomal genomics analysis highlights short defined regions that appear to have been misassembled in the kabuli genome and identifies large-scale misassembly in the draft desi genome. The integration of chromosomal genomics tools within genome sequencing projects has the potential to significantly improve the construction and validation of genome assemblies. The approach could be applied both for new genome assemblies as well as published assemblies, and complements currently applied genome assembly strategies. © 2014 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) applied to the speciation of arsenic compounds from fern leaves.

    PubMed

    de Abreu, Lívia Botelho; Augusti, Rodinei; Schmidt, Lucas; Dressler, Valderi Luiz; Flores, Erico Marlon de Moraes; Nascentes, Clésia Cristina

    2013-09-01

    The different chemical forms of arsenic compounds, including inorganic and organic species, present distinct environmental impacts and toxicities. Desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) is an excellent technique for in situ analysis, as it operates under atmospheric pressure and room temperature and is conducted with no/minimal sample pretreatment. Aimed at expanding its scope, DESI-MS is applied herein for the quick and reliable detection of inorganic (arsenate--As(V): AsO4(3-) and arsenite--As(III): AsO2(-)) and organic (dimethylarsinic acid--DMA: (CH3)2AsO(OH) and disodium methyl arsonate hexahydrate: CH3AsO3·2Na·6H2O) arsenic compounds in fern leaves. Operational conditions of DESI-MS were optimized with DMA standard deposited on paper surfaces to improve ionization efficiency and detection limits. Mass spectra data for all arsenic species were acquired in both the positive and negative ion modes. The positive ion mode was shown to be useful in detecting both the organic and inorganic arsenic compounds. The negative ion mode was shown only to be useful in detecting As(V) species. Moreover, MS/MS spectra were recorded to confirm the identity of each arsenic compound by the characteristic fragmentation profiles. Optimized conditions of DESI-MS were applied to the analysis of fern leaves. LC-ICP-MS was employed to confirm the results obtained by DESI-MS and to quantify the arsenic species in fern leaves. The results confirmed the applicability of DESI-MS in detecting arsenic compounds in complex matrices.

  18. Confirmation and 3D profiling of anabolic steroid esters in injection sites using imaging desorption electrospray ionisation (DESI) mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    de Rijke, Eva; Hooijerink, Dick; Sterk, Saskia S; Nielen, Michel W F

    2013-01-01

    In this study, desorption electrospray ionisation (DESI) linear ion trap tandem mass spectrometry (MS(n)) was applied for the confirmation and three-dimensional profiling of anabolic steroid esters in an injection site of bovine muscle. The spatial resolution of the DESI-MS(n) was demonstrated by scanning hormone esters and marker ink lines drawn at various distances on a microscopic slide at set distances, using an x-scanner with manual y and z adjustment. Tissue slices of bovine muscle injected with a hormone cocktail were analysed. All anabolic steroid esters could be directly detected in the sample and confirmed on the basis of identification points awarded for selected MS/MS transitions according to the performance criteria given in Commission Decision 2002/657/EC. Moreover, the injection site could be mapped by two-dimensional and three-dimensional imaging MS, showing a horizontal and vertical distribution through the muscle tissue. This DESI approach offers potential for analysis of injection sites of steroid esters from illegally treated animals; moreover, direct analysis by ambient imaging DESI-MS still allows conventional extraction and analysis of the whole tissue for further confirmatory or contra-analysis afterwards.

  19. A Combined Desorption Ionization by Charge Exchange (DICE) and Desorption Electrospray Ionization (DESI) Source for Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Chang-Ching; Bolgar, Mark S.; Miller, Scott A.; Attygalle, Athula B.

    2011-01-01

    A source that couples the desorption ionization by charge exchange (DICE) and desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) techniques together was demonstrated to broaden the range of compounds that can be analyzed in a single mass spectrometric experiment under ambient conditions. A tee union was used to mix the spray reagents into a partially immiscible blend before this mixture was passed through a conventional electrospray (ES) probe capillary. Using this technique, compounds that are ionized more efficiently by the DICE method and those that are ionized better with the DESI procedure could be analyzed simultaneously. For example, hydroquinone, which is not detected when subjected to DESI-MS in the positive-ion generation mode, or the sodium adduct of guaifenesin, which is not detected when examined by DICE-MS, could both be detected in one experiment when the two techniques were combined. The combined technique was able to generate the molecular ion, proton and metal adduct from the same compound. When coupled to a tandem mass spectrometer, the combined source enabled the generation of product ion spectra from the molecular ion and the [M + H]+ or [M + metal]+ ions of the same compound without the need to physically change the source from DICE to DESI. The ability to record CID spectra of both the molecular ion and adduct ions in a single mass spectrometric experiment adds a new dimension to the array of mass spectrometric methods available for structural studies.

  20. Mitigating the impact of the DESI fiber assignment on galaxy clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burden, Angela; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Cahn, Robert N.; White, Martin J.; Samushia, Lado

    2017-03-01

    We present a simple strategy to mitigate the impact of an incomplete spectroscopic redshift galaxy sample as a result of fiber assignment and survey tiling. The method has been designed for the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) galaxy survey but may have applications beyond this. We propose a modification to the usual correlation function that nulls the almost purely angular modes affected by survey incompleteness due to fiber assignment. Predictions of this modified statistic can be calculated given a model of the two point correlation function. The new statistic can be computed with a slight modification to the data catalogues input to the standard correlation function code and does not incur any additional computational time. Finally we show that the spherically averaged baryon acoustic oscillation signal is not biased by the new statistic.

  1. Resolution Studies at Beam Position Monitors at the FLASH Facility at DESY

    SciTech Connect

    Baboi, N.; Lund-Nielsen, J.; Noelle, D.; Traber, T.; Kruse, J.; Riesch, W.; Wendt, M.

    2006-11-20

    More than 60 beam position monitors (BPM) are installed along about 350m of beamline of the Free Electron LASer in Hamburg (FLASH) at DESY. The room-temperature part of the accelerator is equipped mainly with stripline position monitors. In the accelerating cryo-modules there are cavity and re-entrant cavity BPMs, which will not be discussed here. In the undulator part of the machine button BPMs are used. This area requires a single bunch resolution of 10{mu}m. The electronics is based on the AM/PM normalization principle and is externally triggered. Single-bunch position is measured. This paper presents the methods used to determine the resolution of the BPMs. The results based on correlations between different BPMs along the machine are compared to noise measurements in the RF lab. The performance and difficulties with the BPM design and the current electronics as well as its development are discussed.

  2. Signatures of heavy Majorana neutrinos and DESY HERA's isolated lepton events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodejohann, W.; Zuber, K.

    2000-11-01

    The graph of neutrinoless double beta decay is applied to DESY HERA data and generalized to final states with any two charged leptons. Considered is the case in which one of the two escapes typical identification criteria and the case when a produced tau decays hadronically. Both possibilities give one isolated lepton with high transverse momentum, hadronic activity, and an imbalance in transverse momentum. We examine the kinematical properties of these events and compare them with the high pT isolated leptons reported by the H1 Collaboration. Their positive charged muon events can be explained by the ``double beta'' process and we discuss the possibilities for the precise determination which original final state produced the single isolated lepton. To confirm our hypothesis one should search in the data for high pseudorapidity and/or low pT leptons or for additional separated jets.

  3. Hard diffraction at DESY HERA and the gluonic content of the Pomeron

    SciTech Connect

    Capella, A.; Kaidalov, A.; Merino, C.; Pertermann, D.; Tran Thanh Van, J.

    1996-03-01

    We show that the previously introduced CKMT model, based on conventional Regge theory, gives a good description of the data from DESY HERA on the structure function {ital F}{sup {ital D}}{sub 2} for large rapidity gap (diffractive) events. These data allow us not only to determine the valence and sea quark content of the Pomeron, but also, through their {ital Q}{sup 2} dependence, give us information on its gluonic content. Using DGLAP evolution, we find that the gluon distribution in the Pomeron is very hard and the gluons carry more momentum than the quarks. This indicates that the Pomeron, unlike ordinary hadrons, is a mostly gluonic object. With our definition of the Pomeron flux factor the total momentum carried by quarks and gluons turns out to be 0.3{endash}0.4, strongly violating the momentum sum rule. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  4. Review of R&D at DESY on ingot niobium for accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navitski, Aliaksandr; Sekutowicz, Jacek; Singer, Waldemar; Singer, Xenia

    2015-12-01

    An R&D program at DESY exploring the potential of the production of 1.3 GHz TESLA shape cavities from large grain or ingot niobium material has been carried out as a feasibility study for using ingot niobium material for the European X-ray Free-Electron Laser project. The most important issues like feasibility of the fabrication of niobium discs from ingots, material properties, cavity fabrication, treatment, and finally the cryogenic radiofrequency (RF) performance of the cavity in the accelerator modules are presented and discussed. At least 25% higher intrinsic quality factor comparing to conventional fine-grain niobium and high accelerating gradient of up to 45 MV/m have been demonstrated during the cryogenic RF tests both in the vertical cryostats and in a completely assembled accelerating cryo-module.

  5. Review of R&D at DESY on ingot niobium for accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Navitski, Aliaksandr Sekutowicz, Jacek Singer, Waldemar Singer, Xenia

    2015-12-04

    An R&D program at DESY exploring the potential of the production of 1.3 GHz TESLA shape cavities from large grain or ingot niobium material has been carried out as a feasibility study for using ingot niobium material for the European X-ray Free-Electron Laser project. The most important issues like feasibility of the fabrication of niobium discs from ingots, material properties, cavity fabrication, treatment, and finally the cryogenic radiofrequency (RF) performance of the cavity in the accelerator modules are presented and discussed. At least 25% higher intrinsic quality factor comparing to conventional fine-grain niobium and high accelerating gradient of up to 45 MV/m have been demonstrated during the cryogenic RF tests both in the vertical cryostats and in a completely assembled accelerating cryo-module.

  6. Development of capabilities for imaging mass spectrometry under ambient conditions with desorption electrospray ionization (DESI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ifa, Demian R.; Wiseman, Justin M.; Song, Qingyu; Cooks, R. Graham

    2007-01-01

    Aspects of the development of mass spectrometry over the past three decades are briefly reviewed and growth points in the subject are identified. Molecular imaging by mass spectrometry is one such growth area. The development of a capability for 2D chemical imaging of surfaces is described, based on the combination of a desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) ion source with an automated surface stage capable of x, y translational motion. The lateral resolution of this new system is found to be less than 200 microns, using a test ink pattern. Chemical imaging of surfaces is demonstrated using model examples of organic and biological systems: (i) imaging of a 2D pattern written in different colored inks on photographic paper and (ii) imaging of thin coronal sections of rat brain tissue fixed onto a glass microscope slide. In both cases, full mass spectra are recorded as a function of x,y-position on the surface. In the chemical imaging example, the distributions of the two different inks on the paper surface were mapped by tracking the abundance of the intact organic cation which characterizes each particular ink dye. In the tissue imaging example, distributions of specific lipids in coronal sections of rat brain tissue were followed from the abundance distributions in 2D space of the deprotonated lipid molecules recorded in the negative ion mass spectra. These latter distributions reveal distinct anatomical features of the rat brain. The results of these studies demonstrate the feasibility of performing surface imaging studies using DESI and show that at this stage of its development it has a lateral spatial resolution of a few hundred microns.

  7. Monitoring Toxic Ionic Liquids in Zebrafish (Danio rerio) with Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging (DESI-MSI).

    PubMed

    Perez, Consuelo J; Tata, Alessandra; de Campos, Michel L; Peng, Chun; Ifa, Demian R

    2016-10-24

    Ambient mass spectrometry imaging has become an increasingly powerful technique for the direct analysis of biological tissues in the open environment with minimal sample preparation and fast analysis times. In this study, we introduce desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry imaging (DESI-MSI) as a novel, rapid, and sensitive approach to localize the accumulation of a mildly toxic ionic liquid (IL), AMMOENG 130 in zebrafish (Danio rerio). The work demonstrates that DESI-MSI has the potential to rapidly monitor the accumulation of IL pollutants in aquatic organisms. AMMOENG 130 is a quaternary ammonium-based IL reported to be broadly used as a surfactant in commercialized detergents. It is known to exhibit acute toxicity to zebrafish causing extensive damage to gill secondary lamellae and increasing membrane permeability. Zebrafish were exposed to the IL in a static 96-h exposure study in concentrations near the LC50 of 1.25, 2.5, and 5.0 mg/L. DESI-MS analysis of zebrafish gills demonstrated the appearance of a dealkylated AMMOENG 130 metabolite in the lowest concentration of exposure identified by a high resolution hybrid LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometer as the trimethylstearylammonium ion, [C21H46N](+). With DESI-MSI, the accumulation of AMMOENG 130 and its dealkylated metabolite in zebrafish tissue was found in the nervous and respiratory systems. AMMOENG 130 and the metabolite were capable of penetrating the blood brain barrier of the fish with significant accumulation in the brain. Hence, we report for the first time the simultaneous characterization, distribution, and metabolism of a toxic IL in whole body zebrafish analyzed by DESI-MSI. This ambient mass spectrometry imaging technique shows great promise for the direct analysis of biological tissues to qualitatively monitor foreign, toxic, and persistent compounds in aquatic organisms from the environment. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  8. Monitoring Toxic Ionic Liquids in Zebrafish (Danio rerio) with Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging (DESI-MSI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Consuelo J.; Tata, Alessandra; de Campos, Michel L.; Peng, Chun; Ifa, Demian R.

    2016-10-01

    Ambient mass spectrometry imaging has become an increasingly powerful technique for the direct analysis of biological tissues in the open environment with minimal sample preparation and fast analysis times. In this study, we introduce desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry imaging (DESI-MSI) as a novel, rapid, and sensitive approach to localize the accumulation of a mildly toxic ionic liquid (IL), AMMOENG 130 in zebrafish (Danio rerio). The work demonstrates that DESI-MSI has the potential to rapidly monitor the accumulation of IL pollutants in aquatic organisms. AMMOENG 130 is a quaternary ammonium-based IL reported to be broadly used as a surfactant in commercialized detergents. It is known to exhibit acute toxicity to zebrafish causing extensive damage to gill secondary lamellae and increasing membrane permeability. Zebrafish were exposed to the IL in a static 96-h exposure study in concentrations near the LC50 of 1.25, 2.5, and 5.0 mg/L. DESI-MS analysis of zebrafish gills demonstrated the appearance of a dealkylated AMMOENG 130 metabolite in the lowest concentration of exposure identified by a high resolution hybrid LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometer as the trimethylstearylammonium ion, [C21H46N]+. With DESI-MSI, the accumulation of AMMOENG 130 and its dealkylated metabolite in zebrafish tissue was found in the nervous and respiratory systems. AMMOENG 130 and the metabolite were capable of penetrating the blood brain barrier of the fish with significant accumulation in the brain. Hence, we report for the first time the simultaneous characterization, distribution, and metabolism of a toxic IL in whole body zebrafish analyzed by DESI-MSI. This ambient mass spectrometry imaging technique shows great promise for the direct analysis of biological tissues to qualitatively monitor foreign, toxic, and persistent compounds in aquatic organisms from the environment.

  9. Comparative Analysis of Kabuli Chickpea Transcriptome with Desi and Wild Chickpea Provides a Rich Resource for Development of Functional Markers

    PubMed Central

    Priya, Pushp; Singh, Vikash K.; Saxena, Maneesha S.; Parida, Swarup K.; Garg, Rohini; Tyagi, Akhilesh K.; Jain, Mukesh

    2012-01-01

    Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) is an important crop legume plant with high nutritional value. The transcriptomes of desi and wild chickpea have already been sequenced. In this study, we sequenced the transcriptome of kabuli chickpea, C. arietinum (genotype ICCV2), having higher commercial value, using GS-FLX Roche 454 and Illumina technologies. The assemblies of both Roche 454 and Illumina datasets were optimized using various assembly programs and parameters. The final optimized hybrid assembly generated 43,389 transcripts with an average length of 1065 bp and N50 length of 1653 bp representing 46.2 Mb of kabuli chickpea transcriptome. We identified a total of 5409 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) in these transcript sequences. Among these, at least 130 and 493 SSRs were polymorphic with desi (ICC4958) and wild (PI489777) chickpea, respectively. In addition, a total of 1986 and 37,954 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were predicted in kabuli/desi and kabuli/wild genotypes, respectively. The SNP frequency was 0.043 SNP per kb for kabuli/desi and 0.821 SNP per kb for kabuli/wild, reflecting very low genetic diversity in chickpea. Further, SSRs and SNPs present in tissue-specific and transcription factor encoding transcripts have been identified. The experimental validation of a selected set of polymorphic SSRs and SNPs exhibited high intra-specific polymorphism potential between desi and kabuli chickpea, suggesting their utility in large-scale genotyping applications. The kabuli chickpea gene index assembled, and SSRs and SNPs identified in this study will serve as useful genomic resource for genetic improvement of chickpea. PMID:23300670

  10. Monitoring Toxic Ionic Liquids in Zebrafish ( Danio rerio) with Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging (DESI-MSI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Consuelo J.; Tata, Alessandra; de Campos, Michel L.; Peng, Chun; Ifa, Demian R.

    2017-06-01

    Ambient mass spectrometry imaging has become an increasingly powerful technique for the direct analysis of biological tissues in the open environment with minimal sample preparation and fast analysis times. In this study, we introduce desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry imaging (DESI-MSI) as a novel, rapid, and sensitive approach to localize the accumulation of a mildly toxic ionic liquid (IL), AMMOENG 130 in zebrafish ( Danio rerio). The work demonstrates that DESI-MSI has the potential to rapidly monitor the accumulation of IL pollutants in aquatic organisms. AMMOENG 130 is a quaternary ammonium-based IL reported to be broadly used as a surfactant in commercialized detergents. It is known to exhibit acute toxicity to zebrafish causing extensive damage to gill secondary lamellae and increasing membrane permeability. Zebrafish were exposed to the IL in a static 96-h exposure study in concentrations near the LC50 of 1.25, 2.5, and 5.0 mg/L. DESI-MS analysis of zebrafish gills demonstrated the appearance of a dealkylated AMMOENG 130 metabolite in the lowest concentration of exposure identified by a high resolution hybrid LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometer as the trimethylstearylammonium ion, [C21H46N]+. With DESI-MSI, the accumulation of AMMOENG 130 and its dealkylated metabolite in zebrafish tissue was found in the nervous and respiratory systems. AMMOENG 130 and the metabolite were capable of penetrating the blood brain barrier of the fish with significant accumulation in the brain. Hence, we report for the first time the simultaneous characterization, distribution, and metabolism of a toxic IL in whole body zebrafish analyzed by DESI-MSI. This ambient mass spectrometry imaging technique shows great promise for the direct analysis of biological tissues to qualitatively monitor foreign, toxic, and persistent compounds in aquatic organisms from the environment. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  11. Analysis of lipids with desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization-mass spectrometry (DAPPI-MS) and desorption electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (DESI-MS).

    PubMed

    Suni, Niina M; Aalto, Henni; Kauppila, Tiina J; Kotiaho, Tapio; Kostiainen, Risto

    2012-05-01

    In this article, the effect of spray solvent on the analysis of selected lipids including fatty acids, fat-soluble vitamins, triacylglycerols, steroids, phospholipids, and sphingolipids has been studied by two different ambient mass spectrometry (MS) methods, desorption electrospray ionization-MS (DESI-MS) and desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization-MS (DAPPI-MS). The ionization of the lipids with DESI and DAPPI was strongly dependent on the spray solvent. In most cases, the lipids were detected as protonated or deprotonated molecules; however, other ions were also formed, such as adduct ions (in DESI), [M-H](+) ions (in DESI and DAPPI), radical ions (in DAPPI), and abundant oxidation products (in DESI and DAPPI). DAPPI provided efficient desorption and ionization for neutral and less polar as well as for ionic lipids but caused extensive fragmentation for larger and more labile compounds because of a thermal desorption process. DESI was more suitable for the analysis of the large and labile lipids, but the ionization efficiency for less polar lipids was poor. Both methods were successfully applied to the direct analysis of lipids from pharmaceutical and food products. Although DESI and DAPPI provide efficient analysis of lipids, the multiple and largely unpredictable ionization reactions may set challenges for routine lipid analysis with these methods. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Scientific Journalism in Armenia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmanyan, S. V.; Mickaelian, A. M.

    2015-07-01

    In the present study, the problems of scientific journalism and activities of Armenian science journalists are presented. Scientific journalism in the world, forms of its activities, Armenian Astronomical Society (ArAS) press-releases and their subjects, ArAS website "Mass Media News" section, annual and monthly calendars of astronomical events, and "Astghagitak" online journal are described. Most interesting astronomical subjects involved in scientific journalism, reasons for non-satisfactory science outreach and possible solutions are discussed.

  13. The critical steps for successful research: The research proposal and scientific writing: (A report on the pre-conference workshop held in conjunction with the 64(th) annual conference of the Indian Pharmaceutical Congress-2012).

    PubMed

    Balakumar, Pitchai; Inamdar, Mohammed Naseeruddin; Jagadeesh, Gowraganahalli

    2013-04-01

    An interactive workshop on 'The Critical Steps for Successful Research: The Research Proposal and Scientific Writing' was conducted in conjunction with the 64(th) Annual Conference of the Indian Pharmaceutical Congress-2012 at Chennai, India. In essence, research is performed to enlighten our understanding of a contemporary issue relevant to the needs of society. To accomplish this, a researcher begins search for a novel topic based on purpose, creativity, critical thinking, and logic. This leads to the fundamental pieces of the research endeavor: Question, objective, hypothesis, experimental tools to test the hypothesis, methodology, and data analysis. When correctly performed, research should produce new knowledge. The four cornerstones of good research are the well-formulated protocol or proposal that is well executed, analyzed, discussed and concluded. This recent workshop educated researchers in the critical steps involved in the development of a scientific idea to its successful execution and eventual publication.

  14. The critical steps for successful research: The research proposal and scientific writing: (A report on the pre-conference workshop held in conjunction with the 64th annual conference of the Indian Pharmaceutical Congress-2012)

    PubMed Central

    Balakumar, Pitchai; Inamdar, Mohammed Naseeruddin; Jagadeesh, Gowraganahalli

    2013-01-01

    An interactive workshop on ‘The Critical Steps for Successful Research: The Research Proposal and Scientific Writing’ was conducted in conjunction with the 64th Annual Conference of the Indian Pharmaceutical Congress-2012 at Chennai, India. In essence, research is performed to enlighten our understanding of a contemporary issue relevant to the needs of society. To accomplish this, a researcher begins search for a novel topic based on purpose, creativity, critical thinking, and logic. This leads to the fundamental pieces of the research endeavor: Question, objective, hypothesis, experimental tools to test the hypothesis, methodology, and data analysis. When correctly performed, research should produce new knowledge. The four cornerstones of good research are the well-formulated protocol or proposal that is well executed, analyzed, discussed and concluded. This recent workshop educated researchers in the critical steps involved in the development of a scientific idea to its successful execution and eventual publication. PMID:23761709

  15. 21 CFR 330.12 - Status of over-the-counter (OTC) drugs previously reviewed under the Drug Efficacy Study (DESI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... filing of objections. (vi) Thorexin Cough Medicine (DESI 11160) for which a notice of opportunity for... (37 FR 5294), and confirmed in the Federal Register of July 6, 1972 (37 FR 13254). (xi) Candette...

  16. 21 CFR 330.12 - Status of over-the-counter (OTC) drugs previously reviewed under the Drug Efficacy Study (DESI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... filing of objections. (vi) Thorexin Cough Medicine (DESI 11160) for which a notice of opportunity for... (37 FR 5294), and confirmed in the Federal Register of July 6, 1972 (37 FR 13254). (xi) Candette Cough...

  17. 21 CFR 330.12 - Status of over-the-counter (OTC) drugs previously reviewed under the Drug Efficacy Study (DESI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... filing of objections. (vi) Thorexin Cough Medicine (DESI 11160) for which a notice of opportunity for... (37 FR 5294), and confirmed in the Federal Register of July 6, 1972 (37 FR 13254). (xi) Candette Cough...

  18. 21 CFR 330.12 - Status of over-the-counter (OTC) drugs previously reviewed under the Drug Efficacy Study (DESI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... filing of objections. (vi) Thorexin Cough Medicine (DESI 11160) for which a notice of opportunity for... (37 FR 5294), and confirmed in the Federal Register of July 6, 1972 (37 FR 13254). (xi) Candette Cough...

  19. 21 CFR 330.12 - Status of over-the-counter (OTC) drugs previously reviewed under the Drug Efficacy Study (DESI).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... filing of objections. (vi) Thorexin Cough Medicine (DESI 11160) for which a notice of opportunity for... (37 FR 5294), and confirmed in the Federal Register of July 6, 1972 (37 FR 13254). (xi) Candette Cough...

  20. Understanding the molecular signatures in leaves and flowers by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI MS) imaging.

    PubMed

    Hemalatha, R G; Pradeep, T

    2013-08-07

    The difference in size, shape, and chemical cues of leaves and flowers display the underlying genetic makeup and their interactions with the environment. The need to understand the molecular signatures of these fragile plant surfaces is illustrated with a model plant, Madagascar periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don). Flat, thin layer chromatographic imprints of leaves/petals were imaged using desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI MS), and the results were compared with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI MS) of their extracts. Tandem mass spectrometry with DESI and ESI, in conjunction with database records, confirmed the molecular species. This protocol has been extended to other plants. Implications of this study in identifying varietal differences, toxic metabolite production, changes in metabolites during growth, pest/pathogen attack, and natural stresses are shown with illustrations. The possibility to image subtle features like eye color of petals, leaf vacuole, leaf margin, and veins is demonstrated.

  1. DESI-MS imaging and NMR spectroscopy to investigate the influence of biodiesel in the structure of commercial rubbers.

    PubMed

    Silva, Lorena M A; Alves Filho, Elenilson G; Simpson, André J; Monteiro, Marcos R; Cabral, Elaine; Ifa, Demian; Venâncio, Tiago

    2017-10-01

    Biodiesel has been introduced as an energetic matrix in several countries around the world. However, the affinity of biodiesel with the components of petrodiesel engines is a growing concern. In order to obtain information regarding the effect of biodiesel on the rubber structure, nuclear magnetic resonance technics under a new technology named as comprehensive multiphase (CMP NMR) and the imaging through desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS imaging) were used. The (1)H CMP-DOSY NMR showed the entrapped fuel into the rubber cavities, which the higher constraint caused by the rubber structure is related to the smaller diffusion coefficient. The less affected type of rubber by biodiesel was ethylene-propylene-diene monomer (EPDM), and the most affected was synthetic rubber nitrile (NBR). The (13)C CMP MAS-SPE experiments also confirmed that the internal region of EPDM was less accessible to the biodiesel molecules (no fuels detected) while other rubbers were more susceptible to the penetration of the fuel. DESI-MS imaging revealed for the first time the topography of the rubbers exposed to fuels. The biodiesel molecules entrapped at the EPDM and NBR pores were in oxidized form, which might degrade the rubber structure at long exposure time. The employed technics enabled the study of dynamic and molecular structure of the mixing complex multiphase. The DOSY under CMP used in this study could prove helpful in assessing the interactions throughout all physical phases (liquid, solid, and gel or semi-solid) by observing swellability caused by the fuel in the rubber. In addition, the DESI-MS was especially valuable to detect the degradation products of biodiesel entangled at the rubber structure. In our knowledge, this was the first report in which chemical changes of commercial rubbers induced by biodiesel and petrodiesel were investigated by means of DESI-MS and DOSY NMR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Direct Visualization of Neurotransmitters in Rat Brain Slices by Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging (DESI - MS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Anna Maria A. P.; Vendramini, Pedro H.; Galaverna, Renan; Schwab, Nicolas V.; Alberici, Luciane C.; Augusti, Rodinei; Castilho, Roger F.; Eberlin, Marcos N.

    2016-12-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) of neurotransmitters has so far been mainly performed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) where derivatization reagents, deuterated matrix and/or high resolution, or tandem MS have been applied to circumvent problems with interfering ion peaks from matrix and from isobaric species. We herein describe the application of desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry imaging (DESI)-MSI in rat brain coronal and sagittal slices for direct spatial monitoring of neurotransmitters and choline with no need of derivatization reagents and/or deuterated materials. The amino acids γ-aminobutyric (GABA), glutamate, aspartate, serine, as well as acetylcholine, dopamine, and choline were successfully imaged using a commercial DESI source coupled to a hybrid quadrupole-Orbitrap mass spectrometer. The spatial distribution of the analyzed compounds in different brain regions was determined. We conclude that the ambient matrix-free DESI-MSI is suitable for neurotransmitter imaging and could be applied in studies that involve evaluation of imbalances in neurotransmitters levels.

  3. The Coadministration of Unoxidized and Oxidized Desi Ghee Ameliorates the Toxic Effects of Thermally Oxidized Ghee in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Islam

    2017-01-01

    Desi Ghee was thermally oxidized at 160°C for 9 h and characterized for peroxide value (PV), free fatty acid (FFA), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), radical scavenging activity (RSA), and fatty acid and cholesterol composition using GC-MS. Oxidized (OG) and normal ghee (NG) were fed to rabbits in different doses. Blood was collected for hematology and biochemical analyses after 7 and 14 days. The oxidation of desi ghee increased the PV, FFA, and TBARS values and showed a decline in the RSA values. GC-MS revealed that desi ghee was rich in saturated fatty acids (55.9 g/100 g) and significant amounts of oleic acid (26.2 g/100 g). The OG significantly decreased the body weight, which was normalized by the coadministration of NG. Serum lipid profile showed a dose dependent increase in total cholesterol, triglycerides, and low density lipoproteins (LDL) and decrease in RBCs count, hematocrit, glucose, and hemoglobin concentration with OG feeding. These parameters were normalized by coadministration of NG. Liver histopathology of OG fed groups showed bile duct dilation and necrotic changes, while normal architecture showed in NG groups, compared to control. These results indicate that NG has no significant effect on rabbits comparing with OG and that it was beneficial when coadministered with oxidized ghee. PMID:28299204

  4. Direct Visualization of Neurotransmitters in Rat Brain Slices by Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging (DESI - MS).

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Anna Maria A P; Vendramini, Pedro H; Galaverna, Renan; Schwab, Nicolas V; Alberici, Luciane C; Augusti, Rodinei; Castilho, Roger F; Eberlin, Marcos N

    2016-12-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) of neurotransmitters has so far been mainly performed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) where derivatization reagents, deuterated matrix and/or high resolution, or tandem MS have been applied to circumvent problems with interfering ion peaks from matrix and from isobaric species. We herein describe the application of desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry imaging (DESI)-MSI in rat brain coronal and sagittal slices for direct spatial monitoring of neurotransmitters and choline with no need of derivatization reagents and/or deuterated materials. The amino acids γ-aminobutyric (GABA), glutamate, aspartate, serine, as well as acetylcholine, dopamine, and choline were successfully imaged using a commercial DESI source coupled to a hybrid quadrupole-Orbitrap mass spectrometer. The spatial distribution of the analyzed compounds in different brain regions was determined. We conclude that the ambient matrix-free DESI-MSI is suitable for neurotransmitter imaging and could be applied in studies that involve evaluation of imbalances in neurotransmitters levels. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  5. Studies on a VUV free electron laser at the TESLA Test Facility at DESY

    SciTech Connect

    Rossbach, J.

    1995-12-31

    The TESLA Test Facility (TTF) currently under construction at DESY is a test-bed for acceleration sections of a high-gradient, high efficiency superconducting linear collider. Due to ist unrivaled ability to sustain high beam quality during acceleration, a superconducting rf linac is considered the optimum choice to drive a Free Electron Laser (FEL). We aim at a photon wavelength of {lambda} = 6 manometer utilizing the TTF after is has been extended to 1 GeV beam energy. Due to lack of mirrors and seed-lasers in this wavelength regime, a single pass FEL and Self-Amplified-Spontaneous-Emission (SASE) is considered. A first test is foreseen at a larger photon wavelength. The overall design as well as both electron and photon beam properties will be discussed. To reach the desired photon wavelength, the main components that have to be added to the TTF are: (a) a low emittance rf gun including space charge compensation (b) a two stage bunch compressor increasing the peak bunch current from 100 A up to 2500 A (c) four more accelerating modules to achieve 1 GeV beam energy (d) a 25 m long undulator (period length 27 mm, peak field 0.5 T) The average brillance will be larger than 1-10{sup 22}photons/s/mm{sup 2}/mrad{sup 2}/0.1%. Each 800 {mu}s long pulse will contain up to 7200 equidistant bunches. The repetition frequency of the linac is 10 Hz.

  6. Transatlantic transport of Fermilab 3.9 GHz cryomodule for TTF/FLASH to DESY

    SciTech Connect

    McGee, M.W.; Vocean, V.; Grimm, C.; Schappert, W.; /Fermilab

    2008-06-01

    In an exchange of technology agreement, Fermilab built and will deliver a 3.9 GHz (3rd harmonic) cryomodule to DESY to be installed in the TTF/FLASH beamline. This cryomodule delivery will involve a combination of flatbed air ride truck and commercial aircraft transport to Hamburg Germany. A description of the isolation and damping systems that maintain alignment during transport and protect fragile components is provided. Initially, transport and corresponding alignment stability studies were performed in order to assess the risk associated with transatlantic travel of a fully assembled cryomodule. Shock loads were applied to the cryomodule by using a coldmass mockup to prevent subjecting actual critical components (such as the cavities and input couplers) to excessive forces. Accumulative and peak shock loads were applied through over-the-road testing and using a pendulum hammer apparatus, respectively. Finite Element Analysis (FEA) studies were implemented to define location of instrumentation for transport studies and provide modal frequencies and shapes. Shock and vibration measurement results of transport studies and stabilization techniques are discussed.

  7. Imprint of DESI fiber assignment on anisotropic power spectrum of emission line galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahn, Robert N.; Pinol, Lucas; Hand, Nicholas; McDonald, Patrick; Seljak, Uros

    2017-01-01

    The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI), a multiplexed fiber-fed spectrograph, is a Stage-IV ground-based dark energy experiment aiming to measure redshifts for 29 million Emission-Line Galaxies (ELG), 4 million Luminous Red Galaxies (LRG), and 2 million Quasi-Stellar Objects (QSO). The survey design includes an observation strategy determined by a fiber assignment algorithm that optimizes the allocation of fibers to targets. We investigate the systematic effects of the fiber assignment coverage on the anisotropic galaxy clustering of ELGs and show that, in the absence of any corrections, it leads to discrepancies of order ten percent on large scales for the power spectrum multipoles. We introduce a method where objects in a random catalog are assigned a coverage, and the mean density is separately computed for each coverage factor, and show that this method reduces, but does not eliminate the effect. The angular dependence of the contaminating signal is mostly in purely transverse modes. We find that the effect can be mitigated by binning in angle and excluding contributions near the transverse direction. This material is based upon work supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of High Energy Physics, under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  8. Properties of hadronic final states in diffractive deep inelastic ep scattering at DESY HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.; Musgrave, B.; Pellegrino, A.; Repond, J.; Yoshida, R.; Mattingly, M. C.; Antonioli, P.; Bari, G.; Basile, M.; Bellagamba, L.; Boscherini, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Romeo, G. Cara; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Corradi, M.; de Pasquale, S.; Giusti, P.; Iacobucci, G.; Levi, G.; Margotti, A.; Massam, T.; Nania, R.; Palmonari, F.; Pesci, A.; Sartorelli, G.; Zichichi, A.; Aghuzumtsyan, G.; Brock, I.; Goers, S.; Hartmann, H.; Hilger, E.; Irrgang, P.; Jakob, H.-P.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U. F.; Kerger, R.; Kind, O.; Paul, E.; Rautenberg, J.; Schnurbusch, H.; Stifutkin, A.; Tandler, J.; Voss, K. C.; Weber, A.; Wieber, H.; Bailey, D. S.; Brook, N. H.; Cole, J. E.; Foster, B.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Robins, S.; Rodrigues, E.; Scott, J.; Tapper, R. J.; Wing, M.; Capua, M.; Mastroberardino, A.; Schioppa, M.; Susinno, G.; Jeoung, H. Y.; Kim, J. Y.; Lee, J. H.; Lim, I. T.; Ma, K. J.; Pac, M. Y.; Caldwell, A.; Helbich, M.; Liu, W.; Liu, X.; Mellado, B.; Paganis, S.; Sampson, S.; Schmidke, W. B.; Sciulli, F.; Chwastowski, J.; Eskreys, A.; Figiel, J.; Klimek, K.; Olkiewicz, K.; Przybycień, M. B.; Stopa, P.; Zawiejski, L.; Bednarek, B.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Jeleń, K.; Kisielewska, D.; Kowal, A. M.; Kowal, M.; Kowalski, T.; Mindur, B.; Przybycień, M.; Rulikowska-Zarȩbska, E.; Suszycki, L.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Kotański, A.; Bauerdick, L. A.; Behrens, U.; Borras, K.; Chiochia, V.; Crittenden, J.; Dannheim, D.; Desler, K.; Drews, G.; Fox-Murphy, A.; Fricke, U.; Geiser, A.; Goebel, F.; Göttlicher, P.; Graciani, R.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hartner, G. F.; Hebbel, K.; Hillert, S.; Koch, W.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Labes, H.; Löhr, B.; Mankel, R.; Martens, J.; Martínez, M.; Milite, M.; Moritz, M.; Notz, D.; Petrucci, M. C.; Polini, A.; Schneekloth, U.; Selonke, F.; Stonjek, S.; Wolf, G.; Wollmer, U.; Whitmore, J. J.; Wichmann, R.; Youngman, C.; Zeuner, W.; Coldewey, C.; Viani, A. Lopez-Duran; Meyer, A.; Schlenstedt, S.; Barbagli, G.; Gallo, E.; Pelfer, P. G.; Bamberger, A.; Benen, A.; Coppola, N.; Markun, P.; Raach, H.; Wölfle, S.; Bell, M.; Bussey, P. J.; Doyle, A. T.; Glasman, C.; Lee, S. W.; Lupi, A.; McCance, G. J.; Saxon, D. H.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Bodmann, B.; Gendner, N.; Holm, U.; Salehi, H.; Wick, K.; Yildirim, A.; Ziegler, A.; Carli, T.; Garfagnini, A.; Gialas, I.; Lohrmann, E.; Foudas, C.; Gonçalo, R.; Long, K. R.; Metlica, F.; Miller, D. B.; Tapper, A. D.; Walker, R.; Cloth, P.; Filges, D.; Kuze, M.; Nagano, K.; Tokushuku, K.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Boos, E. G.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Ahn, S. H.; Lee, S. B.; Park, S. K.; Lim, H.; Son, D.; Barreiro, F.; García, G.; González, O.; Labarga, L.; del Peso, J.; Redondo, I.; Terrón, J.; Vázquez, M.; Barbi, M.; Bertolin, A.; Corriveau, F.; Ochs, A.; Padhi, S.; Stairs, D. G.; Tsurugai, T.; Antonov, A.; Bashkirov, V.; Danilov, P.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Gladkov, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Suchkov, S.; Dementiev, R. K.; Ermolov, P. F.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Katkov, I. I.; Khein, L. A.; Korotkova, N. A.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Solomin, A. N.; Vlasov, N. N.; Zotkin, S. A.; Bokel, C.; Engelen, J.; Grijpink, S.; Maddox, E.; Koffeman, E.; Kooijman, P.; Schagen, S.; Tassi, E.; Tiecke, H.; Tuning, N.; Velthuis, J. J.; Wiggers, L.; de Wolf, E.; Brümmer, N.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Gilmore, J.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Kim, C. L.; Ling, T. Y.; Boogert, S.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Devenish, R. C.; Ferrando, J.; Große-Knetter, J.; Matsushita, T.; Rigby, M.; Ruske, O.; Sutton, M. R.; Walczak, R.; Brugnera, R.; Carlin, R.; Corso, F. Dal; Dusini, S.; Limentani, S.; Longhin, A.; Parenti, A.; Posocco, M.; Stanco, L.; Turcato, M.; Adamczyk, L.; Iannotti, L.; Oh, B. Y.; Saull, P. R.; Toothacker, W. S.; Iga, Y.; D'Agostini, G.; Marini, G.; Nigro, A.; Cormack, C.; Hart, J. C.; McCubbin, N. A.; Epperson, D.; Heusch, C.; Sadrozinski, H.; Seiden, A.; Williams, D. C.; Park, I. H.; Pavel, N.; Abramowicz, H.; Dagan, S.; Gabareen, A.; Kananov, S.; Kreisel, A.; Levy, A.; Abe, T.; Fusayasu, T.; Kohno, T.; Umemori, K.; Yamashita, T.; Hamatsu, R.; Hirose, T.; Inuzuka, M.; Kitamura, S.; Matsuzawa, K.; Nishimura, T.; Arneodo, M.; Cartiglia, N.; Cirio, R.; Costa, M.; Ferrero, M. I.; Maselli, S.; Monaco, V.; Peroni, C.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Bailey, D. C.; Fagerstroem, C.-P.; Galea, R.; Koop, T.; Levman, G. M.; Martin, J. F.; Mirea, A.; Sabetfakhri, A.; Butterworth, J. M.; Gwenlan, C.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Hayes, M. E.; Heaphy, E. A.; Jones, T. W.; Lane, J. B.; Lightwood, M. S.; West, B. J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Grzelak, G.; Nowak, R. J.; Pawlak, J. M.; Smalska, B.; Tymieniecka, T.; Ukleja, A.; Ukleja, J.; Zakrzewski, J. A.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Adamus, M.; Plucinski, P.; Sztuk, J.; Eisenberg, Y.; Gladilin, L. K.; Hochman, D.; Karshon, U.; Breitweg, J.; Chapin, D.; Cross, R.; Kçira, D.; Lammers, S.; Reeder, D. D.; Savin, A. A.; Smith, W. H.; Deshpande, A.; Dhawan, S.; Hughes, V. W.; Straub, P. B.; Bhadra, S.; Catterall, C. D.; Frisken, W. R.; Khakzad, M.; Menary, S.

    2002-03-01

    Characteristics of the hadronic final state of diffractive deep inelastic scattering events ep-->eXp were studied in the kinematic range 4DESY ep collider HERA using an integrated luminosity of 13.8 pb-1. The events were tagged by identifying the diffractively scattered proton using the leading proton spectrometer. The properties of the hadronic final state X were studied in its center-of-mass frame using thrust, thrust angle, sphericity, energy flow, transverse energy flow, and ``seagull'' distributions. As the invariant mass of the system increases, the final state becomes more collimated, more aligned, and more asymmetric in the average transverse momentum with respect to the direction of the virtual photon. Comparisons of the properties of the hadronic final state with predictions from various Monte Carlo model generators suggest that the final state is dominated by qq&;g states at the parton level.

  9. Metabolic profiling directly from the Petri dish using nanoDESI imaging mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Watrous, Jeramie; Roach, Patrick; Heath, Brandi; Alexandrov, Theodore; Laskin, Julia; Dorrestein, Pieter C.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding molecular interaction pathways in complex biological systems constitutes a treasure trove of knowledge that might facilitate the specific, chemical manipulation of the countless microbiological systems that occur throughout our world. However, there is a lack of methodologies that allow the direct investigation of chemical gradients and interactions in living biological systems, in real time. Here we report the use of nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nanoDESI) imaging mass spectrometry for in vivo metabolic profiling of living bacterial colonies directly from the Petri dish with absolutely no sample preparation needed. Using this technique, we investigated single colonies of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, Bacillus subtilis 3610, Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) as well as a mixed biofilm of S. oneidensis MR-1 and B. subtilis 3610. Data from B. subtilis 3610 and S. coelicolor A3(2) provided a means of validation for the method while data from S. oneidensis MR-1 and the mixed biofilm showed a wide range of compounds that this bacterium uses for the dissimilatory reduction of extracellular metal oxides, including riboflavin, iron-bound heme and heme biosynthetic intermediates, and the siderophore putrebactin. PMID:24047514

  10. Proceedings of the Annual Day of Scientific Lectures (17th), and Annual Meeting of the National Society of Black Physicists (13th), Held in Baton Rouge, LA on March 21-24, 1990

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-01

    CLASSIFICATION lb RESTRICTIVE MARKINGS UNCLASSIFIED - NONE 2a. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION AUTHORITY 3. DISTRIBUTION /AVAILABILITY OF REPORT 2b. DECLASSIFICATION...papers presented. 20 DISTRIBUTION /AVAILAG;LITY OF ABSTRACT 21 ABSTRACT SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 1X] UNCLASSIFIED/UNLIMITED 0 SAME AS RPT D DTIC USERS...Annual Meeting of the National Society of Black Physicists". Additional copies are being distributed in accordance with Grant Attachment No 1, copy

  11. Abstracts of the 11th Annual U.S. Geological Survey, Central Region, 1999 Poster Review; Collected Abstracts of Selected Poster Papers Presented at Scientific Meetings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Modreski, P.J.

    1999-01-01

    In 1999, the U.S. Geological Survey Central Region had a poster review where USGS scientists showcased posters that had been presented at scientific meetings. This report contains abstracts for selected posters that were presented at this review. Science topics were from several USGS teams with a broad range of topics.

  12. Northern Scientific Training Program: Annual Report, 1999-2000 = Programme de formation scientifique dans le Nord: Rapport annuel, 1999-2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development, Ottawa (Ontario).

    The Northern Scientific Training Program (NSTP) is managed by the Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development as part of its mandate to foster science and technology in the Canadian North. NSTP supports Canadian universities in providing training that gives advanced and graduate students the opportunity to gain professional experience in…

  13. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication (12th, Oxford, Ohio, February 13-15, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, Marilyn Schauer, Ed.

    The papers in this proceedings of the Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication (CPTSC) conference discuss collaboration with other disciplines, with business and industry, and with research foundations, reflecting the readiness to reach out that characterizes CPTSC in its second decade. Papers in the proceedings are:…

  14. Northern Scientific Training Program: Annual Report, 1999-2000 = Programme de formation scientifique dans le Nord: Rapport annuel, 1999-2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development, Ottawa (Ontario).

    The Northern Scientific Training Program (NSTP) is managed by the Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development as part of its mandate to foster science and technology in the Canadian North. NSTP supports Canadian universities in providing training that gives advanced and graduate students the opportunity to gain professional experience in…

  15. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Council for Programs in Technical and Scientific Communication (13th, Portland, Oregon, April 17-18, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geonetta, Sam C., Ed.

    Focusing on what quality "is" in technical and scientific communication programs, the papers in this proceedings are divided into five sections: Quality in Programs; Quality in Administrators; Quality in Teachers; Quality in Students; and Quality in Graduates. Papers in the proceedings are: "The Proof Is in the Pudding: Evaluating…

  16. NERSC Annual Report 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Hules , John

    2006-07-31

    The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the premier computational resource for scientific research funded by the DOE Office of Science. The Annual Report includes summaries of recent significant and representative computational science projects conducted on NERSC systems as well as information about NERSC's current and planned systems and services.

  17. NERSC Annual Report 2004

    SciTech Connect

    Hules, John; Bashor, Jon; Yarris, Lynn; McCullough, Julie; Preuss, Paul; Bethel, Wes

    2005-04-15

    The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the premier computational resource for scientific research funded by the DOE Office of Science. The Annual Report includes summaries of recent significant and representative computational science projects conducted on NERSC systems as well as information about NERSC's current and planned systems and services.

  18. NRCC annual report, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-11-01

    This annual report of the National Research for Computation in Chemistry (NRCC) Division describes the program of research workshops, software development, and scientific research of the Division in 1979. This year marked the first full calendar year of activity of the Division. Initial staffing in the core scientific areas was completed by the addition of a crystallographer.

  19. NERSC Annual Report 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Hules, John

    2003-01-31

    The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the primary computational resource for scientific research funded by the DOE Office of Science. The Annual Report for FY2002 includes a summary of recent computational science conducted on NERSC systems (with abstracts of significant and representative projects), and information about NERSC's current and planned systems and service

  20. Optimizations of transverse projected emittance at the photo-injector test facility at DESY, location Zeuthen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimjaem, S.; Stephan, F.; Krasilnikov, M.; Ackermann, W.; Asova, G.; Bähr, J.; Gjonaj, E.; Grabosch, H. J.; Hakobyan, L.; Hänel, M.; Ivanisenko, Y.; Khojoyan, M.; Klemz, G.; Lederer, S.; Mahgoub, M.; Michelato, P.; Monaco, L.; Nozdrin, M.; O'Shea, B.; Otevrel, M.; Petrosyan, B.; Richter, D.; Rönsch-Schulenburg, J.; Sertore, D.; Schreiber, S.; Schnepp, S.; Shapovalov, A.; Spesyvtsev, R.; Staykov, L.; Vashchenko, G.; Weiland, T.; Will, I.

    2012-04-01

    High brightness electron sources for linac based short-wavelength free-electron lasers are developed and optimized for small transverse projected emittance at the photo-injector test facility at DESY, location Zeuthen (PITZ). A major part of the measurement program at PITZ is dedicated to transverse phase space optimization in order to fulfill the requirements of the European X-ray free-electron laser (European XFEL). A laser-driven RF-gun, treated with a dry-ice sublimation-impulse cleaning technique, a new photocathode laser system allowing short rise and fall times of the flat-top temporal distribution as well as several new diagnostic components have been installed at PITZ in 2008. The electrons generated via the photo-effect at a cesium telluride (Cs2Te) cathode are accelerated by a 1.6 cell L-band RF-gun cavity with a maximum accelerating gradient at the cathode of about 60 MV/m. The transverse projected emittance is measured using a single slit scan technique. In the 2008-2009 run period, a detailed characterization of the projected transverse emittance was performed at different operating conditions. Optimizations and measurement results as well as simulation predictions of the transverse projected emittance for bunch charges of 1, 0.5, 0.25 and 0.1 nC are presented and discussed in this paper. The geometric mean of the normalized projected rms emittance in both transverse directions for an electron bunch charge of 1 nC was measured to be 0.89±0.01 mm mrad for a 100% rms phase-space distribution.

  1. Imprint of DESI fiber assignment on the anisotropic power spectrum of emission line galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinol, Lucas; Cahn, Robert N.; Hand, Nick; Seljak, Uroš; White, Martin

    2017-04-01

    The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI), a multiplexed fiber-fed spectrograph, is a Stage-IV ground-based dark energy experiment aiming to measure redshifts for 29 million Emission-Line Galaxies (ELG), 4 million Luminous Red Galaxies (LRG), and 2 million Quasi-Stellar Objects (QSO). The survey design includes a pattern of tiling on the sky, the locations of the fiber positioners in the focal plane of the telescope, and an observation strategy determined by a fiber assignment algorithm that optimizes the allocation of fibers to targets. This strategy allows a given region to be covered on average five times for a five-year survey, with a typical variation of about 1.5 about the mean, which imprints a spatially-dependent pattern on the galaxy clustering. We investigate the systematic effects of the fiber assignment coverage on the anisotropic galaxy clustering of ELGs and show that, in the absence of any corrections, it leads to discrepancies of order ten percent on large scales for the power spectrum multipoles. We introduce a method where objects in a random catalog are assigned a coverage, and the mean density is separately computed for each coverage factor. We show that this method reduces, but does not eliminate the effect. We next investigate the angular dependence of the contaminated signal, arguing that it is mostly localized to purely transverse modes. We demonstrate that the cleanest way to remove the contaminating signal is to perform an analysis of the anisotropic power spectrum P(k,μ) and remove the lowest μ bin, leaving μ > 0 modes accurate at the few-percent level. Here, μ is the cosine of the angle between the line-of-sight and the direction of vec k. We also investigate two alternative definitions of the random catalog and show that they are comparable but less effective than the coverage randoms method.

  2. Benchmark datasets for 3D MALDI- and DESI-imaging mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Oetjen, Janina; Veselkov, Kirill; Watrous, Jeramie; McKenzie, James S; Becker, Michael; Hauberg-Lotte, Lena; Kobarg, Jan Hendrik; Strittmatter, Nicole; Mróz, Anna K; Hoffmann, Franziska; Trede, Dennis; Palmer, Andrew; Schiffler, Stefan; Steinhorst, Klaus; Aichler, Michaela; Goldin, Robert; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando; von Eggeling, Ferdinand; Thiele, Herbert; Maedler, Kathrin; Walch, Axel; Maass, Peter; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Takats, Zoltan; Alexandrov, Theodore

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) imaging mass spectrometry (MS) is an analytical chemistry technique for the 3D molecular analysis of a tissue specimen, entire organ, or microbial colonies on an agar plate. 3D-imaging MS has unique advantages over existing 3D imaging techniques, offers novel perspectives for understanding the spatial organization of biological processes, and has growing potential to be introduced into routine use in both biology and medicine. Owing to the sheer quantity of data generated, the visualization, analysis, and interpretation of 3D imaging MS data remain a significant challenge. Bioinformatics research in this field is hampered by the lack of publicly available benchmark datasets needed to evaluate and compare algorithms. High-quality 3D imaging MS datasets from different biological systems at several labs were acquired, supplied with overview images and scripts demonstrating how to read them, and deposited into MetaboLights, an open repository for metabolomics data. 3D imaging MS data were collected from five samples using two types of 3D imaging MS. 3D matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging (MALDI) MS data were collected from murine pancreas, murine kidney, human oral squamous cell carcinoma, and interacting microbial colonies cultured in Petri dishes. 3D desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) imaging MS data were collected from a human colorectal adenocarcinoma. With the aim to stimulate computational research in the field of computational 3D imaging MS, selected high-quality 3D imaging MS datasets are provided that could be used by algorithm developers as benchmark datasets.

  3. Overview of the 80(th) Annual Scientific Meeting of the Japanese Circulation Society - The Past, Present and Future of Cardiovascular Medicine in Japan - - The 5(th) Anniversary of the Great East Japan Earthquake.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Jun; Satoh, Kimio; Fukuda, Koji; Sugimura, Koichiro; Matsumoto, Yasuharu; Nakano, Makoto; Tsuburaya, Ryuji; Aoki, Tatsuo; Hao, Kiyotaka; Nishimiya, Kensuke; Ito, Kenta; Sakata, Yasuhiko; Shimokawa, Hiroaki

    2016-07-25

    The 80(th)Annual Scientific Meeting of the Japanese Circulation Society was held in Sendai, Japan, on March 18-20, 2016, which coincided with the 5(th)anniversary of the Great East Japan Earthquake that hit the Tohoku area on March 11, 2011. Thus, the main themes for this meeting were "The Past, Present and Future of Cardiovascular Medicine in Japan" and "The 5(th)Anniversary of the Great East Japan Earthquake". Despite the provincial location, approximately 15,000 people attended during the 3-day meeting, and there were in-depth discussions in each of the various sessions on these themes. Especially, to our great pleasure, the Japanese Royals, Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko, kindly visited the panel exhibition of the Great East Japan Earthquake and spoke words of appreciation to us. The meeting successfully completed and we sincerely appreciate the great cooperation and support from all affiliates. (Circ J 2016; 80: 1689-1694).

  4. Current developments and clinical applications of bubble technology in Japan: a report from 85th Annual Scientific Meeting of The Japan Society of Ultrasonic in Medicine, Tokyo, 25-27 May, 2012.

    PubMed

    Achmad, Arifudin; Taketomi-Takahashi, Ayako; Tsushima, Yoshito

    2013-06-01

    The potentials of bubble technology in ultrasound has been investigated thoroughly in the last decade. Japan has entered as one of the leaders in bubble technology in ultrasound since Sonazoid (Daiichi Sankyo & GE Healthcare) was marketed in 2007. The 85th Annual Scientific Meeting of The Japan Society of Ultrasonics in Medicine held in Tokyo from May 25 to 27, 2012 is where researchers and clinicians from all over Japan presented recent advances and new developments in ultrasound in both the medical and the engineering aspects of this science. Even though bubble technology was originally developed simply to improve the conventional ultrasound imaging, recent discoveries have opened up powerful emerging applications. Bubble technology is the particular topic to be reviewed in this report, including its mechanical advances for molecular imaging, drug/gene delivery device and sonoporation up to its current clinical application for liver cancers and other liver, gastrointestinal, kidney and breast diseases.

  5. Seasonal prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites in desi fowl (Gallus gallus domesticus) in and around Gannavaram, Andhra Pradesh.

    PubMed

    Sreedevi, C; Jyothisree, Ch; Rama Devi, V; Annapurna, P; Jeyabal, L

    2016-09-01

    A study was carried out to know the prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites in desi fowl in and nearby villages of Gannavaram, Andhra Pradesh for a period of 1 year. Screening of 492 samples comprising faecal samples and gastrointestinal tracts from freshly slaughtered desi birds at local poultry shops and samples from post mortem examinations at NTR College of Veterinary Science, Gannavaram revealed 63.21 % of gastrointestinal parasites. Faecal samples were examined by floatation technique using salt solution and samples positive for coccidian oocysts were sporulated in 2.5 % potassium dichromate solution for species identification. Adult worms were identified after routine processing and mounting. The species identified includes Davainea proglottina, Raillietina cesticillus and Raillietina echinobothrida in cestodes (32.47 %), Ascaridia galli, Capillaria annulata, Heterakis gallinarum in nematodes (39.87 %), Eimeria tenella, Eimeria acervulina and Eimeria necatrix in Eimeria spp. (39.87 %). Ascaridia galli and R. cesticillus and A. galli and Eimeria spp. were common in mixed infection (12.86 %). Ascaridia galli was the more prevalent species. No trematode parasite was identified during the study period. Significant (p = 0.001) relationship between the seasonality and prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites was observed (χ2 = 17.46, df = 2). Data revealed high prevalence in rainy season (43.41 %) followed by summer (38.91 %) and winter (17.68 %) seasons for all parasites except for A. galli and C. annulata infections which were higher in summer season. Results indicated high prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites in desi fowl in study area emphasizing the need of improved management practices of backyard poultry.

  6. Studies on the effectiveness of oral pellet vaccine in improving egg production and egg quality in desi chicken

    PubMed Central

    Reetha, T. Lurthu; Rajeswar, J. Johnson; Harikrishnan, T. J.; Sukumar, K.; Srinivasan, P.; Kirubakaran, J. John

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To study the effect of Newcastle disease (ND) oral pellet vaccine in egg production and egg quality in desi chicken. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted at Veterinary University Training and Research Centre, Tiruchirapalli, Tamil Nadu. A total of 48-day-old desi chicks obtained from a private hatchery in Namakkal, Tamil Nadu, were maintained under cage system of rearing up to 52 weeks of age as per standard management practices. All the 48 chicks were divided into six groups having eight chicks in each group were subjected to different treatment regimes. All the birds were challenged at 52 weeks of age with 0.5 ml dose of 104.0 egg infectious dose 50 virulent ND field virus. 10 eggs from each group were randomly collected during the last 3 days of 8 weeks interval period from 28 to 52 weeks of age and were used to measure the egg quality parameters. The production performance of each group was assessed at 4 weeks interval period from 25 to 52 weeks of age. Results: In all the six treatment groups with respect to egg production, no significant difference (p≥0.05) was noticed from 25 to 52 weeks of age. Similarly, in egg weight, egg shape index and specific gravity, no significant difference (p≥0.05) was noticed from 28 to 52 weeks of age. Conclusion: From this study, it is concluded that the administration of ND oral pellet vaccine to desi chicken does not affect the egg production performance, egg weight, egg shape index, and specific gravity of egg. PMID:27651681

  7. Ambient DESI and LESA-MS Analysis of Proteins Adsorbed to a Biomaterial Surface Using In-Situ Surface Tryptic Digestion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Wei; Celiz, Adam D.; Scurr, David J.; Alexander, Morgan R.; Barrett, David A.

    2013-12-01

    The detection and identification of proteins adsorbed onto biomaterial surfaces under ambient conditions has significant experimental advantages but has proven to be difficult to achieve with conventional measuring technologies. In this study, we present an adaptation of desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) and liquid extraction surface analysis (LESA) mass spectrometry (MS) coupled with in-situ surface tryptic digestion to identify protein species from a biomaterial surface. Cytochrome c, myoglobin, and BSA in a combination of single and mixture spots were printed in an array format onto Permanox slides, followed by in-situ surface digestion and detection via MS. Automated tandem MS performed on surface peptides was able to identify the proteins via MASCOT. Limits of detection were determined for DESI-MS and a comparison of DESI and LESA-MS peptide spectra characteristics and sensitivity was made. DESI-MS images of the arrays were produced and analyzed with imaging multivariate analysis to automatically separate peptide peaks for each of the proteins within a mixture into distinct components. This is the first time that DESI and LESA-MS have been used for the in-situ detection of surface digested proteins on biomaterial surfaces and presents a promising proof of concept for the use of ambient MS in the rapid and automated analysis of surface proteins.

  8. Detection of follicular transport of lidocaine and metabolism in adipose tissue in pig ear skin by DESI mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    D'Alvise, Janina; Mortensen, Rasmus; Hansen, Steen H; Janfelt, Christian

    2014-06-01

    Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) mass spectrometry imaging is demonstrated as a detection technique for penetration experiments of drugs in skin. Lidocaine ointment was used as the model compound in ex vivo experiments with whole pig ears as the skin model. Follicular transport of lidocaine into the deeper skin layers is demonstrated for the first time. Furthermore, metabolism of lidocaine to 3-OH-lidocaine was observed in subcutaneous tissue as well as in lobules of white adipose tissue surrounding the hair follicles. These results suggest that it is advantageous to use full thickness skin, including subcutaneous tissue, for skin metabolism studies.

  9. Report of the 19th Annual Meeting of the International Scientific Working Group on Tick-Borne Encephalitis (ISW-TBE) - TBE in a changing world.

    PubMed

    Kunze, Ursula

    2017-08-30

    The 19th meeting of the International Scientific Working Group on Tick-Borne Encephalitis (ISW-TBE) - a group of neurologists, general practitioners, clinicians, travel physicians, virologists, pediatricians and epidemiologists-was held under the title "TBE in a changing world". Key topics within virology, current epidemiological developments and investigations, expansion of risk areas, clinical aspects and cases, traveling and mobility, vaccination rates, and latest news on vaccination were presented and extensively discussed. Over the past four decades, TBE has become a growing public health challenge in Europe and parts of Asia. It may be considered a complex eco-epidemiological system, characterized by an intricate interplay between the virus, ticks and tick hosts on the one hand and human exposure strongly influenced by socioeconomic conditions on the other hand. Although the facts are simple - vaccination is the best prevention - the socioeconomic conditions keep changing, and with them the ability or willingness of people to get vaccinated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. DESI-MS2: a rapid and innovative method for trace analysis of six cytostatic drugs in health care setting.

    PubMed

    Fabrizi, Giovanni; Fioretti, Marzia; Rocca, Lucia Mainero; Curini, Roberta

    2012-05-01

    With the aim of establishing exposure levels for hospital personnel preparing and administering cytostatic drugs (CDs), here, we present an innovative screening method based on the use of the desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) interface coupled with a hybrid quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometer. A rapid, simple, and sensitive procedure was developed for the simultaneous surface monitoring of cyclophosphamide, dacarbazine, methotrexate, vincristine, gemcitabine, and cytarabine. Since analytes were in the solid state, a novel approach based on the use of passive samplers was combined with the direct analysis of wipes. A PTFE-printed glass slide was used as a passive sampler, while hydrophobic centers of Swiffer® cloths were judged extremely efficient as wipe samplers. After the sampling period, the CD collectors were directly processed with the DESI-MS system without any further treatment. MS/MS confirmatory analysis was conducted using selected reaction monitoring in the positive ion mode and detection limits were evaluated. Values were at the picograms per square millimeter levels on the passive collector and at the picograms per square centimeter levels for the wipe ones. Direct determination on solid-state samples combined with mass spectrometry selectivity provided a powerful tool so far unapplied to occupational hygiene.

  11. TiO2 photocatalysis-DESI-MS rotating array platform for high-throughput investigation of oxidation reactions.

    PubMed

    Ruokolainen, Miina; Miikkulainen, Ville; Ritala, Mikko; Sikanen, Tiina M; Kotiaho, Tapio; Kostiainen, Risto

    2017-10-03

    We present a new high-throughput platform for studying TiO2 photocatalytic oxidation reactions by performing reactions on a TiO2-coated surface, followed by direct analysis of oxidation products from the surface by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS). For this purpose, we coated a round glass wafer with photocatalytically active anatase-phase TiO2 using atomic layer deposition. Approximately 70 aqueous 1 µL samples can be injected onto the rim of the TiO2-coated glass wafer, before the entire wafer is exposed to UV irradiation. After evaporation of water, the oxidation products can be directly analyzed from the sample spots by DESI-MS, using a commercial rotating sample platform. The method was shown to provide fast photocatalytic oxidation reactions and analysis with throughput of about four samples per minute. The feasibility of the method was examined for mimicking phase I metabolism reactions of amodiaquine, buspirone and verapamil. Their main photocatalytic reaction products were mostly similar to the products observed earlier in TiO2 photocatalysis and in in vitro phase I metabolism assays performed using human liver microsomes.

  12. Near-isogenic lines of desi chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) that differ in milling ease: differences in chemical composition.

    PubMed

    Wood, Jennifer A; Knights, Edmund J; Campbell, Grant M; Choct, Mingan

    2017-03-01

    Milling performance is an important attribute for desi chickpea and other pulses, as varieties that are more difficult-to-mill lead to processing yield loss and damage to the resulting split cotyledons (dhal) such as chipping and abrasion which are unattractive to the consumer. Poor milling performance leads to poor dhal quality and therefore lower prices and profitability along the pulse value chain. The Pulse Breeding Australia Chickpea Program identified near-isogenic desi lines that differed in seed shape and milling yields, however it was unknown whether this was due simply to a difference in physical forces on the seed during milling, mediated by seed shape, or whether there were underlying differences in chemical composition that could explain these differences. The two isolines differed in the composition of their seed coat, cotyledons and adjoining surfaces. Some of these differences were in agreement with previous research on composition of easy- and difficult-to-mill samples. These differences suggest that biochemical adhesive or cohesive mechanisms at the interface of seed tissues involve pectic polysaccharides and lignin-mediated binding.

  13. An Assessment of the Utility of Tissue Smears in Rapid Cancer Profiling with Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry (DESI-MS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolman, Michael; Tata, Alessandra; Bluemke, Emma; Dara, Delaram; Ginsberg, Howard J.; Zarrine-Afsar, Arash

    2017-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging with desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) is used to characterize cancer from ex vivo slices of tissues. The process is time-consuming. The use of tissue smears for DESI-MS analysis has been proposed as it eliminates the time required to snap-freeze and section the tissue. To assess the utility of tissue smears for rapid cancer characterization, principal component analysis (PCA) was performed to evaluate the concordance between DESI-MS profiles of breast cancer from tissue slices and smears prepared on various surfaces. PCA suggested no statistical discrimination between DESI-MS profiles of tissue sections and tissue smears prepared on glass, polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), and porous PTFE. However, the abundances of cancer biomarker ions varied between sections and smears, with DESI-MS analysis of tissue sections yielding higher ion abundances of cancer biomarkers compared with smears. Coefficient of variance (CV) analysis suggests DESI-MS profiles from tissue smears are as reproducible as the ones from tissue sections. The limit of detection with smear samples from single pixel analysis is comparable to tissue sections that average the signal from a tissue area of 0.01 mm2. The smears prepared on the PTFE surface possessed a higher degree of homogeneity compared with the smears prepared on the glass surface. This allowed single MS scans ( 1 s) from random positions across the surface of the smear to be used in rapid cancer typing with good reproducibility, providing pathologic information for cancer typing at speeds suitable for clinical utility.

  14. NERSC 2001 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hules, John

    2001-12-12

    The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the primary computational resource for scientific research funded by the DOE Office of Science. The Annual Report for FY2001 includes a summary of recent computational science conducted on NERSC systems (with abstracts of significant and representative projects); information about NERSC's current systems and services; descriptions of Berkeley Lab's current research and development projects in applied mathematics, computer science, and computational science; and a brief summary of NERSC's Strategic Plan for 2002-2005.

  15. NERSC 1998 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Hules, John

    1999-03-01

    This 1998 annual report from the National Scientific Energy Research Computing Center (NERSC) presents the year in review of the following categories: Computational Science; Computer Science and Applied Mathematics; and Systems and Services. Also presented are science highlights in the following categories: Basic Energy Sciences; Biological and Environmental Research; Fusion Energy Sciences; High Energy and Nuclear Physics; and Advanced Scientific Computing Research and Other Projects.

  16. Recent breeding programs enhanced genetic diversity in both desi and kabuli varieties of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Thudi, Mahendar; Chitikineni, Annapurna; Liu, Xin; He, Weiming; Roorkiwal, Manish; Yang, Wei; Jian, Jianbo; Doddamani, Dadakhalandar; Gaur, Pooran M.; Rathore, Abhishek; Samineni, Srinivasan; Saxena, Rachit K.; Xu, Dawen; Singh, Narendra P.; Chaturvedi, Sushil K.; Zhang, Gengyun; Wang, Jun; Datta, Swapan K.; Xu, Xun; Varshney, Rajeev K.

    2016-01-01

    In order to understand the impact of breeding on genetic diversity and gain insights into temporal trends in diversity in chickpea, a set of 100 chickpea varieties released in 14 countries between 1948 and 2012 were re-sequenced. For analysis, the re-sequencing data for 29 varieties available from an earlier study was also included. Copy number variations and presence absence variations identified in the present study have potential to drive phenotypic variations for trait improvement. Re-sequencing of a large number of varieties has provided opportunities to inspect the genetic and genomic changes reflecting the history of breeding, which we consider as breeding signatures and the selected loci may provide targets for crop improvement. Our study also reports enhanced diversity in both desi and kabuli varieties as a result of recent chickpea breeding efforts. The current study will aid the explicit efforts to breed for local adaptation in the context of anticipated climate changes. PMID:27982107

  17. Simulation of a He II Lyman-alpha soft x-ray laser pumped by DESY/XFEL radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Ke; Fill, Ernst E.; Meyer-ter-Vehn, Jurgen

    2003-12-01

    The high brilliance expected from the X-ray Free-Electron Lasers (XFEL"s) now under construction suggest re-investigating the feasibility of a photopumped soft X-ray laser. We present simulations of a Lyman-α X-ray laser in hydrogenic He (λ = 30.4 nm) pumped by XFEL radiation with parameters of the TESLA Test Facility, phase II, at DESY/Hamburg. The simulations show that high gain can be achieved at a pump intensity of 1015 W/cm2. The realization of such a laser could provide a better understanding of the physics of photopumped lasers and thus help to develop table-top X-ray lasers.

  18. Monitoring the FLASH Cryomodule Transportation from DESY Hamburg to CEA Saclay: Coupler Contact, Vacuum, Acceleration and Vibration Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Barbanotti, S.; Bosotti, A.; Fusetti, M.; Michelato, P.; Bertolini, A.; Berry, S.; Dorlot, M.; Madec, C.; Napoly, O.; Amirikas, R.; Boehnert, M.; /DESY /Fermilab

    2009-05-01

    With a view to the series production of one hundred, 12 m long XFEL 1.3 GHz cryomodules and their transportation from the assembly site at CEA Saclay (F) to the installation site at DESY Hamburg (D) a test transportation of a FLASH cryomodule has been performed, in the condition foreseen for the mass transportation. The present study examines the stresses induced on the module and verifies the damping capabilities of the transport frame in order to minimize risk of damage to the most critical components. During the transportation, acceleration and vibration have been monitored as well as coupler antenna contacts and vacuum performances. This paper describes the analysis performed and compares those results to the data of a similar transportation study at Fermilab for the CM1 cryomodule.

  19. Recent breeding programs enhanced genetic diversity in both desi and kabuli varieties of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.).

    PubMed

    Thudi, Mahendar; Chitikineni, Annapurna; Liu, Xin; He, Weiming; Roorkiwal, Manish; Yang, Wei; Jian, Jianbo; Doddamani, Dadakhalandar; Gaur, Pooran M; Rathore, Abhishek; Samineni, Srinivasan; Saxena, Rachit K; Xu, Dawen; Singh, Narendra P; Chaturvedi, Sushil K; Zhang, Gengyun; Wang, Jun; Datta, Swapan K; Xu, Xun; Varshney, Rajeev K

    2016-12-16

    In order to understand the impact of breeding on genetic diversity and gain insights into temporal trends in diversity in chickpea, a set of 100 chickpea varieties released in 14 countries between 1948 and 2012 were re-sequenced. For analysis, the re-sequencing data for 29 varieties available from an earlier study was also included. Copy number variations and presence absence variations identified in the present study have potential to drive phenotypic variations for trait improvement. Re-sequencing of a large number of varieties has provided opportunities to inspect the genetic and genomic changes reflecting the history of breeding, which we consider as breeding signatures and the selected loci may provide targets for crop improvement. Our study also reports enhanced diversity in both desi and kabuli varieties as a result of recent chickpea breeding efforts. The current study will aid the explicit efforts to breed for local adaptation in the context of anticipated climate changes.

  20. Desorption Electrospray Ionization (DESI) Mass Spectrometric Imaging of the Distribution of Rohitukine in the Seedling of Dysoxylum binectariferum Hook. F

    PubMed Central

    Mohana Kumara, Patel; Srimany, Amitava; Arunan, Suganya; Ravikanth, Gudasalamani; Uma Shaanker, Ramanan; Pradeep, Thalappil

    2016-01-01

    Ambient ionization mass spectrometric imaging of all parts of the seedling of Dysoxylum binectariferum Hook. f (Meliaceae) was performed to reconstruct the molecular distribution of rohitukine (Rh) and related compounds. The species accumulates Rh, a prominent chromone alkaloid, in its seeds, fruits, and stem bark. Rh possesses anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, and immuno-modulatory properties. Desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry imaging (DESI MSI) and electrospray ionization (ESI) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) analysis detected Rh as well as its glycosylated, acetylated, oxidized, and methoxylated analogues. Rh was predominantly distributed in the main roots, collar region of the stem, and young leaves. In the stem and roots, Rh was primarily restricted to the cortex region. The identities of the metabolites were assigned based on both the fragmentation patterns and exact mass analyses. We discuss these results, with specific reference to the possible pathways of Rh biosynthesis and translocation during seedling development in D. binectariferum. PMID:27362422

  1. Desorption Electrospray Ionization (DESI) Mass Spectrometric Imaging of the Distribution of Rohitukine in the Seedling of Dysoxylum binectariferum Hook. F.

    PubMed

    Mohana Kumara, Patel; Srimany, Amitava; Arunan, Suganya; Ravikanth, Gudasalamani; Uma Shaanker, Ramanan; Pradeep, Thalappil

    2016-01-01

    Ambient ionization mass spectrometric imaging of all parts of the seedling of Dysoxylum binectariferum Hook. f (Meliaceae) was performed to reconstruct the molecular distribution of rohitukine (Rh) and related compounds. The species accumulates Rh, a prominent chromone alkaloid, in its seeds, fruits, and stem bark. Rh possesses anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, and immuno-modulatory properties. Desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry imaging (DESI MSI) and electrospray ionization (ESI) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) analysis detected Rh as well as its glycosylated, acetylated, oxidized, and methoxylated analogues. Rh was predominantly distributed in the main roots, collar region of the stem, and young leaves. In the stem and roots, Rh was primarily restricted to the cortex region. The identities of the metabolites were assigned based on both the fragmentation patterns and exact mass analyses. We discuss these results, with specific reference to the possible pathways of Rh biosynthesis and translocation during seedling development in D. binectariferum.

  2. SAGES Annual Scientific Session and Postgraduate Courses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    Laparoscopic Trainer (Simbionix) Trainer for laparoscopic skill includes haptics and cholecystectomy W81XWH-06-1-0529 Page 7 of 11 ___LapSim...30PM: CompanyParticipants for Hands-on: METI STEP / HPS Haptica ProMIS Immersion Laparoscopic Simulation Workstation MISTELS Fundamentals of... Laparoscopic Surgery Simbionix Lap Mentor , GI Mentor, UroMentor Surgical Science LapSim RealSim Systems LTS 2000 Verefi Technologies EndoTower

  3. 2016 Annual Scientific Meeting of EUBS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-23

    amputation (AKA). Using the comparison between the county of Romagna in Italy (where HBOT is routinely used for DFU treatment) with the Emilia ...in Emilia Romagna - USA data from 2010 indicate a 0.4/1000 AKA rate there). Using this Number Needed to Treat (NNT) of 4 (with 35 HBOT sessions as

  4. Scientific Advisory Board FY92 Annual Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-03-01

    Implementation Board for the North American Waterfowl Management Plan; Chairman, Chief of Engineers’ Environmental Advisory Board. Awards: Aldo ... Leopold Medal, Wildlife Society; Barbara Swain Medal, Natural Resources Council of America. Authored numerous papers and reports, assisted editing and

  5. INSPIRE: A new scientific information system for HEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, R.; Raae, L.

    2010-04-01

    The status of high-energy physics (HEP) information systems has been jointly analyzed by the libraries of CERN, DESY, Fermilab and SLAC. As a result, the four laboratories have started the INSPIRE project - a new platform built by moving the successful SPIRES features and content, curated at DESY, Fermilab and SLAC, into the open-source CDS Invenio digital library software that was developed at CERN. INSPIRE will integrate current acquisition workflows and databases to host the entire body of the HEP literature (about one million records), aiming to become the reference HEP scientific information platform worldwide. It will provide users with fast access to full text journal articles and preprints, but also material such as conference slides and multimedia. INSPIRE will empower scientists with new tools to discover and access the results most relevant to their research, enable novel text- and data-mining applications, and deploy new metrics to assess the impact of articles and authors. In addition, it will introduce the "Web 2.0" paradigm of user-enriched content in the domain of sciences, with community-based approaches to scientific publishing. INSPIRE represents a natural evolution of scholarly communication built on successful community-based information systems, and it provides a vision for information management in other fields of science. Inspired by the needs of HEP, we hope that the INSPIRE project will be inspiring for other communities.

  6. Scientific Misconduct.

    PubMed

    Gross, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Scientific misconduct has been defined as fabrication, falsification, and plagiarism. Scientific misconduct has occurred throughout the history of science. The US government began to take systematic interest in such misconduct in the 1980s. Since then, a number of studies have examined how frequently individual scientists have observed scientific misconduct or were involved in it. Although the studies vary considerably in their methodology and in the nature and size of their samples, in most studies at least 10% of the scientists sampled reported having observed scientific misconduct. In addition to studies of the incidence of scientific misconduct, this review considers the recent increase in paper retractions, the role of social media in scientific ethics, several instructional examples of egregious scientific misconduct, and potential methods to reduce research misconduct.

  7. Rapid determination of the tumour stroma ratio in squamous cell carcinomas with desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS): a proof-of-concept demonstration.

    PubMed

    Woolman, Michael; Tata, Alessandra; Dara, Delaram; Meens, Jalna; D'Arcangelo, Elisa; Perez, Consuelo J; Saiyara Prova, Shamina; Bluemke, Emma; Ginsberg, Howard J; Ifa, Demian; McGuigan, Alison; Ailles, Laurie; Zarrine-Afsar, Arash

    2017-08-21

    Squamous cell carcinomas constitute a major class of head & neck cancers, where the tumour stroma ratio (TSR) carries prognostic information. Patients affected by stroma-rich tumours exhibit a poor prognosis and a higher chance of relapse. As such, there is a need for a technology platform that allows rapid determination of the tumour stroma ratio. In this work, we provide a proof-of-principle demonstration that Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry (DESI-MS) can be used to determine tumour stroma ratios. Slices from three independent mouse xenograft tumours from the human FaDu cell line were subjected to DESI-MS imaging, staining and detailed analysis using digital pathology methods. Using multivariate statistical methods we compared the MS profiles with those of isolated stromal cells. We found that m/z 773.53 [PG(18:1)(18:1) - H](-), m/z 835.53 [PI(34:1) - H](-) and m/z 863.56 [PI(18:1)(18:0) - H](-) are biomarker ions that can distinguish FaDu cancer from cancer associated fibroblast (CAF) cells. A comparison with DESI-MS analysis of controlled mixtures of the CAF and FaDu cells showed that the abundance of the biomarker ions above can be used to determine, with an error margin of close to 5% compared with quantitative pathology estimates, TSR values. This proof-of-principle demonstration is encouraging and must be further validated using human samples and a larger sample base. At maturity, DESI-MS thus may become a stand-alone molecular pathology tool providing an alternative rapid cancer assessment without the need for time-consuming staining and microscopy methods, potentially further conserving human resources.

  8. Electrospun Nanofiber Mats as "Smart Surfaces" for Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry (DESI MS)-Based Analysis and Imprint Imaging.

    PubMed

    Hemalatha, R G; Ganayee, Mohd Azhardin; Pradeep, T

    2016-06-07

    In this paper, desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI MS)-based molecular analysis and imprint imaging using electrospun nylon-6 nanofiber mats are demonstrated for various analytical contexts. Uniform mats of varying thicknesses composed of ∼200 nm diameter fibers were prepared using needleless electrospinning. Analytical applications requiring rapid understanding of the analytes in single drops, dyes, inks, and/or plant extracts incorporated directly into the nanofibers are discussed with illustrations. The possibility to imprint patterns made of printing inks, plant parts (such as petals, leaves, and slices of rhizomes), and fungal growth on fruits with their faithful reproductions on the nanofiber mats is illustrated with suitable examples. Metabolites were identified by tandem mass spectrometry data available in the literature and in databases. The results highlight the significance of electrospun nanofiber mats as smart surfaces to capture diverse classes of compounds for rapid detection or to imprint imaging under ambient conditions. Large surface area, appropriate chemical functionalities exposed, and easiness of desorption due to weaker interactions of the analyte species are the specific advantages of nanofibers for this application.

  9. Acid-catalyzed Reactions in Model Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA): Insights using Desorption-electrospray Ionization (DESI) Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiddler, M. N.; Cooks, R. G.; Shepson, P.

    2008-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols are presently little understood in terms of their sources, formation, and effect on climate forcing, despite their significant impacts on climate change and respiratory health. Secondary organic aerosols (SOA), which were thought to arise entirely from simple gas-particle partitioning, have recently been found to contain oligomeric species which result from the condensed-phase reactions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The non-methane VOC with the greatest emission flux, isoprene, is known to produce aerosols through chemistry involving its oxidation products. We selected one of its major oxidation product, methacrolein, to assess its role in oligomeric SOA formation in response to the acidic conditions found in cloud water. Since it has been found that acidified aerosol produces oligomeric species with greater molecular weight and yield, acid-catalyzed oligomerization is likely a significant process in the formation of SOA. Aqueous solutions of methacrolein were acidified with sulfuric acid, and studied using linear ion trap mass spectrometry (LIT-MS) with a home-built desorption-electrospray ionization (DESI) source. An extremely heterogeneous mixture of products was produced in this system, resulting from hydrolysis, acid- catalyzed oxidation, reduction, and organosulfate formation. Evidence for disproportionation and heterocycle formation are proposed as reaction mechanisms hitherto unrecognized in the production of SOA. The proposed structure and formation mechanism for several species, based upon their MS/MS spectra, will also be presented.

  10. NSLS annual report 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Klaffky, R.; Thomlinson, W.

    1984-01-01

    The first comprehensive Annual Report of the National Synchrotron Light Source comes at a time of great activity and forward motion for the facility. In the following pages we outline the management changes that have taken place in the past year, the progress that has been made in the commissioning of the x-ray ring and in the enhanced utilization of the uv ring, together with an extensive discussion of the interesting scientific experiments that have been carried out.

  11. Scientific Reporting: Raising the Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLeroy, Kenneth R.; Garney, Whitney; Mayo-Wilson, Evan; Grant, Sean

    2016-01-01

    This article is based on a presentation that was made at the 2014 annual meeting of the editorial board of "Health Education & Behavior." The article addresses critical issues related to standards of scientific reporting in journals, including concerns about external and internal validity and reporting bias. It reviews current…

  12. Scientific Reporting: Raising the Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLeroy, Kenneth R.; Garney, Whitney; Mayo-Wilson, Evan; Grant, Sean

    2016-01-01

    This article is based on a presentation that was made at the 2014 annual meeting of the editorial board of "Health Education & Behavior." The article addresses critical issues related to standards of scientific reporting in journals, including concerns about external and internal validity and reporting bias. It reviews current…

  13. Tuning of 2.998 GHz S-band hybrid buncher for injector upgrade of LINAC II at DESY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Y. C.; Liebig, C.; Hüning, M.; Schmitz, M.

    2014-10-01

    The injector upgrade of LINAC II at DESY aims to improve its reliability and mitigate the radiological activation of components due to electron loss at relatively high energy of hundreds of MeV. Therefore, a 2.998 GHz hybrid buncher has been developed and will be installed in between an existing 2.998 GHz pre-buncher and LINAC II. It comprises a 1-cell standing-wave (SW) section for rapid electron acceleration and a 13-cells traveling-wave (TW) section for further beam bunching and acceleration. This paper focuses on its radio-frequency tuning procedure. The tuning strategy combines a non-resonant bead-pull measurement of complex electric field and a linear model for local reflection coefficient calculation. It is demonstrated that imaginary part of the local reflection coefficient represents the field distribution straightforwardly, based on which the structure can be tuned from cell to cell. During tuning, special attention has been paid to the field enhancement in the SW section to ensure its beam-capturing capability. Field amplitude and phase, global and local reflection coefficients have been analyzed for two different frequencies simultaneously, i.e. the intrinsic frequency of the structure and the target frequency, to avoid over-tuning. The tuning result is satisfying. For the target frequency, field unflatness of the TW section has been reduced from ±9% to ±4%, and field in the SW section has been enhanced significantly. Meanwhile, in the TW section, the deviation of phase advances between adjacent cells from the nominal value 120° has been reduced from the range ±5° to ±2°. By using ASTRA simulation, it has been verified that the residual detuning of the structure is acceptable in view of the beam dynamics performance.

  14. Scientific millenarianism

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberg, A.M.

    1997-12-01

    Today, for the first time, scientific concerns are seriously being addressed that span future times--hundreds, even thousands, or more years in the future. One is witnessing what the author calls scientific millenarianism. Are such concerns for the distant future exercises in futility, or are they real issues that, to the everlasting gratitude of future generations, this generation has identified, warned about and even suggested how to cope with in the distant future? Can the four potential catastrophes--bolide impact, CO{sub 2} warming, radioactive wastes and thermonuclear war--be avoided by technical fixes, institutional responses, religion, or by doing nothing? These are the questions addressed in this paper.

  15. Scientific Satellites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1967-01-01

    1919 paper (ref. 9), in which he suggested a Moon rocket. Rock- etry was on a par with extrasensory perception in those days. 38 SCIENTIFIC SA&TLLITES...this way, images of sky can be taken at different wavelengths. The perceptive reader will note that the two zodiacal-light ex- periments described

  16. Scientific Documentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pieper, Gail W.

    1980-01-01

    Describes how scientific documentation is taught in three 50-minute sessions in a technical writing course. Tells how session one distinguishes between in-text notes, footnotes, and reference entries; session two discusses the author-year system of citing references; and session three is concerned with the author-number system of reference…

  17. Evaluation of the smear layer removal and erosive capacity of EDTA, boric acid, citric acid and desy clean solutions: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Turk, Tugba; Kaval, Mehmet Emin; Şen, Bilge Hakan

    2015-09-03

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the smear layer removal and erosive capacity of various irrigation solutions with sequential use of NaOCl on instrumented root canal walls. The root canals of single-rooted teeth were instrumented with ProTaper rotary instrument. Then, the teeth were randomly divided into five experimental groups. The root canals were irrigated with one of the following solutions (5 mL/1 min): 5% EDTA, 5% boric acid (BA), a mixture of BA and CA, 2.5% citric acid (CA) and 5% Desy Clean. After irrigating with 2.5% NaOCl and distilled water, the roots were split into two halves and each half was prepared for SEM examination. Representative photographs were taken from each third at x500 and x1000 magnifications. Double blind scoring was performed by two calibrated observers for smear layer and erosion. The scores were statistically analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis, Dunn's post hoc and Spearman's correlation tests (p = 0.05). There were statistically significant differences among the solutions by means of smear layer and erosion (p < 0.05). While 2.5% CA solution was the most effective solution in removal of smear layer, it was also the most erosive solution (p < 0.05). 5% Desy Clean removed smear layer effectively and caused less erosion. There was a negative, but statistically significant correlation between presence of smear layer and erosion (r = -0.684; p < 0.0001). Desy Clean can be a promising agent as an irrigation solution with optimal smear layer removal capacity and less erosive effects.

  18. Scientific Claims versus Scientific Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramsey, John

    1991-01-01

    Provides activities that help students to understand the importance of the scientific method. The activities include the science of fusion and cold fusion; a group activity that analyzes and interprets the events surrounding cold fusion; and an application research project concerning a current science issue. (ZWH)

  19. Scientific Claims versus Scientific Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramsey, John

    1991-01-01

    Provides activities that help students to understand the importance of the scientific method. The activities include the science of fusion and cold fusion; a group activity that analyzes and interprets the events surrounding cold fusion; and an application research project concerning a current science issue. (ZWH)

  20. Scientific Misconduct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, John W.

    2002-12-01

    These cases provide a good basis for discussions of scientific ethics, particularly with respect to the responsibilities of colleagues in collaborative projects. With increasing numbers of students working in cooperative or collaborative groups, there may be opportunities for more than just discussion—similar issues of responsibility apply to the members of such groups. Further, this is an area where, “no clear, widely accepted standards of behavior exist” (1). Thus there is an opportunity to point out to students that scientific ethics, like science itself, is incomplete and needs constant attention to issues that result from new paradigms such as collaborative research. Finally, each of us can resolve to pay more attention to the contributions we and our colleagues make to collaborative projects, applying to our own work no less critical an eye than we would cast on the work of those we don’t know at all.

  1. Linking Research to Policy, Practice, and Education: Lessons Learned, Tasks Ahead. Program Abstracts. Annual Scientific Meeting of the Gerontological Society of America (53rd, Washington, DC, November 17-21, 2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerontologist, 2000

    2000-01-01

    This publication contains abstracts from the 53rd annual meeting of the Gerontological Society of America. The abstracts are arranged numerically by the session number in which they appear. Several abstracts are listed under each of the 388 sessions. Although the sessions are not limited to one topic, the dominant theme is education concerning all…

  2. Linking Research to Policy, Practice, and Education: Lessons Learned, Tasks Ahead. Program Abstracts. Annual Scientific Meeting of the Gerontological Society of America (53rd, Washington, DC, November 17-21, 2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerontologist, 2000

    2000-01-01

    This publication contains abstracts from the 53rd annual meeting of the Gerontological Society of America. The abstracts are arranged numerically by the session number in which they appear. Several abstracts are listed under each of the 388 sessions. Although the sessions are not limited to one topic, the dominant theme is education concerning all…

  3. Scientific Eschatology

    SciTech Connect

    Noyes, H

    2005-03-18

    The future evolution of the universe suggested by the cosmological model proposed earlier at this meeting by the authors is explored. The fundamental role played by the positive ''cosmological constant'' is emphasized. Dyson's 1979 paper entitled ''Time Without End'' is briefly reviewed. His most optimistic scenario requires that the universe be geometrically open and that biology is structural in the sense that the current complexity of human society can be reproduced by scaling up its (quantum mechanical) structure to arbitrary size. If the recently measured ''cosmological constant'' is indeed a fundamental constant of nature, then Dyson's scenario is, for various reasons, ruled out by the finite (De Sitter) horizon due to exponential expansion of the resulting space. However, the finite temperature of that horizon does open other interesting options. If, as is suggested by the cosmology under consideration, the current exponential expansion of the universe is due to a phase transition which fixes a physical boundary condition during the early radiation dominated era, the behavior of the universe after the relevant scale factor crosses the De Sitter radius opens up still other possibilities. The relevance of Martin Rees' apocalyptic eschatology recently presented in his book ''Our Final Hour'' is mentioned. It is concluded that even for the far future, whether or not cultural and scientific descendants of the current epoch will play a role in it, an understanding (sadly, currently lacking) of community and political evolution and control is essential for a preliminary treatment of what could be even vaguely called scientific eschatology.

  4. CMS Annual Report 2004

    SciTech Connect

    de la Rubia, T D; Shang, S P; Rennie, G; Fluss, M; Westbrook, C

    2005-07-29

    Glance at the articles in this report, and you will sense the transformation that is reshaping the landscape of materials science and chemistry. This transformation is bridging the gaps among chemistry, materials science, and biology--ushering in a wealth of innovative technologies with broad scientific impact. The emergence of this intersection is reinvigorating our strategic investment into areas that build on our strength of interdisciplinary science. It is at the intersection that we position our strategic vision into a future where we will provide radical materials innovations and solutions to our national-security programs and other sponsors. Our 2004 Annual Report describes how our successes and breakthroughs follow a path set forward by our strategic plan and four organizing research themes, each with key scientific accomplishments by our staff and collaborators. We have organized this report into two major sections: research themes and our dynamic teams. The research-theme sections focus on achievements arising from earlier investments while addressing future challenges. The dynamic teams section illustrates the directorate's organizational structure of divisions, centers, and institutes that support a team environment across disciplinary and institutional boundaries. The research presented in this annual report gives substantive examples of how we are proceeding in each of these four theme areas and how they are aligned with our national-security mission. By maintaining an organizational structure that offers an environment of collaborative problem-solving opportunities, we are able to nurture the discoveries and breakthroughs required for future successes.

  5. Summer Events at the Scientific Library | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Two exciting events are coming this summer from the Scientific Library—the annual Student Science Jeopardy Tournament and the Summer Video Series. This year, the 10th Annual Student Science Jeopardy Tournament will be held on Wednesday, July 20, beginning at 10 a.m. in the auditorium of Building 549. The event will also be streamed live to the Advanced Technology Research Facility (ATRF), room E1203.

  6. Summer Events at the Scientific Library | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Two exciting events are coming this summer from the Scientific Library—the annual Student Science Jeopardy Tournament and the Summer Video Series. This year, the 10th Annual Student Science Jeopardy Tournament will be held on Wednesday, July 20, beginning at 10 a.m. in the auditorium of Building 549. The event will also be streamed live to the Advanced Technology Research Facility (ATRF), room E1203.

  7. Use of intermediate focus for grazing incidence small and wide angle x-ray scattering experiments at the beamline P03 of PETRA III, DESY

    SciTech Connect

    Santoro, G.; Buffet, A.; Döhrmann, R.; Yu, S.; Roth, S. V.; Körstgens, V.; Müller-Buschbaum, P.; Gedde, U.; Hedenqvist, M.

    2014-04-15

    We describe the new experimental possibilities of the micro- and nanofocus X-ray scattering beamline P03 of the synchrotron source PETRA III at DESY, Hamburg (Germany), which arise from experiments with smaller beam sizes in the micrometer range. This beamline has been upgraded recently to perform new kinds of experiments. The use of an intermediate focus allows for reducing the beam size of microfocused hard X-rays while preserving a large working distance between the focusing elements and the focus position. For the first time, this well-known methodology has been employed to grazing incidence small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS/GIWAXS). As examples, we highlight the applications to in situ studies using microfluidic devices in GISAXS geometry as well as the investigation of the crystallinity of thin films in GIWAXS geometry.

  8. The chickpea genomic web resource: visualization and analysis of the desi-type Cicer arietinum nuclear genome for comparative exploration of legumes.

    PubMed

    Misra, Gopal; Priya, Piyush; Bandhiwal, Nitesh; Bareja, Neha; Jain, Mukesh; Bhatia, Sabhyata; Chattopadhyay, Debasis; Tyagi, Akhilesh K; Yadav, Gitanjali

    2014-12-18

    Availability of the draft nuclear genome sequences of small-seeded desi-type legume crop Cicer arietinum has provided an opportunity for investigating unique chickpea genomic features and evaluation of their biological significance. The increasing number of legume genome sequences also presents a challenge for developing reliable and information-driven bioinformatics applications suitable for comparative exploration of this important class of crop plants. The Chickpea Genomic Web Resource (CGWR) is an implementation of a suite of web-based applications dedicated to chickpea genome visualization and comparative analysis, based on next generation sequencing and assembly of Cicer arietinum desi-type genotype ICC4958. CGWR has been designed and configured for mapping, scanning and browsing the significant chickpea genomic features in view of the important existing and potential roles played by the various legume genome projects in mutant mapping and cloning. It also enables comparative informatics of ICC4958 DNA sequence analysis with other wild and cultivated genotypes of chickpea, various other leguminous species as well as several non-leguminous model plants, to enable investigations into evolutionary processes that shape legume genomes. CGWR is an online database offering a comprehensive visual and functional genomic analysis of the chickpea genome, along with customized maps and gene-clustering options. It is also the only plant based web resource supporting display and analysis of nucleosome positioning patterns in the genome. The usefulness of CGWR has been demonstrated with discoveries of biological significance made using this server. The CGWR is compatible with all available operating systems and browsers, and is available freely under the open source license at http://www.nipgr.res.in/CGWR/home.php.

  9. Probing Molecular Associations of Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) Samples from CalNex 2010 with Nano-DESI High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, R. E.; Nguyen, T. B.; Laskin, A.; Laskin, J.; Hayes, P. L.; Liu, S.; Jimenez, J. L.; Russell, L. M.; Nizkorodov, S.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2012-12-01

    This project focuses on analyzing the identities of molecules that comprise oligomers in size resolved aerosol fractions. Since oligomers are generally too large and polar to be measured by typical GC/MS analysis, soft ionization with high resolution mass spectrometry is used to extend the range of observable compounds. Samples collected during CalNex 2010 in Bakersfield and Los Angeles and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) produced in a photochemical chamber by photooxidation of diesel (DSL) fuel and isoprene (ISO) under humid, high-NOx conditions have been analyzed with nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI) and a high-resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometer. The nano-DESI is a soft ionization technique that allows molecular ions to be observed and the Orbitrap has sufficient resolution to determine the elemental composition of almost all species above the detection limit. A large fraction of SOA is made up of high molecular weight oligomers which are thought to form through acid catalyzed reactions of photo-chemically processed volatile organic compounds (VOC). The formation of oligomers is influenced by the VOCs available, the amount of atmospheric sulfate and nitrate, and the magnitude of photo-chemical processing, among other potential influences. We present the elemental composition of chemical species in size resolved SOA samples with six-hour time resolution, providing the first time resolved data set for the study of these oligomers in atmospheric samples. We present a comparison of the degree of overlap between the ambient and chamber experiments as a novel method to examine sources for this fraction of SOA. Possible formation pathways and sources of observed compounds are analyzed by comparison to other concurrent measurements at the site.

  10. Summer Events at the Scientific Library | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    If it’s summer, then it’s time for Jeopardy and videos at the National Cancer Institute at Frederick! Traditionally, the Scientific Library has hosted a Science Jeopardy Tournament in July and offered a Summer Video Series in June, July, and August. This year will be no different, as the Scientific Library will host the 11th Annual Student Science Jeopardy Tournament and a six-week series of film screenings.

  11. AAPCC Annual Reports

    MedlinePlus

    ... Annual Report 2000 Annual Report 1999 Annual Report Poison Data National Poison Data System Uses for NPDS ... Elements NPDS FAQs Annual Reports Find Your Local Poison Center Poison centers offer free, private, confidential medical ...

  12. Tick-borne encephalitis as a notifiable disease--Status quo and the way forward. Report of the 17th annual meeting of the International Scientific Working Group on Tick-Borne Encephalitis (ISW-TBE).

    PubMed

    Kunze, Ursula

    2015-07-01

    The 17th meeting of the International Scientific Working Group on Tick-Borne Encephalitis (ISW-TBE), a group of neurologists, general practicioners, clinicians, travel physicians, virologists, pediatricians, and epidemiologists, was held under the title "Tick-borne encephalitis as a notifiable disease--status quo and the way forward". The conference agenda was divided into three parts on the first day: "Epidemiology & Risk areas", "Poster Walk: Epidemiological Update in Europe", and "News in TBE Research". On the second day, a World Café Working Session took place where the participants could choose three tables out of six to join for discussion. Key topics on current epidemiological developments and investigations, risk areas, cases, travel and mobility, TBE in children, vaccination rates, and latest news on vaccination were presented and extensively discussed.

  13. Tick-borne encephalitis--a notifiable disease: report of the 15th Annual Meeting of the International Scientific Working Group on Tick-Borne Encephalitis (ISW-TBE).

    PubMed

    Kunze, Ursula

    2013-09-01

    The 15th Meeting of the International Scientific Working Group on Tick-Borne Encephalitis (ISW-TBE)--a group of neurologists, general practicioners, clinicians, travel physicans, virologists, pediatricians, and epidemiologists--was held under the title "Tick-Borne Encephalitis--a notifiable disease". With the inclusion of TBE in the list of notifiable diseases, an important measure was established to continue improving the level of evidence on TBE in Europe to better help guide policies and methods to lower the burden of this disease. Due to differences in diagnosis, case definition, and reporting in European countries, the overall epidemiology and burden of TBE remains unclear. During the meeting, important issues regarding epidemiology, risk areas, vaccination rates, and latest news on vaccination were presented and extensively discussed. A poster session provided an overview of the epidemiological situation 2012 in 13 European countries.

  14. Tick-borne encephalitis - a notifiable disease, a review after one year: report of the 16th Annual Meeting of the International Scientific Working Group on Tick-Borne Encephalitis (ISW-TBE).

    PubMed

    Kunze, Ursula

    2014-09-01

    The 16th Meeting of the International Scientific Working Group on Tick-Borne Encephalitis (ISW-TBE) - a group of neurologists, general practitioners, clinicians, travel physicians, virologists, paediatricians, and epidemiologists - was held under the title "Tick-borne Encephalitis - a Notifiable Disease, a Review after One Year". With the inclusion of TBE in the list of notifiable diseases in 2012, an important measure was established to continue improving the level of evidence on TBE in Europe to better help guide policies and methods to lower the burden of this disease. The conference agenda was divided into six parts concerning Travel Medicine, Epidemiology & Risk Areas, Poster Session with an Epidemiological Update in Europe, Interactive Debate, Cases, and Social Communication and Recommendations. Important topics regarding current epidemiological investigations, risk areas, mobility, cases, TBE in children, treatment options, vaccination rates, and latest news on vaccination were presented and extensively discussed.

  15. Tick-borne encephalitis-still on the map: Report of the 18th annual meeting of the international scientific working group on tick-borne encephalitis (ISW-TBE).

    PubMed

    Kunze, Ursula

    2016-07-01

    The 18th meeting of the International Scientific Working Group on Tick-Borne Encephalitis (ISW-TBE)-a group of neurologists, general practitioners, clinicians, travel physicians, virologists, pediatricians and epidemiologists-was held under the title 'Tick-borne encephalitis-still on the map'. The conference agenda was divided into six sessions: 'National Implementation of EU notifiable disease status', 'Virology', 'Epidemiology and Risk areas & Poster Walk Epidemiological Update', 'Clinic', 'Environmental Factors' and 'New Findings and Diagnosis'. Key topics such as 'TBE as a notifiable disease-results of the third European survey', 'TBE vaccines over the years', 'Overview of flaviviruses', 'TBE virus phylogenetics', 'Current epidemiological developments and investigations', 'Clinical aspects', 'TBE in veterinary medicine', 'Laboratory diagnostic', 'Occupational risk', 'Allergy, obesity, and vaccination' were presented and extensively discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. 16 CFR 305.5 - Determinations of estimated annual energy consumption, estimated annual operating cost, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... scientific tests and procedures substantiating the representation. (c) For representations of the light... reasonable basis scientific tests conducted according to IES LM79. (d) Determinations of estimated annual...); the Test Method (Revised Aug-2010); and the CEA Procedure for DAM Testing: For TVs, Revision 0.3 (Sept...

  17. PREDON Scientific Data Preservation 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaconu, C.; Kraml, S.; Surace, C.; Chateigner, D.; Libourel, T.; Laurent, A.; Lin, Y.; Schaming, M.; Benbernou, S.; Lebbah, M.; Boucon, D.; Cérin, C.; Azzag, H.; Mouron, P.; Nief, J.-Y.; Coutin, S.; Beckmann, V.

    Scientific data collected with modern sensors or dedicated detectors exceed very often the perimeter of the initial scientific design. These data are obtained more and more frequently with large material and human efforts. A large class of scientific experiments are in fact unique because of their large scale, with very small chances to be repeated and to superseded by new experiments in the same domain: for instance high energy physics and astrophysics experiments involve multi-annual developments and a simple duplication of efforts in order to reproduce old data is simply not affordable. Other scientific experiments are in fact unique by nature: earth science, medical sciences etc. since the collected data is "time-stamped" and thereby non-reproducible by new experiments or observations. In addition, scientific data collection increased dramatically in the recent years, participating to the so-called "data deluge" and inviting for common reflection in the context of "big data" investigations. The new knowledge obtained using these data should be preserved long term such that the access and the re-use are made possible and lead to an enhancement of the initial investment. Data observatories, based on open access policies and coupled with multi-disciplinary techniques for indexing and mining may lead to truly new paradigms in science. It is therefore of outmost importance to pursue a coherent and vigorous approach to preserve the scientific data at long term. The preservation remains nevertheless a challenge due to the complexity of the data structure, the fragility of the custom-made software environments as well as the lack of rigorous approaches in workflows and algorithms. To address this challenge, the PREDON project has been initiated in France in 2012 within the MASTODONS program: a Big Data scientific challenge, initiated and supported by the Interdisciplinary Mission of the National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS). PREDON is a study group formed by

  18. Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE): an underestimated risk…still: report of the 14th annual meeting of the International Scientific Working Group on Tick-Borne Encephalitis (ISW-TBE).

    PubMed

    Kunze, Ursula

    2012-06-01

    Today, the risk of getting tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) is still underestimated in many parts of Europe and worldwide. Therefore, the 14th meeting of the International Scientific Working Group on Tick-Borne Encephalitis (ISW-TBE) - a group of neurologists, general practitioners, clinicians, travel physicians, virologists, pediatricians, and epidemiologists - was held under the title "Tick-borne encephalitis: an underestimated risk…still". Among the discussed issues were: TBE, an underestimated risk in children, a case report in two Dutch travelers, the very emotional report of a tick victim, an overview of the epidemiological situation, investigations to detect new TBE cases in Italy, TBE virus (TBEV) strains circulation in Northern Europe, TBE Program of the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC), efforts to increase the TBE vaccination rate in the Czech Republic, positioning statement of the World Health Organization (WHO), and TBE in dogs. To answer the question raised above: Yes, the risk of getting TBE is underestimated in children and adults, because awareness is still too low. It is still underestimated in several areas of Europe, where, for a lack of human cases, TBEV is thought to be absent. It is underestimated in travelers, because they still do not know enough about the risk, and diagnostic awareness in non-endemic countries is still low. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. The diagnostic utility of 3D-ESI rotating and moving dipole methodology in the pre-surgical evaluation of MRI-negative childhood epilepsy due to focal cortical dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Russo, Angelo; Lallas, Matt; Jayakar, Prasanna; Miller, Ian; Hyslop, Ann; Dunoyer, Catalina; Resnick, Trevor; Duchowny, Michael

    2016-09-01

    This study investigates whether a combined rotating dipole (RD) and moving dipole (MD) solution enhances three-dimensional electroencephalography (EEG) source imaging (3D-ESI) localization in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-negative pediatric patients with focal cortical dysplasia (FCD). We retrospectively selected 14 MRI-negative patients with FCD from a cohort of 60 pediatric patients previously used to evaluate the diagnostic utility of 3D-ESI in epilepsy surgery. Patients were younger than 18 years at time of surgery and had at least 1 year of outcome data. RD and MD models were constructed for each interictal spike or sharp wave, and it was determined whether each inverse algorithm localized within the surgical resection cavity (SRC). We also compared the 3D-ESI findings and surgical outcome with positron emission tomography (PET) and ictal single photon emission computed tomography (iSPECT). RD analyses revealed a high concordance with the SRC (78.6%), particularly for temporal lobe resection (100.0%), and showed superior localization compared to PET and iSPECT, with the highest correlation in FCD type I and temporal lobe resection. Furthermore, the RD method was superior to iSPECT in FCD type II cases and to PET in extratemporal resections. RD and MD results were comparable, but in 18.2% of patients with FCD type I with localizing RDs, the MD solution was only partially within the SRC; in all of these patients 3D-ESI also correlated with superior surgical outcome compared to PET and iSPECT, especially when RD and MD solutions were analyzed together. 3D-ESI in MRI-negative cases showed superior localization compared to iSPECT or PET, especially in FCD type I and temporal lobe epilepsy, and correlated with superior surgical outcome compared to iSPECT and PET at 1 year and 2 years postoperatively, especially when RD and MD solutions were analyzed together. These findings suggest that 3D-ESI based on a combined RD-MD solution improves surgical accuracy in

  20. Scientific Teaching Targeting Faculty from Diverse Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregg, Christopher S.; Ales, Jo Dale; Pomarico, Steven M.; Wischusen, E. William; Siebenaller, Joseph F.

    2013-01-01

    We offered four annual professional development workshops called STAR (for Scientific Teaching, Assessment, and Resources) modeled after the National Academies Summer Institute (SI) on Undergraduate Education in Biology. In contrast to the SI focus on training faculty from research universities, STAR's target was faculty from community colleges,…

  1. Scientific Teaching Targeting Faculty from Diverse Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregg, Christopher S.; Ales, Jo Dale; Pomarico, Steven M.; Wischusen, E. William; Siebenaller, Joseph F.

    2013-01-01

    We offered four annual professional development workshops called STAR (for Scientific Teaching, Assessment, and Resources) modeled after the National Academies Summer Institute (SI) on Undergraduate Education in Biology. In contrast to the SI focus on training faculty from research universities, STAR's target was faculty from community colleges,…

  2. Scientific Reporting: Raising the Standards.

    PubMed

    McLeroy, Kenneth R; Garney, Whitney; Mayo-Wilson, Evan; Grant, Sean

    2016-10-01

    This article is based on a presentation that was made at the 2014 annual meeting of the editorial board of Health Education & Behavior. The article addresses critical issues related to standards of scientific reporting in journals, including concerns about external and internal validity and reporting bias. It reviews current reporting guidelines, effects of adopting guidelines, and offers suggestions for improving reporting. The evidence about the effects of guideline adoption and implementation is briefly reviewed. Recommendations for adoption and implementation of appropriate guidelines, including considerations for journals, are provided.

  3. Scientific approaches to science policy.

    PubMed

    Berg, Jeremy M

    2013-11-01

    The development of robust science policy depends on use of the best available data, rigorous analysis, and inclusion of a wide range of input. While director of the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS), I took advantage of available data and emerging tools to analyze training time distribution by new NIGMS grantees, the distribution of the number of publications as a function of total annual National Institutes of Health support per investigator, and the predictive value of peer-review scores on subsequent scientific productivity. Rigorous data analysis should be used to develop new reforms and initiatives that will help build a more sustainable American biomedical research enterprise.

  4. NASA Scientific Balloon in Antarctica

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    NASA image captured December 25, 2011 A NASA scientific balloon awaits launch in McMurdo, Antarctica. The balloon, carrying Indiana University's Cosmic Ray Electron Synchrotron Telescope (CREST), was launched on December 25. After a circum-navigational flight around the South Pole, the payload landed on January 5. The CREST payload is one of two scheduled as part of this seasons' annual NASA Antarctic balloon Campaign which is conducted in cooperation with the National Science Foundation's Office of Polar Programs. The campaign's second payload is the University of Arizona's Stratospheric Terahertz Observatory (STO). You can follow the flights at the Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility's web site at www.csbf.nasa.gov/antarctica/ice.htm Credit: NASA NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  5. Effect of dehusking and cooking on protein and dietary fibre of different genotypes of desi, kabuli and green type chickpeas (Cicer arietinum).

    PubMed

    Vasishtha, Hina; Srivastava, Rajendra P; Verma, Prasoon

    2014-12-01

    Dehusking and cooking are essential and important component of processing of chickpea to enhance the digestibility of essential nutrients of grains. Protein and dietary fibres are important due to their role in lowering plasma cholesterol and other health advantages. Changes during dehusking and dehusking followed by cooking on soluble protein, cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin and pectin contents of four genotypes of desi type (BG 256, JG 74, KWR 108 and DCP 92-3), four genotypes of kabuli type (BG 1053, KAK 2, JKG 1 and L 550) and two genotypes of green type (Sadabahar and BDG 112) of chickpeas (Cicer arietinum) were studied. The cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin of grain decreased to an extent of 21.6 %, 29.6 % and 27.3 % respectively on dehusking, whereas pectin recorded an increase of 26.2 % on dehusking. The cooking of dehusked grain registered a marginal increase in cellulose, lignin and pectin, but a decrease in hemicellulose content. The soluble protein recorded an increase of 21.3 % on dehusking and 26.6 % increase on cooking, as compared to unprocessed grain.

  6. High throughput screening of high-affinity ligands for proteins with anion-binding sites using desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xin; Ning, Baoming; He, Dacheng; Huang, Lingyun; Yue, Xiangjun; Zhang, Qiming; Huang, Haiwei; Liu, Yang; He, Lan; Ouyang, Jin

    2014-03-01

    A high throughput screening system involving a linear ion trap (LTQ) analyzer, a house-made platform and a desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) source was established to screen ligands with a high affinity for proteins with anion-binding sites. The complexes were analyzed after incubation, ultrafiltration, washing, and displacement. A new anionic region inhibited dissociation (ARID) mechanism that was suitable for a protein with anion-binding site was proposed. We utilized the differences in detectable dissociation of protein-ligand complexes, combined with displacement experiments, to distinguish free ligands displaced from anion-binding sites from liberated ligands dissociated from nonspecific interactions. The method was validated by α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) and (R), (S)-amlodipine. Site-specific enantioselectivity shown in our experiments was consistent with earlier studies. Obtaining all of the qualitative information of 15*3 samples in 2.3 min indicates that the analysis process is no longer the time-limiting step in the initial stage of drug discovery. Quantitative information verified that our method was at least a semiquantitative method.

  7. High Throughput Screening of High-Affinity Ligands for Proteins with Anion-Binding Sites using Desorption Electrospray Ionization (DESI) Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xin; Ning, Baoming; He, Dacheng; Huang, Lingyun; Yue, Xiangjun; Zhang, Qiming; Huang, Haiwei; Liu, Yang; He, Lan; Ouyang, Jin

    2014-03-01

    A high throughput screening system involving a linear ion trap (LTQ) analyzer, a house-made platform and a desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) source was established to screen ligands with a high affinity for proteins with anion-binding sites. The complexes were analyzed after incubation, ultrafiltration, washing, and displacement. A new anionic region inhibited dissociation (ARID) mechanism that was suitable for a protein with anion-binding site was proposed. We utilized the differences in detectable dissociation of protein-ligand complexes, combined with displacement experiments, to distinguish free ligands displaced from anion-binding sites from liberated ligands dissociated from nonspecific interactions. The method was validated by α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) and (R), (S)-amlodipine. Site-specific enantioselectivity shown in our experiments was consistent with earlier studies. Obtaining all of the qualitative information of 15*3 samples in 2.3 min indicates that the analysis process is no longer the time-limiting step in the initial stage of drug discovery. Quantitative information verified that our method was at least a semiquantitative method.

  8. Probing Molecular Associations of Field-Collected and Laboratory-Generated SOA with Nano-DESI High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, Rachel E.; Nguyen, Tran B.; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Hayes, Patrick L.; Liu, Shang; Jimenez, Jose L.; Russell, Lynn M.; Nizkorodov, Sergey; Goldstein, Allen H.

    2013-01-30

    Aerosol samples from the 2010 CalNex field study in Bakersfield (BF) and Los Angeles (LA) were analyzed using positive mode nanospray-desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (nano-DESI-MS). Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) produced in a photochemical chamber by photooxidation of diesel (DSL) fuel and isoprene (ISO) under humid, high-NOx conditions, was analyzed for comparison. Three groups of organic compounds with zero, one, or two nitrogen atoms in their molecular formulas (0N, 1N, 2N) were compared in detail. The composition of ambient SOA exhibited greater overlap with DSL than with ISO. The overlap of the chamber experiments with the BF data was relatively consistent throughout the day while the overlap with LA data increased significantly in the noon-6pm sample, consistent with the SOA plume arriving from downtown Los Angeles. BF samples were more oxidized, contained more organic nitrogen, and had more overlap with the chamber data compared to LA samples. The addition of gaseous ammonia (NH3) to the DSL experiment was necessary to generate many of the 2N compounds observed in BF. This analysis demonstrates that DSL and ISO were important sources but cannot account for all of the observed ambient compounds indicating that other sources of organics were also likely important.

  9. Spatially resolved investigation of systemic and contact pesticides in plant material by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry imaging (DESI-MSI).

    PubMed

    Gerbig, Stefanie; Brunn, Hubertus E; Spengler, Bernhard; Schulz, Sabine

    2015-09-01

    Distribution of pesticides both on the surface of leaves and in cross sections of plant stem and leaves was investigated using desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry imaging (DESI-MSI) with a spatial resolution of 50-100 μm. Two commercially available insecticide sprays containing different contact pesticides were applied onto leaves of Cotoneaster horizontalis, and the distributions of all active ingredients were directly analyzed. The first spray contained pyrethrins and rapeseed oil, both known as natural insecticides. Each component showed an inhomogeneous spreading throughout the leaf, based on substance polarity and solubility. The second spray contained the synthetic insecticides imidacloprid and methiocarb. Imidacloprid accumulated on the border of the leaf, while methiocarb was distributed more homogenously. In order to investigate the incorporation of a systemically acting pesticide into Kalanchoe blossfeldiana, a commercially available insecticide tablet containing dimethoate was spiked to the soil of the plant. Cross sections of the stem and leaf were obtained 25 and 60 days after application. Dimethoate was mainly detected in the transport system of the plant after 25 days, while it was found to be homogenously distributed in a leaf section after 60 days.

  10. Plate tectonics: Scientific revolution or scientific program?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mareschal, Jean-Claude

    In The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, Thomas S. Kuhn suggested that science progresses discontinuously: As a scientific theory becomes obsolete, a period of crisis results, at the end of which the old theory is overthrown and replaced by a new, sounder, more complete theory [Kuhn, 1962]. After the scientific community has accepted the new [paradigm,] it undertakes only routine research until a new crisis occurs, usually as a result of an anomalous experiment that accidentally happens to be critical.

  11. Scientific Attitudes: A Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gauld, C. F.; Hukins, A. A.

    1980-01-01

    The author reviews the following areas: the nature of scientific attitudes, the development of scientific attitudes as an educational objective, instruments for measuring scientific attitudes, and research concerning relationships between scientific attitudes and other variables; and makes recommendations for changes in research into scientific…

  12. SALTON SEA SCIENTIFIC DRILLING PROJECT: SCIENTIFIC PROGRAM.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sass, J.H.; Elders, W.A.

    1986-01-01

    The Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project, was spudded on 24 October 1985, and reached a total depth of 10,564 ft. (3. 2 km) on 17 March 1986. There followed a period of logging, a flow test, and downhole scientific measurements. The scientific goals were integrated smoothly with the engineering and economic objectives of the program and the ideal of 'science driving the drill' in continental scientific drilling projects was achieved in large measure. The principal scientific goals of the project were to study the physical and chemical processes involved in an active, magmatically driven hydrothermal system. To facilitate these studies, high priority was attached to four areas of sample and data collection, namely: (1) core and cuttings, (2) formation fluids, (3) geophysical logging, and (4) downhole physical measurements, particularly temperatures and pressures.

  13. 5 CFR 534.504 - Annual adjustment in pay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Annual adjustment in pay. 534.504 Section 534.504 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PAY UNDER OTHER SYSTEMS Pay for Senior-Level and Scientific and Professional Positions § 534.504 Annual adjustment...

  14. Scientific integrity in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Lins, Liliane; Carvalho, Fernando Martins

    2014-09-01

    This article focuses on scientific integrity and the identification of predisposing factors to scientific misconduct in Brazil. Brazilian scientific production has increased in the last ten years, but the quality of the articles has decreased. Pressure on researchers and students for increasing scientific production may contribute to scientific misconduct. Cases of misconduct in science have been recently denounced in the country. Brazil has important institutions for controlling ethical and safety aspects of human research, but there is a lack of specific offices to investigate suspected cases of misconduct and policies to deal with scientific dishonesty.

  15. Versatile sample environments and automation for biological solution X-ray scattering experiments at the P12 beamline (PETRA III, DESY).

    PubMed

    Blanchet, Clement E; Spilotros, Alessandro; Schwemmer, Frank; Graewert, Melissa A; Kikhney, Alexey; Jeffries, Cy M; Franke, Daniel; Mark, Daniel; Zengerle, Roland; Cipriani, Florent; Fiedler, Stefan; Roessle, Manfred; Svergun, Dmitri I

    2015-04-01

    A high-brilliance synchrotron P12 beamline of the EMBL located at the PETRA III storage ring (DESY, Hamburg) is dedicated to biological small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and has been designed and optimized for scattering experiments on macromolecular solutions. Scatterless slits reduce the parasitic scattering, a custom-designed miniature active beamstop ensures accurate data normalization and the photon-counting PILATUS 2M detector enables the background-free detection of weak scattering signals. The high flux and small beam size allow for rapid experiments with exposure time down to 30-50 ms covering the resolution range from about 300 to 0.5 nm. P12 possesses a versatile and flexible sample environment system that caters for the diverse experimental needs required to study macromolecular solutions. These include an in-vacuum capillary mode for standard batch sample analyses with robotic sample delivery and for continuous-flow in-line sample purification and characterization, as well as an in-air capillary time-resolved stopped-flow setup. A novel microfluidic centrifugal mixing device (SAXS disc) is developed for a high-throughput screening mode using sub-microlitre sample volumes. Automation is a key feature of P12; it is controlled by a beamline meta server, which coordinates and schedules experiments from either standard or nonstandard operational setups. The integrated SASFLOW pipeline automatically checks for consistency, and processes and analyses the data, providing near real-time assessments of overall parameters and the generation of low-resolution models within minutes of data collection. These advances, combined with a remote access option, allow for rapid high-throughput analysis, as well as time-resolved and screening experiments for novice and expert biological SAXS users.

  16. Versatile sample environments and automation for biological solution X-ray scattering experiments at the P12 beamline (PETRA III, DESY)

    PubMed Central

    Blanchet, Clement E.; Spilotros, Alessandro; Schwemmer, Frank; Graewert, Melissa A.; Kikhney, Alexey; Jeffries, Cy M.; Franke, Daniel; Mark, Daniel; Zengerle, Roland; Cipriani, Florent; Fiedler, Stefan; Roessle, Manfred; Svergun, Dmitri I.

    2015-01-01

    A high-brilliance synchrotron P12 beamline of the EMBL located at the PETRA III storage ring (DESY, Hamburg) is dedicated to biological small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and has been designed and optimized for scattering experiments on macromolecular solutions. Scatterless slits reduce the parasitic scattering, a custom-designed miniature active beamstop ensures accurate data normalization and the photon-counting PILATUS 2M detector enables the background-free detection of weak scattering signals. The high flux and small beam size allow for rapid experiments with exposure time down to 30–50 ms covering the resolution range from about 300 to 0.5 nm. P12 possesses a versatile and flexible sample environment system that caters for the diverse experimental needs required to study macromolecular solutions. These include an in-vacuum capillary mode for standard batch sample analyses with robotic sample delivery and for continuous-flow in-line sample purification and characterization, as well as an in-air capillary time-resolved stopped-flow setup. A novel microfluidic centrifugal mixing device (SAXS disc) is developed for a high-throughput screening mode using sub-microlitre sample volumes. Automation is a key feature of P12; it is controlled by a beamline meta server, which coordinates and schedules experiments from either standard or nonstandard operational setups. The integrated SASFLOW pipeline automatically checks for consistency, and processes and analyses the data, providing near real-time assessments of overall parameters and the generation of low-resolution models within minutes of data collection. These advances, combined with a remote access option, allow for rapid high-throughput analysis, as well as time-resolved and screening experiments for novice and expert biological SAXS users. PMID:25844078

  17. Annual Report to Congress Scientific Advisory Board FY94

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-02-01

    of environmental research, including research concerning global environmental change . (4) To identify technologies developed by the private sector...petroleum-based sources, overall energy consumption, energy costs and greenhouse effects. Global Environmental Change This Thrust Area focused on...USGCRP). Global Environmental Change included improving access to existing DoD and DOE data bases and facilities; developing, demonstrating, and applying

  18. ATR National Scientific User Facility 2009 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Todd R. Allen; Mitchell K. Meyer; Frances Marshall; Mary Catherine Thelen; Jeff Benson

    2010-11-01

    This report describes activities of the ATR NSUF from FY-2008 through FY-2009 and includes information on partner facilities, calls for proposals, users week and education programs. The report also contains project information on university research projects that were awarded by ATR NSUF in the fiscal years 2008 & 2009. This research is university-proposed researcher under a user facility agreement. All intellectual property from these experiments belongs to the university per the user agreement.

  19. Annual Scientific Report, Grant AFOSR-81-0205.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-01

    145 1S. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTATION 17. COSATi CODES It SUBJECT TERMS (Conhinue on ,wuere if neceeary and identify by blocl num er) FIELD I GROUP I SUB. GR...Drinking Philosophers Problem, by Chandy and Misra). They have recently developed a general theory for studying computability issues in asynchronous...programming systems is tractable: a precise theory for distributed, message passing computations may be developed; important paradigms can be abstracted

  20. The Bioelectromagnetics Society Annual Scientific Session (5th) Abstracts,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    Postow Editor-in-Chief Carl Durney Past President DIRECTORS Frank S . Barnes Engineering/Physical Sciences Richard A. TeO Engineering/Physical...Ellen O’Connor Biological/Medical Sciences Ralph J. Smiabwicz Biological/Medical Sciences F. Kristian Storm Biological/Medical Sciences Tom S ...the range 15-30*C to establish the temperature dependence for our system. The crossed-beam spectrophotometer system previously developed In this

  1. The BGC Feedbacks Scientific Focus Area 2016 Annual Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, Forrest M.; Riley, William J.; Randerson, James T.

    2016-06-01

    The BGC Feedbacks Project will identify and quantify the feedbacks between biogeochemical cycles and the climate system, and quantify and reduce the uncertainties in Earth System Models (ESMs) associated with those feedbacks. The BGC Feedbacks Project will contribute to the integration of the experimental and modeling science communities, providing researchers with new tools to compare measurements and models, thereby enabling DOE to contribute more effectively to future climate assessments by the U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).

  2. FIFRA Scientific Advisory Panel

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Experts on the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act Scientific Advisory Panel provide independent scientific advice to the EPA on a wide range of health and safety issues related to pesticides.

  3. Museology and Scientific Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunier, Diane

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the period of transition and self examination of the museology of science. Defines the main issues and limits of the museum as a means of transmitting a scientific culture and scientific ways. (Author/RT)

  4. Extensional scientific realism vs. intensional scientific realism.

    PubMed

    Park, Seungbae

    2016-10-01

    Extensional scientific realism is the view that each believable scientific theory is supported by the unique first-order evidence for it and that if we want to believe that it is true, we should rely on its unique first-order evidence. In contrast, intensional scientific realism is the view that all believable scientific theories have a common feature and that we should rely on it to determine whether a theory is believable or not. Fitzpatrick argues that extensional realism is immune, while intensional realism is not, to the pessimistic induction. I reply that if extensional realism overcomes the pessimistic induction at all, that is because it implicitly relies on the theoretical resource of intensional realism. I also argue that extensional realism, by nature, cannot embed a criterion for distinguishing between believable and unbelievable theories.

  5. WWW: The Scientific Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blystone, Robert V.; Blodgett, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    The scientific method is the principal methodology by which biological knowledge is gained and disseminated. As fundamental as the scientific method may be, its historical development is poorly understood, its definition is variable, and its deployment is uneven. Scientific progress may occur without the strictures imposed by the formal…

  6. Redefining the "Scientific Method".

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spiece, Kelly R.; Colosi, Joseph

    2000-01-01

    Surveys 15 introductory biology textbooks for their presentation of the scientific method. Teaching the scientific method involves more than simplified steps and subjectivity--human politics, cultural influences, and chance are all a part of science. Presents an activity for students to experience the scientific method. (Contains 34 references.)…

  7. WWW: The Scientific Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blystone, Robert V.; Blodgett, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    The scientific method is the principal methodology by which biological knowledge is gained and disseminated. As fundamental as the scientific method may be, its historical development is poorly understood, its definition is variable, and its deployment is uneven. Scientific progress may occur without the strictures imposed by the formal…

  8. 2014 HPC Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, Barbara

    2014-10-01

    Our commitment is to support you through delivery of an IT environment that provides mission value by transforming the way you use, protect, and access information. We approach this through technical innovation, risk management, and relationships with our workforce, Laboratories leadership, and policy makers nationwide. This second edition of our HPC Annual Report continues our commitment to communicate the details and impact of Sandia’s large-scale computing resources that support the programs associated with our diverse mission areas. A key tenet to our approach is to work with our mission partners to understand and anticipate their requirements and formulate an investment strategy that is aligned with those Laboratories priorities. In doing this, our investments include not only expanding the resources available for scientific computing and modeling and simulation, but also acquiring large-scale systems for data analytics, cloud computing, and Emulytics. We are also investigating new computer architectures in our advanced systems test bed to guide future platform designs and prepare for changes in our code development models. Our initial investments in large-scale institutional platforms that are optimized for Informatics and Emulytics work are serving a diverse customer base. We anticipate continued growth and expansion of these resources in the coming years as the use of these analytic techniques expands across our mission space. If your program could benefit from an investment in innovative systems, please work through your Program Management Unit ’s Mission Computing Council representatives to engage our teams.

  9. Scientific workflows as productivity tools for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Shon, John; Ohkawa, Hitomi; Hammer, Juergen

    2008-05-01

    Large pharmaceutical companies annually invest tens to hundreds of millions of US dollars in research informatics to support their early drug discovery processes. Traditionally, most of these investments are designed to increase the efficiency of drug discovery. The introduction of do-it-yourself scientific workflow platforms has enabled research informatics organizations to shift their efforts toward scientific innovation, ultimately resulting in a possible increase in return on their investments. Unlike the handling of most scientific data and application integration approaches, researchers apply scientific workflows to in silico experimentation and exploration, leading to scientific discoveries that lie beyond automation and integration. This review highlights some key requirements for scientific workflow environments in the pharmaceutical industry that are necessary for increasing research productivity. Examples of the application of scientific workflows in research and a summary of recent platform advances are also provided.

  10. Scientific dishonesty and good scientific practice.

    PubMed

    Andersen, D; Axelsen, N H; Riis, P

    1993-04-01

    Scientific dishonesty has been the subject of much public interest in recent years. Although the problem has had a low profile in Denmark, there is no reason to believe that it is non-existent. Several preconditions known to be important prevail here as well as in other countries, such as pressure to publish and severe competition for research grants and senior academic positions. The Danish Medical Research Council (DMRC) decided to respond to this problem by preparing a report on scientific dishonesty with suggestions to the research institutions on rules for good scientific practice and procedures for investigation of suspected dishonesty. To this end, an investigatory system was suggested. The system should consist of two regional committees and one national committee. They should be headed by high court judges and experienced health sciences researchers as members. The committees will investigate cases reported to them and conclude on whether dishonesty has been established and on whether the scientific work should be retracted. Sanctions shall remain the task of the institutions. Preventive measures comprise open access to and a long storage period for scientific data.

  11. Scientific integrity memorandum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2009-03-01

    U.S. President Barack Obama signed a presidential memorandum on 9 March to help restore scientific integrity in government decision making. The memorandum directs the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy to develop a strategy within 120 days that ensures that "the selection of scientists and technology professionals for science and technology positions in the executive branch is based on those individuals' scientific and technological knowledge, credentials, and experience; agencies make available to the public the scientific or technological findings or conclusions considered or relied upon in policy decisions; agencies use scientific and technological information that has been subject to well-established scientific processes such as peer review; and agencies have appropriate rules and procedures to ensure the integrity of the scientific process within the agency, including whistleblower protection."

  12. The Digital Road to Scientific Knowledge Diffusion; A Faster, Better Way to Scientific Progress?

    SciTech Connect

    Wojick, D E; Warnick, W L; Carroll, B C; Crowe, J

    2006-06-01

    With the United States federal government spending billions annually for research and development, ways to increase the productivity of that research can have a significant return on investment. The process by which science knowledge is spread is called diffusion. It is therefore important to better understand and measure the benefits of this diffusion of knowledge. In particular, it is important to understand whether advances in Internet searching can speed up the diffusion of scientific knowledge and accelerate scientific progress despite the fact that the vast majority of scientific information resources continue to be held in deep web databases that many search engines cannot fully access. To address the complexity of the search issue, the term global discovery is used for the act of searching across heterogeneous environments and distant communities. This article discusses these issues and describes research being conducted by the Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI).

  13. Demographic effects of scientific progress.

    PubMed

    Coale, A J

    1987-01-01

    This essay refutes the commonly held view that the demographic transition in the west occurred as a result of scientific progress, but admits that the drop in mortality in the developing world since 1950 is largely due to technology. Human populations have grown at about 0.05% annually for 10,000 years, until about 1750, when the rate grew to 0.5%, then to 0.7% after 1900, and to 2% in the 1960s. Looking at life expectancy, which was about 35 years in the 18th century and 40 in the 19th in Europe, as well as advances in treatment and prevention of the major killer diseases, it is apparent that death rates fell substantially well before any effective therapy or immunization was developed. This can be demonstrated for tuberculosis and smallpox. Probably, life-style changes such as wearing washable cotton clothing, bathing, and better nutrition contributed to longer life. Advances in the understanding of contagion and infection contributed toward eradication of typhoid and cholera after 1850. Hence, public health projects such as sewage and water systems, better housing and working conditions, helped stop typhoid and diarrhea and to prolong life generally. The decline in fertility documented in the west also took place before any scientific birth control methods were available: only folk methods such as withdrawal, and social methods such as later marriage were responsible. In the less developed world, death rates began to plummet after 1950, largely due to immunization, mosquito control and other advances in health technology. It is hoped that contraceptive technology, with methods unrelated to sexual behavior, will reduce births in parallel. In conclusion, although science may not have been responsible in detail for the demographic transition in the west, scientific ideas prompted new attitudes about social change and secularism, which may have played a role in lowering birth rates.

  14. Building Scientific Confidence in Read-Across: Progress in ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Presentation at the 41st Annual Winter Meeting of The Toxicology Forum - From Assay to Assessment: Incorporating High Throughput Strategies into Health and Safety Evaluations on Building Scientific Confidence in Read-Across: Progress in using HT Data to inform Read-Across Performance Presentation at the 41st Annual Winter Meeting of The Toxicology Forum - From Assay to Assessment: Incorporating High Throughput Strategies into Health and Safety Evaluations on Building Scientific Confidence in Read-Across: Progress in using HT Data to inform Read-Across Performance

  15. FY 2014 LDRD Annual Report Project Summaries

    SciTech Connect

    Tomchak, Dena

    2015-02-01

    The FY 2014 Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Annual Report is a compendium of the diverse research performed to develop and ensure the INL's technical capabilities can support future DOE missions and national research priorities. LDRD is essential to INL - it provides a means for the laboratory to pursue novel scientific and engineering research in areas that are deemed too basic or risky for programmatic investments. This research enahnces technical capabilities at the laboratory, providing scientific and engineering staff with opportunities for skill building and partnership development.

  16. Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory 2004 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    White, Julia C.

    2005-04-17

    This 2004 Annual Report describes the research and accomplishments of staff and users of the W.R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), located in Richland, Washington. EMSL is a multidisciplinary, national scientific user facility and research organization, operated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research. The resources and opportunities within the facility are an outgrowth of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to fundamental research for understanding and resolving environmental and other critical scientific issues.

  17. Scientific Notation Watercolor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linford, Kyle; Oltman, Kathleen; Daisey, Peggy

    2016-01-01

    (Purpose) The purpose of this paper is to describe visual literacy, an adapted version of Visual Thinking Strategy (VTS), and an art-integrated middle school mathematics lesson about scientific notation. The intent of this lesson was to provide students with a real life use of scientific notation and exponents, and to motivate them to apply their…

  18. Scientific rigor through videogames.

    PubMed

    Treuille, Adrien; Das, Rhiju

    2014-11-01

    Hypothesis-driven experimentation - the scientific method - can be subverted by fraud, irreproducibility, and lack of rigorous predictive tests. A robust solution to these problems may be the 'massive open laboratory' model, recently embodied in the internet-scale videogame EteRNA. Deploying similar platforms throughout biology could enforce the scientific method more broadly.

  19. Scientifically Based Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beghetto, Ron

    2003-01-01

    Most principals are aware that the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 makes it mandatory for school leaders who depend on federal funding to select and implement programs that are based on scientific research. This publication reviews five documents that offer insights into what is meant by scientifically based research and help school leaders…

  20. Security and Scientific Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chalk, Rosemary

    1983-01-01

    Issues related to reports and proposed regulations seeking to limit openness in scientific work because of national security interests are discussed. Although administration officials argue that free flow of scientific information allows United States' adversaries to grow stronger at our expense, imposition of controls may undermine U.S. vitality…

  1. Scientific Notation Watercolor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linford, Kyle; Oltman, Kathleen; Daisey, Peggy

    2016-01-01

    (Purpose) The purpose of this paper is to describe visual literacy, an adapted version of Visual Thinking Strategy (VTS), and an art-integrated middle school mathematics lesson about scientific notation. The intent of this lesson was to provide students with a real life use of scientific notation and exponents, and to motivate them to apply their…

  2. 3 CFR - Scientific Integrity

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Departments and Agencies Science and the scientific process must inform and guide decisions of my..., and protection of national security. The public must be able to trust the science and scientific..., and integrity. By this memorandum, I assign to the Director of the Office of Science and...

  3. Rekindling Scientific Curiosity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coble, Charles R.; Rice, Dale R.

    1983-01-01

    Active involvement in society-related issues can elevate junior high school students' interest not only in the problem being solved but also in related scientific concepts. Examples of how scientific concepts and society-related issues can be taught in the same class are presented, focusing on genetic engineering, water shortage, and others.…

  4. Earth Sciences Division annual report 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    This Annual Report presents summaries of selected representative research activities from Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory grouped according to the principal disciplines of the Earth Sciences Division: Reservoir Engineering and Hydrology, Geology and Geochemistry, and Geophysics and Geomechanics. We are proud to be able to bring you this report, which we hope will convey not only a description of the Division's scientific activities but also a sense of the enthusiasm and excitement present today in the Earth Sciences.

  5. 4th Annual IRIS Workshop Held

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiens, Douglas

    About 200 scientists gathered at the 4th annual Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS) workshop in Santa Fe, N. Mex., April 12-14 and discussed recent research results obtained with the new generation of seismological instruments. The meeting provided a forum for developing new initiatives and disseminating information on how to access the IRIS Data Management Center. Organizers of the scientific program were Douglas Wiens of Washington University in St. Louis and Terry Wallace of the University of Arizona.

  6. Theory, Modeling and Simulation Annual Report 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, David A; Garrett, Bruce C; Straatsma, TP; Jones, Donald R; Studham, Scott; Harrison, Robert J; Nichols, Jeffrey A

    2001-11-01

    This annual report describes the 2000 research accomplishments for the Theory, Modeling, and Simulation (TM and S) directorate, one of the six research organizations in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). EMSL is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national scientific user facility and is the centerpiece of the DOE commitment to providing world-class experimental, theoretical, and computational capabilities for solving the nation's environmental problems.

  7. Theory, Modeling and Simulation Annual Report 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, David A.; Garrett, Bruce C.; Straatsma, Tp; Jones, Donald R.; Studham, Ronald S.; Harrison, Robert J.; Nichols, Jeffrey A.

    2001-11-01

    This annual report describes the 2000 research accomplishments for the Theory, Modeling, and Simulation (TM&S) directorate, one of the six research organizations in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). EMSL is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national scientific user facility and is the centerpiece of the DOE commitment to providing world-class experimental, theoretical, and computational capabilities for solving the nation's environmental problems.

  8. Final Scientific Report (FSR)

    SciTech Connect

    Granzin, Bill

    2010-11-29

    The Flambeau River Papers Manufacturing Conversion for Energy Efficiency Project has identified the following goals and objectives: 1. A low pressure accumulator tank will be installed to capture low pressure gases for reuse. The estimated cost is $2.1 million with an energy savings of $500,000 annually or enough natural gas savings to heat 590 average Wisconsin homes. 2. Replace the steam turbine and upgrade Paper Machine #3, the largest of Flambeau River Papers machines, at a cost of $6.265 million. The result will save enough natural gas to heat 141 average homes, or about $1.2-million each year. 3. Install a new cyclonic and cell fracturing technology dryer to reduce moisture in both sludge and biomass wastes. The estimated cost of this task is $1.5-million with an annual energy savings of $700,000. It will also eliminate all coal burning at Flambeau River Papers (7,200 tons of coal annually).

  9. Ethics of scientific publication

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Jharna; Ponnambath, Dinoop Korol; Parija, Subhash Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Published scientific research breeds the development of clinical management guidelines and pathways. Currently, scholarly proficiency is assessed using numerous primitive metrics for incentives that can kindle publication of hoax or flawed research content. Such flawed data can lead to wastage of resources, time, and most importantly harm to the society. Authors, editors, and peer reviewers need to be genuine in conducting, analyzing, and publication of scientific research. Institutions need to be aware and utilize advanced metrics to assess the scientific reputation of researchers. This short review discusses in brief the common authorship and editorial ethical issues encountered in scientific publication and the newer metrics available for the assessment of scholarly excellence. Editors and peer reviewers need to be acquainted with the common ethical issues and follow consensus international guidelines on publication ethics to tackle them appropriately. PMID:27722097

  10. Anatomy of Scientific Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Jinhyuk; Kim, Pan-Jun; Jeong, Hawoong

    2015-01-01

    The quest for historically impactful science and technology provides invaluable insight into the innovation dynamics of human society, yet many studies are limited to qualitative and small-scale approaches. Here, we investigate scientific evolution through systematic analysis of a massive corpus of digitized English texts between 1800 and 2008. Our analysis reveals great predictability for long-prevailing scientific concepts based on the levels of their prior usage. Interestingly, once a threshold of early adoption rates is passed even slightly, scientific concepts can exhibit sudden leaps in their eventual lifetimes. We developed a mechanistic model to account for such results, indicating that slowly-but-commonly adopted science and technology surprisingly tend to have higher innate strength than fast-and-commonly adopted ones. The model prediction for disciplines other than science was also well verified. Our approach sheds light on unbiased and quantitative analysis of scientific evolution in society, and may provide a useful basis for policy-making. PMID:25671617

  11. [Challenge in scientific publication].

    PubMed

    Volpato, Gilson Luiz; de Freitas, Eliane Gonçalves

    2003-05-01

    We discuss the main problems which make a scientific text difficult to find, to be read or to be accepted by readers. A scientific text is considered a logical argument. Therefore, methods, results and data from literature are premises supporting the conclusions of the work; and in the "Introduction" session, the justification corroborates the objective of the study. This conception makes the text a hermetically coherent structure where only the necessary data should be included (some controversy is still pertinent). In a second step, we show formal mistakes in scientific writing which make texts less attractive. Thus, we give examples of errors or inadequacy of formal aspects of presenting titles, abstracts, results (figures and tables), and grammar mistakes in Portuguese (but also valid for English grammar). After that, we emphasize the need for writing in international language (English) and for publication in periodicals with international impact on the scientific community. Finally, considerations to improve the Brazilian periodicals in the biological area are presented.

  12. Ethics of scientific publication.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Jharna; Ponnambath, Dinoop Korol; Parija, Subhash Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Published scientific research breeds the development of clinical management guidelines and pathways. Currently, scholarly proficiency is assessed using numerous primitive metrics for incentives that can kindle publication of hoax or flawed research content. Such flawed data can lead to wastage of resources, time, and most importantly harm to the society. Authors, editors, and peer reviewers need to be genuine in conducting, analyzing, and publication of scientific research. Institutions need to be aware and utilize advanced metrics to assess the scientific reputation of researchers. This short review discusses in brief the common authorship and editorial ethical issues encountered in scientific publication and the newer metrics available for the assessment of scholarly excellence. Editors and peer reviewers need to be acquainted with the common ethical issues and follow consensus international guidelines on publication ethics to tackle them appropriately.

  13. STARPROBE: Scientific rationale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Underwood, J. H. (Editor); Randolph, J. E. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    The scientific rationale and instrumentation problems in the areas of solar internal dynamics and relativity, solar plasma and particle dynamics, and solar atmosphere structure were studied. Current STARPROBE mission and system design concepts are summarized.

  14. Scientific Freedom and Responsibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cretsos, James M.

    1976-01-01

    Recommends that the American Society for Information Science become involved and cooperate with the American Association for the Advancement of Science in the issue of scientific freedom and responsibility. (Author/PF)

  15. Anatomy of scientific evolution.

    PubMed

    Yun, Jinhyuk; Kim, Pan-Jun; Jeong, Hawoong

    2015-01-01

    The quest for historically impactful science and technology provides invaluable insight into the innovation dynamics of human society, yet many studies are limited to qualitative and small-scale approaches. Here, we investigate scientific evolution through systematic analysis of a massive corpus of digitized English texts between 1800 and 2008. Our analysis reveals great predictability for long-prevailing scientific concepts based on the levels of their prior usage. Interestingly, once a threshold of early adoption rates is passed even slightly, scientific concepts can exhibit sudden leaps in their eventual lifetimes. We developed a mechanistic model to account for such results, indicating that slowly-but-commonly adopted science and technology surprisingly tend to have higher innate strength than fast-and-commonly adopted ones. The model prediction for disciplines other than science was also well verified. Our approach sheds light on unbiased and quantitative analysis of scientific evolution in society, and may provide a useful basis for policy-making.

  16. Report: Scientific Software.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borman, Stuart A.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses various aspects of scientific software, including evaluation and selection of commercial software products; program exchanges, catalogs, and other information sources; major data analysis packages; statistics and chemometrics software; and artificial intelligence. (JN)

  17. Scientific data requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Each Scientific Data Requirement (SDR) is summarized in terms of professional discipline, research program, technical description, related parameters, geographical extent, resolution, error tolerance,space-based sensors systems, personnel, implementation expert, notes, and references.

  18. Report: Scientific Software.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borman, Stuart A.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses various aspects of scientific software, including evaluation and selection of commercial software products; program exchanges, catalogs, and other information sources; major data analysis packages; statistics and chemometrics software; and artificial intelligence. (JN)

  19. Scientific Computing Paradigm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZandt, John

    1994-01-01

    The usage model of supercomputers for scientific applications, such as computational fluid dynamics (CFD), has changed over the years. Scientific visualization has moved scientists away from looking at numbers to looking at three-dimensional images, which capture the meaning of the data. This change has impacted the system models for computing. This report details the model which is used by scientists at NASA's research centers.

  20. Transdisciplinarity: a scientific essential.

    PubMed

    Hamberger, Erich

    2004-12-01

    Transdisciplinarity in science is necessary to counteract the rapid growth of scientific results and information, the elimination of logical inconsistencies, and the effect of specialization whereby uncomparable disciplines develop. A correspondence is drawn between the uncontrolled growth, immune system malfunction, repression/expansion, and isolation that are characteristic of cancer and of the scientific concept of modernity. Suggestions are presented regarding the promotion of healing in both of these realms.

  1. Open scientific communication urged

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    In a report released last week the National Academy of Sciences' Panel on Scientific Communication and National Security concluded that the ‘limited and uncertain benefits’ of controls on the dissemination of scientific and technological research are ‘outweighed by the importance of scientific progress, which open communication accelerates, to the overall welfare of the nation.’ The 18-member panel, chaired by Dale R. Corson, president emeritus of Cornell University, was created last spring (Eos, April 20, 1982, p. 241) to examine the delicate balance between open dissemination of scientific and technical information and the U.S. government's desire to protect scientific and technological achievements from being translated into military advantages for our political adversaries.The panel dealt almost exclusively with the relationship between the United States and the Soviet Union but noted that there are ‘clear problems in scientific communication and national security involving Third World countries.’ Further study of this matter is necessary.

  2. Scientific Data Management Center Scientific Data Integration

    SciTech Connect

    Critchlow, T J; Liu, L; Pu, C; Gupta, A; Ludaescher, B; Altintas, I; Vouk, M; Bitzer, D; Singh, M; Rosnick, D

    2003-01-31

    The Internet is becoming the preferred method for disseminating scientific data from a variety of disciplines. This has resulted in information overload on the part of the scientists, who are unable to query all of the relevant sources, even if they knew where to find them, what they contained, how to interact with them, and how to interpret the results. Thus instead of benefiting from this information rich environment, scientists become experts on a small number of sources and use those sources almost exclusively. Enabling information based scientific advances, in domains such as functional genomics, requires fully utilizing all available information. We are developing an end-to-end solution using leading-edge automatic wrapper generation, mediated query, and agent technology that will allow scientists to interact with more information sources than currently possible. Furthermore, by taking a workflow-based approach to this problem, we allow them to easily adjust the dataflow between the various sources to address their specific research needs.

  3. Annual Technical Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-01

    T ’ .. . . . -. . . . , . . . - . ... - -. --- ~ . . . ..... .... IIS~ANNUAL TECHNICAL REPORT K-TO THE OFFICE OF NAVAL RESEARCH CONTRACT No, N00014...RIECIPICHT’S CATC1.O@ NUM@SA 4. TITLE (sn$ S-611fleI) ’I TYPE OP RErPORT A Pimo0o COVEREC, Annual Technical Report Am~4~10/01ZS-9130/26 S.PERFORMING

  4. Annual Energy Review, 2008

    SciTech Connect

    2009-06-01

    The Annual Energy Review (AER) is the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) primary report of annual historical energy statistics. For many series, data begin with the year 1949. Included are statistics on total energy production, consumption, trade, and energy prices; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, renewable energy, and international energy; financial and environment indicators; and data unit conversions.

  5. Annual Review of Biophysics.

    PubMed

    Hatzis, Christos

    2013-07-01

    Annual Review of Biophysics Rees D. Dill K., Williamson J., Annual Reviews Palo Alto, CA, 2010. 581 pp. (hardcover), ISBN: 978-0-8243-1839-0, © 2013 Doody's Review Service. Doody's Review Service. © 2013 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  6. Annual Data Profile, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, Austin. Community Colleges and Technical Institutes Div.

    This document is a compilation of annual data profile tables, Perkins measures, and institutional effectiveness measures and standards for South Texas Community College, 1998. Data highlights include: (1) total annual enrollment in 1996-97 was 11,508 (872 white; 29 black; 10,526 Hispanic; 69 Asian; 9 Native American; 3 international; and 81…

  7. Annual Partnership Report, 2016

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyoming Community College Commission, 2016

    2016-01-01

    The "Annual Partnership Report" catalogs partnerships that Wyoming community colleges established and maintained for each fiscal year. This partnership report fulfills statutory reporting requirement W.S. 21-18-202(e)(iv) which mandates the development of annual reports to the legislature on the outcomes of partnerships between colleges…

  8. The Scientific Mentor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodia, Becky

    2004-01-01

    This article describes the Cornell Science Challenge, an annual science fair held at Olin Hall at Weill Medical College of Cornell University. This science fair features seventh graders from East Middle School in New York who have been mentored for three months by actual scientists (graduate students, faculty members, laboratory technicians, and…

  9. Calibration of the radiation monitors from DESY and SPring-8 at the quasi-mono-energetic neutron beams using 100 and 300 MeV 7Li(p,n) reaction at RCNP in Osaka Japan in November 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leuschner, Albrecht; Asano, Yoshihiro; Klett, Alfred

    2017-09-01

    At the ring cyclotron facility of the Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP) Osaka University, Osaka, Japan a series of measurement campaigns had been continued with quasi mono-energetic neutron beams in November 2014. A 7Li target was bombarded with 100 and 300 MeV protons and the generated neutron beams were directed into a long time-of-flight tunnel at 0 and 25 degrees deflection angle with respect to the proton beam. At a distance of 41 m the cross section of the neutron beam was large enough for the illumination of square meter sized objects like extended range rem-counters. The research institutes SPring-8/RIKEN, Japan, and DESY, Germany, participated in this campaign for the calibration of 4 different types of active ambient dose rate monitors: LB 6411, LB 6411-Pb, LB 6419 and LB 6420. The measurements of their responses are reported and compared with the calculated values.

  10. Scientific/Techical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Chris Leighton, Neutron Scattering Society of American; Mr. J. Ardie Dillen, MRS Director of Finance and Administration

    2012-11-07

    The ACNS provides a focal point for the North American neutron user community, strengthening ties within this diverse group, and promoting neutron research in related disciplines. The conference thus serves a dual role as both a national user meeting and a scientific meeting. As a venue for scientific exchange, the ACNS showcases recent results and provides a forum for scientific discussion of neutron-enabled research in fields as diverse as hard and soft condensed matter, liquids, biology, magnetism, engineering materials, chemical spectroscopy, crystal structure, elementary excitations, fundamental physics, and development of neutron instrumentation. This is achieved through a combination of invited oral presentations, contributed oral presentations, and poster sessions. Adequate opportunity for spontaneous discussion and collaboration is also built into the ACNS program in order to foster free exchange of new scientific ideas and the potential for use of powerful neutron scattering methods beyond the current realms of application. The sixth American Conference on Neutron Scattering (ACNS 2012) provided essential information on the breadth and depth of current neutron-related research worldwide. A strong program of plenary, invited and contributed talks showcased recent scientific results in neutron science in a wide range of fields, including soft and hard condensed matter, biology, chemistry, energy and engineering applications, and neutron physics.

  11. Polar Research Board annual report, 1987 and future plans

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    This annual report describes the Polar Research Board, its origin and objectives, its work and plans, and its principle activities and accomplishments during calendar year 1987. The Overview presents a concise summary of the various aspects of the Board's program and of its responsibilities as US National Committee for the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR) of the International Council of Scientific Unins. Arctic and Antarctic activities are described.

  12. Polar Research Board annual report, 1987 and future plans

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-12-31

    This annual report describes the Polar Research Board, its origin and objectives, its work and plans, and its principle activities and accomplishments during calendar year 1987. The Overview presents a concise summary of the various aspects of the Board`s program and of its responsibilities as US National Committee for the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR) of the International Council of Scientific Unins. Arctic and Antarctic activities are described.

  13. Etiquette in scientific publishing.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Vinod

    2013-10-01

    Publishing a scientific article in a journal with a high impact factor and a good reputation is considered prestigious among one's peer group and an essential achievement for career progression. In the drive to get their work published, researchers can forget, either intentionally or unintentionally, the ethics that should be followed in scientific publishing. In an environment where "publish or perish" rules the day, some authors might be tempted to bend or break rules. This special article is intended to raise awareness among orthodontic journal editors, authors, and readers about the types of scientific misconduct in the current publishing scenario and to provide insight into the ways these misconducts are managed by the Committee of Publishing Ethics. Case studies are presented, and various plagiarism detection software programs used by publishing companies are briefly described. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Scientific ballooning in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makino, Fumiyoshi

    Activities in scientific ballooning in Japan during 1998-1999 are reported. The total number of scientific balloons flown in Japan in 1998 and 1999 was sixteen, eight flights in each year. The scientific objectives were observations of high energy cosmic electrons, air samplings at various altitudes, monitoring of atmospheric ozone density, Galactic infrared observations, and test flights of new type balloons. Balloon expeditions were conducted in Antarctica by the National Institute of Polar Research, in Russia, in Canada and in India in collaboration with foreign countries' institutes to investigate cosmic rays, Galactic infrared radiation, and Earth's atmosphere. There were three flights in Antarctica, four flights in Russia, three flights in Canada and two flights in India. Four test balloons were flown for balloon technology, which included pumpkin-type super-pressure balloon and a balloon made with ultra-thin polyethylene film of 3.4 μm thickness.

  15. The future scientific CCD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janesick, J. R.; Elliott, T.; Collins, S.; Marsh, H.; Blouke, M. M.

    1984-01-01

    Since the first introduction of charge-coupled devices (CCDs) in 1970, CCDs have been considered for applications related to memories, logic circuits, and the detection of visible radiation. It is pointed out, however, that the mass market orientation of CCD development has left largely untapped the enormous potential of these devices for advanced scientific instrumentation. The present paper has, therefore, the objective to introduce the CCD characteristics to the scientific community, taking into account prospects for further improvement. Attention is given to evaluation criteria, a summary of current CCDs, CCD performance characteristics, absolute calibration tools, quantum efficiency, aspects of charge collection, charge transfer efficiency, read noise, and predictions regarding the characteristics of the next generation of silicon scientific CCD imagers.

  16. PLAGIARISM IN SCIENTIFIC PUBLISHING

    PubMed Central

    Masic, Izet

    2012-01-01

    Scientific publishing is the ultimate product of scientist work. Number of publications and their quoting are measures of scientist success while unpublished researches are invisible to the scientific community, and as such nonexistent. Researchers in their work rely on their predecessors, while the extent of use of one scientist work, as a source for the work of other authors is the verification of its contributions to the growth of human knowledge. If the author has published an article in a scientific journal it cannot publish the article in any other journal h with a few minor adjustments or without quoting parts of the first article, which are used in another article. Copyright infringement occurs when the author of a new article with or without the mentioning the author used substantial portions of previously published articles, including tables and figures. Scientific institutions and universities should,in accordance with the principles of Good Scientific Practice (GSP) and Good Laboratory Practices (GLP) have a center for monitoring,security, promotion and development of quality research. Establish rules and compliance to rules of good scientific practice are the obligations of each research institutions,universities and every individual-researchers,regardless of which area of science is investigated. In this way, internal quality control ensures that a research institution such as a university, assume responsibility for creating an environment that promotes standards of excellence, intellectual honesty and legality. Although the truth should be the aim of scientific research, it is not guiding fact for all scientists. The best way to reach the truth in its study and to avoid the methodological and ethical mistakes is to consistently apply scientific methods and ethical standards in research. Although variously defined plagiarism is basically intended to deceive the reader’s own scientific contribution. There is no general regulation of control of

  17. Making better scientific figures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, Ed; McNeall, Doug

    2016-04-01

    In the words of the UK government chief scientific adviser "Science is not finished until it's communicated" (Walport 2013). The tools to produce good visual communication have never been so easily accessible to scientists as at the present. Correspondingly, it has never been easier to produce and disseminate poor graphics. In this presentation, we highlight some good practice and offer some practical advice in preparing scientific figures for presentation to peers or to the public. We identify common mistakes in visualisation, including some made by the authors, and offer some good reasons not to trust defaults in graphics software. In particular, we discuss the use of colour scales and share our experiences in running a social media campaign (http://tiny.cc/endrainbow) to replace the "rainbow" (also "jet", or "spectral") colour scale as the default in (climate) scientific visualisation.

  18. Plagiarism in scientific publishing.

    PubMed

    Masic, Izet

    2012-12-01

    Scientific publishing is the ultimate product of scientist work. Number of publications and their quoting are measures of scientist success while unpublished researches are invisible to the scientific community, and as such nonexistent. Researchers in their work rely on their predecessors, while the extent of use of one scientist work, as a source for the work of other authors is the verification of its contributions to the growth of human knowledge. If the author has published an article in a scientific journal it cannot publish the article in any other journal h with a few minor adjustments or without quoting parts of the first article, which are used in another article. Copyright infringement occurs when the author of a new article with or without the mentioning the author used substantial portions of previously published articles, including tables and figures. Scientific institutions and universities should,in accordance with the principles of Good Scientific Practice (GSP) and Good Laboratory Practices (GLP) have a center for monitoring,security, promotion and development of quality research. Establish rules and compliance to rules of good scientific practice are the obligations of each research institutions,universities and every individual-researchers,regardless of which area of science is investigated. In this way, internal quality control ensures that a research institution such as a university, assume responsibility for creating an environment that promotes standards of excellence, intellectual honesty and legality. Although the truth should be the aim of scientific research, it is not guiding fact for all scientists. The best way to reach the truth in its study and to avoid the methodological and ethical mistakes is to consistently apply scientific methods and ethical standards in research. Although variously defined plagiarism is basically intended to deceive the reader's own scientific contribution. There is no general regulation of control of

  19. NASA's Scientific Visualization Studio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Horace G.

    2003-01-01

    Since 1988, the Scientific Visualization Studio(SVS) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center has produced scientific visualizations of NASA s scientific research and remote sensing data for public outreach. These visualizations take the form of images, animations, and end-to-end systems and have been used in many venues: from the network news to science programs such as NOVA, from museum exhibits at the Smithsonian to White House briefings. This presentation will give an overview of the major activities and accomplishments of the SVS, and some of the most interesting projects and systems developed at the SVS will be described. Particular emphasis will be given to the practices and procedures by which the SVS creates visualizations, from the hardware and software used to the structures and collaborations by which products are designed, developed, and delivered to customers. The web-based archival and delivery system for SVS visualizations at svs.gsfc.nasa.gov will also be described.

  20. Awe and scientific explanation.

    PubMed

    Valdesolo, Piercarlo; Park, Jun; Gottlieb, Sara

    2016-10-01

    Past research has established a relationship between awe and explanatory frameworks, such as religion. We extend this work, showing (a) the effects of awe on a separate source of explanation: attitudes toward science, and (b) how the effects of awe on attitudes toward scientific explanations depend on individual differences in theism. Across 3 studies, we find consistent support that awe decreases the perceived explanatory power of science for the theistic (Study 1 and 2) and mixed support that awe affects attitudes toward scientific explanations for the nontheistic (Study 3). (PsycINFO Database Record

  1. USGS Scientific Visualization Laboratory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Scientific Visualization Laboratory at the National Center in Reston, Va., provides a central facility where USGS employees can use state-of-the-art equipment for projects ranging from presentation graphics preparation to complex visual representations of scientific data. Equipment including color printers, black-and-white and color scanners, film recorders, video equipment, and DOS, Apple Macintosh, and UNIX platforms with software are available for both technical and nontechnical users. The laboratory staff provides assistance and demonstrations in the use of the hardware and software products.

  2. Recording Scientific Knowledge

    SciTech Connect

    Bowker, Geof

    2006-01-09

    The way we record knowledge, and the web of technical, formal, and social practices that surrounds it, inevitably affects the knowledge that we record. The ways we hold knowledge about the past - in handwritten manuscripts, in printed books, in file folders, in databases - shape the kind of stories we tell about that past. In this talk, I look at how over the past two hundred years, information technology has affected the nature and production of scientific knowledge. Further, I explore ways in which the emergent new cyberinfrastructure is changing our relationship to scientific practice.

  3. Recording Scientific Knowledge

    SciTech Connect

    Bowker, Geof

    2006-01-09

    The way we record knowledge, and the web of technical, formal, and social practices that surrounds it, inevitably affects the knowledge that we record. The ways we hold knowledge about the past - in handwritten manuscripts, in printed books, in file folders, in databases - shape the kind of stories we tell about that past. In this talk, I look at how over the past two hundred years, information technology has affected the nature and production of scientific knowledge. Further, I explore ways in which the emergent new cyberinfrastructure is changing our relationship to scientific practice.

  4. Preliminary estimates of annual agricultural pesticide use for counties of the conterminous United States, 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baker, Nancy T.

    2015-10-05

    Thelin, G.P., and Stone, W.W., 2013, Estimation of annual agricultural pesticide use for counties of the conterminous United States, 1992–2009: U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2013–5009, 54 p.

  5. Improving the Accuracy of the Institute for Scientific Information's Journal Impact Factors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moed, H. F.; Van Leeuwen, T. N.

    1995-01-01

    Discussion of impact factors of scientific journals focuses on a study that examined the Institute for Scientific Information's annual listing based upon data from the Science Citation Index. This article presents evidence that the values of the impact factors are often inaccurate due to an inappropriate definition of citable documents.…

  6. Scientific Component Technology Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Kohn, S; Bosl, B; Dahlgren, T; Kumfert, G; Smith, S

    2003-02-07

    The laboratory has invested a significant amount of resources towards the development of high-performance scientific simulation software, including numerical libraries, visualization, steering, software frameworks, and physics packages. Unfortunately, because this software was not designed for interoperability and re-use, it is often difficult to share these sophisticated software packages among applications due to differences in implementation language, programming style, or calling interfaces. This LDRD Strategic Initiative investigated and developed software component technology for high-performance parallel scientific computing to address problems of complexity, re-use, and interoperability for laboratory software. Component technology is an extension of scripting and object-oriented software development techniques that specifically focuses on the needs of software interoperability. Component approaches based on CORBA, COM, and Java technologies are widely used in industry; however, they do not support massively parallel applications in science and engineering. Our research focused on the unique requirements of scientific computing on ASCI-class machines, such as fast in-process connections among components, language interoperability for scientific languages, and data distribution support for massively parallel SPMD components.

  7. Program Supports Scientific Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Stephan

    1994-01-01

    Primary purpose of General Visualization System (GVS) computer program is to support scientific visualization of data generated by panel-method computer program PMARC_12 (inventory number ARC-13362) on Silicon Graphics Iris workstation. Enables user to view PMARC geometries and wakes as wire frames or as light shaded objects. GVS is written in C language.

  8. Scientific and Technical English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaclavik, Jaroslav

    Technical English differs from everyday English because of the specialized contexts in which it is used and because of the specialized interests of scientists and engineers. This text provides exercises in technical and scientific exposition in the following fields: mathematics, physics, temperature effects, mechanics, dynamics, conservation of…

  9. Scientific networking in disciplines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ching-Ray; Marks, Ann; Dawson, Silvina Ponce

    2013-03-01

    Scientific networking occurs at various levels. There are regional and worldwide professional organizations that link together national physical societies (IUPAP, EPS, AAPPS, FeLaSoFi), providing a platform to exchange ideas and advance common agendas. National and international agencies have special lines of funding for scientific collaboration between groups of various countries. Some of these lines are targeted at improving science education at all levels. There are then personal networks that link people with common interests or who know each other for any reason. The International Conferences on Women in Physics have provided a unique opportunity for female physicists from all over the world to start a network of interactions that can involve all sorts of collaborative efforts. In the three-session workshop organized at ICWIP11, we discussed these various issues that the worldwide scientific community faces. In this paper we summarize the main ideas that surged during the meeting and provide the list of recommendations that were to start and keep an active network of female physicists and to foster scientific collaboration regionally and internationally.

  10. Scientific and Artistic Authority

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    The differences and similarities between science and art are commonly discussed in various disciplines, e.g. collective versus individual, truth versus imagination, fact versus fiction, and more. Both art and science involve communication. Both artists and scientists have responsibilities of integrity in the arena of intellectual property. However, an artist has a primary responsibility to his/her personal artistic vision and craft. A scientist has a very clearly defined responsibility to scientific method as a collective practice, i.e. generally accepted scientific knowledge, norms of data collection and analysis as well as norms of communication. In presenting a work of art to an audience, it is accepted that different people will interpret the art through different lens. In science communication, we hope that the audience's understanding is in line with scientific interpretation. When science and art meet, how do we come to an understanding of what the intended message should be and how it should or must be received. Accuracy in fact is important in science, as is accuracy of the message whether it is a process, model, image or story. How do we mediate this tension in collaborative projects? How do we celebrate the artistic nature of an artwork based on science when there is tension between the artistic merit and the scientific content? Authority of the artist, scientist, and organization must be satisfied.

  11. Professional Scientific Blog

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beke, Tamás

    2009-01-01

    The professional blog is a weblog that on the whole meets the requirements of scientific publication. In my opinion it bears a resemblance to digital notice boards, where the competent specialists of the given branch of science can place their ideas, questions, possible solutions and can raise problems. Its most important function can be…

  12. Mario Bunge's Scientific Realism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordero, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents and comments on Mario Bunge's scientific realism. After a brief introduction in Sects. 1 and 2 outlines Bunge's conception of realism. Focusing on the case of quantum mechanics, Sect. 3 explores how his approach plays out for problematic theories. Section 4 comments on Bunge's project against the background of the current…

  13. Ethics and Scientific Publication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benos, Dale J.; Fabres, Jorge; Farmer, John; Gutierrez, Jessica P.; Hennessy, Kristin; Kosek, David; Lee, Joo Hyoung; Olteanu, Dragos; Russell, Tara; Wang, Kai

    2005-01-01

    This article summarizes the major categories of ethical violations encountered during submission, review, and publication of scientific articles. We discuss data fabrication and falsification, plagiarism, redundant and duplicate publication, conflict of interest, authorship, animal and human welfare, and reviewer responsibility. In each section,…

  14. Nursing's Scientific Quest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Jean

    1981-01-01

    Examines nursing's changing research practices. Discusses changes in the philosophy of science, dichotomies within nursing, and nursing's changing research tradition. Concludes that a new research tradition can provide nursing with the scientific and social freedom and openness to solve both conceptual and empirical problems. (CT)

  15. Framing for Scientific Argumentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berland, Leema K.; Hammer, David

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, research on students' scientific argumentation has progressed to a recognition of nascent resources: Students can and do argue when they experience the need and possibility of persuading others who may hold competing views. Our purpose in this article is to contribute to this progress by applying the perspective of framing to the…

  16. Program Supports Scientific Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Stephan

    1994-01-01

    Primary purpose of General Visualization System (GVS) computer program is to support scientific visualization of data generated by panel-method computer program PMARC_12 (inventory number ARC-13362) on Silicon Graphics Iris workstation. Enables user to view PMARC geometries and wakes as wire frames or as light shaded objects. GVS is written in C language.

  17. Assessing Scientific Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiner, John M.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    A method for assessing scientific performance based on relationships displayed numerically in published documents is proposed and illustrated using published documents in pediatric oncology for the period 1979-1982. Contributions of a major clinical investigations group, the Childrens Cancer Study Group, are analyzed. Twenty-nine references are…

  18. Assessing Scientific Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiner, John M.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    A method for assessing scientific performance based on relationships displayed numerically in published documents is proposed and illustrated using published documents in pediatric oncology for the period 1979-1982. Contributions of a major clinical investigations group, the Childrens Cancer Study Group, are analyzed. Twenty-nine references are…

  19. Scientific Imagination in Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stableford, Brian M.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the conflict between the religious and scientific imaginations as existing between the intellectual realms of unquestioning faith and constant questioning. Relates this conflict to writers of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, e.g., Bacon, Kepler, Wilkins, Godwin, Harrington, Campanella, Cyrano, Le Bret, Defoe, Swift, Voltiare,…

  20. Mario Bunge's Scientific Realism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordero, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents and comments on Mario Bunge's scientific realism. After a brief introduction in Sects. 1 and 2 outlines Bunge's conception of realism. Focusing on the case of quantum mechanics, Sect. 3 explores how his approach plays out for problematic theories. Section 4 comments on Bunge's project against the background of the current…

  1. Mario Bunge's Scientific Realism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordero, Alberto

    2012-10-01

    This paper presents and comments on Mario Bunge's scientific realism. After a brief introduction in Sects. 1 and 2 outlines Bunge's conception of realism. Focusing on the case of quantum mechanics, Sect. 3 explores how his approach plays out for problematic theories. Section 4 comments on Bunge's project against the background of the current debate on realism in contemporary analytic philosophy.

  2. Is risk analysis scientific?

    PubMed

    Hansson, Sven Ove; Aven, Terje

    2014-07-01

    This article discusses to what extent risk analysis is scientific in view of a set of commonly used definitions and criteria. We consider scientific knowledge to be characterized by its subject matter, its success in developing the best available knowledge in its fields of study, and the epistemic norms and values that guide scientific investigations. We proceed to assess the field of risk analysis according to these criteria. For this purpose, we use a model for risk analysis in which science is used as a base for decision making on risks, which covers the five elements evidence, knowledge base, broad risk evaluation, managerial review and judgment, and the decision; and that relates these elements to the domains experts and decisionmakers, and to the domains fact-based or value-based. We conclude that risk analysis is a scientific field of study, when understood as consisting primarily of (i) knowledge about risk-related phenomena, processes, events, etc., and (ii) concepts, theories, frameworks, approaches, principles, methods and models to understand, assess, characterize, communicate, and manage risk, in general and for specific applications (the instrumental part). © 2014 Society for Risk Analysis.

  3. Scientific Inquiry 'R' Us.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bourdeau, Virginia D.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the role that informal interpretative programs and facilities can play in providing inquiry-oriented science experiences. Presents two examples of scientific inquiry programs: investigating wetlands and investigating density. In both examples, participants formulate questions, collect data, and attempt to answer their own questions. (DLH)

  4. Scientific Workflows in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaaff, A.; Verdes-Montenegro, L.; Ruiz, J. E.; Santander-Vela, J.

    2012-09-01

    We will soon be facing a new generation of facilities and archives dealing with huge amounts of data (ALMA, LSST, Pan-Starrs, LOFAR, SKA pathfinders,…) where scientific workflows will play an important role in the working methodology of astronomers. While the traditional pipelines tend to produce exploitable products, scientific workflows are aimed at producing scientific insight. Virtual Observatory standards provide the tools to design reproducible scientific workflows. A detailed analysis about the state of the art of workflows involves languages, design tools, execution engines, use cases, etc. A major topic is also the preservation of the workflows and the capability to replay a workflow several years after its design and implementation. Discussions on these topics are being held recently in IVOA forums and are part of the work that is being done in the Wf4Ever project. The purpose of the BoF was to present to the community the work in progress at the IVOA, collect ideas and identify needs not yet addressed.

  5. Scientific Inquiry 'R' Us.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bourdeau, Virginia D.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the role that informal interpretative programs and facilities can play in providing inquiry-oriented science experiences. Presents two examples of scientific inquiry programs: investigating wetlands and investigating density. In both examples, participants formulate questions, collect data, and attempt to answer their own questions. (DLH)

  6. Scientific Imagination in Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stableford, Brian M.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the conflict between the religious and scientific imaginations as existing between the intellectual realms of unquestioning faith and constant questioning. Relates this conflict to writers of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, e.g., Bacon, Kepler, Wilkins, Godwin, Harrington, Campanella, Cyrano, Le Bret, Defoe, Swift, Voltiare,…

  7. Large scale scientific computing

    SciTech Connect

    Deuflhard, P. ); Engquist, B. )

    1987-01-01

    This book presents papers on large scale scientific computing. It includes: Initial value problems of ODE's and parabolic PDE's; Boundary value problems of ODE's and elliptic PDE's; Hyperbolic PDE's; Inverse problems; Optimization and optimal control problems; and Algorithm adaptation on supercomputers.

  8. Serendipity and Scientific Discovery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenman, Martin F.

    1988-01-01

    The discovery of penicillin is cited in a discussion of the role of serendipity as it relates to scientific discovery. The importance of sagacity as a personality trait is noted. Successful researchers have questioning minds, are willing to view data from several perspectives, and recognize and appreciate the unexpected. (JW)

  9. Projecting the Scientific Method.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uthe, R. E.

    2000-01-01

    Describes how the gas laws are an excellent vehicle for introducing the steps of the scientific method. Students can use balloons and a simple apparatus to observe changes in various gas parameters, develop ideas about the changes they see, collect numerical data, test their ideas, derive simple equations for the relationships, and use the…

  10. Scientific Discovery for All

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaikowski, Lori; Lichtman, Paul; Quarless, Duncan

    2007-01-01

    The scientific discovery process comes alive for 70 minority students each year at Uniondale High School in New York where students have won top awards for "in-house" projects. Uniondale High School is in a middle-income school district where over 95% of students are from minority groups. Founded in 2000, the Uniondale High School Research Program…

  11. Projecting the Scientific Method.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uthe, R. E.

    2000-01-01

    Describes how the gas laws are an excellent vehicle for introducing the steps of the scientific method. Students can use balloons and a simple apparatus to observe changes in various gas parameters, develop ideas about the changes they see, collect numerical data, test their ideas, derive simple equations for the relationships, and use the…

  12. Serendipity and Scientific Discovery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenman, Martin F.

    1988-01-01

    The discovery of penicillin is cited in a discussion of the role of serendipity as it relates to scientific discovery. The importance of sagacity as a personality trait is noted. Successful researchers have questioning minds, are willing to view data from several perspectives, and recognize and appreciate the unexpected. (JW)

  13. Improving scientific knowledge

    Treesearch

    James M. Vose; David L. Peterson

    2012-01-01

    Scientific literature on the effects of climatic variability and change on forest ecosystems has increased significantly over the past decade, providing a foundation for establishing forest-climate relationships and projecting the effects of continued warming on a wide range of forest resources and ecosystem services. In addition, certainty about the nature of some of...

  14. Framing for Scientific Argumentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berland, Leema K.; Hammer, David

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, research on students' scientific argumentation has progressed to a recognition of nascent resources: Students can and do argue when they experience the need and possibility of persuading others who may hold competing views. Our purpose in this article is to contribute to this progress by applying the perspective of framing to the…

  15. Scientific Discovery for All

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaikowski, Lori; Lichtman, Paul; Quarless, Duncan

    2007-01-01

    The scientific discovery process comes alive for 70 minority students each year at Uniondale High School in New York where students have won top awards for "in-house" projects. Uniondale High School is in a middle-income school district where over 95% of students are from minority groups. Founded in 2000, the Uniondale High School Research Program…

  16. Scientific and Technical English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaclavik, Jaroslav

    Technical English differs from everyday English because of the specialized contexts in which it is used and because of the specialized interests of scientists and engineers. This text provides exercises in technical and scientific exposition in the following fields: mathematics, physics, temperature effects, mechanics, dynamics, conservation of…

  17. Scientific Tourism in Armenia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tashchyan, Davit

    2016-12-01

    The Scientific Tourism is relatively new direction in the world, however it already has managed to gain great popularity. As it is, it has arisen in 1980s, but its ideological basis comes from the earliest periods of the human history. In Armenia, it is a completely new phenomenon and still not-understandable for many people. At global level, the Scientific Tourism has several definitions: for example, as explains the member of the scientific tourist centre of Zlovlen Mrs. Pichelerova "The essence of the scientific tourism is based on the provision of the educational, cultural and entertainment needs of a group of people of people who are interested in the same thing", which in our opinion is a very comprehensive and discreet definition. We also have our own views on this type of tourism. Our philosophy is that by keeping the total principles, we put the emphasis on the strengthening of science-individual ties. Our main emphasis is on the scientific-experimental tourism. But this does not mean that we do not take steps to other forms of tourism. Studying the global experience and combining it with our resources, we are trying to get a new interdisciplinary science, which will bring together a number of different professionals as well as individuals, and as a result will have a new lore. It is in this way that an astronomer will become an archaeologist, an archaeologist will become an astrophysicist, etc. Speaking on interdisciplinary sciences, it's worth mentioning that in recent years, the role of interdisciplinary sciences at global level every day is being considered more and more important. In these terms, tourism is an excellent platform for the creation of interdisciplinary sciences and, therefore, the preparation of corresponding scholars. Nevertheless, scientific tourism is very important for the revelation, appreciation and promotion of the country's historical-cultural heritage and scientific potential. Let us not forget either that tourism in all its

  18. 2010 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    This annual report includes: an overview of Western; approaches for future hydropower and transmission service; major achievements in FY 2010; FY 2010 customer Integrated Resource Planning, or IRP, survey; and financial data.

  19. Turning Scientific Presentations into Stories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aruffo, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    To increase students' confidence in giving scientific presentations, students were shown how to present scientific findings as a narrative story. Students who were preparing to give a scientific talk attended a workshop in which they were encouraged to experience the similarities between telling a personal anecdote and presenting scientific data.…

  20. TARDEC Annual Report 2010

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-15

    working on specific technologies, such as automotive capabilities, materials and software development. The benefits of these collaborations are two-fold...ANNUAL REPORT U.S. ARMY TANK AUTOMOTIVE RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT AND ENGINEERING CENTER TWO THOUSAND TEN Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No...unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES Tank- Automotive Research Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC) Fiscal Year (FY) 10 Annual Report 14. ABSTRACT

  1. Natural gas annual 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1995 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1991 to 1995 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

  2. Natural gas annual 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-17

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1994 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1990 to 1994 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

  3. Report of the American College of Cardiology (ACC) Scientific Sessions 2016, Chicago.

    PubMed

    Mano, Toshiaki; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro

    2016-05-25

    The 65(th)Annual Scientific Sessions of the American College of Cardiology (ACC) were held at McCormick Place, Chicago, from April 2-4, 2016. The ACC Scientific Sessions are one of the 2 major scientific cardiology meetings in the USA and one of the major scientific meetings of cardiology in the world. It had an attendance of 18,769 and over 2,000 oral and poster abstracts, including 8 late-breaking clinical trials. This report presents the key presentations and the highlights from the ACC Scientific Sessions 2016 in Chicago. (Circ J 2016; 80: 1308-1313).

  4. Nuclear Chemistry Division annual report FY83

    SciTech Connect

    Struble, G.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of the annual reports of the Nuclear Chemistry Division is to provide a timely summary of research activities pursued by members of the Division during the preceding year. Throughout, details are kept to a minimum; readers desiring additional information are encouraged to read the referenced documents or contact the authors. The Introduction presents an overview of the Division's scientific and technical programs. Next is a section of short articles describing recent upgrades of the Division's major facilities, followed by sections highlighting scientific and technical advances. These are grouped under the following sections: nuclear explosives diagnostics; geochemistry and environmental sciences; safeguards technology and radiation effect; and supporting fundamental science. A brief overview introduces each section. Reports on research supported by a particular program are generally grouped together in the same section. The last section lists the scientific, administrative, and technical staff in the Division, along with visitors, consultants, and postdoctoral fellows. It also contains a list of recent publications and presentations. Some contributions to the annual report are classified and only their abstracts are included in this unclassified portion of the report (UCAR-10062-83/1); the full article appears in the classified portion (UCAR-10062-83/2).

  5. ISCR FY2005 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Keyes, D E; McGraw, J R

    2006-02-02

    seminar series. The ISCR identifies researchers from the academic community for computer science and computational science collaborations with LLNL and hosts them for both brief and extended visits with the aim of encouraging long-term academic research agendas that address LLNL research priorities. Through these collaborations, ideas and software flow in both directions, and LLNL cultivates its future workforce. The Institute strives to be LLNL's ''eyes and ears'' in the computer and information sciences, keeping the Laboratory aware of and connected to important external advances. It also attempts to be the ''hands and feet'' that carry those advances into the Laboratory and incorporate them into practice. ISCR research participants are integrated into LLNL's Computing Applications and Research (CAR) Department, especially into its Center for Applied Scientific Computing (CASC). In turn, these organizations address computational challenges arising throughout the rest of the Laboratory. Administratively, the ISCR flourishes under LLNL's University Relations Program (URP). Together with the other four institutes of the URP, the ISCR navigates a course that allows LLNL to benefit from academic exchanges while preserving national security. While it is difficult to operate an academic-like research enterprise within the context of a national security laboratory, the results declare the challenges well met and worth the continued effort. The pages of this annual report summarize the activities of the faculty members, postdoctoral researchers, students, and guests from industry and other laboratories who participated in LLNL's computational mission under the auspices of the ISCR during FY 2005.

  6. Third Annual David Derse Memorial Lecture and Award | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Anne Arthur, Guest Writer The Third Annual David Derse Memorial Lecture and Award presentation was held on Nov. 18 at NCI at Frederick to honor the outstanding research accomplishments of David Derse, Ph.D., and to stimulate the exchange of innovative ideas that Derse was well known for promoting throughout his scientific career.

  7. The National Eye Institute Annual Report: FY 1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Eye Inst. (DHEW/PHS), Bethesda, MD.

    Presented is an annual report of research and supported by the National Eye Institute (NEI) during the 1974 fiscal year. It is explained that the purpose of NEI research programs is to develop scientific knowledge which can be applied to the improved prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of visual disorders. The section on extramural and…

  8. Third Annual David Derse Memorial Lecture and Award | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Anne Arthur, Guest Writer The Third Annual David Derse Memorial Lecture and Award presentation was held on Nov. 18 at NCI at Frederick to honor the outstanding research accomplishments of David Derse, Ph.D., and to stimulate the exchange of innovative ideas that Derse was well known for promoting throughout his scientific career.

  9. Abstracts of Presentations--Seventh Annual 4S Meeting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    4S - Society for Social Studies of Science, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Presents abstracts of papers for the Seventh Annual Meeting of the Society for the Social Studies of Science. Topics include, among others, rhetoric of a scientific controversy; recombinant DNA; science and social justice; patent citation analysis; national need and peer-review process; and scientism, romanticism, and social realist images of…

  10. The 16th James L. Waters Annual Symposium: Electrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, Adrian C.

    2007-04-01

    The 16th Annual James L. Waters Symposium focused on electrochemistry, with emphasis on methods involving the flow of current. The speakers in this year's symposium are uniquely qualified to review the history of electroanalytical chemistry starting with Heyrovsky's initial studies and culminating with the present state of the art. Each has contributed significantly to the scientific, technical, and commercial development of the field.

  11. Abstracts of Presentations--Seventh Annual 4S Meeting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    4S - Society for Social Studies of Science, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Presents abstracts of papers for the Seventh Annual Meeting of the Society for the Social Studies of Science. Topics include, among others, rhetoric of a scientific controversy; recombinant DNA; science and social justice; patent citation analysis; national need and peer-review process; and scientism, romanticism, and social realist images of…

  12. Toward Scientific Numerical Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleb, Bil

    2007-01-01

    Ultimately, scientific numerical models need quantified output uncertainties so that modeling can evolve to better match reality. Documenting model input uncertainties and verifying that numerical models are translated into code correctly, however, are necessary first steps toward that goal. Without known input parameter uncertainties, model sensitivities are all one can determine, and without code verification, output uncertainties are simply not reliable. To address these two shortcomings, two proposals are offered: (1) an unobtrusive mechanism to document input parameter uncertainties in situ and (2) an adaptation of the Scientific Method to numerical model development and deployment. Because these two steps require changes in the computational simulation community to bear fruit, they are presented in terms of the Beckhard-Harris-Gleicher change model.

  13. Scientific Computing with Python

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beazley, D. M.

    Scripting languages have become a powerful tool for the construction of flexible scientific software because they provide scientists with an interpreted programming environment, can be easily interfaced with existing software written in C, C++, and Fortran, and can serve as a framework for modular software construction. In this paper, I describe the process of adding a scripting language to a scientific computing project by focusing on the use of Python with a large-scale molecular dynamics code developed for materials science research at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Although this application is not related to astronomical data analysis, the problems, solutions, and lessons learned may be of interest to researchers who are considering the use of scripting languages with their own projects.

  14. Ethics and scientific publication.

    PubMed

    Benos, Dale J; Fabres, Jorge; Farmer, John; Gutierrez, Jessica P; Hennessy, Kristin; Kosek, David; Lee, Joo Hyoung; Olteanu, Dragos; Russell, Tara; Shaikh, Faheem; Wang, Kai

    2005-06-01

    This article summarizes the major categories of ethical violations encountered during submission, review, and publication of scientific articles. We discuss data fabrication and falsification, plagiarism, redundant and duplicate publication, conflict of interest, authorship, animal and human welfare, and reviewer responsibility. In each section, pertinent historical background and citation of relevant regulations and statutes are provided. Furthermore, a specific case(s) derived from actual situations is(are) presented. These cases were chosen to highlight the complexities that investigators and journals must face when dealing with ethical issues. A series of discussion questions follow each case. It is our hope that by increasing education and awareness of ethical matters relevant to scientific investigation and publication, deviations from appropriate conduct will be reduced.

  15. Scientific publications in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Magar, A

    2012-09-01

    Scientific publications have become a mainstay of communication among readers, academicians, researchers and scientists worldwide. Although, its existence dates back to 17 th century in the West, Nepal is still struggling to take few steps towards improving its local science for last 50 years. Since the start of the first medical journal in 1963, the challenges remains as it were decades back regarding role of authors, peer reviewers, editors and even publishers in Nepal. Although, there has been some development in terms of the number of articles being published and appearances of the journals, yet there is a long way to go. This article analyzes the past and present scenario, and future perspective for scientific publications in Nepal.

  16. Toward Scientific Numerical Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleb, Bil

    2007-01-01

    Ultimately, scientific numerical models need quantified output uncertainties so that modeling can evolve to better match reality. Documenting model input uncertainties and verifying that numerical models are translated into code correctly, however, are necessary first steps toward that goal. Without known input parameter uncertainties, model sensitivities are all one can determine, and without code verification, output uncertainties are simply not reliable. To address these two shortcomings, two proposals are offered: (1) an unobtrusive mechanism to document input parameter uncertainties in situ and (2) an adaptation of the Scientific Method to numerical model development and deployment. Because these two steps require changes in the computational simulation community to bear fruit, they are presented in terms of the Beckhard-Harris-Gleicher change model.

  17. Sherlock Holmes: scientific detective.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Laura J

    2004-09-01

    Sherlock Holmes was intended by his creator, Arthur Conan Doyle, to be a 'scientific detective'. Conan Doyle criticized his predecessor Edgar Allan Poe for giving his creation - Inspector Dupin - only the 'illusion' of scientific method. Conan Doyle believed that he had succeeded where Poe had failed; thus, he has Watson remark that Holmes has 'brought detection as near an exact science as it will ever be brought into the world.' By examining Holmes' methods, it becomes clear that Conan Doyle modelled them on certain images of science that were popular in mid- to late-19th century Britain. Contrary to a common view, it is also evident that rather than being responsible for the invention of forensic science, the creation of Holmes was influenced by the early development of it.

  18. [Communication of scientific fraud].

    PubMed

    Zeitoun, Jean-David; Rouquette, Sébastien

    2012-09-01

    There is for a scientific journal several levels of communication depending of the degree of suspicion or certainty of a case of error or fraud. The task is increasingly difficult for journal editors as disclosed cases of fraud are more common and scientific communication on this topic is growing. Biomedical fraud is fairly little reported by the mainstream press and causes of this low interest are not currently well understood. The difficulty of processing this type of news for journalists appears to be one possible reason. The potentially numerous and significant consequences of fraud on health professionals are poorly documented. Though it is likely to cause a feeling of distrust and create controversy, the impact of fraud on the general public is poorly studied and appears multifactorial.

  19. Scientific workflows for bibliometrics.

    PubMed

    Guler, Arzu Tugce; Waaijer, Cathelijn J F; Palmblad, Magnus

    Scientific workflows organize the assembly of specialized software into an overall data flow and are particularly well suited for multi-step analyses using different types of software tools. They are also favorable in terms of reusability, as previously designed workflows could be made publicly available through the myExperiment community and then used in other workflows. We here illustrate how scientific workflows and the Taverna workbench in particular can be used in bibliometrics. We discuss the specific capabilities of Taverna that makes this software a powerful tool in this field, such as automated data import via Web services, data extraction from XML by XPaths, and statistical analysis and visualization with R. The support of the latter is particularly relevant, as it allows integration of a number of recently developed R packages specifically for bibliometrics. Examples are used to illustrate the possibilities of Taverna in the fields of bibliometrics and scientometrics.

  20. Scientific Software Component Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Kohn, S.; Dykman, N.; Kumfert, G.; Smolinski, B.

    2000-02-16

    We are developing new software component technology for high-performance parallel scientific computing to address issues of complexity, re-use, and interoperability for laboratory software. Component technology enables cross-project code re-use, reduces software development costs, and provides additional simulation capabilities for massively parallel laboratory application codes. The success of our approach will be measured by its impact on DOE mathematical and scientific software efforts. Thus, we are collaborating closely with library developers and application scientists in the Common Component Architecture forum, the Equation Solver Interface forum, and other DOE mathematical software groups to gather requirements, write and adopt a variety of design specifications, and develop demonstration projects to validate our approach. Numerical simulation is essential to the science mission at the laboratory. However, it is becoming increasingly difficult to manage the complexity of modern simulation software. Computational scientists develop complex, three-dimensional, massively parallel, full-physics simulations that require the integration of diverse software packages written by outside development teams. Currently, the integration of a new software package, such as a new linear solver library, can require several months of effort. Current industry component technologies such as CORBA, JavaBeans, and COM have all been used successfully in the business domain to reduce software development costs and increase software quality. However, these existing industry component infrastructures will not scale to support massively parallel applications in science and engineering. In particular, they do not address issues related to high-performance parallel computing on ASCI-class machines, such as fast in-process connections between components, language interoperability for scientific languages such as Fortran, parallel data redistribution between components, and massively

  1. Fairness in scientific publishing

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Philippa C.

    2017-01-01

    Major changes are afoot in the world of academic publishing, exemplified by innovations in publishing platforms, new approaches to metrics, improvements in our approach to peer review, and a focus on developing and encouraging open access to scientific literature and data. The FAIR acronym recommends that authors and publishers should aim to make their output Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Reusable. In this opinion article, I explore the parallel view that we should take a collective stance on making the dissemination of scientific data fair in the conventional sense, by being mindful of equity and justice for patients, clinicians, academics, publishers, funders and academic institutions. The views I represent are founded on oral and written dialogue with clinicians, academics and the publishing industry. Further progress is needed to improve collaboration and dialogue between these groups, to reduce misinterpretation of metrics, to minimise inequity that arises as a consequence of geographic setting, to improve economic sustainability, and to broaden the spectrum, scope, and diversity of scientific publication. PMID:28163900

  2. Scientific dishonesty: European reflections

    PubMed Central

    Riis, P

    2001-01-01

    Scientific dishonesty has attracted increased attention around the world during the past three to four decades. Europe became aware of the problem later than the USA, but has within the past 10 years created national control systems for all biomedical projects, not only those supported by public money. The prevalence of the problem can only be calculated indirectly by referring to population figures as denominators. Measured this way, figures from Denmark as a whole show: 1–2 cases referred/million inhabitants/year, 1 case treated/million inhabitants/year, 1 case of scientific dishonesty/million inhabitants/5 years. For Finland, 1–2 cases were referred/million inhabitants/1–2 years; for Norway, similar figures of 1/4 million inhabitants/year were calculated. Figures from the Danish national independent control body 1993–7 show the distribution of the types of cases that were charged, with numbers of confirmed cases in parentheses: fabrication, 2 (1); plagiarism, 3 (0); theft, 2 (0); ghost authorship, 2 (1); false methodological description, 3 (1); twisted statistics, 2 (0); suppression of existing data, 4 (0); unwarranted use of data, 4 (0); and authorship problems, 8 (1). This survey emphasises the need for national guidelines, an independent national control body, and initiatives for strong preventive actions. Key Words: scientific dishonesty • fraud • authorship PMID:11271787

  3. [Plagiarism in scientific publications].

    PubMed

    Reyes B, Humberto

    2009-01-01

    Similar to what occurs in literature, art and other human endeavours, every scientific report is based in previous work done by others. The new paper should add something original but a basic law of scientific honesty demands that any mention ideas, observations or thinking that has been previously proposed or published by others, should be acknowledged properly in the text and in the references. Plagiarism is identified when the authors of a scientific report use ideas or text that belong to others and present them as original, the previous source is concealed or it is referred to in a different context. The authors of a paper that contains plagiarism have the intention to mislead the readers, pretending to be the original authors of an idea that was expressed previously by others, or to be the owners of results shown by them. Plagiarism is a dishonest behaviour and, when discovered, may have dangerous consequences because the editors of the journal may publish a notice of retraction that will be inserted by Medline in both papers: the plagiarized and the plagiarizer, to be noticed by everyone who accesses to either of them in the Internet.

  4. Scientific ballooning in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corrêa, R.; Rinke, E.; Fernandes, J. O.; Villela, T.

    We present an overview of the scientific ballooning activities that took place in Brazil over the past 30 years as well as the current ongoing efforts in the area. We also briefly describe the balloon launching facility that exists at the Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (National Institute for Space Research) — INPE. Up to now, over 100 scientific balloon experiments, related to Astrophysics, Aeronomy, and Geophysics were launched from Brazil taking advantage of the country's continental dimensions, a well-defined rain season, and a low population density, which offer excellent conditions for scientific ballooning activities. Balloons with volumes up to 500,000 cubic meters can be launched from INPE's balloon launching base (latitude S 22° 4' 2″; longitude W 044° 58' 41″). The availability of good roads and several inland airports in Brazil provides the necessary structure for safe payload retrieval and its rapid return to the balloon base. There are several airports throughout Brazil that can also be used as balloon launching bases, mainly in the country's Eastern region. Overflights of more than 1,000 kilometers are possible and easily attained. Balloon flights ranging from a few hours to long duration flights can be safely verified. The constant climate monitoring through the use of weather satellites information received at INPE provides the necessary data to determine the necessary conditions for a long duration flight. INPE's Center for Weather Forecast and Climate Studies (CPTEC) provides the necessary weather forecast support for launch and payload retrieval.

  5. The next scientific revolution.

    PubMed

    Hey, Tony

    2010-11-01

    For decades, computer scientists have tried to teach computers to think like human experts. Until recently, most of those efforts have failed to come close to generating the creative insights and solutions that seem to come naturally to the best researchers, doctors, and engineers. But now, Tony Hey, a VP of Microsoft Research, says we're witnessing the dawn of a new generation of powerful computer tools that can "mash up" vast quantities of data from many sources, analyze them, and help produce revolutionary scientific discoveries. Hey and his colleagues call this new method of scientific exploration "machine learning." At Microsoft, a team has already used it to innovate a method of predicting with impressive accuracy whether a patient with congestive heart failure who is released from the hospital will be readmitted within 30 days. It was developed by directing a computer program to pore through hundreds of thousands of data points on 300,000 patients and "learn" the profiles of patients most likely to be rehospitalized. The economic impact of this prediction tool could be huge: If a hospital understands the likelihood that a patient will "bounce back," it can design programs to keep him stable and save thousands of dollars in health care costs. Similar efforts to uncover important correlations that could lead to scientific breakthroughs are under way in oceanography, conservation, and AIDS research. And in business, deep data exploration has the potential to unearth critical insights about customers, supply chains, advertising effectiveness, and more.

  6. NASA scientific integrity policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    On 16 December, NASA became the latest U.S. federal agency to issue a scientific integrity policy. It was issued less than 10 days after the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) issued its policy on the same topic (see "NOAA issues scientific integrity policy," Eos Trans. AGU, 92(50), 467, doi:10.1029/2011EO500004, 2011). The agency policies respond to earlier White House memos on the topic issued in 2009 and 2010. NASA is the fifth federal department or agency that has finalized a scientific integrity policy; the Department of the Interior and the National Science Foundation also have finalized their policies. As Eos went to press, 13 other policies were in near-final draft form, including those from the departments of Agriculture and Energy; the Environmental Protection Agency and the Department of Labor had indicated that they expected to submit their policies to the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) soon, OSTP director John Holdren wrote in a 21 December note on the office's Web site.

  7. Heliophysics as a Scientific Discipline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greb, K.; Austin, M.; Guhathakurta, M.

    2016-12-01

    Heliophysics is a developing scientific discipline integrating studies of the Sun's variability, the surrounding heliosphere, and climate environments. Over the past few centuries our understanding of how the Sun drives space weather and climate on the Earth and other planets has advanced at an ever-increasing rate. NASA Living With a Star and the UCAR Visiting Scientist Progams sponsor the annual Heliophysics Summer Schools to build the next generation of scientists in this emerging field. The highly successful series of the summer schools (commencing 2007) trains a select group of graduate students, postdoctoral fellows and university faculty to learn and develop the science of heliophysics as a broad, coherent discipline that reaches in space from the Earth's troposphere to the depths of the Sun, and in time from the formation of the solar system to the distant future. Now in its tenth year, the School has resulted in the publication of five Heliophysics textbooks now being used at universities worldwide. The books provide a foundational reference for researchers in space physics, solar physics, aeronomy, space weather, planetary science and climate science, astrophysics, plasma physics,. In parallel, the School also developed the complementary materials that support teaching of heliophysics at both graduate and undergraduate levels. The Jack Eddy Postdoctoral Fellowship Program matches newly graduated postdoctorates with hosting mentors for the purpose of training the next generation researchers needed in heliophysics. The fellowships are for two years, and any U.S. university or research lab may apply to host a fellow. Two major topics of focus for the program are the science of space weather and of the Sun-climate connection. Since the goal of this fellowship program is to train Sun-Earth system researchers, preference is also given to research projects that cross the traditional heliophysics subdomains of the Sun, heliosphere, magnetosphere, and ionosphere

  8. Heliophysics as a Scientific Discipline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greb, K.

    2015-12-01

    Heliophysics is a developing scientific discipline integrating studies of the Sun's variability, the surrounding heliosphere, and climate environments. Over the past few centuries our understanding of how the Sun drives space weather and climate on the Earth and other planets has advanced at an ever-increasing rate. NASA Living With a Star and the UCAR Visiting Scientist Progams sponsor the annual Heliophysics Summer Schools to build the next generation of scientists in this emerging field. The highly successful series of the summer schools (commencing 2007) trains a select group of graduate students, postdoctoral fellows and university faculty to learn and develop the science of heliophysics as a broad, coherent discipline that reaches in space from the Earth's troposphere to the depths of the Sun, and in time from the formation of the solar system to the distant future. Now in its tenth year, the School has resulted in the publication of five Heliophysics textbooks now being used at universities worldwide. The books provide a foundational reference for researchers in space physics, solar physics, aeronomy, space weather, planetary science and climate science, astrophysics, plasma physics,. In parallel, the School also developed the complementary materials that support teaching of heliophysics at both graduate and undergraduate levels. The Jack Eddy Postdoctoral Fellowship Program matches newly graduated postdoctorates with hosting mentors for the purpose of training the next generation researchers needed in heliophysics. The fellowships are for two years, and any U.S. university or research lab may apply to host a fellow. Two major topics of focus for the program are the science of space weather and of the Sun-climate connection. Since the goal of this fellowship program is to train Sun-Earth system researchers, preference is also given to research projects that cross the traditional heliophysics subdomains of the Sun, heliosphere, magnetosphere, and ionosphere

  9. [Medical scientific Romania in the European context].

    PubMed

    Rădut, D S; Alvarez-Dardet, C; Ruiz, Maria Teresa

    2006-01-01

    A national and international publications bibliometric analysis was assessed to evaluate the scientific research situation about Romania and the relation with the European Parliament Health objectives for 2003-2008. A bibliographical search in MEDLINE between 1999 and 2003 was performed. An annual review was done and the articles were classified on seven activity branches. The clinical medicine articles were classified by using medical specialties. The 2003-2008 Health European report was classified on fourteen objectives and related to the Romanian scientific production. 2068 articles were found, distributed 271 in 1999, 373 in 2000, 434 in 2001, 492 in 2002, and 498 in 2003. 1335 are clinical medicine, 485 basic sciences, 126 Public Health, 40 pollution and environmental, 36 mental health and 25 nursing articles. 21 were not classified. The highest article's number belongs to the clinical medicine field and the highest research interest was found in Ophthalmology medical specialty. An increasing scientific research evolution was found but a focussed research tendency was observed around some of the European Union Parliament's objectives.

  10. American Radium Society 92nd Annual Meeting.

    PubMed

    Jani, Ashesh B; Le, Quynh-Thu; Michalski, Jeff J; Sawaya, Raymond; Wilson, Lynn D

    2010-08-01

    We provide a summary of the 92nd Annual Meeting of the American Radium Society (ARS), the oldest organization devoted to the study of cancer. This May 2010 meeting included a postgraduate course/contouring laboratory, seven scientific sessions, two keynote lectures, one Janeway lecture, four Panel presentations, one debate, one satellite symposium and 107 poster presentations--details of each of these activities are provided. All of these academic activities revolved around the major meeting theme of 'Improved Outcomes Through Judicious Applications of Advanced Technology'.

  11. Hazards Control Department annual technology review, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, R.V.; Anderson, K.J.

    1988-07-01

    This document describes some of the research performed in the LLNL Hazards Control Department from October 1986 to September 1987. The sections in the Annual report cover scientific concerns in the areas of Health Physics, Industrial Hygiene, Industrial Safety, Aerosol Science, Resource Management, Dosimetry and Radiation Physics, Criticality Safety, and Fire Science. For a broader overview of the types of work performed in the Hazards Control Department, we have also compiled a selection of abstracts of recent publications by Hazards Control employees. Individual reports are processed separately for the data base.

  12. ISCR annual report FY 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzgerald, John M.

    1999-05-03

    Advances in scientific computing research have never been more vital to the core missions of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory than they are today. These advances are evolving so rapidly, and over such a broad front of computational science, that to remain on the leading edge, the Laboratory must collaborate with many academic centers of excellence. In FY 1998, ISCR dramatically expanded its interactions with academia through collaborations, visiting faculty, guests and a seminar series. The pages of this annual report summarize the activities of the 63 faculty members and 34 students who participated in ISCR collaborative activities during FY 1998. The 1998 ISCR call for proposals issued by the University Collaborative Research Program (UCRP) resulted in eight awards made by the University of California Office of the President to research teams at UC San Diego, UC Davis, UC Los Angeles, and UC Berkeley. These projects are noted. ISCR is now part of the Laboratory's Center for Applied Scientific Computing (CASC). Many CASC scientists participate actively in ISCR University collaborations, as noted. The eight collaborations shown represent innovative research efforts supported by ISCR in FY 1998. Abstracts discussing each of these collaborations begin on page 79. The Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) established Academic Strategic Alliances Program (ASAP) centers located at: Stanford University; California Institute of Technology; University of Chicago; University of Utah, Salt Lake; and University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. The ASCI Alliances strategy was established to enhance overall ASCI goals by establishing technical interactions between the Department of Energy, Defense Programs laboratories (Lawrence Livermore, Los Alamos, and Sandia National Laboratories), and leading-edge research-and-development universities in the United States. ISCR has partnered with the LLNL ASCI Program Office to facilitate these collaborations. In FY 1998

  13. NCI at Frederick Scientific Library Reintroduces Scientific Publications Database | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    A 20-year-old database of scientific publications by NCI at Frederick, FNLCR, and affiliated employees has gotten a significant facelift. Maintained by the Scientific Library, the redesigned database—which is linked from each of the Scientific Library’s web pages—offers features that were not available in previous versions, such as additional search limits and non-traditional metrics for scholarly and scientific publishing known as altmetrics.

  14. Natural gas annual 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1998-10-01

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1997 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1993 to 1997 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level. 27 figs., 109 tabs.

  15. International energy annual 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-01

    The International Energy Annual presents an overview of key international energy trends for production, consumption, imports, and exports of primary energy commodities in over 220 countries, dependencies, and areas of special sovereignty. Also included are population and gross domestic product data, as well as prices for crude oil and petroleum products in selected countries. Renewable energy reported in the International Energy Annual includes hydroelectric power, geothermal, solar, and wind electric power, biofuels energy for the US, and biofuels electric power for Brazil. New in the 1996 edition are estimates of carbon dioxide emissions from the consumption of petroleum and coal, and the consumption and flaring of natural gas. 72 tabs.

  16. Scientific Grid computing.

    PubMed

    Coveney, Peter V

    2005-08-15

    We introduce a definition of Grid computing which is adhered to throughout this Theme Issue. We compare the evolution of the World Wide Web with current aspirations for Grid computing and indicate areas that need further research and development before a generally usable Grid infrastructure becomes available. We discuss work that has been done in order to make scientific Grid computing a viable proposition, including the building of Grids, middleware developments, computational steering and visualization. We review science that has been enabled by contemporary computational Grids, and associated progress made through the widening availability of high performance computing.

  17. 'El Capitan's' Scientific Gems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This mosaic of images taken by the panoramic camera onboard the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the rock region dubbed 'El Capitan,' which lies within the larger outcrop near the rover's landing site. 'El Capitan' is being studied in great detail using the scientific instruments on the rover's arm; images from the panoramic camera help scientists choose the locations for this compositional work. The millimeter-scale detail of the lamination covering these rocks can be seen. The face of the rock to the right of the mosaic may be a future target for grinding with the rover's rock abrasion tool.

  18. The GTC scientific archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, R.; Solano, E.

    2011-11-01

    At present, data management in telescopes ofclass 8-10 meters is very inefficient. The Gran Telescopio Canarias(GTC) scientific archive that is being developed by the Centro deAstrobiología (CAB) in the framework of the Spanish Virtual Observatoryis aimed at avoiding this situation, providing the telescope with anarchive accessible via internet, guaranteeing the accessibility,efficiency, visibility and data security demanded by a telescope of itsentity. The GTC archive will also be adapted to the standards defined bythe International Virtual Observatory, maximizing the visibility of thedata produced by the telescope. The main characteristics of the GTCscientific archive are described in this poster.

  19. Advances in scientific visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Max, N.; Crawfis, R. |

    1995-01-11

    This paper discusses scientific visualization of scalar and vector fields, particularly relating to clouds and climate modeling. One cloud rendering method applies a 3-D texture to cloudiness contour surfaces, to simulate a view from outer space. The texture is advected by the wind flow, so that it follows the cloud motion. Another technique simulates multiple scattering of incident light from the sun and sky. This paper also presents a simulation of the microscopic cross-bridge motion which powers muscle contraction. It was rendered by ray-tracing contour surfaces of summed Gaussian ellipsoids approximating the actin and myosin protein shapes.

  20. The Scientific Case against Astrology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Ivan

    1980-01-01

    Discussed is the lack of a scientific foundation and scientific evidence favoring astrology. Included are several research studies conducted to examine astrological tenets which yield generally negative results. (Author/DS)

  1. TSCA Scientific Peer Review Committees

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The SACC will provide independent scientific advice and recommendations to the EPA on the scientific basis for risk assessments, methodologies, and pollution prevention measures and approaches for chemicals regulated under TSCA.

  2. The Scientific Case against Astrology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Ivan

    1980-01-01

    Discussed is the lack of a scientific foundation and scientific evidence favoring astrology. Included are several research studies conducted to examine astrological tenets which yield generally negative results. (Author/DS)

  3. SRNL LDRD ANNUAL REPORT 2008

    SciTech Connect

    French, T

    2008-12-29

    The Laboratory Director is pleased to have the opportunity to present the 2008 Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) annual report. This is my first opportunity to do so, and only the second such report that has been issued. As will be obvious, SRNL has built upon the excellent start that was made with the LDRD program last year, and researchers have broken new ground in some important areas. In reviewing the output of this program this year, it is clear that the researchers implemented their ideas with creativity, skill and enthusiasm. It is gratifying to see this level of participation, because the LDRD program remains a key part of meeting SRNL's and DOE's strategic goals, and helps lay a solid scientific foundation for SRNL as the premier applied science laboratory. I also believe that the LDRD program's results this year have demonstrated SRNL's value as the EM Corporate Laboratory, having advanced knowledge in a spectrum of areas, including reduction of the technical risks of cleanup, separations science, packaging and transportation of nuclear materials, and many others. The research in support of Energy Security and National and Homeland Security has been no less notable. SRNL' s researchers have shown again that the nascent LDRD program is a sound investment for DOE that will pay off handsomely for the nation as time goes on.

  4. Scientific ballooning in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makino, F.

    Scientific ballooning activity in Japan during 2001 and 2002 is presented. Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS) launched 10 balloons from Sanriku Balloon Center (SBC) located 500 km north of Tokyo in 2001. Six flights were for scientific observations, observations of high energy cosmic electrons, cryogenic sampling of the air at high altitude, an observation of atmospheric ozone distribution, an observation of hard X-ray spectra of solar flare and a sampling of microorganism in the stratosphere. Two balloons made with 3.4 micron polyethylene film, of 30,000 m^3 without exhaust tube and 1,000 m^3 with exhaust tube were successfully flown and reached at altitudes of 50.7 km and 30.8 km respectively. It has been scheduled to launch 10 balloons in 2002 to observe solar flare, NO_2 and O_3 in the atmosphere, low frequency radiation in the environment, and atmospheric ozone density and to sample the air at high altitude. International collaborative balloon observations of cosmic-rays, Galactic infrared radiation and atmospheric ozone density were successfully conducted in USA, India and Spitzbergen, respectively in 2001. Two balloons will be flown from antarctica for the observations of cosmic-ray electrons and for auroral X-rays, respectively in December of 2002.

  5. Scientific dishonestry: European reflections.

    PubMed

    Riis, P

    2001-01-01

    Scientific dishonesty has attracted increased attention around the world during the past three to four decades. Europe became aware of the problem later than the USA, but has within the past 10 years created national control systems for all biomedical projects, not only those supported by public money. The prevalence of the problem can only be calculated indirectly by referring to population figures as denominators. Measured this way, figures from Denmark as a whole show: 1-2 cases referred/million inhabitants/year, 1 case treated/million inhabitants/year, 1 case of scientific dishonesty/million inhabitants/5 years. For Finland, 1-2 cases were referred/million inhabitants/1-2 years; for Norway, similar figures of 1/4 million inhabitants/year were calculated. Figures from the Danish national independent control body 1993-7 show the distribution of the types of cases that were charged, with numbers of confirmed cases in parentheses: fabrication, 2 (1); plagiarism, 3 (0); theft, 2 (0); ghost authorship, 2 (1); false methodological description, 3 (1); twisted statistics, 2 (0); suppression of existing data, 4 (0); unwarranted use of data, 4 (0); and authorship problems, 8 (1). This survey emphasises the need for national guidelines, an independent national control body, and initiatives for strong preventive actions.

  6. Scientific methodology applied.

    PubMed

    Lussier, A

    1975-04-01

    The subject of this symposium is naproxen, a new drug that resulted from an investigation to find a superior anti-inflammatory agent. It was synthesized by Harrison et al. in 1970 at the Syntex Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biological Sciences. How can we chart the evolution of this or any other drug? Three steps are necessary: first, chemical studies (synthesis, analysis); second, animal pharmacology; third, human pharmacology. The last step can additionally be divided into four phases: metabolism and toxicology of the drug in normal volunteers; dose titration and initial clinical trials with sick subjects (pharmacometry); confirmatory clinical trials when the drug is accepted on the market and revaluation (familiarization trials). To discover the truth about naproxen, we must all participate actively with a critical mind, following the principles of scientific methodology. We shall find that the papers to be presented today all deal with the third step in the evaluation process--clinical pharmacology. It is quite evident that the final and most decisive test must be aimed at the most valuable target: the human being. The end product of this day's work for each of us should be the formation of an opinion based on solid scientific proofs. And let us hope that we will all enjoy fulfilling the symposium in its entire etymological meaning this evening. In vino veritas.

  7. IAHS Third Scientific Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The International Association of Hydrological Sciences (IAHS) convened its Third Scientific Assembly in Baltimore, Md., May 10-19, 1989. The Assembly was attended by about 450 scientists and engineers. The attendance was highest from the U.S., as could be expected; 37 were from Canada; 22 each, Netherlands and United Kingdom; 14, Italy; 12, China; 10, Federal Republic of Germany; 8 each from France, the Republic of South Africa, and Switzerland; 7, Austria; 6 each, Finland and Japan; others were scattered among the remainder of 48 countries total.one of the cosponsors and also handled business matters for the Assembly. Other cosponsors included the International Association of Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics (IAMAP), United Nations Environmental Program (UNEP), United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), World Meteorological Organization (WMO), and U.K. Overseas Development Authority (ODA). U.S. federal agencies serving as cosponsors included the Environmental Protection Agency, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, National Science Foundation, National Weather Service, Department of Agriculture, Department of State, and U.S. Geological Survey.

  8. Compendium of Scientific Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Clendenin, James E

    2003-05-16

    The International Committee supported the proposal of the Chairman of the XVIII International Linac Conference to issue a new Compendium of linear accelerators. The last one was published in 1976. The Local Organizing Committee of Linac96 decided to set up a sub-committee for this purpose. Contrary to the catalogues of the High Energy Accelerators which compile accelerators with energies above 1 GeV, we have not defined a specific limit in energy. Microtrons and cyclotrons are not in this compendium. Also data from thousands of medical and industrial linacs has not been collected. Therefore, only scientific linacs are listed in the present compendium. Each linac found in this research and involved in a physics context was considered. It could be used, for example, either as an injector for high energy accelerators, or in nuclear physics, materials physics, free electron lasers or synchrotron light machines. Linear accelerators are developed in three continents only: America, Asia, and Europe. This geographical distribution is kept as a basis. The compendium contains the parameters and status of scientific linacs. Most of these linacs are operational. However, many facilities under construction or design studies are also included. A special mention has been made at the end for the studies of future linear colliders.

  9. Scientific Operation of LIGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Gary H.

    2003-04-01

    LIGO construction has been completed. The three interferometers at the two LIGO observatory sites (Livingston, Louisiana and Hanford, Washington) have been operated successfully as power-recycled Michelson interferometers with Fabry-Perot arm cavities. Commissioning of the interferometers has progressed to operating them simultaneously in this final optical configuration. Initial coincidence operation between the observatory sites has provided a full test of the detector hardware and software subsystems, and full operation of the data acquisition and data analysis systems. The LIGO Laboratory and the LIGO Scientific Collaboration are working together to exploit the early series of interleaved engineering and science runs to commission the detector and data systems, to provide a detailed characterization of the detector and to produce the first scientific results from LIGO. The operation of LIGO is also coordinated with operation of the GEO 600 detector, the TAMA 300 detector and the Allegro resonant mass detector. The status of this early operation, including the first science run during 2002, and the resulting data study will be presented. The support of the US National Science Foundation under Cooperative Agreement No. PHY - 0107417 is gratefully acknowledged.

  10. The Scientific Competitiveness of Nations.

    PubMed

    Cimini, Giulio; Gabrielli, Andrea; Sylos Labini, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    We use citation data of scientific articles produced by individual nations in different scientific domains to determine the structure and efficiency of national research systems. We characterize the scientific fitness of each nation-that is, the competitiveness of its research system-and the complexity of each scientific domain by means of a non-linear iterative algorithm able to assess quantitatively the advantage of scientific diversification. We find that technological leading nations, beyond having the largest production of scientific papers and the largest number of citations, do not specialize in a few scientific domains. Rather, they diversify as much as possible their research system. On the other side, less developed nations are competitive only in scientific domains where also many other nations are present. Diversification thus represents the key element that correlates with scientific and technological competitiveness. A remarkable implication of this structure of the scientific competition is that the scientific domains playing the role of "markers" of national scientific competitiveness are those not necessarily of high technological requirements, but rather addressing the most "sophisticated" needs of the society.

  11. The Spectrum of Scientific Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koballa, Thomas; Kemp, Andrew; Evans, Robert

    1997-01-01

    Provides an in-depth look at what it means to be scientifically literate. Argues that if teachers are going to help students achieve true scientific literacy, they must agree upon a definition and reach a common understanding of the nature of scientific literacy. (DDR)

  12. The Scientific Competitiveness of Nations

    PubMed Central

    Cimini, Giulio; Gabrielli, Andrea; Sylos Labini, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    We use citation data of scientific articles produced by individual nations in different scientific domains to determine the structure and efficiency of national research systems. We characterize the scientific fitness of each nation—that is, the competitiveness of its research system—and the complexity of each scientific domain by means of a non-linear iterative algorithm able to assess quantitatively the advantage of scientific diversification. We find that technological leading nations, beyond having the largest production of scientific papers and the largest number of citations, do not specialize in a few scientific domains. Rather, they diversify as much as possible their research system. On the other side, less developed nations are competitive only in scientific domains where also many other nations are present. Diversification thus represents the key element that correlates with scientific and technological competitiveness. A remarkable implication of this structure of the scientific competition is that the scientific domains playing the role of “markers” of national scientific competitiveness are those not necessarily of high technological requirements, but rather addressing the most “sophisticated” needs of the society. PMID:25493626

  13. Scientific Language: Wherein Its Mystique?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randall, Alice Fracker

    In recent years both scientists and laypeople have viewed with dismay the notion that science seems mysteriously different from other areas of human concern. Scientific language is part of the mystique. Yet scientific language is human language before it is science. The mystique that people ascribe to scientific language is of their own making,…

  14. World Map of Scientific Misconduct.

    PubMed

    Ataie-Ashtiani, Behzad

    2017-06-26

    A comparative world map of scientific misconduct reveals that countries with the most rapid growth in scientific publications also have the highest retraction rate. To avoid polluting the scientific record further, these nations must urgently commit to enforcing research integrity among their academic communities.

  15. ASE Annual Conference 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCune, Roger

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author describes the ASE Annual Conference 2010 which was held at Nottingham after a gap of 22 years. As always, the main conference was preceded by International Day, an important event for science educators from across the world. There were two strands to the programme: (1) "What works for me?"--sharing new ideas…

  16. Annual Research Briefs - 1996

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This report contains the 1996 annual progress reports of the research fellows and students supported by the Center for Turbulence Research. Last year, CTR hosted twelve resident Postdoctoral Fellows, three Research Associates, four Senior Research Fellows, and supported one doctoral student and ten short term visitors.

  17. TACSCE Research Annual 1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lesko, Silvia Jo

    1991-01-01

    This annual contains the paper that won the 1991 President's Award of the Texas Association for Community Service and Continuing Education (TACSCE) as well as the runner-up paper and other articles. An editorial, "Learning to Crawl" (Silvia Lesko), focuses on the editor's "discovery" of the adult learner. "Ethics and…

  18. Carolinas Communication Annual, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLennan, David B.

    1998-01-01

    This 1998 issue of "Carolinas Communication Annual" contains the following articles: "Give Me That Old Time Religion?: A Study of Religious Themes in the Rhetoric of the Ku Klux Klan" (John S. Seiter); "The Three Stooges versus the Third Reich" (Roy Schwartzman); "Interdisciplinary Team Teaching: Implementing…

  19. UNICEF Annual Report, 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Children's Fund, New York, NY.

    This annual report for the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) describes the programs and services provided by this organization in 1993. Following an introduction by UNICEF's executive director, the report reviews regional developments in Sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle East and North Africa, East Asia and the Pacific, South Asia, Latin…

  20. Folklife Annual, 1987.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jabbour, Alan, Ed.; Hardin, James, Ed.

    This annual publication is intended to promote the documentation and study of the folklife of the United States, to share the traditions, values, and activities of U.S. folk culture, and to serve as a national forum for the discussion of ideas and issues in folklore and folklife. The articles in this collection are: (1) "Eating in the Belly…

  1. Ultrasound Annual, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, R.C.; Hill, M.C.

    1984-01-01

    The 1984 edition of Ultrasound Annual explores new applications of ultrasound in speech and swallowing and offers guidelines on the use of ultrasound and nuclear medicine in thyroid and biliary tract disease. Other areas covered include Doppler sonography of the abdomen, intraoperative abdominal ultrasound, sonography of the placenta, ultrasound of the neonatal head and abdomen, and sonographic echo patterns created by fat.

  2. UNICEF Annual Report, 1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Children's Fund, New York, NY.

    This annual report for the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) details the programs and services provided by this organization in 1992-93. Following an introduction by UNICEF's executive director, the report briefly reviews UNICEF activities for 1992, then describes specific projects in the following areas: (1) child survival and development;…

  3. UNICEF Annual Report 1983.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Children's Fund, New York, NY.

    In introducing this annual report, the executive director of UNICEF delineates the four techniques for primary health care and basic services reported in the publication "State of the World's Children, 1982-1983." The ensuing review of UNICEF's activities illustrates highlights of the year's program cooperation, including trends and key…

  4. Annual Report, FY 1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland State Board for Community Colleges, Annapolis.

    This annual report from the Maryland State Board for Community Colleges outlines information on enrollment, instructional programs, finance, capital construction, the state master plan, legislation, and the Vocational Education Acts Grant for fiscal year 1978. The report reveals that the 1977 opening fall credit enrollment for Maryland community…

  5. Annual Energy Outlook

    EIA Publications

    2017-01-01

    The Annual Energy Outlook provides modeled projections of domestic energy markets through 2050, and includes cases with different assumptions of macroeconomic growth, world oil prices, technological progress, and energy policies. With strong domestic production and relatively flat demand, the United States becomes a net energy exporter over the projection period in most cases.

  6. Annual Income Tax Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keener, Sandra C.

    1992-01-01

    This annual guide to income tax for parents of children with disabilities covers organizing records; avoiding audits; deducting medical expenses; and considering the impact of recent changes in medical expenses, Social Security numbers for children, child care, earned income credit, and deduction for dependents. (DB)

  7. Annual Conference Abstracts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Engineering Education, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Includes abstracts of papers presented at the 80th Annual Conference of the American Society for Engineering Education. The broad areas include aerospace, affiliate and associate member council, agricultural engineering, biomedical engineering, continuing engineering studies, chemical engineering, civil engineering, computers, cooperative…

  8. OMS 1987 Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Research Libraries, Washington, DC. Office of Management Studies.

    Designed to serve both as an activity report on Office of Management Studies (OMS) progress during 1987 and a catalog of OMS services and products, this annual report focuses on the management of technology in a scholarly environment. Programs and services are reported in five sections: (1) Applied Research and Development (the Institute on…

  9. Annual Energy Outlook

    EIA Publications

    2017-01-01

    The Annual Energy Outlook provides modeled projections of domestic energy markets through 2050, and includes cases with different assumptions of macroeconomic growth, world oil prices, technological progress, and energy policies. With strong domestic production and relatively flat demand, the United States becomes a net energy exporter over the projection period in most cases.

  10. Annual Conference Abstracts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Engineering Education, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Includes abstracts of papers presented at the 80th Annual Conference of the American Society for Engineering Education. The broad areas include aerospace, affiliate and associate member council, agricultural engineering, biomedical engineering, continuing engineering studies, chemical engineering, civil engineering, computers, cooperative…

  11. 2010 AAUW Annual Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of University Women, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This report highlights some of the outstanding accomplishments of AAUW (American Association of University Women) for fiscal year 2010. This year's annual report also features stories of remarkable women who are leading the charge to break through barriers and ensure that all women have a fair chance. Sharon is working to reduce the pay gap…

  12. UNICEF Annual Report, 1994.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Children's Fund, New York, NY.

    This annual report for the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) describes the programs and services provided by this organization in 1993. Following an introduction by UNICEF's executive director, the report reviews regional developments in Sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle East and North Africa, East Asia and the Pacific, South Asia, Latin…

  13. International Energy Annual, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-14

    This report is prepared annually and presents the latest information and trends on world energy production and consumption for petroleum, natural gas, coal, and electricity. Trade and reserves are shown for petroleum, natural gas, and coal. Prices are included for selected petroleum products. Production and consumption data are reported in standard units as well as British thermal units (Btu) and joules.

  14. Annual Coal Distribution

    EIA Publications

    2016-01-01

    The Annual Coal Distribution Report (ACDR) provides detailed information on domestic coal distribution by origin state, destination state, consumer category, and method of transportation. Also provided is a summary of foreign coal distribution by coal-producing state. All data for the report year are final and this report supersedes all data in the quarterly distribution reports.

  15. Grassroots. Annual Report 1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grassroots Educare Trust, Gatesville (South Africa).

    This annual report describes the programs and staff for 1993 of Grassroots Educare Trust, an organization that helps South African communities provide preschool education and health care. Contents of the report are: (1) a list of the board of trustees; (2) a message from the chairman; (3) the director's report on external efforts and internal…

  16. Annual Conference Abstracts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engineering Education, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Presents the abstracts of 158 papers presented at the American Society for Engineering Education's annual conference at Knoxville, Tennessee, June 14-17, 1976. Included are engineering topics covering education, aerospace, agriculture, biomedicine, chemistry, computers, electricity, acoustics, environment, mechanics, and women. (SL)

  17. Annual research briefs, 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Briefs of the 1994 annual progress reports of the Research Fellows and students of the Center for Turbulence Research are presented. Subjects covered include turbulence combustion, large eddy simulation, Reynolds-averaged turbulence modeling, turbulence control, postprocessing, sound generation, and turbulence physics.

  18. NUFFIC Annual Report, 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Netherlands Universities Foundation for International Co-operation, The Hague.

    The 1977 annual report of the Netherlands Universities Foundation for International Cooperation (NUFFIC) considers the following topics: major developments in work and policy; relationships NUFFIC has with other organizations; University Development Cooperation; developments in international education; the functioning of the Consultative Structure…

  19. UNICEF Annual Report. 1984.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Children's Fund, New York, NY.

    This annual report reviews the work UNICEF has been doing to help transform the "Child Survival Revolution" from a dream into a reality. Discussion focuses primarily on child health and nutrition and other basic services for children. Throughout, the review is supplemented with profiles of program initiatives made to improve the…

  20. UNICEF Annual Report 1983.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Children's Fund, New York, NY.

    In introducing this annual report, the executive director of UNICEF delineates the four techniques for primary health care and basic services reported in the publication "State of the World's Children, 1982-1983." The ensuing review of UNICEF's activities illustrates highlights of the year's program cooperation, including trends and key…

  1. UNICEF Annual Report. 1984.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Children's Fund, New York, NY.

    This annual report reviews the work UNICEF has been doing to help transform the "Child Survival Revolution" from a dream into a reality. Discussion focuses primarily on child health and nutrition and other basic services for children. Throughout, the review is supplemented with profiles of program initiatives made to improve the…

  2. UNICEF Annual Report, 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Children's Fund, New York, NY.

    At this time, the United Nations Children Fund (UNICEF) is commemorating its 50th anniversary, under the slogan "children first." This annual UNICEF report reviews the organization's activities during 1995. An introduction by the executive director states that the report will give readers a sense of what UNICEF is doing with partners to…

  3. Carolinas Communication Annual, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLennan, David B.

    1999-01-01

    This 1999 issue of the "Carolinas Communication Annual" contains the following articles: "The Unmade Analogy: Alcohol and Abortion" (Richard W. Leeman); "Say, You Want a Revolution" (Roy Schwartzman and Constance Y. Green); "Exploring the Relationship between Perceived Narrativity and Persuasiveness"…

  4. ASE Annual Conference 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCune, Roger

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author describes the ASE Annual Conference 2010 which was held at Nottingham after a gap of 22 years. As always, the main conference was preceded by International Day, an important event for science educators from across the world. There were two strands to the programme: (1) "What works for me?"--sharing new ideas…

  5. Uranium industry annual 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1999-04-22

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1998 (UIA 1998) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. It contains data for the period 1989 through 2008 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey.`` Data provides a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1989 through 1998, including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment, are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2008, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, and uranium inventories, are shown in Chapter 2. The methodology used in the 1998 survey, including data edit and analysis, is described in Appendix A. The methodologies for estimation of resources and reserves are described in Appendix B. A list of respondents to the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is provided in Appendix C. The Form EIA-858 ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is shown in Appendix D. For the readers convenience, metric versions of selected tables from Chapters 1 and 2 are presented in Appendix E along with the standard conversion factors used. A glossary of technical terms is at the end of the report. 24 figs., 56 tabs.

  6. Magnetic Resonance Annual, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Kressel, H.Y.

    1985-01-01

    The inaugural volume of Magnetic Resonance Annual includes reviews of MRI of the posterior fossa, cerebral neoplasms, and the cardiovascular and genitourinary systems. A chapter on contrast materials outlines the mechanisms of paramagnetic contrast enhancement and highlights several promising contrast agents.

  7. Expert opinions and scientific evidence for colonoscopy key performance indicators

    PubMed Central

    Rees, Colin J; Bevan, Roisin; Zimmermann-Fraedrich, Katharina; Rutter, Matthew D; Rex, Douglas; Dekker, Evelien; Ponchon, Thierry; Bretthauer, Michael; Regula, Jaroslaw; Saunders, Brian; Hassan, Cesare; Bourke, Michael J; Rösch, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Colonoscopy is a widely performed procedure with procedural volumes increasing annually throughout the world. Many procedures are now performed as part of colorectal cancer screening programmes. Colonoscopy should be of high quality and measures of this quality should be evidence based. New UK key performance indicators and quality assurance standards have been developed by a working group with consensus agreement on each standard reached. This paper reviews the scientific basis for each of the quality measures published in the UK standards. PMID:27802153

  8. Recent Highlights of Scientific Ballooning in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuke, H.

    Since 2008, the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has carried out annual domestic balloon campaigns from Taiki Aerospace Research Field (TARF). Productive results have been obtained by many projects in academic fields such as atmospheric science, space engineering, cosmic-ray physics, and astronomy. In 2013, an 80,000-m3 balloon made from a 2.8-μm ultra-thin polyethylene film reached an altitude of 53.7 km, equaling the world record for the altitude of an unmanned balloon. In 2015, JAXA carried out a balloon campaign from Alice Springs in Australia as a precursor of future sustainable overseas activities to compliment the domestic ones at TARF. In this paper, we discuss recent highlights of and future prospects for Japanese scientific ballooning.

  9. Dishonesty in scientific research.

    PubMed

    Mazar, Nina; Ariely, Dan

    2015-11-02

    Fraudulent business practices, such as those leading to the Enron scandal and the conviction of Bernard Madoff, evoke a strong sense of public outrage. But fraudulent or dishonest actions are not exclusive to the realm of big corporations or to evil individuals without consciences. Dishonest actions are all too prevalent in everyone's daily lives, because people are constantly encountering situations in which they can gain advantages by cutting corners. Whether it's adding a few dollars in value to the stolen items reported on an insurance claim form or dropping outlier data points from a figure to make a paper sound more interesting, dishonesty is part of the human condition. Here, we explore how people rationalize dishonesty, the implications for scientific research, and what can be done to foster a culture of research integrity.

  10. Final Scientific EFNUDAT Workshop

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The Final Scientific EFNUDAT Workshop - organized by the CERN/EN-STI group on behalf of n_TOF Collaboration - will be held at CERN, Geneva (Switzerland) from 30 August to 2 September 2010 inclusive.EFNUDAT website: http://www.efnudat.euTopics of interest include: Data evaluationCross section measurementsExperimental techniquesUncertainties and covariancesFission propertiesCurrent and future facilities  International Advisory Committee: C. Barreau (CENBG, France)T. Belgya (IKI KFKI, Hungary)E. Gonzalez (CIEMAT, Spain)F. Gunsing (CEA, France)F.-J. Hambsch (IRMM, Belgium)A. Junghans (FZD, Germany)R. Nolte (PTB, Germany)S. Pomp (TSL UU, Sweden) Workshop Organizing Committee: Enrico Chiaveri (Chairman)Marco CalvianiSamuel AndriamonjeEric BerthoumieuxCarlos GuerreroRoberto LositoVasilis Vlachoudis Workshop Assistant: Géraldine Jean

  11. Final Scientific EFNUDAT Workshop

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The Final Scientific EFNUDAT Workshop - organized by the CERN/EN-STI group on behalf of n_TOF Collaboration - will be held at CERN, Geneva (Switzerland) from 30 August to 2 September 2010 inclusive.EFNUDAT website: http://www.efnudat.euTopics of interest include: Data evaluationCross section measurementsExperimental techniquesUncertainties and covariancesFission propertiesCurrent and future facilities  International Advisory Committee: C. Barreau (CENBG, France)T. Belgya (IKI KFKI, Hungary)E. Gonzalez (CIEMAT, Spain)F. Gunsing (CEA, France)F.-J. Hambsch (IRMM, Belgium)A. Junghans (FZD, Germany)R. Nolte (PTB, Germany)S. Pomp (TSL UU, Sweden) Workshop Organizing Committee: Enrico Chiaveri (Chairman)Marco CalvianiSamuel AndriamonjeEric BerthoumieuxCarlos GuerreroRoberto LositoVasilis Vlachoudis Workshop Assistant: Géraldine Jean

  12. Dishonesty in scientific research

    PubMed Central

    Mazar, Nina; Ariely, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Fraudulent business practices, such as those leading to the Enron scandal and the conviction of Bernard Madoff, evoke a strong sense of public outrage. But fraudulent or dishonest actions are not exclusive to the realm of big corporations or to evil individuals without consciences. Dishonest actions are all too prevalent in everyone’s daily lives, because people are constantly encountering situations in which they can gain advantages by cutting corners. Whether it’s adding a few dollars in value to the stolen items reported on an insurance claim form or dropping outlier data points from a figure to make a paper sound more interesting, dishonesty is part of the human condition. Here, we explore how people rationalize dishonesty, the implications for scientific research, and what can be done to foster a culture of research integrity. PMID:26524587

  13. Ethics in Scientific Publishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sage, Leslie J.

    2012-08-01

    We all learn in elementary school not turn in other people's writing as if it were our own (plagiarism), and in high school science labs not to fake our data. But there are many other practices in scientific publishing that are depressingly common and almost as unethical. At about the 20 percent level authors are deliberately hiding recent work -- by themselves as well as by others -- so as to enhance the apparent novelty of their most recent paper. Some people lie about the dates the data were obtained, to cover up conflicts of interest, or inappropriate use of privileged information. Others will publish the same conference proceeding in multiple volumes, or publish the same result in multiple journals with only trivial additions of data or analysis (self-plagiarism). These shady practices should be roundly condemned and stopped. I will discuss these and other unethical actions I have seen over the years, and steps editors are taking to stop them.

  14. Scientific Highlights from ROMIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lübken, Franz-Josef

    2017-04-01

    The German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung, BMBF) has launched a research initiative in 2013/2014 called ROMIC (Role of the Middle Atmosphere in Climate). The aim of ROMIC is to improve our understanding of long term variations in the stratosphere, mesosphere, and lower thermosphere and to investigate their potential role for climate changes in the troposphere. This includes to study coupling mechanisms between various layers and the relative importance of anthropogenic and natural forcing, e. g., by the Sun. Scientists at a total of 15 research institutes in Germany are involved and cover a large range of experimental and theoretical topics relevant for ROMIC. Some scientific highlights from the research projects within ROMIC will be presented.

  15. Space telescope scientific instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leckrone, D. S.

    1979-01-01

    The paper describes the Space Telescope (ST) observatory, the design concepts of the five scientific instruments which will conduct the initial observatory observations, and summarizes their astronomical capabilities. The instruments are the wide-field and planetary camera (WFPC) which will receive the highest quality images, the faint-object camera (FOC) which will penetrate to the faintest limiting magnitudes and achieve the finest angular resolution possible, and the faint-object spectrograph (FOS), which will perform photon noise-limited spectroscopy and spectropolarimetry on objects substantially fainter than those accessible to ground-based spectrographs. In addition, the high resolution spectrograph (HRS) will provide higher spectral resolution with greater photometric accuracy than previously possible in ultraviolet astronomical spectroscopy, and the high-speed photometer will achieve precise time-resolved photometric observations of rapidly varying astronomical sources on short time scales.

  16. Ben Franklin's Scientific Amusements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herschbach, Dudley

    2003-04-01

    As an American icon, Benjamin Franklin is often portrayed as wise and canny in business and politics, earnestly pursuing and extolling diligence, sensible conduct, pragmatism, and good works. Also legendary are some of his inventions, particularly the lightning rod, bifocals, and an efficient wood-burning stove. The iconic image is misleading in major respects. Today, surprisingly few people appreciate that, in the 18th century, Franklin was greatly esteemed throughout Europe as a scientist (termed then a "natural philosopher.") He was hailed as the "Newton of Electricity." Indeed, until Franklin, electricity seemed more mysterious than had gravity in Newton's time, and lightning was considered the wrath of God. By his own account, Franklin's studies of electricity and many other phenomena were prompted not by practical aims, but by his playful curiosity--which often became obsessive. Also not generally appreciated is the importance of Franklin's scientific reputation in enhancing his efforts to obtain French support for the American Revolution.

  17. Final Scientific EFNUDAT Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    2010-11-09

    The Final Scientific EFNUDAT Workshop - organized by the CERN/EN-STI group on behalf of n_TOF Collaboration - will be held at CERN, Geneva (Switzerland) from 30 August to 2 September 2010 inclusive.EFNUDAT website: http://www.efnudat.euTopics of interest include: Data evaluationCross section measurementsExperimental techniquesUncertainties and covariancesFission propertiesCurrent and future facilities  International Advisory Committee: C. Barreau (CENBG, France)T. Belgya (IKI KFKI, Hungary)E. Gonzalez (CIEMAT, Spain)F. Gunsing (CEA, France)F.-J. Hambsch (IRMM, Belgium)A. Junghans (FZD, Germany)R. Nolte (PTB, Germany)S. Pomp (TSL UU, Sweden) Workshop Organizing Committee: Enrico Chiaveri (Chairman)Marco CalvianiSamuel AndriamonjeEric BerthoumieuxCarlos GuerreroRoberto LositoVasilis Vlachoudis Workshop Assistant: Géraldine Jean

  18. Scientific developments ISFD3

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schropp, M.H.I.; Soong, T.W.

    2006-01-01

    Highlights, trends, and consensus from the 63 papers submitted to the Scientific Developments theme of the Third International Symposium on Flood Defence (ISFD) are presented. Realizing that absolute protection against flooding can never be guaranteed, trends in flood management have shifted: (1) from flood protection to flood-risk management, (2) from reinforcing structural protection to lowering flood levels, and (3) to sustainable management through integrated problem solving. Improved understanding of watershed responses, climate changes, applications of GIS and remote-sensing technologies, and advanced analytical tools appeared to be the driving forces for renewing flood-risk management strategies. Technical competence in integrating analytical tools to form the basin wide management systems are demonstrated by several large, transnation models. However, analyses from social-economic-environmental points of view are found lag in general. ?? 2006 Taylor & Francis Group.

  19. Evolution of the scientific paper

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, J.E.

    1992-09-01

    The first papers reporting original research results in technical periodicals and proceedings appeared in the late 17th century. Since that time, the typical scientific paper has evolved from a fairly simple document, accessible to a general audience, to a much more complex one, aimed at a specialized audience. The purpose of this article is to give an overview of what the first scientific papers were like and how they evolved to their present form and style. To facilitate this discussion, the scientific paper`s development has arbitrarily been divided into four stages: the origin and formative years of the scientific paper (1665-1765), emergence of scientific papers written for specialized publications (1765-1865), development of the modem scientific paper (1865-1965), and hyperspecialization and computerization of the modem scientific paper (1965-?).

  20. Evolution of the scientific paper

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    The first papers reporting original research results in technical periodicals and proceedings appeared in the late 17th century. Since that time, the typical scientific paper has evolved from a fairly simple document, accessible to a general audience, to a much more complex one, aimed at a specialized audience. The purpose of this article is to give an overview of what the first scientific papers were like and how they evolved to their present form and style. To facilitate this discussion, the scientific paper's development has arbitrarily been divided into four stages: the origin and formative years of the scientific paper (1665-1765), emergence of scientific papers written for specialized publications (1765-1865), development of the modem scientific paper (1865-1965), and hyperspecialization and computerization of the modem scientific paper (1965- ).

  1. Scientific Tourism Centres in Armenia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, A. M.; Farmanyan, S. V.; Mikayelyan, G. A.; Mikayelyan, A. A.

    2016-12-01

    Armenia is rich in scientific sites, among which archaeological sites of scientific nature, modern scientific institutions and science related museums can be mentioned. Examples of archaeological sites are ancient observatories, petroglyphs having astronomical nature, as well as intangible heritage, such as Armenian calendars. Modern institutions having tools or laboratories which can be represented in terms of tourism, are considered as scientific tourism sites. Science related museums are Museum of science and technology, Space museum, Geological museum and other museums. Despite the fact, that scientific tourism is a new direction, it has great perspectives, and Armenia has a great potential in this field. It is very important to introduce Armenia from this angle, including scientific archaeological sites as well as modern institutions and museums. This article presents major scientific tourism centers of Armenia.

  2. Report of the American College of Cardiology (ACC) Scientific Sessions 2015, San Diego.

    PubMed

    Murohara, Toyoaki

    2015-01-01

    The 64th Annual Scientific Sessions and Exposition of the American College of Cardiology (ACC) were held at the San Diego Convention Center from March 14-16, 2015. The ACC Scientific Sessions are 1 of 2 major scientific cardiology meetings in the United States, with nearly 20,000 attendees, including 15,000 cardiovascular professionals. There were over 2,100 oral and poster abstracts, and more than 15 late-breaking clinical trials (LBCTs) abstructs. This report presents the highlights and several key presentations, especially the LBCTs, from the ACC Scientific Sessions 2015. I hope this review will help cardiologists update to the latest information.

  3. Second Annual David Derse Memorial Lecture and Award | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Anne Arthur, Guest Writer The Second Annual David Derse Memorial Lecture and Award presentation was held on November 12, 2013, at the NCI at Frederick Conference Center to honor David Derse’s outstanding research accomplishments and to stimulate the exchange of innovative ideas that Derse was well known for promoting throughout his scientific career. The Annual David Derse Memorial Lecture and Award is sponsored by the HIV Drug Resistance Program, with support from Hye Kyung Chung-Derse, Ph.D., the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and colleagues and friends of Derse who contributed to the memorial fund in his honor.

  4. Second Annual David Derse Memorial Lecture and Award | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Anne Arthur, Guest Writer The Second Annual David Derse Memorial Lecture and Award presentation was held on November 12, 2013, at the NCI at Frederick Conference Center to honor David Derse’s outstanding research accomplishments and to stimulate the exchange of innovative ideas that Derse was well known for promoting throughout his scientific career. The Annual David Derse Memorial Lecture and Award is sponsored by the HIV Drug Resistance Program, with support from Hye Kyung Chung-Derse, Ph.D., the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and colleagues and friends of Derse who contributed to the memorial fund in his honor.

  5. Annual recertification: fun? Wow!

    PubMed

    Amos, A

    1994-01-01

    Learning is critical to fostering a knowledge base required for maintaining currency and furthering professional development. In the ever-changing field of nephrology, most skills practised in nursing are considered to be sanctioned medical acts or added nursing skills. Therefore, annual recertification of the skills designated as sanctioned medical acts is an expectation of the College of Nurses of Ontario. The Wellesley Hospital policy indicates one time only or annual approval of the added nursing skills. The article will discuss the use of games as a creative, non-threatening educational tool in the recertification/re-approval process currently in place at The Wellesley Hospital, renal programs. In the past two years, several games or alternative teaching strategies have been utilized to assist the staff in preparing for recertification. This paper will examine the advantages and disadvantages of utilizing alternative teaching formats. Commentary regarding the response of staff nurses, nursing management and education will be highlighted.

  6. Annual Energy Review 2007

    SciTech Connect

    Seiferlein, Katherine E.

    2008-06-01

    The Annual Energy Review (AER) is the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) primary report of annual historical energy statistics. For many series, data begin with the year 1949. Included are data on total energy production, consumption, and trade; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, renewable energy, international energy, as well as financial and environment indicators; and data unit conversion tables. Publication of this report is required under Public Law 95–91 (Department of Energy Organization Act), Section 205(c), and is in keeping with responsibilities given to the EIA under Section 205(a)(2), which states: “The Administrator shall be responsible for carrying out a central, comprehensive, and unified energy data and information program which will collect, evaluate, assemble, analyze, and disseminate data and information....”

  7. Coal industry annual 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    Coal Industry Annual 1997 provides comprehensive information about US coal production, number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves. US Coal production for 1997 and previous years is based on the annual survey EIA-7A, Coal Production Report. This report presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, and coal quality for Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report includes a national total coal consumption for nonutility power producers that are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. 14 figs., 145 tabs.

  8. Renewable energy annual 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    The Renewable Energy Annual 1995 is the first in an expected series of annual reports the Energy Information Administration (EIA) intends to publish to provide a comprehensive assessment of renewable energy. This report presents the following information on the history, status, and prospects of renewable energy data: estimates of renewable resources; characterizations of renewable energy technologies; descriptions of industry infrastructures for individual technologies; evaluations of current market status; and assessments of near-term prospects for market growth. An international section is included, as well as two feature articles that discuss issues of importance for renewable energy as a whole. The report also contains a number of technical appendices and a glossary. The renewable energy sources included are biomass (wood), municipal solid waste, biomass-derived liquid fuels, geothermal, wind, and solar and photovoltaic.

  9. International energy annual 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1999-04-01

    The International Energy Annual presents an overview of key international energy trends for production, consumption, imports, and exports of primary energy commodities in over 220 countries, dependencies, and areas of special sovereignty. Also included are population and gross domestic product data, as well as prices for crude oil and petroleum products in selected countries. Renewable energy reported in the International Energy Annual includes hydroelectric power and geothermal, solar, and wind electric power. Also included are biomass electric power for Brazil and the US, and biomass, geothermal, and solar energy produced in the US and not used for electricity generation. This report is published to keep the public and other interested parties fully informed of primary energy supplies on a global basis. The data presented have been largely derived from published sources. The data have been converted to units of measurement and thermal values (Appendices E and F) familiar to the American public. 93 tabs.

  10. Petroleum marketing annual 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-24

    The Petroleum Marketing Annual (PMA) provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysis, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the fob and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners` acquisition cost of crude oil. Refined petroleum product sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane. The Petroleum Marketing Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration ensures the accuracy, quality, and confidentiality of the published data in the Petroleum Marketing Annual. For this production, all estimates have been recalculated since their earlier publication in the Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM). These calculations made use of additional data and corrections that were received after the PMM publication date.

  11. 2008 annual merit review

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    The 2008 DOE Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review was held February 25-28, 2008 in Bethesda, Maryland. The review encompassed all of the work done by the Vehicle Technologies Program: a total of 280 individual activities were reviewed, by a total of just over 100 reviewers. A total of 1,908 individual review responses were received for the technical reviews, and an additional 29 individual review responses were received for the plenary session review.

  12. Uranium industry annual 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1995 (UIA 1995) provides current statistical data on the U.S. uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. The UIA 1995 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. It contains data for the period 1986 through 2005 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey``. Data collected on the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Where aggregate data are presented in the UIA 1995, care has been taken to protect the confidentiality of company-specific information while still conveying accurate and complete statistical data. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1986 through 1995 including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2005, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, uranium imports and exports, and uranium inventories are shown in Chapter 2. The methodology used in the 1995 survey, including data edit and analysis, is described in Appendix A. The methodologies for estimation of resources and reserves are described in Appendix B. A list of respondents to the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` is provided in Appendix C. For the reader`s convenience, metric versions of selected tables from Chapters 1 and 2 are presented in Appendix D along with the standard conversion factors used. A glossary of technical terms is at the end of the report. 14 figs., 56 tabs.

  13. Annual Report 1984.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    quality activities, and coordinating activities with other Federal and non-Federal basin interests groups. - , DD Fo’N, 1473 EDITION Ort NOV6S IS...Sod•’ I TABLE OF CONTENTS (CONTINUED) PAGE SECTION VII- RESERVOIR DATA SUMMARY 1. SWD MAP 2. INDEX BY BASINS 3. INDEX IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER 4. DATA...TABLES SECTION VIII - MINUTES OF THE TRINITY RIVER BASIN INTERESTS GROUP AND THE ANNUAL SWD WATER MANAGEMENT PERSONNEL MEETING 1. TRINITY RIVER BASIN

  14. Sources Sought for Innovative Scientific Instrumentation for Scientific Lunar Rovers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, C.

    1993-01-01

    Lunar rovers should be designed as integrated scientific measurement systems that address scientific goals as their main objective. Scientific goals for lunar rovers are presented. Teleoperated robotic field geologists will allow the science team to make discoveries using a wide range of sensory data collected by electronic 'eyes' and sophisticated scientific instrumentation. rovers need to operate in geologically interesting terrain (rock outcrops) and to identify and closely examine interesting rock samples. Enough flight-ready instruments are available to fly on the first mission, but additional instrument development based on emerging technology is desirable. Various instruments that need to be developed for later missions are described.

  15. Scientific authorship. Part 1. A window into scientific fraud?

    PubMed

    Claxton, Larry D

    2005-01-01

    The examination of a single scientific manuscript seldom alerts scientists, reviewers, editors, and scientific administrators to the fabrication and falsification of data and information. This review shows that most documented cases of scientific fraud involve falsification (altering truthful information) and fabrication (inventing information where none previously existed). Plagiarism is much less frequent. The review of published accounts also shows that the publication of scientific papers containing recognizable fraudulent material is very low, probably less than 0.02% and extremely difficult to detect. Because most reported cases of fraud have involved research done at prestigious organizations with distinguished co-authors, and that is published in journals with exacting review processes, it becomes evident that some unscrupulous scientists are adept at fabricating and falsifying data. However, "significant" scientific fraud is detected when scientists repeatedly report results that cannot be independently verified, when colleagues report suspicious behavior, or scientific audits are performed. This review documents and compares many of the better-known cases of scientific fraud. Fraudulent behavior has served as the impetus for the scientific community to develop publication procedures and guidelines that help to guard against not only fraudulent behavior but also against other types of unethical or undesirable behaviors. A companion paper reviews the non-fraudulent issues associated with scientific publication.

  16. Uranium industry annual 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-05

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1994 (UIA 1994) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry`s activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing during that survey year. The UIA 1994 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. It contains data for the 10-year period 1985 through 1994 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey.`` Data collected on the ``Uranium Industry Annual Survey`` (UIAS) provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry`s activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry`s plans and commitments for the near-term future. Where aggregate data are presented in the UIA 1994, care has been taken to protect the confidentiality of company-specific information while still conveying accurate and complete statistical data. A feature article, ``Comparison of Uranium Mill Tailings Reclamation in the United States and Canada,`` is included in the UIA 1994. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, and uranium inventories, enrichment feed deliveries (actual and projected), and unfilled market requirements are shown in Chapter 2.

  17. Proceedings of the Fifty-Sixth Annual Meeting of the American College Health Association. New Orleans, Louisiana, 1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of the American College Health Association, 1978

    1978-01-01

    This issue is devoted to a report of the proceedings of the Fifty-Sixth Annual Meeting of the American College Health Association. Abstracts of scientific programs instituted by the Association are included. (JD)

  18. Tracking scientific interest in the dissociative disorders: a study of scientific publication output 1984-2003.

    PubMed

    Pope, Harrison G; Barry, Steven; Bodkin, Alexander; Hudson, James I

    2006-01-01

    We attempted to track scientific interest in dissociative amnesia and dissociative identity disorder by estimating the annual output of publications regarding these entities over the last 20 years. Using a standard medical index, PsycINFO, we counted the number of indexed publications involving dissociative amnesia and dissociative identity disorder listed for each year. We then compared these rates with those of well-established diagnoses such as anorexia nervosa, alcohol abuse, and schizophrenia. We also systematically reviewed all publications involving dissociative amnesia that appeared in 2003. Annual publications involving dissociative amnesia and dissociative identity disorder rose from low levels in the 1980's to a sharp peak in the mid 1990's, followed by an equally sharp decline to only about one quarter of their peak levels by 2002 and 2003. In contrast, all of the 25 comparison diagnoses in our survey showed constant or steadily rising publication rates; none showed the 'bubble' pattern of the dissociative disorders. Of the 34 papers involving dissociative amnesia identified by PsycINFO for 2003, 10 (32%) appeared skeptical of the validity of dissociative amnesia and/or recovered-memory therapy. Despite a detailed search using multiple medical indices and search terms, we could find only 13 explicit cases of individuals with dissociative amnesia worldwide in the 2003 literature. Dissociative amnesia and dissociative identity disorder have not generated consistent scientific interest over the years, but instead apparently enjoyed a brief period of fashion that now has waned. Overall, our observations suggest that these diagnostic entities presently do not command widespread scientific acceptance. Copyright 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Scientific teaching targeting faculty from diverse institutions.

    PubMed

    Gregg, Christopher S; Ales, Jo Dale; Pomarico, Steven M; Wischusen, E William; Siebenaller, Joseph F

    2013-01-01

    We offered four annual professional development workshops called STAR (for Scientific Teaching, Assessment, and Resources) modeled after the National Academies Summer Institute (SI) on Undergraduate Education in Biology. In contrast to the SI focus on training faculty from research universities, STAR's target was faculty from community colleges, 2-yr campuses, and public and private research universities. Because of the importance of community colleges and 2-yr institutions as entries to higher education, we wanted to determine whether the SI model can be successfully extended to this broader range of institutions. We surveyed the four cohorts; 47 STAR alumni responded to the online survey. The responses were separated into two groups based on the Carnegie undergraduate instructional program categories, faculty from seven associate's and associate's-dominant institutions (23) and faculty from nine institutions with primarily 4-yr degree programs (24). Both groups expressed the opinion that STAR had a positive impact on teaching, student learning, and engagement. The two groups reported using techniques of formative assessment and active learning with similar frequency. The mix of faculty from diverse institutions was viewed as enhancing the workshop experience. The present analysis indicates that the SI model for training faculty in scientific teaching can successfully be extended to a broad range of higher education institutions.

  20. Scientific Teaching Targeting Faculty from Diverse Institutions

    PubMed Central

    Gregg, Christopher S.; Ales, Jo Dale; Pomarico, Steven M.; Wischusen, E. William; Siebenaller, Joseph F.

    2013-01-01

    We offered four annual professional development workshops called STAR (for Scientific Teaching, Assessment, and Resources) modeled after the National Academies Summer Institute (SI) on Undergraduate Education in Biology. In contrast to the SI focus on training faculty from research universities, STAR's target was faculty from community colleges, 2-yr campuses, and public and private research universities. Because of the importance of community colleges and 2-yr institutions as entries to higher education, we wanted to determine whether the SI model can be successfully extended to this broader range of institutions. We surveyed the four cohorts; 47 STAR alumni responded to the online survey. The responses were separated into two groups based on the Carnegie undergraduate instructional program categories, faculty from seven associate's and associate's-dominant institutions (23) and faculty from nine institutions with primarily 4-yr degree programs (24). Both groups expressed the opinion that STAR had a positive impact on teaching, student learning, and engagement. The two groups reported using techniques of formative assessment and active learning with similar frequency. The mix of faculty from diverse institutions was viewed as enhancing the workshop experience. The present analysis indicates that the SI model for training faculty in scientific teaching can successfully be extended to a broad range of higher education institutions. PMID:24006387