Science.gov

Sample records for detailed abundance analysis

  1. Detailed chemical abundance analysis of the thick disk star cluster Gaia 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Andreas; Hansen, Terese T.; Kunder, Andrea

    2018-01-01

    Star clusters, particularly those objects in the disk-bulge-halo interface are as yet poorly charted, despite the fact that they carry important information about the formation and the structure of the Milky Way. Here, we present a detailed chemical abundance study of the recently discovered object Gaia 1. Photometry has previously suggested it as an intermediate-age, moderately metal-rich system, although the exact values for its age and metallicity remained ambiguous in the literature. We measured detailed chemical abundances of 14 elements in four red giant members, from high-resolution (R = 25 000) spectra that firmly establish Gaia 1 as an object associated with the thick disk. The resulting mean Fe abundance is -0.62 ± 0.03(stat.)± 0.10(sys.) dex, which is more metal-poor than indicated by previous spectroscopy from the literature, but it is fully in line with values from isochrone fitting. We find that Gaia 1 is moderately enhanced in the α-elements, which allowed us to consolidate its membership with the thick disk via chemical tagging. The cluster's Fe-peak and neutron-capture elements are similar to those found across the metal-rich disks, where the latter indicate some level of s-process activity. No significant spread in iron nor in other heavy elements was detected, whereas we find evidence of light-element variations in Na, Mg, and Al. Nonetheless, the traditional Na-O and Mg-Al (anti-)correlations, typically seen in old globular clusters, are not seen in our data. This confirms that Gaia 1 is rather a massive and luminous open cluster than a low-mass globular cluster. Finally, orbital computations of the target stars bolster our chemical findings of Gaia 1's present-day membership with the thick disk, even though it remains unclear which mechanisms put it in that place. This paper includes data gathered with the 2.5 meter du Pont Telescope located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.Full Table 2 is available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http

  2. Preliminary Results of Detailed Chemical Abundance Analysis of Milky Way Satellite Galaxy Reticulum II Discovered in the Dark Energy Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagasawa, Daniel; Marshall, Jennifer L.; Li, Ting; Dark Energy Survey Milky Way Science Group

    2016-01-01

    We present preliminary results from abundance analysis of stars in Milky Way satellite galaxies found in the Dark Energy Survey (DES). DES has discovered 16 candidate satellite galaxies of the Milky Way in its first two years of operation. Since January 2015, three candidates have subsequently been revealed to be dark matter-dominated by spectroscopic follow-up studies of their kinematics, confirming their status as satellite galaxies. Spectroscopic follow-up of the remaining 13 candidates is underway. We have analyzed high resolution VLT/GIRAFFE spectra of member stars in one of these satellite galaxies, Reticulum II. Using equivalent width measurement and spectral synthesis methods, we measure the abundances of Iron and other species in order to begin to understand the chemical content of these Milky Way satellites.

  3. Detailed abundances in EMP dwarfs from SDSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sbordone, Luca; Caffau, Elisabetta; Bonifacio, Piercarlo

    2012-09-01

    We report on the current status of an ongoing survey to select extremely metal poor (EMP) turn-off (TO) stars from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectra, and determine their detailed chemical composition through high resolution follow-up. So far, 26 stars have been observed with UVESatVLT and X-SHOOTERatVLT, all but two showing an iron content below [Fe/H]=-3. Among them we detected the current record holder for the lowest total metallicity (SDSS J102915+172927, Z=10-5 Zsolar), four carbon-enhanced extremely metal poor objects (CEMP), as well as subsets with enhanced Ni and Mn. Lithium abundances or upper limits were derived, confirming the previously detected ``meltdown'' of the Spite plateau for metallicities below about [Fe/H]=-2.8. SDSS J102915+172927 in particular shows no detectable Li I 670.8 doublet, leading to an upper limit of A(Li)<1.1, hinting to an even deeper Li depletion in TO stars below [Fe/H]=-4. Spectroscopic follow-up is currently being prosecuted by the recently started ESO large program TOPoS, aiming to observe about 80 more EMP candidates.

  4. Detailed Abundances of Stars with Small Planets Discovered by Kepler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuler, Simon C.; Vaz, Zachary A.; Katime Santrich, Orlando J.; Cunha, Katia M. L.; Smith, Verne V.; King, Jeremy R.; Ghezzi, Luan; Howell, Steve B.; Teske, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    We present newly derived stellar parameters and the detailed abundances of 19 elements of seven stars with small planets discovered by NASA's Kepler Mission. Each star save one has at least one planet with a radius less than 2 REarth, suggesting a primarily rocky composition. The stellar parameters and abundances are derived from high signal-to-noise ratio, high-resolution echelle spectroscopy obtained with the 10-m Keck I telescope and HIRES spectrometer using standard spectroscopic techniques. We compare the abundances to those of a general Galactic disk population and investigate possible abundance trends with condensation temperature of the elements.S.C.S. acknowledges support provided by grant NNX12AD19G to S.C.S. from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration as part of the Kepler Participating Scientist Program.

  5. A search for stars of very low metal abundance. VI. Detailed abundances of 313 metal-poor stars

    SciTech Connect

    Roederer, Ian U.; Preston, George W.; Thompson, Ian B.

    2014-06-01

    We present radial velocities, equivalent widths, model atmosphere parameters, and abundances or upper limits for 53 species of 48 elements derived from high resolution optical spectroscopy of 313 metal-poor stars. A majority of these stars were selected from the metal-poor candidates of the HK Survey of Beers, Preston, and Shectman. We derive detailed abundances for 61% of these stars for the first time. Spectra were obtained during a 10 yr observing campaign using the Magellan Inamori Kyocera Echelle spectrograph on the Magellan Telescopes at Las Campanas Observatory, the Robert G. Tull Coudé Spectrograph on the Harlan J. Smith Telescope atmore » McDonald Observatory, and the High Resolution Spectrograph on the Hobby-Eberly Telescope at McDonald Observatory. We perform a standard LTE abundance analysis using MARCS model atmospheres, and we apply line-by-line statistical corrections to minimize systematic abundance differences arising when different sets of lines are available for analysis. We identify several abundance correlations with effective temperature. A comparison with previous abundance analyses reveals significant differences in stellar parameters, which we investigate in detail. Our metallicities are, on average, lower by ≈0.25 dex for red giants and ≈0.04 dex for subgiants. Our sample contains 19 stars with [Fe/H] ≤–3.5, 84 stars with [Fe/H] ≤–3.0, and 210 stars with [Fe/H] ≤–2.5. Detailed abundances are presented here or elsewhere for 91% of the 209 stars with [Fe/H] ≤–2.5 as estimated from medium resolution spectroscopy by Beers, Preston, and Shectman. We will discuss the interpretation of these abundances in subsequent papers.« less

  6. Abundance Analysis of 10 Kepler Planetary Hosts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaz, Zachary A.; Schuler, Simon C.; Williams, Drake; Cunha, Katia M. L.; Smith, Verne V.; Ghezzi, Luan; Teske, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to identify possible connections between the detailed chemical abundances of stars and the existence of small planets discovered by NASA's Kepler spacecraft. We have analyzed high quality Keck/HIRES spectra of the planetary hosts Kepler-65, Kepler-93, Kepler-97, Kepler-98, Kepler-102, Kepler 128, Kepler-406, Kepler-408, Kepler-409, and Kepler-411 and derived the abundances of up to 17 elements for these stars. Results from previous studies have suggested that stellar abundance patterns or "signatures" may indicate the presence of planets, possibly terrestrial planets in particular. Should such patterns exist, they could be used to identify stars with small planets. Here we present the results of our abundance analysis of 10 stars with a variety of exoplanet systems discovered by Kepler and address the hypothesis that chemical abundance signatures can indicate the presence of small planets.This work is generously supported by NASA through a Kepler Participating Scientist grant to SCS (Grant #NNX13AH78G).

  7. Detailed photospheric abundances of 28 Peg and HD 202240

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmaslı, Aslı; Çalışkan, Şeyma; Kılıçoğlu, Tolgahan; Ünal, Kübraözge; Nasolo, Yahya; Albayrak, Berahitdin

    2016-01-01

    The atmospheric parameters and chemical abundances of two neglected A-type stars, 28 Peg and HD 202240, were derived using high resolution spectra obtained at the TÜBİTAK National Observatory. We determined the photospheric abundances of 11 elements for 28 Peg and 20 for HD 202240, using equivalent-width measurement and spectral synthesis methods. Their abundance patterns are in good agreement with those of chemically normal A-type stars having similar atmospheric parameters. We pinpoint the position of these stars on the H-R diagram and estimate their masses and ages as; 2.60 ± 0.10 M⊙ and 650 ± 50 Myr for 28 Peg and 4.50 ± 0.09 M⊙ and 150 ± 10 Myr for HD 202240. To compare our abundance determinations with those of stars having similar ages and atmospheric parameters, we select members of open clusters. We notice that our target stars exhibit similar abundance patterns with these members.

  8. Calibrating Detailed Chemical Analysis of M dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veyette, Mark; Muirhead, Philip Steven; Mann, Andrew; Brewer, John; Allard, France; Homeier, Derek

    2018-01-01

    The ability to perform detailed chemical analysis of Sun-like F-, G-, and K-type stars is a powerful tool with many applications including studying the chemical evolution of the Galaxy, assessing membership in stellar kinematic groups, and constraining planet formation theories. Unfortunately, complications in modeling cooler stellar atmospheres has hindered similar analysis of M-dwarf stars. Large surveys of FGK abundances play an important role in developing methods to measure the compositions of M dwarfs by providing benchmark FGK stars that have widely-separated M dwarf companions. These systems allow us to empirically calibrate metallicity-sensitive features in M dwarf spectra. However, current methods to measure metallicity in M dwarfs from moderate-resolution spectra are limited to measuring overall metallicity and largely rely on astrophysical abundance correlations in stellar populations. In this talk, I will discuss how large, homogeneous catalogs of precise FGK abundances are crucial to advancing chemical analysis of M dwarfs beyond overall metallicity to direct measurements of individual elemental abundances. I will present a new method to analyze high-resolution, NIR spectra of M dwarfs that employs an empirical calibration of synthetic M dwarf spectra to infer effective temperature, Fe abundance, and Ti abundance. This work is a step toward detailed chemical analysis of M dwarfs at a similar precision achieved for FGK stars.

  9. The Open Cluster Chemical Abundances and Mapping (OCCAM) Survey: Detailed Age and Abundance Gradients using DR12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frinchaboy, Peter M.; Thompson, Benjamin A.; O'Connell, Julia; Meyer, Brianne; Donor, John; Majewski, Steven R.; Holtzman, Jon A.; Zasowski, Gail; Beers, Timothy C.; Beaton, Rachael; Cunha, Katia M. L.; Hearty, Fred; Nidever, David L.; Schiavon, Ricardo P.; Smith, Verne V.; Hayden, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    We present detailed abundance results for Galactic open clusters as part of the Open Cluster Chemical Abundances and Mapping (OCCAM) Survey, which is based primarily on data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey/ Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment. Using 100 open clusters from the uniformly observed complete SDSS-III/APOGEE-1 DR12 dataset, we present age and multi-element abundance gradients for the disk of the Milky Way.This work is supported by an NSF AAG grant AST-1311835.

  10. DETAILED ABUNDANCES OF THE SOLAR TWINS 16 CYGNI A AND B: CONSTRAINING PLANET FORMATION MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Schuler, Simon C.; Cunha, Katia; Smith, Verne V.

    2011-08-20

    Results of a detailed abundance analysis of the solar twins 16 Cyg A and 16 Cyg B based on high-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio echelle spectroscopy are presented. 16 Cyg B is known to host a giant planet while no planets have yet been detected around 16 Cyg A. Stellar parameters are derived directly from our high-quality spectra, and the stars are found to be physically similar, with {Delta}T{sub eff} = +43 K, {Delta}log g = -0.02 dex, and {Delta}{xi} = +0.10 km s{sup -1} (in the sense of A - B), consistent with previous findings. Abundances of 15 elements aremore » derived and are found to be indistinguishable between the two stars. The abundances of each element differ by {<=}0.026 dex, and the mean difference is +0.003 {+-} 0.015 ({sigma}) dex. Aside from Li, which has been previously shown to be depleted by a factor of at least 4.5 in 16 Cyg B relative to 16 Cyg A, the two stars appear to be chemically identical. The abundances of each star demonstrate a positive correlation with the condensation temperature of the elements (T{sub c}); the slopes of the trends are also indistinguishable. In accordance with recent suggestions, the positive slopes of the [m/H]-T{sub c} relations may imply that terrestrial planets have not formed around either 16 Cyg A or 16 Cyg B. The physical characteristics of the 16 Cyg system are discussed in terms of planet formation models, and plausible mechanisms that can account for the lack of detected planets around 16 Cyg A, the disparate Li abundances of 16 Cyg A and B, and the eccentricity of the planet 16 Cyg B b are suggested.« less

  11. Abundance Analysis of Red Horizontal Branch Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafarzadeh, S.; Lagerholm, C.; Mikolaitis, Š.

    2008-12-01

    During the Observational Stellar Astrophysics research course in Lithuania, we analyzed the spectra of four red horizontal branch stars obtained on the Nordic Optical Telescope and FIES spectrograph. For the analysis we used the program SIU running under IDL. Overall, the metallicity for these stars seems to be higher than what is listed in the literature. We have determined the main atmospheric parameters and abundances of C, N, O and Mg chemical elements. We were only able to get the [O/Fe] abundance for one star because of telluric lines. The abundances were compared with stellar evolutionary models, both for finding the stellar mass and to investigate how well these stars follow theoretical predictions of evolutionary abundance alterations.

  12. Detailed abundances from integrated-light spectroscopy: Milky Way globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, S. S.; Brodie, J. P.; Strader, J.

    2017-05-01

    Context. Integrated-light spectroscopy at high spectral resolution is rapidly maturing as a powerful way to measure detailed chemical abundances for extragalactic globular clusters (GCs). Aims: We test the performance of our analysis technique for integrated-light spectra by applying it to seven well-studied Galactic GCs that span a wide range of metallicities. Methods: Integrated-light spectra were obtained by scanning the slit of the UVES spectrograph on the ESO Very Large Telescope across the half-light diameters of the clusters. We modelled the spectra using resolved Hubble Space Telescope colour-magnitude diagrams (CMDs), as well as theoretical isochrones, in combination with standard stellar atmosphere and spectral synthesis codes. The abundances of Fe, Na, Mg, Ca, Ti, Cr, and Ba were compared with literature data for individual stars in the clusters. Results: The typical differences between iron abundances derived from our integrated-light spectra and those compiled from the literature are less than 0.1 dex. A larger difference is found for one cluster (NGC 6752), and is most likely caused primarily by stochastic fluctuations in the numbers of bright red giants within the scanned area. As expected, the α-elements (Ca, Ti) are enhanced by about 0.3 dex compared to the Solar-scaled composition, while the [Cr/Fe] ratios are close to Solar. When using up-to-date line lists, our [Mg/Fe] ratios also agree well with literature data. Our [Na/Fe] ratios are, on average, 0.08-0.14 dex lower than average values quoted in the literature, and our [Ba/Fe] ratios may be overestimated by 0.20-0.35 dex at the lowest metallicities. We find that analyses based on theoretical isochrones give very similar results to those based on resolved CMDs. Conclusions: Overall, the agreement between our integrated-light abundance measurements and the literature data is satisfactory. Refinements of the modelling procedure, such as corrections for stellar evolutionary and non-LTE effects

  13. Chemical abundance analysis of π Dra and HR 7545

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmaslı, Aslı; Nasolo, Yahya

    2017-02-01

    We carried out detailed abundance analysis of two A-type stars; π Dra and HR 7545. High resolution echelle spectra of these stars were obtained at the TÜBİTAK National Observatory. We determined the fundamental parameters of each target star using traditional methods. We also plotted the stars on the H-R diagram and calculated the masses from evolutionary tracks and ages from isochrones.

  14. A Comparison of the Detailed Chemical Abundances of Globular Clusters in the Milky Way, Andromeda, and Centaurus A Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colucci, Janet E.; Bernstein, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    We present a homogeneous analysis of high resolution spectra of globular clusters in three massive galaxies: the Milky Way, M31, and NGC 5128. We measure detailed abundance ratios for alpha, light, Fe-peak, and neutron capture elements using our technique for analyzing the integrated light spectra of globular clusters. For many of the heavy elements we provide a first look at the detailed chemistry of old populations in an early type galaxy. We discuss similarities and differences between the galaxies and the potential implications for their star formation histories.

  15. Detailed Iron-Group Abundances in a Very Metal-Poor Main Sequence Turnoff Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sneden, Chris; Roederer, Ian U.; Boesgaard, Ann M.; Lawler, James E.; Den Hartog, Elizabeth; Cowan, John J.; Sobeck, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    We have obtained Keck HIRES and HST STIS high resolution, high signal-to-noise spectra of the very metal-poor ([Fe/H] ~ -2.9) main-sequence turnoff star BD+03 740. A detailed chemical composition analysis based on synthetic spectrum computations has been conducted. Our initial focus has been on the iron-group elements in the Z = 21-28 range. This study takes advantage of recent improvements in neutral and ionzied species transition data for all of these elements except Sc (Z = 21) by the Wisconsin atomic physics group (see a companion presentation on Cr II at this meeting). Several metal-poor abundance surveys have concluded that there are large overabundances of Co and underabundances of Cr with respect to Fe for stars with [Fe/H] < -2.5. Neither of these anomalies is seen in BD+03 740. We discuss the implications of this result for early iron-group synthesis in the Galaxy.This work has been supported by HST STScI Program GO-14232; and NSF grants AST-1211585 and AST-1616040 to CS; AST-1516182 to JEL and EDH; NASA grant NNX16AE96G to JEL

  16. Detailed chemical abundances of distant RR Lyrae stars in the Virgo Stellar Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffau, S.; Sbordone, L.; Vivas, A. K.; Hansen, C. J.; Zoccali, M.; Catelan, M.; Minniti, D.; Grebel, E. K.

    2016-05-01

    We present the first detailed chemical abundances for distant RR Lyrae stars members of the Virgo Stellar Stream (VSS), derived from X- Shooter medium-resolution spectra. Sixteen elements from carbon to barium have been measured in six VSS RR Lyrae stars, sampling all main nucleosynthetic channels. For the first time we will be able to compare in detail the chemical evolution of the VSS progenitor with those of Local Group dwarf spheroidal galaxies (LG dSph) as well as the one of the smooth halo.

  17. DETAILED ABUNDANCES OF STARS WITH SMALL PLANETS DISCOVERED BY KEPLER. I. THE FIRST SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect

    Schuler, Simon C.; Vaz, Zachary A.; Santrich, Orlando J. Katime

    2015-12-10

    We present newly derived stellar parameters and the detailed abundances of 19 elements of seven stars with small planets discovered by NASA's Kepler Mission. Each star, save one, has at least one planet with a radius ≤1.6 R{sub ⊕}, suggesting a primarily rocky composition. The stellar parameters and abundances are derived from high signal-to-noise ratio, high-resolution echelle spectroscopy obtained with the 10 m Keck I telescope and High Resolution Echelle Spectrometer using standard spectroscopic techniques. The metallicities of the seven stars range from −0.32 to +0.13 dex, with an average metallicity that is subsolar, supporting previous suggestions that, unlike Jupiter-typemore » giant planets, small planets do not form preferentially around metal-rich stars. The abundances of elements other than iron are in line with a population of Galactic disk stars, and despite our modest sample size, we find hints that the compositions of stars with small planets are similar to stars without known planets and with Neptune-size planets, but not to those of stars with giant planets. This suggests that the formation of small planets does not require exceptional host-star compositions and that small planets may be ubiquitous in the Galaxy. We compare our derived abundances (which have typical uncertainties of ≲0.04 dex) to the condensation temperature of the elements; a correlation between the two has been suggested as a possible signature of rocky planet formation. None of the stars demonstrate the putative rocky planet signature, despite at least three of the stars having rocky planets estimated to contain enough refractory material to produce the signature, if real. More detailed abundance analyses of stars known to host small planets are needed to verify our results and place ever more stringent constraints on planet formation models.« less

  18. Abundance analysis of s-process enhanced barium stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahanta, Upakul; Karinkuzhi, Drisya; Goswami, Aruna; Duorah, Kalpana

    2016-12-01

    Detailed chemical composition studies of stars with enhanced abundances of neutron-capture elements can provide observational constraints for neutron-capture nucleosynthesis studies and clues for understanding their contribution to the Galactic chemical enrichment. We present abundance results from high-resolution spectral analyses of a sample of four chemically peculiar stars characterized by s-process enhancement. High-resolution spectra (R ˜ 42 000) of these objects spanning a wavelength range from 4000 to 6800 Å are taken from the ELODIE archive. We have estimated the stellar atmospheric parameters, the effective temperature Teff, the surface gravity log g and metallicity [Fe/H] from local thermodynamic equilibrium analysis using model atmospheres. We report estimates of elemental abundances for several neutron-capture elements, Sr, Y, Zr, Ba, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu and Dy. While HD 49641 and HD 58368 show [Ba/Fe] ≥ 1.16, the other two objects HD 119650 and HD 191010 are found to be mild barium stars with [Ba/Fe] ˜ 0.4. The derived abundances of the elements are interpreted on the basis of existing theories for understanding their origin and evolution.

  19. Detailed Astrometric Analysis of Pluto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ROSSI, GUSTAVO B.; Vieira-Martins, R.; Camargo, J. I.; Assafin, M.

    2013-05-01

    Abstract (2,250 Maximum Characters): Pluto is the main representant of the transneptunian objects (TNO's), presenting some peculiarities such as an atmosphere and a satellite system with 5 known moons: Charon, discovered in 1978, Nix and Hydra, in 2006, P4 in 2011 and P5 in 2012. Until the arrival of the New Horizons spacecraft to this system (july 2015), stellar occultations are the most efficient method, from the ground, to know physical and dinamical properties of this system. In 2010, it was evident a drift in declinations (about 20 mas/year) comparing to the ephemerides. This fact motivated us to remake the reductions and analysis of a great set of our observations at OPD/LNA, in a total of 15 years. The ephemerides and occultations results was then compared with the astrometric and photometric reductions of CCD images of Pluto (around 6500 images). Two corrections were used for a refinement of the data set: diferential chromatic refraction and photocenter. The first is due to the mean color of background stars beeing redder than the color of Pluto, resulting in a slightly different path of light through the atmosphere (that may cause a difference in position of 0.1”). It became more evident because Pluto is crossing the region of the galactic plane. The photocenter correction is based on two gaussians curves overlapped, with different hights and non-coincident centers, corresponding to Pluto and Charon (since they have less than 1” of angular separation). The objective is to separate these two gaussian curves from the observed one and find the right position of Pluto. The method is strongly dependent of the hight of each of the gaussian curves, related to the respective albedos of charon and Pluto. A detailed analysis of the astrometric results, as well a comparison with occultation results was made. Since Pluto has an orbital period of 248,9 years and our interval of observation is about 15 years, we have around 12% of its observed orbit and also, our

  20. Detailed Abundances of Two Very Metal-poor Stars in Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby, Evan N.; Cohen, Judith G.

    2012-12-01

    The most metal-poor stars in dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) can show the nucleosynthetic patterns of one or a few supernovae (SNe). These SNe could have zero metallicity, making metal-poor dSph stars the closest surviving links to Population III stars. Metal-poor dSph stars also help to reveal the formation mechanism of the Milky Way (MW) halo. We present the detailed abundances from Keck/HIRES spectroscopy for two very metal-poor stars in two MW dSphs. One star, in the Sculptor dSph, has [Fe I/H] = -2.40. The other star, in the Ursa Minor dSph, has [Fe I/H] = -3.16. Both stars fall in the previously discovered low-metallicity, high-[α/Fe] plateau. Most abundance ratios of very metal-poor stars in these two dSphs are largely consistent with very metal-poor halo stars. However, the abundances of Na and some r-process elements lie at the lower end of the envelope defined by inner halo stars of similar metallicity. We propose that the metallicity dependence of SN yields is the cause. The earliest SNe in low-mass dSphs have less gas to pollute than the earliest SNe in massive halo progenitors. As a result, dSph stars at -3 < [Fe/H] < -2 sample SNe with [Fe/H] Lt -3, whereas halo stars in the same metallicity range sample SNe with [Fe/H] ~ -3. Consequently, enhancements in [Na/Fe] and [r/Fe] were deferred to higher metallicity in dSphs than in the progenitors of the inner halo. Data herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and NASA. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  1. Detailed Chemical Abundances in the r-process-rich Ultra-faint Dwarf Galaxy Reticulum 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roederer, Ian U.; Mateo, Mario; Bailey, John I., III; Song, Yingyi; Bell, Eric F.; Crane, Jeffrey D.; Loebman, Sarah; Nidever, David L.; Olszewski, Edward W.; Shectman, Stephen A.; Thompson, Ian B.; Valluri, Monica; Walker, Matthew G.

    2016-03-01

    The ultra-faint dwarf (UFD) galaxy Reticulum 2 (Ret 2) was recently discovered in images obtained by the Dark Energy Survey. We have observed the four brightest red giants in Ret 2 at high spectral resolution using the Michigan/Magellan Fiber System. We present detailed abundances for as many as 20 elements per star, including 12 elements heavier than the Fe group. We confirm previous detection of high levels of r-process material in Ret 2 (mean [Eu/Fe] = +1.69 ± 0.05) found in three of these stars (mean [Fe/H] = -2.88 ± 0.10). The abundances closely match the r-process pattern found in the well-studied metal-poor halo star CS 22892-052. Such r-process-enhanced stars have not been found in any other UFD galaxy, though their existence has been predicted by at least one model. The fourth star in Ret 2 ([Fe/H] = -3.42 ± 0.20) contains only trace amounts of Sr ([Sr/Fe] = -1.73 ± 0.43) and no detectable heavier elements. One r-process enhanced star is also enhanced in C (natal [C/Fe] ≈ +1.1). This is only the third such star known, which suggests that the nucleosynthesis sites leading to C and r-process enhancements are decoupled. The r-process-deficient star is enhanced in Mg ([Mg/Fe] = +0.81 ± 0.14), and the other three stars show normal levels of α-enhancement (mean [Mg/Fe] = +0.34 ± 0.03). The abundances of other α and Fe-group elements closely resemble those in UFD galaxies and metal-poor halo stars, suggesting that the nucleosynthesis that led to the large r-process enhancements either produced no light elements or produced light-element abundance signatures indistinguishable from normal supernovae. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  2. CD -24°17504: A New Comprehensive Element Abundance Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Heather R.; Frebel, Anna

    2015-07-01

    With [Fe/H] ˜ -3.3, CD -24°17504 is a canonical metal-poor main-sequence turn-off star. Though it has appeared in numerous literature studies, the most comprehensive abundance analysis for the star based on high-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) spectra is nearly 15 years old. We present a new detailed abundance analysis for 21 elements based on combined archival Keck-HIRES and Very Large Telescope-UVES spectra of the star that is higher in both spectral resolution and S/N than previous data. Our results are very similar to those of an earlier comprehensive study of the star, but we present for the first time a carbon abundance from the CH G-band feature as well as improved upper limits for neutron-capture species such as Y, Ba, and Eu. In particular, we find that CD -24°17504 has [Fe/H] = -3.41, [C/Fe] = +1.10, [Sr/H] = -4.68, and [Ba/H] ≤ -4.46, making it a carbon-enhanced metal-poor star with neutron-capture element abundances among the lowest measured in Milky Way halo stars. This work is based on data obtained from the ESO Science Archive Facility and associated with Programs 68.D-0094(A) and 073.D-0024(A). This work is also based on data obtained from the Keck Observatory Archive (KOA), which is operated by the W.M. Keck Obsevatory and the NASA Exoplanet Science Institute (NExScI), under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. These data are associated with Program C01H (P.I. Mélendez).

  3. Detailed fuel spray analysis techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mularz, E. J.; Bosque, M. A.; Humenik, F. M.

    1983-01-01

    Detailed fuel spray analyses are a necessary input to the analytical modeling of the complex mixing and combustion processes which occur in advanced combustor systems. It is anticipated that by controlling fuel-air reaction conditions, combustor temperatures can be better controlled, leading to improved combustion system durability. Thus, a research program is underway to demonstrate the capability to measure liquid droplet size, velocity, and number density throughout a fuel spray and to utilize this measurement technique in laboratory benchmark experiments. The research activities from two contracts and one grant are described with results to data. The experiment to characterize fuel sprays is also described. These experiments and data should be useful for application to and validation of turbulent flow modeling to improve the design systems of future advanced technology engines.

  4. High-resolution abundance analysis of HD 140283

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siqueira-Mello, C.; Andrievsky, S. M.; Barbuy, B.; Spite, M.; Spite, F.; Korotin, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Context. HD 140283 is a reference subgiant that is metal poor and confirmed to be a very old star. The element abundances of this type of old star can constrain the nature and nucleosynthesis processes that occurred in its (even older) progenitors. The present study may shed light on nucleosynthesis processes yielding heavy elements early in the Galaxy. Aims: A detailed analysis of a high-quality spectrum is carried out, with the intent of providing a reference on stellar lines and abundances of a very old, metal-poor subgiant. We aim to derive abundances from most available and measurable spectral lines. Methods: The analysis is carried out using high-resolution (R = 81 000) and high signal-to-noise ratio (800 analysis in non-LTE (NLTE) is based on the MULTI code. We present LTE abundances for 26 elements, and NLTE calculations for the species C i, O i, Na i, Mg i, Al i, K i, Ca i, Sr ii, and Ba ii lines. Results: The abundance analysis provided an extensive line list suitable for metal-poor subgiant stars. The results for Li, CNO, α-, and iron peak elements are in good agreement with literature. The newly NLTE Ba abundance, along with a NLTE Eu correction and a 3D Ba correction from literature, leads to [Eu/Ba] = + 0.59 ± 0.18. This result confirms a dominant r-process contribution, possibly together with a very small contribution from the main s-process, to the neutron-capture elements in HD 140283. Overabundances of the lighter heavy elements and the high abundances derived for Ba, La, and Ce favour the operation of the weak r-process in HD 140283

  5. Abundance recovery error analysis using simulated AVIRIS data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoner, William W.; Harsanyi, Joseph C.; Farrand, William H.; Wong, Jennifer A.

    1992-01-01

    Measurement noise and imperfect atmospheric correction translate directly into errors in the determination of the surficial abundance of materials from imaging spectrometer data. The effects of errors on abundance recovery were investigated previously using Monte Carlo simulation methods by Sabol et. al. The drawback of the Monte Carlo approach is that thousands of trials are needed to develop good statistics on the probable error in abundance recovery. This computational burden invariably limits the number of scenarios of interest that can practically be investigated. A more efficient approach is based on covariance analysis. The covariance analysis approach expresses errors in abundance as a function of noise in the spectral measurements and provides a closed form result eliminating the need for multiple trials. Monte Carlo simulation and covariance analysis are used to predict confidence limits for abundance recovery for a scenario which is modeled as being derived from Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS).

  6. Doppler Imaging and Chemical Abundance Analysis of EK Dra: Capabilities of Small Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilicoglu, Tolgahan; Senavci, H. V.; Bahar, E.; Isik, E.; Montes, D.; Hussain, G. A. J.

    2018-04-01

    We investigate the chromospheric and spot activity behaviour of the young Solar-like star EK Dra via Doppler imaging and spectral synthesis methods, using mid-resolution time series spectra of the system. We also present the atmospheric parameters and detailed elemental photospheric abundances of the star. The chemical abundance pattern of EK Dra do not suggest any remarkable peculiarities except few elements. The Titanium Oxide (TiO) bandheads at 7000 - 7100 A region also give clues about the spot temperature that may be cooler than 4000 K. In addition, we also discuss the capabilities of small telescopes (40 cm in our case) and medium resolution spectrographs in terms of Doppler imaging and chemical abundance analysis.

  7. Hierarchical analysis of species distributions and abundance across environmental gradients.

    PubMed

    Diez, Jeffrey M; Pulliam, H Ronald

    2007-12-01

    Abiotic and biotic processes operate at multiple spatial and temporal scales to shape many ecological processes, including species distributions and demography. Current debate about the relative roles of niche-based and stochastic processes in shaping species distributions and community composition reflects, in part, the challenge of understanding how these processes interact across scales. Traditional statistical models that ignore autocorrelation and spatial hierarchies can result in misidentification of important ecological covariates. Here, we demonstrate the utility of a hierarchical modeling framework for testing hypotheses about the importance of abiotic factors at different spatial scales and local spatial autocorrelation for shaping species distributions and abundances. For the two orchid species studied, understory light availability and soil moisture helped to explain patterns of presence and abundance at a microsite scale (<4 m2), while soil organic content was important at a population scale (<400 m2). The inclusion of spatial autocorrelation is shown to alter the magnitude and certainty of estimated relationships between abundance and abiotic variables, and we suggest that such analysis be used more often to explore the relationships between species life histories and distributions. The hierarchical modeling framework is shown to have great potential for elucidating ecological relationships involving abiotic and biotic processes simultaneously at multiple scales.

  8. A Differential Abundance Analysis of Very Metal-poor Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Malley, Erin M.; McWilliam, Andrew; Chaboyer, Brian; Thompson, Ian

    2017-04-01

    We have performed a differential line-by-line chemical abundance analysis, ultimately relative to the Sun, of nine very metal-poor main-sequence (MS) halo stars, near [Fe/H] = -2 dex. Our abundances range from -2.66≤slant [{Fe}/{{H}}]≤slant -1.40 dex with conservative uncertainties of 0.07 dex. We find an average [α/Fe] = 0.34 ± 0.09 dex, typical of the Milky Way. While our spectroscopic atmosphere parameters provide good agreement with Hubble Space Telescope parallaxes, there is significant disagreement with temperature and gravity parameters indicated by observed colors and theoretical isochrones. Although a systematic underestimate of the stellar temperature by a few hundred degrees could explain this difference, it is not supported by current effective temperature studies and would create large uncertainties in the abundance determinations. Both 1D and < 3{{D}}> hydrodynamical models combined with separate 1D non-LTE effects do not yet account for the atmospheres of real metal-poor MS stars, but a fully 3D non-LTE treatment may be able to explain the ionization imbalance found in this work.

  9. New records and detailed distribution and abundance of selected arthropod species collected between 1999 and 2011 in Azorean native forests

    PubMed Central

    Gaspar, Clara; Crespo, Luís Carlos Fonseca; Rigal, François; Cardoso, Pedro; Pereira, Fernando; Rego, Carla; Amorim, Isabel R.; Melo, Catarina; Aguiar, Carlos; André, Genage; Mendonça, Enésima P.; Ribeiro, Sérvio; Hortal, Joaquín; Santos, Ana M.C.; Barcelos, Luís; Enghoff, Henrik; Mahnert, Volker; Pita, Margarida T.; Ribes, Jordi; Baz, Arturo; Sousa, António B.; Vieira, Virgílio; Wunderlich, Jörg; Parmakelis, Aristeidis; Whittaker, Robert J.; Quartau, José Alberto; Serrano, Artur R.M.; Triantis, Kostas A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background In this contribution we present detailed distribution and abundance data for arthropod species identified during the BALA – Biodiversity of Arthropods from the Laurisilva of the Azores (1999-2004) and BALA2 projects (2010-2011) from 18 native forest fragments in seven of the nine Azorean islands (all excluding Graciosa and Corvo islands, which have no native forest left). New information Of the total 286 species identified, 81% were captured between 1999 and 2000, a period during which only 39% of all the samples were collected. On average, arthropod richness for each island increased by 10% during the time frame of these projects. The classes Arachnida, Chilopoda and Diplopoda represent the most remarkable cases of new island records, with more than 30% of the records being novelties. This study stresses the need to expand the approaches applied in these projects to other habitats in the Azores, and more importantly to other less surveyed taxonomic groups (e.g. Diptera and Hymenoptera). These steps are fundamental for getting a more accurate assessment of biodiversity in the archipelago. PMID:28174509

  10. Plasma proteomic analysis reveals altered protein abundances in cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Lygirou, Vasiliki; Latosinska, Agnieszka; Makridakis, Manousos; Mullen, William; Delles, Christian; Schanstra, Joost P; Zoidakis, Jerome; Pieske, Burkert; Mischak, Harald; Vlahou, Antonia

    2018-04-17

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) describes the pathological conditions of the heart and blood vessels. Despite the large number of studies on CVD and its etiology, its key modulators remain largely unknown. To this end, we performed a comprehensive proteomic analysis of blood plasma, with the scope to identify disease-associated changes after placing them in the context of existing knowledge, and generate a well characterized dataset for further use in CVD multi-omics integrative analysis. LC-MS/MS was employed to analyze plasma from 32 subjects (19 cases of various CVD phenotypes and 13 controls) in two steps: discovery (13 cases and 8 controls) and test (6 cases and 5 controls) set analysis. Following label-free quantification, the detected proteins were correlated to existing plasma proteomics datasets (plasma proteome database; PPD) and functionally annotated (Cytoscape, Ingenuity Pathway Analysis). Differential expression was defined based on identification confidence (≥ 2 peptides per protein), statistical significance (Mann-Whitney p value ≤ 0.05) and a minimum of twofold change. Peptides detected in at least 50% of samples per group were considered, resulting in a total of 3796 identified proteins (838 proteins based on ≥ 2 peptides). Pathway annotation confirmed the functional relevance of the findings (representation of complement cascade, fibrin clot formation, platelet degranulation, etc.). Correlation of the relative abundance of the proteins identified in the discovery set with their reported concentrations in the PPD was significant, confirming the validity of the quantification method. The discovery set analysis revealed 100 differentially expressed proteins between cases and controls, 39 of which were verified (≥ twofold change) in the test set. These included proteins already studied in the context of CVD (such as apolipoprotein B, alpha-2-macroglobulin), as well as novel findings (such as low density lipoprotein receptor related

  11. Detailed heart rate variability analysis in athletes.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Orsolya; Sydó, Nóra; Vargha, Péter; Vágó, Hajnalka; Czimbalmos, Csilla; Édes, Eszter; Zima, Endre; Apponyi, Györgyi; Merkely, Gergő; Sydó, Tibor; Becker, Dávid; Allison, Thomas G; Merkely, Béla

    2016-08-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) analysis has been used to evaluate patients with various cardiovascular diseases. While the vast majority of HRV studies have focused on pathological states, our study focuses on the less explored area of HRV analysis across different training intensity and sports. We aimed to measure HRV in healthy elite and masters athletes and compare to healthy, but non-athletic controls. Time-domain HRV analysis was applied in 138 athletes (male 110, age 28.4 ± 8.3) and 100 controls (male 56, age 28.3 ± 6.9) during Holter monitoring (21.3 ± 3.0 h). All studied parameters were higher in elite athletes compared to controls [SDNN (CI) 225.3 (216.2-234.5) vs 158.6 (150.2-167.1) ms; SDNN Index (CI) 99.6 (95.6-103.7) vs 72.4 (68.7-76.2) ms; pNN50 (CI) 24.2 (22.2-26.3) vs 14.4 (12.7-16.3) %; RMSSD (CI) 71.8 (67.6-76.2) vs 50.8 (46.9-54.8) ms; p < 0.001]. Masters had higher HRV values than controls, but no significant differences were found between elite athletes and masters athletes. Some parameters were higher in canoeists-kayakers and bicyclists than runners. Lower cut-off values in elite athletes were SDNN: 147.4 ms, SDNN Index: 66.6 ms, pNN50: 9.7 %, RMSSD: 37.9 ms. Autonomic regulation in elite athletes described with HRV is significantly different than in healthy controls. Sports modality and level of performance, but not age- or sex-influenced HRV. Our study provides athletic normal HRV values. Further investigations are needed to determine its role in risk stratification, optimization of training, or identifying overtraining.

  12. Chemical abundance analysis of the old, rich open cluster Trumpler 20

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carraro, Giovanni; Villanova, Sandro; Monaco, Lorenzo; Beccari, Giacomo; Ahumada, Javier A.; Boffin, Henri M. J.

    2014-02-01

    Aims: Trumpler 20 is an open cluster located at low Galactic longitude, just beyond the great Carina spiral arm, and whose metallicity and fundamental parameters were very poorly known until now. As it is most likely a rare example of an old, rich open cluster - possibly a twin of NGC 7789 - it is useful to characterize it. To this end, we determine here the abundance of several elements and their ratios in a sample of stars in the clump of Trumpler 20. Methods: We present high-resolution spectroscopy of eight clump stars. Based on their radial velocities, we identify six bona fide cluster members, and for five of them (the sixth being a fast rotator) we perform a detailed abundance analysis. Results: We find that Trumpler 20 is slightly more metal-rich than the Sun, having [Fe/H] = +0.09 ± 0.10. The abundance ratios of α-elements are generally solar. In line with recent studies of clusters as old as Trumpler 20, Ba is overabundant compared to the Sun. Our analysis of the iron-peak elements (Cr and Ni) does not reveal anything anomalous. Based on these results, we re-estimate the cluster age to be 1.5-0.1+0.2 Gyr. Its distance to the Galactic centre turns out to be 7.3 kpc. With this distance and metallicity, Trumpler 20 fits fairly well in the metallicity gradient for the Galactic inner disc. Conclusions: With this new study, the characterization of Trumpler 20 is now on much more solid ground. Further studies should focus on the estimate of the binary fraction and on its main sequence membership. Based on observations collected at Paranal Observatory under program 088.D-0045.Table 9 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  13. Abundance analysis of a CEMP-no star in the Carina dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susmitha, A.; Koch, A.; Sivarani, T.

    2017-10-01

    Carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars bear important imprints of the early chemical enrichment of any stellar system. While these stars are known to exist in copious amounts in the Milky Way halo, detailed chemical abundance data from the faint dwarf spheroidal (dSph) satellites are still sparse, although the relative fraction of these stars increases with decreasing metallicity. Here, we report the abundance analysis of a metal-poor ([ Fe / H ] = - 2.5 dex), carbon-rich ([C/Fe] = 1.4 dex) star, ALW-8, in the Carina dSph using high-resolution spectroscopy obtained with the ESO/UVES instrument. Its spectrum does not indicate any over-enhancements of neutron capture elements. Thus classified as a CEMP-no star, this is the first detection of this kind of star in Carina. Another of our sample stars, ALW-1, is shown to be a CEMP-s star, but its immediate binarity prompted us to discard it from a detailed analysis. The majority of the 18 chemical elements we measured are typical of Carina's field star population and also agree with CEMP stars in other dSph galaxies. Similar to the only known CEMP-no star in the Sculptor dSph and the weak-r-process star HD 122563, the lack of any strong barium-enhancement is accompanied by a moderate overabundance in yttrium, indicating a weak r-process activity. The overall abundance pattern confirms that, also in Carina, the formation site for CEMP-no stars has been affected by both faint supernovae and by standard core collapse supernovae. Whichever process was responsible for the heavy element production in ALW-8 must be a ubiquitous source to pollute the CEMP-no stars, acting independently of the environment such as in the Galactic halo or in dSphs. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory at Paranal, Chile; Large Programme proposal 171.B- 0520.Table A.1 is also available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  14. Exploring the Milky Way stellar disk. A detailed elemental abundance study of 714 F and G dwarf stars in the solar neighbourhood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bensby, T.; Feltzing, S.; Oey, M. S.

    2014-02-01

    Aims: The aim of this paper is to explore and map the age and abundance structure of the stars in the nearby Galactic disk. Methods: We have conducted a high-resolution spectroscopic study of 714 F and G dwarf and subgiant stars in the Solar neighbourhood. The star sample has been kinematically selected to trace the Galactic thin and thick disks to their extremes, the metal-rich stellar halo, sub-structures in velocity space such as the Hercules stream and the Arcturus moving group, as well as stars that cannot (kinematically) be associated with either the thin disk or the thick disk. The determination of stellar parameters and elemental abundances is based on a standard analysis using equivalent widths and one-dimensional, plane-parallel model atmospheres calculated under the assumption of local thermodynamical equilibrium (LTE). The spectra have high resolution (R = 40 000-110 000) and high signal-to-noise (S/N = 150-300) and were obtained with the FEROS spectrograph on the ESO 1.5 m and 2.2 m telescopes, the SOFIN and FIES spectrographs on the Nordic Optical Telescope, the UVES spectrograph on the ESO Very Large Telescope, the HARPS spectrograph on the ESO 3.6 m telescope, and the MIKE spectrograph on the Magellan Clay telescope. The abundances from individual Fe i lines were were corrected for non-LTE effects in every step of the analysis. Results: We present stellar parameters, stellar ages, kinematical parameters, orbital parameters, and detailed elemental abundances for O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Cr, Fe, Ni, Zn, Y, and Ba for 714 nearby F and G dwarf stars. Our data show that there is an old and α-enhanced disk population, and a younger and less α-enhanced disk population. While they overlap greatly in metallicity between -0.7 < [Fe/H] ≲ +0.1, they show a bimodal distribution in [α/Fe]. This bimodality becomes even clearer if stars where stellar parameters and abundances show larger uncertainties (Teff ≲ 5400 K) are discarded, showing that it is

  15. Measuring Detailed Chemical Abundances from Co-added Medium-resolution Spectra. I. Tests Using Milky Way Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies and Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lei; Kirby, Evan N.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Peng, Eric W.; Cheng, Lucy

    2013-05-01

    The ability to measure metallicities and α-element abundances in individual red giant branch (RGB) stars using medium-resolution spectra (R ≈ 6000) is a valuable tool for deciphering the nature of Milky Way dwarf satellites and the history of the Galactic halo. Extending such studies to more distant systems like Andromeda is beyond the ability of the current generation of telescopes, but by co-adding the spectra of similar stars, we can attain the necessary signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) to make detailed abundance measurements. In this paper, we present a method to determine metallicities and α-element abundances using the co-addition of medium-resolution spectra. We test the method of spectral co-addition using high-S/N spectra of more than 1300 RGB stars from Milky Way globular clusters and dwarf spheroidal galaxies obtained with the Keck II telescope/DEIMOS spectrograph. We group similar stars using photometric criteria and compare the weighted ensemble average abundances ([Fe/H], [Mg/Fe], [Si/Fe], [Ca/Fe], and [Ti/Fe]) of individual stars in each group with the measurements made on the corresponding co-added spectrum. We find a high level of agreement between the two methods, which permits us to apply this co-added spectra technique to more distant RGB stars, like stars in the M31 satellite galaxies. This paper outlines our spectral co-addition and abundance measurement methodology and describes the potential biases in making these measurements. Data herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and NASA. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  16. Detailed abundances for a large sample of giant stars in the globular cluster 47 Tucanae (NGC 104)

    SciTech Connect

    Cordero, M. J.; Pilachowski, C. A.; Johnson, C. I.

    2014-01-01

    47 Tuc is an ideal target to study chemical evolution and globular cluster (GC) formation in massive more metal-rich GCs, as it is the closest massive GC. We present chemical abundances for O, Na, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Fe, Ni, La, and Eu in 164 red giant branch stars in the massive GC 47 Tuc using spectra obtained with both the Hydra multifiber spectrograph at the Blanco 4 m telescope and the FLAMES multiobject spectrograph at the Very Large Telescope. We find an average [Fe/H] = –0.79 ± 0.09 dex, consistent with literature values, as well as overabundances of alpha-elementsmore » ([α/Fe] ∼ 0.3 dex). The n-capture process elements indicate that 47 Tuc is r process-dominated ([Eu/La] = +0.24), and the light elements O, Na, and Al exhibit star-to-star variations. The Na-O anticorrelation, a signature typically seen in Galactic GCs, is present in 47 Tuc, and extends to include a small number of stars with [O/Fe] ∼ –0.5. Additionally, the [O/Na] ratios of our sample reveal that the cluster stars can be separated into three distinct populations. A Kolmogorov-Smirnov test demonstrates that the O-poor/Na-rich stars are more centrally concentrated than the O-rich/Na-poor stars. The observed number and radial distribution of 47 Tuc's stellar populations, as distinguished by their light element composition, agrees closely with the results obtained from photometric data. We do not find evidence supporting a strong Na-Al correlation in 47 Tuc, which is consistent with current models of asymptotic giant branch nucleosynthesis yields.« less

  17. Local Mode Analysis: Decoding IR Spectra by Visualizing Molecular Details.

    PubMed

    Massarczyk, M; Rudack, T; Schlitter, J; Kuhne, J; Kötting, C; Gerwert, K

    2017-04-20

    Integration of experimental and computational approaches to investigate chemical reactions in proteins has proven to be very successful. Experimentally, time-resolved FTIR difference-spectroscopy monitors chemical reactions at atomic detail. To decode detailed structural information encoded in IR spectra, QM/MM calculations are performed. Here, we present a novel method which we call local mode analysis (LMA) for calculating IR spectra and assigning spectral IR-bands on the basis of movements of nuclei and partial charges from just a single QM/MM trajectory. Through LMA the decoding of IR spectra no longer requires several simulations or optimizations. The novel approach correlates the motions of atoms of a single simulation with the corresponding IR bands and provides direct access to the structural information encoded in IR spectra. Either the contributions of a particular atom or atom group to the complete IR spectrum of the molecule are visualized, or an IR-band is selected to visualize the corresponding structural motions. Thus, LMA decodes the detailed information contained in IR spectra and provides an intuitive approach for structural biologists and biochemists. The unique feature of LMA is the bidirectional analysis connecting structural details to spectral features and vice versa spectral features to molecular motions.

  18. Cask crush pad analysis using detailed and simplified analysis methods

    SciTech Connect

    Uldrich, E.D.; Hawkes, B.D.

    1997-12-31

    A crush pad has been designed and analyzed to absorb the kinetic energy of a hypothetically dropped spent nuclear fuel shipping cask into a 44-ft. deep cask unloading pool at the Fluorinel and Storage Facility (FAST). This facility, located at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) at the Idaho national Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), is a US Department of Energy site. The basis for this study is an analysis by Uldrich and Hawkes. The purpose of this analysis was to evaluate various hypothetical cask drop orientations to ensure that the crush pad design was adequate and the cask decelerationmore » at impact was less than 100 g. It is demonstrated herein that a large spent fuel shipping cask, when dropped onto a foam crush pad, can be analyzed by either hand methods or by sophisticated dynamic finite element analysis using computer codes such as ABAQUS. Results from the two methods are compared to evaluate accuracy of the simplified hand analysis approach.« less

  19. Exoproteome analysis reveals higher abundance of proteins linked to alkaline stress in persistent Listeria monocytogenes strains.

    PubMed

    Rychli, Kathrin; Grunert, Tom; Ciolacu, Luminita; Zaiser, Andreas; Razzazi-Fazeli, Ebrahim; Schmitz-Esser, Stephan; Ehling-Schulz, Monika; Wagner, Martin

    2016-02-02

    surface virulence associated protein SvpA. Furthermore proteins involved in cell wall modification, such as the lipoteichonic acid primase LtaP and the N-acetylmuramoyl-l-alanine amidase (Lmo2591) are more abundant in EGDe than in the persistent strains and could indirectly contribute to virulence. In conclusion this study provides information about a set of proteins that could potentially support survival of L. monocytogenes in abiotic niches in food processing environments. Based on these data, a more detailed analysis of the role of the identified proteins under stresses mimicking conditions in food producing environment is essential for further elucidate the mechanism of the phenomenon of persistence of L. monocytogenes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Quantitative determination of mineral types and abundances from reflectance spectra using principal components analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M. O.; Adams, J. B.; Johnson, P. E.

    1985-01-01

    A procedure was developed for analyzing remote reflectance spectra, including multispectral images, that quantifies parameters such as types of mineral mixtures, the abundances of mixed minerals, and particle sizes. Principal components analysis reduced the spectral dimensionality and allowed testing the uniqueness and validity of spectral mixing models. By analyzing variations in the overall spectral reflectance curves, the type of spectral mixture was identified, mineral abundances quantified and the effects of particle size identified. The results demonstrate an advantage in classification accuracy over classical forms of analysis that ignore effects of particle-size or mineral-mixture systematics on spectra. The approach is applicable to remote sensing data of planetary surfaces for quantitative determinations of mineral abundances.

  1. Detailed Modeling and Analysis of the CPFM Dataset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swartz, William H.; Lloyd, Steven A.; DeMajistre, Robert

    2004-01-01

    A quantitative understanding of photolysis rate coefficients (or "j-values") is essential to determining the photochemical reaction rates that define ozone loss and other crucial processes in the atmosphere. j-Values can be calculated with radiative transfer models, derived from actinic flux observations, or inferred from trace gas measurements. The principal objective of this study is to cross-validate j-values from the Composition and Photodissociative Flux Measurement (CPFM) instrument during the Photochemistry of Ozone Loss in the Arctic Region In Summer (POLARIS) and SAGE I11 Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE) field campaigns with model calculations and other measurements and to use this detailed analysis to improve our ability to determine j-values. Another objective is to analyze the spectral flux from the CPFM (not just the j-values) and, using a multi-wavelength/multi-species spectral fitting technique, determine atmospheric composition.

  2. Detailed Uncertainty Analysis of the ZEM-3 Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackey, Jon; Sehirlioglu, Alp; Dynys, Fred

    2014-01-01

    The measurement of Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity are critical to the investigation of all thermoelectric systems. Therefore, it stands that the measurement uncertainty must be well understood to report ZT values which are accurate and trustworthy. A detailed uncertainty analysis of the ZEM-3 measurement system has been performed. The uncertainty analysis calculates error in the electrical resistivity measurement as a result of sample geometry tolerance, probe geometry tolerance, statistical error, and multi-meter uncertainty. The uncertainty on Seebeck coefficient includes probe wire correction factors, statistical error, multi-meter uncertainty, and most importantly the cold-finger effect. The cold-finger effect plagues all potentiometric (four-probe) Seebeck measurement systems, as heat parasitically transfers through thermocouple probes. The effect leads to an asymmetric over-estimation of the Seebeck coefficient. A thermal finite element analysis allows for quantification of the phenomenon, and provides an estimate on the uncertainty of the Seebeck coefficient. The thermoelectric power factor has been found to have an uncertainty of +9-14 at high temperature and 9 near room temperature.

  3. An elemental abundance analysis of the superficially normal A star Vega

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelman, Saul J.; Gulliver, Austin F.

    1990-01-01

    An elemental abundance analysis of Vega has been performed using high-signal-to-noise 2.4 A/mm Reticon observations of the region 4313-4809 A. Vega is found to be a metal-poor star with a mean underabundance of 0.60 dex. The He/H ratio of 0.03 as derived from He I 4472 A suggests that the superficial helium convection zone has disappeared and that radiative diffusion is producing the photospheric abundance anomalies.

  4. Neon and CNO Abundances for Extreme Helium Stars—A Non-LTE Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Gajendra; Lambert, David L.

    2011-02-01

    A non-LTE (NLTE) abundance analysis was carried out for three extreme helium stars (EHes): BD+10° 2179, BD-9° 4395, and LS IV+6° 002, from their optical spectra with NLTE model atmospheres. NLTE TLUSTY model atmospheres were computed with H, He, C, N, O, and Ne treated in NLTE. Model atmosphere parameters were chosen from consideration of fits to observed He I line profiles and ionization equilibria of C and N ions. The program SYNSPEC was then used to determine the NLTE abundances for Ne as well as H, He, C, N, and O. LTE neon abundances from Ne I lines in the EHes: LSE 78, V1920 Cyg, HD 124448, and PV Tel, are derived from published models and an estimate of the NLTE correction applied to obtain the NLTE Ne abundance. We show that the derived abundances of these key elements, including Ne, are well matched with semi-quantitative predictions for the EHe resulting from a cold merger (i.e., no nucleosynthesis during the merger) of an He white dwarf with a C-O white dwarf.

  5. Comparison of normalization methods for the analysis of metagenomic gene abundance data.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Mariana Buongermino; Wallroth, Mikael; Jonsson, Viktor; Kristiansson, Erik

    2018-04-20

    In shotgun metagenomics, microbial communities are studied through direct sequencing of DNA without any prior cultivation. By comparing gene abundances estimated from the generated sequencing reads, functional differences between the communities can be identified. However, gene abundance data is affected by high levels of systematic variability, which can greatly reduce the statistical power and introduce false positives. Normalization, which is the process where systematic variability is identified and removed, is therefore a vital part of the data analysis. A wide range of normalization methods for high-dimensional count data has been proposed but their performance on the analysis of shotgun metagenomic data has not been evaluated. Here, we present a systematic evaluation of nine normalization methods for gene abundance data. The methods were evaluated through resampling of three comprehensive datasets, creating a realistic setting that preserved the unique characteristics of metagenomic data. Performance was measured in terms of the methods ability to identify differentially abundant genes (DAGs), correctly calculate unbiased p-values and control the false discovery rate (FDR). Our results showed that the choice of normalization method has a large impact on the end results. When the DAGs were asymmetrically present between the experimental conditions, many normalization methods had a reduced true positive rate (TPR) and a high false positive rate (FPR). The methods trimmed mean of M-values (TMM) and relative log expression (RLE) had the overall highest performance and are therefore recommended for the analysis of gene abundance data. For larger sample sizes, CSS also showed satisfactory performance. This study emphasizes the importance of selecting a suitable normalization methods in the analysis of data from shotgun metagenomics. Our results also demonstrate that improper methods may result in unacceptably high levels of false positives, which in turn may lead

  6. Analysis of Fragments from Cluster Particles: Carbon Abundances, Bulk Chemistry, and Mineralogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, K. L.; Klock, W.; Keller, L. P.; Blanford, G. E.; McKay, D. S.

    1993-07-01

    Anhydrous interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) containing fine-grained aggregates (FGAs) have chondritic element abundances, characteristic textures, and high 4He and Zn abundances. These FGAs can account for >75 vol% of some anhydrous IDPs [1]. We previously noted a correlation of carbon abundance with modal pyroxene content in anhydrous particles [2]. In this study, we analyzed multiple fragments from individual cluster particles to determine (1) if carbon content is correlated with the abundance of FGAs and (2) the extent of chemical and mineralogical heterogeneities of particle clusters. We examined 15 IDPs from 7 distinct clusters of particles on the large area collectors using methods described in [2]. Optically light and dark fragments were selected from each cluster in order to sample a variety of material. Major-, minor-, and light-element compositions and mineralogical data are given for the cluster particle fragments in Table 1. Of the seven clusters sampled, two are coarse-grained and five are dominated by FGAs (>50% of the particle volume). Four of the seven clusters have pyroxene as the dominant crystalline silicate, one has a subequal mixture of pyroxene and olivine, one is dominated by sulfides, and one is dominated by olivine. L2005, #17 and L2005, #26 contain FeZnS grains. The C abundance is chondritic (<3x CI) for five of the clusters; only two clusters have high C abundances. All major and minor elements are within 2x CI for all clusters with the exception of Na, which is typically >2x CI. Solar flare tracks were observed in L2005,, #19. Compositional differences were observed between light and dark fragments from all clusters except cluster L2006, #28, indicating that most clusters are heterogeneous at the 10-micrometer scale. In general, the C abundance and the sulfide content in the dark fragments are greater than or equal to that in the light fragments. Carbon abundance does not appear to correlate with the content of FGAs. Another example

  7. Estimating abundance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sutherland, Chris; Royle, Andy

    2016-01-01

    This chapter provides a non-technical overview of ‘closed population capture–recapture’ models, a class of well-established models that are widely applied in ecology, such as removal sampling, covariate models, and distance sampling. These methods are regularly adopted for studies of reptiles, in order to estimate abundance from counts of marked individuals while accounting for imperfect detection. Thus, the chapter describes some classic closed population models for estimating abundance, with considerations for some recent extensions that provide a spatial context for the estimation of abundance, and therefore density. Finally, the chapter suggests some software for use in data analysis, such as the Windows-based program MARK, and provides an example of estimating abundance and density of reptiles using an artificial cover object survey of Slow Worms (Anguis fragilis).

  8. Abundance Analysis of 17 Planetary Nebulae from High-Resolution Optical Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherrard, Cameroun G.; Sterling, Nicholas C.; Dinerstein, Harriet L.; Madonna, Simone; Mashburn, Amanda

    2017-06-01

    We present an abundance analysis of 17 planetary nebulae (PNe) observed with the 2D-coudé echelle spectrograph on the 2.7-m Harlan J. Smith telescope at McDonald Observatory. The spectra cover the wavelength range 3600--10,400 Å at a resolution R = 36,700, and are the first high-resolution optical spectra for many objects in our sample. The number of emission lines detected in individual nebulae range from ~125 to over 600. We derive temperatures, densities, and abundances from collisionally-excited lines using the PyNeb package (Luridiana et al. 2015, A&A, 573, A42) and the ionization correction factor scheme of Delgado-Inglada et al. (2014, MNRAS, 440, 536). The abundances of light elements agree with previous estimates for most of the PNe. Several objects exhibit emission lines of refractory elements such as K and Fe, and neutron-capture elements that can be enriched by the s-process. We find that K and Fe are depleted relative to solar by ~0.3--0.7~dex and 1-2 dex, respectively, and find evidence for s-process enrichments in 10 objects. Several objects in our sample exhibit C, N, and O recombination lines that are useful for abundance determinations. These transitions are used to compute abundance discrepancy factors (ADFs), the ratio of ionic abundances derived from permitted lines to those from collisionally-excited transitions. We explore relations among depletion factors, ADFs, s-process enrichment factors, and other nebular stellar and nebular properties. We acknowledge support from NSF awards AST-901432 and AST-0708429.

  9. A Bayesian Analysis of Abundance, Trend, and Population Viability for Harbor Seals in Iliamna Lake, Alaska.

    PubMed

    Boveng, Peter L; Hoef, Jay M Ver; Withrow, David E; London, Josh M

    2018-03-23

    Harbor seals in Iliamna Lake, Alaska, are a small, isolated population, and one of only two freshwater populations of harbor seals in the world, yet little is known about their abundance or risk for extinction. Bayesian hierarchical models were used to estimate abundance and trend of this population. Observational models were developed from aerial survey and harvest data, and they included effects for time of year and time of day on survey counts. Underlying models of abundance and trend were based on a Leslie matrix model that used prior information on vital rates from the literature. We developed three scenarios for variability in the priors and used them as part of a sensitivity analysis. The models were fitted using Markov chain Monte Carlo methods. The population production rate implied by the vital rate estimates was about 5% per year, very similar to the average annual harvest rate. After a period of growth in the 1980s, the population appears to be relatively stable at around 400 individuals. A population viability analysis assessing the risk of quasi-extinction, defined as any reduction to 50 animals or below in the next 100 years, ranged from 1% to 3%, depending on the prior scenario. Although this is moderately low risk, it does not include genetic or catastrophic environmental events, which may have occurred to the population in the past, so our results should be applied cautiously. © 2018 The Authors Risk Analysis published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Society for Risk Analysis.

  10. Patterns of Communication through Interpreters: A Detailed Sociolinguistic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Aranguri, Cesar; Davidson, Brad; Ramirez, Robert

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND Numerous articles have detailed how the presence of an interpreter leads to less satisfactory communication with physicians; few have studied how actual communication takes place through an interpreter in a clinical setting. OBJECTIVE Record and analyze physician-interpreter-patient interactions. DESIGN Primary care physicians with high-volume Hispanic practices were recruited for a communication study. Dyslipidemic Hispanic patients, either monolingual Spanish or bilingual Spanish-English, were recruited on the day of a normally scheduled appointment and, once consented, recorded without a researcher present in the room. Separate postvisit interviews were conducted with the patient and the physician. All interactions were fully transcribed and analyzed. PARTICIPANTS Sixteen patients were recorded interacting with 9 physicians. Thirteen patients used an interpreter with 8 physicians, and 3 patients spoke Spanish with the 1 bilingual physician. APPROACH Transcript analysis based on sociolinguistic and discourse analytic techniques, including but not limited to time speaking, analysis of questions asked and answered, and the loss of semantic information. RESULTS Speech was significantly reduced and revised by the interpreter, resulting in an alteration of linguistic features such as content, meaning, reinforcement/validation, repetition, and affect. In addition, visits that included an interpreter had virtually no rapport-building “small talk,” which typically enables the physician to gain comprehensive patient history, learn clinically relevant information, and increase emotional engagement in treatment. CONCLUSIONS The presence of an interpreter increases the difficulty of achieving good physician-patient communication. Physicians and interpreters should be trained in the process of communication and interpretation, to minimize conversational loss and maximize the information and relational exchange with interpreted patients. PMID:16808747

  11. Patterns of communication through interpreters: a detailed sociolinguistic analysis.

    PubMed

    Aranguri, Cesar; Davidson, Brad; Ramirez, Robert

    2006-06-01

    Numerous articles have detailed how the presence of an interpreter leads to less satisfactory communication with physicians; few have studied how actual communication takes place through an interpreter in a clinical setting. Record and analyze physician-interpreter-patient interactions. Primary care physicians with high-volume Hispanic practices were recruited for a communication study. Dyslipidemic Hispanic patients, either monolingual Spanish or bilingual Spanish-English, were recruited on the day of a normally scheduled appointment and, once consented, recorded without a researcher present in the room. Separate postvisit interviews were conducted with the patient and the physician. All interactions were fully transcribed and analyzed. Sixteen patients were recorded interacting with 9 physicians. Thirteen patients used an interpreter with 8 physicians, and 3 patients spoke Spanish with the 1 bilingual physician. Transcript analysis based on sociolinguistic and discourse analytic techniques, including but not limited to time speaking, analysis of questions asked and answered, and the loss of semantic information. Speech was significantly reduced and revised by the interpreter, resulting in an alteration of linguistic features such as content, meaning, reinforcement/validation, repetition, and affect. In addition, visits that included an interpreter had virtually no rapport-building "small talk," which typically enables the physician to gain comprehensive patient history, learn clinically relevant information, and increase emotional engagement in treatment. The presence of an interpreter increases the difficulty of achieving good physician-patient communication. Physicians and interpreters should be trained in the process of communication and interpretation, to minimize conversational loss and maximize the information and relational exchange with interpreted patients.

  12. Abundance analysis of Am binaries and search for tidally driven abundance anomalies - III. HD 116657, HD 138213, HD 155375, HD 159560, HD 196544 and HD 204188

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stateva, I.; Iliev, I. Kh.; Budaj, J.

    2012-02-01

    We continue here the systematic abundance analysis of a sample of Am binaries in order to search for possible abundance anomalies driven by tidal interaction in these binary systems. New CCD observations of HD 116657, HD 138213, HD 155375, HD 159560, HD 196544 and HD 204188 were obtained in two spectral regions (6400-6500 and 6660-6760 Å). A synthetic spectrum analysis was carried out and the basic stellar properties, effective temperatures, gravities, projected rotational velocities, masses, ages and abundances of several elements were determined. We conclude that all six stars are Am stars. These stars were put into the context of other Am binaries with 10 < Porb < 200 d, and their abundance anomalies discussed in the context of possible tidal effects. There is a clear anticorrelation of the Am peculiarities with v sin i. However, there seems also to be a correlation with the eccentricity and perhaps with the orbital period. The dependence on temperature, age, mass and microturbulence was studied as well. The projected rotational velocities obtained by us were compared with those of Royer et al. and Abt & Morrell.

  13. Meta-Analysis of the Effects of Predation on Animal Prey Abundance: Evidence from UK Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Alison R.; Davies, Zoe G.; Tyler, Claire; Staddon, Samantha

    2008-01-01

    Background Controlling vertebrate predators is one of the most widespread forms of wildlife management and it continues to cause conflict between stakeholders worldwide. It is important for managers and policy-makers to make decisions on this issue that are based on the best available scientific evidence. Therefore, it is first important to understand if there is indeed an impact of vertebrate predators on prey, and then to quantify this impact. Methodology/Principal Findings Using the UK as a case study, we use a meta-analytical approach to review the available evidence to assess the effect of vertebrate predation on animal prey abundance. We find a significant effect of predators on prey abundance across our studies. On average, there is a 1.6 fold increase in prey abundance in the absence of predation. However, we show significant heterogeneity in effect sizes, and discuss how the method of predator control, whether the predator is native or non-native, and aspects of study design, may be potential causes. Conclusions/Significance Our results allow some cautious policy recommendations to be made regarding the management of predator and prey populations. Meta-analysis is an important tool for understanding general patterns in the effect of predators on prey abundance across studies. Such an approach is especially valuable where management decisions need to be made in the absence of site-specific information. PMID:18545690

  14. Project VeSElkA: abundance analysis of chemical species in HD 41076 and HD 148330

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalack, V.; Gallant, G.; Thibeault, C.

    2017-10-01

    A new semi-automatic approach is employed to carry out the abundance analysis of high-resolution spectra of HD 41076 and HD 148330 obtained recently with the spectropolarimetre Echelle SpectroPolarimetric Device for Observations of Stars at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. This approach allows to prepare in a semi-automatic mode the input data for the modified zeeman2 code and to analyse several hundreds of line profiles in sequence during a single run. It also provides more information on abundance distribution for each chemical element at the deeper atmospheric layers. Our analysis of the Balmer profiles observed in the spectra of HD 41076 and HD 148330 has resulted in the estimates of their effective temperature, gravity, metallicity and radial velocity. The respective models of stellar atmosphere have been calculated with the code phoenix and used to carry out abundance analysis employing the modified zeeman2 code. The analysis shows a deficit of the C, N, F, Mg, Ca, Ti, V, Cu, Y, Mo, Sm and Gd, and overabundance of Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Sr, Zr, Ba, Ce, Nd and Dy in the stellar atmosphere of HD 41076. In the atmosphere of HD 148330, the C, N and Mo appear to be underabundant, while the Ne, Na, Al, Si, P, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Zn, Sr, Y, Zr, Ba, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd and Dy are overabundant. We also have found signatures of vertical abundance stratification of Fe, Ti, Cr and Mn in HD 41076, and of Fe, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Y, Zr, Ce, Nd, Sm and Gd in HD 148330.

  15. Galactic Pal-eontology: abundance analysis of the disrupting globular cluster Palomar 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Andreas; Côté, Patrick

    2017-05-01

    We present a chemical abundance analysis of the tidally disrupted globular cluster (GC) Palomar 5. By co-adding high-resolution spectra of 15 member stars from the cluster's main body, taken at low signal-to-noise with the Keck/HIRES spectrograph, we were able to measure integrated abundance ratios of 24 species of 20 elements including all major nucleosynthetic channels (namely the light element Na; α-elements Mg, Si, Ca, Ti; Fe-peak and heavy elements Sc, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn; and the neutron-capture elements Y, Zr, Ba, La, Nd, Sm, Eu). The mean metallicity of -1.56 ± 0.02 ± 0.06 dex (statistical and systematic errors) agrees well with the values from individual, low-resolution measurements of individual stars, but it is lower than previous high-resolution results of a small number of stars in the literature. Comparison with Galactic halo stars and other disrupted and unperturbed GCs renders Pal 5 a typical representative of the Milky Way halo population, as has been noted before, emphasizing that the early chemical evolution of such clusters is decoupled from their later dynamical history. We also performed a test as to the detectability of light element variations in this co-added abundance analysis technique and found that this approach is not sensitive even in the presence of a broad range in sodium of 0.6 dex, a value typically found in the old halo GCs. Thus, while methods of determining the global abundance patterns of such objects are well suited to study their overall enrichment histories, chemical distinctions of their multiple stellar populations is still best obtained from measurements of individual stars. Full Table 3 is is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/601/A41

  16. The national biennial RCRA hazardous waste report (based on 1999 data) : state detail analysis

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2001-06-01

    The State Detail Analysis is a detailed look at each State's waste handling practices, including overall totals for generation, management, and shipments and receipts, as well as totals for the largest fifty facilities.

  17. Detailed weather and terrain analysis for aircraft noise modeling

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-04-30

    A study has been conducted supporting refinement and development of FAAs airport environmental analysis tools. Tasks conducted in this study are: (1) updated analysis of the 1997 KDEN noise model validation study with newer versions of INM and rel...

  18. Chemical abundance analysis of the A-type stars CP Cyg and HD 33266

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çalışkan, Şeyma; Kılıçoğlu, Tolgahan; Elmaslı, Aslı; Nasolo, Yahya; Avcı, Zeynep; Albayrak, Berahitdin

    2015-01-01

    We selected two neglected A-type stars with low rotational velocity (v sin i<20 km s-1) to reveal their chemical composition. Our abundance analysis was based on high resolution spectra of CP Cyg and HD 33266, obtained at the Tubitak National Observatory. We determined the fundamental parameters of our target stars from traditional methods. We also measured the abundances of 19 elements for CP Cyg and 20 for HD 33266 from the unblended lines emerging in the optical region of our spectra. The results of the analysis show that CP Cyg is a chemically normal A-type star, while HD 33266 is a metallic-line star. This is the first study in which HD 33266 is classified as a hot Am star. We also plotted the stars on the H-R diagram and calculated the masses from evolutionary tracks and ages from isochrones. We then compared both stars with members of similar ages and atmosphere parameters that belong to Coma Berenices and Hyades clusters. Our study is useful to understand the physical processes inside the atmospheres of chemically normal and peculiar A-type stars as well as their origin.

  19. Helium Abundance of Saturn from Cassini VIMS and CIRS Combined Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banfield, D. J.; Gierasch, P. J.; Conrath, B. J.; Nicholson, P. D.; Hedman, M. M.

    2013-12-01

    The Cassini VIMS instrument has obtained about 11 stellar occultations of sufficient quality that they can be used to infer the atmospheric structure where the stellar light cuts through Saturn's atmosphere on its way to thespacecraft. For 5 of these stellar occultations, the Cassini CIRS instrument obtained spectra of Saturn's limb at nearly the same time and place. By combining these observations, we have previously demonstrated that we can produce an estimate of the Helium abundance on Saturn (e.g., Banfield et al., DPS BAAS, 2011). The Helium abundance of Saturn is of great interest due to its leverage on our understanding of the formation and internal evolution processes of the giant planets in our Solar System, as well as giant exoplanets in other solar systems. The Helium abundance is also of significant interest due to a long-standing discrepancy between estimates obtained using a combined IR Spectra/Radio Science Occultation technique (He/H2~0.03, Conrath et al., '84) and those obtained using IR spectra alone (He/H2~0.13, Conrath & Gautier, '00). We will present our results from the Cassini VIMS/CIRS analysis of this problem. The technique uses the Cassini CIRS limb spectra to produce an estimate of the temperature profile between about 0.01 mbar and 5 mbar. The VIMS stellar occultations are used to produce a scale height profile over a similar vertical region, but with much better information content (and thus tighter constraints) between about 1 mbar and 5 mbar. By comparing these two results and demanding consistency we can infer the mean molecular mass of the atmosphere (and thus the Helium abundance) in the region of overlap (~1mbar to 5 mbar). Realistically, both sets of observations are quite challenging to perform. The signal levels are relatively low for the CIRS limb spectra (compared to nadir spectra), making calibration especially challenging. Not all VIMS occultations are successful with variable stellar baselines or stray light corrupting the

  20. Smaller desert dust cooling effect estimated from analysis of dust size and abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kok, Jasper F.; Ridley, David A.; Zhou, Qing; Miller, Ron L.; Zhao, Chun; Heald, Colette L.; Ward, Daniel S.; Albani, Samuel; Haustein, Karsten

    2017-03-01

    Desert dust aerosols affect Earth's global energy balance through direct interactions with radiation, and through indirect interactions with clouds and ecosystems. But the magnitudes of these effects are so uncertain that it remains unclear whether atmospheric dust has a net warming or cooling effect on global climate. Consequently, it is still uncertain whether large changes in atmospheric dust loading over the past century have slowed or accelerated anthropogenic climate change, or what the effects of potential future changes in dust loading will be. Here we present an analysis of the size and abundance of dust aerosols to constrain the direct radiative effect of dust. Using observational data on dust abundance, in situ measurements of dust optical properties and size distribution, and climate and atmospheric chemical transport model simulations of dust lifetime, we find that the dust found in the atmosphere is substantially coarser than represented in current global climate models. As coarse dust warms the climate, the global dust direct radiative effect is likely to be less cooling than the ~-0.4 W m-2 estimated by models in a current global aerosol model ensemble. Instead, we constrain the dust direct radiative effect to a range between -0.48 and +0.20 W m-2, which includes the possibility that dust causes a net warming of the planet.

  1. Analysis of Carbohydrate and Fatty Acid Marker Abundance in Ricin Toxin Preparations for Forensic Information

    SciTech Connect

    Colburn, Heather A.; Wunschel, David S.; Kreuzer-Martin, Helen W.

    2010-07-15

    One challenge in the forensic analysis of ricin samples is determining the method and extent of sample preparation. Ricin purification from the source castor seeds is essentially a protein purification through removal of the non-protein fractions of the seed. Two major, non-protein constituents in the seed are the castor oil and carbohydrates. Ricinoleic acid is a relatively unique fatty acid in nature and is the most abundant component of castor oil, which comprises roughly half the seed weight. The carbohydrate component comprises roughly half of the remaining “mash” left after oil and hull removal. We used derivatization of carbohydrate andmore » fatty acid markers followed by identification and quantification using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) to assess compositional changes in ricin samples purified by different methods. The loss of ricinoleic acid indicated steps for oil removal had occurred. Changes to the carbohydrate content of the sample were also observed following protein precipitation. The differential loss of arabinose relative to mannose indicated removal of the major carbohydrate fraction of the seed and enrichment of the protein content. Taken together, these changes in fatty acid and carbohydrate abundance are indicative of the preparation method used for each sample.« less

  2. An analysis of commitment strategies in planning: The details

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minton, Steven; Bresina, John; Drummond, Mark; Philips, Andrew B.

    1991-01-01

    We compare the utility of different commitment strategies in planning. Under a 'least commitment strategy', plans are represented as partial orders and operators are ordered only when interactions are detected. We investigate claims of the inherent advantages of planning with partial orders, as compared to planning with total orders. By focusing our analysis on the issue of operator ordering commitment, we are able to carry out a rigorous comparative analysis of two planners. We show that partial-order planning can be more efficient than total-order planning, but we also show that this is not necessarily so.

  3. Service Vessel Analysis. Vol. II : Detailed District Plots.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1987-09-01

    This is a supplement to Service Vessel Analysis, Vol. I: Seagoing and Coastal Vessel Requirements for Servicing Aids to Navigation. The material included is not intended to stand alone but is prepared for use in conjunction with the original study. T...

  4. The need for detailed gender-specific occupational safety analysis.

    PubMed

    Cruz Rios, Fernanda; Chong, Wai K; Grau, David

    2017-09-01

    The female work in population is growing in the United States, therefore the occupational health and safety entities must start to analyze gender-specific data related to every industry, especially to nontraditional occupations. Women working in nontraditional jobs are often exposed to extreme workplace hazards. These women have their safety and health threatened because there are no adequate policies to mitigate gender-specific risks such as discrimination and harassment. Employers tend to aggravate this situation because they often fail to provide proper reporting infrastructure and support. According to past studies, women suffered from workplace injuries and illnesses that were less prominent among men. Statistics also confirmed that men and women faced different levels of risks in distinct work environments. For example, the rates of workplace violence and murders by personal acquaintances were significantly higher among women. In this paper, the authors analyze prior public data on fatal and nonfatal injuries to understand why we need to differentiate genders when analyzing occupational safety and health issues. The analyses confirmed that women dealt with unique workplace hazards compared to men. It is urgent that public agencies, such as the U.S. Department of Labor, record gender-specific data in details and by occupations and industries. The reader will become aware of the current lack - and need - of data and knowledge about injuries and illnesses separated by gender and industry. Finally, safety and health researchers are encouraged to investigate the gender-specific data in all industries and occupations, as soon as they become available. Copyright © 2017 National Safety Council and Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Dancing sprites: Detailed analysis of two case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soula, Serge; Mlynarczyk, Janusz; Füllekrug, Martin; Pineda, Nicolau; Georgis, Jean-François; van der Velde, Oscar; Montanyà, Joan; Fabró, Ferran

    2017-03-01

    On 29-30 October 2013, a low-light video camera installed at Pic du Midi (2877 m), recorded transient luminous events above a very active storm over the Mediterranean Sea. The minimum cloud top temperature reached -73°C, while its cloud to ground (CG) flash rate exceeded 30 fl min-1. Some sprite events have long duration and resemble to dancing sprites. We analyze in detail the temporal evolution and estimated location of two series of sprite sequences, as well as the cloud structure, the lightning activity, the electric field radiated in a broad range of low frequencies, and the current moment waveform of the lightning strokes. (i) In each series, successive sprite sequences reflect time and location of corresponding positive lightning strokes across the stratiform region. (ii) The longer time-delayed (>20 ms) sprite elements correspond to the lower impulsive charge moment changes (iCMC) of the parent strokes (<200 C km), and they are shifted few tens of kilometers from their SP + CG stroke. However, both short and long time-delayed sprite elements also occur after strokes that produce a large iCMC and that are followed by a continuing current. (iii) The long time-delayed sprite elements during the continuing current correspond to surges in the current moment waveform. They occur sometimes at an altitude apparently lower than the previous short time-delayed sprite elements, possibly because of changes in the local conductivity. (iv) The largest and brightest sprite elements produce significant current signatures, visible when their delay is not too short ( 3-5 ms).

  6. 78 FR 66929 - Intent To Conduct a Detailed Economic Impact Analysis

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-07

    ... EXPORT-IMPORT BANK Intent To Conduct a Detailed Economic Impact Analysis AGENCY: Policy and... Federal Register notice informing the public of its intent to conduct a detailed economic impact analysis... aircraft to an airline in China. Export-Import Bank has recently learned that the Chinese airline will not...

  7. Hydrogen-fueled scramjets: Potential for detailed combustor analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beach, H. L., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Combustion research related to hypersonic scramjet (supersonic combustion ramjet) propulsion is discussed from the analytical point of view. Because the fuel is gaseous hydrogen, mixing is single phase and the chemical kinetics are well known; therefore, the potential for analysis is good relative to hydro-carbon fueled engines. Recent progress in applying two and three dimensional analytical techniques to mixing and reacting flows indicates cause for optimism, and identifies several areas for continuing effort.

  8. ANALYSIS OF RICIN TOXIN PREPARATIONS FOR CARBOHYDRATE AND FATTY ACID ABUNDANCE AND ISOTOPE RATIO INFORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Wunschel, David S.; Kreuzer-Martin, Helen W.; Antolick, Kathryn C.

    2009-12-01

    This report describes method development and preliminary evaluation for analyzing castor samples for signatures of purifying ricin. Ricin purification from the source castor seeds is essentially a problem of protein purification using common biochemical methods. Indications of protein purification will likely manifest themselves as removal of the non-protein fractions of the seed. Two major, non-protein, types of biochemical constituents in the seed are the castor oil and various carbohydrates. The oil comprises roughly half the seed weight while the carbohydrate component comprises roughly half of the remaining “mash” left after oil and hull removal. Different castor oil and carbohydrate componentsmore » can serve as indicators of specific toxin processing steps. Ricinoleic acid is a relatively unique fatty acid in nature and is the most abundant component of castor oil. The loss of ricinoleic acid indicates a step to remove oil from the seeds. The relative amounts of carbohydrates and carbohydrate-like compounds, including arabinose, xylose, myo-inositol fucose, rhamnose, glucosamine and mannose detected in the sample can also indicate specific processing steps. For instance, the differential loss of arabinose relative to mannose and N-acetyl glucosamine indicates enrichment for the protein fraction of the seed using protein precipitation. The methods developed in this project center on fatty acid and carbohydrate extraction from castor samples followed by derivatization to permit analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Method descriptions herein include: the source and preparation of castor materials used for method evaluation, the equipment and description of procedure required for chemical derivatization, and the instrument parameters used in the analysis. Two types of derivatization methods describe analysis of carbohydrates and one procedure for analysis of fatty acids. Two types of GC-MS analysis is included in the method development

  9. The Kepler Light Curves of AGN: A Detailed Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Krista Lynne; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Boyd, Patricia T.; Malkan, Matt; Howell, Steve B.; Gelino, Dawn M.

    2018-04-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of 21 light curves of Type 1 active galactic nuclei (AGN) from the Kepler spacecraft. First, we describe the necessity and development of a customized pipeline for treating Kepler data of stochastically variable sources like AGN. We then present the light curves, power spectral density functions (PSDs), and flux histograms. The light curves display an astonishing variety of behaviors, many of which would not be detected in ground-based studies, including switching between distinct flux levels. Six objects exhibit PSD flattening at characteristic timescales that roughly correlate with black hole mass. These timescales are consistent with orbital timescales or free-fall accretion timescales. We check for correlations of variability and high-frequency PSD slope with accretion rate, black hole mass, redshift, and luminosity. We find that bolometric luminosity is anticorrelated with both variability and steepness of the PSD slope. We do not find evidence of the linear rms–flux relationships or lognormal flux distributions found in X-ray AGN light curves, indicating that reprocessing is not a significant contributor to optical variability at the 0.1%–10% level.

  10. Abundances from solar flare line spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Ronald J.

    1989-01-01

    Updating and improvement of computer codes used in the abundance analyses of solar-flare gamma-ray data are described. These modifications are itemized in detail. The abundance analysis technique was then applied to data obtained by the Gamma-Ray Spectrometer of the Solar Maximum Mission spacecraft for the 27 April 1981 solar flare to set constraints on the interacting-particle angular distribution. The results are presented. Research in several other areas was also performed and they are discussed.

  11. Combination of affinity depletion of abundant proteins and reversed-phase fractionation in proteomic analysis of human plasma/serum.

    PubMed

    Zolotarjova, Nina; Mrozinski, Peter; Chen, Haiying; Martosella, James

    2008-05-02

    The tremendous complexity of the serum and plasma proteome presents extreme analytical challenges in comprehensive analysis due to the wide dynamic range of protein concentrations. Therefore, robust sample preparation methods remain one of the important steps in the proteome characterization workflow. We present the results on a new column for the specific depletion of 14 high-abundant proteins from human serum and plasma and the subsequent reversed-phase fractionation of the flow-through proteins. Analysis of tryptic peptides was accomplished with microfluidic HPLC-Chip/MS system. Results indicate that high-abundant protein depletion combined with RP fractionation of plasma showed an improved dynamic range for proteomic analysis and enabled the identification of low-abundant plasma proteins.

  12. Chemical abundances and kinematics of 257 G-, K-type field giants. Setting a base for further analysis of giant-planet properties orbiting evolved stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adibekyan, V. Zh.; Benamati, L.; Santos, N. C.; Alves, S.; Lovis, C.; Udry, S.; Israelian, G.; Sousa, S. G.; Tsantaki, M.; Mortier, A.; Sozzetti, A.; De Medeiros, J. R.

    2015-06-01

    We performed a uniform and detailed abundance analysis of 12 refractory elements (Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Cr, Ni, Co, Sc, Mn, and V) for a sample of 257 G- and K-type evolved stars from the CORALIE planet search programme. To date, only one of these stars is known to harbour a planetary companion. We aimed to characterize this large sample of evolved stars in terms of chemical abundances and kinematics, thus setting a solid base for further analysis of planetary properties around giant stars. This sample, being homogeneously analysed, can be used as a comparison sample for other planet-related studies, as well as for different type of studies related to stellar and Galaxy astrophysics. The abundances of the chemical elements were determined using an local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) abundance analysis relative to the Sun, with the spectral synthesis code MOOG and a grid of Kurucz ATLAS9 atmospheres. To separate the Galactic stellar populations, both a purely kinematical approach and a chemical method were applied. We confirm the overabundance of Na in giant stars compared to the field FGK dwarfs. This enhancement might have a stellar evolutionary character, but departures from LTE may also produce a similar enhancement. Our chemical separation of stellar populations also suggests a `gap' in metallicity between the thick-disc and high-α metal-rich stars, as previously observed in dwarfs sample from HARPS. The present sample, as most of the giant star samples, also suffers from the B - V colour cut-off, which excludes low-log g stars with high metallicities, and high-log g star with low [Fe/H]. For future studies of planet occurrence dependence on stellar metallicity around these evolved stars, we suggest to use a subsample of stars in a `cut-rectangle' in the log g-[Fe/H] diagram to overcome the aforementioned issue.

  13. Bayesian change point analysis of abundance trends for pelagic fishes in the upper San Francisco Estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, James R.; Kimmerer, Wim J.; Brown, Larry R.; Newman, Ken B.; Mac Nally, Ralph; Bennett, William A.; Feyrer, Frederick; Fleishman, Erica

    2010-01-01

    We examined trends in abundance of four pelagic fish species (delta smelt, longfin smelt, striped bass, and threadfin shad) in the upper San Francisco Estuary, California, USA, over 40 years using Bayesian change point models. Change point models identify times of abrupt or unusual changes in absolute abundance (step changes) or in rates of change in abundance (trend changes). We coupled Bayesian model selection with linear regression splines to identify biotic or abiotic covariates with the strongest associations with abundances of each species. We then refitted change point models conditional on the selected covariates to explore whether those covariates could explain statistical trends or change points in species abundances. We also fitted a multispecies change point model that identified change points common to all species. All models included hierarchical structures to model data uncertainties, including observation errors and missing covariate values. There were step declines in abundances of all four species in the early 2000s, with a likely common decline in 2002. Abiotic variables, including water clarity, position of the 2‰ isohaline (X2), and the volume of freshwater exported from the estuary, explained some variation in species' abundances over the time series, but no selected covariates could explain statistically the post-2000 change points for any species.

  14. Integrative Analysis of Desert Dust Size and Abundance Suggests Less Dust Climate Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kok, Jasper F.; Ridley, David A.; Zhou, Qing; Miller, Ron L.; Zhao, Chun; Heald, Colette L.; Ward, Daniel S.; Albani, Samuel; Haustein, Karsten

    2017-01-01

    Desert dust aerosols affect Earths global energy balance through interactions with radiation, clouds, and ecosystems. But the magnitudes of these effects are so uncertain that it remains unclear whether atmospheric dust has a net warming or cooling effect on global climate. Consequently, it is still uncertain whether large changes in atmospheric dust loading over the past century have slowed or accelerated anthropogenic climate change, and the climate impact of possible future alterations in dust loading is similarly disputed. Here we use an integrative analysis of dust aerosol sizes and abundance to constrain the climatic impact of dust through direct interactions with radiation. Using a combination of observational, experimental, and model data, we find that atmospheric dust is substantially coarser than represented in current climate models. Since coarse dust warms global climate, the dust direct radiative effect (DRE) is likely less cooling than the 0.4 W m superscript 2 estimated by models in a current ensemble. We constrain the dust DRE to -0.20 (-0.48 to +0.20) W m superscript 2, which suggests that the dust DRE produces only about half the cooling that current models estimate, and raises the possibility that dust DRE is actually net warming the planet.

  15. High cycle fatigue crack modeling and analysis for deck truss flooring connection details : appendices.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-07-01

    The appendix belongs to "High cycle fatigue crack modeling and analysis for deck truss flooring connection details : final report". : The Oregon Department of Transportation is responsible for many steel deck truss bridges containing connection detai...

  16. Quantitative spectroscopy of extreme helium stars Model atmospheres and a non-LTE abundance analysis of BD+10°2179

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupfer, T.; Przybilla, N.; Heber, U.; Jeffery, C. S.; Behara, N. T.; Butler, K.

    2017-10-01

    Extreme helium stars (EHe stars) are hydrogen-deficient supergiants of spectral type A and B. They are believed to result from mergers in double degenerate systems. In this paper, we present a detailed quantitative non-LTE spectral analysis for BD+10°2179, a prototype of this rare class of stars, using UV-Visual Echelle Spectrograph and Fiber-fed Extended Range Optical Spectrograph spectra covering the range from ˜3100 to 10 000 Å. Atmosphere model computations were improved in two ways. First, since the UV metal line blanketing has a strong impact on the temperature-density stratification, we used the atlas12 code. Additionally, We tested atlas12 against the benchmark code sterne3, and found only small differences in the temperature and density stratifications, and good agreement with the spectral energy distributions. Secondly, 12 chemical species were treated in non-LTE. Pronounced non-LTE effects occur in individual spectral lines but, for the majority, the effects are moderate to small. The spectroscopic parameters give Teff =17 300±300 K and log g = 2.80±0.10, and an evolutionary mass of 0.55±0.05 M⊙. The star is thus slightly hotter, more compact and less massive than found in previous studies. The kinematic properties imply a thick-disc membership, which is consistent with the metallicity [Fe/H] ≈ -1 and α-enhancement. The refined light-element abundances are consistent with the white dwarf merger scenario. We further discuss the observed helium spectrum in an appendix, detecting dipole-allowed transitions from about 150 multiplets plus the most comprehensive set of known/predicted isolated forbidden components to date. Moreover, a so far unreported series of pronounced forbidden He I components is detected in the optical-UV.

  17. An abundance analysis from the STIS-HST UV spectrum of the non-magnetic Bp star HR 6000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelli, F.; Cowley, C. R.; Ayres, T. R.; Catanzaro, G.; Leone, F.

    2017-05-01

    Context. The sharp-line spectrum of the non-magnetic, main-sequence Bp star HR 6000 has peculiarities that distinguish it from those of the HgMn stars with which it is sometimes associated. The position of the star close to the center of the Lupus 3 molecular cloud, whose estimated age is on the order of 9.1 ± 2.1 Myr, has lead to the hypothesis that the anomalous peculiarities of HR 6000 can be explained by the young age of the star. Aims: Observational material from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) provides the opportunity to extend the abundance analysis previously performed for the optical region and clarify the properties of this remarkable peculiar star. Our aim was to obtain the atmospheric abundances for all the elements observed in a broad region from 1250 to 10 000 Å. Methods: An LTE synthetic spectrum was compared with a high-resolution spectrum observed with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) equipment in the 1250-3040 Å interval. Abundances were changed until the synthetic spectrum fit the observed spectrum. The assumed model is an LTE, plane-parallel, line-blanketed ATLAS12 model already used for the abundance analysis of a high-resolution optical spectrum observed at ESO with the Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph (UVES). The stellar parameters are Teff = 13450 K, log g = 4.3, and zero microturbulent velocity. Results: Abundances for 28 elements and 7 upper limits were derived from the ultraviolet spectrum. Adding results from previous work, we have now quantitative results for 37 elements, some of which show striking contrasts with those of a broad sample of HgMn stars. The analysis has pointed out numerous abundance anomalies, such as ionization anomalies and line-to-line variation in the derived abundances, in particular for silicon. The inferred discrepancies could be explained by non-LTE effects and with the occurrence of diffusion and vertical abundance stratification. In the framework of the last hypothesis, we

  18. Abundant Topological Outliers in Social Media Data and Their Effect on Spatial Analysis.

    PubMed

    Westerholt, Rene; Steiger, Enrico; Resch, Bernd; Zipf, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Twitter and related social media feeds have become valuable data sources to many fields of research. Numerous researchers have thereby used social media posts for spatial analysis, since many of them contain explicit geographic locations. However, despite its widespread use within applied research, a thorough understanding of the underlying spatial characteristics of these data is still lacking. In this paper, we investigate how topological outliers influence the outcomes of spatial analyses of social media data. These outliers appear when different users contribute heterogeneous information about different phenomena simultaneously from similar locations. As a consequence, various messages representing different spatial phenomena are captured closely to each other, and are at risk to be falsely related in a spatial analysis. Our results reveal indications for corresponding spurious effects when analyzing Twitter data. Further, we show how the outliers distort the range of outcomes of spatial analysis methods. This has significant influence on the power of spatial inferential techniques, and, more generally, on the validity and interpretability of spatial analysis results. We further investigate how the issues caused by topological outliers are composed in detail. We unveil that multiple disturbing effects are acting simultaneously and that these are related to the geographic scales of the involved overlapping patterns. Our results show that at some scale configurations, the disturbances added through overlap are more severe than at others. Further, their behavior turns into a volatile and almost chaotic fluctuation when the scales of the involved patterns become too different. Overall, our results highlight the critical importance of thoroughly considering the specific characteristics of social media data when analyzing them spatially.

  19. Abundant Topological Outliers in Social Media Data and Their Effect on Spatial Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zipf, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Twitter and related social media feeds have become valuable data sources to many fields of research. Numerous researchers have thereby used social media posts for spatial analysis, since many of them contain explicit geographic locations. However, despite its widespread use within applied research, a thorough understanding of the underlying spatial characteristics of these data is still lacking. In this paper, we investigate how topological outliers influence the outcomes of spatial analyses of social media data. These outliers appear when different users contribute heterogeneous information about different phenomena simultaneously from similar locations. As a consequence, various messages representing different spatial phenomena are captured closely to each other, and are at risk to be falsely related in a spatial analysis. Our results reveal indications for corresponding spurious effects when analyzing Twitter data. Further, we show how the outliers distort the range of outcomes of spatial analysis methods. This has significant influence on the power of spatial inferential techniques, and, more generally, on the validity and interpretability of spatial analysis results. We further investigate how the issues caused by topological outliers are composed in detail. We unveil that multiple disturbing effects are acting simultaneously and that these are related to the geographic scales of the involved overlapping patterns. Our results show that at some scale configurations, the disturbances added through overlap are more severe than at others. Further, their behavior turns into a volatile and almost chaotic fluctuation when the scales of the involved patterns become too different. Overall, our results highlight the critical importance of thoroughly considering the specific characteristics of social media data when analyzing them spatially. PMID:27611199

  20. Secondary ion mass spectrometry combined with alpha track detection for isotope abundance ratio analysis of individual uranium-bearing particles.

    PubMed

    Esaka, Fumitaka; Magara, Masaaki

    2014-03-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) was used in combination with alpha track detection for the efficient analysis of uranium-bearing particles with higher (235)U abundances in environmental samples. A polycarbonate film containing particles was prepared and placed in contact with a CR-39 plastic detector. After exposure for 28 days, the detector was etched in a NaOH solution and each uranium-bearing particle was identified through observation of the alpha tracks recorded in the detector. A portion of the film containing each uranium-bearing particle was cut out and put onto a glassy carbon planchet. The films on the planchet were decomposed through plasma ashing for subsequent uranium abundance ratio analysis with SIMS. The alpha track-SIMS analysis of 10 uranium-bearing particles in a sample taken from a nuclear facility enabled n((235)U)/n((238)U) abundance ratios in the range 0.0072-0.25 to be detected, which were significantly higher than those obtained by SIMS without alpha track detection. The duration of the whole analytical process for analysis of 10 particles was about 32 days. The detection efficiency was calculated to be 27.1±6.5%, based on the analysis of the particles in uranium reference materials. The detection limits, defined as the diameter of the particle which produces alpha tracks more than one for a 28-days exposure, were estimated to be 0.8, 0.9, 1.1, 2.1 and 3.0 μm for the particles having the same uranium abundance ratios with NBL CRM U850, U500, U350, U050 and U010 reference materials, respectively. The use of alpha track detection for subsequent SIMS analysis is an inexpensive and an efficient way to measure uranium-bearing particles with higher (235)U abundances. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Assessing plantation canopy condition from airborne imagery using spectral mixture analysis and fractional abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, Nicholas; Coops, Nicholas C.; Stone, Christine

    2005-05-01

    Pine plantations in Australia are subject to a range of abiotic and biotic damaging agents that affect tree health and productivity. In order to optimise management decisions, plantation managers require regular intelligence relating to the status and trends in the health and condition of trees within individual compartments. Remote sensing technology offers an alternative to traditional ground-based assessment of these plantations. Automated estimation of foliar crown health, especially in degraded crowns, can be difficult due to mixed pixels when there is low or fragmented vegetation cover. In this study we apply a linear spectral unmixing approach to high spatial resolution (50 cm) multispectral imagery to quantify the fractional abundances of the key image endmembers: sunlit canopy, shadow, and soil. A number of Pinus radiata tree crown attributes were modelled using multiple linear regression and endmember fraction images. We found high levels of significance ( r2 = 0.80) for the overall crown colour and colour of the crown leader ( r2 = 0.79) in tree crowns affected by the fungal pathogen Sphaeropsis sapinea, which produces both needle necrosis and chlorosis. Results for stands associated with defoliation and chlorosis through infestation by the aphid Essigella californica were lower with an r2 = 0.33 for crown transparency and r2 = 0.31 for proportion of crown affected. Similar analysis of data from a nitrogen deficient site produced an outcome somewhat in between the other two damaging agents. Overall the sunlit canopy image fraction has been the most important variable used in the modelling of forest condition for all damaging agents.

  2. Evaluating abundance and trends in a Hawaiian avian community using state-space analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Camp, Richard J.; Brinck, Kevin W.; Gorresen, P.M.; Paxton, Eben H.

    2016-01-01

    Estimating population abundances and patterns of change over time are important in both ecology and conservation. Trend assessment typically entails fitting a regression to a time series of abundances to estimate population trajectory. However, changes in abundance estimates from year-to-year across time are due to both true variation in population size (process variation) and variation due to imperfect sampling and model fit. State-space models are a relatively new method that can be used to partition the error components and quantify trends based only on process variation. We compare a state-space modelling approach with a more traditional linear regression approach to assess trends in uncorrected raw counts and detection-corrected abundance estimates of forest birds at Hakalau Forest National Wildlife Refuge, Hawai‘i. Most species demonstrated similar trends using either method. In general, evidence for trends using state-space models was less strong than for linear regression, as measured by estimates of precision. However, while the state-space models may sacrifice precision, the expectation is that these estimates provide a better representation of the real world biological processes of interest because they are partitioning process variation (environmental and demographic variation) and observation variation (sampling and model variation). The state-space approach also provides annual estimates of abundance which can be used by managers to set conservation strategies, and can be linked to factors that vary by year, such as climate, to better understand processes that drive population trends.

  3. Detailed analysis of low energy plasma data under the Voyager Uranus data analysis program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnutt, Ralph L., Jr.; Belcher, John W.; Bagenal, Frances; Richardson, John D.

    1992-01-01

    Research effort included the PLS data analysis program where modifications to the data fitting procedure and elimination of possible noise and electron contamination were made. The analysis code corrections were used in checking the Neptune data gathered during the Voyager 2 encounter and for analyzing selected plasma spectra from the warm Io torus. A major task accomplished was the summary of Uranus-related research in the U.S. National Report to the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics for the 1987 - 1990 quadrennium. A limited amount of work was accomplished on assessing the Pedersen conductivity of the ionosphere and comparing it with inferred values from shielding by the Uranian ring current. Under this grant there has been a great deal of effort expended on identifying and classifying plasma waves and oscillations in the magnetosheath and solar wind downstream from Uranus. Large amplitude oscillations in plasma parameters are found in the magnetosheath, with density changes of up to a factor of ten occurring on times scales of minutes. New algorithms developed for analyzing the inbound bow shock crossing of Neptune will probably be applied to a more detailed analysis of the Uranus shock in the near future.

  4. Humidity affects relative ion abundance in direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry of hexamethylene triperoxide diamine.

    PubMed

    Newsome, G Asher; Ackerman, Luke K; Johnson, Kevin J

    2014-12-16

    Unstable explosive hexamethylene triperoxide diamine (HMTD) is dangerous in quantity and benefits from the minimal sampling handling associated with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization for mass spectral analysis. Seasonal variation observed in HMTD mass spectra suggested a humidity dependence. Therefore, direct analysis in real time (DART) ionization mass spectra were acquired at a range of humidity values. An enclosure was designed to fit around the ion source and mass spectrometer inlet at atmospheric pressure. The enclosure was supplied with controlled amounts of humidified air from a test atmosphere generator to create programmable conditions for ambient analysis. The relative abundance and fragmentation of analyte ions were observed to change reliably with changing humidity values and, to a lesser degree, temperature. Humidity at such plasma-based ion sources should be regulated to avoid ∼90% shifts in relative ion abundance and provide stability and reproducibility of HMTD analysis.

  5. CHARACTERIZING THE CHEMISTRY OF THE MILKY WAY STELLAR HALO: DETAILED CHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF A METAL-POOR STELLAR STREAM ,

    SciTech Connect

    Roederer, Ian U.; Sneden, Christopher; Thompson, Ian B.

    2010-03-10

    We present the results of a detailed abundance analysis of one of the confirmed building blocks of the Milky Way stellar halo, a kinematically coherent metal-poor stellar stream. We have obtained high-resolution and high signal-to-noise spectra of 12 probable stream members using the Magellan Inamori Kyocera Echelle spectrograph on the Magellan-Clay Telescope at Las Campanas Observatory and the 2dCoude spectrograph on the Smith Telescope at McDonald Observatory. We have derived abundances or upper limits for 51 species of 46 elements in each of these stars. The stream members show a range of metallicity (-3.4 < [Fe/H] <-1.5) but are otherwisemore » chemically homogeneous, with the same star-to-star dispersion in [X/Fe] as the rest of the halo. This implies that, in principle, a significant fraction of the Milky Way stellar halo could have formed from accreted systems like the stream. The stream stars show minimal evolution in the alpha or Fe-group elements over the range of metallicity. This stream is enriched with material produced by the main and weak components of the rapid neutron-capture process and shows no evidence for enrichment by the slow neutron-capture process.« less

  6. A new solar carbon abundance based on non-LTE CN molecular spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mount, G. H.; Linsky, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    A detailed non-LTE analysis of solar CN spectra strongly suggest a revised carbon abundance for the sun. We recommend a value of log carbon abundance = 8.35 plus or minus 0.15 which is significantly lower than the presently accepted value of log carbon abundance = 8.55. This revision may have important consequences in astrophysics.

  7. Elemental abundances in star-forming regions: results in Lupus and future analysis in Orion .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biazzo, K.; Frasca, A.; Alcalá, J. M.; Zusi, M.; Covino, E.; Randich, S.; Esposito, M.; Manara, C. F.; Antoniucci, S.; Nisini, B.; Rigliaco, E.; Getman, F.; Spina, L.

    We present a recent study in press on lithium, iron, and barium abundance measurements obtained for low-mass (˜ 0.025-1.8 M_⊙) stars in four Lupus clouds and future investigations on chemical content to be performed in the Orion A cloud.

  8. Comprehensive abundance analysis of red giants in the open clusters NGC 752, 1817, 2360 and 2506

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Arumalla B. S.; Giridhar, Sunetra; Lambert, David L.

    2012-01-01

    We have analysed high-dispersion echelle spectra (R ≳ 50 000) of red giant members for four open clusters to derive abundances for many elements. The spread in temperatures and gravities being very small among the red giants nearly the same stellar lines were employed thereby reducing the random errors. The errors of average abundance for the cluster were generally in the range 0.02-0.07 dex. Our present sample covers Galactocentric distances of 8.3-10.5 kpc. The [Fe/H] values are -0.02 ± 0.05 for NGC 752, -0.07 ± 0.06 for NGC 2360, -0.11 ± 0.05 for NGC 1817 and -0.19 ± 0.06 for NGC 2506. Abundances relative to Fe for elements from Na to Eu are equal within measurement uncertainties to published abundances for thin-disc giants in the field. This supports the view that field stars come from disrupted open clusters.

  9. The impact of land abandonment on species richness and abundance in the Mediterranean Basin: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Plieninger, Tobias; Hui, Cang; Gaertner, Mirijam; Huntsinger, Lynn

    2014-01-01

    Land abandonment is common in the Mediterranean Basin, a global biodiversity hotspot, but little is known about its impacts on biodiversity. To upscale existing case-study insights to the Pan-Mediterranean level, we conducted a meta-analysis of the effects of land abandonment on plant and animal species richness and abundance in agroforestry, arable land, pastures, and permanent crops of the Mediterranean Basin. In particular, we investigated (1) which taxonomic groups (arthropods, birds, lichen, vascular plants) are more affected by land abandonment; (2) at which spatial and temporal scales the effect of land abandonment on species richness and abundance is pronounced; (3) whether previous land use and current protected area status affect the magnitude of changes in the number and abundance of species; and (4) how prevailing landforms and climate modify the impacts of land abandonment. After identifying 1240 potential studies, 154 cases from 51 studies that offered comparisons of species richness and abundance and had results relevant to our four areas of investigation were selected for meta-analysis. Results are that land abandonment showed slightly increased (effect size  = 0.2109, P<0.0001) plant and animal species richness and abundance overall, though results were heterogeneous, with differences in effect size between taxa, spatial-temporal scales, land uses, landforms, and climate. In conclusion, there is no "one-size-fits-all" conservation approach that applies to the diverse contexts of land abandonment in the Mediterranean Basin. Instead, conservation policies should strive to increase awareness of this heterogeneity and the potential trade-offs after abandonment. The strong role of factors at the farm and landscape scales that was revealed by the analysis indicates that purposeful management at these scales can have a powerful impact on biodiversity.

  10. The Impact of Land Abandonment on Species Richness and Abundance in the Mediterranean Basin: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Plieninger, Tobias; Hui, Cang; Gaertner, Mirijam; Huntsinger, Lynn

    2014-01-01

    Land abandonment is common in the Mediterranean Basin, a global biodiversity hotspot, but little is known about its impacts on biodiversity. To upscale existing case-study insights to the Pan-Mediterranean level, we conducted a meta-analysis of the effects of land abandonment on plant and animal species richness and abundance in agroforestry, arable land, pastures, and permanent crops of the Mediterranean Basin. In particular, we investigated (1) which taxonomic groups (arthropods, birds, lichen, vascular plants) are more affected by land abandonment; (2) at which spatial and temporal scales the effect of land abandonment on species richness and abundance is pronounced; (3) whether previous land use and current protected area status affect the magnitude of changes in the number and abundance of species; and (4) how prevailing landforms and climate modify the impacts of land abandonment. After identifying 1240 potential studies, 154 cases from 51 studies that offered comparisons of species richness and abundance and had results relevant to our four areas of investigation were selected for meta-analysis. Results are that land abandonment showed slightly increased (effect size  = 0.2109, P<0.0001) plant and animal species richness and abundance overall, though results were heterogeneous, with differences in effect size between taxa, spatial-temporal scales, land uses, landforms, and climate. In conclusion, there is no “one-size-fits-all” conservation approach that applies to the diverse contexts of land abandonment in the Mediterranean Basin. Instead, conservation policies should strive to increase awareness of this heterogeneity and the potential trade-offs after abandonment. The strong role of factors at the farm and landscape scales that was revealed by the analysis indicates that purposeful management at these scales can have a powerful impact on biodiversity. PMID:24865979

  11. Non-LTE analysis of copper abundances for the two distinct halo populations in the solar neighborhood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, H. L.; Shi, J. R.; Nissen, P. E.; Zhao, G.

    2016-01-01

    Context. Two distinct halo populations were found in the solar neighborhood by a series of works. They can be clearly separated by [α/Fe] and several other elemental abundance ratios including [Cu/Fe]. Very recently, a non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) study revealed that relatively large departures exist between LTE and non-LTE results in copper abundance analysis. The study also showed that non-LTE effects of neutral copper vary with stellar parameters and thus affect the [Cu/Fe] trend. Aims: We aim to derive the copper abundances for the stars from the sample of Nissen & Schuster (2010) with both LTE and non-LTE calculations. Based on our results, we study the non-LTE effects of copper and investigate whether the high-α population can still be distinguished from the low-α population in the non-LTE [Cu/Fe] results. Methods: Our differential abundance ratios are derived from the high-resolution spectra collected from VLT/UVES and NOT/FIES spectrographs. Applying the MAFAGS opacity sampling atmospheric models and spectrum synthesis method, we derive the non-LTE copper abundances based on the new atomic model with current atomic data obtained from both laboratory and theoretical calculations. Results: The copper abundances determined from non-LTE calculations are increased by 0.01 to 0.2 dex depending on the stellar parameters compared with the LTE results. The non-LTE [Cu/Fe] trend is much flatter than the LTE one in the metallicity range -1.6 < [ Fe / H ] < -0.8. Taking non-LTE effects into consideration, the high- and low-α stars still show distinguishable copper abundances, which appear even more clear in a diagram of non-LTE [Cu/Fe] versus [Fe/H]. Conclusions: The non-LTE effects are strong for copper, especially in metal-poor stars. Our results confirmed that there are two distinct halo populations in the solar neighborhood. The dichotomy in copper abundance is a peculiar feature of each population, suggesting that they formed in different

  12. A critical analysis of interstellar Zn and Cr as galactic abundance benchmarks for quasar absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sembach, Kenneth R.; Steidel, Charles C.; Macke, Robert J.; Meyer, David M.

    1995-01-01

    We present interstellar gas-phase abundances of zinc and chromium in the Milky Way for comparison with the abundances of these elements in damped Ly-alpha systems at redshifts near z approximately 2. We make use of both IUE (International Ultraviolet Explorer) and GHRS (Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph) archival information in deriving the Milky Way values and find that the average difference in (Zn/H) and (Cr/Zn) between the Milky Way and damped Ly-alpha systems at large N(H1) is about 0.9 dex. The Zn/H values we find for the Milky Way are approximately -0.2 to -0.7 dex below solar and are due in large part to depletion of Zn onto dust grains. The amount of this gas-phase depletion is variable and depends upon the H1 column density and molecular fraction of the gas. Milky Way sight lines having low molecular fractions have values of (Zn/H) within approximately 0.2 dex of the solar value. Combined with larger values of (Cr/Zn) found for the damped Ly-alpha systems, this result confirms that measures of (Zn/H) should accurately reflect the lower gas-phase abundances of Zn found in these systems.

  13. High-resolution abundance analysis of red giants in the globular cluster NGC 6522

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbuy, B.; Chiappini, C.; Cantelli, E.; Depagne, E.; Pignatari, M.; Hirschi, R.; Cescutti, G.; Ortolani, S.; Hill, V.; Zoccali, M.; Minniti, D.; Trevisan, M.; Bica, E.; Gómez, A.

    2014-10-01

    Context. The [Sr/Ba] and [Y/Ba] scatter observed in some galactic halo stars that are very metal-poor and in a few individual stars of the oldest known Milky Way globular cluster NGC 6522 have been interpreted as evidence of early enrichment by massive fast-rotating stars (spinstars). Because NGC 6522 is a bulge globular cluster, the suggestion was that not only the very-metal poor halo stars, but also bulge stars at [Fe/H] ~ -1 could be used as probes of the stellar nucleosynthesis signatures from the earlier generations of massive stars, but at much higher metallicity. For the bulge the suggestions were based on early spectra available for stars in NGC 6522, with a medium resolution of R ~ 22 000 and a moderate signal-to-noise ratio. Aims: The main purpose of this study is to re-analyse the NGC 6522 stars reported previously by using new high-resolution (R ~ 45 000) and high signal-to-noise spectra (S/N > 100). We aim at re-deriving their stellar parameters and elemental ratios, in particular the abundances of the neutron-capture s-process-dominated elements such as Sr, Y, Zr, La, and Ba, and of the r-element Eu. Methods: High-resolution spectra of four giants belonging to the bulge globular cluster NGC 6522 were obtained at the 8m VLT UT2-Kueyen telescope with the UVES spectrograph in FLAMES-UVES configuration. The spectroscopic parameters were derived based on the excitation and ionization equilibrium of Fe i and Fe ii. Results: Our analysis confirms a metallicity [Fe/H] = -0.95 ± 0.15 for NGC 6522 and the overabundance of the studied stars in Eu (with +0.2 < [Eu/Fe] < + 0.4) and alpha-elements O and Mg. The neutron-capture s-element-dominated Sr, Y, Zr, Ba, and La now show less pronounced variations from star to star. Enhancements are in the range 0.0 < [Sr/Fe] < +0.4, +0.23 < [Y/Fe] < +0.43, 0.0 < [Zr/Fe] < +0.4, 0.0 < [La/Fe] < +0.35, and 0.05 < [Ba/Fe] < +0.55. Conclusions: The very high overabundances of [Y/Fe] previously reported for the four studied

  14. Analysis of Dynamic Interactions between Different Drivetrain Components with a Detailed Wind Turbine Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartschat, A.; Morisse, M.; Mertens, A.; Wenske, J.

    2016-09-01

    The presented work describes a detailed analysis of the dynamic interactions among mechanical and electrical drivetrain components of a modern wind turbine under the influence of parameter variations, different control mechanisms and transient excitations. For this study, a detailed model of a 2MW wind turbine with a gearbox, a permanent magnet synchronous generator and a full power converter has been developed which considers all relevant characteristics of the mechanical and electrical subsystems. This model includes an accurate representation of the aerodynamics and the mechanical properties of the rotor and the complete mechanical drivetrain. Furthermore, a detailed electrical modelling of the generator, the full scale power converter with discrete switching devices, its filters, the transformer and the grid as well as the control structure is considered. The analysis shows that, considering control measures based on active torsional damping, interactions between mechanical and electrical subsystems can significantly affect the loads and thus the individual lifetime of the components.

  15. 78 FR 69669 - Intent To Conduct a Detailed Economic Impact Analysis

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-20

    ... EXPORT-IMPORT BANK Intent To Conduct a Detailed Economic Impact Analysis This notice is to inform the public that the Export-Import Bank of the United States has received an application for a loan... United States. Interested parties may submit comments on this transaction by email to economic.impact...

  16. 78 FR 47317 - Intent To Conduct a Detailed Economic Impact Analysis

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-05

    ... EXPORT-IMPORT BANK OF THE UNITED STATES Intent To Conduct a Detailed Economic Impact Analysis This... aircraft to an airline in China, which will provide passenger services. The specific amount of the loan... route service within China and from China to various regional and international destinations...

  17. An Improved Spectral Analysis Method for Fatigue Damage Assessment of Details in Liquid Cargo Tanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Peng-yuan; Huang, Xiao-ping

    2018-03-01

    Errors will be caused in calculating the fatigue damages of details in liquid cargo tanks by using the traditional spectral analysis method which is based on linear system, for the nonlinear relationship between the dynamic stress and the ship acceleration. An improved spectral analysis method for the assessment of the fatigue damage in detail of a liquid cargo tank is proposed in this paper. Based on assumptions that the wave process can be simulated by summing the sinusoidal waves in different frequencies and the stress process can be simulated by summing the stress processes induced by these sinusoidal waves, the stress power spectral density (PSD) is calculated by expanding the stress processes induced by the sinusoidal waves into Fourier series and adding the amplitudes of each harmonic component with the same frequency. This analysis method can take the nonlinear relationship into consideration and the fatigue damage is then calculated based on the PSD of stress. Take an independent tank in an LNG carrier for example, the accuracy of the improved spectral analysis method is proved much better than that of the traditional spectral analysis method by comparing the calculated damage results with the results calculated by the time domain method. The proposed spectral analysis method is more accurate in calculating the fatigue damages in detail of ship liquid cargo tanks.

  18. The formation of the Milky Way halo and its dwarf satellites; a NLTE-1D abundance analysis. I. Homogeneous set of atmospheric parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashonkina, L.; Jablonka, P.; Pakhomov, Yu.; Sitnova, T.; North, P.

    2017-08-01

    We present a homogeneous set of accurate atmospheric parameters for a complete sample of very and extremely metal-poor stars in the dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) Sculptor, Ursa Minor, Sextans, Fornax, Boötes I, Ursa Major II, and Leo IV. We also deliver a Milky Way (MW) comparison sample of giant stars covering the - 4 < [Fe/H] < - 1.7 metallicity range. We show that, in the [Fe/H] ≿ - 3.7 regime, the non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) calculations with non-spectroscopic effective temperature (Teff) and surface gravity (log g) based on the photometric methods and known distance provide consistent abundances of the Fe I and Fe II lines. This justifies the Fe I/Fe II ionisation equilibrium method to determine log g for the MW halo giants with unknown distance. The atmospheric parameters of the dSphs and MW stars were checked with independent methods. In the [Fe/H] > - 3.5 regime, the Ti I/Ti II ionisation equilibrium is fulfilled in the NLTE calculations. In the log g - Teff plane, all the stars sit on the giant branch of the evolutionary tracks corresponding to [Fe/H] = - 2 to - 4, in line with their metallicities. For some of the most metal-poor stars of our sample, we achieve relatively inconsistent NLTE abundances from the two ionisation stages for both iron and titanium. We suggest that this is a consequence of the uncertainty in the Teff-colour relation at those metallicities. The results of this work provide the basis for a detailed abundance analysis presented in a companion paper. Tables A.1 and A.2 are also available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/604/A129

  19. Detailed requirements document for the integrated structural analysis system, phase B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rainey, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    The requirements are defined for a software system entitled integrated Structural Analysis System (ISAS) Phase B which is being developed to provide the user with a tool by which a complete and detailed analysis of a complex structural system can be performed. This software system will allow for automated interface with numerous structural analysis batch programs and for user interaction in the creation, selection, and validation of data. This system will include modifications to the 4 functions developed for ISAS, and the development of 25 new functions. The new functions are described.

  20. Elemental abundance analysis of the early-type members of the open cluster M6: Preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kılıçoǧlu, T.; Monier, R.; Fossati, L.

    2014-11-01

    Differences in chemical composition among main sequence stars within a given cluster are probably due to differences in their masses and other effects such as radiative diffusion, magnetic field, rotation, mixing mechanisms, mass loss, accretion and multiplicity. The early type main-sequence members of open clusters of different ages support studies of the competition between radiative diffusion and mixing mechanisms. We have analysed low- and high-resolution spectra covering the spectral range λ 4500-5840 Å of late B-, A- and F-type members of the open cluster M6 (age ˜100 Myr). The spectra were obtained with the FLAMES/GIRAFFE spectrograph mounted at UT2, the 8-m VLT telescope. The effective temperatures, surface gravities and microturbulent velocities of the stars were derived from both photometric and spectral methods. We have also performed a chemical abundance analysis using synthetic spectra. Abundances were determined for the elements C, O, Mg, Si, Ca, Sc, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Y and Ba. The star-to-star variations in element abundances among the members of M6 are discussed.

  1. Estimating stellar atmospheric parameters, absolute magnitudes and elemental abundances from the LAMOST spectra with Kernel-based principal component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, M.-S.; Liu, X.-W.; Shi, J.-R.; Yuan, H.-B.; Huang, Y.; Luo, A.-L.; Zhang, H.-W.; Zhao, Y.-H.; Zhang, J.-N.; Ren, J.-J.; Chen, B.-Q.; Wang, C.; Li, J.; Huo, Z.-Y.; Zhang, W.; Wang, J.-L.; Zhang, Y.; Hou, Y.-H.; Wang, Y.-F.

    2017-01-01

    Accurate determination of stellar atmospheric parameters and elemental abundances is crucial for Galactic archaeology via large-scale spectroscopic surveys. In this paper, we estimate stellar atmospheric parameters - effective temperature Teff, surface gravity log g and metallicity [Fe/H], absolute magnitudes MV and MKs, α-element to metal (and iron) abundance ratio [α/M] (and [α/Fe]), as well as carbon and nitrogen abundances [C/H] and [N/H] from the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fibre Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) spectra with a multivariate regression method based on kernel-based principal component analysis, using stars in common with other surveys (Hipparcos, Kepler, Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment) as training data sets. Both internal and external examinations indicate that given a spectral signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) better than 50, our method is capable of delivering stellar parameters with a precision of ˜100 K for Teff, ˜0.1 dex for log g, 0.3-0.4 mag for MV and MKs, 0.1 dex for [Fe/H], [C/H] and [N/H], and better than 0.05 dex for [α/M] ([α/Fe]). The results are satisfactory even for a spectral SNR of 20. The work presents first determinations of [C/H] and [N/H] abundances from a vast data set of LAMOST, and, to our knowledge, the first reported implementation of absolute magnitude estimation directly based on a vast data set of observed spectra. The derived stellar parameters for millions of stars from the LAMOST surveys will be publicly available in the form of value-added catalogues.

  2. A detailed pathway analysis of the chemical reaction system generating the Martian vertical ozone profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, Joachim W.; Blaszczak-Boxe, Christopher S.; Lehmann, Ralph; Grenfell, J. Lee; Patzer, A. Beate C.; Rauer, Heike; Yung, Yuk L.

    2017-07-01

    Atmospheric chemical composition is crucial in determining a planet's atmospheric structure, stability, and evolution. Attaining a quantitative understanding of the essential chemical mechanisms governing atmospheric composition is nontrivial due to complex interactions between chemical species. Trace species, for example, can participate in catalytic cycles - affecting the abundance of major and other trace gas species. Specifically, for Mars, such cycles dictate the abundance of its primary atmospheric constituent, carbon dioxide (CO2), but also for one of its trace gases, ozone (O3). The identification of chemical pathways/cycles by hand is extremely demanding; hence, the application of numerical methods, such as the Pathway Analysis Program (PAP), is crucial to analyze and quantitatively exemplify chemical reaction networks. Here, we carry out the first automated quantitative chemical pathway analysis of Mars' atmosphere with respect to O3. PAP was applied to JPL/Caltech's 1-D updated photochemical Mars model's output data. We determine all significant chemical pathways and their contribution to O3 production and consumption (up to 80 km) in order to investigate the mechanisms causing the characteristic shape of the O3 volume mixing ratio profile, i.e. a ground layer maximum and an ozone layer at ∼50 km. These pathways explain why an O3 layer is present, why it is located at that particular altitude and what the different processes forming the near-surface and middle atmosphere O3 maxima are. Furthermore, we show that the Martian atmosphere can be divided into two chemically distinct regions according to the O(3P):O3 ratio. In the lower region (below approximately 24 km altitude) O3 is the most abundant Ox (= O3 + O(3P)) species. In the upper region (above approximately 24 km altitude), where the O3 layer is located, O(3P) is the most abundant Ox species. Earlier results concerning the formation of O3 on Mars can now be explained with the help of chemical

  3. Detailed interpretation and analysis of selected corn blight watch data sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nalepka, R. F.; Morgenstern, J. P.; Brown, W. L.

    1972-01-01

    A detailed interpretation and analysis of selected corn blight data set was undertaken in order to better define the present capabilities and limitations of agricultural remote multispectral sensing and automatic processing techniques and to establish the areas of investigation needing futher attention in the development of operational survey systems. While the emphasis of this effort was directed toward the detection of various corn blight levels, problems related to the more general task of crop identification were also investigated. Since the analog recognition computer (SPARC) was fully committed to the more routine aspects of processing and since the detailed interpretation and analysis required more in the way of quantitative information, the CDC 1604 digital computer was employed.

  4. Project VeSElkA: results of abundance analysis for HD 53929 and HD 63975

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ndiaye, M. L.; LeBlanc, F.; Khalack, V.

    2018-03-01

    Project VeSElkA (Vertical Stratification of Element Abundances) has been initiated with the aim to detect and study the vertical stratification of element abundances in the atmosphere of chemically peculiar stars. Abundance stratification occurs in hydrodynamically stable stellar atmospheres due to the migration of the elements caused by atomic diffusion. Two HgMn stars, HD 53929 and HD 63975 were selected from the VeSElkA sample and analysed with the aim to detect some abundance peculiarities employing the ZEEMAN2 code. We present the results of abundance analysis of HD 53929 and HD 63975 observed recently with the spectropolarimeter ESPaDOnS at Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. Evidence of phosphorus vertical stratification was detected in the atmosphere of these two stars. In both cases, phosphorus abundance increases strongly towards the superficial layers. The strong overabundance of Mn found in stellar atmosphere of both stars confirms that they are HgMn type stars.

  5. Deriving Plasma Densities and Elemental Abundances from SERTS Differential Emission Measure Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmelz, J. T.; Kimble, J. A.; Saba, J. L. R.

    2012-01-01

    We use high-resolution spectral emission line data obtained by the SERTS instrument during three rocket flights to demonstrate a new approach for constraining electron densities of solar active region plasma.We apply differential emission measure (DEM) forward-fitting techniques to characterize the multithermal solar plasma producing the observed EUV spectra, with constraints on the high-temperature plasma from the Yohkoh Soft X-ray Telescope. In this iterative process, we compare line intensities predicted by an input source distribution to observed line intensities for multiple iron ion species, and search a broad range of densities to optimize chi-square simultaneously for the many available density-sensitive lines. This produces a density weighted by the DEM, which appears to be useful for characterizing the bulk of the emitting plasma over a significant range of temperature. This "DEM-weighted density" technique is complementary to the use of density-sensitive line ratios and less affected by uncertainties in atomic data and ionization fraction for any specific line. Once the DEM shape and the DEM-weighted density have been established from the iron lines, the relative elemental abundances can be determined for other lines in the spectrum. We have also identified spectral lines in the SERTS wavelength range that may be problematic

  6. Detailed Uncertainty Analysis for Ares I Ascent Aerodynamics Wind Tunnel Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemsch, Michael J.; Hanke, Jeremy L.; Walker, Eric L.; Houlden, Heather P.

    2008-01-01

    A detailed uncertainty analysis for the Ares I ascent aero 6-DOF wind tunnel database is described. While the database itself is determined using only the test results for the latest configuration, the data used for the uncertainty analysis comes from four tests on two different configurations at the Boeing Polysonic Wind Tunnel in St. Louis and the Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center. Four major error sources are considered: (1) systematic errors from the balance calibration curve fits and model + balance installation, (2) run-to-run repeatability, (3) boundary-layer transition fixing, and (4) tunnel-to-tunnel reproducibility.

  7. Sims Analysis of Water Abundance and Hydrogen Isotope in Lunar Highland Plagioclase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hui, Hejiu; Guan, Yunbin; Chen, Yang; Peslier, Anne H.; Zhang, Youxue; Liu, Yang; Rossman, George R.; Eiler, John M.; Neal, Clive R.

    2015-01-01

    The detection of indigenous water in mare basaltic glass beads has challenged the view established since the Apollo era of a "dry" Moon. Since this discovery, measurements of water in lunar apatite, olivine-hosted melt inclusions, agglutinates, and nominally anhydrous minerals have confirmed that lunar igneous materials contain water, implying that some parts of lunar mantle may have as much water as Earth's upper mantle. The interpretation of hydrogen (H) isotopes in lunar samples, however, is controversial. The large variation of H isotope ratios in lunar apatite (delta Deuterium = -202 to +1010 per mille) has been taken as evidence that water in the lunar interior comes from the lunar mantle, solar wind protons, and/or comets. The very low deuterium/H ratios in lunar agglutinates indicate that solar wind protons have contributed to their hydrogen content. Conversely, H isotopes in lunar volcanic glass beads and olivine-hosted melt inclusions being similar to those of common terrestrial igneous rocks, suggest a common origin for water in both Earth and Moon. Lunar water could be inherited from carbonaceous chondrites, consistent with the model of late accretion of chondrite-type materials to the Moon as proposed by. One complication about the sources of lunar water, is that geologic processes (e.g., late accretion and magmatic degassing) may have modified the H isotope signatures of lunar materials. Recent FTIR analyses have shown that plagioclases in lunar ferroan anorthosite contain approximately 6 ppm H2O. So far, ferroan anorthosite is the only available lithology that is believed to be a primary product of the lunar magma ocean (LMO). A possible consequence is that the LMO could have contained up to approximately 320 ppm H2O. Here we examine the possible sources of water in the LMO through measurements of water abundances and H isotopes in plagioclase of two ferroan anorthosites and one troctolite from lunar highlands.

  8. High-resolution spectroscopy and abundance analysis of δ Scuti stars near the γ Doradus instability strip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahraman Aliçavuş, F.; Niemczura, E.; Polińska, M.; Hełminiak, K. G.; Lampens, P.; Molenda-Żakowicz, J.; Ukita, N.; Kambe, E.

    2017-10-01

    δ Scuti stars are remarkable objects for asteroseismology. In spite of decades of investigations, there are still important questions about these pulsating stars to be answered, such as their positions in log Teff-log g diagram, or the dependence of the pulsation modes on atmospheric parameters and rotation. Therefore, we performed a detailed spectroscopic study of 41 δ Scuti stars. The selected objects are located near the γ Doradus instability strip to make a reliable comparison between both types of variables. Spectral classification, stellar atmospheric parameters (Teff, log g, ξ) and v sin I values were determined. The spectral types and luminosity classes of stars were found to be A1-F5 and III-V, respectively. The Teff ranges from 6600 to 9400 K, whereas the obtained log g values are from 3.4 to 4.3. The v sin I values were found between 10 and 222 km s-1. The derived chemical abundances of δ Scuti stars were compared to those of the non-pulsating stars and γ Doradus variables. It turned out that both δ Scuti and γ Doradus variables have similar abundance patterns, which are slightly different from the non-pulsating stars. These chemical differences can help us to understand why there are non-pulsating stars in classical instability strip. Effects of the obtained parameters on pulsation period and amplitude were examined. It appears that the pulsation period decreases with increasing Teff. No significant correlations were found between pulsation period, amplitude and v sin I.

  9. Abundances and implications of volatile-bearing species from evolved gas analysis of the Rocknest aeolian deposit, Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer, Paul Douglas; Franz, Heather B.; Sutter, Brad; Arevalo, Ricardo D.; Coll, Patrice; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Jones, John J.; Leshin, Laurie A.; Mahaffy, Paul R.; McAdam, Amy C.; McKay, Christopher P.; Ming, Douglas W.; Morris, Richard V.; Navarro-González, Rafael; Niles, Paul B.; Pavlov, Alex; Squyres, Steven W.; Stern, Jennifer C.; Steele, Andrew; Wray, James J.

    2014-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover Curiosity detected evolved gases during thermal analysis of soil samples from the Rocknest aeolian deposit in Gale Crater. Major species detected (in order of decreasing molar abundance) were H2O, SO2, CO2, and O2, all at the µmol level, with HCl, H2S, NH3, NO, and HCN present at the tens to hundreds of nmol level. We compute weight % numbers for the major gases evolved by assuming a likely source and calculate abundances between 0.5 and 3 wt.%. The evolution of these gases implies the presence of both oxidized (perchlorates) and reduced (sulfides or H-bearing) species as well as minerals formed under alkaline (carbonates) and possibly acidic (sulfates) conditions. Possible source phases in the Rocknest material are hydrated amorphous material, minor clay minerals, and hydrated perchlorate salts (all potential H2O sources), carbonates (CO2), perchlorates (O2 and HCl), and potential N-bearing materials (e.g., Martian nitrates, terrestrial or Martian nitrogenated organics, ammonium salts) that evolve NH3, NO, and/or HCN. We conclude that Rocknest materials are a physical mixture in chemical disequilibrium, consistent with aeolian mixing, and that although weathering is not extensive, it may be ongoing even under current Martian surface conditions.

  10. Detailed analysis of Seth's circular niches on comet 67P Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucchetti, Alice; Pajola, Maurizio; Fornasier, Sonia; Mottola, Stefano; Penasa, Luca; Jorda, Laurent; Cremonese, Gabriele; Feller, Clement; Hasselmann, Pedro; Massironi, Matteo; Naletto, Giampiero; Deshapriya, Prasanna

    2017-04-01

    We performed a detailed geomorphological and spectrophotometric analysis of the circular niches located on Seth region on comet 67P Churyumov-Gerasimenko (67P): they are flat-floored and steep-walled circular depressions present on the Northern hemisphere of 67P (Thomas et al., 2015). The aim is to determine if these features are associated to landslides events or if they are correlated to comet's activity. We selected high resolution OSIRIS images acquired in August 2016 (scale of 31 cm/px) focusing on Seth's niches with unprecedented detail. First, we counted boulders in order to compare the boulders size-frequency distribution of niches with previous results (Pajola et al., 2015), finding that no changes occurred after comet perihelion passage. Consequently, we characterized the region by considering the erosion and insolation models covering the area (Keller et al., 2015), and using a high resolution DTM that allowed us to perform a more detailed geomorphological analysis regarding the height of niches' walls and the volume of the deposit material located at their feet. In addition, we performed a color analysis of the region identifying the presence of few bright patches, probably composed of ices. The next step will be the comparison of these results with pre-perihelion images to find if there are any compositional changes that occurred in that region. From this preliminary analysis we conclude that niches can be correlated to past landslide events that occurred on the comet. To strengthen our conclusion we will compare the fractures distribution on the niches' wall with those characterizing the boulders of the landslide deposit (with image of 6 - 10 cm/px in scale) in order to understand wether the fracture pattern is the same or fragmentation processes occurred after the landslide event.

  11. Distribution and Abundance of Phlebotominae, Vectors of Leishmaniasis, in Argentina: Spatial and Temporal Analysis at Different Scales

    PubMed Central

    Quintana, María Gabriela; Fernández, María Soledad; Salomón, Oscar Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The spatial-temporal analysis of the abundance of insects, vectors of tegumentary leishmaniasis (TL) and visceral leishmaniasis (VL), was performed in Argentina using spatial-temporal increasing scales. In the microscale (microfocal), the effect of the primary vegetation-crop interface in vector abundance was observed, and also how the shelters, food sources, and other environmental characteristics contribute to habitat microheterogeneity and so to a microheterogeneous vector distribution. In the mesoscale (locality or epidemic focus), the results from different foci of TL (rural and periurban) and VL (urban) suggested a metapopulation structure determined partially by quantifiable habitat variables that could explain the increase of risk associated to an increase of vector-human contact due to climatic or anthropogenic changes. In the macroscale (regional), captures of vectors and records of human cases allowed the construction of risk maps and predictive models of vector distribution. In conclusion, in order to obtain valid results transferrable to control programs from spatial studies, special attention should be paid in order to assure the consistency between the spatial scales of the hypotheses, data, and analytical tools of each experimental or descriptive design. PMID:22315620

  12. A detailed analysis of the erythropoietic control system in the human, squirrel, monkey, rat and mouse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nordheim, A. W.

    1985-01-01

    The erythropoiesis modeling performed in support of the Body Fluid and Blood Volume Regulation tasks is described. The mathematical formulation of the species independent model, the solutions to the steady state and dynamic versions of the model, and the individual species specific models for the human, squirrel monkey, rat and mouse are outlined. A detailed sensitivity analysis of the species independent model response to parameter changes and how those responses change from species to species is presented. The species to species response to a series of simulated stresses directly related to blood volume regulation during space flight is analyzed.

  13. Organic farming enhances soil microbial abundance and activity—A meta-analysis and meta-regression

    PubMed Central

    Symnaczik, Sarah; Mäder, Paul; De Deyn, Gerlinde; Gattinger, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Population growth and climate change challenge our food and farming systems and provide arguments for an increased intensification of agriculture. A promising option is eco-functional intensification through organic farming, an approach based on using and enhancing internal natural resources and processes to secure and improve agricultural productivity, while minimizing negative environmental impacts. In this concept an active soil microbiota plays an important role for various soil based ecosystem services such as nutrient cycling, erosion control and pest and disease regulation. Several studies have reported a positive effect of organic farming on soil health and quality including microbial community traits. However, so far no systematic quantification of whether organic farming systems comprise larger and more active soil microbial communities compared to conventional farming systems was performed on a global scale. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis on current literature to quantify possible differences in key indicators for soil microbial abundance and activity in organic and conventional cropping systems. All together we integrated data from 56 mainly peer-reviewed papers into our analysis, including 149 pairwise comparisons originating from different climatic zones and experimental duration ranging from 3 to more than 100 years. Overall, we found that organic systems had 32% to 84% greater microbial biomass carbon, microbial biomass nitrogen, total phospholipid fatty-acids, and dehydrogenase, urease and protease activities than conventional systems. Exclusively the metabolic quotient as an indicator for stresses on microbial communities remained unaffected by the farming systems. Categorical subgroup analysis revealed that crop rotation, the inclusion of legumes in the crop rotation and organic inputs are important farming practices affecting soil microbial community size and activity. Furthermore, we show that differences in microbial size and activity

  14. Organic farming enhances soil microbial abundance and activity-A meta-analysis and meta-regression.

    PubMed

    Lori, Martina; Symnaczik, Sarah; Mäder, Paul; De Deyn, Gerlinde; Gattinger, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Population growth and climate change challenge our food and farming systems and provide arguments for an increased intensification of agriculture. A promising option is eco-functional intensification through organic farming, an approach based on using and enhancing internal natural resources and processes to secure and improve agricultural productivity, while minimizing negative environmental impacts. In this concept an active soil microbiota plays an important role for various soil based ecosystem services such as nutrient cycling, erosion control and pest and disease regulation. Several studies have reported a positive effect of organic farming on soil health and quality including microbial community traits. However, so far no systematic quantification of whether organic farming systems comprise larger and more active soil microbial communities compared to conventional farming systems was performed on a global scale. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis on current literature to quantify possible differences in key indicators for soil microbial abundance and activity in organic and conventional cropping systems. All together we integrated data from 56 mainly peer-reviewed papers into our analysis, including 149 pairwise comparisons originating from different climatic zones and experimental duration ranging from 3 to more than 100 years. Overall, we found that organic systems had 32% to 84% greater microbial biomass carbon, microbial biomass nitrogen, total phospholipid fatty-acids, and dehydrogenase, urease and protease activities than conventional systems. Exclusively the metabolic quotient as an indicator for stresses on microbial communities remained unaffected by the farming systems. Categorical subgroup analysis revealed that crop rotation, the inclusion of legumes in the crop rotation and organic inputs are important farming practices affecting soil microbial community size and activity. Furthermore, we show that differences in microbial size and activity

  15. Detailed analysis and test correlation of a stiffened composite wing panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, D. Dale, Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Nonlinear finite element analysis techniques are evaluated by applying them to a realistic aircraft structural component. A wing panel from the V-22 tiltrotor aircraft is chosen because it is a typical modern aircraft structural component for which there is experimental data for comparison of results. From blueprints and drawings supplied by the Bell Helicopter Textron Corporation, a very detailed finite element model containing 2284 9-node Assumed Natural-Coordinate Strain (ANS) elements was generated. A novel solution strategy which accounts for geometric nonlinearity through the use of corotating element reference frames and nonlinear strain displacements relations is used to analyze this detailed model. Results from linear analyses using the same finite element model are presented in order to illustrate the advantages and costs of the nonlinear analysis as compared with the more traditional linear analysis. Strain predictions from both the linear and nonlinear stress analyses are shown to compare well with experimental data up through the Design Ultimate Load (DUL) of the panel. However, due to the extreme nonlinear response of the panel, the linear analysis was not accurate at loads above the DUL. The nonlinear analysis more accurately predicted the strain at high values of applied load, and even predicted complicated nonlinear response characteristics, such as load reversals, at the observed failure load of the test panel. In order to understand the failure mechanism of the panel, buckling and first ply failure analyses were performed. The buckling load was 17 percent above the observed failure load while first ply failure analyses indicated significant material damage at and below the observed failure load.

  16. Estimating abundance: Chapter 27

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Royle, J. Andrew

    2016-01-01

    This chapter provides a non-technical overview of ‘closed population capture–recapture’ models, a class of well-established models that are widely applied in ecology, such as removal sampling, covariate models, and distance sampling. These methods are regularly adopted for studies of reptiles, in order to estimate abundance from counts of marked individuals while accounting for imperfect detection. Thus, the chapter describes some classic closed population models for estimating abundance, with considerations for some recent extensions that provide a spatial context for the estimation of abundance, and therefore density. Finally, the chapter suggests some software for use in data analysis, such as the Windows-based program MARK, and provides an example of estimating abundance and density of reptiles using an artificial cover object survey of Slow Worms (Anguis fragilis).

  17. Thermal characterization and detailed kinetic analysis of Cassava starch thermo-oxidative degradation.

    PubMed

    Janković, Bojan

    2013-06-20

    Detailed kinetic analysis of Cassava starch thermo-oxidative degradation was performed, using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and derivative thermogravimetry (DTG) at four different heating rates. It was found that degradation process is very complex, as identified through continuous change of apparent activation energy with degree of degradation. It was established that process proceeds through three main degradation stages with one additional sub-stage attached to the second degradation stage, which was detected by appearance of "shoulder" on DTG curves. It was found that most important degradation stage can be described by "lumped" model, which implies that free radicals simultaneously attack both linear and branched molecular forms of the starch. This is characterized by an unusually high value of obtained reaction order (n=3.49). Application of nonlinear least squares method was confirmed the reliability of evaluated kinetic parameters and function of reaction mechanism, which were derived on the basis of other kinetic methods. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. KNOW YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD: A DETAILED MODEL ATMOSPHERE ANALYSIS OF NEARBY WHITE DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Giammichele, N.; Bergeron, P.; Dufour, P., E-mail: noemi.giammichele@astro.umontreal.ca, E-mail: pierre.bergeron@astro.umontreal.ca, E-mail: patrick.dufour@astro.umontreal.ca

    2012-04-01

    We present improved atmospheric parameters of nearby white dwarfs lying within 20 pc of the Sun. The aim of the current study is to obtain the best statistical model of the least-biased sample of the white dwarf population. A homogeneous analysis of the local population is performed combining detailed spectroscopic and photometric analyses based on improved model atmosphere calculations for various spectral types including DA, DB, DC, DQ, and DZ stars. The spectroscopic technique is applied to all stars in our sample for which optical spectra are available. Photometric energy distributions, when available, are also combined to trigonometric parallax measurementsmore » to derive effective temperatures, stellar radii, as well as atmospheric compositions. A revised catalog of white dwarfs in the solar neighborhood is presented. We provide, for the first time, a comprehensive analysis of the mass distribution and the chemical distribution of white dwarf stars in a volume-limited sample.« less

  19. Microbiome analysis reveals the abundance of bacterial pathogens in Rousettus leschenaultii guano

    PubMed Central

    Banskar, Sunil; Bhute, Shrikant S.; Suryavanshi, Mangesh V.; Punekar, Sachin; Shouche, Yogesh S.

    2016-01-01

    Bats are crucial for proper functioning of an ecosystem. They provide various important services to ecosystem and environment. While, bats are well-known carrier of pathogenic viruses, their possible role as a potential carrier of pathogenic bacteria is under-explored. Here, using culture-based approach, employing multiple bacteriological media, over thousand bacteria were cultivated and identified from Rousettus leschenaultii (a frugivorous bat species), the majority of which were from the family Enterobacteriaceae and putative pathogens. Next, pathogenic potential of most frequently cultivated component of microbiome i.e. Escherichia coli was assessed to identify its known pathotypes which revealed the presence of virulent factors in many cultivated E. coli isolates. Applying in-depth bacterial community analysis using high-throughput 16 S rRNA gene sequencing, a high inter-individual variation was observed among the studied guano samples. Interestingly, a higher diversity of bacterial communities was observed in decaying guano representative. The search against human pathogenic bacteria database at 97% identity, a small proportion of sequences were found associated to well-known human pathogens. The present study thus indicates that this bat species may carry potential bacterial pathogens and advice to study the effect of these pathogens on bats itself and the probable mode of transmission to humans and other animals. PMID:27845426

  20. Exergy analysis of an industrial-scale ultrafiltrated (UF) cheese production plant: a detailed survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasiri, Farshid; Aghbashlo, Mortaza; Rafiee, Shahin

    2017-02-01

    In this study, a detailed exergy analysis of an industrial-scale ultrafiltrated (UF) cheese production plant was conducted based on actual operational data in order to provide more comprehensive insights into the performance of the whole plant and its main subcomponents. The plant included four main subsystems, i.e., steam generator (I), above-zero refrigeration system (II), Bactocatch-assisted pasteurization line (III), and UF cheese production line (IV). In addition, this analysis was aimed at quantifying the exergy destroyed in processing a known quantity of the UF cheese using the mass allocation method. The specific exergy destruction of the UF cheese production was determined at 2330.42 kJ/kg. The contributions of the subsystems I, II, III, and IV to the specific exergy destruction of the UF cheese production were computed as 1337.67, 386.18, 283.05, and 323.51 kJ/kg, respectively. Additionally, it was observed through the analysis that the steam generation system had the largest contribution to the thermodynamic inefficiency of the UF cheese production, accounting for 57.40 % of the specific exergy destruction. Generally, the outcomes of this survey further manifested the benefits of applying exergy analysis for design, analysis, and optimization of industrial-scale dairy processing plants to achieve the most cost-effective and environmentally-benign production strategies.

  1. ReadXplorer 2—detailed read mapping analysis and visualization from one single source

    PubMed Central

    Hilker, Rolf; Stadermann, Kai Bernd; Schwengers, Oliver; Anisiforov, Evgeny; Jaenicke, Sebastian; Weisshaar, Bernd; Zimmermann, Tobias; Goesmann, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: The vast amount of already available and currently generated read mapping data requires comprehensive visualization, and should benefit from bioinformatics tools offering a wide spectrum of analysis functionality from just one source. Appropriate handling of multiple mapped reads during mapping analyses remains an issue that demands improvement. Results: The capabilities of the read mapping analysis and visualization tool ReadXplorer were vastly enhanced. Here, we present an even finer granulated read mapping classification, improving the level of detail for analyses and visualizations. The spectrum of automatic analysis functions has been broadened to include genome rearrangement detection as well as correlation analysis between two mapping data sets. Existing functions were refined and enhanced, namely the computation of differentially expressed genes, the read count and normalization analysis and the transcription start site detection. Additionally, ReadXplorer 2 features a highly improved support for large eukaryotic data sets and a command line version, enabling its integration into workflows. Finally, the new version is now able to display any kind of tabular results from other bioinformatics tools. Availability and Implementation: http://www.readxplorer.org Contact: readxplorer@computational.bio.uni-giessen.de Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27540267

  2. Developments in remote sensing technology enable more detailed urban flood risk analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denniss, A.; Tewkesbury, A.

    2009-04-01

    digital airborne sensors, both optical and lidar, to produce the input layer for surface water flood modelling. A national flood map product has been created. The new product utilises sophisticated modelling techniques, perfected over many years, which harness graphical processing power. This product will prove particularly valuable for risk assessment decision support within insurance/reinsurance, property/environmental, utilities, risk management and government agencies. However, it is not just the ground elevation that determines the behaviour of surface water. By combining height information (surface and terrain) with high resolution aerial photography and colour infrared imagery, a high definition land cover mapping dataset (LandBase) is being produced, which provides a precise measure of sealed versus non sealed surface. This will allows even more sophisticated modelling of flood scenarios. Thus, the value of airborne survey data can be demonstrated by flood risk analysis down to individual addresses in urban areas. However for some risks, an even more detailed survey may be justified. In order to achieve this, Infoterra is testing new 360˚ mobile lidar technology. Collecting lidar data from a moving vehicle allows each street to be mapped in very high detail, allowing precise information about the location, size and shape of features such as kerbstones, gullies, road camber and building threshold level to be captured quickly and accurately. These data can then be used to model the problem of overland flood risk at the scale of individual properties. Whilst at present it might be impractical to undertake such detailed modelling for all properties, these techniques can certainly be used to improve the flood risk analysis of key locations. This paper will demonstrate how these new high resolution remote sensing techniques can be combined to provide a new resolution of detail to aid urban flood modelling.

  3. Conventional tillage decreases the abundance and biomass of earthworms and alters their community structure in a global meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Briones, María Jesús I; Schmidt, Olaf

    2017-10-01

    The adoption of less intensive soil cultivation practices is expected to increase earthworm populations and their contributions to ecosystem functioning. However, conflicting results have been reported on the effects of tillage intensity on earthworm populations, attributed in narrative reviews to site-dependent differences in soil properties, climatic conditions and agronomic operations (e.g. fertilization, residue management and chemical crop protection). We present a quantitative review based on a global meta-analysis, using paired observations from 165 publications performed over 65 years (1950-2016) across 40 countries on five continents, to elucidate this long-standing unresolved issue. Results showed that disturbing the soil less (e.g. no-tillage and conservation agriculture [CA]) significantly increased earthworm abundance (mean increase of 137% and 127%, respectively) and biomass (196% and 101%, respectively) compared to when the soil is inverted by conventional ploughing. Earthworm population responses were more pronounced when the soil had been under reduced tillage (RT) for a long time (>10 years), in warm temperate zones with fine-textured soils, and in soils with higher clay contents (>35%) and low pH (<5.5). Furthermore, retaining organic harvest residues amplified this positive response to RT, whereas the use of the herbicide glyphosate did not significantly affect earthworm population responses to RT. Additional meta-analyses confirmed that epigeic and, more importantly, the bigger-sized anecic earthworms were the most sensitive ecological groups to conventional tillage. In particular, the deep burrower Lumbricus terrestris exhibited the strongest positive response to RT, increasing in abundance by 124% more than the overall mean of all 13 species analysed individually. The restoration of these two important ecological groups of earthworms and their burrowing, feeding and casting activities under various forms of RT will ensure the provision of

  4. Detailed precision and accuracy analysis of swarm parameters from a pulsed Townsend experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haefliger, P.; Franck, C. M.

    2018-02-01

    A newly built pulsed Townsend experimental setup which allows one to measure both electron and ion currents is presented. The principle of pulsed Townsend measurements itself is well established to obtain swarm parameters such as the effective ionization rate coefficient, the density-reduced mobility, and the density-normalized longitudinal diffusion coefficient. The main novelty of the present contribution is a detailed and comprehensive analysis of the entire measurement and evaluation chain with respect to accuracy, precision, and reproducibility. The influence of the input parameters (gap distance, applied voltage, measured pressure, and temperature) is analyzed in detail. An overall accuracy of ±0.5% in the density reduced electric field (E/N) is achieved, which is close to the theoretically possible limit using the chosen components. The precision of the experimental results is higher than the accuracy. Through an extensive measurement campaign, the repeatability of our measurements proved to be high and similar to the precision. The reproducibility of results at identical (E/N) is similar to the precision for different distances but decreases for varying pressures. For benchmark purposes, measurements for Ar, CO2, and N2 are presented and compared with our previous experimental setup, simulations, and other experimental references.

  5. Fatigue Reliability Analysis of 6156-T6 Riveted Joints based on Detail Fatigue Rating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, An; Yang, Jun; Zhang, Kan; Zhang, Haiying

    2017-11-01

    The fatigue behavior of two kinds of riveted joints 6156-T6 aluminum alloy structures was experimentally investigated. The detail fatigue rating (DFR) values of 6156-T6 is calculated based on statistical analysis of fatigue tests. The fatigue crack initiation and propagation behavior are examined using scanning electron microscopy. The results show that DFR value of 6156-T6 aluminum alloy with riveted lap joints is 97.81MPa, and the DFR value of rivet-filled countersink hole structure is 168.39MPa. The crack initiation sites occurred at the vicinity of the fastener hole in all specimens. The fatigue striations were uniformly spaced in the region of stable crack growth.

  6. Contrast to Noise Ratio and Contrast Detail Analysis in Mammography:A Monte Carlo Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metaxas, V.; Delis, H.; Kalogeropoulou, C.; Zampakis, P.; Panayiotakis, G.

    2015-09-01

    The mammographic spectrum is one of the major factors affecting image quality in mammography. In this study, a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation model was used to evaluate image quality characteristics of various mammographic spectra. The anode/filter combinations evaluated, were those traditionally used in mammography, for tube voltages between 26 and 30 kVp. The imaging performance was investigated in terms of Contrast to Noise Ratio (CNR) and Contrast Detail (CD) analysis, by involving human observers, utilizing a mathematical CD phantom. Soft spectra provided the best characteristics in terms of both CNR and CD scores, while tube voltage had a limited effect. W-anode spectra filtered with k-edge filters demonstrated an improved performance, that sometimes was better compared to softer x-ray spectra, produced by Mo or Rh anode. Regarding the filter material, k-edge filters showed superior performance compared to Al filters.

  7. Levels of detail analysis of microwave scattering from human head models for brain stroke detection

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we have presented a microwave scattering analysis from multiple human head models. This study incorporates different levels of detail in the human head models and its effect on microwave scattering phenomenon. Two levels of detail are taken into account; (i) Simplified ellipse shaped head model (ii) Anatomically realistic head model, implemented using 2-D geometry. In addition, heterogenic and frequency-dispersive behavior of the brain tissues has also been incorporated in our head models. It is identified during this study that the microwave scattering phenomenon changes significantly once the complexity of head model is increased by incorporating more details using magnetic resonance imaging database. It is also found out that the microwave scattering results match in both types of head model (i.e., geometrically simple and anatomically realistic), once the measurements are made in the structurally simplified regions. However, the results diverge considerably in the complex areas of brain due to the arbitrary shape interface of tissue layers in the anatomically realistic head model. After incorporating various levels of detail, the solution of subject microwave scattering problem and the measurement of transmitted and backscattered signals were obtained using finite element method. Mesh convergence analysis was also performed to achieve error free results with a minimum number of mesh elements and a lesser degree of freedom in the fast computational time. The results were promising and the E-Field values converged for both simple and complex geometrical models. However, the E-Field difference between both types of head model at the same reference point differentiated a lot in terms of magnitude. At complex location, a high difference value of 0.04236 V/m was measured compared to the simple location, where it turned out to be 0.00197 V/m. This study also contributes to provide a comparison analysis between the direct and iterative solvers so as to

  8. Patterns of failure after MammoSite brachytherapy partial breast irradiation: a detailed analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sea; Dickler, Adam; Kirk, Michael; Shah, Anand; Jokich, Peter; Solmos, Gene; Strauss, Jonathan; Dowlatshahi, Kambiz; Nguyen, Cam; Griem, Katherine

    2007-09-01

    To report the results of a detailed analysis of treatment failures after MammoSite breast brachytherapy for partial breast irradiation from our single-institution experience. Between October 14, 2002 and October 23, 2006, 78 patients with early-stage breast cancer were treated with breast-conserving surgery and accelerated partial breast irradiation using the MammoSite brachytherapy applicator. We identified five treatment failures in the 70 patients with >6 months' follow-up. Pathologic data, breast imaging, and radiation treatment plans were reviewed. For in-breast failures more than 2 cm away from the original surgical bed, the doses delivered to the areas of recurrence by partial breast irradiation were calculated. At a median follow-up time of 26.1 months, five treatment failures were identified. There were three in-breast failures more than 2 cm away from the original surgical bed, one failure directly adjacent to the original surgical bed, and one failure in the axilla with synchronous distant metastases. The crude failure rate was 7.1% (5 of 70), and the crude local failure rate was 5.7% (4 of 70). Estimated progression-free survival at 48 months was 89.8% (standard error = 4.5%). Our case series of 70 patients with >6 months' follow-up and a median follow-up of 26 months is the largest single-institution report to date with detailed failure analysis associated with MammoSite brachytherapy. Our failure data emphasize the importance of patient selection when offering partial breast irradiation.

  9. Genome analysis of Excretory/Secretory proteins in Taenia solium reveals their Abundance of Antigenic Regions (AAR).

    PubMed

    Gomez, Sandra; Adalid-Peralta, Laura; Palafox-Fonseca, Hector; Cantu-Robles, Vito Adrian; Soberón, Xavier; Sciutto, Edda; Fragoso, Gladis; Bobes, Raúl J; Laclette, Juan P; Yauner, Luis del Pozo; Ochoa-Leyva, Adrián

    2015-05-19

    Excretory/Secretory (ES) proteins play an important role in the host-parasite interactions. Experimental identification of ES proteins is time-consuming and expensive. Alternative bioinformatics approaches are cost-effective and can be used to prioritize the experimental analysis of therapeutic targets for parasitic diseases. Here we predicted and functionally annotated the ES proteins in T. solium genome using an integration of bioinformatics tools. Additionally, we developed a novel measurement to evaluate the potential antigenicity of T. solium secretome using sequence length and number of antigenic regions of ES proteins. This measurement was formalized as the Abundance of Antigenic Regions (AAR) value. AAR value for secretome showed a similar value to that obtained for a set of experimentally determined antigenic proteins and was different to the calculated value for the non-ES proteins of T. solium genome. Furthermore, we calculated the AAR values for known helminth secretomes and they were similar to that obtained for T. solium. The results reveal the utility of AAR value as a novel genomic measurement to evaluate the potential antigenicity of secretomes. This comprehensive analysis of T. solium secretome provides functional information for future experimental studies, including the identification of novel ES proteins of therapeutic, diagnosis and immunological interest.

  10. Genome analysis of Excretory/Secretory proteins in Taenia solium reveals their Abundance of Antigenic Regions (AAR)

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Sandra; Adalid-Peralta, Laura; Palafox-Fonseca, Hector; Cantu-Robles, Vito Adrian; Soberón, Xavier; Sciutto, Edda; Fragoso, Gladis; Bobes, Raúl J.; Laclette, Juan P.; Yauner, Luis del Pozo; Ochoa-Leyva, Adrián

    2015-01-01

    Excretory/Secretory (ES) proteins play an important role in the host-parasite interactions. Experimental identification of ES proteins is time-consuming and expensive. Alternative bioinformatics approaches are cost-effective and can be used to prioritize the experimental analysis of therapeutic targets for parasitic diseases. Here we predicted and functionally annotated the ES proteins in T. solium genome using an integration of bioinformatics tools. Additionally, we developed a novel measurement to evaluate the potential antigenicity of T. solium secretome using sequence length and number of antigenic regions of ES proteins. This measurement was formalized as the Abundance of Antigenic Regions (AAR) value. AAR value for secretome showed a similar value to that obtained for a set of experimentally determined antigenic proteins and was different to the calculated value for the non-ES proteins of T. solium genome. Furthermore, we calculated the AAR values for known helminth secretomes and they were similar to that obtained for T. solium. The results reveal the utility of AAR value as a novel genomic measurement to evaluate the potential antigenicity of secretomes. This comprehensive analysis of T. solium secretome provides functional information for future experimental studies, including the identification of novel ES proteins of therapeutic, diagnosis and immunological interest. PMID:25989346

  11. A detailed protocol for a rapid analysis of testicular cell populations using flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Rotgers, E; Cisneros-Montalvo, S; Jahnukainen, K; Sandholm, J; Toppari, J; Nurmio, M

    2015-09-01

    Accurate analysis and quantification of different testicular cell populations are of central importance in studies of male reproductive biology. The traditional histomorphometric and immunohistochemical methods remain the gold standard in studying the complex dynamics of the testicular tissue. Through past years advances have been made in the application of flow cytometry for the rapid analysis of testicular cell populations. Detection of DNA content and of surface antigens and fluorescent reporters have been widely used to analyze and sort cells. Detection of intracellular antigens can broaden the possibilities of applying flow cytometry in studies of male reproduction. Here, we report a detailed protocol for the preparation of rat testicular tissue for detection of intracellular antigens by flow cytometry, and a pipeline for subsequent data analysis and troubleshooting. Rat testicular ontogenesis was chosen as the experimental model to validate the performance of the assay using vimentin and γH2AX as intracellular markers for the somatic and spermatogenic cells, respectively. The results show that the assay is reproducible and recapitulates the rat testis ontogenesis. © 2015 The Authors. Andrology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  12. Mutation abundance affects the therapeutic efficacy of EGFR-TKI in patients with advanced lung adenocarcinoma: a retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huijuan; Zhang, Mina; Tang, Wanyu; Ma, Jie; Wei, Bing; Niu, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Guowei; Li, Peng; Yan, Xiangtao; Ma, Zhiyong

    2018-03-22

    To investigate the influence of mutation abundance and sites of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) on therapeutic efficacies of EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKIs) treatments of patients with advanced non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). EGFR mutational sites and mutation abundance were analyzed by amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS) in paraffin-embedded tissue sections taken from primary or metastatic tumors of 194 NSCLC patients Results: The median progression-free survival (PFS) time of the enrolled patients was 9.3 months (95% CI, 8.2-10.8 months). The PFS was significantly different with EGFR gene mutation abundance after EGFR-TKI therapy (P = 0.014). The median PFS was significantly longer when the cut-off value of EGFR mutation abundance of exon 19 or exon 21, and solely exon 19 was > 26.7% and 61.8%, respectively. For patients who received EGFR-TKI as first-line treatment, the median PFS was significantly longer in the high mutation abundance group than in the low mutation abundance group (12.7 vs 8.7 months, P = 0.002). The PFS benefits were greater in patients with a higher abundance of exon 19 deletion mutations in the EGFR gene after EGFR-TKI treatment and first line EGFR-TKI treatment led to improved PFS in high mutation abundance patients.

  13. A detailed analysis for the absorption coefficient of multilevel uncooled infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucuk, Seniz E.; Yusuf Tanrikulu, M.; Akin, Tayfun

    2011-06-01

    This paper introduces a detailed analysis on the calculation of the absorption coefficient of multilevel uncooled infrared detectors. The analysis is carried out considering a two-level 25μm pixel pitch infrared detector with a sandwich type resistor which is divided into sub-regions consisting of different stacks of layers. The absorption coefficients of these different subregions are calculated individually by using the cascaded transmission line model, including the main body, arms, and the regions where the resistors are implemented. Then, the total absorption coefficient of the detector is found by calculating the weighted average of these individual absorption coefficients, where the areas of sub-regions are taken into account. The absorption can be calculated as a function of the sacrificial and structural layer thicknesses together with the sheet resistance of the absorber layer to find the optimum value. However, the thermal conductance of the detector must be considered while adjusting the structural layer thickness. The proposed analysis also takes the thermal conductance into account in order not to compromise the overall detector performance. Analysis shows that a maximum absorption coefficient of 0.92 for a specific two-level pixel can be obtained at the 10 μm wavelength, while the pixel results in a time constant of 11.3 ms with 27.2 nW/K thermal conductance in the thermal simulation. It is shown that the absorption coefficient of the pixel is maximized when the sheet resistance of the absorber is 380 Ω/sheet-resistance, which is almost equal to the free space impedance, as expected.

  14. Reaction rate and abundance uncertainty correlations in primordial nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.S.

    1993-10-01

    A recent detailed analysis of Standard Big Bang Nucleo-synthesis incorporates temperature-dependent-reaction rate uncertainties in a Monte Carlo analysis to calculate primordial abundances with uncertainties. This approach is now employed to determine the individual contributions of the uncertainty of the 12 key reaction rates (including the neutron lifetime) to the overall uncertainty of the primordial d+{sup 3} He, {sup 4}He, and {sup 7}Li abundances. Furthermore, in order to set priorities for future measurements, the effects of decreasing the individual reaction rate uncertainties on the abundance uncertainties are determined. It is found that more precise measurements of d(d, p)t and d(d, n){supmore » 3}He are important for decreasing the d+{sup 3}He abundance uncertainty (by up to 25%); that a more precise neutron lifetime has by far the largest effect (up to a 60% decrease) on the {sup 4}He abundance uncertainty; and that more precise measurements of {sup 3}He({alpha},{gamma}){sup 7}Be, t({alpha},{gamma}){sup 7}Li, and p(n, {gamma})d could decrease the {sup 7}Li abundance uncertainty, but only by 10 - 20%. Details of the analysis and of the Monte Carlo routine will be discussed.« less

  15. Low abundance materials at the mars pathfinder landing site: An investigation using spectral mixture analysis and related techniques

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bell, J.F.; Farrand, W. H.; Johnson, J. R.; Morris, R.V.

    2002-01-01

    Recalibrated and geometrically registered multispectral images from the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) were analyzed using Spectral Mixture Analysis (SMA) and related techniques. SMA models a multispectral image scene as a linear combination of end-member spectra, and anomalous materials which do not fit the model are detected as model residuals. While most of the IMP data studied here are modeled generally well using "Bright Dust," "Gray Rock," and "Shade" image endmembers, additional anomalous materials were detected through careful analysis of root mean square (RMS) error images resulting from SMA. For example, analysis of SMA fraction and RMS images indicates spectral differences within a previously monolithologic Dark Soil class. A type of Dark Soil that has high fractional abundances in rock fraction images (Gray Rock Soil) was identified. Other anomalous materials identified included a previously noted "Black Rock" lithology, a class of possibly indurated, compacted, or partially cemented soils ("Intermediate Soil"), and a unit referred to as "Anomalous Patches" on at least one rock. The Black Rock lithology has a strong 900-1000-nm absorption, and modeling of the derived image endmembers using a laboratory reference endmember modeling (REM) approach produced best-fit model spectra that are most consistent with the presence of high-Ca pyroxenes and/or olivine, crystalline ferric oxide minerals, or mixtures of these materials as important components of the Black Rock endmember. More unique mineralogic identifications could not be obtained using our initial REM analyses. Both Intermediate Soil and Anomalous Patches units exhibit a relatively narrow 860-950-nm absorption that is consistent with the presence of either low-Ca pyroxenes or a cementing crystalline ferric oxide mineral. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science (USA).

  16. Detailed analysis of evolution of the state of polarization in all-fiber polarization transformers.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiushan; Jain, Ravinder K

    2006-10-30

    We present a detailed analysis of key attributes and performance characteristics of controllably-spun birefringent-fiber-based all-fiber waveplates or "all fiber polarization transformers" (AFPTs), first proposed and demonstrated by Huang [11]; these AFPTs consist essentially of a long carefully-designed "spin-twisted" high-birefringence fiber, fabricated by slowly varying the spin rate of a birefringent fiber preform (either from very fast to very slow or vice versa) while the fiber is being drawn. The evolution of the eigenstate from a linear polarization state to a circular polarization state, induced by slow variation of the intrinsic structure from linear anisotropy at the unspun end to circular anisotropy at the fast-spun end, enables the AFPT to behave like an all-fiber quarter-wave plate independent of the wavelength of operation. Power coupling between local eigenstates causes unique evolution of the polarization state along the fiber, and has been studied to gain insight into - as well as to understand detailed characteristics of -- the polarization transformation behavior. This has been graphically illustrated via plots of the relative power in these local eigenstates as a function of distance along the length of the fiber and plots of the extinction ratio of the output state of polarization (SOP) as a function of distance and the normalized spin rate. Deeper understanding of such polarization transformers has been further elucidated by quantitative calculations related to two crucial requirements for fabricating practical AFPT devices. Our calculations have also indicated that the polarization mode dispersion behaviour of the AFPT is much smaller than that of the original birefringent fiber. Finally, a specific AFPT was experimentally investigated at two widely-separated wavelengths (1310 nm and 1550 nm) of interest in telecommunications systems applications, further demonstrating and elucidating the broadband character of such AFPTs.

  17. Characterizing liability for cranial nerve injuries: a detailed analysis of 209 malpractice trials.

    PubMed

    Svider, Peter F; Sunaryo, Peter L; Keeley, Brieze R; Kovalerchik, Olga; Mauro, Andrew C; Eloy, Jean Anderson

    2013-05-01

    The potential for adverse events with lasting functional effects makes cranial nerve (CN) injury a target for litigation. Our objective was to comprehensively examine records of malpractice trials and detail issues influencing outcomes. Retrospective analysis. The Westlaw database (Thomson Reuters, New York, NY) was searched for jury verdict reports related to medical malpractice and CN injury. After excluding nonrelevant cases, we examined 209 trials for characteristics including nerve(s) injured, alleged causes of malpractice, demographic information, specialty, and outcome. The most commonly litigated CNs were VII (24.4%) and II (19.6%). Sixty-nine (33.0%) trials resulted in damages awarded. Outcomes varied, ranging from a 29.2% plaintiff success rate for CN XI injury to 48.4% for CN II injury. Plaintiffs had less success with increasing age. Average damages awarded were $1.7 million. The most commonly named defendants were otolaryngologists and general surgeons. Individual considerations varied but commonly included alleged deficits in informed consent (25.4%), unnecessary procedures (14.8%), undergoing additional surgery (25.8%), and untimely recognition of complications (23.9%). Malpractice trials were resolved in the defendant's favor the majority of the time. In cases where plaintiffs were successful, however, awards were considerable, averaging nearly $2 million. Factors influencing case outcome included age, location, perceived deficits in informed consent, allegedly unnecessary surgery, requiring additional surgery to repair a complication, and untimely recognition of complications. Although specific factors should be taken into consideration with each procedure, providing detailed informed consent and communicating with patients regarding expectations may minimize liability. Copyright © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  18. Detailed spectroscopic analysis of chloride salt deposits in Terra Sirenum, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterloo, M. M.; Glotch, T. D.; Bandfield, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    Chloride salt-bearing deposits have been identified throughout the southern highlands of Mars [1] based on the lack of diagnostic spectral features of anhydrous chlorides in both the visible near infrared (VNIR) and middle infrared (MIR) wavelength ranges [1,2]. A puzzling aspect of martian chloride deposits is the apparent lack of other weathering or evaporite phases associated with most of the deposits. A global analysis over the chloride salt sites conducted by [3] found that only ~9% of the deposits they analyzed were associated with minerals such as phyllosilicates. Most of these occurrences are in Terra Sirenum where [4] noted that salt-bearing deposits lie stratigraphically above Noachian phyllosilicates. Although a variety of formation mechanisms have been proposed for these intriguing deposits, detailed geologic mapping by [5] suggests that surface water and evaporation played a dominant role. On Earth, evaporative settings are often characterized by a multitude of evaporite and phyllosilicate phases including carbonates, sulfates, and nitrates. [6] evaluated chemical divides and brine evolution for martian systems and their results indicate three pathways wherein late-stage brines favor chloride precipitation. In each case the pathway to chloride formation includes precipitation of carbonates (calcite, siderite, and/or magnesite) and sulfates (gypsum, melanterite, and/or epsomite). Here, we present the results of our detailed and systematic spectroscopic study to identify additional evaporite phases associated with salt/silicate mixtures in Terra Sirenum. [1] Osterloo et al. (2008) Science, 319, [2] Glotch, T. D. et al. (2013) Lunar and Planet. Sci. XLIV, abstract #1549 [3] Ruesch, O. et al. (2012), J. Geophys. Res., 117, E00J13 [4] Glotch, T. D. et al. (2010) Geophys. Res. Lett. 37, L16202, [5] Osterloo, M. M. and B. M Hynek (2015) Lunar and Planet. Sci XLVI. Abstract #1054 [6] Tosca, N. J. and S. M. McLennan (2006), Earth and Planet. Sci. Lett., 241.

  19. Detailed product analysis during the low temperature oxidation of n-butane

    PubMed Central

    Herbinet, Olivier; Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique; Bax, Sarah; Le Gall, Hervé; Glaude, Pierre-Alexandre; Fournet, René; Zhou, Zhongyue; Deng, Liulin; Guo, Huijun; Xie, Mingfeng; Qi, Fei

    2013-01-01

    The products obtained from the low-temperature oxidation of n-butane in a jet-stirred reactor (JSR) have been analysed using two methods: gas chromatography analysis of the outlet gas and reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The mass spectrometer was combined with tunable synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet photoionization and coupled with a JSR via a molecular-beam sampling system. Experiments were performed under quasi-atmospheric pressure, for temperatures between 550 and 800 K, at a mean residence time of 6s and with a stoichiometric n-butane/oxygen/argon mixture (composition = 4/26/70 in mol %). 36 reaction products have been quantified, including addition to the usual oxidation products, acetic acid, hydrogen peroxide, C1, C2 and C4 alkylhydroperoxides and C4 ketohydroperoxides. Evidence of the possible formation of products (dihydrofuranes, furanones) derived from cyclic ethers has also been found. The performance of a detailed kinetic model of the literature has been assessed with the simulation of the formation of this extended range of species. These simulations have also allowed the analysis of possible pathways for the formation of some obtained products. PMID:21031192

  20. Detailed Vibration Analysis of Pinion Gear with Time-Frequency Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mosher, Marianne; Pryor, Anna H.; Lewicki, David G.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, the authors show a detailed analysis of the vibration signal from the destructive testing of a spiral bevel gear and pinion pair containing seeded faults. The vibration signal is analyzed in the time domain, frequency domain and with four time-frequency transforms: the Short Time Frequency Transform (STFT), the Wigner-Ville Distribution with the Choi-Williams kernel (WV-CW), the Continuous Wavelet' Transform (CWT) and the Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT). Vibration data of bevel gear tooth fatigue cracks, under a variety of operating load levels and damage conditions, are analyzed using these methods. A new metric for automatic anomaly detection is developed and can be produced from any systematic numerical representation of the vibration signals. This new metric reveals indications of gear damage with all of the time-frequency transforms, as well as time and frequency representations, on this data set. Analysis with the CWT detects changes in the signal at low torque levels not found with the other transforms. The WV-CW and CWT use considerably more resources than the STFT and the DWT. More testing of the new metric is needed to determine its value for automatic anomaly detection and to develop fault detection methods for the metric.

  1. Abundances of Volatile - Bearing Species from Evolved Gas Analysis of Samples from the Rocknest Aeolian Bedform in Gale Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Archer, P. D., Jr.; Franc, H. B.; Sutter, B.; McAdam, A.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2013-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite on board the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) recently ran four samples from an aeolian bedform named Rocknest. SAM detected the evolution of H2O, CO2, O2, and SO2, indicative of the presence of multiple volatile bearing species (Fig 1). The Rocknest bedform is a windblown deposit selected as representative of both the windblown material in Gale crater as well as the globally-distributed martian dust. Four samples of Rocknest material were analyzed by SAM, all from the fifth scoop taken at this location. The material delivered to SAM passed through a 150 m sieve and is assumed to have been well mixed during the sample acquisition/preparation/handoff process. SAM heated the Rocknest samples to approx.835 C at a ramp rate of 35 C/min with a He carrier gas flow rate of apprx.1.5 standard cubic centimeters per minute and at an oven pressure of 30 mbar [1]. Evolved gases were detected by a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS). This abstract presents the molar abundances of H2O, CO2, O2, and SO2 as well as their concentration in rocknest samples using an estimated sample mass.

  2. Community analysis of the abundance and diversity of mosquito species (Diptera: Culicidae) in three European countries at different latitudes.

    PubMed

    Möhlmann, Tim W R; Wennergren, Uno; Tälle, Malin; Favia, Guido; Damiani, Claudia; Bracchetti, Luca; Koenraadt, Constantianus J M

    2017-10-23

    Studies on mosquito species diversity in Europe often focus on a specific habitat, region or country. Moreover, different trap types are used for these sampling studies, making it difficult to compare and validate results across Europe. To facilitate comparisons of trapping sites and community analysis, the present study used two trap types for monitoring mosquito species diversity in three habitat types for three different countries in Europe. Mosquitoes were trapped using Biogents Sentinel (BGS), and Mosquito Magnet Liberty Plus (MMLP) traps at a total of 27 locations in Sweden, the Netherlands and Italy, comprising farm, peri-urban and wetland habitats. From July 2014 to June 2015 all locations were sampled monthly, except for the winter months. Indices of species richness, evenness and diversity were calculated, and community analyses were carried out with non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) techniques. A total of 11,745 female mosquitoes were trapped during 887 collections. More than 90% of the mosquitoes belonged to the genera Culex and Aedes, with Culex pipiens being the most abundant species. The highest mosquito diversity was found in Sweden. Within Sweden, species diversity was highest in wetland habitats, whereas in the Netherlands and Italy this was highest at farms. The NMDS analyses showed clear differences in mosquito communities among countries, but not among habitat types. The MMLP trapped a higher diversity of mosquito species than the BGS traps. Also, MMLP traps trapped higher numbers of mosquitoes, except for the genera Culex and Culiseta in Italy. A core mosquito community could be identified for the three countries, with Culex pipiens as the most abundant species. Differences in mosquito species communities were more defined by the three countries included in the study than by the three habitat types. Differences in mosquito community composition across countries may have implications for disease emergence and further spread throughout

  3. Paleodietary reconstruction using stable isotopes and abundance analysis of bovids from the Shungura Formation of South Omo, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Negash, Enquye W; Alemseged, Zeresenay; Wynn, Jonathan G; Bedaso, Zelalem K

    2015-11-01

    Preservation of the stable carbon isotopic composition of fossil tooth enamel enables us to estimate the relative proportion of C3 versus C4 vegetation in an animal's diet, which, combined with analysis of faunal abundance, may provide complementary methods of paleoenvironmental reconstruction. To this end, we analyzed stable carbon isotopic composition (δ(13)C values) of tooth enamel from four bovid tribes (Tragelaphini, Aepycerotini, Reduncini, and Alcelaphini) derived from six members of the Shungura Formation (Members B, C, D, F, G, and L; ages from ca. 2.90-1.05 Ma (millions of years ago) in the Lower Omo Valley of southwestern Ethiopia. The bovids show a wide range of δ(13)C values within taxa and stratigraphic members, as well as temporal changes in the feeding strategies of taxa analyzed throughout the middle to late Pliocene and early Pleistocene. Such variation suggests that the use of actualistic approaches for paleoenvironmental reconstruction may not always be warranted. Alcelaphini was the only taxon analyzed that retained a consistent dietary preference throughout the sequence, with entirely C4-dominated diets. Reduncini had a mixed C3/C4 to C4-dominated diet prior to 2.4 Ma, after which this taxon shifted to a largely C4-dominated diet. Aepycerotini generally showed a mixed C3/C4 diet, with a period of increased C4 diet from 2.5 to 2.3 Ma. Tragelaphini showed a range of mixed C3/C4 diets, with a median value that was briefly nearer the C4 end member from 2.9 to 2.4 Ma but was otherwise towards the C3 end member. These isotopic results, combined with relative abundance data for these bovids, imply that the environment of the Lower Omo Valley consisted of a mosaic of closed woodlands, with riverine forests and open grasslands. However, our data also signify that the overall environment gradually became more open, and that C4 grasses became more dominant. Finally, these results help document the range and extent of environments and potential diets

  4. IP Network Failure Identification Based on the Detailed Analysis of OSPF LSA Flooding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hei, Yuichiro; Ogishi, Tomohiko; Ano, Shigehiro; Hasegawa, Toru

    It is important to monitor routing protocols to ensure IP networks and their operations can maintain sufficient level of stability and reliability because IP routing is an essential part of such networks. In this paper, we focus on Open Shortest Path First (OSPF), a widely deployed intra-domain routing protocol. Routers running OSPF advertise their link states on Link State Advertisements (LSAs) as soon as they detect changes in their link states. In IP network operations, it is important for operators to ascertain the location and type of a failure in order to deal with failures adequately. We therefore studied IP network failure identification based on the monitoring of OSPF LSAs. There are three issues to consider in regard to identifying network failures by monitoring LSAs. The first is that multiple LSAs are flooded by a single failure. The second is the LSA delay, and the third is that multiple failures may occur simultaneously. In this paper, we propose a method of network failure identification based on a detailed analysis of OSPF LSA flooding that takes into account the above three issues.

  5. Detailed Analysis of Protein Topology of Extracellular Vesicles-Evidence of Unconventional Membrane Protein Orientation.

    PubMed

    Cvjetkovic, Aleksander; Jang, Su Chul; Konečná, Barbora; Höög, Johanna L; Sihlbom, Carina; Lässer, Cecilia; Lötvall, Jan

    2016-11-08

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are important mediators of intercellular communication that change the recipient cell by shuttling lipids, RNA, or protein cargo between cells. Here, we investigate the topology of the protein cargo found in EVs, as this topology can fundamentally influence the biological effects of EVs. A multiple proteomics approach, combining proteinase treatment and biotin tagging, shows that many proteins of cytosolic origin are localized on the surface of EVs. A detailed analysis of the EV proteome at the peptide level revealed that a number of EV membrane proteins are present in a topologically reversed orientation compared to what is annotated. Two examples of such proteins, SCAMP3 and STX4, were confirmed to have a reversed topology. This reversed typology was determined using flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy with antibodies directed toward their cytoplasmic epitopes. These results describe a novel workflow to define the EV proteome and the orientation of each protein, including membrane protein topology. These data are fundamentally important to understanding the EV proteome and required to fully explain EV biogenesis as well as biological function in recipient cells.

  6. A global/local analysis method for treating details in structural design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aminpour, Mohammad A.; Mccleary, Susan L.; Ransom, Jonathan B.

    1993-01-01

    A method for analyzing global/local behavior of plate and shell structures is described. In this approach, a detailed finite element model of the local region is incorporated within a coarser global finite element model. The local model need not be nodally compatible (i.e., need not have a one-to-one nodal correspondence) with the global model at their common boundary; therefore, the two models may be constructed independently. The nodal incompatibility of the models is accounted for by introducing appropriate constraint conditions into the potential energy in a hybrid variational formulation. The primary advantage of this method is that the need for transition modeling between global and local models is eliminated. Eliminating transition modeling has two benefits. First, modeling efforts are reduced since tedious and complex transitioning need not be performed. Second, errors due to the mesh distortion, often unavoidable in mesh transitioning, are minimized by avoiding distorted elements beyond what is needed to represent the geometry of the component. The method is applied reduced to a plate loaded in tension and transverse bending. The plate has a central hole, and various hole sixes and shapes are studied. The method is also applied to a composite laminated fuselage panel with a crack emanating from a window in the panel. While this method is applied herein to global/local problems, it is also applicable to the coupled analysis of independently modeled components as well as adaptive refinement.

  7. CFD Analysis and Design of Detailed Target Configurations for an Accelerator-Driven Subcritical System

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, Adam; Merzari, Elia; Sofu, Tanju

    2016-08-01

    High-fidelity analysis has been utilized in the design of beam target options for an accelerator driven subcritical system. Designs featuring stacks of plates with square cross section have been investigated for both tungsten and uranium target materials. The presented work includes the first thermal-hydraulic simulations of the full, detailed target geometry. The innovative target cooling manifold design features many regions with complex flow features, including 90 bends and merging jets, which necessitate three-dimensional fluid simulations. These were performed using the commercial computational fluid dynamics code STAR-CCM+. Conjugate heat transfer was modeled between the plates, cladding, manifold structure, and fluid. Steady-statemore » simulations were performed but lacked good residual convergence. Unsteady simulations were then performed, which converged well and demonstrated that flow instability existed in the lower portion of the manifold. It was established that the flow instability had little effect on the peak plate temperatures, which were well below the melting point. The estimated plate surface temperatures and target region pressure were shown to provide sufficient margin to subcooled boiling for standard operating conditions. This demonstrated the safety of both potential target configurations during normal operation.« less

  8. Inferring cell state by quantitative motility analysis reveals a dynamic state system and broken detailed balance

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Amy Y.; Brack, Andrew S.

    2018-01-01

    Cell populations display heterogeneous and dynamic phenotypic states at multiple scales. Similar to molecular features commonly used to explore cell heterogeneity, cell behavior is a rich phenotypic space that may allow for identification of relevant cell states. Inference of cell state from cell behavior across a time course may enable the investigation of dynamics of transitions between heterogeneous cell states, a task difficult to perform with destructive molecular observations. Cell motility is one such easily observed cell behavior with known biomedical relevance. To investigate heterogenous cell states and their dynamics through the lens of cell behavior, we developed Heteromotility, a software tool to extract quantitative motility features from timelapse cell images. In mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), myoblasts, and muscle stem cells (MuSCs), Heteromotility analysis identifies multiple motility phenotypes within the population. In all three systems, the motility state identity of individual cells is dynamic. Quantification of state transitions reveals that MuSCs undergoing activation transition through progressive motility states toward the myoblast phenotype. Transition rates during MuSC activation suggest non-linear kinetics. By probability flux analysis, we find that this MuSC motility state system breaks detailed balance, while the MEF and myoblast systems do not. Balanced behavior state transitions can be captured by equilibrium formalisms, while unbalanced switching between states violates equilibrium conditions and would require an external driving force. Our data indicate that the system regulating cell behavior can be decomposed into a set of attractor states which depend on the identity of the cell, together with a set of transitions between states. These results support a conceptual view of cell populations as dynamical systems, responding to inputs from signaling pathways and generating outputs in the form of state transitions and observable

  9. Designing the optimal semi-warm NIR spectrograph for SALT via detailed thermal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Marsha J.; Sheinis, Andrew I.; Mulligan, Mark P.; Wong, Jeffrey P.; Rogers, Allen

    2008-07-01

    The near infrared (NIR) upgrade to the Robert Stobie Spectrograph (RSS) on the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT), RSS/NIR, extends the spectral coverage of all modes of the optical spectrograph. The RSS/NIR is a low to medium resolution spectrograph with broadband, spectropolarimetric, and Fabry-Perot imaging capabilities. The optical and NIR arms can be used simultaneously to extend spectral coverage from 3200 Å to approximately 1.6 μm. Both arms utilize high efficiency volume phase holographic gratings via articulating gratings and cameras. The NIR camera incorporates a HAWAII-2RG detector with an Epps optical design consisting of 6 spherical elements and providing subpixel rms image sizes of 7.5 +/- 1.0 μm over all wavelengths and field angles. The NIR spectrograph is semi-warm, sharing a common slit plane and partial collimator with the optical arm. A pre-dewar, cooled to below ambient temperature, houses the final NIR collimator optic, the grating/Fabry-Perot etalon, the polarizing beam splitter, and the first three camera optics. The last three camera elements, blocking filters, and detector are housed in a cryogenically cooled dewar. The semi-warm design concept has long been proposed as an economical way to extend optical instruments into the NIR, however, success has been very limited. A major portion of our design effort entails a detailed thermal analysis using non-sequential ray tracing to interactively guide the mechanical design and determine a truly realizable long wavelength cutoff over which astronomical observations will be sky-limited. In this paper we describe our thermal analysis, design concepts for the staged cooling scheme, and results to be incorporated into the overall mechanical design and baffling.

  10. Detailed computational analysis of a comprehensive set of group A rotavirus NSP4 proteins.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shuo Liang; Tian, Peng

    2003-05-01

    Rotavirus infection causes diarrhea to humans, animals and birds. The NSP4 protein of Group A rotavirus has been recognized as a viral enterotoxin. This single protein plays important roles in viral pathogenesis and morphogenesis. Domains involved in structure and biologic functions have been proposed mainly based on the SA11 strain, a prototype of group A rotavirus. NSP4 has been classified into different genotypes based on sequence homology. These analyses are based on representative strains selected but not comprehensive. In this paper, we collected all NSP4 sequences in the GenBank and performed a detailed computational analysis. Our analysis of 176 NSP4 proteins in Groups A, B and C rotaviruses confirms that the recently published avian NSP4 sequences belong to a new genotype (Mori Y., Borgan M.A., Ito N., Sugiyama M. and Minamoto N., Virus Res 89, 145-151, 2002), besides the four known NSP4 genotypes of Group A mammalian rotaviruses. Significant differences were discovered in the physicochemical properties between the avian and mammalian NSP4 proteins. In particular, lack of a highly probable coiled-coil region in the avian sequences implies a diversion of the NSP4 quaternary structure from the latter, although the secondary and tertiary structures may be similar. Fourteen amino acids are found absolutely conserved in the Group A NSP4 sequences, regardless of genotype. Of the conserved residues, two are glycosylation sites, one is in the middle of the transmembrane segment, seven span the VP4 binding domain, and five are clustered in the middle of the toxic peptide region, indicating the functional importance of the conservation.

  11. Detailed Far-Ultraviolet to Optical Analysis of Four [WR] Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcolino, W. L. F.; Hillier, D. J.; de Araujo, F. X.; Pereira, C. B.

    2007-01-01

    We present far-UV to optical analyses of four hydrogen-deficient central stars of planetary nebulae: BD +30 3639, NGC 40, NGC 5315, and NGC 6905. Using the radiative transfer code CMFGEN, we determined new physical parameters and chemical abundances for these stars. The results were analyzed in the context of the [WR]-->PG 1159 evolution via the transformed radius-temperature (RT×T*) and H-R diagrams. NGC 5315 showed itself as an odd object among the previously analyzed central stars. Its temperature (~76 kK) is considerably lower than other early-type [WR] stars (~120-150 kK). From our models for NGC 5315 and NGC 6905, it is unclear if early-type [WR] stars have smaller C/He mass ratios than other spectral classes, as claimed in the literature. A ratio of ~0.8 is found for NGC 6905. We analyzed FUSE spectra of these stars for the first time and identified phosphorus in the spectra of BD +30 3639, NGC 40, and NGC 5315 through the doublet transition P V λλ1118, 1128 (3p 2Po-3s 2S). The Fe, Si, P, S, and Ne abundances were analyzed in the context of the nucleosynthesis occurring in previous evolutionary phases. We found evidence for Fe deficiency in BD +30 3639 and NGC 5315, and we determined a solar Si abundance for BD +30 3639 and NGC 40. Regarding P, an oversolar abundance in the NGC 5315 model was preferred. Upper limits for the S abundance were estimated. We found that Ne is overabundant in BD +30 3639. In the other stars, Ne is weak or undetectable. Our results are in agreement with theoretical predictions and show the usefulness of [WR] stars as test beds for nucleosynthesis calculations in the AGB and post-AGB phases.

  12. Detailed analysis of latencies in image-based dynamic MLC tracking1

    PubMed Central

    Poulsen, Per Rugaard; Cho, Byungchul; Sawant, Amit; Ruan, Dan; Keall, Paul J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Previous measurements of the accuracy of image-based real-time dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) tracking show that the major contributor to errors is latency, i.e., the delay between target motion and MLC response. Therefore the purpose of this work was to develop a method for detailed analysis of latency contributions during image-based DMLC tracking. Methods: A prototype DMLC tracking system integrated with a linear accelerator was used for tracking a phantom with an embedded fiducial marker during treatment delivery. The phantom performed a sinusoidal motion. Real-time target localization was based on x-ray images acquired either with a portal imager or a kV imager mounted orthogonal to the treatment beam. Each image was stored in a file on the imaging workstation. A marker segmentation program opened the image file, determined the marker position in the image, and transferred it to the DMLC tracking program. This program estimated the three-dimensional target position by a single-imager method and adjusted the MLC aperture to the target position. Imaging intervals ΔTimage from 150 to 1000 ms were investigated for both kV and MV imaging. After the experiments, the recorded images were synchronized with MLC log files generated by the MLC controller and tracking log files generated by the tracking program. This synchronization allowed temporal analysis of the information flow for each individual image from acquisition to completed MLC adjustment. The synchronization also allowed investigation of the MLC adjustment dynamics on a considerably finer time scale than the 50 ms time resolution of the MLC log files. Results: For ΔTimage=150 ms, the total time from image acquisition to completed MLC adjustment was 380±9 ms for MV and 420±12 ms for kV images. The main part of this time was from image acquisition to completed image file writing (272 ms for MV and 309 ms for kV). Image file opening (38 ms), marker segmentation (4 ms), MLC position calculation

  13. Detailed analysis of latencies in image-based dynamic MLC tracking.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Per Rugaard; Cho, Byungchul; Sawant, Amit; Ruan, Dan; Keall, Paul J

    2010-09-01

    Previous measurements of the accuracy of image-based real-time dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) tracking show that the major contributor to errors is latency, i.e., the delay between target motion and MLC response. Therefore the purpose of this work was to develop a method for detailed analysis of latency contributions during image-based DMLC tracking. A prototype DMLC tracking system integrated with a linear accelerator was used for tracking a phantom with an embedded fiducial marker during treatment delivery. The phantom performed a sinusoidal motion. Real-time target localization was based on x-ray images acquired either with a portal imager or a kV imager mounted orthogonal to the treatment beam. Each image was stored in a file on the imaging workstation. A marker segmentation program opened the image file, determined the marker position in the image, and transferred it to the DMLC tracking program. This program estimated the three-dimensional target position by a single-imager method and adjusted the MLC aperture to the target position. Imaging intervals deltaT(image) from 150 to 1000 ms were investigated for both kV and MV imaging. After the experiments, the recorded images were synchronized with MLC log files generated by the MLC controller and tracking log files generated by the tracking program. This synchronization allowed temporal analysis of the information flow for each individual image from acquisition to completed MLC adjustment. The synchronization also allowed investigation of the MLC adjustment dynamics on a considerably finer time scale than the 50 ms time resolution of the MLC log files. For deltaT(image) = 150 ms, the total time from image acquisition to completed MLC adjustment was 380 +/- 9 ms for MV and 420 +/- 12 ms for kV images. The main part of this time was from image acquisition to completed image file writing (272 ms for MV and 309 ms for kV). Image file opening (38 ms), marker segmentation (4 ms), MLC position calculation (16 ms

  14. Macroscale intraspecific variation and environmental heterogeneity: analysis of cold and warm zone abundance, mortality, and regeneration distributions of four eastern US tree species

    Treesearch

    Anantha M. Prasad

    2015-01-01

    I test for macroscale intraspecific variation of abundance, mortality, and regeneration of four eastern US tree species (Tsuga canadensis, Betula lenta, Liriodendron tulipifera, and Quercus prinus) by splitting them into three climatic zones based on plant hardiness zones (PHZs). The primary goals of the analysis are to assess the...

  15. Proteomic Analysis of the Excretory-Secretory Products from Larval Stages of Ascaris suum Reveals High Abundance of Glycosyl Hydrolases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Van Steendam, Katleen; Dhaenens, Maarten; Vlaminck, Johnny; Deforce, Dieter; Jex, Aaron R.; Gasser, Robin B.; Geldhof, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Background Ascaris lumbricoides and Ascaris suum are socioeconomically important and widespread parasites of humans and pigs, respectively. The excretory-secretory (ES) molecules produced and presented at the parasite-host interface during the different phases of tissue invasion and migration are likely to play critical roles in the induction and development of protective immune and other host responses. Methodology/Principal Findings The aim of this study was to identify the ES proteins of the different larval stages (L3-egg, L3-lung and L4) by LC-MS/MS. In total, 106 different proteins were identified, 20 in L3-egg, 45 in L3-lung stage and 58 in L4. Although most of the proteins identified were stage-specific, 15 were identified in the ES products of at least two stages. Two proteins, i.e. a 14-3-3-like protein and a serpin-like protein, were present in the ES products from the three different larval stages investigated. Interestingly, a comparison of ES products from L4 with those of L3-egg and L3-lung showed an abundance of metabolic enzymes, particularly glycosyl hydrolases. Further study indicated that most of these glycolytic enzymes were transcriptionally upregulated from L4 onwards, with a peak in the adult stage, particularly in intestinal tissue. This was also confirmed by enzymatic assays, showing the highest glycosidase activity in protein extracts from adult worms gut. Conclusions/Significance The present proteomic analysis provides important information on the host-parasite interaction and the biology of the migratory stages of A. suum. In particular, the high transcriptional upregulation of glycosyl hydrolases from the L4 stage onwards reveals that the degradation of complex carbohydrates forms an essential part of the energy metabolism of this parasite once it establishes in the small intestine. PMID:24098821

  16. Using Landscape Analysis to Test Hypotheses about Drivers of Tick Abundance and Infection Prevalence with Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Ferrell, A Michelle; Brinkerhoff, R Jory

    2018-04-12

    Patterns of vector-borne disease risk are changing globally in space and time and elevated disease risk of vector-borne infection can be driven by anthropogenic modification of the environment. Incidence of Lyme disease, caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, has risen in a number of locations in North America and this increase may be driven by spatially or numerically expanding populations of the primary tick vector, Ixodes scapularis . We used a model selection approach to identify habitat fragmentation and land-use/land cover variables to test the hypothesis that the amount and configuration of forest cover at spatial scales relevant to deer, the primary hosts of adult ticks, would be the predominant determinants of tick abundance. We expected that land cover heterogeneity and amount of forest edge, a habitat thought to facilitate deer foraging and survival, would be the strongest driver of tick density and that larger spatial scales (5-10 km) would be more important than smaller scales (1 km). We generated metrics of deciduous and mixed forest fragmentation using Fragstats 4.4 implemented in ArcMap 10.3 and found, after adjusting for multicollinearity, that total forest edge within a 5 km buffer had a significant negative effect on tick density and that the proportion of forested land cover within a 10 km buffer was positively associated with density of I. scapularis nymphs. None of the 1 km fragmentation metrics were found to significantly improve the fit of the model. Elevation, previously associated with increased density of I. scapularis nymphs in Virginia, while significantly predictive in univariate analysis, was not an important driver of nymph density relative to fragmentation metrics. Our results suggest that amount of forest cover (i.e., lack of fragmentation) is the most important driver of I. scapularis density in our study system.

  17. Abundance and Multilocus Sequence Analysis of Vibrio Bacteria Associated with Diseased Elkhorn Coral (Acropora palmata) of the Florida Keys.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Keri M; Westrich, Jason R; Alabady, Magdy S; Edwards, Martinique L; Lipp, Erin K

    2018-01-15

    The critically endangered elkhorn coral ( Acropora palmata ) is affected by white pox disease (WPX) throughout the Florida Reef Tract and wider Caribbean. The bacterium Serratia marcescens was previously identified as one etiologic agent of WPX but is no longer consistently detected in contemporary outbreaks. It is now believed that multiple etiologic agents cause WPX; however, to date, no other potential pathogens have been thoroughly investigated. This study examined the association of Vibrio bacteria with WPX occurrence from August 2012 to 2014 at Looe Key Reef in the Florida Keys, USA. The concentration of cultivable Vibrio was consistently greater in WPX samples than in healthy samples. The abundance of Vibrio bacteria relative to total bacteria was four times higher in samples from WPX lesions than in adjacent apparently healthy regions of diseased corals based on quantitative PCR (qPCR). Multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) was used to assess the diversity of 69 Vibrio isolates collected from diseased and apparently healthy A. palmata colonies and the surrounding seawater. Vibrio species with known pathogenicity to corals were detected in both apparently healthy and diseased samples. While the causative agent(s) of contemporary WPX outbreaks remains elusive, our results suggest that Vibrio spp. may be part of a nonspecific heterotrophic bacterial bloom rather than acting as primary pathogens. This study highlights the need for highly resolved temporal sampling in situ to further elucidate the role of Vibrio during WPX onset and progression. IMPORTANCE Coral diseases are increasing worldwide and are now considered a major contributor to coral reef decline. In particular, the Caribbean has been noted as a coral disease hot spot, owing to the dramatic loss of framework-building acroporid corals due to tissue loss diseases. The pathogenesis of contemporary white pox disease (WPX) outbreaks in Acropora palmata remains poorly understood. This study investigates the

  18. Economic analysis of a randomized trial of academic detailing interventions to improve use of antihypertensive medications.

    PubMed

    Simon, Steven R; Rodriguez, Hector P; Majumdar, Sumit R; Kleinman, Ken; Warner, Cheryl; Salem-Schatz, Susanne; Miroshnik, Irina; Soumerai, Stephen B; Prosser, Lisa A

    2007-01-01

    The authors estimated the costs and cost savings of implementing a program of mailed practice guidelines and single-visit individual and group academic detailing interventions in a randomized controlled trial to improve the use of antihypertensive medications. Analyses took the perspective of the payer. The total costs of the mailed guideline, group detailing, and individual detailing interventions were estimated at 1000 dollars, 5500 dollars, and 7200 dollars, respectively, corresponding to changes in the average daily per person drug costs of -0.0558 dollars (95% confidence interval, -0.1365 dollars to 0.0250 dollars) in the individual detailing intervention and -0.0001 dollars (95% confidence interval, -0.0803 dollars to 0.0801 dollars) in the group detailing intervention, compared with the mailed intervention. For all patients with incident hypertension in the individual detailing arm, the annual total drug cost savings were estimated at 21,711 dollars (95% confidence interval, 53,131 dollars savings to 9709 dollars cost increase). Information on costs of academic detailing could assist with health plan decision making in developing interventions to improve prescribing.

  19. The Active for Life Year 5 (AFLY5) school-based cluster randomised controlled trial protocol: detailed statistical analysis plan.

    PubMed

    Lawlor, Debbie A; Peters, Tim J; Howe, Laura D; Noble, Sian M; Kipping, Ruth R; Jago, Russell

    2013-07-24

    The Active For Life Year 5 (AFLY5) randomised controlled trial protocol was published in this journal in 2011. It provided a summary analysis plan. This publication is an update of that protocol and provides a detailed analysis plan. This update provides a detailed analysis plan of the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the AFLY5 intervention. The plan includes details of how variables will be quality control checked and the criteria used to define derived variables. Details of four key analyses are provided: (a) effectiveness analysis 1 (the effect of the AFLY5 intervention on primary and secondary outcomes at the end of the school year in which the intervention is delivered); (b) mediation analyses (secondary analyses examining the extent to which any effects of the intervention are mediated via self-efficacy, parental support and knowledge, through which the intervention is theoretically believed to act); (c) effectiveness analysis 2 (the effect of the AFLY5 intervention on primary and secondary outcomes 12 months after the end of the intervention) and (d) cost effectiveness analysis (the cost-effectiveness of the AFLY5 intervention). The details include how the intention to treat and per-protocol analyses were defined and planned sensitivity analyses for dealing with missing data. A set of dummy tables are provided in Additional file 1. This detailed analysis plan was written prior to any analyst having access to any data and was approved by the AFLY5 Trial Steering Committee. Its publication will ensure that analyses are in accordance with an a priori plan related to the trial objectives and not driven by knowledge of the data. ISRCTN50133740.

  20. Prognosis of Ti abundance in Sinus Iridum using a nonlinear analysis of Chang' E-1 Interference Imaging Spectrometer imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tingyan, Xing; Fujiang, Liu; Li, Liu; Chan, Li; Ying, Zhang; Le, Qiao; Rong, Yang; Xiaopo, Zheng; Meng, Zhu; Qi, Zhang

    2015-05-01

    We report here on the relationship between titanium abundance and its spectral features on the Moon, using 36 craters exposed in Sinus Iridum, a landing site for China's Lunar Exploration Program. Six absorption parameters (full width at half maximum, absorption depth (D), absorption position (λ), absorption area (A), absorption asymmetry (S), and (Rmin)) at the wavelength of 500-550 nm were computed, and the lowest reflectance values (Rmin) to characterize the properties of titanium abundance and its spectral features were calculated. The correlation between Rmin and TiO2 abundance calculated by Clementine multispectral images is 0.812, and a second-order polynomial fits the data better with a correlation of 0.837. The TiO2 abundance inversed by the Chang' E-1 Interference Imaging Spectrometers (IIM) data is thus relatively higher than that revealed by the Clementine data. This good correlation between Rmin and TiO2 abundance may thus be used very effectively to estimate the Ti distribution on the surface of the Moon by IIM hyperspectral data.

  1. SO and CS observations of molecular clouds. II. Analysis and modelling of the abundance ratios - probing O_2/CO with SO/CS?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, A.; Hjalmarson, Å.; Bergman, P.; Millar, T. J.

    2000-06-01

    We here analyse the observational SO and CS data presented in Nilsson et al. (\\cite{2000A&A...XXX..XXXN}). The SO/CS integrated intensity ratio maps are presented for 19 molecular clouds, together with tables of relevant ratios at strategic positions, where we have also observed 34SO and/or C34S. The SO/CS abundance ratio as calculated from an LTE analysis is highly varying within and between the sources. Our isotopomer observations and Monte Carlo simulations verify that this is not an artifact due to optical depth problems. The variation of the maximum SO/CS abundance ratio between the clouds is 0.2-7. The largest variations within a cloud are found for the most nearby objects, possibly indicating resolution effects. We have also performed time dependent chemical simulations. We compare the simulations with our observed SO/CS abundance ratios and suggest a varying oxygen to carbon initial abundance, differing temporal evolution, density differences and X-ray sources associated with young stellar objects as possible explanations to the variations. In particular, the observed variation of the maximum SO/CS abundance ratio between the clouds can be explained by using initial O/C+ abundance ratios in the range 1.3-2.5. We finally derive a relationship between the SO/CS and O_2/CO abundance ratios, which may be used as a guide to find the most promising interstellar O_2 search targets. Table 1 and Figs. 4 to 21 are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/Abstract.html)

  2. GLOBULAR CLUSTER ABUNDANCES FROM HIGH-RESOLUTION, INTEGRATED-LIGHT SPECTROSCOPY. II. EXPANDING THE METALLICITY RANGE FOR OLD CLUSTERS AND UPDATED ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES

    SciTech Connect

    Colucci, Janet E.; Bernstein, Rebecca A.; McWilliam, Andrew

    2017-01-10

    We present abundances of globular clusters (GCs) in the Milky Way and Fornax from integrated-light (IL) spectra. Our goal is to evaluate the consistency of the IL analysis relative to standard abundance analysis for individual stars in those same clusters. This sample includes an updated analysis of seven clusters from our previous publications and results for five new clusters that expand the metallicity range over which our technique has been tested. We find that the [Fe/H] measured from IL spectra agrees to ∼0.1 dex for GCs with metallicities as high as [Fe/H] = −0.3, but the abundances measured for more metal-rich clustersmore » may be underestimated. In addition we systematically evaluate the accuracy of abundance ratios, [X/Fe], for Na i, Mg i, Al i, Si i, Ca i, Ti i, Ti ii, Sc ii, V i, Cr i, Mn i, Co i, Ni i, Cu i, Y ii, Zr i, Ba ii, La ii, Nd ii, and Eu ii. The elements for which the IL analysis gives results that are most similar to analysis of individual stellar spectra are Fe i, Ca i, Si i, Ni i, and Ba ii. The elements that show the greatest differences include Mg i and Zr i. Some elements show good agreement only over a limited range in metallicity. More stellar abundance data in these clusters would enable more complete evaluation of the IL results for other important elements.« less

  3. Globular Cluster Abundances from High-resolution, Integrated-light Spectroscopy. II. Expanding the Metallicity Range for Old Clusters and Updated Analysis Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colucci, Janet E.; Bernstein, Rebecca A.; McWilliam, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    We present abundances of globular clusters (GCs) in the Milky Way and Fornax from integrated-light (IL) spectra. Our goal is to evaluate the consistency of the IL analysis relative to standard abundance analysis for individual stars in those same clusters. This sample includes an updated analysis of seven clusters from our previous publications and results for five new clusters that expand the metallicity range over which our technique has been tested. We find that the [Fe/H] measured from IL spectra agrees to ˜0.1 dex for GCs with metallicities as high as [Fe/H] = -0.3, but the abundances measured for more metal-rich clusters may be underestimated. In addition we systematically evaluate the accuracy of abundance ratios, [X/Fe], for Na I, Mg I, Al I, Si I, Ca I, Ti I, Ti II, Sc II, V I, Cr I, Mn I, Co I, Ni I, Cu I, Y II, Zr I, Ba II, La II, Nd II, and Eu II. The elements for which the IL analysis gives results that are most similar to analysis of individual stellar spectra are Fe I, Ca I, Si I, Ni I, and Ba II. The elements that show the greatest differences include Mg I and Zr I. Some elements show good agreement only over a limited range in metallicity. More stellar abundance data in these clusters would enable more complete evaluation of the IL results for other important elements. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  4. Analysis of magnetic-dipole transitions in tungsten plasmas using detailed and configuration-average descriptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Xieyu; Poirier, Michel

    2017-06-01

    This paper is devoted to the analysis of transition arrays of magnetic-dipole (M1) type in highly charged ions. Such transitions play a significant role in highly ionized plasmas, for instance in the tungsten plasma present in tokamak devices. Using formulas recently published and their implementation in the Flexible Atomic Code for M1-transition array shifts and widths, absorption and emission spectra arising from transitions inside the 3*n complex of highly-charged tungsten ions are analyzed. A comparison of magnetic-dipole transitions with electric-dipole (E1) transitions shows that, while the latter are better described by transition array formulas, M1 absorption and emission structures reveal some insufficiency of these formulas. It is demonstrated that the detailed spectra account for significantly richer structures than those predicted by the transition array formalism. This is due to the fact that M1 transitions may occur between levels inside the same relativistic configuration, while such inner configuration transitions are not accounted for by the currently available averaging expression. In addition, because of configuration interaction, transition processes involving more than one electron jump, such as 3p1/23d5/2 → 3p3/23d3/2, are possible but not accounted for in the transition array formulas. These missing transitions are collected in pseudo-arrays using a post-processing method described in this paper. The relative influence of inner- and inter-configuration transitions is carefully analyzed in cases of tungsten ions with net charge around 50. The need for an additional theoretical development is emphasized.

  5. Detailed deposition analysis of inertial and diffusive particles in a rat nasal passage.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jingliang; Shang, Yidan; Tian, Lin; Inthavong, Kiao; Tu, Jiyuan

    2018-01-01

    Rats have been widely used as surrogates for evaluating the health effects of inhaled airborne particulate matter. To provide a thorough understanding of particle transport and deposition mechanisms in the rat nasal airway, this article presents a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study of particle exposure in a realistic rat nasal passage under a resting flow condition. Particles covering a diameter range from 1 nm to 4 µm were passively released in front of the rat's breathing zone, and the Lagrangian particle tracking approach was used to calculate individual particle trajectories. Detailed particle deposition analysis shows the deposition of inertial particles >2 µm is high in the rat nasal vestibule and more than 70% of all inhaled inertial particles were trapped in this region. While for diffusive nanoparticles, the vestibule filtration effect is reduced, only less than 60% of inhaled nanoparticles were blocked by the anterior nasal structures. The particle exposure in the olfactory region only shows notable deposition for diffusive nanoparticles, which peaks at 9.4% for 5 nm particles. Despite the olfactory deposition remains at a low level, the ratio between the olfactory and the main passage is kept around 30-40% for 10-800 nm particles, which indicates a particle-size-independent distribution pattern in the main nasal passage and olfactory. This study provides a deep understanding of particles deposition features in a rat nasal passage, and the research findings can aid toxicologist in inter-species exposure-response extrapolation study.

  6. Cardiometabolic risk in Canada: a detailed analysis and position paper by the cardiometabolic risk working group.

    PubMed

    Leiter, Lawrence A; Fitchett, David H; Gilbert, Richard E; Gupta, Milan; Mancini, G B John; McFarlane, Philip A; Ross, Robert; Teoh, Hwee; Verma, Subodh; Anand, Sonia; Camelon, Kathryn; Chow, Chi-Ming; Cox, Jafna L; Després, Jean-Pierre; Genest, Jacques; Harris, Stewart B; Lau, David C W; Lewanczuk, Richard; Liu, Peter P; Lonn, Eva M; McPherson, Ruth; Poirier, Paul; Qaadri, Shafiq; Rabasa-Lhoret, Rémi; Rabkin, Simon W; Sharma, Arya M; Steele, Andrew W; Stone, James A; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Tobe, Sheldon; Ur, Ehud

    2011-01-01

    The concepts of "cardiometabolic risk," "metabolic syndrome," and "risk stratification" overlap and relate to the atherogenic process and development of type 2 diabetes. There is confusion about what these terms mean and how they can best be used to improve our understanding of cardiovascular disease treatment and prevention. With the objectives of clarifying these concepts and presenting practical strategies to identify and reduce cardiovascular risk in multiethnic patient populations, the Cardiometabolic Working Group reviewed the evidence related to emerging cardiovascular risk factors and Canadian guideline recommendations in order to present a detailed analysis and consolidated approach to the identification and management of cardiometabolic risk. The concepts related to cardiometabolic risk, pathophysiology, and strategies for identification and management (including health behaviours, pharmacotherapy, and surgery) in the multiethnic Canadian population are presented. "Global cardiometabolic risk" is proposed as an umbrella term for a comprehensive list of existing and emerging factors that predict cardiovascular disease and/or type 2 diabetes. Health behaviour interventions (weight loss, physical activity, diet, smoking cessation) in people identified at high cardiometabolic risk are of critical importance given the emerging crisis of obesity and the consequent epidemic of type 2 diabetes. Vascular protective measures (health behaviours for all patients and pharmacotherapy in appropriate patients) are essential to reduce cardiometabolic risk, and there is growing consensus that a multidisciplinary approach is needed to adequately address cardiometabolic risk factors. Health care professionals must also consider risk factors related to ethnicity in order to appropriately evaluate everyone in their diverse patient populations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Detailed analysis of an Eigen quasispecies model in a periodically moving sharp-peak landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, Armando G. M.

    2010-09-01

    The Eigen quasispecies model in a periodically moving sharp-peak landscape considered in previous seminal works [M. Nilsson and N. Snoad, Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 191 (2000)10.1103/PhysRevLett.84.191] and [C. Ronnewinkel , in Theoretical Aspects of Evolutionary Computing, edited by L. Kallel, B. Naudts, and A. Rogers (Springer-Verlag, Heidelberg, 2001)] is analyzed in greater detail. We show here, through a more rigorous analysis, that results in those papers are qualitatively correct. In particular, we obtain a phase diagram for the existence of a quasispecies with the same shape as in the above cited paper by C. Ronnewinkel , with upper and lower thresholds for the mutation rate between which a quasispecies may survive. A difference is that the upper value is larger and the lower value is smaller than the previously reported ones, so that the range for quasispecies existence is always larger than thought before. The quantitative information provided might also be important in understanding genetic variability in virus populations and has possible applications in antiviral therapies. The results in the quoted papers were obtained by studying the populations only at some few genomes. As we will show, this amounts to diagonalizing a 3×3 matrix. Our work is based instead in a different division of the population allowing a finer control of the populations at various relevant genetic sequences. The existence of a quasispecies will be related to Perron-Frobenius eigenvalues. Although huge matrices of sizes 2ℓ , where ℓ is the genome length, may seem necessary at a first look, we show that such large sizes are not necessary and easily obtain numerical and analytical results for their eigenvalues.

  8. A novel method for collection of soil-emitted nitric oxide (NO) for natural abundance stable N isotope analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Z.; Elliott, E. M.

    2016-12-01

    The global inventory of NO emissions is poorly constrained with a large portion of the uncertainty attributed to soil NO emissions that result from soil abiotic and microbial processes. While natural abundance stable N isotopes (δ15N) in various soil N-containing compounds have proven to be a robust tracer of soil N cycling, soil δ15N-NO is rarely quantified mainly due to the diffuse nature, low concentrations, and high reactivity of soil-emitted NO. Here, we present the development and application of a dynamic flux chamber system capable of simultaneously measuring soil NO fluxes and collecting NO for δ15N-NO measurements. The system couples a widely used flow-through soil chamber with a NO collection train, in which NO can be converted to NO2 through O3 titration in a Teflon reaction coil, followed by NO2 collection in a 20% triethanolamine (TEA) solution as nitrite and nitrate for δ15N analysis using the denitrifier method. The efficiency of NO-NO2 conversion in the reaction coil and the recovery of NO in the TEA solution were determined experimentally and found to be quantitative (>99%) over a 10 to 749 ppbv NO mixing ratio range. An analytical NO tank (δ15N-NO=71.0±0.4‰) was used to calibrate the method for δ15N-NO analysis. The resulting accuracy and precision (1σ) of the method across various environmental conditions were 1.6‰ and 1.2‰, respectively. Using this new method, controlled laboratory incubations have been conducted to characterize NO emissions induced by rewetting of air-dried surface soil sampled from an urban forest. Pulsed NO emissions, up to 30 times higher than maximum soil NO emissions under steady state, were triggered upon the rewetting and lasted for next 36 hours. While the measured δ15N-NO over the course of the NO pulsing ranged from -52.0‰ and -34.6‰, reinforcing the notion that soil δ15N-NO is lower than those of fossil-fuel combustion sources, a transient δ15N-NO shift was captured immediately after the

  9. Detailed puncture analyses tank cars : analysis of different impactor threats and impact conditions.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-03-01

    There has been significant research in recent years to analyze and improve the impact behavior and puncture resistance of railroad tank cars. Much of this research has been performed using detailed nonlinear finite element analyses supported by full ...

  10. High cycle fatigue crack modeling and analysis for deck truss flooring connection details : final report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-07-01

    The Oregon Department of Transportation is responsible for many steel deck truss bridges containing connection details that are fatigue prone. A typical bridge, the Winchester Bridge in Roseburg, Oregon, was analyzed to assess the loading conditions,...

  11. Landscape evolution reconstructions on Mars: a detailed analysis of lacustrine and fluvial terraces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossato, Sandro; Pajola, Maurizio; Baratti, Emanuele; Mangili, Clara; Coradini, Marcello

    2015-04-01

    Liquid water was flowing on the surface of Mars in the past, leaving behind a wide range of geomorphic features. The ancient major Martian water fluxes vanished about 3.5 Ga. Meteoritic impacts, wind-erosion, gravity-related phenomena, tectonic deformations and volcanic activities deeply altered the landforms during the ages. Hence, the reconstruction of water-shaped landscapes is often complicated. Fluvial and lacustrine terraces analysis and correlation is a useful approach to understand and reconstruct the past changes in Martian landscape evolution. These features are commonly used as reference for the top of water bodies on Earth, since they are void of the uncertainties or errors deriving from erosional or slumping processes that could have acted on the valley flanks or in the plateau, where the hydrological network was carved in. The study area is located in the western hemisphere of Mars, in the Memnonia quadrangle, between latitude 9° 10'-9° 50'South and longitude 167° 0'-167° 30' West and it constitutes a transition region between the southern highlands of Terra Sirenum and the northern lowlands of Lucus Planum. Many water-shaped features have already been described near the study area, the most prominent of them being the Ma'adim Vallis and the Mangala Valles system. Our results derive from the observations and the analysis of HRSC images (12.5 m spatial resolution) and Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) derived from the MEX-HRSC (75 m resolution), that allow the identification of elevation differences up to the tens of meter scale. We were able to reconstruct six main evolutionary stages of a complex hydrologic systems consisting of two main palaeorivers (up to 5 km wide) connected one another by a palaeolake that formed within a meteor crater (~20 km diameter). On the basis of Earth analogs, these stages/terraces should have evolved during a long period of time, at least thousands years long. Furthermore, crater counting date back the deactivation of

  12. Pan-Antarctic analysis aggregating spatial estimates of Adélie penguin abundance reveals robust dynamics despite stochastic noise.

    PubMed

    Che-Castaldo, Christian; Jenouvrier, Stephanie; Youngflesh, Casey; Shoemaker, Kevin T; Humphries, Grant; McDowall, Philip; Landrum, Laura; Holland, Marika M; Li, Yun; Ji, Rubao; Lynch, Heather J

    2017-10-10

    Colonially-breeding seabirds have long served as indicator species for the health of the oceans on which they depend. Abundance and breeding data are repeatedly collected at fixed study sites in the hopes that changes in abundance and productivity may be useful for adaptive management of marine resources, but their suitability for this purpose is often unknown. To address this, we fit a Bayesian population dynamics model that includes process and observation error to all known Adélie penguin abundance data (1982-2015) in the Antarctic, covering >95% of their population globally. We find that process error exceeds observation error in this system, and that continent-wide "year effects" strongly influence population growth rates. Our findings have important implications for the use of Adélie penguins in Southern Ocean feedback management, and suggest that aggregating abundance across space provides the fastest reliable signal of true population change for species whose dynamics are driven by stochastic processes.Adélie penguins are a key Antarctic indicator species, but data patchiness has challenged efforts to link population dynamics to key drivers. Che-Castaldo et al. resolve this issue using a pan-Antarctic Bayesian model to infer missing data, and show that spatial aggregation leads to more robust inference regarding dynamics.

  13. Identifying Type Ia Supernova Mechanisms in Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies through Analysis of Iron-peak Elemental Abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Rachel; Xie, Justin Long; Kirby, Evan N.

    2017-01-01

    Through the fusion of nucleons to produce elements heavier than hydrogen and helium, stellar nucleosynthesis produces most of the elements in the universe. Such is the case in a supernova explosion, which creates most of the elements on the periodic table—including iron-peak elements, atomic numbers 21 through 30—through nucleosynthesis and ejects them into the interstellar medium. In this study, we determine the best theoretical supernova model appropriate for the stars in the dwarf spheroidal galaxies Sculptor, Fornax, Ursa Minor, and Leo II by calculating the abundances of iron-peak elements in these stars. To determine iron-peak elemental abundances, we compare synthesized spectra with observed spectra from medium-resolution spectroscopy and determine the best-fitting spectrum by way of a chi-squared minimization. Through inspecting the relationship between the iron-peak element abundances and the abundance of iron itself and by comparing them to previously hypothesized supernova model theories, we discover that the near-Chandrasekhar mass “n1” model, as predicted by Seitenzahl et al., most accurately represents the trends and patterns within our data, presenting new insight into Type Ia supernovae mechanisms within the Milky Way and beyond.

  14. Stellar Oxygen Abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Jeremy

    1994-04-01

    This dissertation addresses several issues concerning stellar oxygen abundances. The 7774 {\\AA} O I triplet equivalent widths of Abia & Rebolo [1989, AJ, 347, 186] for metal-poor dwarfs are found to be systematically too high. I also argue that current effective temperatures used in halo star abundance studies may be ~150 K too low. New color-Teff relations are derived for metal-poor stars. Using the revised Teff values and improved equivalent widths for the 7774A O I triplet, the mean [O/Fe] ratio for a handful of halo stars is found to be +0.52 with no dependence on Teff or [Fe/H]. Possible cosmological implications of the hotter Teff scale are discussed along with additional evidence supporting the need for a higher temperature scale for metal-poor stars. Our Teff scale leads to a Spite Li plateau value of N(Li)=2.28 +/- 0.09. A conservative minimal primordial value of N(Li)=2.35 is inferred. If errors in the observations and models are considered, consistency with standard models of Big Bang nucleosynthesis is still achieved with this larger Li abundance. The revised Teff scale raises the observed B/Be ratio of HD 140283 from 10 to 12, making its value more comfortably consistent with the production of the observed B and Be by ordinary spallation. Our Teff values are found to be in good agreement with values predicted from both the Victoria and Yale isochrone color-Teff relations. Thus, it appears likely that no changes in globular cluster ages would result. Next, we examine the location of the break in the [O/Fe] versus [Fe/H] plane in a quantitative fashion. Analysis of a relatively homogeneous data set does not favor any unique break point in the range -1.7 analysis also indicates that [O/Fe] is constant in the halo (at least for [Fe/H] >/= -3), in agreement with the new results for halo dwarfs. We find that the gap in the observed [O/H] distribution, noted by Wheeler et al

  15. New mapping of Radlandi basin and detailed analysis of its inner plains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minelli, Francesco; Giorgetti, Carolina; Mondini, Alessandro; Pauselli, Cristina; Mancinelli, Paolo

    2013-04-01

    NEW MAPPING OF RADITLADI BASIN AND DETAILED ANALYSIS OF ITS INNER PLAINS. Francesco Minelli 1, Carolina Giorgetti 1, Alessandro C. Mondini 2, Cristina Pauselli 1, Paolo Mancinelli1. 1 Gruppo di Geologia Strutturale e Geofisica (GSG), Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Università degli Studi di Perugia, 06123, Perugia, Italy . Email: minelli91@yahoo.it. 2 CNR IRPI Perugia, 06123, Perugia. Introduction: The Raditladi basin is a large peak-ring impact crater discovered during the MESSENGER (MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging) first flyby of Mercury in January 2008 [1]. The Raditladi basin is relatively young [2], and the study of the internal structures give an indication of the processes that acted recently in Mercury's geological history. Geological mapping: We first present the geological mapping of Raditladi crater. In the map we defined different sub-units on the base of previous studies [4][5] and surface morphology and reflectance. Through a GIS software we associated a polygonal layer to each sub-unit, this allowed to distinguish nine different layers. Due to the similarities with the Rachmaninoff basin, to define sub-units mapped on Raditladi, we adopted Rachmaninoff crater's units definitions made by Marchi et al. (2011) [4]. Structures analysis : We also mapped secondary structures consisting in concentric troughs arranged in a circular pattern. We defined two different kinds of troughs: (i) structures characterized by a distinct flat floor and interpretable as grabens, and (ii) structures with linear and curvilinear segments [5]. Inner plain deposit: The analysis of the topography made possible the estimation of the deposit's thickness. The measurement of the thickness is possible thanks to the presence of two small craters, crater A and crater, located in Raditladi's Inner plain. Observing the morphology of the two small craters' rim and hummocky central floor, we distinguished two different units: the shallower consists in

  16. Detailed modeling analysis for soot formation and radiation in microgravity gas jet diffusion flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, Jerry C.; Tong, LI; Greenberg, Paul S.

    1995-01-01

    Radiation heat transfer in combustion systems has been receiving increasing interest. In the case of hydrocarbon fuels, a significant portion of the radiation comes from soot particles, justifying the need for detailed soot formation model and radiation transfer calculations. For laminar gas jet diffusion flames, results from this project (4/1/91 8/22/95) and another NASA study show that flame shape, soot concentration, and radiation heat fluxes are substantially different under microgravity conditions. Our emphasis is on including detailed soot transport models and a detailed solution for radiation heat transfer, and on coupling them with the flame structure calculations. In this paper, we will discuss the following three specific areas: (1) Comparing two existing soot formation models, and identifying possible improvements; (2) A simple yet reasonably accurate approach to calculating total radiative properties and/or fluxes over the spectral range; and (3) Investigating the convergence of iterations between the flame structure solver and the radiation heat transfer solver.

  17. Evaluation of strontium isotope abundance ratios in combination with multi-elemental analysis as a possible tool to study the geographical origin of ciders.

    PubMed

    García-Ruiz, Silvia; Moldovan, Mariella; Fortunato, Giuseppino; Wunderli, Samuel; García Alonso, J Ignacio

    2007-05-02

    In order to evaluate alternative analytical methodologies to study the geographical origin of ciders, both multi-elemental analysis and Sr isotope abundance ratios in combination with multivariate statistical analysis were estimated in 67 samples from England, Switzerland, France and two Spanish regions (Asturias and the Basque Country). A methodology for the precise and accurate determination of the (87)Sr/(86)Sr isotope abundance ratio in ciders by multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) was developed. Major elements (Na, K, Ca and Mg) were measured by ICP-AES and minor and trace elements (Li, Be, B, Al, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, As, Se, Rb, Sr, Y, Mo, Cd, Sn, Sb, Cs, Ba, La, Ce, W, Tl, Pb, Bi, Th and U) were measured by ICP-MS using a collision cell instrument operated in multitune mode. An analysis of variance (ANOVA test) indicated that group means for B, Cr, Fe, Ni, Cu, Se, Cd, Cs, Ce, W, Pb, Bi and U did not show any significant differences at the 95% confidence level, so these elements were rejected for further statistical analysis. Another group of elements (Li, Be, Sc, Co, Ga, Y, Sn, Sb, La, Tl, Th) was removed from the data set because concentrations were close to the limits of detection for many samples. Therefore, the remaining elements (Na, Mg, Al, K, Ca, Ti, V, Mn, Zn, As, Rb, Sr, Mo, Ba) together with (87)Sr/(86)Sr isotope abundance ratio were considered for principal component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA). Finally, LDA was able to classify correctly 100% of cider samples coming from different Spanish regions, France, England and Switzerland when considering Na, Mg, Al, K, Ca, Ti, V, Mn, Zn, As, Rb, Sr, Mo, Ba and (87)Sr/(86)Sr isotope abundance ratio as original variables.

  18. Eigenvalue analysis of an irreversible random walk with skew detailed balance conditions.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Yuji; Hukushima, Koji

    2016-04-01

    An irreversible Markov-chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm with skew detailed balance conditions originally proposed by Turitsyn et al. is extended to general discrete systems on the basis of the Metropolis-Hastings scheme. To evaluate the efficiency of our proposed method, the relaxation dynamics of the slowest mode and the asymptotic variance are studied analytically in a random walk on one dimension. It is found that the performance in irreversible MCMC methods violating the detailed balance condition is improved by appropriately choosing parameters in the algorithm.

  19. Detailed Compositional Analysis of the Heavily Polluted DBZ White Dwarf SDSS J073842.56+183509.06: A Window on Planet Formation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufour, P.; Kilic, M.; Fontaine, G.; Bergeron, P.; Melis, C.; Bochanski, J.

    2012-04-01

    We present a new model atmosphere analysis of the most metal-contaminated white dwarf known, the DBZ SDSS J073842.56+183509.06. Using new high-resolution spectroscopic observations taken with Keck and Magellan, we determine precise atmospheric parameters and measure abundances of 14 elements heavier than helium. We also report new Spitzer mid-infrared photometric data that are used to better constrain the properties of the debris disk orbiting this star. Our detailed analysis, which combines data taken from seven different observational facilities (Galaxy Evolution Explorer, Gemini, Keck, Magellan, MMT, Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and Spitzer), clearly demonstrates that J0738+1835 is accreting large amounts of rocky terrestrial-like material that has been tidally disrupted into a debris disk. We estimate that the body responsible for the photospheric metal contamination was at least as large as Ceres, but was much drier, with less than 1% of the mass contained in the form of water ice, indicating that it formed interior to the snow line around its parent star. We also find a correlation between the abundances (relative to Mg and bulk Earth) and the condensation temperature; refractory species are clearly depleted, while the more volatile elements are possibly enhanced. This could be the signature of a body that formed in a lower temperature environment than where Earth formed. Alternatively, we could be witnessing the remains of a differentiated body that lost a large part of its outer layers. Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory and the MMT Observatory. Keck is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation. The MMT is a joint facility of the Smithsonian Institution and the University of Arizona.

  20. Remote sensing of selective logging in Amazonia Assessing limitations based on detailed field observations, Landsat ETM+, and textural analysis.

    Treesearch

    Gregory P. Asner; Michael Keller; Rodrigo Pereira; Johan C. Zweede

    2002-01-01

    We combined a detailed field study of forest canopy damage with calibrated Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) reflectance data and texture analysis to assess the sensitivity of basic broadband optical remote sensing to selective logging in Amazonia. Our field study encompassed measurements of ground damage and canopy gap fractions along a chronosequence of...

  1. Evaluation of fatigue-prone details using a low-cost thermoelastic stress analysis system.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2016-11-01

    This study was designed to develop a novel approach for in situ evaluation of stress fields in the vicinity of fatigue-prone details on highway bridges using a low-cost microbolometer thermal imager. : The method was adapted into a field-deployable i...

  2. Quantifying mineral abundances of complex mixtures by coupling spectral deconvolution of SWIR spectra (2.1-2.4 μm) and regression tree analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mulder, V.L.; Plotze, Michael; de Bruin, Sytze; Schaepman, Michael E.; Mavris, C.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Egli, Markus

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a methodology for assessing mineral abundances of mixtures having more than two constituents using absorption features in the 2.1-2.4 μm wavelength region. In the first step, the absorption behaviour of mineral mixtures is parameterised by exponential Gaussian optimisation. Next, mineral abundances are predicted by regression tree analysis using these parameters as inputs. The approach is demonstrated on a range of prepared samples with known abundances of kaolinite, dioctahedral mica, smectite, calcite and quartz and on a set of field samples from Morocco. The latter contained varying quantities of other minerals, some of which did not have diagnostic absorption features in the 2.1-2.4 μm region. Cross validation showed that the prepared samples of kaolinite, dioctahedral mica, smectite and calcite were predicted with a root mean square error (RMSE) less than 9 wt.%. For the field samples, the RMSE was less than 8 wt.% for calcite, dioctahedral mica and kaolinite abundances. Smectite could not be well predicted, which was attributed to spectral variation of the cations within the dioctahedral layered smectites. Substitution of part of the quartz by chlorite at the prediction phase hardly affected the accuracy of the predicted mineral content; this suggests that the method is robust in handling the omission of minerals during the training phase. The degree of expression of absorption components was different between the field sample and the laboratory mixtures. This demonstrates that the method should be calibrated and trained on local samples. Our method allows the simultaneous quantification of more than two minerals within a complex mixture and thereby enhances the perspectives of spectral analysis for mineral abundances.

  3. Chemical Abundance Analysis of Three α-poor, Metal-poor Stars in the Ultrafaint Dwarf Galaxy Horologium I

    DOE PAGES

    Nagasawa, D. Q.; Marshall, J. L.; Li, T. S.; ...

    2018-01-11

    We present chemical abundance measurements of three stars in the ultrafaint dwarf galaxy Horologium I, a Milky Way satellite discovered by the Dark Energy Survey. Using high-resolution spectroscopic observations, we measure the metallicity of the three stars, as well as abundance ratios of several α-elements, iron-peak elements, and neutron-capture elements. The abundance pattern is relatively consistent among all three stars, which have a low average metallicity of [Fe/H] ~ –2.6 and are not α-enhanced ([α/Fe] ~ 0.0). This result is unexpected when compared to other low-metallicity stars in the Galactic halo and other ultrafaint dwarfs and suggests the possibility ofmore » a different mechanism for the enrichment of Hor I compared to other satellites. Here, we discuss possible scenarios that could lead to this observed nucleosynthetic signature, including extended star formation, enrichment by a Population III supernova, and or an association with the Large Magellanic Cloud.« less

  4. Chemical Abundance Analysis of Three α-poor, Metal-poor Stars in the Ultrafaint Dwarf Galaxy Horologium I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagasawa, D. Q.; Marshall, J. L.; Li, T. S.; Hansen, T. T.; Simon, J. D.; Bernstein, R. A.; Balbinot, E.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Pace, A. B.; Strigari, L. E.; Pellegrino, C. M.; DePoy, D. L.; Suntzeff, N. B.; Bechtol, K.; Walker, A. R.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Annis, J.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Cunha, C. E.; D’Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Davis, C.; Desai, S.; Doel, P.; Eifler, T. F.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; García-Bellido, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D. W.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gschwend, J.; Gutierrez, G.; Hartley, W. G.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Jeltema, T.; Krause, E.; Kuehn, K.; Kuhlmann, S.; Kuropatkin, N.; March, M.; Miquel, R.; Nord, B.; Roodman, A.; Sanchez, E.; Santiago, B.; Scarpine, V.; Schindler, R.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, M.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Tucker, D. L.; Wechsler, R. H.; Wolf, R. C.; Yanny, B.

    2018-01-01

    We present chemical abundance measurements of three stars in the ultrafaint dwarf galaxy Horologium I, a Milky Way satellite discovered by the Dark Energy Survey. Using high-resolution spectroscopic observations, we measure the metallicity of the three stars, as well as abundance ratios of several α-elements, iron-peak elements, and neutron-capture elements. The abundance pattern is relatively consistent among all three stars, which have a low average metallicity of [Fe/H] ∼ ‑2.6 and are not α-enhanced ([α/Fe] ∼ 0.0). This result is unexpected when compared to other low-metallicity stars in the Galactic halo and other ultrafaint dwarfs and suggests the possibility of a different mechanism for the enrichment of Hor I compared to other satellites. We discuss possible scenarios that could lead to this observed nucleosynthetic signature, including extended star formation, enrichment by a Population III supernova, and or an association with the Large Magellanic Cloud. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile. This paper also includes data based on observations made with the ESO Very Large Telescope at Paranal Observatory, Chile (ID 096.D-0967(B); PI: E. Balbinot).

  5. Elemental abundances of solar sibling candidates

    SciTech Connect

    Ramírez, I.; Lambert, D. L.; Endl, M.

    2014-06-01

    Dynamical information along with survey data on metallicity and in some cases age have been used recently by some authors to search for candidates of stars that were born in the cluster where the Sun formed. We have acquired high-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio spectra for 30 of these objects to determine, using detailed elemental abundance analysis, if they could be true solar siblings. Only two of the candidates are found to have solar chemical composition. Updated modeling of the stars' past orbits in a realistic Galactic potential reveals that one of them, HD 162826, satisfies both chemical and dynamical conditionsmore » for being a sibling of the Sun. Measurements of rare-element abundances for this star further confirm its solar composition, with the only possible exception of Sm. Analysis of long-term high-precision radial velocity data rules out the presence of hot Jupiters and confirms that this star is not in a binary system. We find that chemical tagging does not necessarily benefit from studying as many elements as possible but instead from identifying and carefully measuring the abundances of those elements that show large star-to-star scatter at a given metallicity. Future searches employing data products from ongoing massive astrometric and spectroscopic surveys can be optimized by acknowledging this fact.« less

  6. Elemental Abundances of Solar Sibling Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez, I.; Bajkova, A. T.; Bobylev, V. V.; Roederer, I. U.; Lambert, D. L.; Endl, M.; Cochran, W. D.; MacQueen, P. J.; Wittenmyer, R. A.

    2014-06-01

    Dynamical information along with survey data on metallicity and in some cases age have been used recently by some authors to search for candidates of stars that were born in the cluster where the Sun formed. We have acquired high-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio spectra for 30 of these objects to determine, using detailed elemental abundance analysis, if they could be true solar siblings. Only two of the candidates are found to have solar chemical composition. Updated modeling of the stars' past orbits in a realistic Galactic potential reveals that one of them, HD 162826, satisfies both chemical and dynamical conditions for being a sibling of the Sun. Measurements of rare-element abundances for this star further confirm its solar composition, with the only possible exception of Sm. Analysis of long-term high-precision radial velocity data rules out the presence of hot Jupiters and confirms that this star is not in a binary system. We find that chemical tagging does not necessarily benefit from studying as many elements as possible but instead from identifying and carefully measuring the abundances of those elements that show large star-to-star scatter at a given metallicity. Future searches employing data products from ongoing massive astrometric and spectroscopic surveys can be optimized by acknowledging this fact.

  7. Detailed Aerodynamic Analysis of a Shrouded Tail Rotor Using an Unstructured Mesh Flow Solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hee Dong; Kwon, Oh Joon

    The detailed aerodynamics of a shrouded tail rotor in hover has been numerically studied using a parallel inviscid flow solver on unstructured meshes. The numerical method is based on a cell-centered finite-volume discretization and an implicit Gauss-Seidel time integration. The calculation was made for a single blade by imposing a periodic boundary condition between adjacent rotor blades. The grid periodicity was also imposed at the periodic boundary planes to avoid numerical inaccuracy resulting from solution interpolation. The results were compared with available experimental data and those from a disk vortex theory for validation. It was found that realistic three-dimensional modeling is important for the prediction of detailed aerodynamics of shrouded rotors including the tip clearance gap flow.

  8. Trelliscope: A System for Detailed Visualization in the Deep Analysis of Large Complex Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The Trellis visualization framework [2] provides an effective ap- proach to detailed visualization of complex data. It has been widely... effectively for large complex data. There are two problems: (1) how to efficiently generate and organize a large number of panels; and (2) how to view...Display of data from a 1930s experiment at the Minnesota Agricultural Experiment Station. At 6 sites, 10 va- rieties of barley were grown in each of 2

  9. Lithium abundance and 6Li/7Li ratio in the active giant HD 123351. I. A comparative analysis of 3D and 1D NLTE line-profile fits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mott, A.; Steffen, M.; Caffau, E.; Spada, F.; Strassmeier, K. G.

    2017-08-01

    Context. Current three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamical model atmospheres together with detailed spectrum synthesis, accounting for departures from local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE), permit to derive reliable atomic and isotopic chemical abundances from high-resolution stellar spectra. Not much is known about the presence of the fragile 6Li isotope in evolved solar-metallicity red giant branch (RGB) stars, not to mention its production in magnetically active targets like HD 123351. Aims: A detailed spectroscopic investigation of the lithium resonance doublet in HD 123351 in terms of both abundance and isotopic ratio is presented. From fits of the observed spectrum, taken at the Canada-France-Hawaii telescope, with synthetic line profiles based on 1D and 3D model atmospheres, we seek to estimate the abundance of the 6Li isotope and to place constraints on its origin. Methods: We derive the lithium abundance A(Li) and the 6Li/7Li isotopic ratio by fitting different synthetic spectra to the Li-line region of a high-resolution CFHT spectrum (R = 120 000, S/N = 400). The synthetic spectra are computed with four different line lists, using in parallel 3D hydrodynamical CO5BOLD and 1D LHD model atmospheres and treating the line formation of the lithium components in non-LTE (NLTE). The fitting procedure is repeated with different assumptions and wavelength ranges to obtain a reasonable estimate of the involved uncertainties. Results: We find A(Li) = 1.69 ± 0.11 dex and 6Li/7Li = 8.0 ± 4.4% in 3D-NLTE, using the line list of Meléndez et al. (2012, A&A, 543, A29), updated with new atomic data for V I, which results in the best fit of the lithium line profile of HD 123351. Two other line lists lead to similar results but with inferior fit qualities. Conclusions: Our 2σ detection of the 6Li isotope is the result of a careful statistical analysis and the visual inspection of each achieved fit. Since the presence of a significant amount of 6Li in the atmosphere of a cool

  10. Integrated analysis of transcriptomic and proteomic data of Desulfovibrio vulgaris: Zero-Inflated Poisson regression models to predict abundance of undetected proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Nie, Lei; Wu, Gang; Brockman, Fred J.

    2006-05-04

    Abstract Advances in DNA microarray and proteomics technologies have enabled high-throughput measurement of mRNA expression and protein abundance. Parallel profiling of mRNA and protein on a global scale and integrative analysis of these two data types could provide additional insight into the metabolic mechanisms underlying complex biological systems. However, because protein abundance and mRNA expression are affected by many cellular and physical processes, there have been conflicting results on the correlation of these two measurements. In addition, as current proteomic methods can detect only a small fraction of proteins present in cells, no correlation study of these two data typesmore » has been done thus far at the whole-genome level. In this study, we describe a novel data-driven statistical model to integrate whole-genome microarray and proteomic data collected from Desulfovibrio vulgaris grown under three different conditions. Based on the Poisson distribution pattern of proteomic data and the fact that a large number of proteins were undetected (excess zeros), Zero-inflated Poisson models were used to define the correlation pattern of mRNA and protein abundance. The models assumed that there is a probability mass at zero representing some of the undetected proteins because of technical limitations. The models thus use abundance measurements of transcripts and proteins experimentally detected as input to generate predictions of protein abundances as output for all genes in the genome. We demonstrated the statistical models by comparatively analyzing D. vulgaris grown on lactate-based versus formate-based media. The increased expressions of Ech hydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh)-periplasmic Fe-only hydrogenase (Hyd) pathway for ATP synthesis were predicted for D. vulgaris grown on formate.« less

  11. Using SPIRAL (Single Pollen Isotope Ratio AnaLysis) to estimate C 3- and C 4-grass abundance in the paleorecord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, David M.; Hu, Feng Sheng; Scholes, Daniel R.; Joshi, Neeraj; Pearson, Ann

    2008-05-01

    C 3 and C 4 grasses differ greatly in their responses to environmental controls and influences on biogeochemical processes (e.g. water, carbon, and nutrient cycling). Difficulties in distinguishing between these two functional groups of grasses have hindered paleoecological studies of grass-dominated ecosystems. Stable carbon isotopic analysis of individual grains of grass pollen using a spooling-wire microcombustion device interfaced with an isotope-ratio mass spectrometer holds promise for improving C 3 and C 4 grass reconstructions. This technique, SPIRAL (Single Pollen Isotope Ratio AnaLysis), has only been evaluated using pollen of known C 3 and C 4 grasses. To test the ability of SPIRAL to reproduce the abundance of C 3 and C 4 grasses on the landscape, we measured δ13C values of > 1500 individual grains of grass pollen isolated from the surface sediments of ten lakes in areas that span a large gradient of C 3- and C 4-grass abundance, as determined from vegetation surveys. Results indicate a strong positive correlation between the δ13C-based estimates of % C 4-grass pollen and the abundance of C 4 grasses on the landscape. The % C 4-grass pollen slightly underestimates the actual abundance of C 4 grasses at sites with high proportions of C 4 grasses, which can be corrected using regression analysis. Comparison of the % C 4-grass pollen with C/N and δ13C measurements of bulk organic matter illustrates the distinct advantages of grass-pollen δ13C as a proxy for distinguishing C 3 and C 4 shifts within the grass family. Thus SPIRAL promises to advance our understanding of grassland ecology and evolution.

  12. Detailed analysis of a quench bomb for the study of aluminum agglomeration in solid propellants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallier, S.; Kratz, J.-G.; Quaglia, N.; Fouin, G.

    2016-07-01

    A standard quench bomb (QB) - widely used to characterize condensed phase from metalized solid propellant combustion - is studied in detail. Experimental and numerical investigations proved that collected particles are mostly unburned aluminum (Al) agglomerates despite large quenching distances. Particles are actually found to quench early as propellant surface is swept by inert pressurant. Further improvements of the QB are proposed which allow measuring both Al agglomerates and alumina residue with the same setup. Finally, the results obtained on a typical aluminized ammonium perchlorate (AP) / hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) propellant are briefly discussed.

  13. Chemical Abundance Analysis of Three α -poor, Metal-poor Stars in the Ultrafaint Dwarf Galaxy Horologium I

    SciTech Connect

    Nagasawa, D. Q.; Marshall, J. L.; Li, T. S.

    2018-01-10

    We present chemical abundance measurements of three stars in the ultra-faintdwarf galaxy Horologium I, a Milky Way satellite discovered by the Dark EnergySurvey. Using high resolution spectroscopic observations we measure themetallicity of the three stars as well as abundance ratios of severalmore » $$\\alpha$$-elements, iron-peak elements, and neutron-capture elements. Theabundance pattern is relatively consistent among all three stars, which have alow average metallicity of [Fe/H] $$\\sim -2.6$$ and are not $$\\alpha$$-enhanced([$$\\alpha$$/Fe] $$\\sim 0.0$$). This result is unexpected when compared to otherlow-metallicity stars in the Galactic halo and other ultra-faint dwarfs andhints at an entirely different mechanism for the enrichment of Hor I comparedto other satellites. We discuss possible scenarios that could lead to thisobserved nucleosynthetic signature including extended star formation, aPopulation III supernova, and a possible association with the Large MagellanicCloud.« less

  14. Abundance analysis of SDSS J134338.67+484426.6; an extremely metal-poor star from the MARVELS pre-survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susmitha Rani, A.; Sivarani, T.; Beers, T. C.; Fleming, S.; Mahadevan, S.; Ge, J.

    2016-05-01

    We present an elemental-abundance analysis of an extremely metal-poor (EMP; [Fe/H] <-3.0) star, SDSS J134338.67+484426.6, identified during the course of the Multi-object Apache Point Observatory Radial Velocity Exoplanet Large-area Survey spectroscopic pre-survey of some 20 000 stars to identify suitable candidates for exoplanet searches. This star, with an apparent magnitude V = 12.14, is the lowest metallicity star found in the pre-survey, and is one of only ˜20 known EMP stars that are this bright or brighter. Our high-resolution spectroscopic analysis shows that this star is a subgiant with [Fe/H] = -3.42, having `normal' carbon and no enhancement of neutron-capture abundances. Strontium is underabundant, [Sr/Fe] = -0.47, but the derived lower limit on [Sr/Ba] indicates that Sr is likely enhanced relative to Ba. This star belongs to the sparsely populated class of α-poor EMP stars that exhibit low ratios of [Mg/Fe], [Si/Fe], and [Ca/Fe] compared to typical halo stars at similar metallicity. The observed variations in radial velocity from several epochs of (low- and high-resolution) spectroscopic follow-up indicate that SDSS J134338.67+484426.6 is a possible long-period binary. We also discuss the abundance trends in EMP stars for r-process elements, and compare with other magnesium-poor stars.

  15. Dynamic Relaxation: A Technique for Detailed Thermo-Elastic Structural Analysis of Transportation Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoukry, Samir N.; William, Gergis W.; Riad, Mourad Y.; McBride, Kevyn C.

    2006-08-01

    Dynamic relaxation is a technique developed to solve static problems through an explicit integration in finite element. The main advantage of such a technique is the ability to solve a large problem in a relatively short time compared with the traditional implicit techniques, especially when using nonlinear material models. This paper describes the use of such a technique in analyzing large transportation structures as dowel jointed concrete pavements and 306-m-long, reinforced concrete bridge superstructure under the effect of temperature variations. The main feature of the pavement model is the detailed modeling of dowel bars and their interfaces with the surrounding concrete using extremely fine mesh of solid elements, while in the bridge structure it is the detailed modeling of the girder-deck interface as well as the bracing members between the girders. The 3DFE results were found to be in a good agreement with experimentally measured data obtained from an instrumented pavements sections and a highway bridge constructed in West Virginia. Thus, such a technique provides a good tool for analyzing the response of large structures to static loads in a fraction of the time required by traditional, implicit finite element methods.

  16. Single-step analysis of low abundance phosphoamino acids via on-line sample preconcentration with chemical derivatization by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Ptolemy, Adam S; Britz-McKibbin, Philip

    2005-09-01

    New strategies for rapid, sensitive and high-throughput analysis of low abundance metabolites in biological samples are required for future metabolomic research. In this report, a direct method for sub-micromolar analyses of phosphoamino acids was developed using on-line sample preconcentration with 9-fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl chloride (FMOC) derivatization by capillary electrophoresis (CE) and UV detection. Analyte focusing by dynamic pH junction and FMOC labeling efficiency were influenced by several experimental factors including buffer pH, ionic strength, sample injection length and FMOC concentration. About a 200-fold enhancement in concentration sensitivity was achieved under optimal conditions relative to conventional off-line derivatization, as reflected by a detection limit (S/N approximately 3) of 0.1 microM. In-capillary sample preconcentration with chemical labeling by CE offers a unique single-step analytical platform for high-throughput screening of low abundance metabolites without intrinsic chromophores.

  17. Comparative Analysis of the Heat Stable Proteome of Radicles of Medicago truncatula Seeds during Germination Identifies Late Embryogenesis Abundant Proteins Associated with Desiccation Tolerance1[W

    PubMed Central

    Boudet, Julie; Buitink, Julia; Hoekstra, Folkert A.; Rogniaux, Hélène; Larré, Colette; Satour, Pascale; Leprince, Olivier

    2006-01-01

    A proteomic analysis was performed on the heat stable protein fraction of imbibed radicles of Medicago truncatula seeds to investigate whether proteins can be identified that are specifically linked to desiccation tolerance (DT). Radicles were compared before and after emergence (2.8 mm long) in association with the loss of DT, and after reinduction of DT by an osmotic treatment. To separate proteins induced by the osmotic treatment from those linked with DT, the comparison was extended to 5 mm long emerged radicles for which DT could no longer be reinduced, albeit that drought tolerance was increased. The abundance of 15 polypeptides was linked with DT, out of which 11 were identified as late embryogenesis abundant proteins from different groups: MtEm6 (group 1), one isoform of DHN3 (dehydrins), MtPM25 (group 5), and three members of group 3 (MP2, an isoform of PM18, and all the isoforms of SBP65). In silico analysis revealed that their expression is likely seed specific, except for DHN3. Other isoforms of DNH3 and PM18 as well as three isoforms of the dehydrin Budcar5 were associated with drought tolerance. Changes in the abundance of MtEm6 and MtPM25 in imbibed cotyledons during the loss of DT and in developing embryos during the acquisition of DT confirmed the link of these two proteins with DT. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy revealed that the recombinant MtPM25 and MtEm6 exhibited a certain degree of order in the hydrated state, but that they became more structured by adopting α helices and β sheets during drying. A model is presented in which DT-linked late embryogenesis abundant proteins might exert different protective functions at high and low hydration levels. PMID:16461389

  18. Suitable housekeeping genes for normalization of transcript abundance analysis by real-time RT-PCR in cultured bovine granulosa cells during hypoxia and differential cell plating density.

    PubMed

    Baddela, Vijay S; Baufeld, Anja; Yenuganti, Vengala R; Vanselow, Jens; Singh, Dheer

    2014-11-27

    Bovine granulosa cell culture models are important to understand molecular mechanisms of ovarian function. Folliculogenesis and luteinization are associated with increasing density of cells and local hypoxic conditions. The current study identified two reliable housekeeping genes useful for gene normalization in granulosa cells under different in vitro conditions. During the current experiments cells were subjected to different biological and physical stimuli, follicle stimulating hormone, different initial cell plating density and hypoxia. Transcript abundance of seven housekeeping genes was quantified by real-time RT-PCR with co-amplification of the respective external standard. Three of the genes, GAPDH, HMBS, and HPRT1 were found to be regulated by initial cell plating density, five of them, GAPDH, HMBS, HPRT1, RPLP0 and RPS18 under hypoxic conditions, but none of them after FSH stimulation. In detail, GAPDH was up regulated, but HPRT1 and HMBS were down regulated at high density and under hypoxia. Expression of RPLP0 and RPS18 was inconsistent, but was significantly down-regulated in particular at high cell density combined with hypoxia. In contrast, TBP and B2M genes were neither regulated under different plating density conditions nor by hypoxia as they showed similar expression levels under all conditions analyzed. The present data indicate that TBP and B2M are appropriate housekeeping genes for normalization of transcript abundance measured by real-time RT-PCR in granulosa cells subjected to different plating densities, oxygen concentrations and FSH stimulation.

  19. High-resolution abundance analysis of red giants in the metal-poor bulge globular cluster HP 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbuy, B.; Cantelli, E.; Vemado, A.; Ernandes, H.; Ortolani, S.; Saviane, I.; Bica, E.; Minniti, D.; Dias, B.; Momany, Y.; Hill, V.; Zoccali, M.; Siqueira-Mello, C.

    2016-06-01

    Context. The globular cluster HP 1 is projected at only 3.̊33 from the Galactic center. Together with its distance, this makes it one of the most central globular clusters in the Milky Way. It has a blue horizontal branch (BHB) and a metallicity of [Fe/H] ≈ -1.0. This means that it probably is one of the oldest objects in the Galaxy. Abundance ratios can reveal the nucleosynthesis pattern of the first stars as well as the early chemical enrichment and early formation of stellar populations. Aims: High-resolution spectra obtained for six stars were analyzed to derive the abundances of the light elements C, N, O, Na, and Al, the alpha-elements Mg, Si, Ca, and Ti, and the heavy elements Sr, Y, Zr, Ba, La, and Eu. Methods: High-resolution spectra of six red giants that are confirmed members of the bulge globular cluster HP 1 were obtained with the 8 m VLT UT2-Kueyen telescope with the UVES spectrograph in FLAMES-UVES configuration. The spectroscopic parameter derivation was based on the excitation and ionization equilibrium of Fe I and Fe II. Results: We confirm a mean metallicity of [Fe/H] = -1.06 ± 0.10, by adding the two stars that were previously analyzed in HP 1. The alpha-elements O and Mg are enhanced by about +0.3 ≲ [O,Mg/Fe] ≲ +0.5 dex, Si is moderately enhanced with +0.15 ≲ [Si/Fe] ≲ +0.35 dex, while Ca and Ti show lower values of -0.04 ≲ [Ca,Ti/Fe] ≲ +0.28 dex. The r-element Eu is also enhanced with [Eu/Fe] ≈ +0.4, which together with O and Mg is indicative of early enrichment by type II supernovae. Na and Al are low, but it is unclear if Na-O are anticorrelated. The heavy elements are moderately enhanced, with -0.20 < [La/Fe] < +0.43 dex and 0.0 < [Ba/Fe] < +0.75 dex, which is compatible with r-process formation. The spread in Y, Zr, Ba, and La abundances, on the other hand, appears to be compatible with the spinstar scenario or other additional mechanisms such as the weak r-process. Observations collected at the European Southern

  20. Detailed interrogation of trypanosome cell biology via differential organelle staining and automated image analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Many trypanosomatid protozoa are important human or animal pathogens. The well defined morphology and precisely choreographed division of trypanosomatid cells makes morphological analysis a powerful tool for analyzing the effect of mutations, chemical insults and changes between lifecycle stages. High-throughput image analysis of micrographs has the potential to accelerate collection of quantitative morphological data. Trypanosomatid cells have two large DNA-containing organelles, the kinetoplast (mitochondrial DNA) and nucleus, which provide useful markers for morphometric analysis; however they need to be accurately identified and often lie in close proximity. This presents a technical challenge. Accurate identification and quantitation of the DNA content of these organelles is a central requirement of any automated analysis method. Results We have developed a technique based on double staining of the DNA with a minor groove binding (4'', 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI)) and a base pair intercalating (propidium iodide (PI) or SYBR green) fluorescent stain and color deconvolution. This allows the identification of kinetoplast and nuclear DNA in the micrograph based on whether the organelle has DNA with a more A-T or G-C rich composition. Following unambiguous identification of the kinetoplasts and nuclei the resulting images are amenable to quantitative automated analysis of kinetoplast and nucleus number and DNA content. On this foundation we have developed a demonstrative analysis tool capable of measuring kinetoplast and nucleus DNA content, size and position and cell body shape, length and width automatically. Conclusions Our approach to DNA staining and automated quantitative analysis of trypanosomatid morphology accelerated analysis of trypanosomatid protozoa. We have validated this approach using Leishmania mexicana, Crithidia fasciculata and wild-type and mutant Trypanosoma brucei. Automated analysis of T. brucei morphology was of comparable

  1. Performance analysis on wideband-interference cancellation based on detailed hardware design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Jama

    Use of a stretch waveform in a jamming environment with closely spaced objects such as surface vessels or fighter aircraft is presented. Adaptive cancellation in the sub-banding architecture improves the system cancellation ratio on large sub-array digital receiver systems. Detailed hardware models that capture key system requirements are described. Key model components are system aperture, receive chain with beamforming and digital data processing elements. The model takes error levels at array elements (e.g., quantization and beam pointing), digital receiver (e.g., amplitude and phase errors, time-delays, and aperture dispersions). System performance is evaluated via high-fidelity models and is characterized by the computing system's cancellation ratio.

  2. Detailed quality analysis of ideal high-order thermal ghost imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Hu; Shi, Jianhong; Chen, Zhipeng; Zeng, Guihua

    2012-11-01

    The performances of ideal high-order thermal ghost imaging, including conventional high-order ghost imaging, background-subtracted high-order ghost imaging (BSGI), and intensity fluctuation high-order ghost imaging (IFGI), are compared in this paper. The detailed quality analyses of the three high-order ghost imaging algorithms are demonstrated. The signal-to-background ratio and contrast-to-noise ratio of the pattern-normalized high-order ghost imaging with an arbitrary-pixel object are deduced, which are in great agreement with the experimental results. Experimental results indicate that the best performance is achieved by the lowest-order BSGI or the lowest-order IFGI.

  3. Continuous-variable quantum cryptography with an untrusted relay: Detailed security analysis of the symmetric configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottaviani, Carlo; Spedalieri, Gaetana; Braunstein, Samuel L.; Pirandola, Stefano

    2015-02-01

    We consider the continuous-variable protocol of Pirandola et al. [arXiv:1312.4104] where the secret key is established by the measurement of an untrusted relay. In this network protocol, two authorized parties are connected to an untrusted relay by insecure quantum links. Secret correlations are generated by a continuous-variable Bell detection performed on incoming coherent states. In the present work we provide a detailed study of the symmetric configuration, where the relay is midway between the parties. We analyze symmetric eavesdropping strategies against the quantum links explicitly showing that, at fixed transmissivity and thermal noise, two-mode coherent attacks are optimal, manifestly outperforming one-mode collective attacks based on independent entangling cloners. Such an advantage is shown both in terms of security threshold and secret-key rate.

  4. New SUSYQM coherent states for Pöschl-Teller potentials: a detailed mathematical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, H.; Siegl, P.; Youssef, A.

    2012-06-01

    In a recent short note (Bergeron et al 2010 Europhys. Lett. 92 60003), we have presented the good properties of a new family of semi-classical states for Pöschl-Teller potentials. These states are built from a supersymmetric quantum mechanics (SUSYQM) approach and the parameters of these ‘coherent’ states are points in the classical phase space. In this paper, we develop all the mathematical aspects that have been left out of the previous paper (proof of the resolution of unity, detailed calculations of the quantized version of classical observables and mathematical study of the resulting operators: problems of domains, self-adjointness or self-adjoint extensions). Some additional questions such as asymptotic behavior are also studied. Moreover, the framework is extended to a larger class of Pöschl-Teller potentials. This article is part of a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical devoted to ‘Coherent states: mathematical and physical aspects’.

  5. The detailed analysis of the changes of murine dendritic cells (DCs) induced by thymic peptide

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaofang; Zheng, Wei; Wang, Lu; Wan, Nan; Wang, Bing; Li, Weiwei; Hua, Hui; Hu, Xu; Shan, Fengping

    2012-01-01

    The aim of present research is to analyze the detailed changes of dendritic cells (DCs) induced by pidotimod(PTD). These impacts on DCs of both bone marrow derived DCs and established DC2.4 cell line were assessed with use of conventional scanning electron microscopy (SEM), flow cytometry (FCM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), cytochemistry assay FITC-dextran, bio-assay and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). We demonstrated the ability of PTD to induce DC phynotypic and functional maturation as evidenced by higher expression of key surface molecules such as MHC II, CD80 and CD86. The functional tests proved the downregulation of ACP inside the DCs, occurred when phagocytosis of DCs decreased, with simultaneously antigen presentation increased toward maturation. Finally, PTD also stimulated production of more cytokine IL-12 and less TNF-α. Therefore it is concluded that PTD can markedly exert positive induction to murine DCs. PMID:22863756

  6. The solar abundance of thulium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, J. E.; Aller, L. H.

    1974-01-01

    Consideration of one relatively unblended line of the solar spectrum, namely, the 3131.258-A line of Tm II, which yields a thulium abundance of 0.80 plus or minus 0.10 with the Corliss and Bozman (1962) f-value. The uncertainty of this figure is discussed in conjunction with the contradictory findings of some other investigators. The need for further detailed study of the lanthanides by the method of spectrum synthesis is pointed out.

  7. Chemical content of the circumstellar envelope of the oxygen-rich AGB star R Doradus. Non-LTE abundance analysis of CO, SiO, and HCN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van de Sande, M.; Decin, L.; Lombaert, R.; Khouri, T.; de Koter, A.; Wyrowski, F.; De Nutte, R.; Homan, W.

    2018-01-01

    Context. The stellar outflows of low- to intermediate-mass stars are characterised by a rich chemistry. Condensation of molecular gas species into dust grains is a key component in a chain of physical processes that leads to the onset of a stellar wind. In order to improve our understanding of the coupling between the micro-scale chemistry and macro-scale dynamics, we need to retrieve the abundance of molecules throughout the outflow. Aims: Our aim is to determine the radial abundance profile of SiO and HCN throughout the stellar outflow of R Dor, an oxygen-rich AGB star with a low mass-loss rate. SiO is thought to play an essential role in the dust-formation process of oxygen-rich AGB stars. The presence of HCN in an oxygen-rich environment is thought to be due to non-equilibrium chemistry in the inner wind. Methods: We analysed molecular transitions of CO, SiO, and HCN measured with the APEX telescope and all three instruments on the Herschel Space Observatory, together with data available in the literature. Photometric data and the infrared spectrum measured by ISO-SWS were used to constrain the dust component of the outflow. Using both continuum and line radiative transfer methods, a physical envelope model of both gas and dust was established. We performed an analysis of the SiO and HCN molecular transitions in order to calculate their abundances. Results: We have obtained an envelope model that describes the dust and the gas in the outflow, and determined the abundance of SiO and HCN throughout the region of the stellar outflow probed by our molecular data. For SiO, we find that the initial abundance lies between 5.5 × 10-5 and 6.0 × 10-5 with respect to H2. The abundance profile is constant up to 60 ± 10 R∗, after which it declines following a Gaussian profile with an e-folding radius of 3.5 ± 0.5 × 1013 cm or 1.4 ± 0.2 R∗. For HCN, we find an initial abundance of 5.0 × 10-7 with respect to H2. The Gaussian profile that describes the decline

  8. Chemical abundance analysis of 13 southern symbiotic giants from high-resolution spectra at ˜1.56 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gałan, Cezary; Mikołajewska, Joanna; Hinkle, Kenneth H.; Joyce, Richard R.

    2017-04-01

    Symbiotic stars (SySt) are binaries composed of a star in the later stages of evolution and a stellar remnant. The enhanced mass-loss from the giant drives interacting mass exchange and makes these systems laboratories for understanding binary evolution. Studies of the chemical compositions are particularly useful since this parameter has strong impact on the evolutionary path. The previous paper in this series presented photospheric abundances for 24 giants in S-type SySt enabling a first statistical analysis. Here, we present results for an additional sample of 13 giants. The aims are to improve statistics of chemical composition involved in the evolution of SySt, to study evolutionary status, mass transfer and to interpret this in terms of Galactic populations. High-resolution, near-IR spectra are used, employing the spectrum synthesis method in a classical approach, to obtain abundances of CNO and elements around the iron peak (Fe, Ti, Ni). Low-resolution spectra in the region around the Ca II triplet were used for spectral classification. The metallicities obtained cover a wide range with a maximum around ˜- 0.2 dex. The enrichment in the 14N isotope indicates that these giants have experienced the first dredge-up. Relative O and Fe abundances indicate that most SySt belong to the Galactic disc; however, in a few cases, the extended thick-disc/halo is suggested. Difficult to explain, relatively high Ti abundances can indicate that adopted microturbulent velocities were too small by ˜0.2-0.3 km s-1. The revised spectral types for V2905 Sgr, and WRAY 17-89 are M3 and M6.5, respectively.

  9. CFD analysis of municipal solid waste combustion using detailed chemical kinetic modelling.

    PubMed

    Frank, Alex; Castaldi, Marco J

    2014-08-01

    Nitrogen oxides (NO x ) emissions from the combustion of municipal solid waste (MSW) in waste-to-energy (WtE) facilities are receiving renewed attention to reduce their output further. While NO x emissions are currently 60% below allowed limits, further reductions will decrease the air pollution control (APC) system burden and reduce consumption of NH3. This work combines the incorporation of the GRI 3.0 mechanism as a detailed chemical kinetic model (DCKM) into a custom three-dimensional (3D) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model fully to understand the NO x chemistry in the above-bed burnout zones. Specifically, thermal, prompt and fuel NO formation mechanisms were evaluated for the system and a parametric study was utilized to determine the effect of varying fuel nitrogen conversion intermediates between HCN, NH3 and NO directly. Simulation results indicate that the fuel nitrogen mechanism accounts for 92% of the total NO produced in the system with thermal and prompt mechanisms accounting for the remaining 8%. Results also show a 5% variation in final NO concentration between HCN and NH3 inlet conditions, demonstrating that the fuel nitrogen intermediate assumed is not significant. Furthermore, the conversion ratio of fuel nitrogen to NO was 0.33, revealing that the majority of fuel nitrogen forms N2. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. Detailed Uncertainty Analysis of the Ares I A106 Liftoff/Transition Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanke, Jeremy L.

    2011-01-01

    The Ares I A106 Liftoff/Transition Force and Moment Aerodynamics Database describes the aerodynamics of the Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV) from the moment of liftoff through the transition from high to low total angles of attack at low subsonic Mach numbers. The database includes uncertainty estimates that were developed using a detailed uncertainty quantification procedure. The Ares I Aerodynamics Panel developed both the database and the uncertainties from wind tunnel test data acquired in the NASA Langley Research Center s 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel Test 591 using a 1.75 percent scale model of the Ares I and the tower assembly. The uncertainty modeling contains three primary uncertainty sources: experimental uncertainty, database modeling uncertainty, and database query interpolation uncertainty. The final database and uncertainty model represent a significant improvement in the quality of the aerodynamic predictions for this regime of flight over the estimates previously used by the Ares Project. The maximum possible aerodynamic force pushing the vehicle towards the launch tower assembly in a dispersed case using this database saw a 40 percent reduction from the worst-case scenario in previously released data for Ares I.

  11. Detailed seismotectonic analysis of Sumatra subduction zone revealed by high precision earthquake location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagala, Ricardo Alfencius; Harjadi, P. J. Prih; Heryandoko, Nova; Sianipar, Dimas

    2017-07-01

    Sumatra was one of the most high seismicity regions in Indonesia. The subduction of Indo-Australian plate beneath Eurasian plate in western Sumatra contributes for many significant earthquakes that occur in this area. These earthquake events can be used to analyze the seismotectonic of Sumatra subduction zone and its system. In this study we use teleseismic double-difference method to obtain more high precision earthquake distribution in Sumatra subduction zone. We use a 3D nested regional-global velocity model. We use a combination of data from both of ISC (International Seismological Center) and BMKG (Agency for Meteorology Climatology and Geophysics, Indonesia). We successfully relocate about 6886 earthquakes that occur on period of 1981-2015. We consider that this new location is more precise than the regular bulletin. The relocation results show greatly reduced of RMS residual of travel time. Using this data, we can construct a new seismotectonic map of Sumatra. A well-built geometry of subduction slab, faults and volcano arc can be obtained from the new bulletin. It is also showed that at a depth of 140-170 km, there is many events occur as moderate-to-deep earthquakes, and we consider about the relation of the slab's events with volcanic arc and inland fault system. A reliable slab model is also built from regression equation using new relocated data. We also analyze the spatial-temporal of seismotectonic using b-value mapping that inspected in detail horizontally and vertically cross-section.

  12. A detailed analysis of the recombination landscape of the button mushroom Agaricus bisporus var. bisporus.

    PubMed

    Sonnenberg, Anton S M; Gao, Wei; Lavrijssen, Brian; Hendrickx, Patrick; Sedaghat-Tellgerd, Narges; Foulongne-Oriol, Marie; Kong, Won-Sik; Schijlen, Elio G W M; Baars, Johan J P; Visser, Richard G F

    2016-08-01

    The button mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) is one of the world's most cultivated mushroom species, but in spite of its economic importance generation of new cultivars by outbreeding is exceptional. Previous genetic analyses of the white bisporus variety, including all cultivars and most wild isolates revealed that crossing over frequencies are low, which might explain the lack of introducing novel traits into existing cultivars. By generating two high quality whole genome sequence assemblies (one de novo and the other by improving the existing reference genome) of the first commercial white hybrid Horst U1, a detailed study of the crossover (CO) landscape was initiated. Using a set of 626 SNPs in a haploid offspring of 139 single spore isolates and whole genome sequencing on a limited number of homo- and heterokaryotic single spore isolates, we precisely mapped all COs showing that they are almost exclusively restricted to regions of about 100kb at the chromosome ends. Most basidia of A. bisporus var. bisporus produce two spores and pair preferentially via non-sister nuclei. Combined with the COs restricted to the chromosome ends, these spores retain most of the heterozygosity of the parent thus explaining how present-day white cultivars are genetically so close to the first hybrid marketed in 1980. To our knowledge this is the first example of an organism which displays such specific CO landscape. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Detailed analysis of the nucleosomal organization of transcribed DNA in yeast chromatin.

    PubMed

    Lohr, D E

    1981-10-13

    The precise chromatin structure of actively transcribed DNA in yeast has been analyzed by electrophoretic transfer of high-resolution staphylococcal nuclease and DNase I chromatin digest DNA patterns to DBM paper and hybridization with active sequence probes. The DNA patterns of the transcribed DNA sequences resemble the DNA patterns produced by digestion of bulk yeast nucleosomes. Hence, these active sequences must be arranged in "typical" nucleosome structures. Furthermore, in details of the structure, the active sequence nucleosomes look almost exactly like the average yeast nucleosome in repeat length, in the length of DNA associated with the core particle, in the amount and type of heterogeneity found within and between the oligomeric and monomeric repeat lengths of DNA, in the occurrence of discrete spacer lengths including the characteristic five nucleotide increments (i.e., 5, 15, 25, ... base pairs), and in the length of DNA between yeast nucleosomes. Early in digestion, there are some differences: increases in peak breadths (i.e., in the distribution of spacer lengths) and some preferential release of monomer DNA. These results suggest that transcribed DNA can exist in the typical (yeast) type of nucleosome organization and thus that active chromatin regions do not necessarily require profound structural rearrangements. The slight differences noted are consistent with some slight, mainly spacer, modification in the vicinity of the transcription event itself.

  14. Selection Metric for Photovoltaic Materials Screening Based on Detailed-Balance Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blank, Beatrix; Kirchartz, Thomas; Lany, Stephan; Rau, Uwe

    2017-08-01

    The success of recently discovered absorber materials for photovoltaic applications has been generating increasing interest in systematic materials screening over the last years. However, the key for a successful materials screening is a suitable selection metric that goes beyond the Shockley-Queisser theory that determines the thermodynamic efficiency limit of an absorber material solely by its band-gap energy. In this work, we develop a selection metric to quantify the potential photovoltaic efficiency of a material. Our approach is compatible with detailed balance and applicable in computational and experimental materials screening. We use the complex refractive index to calculate radiative and nonradiative efficiency limits and the respective optimal thickness in the high mobility limit. We compare our model to the widely applied selection metric by Yu and Zunger [Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 068701 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.108.068701] with respect to their dependence on thickness, internal luminescence quantum efficiency, and refractive index. Finally, the model is applied to complex refractive indices calculated via electronic structure theory.

  15. Preliminary evaluation of crisis-relocation fallout-shelter options. Volume 2. Detailed analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Santini, D.J.; Clinch, J.M.; Davis, F.H.

    1982-12-01

    This report presents a preliminary, detailed evaluation of various shelter options for use if the President orders crisis relocation of the US urban population because of strong expectation of a nuclear war. The availability of livable shelter space at 40 ft/sup 2/ per person (congregate-care space) by state is evaluated. Options are evaluated for construction of fallout shelters allowing 10 ft/sup 2/ per person - such shelters are designed to provide 100% survival at projected levels of radioactive fallout. The FEMA concept of upgrading existing buildings to act as fallout shelters can, in principle, provide adequate shelter throughout most ofmore » the US. Exceptions are noted and remedies proposed. In terms of upgrading existing buildings to fallout shelter status, great benefits are possible by turning away from a standard national approach and adopting a more site-specific approach. Existing FEMA research provides a solid foundation for successful crisis relocation planning, but the program can be refined by making suitable modifications in its locational, engineering, and institutionally specific elements.« less

  16. Detailed analysis of the cell-inactivation mechanism by accelerated protons and light ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundrát, Pavel

    2006-03-01

    A detailed study of the biological effects of diverse quality radiations, addressing their biophysical interpretation, is presented. Published survival data for V79 cells irradiated by monoenergetic protons, helium-3, carbon and oxygen ions and for CHO cells irradiated by carbon ions have been analysed using the probabilistic two-stage model of cell inactivation. Three different classes of DNA damage formed by traversing particles have been distinguished, namely severe single-track lesions which might lead to cell inactivation directly, less severe lesions where cell inactivation is caused by their combinations and lesions of negligible severity that can be repaired easily. Probabilities of single ions forming these lesions have been assessed in dependence on their linear energy transfer (LET) values. Damage induction probabilities increase with atomic number and LET. While combined lesions play a crucial role at lower LET values, single-track damage dominates in high-LET regions. The yields of single-track lethal lesions for protons have been compared with Monte Carlo estimates of complex DNA lesions, indicating that lethal events correlate well with complex DNA double-strand breaks. The decrease in the single-track damage probability for protons of LET above approximately 30 keV µm-1, suggested by limited experimental evidence, is discussed, together with the consequent differences in the mechanisms of biological effects between protons and heavier ions. Applications of the results in hadrontherapy treatment planning are outlined.

  17. Selection Metric for Photovoltaic Materials Screening Based on Detailed-Balance Analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Blank, Beatrix; Kirchartz, Thomas; Lany, Stephan; ...

    2017-08-31

    The success of recently discovered absorber materials for photovoltaic applications has been generating increasing interest in systematic materials screening over the last years. However, the key for a successful materials screening is a suitable selection metric that goes beyond the Shockley-Queisser theory that determines the thermodynamic efficiency limit of an absorber material solely by its band-gap energy. Here, we develop a selection metric to quantify the potential photovoltaic efficiency of a material. Our approach is compatible with detailed balance and applicable in computational and experimental materials screening. We use the complex refractive index to calculate radiative and nonradiative efficiency limitsmore » and the respective optimal thickness in the high mobility limit. We also compare our model to the widely applied selection metric by Yu and Zunger [Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 068701 (2012)] with respect to their dependence on thickness, internal luminescence quantum efficiency, and refractive index. Finally, the model is applied to complex refractive indices calculated via electronic structure theory.« less

  18. Unveiling the Properties of Metagratings via a Detailed Analytical Model for Synthesis and Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epstein, Ariel; Rabinovich, Oshri

    2017-11-01

    We present detailed analytical modeling and in-depth investigation of wide-angle reflect-mode metagrating beam splitters. These recently introduced ultrathin devices are capable of implementing intricate diffraction engineering functionalities with only a single meta-atom per macroperiod, making them considerably simpler to synthesize than conventional metasurfaces. We extend recent work and focus on electrically polarizable metagratings, comprised of loaded conducting wires in front of a perfect electric conductor, excited by transverse-electric polarized fields, which are more practical for planar fabrication. The derivation further relates the metagrating performance parameters to the individual meta-atom load, facilitating an efficient semianalytical synthesis scheme to determine the required conductor geometry for achieving optimal beam splitting. Subsequently, we utilize the model to analyze the effects of realistic conductor losses, reactance deviations, and frequency shifts on the device performance, and reveal that metagratings feature preferable working points, in which the sensitivity to these nonidealities is rather low. The analytical relations shed light on the physical origin of this phenomenon, associating it with fundamental interference processes taking place in the device. These results, verified via full-wave simulations of realistic physical structures, yield a set of efficient engineering tools, as well as profound physical intuition, for devising future metagrating devices, with immense potential for microwave, terahertz, and optical beam-manipulation applications.

  19. Non-destructive digital imaging in poplar allows detailed analysis of adventitious rooting dynamics

    Treesearch

    R.J. Kodrzycki; R.B. Michaels; A.L. Friend; R.S. Zalesny; Ch.P. Mawata; D.W. McDonald

    2008-01-01

    The dynamics of root formation are difficult to observe directly over time without disturbing the rooting environment. A novel system for a non-destructive, non-invasive root analysis (RootViz FS, Phenotype Screening Corp.) was evaluated for its ability to analyze root formation from cuttings over a 32 day period in three poplar genotypes (DN70, P. Deltoides x...

  20. Detailed structural analysis on retinal vascular bed by automated computer processing of fluorescein angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noszek, Annamaria; Garab, Sandor; Nemes, Janos; Simon, Laszlo

    2005-08-01

    Fluorescein angiography (FLAG) became a standard and essential diagnostic tool, especially in diabetic retinopathy (DR). Our computer program, developed for semi-automatic analysis (Dendron Pro Ret) on vascular ramification, enabled us to define a set of structural parameters resulting in a powerful tool both for clinical and scientific studies.

  1. Reconstruction of residential buildings by detail analysis of multi-aspect InSAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiele, Antje; Cadario, Erich; Schulz, Karsten; Thoennessen, Ulrich; Soergel, Uwe

    2008-10-01

    State-of-the-art SAR sensors suggest utilizing InSAR-Data for the analysis of dense urban areas. The appearance of buildings in SAR or InSAR data is characterized by the effects of the inherent oblique scene illumination, such as layover, occlusion by radar shadow and multipath signal propagation. Therefore, especially in dense built-up areas reconstruction quality can be improved by a combined analysis of multi-aspect data. The presented approach focuses on reconstruction of buildings in residential districts supported by knowledge based analysis considering the mentioned SAR-specific effects. The algorithm of building extraction starts with the segmentation of primitives, such as lines and edges, followed by the assembly of building hypotheses based on typical building features like linearity and right-angularity. The subsequent post-processing of building hypotheses contains the analysis of InSAR phases to improve footprint or to detect roof-type of buildings. The results are presented by using optical data and a high resolution LIDAR surface model as ground truth data.

  2. Analysis and optimization of chlorocarbon incineration through use of a detailed reaction mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, W.; Booty, M.R.; Magee, R.S.

    1995-12-01

    Chemical species profiles are calculated by using a detailed reaction mechanism and a reactor code that simulates a well-mixed, three-zone incineration process. The chemical systems include CH{sub 3}Cl/CH{sub 4} and CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} oxidation in air at fuel equivalence ratios {phi} from 0.8 to 1.1, with additives injected at downstream positions. Combustion is characterized for temperature, principal organic hazardous constituent (POHC), and product of incomplete combustion (PIC) levels. Major PICs comprise Cl, CL{sub 2}, CO, HOCl, and COCl{sub 2} and are calculated versus time, temperature, fuel equivalence ratio, and feed conditions. Steam, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, air, andmore » other species are injected as additives in the burnout region to discern changes i the combustion chemistry. Steam addition improves or decreases the CO/CO{sub 2} ratio at an additive mole fraction of 0.1. Atomic Cl is the active radical species of highest concentration in the initial high-temperature reaction zone when CH{sub 3}Cl is the POHC at a feed concentration above 1,200 ppm and {phi} {le} 1. Cl{sub 2} is found to be a major PIC under fuel-lean and stoichiometric conditions, while CO is a major PIC under fuel-rich conditions. Reduction of combined CO and Cl{sub 2} levels in the incinerator stack effluent is achieved by operation at stoichiometric conditions or slightly fuel-lean with the controlled addition of high-temperature steam.« less

  3. Tuberculosis in Sulaimaniyah, Iraqi Kurdistan: A Detailed Analysis of Cases Registered in Treatment Centers.

    PubMed

    Karadakhy, Kamaran; Othman, Nasih; Ibrahimm, Faredun; Saeed, Akam Ali; Amin, Ari Abdul-Adheem Hama

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major public health problem especially in low and middle-income countries. The current study was undertaken to estimate the incidence of the disease and describe its epidemiological characteristics in Iraqi Kurdistan. A retrospective study was carried out on cases registered in the directly observed treatment-short course (DOTS) centers in Sulaimaniyah province. Information was collected from the summary reports of all cases registered in 2010 and detailed information was obtained from 307 cases in the main center. During 2010, a total of 530 new and relapsed cases were registered in the DOTS centers amounting to an annual incidence of 31 per 100,000. Over 73% of cases were pulmonary TB and 45% of all cases had positive smear. Most common symptoms were cough (58%), sweating (49%) and fever (48). Almost 43% of patients were diagnosed by direct swab examination, 30% by biopsy and 23% through clinical and radiologic examination. In relation to outcome, 89% of patients were treated successfully, 7% died and 3% defaulted. Mortality rate was 8% in pulmonary infection and 4% in extrapulmonary infection. Old age (65 years and over) was significantly associated with higher odds of death compared to people aged 34 years and younger (OR 6.7, 95% CI 1.3-36.1, P=0.03). The incidence of TB is still high in the Iraqi Kurdistan. The DOTS has been successful in treating the majority of cases but there are areas needing improvement especially record-keeping and patient follow-up during and after treatment.

  4. Tuberculosis in Sulaimaniyah, Iraqi Kurdistan: A Detailed Analysis of Cases Registered in Treatment Centers

    PubMed Central

    Karadakhy, Kamaran; Ibrahimm, Faredun; Saeed, Akam Ali; Amin, Ari Abdul-Adheem Hama

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major public health problem especially in low and middle-income countries. The current study was undertaken to estimate the incidence of the disease and describe its epidemiological characteristics in Iraqi Kurdistan. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study was carried out on cases registered in the directly observed treatment-short course (DOTS) centers in Sulaimaniyah province. Information was collected from the summary reports of all cases registered in 2010 and detailed information was obtained from 307 cases in the main center. Results: During 2010, a total of 530 new and relapsed cases were registered in the DOTS centers amounting to an annual incidence of 31 per 100,000. Over 73% of cases were pulmonary TB and 45% of all cases had positive smear. Most common symptoms were cough (58%), sweating (49%) and fever (48). Almost 43% of patients were diagnosed by direct swab examination, 30% by biopsy and 23% through clinical and radiologic examination. In relation to outcome, 89% of patients were treated successfully, 7% died and 3% defaulted. Mortality rate was 8% in pulmonary infection and 4% in extrapulmonary infection. Old age (65 years and over) was significantly associated with higher odds of death compared to people aged 34 years and younger (OR 6.7, 95% CI 1.3–36.1, P=0.03). Conclusion: The incidence of TB is still high in the Iraqi Kurdistan. The DOTS has been successful in treating the majority of cases but there are areas needing improvement especially record-keeping and patient follow-up during and after treatment. PMID:28469675

  5. Meta-analysis reveals that seed-applied neonicotinoids and pyrethroids have similar negative effects on abundance of arthropod natural enemies

    PubMed Central

    Tooker, John F.

    2016-01-01

    crop species, neonicotinoid active ingredients, or methodological choices. Discussion Our meta-analysis of nearly 1,000 observations from North American and European field studies revealed that seed-applied neonicotinoids reduced the abundance of arthropod natural enemies similarly to broadcast applications of pyrethroid insecticides. These findings suggest that substituting pyrethroids for seed-applied neonicotinoids, or vice versa, will have little net affect on natural enemy abundance. Consistent with previous lab work, our results also suggest that seed-applied neonicotinoids are less toxic to spiders and mites, which can contribute substantially to biological control in many agricultural systems. Finally, our ability to interpret the negative effect of neonicotinoids on natural enemies is constrained by difficulty relating natural-enemy abundance to biological control function; this is an important area for future study. PMID:27957400

  6. Detailed Skylab ECS consumables analysis for the interim revision flight plan (November, 1972, SL-1 launch)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, C.; Kolkhorst, H. E.

    1971-01-01

    The consumables analysis was performed for the Skylab 2, 3, and 4 Preliminary Reference Interim Revision Flight Plan. The analysis and the results are based on the mission requirements as specified in the flight plan and on other available data. The results indicate that the consumables requirements for the Skylab missions allow for remaining margins (percent) of oxygen, nitrogen, and water nominal as follows: 83.5, 90.8, and 88.7 for mission SL-2; 57.1, 64.1, and 67.3 for SL-3; and 30.8, 44.3, and 46.5 for SL-4. Performance of experiment M509 as scheduled in the flight plan results in venting overboard the cluster atmosphere. This is due to the addition of nitrogen for propulsion and to the additional oxygen introduced into the cabin when the experiment is performed with the crewman suited.

  7. Draft genome sequence and detailed analysis ofPantoea eucrinastrain Russ and implication for opportunistic pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Moghadam, Farzaneh; Couger, M B; Russ, Breeanna; Ramsey, Randi; Hanafy, Radwa A; Budd, Connie; French, Donald P; Hoff, Wouter D; Youssef, Noha

    2016-12-01

    The genus Pantoea is a predominant member of host-associated microbiome. We here report on the genomic analysis of Pantoea eucrina strain Russ that was isolated from a trashcan at Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK. The draft genome of Pantoea eucrina strain Russ consists of 3,939,877 bp of DNA with 3704 protein-coding genes and 134 RNA genes. This is the first report of a genome sequence of a member of Pantoea eucrina . Genomic analysis revealed metabolic versatility with genes involved in the metabolism and transport of all amino acids as well as glucose, fructose, mannose, xylose, arabinose and galactose, suggesting the organism is a versatile heterotroph. The genome also encodes an extensive secretory machinery including types I, II, III, IV, and Vb secretion systems, and several genes for pili production including the new usher/chaperone system (pfam 05,229). The implications of these systems for opportunistic pathogenesis are discussed.

  8. Detailed analysis of Japanese population substructure with a focus on the southwest islands of Japan.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Takeshi; Kishino, Hirohisa; Suzuki, Sadao; Ando, Ryosuke; Niimura, Hideshi; Uemura, Hirokazu; Horita, Mikako; Ohnaka, Keizo; Kuriyama, Nagato; Mikami, Haruo; Takashima, Naoyuki; Mastuo, Keitaro; Guang, Yin; Wakai, Kenji; Hamajima, Nobuyuki; Tanaka, Hideo

    2012-01-01

    Uncovering population structure is important for properly conducting association studies and for examining the demographic history of a population. Here, we examined the Japanese population substructure using data from the Japan Multi-Institutional Collaborative Cohort (J-MICC), which covers all but the northern region of Japan. Using 222 autosomal loci from 4502 subjects, we investigated population substructure by estimating F(ST) among populations, testing population differentiation, and performing principal component analysis (PCA) and correspondence analysis (CA). All analyses revealed a low but significant differentiation between the Amami Islanders and the mainland Japanese population. Furthermore, we examined the genetic differentiation between the mainland population, Amami Islanders and Okinawa Islanders using six loci included in both the Pan-Asian SNP (PASNP) consortium data and the J-MICC data. This analysis revealed that the Amami and Okinawa Islanders were differentiated from the mainland population. In conclusion, we revealed a low but significant level of genetic differentiation between the mainland population and populations in or to the south of the Amami Islands, although genetic variation between both populations might be clinal. Therefore, the possibility of population stratification must be considered when enrolling the islander population of this area, such as in the J-MICC study.

  9. Detailed Analysis of Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall Processes with Modern/High-Quality Satellite Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Eric A.; Kuo, Kwo-Sen; Mehta, Amita V.; Yang, Song

    2007-01-01

    We examine, in detail, Indian Summer Monsoon rainfall processes using modernhigh quality satellite precipitation measurements. The focus here is on measurements derived from three NASA cloud and precipitation satellite missionslinstruments (TRMM/PR&TMI, AQUNAMSRE, and CLOUDSATICPR), and a fourth TRMM Project-generated multi-satellite precipitation measurement dataset (viz., TRMM standard algorithm 3b42) -- all from a period beginning in 1998 up to the present. It is emphasized that the 3b42 algorithm blends passive microwave (PMW) radiometer-based precipitation estimates from LEO satellites with infi-ared (IR) precipitation estimates from a world network of CEO satellites (representing -15% of the complete space-time coverage) All of these observations are first cross-calibrated to precipitation estimates taken from standard TRMM combined PR-TMI algorithm 2b31, and second adjusted at the large scale based on monthly-averaged rain-gage measurements. The blended approach takes advantage of direct estimates of precipitation from the PMW radiometerequipped LEO satellites -- but which suffer fi-om sampling limitations -- in combination with less accurate IR estimates from the optical-infrared imaging cameras on GEO satellites -- but which provide continuous diurnal sampling. The advantages of the current technologies are evident in the continuity and coverage properties inherent to the resultant precipitation datasets that have been an outgrowth of these stable measuring and retrieval technologies. There is a wealth of information contained in the current satellite measurements of precipitation regarding the salient precipitation properties of the Indian Summer Monsoon. Using different datasets obtained from the measuring systems noted above, we have analyzed the observations cast in the form of: (1) spatially distributed means and variances over the hierarchy of relevant time scales (hourly I diurnally, daily, monthly, seasonally I intra-seasonally, and inter

  10. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Fe-group elemental abundance analysis in HD84937 (Sneden+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sneden, C.; Cowan, J. J.; Kobayashi, C.; Pignatari, M.; Lawler, J. E.; den Hartog, E. A.; Wood, M. P.

    2016-04-01

    Solar and HD 84937 data sets are the same as in previous papers of this series. The spectra have been discussed in detail by Lawler et al. (2013ApJS..205...11L). For the Sun we used the photospheric center-of-disk spectrum of Delbouille et al. (1973apds.book.....D). The ground-based spectrum of HD 84937 was obtained from the ESO Very Large Telescope UVES archive. It extends over 3100<~λ<~10000Å, with resolving power R~60000 and signal-to-noise ratio S/N~100 at 3500Å. The vacuum-UV spectrum of HD 84937 comes from the Hubble Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (HST/STIS) public archive, having been part of proposal #7402 (PI: R. C. Peterson) with a wavelength range 2280<~λ<~3120Å and R~25000. (2 data files).

  11. A detailed description of the uncertainty analysis for High Area Ratio Rocket Nozzle tests at the NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidian, Kenneth J.; Dieck, Ronald H.; Chuang, Isaac

    1987-01-01

    A preliminary uncertainty analysis has been performed for the High Area Ratio Rocket Nozzle test program which took place at the altitude test capsule of the Rocket Engine Test Facility at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Results from the study establish the uncertainty of measured and calculated parameters required for the calculation of rocket engine specific impulse. A generalized description of the uncertainty methodology used is provided. Specific equations and a detailed description of the analysis are presented. Verification of the uncertainty analysis model was performed by comparison with results from the experimental program's data reduction code. Final results include an uncertainty for specific impulse of 1.30 percent. The largest contributors to this uncertainty were calibration errors from the test capsule pressure and thrust measurement devices.

  12. In vivo versus in vitro protein abundance analysis of Shigella dysenteriae type 1 reveals changes in the expression of proteins involved in virulence, stress and energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Shigella dysenteriae serotype 1 (SD1) causes the most severe form of epidemic bacillary dysentery. Quantitative proteome profiling of Shigella dysenteriae serotype 1 (SD1) in vitro (derived from LB cell cultures) and in vivo (derived from gnotobiotic piglets) was performed by 2D-LC-MS/MS and APEX, a label-free computationally modified spectral counting methodology. Results Overall, 1761 proteins were quantitated at a 5% FDR (false discovery rate), including 1480 and 1505 from in vitro and in vivo samples, respectively. Identification of 350 cytoplasmic membrane and outer membrane (OM) proteins (38% of in silico predicted SD1 membrane proteome) contributed to the most extensive survey of the Shigella membrane proteome reported so far. Differential protein abundance analysis using statistical tests revealed that SD1 cells switched to an anaerobic energy metabolism under in vivo conditions, resulting in an increase in fermentative, propanoate, butanoate and nitrate metabolism. Abundance increases of transcription activators FNR and Nar supported the notion of a switch from aerobic to anaerobic respiration in the host gut environment. High in vivo abundances of proteins involved in acid resistance (GadB, AdiA) and mixed acid fermentation (PflA/PflB) indicated bacterial survival responses to acid stress, while increased abundance of oxidative stress proteins (YfiD/YfiF/SodB) implied that defense mechanisms against oxygen radicals were mobilized. Proteins involved in peptidoglycan turnover (MurB) were increased, while β-barrel OM proteins (OmpA), OM lipoproteins (NlpD), chaperones involved in OM protein folding pathways (YraP, NlpB) and lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis (Imp) were decreased, suggesting unexpected modulations of the outer membrane/peptidoglycan layers in vivo. Several virulence proteins of the Mxi-Spa type III secretion system and invasion plasmid antigens (Ipa proteins) required for invasion of colonic epithelial cells, and release of bacteria

  13. Community analysis of the abundance and diversity of biting midge species (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) in three European countries at different latitudes.

    PubMed

    Möhlmann, Tim W R; Wennergren, Uno; Tälle, Malin; Favia, Guido; Damiani, Claudia; Bracchetti, Luca; Takken, Willem; Koenraadt, Constantianus J M

    2018-03-27

    The outbreaks of bluetongue and Schmallenberg disease in Europe have increased efforts to understand the ecology of Culicoides biting midges and their role in pathogen transmission. However, most studies have focused on a specific habitat, region, or country. To facilitate wider comparisons, and to obtain a better understanding of the spread of disease through Europe, the present study focused on monitoring biting midge species diversity in three different habitat types and three countries across Europe. Biting midges were trapped using Onderstepoort Veterinary Institute light traps at a total of 27 locations in Sweden, the Netherlands and Italy, comprising farm, peri-urban and wetland habitats. From July 2014 to June 2015 all locations were sampled monthly, except for during the winter months. Trapped midges were counted and identified morphologically. Indices on species richness, evenness and diversity were calculated. Community compositions were analysed using non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) techniques. A total of 50,085 female midges were trapped during 442 collection nights. More than 88% of these belonged to the Obsoletus group. The highest midge diversity was found in Sweden, while species richness was highest in the Netherlands, and most specimens were trapped in Italy. For habitats within countries, diversity of the trapped midges was lowest for farms in all countries. Differences in biting midge species communities were more distinct across the three countries than the three habitat types. A core midge community could be identified, in which the Obsoletus group was the most abundant. Variations in vector communities across countries imply different patterns of disease spread throughout Europe. How specific species and their associated communities affect disease risk is still unclear. Our results emphasize the importance of midge diversity data at community level, how this differs across large geographic range within Europe, and its implications

  14. RNA-seq analysis reveals differences in transcript abundance between cultured and sand fly-derived Leishmania infantum promastigotes.

    PubMed

    Alcolea, Pedro J; Alonso, Ana; Baugh, Loren; Paisie, Carolyn; Ramasamy, Gowthaman; Sekar, Aarthi; Sur, Aakash; Jiménez, Maribel; Molina, Ricardo; Larraga, Vicente; Myler, Peter J

    2018-03-30

    Leishmania infantum is responsible for human and canine leishmaniasis in the Mediterranean basin, where the major vector is Phlebotomus perniciosus. Because isolation of sufficient parasites from the sand fly gut is technically challenging, axenic cultivation of promastigotes is routinely used to obtain material for biochemical and genetic analyses. Here, we report the use of Spliced Leader RNA-seq (SL-seq) to compare transcript abundance in cultured promastigotes and those obtained from the whole midgut of the sand fly 5 days after infection. SL-seq allows for amplification of RNA from the parasite avoiding contamination with RNA from the gut of the insect. The study has been performed by means of a single technical replicate comparing pools of samples obtained from sand fly-derived (sfPro) and axenic culture promastigotes (acPro). Although there was a moderate correlation (R 2  = 0.83) in gene expression, 793 genes showed significantly different (≥2-fold, p < .05) mRNA levels in sand fly-derived promastigotes and in culture, of which 31 were up-regulated ≥8-fold (p < 10 -8 in most cases). These included several genes that are typically up-regulated during metacyclogenesis, suggesting that sand fly-derived promastigotes contain a substantial number of metacyclics, and/or that their differentiation status as metacyclics is more advanced in these populations. Infection experiments and studies evaluating the proportion of metacyclic promastigotes in culture and whithin the sand fly gut, previously reported by us, support the last hypothesis. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Meta-Analysis of Quantification Methods Shows that Archaea and Bacteria Have Similar Abundances in the Subseafloor

    PubMed Central

    May, Megan K.; Kevorkian, Richard T.; Steen, Andrew D.

    2013-01-01

    There is no universally accepted method to quantify bacteria and archaea in seawater and marine sediments, and different methods have produced conflicting results with the same samples. To identify best practices, we compiled data from 65 studies, plus our own measurements, in which bacteria and archaea were quantified with fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), catalyzed reporter deposition FISH (CARD-FISH), polyribonucleotide FISH, or quantitative PCR (qPCR). To estimate efficiency, we defined “yield” to be the sum of bacteria and archaea counted by these techniques divided by the total number of cells. In seawater, the yield was high (median, 71%) and was similar for FISH, CARD-FISH, and polyribonucleotide FISH. In sediments, only measurements by CARD-FISH in which archaeal cells were permeabilized with proteinase K showed high yields (median, 84%). Therefore, the majority of cells in both environments appear to be alive, since they contain intact ribosomes. In sediments, the sum of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA gene qPCR counts was not closely related to cell counts, even after accounting for variations in copy numbers per genome. However, qPCR measurements were precise relative to other qPCR measurements made on the same samples. qPCR is therefore a reliable relative quantification method. Inconsistent results for the relative abundance of bacteria versus archaea in deep subsurface sediments were resolved by the removal of CARD-FISH measurements in which lysozyme was used to permeabilize archaeal cells and qPCR measurements which used ARCH516 as an archaeal primer or TaqMan probe. Data from best-practice methods showed that archaea and bacteria decreased as the depth in seawater and marine sediments increased, although archaea decreased more slowly. PMID:24096423

  16. Volcano Hazard Tracking and Disaster Risk Mitigation: A Detailed Gap Analysis from Data-Collection to User Implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faied, D.; Sanchez, A.

    2009-04-01

    Volcano Hazard Tracking and Disaster Risk Mitigation: A Detailed Gap Analysis from Data-Collection to User Implementation Dohy Faied, Aurora Sanchez (on behalf of SSP08 VAPOR Project Team) Dohy.Faied@masters.isunet.edu While numerous global initiatives exist to address the potential hazards posed by volcanic eruption events and assess impacts from a civil security viewpoint, there does not yet exist a single, unified, international system of early warning and hazard tracking for eruptions. Numerous gaps exist in the risk reduction cycle, from data collection, to data processing, and finally dissemination of salient information to relevant parties. As part of the 2008 International Space University's Space Studies Program, a detailed gap analysis of the state of volcano disaster risk reduction was undertaken, and this paper presents the principal results. This gap analysis considered current sensor technologies, data processing algorithms, and utilization of data products by various international organizations. Recommendations for strategies to minimize or eliminate certain gaps are also provided. In the effort to address the gaps, a framework evolved at system level. This framework, known as VIDA, is a tool to develop user requirements for civil security in hazardous contexts, and a candidate system concept for a detailed design phase. VIDA also offers substantial educational potential: the framework includes a centralized clearinghouse for volcanology data which could support education at a variety of levels. Basic geophysical data, satellite maps, and raw sensor data are combined and accessible in a way that allows the relationships between these data types to be explored and used in a training environment. Such a resource naturally lends itself to research efforts in the subject but also research in operational tools, system architecture, and human/machine interaction in civil protection or emergency scenarios.

  17. Detailed investigation of Long-Period activity at Campi Flegrei by Convolutive Independent Component Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capuano, P.; De Lauro, E.; De Martino, S.; Falanga, M.

    2016-04-01

    This work is devoted to the analysis of seismic signals continuously recorded at Campi Flegrei Caldera (Italy) during the entire year 2006. The radiation pattern associated with the Long-Period energy release is investigated. We adopt an innovative Independent Component Analysis algorithm for convolutive seismic series adapted and improved to give automatic procedures for detecting seismic events often buried in the high-level ambient noise. The extracted waveforms characterized by an improved signal-to-noise ratio allows the recognition of Long-Period precursors, evidencing that the seismic activity accompanying the mini-uplift crisis (in 2006), which climaxed in the three days from 26-28 October, had already started at the beginning of the month of October and lasted until mid of November. Hence, a more complete seismic catalog is then provided which can be used to properly quantify the seismic energy release. To better ground our results, we first check the robustness of the method by comparing it with other blind source separation methods based on higher order statistics; secondly, we reconstruct the radiation patterns of the extracted Long-Period events in order to link the individuated signals directly to the sources. We take advantage from Convolutive Independent Component Analysis that provides basic signals along the three directions of motion so that a direct polarization analysis can be performed with no other filtering procedures. We show that the extracted signals are mainly composed of P waves with radial polarization pointing to the seismic source of the main LP swarm, i.e. a small area in the Solfatara, also in the case of the small-events, that both precede and follow the main activity. From a dynamical point of view, they can be described by two degrees of freedom, indicating a low-level of complexity associated with the vibrations from a superficial hydrothermal system. Our results allow us to move towards a full description of the complexity of

  18. Ar-39-Ar-40 Ages of Two Nakhlites, MIL03346 and Y000593: A Detailed Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Jisun; Garrison, Daniel; Bogard, Donald

    2007-01-01

    Radiometric dating of martian nakhlites by several techniques have given similar ages of approx.1.2-1.4 Ga [e.g. 1, 2]. Unlike the case with shergottites, where the presence of martian atmosphere and inherited radiogenic Ar-40 produce apparent Ar-39-Ar-40 ages older than other radiometric ages, Ar-Ar ages of nakhlites are similar to ages derived by other techniques. However, even in some nakhlites the presence of trapped martian Ar produces some uncertainty in the Ar-Ar age. We present here an analysis of such Ar-Ar ages from the MIL03346 and Y000593 nakhlites.

  19. Coronal abundances and their variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saba, Julia L. R.

    1994-01-01

    This contract supports the investigation of elemental abundances in the solar corona, principally through analysis of high-resolution soft x-ray spectra from the Flat Crystal Spectrometer (FCS) on the Solar Maximum Mission. The goals of the study are a characterization of the mean values of relative abundances of elements accessible in the FCS data, and information on the extent and circumstances of their variability. This report is a summation of the data analysis and reporting activities which occurred during the first ten months of the contract, 15 Jun. 1993 to 15 Apr. 1994.

  20. Detailed analysis of the Valdes slide: a landward facing slope failure off Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anasetti, Andrea; Krastel, Sebastian; Weinrebe, Willy; Klaucke, Ingo; Bialas, Jorge

    2010-05-01

    The Chilean continental margin is a very active area interested by important tectonic movements and characterized by a fast morphological evolution. Geophysical data acquired during cruise JC 23, aboard RV JAMES COOK in March/April 2008 and previous cruises cover most of the active Chilean continental margin between 33° and 37° S. Integrated interpretation of multi-beam bathymetric, sub-bottom profiles, side-scan sonar and seismic data allowed the identification of a number of slope failures. The main topic of this project is the morphological and sedimentological analysis of the Valdes slide, a medium-sized submarine landslide offshore the city of Talcahuano (300 km south of Santiago). In contrast to most other slides along continental margins, the Valdes slide is located on the landward facing eastern slope of a submarine ridge. This setting has important implications for the associated tsunami wave field (first arrival of positive amplitude). We measured geometrical parameters of the failure and adjacent slope. The slide affected an area of 19 km2 between ~1060 m and >1700 m water depths. Its is ~ 6 km long, up to 3 km wide and involved a total sedimentary volume of about 0,8 km3. The failure process was characterized by a multiple-event and we assume its tsunami potential to be high. Using the high resolution bathymetric data and the seismic profiles along the slide deposit it was possible to reconstruct the original morphology of the area in order to understand the relation between the slide event and the structural evolution of the ridge. Through the analysis of the data and bibliographic information about the Chilean margin, we analyzed potential trigger mechanisms for the landslide. The Valdes slide is situated on a steep ridge flank. The ridge follows an elongated fault zone running app. parallel to the margin. This fault zone has a dextral component which in combination with the faults elongation results in a compressional regime that is superimposed on

  1. High-throughput analysis of satellite DNA in the grasshopper Pyrgomorpha conica reveals abundance of homologous and heterologous higher-order repeats.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Ruano, Francisco J; Castillo-Martínez, Jesús; Cabrero, Josefa; Gómez, Ricardo; Camacho, Juan Pedro M; López-León, María Dolores

    2018-03-16

    Satellite DNA (satDNA) constitutes an important fraction of repetitive DNA in eukaryotic genomes, but it is barely known in most species. The high-throughput analysis of satDNA in the grasshopper Pyrgomorpha conica revealed 87 satDNA variants grouped into 76 different families, representing 9.4% of the genome. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis of the 38 most abundant satDNA families revealed four different patterns of chromosome distribution. Homology search between the 76 satDNA families showed the existence of 15 superfamilies, each including two or more families, with the most abundant superfamily representing more than 80% of all satDNA found in this species. This also revealed the presence of two types of higher-order repeats (HORs), one showing internal homologous subrepeats, as conventional HORs, and an additional type showing non-homologous internal subrepeats, the latter arising by the combination of a given satDNA family with a non-annotated sequence, or with telomeric DNA. Interestingly, the heterologous subrepeats included in these HORs showed higher divergence within the HOR than outside it, suggesting that heterologous HORs show poor homogenization, in high contrast with conventional (homologous) HORs. Finally, heterologous HORs can show high differences in divergence between their constituent subrepeats, suggesting the possibility of regional homogenization.

  2. Annual-cycle thermal energy storage for a community solar system: Details of a sensitivity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baylin, F.; Monte, R.; Sillman, S.

    1980-07-01

    Results and conclusions of a simulation and sensitivity analysis of community sized, annual cycle thermal energy storage (ACTES) solar energy systems. A total of 440 systems were sized for 10 locations in the United States. Three different building types and four different community sizes were modeled. All designs used each of two collector types at each of two different tilt angles. Two linear relationships were derived which simplify system sizing. The average ambient temperature is used to determine average yearly collector efficiency. This parameter combined with estimates of space/DHW loads, storage/distribution losses, and total yearly insolation per square meter allows estimation of collector area. Storage size can be estimated from the winter net load which is based on space and DHW loads, storage and distribution losses, and collector solar heat gain for the winter months.

  3. Detailed behavioral analysis as a window into cross-situational word learning.

    PubMed

    Suanda, Sumarga H; Namy, Laura L

    2012-04-01

    Recent research has demonstrated that word learners can determine word-referent mappings by tracking co-occurrences across multiple ambiguous naming events. The current study addresses the mechanisms underlying this capacity to learn words cross-situationally. This replication and extension of Yu and Smith (2007) investigates the factors influencing both successful cross-situational word learning and mis-mappings. Item analysis and error patterns revealed that the co-occurrence structure of the learning environment as well as the context of the testing environment jointly affected learning across observations. Learners also adopted an exclusion strategy, which contributed conjointly with statistical tracking to performance. Implications for our understanding of the processes underlying cross-situational word learning are discussed. Copyright © 2012 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  4. A path flux analysis method for the reduction of detailed chemical kinetic mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Wenting; Ju, Yiguang; Chen, Zheng

    2010-07-15

    A direct path flux analysis (PFA) method for kinetic mechanism reduction is proposed and validated by using high temperature ignition, perfect stirred reactors, and steady and unsteady flame propagations of n-heptane and n-decane/air mixtures. The formation and consumption fluxes of each species at multiple reaction path generations are analyzed and used to identify the important reaction pathways and the associated species. The formation and consumption path fluxes used in this method retain flux conservation information and are used to define the path indexes for the first and the second generation reaction paths related to a targeted species. Based on themore » indexes of each reaction path for the first and second generations, different sized reduced chemical mechanisms which contain different number of species are generated. The reduced mechanisms of n-heptane and n-decane obtained by using the present method are compared to those generated by the direct relation graph (DRG) method. The reaction path analysis for n-decane is conducted to demonstrate the validity of the present method. The comparisons of the ignition delay times, flame propagation speeds, flame structures, and unsteady spherical flame propagation processes showed that with either the same or significantly less number of species, the reduced mechanisms generated by the present PFA are more accurate than that of DRG in a broad range of initial pressures and temperatures. The method is also integrated with the dynamic multi-timescale method and a further increase of computation efficiency is achieved. (author)« less

  5. Does the use of ingredients added to tobacco increase cigarette addictiveness?: A detailed analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Edward; Weitkunat, Rolf; Utan, Aneli; Dempsey, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    The possibility that ingredients added to tobacco contribute to the addictiveness of cigarette smoking was evaluated by comparing cessation rates of smokers of traditional blended cigarettes to those of smokers of flue-cured cigarettes. Such a comparison is a valid means of assessing cigarette ingredients as traditional blended cigarettes contain ingredients (>20), whereas flue-cured cigarettes contain no or very few ingredients. Separate analysis of 108 treatment groups and 108 control groups from randomized clinical trials of nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) were performed by multiple logistic regressions. The results of these analyses demonstrated slightly higher quit rates for smokers of blended cigarettes (OR = 1.90, 95% Cl 1.70–2.13 and OR = 1.32, 95% Cl 1.14–1.53 for treatment and control groups, respectively).The control groups were also investigated using classification tree analysis from which no difference in quit rates were observed for smokers of either type of cigarette. Further analyses showed that studies that utilized a high level of psychological support in conjunction with NRT produced at least a two-fold increase in quit rates compared to studies that utilized a low level of psychological support. It was also demonstrated that there is a large difference when results were reported by sustained abstinence compared to point prevalence. Additional meta-analyses found the pooled OR for NRT treatment to be in exact agreement with a recent review that assessed the effectiveness of NRT. Overall these results strongly suggest that ingredients used in the manufacture of traditional blended cigarettes do not increase the inherent addictiveness of cigarettes. PMID:22429143

  6. Environmental occurrence, abundance, and potential toxicity of polychlorinated biphenyl congeners: considerations for a congener-specific analysis.

    PubMed Central

    McFarland, V A; Clarke, J U

    1989-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) as environmental contaminants often cannot be adequately described by reference to Aroclors or to total PCBs. Although there are 209 possible PCB configurations (congeners), perhaps half that number account for nearly all of the environmental contamination attributable to PCBs. Still fewer congeners are both prevalent and either demonstrably or potentially toxic. If potential toxicity, environmental prevalence, and relative abundance in animal tissues are used as criteria, the number of environmentally threatening PCB congeners reduces to about thirty-six. Twenty-five of these account for 50 to 75% of total PCBs in tissue samples of fish, invertebrates, birds, and mammals. A few PCB congeners that are sterically similar to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (2,3,7,8-TCDD) are directly toxic. Other PCB congeners, as well as those that are directly toxic, may also be involved in toxicity indirectly by stimulating the production of (inducing) bioactivating enzyme systems. The most consequential of these have the ability to induce aryl hydrocarbon metabolizing mixed-function oxidases (MFOs). A result can be an increased capacity for bioactivation of otherwise nontoxic foreign compounds such as certain polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) to cytotoxic or genotoxic metabolites. The effectiveness of specific PCB congeners as inducers of different types of cytochrome P-450-dependent MFO systems is determined by their stereochemistry. Although MFO induction is not a proximate cause, it is a strong correlate of certain kinds of toxicities. Structural patterns can thus be used to discriminate among PCB congeners on the basis of toxic potential, if not entirely on toxicity per se. Congeners that demonstrate 3-methylcholanthrene-type (3-MC-type) and mixed-type MFO induction have the greatest toxic potential. These congeners most closely resemble 2,3,7,8-TCDD in their structures and in their toxic effects. The larger group of phenobarbital

  7. An Abundance Analysis of Two Carbon-Rich Proto-Planetary Nebulae: IRAS Z02229+6208 And IRAS 07430+1115

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, Bacham E.; Bakker, Eric J.; Hrivnak, Bruce J.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, we present an LTE abundance analysis of two new proto-planetary nebulae, IRAS Z02229 + 6208 and IRAS 07430 + 1115, based on high-resolution (R approximately equal 55,000) optical echelle spectra. Results show that both stars are metal-poor ([Fe/H] = -0.5) and overabundant in C, N, and s-process elements. The average elemental abundances are [C/Fe] = +0.8, [N/Fe] = +1.2, and [s-process/Fe] = +1.4 for IRAS Z02229 + 6208, and [C/Fe] = +0.6, [N/Fe] = +0.4, and [s-process/Fe] = +1.6 for IRAS 07430+ 1115. These abundances suggest that the stars have experienced nucleo-synthesis on the asymptotic giant branch (AGB), and the resultant products of CNO, 3alpha, and s-process reactions were brought to the photosphere during shell flashes and deep mixing episodes during the AGB phase of their evolution. Of major significance is the measurement of a high Li abundance in both stars, log epsilon(Li) approximately equal 2.3 and 2.4 for IRAS Z02229 + 6208 and IRAS 07430 + 1115, respectively. This may be the result of hot bottom burning, below the deep convective zone. We also present an analysis of the circumstellar molecular (C2 and CN) and atomic (Na I and K I) absorption spectra of both stars. We derive rotational temperatures, column densities, and envelope expansion velocities using molecular C2 Phillips and CN Red system bands. The values derived for expansion velocities, 8-14 km/s, are typical of the values found for post-AGB stars. IRAS 07430+ 1115 is unusual in that it shows P Cygni-shaped C2 emission profiles in the spectra of the circumstellar envelope. A minimum distance for IRAS Z02229+6208, determined from interstellar Na I lines, suggests that it is evolved from an intermediate-mass star. Including these two stars, the number of post-AGB stars for which clear C, N, and s-process elemental overabundances are found rises to eight. IRAS Z02229 + 6208 is known to possess the 21 micron emission feature in its mid-infrared spectrum; these results support the

  8. Cath lab costs in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary angioplasty - detailed analysis of consecutive procedures.

    PubMed

    Dziki, Beata; Miechowicz, Izabela; Iwachów, Piotr; Kuzemczak, Michał; Kałmucki, Piotr; Szyszka, Andrzej; Baszko, Artur; Siminiak, Tomasz

    2017-01-01

    Costs of percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) have an important impact on health care expenditures. Despite the present stress upon the cost-effectiveness issues in medicine, few comprehensive data exist on costs and resource use in different clinical settings. To assess catheterisation laboratory costs related to use of drugs and single-use devices in patients undergoing PCI due to coronary artery disease. Retrospective analysis of 1500 consecutive PCIs (radial approach, n = 1103; femoral approach, n = 397) performed due to ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI; n = 345) and non ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI; n = 426) as well as unstable angina (UA; n = 489) and stable angina (SA; n = 241) was undertaken. Comparative cost analysis was performed and shown in local currency units (PLN). The cath lab costs were higher in STEMI (4295.01 ± 2384.54PLN, p < 0.001) compared to NSTEMI (3493.40 ± 1907.43 PLN, p < 0.001), UA (3206.31 ± 1692.82 PLN, p < 0.001) and SA patients (3138.91 ± 1427.62 PLN, p < 0.001). They were higher in males than in females (3668.9 ± 2095.2 vs. 3292.0 ± 1656.0 PLN, p < 0.05). In females PCIs performed via radial approach were more expensive than via femoral approach (3360.4 ± 1540.1 vs. 3135.5 ± 1890.3 PLN, p < 0.01). In all subgroups analysed, costs were positively correlated with X-ray dose, fluoroscopy, and total procedure times. Patients' age negatively correlated with cath lab costs in STEMI/NSTEMI patients. Cath lab costs were higher in STEMI patients compared to other groups. In STEMI/NSTEMI they were lower in older patients. In all analysed groups costs were related to the level of procedural difficulty. In female patients, the costs of PCI performed via radial approach were higher compared to femoral approach. Despite younger age, male patients underwent more expensive procedures.

  9. Comparison of drilling reports and detailed geophysical analysis of ground-water production in bedrock wells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paillet, Frederick; Duncanson, Russell

    1994-01-01

    The most extensive data base for fractured bedrock aquifers consists of drilling reports maintained by various state agencies. We investigated the accuracy and reliability of such reports by comparing a representative set of reports for nine wells drilled by conventional air percussion methods in granite with a suite of geophysical logs for the same wells designed to identify the depths of fractures intersecting the well bore which may have produced water during aquifer tests. Production estimates reported by the driller ranged from less than 1 to almost 10 gallons per minute. The moderate drawdowns maintained during subsequent production tests were associated with approximately the same flows as those measured when boreholes were dewatered during air percussion drilling. We believe the estimates of production during drilling and drawdown tests were similar because partial fracture zone dewatering during drilling prevented larger inflows otherwise expected from the steeper drawdowns during drilling. The fractures and fracture zones indicated on the drilling report and the amounts of water produced by these fractures during drilling generally agree with those identified from the geophysical log analysis. Most water production occurred from two fractured and weathered zones which are separated by an interval of unweathered granite. The fractures identified in the drilling reports show various depth discrepancies in comparison to the geophysical logs, which are subject to much better depth control. However, the depths of the fractures associated with water production on the drilling report are comparable to the depths of the fractures shown to be the source of water inflow in the geophysical log analysis. Other differences in the relative contribution of flow from fracture zones may by attributed to the differences between the hydraulic conditions during drilling, which represent large, prolonged drawdowns, and pumping tests, which consisted of smaller drawdowns

  10. Detailed analysis of biased histamine H4 receptor signalling by JNJ 7777120 analogues

    PubMed Central

    Nijmeijer, S; Vischer, H F; Sirci, F; Schultes, S; Engelhardt, H; de Graaf, C; Rosethorne, E M; Charlton, S J; Leurs, R

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose The histamine H4 receptor, originally thought to signal merely through Gαi proteins, has recently been shown to also recruit and signal via β-arrestin2. Following the discovery that the reference antagonist indolecarboxamide JNJ 7777120 appears to be a partial agonist in β-arrestin2 recruitment, we have identified additional biased hH4R ligands that preferentially couple to Gαi or β-arrestin2 proteins. In this study, we explored ligand and receptor regions that are important for biased hH4R signalling. Experimental Approach We evaluated a series of 48 indolecarboxamides with subtle structural differences for their ability to induce hH4R-mediated Gαi protein signalling or β-arrestin2 recruitment. Subsequently, a Fingerprints for Ligands and Proteins three-dimensional quantitative structure–activity relationship analysis correlated intrinsic activity values with structural ligand requirements. Moreover, a hH4R homology model was used to identify receptor regions important for biased hH4R signalling. Key Results One indolecarboxamide (75) with a nitro substituent on position R7 of the aromatic ring displayed an equal preference for the Gαi and β-arrestin2 pathway and was classified as unbiased hH4R ligand. The other 47 indolecarboxamides were β-arrestin2-biased agonists. Intrinsic activities of the unbiased as well as β-arrestin2-biased indolecarboxamides to induce β-arrestin2 recruitment could be correlated with different ligand features and hH4R regions. Conclusion and Implications Small structural modifications resulted in diverse intrinsic activities for unbiased (75) and β-arrestin2-biased indolecarboxamides. Analysis of ligand and receptor features revealed efficacy hotspots responsible for biased-β-arrestin2 recruitment. This knowledge is useful for the design of hH4R ligands with biased intrinsic activities and aids our understanding of the mechanism of H4R activation. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed

  11. Detailed faecal fat analysis using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy: Exploring the possibilities.

    PubMed

    De Koninck, Anne-Sophie; Nys, Karen; Vandenheede, Brent; Van Biervliet, Stephanie; Speeckaert, Marijn M; Delanghe, Joris R

    2016-11-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic determination of faecal fat is a simple and elegant alternative for the classical Van De Kamer approach. Besides quantification of the total amount of fat, analysis of the lipase hydrolysis efficiency (fatty acid/triglyceride ratio), fatty acid chain length and trans-unsaturated fatty acids could provide a better monitoring of dietary treatment. Stool samples (26 routine samples and 36 cystic fibrosis patients) were analysed with the Perkin Elmer Spectrum Two® spectrometer (3500-450cm -1 ). Fatty acid/triglyceride ratio was calculated using the absorbance ratio at 2855:1746cm -1 . To estimate lipase hydrolysis efficiency, sample ratios were compared with the ratio of butter and pure free fatty acids. Mean fatty acid chain length was calculated using the absorbance ratio at 2855:1709cm -1 . The absorbance at 966cm -1 was used to trace the presence of trans-type unsaturated fatty acids. Butter showed a low fatty acid/triglyceride ratio (1.21) and pure free fatty acids a high fatty acid/triglyceride ratio (6.76). Mean fatty acid/triglyceride ratio of routine stool samples was 4.16±1.01. The applicability of fatty acid/triglyceride ratios was also tested in cystic fibrosis patients under treatment with a mean of 4.92±0.98. Relative absorbance contribution per carbon atom was 0.06 (ratio 1.06 for C18 standard, 0.91 for C16 standard). The mean ratio of the stool samples was 1.12 (mean acyl chain length of C19), with values ranging from 0.73 (C12) to 1.68 (C28). The presence of traceable amounts of trans-unsaturated fatty acids was also demonstrated. For the analysis of faecal material, FTIR provides unique information, difficult to obtain using other techniques. These findings offer perspectives for diet monitoring in patients with (non-)pancreatic malabsorption. Copyright © 2016 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Research priorities by professional background - A detailed analysis of the James Lind Alliance Priority Setting Partnership.

    PubMed

    Arulkumaran, Nishkantha; Reay, Hannah; Brett, Stephen J

    2016-05-01

    The Intensive Care Foundation, in partnership with the James Lind Alliance, has supported a national project to identify and prioritise unanswered questions about adult intensive care that are important to people who have been critically ill, their families, and the health professionals who care for them. We conducted a secondary analysis to explore differences in priorities determined by different respondent groups in order to identify different groups' perceptions of gaps in knowledge. There were two surveys conducted as part of the original project. Survey 1 comprised a single open question to identify important research topics; survey 2 aimed to prioritise these topics using a 10-point Likert scale. In survey 1, despite clear differences in suggestions amongst the respondent groups, themes of comfort/communication and post-ICU rehabilitation were the within the top 2 suggestions across all groups. Patients and relatives suggested research topics to which they could easily relate, whereas there was a greater breadth of suggestions from clinicians. In survey 2, the number of research priorities that received a mode score of 10 varied from 1 to 36. Patients scored 36 out of the 37 topics with a mode score of 10. All other groups scored topics with more discrimination, with the number of topics with a mode score of 10 ranging from 1 to 20. Differences in the proportions of the representative groups are therefore unlikely to have translated to an impartial conclusion. Clinicians, patients, and family members have jointly identified the research priorities for UK ICM practice.

  13. Enhanced Ethanol and Biogas Production from Pinewood by NMMO Pretreatment and Detailed Biomass Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zilouei, Hamid; Taherzadeh, Mohammad J.

    2014-01-01

    N-Methyl morpholine-N-oxide (NMMO) is an environmentally friendly and commercially applied cellulose solvent that is suggested for pretreatment of lignocelluloses to improve biofuel productions. However, the underlying mechanisms of the improvements have been poorly understood yet. In an attempt to investigate the mechanisms, pinewood powder and chips were pretreated with 85% (w/w) NMMO at 120°C for 1–15 h. The pretreatment improved ethanol production yield from 7.2% (g/g) for the untreated wood powder to 68.1–86.1% (g/g) and from 1.7% (g/g) for the untreated wood chips to 12.6–51.2% (g/g) of theoretical yield. Similarly, the biogas yields of untreated wood chips and powder were improved from 21 and 66 (mL/g volatile solids) by 3.5–6.8- and 2.6–3.4-folds, respectively. SEM micrographs indicated major increase in the wood porosity by the pretreatment, which would confirm increase in the water swelling capacity as well as enzyme adsorption. The analysis of X-ray diffraction showed considerable reduction in the cellulose crystallinity by the pretreatment, while FTIR spectroscopy results indicated reduction of lignin on the wood surface by the pretreatment. PMID:25162014

  14. Detailed Bayesian Analysis of the CoRoT-7 Lightcurve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parviainen, Hannu; Deeg, H.

    2011-09-01

    With a mass of 7.4 Earth masses and radius of 1.6 Earth radii, CoRoT-7b is among the smallest transiting planets found to date. Due to its small size, the transit signal is very shallow, which makes the estimation of the planetary parameters from the light curve challenging. We carry out a Bayesian analysis of the CoRoT-7b lightcurve using a minimalistic approach to the pre-processing of the data. We use parallel tempering Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulations to gain a comprehensive view of the geometric and planetary parameter probability distributions, including the possibility for transit timing variations. Furthermore, we assess whether the use of a quadratic limb-darkening model is justified given the accuracy of the data, and how the choice of the limb-darkening model affects the geometric and planetary parameters inferred from the PTMCMC simulations. This research is supported by RoPACS, a Marie Curie Initial Training Network funded by the European Commission’s Seventh Framework Programme.

  15. Helium abundances in HII regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valerdi, M.; Peimbert, A.

    2017-11-01

    The formation of elements is a key problem in order to understand the evolution of the Universe. Particularly, the formation of ^{4}He has been fundamental for the study of cosmology and the chemical evolution of galaxies. The primordial abundance of ^{4}He (Y_{P}) has allowed us to verify the details of the SBBN theory. The value of Y_{P} can be determined from observations of the helium and hydrogen emission lines from low metallicity galaxies, where the small star formation rate has enriched the gas with a few helium and heavy elements. It is commonly known that the total abundance of an element relative to the hydrogen is given by all its ion abundances. In practice, not all the ionization stages are observed. Therefore, we must correct for unobserved stages using ICFs. As a particular case ICF(He) has been ignored due to the fact that, for high ionization HII regions, its correction is 1-2% (which can be positive or negative depending on the exact nature of the particular HII region). Nevertheless, if we want to have a high determination of helium abundance in order to determine a better value of Y_{P}, the ICF(He) becomes important.

  16. Elemental abundances in stone meteorites.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, R. A.; Goles, G. G.; Osborn, T. W.; Smith, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    Measurement of abundances of Na, Al, Sc, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, and Cu by instrumental neutron activation analyses of 103 chondrites and 17 achondrites. Various sources of error in the method, including sampling errors, are discussed in detail. Examination of the patterns of coherence of the elements determined suggests the presence of effects of fractionation during condensation from the solar nebula of matter parental to chondrites. Such effects seem to be exhibited both in the abundances of lithophilic elements, perhaps being related to varied temperatures of accretion and in the abundances of those elements which would be affected by metal-silicate fractionation in the solar nebula. Atomic abundances relative to Si vary little in carbonaceous chondrites, suggesting that efficient mixing processes operated on these meteorites prior to or during their formation. It is suggested that, at present, no single class of carbonaceous chondrites is clearly more primitive than another. Carbonaceous and unequilibrated ordinary chondrites may represent aggregates of material accreted from the solar nebula at relatively low temperatures. The present data support a model of equilibration and minor mobilization of nonvolatile elements within small domains of chondrites after accretion. Such a model would be consistent with the petrologic types of Van Schmus and Wood (1967).

  17. Full Field Deformation Measurements in Tensile Kolsky Bar Experiments: Studies and Detailed Analysis of the Early Time History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, M. A.; Gilat, A.; Seidt, J.; Rajan, S.; Kidane, A.

    2018-01-01

    The very early stages of high rate tensile loading are important when attempting to characterize the response of materials during the transient loading time. To improve understanding of the conditions imposed on the specimen during the transient stage, a series of high rate loading experiments are performed using a Kolsky tensile bar system. Specimen forces and velocities during the high rate loading experiment are obtained by performing a thorough method of characteristics analysis of the system employed in the experiments. The in-situ full-field specimen displacements, velocities and accelerations during the loading process are quantified using modern ultra-high-speed imaging systems to provide detailed measurements of specimen response, with emphasis on the earliest stages of loading. Detailed analysis of the image-based measurements confirms that conditions are nominally consistent with those necessary for use of the one-dimensional wave equation within the relatively thin, dog-bone shaped tensile specimen. Specifically, measurements and use of the one-dimensional wave equation show clearly that the specimen has low inertial stresses in comparison to the applied transmitted force. Though the accelerations of the specimen continue for up to 50 μs, measurements show that the specimen is essentially in force equilibrium beginning a few microseconds after initial loading. These local measurements contrast with predictions based on comparison of the wave-based incident force measurements, which suggest that equilibrium occurs much later, on the order of 40-50 μs .

  18. Detailed Analysis of Peri-Procedural Strokes in Patients Undergoing Intracranial Stenting in SAMMPRIS

    PubMed Central

    Fiorella, David; Derdeyn, Colin P; Lynn, Michael J; Barnwell, Stanley L; Hoh, Brian L.; Levy, Elad I.; Harrigan, Mark R.; Klucznik, Richard P.; McDougall, Cameron G.; Pride, G. Lee; Zaidat, Osama O.; Lutsep, Helmi L.; Waters, Michael F.; Hourihane, J. Maurice; Alexandrov, Andrei V.; Chiu, David; Clark, Joni M.; Johnson, Mark D.; Torbey, Michel T.; Rumboldt, Zoran; Cloft, Harry J.; Turan, Tanya N.; Lane, Bethany F.; Janis, L. Scott; Chimowitz, Marc I.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Purpose Enrollment in the SAMMPRIS trial was halted due to the high risk of stroke or death within 30 days of enrollment in the percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting (PTAS) arm relative to the medical arm. This analysis focuses on the patient and procedural factors that may have been associated with peri-procedural cerebrovascular events in the trial. Methods Bivariate and multivariate analyses were performed to evaluate whether patient and procedural variables were associated with cerebral ischemic or hemorrhagic events occurring within 30 days of enrollment (termed peri-procedural) in the PTAS arm. Results Of 224 patients randomized to PTAS, 213 underwent angioplasty alone (n=5) or with stenting (n=208). Of these, 13 had hemorrhagic strokes (7 parenchymal, 6 subarachnoid), 19 had ischemic stroke, and 2 had cerebral infarcts with temporary signs (CITS) within the peri-procedural period. Ischemic events were categorized as perforator occlusions (13), embolic (4), mixed perforator and embolic (2), and delayed stent occlusion (2). Multivariate analyses showed that higher percent stenosis, lower modified Rankin score, and clopidogrel load associated with an activated clotting time above the target range were associated (p ≤ 0.05) with hemorrhagic stroke. Non-smoking, basilar artery stenosis, diabetes, and older age were associated (p ≤ 0.05) with ischemic events. Conclusions Peri-procedural strokes in SAMMPRIS had multiple causes with the most common being perforator occlusion. Although risk factors for peri-procedural strokes could be identified, excluding patients with these features from undergoing PTAS to lower the procedural risk would limit PTAS to a small subset of patients. Moreover, given the small number of events, the present data should be used for hypothesis generation rather than to guide patient selection in clinical practice. PMID:22984008

  19. Detailed volumetric analysis of the hypothalamus in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Bocchetta, Martina; Gordon, Elizabeth; Manning, Emily; Barnes, Josephine; Cash, David M; Espak, Miklos; Thomas, David L; Modat, Marc; Rossor, Martin N; Warren, Jason D; Ourselin, Sebastien; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Rohrer, Jonathan D

    2015-12-01

    Abnormal eating behaviors are frequently reported in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD). The hypothalamus is the regulatory center for feeding and satiety but its involvement in bvFTD has not been fully clarified, partly due to its difficult identification on MR images. We measured hypothalamic volume in 18 patients with bvFTD (including 9 MAPT and 6 C9orf72 mutation carriers) and 18 cognitively normal controls using a novel optimized multimodal segmentation protocol, combining 3D T1 and T2-weighted 3T MRIs (intrarater intraclass correlation coefficients ≥0.93). The whole hypothalamus was subsequently segmented into five subunits: the anterior (superior and inferior), tuberal (superior and inferior), and posterior regions. The presence of abnormal eating behavior was assessed with the revised version of the Cambridge Behavioural Inventory (CBI-R). The bvFTD group showed a 17% lower hypothalamic volume compared with controls (p < 0.001): mean 783 (standard deviation 113) versus 944 (73) mm(3) (corrected for total intracranial volume). In the hypothalamic subunit analysis, the superior parts of the anterior and tuberal regions and the posterior region were significantly smaller in the bvFTD group compared with controls. There was a trend for a smaller hypothalamic volume, particularly in the superior tuberal region, in those with severe eating disturbance scores on the CBI-R. Differences were seen between the two genetic subgroups with significantly smaller volumes in the MAPT but not the C9orf72 group compared with controls. In summary, bvFTD patients had lower hypothalamic volumes compared with controls. Different genetic mutations may have a differential impact on the hypothalamus.

  20. A geostatistical analysis of small-scale spatial variability in bacterial abundance and community structure in salt marsh creek bank sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, Rima B.; Blum, Linda K.; McComb, Alison C.; Mills, Aaron L.

    2002-01-01

    Small-scale variations in bacterial abundance and community structure were examined in salt marsh sediments from Virginia's eastern shore. Samples were collected at 5 cm intervals (horizontally) along a 50 cm elevation gradient, over a 215 cm horizontal transect. For each sample, bacterial abundance was determined using acridine orange direct counts and community structure was analyzed using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA fingerprinting of whole-community DNA extracts. A geostatistical analysis was used to determine the degree of spatial autocorrelation among the samples, for each variable and each direction (horizontal and vertical). The proportion of variance in bacterial abundance that could be accounted for by the spatial model was quite high (vertical: 60%, horizontal: 73%); significant autocorrelation was found among samples separated by 25 cm in the vertical direction and up to 115 cm horizontally. In contrast, most of the variability in community structure was not accounted for by simply considering the spatial separation of samples (vertical: 11%, horizontal: 22%), and must reflect variability from other parameters (e.g., variation at other spatial scales, experimental error, or environmental heterogeneity). Microbial community patch size based upon overall similarity in community structure varied between 17 cm (vertical) and 35 cm (horizontal). Overall, variability due to horizontal position (distance from the creek bank) was much smaller than that due to vertical position (elevation) for both community properties assayed. This suggests that processes more correlated with elevation (e.g., drainage and redox potential) vary at a smaller scale (therefore producing smaller patch sizes) than processes controlled by distance from the creek bank. c2002 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Opening research sites in multicentre clinical trials within the UK: a detailed analysis of delays.

    PubMed

    Kearney, Anna; McKay, Andrew; Hickey, Helen; Balabanova, Silviya; Marson, Anthony G; Gamble, Carrol; Williamson, Paula

    2014-09-16

    To investigate the length of time taken to open UK research sites in multicentre clinical trials and to identify reasons for any delays. A case study, recording key milestone dates from the time a site receives ethical approval through to opening to recruitment. Delay reasons were prospectively logged by trial staff at a minimum of fortnightly periods using a coding system. SANADII, a phase IV pragmatic trial, managed by the Clinical Trials Research Centre, Liverpool. The trial seeks to work with over 100 National Health Service (NHS) sites to meet its recruitment target of 1510 patients. The primary outcome was time from Multicentre Regional Ethics Committee (MREC) approval to site opening using survival analysis. Where sites took over a specified time to reach milestones (>3 months from MREC to Site Specific Information (SSI) submission, >30 days from SSI validation to local R&D approval, or >30 days from local Research and Development (R&D) approval to opening to recruitment), the longest continuous delay during that milestone was identified. The median opening time for participating sites was 9.7 months (IQR 6.2 to Not Reached). SSI submission took 7 months (IQR 4.1-12.3) from ethics approval, R&D approval took 16 days (IQR 5.0-32.0) from SSI validation and site opening took 15 days (IQR 8.5-40.0) following R&D approval. The longest delays before SSI submission resulted from negotiating excess treatment costs, finalising logistics, collecting CVs and ongoing participation discussions. While recently imposed targets are reducing the time taken for R&D departments to approve valid applications, the time taken to open UK research sites remains excessive and must be reduced. At present significant public funds are being used inefficiently in order to navigate NHS systems, challenging the resolve of trial teams and the competitiveness of the UK. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go

  2. Initiation of and distributed deformation at and around stylolite interfaces: Insights from detailed microstructural analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebner, M.; Piazolo, S.; Koehn, D.

    2009-04-01

    In the present contribution we investigate the microstructure of bedding parallel and bedding normal stylolites in carbonate rocks. We focused our study on micro-stylolites which represent an initial stage of this localised pressure solution process as stylolite roughness amplitude is a function of strain. We use electron backscatter diffraction analysis (EBSD) and orientation contrast imaging to address the following issues: (i) What causes the initiation of stylolite interfaces at a submicroscopic scale, (ii) is there distributed deformation around the stylolite interface and (iii) what is the role of the interface (residuum)? Our findings demonstrate that the characteristic stylolite teeth are initiated at a pre-existing heterogeneity in the host-rock. This quenched noise in carbonate rocks is typically composed of clay particles in the submicron scale. In addition, qtz-grains are present along especially pronounced stylolite peaks. The stylolite interface evolves with increasing strain from individual clay particles separated by grain-grain contacts of calcite along the interface to a continuous layer of clay and oxides. Thickness variation of the residuum along the interface is inferred to be strongly influenced by the pre-existing distribution of pinning particles that are more resistant to dissolution. Another important observation is that a shaped preferred orientation (SPO) exists in a halo around the stylolite. This SPO increases with proximity to the stylolite interface. Within this halo, crystal plastic deformation is expressed by subgrain formation with subgrain boundaries usually aligned parallel to shortening direction. Bedding normal (tectonic) stylolites which overprint already compacted beds i.e. with a pre-existing sedimentary SPO parallel to the bedding plane exhibit a SPO at a high angle to the sedimentary SPO. We conclude that stylolite roughness is primarily caused by pre-existing heterogeneities in the host-rock which are more resistant to

  3. Space shuttle/food system study. Volume 2, Appendix G: Ground support system analysis. Appendix H: Galley functional details analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The capabilities for preflight feeding of flight personnel and the supply and control of the space shuttle flight food system were investigated to determine ground support requirements; and the functional details of an onboard food system galley are shown in photographic mockups. The elements which were identified as necessary to the efficient accomplishment of ground support functions include the following: (1) administration; (2) dietetics; (3) analytical laboratories; (4) flight food warehouse; (5) stowage module assembly area; (6) launch site module storage area; (7) alert crew restaurant and disperse crew galleys; (8) ground food warehouse; (9) manufacturing facilities; (10) transport; and (11) computer support. Each element is discussed according to the design criteria of minimum cost, maximum flexibility, reliability, and efficiency consistent with space shuttle requirements. The galley mockup overview illustrates the initial operation configuration, food stowage locations, meal assembly and serving trays, meal preparation configuration, serving, trash management, and the logistics of handling and cleanup equipment.

  4. Natural abundance 14C analysis of biomarkers: A further tool for understanding microbial metabolism in the environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, G. F.; Eglinton, T. I.; Reddy, C. M.

    2004-12-01

    On April 27, 2004 the barge Bouchard 120 spilled ~400,000 liters of No. 6 fuel oil into Buzzards Bay, MA and contaminated ~200 km of rocky and sandy beaches. To investigate the short-term fate of the spilled oil on one of the rocky beaches (Nyes Neck), oil-covered rocks were collected and analyzed by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GCxGC). Within several weeks, the major removal processes were evaporation and water-washing, but microbial degradation of n-alkanes became evident in mid June 2004 and continued through July and August. In order to confirm that the observed losses of n-alkanes were due to microbial activity, select rocks collected in mid July 2004 were analyzed for the stable carbon and radiocarbon content of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA). These results indicate that the active community living on these oil-covered rocks was predominated by algae due to the presence of polyunsaturated C:20 PLFA that represented 48.4 mole percent of the PLFA at the site. The ubiquitous C16:0 and C18:0 PLFA made up 18.9 and 15.2 mole percent respectively, and PLFA commonly associated with bacteria, C16:1, C17:0, C18:unsaturated, and C20:0 made up a cumulative 14.4 mole percent. Compound specific 13C analysis yielded ambiguous results and gave no clear indication of petroleum metabolism by the microbial community. In contrast, 14C analysis of the individual PLFA clearly demonstrated that microbial uptake of the petroleum carbon was occurring. The 14C content of the algal PLFA (33.4 permil) closely matches that of Buzzards Bay dissolved inorganic carbon (51-62 permil), but the bacterial PLFA were strongly depleted in 14C (-230 permil). The ubiquitous C16 and C18 PLFA fell between these values (-8 and -39 permil respectively). These observed depletions could only be due to incorporation of the petroleum carbon, which has a 14C of -1000 permil. Thus compound specific radiocarbon analysis has proved to be an excellent tool for identification of microbial

  5. Detailed analysis of temporal features on contrast enhanced ultrasound may help differentiate intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma from hepatocellular carcinoma in cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Yuan, Meng-Xia; Ma, Kuan-sheng; Li, Xiao-Wu; Tang, Chun-Lin; Zhang, Xiao-Hang; Guo, De-Yu; Yan, Xiao-Chu

    2014-01-01

    To verify if detailed analysis of temporal enhancement patterns on contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) may help differentiate intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in cirrhosis. Thirty three ICC and fifty HCC in cirrhosis were enrolled in this study. The contrast kinetics of ICC and HCC was analyzed and compared. Statistical analysis did not reveal significant difference between ICC and HCC in the time of contrast first appearance and arterial peak maximum time. ICC displayed much earlier washout than that of HCC (47.93±26.45 seconds vs 90.86±31.26 seconds) in the portal phase, and most ICC (87.9%) showed washout before 60 seconds than HCC (16.0%). Much more ICC (78.8%) revealed marked washout than HCC (12.0%) while most HCC (88.0%) showed mild washout or no washout in late part of the portal phase (90-120 seconds). Twenty six out of thirty three ICC (78.8%) demonstrated both early washout(<60 seconds) and marked washout in late part of the portal phase, whereas, only six of fifty HCC (12.0%)showed these temporal enhancement features (p = 0.000).When both early washout and marked washout in the portal phase are taken as diagnostic criterion for ICC, the diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy were 78.8%,88.0%,81.3%,86.3%,and 84.3% respectively by CEUS. Analysis of detailed temporal enhancement features on CEUS is helpful differentiate ICC from HCC in cirrhosis.If a nodule in cirrhotic liver displays hyper-enhancement in the arterial phase followed by early and marked washout in the portal phase, the nodule is highly suspicious of ICC rather than HCC.

  6. Anarchy in the UK: Detailed genetic analysis of worker reproduction in a naturally occurring British anarchistic honeybee, Apis mellifera, colony using DNA microsatellites.

    PubMed

    Châline, N; Ratnieks, F L W; Burke, T

    2002-09-01

    Anarchistic behaviour is a very rare phenotype of honeybee colonies. In an anarchistic colony, many workers' sons are reared in the presence of the queen. Anarchy has previously been described in only two Australian colonies. Here we report on a first detailed genetic analysis of a British anarchistic colony. Male pupae were present in great abundance above the queen excluder, which was clearly indicative of extensive worker reproduction and is the hallmark of anarchy. Seventeen microsatellite loci were used to analyse these male pupae, allowing us to address whether all the males were indeed workers' sons, and how many worker patrilines and individual workers produced them. In the sample, 95 of 96 of the males were definitely workers' sons. Given that approximately 1% of workers' sons were genetically indistinguishable from queen's sons, this suggests that workers do not move any queen-laid eggs between the part of the colony where the queen is present to the area above the queen excluder which the queen cannot enter. The colony had 16 patrilines, with an effective number of patrilines of 9.85. The 75 males that could be assigned with certainty to a patriline came from 7 patrilines, with an effective number of 4.21. They were the offspring of at least 19 workers. This is in contrast to the two previously studied Australian naturally occurring anarchist colonies, in which most of the workers' sons were offspring of one patriline. The high number of patrilines producing males leads to a low mean relatedness between laying workers and males of the colony. We discuss the importance of studying such colonies in the understanding of worker policing and its evolution.

  7. Lithium Abundance in Planet Search Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myles, Justin; Yale Exoplanets

    2016-01-01

    Since most lithium in the universe is primordial and is destroyed in stars, lithium abundance can be used as a stellar age indicator. Some research seems to show that planet formation may also affect lithium abundance in exoplanet host stars (EHS). However, small and heterogenous samples have made both of these phenomena unclear. Further study of lithium abundance in EHS is needed to better understand possible physical roles of lithium in planet formation theory. We use a large homogenous sample with accurate stellar parameters on which we will use equivalent width analysis to determine precise lithium abundances. From these abundance values we determine an age vs. abundance relation. Additionally, we aim to explore correlation between lithium abundance and planet formation.

  8. What's on the menu? Assessing microbial carbon sources and cycling in soils using natural abundance radiocarbon analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudi, N.; Burns, L.; Mancini, S.; Fulthorpe, R.; Slater, G. F.

    2011-12-01

    Organic matter in soils is composed of diverse materials in various stages of decomposition. Soil organic matter is not in a single pool but rather in multiple carbon pools with different intrinsic turnover times that can be on annual to decadal and even millennial timescales. Microorganisms can influence the total amount of carbon stored in soils and the turnover rates of these different pools. However, the links between microbes and their ability to utilize these various carbon pools are not well understood. Moreover, microbes have been shown to co-utilize a number of available carbon sources rather than a single carbon source under soil conditions which creates difficulties in identifying microbial carbon sources in the natural environment. Compound-specific radiocarbon analysis of microbial phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) has become a useful tool in elucidating microbial carbon sources in complex environments with multiple carbon sources. We investigated microbial carbon cycling at an industrial site in Ontario which included a variety of carbon sources including vegetation, PAHs and natural organic matter (NOM). Using this approach, the 14C content of microbial membrane lipids (which reflects their carbon source) can be compared to surrounding carbon sources in order to assess which carbon source they are metabolizing and incorporating into their lipids. In addition, we assessed microbial community structure and diversity by analyzing amplified bacterial, eukaryotic and archaeal rDNA fragments with denaturing gel gradient electrophoresis (DGGE). The Δ14C value for PLFAs ranged from +54 to -697% which indicates that microbial carbon sources across soils differ. The Δ14CPLFA for some soils is consistent with modern carbon sources while Δ14CPLFA for other soils is consistent with natural organic matter including older pools of carbon. The microbial communities at this site are not metabolizing PAHs but rather they are utilizing various pools of natural organic

  9. Threading events in ring polymer melts: a detailed geometric analysis and their connection with the slow relaxation modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavrantzas, Vlasis; Tsalikis, Dimitrios; Vlassopoulos, Dimitris

    We will present results from a detailed geometric analysis of atomistic configurations of ring polyethylene oxide melts accumulated in the course of very long molecular dynamics (MD) simulations at T = 413K and P = 1atm which allowed us to locate ring-ring threading events and quantify their strengths and survival times. We have identified a variety of threading situations and studied their dependence on ring molecular weight. We have found that threadings can last up to several times the corresponding ring relaxation time, which can explain (at least in part) the appearance of slow relaxation modes observed experimentally in entangled polymer rings. We confirm this by proposing a new expression for the stress relaxation modulus of entangled polymer rings that is found to provide excellent fits to experimentally measured curves.

  10. Detailed analysis of charge transport in amorphous organic thin layer by multiscale simulation without any adjustable parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uratani, Hiroki; Kubo, Shosei; Shizu, Katsuyuki; Suzuki, Furitsu; Fukushima, Tatsuya; Kaji, Hironori

    2016-12-01

    Hopping-type charge transport in an amorphous thin layer composed of organic molecules is simulated by the combined use of molecular dynamics, quantum chemical, and Monte Carlo calculations. By explicitly considering the molecular structure and the disordered intermolecular packing, we reasonably reproduce the experimental hole and electron mobilities and their applied electric field dependence (Poole-Frenkel behaviour) without using any adjustable parameters. We find that the distribution of the density-of-states originating from the amorphous nature has a significant impact on both the mobilities and Poole-Frenkel behaviour. Detailed analysis is also provided to reveal the molecular-level origin of the charge transport, including the origin of Poole-Frenkel behaviour.

  11. Comparative analysis of miRNA and mRNA abundance in determinate cucumber by high-throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chao; Yang, Jingjing; Cheng, Qing; Mao, Aijun; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Shiping; Weng, Yiqun; Wen, Changlong

    2018-01-01

    Determinate cucumber is a type of short vines, fewer nodes, and terminal flowers, it is suitable for high-density planting and available harvesting in field cultivation, whereas the indeterminate cucumber is preferred to cultivate in greenhouses. However, many biotic or abiotic stresses could lead indeterminate cucumber to be determinate in greenhouse cultivation, which may decrease yield and fruit quality. Therefore, it is urgent and essential to investigate the key factors forming determinate and terminal flowering in cucumber. In this study, two close background inbred lines were selected and conducted the miRNA and mRNA high throughput sequencing. Interestingly, ethylene-associated miRNAs and mRNAs were intensively obtained, indicating that the plant hormone ethylene is a key factor impacting determinate and terminal flowering in cucumber. The ethylene metabolites analysis showed that significant higher ethylene was observed in determinate line than that in the indeterminate line. The RT-qPCR validation of ethylene related miRNAs Cas-miR172, Cas-miR396, and Cas-miR414 and their target mRNAs showed a significant negative correlation. These data suggested that ethylene-associated miRNAs might affect determinate and terminal flower phenotypes by regulating their target genes expression. This study not only provides a potential molecular mechanism for determinate formation in cucumber but also establishes a method to demonstrate important physiological processes through the comprehensive association of miRNA and mRNA high-throughput sequencing.

  12. Understanding the structure of skill through a detailed analysis of Individuals' performance on the Space Fortress game.

    PubMed

    Towne, Tyler J; Boot, Walter R; Ericsson, K Anders

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we describe a novel approach to the study of individual differences in acquired skilled performance in complex laboratory tasks based on an extension of the methodology of the expert-performance approach (Ericsson & Smith, 1991) to shorter periods of training and practice. In contrast to more traditional approaches that study the average performance of groups of participants, we explored detailed behavioral changes for individual participants across their development on the Space Fortress game. We focused on dramatic individual differences in learning and skill acquisition at the individual level by analyzing the archival game data of several interesting players to uncover the specific structure of their acquired skill. Our analysis revealed that even after maximal values for game-generated subscores were reached, the most skilled participant's behaviors such as his flight path, missile firing, and mine handling continued to be refined and improved (Participant 17 from Boot et al., 2010). We contrasted this participant's behavior with the behavior of several other participants and found striking differences in the structure of their performance, which calls into question the appropriateness of averaging their data. For example, some participants engaged in different control strategies such as "world wrapping" or maintaining a finely-tuned circular flight path around the fortress (in contrast to Participant 17's angular flight path). In light of these differences, we raise fundamental questions about how skill acquisition for individual participants should be studied and described. Our data suggest that a detailed analysis of individuals' data is an essential step for generating a general theory of skill acquisition that explains improvement at the group and individual levels. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Identification of Potential Efficiency Opportunities in Internal Combustion Engines Using a Detailed Thermodynamic Analysis of Engine Simulation Results

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Kevin Dean; Wagner, Robert M; Graves, Ronald L

    2008-01-01

    Current political and environmental concerns are driving renewed efforts to develop techniques for improving the efficiency of internal combustion engines. A detailed thermodynamic analysis of an engine and its components from a 1st and 2nd law perspective is necessary to characterize system losses and to identify efficiency opportunities. We have developed a method for performing this analysis using engine-simulation results obtained from WAVE , a commercial engine-modeling software package available from Ricardo, Inc. Results from the engine simulation are post-processed to compute thermodynamic properties such as internal energy, enthalpy, entropy, and availability (or exergy), which are required to perform energymore » and availability balances of the system. This analysis is performed for all major components (turbocharger, intercooler, EGR cooler, etc.) of the engine as a function of crank angle degree for the entire engine cycle. With this information, we are able to identify potential efficiency opportunities as well as guide engine experiments for exploring new technologies for recovering system losses.« less

  14. Oxygen Abundance in Coronal Streamers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vásquez, Alberto M.; Raymond, John C.

    2005-02-01

    In a previous work we developed a stationary proton-electron MHD model of the solar corona, suitable for the minimum-activity epochs. In the present work, we use empirically derived information from the past solar minimum for the oxygen parameters (temperatures and outflow velocity) to develop an oxygen model in the frame of our previous model. Solar and Heliospheric Observatory UVCS observations of past minimum coronal streamers in the O VI λ1032 and O VI λ1037 lines have revealed that oxygen abundances are very much depleted within the stable closed-field regions of the quiescent streamers. This characteristic appears as a relatively dark region, often seen in the core of the quiescent equatorial streamers when imaged in oxygen lines. Using the oxygen abundance as a free parameter, we compute the expected O VI line emissivities from our models and synthesize images considering the projection effects in detail. We find here that, in order to obtain oxygen images with dark streamer cores similar to those observed, very low element abundances have to be assumed. The required depletion factors are lower than previous estimates that do not account for projection effects, which is especially important at 1.75 Rsolar and higher.

  15. Temporal Patterns of Abundance of Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) and Mitochondrial DNA Analysis of Ae. albopictus in the Central African Republic

    PubMed Central

    Kamgang, Basile; Ngoagouni, Carine; Manirakiza, Alexandre; Nakouné, Emmanuel; Paupy, Christophe; Kazanji, Mirdad

    2013-01-01

    The invasive Asian tiger mosquito Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) was first reported in central Africa in 2000, in Cameroon, with the indigenous mosquito species Ae. aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae). Today, this invasive species is present in almost all countries of the region, including the Central African Republic (CAR), where it was first recorded in 2009. As invasive species of mosquitoes can affect the distribution of native species, resulting in new patterns of vectors and concomitant risk for disease, we undertook a comparative study early and late in the wet season in the capital and the main cities of CAR to document infestation and the ecological preferences of the two species. In addition, we determined the probable geographical origin of invasive populations of Ae. albopictus with two mitochondrial DNA genes, COI and ND5. Analysis revealed that Ae. aegypti was more abundant earlier in the wet season and Ae. albopictus in the late wet season. Used tyres were the most heavily colonized productive larval habitats for both species in both seasons. The invasive species Ae. albopictus predominated over the resident species at all sites in which the two species were sympatric. Mitochondrial DNA analysis revealed broad low genetic diversity, confirming recent introduction of Ae. albopictus in CAR. Phylogeographical analysis based on COI polymorphism indicated that the Ae. albopictus haplotype in the CAR population segregated into two lineages, suggesting multiple sources of Ae. albopictus. These data may have important implications for vector control strategies in central Africa. PMID:24349596

  16. Quantitative assessment of hyperspectral imaging in detection of plasmonic nanoparticles: a modified contrast-detail analysis approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianting; Chen, Yu; Pfefer, T. Joshua

    2016-03-01

    Hyperspectral reflectance imaging (HRI) is an emerging imaging modality being applied for clinical indications such as tissue oximetry, and cancer detection based on endogenous biological constituents including plasmonic nanoparticles. However, there is currently a lack of standardized test methods for objective, quantitative evaluation of HRI system performance. Contrast-detail analysis (CDA) is a phantom-based test method commonly used to evaluate medical imaging devices (e.g., mammography systems) in terms of their lower detection limit. We investigated a modified CDA (mCDA) method to quantify the detectability of gold nanoparticles by HRI systems. Silicone-based turbid phantoms containing micro-fluidic channels were developed for the mCDA tests. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) phantom materials were doped with chromophores and scatterers to achieve biologically relevant optical properties (OPs). Molds were used to produce cylindrical channels of diameters 0.3 to 1.65 mm and depths of 0.2 mm inside the phantoms. Channels were filled with a mixture of hemoglobin and concentrations of gold nanorods (GNR) and measured with our HRI system. The contrast of GNRs was solved with a spectral unmixing algorithm from the reflectance spectra. The lowest detectable concentration was determined as a function of inclusion size and depth and plotted as modified contrast detail curve (mCDC). mCDCs were used to compare the detectabilities of the HRI system with different data processing algorithms. It is demonstrated that our mCDA test method involving turbid microchannel phantoms can help to elucidate the combined performance of imaging devices and plasmonic nanoparticle contrast agents. This approach may be useful for performing clinical trial standardization and device re-calibration, thus ensuring quality control and clinical performance.

  17. Detailed Analysis of the Microbial Population in Malaysian Spontaneous Cocoa Pulp Fermentations Reveals a Core and Variable Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Mathawan, Melissa; Wittocx, Pieter-Jan; Saels, Veerle; Struyf, Nore; Bernaert, Herwig; Vrancken, Gino; Verstrepen, Kevin J.

    2013-01-01

    The fermentation of cocoa pulp is one of the few remaining large-scale spontaneous microbial processes in today's food industry. The microbiota involved in cocoa pulp fermentations is complex and variable, which leads to inconsistent production efficiency and cocoa quality. Despite intensive research in the field, a detailed and comprehensive analysis of the microbiota is still lacking, especially for the expanding Asian production region. Here, we report a large-scale, comprehensive analysis of four spontaneous Malaysian cocoa pulp fermentations across two time points in the harvest season and two fermentation methods. Our results show that the cocoa microbiota consists of a “core” and a “variable” part. The bacterial populations show a remarkable consistency, with only two dominant species, Lactobacillus fermentum and Acetobacter pasteurianus. The fungal diversity is much larger, with four dominant species occurring in all fermentations (“core” yeasts), and a large number of yeasts that only occur in lower numbers and specific fermentations (“variable” yeasts). Despite this diversity, a clear pattern emerges, with early dominance of apiculate yeasts and late dominance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Our results provide new insights into the microbial diversity in Malaysian cocoa pulp fermentations and pave the way for the selection of starter cultures to increase efficiency and consistency. PMID:24358116

  18. Detailed analysis of the microbial population in Malaysian spontaneous cocoa pulp fermentations reveals a core and variable microbiota.

    PubMed

    Meersman, Esther; Steensels, Jan; Mathawan, Melissa; Wittocx, Pieter-Jan; Saels, Veerle; Struyf, Nore; Bernaert, Herwig; Vrancken, Gino; Verstrepen, Kevin J

    2013-01-01

    The fermentation of cocoa pulp is one of the few remaining large-scale spontaneous microbial processes in today's food industry. The microbiota involved in cocoa pulp fermentations is complex and variable, which leads to inconsistent production efficiency and cocoa quality. Despite intensive research in the field, a detailed and comprehensive analysis of the microbiota is still lacking, especially for the expanding Asian production region. Here, we report a large-scale, comprehensive analysis of four spontaneous Malaysian cocoa pulp fermentations across two time points in the harvest season and two fermentation methods. Our results show that the cocoa microbiota consists of a "core" and a "variable" part. The bacterial populations show a remarkable consistency, with only two dominant species, Lactobacillus fermentum and Acetobacter pasteurianus. The fungal diversity is much larger, with four dominant species occurring in all fermentations ("core" yeasts), and a large number of yeasts that only occur in lower numbers and specific fermentations ("variable" yeasts). Despite this diversity, a clear pattern emerges, with early dominance of apiculate yeasts and late dominance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Our results provide new insights into the microbial diversity in Malaysian cocoa pulp fermentations and pave the way for the selection of starter cultures to increase efficiency and consistency.

  19. Man-machine Integration Design and Analysis System (MIDAS) Task Loading Model (TLM) experimental and software detailed design report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staveland, Lowell

    1994-01-01

    This is the experimental and software detailed design report for the prototype task loading model (TLM) developed as part of the man-machine integration design and analysis system (MIDAS), as implemented and tested in phase 6 of the Army-NASA Aircrew/Aircraft Integration (A3I) Program. The A3I program is an exploratory development effort to advance the capabilities and use of computational representations of human performance and behavior in the design, synthesis, and analysis of manned systems. The MIDAS TLM computationally models the demands designs impose on operators to aide engineers in the conceptual design of aircraft crewstations. This report describes TLM and the results of a series of experiments which were run this phase to test its capabilities as a predictive task demand modeling tool. Specifically, it includes discussions of: the inputs and outputs of TLM, the theories underlying it, the results of the test experiments, the use of the TLM as both stand alone tool and part of a complete human operator simulation, and a brief introduction to the TLM software design.

  20. Genome-wide analysis of Family-1 UDP-glycosyltransferases in soybean confirms their abundance and varied expression during seed development.

    PubMed

    Mamoon Rehman, Hafiz; Amjad Nawaz, Muhammad; Bao, Le; Hussain Shah, Zahid; Lee, Jae-Min; Ahmad, Muhammad Qadir; Chung, Gyuhwa; Yang, Seung Hwan

    2016-11-01

    Family-1 UDP-glycosyltransferases (EC 2.4.1.x; UGTs) are enzymes that glycosylate aglycones into glycoside-associated compounds with improved transport and water solubility. This glycosylation mechanism is vital to plant functions, such as regulation of hormonal homeostasis, growth and development, xenobiotic detoxification, stress response, and biosynthesis of secondary metabolites. Here, we report a genome-wide analysis of soybean that identified 149 putative UGTs based on 44 conserved plant secondary product glycosyl-transferase (PSPG) motif amino acid sequences. Phylogenetic analysis against 22 referenced UGTs from Arabidopsis and maize clustered the putative UGTs into 15 major groups (A-O); J, K, and N were not represented, but the UGTs were distributed across all chromosomes except chromosome 04. Leucine was the most abundant amino acid across all 149 UGT peptide sequences. Two conserved introns (C 1 and C 2 ) were detected in the most intron-containing UGTs. Publicly available microarray data on their maximum expression in the seed developmental stage were further confirmed using Affymetrix soybean IVT array and RNA sequencing data. The UGT expression models were designed, based on reads per kilobase of gene model per million mapped read (RPKM) values confirmed their maximally varied expression at globular and early maturation stages of seed development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Unraveling Sterol-dependent Membrane Phenotypes by Analysis of Protein Abundance-ratio Distributions in Different Membrane Fractions Under Biochemical and Endogenous Sterol Depletion*

    PubMed Central

    Zauber, Henrik; Szymanski, Witold; Schulze, Waltraud X.

    2013-01-01

    During the last decade, research on plasma membrane focused increasingly on the analysis of so-called microdomains. It has been shown that function of many membrane-associated proteins involved in signaling and transport depends on their conditional segregation within sterol-enriched membrane domains. High throughput proteomic analysis of sterol-protein interactions are often based on analyzing detergent resistant membrane fraction enriched in sterols and associated proteins, which also contain proteins from these microdomain structures. Most studies so far focused exclusively on the characterization of detergent resistant membrane protein composition and abundances. This approach has received some criticism because of its unspecificity and many co-purifying proteins. In this study, by a label-free quantitation approach, we extended the characterization of membrane microdomains by particularly studying distributions of each protein between detergent resistant membrane and detergent-soluble fractions (DSF). This approach allows a more stringent definition of dynamic processes between different membrane phases and provides a means of identification of co-purifying proteins. We developed a random sampling algorithm, called Unicorn, allowing for robust statistical testing of alterations in the protein distribution ratios of the two different fractions. Unicorn was validated on proteomic data from methyl-β-cyclodextrin treated plasma membranes and the sterol biosynthesis mutant smt1. Both, chemical treatment and sterol-biosynthesis mutation affected similar protein classes in their membrane phase distribution and particularly proteins with signaling and transport functions. PMID:24030099

  2. Coronal abundances and their variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saba, Julia L. R.

    1994-01-01

    This contract supports the investigation of elemental abundances in the solar corona, principally through analysis of high-resolution software X-ray spectra from the Flat Crystal Spectrometer on NASA's Solar Maximum Mission. The goals of the study are a characterization of the mean values of relative abundances of elements accessible in the FCS data, and information on the extent and circumstances of their variability. This report is a summation of the data analysis and reporting activities which occurred since the last report, submitted two months early, in April 1994, to facilitate evaluation of the first year's progress for contract renewal. Hence this report covers the period 15 April 1994 - 15 December 1994. A list of publications resulting from this research is included.

  3. The influence of photochemical fractionation on the evolution of the nitrogen isotope ratios - detailed analysis of current photochemical loss rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandt, K. E.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Westlake, J.; Magee, B.; Liang, M. C.; Bell, J.

    2012-04-01

    Tracking the evolution of molecular nitrogen over geologic time scales requires an understanding of the loss rates of both isotopologues (14N2 and 14N15N) as a function of time (e.g. Mandt et al., 2009). The relative loss rates, if different, “fractionate” the isotopes so that the ratios change as a function of time, and rate at which the ratio changes due to a loss process is determined by the “fractionation factor.” Photochemistry is known to fractionate the nitrogen isotopes in Titan’s atmosphere by preferentially removing the heavy isotope from the molecular nitrogen inventory and increasing the ratio (heavy/light) in one of the primary photochemical products, HCN. This fractionation occurs due to a selective shielding during photodissociation where the photons that dissociate 14N15N penetrate deeper into the atmosphere (Liang et al., 2007) than the photons that dissociate 14N14N. Two methods can be used to determine the photochemical fractionation factor, f. The first approach for calculating f is based on the isotopic ratios of the photochemical source and product, as measured by the Huygens Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) (Niemann et al., 2010) and the Cassini Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) (Vinatier et al., 2007), respectively. The second method uses the loss rates and the ratio of the source and requires detailed photochemical modeling to ensure that the loss rates are calculated accurately. We compare these two methods for calculating the photochemical fractionation factor for N2 by using measurements of the isotopic ratios of N2 and HCN combined with an updated coupled ion-neutral-thermal model (De la Haye et al., 2008). We find that accurate magnetospheric electron fluxes and a rotating model that accounts for diurnal variations are essential for accurate calculations of the HCN densities and for determination of the fractionation factor through photochemical modeling. References: De La Haye, V., J. H. Waite, Jr., T. E. Cravens, I. P

  4. Academic detailing.

    PubMed

    Shankar, P R; Jha, N; Piryani, R M; Bajracharya, O; Shrestha, R; Thapa, H S

    2010-01-01

    There are a number of sources available to prescribers to stay up to date about medicines. Prescribers in rural areas in developing countries however, may not able to access some of them. Interventions to improve prescribing can be educational, managerial, and regulatory or use a mix of strategies. Detailing by the pharmaceutical industry is widespread. Academic detailing (AD) has been classically seen as a form of continuing medical education in which a trained health professional such as a physician or pharmacist visits physicians in their offices to provide evidence-based information. Face-to-face sessions, preferably on an individual basis, clear educational and behavioural objectives, establishing credibility with respect to objectivity, stimulating physician interaction, use of concise graphic educational materials, highlighting key messages, and when possible, providing positive reinforcement of improved practices in follow-up visits can increase success of AD initiatives. AD is common in developed countries and certain examples have been cited in this review. In developing countries the authors have come across reports of AD in Pakistan, Sudan, Argentina and Uruguay, Bihar state in India, Zambia, Cuba, Indonesia and Mexico. AD had a consistent, small but potentially significant impact on prescribing practices. AD has much less resources at its command compared to the efforts by the industry. Steps have to be taken to formally start AD in Nepal and there may be specific hindering factors similar to those in other developing nations.

  5. One Percent Determination of the Primordial Deuterium Abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooke, Ryan J.; Pettini, Max; Steidel, Charles C.

    2018-03-01

    We report a reanalysis of a near-pristine absorption system, located at a redshift {z}abs}=2.52564 toward the quasar Q1243+307, based on the combination of archival and new data obtained with the HIRES echelle spectrograph on the Keck telescope. This absorption system, which has an oxygen abundance [O/H] = ‑2.769 ± 0.028 (≃1/600 of the solar abundance), is among the lowest metallicity systems currently known where a precise measurement of the deuterium abundance is afforded. Our detailed analysis of this system concludes, on the basis of eight D I absorption lines, that the deuterium abundance of this gas cloud is {log}}10({{D}}/{{H}})=-4.622+/- 0.015, which is in very good agreement with the results previously reported by Kirkman et al., but with an improvement on the precision of this single measurement by a factor of ∼3.5. Combining this new estimate with our previous sample of six high precision and homogeneously analyzed D/H measurements, we deduce that the primordial deuterium abundance is {log}}10{({{D}}/{{H}})}{{P}}=-4.5974+/- 0.0052 or, expressed as a linear quantity, {10}5{({{D}}/{{H}})}{{P}}=2.527+/- 0.030; this value corresponds to a one percent determination of the primordial deuterium abundance. Combining our result with a big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) calculation that uses the latest nuclear physics input, we find that the baryon density derived from BBN agrees to within 2σ of the latest results from the Planck cosmic microwave background data. Based on observations collected at the W.M. Keck Observatory which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W.M. Keck Foundation.

  6. Image quality assessment in digital mammography: part II. NPWE as a validated alternative for contrast detail analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monnin, P.; Marshall, N. W.; Bosmans, H.; Bochud, F. O.; Verdun, F. R.

    2011-07-01

    Assessment of image quality for digital x-ray mammography systems used in European screening programs relies mainly on contrast-detail CDMAM phantom scoring and requires the acquisition and analysis of many images in order to reduce variability in threshold detectability. Part II of this study proposes an alternative method based on the detectability index (d') calculated for a non-prewhitened model observer with an eye filter (NPWE). The detectability index was calculated from the normalized noise power spectrum and image contrast, both measured from an image of a 5 cm poly(methyl methacrylate) phantom containing a 0.2 mm thick aluminium square, and the pre-sampling modulation transfer function. This was performed as a function of air kerma at the detector for 11 different digital mammography systems. These calculated d' values were compared against threshold gold thickness (T) results measured with the CDMAM test object and against derived theoretical relationships. A simple relationship was found between T and d', as a function of detector air kerma; a linear relationship was found between d' and contrast-to-noise ratio. The values of threshold thickness used to specify acceptable performance in the European Guidelines for 0.10 and 0.25 mm diameter discs were equivalent to threshold calculated detectability indices of 1.05 and 6.30, respectively. The NPWE method is a validated alternative to CDMAM scoring for use in the image quality specification, quality control and optimization of digital x-ray systems for screening mammography.

  7. APOGEE Chemical Abundances of the Sagittarius Dwarf Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasselquist, Sten; Shetrone, Matthew; Smith, Verne; Holtzman, Jon; McWilliam, Andrew; Fernández-Trincado, J. G.; Beers, Timothy C.; Majewski, Steven R.; Nidever, David L.; Tang, Baitian; Tissera, Patricia B.; Fernández Alvar, Emma; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Almeida, Andres; Anguiano, Borja; Battaglia, Giuseppina; Carigi, Leticia; Delgado Inglada, Gloria; Frinchaboy, Peter; García-Hernández, D. A.; Geisler, Doug; Minniti, Dante; Placco, Vinicius M.; Schultheis, Mathias; Sobeck, Jennifer; Villanova, Sandro

    2017-08-01

    The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment provides the opportunity of measuring elemental abundances for C, N, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, K, Ca, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni in vast numbers of stars. We analyze thechemical-abundance patterns of these elements for 158 red giant stars belonging to the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy (Sgr). This is the largest sample of Sgr stars with detailed chemical abundances, and it is the first time that C, N, P, K, V, Cr, Co, and Ni have been studied at high resolution in this galaxy. We find that the Sgr stars with [Fe/H] ≳ -0.8 are deficient in all elemental abundance ratios (expressed as [X/Fe]) relative to the Milky Way, suggesting that the Sgr stars observed today were formed from gas that was less enriched by Type II SNe than stars formed in the Milky Way. By examining the relative deficiencies of the hydrostatic (O, Na, Mg, and Al) and explosive (Si, P, K, and Mn) elements, our analysis supports the argument that previous generations of Sgr stars were formed with a top-light initial mass function, one lacking the most massive stars that would normally pollute the interstellar medium with the hydrostatic elements. We use a simple chemical-evolution model, flexCE, to further support our claim and conclude that recent stellar generations of Fornax and the Large Magellanic Cloud could also have formed according to a top-light initial mass function.

  8. New quantitative nitrogen abundance estimations in a sample of Seyfert 2 active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dors, O. L., Jr.; Arellano-Córdova, K. Z.; Cardaci, M. V.; Hägele, G. F.

    2017-06-01

    We obtained new quantitative determinations of the nitrogen abundance and a consistent relation between the nitrogen and oxygen abundances for a sample of Seyfert 2 galaxies located at redshift z < 0.1. We carried out this analysis using the cloudy code to build detailed photoionization models. We were able to reproduce observed optical narrow emission line intensities for 44 sources compiled from the literature. Our results show that Seyfert 2 nuclei have nitrogen abundances ranging from ˜0.3 to ˜7.5 times the solar value. We derived the relation log (N/H) = 1.05( ± 0.09) × [log (O/H)] - 0.35( ± 0.33). Results for N/O versus O/H abundance ratios derived for Seyfert 2 galaxies are in consonance with those recently derived for a sample of extragalactic disc H II regions with high metallicity.

  9. CHEMICAL ABUNDANCES IN A SAMPLE OF RED GIANTS IN THE OPEN CLUSTER NGC 2420 FROM APOGEE

    SciTech Connect

    Souto, Diogo; Cunha, K.; Smith, V.

    2016-10-10

    NGC 2420 is a ∼2 Gyr old well-populated open cluster that lies about 2 kpc beyond the solar circle, in the general direction of the Galactic anti-center. Most previous abundance studies have found this cluster to be mildly metal-poor, but with a large scatter in the obtained metallicities. Detailed chemical abundance distributions are derived for 12 red-giant members of NGC 2420 via a manual abundance analysis of high-resolution ( R = 22,500) near-infrared ( λ 1.5–1.7 μ m) spectra obtained from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) survey. The sample analyzed contains six stars that are identified asmore » members of the first-ascent red giant branch (RGB), as well as six members of the red clump (RC). We find small scatter in the star-to-star abundances in NGC 2420, with a mean cluster abundance of [Fe/H] = −0.16 ± 0.04 for the 12 red giants. The internal abundance dispersion for all elements (C, N, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Co and Ni) is also very small (∼0.03–0.06 dex), indicating a uniform cluster abundance distribution within the uncertainties. NGC 2420 is one of the clusters used to calibrate the APOGEE Stellar Parameter and Chemical Abundance Pipeline (ASPCAP). The results from this manual analysis compare well with ASPCAP abundances for most of the elements studied, although for Na, Al, and V there are more significant offsets. No evidence of extra-mixing at the RGB luminosity bump is found in the {sup 12}C and {sup 14}N abundances from the pre-luminosity-bump RGB stars in comparison to the post-He core-flash RC stars.« less

  10. Detailed analysis of the Canary on-sky results at the WHT using Rayleigh laser guide stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, O.; Gendron, É.; Morris, T.; Basden, A.; Hubert, Z.; Gratadour, D.; Osborn, J.; Vidal, F.; Chemla, F.; Rousset, G.; Myers, R.

    2014-07-01

    CANARY is the multi-object adaptive optics (MOAO) on-sky demonstrator developed by Durham University and LESIA Observatoire de Paris, in the perspective of the E-ELT. Since 2013, CANARY has been operating with 3 off-axis NGS and 4 off-axis Rayleigh LGS and compensating for one on-axis NGS observed with a near IR camera and the Truth Sensor (TS) for diagnostic purpose. In this paper, we present the tomographic performance of CANARY during the runs in 2013. We propose a detailed analysis of the tomographic error leading to the establishment of the CANARY wave-front error budget. In particular we are able to evaluate the tomographic error for each altitude in the atmosphere for a given reconstructor by modelling a set of one-layer covariance matrices. This tool allows us to understand the tradeoffs to be made in the building of the tomographic reconstructor. We present two methods for the wavefront error budget computation. The DTI one uses input system parameters and open loop WFS slopes to estimate the error in a number of independent terms. The DMTS method directly uses the Truth Sensor measurements to estimate the error. We show a good agreement between the two approaches making us confident in our modelling of the instrument. We derive estimations of the Strehl ratio from the error variance and compare them to the recorded IR image Strehl ratio. We find a good agreement between the two, hence validating our wavefront error analysis. Finally we present an on-sky validation of the tomographic reconstruction using LGS based on GLAO and MOAO data. We also quantify the gain brought by the LGS, comparing results obtained in MOAO with 3 NGS and with or without LGS in the wavefront measurements.

  11. A detailed analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging in the frontal language area: a comparative study with extraoperative electrocortical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kunii, Naoto; Kamada, Kyousuke; Ota, Takahiro; Kawai, Kensuke; Saito, Nobuhito

    2011-09-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a less invasive way of mapping brain functions. The reliability of fMRI for localizing language-related function is yet to be determined. We performed a detailed analysis of language fMRI reliability by comparing the results of 3-T fMRI with maps determined by extraoperative electrocortical stimulation (ECS). This study was performed on 8 epileptic patients who underwent subdural electrode placement. The tasks performed during fMRI included verb generation, abstract/concrete categorization, and picture naming. We focused on the frontal lobe, which was effectively activated by these tasks. In extraoperative ECS, 4 tasks were combined to determine the eloquent areas: spontaneous speech, picture naming, reading, and comprehension. We calculated the sensitivity and specificity with different Z score thresholds for each task and appropriate matching criteria. For further analysis, we divided the frontal lobe into 5 areas and investigated intergyrus variations in sensitivity and specificity. The abstract/concrete categorization task was the most sensitive and specific task in fMRI, whereas the picture naming task detected eloquent areas most efficiently in ECS. The combination of the abstract/concrete categorization task and a 3-mm matching criterion gave the best tradeoff (sensitivity, 83%; specificity, 61%) when the Z score was 2.24. As for intergyrus variation, the posterior inferior frontal gyrus showed the best tradeoff (sensitivity, 91%; specificity, 59%), whereas the anterior middle frontal gyrus had low specificity. Despite different tasks for fMRI and extraoperative ECS, the relatively low specificity might be caused by a fundamental discrepancy between the 2 techniques. Reliability of language fMRI activation might differ, depending on the brain region.

  12. Biodegradation of cis-1,4-Polyisoprene Rubbers by Distinct Actinomycetes: Microbial Strategies and Detailed Surface Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Linos, Alexandros; Berekaa, Mahmoud M.; Reichelt, Rudolf; Keller, Ulrike; Schmitt, Jürgen; Flemming, Hans-Curt; Kroppenstedt, Reiner M.; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2000-01-01

    Several actinomycetes isolated from nature were able to use both natural rubber (NR) and synthetic cis-1,4-polyisoprene rubber (IR) as a sole source of carbon. According to their degradation behavior, they were divided into two groups. Representatives of the first group grew only in direct contact to the rubber substrate and led to considerable disintegration of the material during cultivation. The second group consisted of weaker rubber decomposers that did not grow adhesively, as indicated by the formation of clear zones (translucent halos) around bacterial colonies after cultivation on NR dispersed in mineral agar. Taxonomic analysis of four selected strains based on 16S rRNA similarity examinations revealed two Gordonia sp. strains, VH2 and Kb2, and one Mycobacterium fortuitum strain, NF4, belonging to the first group as well as one Micromonospora aurantiaca strain, W2b, belonging to the second group. Schiff's reagent staining tests performed for each of the strains indicated colonization of the rubber surface, formation of a bacterial biofilm, and occurrence of compounds containing aldehyde groups during cultivation with NR latex gloves. Detailed analysis by means of scanning electron microscopy yielded further evidence for the two different microbial strategies and clarified the colonization efficiency. Thereby, strains VH2, Kb2, and NF4 directly adhered to and merged into the rubber material, while strain W2b produced mycelial corridors, especially on the surface of IR. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy comprising the attenuated total reflectance technique was applied on NR latex gloves overgrown by cells of the Gordonia strains, which were the strongest rubber decomposers. Spectra demonstrated the decrease in number of cis-1,4 double bonds, the formation of carbonyl groups, and the change of the overall chemical environment, indicating that an oxidative attack at the double bond is the first metabolic step of the biodegradation process. PMID:10742254

  13. NPWE model observer as a validated alternative for contrast detail analysis of digital detectors in general radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Peteghem, N.; Bosmans, H.; Marshall, N. W.

    2016-11-01

    To propose and validate a non-prewhitening with eye filter (NPWE) model observer as an alternative means of quantifying and specifying imaging performance for general radiography detectors, in a comparative study with contrast detail analysis and detective quantum efficiency (DQE). Five different x-ray detectors were assessed, covering a range of detector technologies including powder computed radiography (CR), needle CR, and three indirect conversion flat panel digital radiography detectors (DR). For each detector, threshold contrast detail (c-d) detectability was measured using the Leeds TO20 test object. A tube voltage of 70 kV and 1 mm Cu added filtration was used and five target detector air kerma (DAK) levels were set, ranging from 0.625 µGy to 10 µGy. Three c-d images were acquired at the same DAK levels and these were scored by two observers. Presampling modulation transfer function (MTF) was measured using an edge method while contrast was measured with a 2 mm Al square of dimension 10  ×  10 mm. The normalized noise power spectrum (NNPS) was calculated at the target DAK values of the c-d images. The MTF, NNPS and contrast data were then used to calculate a detectability index (d‧) with the NPWE model and compared to the human observer c-d results. The standard quantitative means of evaluating detector performance i.e. DQE, was then calculated for each detector. A linear correlation was found between the logarithm of threshold contrast and the logarithm of d’ for all detectors, as DAK was increased. Furthermore, the absolute value of d‧ tracked threshold contrast between the five detectors, enabling the use of detectability to quantify image quality rather than the intrinsically subjective threshold contrast scored by human observers from c-d test object images. At 2.5 µGy target DAK, d’ followed the differences in DQE between the five detectors. The NPWE detectability index can be used an alternative parameter for the

  14. HST/STIS Observations of the Local Interstellar Medium toward Very Nearby Stars: A Detailed Analysis of the a Centuari Sight Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dann, Julian; Redfield, Seth; Ayres, Thomas R.

    2017-01-01

    The Local Interstellar Medium (LISM), a region extending about 100 parsecs and in which the Sun is currently immersed, can only be studied using UV/optical absorption features against bright background stars. Perhaps in the future in-situ measurements will be possible (e.g., the Voyager spacecraft or Breakthrough Starshot-style missions). Using high-resolution observations with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) on-board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), we have analyzed several very nearby sight lines to measure physical properties of the LISM. The data used in this study is a part of the Advanced Spectral Library (ASTRAL) Project, an HST Large Treasury Project, in which we have analyzed the spectra of fourteen nearby stars. LISM absorption features in these stellar spectra reveal key information about the abundances, temperature, and turbulence in the intervening gas. We have fit ion transitions in the near-UV for MgII, FeII, CII, DI, SiII, and OII. These absorption features provide direct measurements of the radial velocity, Doppler broadening parameter, and the column density along the line of sight. The presence of multiple local minima in the deep and narrow ISM profile is evidence of multiple clouds moving at different radial velocities.Included in our data set is the a Centauri sight line. We provide a detailed analysis of these new observations and a comparison with previous HST observations that were observed more than 20 years ago. A discussion of the physical properties along this line of sight is provided within the context of a Breakthrough Starshot mission. These high resolution and high signal-to-noise spectra will be important for making accurate estimations of the interstellar environment to help inform such an interstellar mission.We would like to acknowledge NASA HST Grant GO-12278 and GO-13346 awarded by the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., for

  15. Uses of phage display in agriculture: sequence analysis and comparative modeling of late embryogenesis abundant client proteins suggest protein-nucleic acid binding functionality.

    PubMed

    Kushwaha, Rekha; Downie, A Bruce; Payne, Christina M

    2013-01-01

    A group of intrinsically disordered, hydrophilic proteins-Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins-has been linked to survival in plants and animals in periods of stress, putatively through safeguarding enzymatic function and prevention of aggregation in times of dehydration/heat. Yet despite decades of effort, the molecular-level mechanisms defining this protective function remain unknown. A recent effort to understand LEA functionality began with the unique application of phage display, wherein phage display and biopanning over recombinant Seed Maturation Protein homologs from Arabidopsis thaliana and Glycine max were used to retrieve client proteins at two different temperatures, with one intended to represent heat stress. From this previous study, we identified 21 client proteins for which clones were recovered, sometimes repeatedly. Here, we use sequence analysis and homology modeling of the client proteins to ascertain common sequence and structural properties that may contribute to binding affinity with the protective LEA protein. Our methods uncover what appears to be a predilection for protein-nucleic acid interactions among LEA client proteins, which is suggestive of subcellular residence. The results from this initial computational study will guide future efforts to uncover the protein protective mechanisms during heat stress, potentially leading to phage-display-directed evolution of synthetic LEA molecules.

  16. Identification of Putative Genes Involved in Bisphenol A Degradation Using Differential Protein Abundance Analysis of Sphingobium sp. BiD32.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Nicolette A; Kjeldal, Henrik; Gough, Heidi L; Nielsen, Jeppe L

    2015-10-20

    Discharge of the endocrine disrupting compound bisphenol A (BPA) with wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents into surface waters results in deleterious effects on aquatic life. Sphingobium sp. BiD32 was previously isolated from activated sludge based on its ability to degrade BPA. This study investigated BPA metabolism by Sphingobium sp. BiD32 using label-free quantitative proteomics. The genome of Sphingobium sp. BiD32 was sequenced to provide a species-specific platform for optimal protein identification. The bacterial proteomes of Sphingobium sp. BiD32 in the presence and absence of BPA were identified and quantified. A total of 2155 proteins were identified; 1174 of these proteins were quantified, and 184 of these proteins had a statistically significant change in abundance in response to the presence/absence of BPA (p ≤ 0.05). Proteins encoded by genes previously identified to be responsible for protocatechuate degradation were upregulated in the presence of BPA. The analysis of the metabolites from BPA degradation by Sphingobium sp. BiD32 detected a hydroxylated metabolite. A novel p-hydroxybenzoate hydroxylase enzyme detected by proteomics was implicated in the metabolic pathway associated with the detected metabolite. This enzyme is hypothesized to be involved in BPA degradation by Sphingobium sp. BiD32, and may serve as a future genetic marker for BPA degradation.

  17. Semi-quantitative analysis of solid waste flows from nano-enabled consumer products in Europe, Denmark and the United Kingdom - Abundance, distribution and management.

    PubMed

    Heggelund, Laura; Hansen, Steffen Foss; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard; Boldrin, Alessio

    2016-10-01

    Many nano-enabled consumer products are known to be in the global market. At the same, little is known about the quantity, type, location etc. of the engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) inside the products. This limits the scientific investigations of potential environmental effects of these materials, and especially the knowledge of ENM behaviour and potential effects at the end-of-life stage of the products is scarce. To gain a better understanding of the end-of-life waste treatment of nano-enabled consumer product, we provide an overview of the ENMs flowing into and throughout waste systems in Europe, Denmark and the United Kingdom. Using a nanoproduct inventory (nanodb.dk), we performed a four-step analysis to estimate the most abundant ENMs and in which waste fractions they are present. We found that in terms of number of products: (i) nano silver is the most used ENM in consumer products, and (ii) plastic from used product containers is the largest waste fraction also comprising a large variety of ENMs, though possibly in very small masses. Also, we showed that the local waste management system can influence the distribution of ENMs. It is recommended that future research focus on recycling and landfilling of nano-enabled products since these compartments represent hot spots for end-of-life nanoproducts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Spectral modeling of water ice-rich areas on Ceres' surface from Dawn-VIR data analysis: abundance and grain size retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raponi, Andrea; De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Ciarniello, Mauro; Tosi, Federico; Combe, Jean-Philippe; Frigeri, Alessandro; Zambon, Francesca; Ammannito, Eleonora; Giacomo Carrozzo, Filippo; Magni, Gianfranco; Capria, Maria Teresa; Formisano, Michelangelo; Longobardo, Andrea; Palomba, Ernesto; Pieters, Carle; Russell, Christopher T.; Raymond, Carol; Dawn/VIR Team

    2016-10-01

    Dawn spacecraft orbits around Ceres since early 2015 acquiring a huge amount of data at different spatial resolutions during the several phases of the mission. VIR, the visible and InfraRed spectrometer onboard Dawn [1] allowed to detect the principal mineralogical phases present on Ceres: a large abundance of dark component, NH4-phillosilicates and carbonates.Water has been detected in small areas on Ceres' surface by the Dawn-VIR instrument. The most obvious finding is located in Oxo crater [2]. Further detections of water have been made during the Survey observation phase (1.1 km/pixel) and High-Altitude Mapping Orbit (400 m/px) [3]. During the LAMO phase (Low Altitude Mapping Orbit), the data with increased spatial resolution (100 m/px) coming from both regions have improved the detection of water, highlighting clear diagnostic water ice absorption features. In this study, we focused on spectral modeling of VIR spectra of Oxo and another crater (lon = 227°, lat 57°), near Messor crater.The Hapke radiative transfer model [4] has been applied in order to retrieve the water ice properties. We consider two types of mixtures: areal and intimate mixing. In areal mixing, the surface is modelled as patches of pure water ice, with each photon scattered within one patch. In intimate mixing, the particles of water ice are in contact with particles of the dark terrain, and both are involved in the scattering of a single photon. The best fit with the measured spectra has been derived with the areal mixture. The water ice abundance obtained is up to 15-20% within the field of view, and the grain size retrieved is of the order of 100-200 μm. Phyllosilicates and carbonates, which are ubiquitous on Ceres surface [5], have been also detected and modeled in correspondence with the icy regions. The water ice is typically located near and within the shadows projected by the crater rims. Further analysis is required to study the thermal state of the ice and its origin

  19. Small RNA sequence analysis of adenovirus VA RNA-derived miRNAs reveals an unexpected serotype-specific difference in structure and abundance.

    PubMed

    Kamel, Wael; Segerman, Bo; Punga, Tanel; Akusjärvi, Göran

    2014-01-01

    Human adenoviruses (HAds) encode for one or two highly abundant virus-associated RNAs, designated VA RNAI and VA RNAII, which fold into stable hairpin structures resembling miRNA precursors. Here we show that the terminal stem of the VA RNAs originating from Ad4, Ad5, Ad11 and Ad37, all undergo Dicer dependent processing into virus-specific miRNAs (so-called mivaRNAs). We further show that the mivaRNA duplex is subjected to a highly asymmetric RISC loading with the 3'-strand from all VA RNAs being the favored strand, except for the Ad37 VA RNAII, where the 5'-mivaRNAII strand was preferentially assembled into RISC. Although the mivaRNA seed sequences are not fully conserved between the HAds a bioinformatics prediction approach suggests that a large fraction of the VA RNAII-, but not the VA RNAI-derived mivaRNAs still are able to target the same cellular genes. Using small RNA deep sequencing we demonstrate that the Dicer processing event in the terminal stem of the VA RNAs is not unique and generates 3'-mivaRNAs with a slight variation of the position of the 5' terminal nucleotide in the RISC loaded guide strand. Also, we show that all analyzed VA RNAs, except Ad37 VA RNAI and Ad5 VA RNAII, utilize an alternative upstream A start site in addition to the classical +1 G start site. Further, the 5'-mivaRNAs with an A start appears to be preferentially incorporated into RISC. Although the majority of mivaRNA research has been done using Ad5 as the model system our analysis demonstrates that the mivaRNAs expressed in Ad11- and Ad37-infected cells are the most abundant mivaRNAs associated with Ago2-containing RISC. Collectively, our results show an unexpected variability in Dicer processing of the VA RNAs and a serotype-specific loading of mivaRNAs into Ago2-based RISC.

  20. The APOGEE Stellar Parameters and Chemical Abundances Pipeline (ASPCAP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elia Garcia Perez, Ana; Allende-Prieto, C.; Cunha, K. M.; Holtzman, J. A.; Johnson, J.; Majewski, S.; Meszaros, Sz.; Schiavon, R. P.; Shetrone, M. D.; Smith, V. V.; SDSS-III/APOGEE Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) of Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III) will be providing high quality (R ˜ 22,500 and a typical S/N > 100) near-infrared spectra for ~100,000, predominantly cool stars (mostly giant stars). In principle these spectra can be used to ascertain the stellar atmospheric parameters of those stars as well as the chemical abundances for approximately 15 chemical species expressed in the APOGEE wavelength region via both atomic and molecular line transitions. Detailed analysis of such an enormous database of infrared stellar spectra --- each blanketed with a multitude of lines and bands --- is obviously not viable manually, but is also a challenge to automate and simultaneously achieve the survey goals of high, 0.1 (0.2) dex internal (external) abundances precision. The APOGEE Stellar Parameters and Chemical Abundances Pipeline (ASPCAP) has been designed to estimate the above parameters via comparison to large, multi-dimensional libraries of synthetic spectral templates. To make the problem tractable and efficient, ASPCAP conducts this analysis in two phases. First the entire wavelength range is template-matched to derive the primary stellar parameters affecting the spectral energy distribution of the stars (Teff, log g, microturbulence, along with the bulk stellar metallicity and carbon, nitrogen and α-elements abundances). After an appropriate stellar template is matched or interpolated from the synthetic library, the abundances of other chemical species (e.g., C, N, O, Mg, Na, Al, Si, S, K, Ca, Ti, V, Mn, Cr, Co, Fe, and Ni) are derived using restricted windows around particularly sensitive atomic or molecular transitions. We will present an overview of ASPCAP, its calibration and measured performance, as evaluated with data from the first year of APOGEE observations as released in SDSS-III Data Release 10.

  1. Abundance estimation and conservation biology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, J.D.; MacKenzie, D.I.

    2004-01-01

    should be focused on relationships between demographic processes such as survival and recruitment, the two quantities responsible for changes in abundance, rather than simply on the magnitudes of these quantities. They describe a type of Jolly–Seber capture–recapture model that permits inference about the underlying relationship between per capita recruitment rates and survival rates (Link & Barker, this volume). Implementation used Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods and appeared to work well, yielding inferences about the relationship between recruitment and survival that were robust to selection of prior distribution. We believe that readers will find their arguments compelling, and we expect to see increased use of hierarchical modeling approaches in capture–recapture and related fields. Otto (presentation without paper) also recommended use of hierarchical models in analysis of multiple data sources dealing with population dynamics of North American mallards. He integrated survival inferences from ringing data, abundance information from aerial survey data, and recruitment information based on age ratios from a harvest survey. He used a Leslie matrix population projection model as an integrating framework and obtained estimates of breeding population size using all data.Otto’s approach also permitted inference about biases in estimated quantities. As with the work of Link & Barker (2004), we find Otto’s recommendation to use hierarchical models to integrate data from multiple sources to be very compelling. Alisauskas et al. (2004) report results of an analysis of capture–recapture data for a askatchewan population of white–winged scoters. They used the approach of Pradel (1996) to estimate population growth rate (See the PDF) directly. Estimates for 1975–1985 were quite low, but estimates for the recent period, 2000–2003,increased to values > 1. Parameter estimates for seniority, survival and per capita recruitment (Pradel, 1996) led to the

  2. The clinical spectrum of the presenting signs and symptoms of anterior urethral stricture: detailed analysis of a single institutional cohort.

    PubMed

    Rourke, Keith; Hickle, Jonathan

    2012-05-01

    To accurately delineate the presentation of anterior urethral stricture in an economically developed patient cohort. It is widely assumed that patients with urethral stricture typically present with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). There is a paucity of data examining this assumption. With no uniformly accepted clinical definition or measure of treatment success, a clear clinical description of urethral stricture is important. Retrospective detailed analysis was performed on 611 patients presenting with anterior urethral stricture from July 2004 to June 2010. Both the presenting complaint and associated signs and symptoms were classified according to one of 10 clinical categories. The most common presenting complaint was LUTS typical of those found on the American Urological Association-Symptom Score (54.3%) and another 23.4% of patients presented initially with acute urinary retention (AUR). Symptoms other than LUTS or urinary retention accounted for 22.3% of presenting complaints. In addition, 22.9% of patients had genitourinary pain, 50.7% of patients required emergent urologic treatment, and 7.4% of patients presented with renal insufficiency or urethral abscess/necrotizing fasciitis directly related to urethral stricture. Although many patients with urethral stricture present initially with LUTS or AUR, almost one quarter of patients have a different presenting complaint. Defining successful treatment of anterior urethral stricture should include more than improvement in LUTS or absence of urinary retention. Urethral stricture is not just a "quality of life" condition because >50% of patients require emergent treatment and 7.4% have a life-threatening condition directly related to the stricture. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Detailed analysis of inversions predicted between two human genomes: errors, real polymorphisms, and their origin and population distribution.

    PubMed

    Vicente-Salvador, David; Puig, Marta; Gayà-Vidal, Magdalena; Pacheco, Sarai; Giner-Delgado, Carla; Noguera, Isaac; Izquierdo, David; Martínez-Fundichely, Alexander; Ruiz-Herrera, Aurora; Estivill, Xavier; Aguado, Cristina; Lucas-Lledó, José Ignacio; Cáceres, Mario

    2017-02-01

    The growing catalogue of structural variants in humans often overlooks inversions as one of the most difficult types of variation to study, even though they affect phenotypic traits in diverse organisms. Here, we have analysed in detail 90 inversions predicted from the comparison of two independently assembled human genomes: the reference genome (NCBI36/HG18) and HuRef. Surprisingly, we found that two thirds of these predictions (62) represent errors either in assembly comparison or in one of the assemblies, including 27 misassembled regions in HG18. Next, we validated 22 of the remaining 28 potential polymorphic inversions using different PCR techniques and characterized their breakpoints and ancestral state. In addition, we determined experimentally the derived allele frequency in Europeans for 17 inversions (DAF = 0.01-0.80), as well as the distribution in 14 worldwide populations for 12 of them based on the 1000 Genomes Project data. Among the validated inversions, nine have inverted repeats (IRs) at their breakpoints, and two show nucleotide variation patterns consistent with a recurrent origin. Conversely, inversions without IRs have a unique origin and almost all of them show deletions or insertions at the breakpoints in the derived allele mediated by microhomology sequences, which highlights the importance of mechanisms like FoSTeS/MMBIR in the generation of complex rearrangements in the human genome. Finally, we found several inversions located within genes and at least one candidate to be positively selected in Africa. Thus, our study emphasizes the importance of careful analysis and validation of large-scale genomic predictions to extract reliable biological conclusions. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. NSE abundance data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odrzywolek, Andrzej

    2012-07-01

    A novel method of calculating nuclear statistical equilibrium (NSE) is presented. Basic equations are carefully solved using arbitrary precision arithmetic. A special interpolation procedure is then used to retrieve all abundances using tabulated results for neutrons and protons, together with basic nuclear data. Proton and neutron abundance tables, basic nuclear data, and partition functions for nuclides used in the calculations are provided. A simple interpolation algorithm using pre-calculated p and n abundances tabulated as functions of kT, ρ and Ye is outlined. Unique properties of this method are: (1) ability to pick up out of NSE selected nuclei only, (2) computational time scaling linearly with number of re-calculated abundances, (3) relatively small amount of stored data: only two large tables, (4) slightly faster than solving the NSE equations using traditional Newton-Raphson methods for small networks (few tens of species); superior for huge (800-3000) networks, (5) does not require initial guess; works well on random input, (6) can be tailored to specific application, (7) ability to use third-party NSE solvers to obtain fully compatible tables, and (8) encapsulation of the NSE code for bug-free calculations. A range of applications for this approach is possible: covering tests of traditional NSE Newton-Raphson codes, generating starting values, code-to-code verification, and possible replacement of the old legacy procedures in supernova simulations.

  5. Detailed analysis of the spreading history of the Parece Vela and Shikoku Basins: Implications for Philippine Plate Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roest, W. R.; Sdrolias, M.; Mueller, R. D.

    2003-12-01

    The Philippine plate, located between the Pacific and Eurasian plates, is the world's largest marginal basin plate. Its motion history is poorly understood as it is almost entirely surrounded by subduction zones. Hence, the rotation of the Philippine plate through time has only been constrained by palaeomagnetic data, and estimated to be 34 degree clockwise between 25 and 5 Ma . Here, we present a comprehensive analysis of geophysical data from two Oligocene to Miocene back-arc basins, the Parece Vela and the Shikoku Basin, located along the eastern margin of the Philippine Plate. By means of their seafloor spreading record, these basins provide independent constraints on the rotational history of the Philippine Plate. Our detailed plate model is based on a joint analysis of all available magnetic, gravity and bathymetric data in the region. Subduction occurred along the proto-Izu-Bonin-Mariana trench and led to trench roll-back, arc rupture and back-arc rifting in the Parece Vela and Shikoku Basins at ~30 Ma. A northward and southward propagating rift developed from the extremities of the basin inward, and seafloor spreading in both basins developed by chron 9 (28 Ma) and possibly by chron 10 (29 Ma). The spreading orientation in the Parece Vela Basin was initially E-W, as opposed to ENE-WSW spreading in the Shikoku Basin. The ridges joined by chron 6B (23 Ma) and formed a R-R-R triple junction to accommodate the difference in spreading orientations in both basins. At approximately 20 Ma, the direction of spreading in both basins changed dramatically, from E-W to NE-SW in the Parece Vela Basin and from ENE-WSW to NE-SW in the Shikoku Basin. This change was accompanied by a marked decrease in spreading rate. Cessation of back-arc opening occurred at ~15 Ma, a time of regional plate reorganisation. The dramatic change in spreading rate and direction at ~20 Ma is interpreted to be an expression of Philippine plate rotation, a rotation which was previously thought to

  6. A detailed radiobiological and dosimetric analysis of biochemical outcomes in a case-control study of permanent prostate brachytherapy patients.

    PubMed

    Butler, Wayne M; Stewart, Renee R; Merrick, Gregory S

    2009-03-01

    generalized EUD. In this case-control study of prostate brachytherapy biochemical failures and nonfailures, there were no radiobiological parameters derived from detailed DVH-based analysis that predicted for biochemical control. This may indicate that in our approach, implant dosimetry is at or near the limits of clinically effective dose escalation.

  7. A strategy for acquisition and analysis of complex natural abundance 33S solid-state NMR spectra of a disordered tetrathio transition-metal anion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakobsen, Hans J.; Bildsøe, Henrik; Skibsted, Jørgen; Brorson, Michael; Gor'kov, Peter; Gan, Zhehong

    2010-02-01

    A strategy, involving (i) sensitivity enhancement for the central transition (CT) by population transfer (PT) employing WURST inversion pulses to the satellite transitions (STs) in natural abundance 33S MAS NMR for two different MAS frequencies ( νr = 5.0 and 10.0 kHz) at 14.1 T and (ii) a 33S static QCPMG experiment at 19.6 T, has allowed acquisition and analysis of very complex solid-state 33S CT NMR spectra for the disordered tetrathioperrhenate anion ReS4- in [(C 2H 5) 4N][ReS 4]. This strategy of different NMR experiments combined with spectral analysis/simulations has allowed determination of precise values for two sets of quadrupole coupling parameters ( CQ and ηQ) assigned to the two different S sites for the four sulfur atoms in the ReS4- anion in the ratio S1:S2 = 1:3. These sets of CQ, ηQ values for the S1 and S2 site are quite similar and the magnitudes of the quadrupole coupling constants ( CQ = 2.2-2.5 MHz) are a factor of about three larger than observed for other tetrathiometalates A 2MS 4 (A = NH 4, Cs, Rb and M = W, Mo). In addition, the spectral analysis also leads to a determination of the chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) parameters ( δσ and ησ) for the S1 and S2 site, however, with much lower precisions (about 20% error margins) compared to those for CQ, ηQ, because the magnitudes of the two CSAs (i.e., δσ = 60-90 ppm) are about a factor of six smaller than observed for the other tetrathiometalates mentioned above. This large difference in the magnitudes of the anisotropic parameters CQ and δσ for the ReS4- anion, compared to those for the WS42- and MoS42- anions determined previously under identical experimental conditions, accounts for the increased complexity of the PT-enhanced 33S MAS spectra observed for the ReS4- anion in this study. This difference in CQ also contributes significantly to the intensity distortions observed in the outer wings of the CTs when employing PT from the STs under conditions of slow-speed MAS.

  8. A strategy for acquisition and analysis of complex natural abundance (33)S solid-state NMR spectra of a disordered tetrathio transition-metal anion.

    PubMed

    Jakobsen, Hans J; Bildsøe, Henrik; Skibsted, Jørgen; Brorson, Michael; Gor'kov, Peter; Gan, Zhehong

    2010-02-01

    A strategy, involving (i) sensitivity enhancement for the central transition (CT) by population transfer (PT) employing WURST inversion pulses to the satellite transitions (STs) in natural abundance (33)S MAS NMR for two different MAS frequencies (nu(r)=5.0 and 10.0kHz) at 14.1T and (ii) a (33)S static QCPMG experiment at 19.6T, has allowed acquisition and analysis of very complex solid-state (33)S CT NMR spectra for the disordered tetrathioperrhenate anion ReS(4)(-) in [(C(2)H(5))(4)N][ReS(4)]. This strategy of different NMR experiments combined with spectral analysis/simulations has allowed determination of precise values for two sets of quadrupole coupling parameters (C(Q) and eta(Q)) assigned to the two different S sites for the four sulfur atoms in the ReS(4)(-) anion in the ratio S1:S2=1:3. These sets of C(Q), eta(Q) values for the S1 and S2 site are quite similar and the magnitudes of the quadrupole coupling constants (C(Q)=2.2-2.5MHz) are a factor of about three larger than observed for other tetrathiometalates A(2)MS(4) (A=NH(4), Cs, Rb and M=W, Mo). In addition, the spectral analysis also leads to a determination of the chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) parameters (delta(sigma) and eta(sigma)) for the S1 and S2 site, however, with much lower precisions (about 20% error margins) compared to those for C(Q), eta(Q), because the magnitudes of the two CSAs (i.e., delta(sigma)=60-90ppm) are about a factor of six smaller than observed for the other tetrathiometalates mentioned above. This large difference in the magnitudes of the anisotropic parameters C(Q) and delta(sigma) for the ReS(4)(-) anion, compared to those for the WS(4)(2-) and MoS(4)(2-) anions determined previously under identical experimental conditions, accounts for the increased complexity of the PT-enhanced (33)S MAS spectra observed for the ReS(4)(-) anion in this study. This difference in C(Q) also contributes significantly to the intensity distortions observed in the outer wings of the CTs when

  9. Functional Analysis of the Group 4 Late Embryogenesis Abundant Proteins Reveals Their Relevance in the Adaptive Response during Water Deficit in Arabidopsis1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Olvera-Carrillo, Yadira; Campos, Francisco; Reyes, José Luis; Garciarrubio, Alejandro; Covarrubias, Alejandra A.

    2010-01-01

    Late-Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins accumulate to high levels during the last stages of seed development, when desiccation tolerance is acquired, and in vegetative and reproductive tissues under water deficit, leading to the hypothesis that these proteins play a role in the adaptation of plants to this stress condition. In this work, we obtained the accumulation patterns of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) group 4 LEA proteins during different developmental stages and plant organs in response to water deficit. We demonstrate that overexpression of a representative member of this group of proteins confers tolerance to severe drought in Arabidopsis plants. Moreover, we show that deficiency of LEA proteins in this group leads to susceptible phenotypes upon water limitation, during germination, or in mature plants after recovery from severe dehydration. Upon recovery from this stress condition, mutant plants showed a reduced number of floral and axillary buds when compared with wild-type plants. The lack of these proteins also correlates with a reduced seed production under optimal irrigation, supporting a role in fruit and/or seed development. A bioinformatic analysis of group 4 LEA proteins from many plant genera showed that there are two subgroups, originated through ancient gene duplication and a subsequent functional specialization. This study represents, to our knowledge, the first genetic evidence showing that one of the LEA protein groups is directly involved in the adaptive response of higher plants to water deficit, and it provides data indicating that the function of these proteins is not redundant to that of the other LEA proteins. PMID:20668063

  10. Ammonia abundances in comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyckoff, S.; Tegler, S.; Engel, L.

    The emission band strengths of the NH2 bands of Comets Halley, Hartley-Good, Thiele, and Borrelly were measured to determine the NH2 column densities for the comets. Production rates obtained using the Haser and vectorial models are in agreement within the observational errors, suggesting that a simple two-step decay model may be used to approximate the NH2 distribution in a comet's coma. Ammonia-to-water abundance ratios from 0.01 to 0.4 percent were found for the four comets. The ratio in Comet Halley is found to be Q(NH3)/Q(H2O) = 0.002 + or - 0.001. No significant difference in the ammonia abundance was found before or after perihelion in Comet Halley.

  11. Calibration and Uncertainty Analysis of Water and Solute Transport Models Within Vegetated Soils Using a Detailed Dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, B.; Wheater, H.; Butler, A.

    2006-12-01

    Appropriate models predicting the fate and transport of water and dissolved chemicals in vegetated soils are required for a wide range of applications. Substantial uncertainty is present due to measurement errors, parametric uncertainty, and structural issues related to model conceptualisation. Due to the costs and intrusiveness of subsurface measurements there are limited datasets available to interrogate models against. Furthermore, the models are typically computationally intensive, making it difficult to fully explore parametric and other uncertainty spaces. Hence there are two pressing needs which must be met to improve the utility of models: more data and constraints are needed to quantify the interactions between different uncertainties and their overall impact on the reliability and robustness of model outputs, and efficient methodologies to explore sensitivities and uncertainties are also called for. This paper presents a combined analysis of a particularly detailed dataset and models of water and solute movement, using both simple random search and Markov chain Monte Carlo methods. Data was collected from an outdoor vegetated lysimeter facility over a duration of close to a year, with soil matric potential, moisture content and temperature at 10 cm depth intervals, along with rainfall and other meteorological variables, logged in four instrumented lysimeters at a time interval of 0.01 days. Three radionuclides (Na-22, Cl-36 and Cs-137) were supplied through the base of the lysimeters using an automated water table control system. Periodic soil cores and plant cuttings provided information on their migration and uptake. The integrity of the experimental data is examined, with uncertainty associated with outputs discussed and quantified. To interpret the data, a Richards' equation model coupled to a dynamic plant water model is linked to an advection-dispersion model with additional process representations of sorption, radioactive decay and root uptake

  12. Does skin cancer screening save lives? A detailed analysis of mortality time trends in Schleswig-Holstein and Germany.

    PubMed

    Stang, Andreas; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz

    2016-02-01

    After a pilot study on skin cancer screening was performed between 2003 and 2004 in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, the country implemented what to the authors' knowledge is the first nationwide skin cancer screening program in the world in 2008. The objective of the current study was to provide details regarding mortality trends in Schleswig-Holstein and Germany in relation to the screening. Annual age-standardized mortality rates for skin melanoma (using the 10th Revision of the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems [ICD-10] code C43) and malignant neoplasms of ill-defined, secondary, and unspecified sites (ICD-10 code C76-C80) were analyzed. The European Standard population was used for age standardization. A bias analysis was performed to estimate the number of skin melanoma deaths that may have been incorrectly counted as ICD-10 code C76-C80 when the skin melanoma mortality declined in Schleswig-Holstein. The observed mortality decline in Schleswig-Holstein 5 years after the pilot study was accompanied by a considerable increase in the number of deaths due to malignant neoplasms of ill-defined, secondary, and unspecified sites (ICD-10 code C76-C80) that is not explainable by an increase in the incidence of these neoplasms. Incorrect assignment of 8 to 35 and 12 to 23 skin melanoma deaths per year among men and women, respectively, as ICD-10 code C76-C80 during 2007 through 2010 could explain the transient skin melanoma mortality decline observed in Schleswig-Holstein. Five years after implementation of the program, the nationwide skin melanoma mortality increased (age-standardized rate change of +0.4 per 100,000 person-years [95% confidence interval, 0.2-0.6] in men and +0.1 per 100,000 person-years [95% confidence interval, -0.1 to 0.2] in women). Although the current analyses raise doubts that the skin cancer screening program in Germany can reduce the skin cancer mortality rate, the authors do not believe the program

  13. NASA TLA workload analysis support. Volume 1: Detailed task scenarios for general aviation and metering and spacing studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundstrom, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    The techniques required to produce and validate six detailed task timeline scenarios for crew workload studies are described. Specific emphasis is given to: general aviation single pilot instrument flight rules operations in a high density traffic area; fixed path metering and spacing operations; and comparative workload operation between the forward and aft-flight decks of the NASA terminal control vehicle. The validation efforts also provide a cursory examination of the resultant demand workload based on the operating procedures depicted in the detailed task scenarios.

  14. The Abundance of Interstellar Fluorine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauroesch, James T.

    2005-01-01

    The primary objective of this program was to obtain FUSE observations of the interstellar absorption lines of F I at 951 and 954 Angstroms to derive the abundance of fluorine toward the star HD 164816. The nucleosynthetic source(s) of fluorine are still a matter of debate - the present day abundance of fluorine can potentially constrain models for pulsationally driven dredge-up in asymptotic giant branch stars. An accurate measure for the depletion behavior of fluorine will determine whether it may be detectable in QSO absorption line systems - an unambiguous detection of fluorine at suitably high redshifts would provide the best evidence to date for the neutrino process in massive stars. Furthermore, due to its extreme reactivity, measurement of the gas-phase interstellar fluorine abundance is important for models of grain chemistry. Despite the importance of measuring the interstellar fluorine abundance, at the time of our proposal only one previous detection has been made due to the low relative abundance of fluorine, the lack of lines outside the far-UV, and the blending of the available F I transitions with lines of Hz. The star HD 164816 is associated with the Lagoon nebula (M8), and at a distance of approximately 1.5 kpc probes both distant and local gas. Beginning April 8th, 2004 FUSE FP-Split observations of the star HD 164816 were obtained for this program. This data became available in the FUSE data archive May 21, 2004, and these observations were then downloaded and we began our analysis. Our analysis procedure has involved (1) fitting stellar models to the FUSE spectra, (2) using the multiple lines of Hz and N I at other wavelengths in the FUSE bandpass to derive column densities for the lines of H2 and N I which are blended with the F I features at 951 and 954 angstroms (3) the measurement of the column densities of F I and the species O I and C1 I which are important species for the dis-entangling of dust and nucleosynthetic effects. As discussed in

  15. Comparative analysis of the luminescence microscopy and cascade filtration methods for estimating bacterial abundance and biomass in the soil: Role of soil suspension dilution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyanskaya, L. M.; Pinchuk, I. P.; Stepanov, A. L.

    2017-10-01

    Bacterial abundance and biomass in cultivated soddy-podzolic soil have been studied by luminescence microscopy and cascade filtration. It is found that bacterial biomass determined by cascade filtration is higher than that counted by the direct method of luminescence on slides by one order of magnitude. This result is because the cascade filtration method for the estimation of bacterial biomass is capable to more accurately calculate bacterial abundance with consideration for bacteria from different size groups. This results in a larger bacterial biomass in soils. It should be noted that bacterial abundance calculated for the initial dilution (1: 100 to 1: 10000) decreases in 3, 10, and 20 times rather than in the expected 10, 100, and 1000 times, respectively. The obtained results are of great importance for the correction of concepts about fungal and bacterial biomass ratios in different soil types.

  16. Population Genomic Analysis of 1,777 Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae Isolates, Houston, Texas: Unexpected Abundance of Clonal Group 307.

    PubMed

    Long, S Wesley; Olsen, Randall J; Eagar, Todd N; Beres, Stephen B; Zhao, Picheng; Davis, James J; Brettin, Thomas; Xia, Fangfang; Musser, James M

    2017-05-16

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a major human pathogen responsible for high morbidity and mortality rates. The emergence and spread of strains resistant to multiple antimicrobial agents and documented large nosocomial outbreaks are especially concerning. To develop new therapeutic strategies for K. pneumoniae , it is imperative to understand the population genomic structure of strains causing human infections. To address this knowledge gap, we sequenced the genomes of 1,777 extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing K. pneumoniae strains cultured from patients in the 2,000-bed Houston Methodist Hospital system between September 2011 and May 2015, representing a comprehensive, population-based strain sample. Strains of largely uncharacterized clonal group 307 (CG307) caused more infections than those of well-studied epidemic CG258. Strains varied markedly in gene content and had an extensive array of small and very large plasmids, often containing antimicrobial resistance genes. Some patients with multiple strains cultured over time were infected with genetically distinct clones. We identified 15 strains expressing the New Delhi metallo-beta-lactamase 1 (NDM-1) enzyme that confers broad resistance to nearly all beta-lactam antibiotics. Transcriptome sequencing analysis of 10 phylogenetically diverse strains showed that the global transcriptome of each strain was unique and highly variable. Experimental mouse infection provided new information about immunological parameters of host-pathogen interaction. We exploited the large data set to develop whole-genome sequence-based classifiers that accurately predict clinical antimicrobial resistance for 12 of the 16 antibiotics tested. We conclude that analysis of large, comprehensive, population-based strain samples can assist understanding of the molecular diversity of these organisms and contribute to enhanced translational research. IMPORTANCE Klebsiella pneumoniae causes human infections that are increasingly difficult to

  17. Nearly complete rRNA genes from 371 Animalia: updated structure-based alignment and detailed phylogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Mallatt, Jon; Craig, Catherine Waggoner; Yoder, Matthew J

    2012-09-01

    This study presents a manually constructed alignment of nearly complete rRNA genes from most animal clades (371 taxa from ~33 of the ~36 metazoan phyla), expanded from the 197 sequences in a previous study. This thorough, taxon-rich alignment, available at http://www.wsu.edu/~jmallatt/research/rRNAalignment.html and in the Dryad Repository (doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.5061/dryad.1v62kr3q), is based rigidly on the secondary structure of the SSU and LSU rRNA molecules, and is annotated in detail, including labeling of the erroneous sequences (contaminants). The alignment can be used for future studies of the molecular evolution of rRNA. Here, we use it to explore if the larger number of sequences produces an improved phylogenetic tree of animal relationships. Disappointingly, the resolution did not improve, neither when the standard maximum-likelihood method was used, nor with more sophisticated methods that partitioned the rRNA into paired and unpaired sites (stem, loop, bulge, junction), or accounted for the evolution of the paired sites. For example, no doublet model of paired-site substitutions (16-state, 16A and 16B, 7A-F, or 6A-C models) corrected the placement of any rogue taxa or increased resolution. The following findings are from the simplest, standard, ML analysis. The 371-taxon tree only imperfectly supported the bilaterian clades of Lophotrochozoa and Ecdysozoa, and this problem remained after 17 taxa with unstably positioned sequences were omitted from the analysis. The problem seems to stem from base-compositional heterogeneity across taxa and from an overrepresentation of highly divergent sequences among the newly added taxa (e.g., sequences from Cephalopoda, Rotifera, Acoela, and Myxozoa). The rogue taxa continue to concentrate in two locations in the rRNA tree: near the base of Arthropoda and of Bilateria. The approximately uncertain (AU) test refuted the monophyly of Mollusca and of Chordata, probably due to long-branch attraction of the highly

  18. Abundance measurements in stellar environments

    SciTech Connect

    Leone, F.

    2014-05-09

    Most of what we know about stars, and systems of stars, is derived from the analysis of their electromagnetic radiation. This lesson is an attempt to describe to Physicists, without any Astrophysical background, the framework to understand the present status of abundance determination in stellar environments and its limit. These notes are dedicated to the recently passed, November 21, 2013, Prof. Dimitri Mihalas who spent his life confuting the 19th century positivist philosopher Auguste Comte who stated that we shall not at all be able to determine the chemical composition of stars.

  19. 10. DETAIL, CAB SIDE. DETAIL, END OF BOOM. DETAIL, LOWER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. DETAIL, CAB SIDE. DETAIL, END OF BOOM. DETAIL, LOWER PART OF TOWER, SHOWING METAL WHEELS AND CABLE SPOOLS. DETAIL, LOOKING UP AT THE UNDERSIDE OF THE REVOLVING PLATFORM ATOP THE TOWER. - United Engineering Company Shipyard, Crane, 2900 Main Street, Alameda, Alameda County, CA

  20. ASPCAP: The APOGEE Stellar Parameter and Chemical Abundances Pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García Pérez, Ana E.; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Holtzman, Jon A.; Shetrone, Matthew; Mészáros, Szabolcs; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Carrera, Ricardo; Cunha, Katia; García-Hernández, D. A.; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Majewski, Steven R.; Nidever, David L.; Schiavon, Ricardo P.; Shane, Neville; Smith, Verne V.; Sobeck, Jennifer; Troup, Nicholas; Zamora, Olga; Weinberg, David H.; Bovy, Jo; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Feuillet, Diane; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; Hayden, Michael R.; Hearty, Fred R.; Nguyen, Duy C.; O'Connell, Robert W.; Pinsonneault, Marc H.; Wilson, John C.; Zasowski, Gail

    2016-06-01

    The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) has built the largest moderately high-resolution (R ≈ 22,500) spectroscopic map of the stars across the Milky Way, and including dust-obscured areas. The APOGEE Stellar Parameter and Chemical Abundances Pipeline (ASPCAP) is the software developed for the automated analysis of these spectra. ASPCAP determines atmospheric parameters and chemical abundances from observed spectra by comparing observed spectra to libraries of theoretical spectra, using χ2 minimization in a multidimensional parameter space. The package consists of a fortran90 code that does the actual minimization and a wrapper IDL code for book-keeping and data handling. This paper explains in detail the ASPCAP components and functionality, and presents results from a number of tests designed to check its performance. ASPCAP provides stellar effective temperatures, surface gravities, and metallicities precise to 2%, 0.1 dex, and 0.05 dex, respectively, for most APOGEE stars, which are predominantly giants. It also provides abundances for up to 15 chemical elements with various levels of precision, typically under 0.1 dex. The final data release (DR12) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III contains an APOGEE database of more than 150,000 stars. ASPCAP development continues in the SDSS-IV APOGEE-2 survey.

  1. ASPCAP: THE APOGEE STELLAR PARAMETER AND CHEMICAL ABUNDANCES PIPELINE

    SciTech Connect

    García Pérez, Ana E.; Majewski, Steven R.; Shane, Neville

    2016-06-01

    The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) has built the largest moderately high-resolution ( R  ≈ 22,500) spectroscopic map of the stars across the Milky Way, and including dust-obscured areas. The APOGEE Stellar Parameter and Chemical Abundances Pipeline (ASPCAP) is the software developed for the automated analysis of these spectra. ASPCAP determines atmospheric parameters and chemical abundances from observed spectra by comparing observed spectra to libraries of theoretical spectra, using χ {sup 2} minimization in a multidimensional parameter space. The package consists of a fortran90 code that does the actual minimization and a wrapper IDL code for book-keeping and datamore » handling. This paper explains in detail the ASPCAP components and functionality, and presents results from a number of tests designed to check its performance. ASPCAP provides stellar effective temperatures, surface gravities, and metallicities precise to 2%, 0.1 dex, and 0.05 dex, respectively, for most APOGEE stars, which are predominantly giants. It also provides abundances for up to 15 chemical elements with various levels of precision, typically under 0.1 dex. The final data release (DR12) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III contains an APOGEE database of more than 150,000 stars. ASPCAP development continues in the SDSS-IV APOGEE-2 survey.« less

  2. Trends in naloxone prescriptions prescribed after implementation of a National Academic Detailing Service in the Veterans Health Administration: A preliminary analysis.

    PubMed

    Bounthavong, Mark; Harvey, Michael A; Wells, Daina L; Popish, Sarah J; Himstreet, Julianne; Oliva, Elizabeth M; Kay, Chad L; Lau, Marcos K; Randeria-Noor, Priyanka P; Phillips, Andrea G; Christopher, Melissa L D

    To evaluate the effects of the U.S. Veterans Health Administration (VA) National Academic Detailing Service alongside the Opioid Overdose Education and Naloxone Distribution (OEND) program on naloxone prescriptions prescribed from October 2014 to September 2016. A retrospective, repeated measures cohort study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of a real-world application of academic detailing (AD) alongside OEND on providers' outpatient naloxone prescribing from October 2014 to September 2016. Outcome was the number of naloxone prescriptions prescribed per month per provider. During the study period, VA providers were aware of OEND, but may not have been exposed to academic detailing. Therefore, providers were categorized as exposed when the first OEND-specific academic detailing session was provided during the study period. Generalized estimating equations were used to estimate the association between exposure to academic detailing and monthly naloxone prescriptions prescribed while taking into account the correlation within each provider. Incident rate ratios with 95% CIs were reported. Seven hundred fifty (22.6%) of 3313 providers received at least 1 OEND-specific academic detailing visit. At 1 year, the average number of naloxone prescriptions per month was 3-times greater in AD-exposed providers compared with AD-unexposed providers (95% CI 2.0-5.3); and at 2 years, the average number of naloxone prescriptions was 7-times greater (95% CI 3.0-17.9). Moreover, the average difference in naloxone prescribing from baseline to 2 years was 7.1% greater in AD-exposed providers compared with AD-unexposed providers (95% CI 2.0%-12.5%). This preliminary analysis provides the first evidence that academic detailing influenced naloxone prescribing rates in a large, integrated health care system at 1 and 2 years. In addition, AD-exposed providers had a higher average difference in naloxone prescribing rate compared with AD-unexposed providers after 2 years of follow

  3. Sodium abundances of AGB and RGB stars in Galactic globular clusters. II. Analysis and results of NGC 104, NGC 6121, and NGC 6809

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Primas, F.; Charbonnel, C.; Van der Swaelmen, M.; Bono, G.; Chantereau, W.; Zhao, G.

    2017-11-01

    Aims: We investigate the Na abundance distribution of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in Galactic globular clusters (GCs) and its possible dependence on GC global properties, especially age and metallicity. Methods: We analyze high-resolution spectra of a large sample of AGB and red giant branch (RGB) stars in the Galactic GCs NGC 104, NGC 6121, and NGC 6809 obtained with FLAMES/GIRAFFE at ESO/VLT, and determine their Na abundances. This is the first time that the AGB stars in NGC 6809 are targeted. Moreover, to investigate the dependence of AGB Na abundance dispersion on GC parameters, we compare the AGB [Na/H] distributions of a total of nine GCs, with five determined by ourselves with homogeneous method and four from literature, covering a wide range of GC parameters. Results: NGC 104 and NGC 6809 have comparable AGB and RGB Na abundance distributions revealed by the K-S test, while NGC 6121 shows a lack of very Na-rich AGB stars. By analyzing all nine GCs, we find that the Na abundances and multiple populations of AGB stars form complex picture. In some GCs, AGB stars have similar Na abundances and/or second-population fractions as their RGB counterparts, while some GCs do not have Na-rich second-population AGB stars, and various cases exist between the two extremes. In addition, the fitted relations between fractions of the AGB second population and GC global parameters show that the AGB second-population fraction slightly anticorrelates with GC central concentration, while no robust dependency can be confirmed with other GC parameters. Conclusions: Current data roughly support the prediction of the fast-rotating massive star (FRMS) scenario. However, considering the weak observational and theoretical trends where scatter and exceptions exist, the fraction of second-population AGB stars can be affected by more than one or two factors, and may even be a result of stochasticity. Based on observations made with ESO telescopes at the La Silla Paranal

  4. High efficiency enrichment of low-abundance peptides by novel dual-platform graphene@SiO2@PMMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Peng; Zhao, Man; Deng, Chunhui

    2012-10-01

    For the first time, dual-platform graphene@SiO2@poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) material was synthesized, and successfully applied to efficiently enrich low-abundance peptides for mass spectrometry analysis.For the first time, dual-platform graphene@SiO2@poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) material was synthesized, and successfully applied to efficiently enrich low-abundance peptides for mass spectrometry analysis. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, SEM, TEM, FT-IR spectra, MALDI-TOF MS spectra, data summary. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr31649h

  5. A computer program for detailed analysis of the takeoff and approach performance capabilities of transport category aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foss, W. E., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The takeoff and approach performance of an aircraft is calculated in accordance with the airworthiness standards of the Federal Aviation Regulations. The aircraft and flight constraints are represented in sufficient detail to permit realistic sensitivity studies in terms of either configuration modifications or changes in operational procedures. The program may be used to investigate advanced operational procedures for noise alleviation such as programmed throttle and flap controls. Extensive profile time history data are generated and are placed on an interface file which can be input directly to the NASA aircraft noise prediction program (ANOPP).

  6. A Robust Design Capture-Recapture Analysis of Abundance, Survival and Temporary Emigration of Three Odontocete Species in the Gulf of Corinth, Greece.

    PubMed

    Santostasi, Nina Luisa; Bonizzoni, Silvia; Bearzi, Giovanni; Eddy, Lavinia; Gimenez, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    While the Mediterranean Sea has been designated as a Global Biodiversity Hotspot, assessments of cetacean population abundance are lacking for large portions of the region, particularly in the southern and eastern basins. The challenges and costs of obtaining the necessary data often result in absent or poor abundance information. We applied capture-recapture models to estimate abundance, survival and temporary emigration of odontocete populations within a 2,400 km2 semi-enclosed Mediterranean bay, the Gulf of Corinth. Boat surveys were conducted in 2011-2015 to collect photo-identification data on striped dolphins Stenella coeruleoalba, short-beaked common dolphins Delphinus delphis (always found together with striped dolphins in mixed groups) and common bottlenose dolphins Tursiops truncatus, totaling 1,873 h of tracking. After grading images for quality and marking distinctiveness, 23,995 high-quality photos were included in a striped and common dolphin catalog, and 2,472 in a bottlenose dolphin catalog. The proportions of striped and common dolphins were calculated from the photographic sample and used to scale capture-recapture estimates. Best-fitting robust design capture-recapture models denoted no temporary emigration between years for striped and common dolphins, and random temporary emigration for bottlenose dolphins, suggesting different residency patterns in agreement with previous studies. Average estimated abundance over the five years was 1,331 (95% CI 1,122-1,578) striped dolphins, 22 (16-32) common dolphins, 55 (36-84) "intermediate" animals (potential striped x common dolphin hybrids) and 38 (32-46) bottlenose dolphins. Apparent survival was constant for striped, common and intermediate dolphins (0.94, 95% CI 0.92-0.96) and year-dependent for bottlenose dolphins (an average of 0.85, 95% CI 0.76-0.95). Our work underlines the importance of long-term monitoring to contribute reliable baseline information that can help assess the conservation status

  7. The Open Cluster Chemical Abundances and Mapping (OCCAM) Survey: Optical Extension for Neutron Capture Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melendez, Matthew; O'Connell, Julia; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; Donor, John; Cunha, Katia M. L.; Shetrone, Matthew D.; Majewski, Steven R.; Zasowski, Gail; Pinsonneault, Marc H.; Roman-Lopes, Alexandre; Stassun, Keivan G.; APOGEE Team

    2017-01-01

    The Open Cluster Chemical Abundance & Mapping (OCCAM) survey is a systematic survey of Galactic open clusters using data primarily from the SDSS-III/APOGEE-1 survey. However, neutron capture elements are very limited in the IR region covered by APOGEE. In an effort to fully study detailed Galactic chemical evolution, we are conducting a high resolution (R~60,000) spectroscopic abundance analysis of neutron capture elements for OCCAM clusters in the optical regime to complement the APOGEE results. As part of this effort, we present Ba II, La II, Ce II and Eu II results for a few open clusters without previous abundance measurements using data obtained at McDonald Observatory with the 2.1m Otto Struve telescope and Sandiford Echelle Spectrograph.This work is supported by an NSF AAG grant AST-1311835.

  8. Increased Abundance of Proteins Involved in Resistance to Oxidative and Nitrosative Stress at the Last Stages of Growth and Development of Leishmania amazonensis Promastigotes Revealed by Proteome Analysis.

    PubMed

    Alcolea, Pedro J; Alonso, Ana; García-Tabares, Francisco; Mena, María C; Ciordia, Sergio; Larraga, Vicente

    2016-01-01

    Leishmania amazonensis is one of the major etiological agents of the neglected, stigmatizing disease termed american cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL). ACL is a zoonosis and rodents are the main reservoirs. Most cases of ACL are reported in Brazil, Bolivia, Colombia and Peru. The biological cycle of the parasite is digenetic because sand fly vectors transmit the motile promastigote stage to the mammalian host dermis during blood meal intakes. The amastigote stage survives within phagocytes of the mammalian host. The purpose of this study is detection and identification of changes in protein abundance by 2DE/MALDI-TOF/TOF at the main growth phases of L. amazonensis promastigotes in axenic culture and the differentiation process that takes place simultaneously. The average number of proteins detected per gel is 202 and the non-redundant cumulative number is 339. Of those, 63 are differentially abundant throughout growth and simultaneous differentiation of L. amazonensis promastigotes. The main finding is that certain proteins involved in resistance to nitrosative and oxidative stress are more abundant at the last stages of growth and differentiation of cultured L. amazonensis promastigotes. These proteins are the arginase, a light variant of the tryparedoxin peroxidase, the iron superoxide dismutase, the regulatory subunit of the protein kinase A and a light HSP70 variant. These data taken together with the decrease of the stress-inducible protein 1 levels are additional evidence supporting the previously described pre-adaptative hypothesis, which consists of preparation in advance towards the amastigote stage.

  9. Increased Abundance of Proteins Involved in Resistance to Oxidative and Nitrosative Stress at the Last Stages of Growth and Development of Leishmania amazonensis Promastigotes Revealed by Proteome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Ana; García-Tabares, Francisco; Mena, María C.; Ciordia, Sergio; Larraga, Vicente

    2016-01-01

    Leishmania amazonensis is one of the major etiological agents of the neglected, stigmatizing disease termed american cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL). ACL is a zoonosis and rodents are the main reservoirs. Most cases of ACL are reported in Brazil, Bolivia, Colombia and Peru. The biological cycle of the parasite is digenetic because sand fly vectors transmit the motile promastigote stage to the mammalian host dermis during blood meal intakes. The amastigote stage survives within phagocytes of the mammalian host. The purpose of this study is detection and identification of changes in protein abundance by 2DE/MALDI-TOF/TOF at the main growth phases of L. amazonensis promastigotes in axenic culture and the differentiation process that takes place simultaneously. The average number of proteins detected per gel is 202 and the non-redundant cumulative number is 339. Of those, 63 are differentially abundant throughout growth and simultaneous differentiation of L. amazonensis promastigotes. The main finding is that certain proteins involved in resistance to nitrosative and oxidative stress are more abundant at the last stages of growth and differentiation of cultured L. amazonensis promastigotes. These proteins are the arginase, a light variant of the tryparedoxin peroxidase, the iron superoxide dismutase, the regulatory subunit of the protein kinase A and a light HSP70 variant. These data taken together with the decrease of the stress-inducible protein 1 levels are additional evidence supporting the previously described pre-adaptative hypothesis, which consists of preparation in advance towards the amastigote stage. PMID:27776144

  10. Chemical abundances in Hg-Mn stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heacox, W. D.

    1979-01-01

    An abundance analysis has been conducted of 21 elements in 21 Hg-Mn, two Si-Cr, and six normal stars using model atmospheres and high-dispersion spectroscopy in the visible and UV. Manganese line strengths imply abundances that correlate well with stellar effective temperature. Within the studied sample of Hg-Mn stars there appears to be no correlation of abundances of any element with projected rotational velocity. Abundances in several Hg-Mn stars show patterns that are probably consistent with diffusion but difficult to reconcile with equilibrium nucleosynthesis. In general, no combination of gross stellar physical parameters is sufficient to characterize the patterns of line strengths observed in Hg-Mb Hg-Mn stars.

  11. Psychopathology and episodic future thinking: A systematic review and meta-analysis of specificity and episodic detail.

    PubMed

    Hallford, D J; Austin, D W; Takano, K; Raes, F

    2018-03-01

    Episodic future thinking (EFT) refers to the mental simulation of future events that might be personally-experienced; a crucial mental process in adaptation. Psychiatric disorders are associated with deficits in recalling episodic memory, however, no study has reviewed the empirical literature to assess for similar deficits in EFT. A systematic review comparing psychiatric groups with control groups on the specificity and episodic detail of EFT returned 19 eligible studies. An overall effect of g = -0.84 (95%CI = -1.06, - 0.62, p < .001) indicated individuals with a psychiatric diagnosis have significantly less specific and detailed EFT. Publication bias was not detected, but heterogeneity was. No methodological characteristics were significant moderators. Subgroup analyses showed significant effects for depression (g = -0.79, p < .001, k = 7), bipolar disorder (g = -1.00, p < .001, k = 2), and schizophrenia (g = -1.06, p < .001, k = 6), but not posttraumatic stress disorder (g = -1.04, p = .260, k = 2) or complicated grief (g = -0.41, p = .08, k = 2). Deficits in EFT are apparent in some psychiatric disorders. However, many clinical groups are understudied, and the causal mechanisms and remediation of these deficits require further research attention. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Clustering in the stellar abundance space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boesso, R.; Rocha-Pinto, H. J.

    2018-03-01

    We have studied the chemical enrichment history of the interstellar medium through an analysis of the n-dimensional stellar abundance space. This work is a non-parametric analysis of the stellar chemical abundance space. The main goal is to study the stars from their organization within this abundance space. Within this space, we seek to find clusters (in a statistical sense), that is, stars likely to share similar chemo-evolutionary history, using two methods: the hierarchical clustering and the principal component analysis. We analysed some selected abundance surveys available in the literature. For each sample, we labelled the group of stars according to its average abundance curve. In all samples, we identify the existence of a main enrichment pattern of the stars, which we call chemical enrichment flow. This flow is set by the structured and well-defined mean rate at which the abundances of the interstellar medium increase, resulting from the mixture of the material ejected from the stars and stellar mass-loss and interstellar medium gas. One of the main results of our analysis is the identification of subgroups of stars with peculiar chemistry. These stars are situated in regions outside of the enrichment flow in the abundance space. These peculiar stars show a mismatch in the enrichment rate of a few elements, such as Mg, Si, Sc and V, when compared to the mean enrichment rate of the other elements of the same stars. We believe that the existence of these groups of stars with peculiar chemistry may be related to the accretion of planetary material on to stellar surfaces or may be due to production of the same chemical element by different nucleosynthetic sites.

  13. APOGEE Chemical Abundances of the Sagittarius Dwarf Galaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Hasselquist, Sten; Holtzman, Jon; Shetrone, Matthew

    2017-08-20

    The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment provides the opportunity of measuring elemental abundances for C, N, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, K, Ca, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni in vast numbers of stars. We analyze thechemical-abundance patterns of these elements for 158 red giant stars belonging to the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy (Sgr). This is the largest sample of Sgr stars with detailed chemical abundances, and it is the first time that C, N, P, K, V, Cr, Co, and Ni have been studied at high resolution in this galaxy. We find that the Sgr stars withmore » [Fe/H] ≳ −0.8 are deficient in all elemental abundance ratios (expressed as [X/Fe]) relative to the Milky Way, suggesting that the Sgr stars observed today were formed from gas that was less enriched by Type II SNe than stars formed in the Milky Way. By examining the relative deficiencies of the hydrostatic (O, Na, Mg, and Al) and explosive (Si, P, K, and Mn) elements, our analysis supports the argument that previous generations of Sgr stars were formed with a top-light initial mass function, one lacking the most massive stars that would normally pollute the interstellar medium with the hydrostatic elements. We use a simple chemical-evolution model, flexCE, to further support our claim and conclude that recent stellar generations of Fornax and the Large Magellanic Cloud could also have formed according to a top-light initial mass function.« less

  14. An investigation of techniques for the measurement and interpretation of cosmic ray isotopic abundances. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiedenbeck, M. E.

    1977-01-01

    An instrument, the Caltech High Energy Isotope Spectrometer Telescope was developed to measure isotopic abundances of cosmic ray nuclei by employing an energy loss - residual energy technique. A detailed analysis was made of the mass resolution capabilities of this instrument. A formalism, based on the leaky box model of cosmic ray propagation, was developed for obtaining isotopic abundance ratios at the cosmic ray sources from abundances measured in local interstellar space for elements having three or more stable isotopes, one of which is believed to be absent at the cosmic ray sources. It was shown that the dominant sources of uncertainty in the derived source ratios are uncorrelated errors in the fragmentation cross sections and statistical uncertainties in measuring local interstellar abundances. These results were applied to estimate the extent to which uncertainties must be reduced in order to distinguish between cosmic ray production in a solar-like environment and in various environments with greater neutron enrichments.

  15. Aortic Dissection Caused by Percutaneous Coronary Intervention: 2 New Case Reports and Detailed Analysis of 86 Previous Cases

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Sharad; Shamoon, Fayez

    2016-01-01

    Aortic dissection, a rare sequela of percutaneous coronary intervention, can be fatal when it is not recognized and treated promptly. Treatment varies from conservative management to invasive aortic repair and revascularization. We report the cases of 2 patients whose aortic dissection was caused by percutaneous coronary intervention. In addition, we present detailed analyses of 86 previously reported cases. Aortic dissection was most often seen during intervention to the right coronary artery (in 76.7% of instances). The 2 most frequently reported causes were catheter trauma (in 54% of cases) and balloon inflation (in 23.8%). The overall mortality rate was 7.1%. We conclude that most patients can be treated conservatively or by means of stenting alone, with no need for surgical intervention. PMID:27047287

  16. Numerical calculations of space charge layer effects in nanocrystalline ceria. Part II: detailed analysis of the space charge layer properties.

    PubMed

    Göbel, Marcus C; Gregori, Giuliano; Maier, Joachim

    2014-06-07

    The numerical approach presented in Part I is used to investigate in detail some important characteristics of space charge layer (SCL) concentration profiles (steepness, extent, charge contributions and total charge), which determine the resulting SCL effects on the ionic and electronic transport. Here, as a case study the conductivity changes in nanocrystalline ceria are discussed over a broad range of dopant concentration (acceptor and donor-doped) as well as space charge potential values. In addition, the effects of a mobile dopant on the SCL charge carrier profiles are addressed. Finally, using the numerical approach the possibilities of adjusting (under realistic conditions) the SCL effects to improve the conduction properties of nanocrystalline CeO2 are discussed.

  17. Comparative proteomic analysis of lung tissue from guinea pigs with leptospiral pulmonary haemorrhage syndrome (LPHS) reveals a decrease in abundance of host proteins involved in cytoskeletal and cellular organization.

    PubMed

    Schuller, Simone; Sergeant, Kjell; Renaut, Jenny; Callanan, John J; Scaife, Caitriona; Nally, Jarlath E

    2015-06-03

    Leptospiral pulmonary haemorrhage syndrome (LPHS) is a particularly severe form of leptospirosis. LPHS is increasingly recognized in both humans and animals and is characterized by rapidly progressive intra-alveolar haemorrhage leading to high mortality. The pathogenic mechanisms of LPHS are poorly understood which hampers the application of effective treatment regimes. In this study a 2-D guinea pig proteome lung map was created and used to investigate the pathogenic mechanisms of LPHS. Comparison of lung proteomes from infected and non-infected guinea pigs via differential in-gel electrophoresis revealed highly significant differences in abundance of proteins contained in 130 spots. Acute phase proteins were the largest functional group amongst proteins with increased abundance in LPHS lung tissue, and likely reflect a local and/or systemic host response to infection. The observed decrease in abundance of proteins involved in cytoskeletal and cellular organization in LPHS lung tissue further suggests that infection with pathogenic Leptospira induces changes in the abundance of host proteins involved in cellular architecture and adhesion contributing to the dramatically increased alveolar septal wall permeability seen in LPHS. The recent completion of the complete genome sequence of the guinea pig (Cavia porcellus) provides innovative opportunities to apply proteomic technologies to an important animal model of disease. In this study, the comparative proteomic analysis of lung tissue from experimentally infected guinea pigs with leptospiral pulmonary haemorrhage syndrome (LPHS) revealed a decrease in abundance of proteins involved in cellular architecture and adhesion, suggesting that loss or down-regulation of cytoskeletal and adhesion molecules plays an important role in the pathogenesis of LPHS. A publically available guinea pig lung proteome map was constructed to facilitate future pulmonary proteomics in this species. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All

  18. Actinide abundances in ordinary chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagee, B.; Bernatowicz, T. J.; Podosek, F. A.; Johnson, M. L.; Burnett, D. S.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of actinide and light REE (LREE) abundances and of phosphate abundances in equilibrated ordinary chondrites were obtained and were used to define the Pu abundance in the solar system and to determine the degree of variation of actinide and LREE abundances. The results were also used to compare directly the Pu/U ratio with the earlier obtained ratio determined indirectly, as (Pu/Nd)x(Nd/U), assuming that Pu behaves chemically as a LREE. The data, combined with high-accuracy isotope-dilution data from the literature, show that the degree of gram-scale variability of the Th, U, and LREE abundances for equilibrated ordinary chondrites is a factor of 2-3 for absolute abundances and up to 50 percent for relative abundances. The observed variations are interpreted as reflecting the differences in the compositions and/or proportions of solar nebula components accreted to ordinary chondrite parent bodies.

  19. A Robust Design Capture-Recapture Analysis of Abundance, Survival and Temporary Emigration of Three Odontocete Species in the Gulf of Corinth, Greece

    PubMed Central

    Bonizzoni, Silvia; Bearzi, Giovanni; Eddy, Lavinia; Gimenez, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    While the Mediterranean Sea has been designated as a Global Biodiversity Hotspot, assessments of cetacean population abundance are lacking for large portions of the region, particularly in the southern and eastern basins. The challenges and costs of obtaining the necessary data often result in absent or poor abundance information. We applied capture-recapture models to estimate abundance, survival and temporary emigration of odontocete populations within a 2,400 km2 semi-enclosed Mediterranean bay, the Gulf of Corinth. Boat surveys were conducted in 2011–2015 to collect photo-identification data on striped dolphins Stenella coeruleoalba, short-beaked common dolphins Delphinus delphis (always found together with striped dolphins in mixed groups) and common bottlenose dolphins Tursiops truncatus, totaling 1,873 h of tracking. After grading images for quality and marking distinctiveness, 23,995 high-quality photos were included in a striped and common dolphin catalog, and 2,472 in a bottlenose dolphin catalog. The proportions of striped and common dolphins were calculated from the photographic sample and used to scale capture-recapture estimates. Best-fitting robust design capture-recapture models denoted no temporary emigration between years for striped and common dolphins, and random temporary emigration for bottlenose dolphins, suggesting different residency patterns in agreement with previous studies. Average estimated abundance over the five years was 1,331 (95% CI 1,122–1,578) striped dolphins, 22 (16–32) common dolphins, 55 (36–84) “intermediate” animals (potential striped x common dolphin hybrids) and 38 (32–46) bottlenose dolphins. Apparent survival was constant for striped, common and intermediate dolphins (0.94, 95% CI 0.92–0.96) and year-dependent for bottlenose dolphins (an average of 0.85, 95% CI 0.76–0.95). Our work underlines the importance of long-term monitoring to contribute reliable baseline information that can help assess the

  20. Twilight of Abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archibald, David

    2014-03-01

    Baby boomers enjoyed the most benign period in human history: fifty years of relative peace, cheap energy, plentiful grain supply, and a warming climate due to the highest solar activity for 8,000 years. The party is over - prepare for the twilight of abundance. David Archibald reveals the grim future the world faces on its current trajectory: massive fuel shortages, the bloodiest warfare in human history, a global starvation crisis, and a rapidly cooling planet. Archibald combines pioneering science with keen economic knowledge to predict the global disasters that could destroy civilization as we know it - disasters that are waiting just around the corner. But there's good news, too: We can have a good future if we prepare for it. Advanced, civilized countries can have a permanently high standard of living if they choose to invest in the technologies that will get them there. Archibald, a climate scientist as well as an inventor and a financial specialist, explains which scientific breakthroughs can save civilization in the coming crisis - if we can cut through the special interest opposition to these innovations and allow free markets to flourish.

  1. Aftershock mechanisms from the 2010 Mw 8.8 Maule, Chile earthquake: detailed analysis using full waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rietbrock, A.; Hicks, S. P.; Chagas, B.; Detzel, H. A.

    2014-12-01

    Since the earthquake rupture process is extremely heterogeneous, it is vital to understand how structural variations in the overriding plate and downgoing slab may control slip style along the subduction megathrust. The large-scale 3-D geometry of subduction plate boundaries is rapidly becoming well understood; however, the nature of any finer-scale structure along the plate interface remains elusive. A detailed study of earthquake source mechanisms along a megathrust region can shed light on the nature of fine-scale structures along the megathrust. The Mw 8.8 Maule earthquake that struck central Chile in 2010 is the sixth largest earthquake ever recorded. Following the earthquake, there was an international deployment of seismic stations in the rupture area, making this one of the best datasets of an aftershock sequence following a large earthquake. This dataset provides a unique opportunity to perform a detailed study of megathrust earthquake source mechanisms. Based on a high-resolution 3-D velocity model and robust earthquake locations [Hicks et al., 2014], we calculate regional moment tensors using the ISOLA software package [Sokos & Zahradnik, 2008]. We incorporate accelerometer recordings, important for constraining solutions of large earthquakes in the overriding plate. We also validate the robustness of our solutions by assessing the consistency of mechanisms with P-wave polarities observed at both onshore and offshore seismic stations, and compare them to already published solutions. We find that accurate earthquake locations are vital for the fine-scale interpretation of focal mechanisms, particularly for offshore events. Our results show that most moment tensor solutions with thrusting mechanisms have a nodal plane dipping parallel to the subducting plate interface. Interestingly, we also find earthquakes with normal faulting mechanisms lying along to the megathrust plate interface in the south of the rupture area. This finding suggests that megathrust

  2. Good abundances from bad spectra - I. Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, J. Bryn; Gilmore, Gerard; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    1996-01-01

    Stellar spectra derived from multiple-object fibre-fed spectroscopic radial-velocity surveys, of the type feasible with, among other examples, AUTOFIB, 2dF, HYDRA, NESSIE, and the Sloan survey, differ significantly from those traditionally used for determination of stellar abundances. The spectra tend to be of moderate resolution (around 1A) and signal-to-noise ratio (around 10-20 per resolution element), and cannot usually have reliable continuum shapes determined over wavelength ranges in excess of a few tens of Angstroms. None the less, with care and a calibration of stellar effective temperature from photometry, independent of the spectroscopy, reliable iron abundances can be derived. We have developed techniques to extract true iron abundances and surface gravities from low-signal-to-noise ratio, intermediate-resolution spectra of G-type stars in the 4000-5000A wavelength region. Spectroscopic indices sensitive to iron abundance and gravity are defined from a set of narrow (few-several A wide) wavelength intervals. The indices are calibrated theoretically using synthetic spectra. Given adequate data and a photometrically determined effective temperature, one can derive estimates of the stellar iron abundance and surface gravity. We have also defined a single abundance indicator for the analysis of very low-signal-to-noise ratio spectra; with the further assumption of a value for the stellar surface gravity, this is able to provide useful iron abundance information from spectra having signal-to-noise ratios as low as 10 (1-A elements). The theoretical basis and calibration using synthetic spectra are described in this paper. The empirical calibration of these techniques by application to observational data is described in a separate paper (Jones, Wyse & Gilmore). The technique provides precise iron abundances, with zero-point correct to ~0.1 dex, and is reliable, with typical uncertainties being <~0.2 dex. A derivation of the in situ thick disc metallicity

  3. Mobile Phones in a Traffic Flow: A Geographical Perspective to Evening Rush Hour Traffic Analysis Using Call Detail Records

    PubMed Central

    Järv, Olle; Ahas, Rein; Saluveer, Erki; Derudder, Ben; Witlox, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Excessive land use and suburbanisation around densely populated urban areas has gone hand in hand with a growth in overall transportation and discussions about causality of traffic congestions. The objective of this paper is to gain new insight regarding the composition of traffic flows, and to reveal how and to what extent suburbanites’ travelling affects rush hour traffic. We put forward an alternative methodological approach using call detail records of mobile phones to assess the composition of traffic flows during the evening rush hour in Tallinn, Estonia. We found that daily commuting and suburbanites influence transportation demand by amplifying the evening rush hour traffic, although daily commuting trips comprises only 31% of all movement at that time. The geography of the Friday evening rush hour is distinctive from other working days, presumably in connection with domestic tourism and leisure time activities. This suggests that the rise of the overall mobility of individuals due to societal changes may play a greater role in evening rush hour traffic conditions than does the impact of suburbanisation. PMID:23155461

  4. Evaluation of the 235U prompt fission neutron spectrum including a detailed analysis of experimental data and improved model information

    DOE PAGES

    Neudecker, Denise; Talou, Patrick; Kahler, Albert Comstock III; ...

    2017-09-13

    We present an evaluation of the 235U prompt fission neutron spectrum (PFNS) induced by thermal to 20-MeV neutrons. Experimental data and associated covariances were analyzed in detail. The incident energy dependence of the PFNS was modeled with an extended Los Alamos model combined with the Hauser-Feshbach and the exciton models. These models describe prompt fission, pre-fission compound nucleus and pre-equilibrium neutron emissions. The evaluated PFNS agree well with the experimental data included in this evaluation, preliminary data of the LANL and LLNL Chi-Nu measurement and recent evaluations by Capote et al. and Rising et al. However, they are softer thanmore » the ENDF/B-VII.1 (VII.1) and JENDL-4.0 PFNS for incident neutron energies up to 2 MeV. Simulated effective multiplication factors k eff of the Godiva and Flattop-25 critical assemblies are further from the measured k eff if the current data are used within VII.1 compared to using only VII.1 data. However, if this work is used with ENDF/B-VIII.0β2 data, simulated values of k eff agree well with the measured ones.« less

  5. Details of Side Load Test Data and Analysis for a Truncated Ideal Contour Nozzle and a Parabolic Contour Nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruf, Joseph H.; McDaniels, David M.; Brown, Andrew M.

    2010-01-01

    Two cold flow subscale nozzles were tested for side load characteristics during simulated nozzle start transients. The two test article contours were a truncated ideal and a parabolic. The current paper is an extension of a 2009 AIAA JPC paper on the test results for the same two nozzle test articles. The side load moments were measured with the strain tube approach in MSFC s Nozzle Test Facility. The processing techniques implemented to convert the strain gage signals into side load moment data are explained. Nozzle wall pressure profiles for separated nozzle flow at many NPRs are presented and discussed in detail. The effect of the test cell diffuser inlet on the parabolic nozzle s wall pressure profiles for separated flow is shown. The maximum measured side load moments for the two contours are compared. The truncated ideal contour s peak side load moment was 45% of that of the parabolic contour. The calculated side load moments, via mean-plus-three-standard-deviations at each nozzle pressure ratio, reproduced the characteristics and absolute values of measured maximums for both contours. The effect of facility vibration on the measured side load moments is quantified and the effect on uncertainty is calculated. The nozzle contour designs are discussed and the impact of a minor fabrication flaw in the nozzle contours is explained.

  6. Detailed analysis of the effects of stencil spatial variations with arbitrary high-order finite-difference Maxwell solver

    SciTech Connect

    Vincenti, H.; Vay, J. -L.

    2015-11-22

    Due to discretization effects and truncation to finite domains, many electromagnetic simulations present non-physical modifications of Maxwell's equations in space that may generate spurious signals affecting the overall accuracy of the result. Such modifications for instance occur when Perfectly Matched Layers (PMLs) are used at simulation domain boundaries to simulate open media. Another example is the use of arbitrary order Maxwell solver with domain decomposition technique that may under some condition involve stencil truncations at subdomain boundaries, resulting in small spurious errors that do eventually build up. In each case, a careful evaluation of the characteristics and magnitude of themore » errors resulting from these approximations, and their impact at any frequency and angle, requires detailed analytical and numerical studies. To this end, we present a general analytical approach that enables the evaluation of numerical discretization errors of fully three-dimensional arbitrary order finite-difference Maxwell solver, with arbitrary modification of the local stencil in the simulation domain. The analytical model is validated against simulations of domain decomposition technique and PMLs, when these are used with very high-order Maxwell solver, as well as in the infinite order limit of pseudo-spectral solvers. Results confirm that the new analytical approach enables exact predictions in each case. It also confirms that the domain decomposition technique can be used with very high-order Maxwell solver and a reasonably low number of guard cells with negligible effects on the whole accuracy of the simulation.« less

  7. Shaping thin film growth and microstructure pathways via plasma and deposition energy: a detailed theoretical, computational and experimental analysis.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Bibhuti Bhusan; Han, Jeon Geon; Kersten, Holger

    2017-02-15

    Understanding the science and engineering of thin films using plasma assisted deposition methods with controlled growth and microstructure is a key issue in modern nanotechnology, impacting both fundamental research and technological applications. Different plasma parameters like electrons, ions, radical species and neutrals play a critical role in nucleation and growth and the corresponding film microstructure as well as plasma-induced surface chemistry. The film microstructure is also closely associated with deposition energy which is controlled by electrons, ions, radical species and activated neutrals. The integrated studies on the fundamental physical properties that govern the plasmas seek to determine their structure and modification capabilities under specific experimental conditions. There is a requirement for identification, determination, and quantification of the surface activity of the species in the plasma. Here, we report a detailed study of hydrogenated amorphous and crystalline silicon (c-Si:H) processes to investigate the evolution of plasma parameters using a theoretical model. The deposition processes undertaken using a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition method are characterized by a reactive mixture of hydrogen and silane. Later, various contributions of energy fluxes on the substrate are considered and modeled to investigate their role in the growth of the microstructure of the deposited film. Numerous plasma diagnostic tools are used to compare the experimental data with the theoretical results. The film growth and microstructure are evaluated in light of deposition energy flux under different operating conditions.

  8. Development of Automatic Stellar Abundances Method.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Garcia, Beatriz M.; Solano, Enrique

    In this poster the steps of a semi-automated method aimed at calculating stellar abundances are described. This is essential for obtaining systematic results in an efficient way for a large amount of echelle spectra like those from the EXPORT sample used in our work. EXPORT(EXoPlanetary Observational Research Team) carried out observations of Pre-Main Sequence stars and Main Sequence stars within the International Time campaigns at La Palma Observatory in the period 1998-1999. The steps performed so far are: Effective temperature determination radial velocity correction line selection line identification detailed determination of the continuum level equivalent width measurements and finally abundance determination by comparison with the synthetic models. The effective temperatures were calculated using the Ha and Hb lines.For the radial velocity correction a cross-correlation method between the observed and synthetic spectra. Synthetic spectra were generated using the ALTLAS9 code and convolved with appropiate rotational profiles. For the identification of chemical elements had aid of the Kurucz and Bell database. The abundance determination is the result of an iterative process for which no dependence of the abundance content with equivalent width or excitation potential is found. It is show an example of the application of the method to Tau Boo

  9. Cosmological evolution of the Nitrogen abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vangioni, Elisabeth; Dvorkin, Irina; Olive, Keith A.; Dubois, Yohan; Molaro, Paolo; Petitjean, Patrick; Silk, Joe; Kimm, Taysun

    2018-03-01

    The abundance of nitrogen in the interstellar medium is a powerful probe of star formation processes over cosmological timescales. Since nitrogen can be produced both in massive and intermediate-mass stars with metallicity-dependent yields, its evolution is challenging to model, as evidenced by the differences between theoretical predictions and observations. In this work we attempt to identify the sources of these discrepancies using a cosmic evolution model. To further complicate matters, there is considerable dispersion in the abundances from observations of damped Lyα absorbers (DLAs) at z ˜ 2 - 3. We study the evolution of nitrogen with a detailed cosmic chemical evolution model and find good agreement with these observations, including the relative abundances of (N/O) and (N/Si). We find that the principal contribution of nitrogen comes from intermediate mass stars, with the exception of systems with the lowest N/H, where nitrogen production might possibly be dominated by massive stars. This last result could be strengthened if stellar rotation which is important at low metallicity can produce significant amounts of nitrogen. Moreover, these systems likely reside in host galaxies with stellar masses below 108.5M⊙. We also study the origin of the observed dispersion in nitrogen abundances using the cosmological hydrodynamical simulations Horizon-AGN. We conclude that this dispersion can originate from two effects: difference in the masses of the DLA host galaxies, and difference in the their position inside the galaxy.

  10. An Introductory Classroom Exercise on Protein Molecular Model Visualization and Detailed Analysis of Protein-Ligand Binding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poeylaut-Palena, Andres, A.; de los Angeles Laborde, Maria

    2013-01-01

    A learning module for molecular level analysis of protein structure and ligand/drug interaction through the visualization of X-ray diffraction is presented. Using DeepView as molecular model visualization software, students learn about the general concepts of protein structure. This Biochemistry classroom exercise is designed to be carried out by…

  11. Tectonic evolution of the eastern margin of the Thaumasia Plateau (Mars) as inferred from detailed structural mapping and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borraccini, F.; Di Achille, G.; Ori, G. G.; Wezel, F. C.

    2007-05-01

    The eastern margin of the Thaumasia Plateau (EMTP) is characterized by a diversity of tectonic features, which recorded its complex, and still controversial, tectonic history. A detailed structural survey and analyses have been carried out in order to assess the kinematics and relative age of the main deformational events. Combining results from statistics of lineament orientations and density of fault length for each geologic unit and taking into account crosscutting relationships among tectonic structures, three main deformational events have been recognized. The early stage of the tectonic evolution of EMTP is recorded by Noachian units at the southern edge of Melas Dorsa and is represented by N-S oriented grabens sutured by Early Hesperian formations. Starting from Late Noachian, the extensional stress field became NE-SW oriented and resulted in the formation of NW-SE striking sets of grabens. At the boundary between Noachian and Hesperian, the most important change in tectonic regime occurred. The Hesperian tectonics are characterized by an E-W shortening possibly related to an eastward motion of the Thaumasia Plateau. This tectonic phase likely produced a N-S-oriented wrinkle ridges as well as regional folds and thrust faults. E-W-oriented preexisting tectonic lineaments could have been reactivated forming regional transfer zones. In this scenario, Coprates Rise, Melas Dorsa, and Thaumasia Ridge could be interpreted as mountain belts resulting from buckling and thrust faulting of the eastern and southern margins of the Thaumasia plateau. The proto-Valles Marineris could have experienced a left-lateral component of displacement and played a role of a transfer shear zone.

  12. Detailed systematic analysis of recruitment strategies in randomised controlled trials in patients with an unscheduled admission to hospital

    PubMed Central

    Rooshenas, Leila; Fairhurst, Katherine; Rees, Jonathan; Gamble, Carrol; Blazeby, Jane M

    2018-01-01

    Objectives To examine the design and findings of recruitment studies in randomised controlled trials (RCTs) involving patients with an unscheduled hospital admission (UHA), to consider how to optimise recruitment in future RCTs of this nature. Design Studies within the ORRCA database (Online Resource for Recruitment Research in Clinical TriAls; www.orrca.org.uk) that reported on recruitment to RCTs involving UHAs in patients >18 years were included. Extracted data included trial clinical details, and the rationale and main findings of the recruitment study. Results Of 3114 articles populating ORRCA, 39 recruitment studies were eligible, focusing on 68 real and 13 hypothetical host RCTs. Four studies were prospectively planned investigations of recruitment interventions, one of which was a nested RCT. Most recruitment papers were reports of recruitment experiences from one or more ‘real’ RCTs (n=24) or studies using hypothetical RCTs (n=11). Rationales for conducting recruitment studies included limited time for informed consent (IC) and patients being too unwell to provide IC. Methods to optimise recruitment included providing patients with trial information in the prehospital setting, technology to allow recruiters to cover multiple sites, screening logs to uncover recruitment barriers, and verbal rather than written information and consent. Conclusion There is a paucity of high-quality research into recruitment in RCTs involving UHAs with only one nested randomised study evaluating a recruitment intervention. Among the remaining studies, methods to optimise recruitment focused on how to improve information provision in the prehospital setting and use of screening logs. Future research in this setting should focus on the prospective evaluation of the well-developed interventions to optimise recruitment. PMID:29420230

  13. A detailed analysis of open-field habituation and behavioral and neurochemical antidepressant-like effects in postweaning enriched rats.

    PubMed

    Brenes, Juan C; Padilla, Michael; Fornaguera, Jaime

    2009-01-30

    Our previous work has shown that male Sprague-Dawley rats reared in social isolation, standard housing and environmental enrichment differ in their spontaneous open-field activity and in some neurobehavioral depressive-like parameters. Here, we extended this evidence by using a shorter postweaning rearing period (1 month) and including additional evaluations. First, in order to obtain a better characterization of the exploratory strategies among rearing conditions we analyzed in detail the spontaneous activity at the first minute and during the 10-min session. Second, we asked whether the changes in open-field activity were related with basal anxiety levels in the elevated plus-maze. Third, behavior in the forced-swimming test was analyzed and afterward, the tissue levels of hippocampal norepinephrine and serotonin were assessed. The possible relationship between neurotransmitters and forced-swimming behavior were explored through correlation analyses. We found that rearing conditions (i) differed on locomotor habituation and on sensory-motor exploration at the first minute and during the 10-min session without modifying the plus-maze behavior; (ii) affected differentially the grooming time, its sequential components, and the relationship between grooming and locomotor parameters; (iii) modified forced-swimming behavior and the hippocampal concentration of norepinephrine, serotonin, and its turnover; and (iv) produced different correlation patterns between both neurotransmitters and forced-swimming behaviors. Overall, environmental enrichment accelerated open-field habituation and led to behavioral and neurochemical antidepressant-like effects. In contract, isolation rearing strongly impaired habituation and simple information processing, but showed marginal effects on depressive-like behavior and on hippocampal neurochemistry. The current results suggest that differential rearing is not only a useful procedure to study behavioral plasticity or rigidity in response

  14. Chemical Abundances of Globular Clusters in NGC 5128 (Centaurus a)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Svea; Larsen, Søren; Trager, Scott; Kaper, Lex; Groot, Paul

    2018-02-01

    We perform a detailed abundance analysis on integrated-light spectra of 20 globular clusters (GCs) in the early-type galaxy NGC 5128 (Centaurus A). The GCs were observed with X-Shooter on the VLT. The cluster sample spans a metallicity range of -1.92 < [Fe/H] <-0.13 dex. Using theoretical isochrones we compute synthetic integrated-light spectra and iterate the individual abundances until the best fit to the observations is obtained. We measured abundances of Mg, Ca, and Ti, and find a slightly higher enhancement in NGC 5128 GCs with metallicities [Fe/H] < -0.75 dex, of the order of ˜0.1 dex, than in the average values observed in the MW for GCs of the same metallicity. If this α-enhancement in the metal-poor GCs in NGC 5128 is genuine, it could hint at a chemical enrichment history different than that experienced by the MW. We also measure Na abundances in 9 out of 20 GCs. We find evidence for intra-cluster abundance variations in 6 of these clusters where we see enhanced [Na/Fe] > +0.25 dex. We obtain the first abundance measurements of Cr, Mn, and Ni for a sample of the GC population in NGC 5128 and find consistency with the overall trends observed in the MW, with a slight enhancement (<0.1 dex) in the Fe-peak abundances measured in the NGC 5128.

  15. Abundances of neutron-capture elements in G 24-25. A halo-population CH subgiant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S.; Nissen, P. E.; Schuster, W. J.; Zhao, G.; Chen, Y. Q.; Liang, Y. C.

    2012-05-01

    Aims: The differences between the neutron-capture element abundances of halo stars are important to our understanding of the nucleosynthesis of elements heavier than the iron group. We present a detailed abundance analysis of carbon and twelve neutron-capture elements from Sr up to Pb for a peculiar halo star G 24-25 with [Fe/H] = -1.4 in order to probe its origin. Methods: The equivalent widths of unblended lines are measured from high resolution NOT/FIES spectra and used to derive abundances based on Kurucz model atmospheres. In the case of CH, Pr, Eu, Gd, and Pb lines, the abundances are derived by fitting synthetic profiles to the observed spectra. Abundance analyses are performed both relative to the Sun and to a normal halo star G 16-20 that has similar stellar parameters as G 24-25. Results: We find that G 24-25 is a halo subgiant star with an unseen component. It has large overabundances of carbon and heavy s-process elements and mild overabundances of Eu and light s-process elements. This abundance distribution is consistent with that of a typical CH giant. The abundance pattern can be explained by mass transfer from a former asymptotic giant branch component, which is now a white dwarf. Based on observations made with the Nordic Optical Telescope on La Palma.Table 2 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  16. Lithium in cool magnetic CP stars II. Abundance analysis of two Li "spotted" roAp stars, HD 83368 and HD 60435

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polosukhina, N.; Shavrina, A.; Hack, M.; North, P.; Tzymbal, V.; Khalack, V.; Zverko, J.; Ziznovsky, J.

    We present a) the results of an abundance determination of some elements in the two roAp stars HD 83368 and HD 60435 in the spectral range 6680-6730 Å b) an investigation of the identification of the variable spectral feature 6708 Å by the Li line and of other features in this spectral region by REE lines, especially Nd II, Nd III, Pr II, Pr III, Ce II, Ce III; c) a study of the lithium distribution on the surface of these stars, based on the observed modulation of the Li line profile with rotational phase; d) the correlation of the Li spots with the magnetic field structure, suggesting that the Li distribution might be explained by the effect of ambipolar diffusion.

  17. Prognosis of TiO 2 abundance in lunar soil using a non-linear analysis of Clementine and LSCC data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korokhin, Viktor V.; Kaydash, Vadym G.; Shkuratov, Yuriy G.; Stankevich, Dmitry G.; Mall, Urs

    2008-06-01

    We suggest a technique to determine the chemical and mineral composition of the lunar surface using artificial neural networks (ANNs). We demonstrate this powerful non-linear approach for prognosis of TiO 2 abundance using Clementine UV-VIS mosaics and Lunar Soil Characterization Consortium data. The ANN technique allows one to study correlations between spectral characteristics of lunar soils and composition parameters without any restrictions on the character of these correlations. The advantage of this method in comparison with the traditional linear regression method and the Lucey et al. approaches is shown. The results obtained could be useful for the strategy of analyzing lunar data that will be acquired in incoming lunar missions especially in case of the Chandrayaan-1 and Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter missions.

  18. Abundances, planetary nebulae, and stellar evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aller, Lawrence H.

    1994-01-01

    Among Henry Norris Russell's many achievements were his contributions to solar and stellar spectroscopy, in particular, to an analysis of the chemical composition of the solar atmosphere. The question of composition differences between stars was hotly debated; some distinguished astronomers argued that all stars had the solar composition. Some early challenges to this doctrine are described. Determinations of chemical compositions of gaseous nebulae were much more difficult. If we observe the lines of a given chemical element in one ionization stage in a stellar spectrum, we can deduce readily the abundance of that element. No such luxury is available for a planetary or diffuse gaseous nebula. We must measure lines of as many ionization stages as we can. Furthermore, a nebula is an extended object. Often detailed spectroscopy is at hand only for narrow pencil columns taken through the image. Different observers use a variety of apertures. Fortunately it is possible to calculate theoretical spectra for any arbitrary cross section taken through a symmetrical model, so UV, optical, and IR observations all can be compared properly with a prediction. The value of high-resolution spectra obtained with instruments such as the Hamilton Echelle Spectrograph at Lick Observatory is emphasized. Improved fluxes for weak but important transitions are found. Close blends of lines of different ions can be resolved, and checks can be made on predictions of atomic parameters such as Einstein A-values and collision strengths. High spectral resolution data have been obtained and reduced for 22 planetary nebulae of varying size, structure, stellar population membership, dustiness, level of excitation, evolutionary status, and chemical compositions. The promise seems justified that with such extensive, high quality data, additional insights on nebular genesis and late states of stellar evolution can be found. The present survey is confined to nebulae of high surface brightness, but

  19. Deuterium Abundance in the Local Interstellar Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferlet, R.; Gry, C.; Vidal-Madjar, A.

    1984-01-01

    The present situation of deuterium abundance evaluation in interstellar space is discussed, and it is shown that it should be or = .00001 by studying in more detail lambda the Sco line of sight and by observing two NaI interstellar components toward that star, it can be shown that the D/H evaluation made toward lambda Sco is in fact related to the local interstellar medium (less than 10 pc from the Sun). Because this evaluation is also or = .00001 it is in striking contrast with the one made toward alpha Aur (D/H or = .000018 confirming the fact that the deuterium abundance in the local interstellar medium varies by at least a factor of two over few parsecs.

  20. Evaluation of lunar rocks and soils for resource utilization: Detailed image analysis of raw materials and beneficiated products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Lawrence A.; Chambers, John G.; Patchen, Allan; Jerde, Eric A.; Mckay, David S.; Graf, John; Oder, Robin R.

    1993-01-01

    The rocks and soils of the Moon will be the raw materials for fuels and construction needs at a lunar base. This includes sources of materials for the generation of hydrogen, oxygen, metals, and other potential construction materials. For most of the bulk material needs, the regolith, and its less than 1 cm fraction, the soil, will suffice. But for specific mineral resources, it may be necessary to concentrate minerals from rocks or soils, and it is not always obvious which is the more appropriate feedstock. Besides an appreciation of site geology, the mineralogy and petrography of local rocks and soils is important for consideration of the resources which can provide feedstocks of ilmenite, glass, agglutinates, anorthite, etc. In such studies, it is very time-consuming and practically impossible to correlate particle counts (the traditional method of characterizing lunar soil petrography) with accurate modal analyses and with mineral associations in multi-mineralic grains. But x ray digital imaging, using x rays characteristic of each element, makes all this possible and much more (e.g., size and shape analysis). An application of beneficiation image analysis, in use in our lab (Oxford Instr. EDS and Cameca SX-50 EMP), was demonstrated to study mineral liberation from lunar rocks and soils. Results of x ray image analysis are presented.

  1. Microscale depletion of high abundance proteins in human biofluids using IgY14 immunoaffinity resin: Analysis of human plasma and cerebrospinal fluid

    DOE PAGES

    Hyung, Seok Won; Piehowski, Paul D.; Moore, Ronald J.; ...

    2014-09-06

    Removal of highly abundant proteins in plasma is often carried out using immunoaffinity depletion to extend the dynamic range of measurements to lower abundance species. While commercial depletion columns are available for this purpose, they generally are not applicable to limited sample quantities (<20 µL) due to low yields stemming from losses caused by nonspecific binding to the column matrix. Additionally, the cost of the depletion media can be prohibitive for larger scale studies. Modern LC-MS instrumentation provides the sensitivity necessary to scale-down depletion methods with minimal sacrifice to proteome coverage, which makes smaller volume depletion columns desirable for maximizingmore » sample recovery when samples are limited, as well as for reducing the expense of large scale studies. We characterized the performance of a 346 µL column volume micro-scale depletion system, using four different flow rates to determine the most effective depletion conditions for ~6 μL injections of human plasma proteins and then evaluated depletion reproducibility at the optimum flow rate condition. Depletion of plasma using a commercial 10 mL depletion column served as the control. Results showed depletion efficiency of the micro-scale column increased as flow rate decreased, and that our micro-depletion was reproducible. We found, in an initial application, a 600 µL sample of human cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) pooled from multiple sclerosis patients was depleted and then analyzed using reversed phase liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to demonstrate the utility of the system for this important biofluid where sample quantities are more commonly limited.« less

  2. Molecular and microscopic analysis of the gut contents of abundant rove beetle species (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae) in the boreal balsam fir forest of Quebec, Canada.

    PubMed

    Klimaszewski, Jan; Morency, Marie-Josee; Labrie, Philippe; Séguin, Armand; Langor, David; Work, Timothy; Bourdon, Caroline; Thiffault, Evelyne; Paré, David; Newton, Alfred F; Thayer, Margaret K

    2013-01-01

    Experimental research on beetle responses to removal of logging residues following clearcut harvesting in the boreal balsam fir forest of Quebec revealed several abundant rove beetle (Staphylinidae) species potentially important for long-term monitoring. To understand the trophic affiliations of these species in forest ecosystems, it was necessary to analyze their gut contents. We used microscopic and molecular (DNA) methods to identify the gut contents of the following rove beetles: Atheta capsularis Klimaszewski, Atheta klagesi Bernhauer, Oxypoda grandipennis (Casey), Bryophacis smetanai Campbell, Ischnosoma longicorne (Mäklin), Mycetoporus montanus Luze, Tachinus frigidus Erichson, Tachinus fumipennis (Say), Tachinus quebecensis Robert, and Pseudopsis subulata Herman. We found no apparent arthropod fragments within the guts; however, a number of fungi were identified by DNA sequences, including filamentous fungi and budding yeasts [Ascomycota: Candida derodonti Suh & Blackwell (accession number FJ623605), Candida mesenterica (Geiger) Diddens & Lodder (accession number FM178362), Candida railenensis Ramirez and Gonzáles (accession number JX455763), Candida sophie-reginae Ramirez & González (accession number HQ652073), Candida sp. (accession number AY498864), Pichia delftensis Beech (accession number AY923246), Pichia membranifaciens Hansen (accession number JQ26345), Pichia misumaiensis Y. Sasaki and Tak. Yoshida ex Kurtzman 2000 (accession number U73581), Pichia sp. (accession number AM261630), Cladosporium sp. (accession number KF367501), Acremoniumpsammosporum W. Gams (accession number GU566287), Alternaria sp. (accession number GU584946), Aspergillus versicolor Bubak (accession number AJ937750), and Aspergillusamstelodami (L. Mangin) Thom and Church (accession number HQ728257)]. In addition, two species of bacteria [Bradyrhizobium japonicum (Kirchner) Jordan (accession number BA000040) and Serratia marcescens Bizio accession number CP003942] were found in

  3. Etiology of Cesarean Uterine Scar Defect (Niche): Detailed Critical Analysis of Hypotheses and Prevention Strategies and Peritoneal Closure Debate

    PubMed Central

    Sholapurkar, Shashikant L.

    2018-01-01

    There is an increasing incidence of cesarean scar (CS) defect/niche and its sequelae, probably not entirely explained by better diagnosis or rising cesarean rate. Discussion of possible etiological factors has received scant attention but would be important to formulate preventive strategies. Meaningful informative studies on long-term sequelae of cesarean section are very difficult and none are available for causation of CS defect. Hence, it is crucial to identify key areas in etiology of CS defect for focused research. This practical review proposes an “ischemia and mal-apposition hypothesis for CS niche”, stating that the surgical technique of uterine incision closure is the most important determinant of CS defect formation. Other factors such as cervical location incision, adhesion formation and patient specific factors seem far less important in etiology. Rather than the headline theme of “single versus double-layer closure of uterus”, the finer details of surgical technique which achieve good apposition without inducing tissue ischemia seem more important. Different techniques are discussed and it is proposed that continuous, non-locking absorbable sutures in two layers, without including much of decidua and without undue tight (constricting/devasculaizing) pulling of sutures are likely to result in good healing of uterine scar. Single-layer technique may be best reserved for thin myometrial edges especially during repeat cesareans. Adhesions between uterine isthmus and bladder/abdominal wall seem common associations but not causative for CS niche. It would be desirable to prove these surgical principles by good quality prospective randomized “quantitative” studies but the wait may be very long and this should not hinder the adoption of good surgical principles. Science is much cognitive and not just empirical. To consider a related example, the current recommendation of non-suturing of peritoneal layers during cesarean is mistakenly based on

  4. Etiology of Cesarean Uterine Scar Defect (Niche): Detailed Critical Analysis of Hypotheses and Prevention Strategies and Peritoneal Closure Debate.

    PubMed

    Sholapurkar, Shashikant L

    2018-03-01

    There is an increasing incidence of cesarean scar (CS) defect/niche and its sequelae, probably not entirely explained by better diagnosis or rising cesarean rate. Discussion of possible etiological factors has received scant attention but would be important to formulate preventive strategies. Meaningful informative studies on long-term sequelae of cesarean section are very difficult and none are available for causation of CS defect. Hence, it is crucial to identify key areas in etiology of CS defect for focused research. This practical review proposes an "ischemia and mal-apposition hypothesis for CS niche", stating that the surgical technique of uterine incision closure is the most important determinant of CS defect formation. Other factors such as cervical location incision, adhesion formation and patient specific factors seem far less important in etiology. Rather than the headline theme of "single versus double-layer closure of uterus", the finer details of surgical technique which achieve good apposition without inducing tissue ischemia seem more important. Different techniques are discussed and it is proposed that continuous, non-locking absorbable sutures in two layers, without including much of decidua and without undue tight (constricting/devasculaizing) pulling of sutures are likely to result in good healing of uterine scar. Single-layer technique may be best reserved for thin myometrial edges especially during repeat cesareans. Adhesions between uterine isthmus and bladder/abdominal wall seem common associations but not causative for CS niche. It would be desirable to prove these surgical principles by good quality prospective randomized "quantitative" studies but the wait may be very long and this should not hinder the adoption of good surgical principles. Science is much cognitive and not just empirical. To consider a related example, the current recommendation of non-suturing of peritoneal layers during cesarean is mistakenly based on short

  5. Multivariate factor analysis of detailed milk fatty acid profile: Effects of dairy system, feeding, herd, parity, and stage of lactation.

    PubMed

    Mele, M; Macciotta, N P P; Cecchinato, A; Conte, G; Schiavon, S; Bittante, G

    2016-12-01

    We investigated the potential of using multivariate factor analysis to extract metabolic information from data on the quantity and quality of milk produced under different management systems. We collected data from individual milk samples taken from 1,158 Brown Swiss cows farmed in 85 traditional or modern herds in Trento Province (Italy). Factor analysis was carried out on 47 individual fatty acids, milk yield, and 5 compositional milk traits (fat, protein, casein, and lactose contents, somatic cell score). According to a previous study on multivariate factor analysis, a variable was considered to be associated with a specific factor if the absolute value of its correlation with the factor was ≥0.60. The extracted factors were representative of the following 12 groups of fatty acids or functions: de novo fatty acids, branched fatty acid-milk yield, biohydrogenation, long-chain fatty acids, desaturation, short-chain fatty acids, milk protein and fat contents, odd fatty acids, conjugated linoleic acids, linoleic acid, udder health, and vaccelenic acid. Only 5 fatty acids showed small correlations with these groups. Factor analysis suggested the existence of differences in the metabolic pathways for de novo short- and medium-chain fatty acids and Δ 9 -desaturase products. An ANOVA of factor scores highlighted significant effects of the dairy farming system (traditional or modern), season, herd/date, parity, and days in milk. Factor behavior across levels of fixed factors was consistent with current knowledge. For example, compared with cows farmed in modern herds, those in traditional herds had higher scores for branched fatty acids, which were inversely associated with milk yield; primiparous cows had lower scores than older cows for de novo fatty acids, probably due to a larger contribution of lipids mobilized from body depots on milk fat yield. The statistical approach allowed us to reduce a large number of variables to a few latent factors with biological

  6. In Abundance: Networked Participatory Practices as Scholarship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Bonnie E.

    2015-01-01

    In an era of knowledge abundance, scholars have the capacity to distribute and share ideas and artifacts via digital networks, yet networked scholarship often remains unrecognized within institutional spheres of influence. Using ethnographic methods including participant observation, interviews, and document analysis, this study investigates…

  7. Stellar Abundances and Planet Formation: The Case of 16 Cyg A & B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuler, Simon C.; Cunha, K.; Smith, V. V.; Ghezzi, L.; King, J. R.; Deliyannis, C. P.; Boesgaard, A. M.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a detailed abundance analysis of the solar twins 16 Cyg A and 16 Cyg B based on Keck/HIRES spectroscopy. 16 Cygni is a triple star system with the two solar-twin primary stars and a proper-motion M dwarf companion of 16 Cyg A. 16 Cyg B is known to host a giant planet on an eccentric orbit (e=0.69) while no planets have yet been detected around 16 Cyg A. The abundances of 15 elements have been derived and are found to be indistinguishable between the two stars. The abundances of each element differ by <= 0.026 dex, and the mean abundance difference is +0.003 +/- 0.015 (sigma) dex. Aside from Li, which has been previously shown to be depleted by a factor of at least 4.5 in 16 Cyg B relative to 16 Cyg A, the two stars appear to be chemically identical. The physical characteristics of the 16 Cyg system are discussed in terms of planet formation models, and a consistent scenario that can account for the lack of detected planets around 16 Cyg A, the disparate Li abundances of 16 Cyg A and B, and the eccentricity of the planet 16 Cyg B b is presented. S.C.S. acknowledges support provided by the NOAO Leo Goldberg Fellowship; NOAO is operated by AURA, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF.

  8. Patient factors associated with increased acute care costs of hip fractures: a detailed analysis of 402 patients.

    PubMed

    Aigner, R; Meier Fedeler, T; Eschbach, D; Hack, J; Bliemel, C; Ruchholtz, S; Bücking, B

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify patient factors associated with higher costs in hip fracture patients. The mean costs of a prospectively observed sample of 402 patients were 8853 €. The ASA score, Charlson comorbidity index, and fracture location were associated with increased costs. Fractures of the proximal end of the femur (hip fractures) are of increasing incidence due to demographic changes. Relevant co-morbidities often present in these patients cause high complication rates and prolonged hospital stays, thus leading to high costs of acute care. The aim of this study was to perform a precise cost analysis of the actual hospital costs of hip fractures and to identify patient factors associated with increased costs. The basis of this analysis was a prospectively observed single-center trial, which included 402 patients with fractures of the proximal end of the femur. All potential cost factors were recorded as accurately as possible for each of the 402 patients individually, and statistical analysis was performed to identify associations between pre-existing patient factors and acute care costs. The mean total acute care costs per patient were 8853 ± 5676 € with ward costs (5828 ± 4294 €) and costs for surgical treatment (1972 ± 956 €) representing the major cost factors. The ASA score, Charlson comorbidity index, and fracture location were identified as influencing the costs of acute care for hip fracture treatment. Hip fractures are associated with high acute care costs. This study underlines the necessity of sophisticated risk-adjusted payment models based on specific patient factors. Economic aspects should be an integral part of future hip fracture research due to limited health care resources.

  9. A detailed comparison study of first order and higher order shear deformation theories in the analysis of laminated composite plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreehari, V. M.

    2017-08-01

    The primary aim of the present work is to calculate and compare the response of composite plate using first order and higher order shear deformation theories. The present study initially attempts to develop a finite element formulation for handling the analysis of laminated composite plates. The current study elaborately discusses the formulation that makes an easy programming even for a beginner in this field. Presently, mathematical formulation and Matlab coding using First Order Shear Deformation Theory (FSDT) and Higher Order Shear Deformation Theory (HSDT) had done. Results obtained were compared with the available literature. Parametric study also conducted to clearly understand the variation in results obtained from both FSDT and HSDT.

  10. Thermal relics: Do we know their abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamionkowski, Marc; Turner, Michael S.

    1990-01-01

    The relic abundance of a particle species that was once in thermal equilibrium in the expanding Universe depends upon a competition between the annihilation rate of the species and the expansion rate of the Universe. Assuming that the Universe is radiation dominated at early times the relic abundance is easy to compute and well known. At times earlier than about 1 sec after the bang there is little or no evidence that the Universe had to be radiation dominated, although that is the simplest and standard assumption. Because early-Universe relics are of such importance both to particle physics and to cosmology, three nonstandard possibilities are considered in detail for the Universe at the time a species' abundance froze in: energy density dominated by shear (i.e., anisotropic expansion), energy density dominated by some other nonrelativistic species, and energy density dominated by the kinetic energy of the scalar field that sets the gravitational constant in a Brans-Dicke-Jordan cosmological mode. In the second case the relic abundance is less than the standard value, while in the other two cases it can be enhanced by a significant factor. Two other more exotic possibilities for enhancing the relic abundance of a species are also mentioned--a larger value of Newton's constant at early times (e.g., as might occur in superstring or Kaluza-Klein theories) or a component of the energy density at early times with a very stiff equation of state (p greater than rho/3), e.g., a scalar field phi with potential V(phi) = Beta /phi/ (exp n) with n greater than 4. Results have implications for dark matter searches and searches for particle relics in general.

  11. PSIDD (2): A Prototype Post-Scan Interactive Data Display System for Detailed Analysis of Ultrasonic Scans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cao, Wei; Roth, Don J.

    1997-01-01

    This article presents the description of PSIDD(2), a post-scan interactive data display system for ultrasonic contact scan and single measurement analysis. PSIDD(2) was developed in conjunction with ASTM standards for ultrasonic velocity and attenuation coefficient contact measurements. This system has been upgraded from its original version PSIDD(1) and improvements are described in this article. PSIDD(2) implements a comparison mode where the display of time domain waveforms and ultrasonic properties versus frequency can be shown for up to five scan points on one plot. This allows the rapid contrasting of sample areas exhibiting different ultrasonic properties as initially indicated by the ultrasonic contact scan image. This improvement plus additional features to be described in the article greatly facilitate material microstructural appraisal.

  12. A Detailed Analysis of Visible Defects Formed in Commercial Silicon Thin-Film Modules During Outdoor Exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, Andreas; Johnston, Steve; Olivera-Pimentel, Guillermo

    2016-11-21

    We analyzed defects in silicon thin-film tandem (a-Si:H/..mu..c-Si:H) modules from an outdoor installation in India. The inspection of several affected modules reveals that most of the defects -- which optically appear as bright spots -- were formed primarily nearby the separation and series connection laser lines. Cross-sectional SEM analysis reveals that the bright spots emerge due to electrical isolation, caused by a delamination of the cell from the front TCO in the affected area. In addition, the morphology of the a-Si:H top cell differs in the delaminated area compared to the surrounding unaffected area. We propose that these effects aremore » potentially caused by an explosive and thermally triggered liberation of hydrogen from the a-Si:H layer. Electrical and thermal measurements reveal that these defects can impact the cell performance significantly.« less

  13. A detailed analysis of next generation sequencing reads of microRNA expression in Barrett's esophagus: absolute versus relative quantification.

    PubMed

    Lee, In-Hee; Hong, Xiaoman; Mathur, Sharad C; Sharma, Mukut; Rastogi, Amit; Sharma, Prateek; Christenson, Lane K; Bansal, Ajay

    2014-04-04

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) is a state of the art technology for microRNA (miRNA) analysis. The quantitative interpretation of the primary output of NGS i.e. the read counts for a miRNA sequence that can vary by several orders of magnitude (1 to 107) remains incompletely understood. NGS (SOLiD 3 technology) was performed on biopsies from 6 Barrett's esophagus (BE) and 5 Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) patients. Read sequences were aligned to miRBase 18.0. Differential expression analysis was adjusted for false discovery rate of 5%. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) was performed for 36 miRNA in a validation cohort of 47 patients (27 BE and 20 GERD). Correlation coefficients, accuracy, precision and recall of NGS compared to qRT-PCR were calculated. Increase in NGS reads was associated with progressively lower Cq values, p < 0.05. Although absolute quantification between NGS reads and Cq values correlated modestly: -0.38, p = 0.01 for BE and -0.32, p = 0.05 for GERD, relative quantification (fold changes) of miRNA expression between BE &GERD by NGS correlated highly with qRT-PCR 0.86, p = 2.45E-11. Fold change correlations were unaffected when different thresholds of NGS read counts were compared (>1000 vs. <1000, >500 vs. <500 and >100 vs. <100). The accuracy, precision and recall of NGS to label a miRNA as differentially expressed were 0.71, 0.88 and 0.74 respectively. Absolute NGS reads correlated modestly with qRT-PCR but fold changes correlated highly. NGS is robust at relative but not absolute quantification of miRNA levels and accurate for high-throughput identification of differentially expressed miRNA.

  14. The formation of the Milky Way halo and its dwarf satellites; a NLTE-1D abundance analysis. II. Early chemical enrichment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashonkina, L.; Jablonka, P.; Sitnova, T.; Pakhomov, Yu.; North, P.

    2017-12-01

    We present the non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) abundances of up to 10 chemical species in a sample of 59 very metal-poor (VMP, -4 ≤ [Fe/H] ≾-2) stars in seven dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) and in the Milky Way (MW) halo. Our results are based on high-resolution spectroscopic datasets and homogeneous and accurate atmospheric parameters determined in Paper I. We show that once the NLTE effects are properly taken into account, all massive galaxies in our sample, that is, the MW halo and the classical dSphs Sculptor, Ursa Minor, Sextans, and Fornax, reveal a similar plateau at [α/Fe] ≃ 0.3 for each of the α-process elements: Mg, Ca, and Ti. We put on a firm ground the evidence for a decline in α/Fe with increasing metallicity in the Boötes I ultra-faint dwarf galaxy (UFD), that is most probably due to the ejecta of type Ia supernovae. For Na/Fe, Na/Mg, and Al/Mg, the MW halo and all dSphs reveal indistinguishable trends with metallicity, suggesting that the processes of Na and Al synthesis are identical in all systems, independent of their mass. The dichotomy in the [Sr/Ba] versus [Ba/H] diagram is observed in the classical dSphs, similarly to the MW halo, calling for two different nucleosynthesis channels for Sr. We show that Sr in the massive galaxies is well correlated with Mg suggesting a strong link to massive stars and that its origin is essentially independent of Ba, for most of the [Ba/H] range. Our three UFDs, that is Boötes I, UMa II, and Leo IV, are depleted in Sr and Ba relative to Fe and Mg, with very similar ratios of [Sr/Mg] ≃-1.3 and [Ba/Mg] ≃-1 on the entire range of their Mg abundances. The subsolar Sr/Ba ratios of Boötes I and UMa II indicate a common r-process origin of their neutron-capture elements. Sculptor remains the classical dSph, in which the evidence for inhomogeneous mixing in the early evolution stage, at [Fe/H] <-2, is the strongest. Full Tables 3 and 4 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to

  15. Hierarchical models of animal abundance and occurrence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Royle, J. Andrew; Dorazio, R.M.

    2006-01-01

    Much of animal ecology is devoted to studies of abundance and occurrence of species, based on surveys of spatially referenced sample units. These surveys frequently yield sparse counts that are contaminated by imperfect detection, making direct inference about abundance or occurrence based on observational data infeasible. This article describes a flexible hierarchical modeling framework for estimation and inference about animal abundance and occurrence from survey data that are subject to imperfect detection. Within this framework, we specify models of abundance and detectability of animals at the level of the local populations defined by the sample units. Information at the level of the local population is aggregated by specifying models that describe variation in abundance and detection among sites. We describe likelihood-based and Bayesian methods for estimation and inference under the resulting hierarchical model. We provide two examples of the application of hierarchical models to animal survey data, the first based on removal counts of stream fish and the second based on avian quadrat counts. For both examples, we provide a Bayesian analysis of the models using the software WinBUGS.

  16. Why is Trichodesmium abundant in the Kuroshio?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiozaki, T.; Takeda, S.; Itoh, S.; Kodama, T.; Liu, X.; Hashihama, F.; Furuya, K.

    2015-12-01

    The genus Trichodesmium is recognized as an abundant and major diazotroph in the Kuroshio, but the reason for this remains unclear. The present study investigated the abundance of Trichodesmium spp. and nitrogen fixation together with concentrations of dissolved iron and phosphate in the Kuroshio and its marginal seas. We performed the observations near the Miyako Islands, which form part of the Ryukyu Islands, situated along the Kuroshio, since our satellite analysis suggested that material transport could occur from the islands to the Kuroshio. Trichodesmium spp. bloomed (> 20 000 filaments L-1) near the Miyako Islands, abundance was high in the Kuroshio and the Kuroshio bifurcation region of the East China Sea, but was low in the Philippine Sea. The abundance of Trichodesmium spp. was significantly correlated with the total nitrogen fixation activity. The surface concentrations of dissolved iron (0.19-0.89 nM) and phosphate (< 3-36 nM) were similar for all of the study areas, indicating that the nutrient distribution could not explain the spatial differences in Trichodesmium spp. abundance and nitrogen fixation. Numerical particle-tracking experiments simulated the transportation of water around the Ryukyu Islands to the Kuroshio. Our results indicate that Trichodesmium growing around the Ryukyu Islands could be advected into the Kuroshio.

  17. Wide-field lensing mass maps from Dark Energy Survey science verification data: Methodology and detailed analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Vikram, V.

    2015-07-29

    Weak gravitational lensing allows one to reconstruct the spatial distribution of the projected mass density across the sky. These “mass maps” provide a powerful tool for studying cosmology as they probe both luminous and dark matter. In this paper, we present a weak lensing mass map reconstructed from shear measurements in a 139 deg 2 area from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) science verification data. We compare the distribution of mass with that of the foreground distribution of galaxies and clusters. The overdensities in the reconstructed map correlate well with the distribution of optically detected clusters. We demonstrate that candidatemore » superclusters and voids along the line of sight can be identified, exploiting the tight scatter of the cluster photometric redshifts. We cross-correlate the mass map with a foreground magnitude-limited galaxy sample from the same data. Our measurement gives results consistent with mock catalogs from N-body simulations that include the primary sources of statistical uncertainties in the galaxy, lensing, and photo-z catalogs. The statistical significance of the cross-correlation is at the 6.8σ level with 20 arcminute smoothing. We find that the contribution of systematics to the lensing mass maps is generally within measurement uncertainties. In this study, we analyze less than 3% of the final area that will be mapped by the DES; the tools and analysis techniques developed in this paper can be applied to forthcoming larger data sets from the survey.« less

  18. A detailed numerical analysis of asymmetrical density distribution in Saturn's F ring during an encounter with Prometheus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, Phil J.; Kusmartsev, Feo V.

    2014-04-01

    Saturn's rings, reminiscent of an early Solar system present a unique opportunity to investigate experimentally some mechanisms thought to be responsible for planet and planetesimal formation in protoplanetary discs. Here, we extended the comparison of our numerical models of Prometheus encountering the F ring employing non-interacting and interacting particles. Higher resolution analysis revealed that the density increases known to exist at channel edges is more complex and localized than previously thought. Asymmetry between density increases on channel edges revealed that the channel edge facing way from Prometheus to be the most stable but with lowest maximum increases. However, on the channel edge facing Prometheus the interacting model showed large chaotic fluctuations in the maximum density of some clumps, much larger than those of the other channel. The likely cause of this asymmetry is a variance in localized turbulence introduced into the F ring by Prometheus. High-resolution velocity dispersion maps showed that there was a spatial link between the highest densities and the highest velocity dispersions in the interacting model. Thus, suggesting that the high velocity dispersion we see is the reason for the observed inhomogeneous distribution of fans (evidence of embedded moonlets) on some of the channel edges facing Prometheus.

  19. A new computer program for detailed off-line analysis of swimming navigation in the Morris water maze.

    PubMed

    Wolfer, D P; Lipp, H P

    1992-01-01

    The program TRACK-ANALYZER runs on AT-compatible microcomputers and performs off-line analysis of data recorded from Morris water-maze experiments by means of a video tracking system or digitizing tablet. Raw data must be available on disk as ASCII-files listing position coordinates sampled at a constant frequency. Automatic recognition and correction of artifacts and missing data is a key feature of the program, as well as the option to combine commands to user-defined macros. TRACK-ANALYZER offers maximal flexibility regarding experimental schedule, maze geometry and recording parameters and may also be used to analyze open-field activity. In addition to calculating basic parameters of the swim path, such as path length and time, the program counts crossings and hits of goal platform and four virtual reference annuli, calculates search times in five different maze fields, determines directionality, tortuosity and turning preferences of swimming behavior and allows the viewing of any number of trials simultaneously on screen. ASCII-formated data output may easily be exported to commercial statistics and graphics software.

  20. Statistical and Detailed Analysis on Fiber Reinforced Self-Compacting Concrete Containing Admixtures- A State of Art of Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athiyamaan, V.; Mohan Ganesh, G.

    2017-11-01

    Self-Compacting Concrete is one of the special concretes that have ability to flow and consolidate on its own weight, completely fill the formwork even in the presence of dense reinforcement; whilst maintaining its homogeneity throughout the formwork without any requirement for vibration. Researchers all over the world are developing high performance concrete by adding various Fibers, admixtures in different proportions. Various different kinds Fibers like glass, steel, carbon, Poly propylene and aramid Fibers provide improvement in concrete properties like tensile strength, fatigue characteristic, durability, shrinkage, impact, erosion resistance and serviceability of concrete[6]. It includes fundamental study on fiber reinforced self-compacting concrete with admixtures; its rheological properties, mechanical properties and overview study on design methodology statistical approaches regarding optimizing the concrete performances. The study has been classified into seven basic chapters: introduction, phenomenal study on material properties review on self-compacting concrete, overview on fiber reinforced self-compacting concrete containing admixtures, review on design and analysis of experiment; a statistical approach, summary of existing works on FRSCC and statistical modeling, literature review and, conclusion. It is so eminent to know the resent studies that had been done on polymer based binder materials (fly ash, metakaolin, GGBS, etc.), fiber reinforced concrete and SCC; to do an effective research on fiber reinforced self-compacting concrete containing admixtures. The key aim of the study is to sort-out the research gap and to gain a complete knowledge on polymer based Self compacting fiber reinforced concrete.

  1. Detailed Transmission Network Analysis of a Large Opiate-Driven Outbreak of HIV Infection in the United States.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Ellsworth M; Jia, Hongwei; Shankar, Anupama; Hanson, Debra; Luo, Wei; Masciotra, Silvina; Owen, S Michele; Oster, Alexandra M; Galang, Romeo R; Spiller, Michael W; Blosser, Sara J; Chapman, Erika; Roseberry, Jeremy C; Gentry, Jessica; Pontones, Pamela; Duwve, Joan; Peyrani, Paula; Kagan, Ron M; Whitcomb, Jeannette M; Peters, Philip J; Heneine, Walid; Brooks, John T; Switzer, William M

    2017-11-27

    In January 2015, an outbreak of undiagnosed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections among persons who inject drugs (PWID) was recognized in rural Indiana. By September 2016, 205 persons in this community of approximately 4400 had received a diagnosis of HIV infection. We report results of new approaches to analyzing epidemiologic and laboratory data to understand transmission during this outbreak. HIV genetic distances were calculated using the polymerase region. Networks were generated using data about reported high-risk contacts, viral genetic similarity, and their most parsimonious combinations. Sample collection dates and recency assay results were used to infer dates of infection. Epidemiologic and laboratory data each generated large and dense networks. Integration of these data revealed subgroups with epidemiologic and genetic commonalities, one of which appeared to contain the earliest infections. Predicted infection dates suggest that transmission began in 2011, underwent explosive growth in mid-2014, and slowed after the declaration of a public health emergency. Results from this phylodynamic analysis suggest that the majority of infections had likely already occurred when the investigation began and that early transmission may have been associated with sexual activity and injection drug use. Early and sustained efforts are needed to detect infections and prevent or interrupt rapid transmission within networks of uninfected PWID. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  2. Deep sequencing analysis of viral infection and evolution allows rapid and detailed characterization of viral mutant spectrum.

    PubMed

    Isakov, Ofer; Bordería, Antonio V; Golan, David; Hamenahem, Amir; Celniker, Gershon; Yoffe, Liron; Blanc, Hervé; Vignuzzi, Marco; Shomron, Noam

    2015-07-01

    The study of RNA virus populations is a challenging task. Each population of RNA virus is composed of a collection of different, yet related genomes often referred to as mutant spectra or quasispecies. Virologists using deep sequencing technologies face major obstacles when studying virus population dynamics, both experimentally and in natural settings due to the relatively high error rates of these technologies and the lack of high performance pipelines. In order to overcome these hurdles we developed a computational pipeline, termed ViVan (Viral Variance Analysis). ViVan is a complete pipeline facilitating the identification, characterization and comparison of sequence variance in deep sequenced virus populations. Applying ViVan on deep sequenced data obtained from samples that were previously characterized by more classical approaches, we uncovered novel and potentially crucial aspects of virus populations. With our experimental work, we illustrate how ViVan can be used for studies ranging from the more practical, detection of resistant mutations and effects of antiviral treatments, to the more theoretical temporal characterization of the population in evolutionary studies. Freely available on the web at http://www.vivanbioinfo.org : nshomron@post.tau.ac.il Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  3. Analysis of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from avocado seed (Persea americana var. drymifolia) reveals abundant expression of the gene encoding the antimicrobial peptide snakin.

    PubMed

    Guzmán-Rodríguez, Jaquelina J; Ibarra-Laclette, Enrique; Herrera-Estrella, Luis; Ochoa-Zarzosa, Alejandra; Suárez-Rodríguez, Luis María; Rodríguez-Zapata, Luis C; Salgado-Garciglia, Rafael; Jimenez-Moraila, Beatriz; López-Meza, Joel E; López-Gómez, Rodolfo

    2013-09-01

    Avocado is one of the most important fruits in the world. Avocado "native mexicano" (Persea americana var. drymifolia) seeds are widely used in the propagation of this plant and are the primary source of rootstocks globally for a variety of avocado cultivars, such as the Hass avocado. Here, we report the isolation of 5005 ESTs from the 5' ends of P. americana var. drymifolia seed cDNA clones representing 1584 possible unigenes. These avocado seed ESTs were compared with the avocado flower EST library, and we detected several genes that are expressed either in both tissues or only in the seed. The snakin gene, which encodes an element of the innate immune response in plants, was one of those most frequently found among the seed ESTs, and this suggests that it is abundantly expressed in the avocado seed. We expressed the snakin gene in a heterologous system, namely the bovine endothelial cell line BVE-E6E7. Conditioned media from transfected BVE-E6E7 cells showed antimicrobial activity against strains of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. This is the first study of the function of the snakin gene in plant seed tissue, and our observations suggest that this gene might play a protective role in the avocado seed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Transcriptomic analysis of the mussel Elliptio complanata identifies candidate stress-response genes and an abundance of novel or noncoding transcripts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cornman, Robert S.; Robertson, Laura S.; Galbraith, Heather S.; Blakeslee, Carrie J.

    2014-01-01

    Mussels are useful indicator species of environmental stress and degradation, and the global decline in freshwater mussel diversity and abundance is of conservation concern. Elliptio complanata is a common freshwater mussel of eastern North America that can serve both as an indicator and as an experimental model for understanding mussel physiology and genetics. To support genetic components of these research goals, we assembled transcriptome contigs from Illumina paired-end reads. Despite efforts to collapse similar contigs, the final assembly was in excess of 136,000 contigs with an N50 of 982 bp. Even so, comparisons to the CEGMA database of conserved eukaryotic genes indicated that ∼20% of genes remain unrepresented. However, numerous candidate stress-response genes were present, and we identified lineage-specific patterns of diversification among molluscs for cytochrome P450 detoxification genes and two saccharide-modifying enzymes: 1,3 beta-galactosyltransferase and fucosyltransferase. Less than a quarter of contigs had protein-level similarity based on modest BLAST and Hmmer3 statistical thresholds. These results add comparative genomic resources for molluscs and suggest a wealth of novel proteins and noncoding transcripts.

  5. Molecular analysis of deep subsurface Cretaceous rock indicates abundant Fe(III)- and S(zero)-reducing bacteria in a sulfate-rich environment.

    PubMed

    Kovacik, William P; Takai, Ken; Mormile, Melanie R; McKinley, James P; Brockman, Fred J; Fredrickson, James K; Holben, William E

    2006-01-01

    A multilevel sampler (MLS) was emplaced in a borehole straddling anaerobic, sulfate-rich Cretaceous-era shale and sandstone rock formations approximately 200 m below ground surface at Cerro Negro, New Mexico. Sterile quartzite sand contained in chambers in the sampler allowed in situ colonization and recovery of nucleic acids for molecular analyses. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and 16S rRNA gene cloning results indicated a homogeneously distributed bacterial community across the shale-sandstone interface. delta-Proteobacteria sequences were common at all depths, and were dominated by members of the Geobacteraceae family (Pelobacter, Desulphuromonas and Geobacter). Other members of this group are capable of dissimilatory Fe(III) and/or S degrees reduction, but not sulfate reduction. RNA hybridization data also suggested that Fe(III)-/S degrees -reducing bacteria were predominant. These findings are striking considering the lack of significant concentrations of these electron acceptors in this environment. The next most abundant bacterial group indicated was the sulfate reducers, including Desulfobacterium, Desulfocapsa and Desulfobulbus. Sequences related to fermenters, denitrifiers and acetogens were also recovered. The presence of a phylogenetically and functionally diverse microbial community in this deep subsurface environment likely reflects the complex nature of the primary energy and carbon sources, kerogen associated with the shale.

  6. Relative abundance of deformed wing virus, Varroa destructor virus 1, and their recombinants in honey bees (Apis mellifera) assessed by kmer analysis of public RNA-Seq data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cornman, Robert S.

    2017-01-01

    Deformed wing virus (DWV) is a major pathogen of concern to apiculture, and recent reports have indicated the local predominance and potential virulence of recombinants between DWV and a related virus, Varroa destructor virus 1 (VDV). However, little is known about the frequency and titer of VDV and recombinants relative to DWV generally. In this study, I assessed the relative occurrence and titer of DWV and VDV in public RNA-seq accessions of honey bee using a rapid, kmer-based approach. Three recombinant types were detectable graphically and corroborated by de novo assembly. Recombination breakpoints did not disrupt the capsid-encoding region, consistent with previous reports, and both VDV- and DWV-derived capsids were observed in recombinant backgrounds. High abundance of VDV kmers was largely restricted to recombinant forms. Non-metric multidimensional scaling identified genotypic clusters among DWV isolates, which was corroborated by read mapping and consensus generation. The recently described DWV-C lineage was not detected in the searched accessions. The data further highlight the utility of high-throughput sequencing to monitor viral polymorphisms and statistically test biological predictors of titer, and point to the need for consistent methodologies and sampling schemes.

  7. Analysis of a bovine herpesvirus 1 protein encoded by an alternatively spliced latency related (LR) RNA that is abundantly expressed in latently infected neurons.

    PubMed

    Sinani, Devis; Liu, Yilin; Jones, Clinton

    2014-09-01

    The bovine herpes virus 1 (BoHV-1) encoded latency-related RNA (LR-RNA) is abundantly expressed in latently infected sensory neurons. A LR mutant virus with three stop codons at the amino-terminus of ORF2 does not reactivate from latency or replicate efficiently in certain tissues. ORF2 inhibits apoptosis, interacts with Notch1 or Notch3, and interferes with Notch mediated signaling. Alternative splicing of LR-RNA in trigeminal ganglia yields transcripts that have the potential to encode a protein containing most of ORF2 sequences and parts of other coding sequences located within the LR gene. In this study, we determined that an ORF2 protein fused with reading frame B (15d ORF) was more stable in transfected cells. ORF2 and the 15d ORF stimulated neurite formation in mouse neuroblastoma cells, interfered with Notch3 mediated trans-activation, and had similar DNA binding properties. Increased stability of the 15d ORF is predicted to enhance the establishment of latency. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The abundance and vertical distribution of the unknown ultraviolet absorber in the venusian atmosphere from analysis of Venus Monitoring Camera images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molaverdikhani, Karan; McGouldrick, Kevin; Esposito, Larry W.

    2012-02-01

    Observations of Venus using the ultraviolet filter of the Venus Monitoring Camera (VMC) on ESA's Venus Express Spacecraft (VEX) provide the best opportunity for study of the spatial and temporal distribution of the venusian unknown ultraviolet absorber since the Pioneer Venus (PV) mission. We compare the results of two sets of 125 radiative transfer models of the upper atmosphere of Venus to each pixel in a subset of VMC UV channel images. We use a quantitative best fit criterion based upon the notion that the distribution of the unknown absorber should be independent of the illumination and observing geometry. We use the product of the cosines of the incidence and emission angles and search for absorber distributions that are uncorrelated with this geometric parameter, finding that two models can describe the vertical distribution of the unknown absorber. One model is a well-mixed vertical profile above a pressure level of roughly 120 mb (˜63 km). This is consistent with the altitude of photochemical formation of sulfuric acid. The second model describes it as a thin layer of pure UV absorber at a pressure level roughly around 24 mb (˜71 km) and this altitude is consistent with the top of upper cloud deck. We find that the average abundance of unknown absorber in the equatorial region is 0.21 ± 0.04 optical depth and it decreases in the polar region to 0.08 ± 0.05 optical depth at 365 nm.

  9. Detailed Debunking of Denial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enting, I. G.; Abraham, J. P.

    2012-12-01

    The disinformation campaign against climate science has been compared to a guerilla war whose tactics undermine the traditional checks and balances of science. One comprehensive approach has to been produce archives of generic responses such as the websites of RealClimate and SkepticalScience. We review our experiences with an alternative approach of detailed responses to a small number of high profile cases. Our particular examples were Professor Ian Plimer and Christopher Monckton, the Third Viscount Monckton of Brenchley, each of whom has been taken seriously by political leaders in our respective countries. We relate our experiences to comparable examples such as John Mashey's analysis of the Wegman report and the formal complaints about Lomborg's "Skeptical Environmentalist" and Durkin's "Great Global Warming Swindle". Our two approaches used contrasting approaches: an on-line video of a lecture vs an evolving compendium of misrepresentations. Additionally our approaches differed in the emphasis. The analysis of Monckton concentrated on the misrepresentation of the science, while the analysis of Plimer concentrated on departures from accepted scientific practice: fabrication of data, misrepresentation of cited sources and unattributed use of the work of others. Benefits of an evolving compendium were the ability to incorporate contributions from members of the public who had identified additional errors and the scope for addressing new aspects as they came to public attention. `Detailed debunking' gives non-specialists a reference point for distinguishing non-science when engaging in public debate.

  10. Constraints on chemical evolution models from QSOALS abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauroesch, J. T.

    1993-01-01

    Models of the formation and early chemical evolution of our Galaxy are guided and constrained by our knowledge of abundances in globular cluster stars and halo field stars. The abundance patterns identified in halo and disk stars should be discernible in absorption lines of gas clouds in forming galaxies which are accidentally lying in front of background QSO's. Conversely, the ensemble of QSO absorption line systems (QSOALS) at each redshift may suggest a detailed model for the formation of our Galaxy that is testable using abundance patterns in halo stars.

  11. Association of the Jumping to Conclusions and Evidence Integration Biases With Delusions in Psychosis: A Detailed Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mattiske, Julie K.; Balzan, Ryan P.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract We completed a meta-analysis to investigate the relationship between delusions in psychosis and 4 cognitive biases: “jumping to conclusions” (JTC), the “bias against disconfirmatory evidence” (BADE), the “bias against confirmatory evidence” (BACE), and “liberal acceptance” (LA). Building on recent meta-analyses we compared more narrowly defined groups. We identified 35 JTC, 8 BADE, 7 BACE, and 6 LA studies for inclusion. Groups with schizophrenia who were currently experiencing delusions demonstrated greater JTC, BADE, BACE, and LA than groups with schizophrenia who were not currently experiencing delusions, who in turn demonstrated no more JTC than healthy control groups. Hence JTC, BADE, BACE, and LA co-vary with delusions in cross-sectional samples of people with schizophrenia. Groups who were experiencing delusions due to other psychiatric illnesses also demonstrated greater JTC than healthy controls, and equivalent JTC to groups with schizophrenia currently experiencing delusions. Hence JTC is associated with delusions across a range of diagnoses. Groups with other, non-delusional psychiatric illnesses demonstrated less JTC, BADE, BACE, and LA than groups with schizophrenia currently experiencing delusions, less JTC than groups experiencing delusions due to other diagnoses, and no more JTC, BADE, BACE, or LA than healthy control groups. Hence JTC, BADE, BACE, and LA were not associated with psychiatric illnesses in general. Our results indicate all 4 biases are associated with delusions specifically rather than merely with a diagnosis of schizophrenia or with being psychiatrically ill, consistent with the possibility that they contribute to delusional severity. PMID:27169465

  12. Association of the Jumping to Conclusions and Evidence Integration Biases With Delusions in Psychosis: A Detailed Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    McLean, Benjamin F; Mattiske, Julie K; Balzan, Ryan P

    2017-03-01

    We completed a meta-analysis to investigate the relationship between delusions in psychosis and 4 cognitive biases: "jumping to conclusions" (JTC), the "bias against disconfirmatory evidence" (BADE), the "bias against confirmatory evidence" (BACE), and "liberal acceptance" (LA). Building on recent meta-analyses we compared more narrowly defined groups. We identified 35 JTC, 8 BADE, 7 BACE, and 6 LA studies for inclusion. Groups with schizophrenia who were currently experiencing delusions demonstrated greater JTC, BADE, BACE, and LA than groups with schizophrenia who were not currently experiencing delusions, who in turn demonstrated no more JTC than healthy control groups. Hence JTC, BADE, BACE, and LA co-vary with delusions in cross-sectional samples of people with schizophrenia. Groups who were experiencing delusions due to other psychiatric illnesses also demonstrated greater JTC than healthy controls, and equivalent JTC to groups with schizophrenia currently experiencing delusions. Hence JTC is associated with delusions across a range of diagnoses. Groups with other, non-delusional psychiatric illnesses demonstrated less JTC, BADE, BACE, and LA than groups with schizophrenia currently experiencing delusions, less JTC than groups experiencing delusions due to other diagnoses, and no more JTC, BADE, BACE, or LA than healthy control groups. Hence JTC, BADE, BACE, and LA were not associated with psychiatric illnesses in general. Our results indicate all 4 biases are associated with delusions specifically rather than merely with a diagnosis of schizophrenia or with being psychiatrically ill, consistent with the possibility that they contribute to delusional severity. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Detailed review and analysis of complex radiotherapy clinical trial planning data: evaluation and initial experience with the SWAN software system.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Martin A; Haworth, Annette; Kearvell, Rachel; Hooton, Ben; Coleman, Rhonda; Spry, Nigel; Bydder, Sean; Joseph, David

    2008-02-01

    Contemporary radiotherapy clinical trials typically require complex three-dimensional (3D) treatment planning. This produces large amounts of data relating technique and dose delivery for correlation with patient outcomes. Assessment of the quality of this information is required to ensure protocol compliance, to quantify the variation in treatments given to patients and to enhance the power of studies to determine correlates of patient outcomes. A software system ('SWAN') was developed to facilitate the objective analysis, quality-assurance and review of digital treatment planning data from multi-centre radiotherapy trials. The utility of this system was assessed on the basis of its functionality and our experience of its use in the context of multi-centre clinical trials and trials-support activities. The SWAN system has been shown to have the functionality required for use in several multi-centre trials, including automated review and archive processes. Approximately 800 treatment plans from over 30 participating institutions have so far been assessed with the system for several treatment planning scenarios. To illustrate this we include a description of the use of the system for a large-recruitment prostate radiotherapy trial being undertaken in Australasia, including examples of how the review process has changed clinical practice. The successful implementation of SWAN has been demonstrated in a number of clinical trials. The software provides an opportunity for comprehensive review of treatment parameters that could impact on clinical outcomes and trial results. Such quality-assurance (QA) has previously been difficult or impossible to achieve, particularly for a clinical trial involving large numbers of patients. Such reviews have highlighted inconsistencies in clinical practice that have since been addressed through feedback from the review process. The process of data collection and review should be undertaken by dedicated, experienced and skilled staff in

  14. Characterization of genomic imbalances in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma by detailed SNP-chip analysis.

    PubMed

    Scholtysik, René; Kreuz, Markus; Hummel, Michael; Rosolowski, Maciej; Szczepanowski, Monika; Klapper, Wolfram; Loeffler, Markus; Trümper, Lorenz; Siebert, Reiner; Küppers, Ralf

    2015-03-01

    The pathogenesis of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCL) is only partly understood. We analyzed 148 DLBCL by single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-chips to characterize genomic imbalances. Seventy-nine cases were of the germinal center B-cell like (GCB) type of DLBCL, 49 of the activated B-cell like (ABC) subtype and 20 were unclassified DLBCL. Twenty-four regions of recurrent genomic gains and 38 regions of recurrent genomic losses were identified over the whole cohort, with a median of 25 imbalances per case for ABC-DLBCL and 19 per case for GCB-DLBCL. Several recurrent copy number changes showed differential frequencies in the GCB- and ABC-DLBCL subgroups, including gains of HDAC7A predominantly in GCB-DLBCL (38% of cases) and losses of BACH2 and CASP8AP2 predominantly in ABC-DLBCL (35%), hinting at disparate pathogenetic mechanisms in these entities. Correlating gene expression and copy number revealed a strong gene dosage effect in all tumors, with 34% of probesets showing a concordant expression change in affected regions. Two new potential tumor suppressor genes emerging from the analysis, CASP3 and IL5RA, were sequenced in ten and 16 candidate cases, respectively. However, no mutations were found, pointing to a potential haploinsufficiency effect of these genes, considering their reduced expression in cases with deletions. Our study thus describes differences and similarities in the landscape of genomic aberrations in the DLBCL subgroups in a large collection of cases, confirming already known targets, but also discovering novel copy number changes with possible pathogenetic relevance. © 2014 UICC.

  15. Characteristics and components of poly-aluminum chloride coagulants that enhance arsenate removal by coagulation: Detailed analysis of aluminum species.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Yoshihiko; Shirasaki, Nobutaka; Yamaguchi, Takuro; Kondo, Kenta; Machida, Kaori; Fukuura, Taiga; Matsushita, Taku

    2017-07-01

    We evaluated 51 poly-aluminum chloride (PACl) coagulants to determine the coagulant characteristics that were responsible for effective arsenate removal from contaminated river water by means of experiments involving coagulation, settling, and microfiltration. Some of the high-basicity PACls exhibited high arsenate removal percentages, particularly under alkaline conditions, and we investigated various relevant properties and characteristics of these high-basicity PACls. Effective arsenate removal was correlated with the content of polymeric and colloidal aluminum species (Alb and Alc) in the PACls but was not well correlated with colloid charge or zeta potential. Multiple regression analysis revealed that a portion of Alb and Alc, which reacted with the ferron reagent during the period from 30 min to 3 h, that is, the (Al 30min-3h ) fraction, had the highest arsenate sorption capacity, followed by a colloidal aluminum fraction (Al >3h , which reacted with ferron at a time of >3 h). The Al 30min-3h fraction was stable, and its arsenate sorption capacity did not decrease markedly with increasing pH. The Al 30min-3h fraction did not correspond to the Keggin-type e-Al 13 polycation or the δ-Al 30 polycation; it is likely to be an aluminum polymer that is unobservable by 27 Al NMR spectroscopy. Our results suggest that PACls with a high proportion of the Al 30min-3h fraction should be used for enhanced arsenate removal by coagulation. A high content of the e-Al 13 polycation or the δ-Al 30 polycation was not indispensable for effective arsenate removal. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The remarkably unremarkable global abundance variations of the magnetic Bp star HD 133652

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, J. D.; Landstreet, J. D.

    2015-08-01

    Context. In recent years, significant effort has been made to understand how the magnetic field strengths and atmospheric chemical abundances of Ap/Bp stars evolve during their main sequence lifetime by identifying a large number of Ap/Bp stars with accurately known ages. As a next step, these stars should be studied individually and in detail to offer further insight into the physics of how such main sequence stars evolve. Aims: We have obtained high resolution spectra using the ESPaDOnS spectropolarimeter and FEROS spectrograph of the chemically peculiar, magnetic Bp star HD 133652. Using these data, we present a simple magnetic field model and abundance determinations of He, O, Mg, Si, Ti, Cr, Fe, Pr, and Nd. Methods: Abundance analysis was performed using zeeman.f, a spectral synthesis program that includes the effects of magnetic fields on line formation. The magnetic field structure is approximated as a simple, co-linear multipole expansion that reproduces the observed variations of the line-of-sight magnetic field with phase. The abundance distribution of each element was modelled using a uniform abundance in each of the two magnetic hemispheres. Results: Using the new magnetic field measurements, we were able to refine the rotation period of HD 133652 to P = 2.30405 ± 0.00002 d. The abundance analysis reveals that the elements modelled (except He, O and Mg) are overabundant compared to the Sun; however most elements studied do not show substantial differences in the large-scale mean abundances between the two magnetic hemispheres. The individual line profiles are very complex and clearly indicate the presence of significant small-scale abundance variations on the stellar surface. Conclusions: These data are adequate to perform a useful investigation of the magnetic field structure and abundance distribution over the stellar surface. HD 133652 is now one of a growing list of hotter Bp stars of known age for which this type of analysis has been performed

  17. Detailed analysis of dynamic evolution of three Active Regions at the photospheric level before flare and CME occurrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Yudong; Korsós, M. B.; Erdélyi, R.

    2018-01-01

    We present a combined analysis of the applications of the weighted horizontal magnetic gradient (denoted as WGM in Korsós et al. (2015)) method and the magnetic helicity tool (Berger and Field, 1984) employed for three active regions (ARs), namely NOAA AR 11261, AR 11283 and AR 11429. We analysed the time series of photospheric data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory taken between August 2011 and March 2012. During this period the three ARs produced a series of flares (eight M- and six X-class) and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). AR 11261 had four M-class flares and one of them was accompanied by a fast CME. AR 11283 had similar activities with two M- and two X-class flares, but only with a slow CME. Finally, AR 11429 was the most powerful of the three ARs as it hosted five compact and large solar flare and CME eruptions. For applying the WGM method we employed the Debrecen sunspot data catalogue, and, for estimating the magnetic helicity at photospheric level we used the Space-weather HMI Active Region Patches (SHARP's) vector magnetograms from SDO/HMI (Solar Dynamics Observatory/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager). We followed the evolution of the components of the WGM and the magnetic helicity before the flare and CME occurrences. We found a unique and mutually shared behaviour, called the U-shaped pattern, of the weighted distance component of WGM and of the shearing component of the helicity flux before the flare and CME eruptions. This common pattern is associated with the decreasing-receding phases yet reported only known to be a necessary feature prior to solar flare eruption(s) but found now at the same time in the evolution of the shearing helicity flux. This result leads to the conclusions that (i) the shearing motion of photospheric magnetic field may be a key driver for solar eruption in addition to the flux emerging process, and that (ii) the found decreasing-approaching pattern in the evolution of shearing helicity flux may be another precursor

  18. A reassessment of the Archean-Mesoproterozoic tectonic development of the southeastern Chhattisgarh Basin, Central India through detailed aeromagnetic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridhar, M.; Ramesh Babu, V.; Markandeyulu, A.; Raju, B. V. S. N.; Chaturvedi, A. K.; Roy, M. K.

    2017-08-01

    We constrained the geological framework over polydeformed Paleoproterozoic Sonakhan Greenstone Belt and addressed the tectonic evolution of Singhora basin in the fringes of Bastar Craton, central India by utilizing aeromagnetic data interpretation, 2.5D forward modelling and 3D magnetic susceptibility inversions. The Sonakhan Greenstone Belt exposes volcano-sedimentary sequences of the Sonakhan Group within NNW-SSE to NW-SE trending linear belts surrounded by granite gneisses, which are unconformably overlain by sedimentary rocks of Chhattisgarh Basin. The orientations of aeromagnetic anomalies are coincident with geological trends and appear to correlate with lithology and geologic structure. Regional magnetic anomalies and lineaments reveal both NNW-SSE and NE-SW trends. Prominent E-W trending linear, high amplitude magnetic anomalies are interpreted as the Trans-Chhattisgarh Aeromagnetic Lineament (TCAL). NW-SE trending aeromagnetic signatures related to Sonakhan Greenstone Belt extends below the Singhora sedimentary rocks and forms the basement in the west. The analysis suggests that TCAL is a block fault with northern block down-thrown and affected the basement rocks comprising the Sonakhan Greenstone Belt and Samblapur Granitoids. The episode of faulting represented by the TCAL is pre-Singhora sedimentation and played a vital role in basin evolution. The basement configuration image generated by estimates of depth to magnetic basement suggests a complex pattern of NNE-SSW to NE-SW trending depressions separated by a linear N-S trending basement ridge. It is inferred from the 3D magnetic susceptibility inversion that the thickness of sediments is more towards the eastern basin margin and the N-S ridge is a manifestation of post sedimentary faulting. Results of 2.5D modelling of a WNW-ESE profile across the Singhora Basin combined with results from 3D inversion suggest suggests the basin subsidence was controlled by NE-SW trending regional faults in an active

  19. Chemical Abundances of Main-sequence, Turnoff, Subgiant, and Red Giant Stars from APOGEE Spectra. I. Signatures of Diffusion in the Open Cluster M67

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souto, Diogo; Cunha, Katia; Smith, Verne V.; Allende Prieto, C.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Pinsonneault, Marc; Holzer, Parker; Frinchaboy, Peter; Holtzman, Jon; Johnson, J. A.; Jönsson, Henrik; Majewski, Steven R.; Shetrone, Matthew; Sobeck, Jennifer; Stringfellow, Guy; Teske, Johanna; Zamora, Olga; Zasowski, Gail; Carrera, Ricardo; Stassun, Keivan; Fernandez-Trincado, J. G.; Villanova, Sandro; Minniti, Dante; Santana, Felipe

    2018-04-01

    Detailed chemical abundance distributions for 14 elements are derived for eight high-probability stellar members of the solar metallicity old open cluster M67 with an age of ∼4 Gyr. The eight stars consist of four pairs, with each pair occupying a distinct phase of stellar evolution: two G dwarfs, two turnoff stars, two G subgiants, and two red clump (RC) K giants. The abundance analysis uses near-IR high-resolution spectra (λ1.5–1.7 μm) from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment survey and derives abundances for C, N, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, and Fe. Our derived stellar parameters and metallicity for 2M08510076+1153115 suggest that this star is a solar twin, exhibiting abundance differences relative to the Sun of ≤0.04 dex for all elements. Chemical homogeneity is found within each class of stars (∼0.02 dex), while significant abundance variations (∼0.05–0.20 dex) are found across the different evolutionary phases; the turnoff stars typically have the lowest abundances, while the RCs tend to have the largest. Non-LTE corrections to the LTE-derived abundances are unlikely to explain the differences. A detailed comparison of the derived Fe, Mg, Si, and Ca abundances with recently published surface abundances from stellar models that include chemical diffusion provides a good match between the observed and predicted abundances as a function of stellar mass. Such agreement would indicate the detection of chemical diffusion processes in the stellar members of M67.

  20. Adaptation of micro-diffusion method for the analysis of (15) N natural abundance of ammonium in samples with small volume.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shasha; Fang, Yunting; Xi, Dan

    2015-07-30

    There are several preparation methods for the measurement of the nitrogen (N) isotopic composition of ammonium (NH4 (+) ) in different types of samples (freshwater, saltwater and soil extracts). The diffusion method is the most popular and it involves NH4 (+) in solutions being released under alkaline conditions and then immediately trapped by an acidified filter. However, the traditional preparation is designed for samples with large volume and relatively high N concentrations. The performance of diffusion for small-volume samples (e.g., a few milliliters) remains unknown. We examined the overall performance of micro-diffusion on 5 mL samples on varying the incubation time, temperature and initial NH4 (+) concentration. The trapped ammonia was chemically converted into nitrous oxide (N2 O) with hypobromite and hydroxylamine in sequence. The produced N2 O was analyzed by a commercially available purge and cryogenic trap system coupled to an isotope ratio mass spectrometer. We found that diffusion can be complete with no more than 7 days of treatment at 37 °C. Increasing the temperature to 50 °C and the incubation time to 11 days did not improve the overall performance. There were no significant differences in the overall performance during diffusion with NH4 (+) concentrations from 15 to 60 μM. The blank size was relatively large, and the N contamination might come from the reagents especially KCl salts. The method presented here combines micro-diffusion and hypobromite oxidation and hydroxylamine reduction. It is suitable for samples with small volume and low NH4 (+) concentrations. Our study demonstrates that the NH4 (+) concentrations in samples can be as low as 15 μM, and a volume of 5 mL is sufficient for this method. We suggest that this method can be used for the routine determination of (15) N/(14) N for either natural abundance or (15) N-enriched NH4 (+) . Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Sensitivity Tests Between Vs30 and Detailed Shear Wave Profiles Using 1D and 3D Site Response Analysis, Las Vegas Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Loyd Travis

    Site characterization is an essential aspect of hazard analysis and the time-averaged shear-wave velocity to 30 m depth "Vs30" for site-class has become a critical parameter in site-specific and probabilistic hazard analysis. Yet, the general applicability of Vs30 can be ambiguous and much debate and research surround its application. In 2007, in part to mitigate the uncertainty associated with the use of Vs30 in Las Vegas Valley, the Clark County Building Department (CCBD) in collaboration with the Nevada System of Higher Education (NSHE) embarked on an endeavor to map Vs30 using a geophysical methods approach for a site-class microzonation map of over 500 square miles (1500 km2) in southern Nevada. The resulting dataset, described by Pancha et al. (2017), contains over 10,700 1D shear-wave-velocity-depth profiles (SWVP) that constitute a rich database of 3D shear-wave velocity structure that is both laterally and vertical heterogenous. This study capitalizes on the uniquely detailed and spatially dense CCBD database to carry out sensitivity tests on the detailed shear-wave-velocity-profiles and the Vs30 utilizing 1D and 3D site-response approaches. Sensitivity tests are derived from the 1D oscillator response of a single-degree-of-freedom-oscillator and from 3D finite-difference deterministic simulations up to 15 Hz frequency using similar model parameters. Results demonstrate that the detailed SWVP are amplifying ground motions by roughly 50% over the simple Vs30 models, above 4.6 Hz frequency. Numerical simulations also depict significant lateral resonance, focusing, and scattering from seismic energy attributed to the 3D small-scale heterogeneities of the shear-wave-velocity profiles that result in a 70% increase in peak ground velocity. Additionally, PGV ratio maps clearly establish that the increased amplification from the detailed SWVPs is consistent throughout the model space. As a corollary, this study demonstrates the use of finite-differencing numerical

  2. A global database of ant species abundances.

    PubMed

    Gibb, Heloise; Dunn, Rob R; Sanders, Nathan J; Grossman, Blair F; Photakis, Manoli; Abril, Silvia; Agosti, Donat; Andersen, Alan N; Angulo, Elena; Armbrecht, Inge; Arnan, Xavier; Baccaro, Fabricio B; Bishop, Tom R; Boulay, Raphaël; Brühl, Carsten; Castracani, Cristina; Cerda, Xim; Del Toro, Israel; Delsinne, Thibaut; Diaz, Mireia; Donoso, David A; Ellison, Aaron M; Enriquez, Martha L; Fayle, Tom M; Feener, Donald H; Fisher, Brian L; Fisher, Robert N; Fitzpatrick, Matthew C; Gómez, Crisanto; Gotelli, Nicholas J; Gove, Aaron; Grasso, Donato A; Groc, Sarah; Guenard, Benoit; Gunawardene, Nihara; Heterick, Brian; Hoffmann, Benjamin; Janda, Milan; Jenkins, Clinton; Kaspari, Michael; Klimes, Petr; Lach, Lori; Laeger, Thomas; Lattke, John; Leponce, Maurice; Lessard, Jean-Philippe; Longino, John; Lucky, Andrea; Luke, Sarah H; Majer, Jonathan; McGlynn, Terrence P; Menke, Sean; Mezger, Dirk; Mori, Alessandra; Moses, Jimmy; Munyai, Thinandavha Caswell; Pacheco, Renata; Paknia, Omid; Pearce-Duvet, Jessica; Pfeiffer, Martin; Philpott, Stacy M; Resasco, Julian; Retana, Javier; Silva, Rogerio R; Sorger, Magdalena D; Souza, Jorge; Suarez, Andrew; Tista, Melanie; Vasconcelos, Heraldo L; Vonshak, Merav; Weiser, Michael D; Yates, Michelle; Parr, Catherine L

    2017-03-01

    What forces structure ecological assemblages? A key limitation to general insights about assemblage structure is the availability of data that are collected at a small spatial grain (local assemblages) and a large spatial extent (global coverage). Here, we present published and unpublished data from 51 ,388 ant abundance and occurrence records of more than 2,693 species and 7,953 morphospecies from local assemblages collected at 4,212 locations around the world. Ants were selected because they are diverse and abundant globally, comprise a large fraction of animal biomass in most terrestrial communities, and are key contributors to a range of ecosystem functions. Data were collected between 1949 and 2014, and include, for each geo-referenced sampling site, both the identity of the ants collected and details of sampling design, habitat type, and degree of disturbance. The aim of compiling this data set was to provide comprehensive species abundance data in order to test relationships between assemblage structure and environmental and biogeographic factors. Data were collected using a variety of standardized methods, such as pitfall and Winkler traps, and will be valuable for studies investigating large-scale forces structuring local assemblages. Understanding such relationships is particularly critical under current rates of global change. We encourage authors holding additional data on systematically collected ant assemblages, especially those in dry and cold, and remote areas, to contact us and contribute their data to this growing data set. © 2016 by the Ecological Society of America.

  3. A global database of ant species abundances

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gibb, Heloise; Dunn, Rob R.; Sanders, Nathan J.; Grossman, Blair F.; Photakis, Manoli; Abril, Silvia; Agosti, Donat; Andersen, Alan N.; Angulo, Elena; Armbrecht, Ingre; Arnan, Xavier; Baccaro, Fabricio B.; Bishop, Tom R.; Boulay, Raphael; Bruhl, Carsten; Castracani, Cristina; Cerda, Xim; Del Toro, Israel; Delsinne, Thibaut; Diaz, Mireia; Donoso, David A.; Ellison, Aaron M.; Enriquez, Martha L.; Fayle, Tom M.; Feener Jr., Donald H.; Fisher, Brian L.; Fisher, Robert N.; Fitpatrick, Matthew C.; Gomez, Cristanto; Gotelli, Nicholas J.; Gove, Aaron; Grasso, Donato A.; Groc, Sarah; Guenard, Benoit; Gunawardene, Nihara; Heterick, Brian; Hoffmann, Benjamin; Janda, Milan; Jenkins, Clinton; Kaspari, Michael; Klimes, Petr; Lach, Lori; Laeger, Thomas; Lattke, John; Leponce, Maurice; Lessard, Jean-Philippe; Longino, John; Lucky, Andrea; Luke, Sarah H.; Majer, Jonathan; McGlynn, Terrence P.; Menke, Sean; Mezger, Dirk; Mori, Alessandra; Moses, Jimmy; Munyai, Thinandavha Caswell; Pacheco, Renata; Paknia, Omid; Pearce-Duvet, Jessica; Pfeiffer, Martin; Philpott, Stacy M.; Resasco, Julian; Retana, Javier; Silva, Rogerio R.; Sorger, Magdalena D.; Souza, Jorge; Suarez, Andrew V.; Tista, Melanie; Vasconcelos, Heraldo L.; Vonshak, Merav; Weiser, Michael D.; Yates, Michelle; Parr, Catherine L.

    2017-01-01

    What forces structure ecological assemblages? A key limitation to general insights about assemblage structure is the availability of data that are collected at a small spatial grain (local assemblages) and a large spatial extent (global coverage). Here, we present published and unpublished data from 51,388 ant abundance and occurrence records of more than 2693 species and 7953 morphospecies from local assemblages collected at 4212 locations around the world. Ants were selected because they are diverse and abundant globally, comprise a large fraction of animal biomass in most terrestrial communities, and are key contributors to a range of ecosystem functions. Data were collected between 1949 and 2014, and include, for each geo-referenced sampling site, both the identity of the ants collected and details of sampling design, habitat type and degree of disturbance. The aim of compiling this dataset was to provide comprehensive species abundance data in order to test relationships between assemblage structure and environmental and biogeographic factors. Data were collected using a variety of standardised methods, such as pitfall and Winkler traps, and will be valuable for studies investigating large-scale forces structuring local assemblages. Understanding such relationships is particularly critical under current rates of global change. We encourage authors holding additional data on systematically collected ant assemblages, especially those in dry and cold, and remote areas, to contact us and contribute their data to this growing dataset.

  4. Can Planets Affect Coronal Abundances?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Brian

    2015-09-01

    We propose to observe the coronal X-ray spectrum of the exoplanet host star Tau Boo (F7 V) to determine if the presence of a close-in giant planet can affect coronal abundances. Existing observations from XMM already suggest unexpected abundances for Tau Boo s corona, which could be due to the planet. However, the XMM spectrum is contaminated by emission from an M dwarf companion, Tau Boo B (M2 V). The high spatial resolution of Chandra is required to resolve the binary and determine if Tau Boo s coronal abundances are truly anomalous.

  5. The iron abundance of the Magellanic Bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufton, P. L.; Ryans, R. S. I.; Thompson, H. M. A.; Street, R. A.

    2008-04-01

    High-resolution Hubble Space Telescope ultraviolet spectra for five B-type stars in the Magellanic Bridge and in the Large (LMC) and Small (SMC) Magellanic Clouds have been analysed to estimate their iron abundances. Those for the Clouds are lower than estimates obtained from late-type stars or the optical lines in B-type stars by approximately 0.5 dex. This may be due to systematic errors possibly arising from non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) effects or from errors in the atomic data, as similar low Fe abundances have previously been reported from the analysis of the ultraviolet spectra of Galactic early-type stars. The iron abundance estimates for all three Bridge targets appear to be significantly lower than those found for the SMC and LMC by approximately -0.5 and -0.8 dex, respectively, and these differential results should not be affected by any systematic errors present in the absolute abundance estimates. These differential iron abundance estimates are consistent with the underabundances for C, N, O, Mg and Si of approximately -1.1 dex relative to our Galaxy previously found in our Bridge targets. The implications of these very low metal abundances for the Magellanic Bridge are discussed in terms of metal deficient material being stripped from the SMC. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with programmes 6073, 8161 and 9130. E-mail: p.dufton@qub.ac.uk

  6. Ammonia abundances in four comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyckoff, S.; Tegler, S. C.; Engel, L.

    1991-02-01

    NH2 emission band strengths were measured in four comets and the NH2 column densities were determined in order to measure the ammonia content of the comets. The mean ammonia/water abundance ratio derived for the four comets is found to be 0.13 + or - 0.06 percent, with no significant variation among the comets. The uniformity of this abundance attests to a remarkable degree of chemical homogeneity over large scales in the comet-forming region of the primordial solar nebula, and contrasts with the CO abundance variations found previously in comets. The N2 and NH3 abundances indicate a condensation temperature in the range 20-160 K, consistent with virtually all comet formation hypotheses.

  7. The boron abundance of Procyon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemke, Michael; Lambert, David L.; Edvardsson, Bengt

    1993-01-01

    The B I 2496.8 A resonance line and HST/GHRS echelle spectra are used with model atmospheres and synthetic spectra to derive the B abundance of the F dwarfs Procyon (Alpha Canis Minoris), Theta Ursae Majoris, and Iota Pegasi. The B abundance of Theta UMa and Iota Peg is similar to that derived by Boesgaard and Heacox (1978) from the B II resonance line in spectra of A- and B-type stars. These two dwarfs show normal abundances of Li, Be, and B. Procyon, which is highly depleted in Li and Be, is depleted in B by a factor of at least 3. Comparison of the spectra of Procyon and the halo dwarf HD 140283 shows that the B abundance assigned by Duncan et al. (1992) to three halo dwarfs is not greatly overestimated as a result of contamination of the B I line by an unidentified line.

  8. Deuterium Abundance in Consciousness and Current Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauscher, Elizabeth A.

    We utilize the deuterium-hydrogen abundances and their role in setting limits on the mass and other conditions of cosmogenesis and cosmological evolution. We calculate the dependence of a set of physical variables such as density, temperature, energy mass, entropy and other physical variable parameters through the evolution of the universe under the Schwarzschild conditions as a function from early to present time. Reconciliation with the 3°K and missing mass is made. We first examine the Schwarzschild condition; second, the geometrical constraints of a multidimensional Cartesian space on closed cosmologies, and third we will consider the cosmogenesis and evolution of the universe in a multidimensional Cartesian space, obeying the Schwarzschild condition. Implications of this model for matter creation are made. We also examine experimental evidence for closed versus open cosmologies; x-ray detection of the "missing mass" density. Also the interstellar deuterium abundance, along with the value of the Hubble constant set a general criterion on the value of the curvature constant, k. Once the value of the Hubble constant, H is determined, the deuterium abundance sets stringent restrictions on the value of the curvature constant k by an detailed discussion is presented. The experimental evidences for the determination of H and the primary set of coupled equations to determine D abundance is given. 'The value of k for an open, closed, or flat universe will be discussed in terms of the D abundance which will affect the interpretation of the Schwarzschild, black hole universe. We determine cosmology solutions to Einstein's field obeying the Schwarzschild solutions condition. With this model, we can form a reconciliation of the black hole, from galactic to cosmological scale. Continuous creation occurs at the dynamic blackhole plasma field. We term this new model the multiple big bang or "little whimper model". We utilize the deuteriumhydrogen abundances and their role in

  9. Army-NASA aircrew/aircraft integration program: Phase 4 A(3)I Man-Machine Integration Design and Analysis System (MIDAS) software detailed design document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banda, Carolyn; Bushnell, David; Chen, Scott; Chiu, Alex; Constantine, Betsy; Murray, Jerry; Neukom, Christian; Prevost, Michael; Shankar, Renuka; Staveland, Lowell

    1991-01-01

    The Man-Machine Integration Design and Analysis System (MIDAS) is an integrated suite of software components that constitutes a prototype workstation to aid designers in applying human factors principles to the design of complex human-machine systems. MIDAS is intended to be used at the very early stages of conceptual design to provide an environment wherein designers can use computational representations of the crew station and operator, instead of hardware simulators and man-in-the-loop studies, to discover problems and ask 'what if' questions regarding the projected mission, equipment, and environment. This document is the Software Product Specification for MIDAS. Introductory descriptions of the processing requirements, hardware/software environment, structure, I/O, and control are given in the main body of the document for the overall MIDAS system, with detailed discussion of the individual modules included in Annexes A-J.

  10. [Correlation analysis between abundance of K-ras mutation in plasma free DNA and its correlation with clinical outcome and prognosis in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Bai, Yan-qing; Liu, Xiao-jing; Wang, Yan; Ge, Fei-jiao; Zhao, Chuan-hua; Fu, Ya-li; Lin, Li; Xu, Jian-ming

    2013-09-01

    . COX regression model showed that K-ras status detected by PNA-PCR, ECOG PS, number of surgery and initially metastatic site were independent factors for prognosis. PNA-PCR for the detection of K-ras mutation in plasma free DNA can be used to substitute the traditional method for detection of K-ras mutation in tumor tissues. The abundance of K-ras mutation in plasma free DNA is an independent prognostic factor for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

  11. Determination of hydrocarbon abundances and the strength of eddy mixing in the stratosphere of Neptune: Analysis of UVS solar occultation lightcurves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, James

    1995-01-01

    Work on completing our analysis of the Voyager UVS solar occultation data acquired during Neptune encounter is essentially complete, as testified by the attached poster materials. The photochemical modeling addresses the recent revision in branching ratios for radical production in the photolysis of methane at H Lyman alpha implied by the lab measurements of Mordaunt et al. (1993). The software generated in this effort has been useful for checking the degree to which photochemical models addressing other datasets (mainly infrared) are consistent with the UVS data. This work complements the UVS modeling results in that the IR data refer to deeper pressure levels; as regards the modeling of UVS data, the most significant result is the convincing support for the presence of a stagnant lower stratosphere. Evidence for strong dynamical (mixing) transport of minor constituents at shallower pressures is provided by the UVS data analysis.

  12. GIANO Y-band spectroscopy of dwarf stars: Phosphorus, sulphur, and strontium abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caffau, E.; Andrievsky, S.; Korotin, S.; Origlia, L.; Oliva, E.; Sanna, N.; Ludwig, H.-G.; Bonifacio, P.

    2016-01-01

    Context. In recent years a number of poorly studied chemical elements, such as phosphorus, sulphur, and strontium, have received special attention as important tracers of the Galactic chemical evolution. Aims: By exploiting the capabilities of the infrared echelle spectrograph GIANO mounted at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo, we acquired high resolution spectra of four Galactic dwarf stars spanning the metallicity range between about one-third and twice the solar value. We performed a detailed feasibility study about the effectiveness of the P, S, and Sr line diagnostics in the Y band between 1.03 and 1.10 μm. Methods: Accurate chemical abundances have been derived using one-dimensional model atmospheres computed in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). We computed the line formation assuming LTE for P, while we performed non-LTE analysis to derive S and Sr abundances. Results: We were able to derive phosphorus abundance for three stars and an upper limit for one star, while we obtained the abundance of sulphur and strontium for all of the stars. We find [P/Fe] and [S/Fe] abundance ratios consistent with solar-scaled or slightly depleted values, while the [Sr/Fe] abundance ratios are more scattered (by ±0.2 dex) around the solar-scaled value. This is fully consistent with previous studies using both optical and infrared spectroscopy. Conclusions: We verified that high-resolution, Y-band spectroscopy as provided by GIANO is a powerful tool to study the chemical evolution of P, S, and Sr in dwarf stars. Based on observations obtained with GIANO.

  13. Determining the Local Abundance of Martian Methane and its 13-C/l2-C and D/H Isotopic Ratios for Comparison with Related Gas and Soil Analysis on the 2011 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, Christopher R.; Mahaffy, Paul R.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the origin of Martian methane will require numerous complementary measurements from both in situ and remote sensing investigations and laboratory work to correlate planetary surface geophysics with atmospheric dynamics and chemistry. Three instruments (Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer (QMS), Gas Chromatograph (GC) and Tunable Laser Spectrometer (TLS)) with sophisticated sample handling and processing capability make up the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) analytical chemistry suite on NASA s 2011 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Mission. Leveraging off the SAM sample and gas processing capability that includes methane enrichment, TLS has unprecedented sensitivity for measuring absolute methane (parts-per-trillion), water, and carbon dioxide abundances in both the Martian atmosphere and evolved from heated soil samples. In concert with a wide variety of associated trace gases (e.g. SO2, H2S, NH3, higher hydrocarbons, organics, etc.) and other isotope ratios measured by SAM, TLS will focus on determining the absolute abundances of methane, water and carbon dioxide, and their isotope ratios: 13C/12C and D/H in methane; 13C/12C and 18O/17O/16O in carbon dioxide; and 18O/17O/16O and D/H in water. Measurements near the MSL landing site will be correlated with satellite (Mars Express, Mars 2016) and ground-based observations.

  14. On determining the cluster abundance normalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierpaoli, Elena; Borgani, Stefano; Scott, Douglas; White, Martin

    2003-06-01

    Different determinations currently suggest scattered values for the power spectrum normalization on the scale of galaxy clusters, σ8. Here we concentrate on the constraints coming from the X-ray temperature and luminosity functions (XTF and XLF), and investigate several possible sources of discrepancies in the results. We conclude that the main source of error in both methods is the mass scaling relation involved, in particular the way its intrinsic scatter and systematic normalization are treated. For temperature-derived constraints, we use a sample adapted from the Highest X-ray Flux Galaxy Cluster Sample (HIFLUGCS), and test for several sources of systematic error. We parametrize the mass-temperature relation with an overall factor T*, which varies between approximately 1.5 and 1.9 in the literature, with simulations typically giving lower results than empirically derived estimates. After marginalizing over this range of T*, we obtain a 68 per cent confidence range of σ8= 0.77+0.05-0.04 for a standard Λ-cold dark matter (ΛCDM) model. Most other determinations have chosen a single value for T*, and hence have neglected an important source of uncertainty. For luminosity-derived constraints we use the XLF from the REFLEX survey and explore how sensitive the final results are to the details of the mass-luminosity, M-L, conversion. Assuming a uniform systematic uncertainty of +/-20 per cent in the amplitude of the mass-luminosity relation by Reiprich & Böhringer, we derive σ8= 0.79+0.06-0.07 for the same standard ΛCDM model. Although the XTF- and XLF-derived constraints agree very well with each other, we emphasize that such results can change by approximately 10-15 per cent, depending on how uncertainties in the L-T-M conversions are interpreted and included in the analysis. We point out that in order to achieve precision cosmology on σ8 using cluster abundance, it is first important to separate the uncertainty in the scaling relation into its intrinsic and

  15. Natural abundance 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic analysis of acyclic polyol and trehalose accumulation by several yeast species in response to salt stress.

    PubMed

    Meikle, A J; Chudek, J A; Reed, R H; Gadd, G M

    1991-08-01

    Analysis of seventeen yeast strains by 13C-NMR spectroscopy has confirmed the significance of glycerol as the sole osmoregulatory solute under salt-stressed conditions, and has shown arabitol to be present in most of the osmotolerant species. Ribitol was detected in some species, including Debaryomyces hansenii, although ribitol accumulation did not correlate with the osmotic pressure of the medium. Relative amounts of arabitol and ribitol decreased in relation to glycerol when the external osmotic pressure was increased. Trehalose was present during exponential growth of some species.

  16. Maps showing interpretation, using R-mode factor analysis, of trace-element abundances in heavy-mineral concentrate samples, Delta 1° x 2° Quadrangle, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zimbelman, David R.

    1994-01-01

    A set of heavy-mineral concentrate data for the Delta 1° x 2° quadrangle, Utah Conterminous U.S. Mineral Assessment Program (CUSMAP) project was compiled from results of analyses of samples collected during the National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program (SURE), as well as results obtained from samples collected more recently by the USGS. Data results, sampling methods, and analytical methods are provided in Abrogast and others, 1993; 1990; 1988a; 1988b). A similar report, discussing results obtained from stream-sediment samples, is presented in Zimbelman (1993a). The Delta 1° x 2° quadrangle, Utah (figure 1) contains a variety of hydrothermal mineral deposit types, including porphyry-, vein-, replacement-, and Carlin-type deposits. These deposit types have been worked for commodities including gold, silver, beryllium, uranium, lead, zinc, copper, manganese, and cadmium (Lindsey, 1977; Morris and Mogensen, 1978; Zimbelman and others, 1990; Zimbelman and others, 1988). Heavy-mineral concentrate and stream-sediment samples derived from these hydrothermally altered rocks typically contain many geochemical anomalies (for example, see Zimbelman 1993b, c, d). Element associations characterizing lithology and hydrothermal mineral deposits can be distinguished using R-mode factor analysis. This tool often is useful in reconnaissance-scale surveys where sample anomalies are often weak. and single-element distributions may not help to delineate targets. R-mode factors analysis can help identify geologic trends and areas most likely to contain the mineral deposits. R-mode factor analysis was performed on a data set of results of analyses for 19 elements in 643 samples and produced a six-factor model. These six factors represent the geochemical contributions to the data set provided by lithologic and mineralization processes, The distribution of samples that contain high scores for mineralization-related factors is widespread in the Delta quadrangle. These sample sites

  17. Real-world cost analysis of chemotherapy for colorectal cancer in Japan: detailed costs of various regimens during the entire course of chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yajima, Shuichi; Shimizu, Hisanori; Sakamaki, Hiroyuki; Ikeda, Shunya; Ikegami, Naoki; Murayama, Jun-Ichiro

    2016-01-04

    Various chemotherapy regimens for advanced colorectal cancer have been introduced to clinical practice in Japan over the past decade. The cost profiles of these regimens, however, remain unclear in Japan. To explore the detailed costs of different regimens used to treat advanced colorectal cancer during the entire course of chemotherapy in patients treated in a practical setting, we conducted a so-called "real-world" cost analysis. A detailed cost analysis was performed retrospectively. Patients with advanced colorectal cancer who had received chemotherapy in a practical healthcare setting from July 2004 through October 2010 were extracted from the ordering system database of Showa University Hospital. Direct medical costs of chemotherapy regimens were calculated from the hospital billing data of the patients. The analysis was conducted from a payer's perspective. A total of 30 patients with advanced colorectal cancer were identified. Twenty patients received up to second-line treatment, and 8 received up to third-line treatment. The regimens identified from among all courses of treatment in all patients were 13 oxaliplatin-based regimens, 31 irinotecan-based regimens, and 11 regimens including molecular targeted agents. The average (95% confidence interval [95% CI]) monthly cost during the overall period from the beginning of treatment to the end of treatment was 308,363 (258,792 to 357,933) Japanese yen (JPY). According to the type of regimen, the average monthly cost was 418,463 (357,413 to 479,513) JPY for oxaliplatin-based regimens, 215,499 (188,359 to 242,639) JPY for irinotecan-based regimens, and 705,460 (586,733 to 824,187) JPY for regimens including molecular targeted agents. Anticancer drug costs and hospital fees accounted for 50 to 77% and 11 to 25% of the overall costs of chemotherapy, respectively. The costs of irinotecan-based regimens were lower than those of oxaliplatin-based regimens and regimens including molecular targeted agents in Japan

  18. Population Genomic Analysis of 1,777 Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae Isolates, Houston, Texas: Unexpected Abundance of Clonal Group 307

    PubMed Central

    Long, S. Wesley; Olsen, Randall J.; Eagar, Todd N.; Beres, Stephen B.; Zhao, Picheng; Davis, James J.; Brettin, Thomas; Xia, Fangfang

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Klebsiella pneumoniae is a major human pathogen responsible for high morbidity and mortality rates. The emergence and spread of strains resistant to multiple antimicrobial agents and documented large nosocomial outbreaks are especially concerning. To develop new therapeutic strategies for K. pneumoniae, it is imperative to understand the population genomic structure of strains causing human infections. To address this knowledge gap, we sequenced the genomes of 1,777 extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing K. pneumoniae strains cultured from patients in the 2,000-bed Houston Methodist Hospital system between September 2011 and May 2015, representing a comprehensive, population-based strain sample. Strains of largely uncharacterized clonal group 307 (CG307) caused more infections than those of well-studied epidemic CG258. Strains varied markedly in gene content and had an extensive array of small and very large plasmids, often containing antimicrobial resistance genes. Some patients with multiple strains cultured over time were infected with genetically distinct clones. We identified 15 strains expressing the New Delhi metallo-beta-lactamase 1 (NDM-1) enzyme that confers broad resistance to nearly all beta-lactam antibiotics. Transcriptome sequencing analysis of 10 phylogenetically diverse strains showed that the global transcriptome of each strain was unique and highly variable. Experimental mouse infection provided new information about immunological parameters of host-pathogen interaction. We exploited the large data set to develop whole-genome sequence-based classifiers that accurately predict clinical antimicrobial resistance for 12 of the 16 antibiotics tested. We conclude that analysis of large, comprehensive, population-based strain samples can assist understanding of the molecular diversity of these organisms and contribute to enhanced translational research. PMID:28512093

  19. Differential Single Nucleotide Polymorphism-Based Analysis of an Outbreak Caused by Salmonella enterica Serovar Manhattan Reveals Epidemiological Details Missed by Standard Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Scaltriti, Erika; Sassera, Davide; Comandatore, Francesco; Morganti, Marina; Mandalari, Carmen; Gaiarsa, Stefano; Bandi, Claudio; Zehender, Gianguglielmo; Bolzoni, Luca; Casadei, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    We retrospectively analyzed a rare Salmonella enterica serovar Manhattan outbreak that occurred in Italy in 2009 to evaluate the potential of new genomic tools based on differential single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis in comparison with the gold standard genotyping method, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. A total of 39 isolates were analyzed from patients (n = 15) and food, feed, animal, and environmental sources (n = 24), resulting in five different pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) profiles. Isolates epidemiologically related to the outbreak clustered within the same pulsotype, SXB_BS.0003, without any further differentiation. Thirty-three isolates were considered for genomic analysis based on different sets of SNPs, core, synonymous, nonsynonymous, as well as SNPs in different codon positions, by Bayesian and maximum likelihood algorithms. Trees generated from core and nonsynonymous SNPs, as well as SNPs at the second and first plus second codon positions detailed four distinct groups of isolates within the outbreak pulsotype, discriminating outbreak-related isolates of human and food origins. Conversely, the trees derived from synonymous and third-codon-position SNPs clustered food and human isolates together, indicating that all outbreak-related isolates constituted a single clone, which was in line with the epidemiological evidence. Further experiments are in place to extend this approach within our regional enteropathogen surveillance system. PMID:25653407

  20. PANSAID-PAracetamol and NSAID in combination: detailed statistical analysis plan for a randomised, blinded, parallel, four-group multicentre clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Thybo, Kasper Højgaard; Jakobsen, Janus Christian; Hägi-Pedersen, Daniel; Pedersen, Niels Anker; Dahl, Jørgen Berg; Schrøder, Henrik Morville; Bülow, Hans Henrik; Bjørck, Jan Gottfrid; Overgaard, Søren; Mathiesen, Ole; Wetterslev, Jørn

    2017-10-10

    Effective postoperative pain management is essential for the rehabilitation of the surgical patient. The PANSAID trial evaluates the analgesic effects and safety of the combination of paracetamol and ibuprofen. This paper describes in detail the statistical analysis plan for the primary publication to prevent outcome reporting bias and data-driven analysis results. The PANSAID trial is a multicentre, randomised, controlled, parallel, four-group clinical trial comparing the beneficial and harmful effects of different doses and combinations of paracetamol and ibuprofen in patients having total hip arthroplastic surgery. Patients, caregivers, physicians, investigators, and statisticians are blinded to the intervention. The two co-primary outcomes are 24-h consumption of morphine and proportion of patients with one or more serious adverse events within 90 days after surgery. Secondary outcomes are pain scores during mobilisation and at rest at 6 and 24 h postoperatively, and the proportion of patients with one or more adverse events within 24 h postoperatively. PANSAID will provide a large trial with low risk of bias regarding benefits and harms of the combination of paracetamol and ibuprofen used in a perioperative setting. ClinicalTrials.org identifier: NCT02571361 . Registered on 7 October 2015.

  1. HIGH PRECISION ABUNDANCES OF THE OLD SOLAR TWIN HIP 102152: INSIGHTS ON Li DEPLETION FROM THE OLDEST SUN

    SciTech Connect

    Monroe, TalaWanda R.; Melendez, Jorge; Tucci Maia, Marcelo

    2013-09-10

    We present the first detailed chemical abundance analysis of the old 8.2 Gyr solar twin, HIP 102152. We derive differential abundances of 21 elements relative to the Sun with precisions as high as 0.004 dex ({approx}<1%), using ultra high-resolution (R = 110,000), high S/N UVES spectra obtained on the 8.2 m Very Large Telescope. Our determined metallicity of HIP 102152 is [Fe/H] = -0.013 {+-} 0.004. The atmospheric parameters of the star were determined to be 54 K cooler than the Sun, 0.09 dex lower in surface gravity, and a microturbulence identical to our derived solar value. Elemental abundance ratiosmore » examined versus dust condensation temperature reveal a solar abundance pattern for this star, in contrast to most solar twins. The abundance pattern of HIP 102152 appears to be the most similar to solar of any known solar twin. Abundances of the younger, 2.9 Gyr solar twin, 18 Sco, were also determined from UVES spectra to serve as a comparison for HIP 102152. The solar chemical pattern of HIP 102152 makes it a potential candidate to host terrestrial planets, which is reinforced by the lack of giant planets in its terrestrial planet region. The following non-local thermodynamic equilibrium Li abundances were obtained for HIP 102152, 18 Sco, and the Sun: log {epsilon} (Li) = 0.48 {+-} 0.07, 1.62 {+-} 0.02, and 1.07 {+-} 0.02, respectively. The Li abundance of HIP 102152 is the lowest reported to date for a solar twin, and allows us to consider an emerging, tightly constrained Li-age trend for solar twin stars.« less

  2. Horizontal Cross Bracing Detail, Vertical Cross Bracing Detail, Horizontal Cross ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Horizontal Cross Bracing Detail, Vertical Cross Bracing Detail, Horizontal Cross Bracing Detail, Vertical Cross Bracing-End Detail - Cumberland Covered Bridge, Spanning Mississinewa River, Matthews, Grant County, IN

  3. Robust Abundance Estimation in Animal Abundance Surveys with Imperfect Detection

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surveys of animal abundance are central to the conservation and management of living natural resources. However, detection uncertainty complicates the sampling process of many species. One sampling method employed to deal with this problem is depletion (or removal) surveys in whi...

  4. CHLORINE ABUNDANCES IN COOL STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Maas, Z. G.; Pilachowski, C. A.; Hinkle, K., E-mail: zmaas@indiana.edu, E-mail: cpilacho@indiana.edu, E-mail: hinkle@noao.edu

    2016-12-01

    Chlorine abundances are reported in 15 evolved giants and 1 M dwarf in the solar neighborhood. The Cl abundance was measured using the vibration-rotation 1-0 P8 line of H{sup 35}Cl at 3.69851 μ m. The high-resolution L -band spectra were observed using the Phoenix infrared spectrometer on the Kitt Peak Mayall 4 m telescope. The average [{sup 35}Cl/Fe] abundance in stars with −0.72 < [Fe/H] < 0.20 is [{sup 35}Cl/Fe] = (−0.10 ± 0.15) dex. The mean difference between the [{sup 35}Cl/Fe] ratios measured in our stars and chemical evolution model values is (0.16 ± 0.15) dex. The [{sup 35}Cl/Ca] ratio has an offset of ∼0.35more » dex above model predictions, suggesting that chemical evolution models are underproducing Cl at the high metallicity range. Abundances of C, N, O, Si, and Ca were also measured in our spectral region and are consistent with F and G dwarfs. The Cl versus O abundances from our sample match Cl abundances measured in planetary nebula and H ii regions. In one star where both H{sup 35}Cl and H{sup 37}Cl could be measured, a {sup 35}Cl/{sup 37}Cl isotope ratio of 2.2 ± 0.4 was found, consistent with values found in the Galactic ISM and predicted chemical evolution models.« less

  5. Anthropogenic noise changes arthropod abundances.

    PubMed

    Bunkley, Jessie P; McClure, Christopher J W; Kawahara, Akito Y; Francis, Clinton D; Barber, Jesse R

    2017-05-01

    Anthropogenic noise is a widespread and growing form of sensory pollution associated with the expansion of human infrastructure. One specific source of constant and intense noise is that produced by compressors used for the extraction and transportation of natural gas. Terrestrial arthropods play a central role in many ecosystems, and given that numerous species rely upon airborne sounds and substrate-borne vibrations in their life histories, we predicted that increased background sound levels or the presence of compressor noise would influence their distributions. In the second largest natural gas field in the United States (San Juan Basin, New Mexico, USA), we assessed differences in the abundances of terrestrial arthropod families and community structure as a function of compressor noise and background sound level. Using pitfall traps, we simultaneously sampled five sites adjacent to well pads that possessed operating compressors, and five alternate, quieter well pad sites that lacked compressors, but were otherwise similar. We found a negative association between sites with compressor noise or higher levels of background sound and the abundance of five arthropod families and one genus, a positive relationship between loud sites and the abundance of one family, and no relationship between noise level or compressor presence and abundance for six families and two genera. Despite these changes, we found no evidence of community turnover as a function of background sound level or site type (compressor and noncompressor). Our results indicate that anthropogenic noise differentially affects the abundances of some arthropod families. These preliminary findings point to a need to determine the direct and indirect mechanisms driving these observed responses. Given the diverse and important ecological functions provided by arthropods, changes in abundances could have ecological implications. Therefore, we recommend the consideration of arthropods in the environmental

  6. Sunspots, Starspots, and Elemental Abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doschek, George A.; Warren, Harry P.

    2017-08-01

    The composition of plasma in solar and stellar atmospheres is not fixed, but varies from feature to feature. These variations are organized by the First Ionization Potential (FIP) of the element. Solar measurements often indicate that low FIP elements (< 10eV, such as Fe, Si, Mg) are enriched by factors of 3-4 in the corona relative to high FIP elements (>10 eV, such as C, N, O, Ar, He) compared to abundances in the photosphere. Stellar observations have also shown similar enrichments. An inverse FIP effect, where the low FIP elements are depleted, has been observed in stellar coronae of stars believed to have large starspots in their photospheres. The abundances are important for determining radiative loss rates in models, tracing the origin of the slow solar wind, and for understanding wave propagation in the chromosphere and corona. Recently, inverse FIP effects have been discovered in the Sun (Doschek, Warren, & Feldman 2015, ApJ, 808, L7) from spectra obtained by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on the Hinode spacecraft. The inverse FIP regions seem always to be near sunspots and cover only a very small area (characteristic length = a few arcseconds). However, in pursuing the search for inverse FIP regions, we have found that in some sunspot groups the coronal abundance at a temperature of 3-4 MK can be near photospheric over much larger areas of the sun near the sunspots (e.g., 6,000 arcsec2). Also, sometimes the abundances at 3-4 MK are in between coronal and photospheric values. This can occur in small areas of an active region. It is predicted (Laming 2015, Sol. Phys., 12, 2) that the FIP effect should be highly variable in the corona. Several examples of coronal abundance variations are presented. Our work indicates that a comprehensive re-investigation of solar abundances is highly desirable. This work is supported by a NASA Hinode grant.

  7. Behavior of Abundances in Chemically Peculiar Dwarf and Subgiant A-Type Stars: HD 23193 and HD 170920

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kılıçoğlu, Tolgahan; Çalışkan, Şeyma; Ünal, Kübraözge

    2018-01-01

    To understand the origin of the abundance peculiarities of non-magnetic A-type stars, we present the first detailed chemical abundance analysis of a metallic line star HD 23193 (A2m) and an A-type subgiant HD 170920 (A5), which could have been a HgMn star on the main sequence. Our analysis is based on medium (R ∼ 14,000) and high (R ∼ 40,000) resolution spectroscopic data of the stars. The abundances of 18 elements are derived: C, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, Ca, Sc, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Zn, Sr, Y, and Ba. The masses of HD 23193 and HD 170920 are estimated from evolutionary tracks as 2.3 ± 0.1 M ⊙ and 2.9 ± 0.1 M ⊙. The ages are found to be 635 ± 33 Myr for HD 23193 and 480 ± 50 Myr for HD 170920 using isochrones. The abundance pattern of HD 23193 shows deviations from solar values in the iron-peak elements and indicates remarkable overabundances of Sr (1.16), Y (1.03), and Ba (1.24) with respect to the solar abundances. We compare the derived abundances of this moderately rotating (v\\sin i =37.5 km s‑1) Am star to the theoretical chemical evolution models including rotational mixing. The theoretically predicted abundances resemble our derived abundance pattern, except for a few elements (Si and Cr). For HD 170920, we find nearly solar abundances, except for C (‑0.43), S (0.16), Ti (0.15), Ni (0.16), Zn (0.41), Y (0.57), and Ba (0.97). Its low rotational velocity (v\\sin i=14.5 km s‑1), reduced carbon abundance, and enhanced heavy element abundances suggest that the star is most likely an evolved HgMn star. Based on observations made at the TÜBITAK National Observatory (Program ID 14BRTT150–671), and the Ankara University Observatory, Turkey.

  8. Recovery of atmospheric water vapor total column abundance from imaging spectrometer data around 940 nm - Sensitivity analysis and application to Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carrere, Veronique; Conel, James E.

    1993-01-01

    Two simple techniques (Continuum Interpolated Band Ratio, CIBR, and Narrow/Wide ratio, N/W) to retrieve path precipitable water from AVIRIS high spectral resolution radiance data using the 940 nm water absorption band are compared. A sensitivity analysis was performed using the radiative transfer code LOWTRAN 7 to determine which one of these two approaches will provide a better estimate over land and water areas. The CIBR proved to be the technique less sensitive to perturbing effects, except for errors in visibility estimate. Both techniques were applied to AVIRIS radiance data acquired over Salton Sea, California. Resulting images confirmed that the use of a constant gray reflectance in the model led to a higher overestimation of the amount of water retrieved for N/W over vegetated areas. Validation was performed through comparison between an independent estimate of water vapor from concurrent Reagan sunphotometer measurements and AVIRIS estimates. Amounts retrieved using the N/W approach match more closely in situ measurements, even after adjusting model parameters for background reflectance, viewing geometry, and type of aerosol at the site.

  9. Genome-Wide Identification and Tissue-Specific Expression Analysis of UDP-Glycosyltransferases Genes Confirm Their Abundance in Cicer arietinum (Chickpea) Genome

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ranu; Rawat, Vimal; Suresh, C. G.

    2014-01-01

    UDP-glycosyltransferases (EC 2.4.1.x; UGTs) are enzymes coded by an important gene family of higher plants. They are involved in the modification of secondary metabolites, phytohormones, and xenobiotics by transfer of sugar moieties from an activated nucleotide molecule to a wide range of acceptors. This modification regulates various functions like detoxification of xenobiotics, hormone homeostasis, and biosynthesis of secondary metabolites. Here, we describe the identification of 96 UGT genes in Cicer arietinum (CaUGT) and report their tissue-specific differential expression based on publically available RNA-seq and expressed sequence tag data. This analysis has established medium to high expression of 84 CaUGTs and low expression of 12 CaUGTs. We identified several closely related orthologs of CaUGTs in other genomes and compared their exon-intron arrangement. An attempt was made to assign functional specificity to chickpea UGTs by comparing substrate binding sites with experimentally determined specificity. These findings will assist in precise selection of candidate genes for various applications and understanding functional genomics of chickpea. PMID:25290312

  10. Genome-wide identification and tissue-specific expression analysis of UDP-glycosyltransferases genes confirm their abundance in Cicer arietinum (Chickpea) genome.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ranu; Rawat, Vimal; Suresh, C G

    2014-01-01

    UDP-glycosyltransferases (EC 2.4.1.x; UGTs) are enzymes coded by an important gene family of higher plants. They are involved in the modification of secondary metabolites, phytohormones, and xenobiotics by transfer of sugar moieties from an activated nucleotide molecule to a wide range of acceptors. This modification regulates various functions like detoxification of xenobiotics, hormone homeostasis, and biosynthesis of secondary metabolites. Here, we describe the identification of 96 UGT genes in Cicer arietinum (CaUGT) and report their tissue-specific differential expression based on publically available RNA-seq and expressed sequence tag data. This analysis has established medium to high expression of 84 CaUGTs and low expression of 12 CaUGTs. We identified several closely related orthologs of CaUGTs in other genomes and compared their exon-intron arrangement. An attempt was made to assign functional specificity to chickpea UGTs by comparing substrate binding sites with experimentally determined specificity. These findings will assist in precise selection of candidate genes for various applications and understanding functional genomics of chickpea.

  11. THE OXYGEN ABUNDANCE IN THE SOLAR NEIGHBORHOOD

    SciTech Connect

    RodrIguez, Monica; Delgado-Inglada, Gloria, E-mail: mrodri@inaoep.mx, E-mail: gloria@inaoep.mx

    2011-06-01

    We present a homogeneous analysis of the oxygen abundance in five H II regions and eight planetary nebulae (PNe) located at distances lower than 2 kpc and with available spectra of high quality. We find that both the collisionally excited lines (CELs) and recombination lines imply that the PNe are overabundant in oxygen by about 0.2 dex. An explanation that reconciles the oxygen abundances derived with CELs for H II regions and PNe with the values found for B stars, the Sun, and the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM) requires the presence in H II regions of an organic refractory dustmore » component that is not present in PNe. This dust component has already been invoked to explain the depletion of oxygen in molecular clouds and in the diffuse ISM.« less

  12. Simulating the Universe with MICE: the abundance of massive clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crocce, Martín; Fosalba, Pablo; Castander, Francisco J.; Gaztañaga, Enrique

    2010-04-01

    We introduce a new set of large N-body runs, the Marenostrum Institut de Ciències de l'Espai (MICE) simulations, that provide a unique combination of very large cosmological volumes with good mass resolution. They follow the gravitational evolution of ~8.5 billion particles (20483) in volumes covering up to ~15 Hubble volumes (i.e. 450h-3Gpc3), and sample over five decades in spatial resolution. Our main goal is to accurately model and calibrate basic cosmological probes that will be used by upcoming astronomical surveys of unprecedented volume. Here, we take advantage of the very large volumes of MICE to make a robust sampling of the high-mass tail of the halo mass function (MF). We discuss and avoid possible systematic effects in our study, and do a detailed analysis of different error estimators. We find that available fits to the local abundance of haloes match well the abundance estimated in the large volume of MICE up to M ~ 1014h-1Msolar, but significantly deviate for larger masses, underestimating the MF by 10 per cent (30 per cent) at M = 3.16 × 1014h-1Msolar (1015h-1Msolar). Similarly, the widely used Sheth & Tormen fit, if extrapolated to high redshift assuming universality, leads to an underestimation of the cluster abundance by 30, 20 and 15 per cent at z = 0, 0.5, 1 for fixed ν = δc/σ ~ 3 (corresponding to M ~ [7 - 2.5 - 0.8] × 1014h-1Msolar, respectively). We provide a recalibration of the MF over five orders of magnitude in mass [1010 < M/(h-1Msolar) < 1015], that accurately describes its redshift evolution up to z = 1. We explore the impact of this recalibration on the determination of the dark energy equation of state w, and conclude that using available fits that assume universal evolution for the cluster MF may systematically bias the estimate of w by as much as 50 per cent for medium-depth (z <~ 1) surveys. The halo catalogues used in this analysis are publicly available at the MICE webpage, http://www.ice.cat/mice.

  13. Actinide abundances in ordinary chondrites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hagee, B.; Bernatowicz, T.J.; Podosek, F.A.; Johnson, M.L.; Burnett, D.S.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of 244Pu fission Xe, U, Th, and light REE (LREE) abundances, along with modal petrographic determinations of phosphate abundances, were carried out on equilibrated ordinary chondrites in order to define better the solar system Pu abundance and to determine the degree of variation of actinide and LREE abundances. Our data permit comparison of the directly measured Pu/ U ratio with that determined indirectly as (Pu/Nd) ?? (Nd/U) assuming that Pu behaves chemically as a LREE. Except for Guaren??a, and perhaps H chondrites in general, Pu concentrations are similar to that determined previously for St. Se??verin, although less precise because of higher trapped Xe contents. Trapped 130Xe 136Xe ratios appear to vary from meteorite to meteorite, but, relative to AVCC, all are similar in the sense of having less of the interstellar heavy Xe found in carbonaceous chondrite acid residues. The Pu/U and Pu/Nd ratios are consistent with previous data for St. Se??verin, but both tend to be slightly higher than those inferred from previous data on Angra dos Reis. Although significant variations exist, the distribution of our Th/U ratios, along with other precise isotope dilution data for ordinary chondrites, is rather symmetric about the CI chondrite value; however, actinide/(LREE) ratios are systematically lower than the CI value. Variations in actinide or LREE absolute and relative abundances are interpreted as reflecting differences in the proportions and/or compositions of more primitive components (chondrules and CAI materials?) incorporated into different regions of the ordinary chondrite parent bodies. The observed variations of Th/U, Nd/U, or Ce/U suggest that measurements of Pu/U on any single equilibrated ordinary chondrite specimen, such as St. Se??verin, should statistically be within ??20-30% of the average solar system value, although it is also clear that anomalous samples exist. ?? 1990.

  14. Characterizing accuracy of total hemoglobin recovery using contrast-detail analysis in 3D image-guided near infrared spectroscopy with the boundary element method.

    PubMed

    Ghadyani, Hamid R; Srinivasan, Subhadra; Pogue, Brian W; Paulsen, Keith D

    2010-07-19

    The quantification of total hemoglobin concentration (HbT) obtained from multi-modality image-guided near infrared spectroscopy (IG-NIRS) was characterized using the boundary element method (BEM) for 3D image reconstruction. Multi-modality IG-NIRS systems use a priori information to guide the reconstruction process. While this has been shown to improve resolution, the e(R)ect on quantitative accuracy is unclear. Here, through systematic contrast-detail analysis, the fidelity of IG-NIRS in quantifying HbT was examined using 3D simulations. These simulations show that HbT could be recovered for medium sized (20mm in 100mm total diameter) spherical inclusions with an average error of 15%, for the physiologically relevant situation of 2:1 or higher contrast between background and inclusion. Using partial 3D volume meshes to reduce the ill-posed nature of the image reconstruction, inclusions as small as 14 mm could be accurately quantified with less than 15% error, for contrasts of 1.5 or higher. This suggests that 3D IG-NIRS provides quantitatively accurate results for sizes seen early in treatment cycle of patients undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy when the tumors are larger than 30 mm.

  15. Facing Challenges for Monte Carlo Analysis of Full PWR Cores : Towards Optimal Detail Level for Coupled Neutronics and Proper Diffusion Data for Nodal Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuttin, A.; Capellan, N.; David, S.; Doligez, X.; El Mhari, C.; Méplan, O.

    2014-06-01

    Safety analysis of innovative reactor designs requires three dimensional modeling to ensure a sufficiently realistic description, starting from steady state. Actual Monte Carlo (MC) neutron transport codes are suitable candidates to simulate large complex geometries, with eventual innovative fuel. But if local values such as power densities over small regions are needed, reliable results get more difficult to obtain within an acceptable computation time. In this scope, NEA has proposed a performance test of full PWR core calculations based on Monte Carlo neutron transport, which we have used to define an optimal detail level for convergence of steady state coupled neutronics. Coupling between MCNP for neutronics and the subchannel code COBRA for thermal-hydraulics has been performed using the C++ tool MURE, developed for about ten years at LPSC and IPNO. In parallel with this study and within the same MURE framework, a simplified code of nodal kinetics based on two-group and few-point diffusion equations has been developed and validated on a typical CANDU LOCA. Methods for the computation of necessary diffusion data have been defined and applied to NU (Nat. U) and Th fuel CANDU after assembly evolutions by MURE. Simplicity of CANDU LOCA model has made possible a comparison of these two fuel behaviours during such a transient.

  16. Atmospheric escape from HD 189733b observed in H I Lyman-α: detailed analysis of HST/STIS September 2011 observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourrier, V.; Lecavelier des Etangs, A.; Dupuy, H.; Ehrenreich, D.; Vidal-Madjar, A.; Hébrard, G.; Ballester, G. E.; Désert, J.-M.; Ferlet, R.; Sing, D. K.; Wheatley, P. J.

    2013-03-01

    Observations of transits of the hot giant exoplanet HD 189733b in the unresolved H i Lyman-α line show signs of hydrogen escaping the upper atmosphere of the planet. New resolved Lyman-α observations obtained with the STIS spectrograph onboard the Hubble Space Telescope in April 2010 and September 2011 confirmed that the planet is evaporating, and furthermore discovered significant temporal variations in the physical conditions of its evaporating atmosphere. Here we present a detailed analysis of the September 2011 observations of HD 189733b, when an atmospheric signature was detected. We present specific methods to find and characterize this absorption signature of escaping hydrogen in the Lyman-α line, and to calculate its false-positive probability, found to be 3.6%. Taking advantage of the spectral resolution and high sensitivity of the STIS spectrograph, we also present new results on temporal and spectro-temporal variability of this absorption feature. We also report the observation of HD 189733b in other lines (Si iii at 1206.5 Å, N v at 1240 Å). Variations in these lines could be explained either by early occultation by a bow-shock rich in highly ionized species, or by stellar variations.

  17. Origin of the Martian Moons and Their Volatile Abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, M.; Canup, R. M.

    2017-12-01

    The origin of the Martian moons, Phobos and Deimos, has been actively debated. These moons were initially thought to have been gravitationally captured asteroids given that their spectra appeared to be similar to those of D-type asteroids. However, intact capture is difficult to reconcile with their nearly circular, co-planar orbits. Their orbits may be better explained by recent dynamical studies that suggest that the moons may have instead formed from a disk generated by a large impact, as was likely the case for Earth's Moon. Phobos and Deimos' bulk volatile contents, which are currently very uncertain, would also provide key constraints on their origin. If the moons were captured, their bulk compositions may be similar to those of asteroids, and their sub-surfaces could be volatile-rich. We are here exploring the implications of the alternative impact origin on the moon volatile abundances. We perform numerical simulations to estimate the extent of volatile loss from the moon-forming ejecta produced by a large impact with Mars. We find that hydrogen and water vapor escape hydrodynamically from the disk, leading to moons with dry, hydrogen-depleted bulk compositions. It is thus possible that the moons' mode of origin may be determined by knowledge of their volatile contents, because detection of a substantial (non-exogenically delivered) water content would argue strongly against formation by impact. JAXA's Martian Moons eXploration Mission (MMX) will conduct detailed remote sensing of the moons, including a gamma ray and neutron spectrometer that will for the first time probe their sub-surface elemental compositions, and will return samples from Phobos for laboratory analysis. This should allow for characterization of the moon volatile abundances. We also discuss that the inferred high porosities of these moons could be explained if they are rubble piles formed during accretion from impact-produced ejecta.

  18. Abundance and persistence of antibiotic resistance genes in livestock farms: a comprehensive investigation in eastern China.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Weixiao; Chen, Hong; Su, Chao; Yan, Shuhai

    2013-11-01

    Increases of antibiotic resistance genes in the environment may pose a threat to public health. The purpose of this study was to investigate the abundance and diversity of tetracycline (tet) and sulfonamide (sul) resistance genes in eight livestock farms in Hangzhou, eastern China. Ten tet genes (tetA, tetB, tetC, tetG, tetL, tetM, tetO, tetQ, tetW, and tetX), two sul genes (sulI and sulII), and one genetic element associated with mobile antibiotic resistance genes [class 1 integron (intI1)] were quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction. No significant difference was found in the abundance of the tet and sul genes in various scales of pig, chicken, and duck farms (P>0.05). The average abundance of ribosomal protection protein genes (tetQ, tetM, tetW, and tetO) in the manure and wastewater samples was higher than most of the efflux pump genes (tetA, tetB, tetC, and tetL) and enzymatic modification gene (tetX) (P<0.05), except for efflux pump gene tetG, which was abundant and showed no difference from tetM. Most ARGs had higher relative abundance in the wastewater lagoon than in manures even after treatment. Although the three ribosomal protection protein genes (tetQ, tetW, and tetO) had higher relative abundance, numbers were reduced during the complete wastewater treatment process in pig farms (P<0.05). The relative abundance of tetG, sulI, and sulII increased after the wastewater treatment and the removal of these three genes exhibited significant positive correlations with the intI1 gene (tetG: R(2)=0.60, P<0.05; sulI: R(2)=0.72, P<0.05; sulII: R(2)=0.62, P<0.05), suggesting that intI1 may be involved in their proliferation. As for tetM and sulII genes, a highly significant difference was found in manure samples between pig farms and duck farms (P<0.001). Phylogenetic analysis showed that tetM was more diverse in duck farms than in pig farms. Additionally, sulII sequence was conserved both in pig and duck farms. This is the first comprehensive study to

  19. Comparing the Performance of Three Land Models in Global C Cycle Simulations: A Detailed Structural Analysis: Structural Analysis of Land Models

    SciTech Connect

    Rafique, Rashid; Xia, Jianyang; Hararuk, Oleksandra

    2016-04-01

    Land models are valuable tools to understand the dynamics of global carbon (C) cycle. Various models have been developed and used for predictions of future C dynamics but uncertainties still exist. Diagnosing the models’ behaviors in terms of structures can help to narrow down the uncertainties in prediction of C dynamics. In this study three widely used land surface models, namely CSIRO’s Atmosphere Biosphere Land Exchange (CABLE) with 9 C pools, Community Land Model (version 3.5) combined with Carnegie-Ames-Stanford Approach (CLM-CASA) with 12 C pools and Community Land Model (version 4) (CLM4) with 26 C pools were driven by themore » observed meteorological forcing. The simulated C storage and residence time were used for analysis. The C storage and residence time were computed globally for all individual soil and plant pools, as well as net primary productivity (NPP) and its allocation to different plant components’ based on these models. Remotely sensed NPP and statistically derived HWSD, and GLC2000 datasets were used as a reference to evaluate the performance of these models. Results showed that CABLE exhibited better agreement with referenced C storage and residence time for plant and soil pools, as compared with CLM-CASA and CLM4. CABLE had longer bulk residence time for soil C pools and stored more C in roots, whereas, CLM-CASA and CLM4 stored more C in woody pools due to differential NPP allocation. Overall, these results indicate that the differences in C storage and residence times in three models are largely due to the differences in their fundamental structures (number of C pools), NPP allocation and C transfer rates. Our results have implications in model development and provide a general framework to explain the bias/uncertainties in simulation of C storage and residence times from the perspectives of model structures.« less

  20. The Galactic Thick Disk Stellar Abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prochaska, Jason X.; Naumov, Sergei O.; Carney, Bruce W.; McWilliam, Andrew; Wolfe, Arthur M.

    2000-11-01

    We present first results from a program to measure the chemical abundances of a large (N>30) sample of thick disk stars with the principal goal of investigating the formation history of the Galactic thick disk. We have obtained high-resolution, high signal-to-noise spectra of 10 thick disk stars with the HIRES spectrograph on the 10 m Keck I telescope. Our analysis confirms previous studies of O and Mg in the thick disk stars, which reported enhancements in excess of the thin disk population. Furthermore, the observations of Si, Ca, Ti, Mn, Co, V, Zn, Al, and Eu all argue that the thick disk population has a distinct chemical history from the thin disk. With the exception of V and Co, the thick disk abundance patterns match or tend toward the values observed for halo stars with [Fe/H]~-1. This suggests that the thick disk stars had a chemical enrichment history similar to the metal-rich halo stars. With the possible exception of Si, the thick disk abundance patterns are in excellent agreement with the chemical abundances observed in the metal-poor bulge stars, suggesting the two populations formed from the same gas reservoir at a common epoch. The principal results of our analysis are as follows. (1) All 10 stars exhibit enhanced α/Fe ratios with O, Si, and Ca showing tentative trends of decreasing overabundances with increasing [Fe/H]. In contrast, the Mg and Ti enhancements are constant. (2) The light elements Na and Al are enhanced in these stars. (3) With the exception of Ni, Cr, and possibly Cu, the iron-peak elements show significant departures from the solar abundances. The stars are deficient in Mn, but overabundant in V, Co, Sc, and Zn. (4) The heavy elements Ba and Y are consistent with solar abundances, but Eu is significantly enhanced. If the trends of decreasing O, Si, and Ca with increasing [Fe/H] are explained by the onset of Type Ia SN, then the thick disk stars formed over the course of >~1 Gyr. We argue that this formation time-scale would rule

  1. Isotopic abundance in atom trap trace analysis

    DOEpatents

    Lu, Zheng-Tian; Hu, Shiu-Ming; Jiang, Wei; Mueller, Peter

    2014-03-18

    A method and system for detecting ratios and amounts of isotopes of noble gases. The method and system is constructed to be able to measure noble gas isotopes in water and ice, which helps reveal the geological age of the samples and understand their movements. The method and system uses a combination of a cooled discharge source, a beam collimator, a beam slower and magneto-optic trap with a laser to apply resonance frequency energy to the noble gas to be quenched and detected.

  2. Elemental Abundances of Ultra-Heavy Galactic Cosmic Rays from the SuperTIGER Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Ryan

    2016-07-01

    The SuperTIGER (Trans-Iron Galactic Element Recorder) experiment was launched on a long-duration balloon flight from Williams Field, Antarctica, on December 8, 2012. The instrument measured the relative elemental abundances of Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR) for charge (Z) Z>10 with excellent charge resolution, displaying well resolved individual element peaks for 10 ≤ Z ≤ 40. During its record-breaking 55-day flight, SuperTIGER collected ˜4.73 x10^{6} Iron nuclei, ˜8 times as many as detected by its predecessor, TIGER, with charge resolution at iron of 0.17 cu. SuperTIGER measures charge (Z) and energy (E) using a combination of three scintillator and two Cherenkov detectors, and employs a scintillating fiber hodoscope for event trajectory determination. The SuperTIGER data have been analyzed to correct for instrument effects and remove events that underwent nuclear interactions within the instrument. The data include more than 600 events in the charge range 30 < Z ≤ 40. SuperTIGER is the first experiment to resolve elemental abundances of every element in this charge range with high statistics and single-element resolution. The relative abundances of the galactic cosmic ray source have been derived from the measured relative elemental abundances using atmospheric and interstellar propagations. The SuperTIGER measured abundances are generally consistent with previous experimental results from TIGER and ACE-CRIS, with improved statistical precision. The SuperTIGER results confirm the earlier results from TIGER, supporting a model of cosmic-ray origin in OB associations, with preferential acceleration of refractory elements over volatile elements ordered by atomic mass (A). A second SuperTIGER Antarctic flight is planned for December 2017. Details of the instrument, flight, data analysis, and ongoing preparations will be presented.

  3. M31 Globular Cluster Abundances from High-Resolution, Integrated-Light Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colucci, Janet E.; Bernstein, Rebecca A.; Cameron, Scott; McWilliam, Andrew; Cohen, Judith G.

    2009-10-01

    We report the first detailed chemical abundances for five globular clusters (GCs) in M31 from high-resolution (R ~ 25,000) spectroscopy of their integrated light (IL). These GCs are the first in a larger set of clusters observed as part of an ongoing project to study the formation history of M31 and its GC population. The data presented here were obtained with the HIRES echelle spectrograph on the Keck I telescope and are analyzed using a new IL spectra analysis method that we have developed. In these clusters, we measure abundances for Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Y, and Ba, ages >=10 Gyr, and a range in [Fe/H] of -0.9 to -2.2. As is typical of Milky Way GCs, we find these M31 GCs to be enhanced in the α-elements Ca, Si, and Ti relative to Fe. We also find [Mg/Fe] to be low relative to other [α/Fe], and [Al/Fe] to be enhanced in the IL abundances. These results imply that abundances of Mg, Al (and likely O, Na) recovered from IL do display the inter- and intra-cluster abundance variations seen in individual Milky Way GC stars, and that special care should be taken in the future in interpreting low- or high-resolution IL abundances of GCs that are based on Mg-dominated absorption features. Fe-peak and the neutron-capture elements Ba and Y also follow Milky Way abundance trends. We also present high-precision velocity dispersion measurements for all five M31 GCs, as well as independent constraints on the reddening toward the clusters from our analysis. The data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  4. Water Vapour Abundance and Distribution in the Lower Venusian Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberlain, S.; Bailey, J.

    2012-04-01

    We present ground-based observations and modelling studies of water vapour abundance and distribution in the Venusian lower atmosphere through analysis of absorption band depths within the 1.18 μm window. The lower atmosphere of Venus is difficult to study by both in situ and remote instruments. This is due to the planet wide cloud cover that obscures visual wavelengths and surface pressures approaching 100 times that of the Earth. In 1984 ground based observations resulted in the discovery of atmospheric windows on the Venusian nightside (Allen and Crawford, 1984). Here, near infrared radiation originating at the surface and lower atmosphere, pass relatively unimpeded through the Venus clouds. This discovery enabled remote studies of the Venusian subcloud region. Determining the abundance and distribution of water vapour is key to understanding the development, maintenance and links between major radiative and dynamical features of the Venus atmosphere. Water vapour in the lower atmosphere plays an important role in heat transfer and is pertinent to the runaway greenhouse effect and dynamical superrotation observed on Venus. Detailed studies of water vapour abundance and distribution throughout the lower atmosphere of Venus are therefore needed in order to develop accurate chemical, radiative and dynamical models. Ground-based spatially resolved near infrared spectroscopic observations of the Venusian nightside have been obtained from Siding Spring Observatory at each inferior conjunction since 2002. Observations have been made using the IRIS2 instrument on the Anglo-Australian Telescope and CASPIR on the 2.3m ANU telescope. The model VSTAR (Bailey and Kedziora-Chudczer 2012) is used to simulate the observed Venus spectra as seen through the Earth's atmosphere and best fit water vapour abundances are found for approximately 300 locations across the Venus nightside disk. Recent improvements in ground-based near-infrared instruments allow a substantial improvement

  5. Chlorine Abundances in Martian Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, D.D.; Garrison, D.H.; Park, J.

    2009-01-01

    Chlorine measurements made in martian surface rocks by robotic spacecraft typically give Chlorine (Cl) abundances of approximately 0.1-0.8%. In contrast, Cl abundances in martian meteorites appear lower, although data is limited, and martian nakhlites were also subjected to Cl contamination by Mars surface brines. Chlorine abundances reported by one lab for whole rock (WR) samples of Shergotty, ALH77005, and EET79001 range 108-14 ppm, whereas Cl in nakhlites range 73-1900 ppm. Measurements of Cl in various martian weathering phases of nakhlites varied 0.04-4.7% and reveal significant concentration of Cl by martian brines Martian meteorites contain much lower Chlorine than those measured in martian surface rocks and give further confirmation that Cl in these surface rocks was introduced by brines and weathering. It has been argued that Cl is twice as effective as water in lowering the melting point and promoting melting at shallower martian depths, and that significant Cl in the shergottite source region would negate any need for significant water. However, this conclusion was based on experiments that utilized Cl concentrations more analogous to martian surface rocks than to shergottite meteorites, and may not be applicable to shergottites.

  6. The Amazing Detail Machine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Rick

    1998-01-01

    Argues that using evocative details makes for truly effective high school yearbook stories. Notes that the art of observation is crucial. Describes the difference between telling a story and showing it with details that will help the reader see and feel the story through these powerful images. (SR)

  7. Detailed analysis of the density change on chest CT of COPD using non-rigid registration of inspiration/expiration CT scans.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Young; Seo, Joon Beom; Lee, Hyun Joo; Kim, Namkug; Lee, Eunsol; Lee, Sang Min; Oh, Sang Young; Hwang, Hye Jeon; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Lee, Sang-Do

    2015-02-01

    One objective was to evaluate the air trapping index (ATI), measured by inspiration/expiration CT, in COPD patients and nonsmokers. Another objective was to assess the association between the pulmonary function test (PFT) and CT parameters such as ATI or other indices, separately in the whole lung, in emphysema, and in hyperinflated and normal lung areas. One hundred and thirty-eight COPD patients and 29 nonsmokers were included in our study. The ATI, the emphysema index (EI), the gas trapping index (Exp -856) and expiration/inspiration ratio of mean lung density (E/Iratio of MLD) were measured on CT. The values of the whole lung, of emphysema, and of hyperinflated and normal lung areas were compared and then correlated with various PFT parameters. Compared with nonsmokers, COPD patients showed a higher ATI in the whole lung and in each lung lesion (all P < 0.05). The ATI showed a higher correlation than EI with FEF25-75%, RV and RV/TLC, and was comparable to Exp -856 and the E/I ratio of MLD. The ATI of emphysema and hyperinflated areas on CT showed better correlation than the normal lung area with PFT parameters. Detailed analysis of density change at inspiration and expiration CT of COPD can provide new insights into pulmonary functional impairment in each lung area. • COPD patients show significant air trapping in the lung. • The air trapping index is a comparable parameter to other CT indices. • Air trapping of emphysema and hyperinflated lung areas relates to functional loss. • The emphysema area changes more, with less air trapping than other areas.

  8. The abundances of the heavy elements.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, H. E.; Zeh, H. D.

    1973-01-01

    Abundance regularities for heavy nuclei (A greater than 58) are investigated and formulated as abundance rules. Abundan