Science.gov

Sample records for detailed numerical modeling

  1. Three-dimensional detailed numerical model of a field-scale rotary kiln incinerator

    SciTech Connect

    Leger, C.B.; Cundy, V.A.; Sterling, A.M. )

    1993-04-01

    A detailed three-dimensional numerical model of baseline (support burners only) operation in a rotary kiln incinerator is presented. The focus of this model is on gas-phase fluid mechanics, neglecting solid waste combustion and radiative heat transfer. The model is compared to experimental data, and although relatively crude, it demonstrates remarkably good qualitative and quantitative predictive capability. The model demonstrates that thermal buoyancy is the cause of observed vertical stratification near the exit of the modeled kiln. The model also suggests that the addition of turbulence mixing air actually increases the degree of stratification rather than augmenting mixing, as had been previously suggested. Elucidating the mechanism by which this occurs has resulted in a reinterpretation of the experimental data. The model also suggests that there is probably a zone of recirculation across the kiln exit plane. A parametric study using the model shows that the location and quantity of leak air into the kiln have a major influence on the flow inside the kiln. The study suggests that preheating turbulence air may have little effect on gas-phase mixing. Overall, this modeling study has demonstrated that a relatively simple numerical model of a rotary kiln incinerator can provide valuable insight into the process, especially when used in conjunction with experimental data. 21 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Numerical Study on a Detailed Air Flows in an Urban Area Using a CFD model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, A.

    2014-12-01

    In this study, detailed air flows in an urban area were analyzed using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model. For this model buildings used as the surface boundary in the model were constructed using Los Angeles Region Imagery Acquisition Consortium 2 Geographic Information System (LARIAC2 GIS) data. Three target areas centered at the cross roads of Broadway & 7th St., Olive & 12th St., and Wilshire blvd. & Carondelet, Los Angeles, California were considered. The size of each numerical domain is 400 m, 400 m, and 200 m in the x‒, y‒, and z‒directions, respectively. The grid sizes in the x‒, y‒, and z‒directions are 2 m, 2 m, and 2 m, respectively. Based on the inflow wind data provided by California Air Resources Board, detailed flow characteristics were investigated for each target area. Descending air flow were developed at the leeward area of tall building and ascending air current were occurred on the windward area of tall building. Vertically rotating vortices were formed in spaces between buildings, so-called, street canyons and horizontally rotating vortices appeared near cross roads. When flows came into narrow street canyon from wide street canyon, channeling effects appeared and flow speed increased for satisfying mass continuity.

  3. Science Support for Space-Based Droplet Combustion: Drop Tower Experiments and Detailed Numerical Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchese, Anthony J.; Dryer, Frederick L.

    1997-01-01

    This program supports the engineering design, data analysis, and data interpretation requirements for the study of initially single component, spherically symmetric, isolated droplet combustion studies. Experimental emphasis is on the study of simple alcohols (methanol, ethanol) and alkanes (n-heptane, n-decane) as fuels with time dependent measurements of drop size, flame-stand-off, liquid-phase composition, and finally, extinction. Experiments have included bench-scale studies at Princeton, studies in the 2.2 and 5.18 drop towers at NASA-LeRC, and both the Fiber Supported Droplet Combustion (FSDC-1, FSDC-2) and the free Droplet Combustion Experiment (DCE) studies aboard the shuttle. Test matrix and data interpretation are performed through spherically-symmetric, time-dependent numerical computations which embody detailed sub-models for physical and chemical processes. The computed burning rate, flame stand-off, and extinction diameter are compared with the respective measurements for each individual experiment. In particular, the data from FSDC-1 and subsequent space-based experiments provide the opportunity to compare all three types of data simultaneously with the computed parameters. Recent numerical efforts are extending the computational tools to consider time dependent, axisymmetric 2-dimensional reactive flow situations.

  4. Detailed numerical investigation of the dissipative stochastic mechanics based neuron model.

    PubMed

    Güler, Marifi

    2008-10-01

    Recently, a physical approach for the description of neuronal dynamics under the influence of ion channel noise was proposed in the realm of dissipative stochastic mechanics (Güler, Phys Rev E 76:041918, 2007). Led by the presence of a multiple number of gates in an ion channel, the approach establishes a viewpoint that ion channels are exposed to two kinds of noise: the intrinsic noise, associated with the stochasticity in the movement of gating particles between the inner and the outer faces of the membrane, and the topological noise, associated with the uncertainty in accessing the permissible topological states of open gates. Renormalizations of the membrane capacitance and of a membrane voltage dependent potential function were found to arise from the mutual interaction of the two noisy systems. The formalism therein was scrutinized using a special membrane with some tailored properties giving the Rose-Hindmarsh dynamics in the deterministic limit. In this paper, the resultant computational neuron model of the above approach is investigated in detail numerically for its dynamics using time-independent input currents. The following are the major findings obtained. The intrinsic noise gives rise to two significant coexisting effects: it initiates spiking activity even in some range of input currents for which the corresponding deterministic model is quiet and causes bursting in some other range of input currents for which the deterministic model fires tonically. The renormalization corrections are found to augment the above behavioral transitions from quiescence to spiking and from tonic firing to bursting, and, therefore, the bursting activity is found to take place in a wider range of input currents for larger values of the correction coefficients. Some findings concerning the diffusive behavior in the voltage space are also reported.

  5. A numerical scheme for modelling reacting flow with detailed chemistry and transport.

    SciTech Connect

    Knio, Omar M.; Najm, Habib N.; Paul, Phillip H.

    2003-09-01

    An efficient projection scheme is developed for the simulation of reacting flow with detailed kinetics and transport. The scheme is based on a zero-Mach-number formulation of the compressible conservation equations for an ideal gas mixture. It is a modified version of the stiff operator-split scheme developed by Knio, Najm & Wyckoff (1999, J. Comput. Phys. 154, 428). Similar to its predecessor, the new scheme relies on Strang splitting of the discrete evolution equations, where diffusion is integrated in two half steps that are symmetrically distributed around a single stiff step for the reaction source terms. The diffusive half-step is integrated using an explicit single-step, multistage, Runge-Kutta-Chebyshev (RKC) method, which replaces the explicit, multi-step, fractional sub-step approach used in the previous formulation. This modification maintains the overall second-order convergence properties of the scheme and enhances the efficiency of the computations by taking advantage of the extended real-stability region of the RKC scheme. Two additional efficiency-enhancements are also explored, based on an extrapolation procedure for the transport coefficients and on the use of approximate Jacobian data evaluated on a coarse mesh. By including these enhancement schemes, performance tests using 2D computations with a detailed C{sub 1}C{sub 2} methane-air mechanism and a detailed mixture-averaged transport model indicate that speedup factors of about 15 are achieved over the previous split-stiff scheme.

  6. Large Eddy Simulation of wind turbine wakes: detailed comparisons of two codes focusing on effects of numerics and subgrid modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Tossas, Luis A.; Churchfield, Matthew J.; Meneveau, Charles

    2015-06-01

    In this work we report on results from a detailed comparative numerical study from two Large Eddy Simulation (LES) codes using the Actuator Line Model (ALM). The study focuses on prediction of wind turbine wakes and their breakdown when subject to uniform inflow. Previous studies have shown relative insensitivity to subgrid modeling in the context of a finite-volume code. The present study uses the low dissipation pseudo-spectral LES code from Johns Hopkins University (LESGO) and the second-order, finite-volume OpenFOAMcode (SOWFA) from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. When subject to uniform inflow, the loads on the blades are found to be unaffected by subgrid models or numerics, as expected. The turbulence in the wake and the location of transition to a turbulent state are affected by the subgrid-scale model and the numerics.

  7. Large Eddy Simulation of Wind Turbine Wakes. Detailed Comparisons of Two Codes Focusing on Effects of Numerics and Subgrid Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Tossas, Luis A.; Churchfield, Matthew J.; Meneveau, Charles

    2015-06-18

    In this work we report on results from a detailed comparative numerical study from two Large Eddy Simulation (LES) codes using the Actuator Line Model (ALM). The study focuses on prediction of wind turbine wakes and their breakdown when subject to uniform inflow. Previous studies have shown relative insensitivity to subgrid modeling in the context of a finite-volume code. The present study uses the low dissipation pseudo-spectral LES code from Johns Hopkins University (LESGO) and the second-order, finite-volume OpenFOAMcode (SOWFA) from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. When subject to uniform inflow, the loads on the blades are found to be unaffected by subgrid models or numerics, as expected. The turbulence in the wake and the location of transition to a turbulent state are affected by the subgrid-scale model and the numerics.

  8. Large Eddy Simulation of Wind Turbine Wakes. Detailed Comparisons of Two Codes Focusing on Effects of Numerics and Subgrid Modeling

    DOE PAGES

    Martinez-Tossas, Luis A.; Churchfield, Matthew J.; Meneveau, Charles

    2015-06-18

    In this work we report on results from a detailed comparative numerical study from two Large Eddy Simulation (LES) codes using the Actuator Line Model (ALM). The study focuses on prediction of wind turbine wakes and their breakdown when subject to uniform inflow. Previous studies have shown relative insensitivity to subgrid modeling in the context of a finite-volume code. The present study uses the low dissipation pseudo-spectral LES code from Johns Hopkins University (LESGO) and the second-order, finite-volume OpenFOAMcode (SOWFA) from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. When subject to uniform inflow, the loads on the blades are found to bemore » unaffected by subgrid models or numerics, as expected. The turbulence in the wake and the location of transition to a turbulent state are affected by the subgrid-scale model and the numerics.« less

  9. Modeling primary break-up of turbulent liquid jets in cross-flow using detailed numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pai, Madhusudan; Desjardins, Olivier; Pitsch, Heinz

    2008-11-01

    Combustion efficiency and pollutant emissions from internal combustion engines and gas turbines are determined by the atomization of the liquid fuel. When injected into a quiescent or moving ambient gas, the liquid jet develops instabilities due to various causes (such as aerodynamic effects, pressure fluctuations and cavitation) which in turn lead to the primary break-up of the liquid jet. The ability to understand and accurately quantify these instabilities can provide avenues to model liquid primary break-up. Such statistics are accessible only in accurate numerical simulations of liquid jet break-up. A spectrally-refined interface (SRI) tracking method for interface transport coupled to an accurate and robust Navier-Stokes/Ghost-fluid method solver is employed to perform detailed numerical simulations of liquid-jets in cross-flow. For validation purposes, predictions from the numerical simulations for the liquid-column trajectory and liquid-jet penetration are compared with experimental datasets. Statistics of energy fluctuations due to turbulence and aerodynamic instabilities in the liquid jet, and the impact of these fluctuations on the shedding of ligaments and droplets from the surface of the liquid jet are quantified. Based on the results from the numerical simulations, a framework for modeling primary break-up of liquid jets is proposed.

  10. Detailed numerical simulations of laser cooling processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramirez-Serrano, J.; Kohel, J.; Thompson, R.; Yu, N.

    2001-01-01

    We developed a detailed semiclassical numerical code of the forces applied on atoms in optical and magnetic fields to increase the understanding of the different roles that light, atomic collisions, background pressure, and number of particles play in experiments with laser cooled and trapped atoms.

  11. Detailed numerical modeling of electron injection in the Laser Wakefield Accelerator: Particle Tracking Diagnostics in PIC codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, R. A.; Gargaté, L.; Martins, S. F.; Peano, F.; Vieira, J.; Silva, L. O.; Mori, W. B.

    2007-11-01

    The field of laser plasma acceleration has witnessed significant development over recent years, with experimental demonstrations of the production of quasi mono-energetic electron bunches, with charges of ˜ 50 pC and energies of up to 1 GeV [1]. Fully relativistic PIC codes, such as OSIRIS [2] are the best tools for modeling these problems, but sophisticated visualization and data analysis routines [3] are required to extract physical meaning from the large volumes of data produced. We report on the new particle tracking diagnostics being added into the OSIRIS framework and its application to this problem, specifically targeting self-injection. Details on the tracking algorithm implementation and post processing routines are given. Simulation results from laser wakefield accelerator scenarios will be presented, with detailed analysis of the self injection of the electron bunches. [1] W.P. Leemans et al, Nature Phys. 2 696 (2006) [2] R. A. Fonseca et al., LNCS 2331, 342, (2002) [3] R. A. Fonseca, Proceedings of ISSS-7, (2005)

  12. Protein Folding: Detailed Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pande, Vijay

    Proteins play a fundamental role in biology. With their ability to perform numerous biological roles, including acting as catalysts, antibodies, and molecular signals, proteins today realize many of the goals that modern nanotechnology aspires to. However, before proteins can carry out these remarkable molecular functions, they must perform another amazing feat — they must assemble themselves. This process of protein self-assembly into a particular shape, or "fold" is called protein folding. Due to the importance of the folded state in the biological activity of proteins, recent interest from misfolding related diseases [1], as well as a fascination of just how this process occurs [2-4], there has been much work performed in order to unravel the mechanism of protein folding [5].

  13. The Finer Details: Climate Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    If you want to know whether you will need sunscreen or an umbrella for tomorrow's picnic, you can simply read the local weather report. However, if you are calculating the impact of gas combustion on global temperatures, or anticipating next year's rainfall levels to set water conservation policy, you must conduct a more comprehensive investigation. Such complex matters require long-range modeling techniques that predict broad trends in climate development rather than day-to-day details. Climate models are built from equations that calculate the progression of weather-related conditions over time. Based on the laws of physics, climate model equations have been developed to predict a number of environmental factors, for example: 1. Amount of solar radiation that hits the Earth. 2. Varying proportions of gases that make up the air. 3. Temperature at the Earth's surface. 4. Circulation of ocean and wind currents. 5. Development of cloud cover. Numerical modeling of the climate can improve our understanding of both the past and, the future. A model can confirm the accuracy of environmental measurements taken. in, the past and can even fill in gaps in those records. In addition, by quantifying the relationship between different aspects of climate, scientists can estimate how a future change in one aspect may alter the rest of the world. For example, could an increase in the temperature of the Pacific Ocean somehow set off a drought on the other side of the world? A computer simulation could lead to an answer for this and other questions. Quantifying the chaotic, nonlinear activities that shape our climate is no easy matter. You cannot run these simulations on your desktop computer and expect results by the time you have finished checking your morning e-mail. Efficient and accurate climate modeling requires powerful computers that can process billions of mathematical calculations in a single second. The NCCS exists to provide this degree of vast computing capability.

  14. Detailed Clinical Models: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Goossen-Baremans, Anneke; van der Zel, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Due to the increasing use of electronic patient records and other health care information technology, we see an increase in requests to utilize these data. A highly level of standardization is required during the gathering of these data in the clinical context in order to use it for analyses. Detailed Clinical Models (DCM) have been created toward this purpose and several initiatives have been implemented in various parts of the world to create standardized models. This paper presents a review of DCM. Methods Two types of analyses are presented; one comparing DCM against health care information architectures and a second bottom up approach from concept analysis to representation. In addition core parts of the draft ISO standard 13972 on DCM are used such as clinician involvement, data element specification, modeling, meta information, and repository and governance. Results Six initiatives were selected: Intermountain Healthcare, 13606/OpenEHR Archetypes, Clinical Templates, Clinical Contents Models, Health Level 7 templates, and Dutch Detailed Clinical Models. Each model selected was reviewed for their overall development, involvement of clinicians, use of data types, code bindings, expressing semantics, modeling, meta information, use of repository and governance. Conclusions Using both a top down and bottom up approach to comparison reveals many commonalties and differences between initiatives. Important differences include the use of or lack of a reference model and expressiveness of models. Applying clinical data element standards facilitates the use of conceptual DCM models in different technical representations. PMID:21818440

  15. Numerical optimization of conical flow waveriders including detailed viscous effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowcutt, Kevin G.; Anderson, John D., Jr.; Capriotti, Diego

    1987-01-01

    A family of optimized hypersonic waveriders is generated and studied wherein detailed viscous effects are included within the optimization process itself. This is in contrast to previous optimized waverider work, wherein purely inviscid flow is used to obtain the waverider shapes. For the present waveriders, the undersurface is a streamsurface of an inviscid conical flowfield, the upper surface is a streamsurface of the inviscid flow over a tapered cylinder (calculated by the axisymmetric method of characteristics), and the viscous effects are treated by integral solutions of the boundary layer equations. Transition from laminar to turbulent flow is included within the viscous calculations. The optimization is carried out using a nonlinear simplex method. The resulting family of viscous hypersonic waveriders yields predicted high values of lift/drag, high enough to break the L/D barrier based on experience with other hypersonic configurations. Moreover, the numerical optimization process for the viscous waveriders results in distinctly different shapes compared to previous work with inviscid-designed waveriders. Also, the fine details of the viscous solution, such as how the shear stress is distributed over the surface, and the location of transition, are crucial to the details of the resulting waverider geometry. Finally, the moment coefficient variations and heat transfer distributions associated with the viscous optimized waveriders are studied.

  16. The 1887 tsunami in the Ligurian Sea: detailed appraisal of tsunami waves in the Genoa harbour (Italy) through observations and numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hébert, Hélène; Macary, Olivier; Gailler, Audrey; Daubord, Camille; Créach, Ronan

    2015-04-01

    The February 1887 earthquake in the Ligurian Sea triggered a significant tsunami observed along several coastlines of the Ligurian Sea in Italy and France. The maximum run-up historically reported amount to 1 to 2 m, essentially in harbours and beaches which were quite unpopulated at that time, in addition in winter and early in the morning. The original magnitude of the earthquake was estimated from 6.2 to 6.5, with a probable shallow thrusting mechanism, with a fault geometry however still debated. A tide gauge record is available for this tsunami event in the Genoa harbour (Italy). While the literature reported a 20-cm maximum observed tsunami amplitude (Eva and Rabinovich, 1997), a comparison of the mareogram with tide predictions calculated from the harbour tidal harmonic constants has revealed that the tidal range on mareogram reproduction was increased by an approximate scale factor 3 (outcome of the French research project Maremoti, 2012). Thus after correction of the digitized sea level signal, the tsunami amplitude in this specific harbour is reduced and does not exceed 7 cm. With the help of a contemporary nautical chart accounting for the harbour characteristics and bathymetry at the time of the earthquake, and using tsunami numerical modeling, we discuss various earthquake models able to fit this reduced amplitude. This study allows to define the most plausible earthquake mechanisms at the origin of the tsunami waves observed in 1887. In addition, we discuss the results in terms of uncertainties influencing the tsunami hazard assessment. This work is supported by a French ANR TANDEM program in the frame of "Investissements d'Avenir", under the grant ANR-11-RSNR-00023-01.

  17. Detailed Modelling of Combustion Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-12

    dynamics of fluid motion. Re- lease of chemical energy generates gradients in temperature, pressure, and density. These gradients in turn influence the...describing the strong interplay between chemistry and fluid dynamics is the real challenge of modelling combustion. We have purposely concluded this paper...62 3. Fluid Dynamic Algorithms

  18. Clinical professional governance for detailed clinical models.

    PubMed

    Goossen, William; Goossen-Baremans, Anneke

    2013-01-01

    This chapter describes the need for Detailed Clinical Models for contemporary Electronic Health Systems, data exchange and data reuse. It starts with an explanation of the components related to Detailed Clinical Models with a brief summary of knowledge representation, including terminologies representing clinic relevant "things" in the real world, and information models that abstract these in order to let computers process data about these things. Next, Detailed Clinical Models are defined and their purpose is described. It builds on existing developments around the world and accumulates in current work to create a technical specification at the level of the International Standards Organization. The core components of properly expressed Detailed Clinical Models are illustrated, including clinical knowledge and context, data element specification, code bindings to terminologies and meta-information about authors, versioning among others. Detailed Clinical Models to date are heavily based on user requirements and specify the conceptual and logical levels of modelling. It is not precise enough for specific implementations, which requires an additional step. However, this allows Detailed Clinical Models to serve as specifications for many different kinds of implementations. Examples of Detailed Clinical Models are presented both in text and in Unified Modelling Language. Detailed Clinical Models can be positioned in health information architectures, where they serve at the most detailed granular level. The chapter ends with examples of projects that create and deploy Detailed Clinical Models. All have in common that they can often reuse materials from earlier projects, and that strict governance of these models is essential to use them safely in health care information and communication technology. Clinical validation is one point of such governance, and model testing another. The Plan Do Check Act cycle can be applied for governance of Detailed Clinical Models

  19. Equivalent beam modeling using numerical reduction techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, J. M.; Shaw, F. H.

    1987-01-01

    Numerical procedures that can accomplish model reductions for space trusses were developed. Three techniques are presented that can be implemented using current capabilities within NASTRAN. The proposed techniques accomplish their model reductions numerically through use of NASTRAN structural analyses and as such are termed numerical in contrast to the previously developed analytical techniques. Numerical procedures are developed that permit reductions of large truss models containing full modeling detail of the truss and its joints. Three techniques are presented that accomplish these model reductions with various levels of structural accuracy. These numerical techniques are designated as equivalent beam, truss element reduction, and post-assembly reduction methods. These techniques are discussed in detail.

  20. Risk assessment based on a combination of historical analysis, a detailed field study and numerical modeling on the alluvial fan Gadeinerbach as a basis for a risk management concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, M.

    2009-04-01

    The catchment Gadeinerbach in the District of Lungau/Salzburg/Austria is prone to debris flows. Large debris flow events dates back from the years 1934 and 1953. In the upper catchment large mass movements represent debris sources. A field study shows the debris potential and the catchment looks like a "sleeping torrential giant". To carry out mitigation measures a detailed risk management concept, based on a risk assessment in combination of historical analysis, field study and numerical modeling on the alluvial fan was conducted. Human activities have partly altered the surface of the alluvial fan Gadeinerbach but nevertheless some important hazard indicators could be found. With the hazard indicators and photo analysis from the large debris flow event 1934 the catchment character could be pointed out. With the help of these historical data sets (hazard indicators, sediment and debris amount...) it is possible to calibrate the provided numerical models and to win useful knowledge over the pro and cons and their application. The results were used to simulate the design event and furthermore to derive mitigation measures. Therefore the most effective protection against debris with a reduction of the high energy level to a lower level under particular energy change in combination with a debris/bedload deposition place has been carried out. Expert opinion, the study of historical data and a field work is in addition to numerical simulation techniques very necessary for the work in the field of natural hazard management.

  1. Toward Scientific Numerical Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleb, Bil

    2007-01-01

    Ultimately, scientific numerical models need quantified output uncertainties so that modeling can evolve to better match reality. Documenting model input uncertainties and verifying that numerical models are translated into code correctly, however, are necessary first steps toward that goal. Without known input parameter uncertainties, model sensitivities are all one can determine, and without code verification, output uncertainties are simply not reliable. To address these two shortcomings, two proposals are offered: (1) an unobtrusive mechanism to document input parameter uncertainties in situ and (2) an adaptation of the Scientific Method to numerical model development and deployment. Because these two steps require changes in the computational simulation community to bear fruit, they are presented in terms of the Beckhard-Harris-Gleicher change model.

  2. Toward Scientific Numerical Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleb, Bil

    2007-01-01

    Ultimately, scientific numerical models need quantified output uncertainties so that modeling can evolve to better match reality. Documenting model input uncertainties and verifying that numerical models are translated into code correctly, however, are necessary first steps toward that goal. Without known input parameter uncertainties, model sensitivities are all one can determine, and without code verification, output uncertainties are simply not reliable. To address these two shortcomings, two proposals are offered: (1) an unobtrusive mechanism to document input parameter uncertainties in situ and (2) an adaptation of the Scientific Method to numerical model development and deployment. Because these two steps require changes in the computational simulation community to bear fruit, they are presented in terms of the Beckhard-Harris-Gleicher change model.

  3. Numerical models in hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belotserkovskii, Oleg Mikhailovich

    The use of numerical models in fluid mechanics is examined with emphasis on separated flows at high Reynolds numbers. Topics discussed include the splitting method, homogeneous difference schemes, calculation of the nonstationary motion of ordered and large-scale structures, and numerical modeling of the stochastic component of turbulent shear flow. Attention is also given to motion in wake flows, the problem of turbulent spot breakup, and stability problems.

  4. Numerical Modeling of Airblast.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    REPORT SAIC 87/1701 June 1987 Dr.. Submitted to: cp Dr. Jay Boris Laboratory for Computational Physics Accet F4,r Naval Research Laboratory I...boundary layer physical assumptions provides an unsteady prediction of the mass flux emerging from the ground. This model was first proposed by Mirels...the physics modeled will be explained. High explosive dust cloud simulation provides a research path when combined with numerical calculations can lead

  5. Detailed Numerical Simulation of the Graniteville Train Collision

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, R. L.

    2005-10-24

    An unfortunate accident occurred in Graniteville, South Carolina on 6 January, 2005 when a train carrying a variety of hazardous chemicals collided with a stationary train parked on a siding rail (spur). The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) runs prognostic atmospheric simulations of the Central Savannah River Area (CSRA) on an operational basis in the event of such airborne releases. Although forecast information was provided at 2-km horizontal grid spacing during the accident response, a higher-resolution simulation was later performed to examine influences of local topography on plume migration. The Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS, version 4.3.0) was used to simulate meteorology using multiple grids with an innermost grid spacing of 125 meters. This report discusses comparisons of simulated meteorology with local observations and applications using two separate transport models. Results from the simulations are shown to generally agree with meteorological observations at the time. Use of a dense gas model to simulate localized effects indicates agreement with fatalities in the immediate area and visible damage to vegetation.

  6. Global detailed geoid computation and model analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, J. G.; Vincent, S.

    1974-01-01

    Comparisons and analyses were carried out through the use of detailed gravimetric geoids which we have computed by combining models with a set of 26,000 1 deg x 1 deg mean free air gravity anomalies. The accuracy of the detailed gravimetric geoid computed using the most recent Goddard earth model (GEM-6) in conjunction with the set of 1 deg x 1 deg mean free air gravity anomalies is assessed at + or - 2 meters on the continents of North America, Europe, and Australia, 2 to 5 meters in the Northeast Pacific and North Atlantic areas, and 5 to 10 meters in other areas where surface gravity data are sparse. The R.M.S. differences between this detailed geoid and the detailed geoids computed using the other satellite gravity fields in conjuction with same set of surface data range from 3 to 7 meters.

  7. A detailed DSMC surface chemistry model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molchanova Shumakova, A. N.; Kashkovsky, A. V.; Bondar, Ye. A.

    2014-12-01

    This work is aimed at development of detailed molecular surface chemistry models for DSMC method, their implementation into the SMILE++ software system, verification and validation. An approach to construction of DSMC suface chemistry models based on macroscopic reaction rate data was proposed. The approach was applied to macroscopic data for the air mixture of Deutschmann et al. The resulting DSMC surface chemistry model was implemented into SMILE++ software system and verified for thermal equilibrium conditions.

  8. Numerical model SMODERP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavka, P.; Jeřábek, J.; Strouhal, L.

    2016-12-01

    The contribution presents a numerical model SMODERP that is used for calculation and prediction of surface runoff and soil erosion from agricultural land. The physically based model includes the processes of infiltration (Phillips equation), surface runoff routing (kinematic wave based equation), surface retention, surface roughness and vegetation impact on runoff. The model is being developed at the Department of Irrigation, Drainage and Landscape Engineering, Civil Engineering Faculty, CTU in Prague. 2D version of the model was introduced in last years. The script uses ArcGIS system tools for data preparation. The physical relations are implemented through Python scripts. The main computing part is stand alone in numpy arrays. Flow direction is calculated by Steepest Descent algorithm and in multiple flow algorithm. Sheet flow is described by modified kinematic wave equation. Parameters for five different soil textures were calibrated on the set of hundred measurements performed on the laboratory and filed rainfall simulators. Spatially distributed models enable to estimate not only surface runoff but also flow in the rills. Development of the rills is based on critical shear stress and critical velocity. For modelling of the rills a specific sub model was created. This sub model uses Manning formula for flow estimation. Flow in the ditches and streams are also computed. Numerical stability of the model is controled by Courant criterion. Spatial scale is fixed. Time step is dynamic and depends on the actual discharge. The model is used in the framework of the project "Variability of Short-term Precipitation and Runoff in Small Czech Drainage Basins and its Influence on Water Resources Management". Main goal of the project is to elaborate a methodology and online utility for deriving short-term design precipitation series, which could be utilized by a broad community of scientists, state administration as well as design planners. The methodology will account for

  9. A detailed numerical investigation of Burke-Schumann gaseous and spray flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mawid, M. A.; Aggarwal, S. K.

    1991-01-01

    The classical Burke-Schumann gaseous diffusion flame, and the effect of introducing fuel in the form of liquid sprays are investigated numerically. The time-dependent two-dimensional, axisymmetric conservation equations are solved for the gas phase. A Lagrangian approach is used for the dispersed phase. The chemical reactions are modeled through the one-step global reaction scheme. The numerical results show that the computed flame structure is significantly different from that given by the analytical solution. The computed flame is about 15 percent longer and 5 percent narrower than the classical Burke-Schumann flame. The predicted flame shape is, however, in better agreement with experimental observations than the Burke-Schumann flame. The effects of introducing liquid sprays is found to produce thinner and longer flames than its counterpart gaseous flame. A detailed comparison of the structures of gaseous and spray flames is made, and the differences are discussed.

  10. Direct numerical simulation of temporally evolving luminous jet flames with detailed fuel and soot chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Sankaran, Ramanan

    2011-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations of 2D temporally-evolving luminous turbulent ethylene-air jet diffusion flames are performed using a high-order compressible Navier-Stokes solver. The simulations use a reduced mechanism derived from a detailed ethylene-air chemical kinetic mechanism that includes the reaction pathways for the formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The gas-phase chemistry is coupled with a detailed soot particle model based on the method of moments with interpolative closure that accounts for soot nucleation, coagulation, surface growth through HACA mechanism, and oxidation. Radiative heat transfer of CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and soot is treated by solving the radiative transfer equation using the discrete transfer method. This work presents preliminary results of radiation effects on soot dynamics at the tip of a jet diffusion flame with a particular focus on soot formation/oxidation.

  11. Direct numerical simulation of temporally evolving turbulent luminous jet flames with detailed fuel and soot chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecoustre, Vivien; Arias, Paul; Roy, Somesh; Wang, Wei; Luo, Zhaoyu; Haworth, Dan; Im, Hong; Lu, Tianfeng; Ma, Kwan-Liu; Sankaran, Ramanan; Trouve, Arnaud

    2011-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations of 2D temporally-evolving luminous turbulent ethylene-air jet diffusion flames are performed using a high-order compressible Navier-Stokes solver. The simulations use a reduced mechanism derived from a detailed ethylene-air chemical kinetic mechanism that includes the reaction pathways for the formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The gas-phase chemistry is coupled with a detailed soot particle model based on the method of moments with interpolative closure that accounts for soot nucleation, coagulation, surface growth through HACA mechanism, and oxidation. Radiative heat transfer of CO2, H2O, and soot is treated by solving the radiative transfer equation using the discrete transfer method. This work presents preliminary results of radiation effects on soot dynamics at the tip of a jet diffusion flame with a particular focus on soot formation/oxidation.

  12. Numerical Study for Detailed Flow Fields and Performance of the Savonius-Type Rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Tong; Rempfer, Dietmar

    2011-11-01

    The Savonius-type rotor is simple in structure, has good starting characteristics, relatively low operating speeds, and an ability to accept wind from any direction, although it has a lower efficiency than other vertical axis wind turbines. So far a number of experimental investigations have been carried out to study the performance of the Savonius rotor, however, there is a lack of detailed descriptions of the flow field. The aim of this paper is to numerically explore the non-linear two-dimensional unsteady flow over a Savonius rotor and develop a simulation method for predicting its aerodynamic performance. The simulations are based on Star CCM+. The motion of the blades is solved by using a moving mesh. Different turbulence models are compared. Parameters such as mesh density, wall y+, and boundary conditions will be discussed. Numerical simulation results are compared with experimental data. Separation of the flow at the blade tips is well modeled. The characteristics of flow fields details are studied, including boundary layer, moment coefficient, and pressure distribution. The wall shear on each surface of the blades is studied to look into the position of the separation point. Computational fluid dynamics is proven to be an effective approach for the investigation of the Savonius-type rotor, on the premise of proper theory and reasonable assumption. It also provides a basis for optimization of the Savonius wind turbine.

  13. On the physical and chemical details of alumina atomic layer deposition: A combined experimental and numerical approach

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Dongqing; Ma, Lulu; Xie, Yuanyuan; Yuan, Chris; Jen, Tien Chien

    2015-03-15

    Alumina thin film is typically studied as a model atomic layer deposition (ALD) process due to its high dielectric constant, high thermal stability, and good adhesion on various wafer surfaces. Despite extensive applications of alumina ALD in microelectronics industries, details on the physical and chemical processes are not yet well understood. ALD experiments are not able to shed adequate light on the detailed information regarding the transient ALD process. Most of current numerical approaches lack detailed surface reaction mechanisms, and their results are not well correlated with experimental observations. In this paper, the authors present a combined experimental and numerical study on the details of flow and surface reactions in alumina ALD using trimethylaluminum and water as precursors. Results obtained from experiments and simulations are compared and correlated. By experiments, growth rate on five samples under different deposition conditions is characterized. The deposition rate from numerical simulation agrees well with the experimental results. Details of precursor distributions in a full cycle of ALD are studied numerically to bridge between experimental observations and simulations. The 3D transient numerical model adopts surface reaction kinetics and mechanisms based on atomic-level studies to investigate the surface deposition process. Surface deposition is shown as a strictly self-limited process in our numerical studies. ALD is a complex strong-coupled fluid, thermal and chemical process, which is not only heavily dependent on the chemical kinetics and surface conditions but also on the flow and material distributions.

  14. Detailed reduction of reaction mechanisms for flame modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Hai; Frenklach, Michael

    1991-01-01

    A method for reduction of detailed chemical reaction mechanisms, introduced earlier for ignition system, was extended to laminar premixed flames. The reduction is based on testing the reaction and reaction-enthalpy rates of the 'full' reaction mechanism using a zero-dimensional model with the flame temperature profile as a constraint. The technique is demonstrated with numerical tests performed on the mechanism of methane combustion.

  15. Quality and safety of detailed clinical models.

    PubMed

    Ritz, Derek

    2013-01-01

    This chapter describes quality and safety risks related to the development and use of Detailed Clinical Models (DCM) and mechanisms which may be employed to mitigate such risks. The chapter begins with a brief discussion of DCMs and the role they can play in mitigating patient safety risk. There is then a brief description of the risks which DCMs themselves may introduce, followed by the introduction of a standards-based risk assessment method and the ways this assessment method may be applied to DCMs in particular. A general description is then made of the ISO 9000-based approach to quality management systems (QMS) and, specifically, how such an approach may be applied to DCM development, maintenance, deployment and use. The chapter concludes with a discussion of specific DCM quality and safety challenges and governance approaches which may be employed to help address these.

  16. Systematic reduction of a detailed atrial myocyte model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardo, Daniel M.; Rappel, Wouter-Jan

    2017-09-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias are a major health concern and often involve poorly understood mechanisms. Mathematical modeling is able to provide insights into these mechanisms which might result in better treatment options. A key element of this modeling is a description of the electrophysiological properties of cardiac cells. A number of electrophysiological models have been developed, ranging from highly detailed and complex models, containing numerous parameters and variables, to simplified models in which variables and parameters no longer directly correspond to electrophysiological quantities. In this study, we present a systematic reduction of the complexity of the detailed model of Koivumaki et al. using the recently developed manifold boundary approximation method. We reduce the original model, containing 42 variables and 37 parameters, to a model with only 11 variables and 5 parameters and show that this reduced model can accurately reproduce the action potential shape and restitution curve of the original model. The reduced model contains only five currents and all variables and parameters can be directly linked to electrophysiological quantities. Due to its reduction in complexity, simulation times of our model are decreased more than three-fold. Furthermore, fitting the reduced model to clinical data is much more efficient, a potentially important step towards patient-specific modeling.

  17. Numerical prediction of oblique detonation wave structures using detailed and reduced reaction mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaker, A. A.; Chelliah, H. K.

    1997-12-01

    Modelling of the structure and the limiting flow turning angles of an oblique detonation wave, established by a two-dimensional wedge, requires the implementation of detailed chemical kinetic models involving a large number of chemical species. In this paper, a method of reducing the computational effort involved in simulating such high-speed reacting flows by implementing a systematically reduced reaction mechanism is presented. For a hydrogen - air mixture, starting with an elementary mechanism having eight species in 12 reactions, three alternate four-step reduced reaction mechanisms are developed by introducing the steady-state approximation for the reaction intermediates HO2, O and OH, respectively. Additional reduction of the computational effort is achieved by introducing simplifications to the thermochemical data evaluations. The influence of the numerical grid used in predicting the induction process behind the shock is also investigated. Comparisons of the induction zone predicted by two-dimensional oblique detonation wave calculations with that of a static reactor model (with initial conditions of the gas mixture specified by those behind the nonreactive oblique shock wave) are also presented. The reasonably good agreement between the three four-step reduced mechanism predictions and the starting mechanism predictions indicates that further reduction to a two-step mechanism is feasible for the physical flow time scales (corresponding to inflow Mach numbers of 8 - 10) considered here, and needs to be pursued in the future.

  18. HOW DO NUMERICAL METHODS EFFECT STATISTICAL DETAILS OF RICHTMYER-MESHKOV INSTABILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    W. J. RIDER; J. R. KAMM; C. ZOLDI

    2001-05-01

    next section we briefly describe the experiments. In Section the quantitative measures applied to the images are detailed; the results of these analyses are discussed in Section refsec:compare. The consideration of the relation between turbulence models and numerical methods was inspired by these results and is discussed.

  19. A Detailed Modeling Study of Propane Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, C K; Jayaweera, T M; Pitz, W J; Curran, H J

    2004-03-19

    A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism has been used to simulate ignition delay times recorded by a number of experimental shock tube studies over the temperature range 900 {le} T {le} 1800 K, in the pressure range 0.75-40 atm and in the equivalence ratio range 0.5 {le} {phi} {le} 2.0. Flame speed measurements at 1 atm in the equivalence ratio range 0.4 {le} {phi} {le} 1.8 have also been simulated. Both of these data sets, particularly those recorded at high pressure, are of particular importance in validating a kinetic mechanism, as internal combustion engines operate at elevated pressures and temperatures and rates of fuel oxidation are critical to efficient system operation. Experiments in which reactant, intermediate and product species were quantitatively recorded, versus temperature in a jet-stirred reactor (JSR) and versus time in a flow reactor are also simulated. This data provide a stringent test of the kinetic mechanism as it must reproduce accurate quantitative profiles for all reactant, intermediate and product species. The JSR experiments were performed in the temperature range 1000-1110 K, in the equivalence ratio range 0.5 {le} {phi} {le} 4.0, at a pressure of 5 atm. These experiments are complemented by those carried out in a flow reactor in the temperature range 660-820 K, at 10 atm and at an equivalence ratio of 0.4. In addition, burner stabilized flames were simulated, where chemical species profiles were measured at atmospheric pressure for two propane-air flat flames. Overall, reasonably good agreement is observed between the model simulations and the experimental results.

  20. Numerical Modeling Experiments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-09-01

    presence of clouds is associated with the occurvence of condensation in the atmospheric models. Cloudiness 3t a particulat grid point is introduced -4...when saturation is predicted as a result of either large-scale moisture flux convergence or vertical convective adjustment. In most models such clouds ... cloud top, cloud thickness, and liquid-water content. In some general circulation models the local fractional convective cloud amountv tre taken

  1. Numerical Modelling of Cavitation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    effort then consists in determining a formulation of the source term Γv. 2.2.2.1 Use of the Rayleigh - Plesset Equation The Rayleigh - Plesset equation ...in mind that the Rayleigh - Plesset equation is not solved and that the reference to bubbles is artificial: the most basic expression of Rayleigh ... Plesset equation is simply used to formulate a source term for vaporisation in the frame of a single fluid model. 2.2.2.2 Empirical Modelling of the

  2. Numerical modeling of nonintrusive inspection systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, J.; Morgan, J.; Sale, K.

    1992-12-01

    A wide variety of nonintrusive inspection systems have been proposed in the past several years for the detection of hidden contraband in airline luggage and shipping containers. The majority of these proposed techniques depend on the interaction of radiation with matter to produce a signature specific to the contraband of interest, whether drugs or explosives. In the authors` role as diagnostic specialists in the Underground Test Program over the past forty years, L-Division of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has developed a technique expertise in the combined numerical and experimental modeling of these types of system. Based on their experience, they are convinced that detailed numerical modeling provides a much more accurate estimate of the actual performance of complex experiments than simple analytical modeling. Furthermore, the construction of detailed numerical prototypes allows experimenters to explore the entire region of parameter space available to them before committing their ideas to hardware. This sort of systematic analysis has often led to improved experimental designs and reductions in fielding costs. L-Division has developed an extensive suite of computer codes to model proposed experiments and possible background interactions. These codes allow one to simulate complex radiation sources, model 3-dimensional system geometries with {open_quotes}real world{close_quotes} complexity, specify detailed elemental distributions, and predict the response of almost any type of detector. In this work several examples are presented illustrating the use of these codes in modeling experimental systems at LLNL and their potential usefulness in evaluating nonintrusive inspection systems is discussed.

  3. Numerical Modeling of Ablation Heat Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewing, Mark E.; Laker, Travis S.; Walker, David T.

    2013-01-01

    A unique numerical method has been developed for solving one-dimensional ablation heat transfer problems. This paper provides a comprehensive description of the method, along with detailed derivations of the governing equations. This methodology supports solutions for traditional ablation modeling including such effects as heat transfer, material decomposition, pyrolysis gas permeation and heat exchange, and thermochemical surface erosion. The numerical scheme utilizes a control-volume approach with a variable grid to account for surface movement. This method directly supports implementation of nontraditional models such as material swelling and mechanical erosion, extending capabilities for modeling complex ablation phenomena. Verifications of the numerical implementation are provided using analytical solutions, code comparisons, and the method of manufactured solutions. These verifications are used to demonstrate solution accuracy and proper error convergence rates. A simple demonstration of a mechanical erosion (spallation) model is also provided to illustrate the unique capabilities of the method.

  4. Experimental and Detailed Numerical Studies of Fundamental Flame Properties of Gaseous and Liquid Fuels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    PROPERTIES OF GASEOUS AND LIQUID FUELS FA9550-04-1-0006 5C. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 61102F 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 2308 Se. TASK NUMBER FOKION N...gaseous and liquid fuels, including jet fuels and their surrogates, were considered. Flame ignition and extinction limits were determined experimentally...EXPERIMENTAL AND DETAILED NUMERICAL STUDIES OF FUNDAMENTAL FLAME PROPERTIES OF GASEOUS AND LIQUID FUELS (AFOSR Grant FA9550-04-1-0006) (Period: 11/1/2003

  5. Detailed Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Hydrazine Decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meagher, Nancy E.; Bates, Kami R.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this research project is to develop and validate a detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for gas-phase hydrazine decomposition. Hydrazine is used extensively in aerospace propulsion, and although liquid hydrazine is not considered detonable, many fuel handling systems create multiphase mixtures of fuels and fuel vapors during their operation. Therefore, a thorough knowledge of the decomposition chemistry of hydrazine under a variety of conditions can be of value in assessing potential operational hazards in hydrazine fuel systems. To gain such knowledge, a reasonable starting point is the development and validation of a detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for gas-phase hydrazine decomposition. A reasonably complete mechanism was published in 1996, however, many of the elementary steps included had outdated rate expressions and a thorough investigation of the behavior of the mechanism under a variety of conditions was not presented. The current work has included substantial revision of the previously published mechanism, along with a more extensive examination of the decomposition behavior of hydrazine. An attempt to validate the mechanism against the limited experimental data available has been made and was moderately successful. Further computational and experimental research into the chemistry of this fuel needs to be completed.

  6. A Detailed Chemical Kinetic Model for TNT

    SciTech Connect

    Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2005-01-13

    A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for 2,4,6-tri-nitrotoluene (TNT) has been developed to explore problems of explosive performance and soot formation during the destruction of munitions. The TNT mechanism treats only gas-phase reactions. Reactions for the decomposition of TNT and for the consumption of intermediate products formed from TNT are assembled based on information from the literature and on current understanding of aromatic chemistry. Thermodynamic properties of intermediate and radical species are estimated by group additivity. Reaction paths are developed based on similar paths for aromatic hydrocarbons. Reaction-rate constant expressions are estimated from the literature and from analogous reactions where the rate constants are available. The detailed reaction mechanism for TNT is added to existing reaction mechanisms for RDX and for hydrocarbons. Computed results show the effect of oxygen concentration on the amount of soot precursors that are formed in the combustion of RDX and TNT mixtures in N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} mixtures.

  7. Detailed Performance Model for Photovoltaic Systems: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, H.; Mancilla-David, F.; Ellis, K.; Muljadi, E.; Jenkins, P.

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents a modified current-voltage relationship for the single diode model. The single-diode model has been derived from the well-known equivalent circuit for a single photovoltaic cell. The modification presented in this paper accounts for both parallel and series connections in an array.

  8. Numerical modeling of preburner flowfield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, A. S.; Mo, J. D.; Jin, K. R.

    1993-06-01

    This work is intended to numerically predict the flowfields inside the preburner of the Space Shuttle Main Engine. The computer code (FDNS) based on pressure correction method is modified and adapted with an elliptic grid generator. The original configuration of the preburner in conjunction with downstream gas turbines has been simplified geometrically and numerically modeled at its full power in this work. The computational results are presented and qualitatively discussed with test data collected in NASA/MSFC.

  9. Numerical FEM modeling in dental implantology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roateşi, Iulia; Roateşi, Simona

    2016-06-01

    This paper is devoted to a numerical approach of the stress and displacement calculation of a system made up of dental implant, ceramic crown and surrounding bone. This is the simulation of a clinical situation involving both biological - the bone tissue, and non-biological - the implant and the crown, materials. On the other hand this problem deals with quite fine technical structure details - the threads, tapers, etc with a great impact in masticatory force transmission. Modeling the contact between the implant and the bone tissue is important to a proper bone-implant interface model and implant design. The authors proposed a three-dimensional numerical model to assess the biomechanical behaviour of this complex structure in order to evaluate its stability by determining the risk zones. A comparison between this numerical analysis and clinical cases is performed and a good agreement is obtained.

  10. Detailed Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Cyclohexane Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Silke, E J; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Ribaucour, M

    2006-11-10

    A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism has been developed and used to study the oxidation of cyclohexane at both low and high temperatures. Reaction rate constant rules are developed for the low temperature combustion of cyclohexane. These rules can be used for in chemical kinetic mechanisms for other cycloalkanes. Since cyclohexane produces only one type of cyclohexyl radical, much of the low temperature chemistry of cyclohexane is described in terms of one potential energy diagram showing the reaction of cyclohexyl radical + O{sub 2} through five, six and seven membered ring transition states. The direct elimination of cyclohexene and HO{sub 2} from RO{sub 2} is included in the treatment using a modified rate constant of Cavallotti et al. Published and unpublished data from the Lille rapid compression machine, as well as jet-stirred reactor data are used to validate the mechanism. The effect of heat loss is included in the simulations, an improvement on previous studies on cyclohexane. Calculations indicated that the production of 1,2-epoxycyclohexane observed in the experiments can not be simulated based on the current understanding of low temperature chemistry. Possible 'alternative' H-atom isomerizations leading to different products from the parent O{sub 2}QOOH radical were included in the low temperature chemical kinetic mechanism and were found to play a significant role.

  11. Detailed chemical kinetic modeling of cyclohexane oxidation.

    PubMed

    Silke, Emma J; Pitz, William J; Westbrook, Charles K; Ribaucour, Marc

    2007-05-17

    A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism has been developed and used to study the oxidation of cyclohexane at both low and high temperatures. Rules for reaction rate constants are developed for the low-temperature combustion of cyclohexane. These rules can be used for in chemical kinetic mechanisms for other cycloalkanes. Because cyclohexane produces only one type of cyclohexyl radical, much of the low-temperature chemistry of cyclohexane is described in terms of one potential energy diagram showing the reaction of cyclohexyl radical with O2 through five-, six-, and seven-membered-ring transition states. The direct elimination of cyclohexene and HO2 from RO2 is included in the treatment using a modified rate constant of Cavallotti et al. (Proc. Combust. Inst. 2007, 31, 201). Published and unpublished data from the Lille rapid compression machine, as well as jet-stirred reactor data, are used to validate the mechanism. The effect of heat loss is included in the simulations, an improvement on previous studies on cyclohexane. Calculations indicated that the production of 1,2-epoxycyclohexane observed in the experiments cannot be simulated according to the current understanding of low-temperature chemistry. Possible "alternative" H-atom isomerizations leading to different products from the parent O2QOOH radical were included in the low-temperature chemical kinetic mechanism and were found to play a significant role.

  12. Detailed simulation of morphodynamics: 1. Hydrodynamic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabi, M.; de Vriend, H. J.; Mosselman, E.; Sloff, C. J.; Shimizu, Y.

    2012-12-01

    We present a three-dimensional high-resolution hydrodynamic model for unsteady incompressible flow over an evolving bed topography. This is achieved by using a multilevel Cartesian grid technique that allows the grid to be refined in high-gradient regions and in the vicinity of the river bed. The grid can be locally refined and adapted to the bed geometry, managing the Cartesian grid cells and faces using a hierarchical tree data approach. A ghost-cell immersed-boundary technique is applied to cells intersecting the bed topography. The governing equations have been discretized using a finite-volume method on a staggered grid, conserving second-order accuracy in time and space. The solution advances in time using the fractional step approach. Large-eddy simulation is used as turbulence closure. We validate the model against several experiments and other results from literature. Model results for Stokes flow around a cylinder in the vicinity of a moving wall agree well with Wannier's analytical solution. At higher Reynolds numbers, computed trailing bubble length, separation angle, and drag coefficient compare favorably with experimental and previous computational results. Results for the flow over two- and three-dimensional dunes agree well with published data, including a fair reproduction of recirculation zones, horse-shoe structures, and boiling effects. This shows that the model is suitable for being used as a hydrodynamic submodel in the high-resolution modeling of sediment transport and formation and evolution of subaqueous ripples and dunes.

  13. A detailed model of electrothermal propulsion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Aston, G.; Brophy, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    A semi-empirical model is presented which describes the operating characteristics of resistojet and arcjet engines. Propellants considered include hydrogen, ammonia and hydrazine. Specific engine design and performance correlations are derived from previously published contractor reports, conference and journal papers of the past three decades. Fundamental performance relationships are identified and correlating parameters derived to describe engine operation over a wide range of input powers and propellant mass flow rates. Outputs are presented from a computer program formulated using these modeling relationships. Comparisons are made with present electrothermal engine designs and examples are presented to illustrate the usefulness of the models in predicting engine operation as a function of changes in engine geometry and operating modes. 33 refs.

  14. A detailed model of electrothermal propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aston, Graeme; Brophy, John R.

    1989-01-01

    A semi-empirical model is presented which describes the operating characteristics of resistojet and arcjet engines. Propellants considered include hydrogen, ammonia and hydrazine. Specific engine design and performance correlations are derived from previously published contractor reports, conference and journal papers of the past three decades. Fundamental performance relationships are identified and correlating parameters derived to describe engine operation over a wide range of input powers and propellant mass flow rates. Outputs are presented from a computer program formulated using these modeling relationships. Comparisons are made with present electrothermal engine designs and examples are presented to illustrate the usefulness of the models in predicting engine operation as a function of changes in engine geometry and operating modes.

  15. Structured detailed opto-mechanical tolerance modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swart, P. C.

    2016-02-01

    Opto-mechanical tolerancing is a complex art, which is often reduced to inadequate tabled data of allowable tilts and decentres. During the process the respective roles of optical- and mechanical designers can become entangled and a source of conflict. A framework of principles is introduced to guide the design team through these murky waters. From these principles the development of a catalogue of models, practices and past precedents are proposed. An example is presented to serve as illustration. The final result is a model, of opto-mechanical tolerances, which allows a structured flow of tolerances into optical performance prediction.

  16. Detailed Kinetic Modeling of Gasoline Surrogate Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Mehl, M; Curran, H J; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2009-03-09

    Real fuels are complex mixtures of thousands of hydrocarbon compounds including linear and branched paraffins, naphthenes, olefins and aromatics. It is generally agreed that their behavior can be effectively reproduced by simpler fuel surrogates containing a limited number of components. In this work, a recently revised version of the kinetic model by the authors is used to analyze the combustion behavior of several components relevant to gasoline surrogate formulation. Particular attention is devoted to linear and branched saturated hydrocarbons (PRF mixtures), olefins (1-hexene) and aromatics (toluene). Model predictions for pure components, binary mixtures and multi-component gasoline surrogates are compared with recent experimental information collected in rapid compression machine, shock tube and jet stirred reactors covering a wide range of conditions pertinent to internal combustion engines. Simulation results are discussed focusing attention on the mixing effects of the fuel components.

  17. Detailed Physical Trough Model for NREL's Solar Advisor Model: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, M. J.; Blair, N.; Dobos, A.

    2010-10-01

    Solar Advisor Model (SAM) is a free software package made available by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Sandia National Laboratory, and the US Department of Energy. SAM contains hourly system performance and economic models for concentrating solar power (CSP) systems, photovoltaic, solar hot-water, and generic fuel-use technologies. Versions of SAM prior to 2010 included only the parabolic trough model based on Excelergy. This model uses top-level empirical performance curves to characterize plant behavior, and thus is limited in predictive capability for new technologies or component configurations. To address this and other functionality challenges, a new trough model; derived from physical first principles was commissioned to supplement the Excelergy-based empirical model. This new 'physical model' approaches the task of characterizing the performance of the whole parabolic trough plant by replacing empirical curve-fit relationships with more detailed calculations where practical. The resulting model matches the annual performance of the SAM empirical model (which has been previously verified with plant data) while maintaining run-times compatible with parametric analysis, adding additional flexibility in modeled system configurations, and providing more detailed performance calculations in the solar field, power block, piping, and storage subsystems.

  18. Detailed ball bearing model for magnetic suspension auxiliary service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, G.; Palazzolo, A. B.; Provenza, Andrew; Montague, Gerald

    2004-01-01

    Catcher bearings (CBs) provide backup protection for rotating machines with active magnetic bearings (AMBs). The CBs are required in the event of an AMB failure or high transient loads. Numerical simulations of a rotor drop on CBs in flywheel energy storage system are conducted with a detailed CB model which includes a Hertzian load-deflection relationship between mechanical contacts, speed-and-preload-dependent bearing stiffness due to centrifugal force, and a Palmgren's drag friction torque. The transient simulation results show the rotor shaft response variations with the design parameters: shaft/bearing friction coefficients, axial preload, support damping of damper liner, and side loads from magnetic bearings. The results reveal that friction coefficients, support damping, and side loads are critical parameters to satisfy CB design objectives and prevent backward (super) whirl.

  19. Transient Catalytic Combustor Model With Detailed Gas and Surface Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Struk, Peter M.; Dietrich, Daniel L.; Mellish, Benjamin P.; Miller, Fletcher J.; Tien, James S.

    2005-01-01

    In this work, we numerically investigate the transient combustion of a premixed gas mixture in a narrow, perfectly-insulated, catalytic channel which can represent an interior channel of a catalytic monolith. The model assumes a quasi-steady gas-phase and a transient, thermally thin solid phase. The gas phase is one-dimensional, but it does account for heat and mass transfer in a direction perpendicular to the flow via appropriate heat and mass transfer coefficients. The model neglects axial conduction in both the gas and in the solid. The model includes both detailed gas-phase reactions and catalytic surface reactions. The reactants modeled so far include lean mixtures of dry CO and CO/H2 mixtures, with pure oxygen as the oxidizer. The results include transient computations of light-off and system response to inlet condition variations. In some cases, the model predicts two different steady-state solutions depending on whether the channel is initially hot or cold. Additionally, the model suggests that the catalytic ignition of CO/O2 mixtures is extremely sensitive to small variations of inlet equivalence ratios and parts per million levels of H2.

  20. Numerical modeling of Waianae Harbor

    SciTech Connect

    Mader, C.L.; Lucas, S.

    1985-01-01

    The Waianae harbor problem is an example of the use of numerical modeling techniques available at JTRE of the University of Hawaii to assist in the evaluation of oceanographic fluid dynamic flow problems. The numerical techniques are available to assist in the modeling of many problems of interest to the Hawaii Ocean Experiment. One application that has received considerable effort is the formation, propagation, and run-up of tsunami waves. The interaction of tsunami waves with the island chain is an important problem that needs more study. The models can be used to study storm surge interaction with the Hawaii islands and current and circulation around and through the islands. It is important that the modeling not be limited to the usual nonlinear shallow-water models, since they are inappropriate for many of the problems of interest to the Hawaii Ocean Experiment. 6 references, 5 figures.

  1. Precise numerical modeling of next generation multimode fiber based links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksymiuk, L.; Stepniak, G.

    2015-12-01

    In order to numerically model modern multimode fiber based links we are required to take into account modal and chromatic dispersion, profile dispersion and spectral dependent coupling. In this paper we propose a complete numerical model which not only is precise but also versatile. Additionally to the detailed mathematical description of the model we provide also a bunch of numerical calculations performed with the use of the model.

  2. Numerical approaches to combustion modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Oran, E.S.; Boris, J.P. )

    1991-01-01

    This book presents a series of topics ranging from microscopic combustion physics to several aspects of macroscopic reactive-flow modeling. As the reader progresses into the book, the successive chapters generally include a wider range of physical and chemical processes in the mathematical model. Including more processes, however, usually means that they will be represented phenomenologically at a cruder level. In practice the detailed microscopic models and simulations are often used to develop and calibrate the phenomenologies used in the macroscopic models. The book first describes computations of the most microscopic chemical processes, then considers laminar flames and detonation modeling, and ends with computations of complex, multiphase combustion systems.

  3. San Joaquin-Tulare Conjunctive Use Model: Detailed model description

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, N.W.T.

    1992-03-01

    The San Joaquin - Tulare Conjunctive Use Model (SANTUCM) was originally developed for the San Joaquin Valley Drainage Program to evaluate possible scenarios for long-term management of drainage and drainage - related problems in the western San Joaquin Valley of California. A unique aspect of this model is its coupling of a surface water delivery and reservoir operations model with a regional groundwater model. The model also performs salinity balances along the tributaries and along the main stem of the San Joaquin River to allow assessment of compliance with State Water Resources Control Board water quality objectives for the San Joaquin River. This document is a detailed description of the various subroutines, variables and parameters used in the model.

  4. Numerical Modeling of LCROSS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultanov, V. G.; Kim, V. V.; Matveichev, A. V.; Zhukov, B. G.; Lomonosov, I. V.

    2009-06-01

    The mission objectives of the Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) include confirming the presence or absence of water ice in a permanently shadowed crater in the Moon's polar regions. In this research we present results of numerical modeling of forthcoming LCROSS experiment. The parallel FPIC3D gas dynamic code with implemented realistic equations of state (EOS) and constitutive relations [1] was used. New wide--range EOS for lunar ground was developed. We carried out calculations of impact of model body on the lunar surface at different angels. Situations of impact on dry and water ice--contained lunar ground were also taken into account. Modeling results are given for crater's shape and size along with amount of ejecta. [4pt] [1] V.E. Fortov, V.V. Kim, I.V. Lomonosov, A.V. Matveichev, A.V. Ostrik. Numerical modeling of hypervelocity impacts, Intern J Impact Engeneering, 33, 244-253 (2006)

  5. Numerical Modelling of Gelating Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Babovsky, Hans

    2008-09-01

    The numerical simulation of the gel phase transition of an aerosol system is an interesting and demanding task. Here, we follow an approach first discussed in [6, 8] which turns out as a useful numerical tool. We investigate several improvements and generalizations. In the center of interest are coagulation diffusion systems, where the aerosol dynamics is supplemented with diffusive spreading in physical space. This leads to a variety of scenarios (depending on the coagulation kernel and the diffusion model) for the spatial evolution of the gelation area.

  6. Detailed Numerical Simulation of Liquid Jet In Crossflow Atomization with High Density Ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghods, Sina

    The atomization of a liquid jet by a high speed cross-flowing gas has many applications such as gas turbines and augmentors. The mechanisms by which the liquid jet initially breaks up, however, are not well understood. Experimental studies suggest the dependence of spray properties on operating conditions and nozzle geom- etry. Detailed numerical simulations can offer better understanding of the underlying physical mechanisms that lead to the breakup of the injected liquid jet. In this work, detailed numerical simulation results of turbulent liquid jets injected into turbulent gaseous cross flows for different density ratios is presented. A finite volume, balanced force fractional step flow solver to solve the Navier-Stokes equations is employed and coupled to a Refined Level Set Grid method to follow the phase interface. To enable the simulation of atomization of high density ratio fluids, we ensure discrete consistency between the solution of the conservative momentum equation and the level set based continuity equation by employing the Consistent Rescaled Momentum Transport (CRMT) method. The impact of different inflow jet boundary conditions on different jet properties including jet penetration is analyzed and results are compared to those obtained experimentally by Brown & McDonell(2006). In addition, instability analysis is performed to find the most dominant insta- bility mechanism that causes the liquid jet to breakup. Linear instability analysis is achieved using linear theories for Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin- Helmholtz instabilities and non-linear analysis is performed using our flow solver with different inflow jet boundary conditions.

  7. Sky coverage for layer-oriented MCAO: a detailed analytical and numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Diolaiti, Emiliano; Ragazzoni, Roberto; Farinato, Jacopo; Vernet-Viard, Elise

    2004-10-01

    One of the key-point for the future developments of the multiconjugate adaptive optics for the astronomy is the availability of the correction for a large fraction of the sky. The sky coverage represents one of the limits of the existing single reference adaptive optics system. Multiconjugate adaptive optics allows to overcome the limitations due to the small corrected field of view and the Layer Oriented approach, in particular by its Multiple Field of View version, increases the number of possible references using also very faint stars to guide the adaptive systems. In this paper we study the sky coverage problem in the Layer Oriented case, using both numerical and analytical approaches. Taking into account a star catalogue and a star luminosity distribution function we run a lot of numerical simulation sequences using the Layer Oriented Simulation Tool (LOST). Moreover we perform for several cases a detailed optimization procedure and a relative full simulation in order to achieve better performance for the considered system in those particular conditions. In this way we can retrieve a distribution of numerically simulated cases that allows computing the sky coverage with respect to a performance parameter as the Strehl Ratio and to the scientific field size.

  8. Benchmarking numerical models of brittle thrust wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buiter, Susanne J. H.; Schreurs, Guido; Albertz, Markus; Gerya, Taras V.; Kaus, Boris; Landry, Walter; le Pourhiet, Laetitia; Mishin, Yury; Egholm, David L.; Cooke, Michele; Maillot, Bertrand; Thieulot, Cedric; Crook, Tony; May, Dave; Souloumiac, Pauline; Beaumont, Christopher

    2016-11-01

    We report quantitative results from three brittle thrust wedge experiments, comparing numerical results directly with each other and with corresponding analogue results. We first test whether the participating codes reproduce predictions from analytical critical taper theory. Eleven codes pass the stable wedge test, showing negligible internal deformation and maintaining the initial surface slope upon horizontal translation over a frictional interface. Eight codes participated in the unstable wedge test that examines the evolution of a wedge by thrust formation from a subcritical state to the critical taper geometry. The critical taper is recovered, but the models show two deformation modes characterised by either mainly forward dipping thrusts or a series of thrust pop-ups. We speculate that the two modes are caused by differences in effective basal boundary friction related to different algorithms for modelling boundary friction. The third experiment examines stacking of forward thrusts that are translated upward along a backward thrust. The results of the seven codes that run this experiment show variability in deformation style, number of thrusts, thrust dip angles and surface slope. Overall, our experiments show that numerical models run with different numerical techniques can successfully simulate laboratory brittle thrust wedge models at the cm-scale. In more detail, however, we find that it is challenging to reproduce sandbox-type setups numerically, because of frictional boundary conditions and velocity discontinuities. We recommend that future numerical-analogue comparisons use simple boundary conditions and that the numerical Earth Science community defines a plasticity test to resolve the variability in model shear zones.

  9. Numerical Modelling of Ground Penetrating Radar Antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannakis, Iraklis; Giannopoulos, Antonios; Pajewski, Lara

    2014-05-01

    Numerical methods are needed in order to solve Maxwell's equations in complicated and realistic problems. Over the years a number of numerical methods have been developed to do so. Amongst them the most popular are the finite element, finite difference implicit techniques, frequency domain solution of Helmontz equation, the method of moments, transmission line matrix method. However, the finite-difference time-domain method (FDTD) is considered to be one of the most attractive choice basically because of its simplicity, speed and accuracy. FDTD first introduced in 1966 by Kane Yee. Since then, FDTD has been established and developed to be a very rigorous and well defined numerical method for solving Maxwell's equations. The order characteristics, accuracy and limitations are rigorously and mathematically defined. This makes FDTD reliable and easy to use. Numerical modelling of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) is a very useful tool which can be used in order to give us insight into the scattering mechanisms and can also be used as an alternative approach to aid data interpretation. Numerical modelling has been used in a wide range of GPR applications including archeology, geophysics, forensic, landmine detection etc. In engineering, some applications of numerical modelling include the estimation of the effectiveness of GPR to detect voids in bridges, to detect metal bars in concrete, to estimate shielding effectiveness etc. The main challenges in numerical modelling of GPR for engineering applications are A) the implementation of the dielectric properties of the media (soils, concrete etc.) in a realistic way, B) the implementation of the geometry of the media (soils inhomogeneities, rough surface, vegetation, concrete features like fractures and rock fragments etc.) and C) the detailed modelling of the antenna units. The main focus of this work (which is part of the COST Action TU1208) is the accurate and realistic implementation of GPR antenna units into the FDTD

  10. Moore's Law and Numerical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voller, V. R.; Porté-Agel, F.

    2002-07-01

    An estimate of the rate of increase in numerical simulation grid sizes with time is obtained by counting the grids (measured in terms of number of node points) reported in the nine volumes of an established proceedings on the numerical modeling of solidification phenomena dating back to 1980. It is shown that the largest grids used in a given year increase at a rate consistent with the well-known Moore's law on computing power, i.e., the number of nodes in the grids double every 18 months. From this observation, approximate bounds on the available grid size in a current year are established. This approximation is used to provide projections as to when, assuming Moore's law continues to hold, direct simulations of physical phenomena, which resolve to the smallest scale present, will be achievable.

  11. Numerical modeling of mesospheric bores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laughman, Brian Joseph

    Mesospheric bores were first observed in 1993 and since then there have been few efforts to characterize them. Early results invoked weakly nonlinear hydraulic theory to explain these observed bores and numerical results have reproduced the essential nonlinearities of bore evolution. Internal bores have been demonstrated to exist in density stratified fluids, such as the oceanic thermocline and tropospheric inversion layers, and have been approximated by the Benjamin-Davis-Ono (BDO) equation (the KdV analogue for internal waves). This thesis considers these earlier theories and explores the limits of their validity with two numerical models. The first is a one-dimensional solver of the KdV and BDO equations. The second model describes the nonlinear incompressible dynamics of the Navier-Stokes equations for thermal ducting environments. The results of both models are directly compared to constrain the validity of the weakly nonlinear theory. These results are also compared with spatial and velocity scales of airglow observations and demonstrate the viability of simple mesopausal thermal ducting environments to support realistic bore evolution. Based on observations and on the dependence of the dispersion relationship on the mean horizontal wind, Doppler ducting structures are posed and also demonstrate nonlinear bore evolution. The direction of future studies is then discussed, including extensions to more complex and realistic ducting environments characteristic of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT), the viability of forcing mechanisms beyond the long wave perturbations considered in these studies, and applications to observed bore events.

  12. Numerical Model for Hydrovolcanic Explosions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mader, Charles; Gittings, Michael

    2007-03-01

    A hydrovolcanic explosion is generated by the interaction of hot magma with ground water. It is called Surtseyan after the 1963 explosive eruption off Iceland. The water flashes to steam and expands explosively. Liquid water becomes water gas at constant volume and generates pressures of about 3GPa. The Krakatoa hydrovolcanic explosion was modeled using the full Navier-Stokes AMR Eulerian compressible hydrodynamic code called SAGE [1] which includes the high pressure physics of explosions. The water in the hydrovolcanic explosion was described as liquid water heated by magma to 1100 K. The high temperature water is treated as an explosive with the hot liquid water going to water gas. The BKW [2] steady state detonation state has a peak pressure of 8.9 GPa, a propagation velocity of 5900 meters/sec and the water is compressed to 1.33 g/cc. [1] Numerical Modeling of Water Waves, Second Edition, Charles L. Mader, CRC Press 2004. [2] Numerical Modeling of Explosions and Propellants, Charles L. Mader, CRC Press 1998.

  13. Numerical methods used in fusion science numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, M.

    2015-04-01

    The dynamics of burning plasma is very complicated physics, which is dominated by multi-scale and multi-physics phenomena. To understand such phenomena, numerical simulations are indispensable. Fundamentals of numerical methods used in fusion science numerical modeling are briefly discussed in this paper. In addition, the parallelization technique such as open multi processing (OpenMP) and message passing interface (MPI) parallel programing are introduced and the loop-level parallelization is shown as an example.

  14. Numerical models of complex diapirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podladchikov, Yu.; Talbot, C.; Poliakov, A. N. B.

    1993-12-01

    Numerically modelled diapirs that rise into overburdens with viscous rheology produce a large variety of shapes. This work uses the finite-element method to study the development of diapirs that rise towards a surface on which a diapir-induced topography creeps flat or disperses ("erodes") at different rates. Slow erosion leads to diapirs with "mushroom" shapes, moderate erosion rate to "wine glass" diapirs and fast erosion to "beer glass"- and "column"-shaped diapirs. The introduction of a low-viscosity layer at the top of the overburden causes diapirs to develop into structures resembling a "Napoleon hat". These spread lateral sheets.

  15. Numerical Study of Splash Detail Due to Grain Impact on Granular Bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanabe, Takahiro; Niiya, Hirofumi; Awazu, Akinori; Nishimori, Hiraku

    2017-04-01

    Massive sediment transport phenomena, such as sand storm and drifting snow, pose a considerable threat to human life. Further, the formation of geomorphological patterns on sand-desert and snowfield surfaces as a result of sediment transport, such as dunes and ripples, is of considerable research interest. Because the major component of the grain entrainment into the air is caused by both the collision and ejection, it is necessary to focus on the collisions between wind-blown grains and surface of sand field along with the resultant ejection grains from the surfaces, which processes are, as a whole, called a splash process. However, because of complexity of jumping grains over the ground surface, detailed measurement is very hard. Therefore, to investigate the splash process, we simulate detailed process of splash caused by 1-grain impact onto a randomly packed granular bed using discrete element method. As a result, we obtained good correspondence between our numerical results and the findings of previous experiments for the movement of ejected grains. Furthermore, the distributions of the ejection angle and the vertical ejection speed for individual grains vary depending on the relative timing at which the grains are ejected after the initial impact. Obvious differences are observed between the distributions of grains ejected during the earlier and later splash periods: the form of the vertical ejection-speed distribution varies from a power-law form to a lognormal form with time, and this difference is related to the grain trajectory after ejection [1]. In addition, we focus on the bulk dynamics inside the granular bed to relate the ejected grains behavior to the force propagations from the first impact to the ejection of each grain. [1] T. Tanabe, T. Shimada, N. Ito, and, H. Nishimori, (submitted)

  16. Detail view of lamp in law library; Jennewein modeled symbols ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of lamp in law library; Jennewein modeled symbols of the four seasons on the lamp's aluminum supports - United States Department of Justice, Constitution Avenue between Ninth & Tenth Streets, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  17. 21. INTERIOR, DOUBLE STAIRWAY LEADING TO MODEL HALL, DETAIL OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. INTERIOR, DOUBLE STAIRWAY LEADING TO MODEL HALL, DETAIL OF ONE FLIGHT (5 x 7 negative; 8 x 10 print) - Patent Office Building, Bounded by Seventh, Ninth, F & G Streets, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  18. 45. MISSISSIPPI BASIN MODEL AT CLINTON SUBSTATION. DETAIL OF 20 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. MISSISSIPPI BASIN MODEL AT CLINTON SUBSTATION. DETAIL OF 20 GALLON PER MINUTE INFLOW CONTROLLER AND DIFFERENTIAL PRESSURE REGULATOR. - Waterways Experiment Station, Hydraulics Laboratory, Halls Ferry Road, 2 miles south of I-20, Vicksburg, Warren County, MS

  19. 46. MISSISSIPPI BASIN MODEL AT CLINTON SUBSTATION. DETAIL OF INFLOW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    46. MISSISSIPPI BASIN MODEL AT CLINTON SUBSTATION. DETAIL OF INFLOW CONTROLLER WITH ORIGINAL CAPACITOR BANK. - Waterways Experiment Station, Hydraulics Laboratory, Halls Ferry Road, 2 miles south of I-20, Vicksburg, Warren County, MS

  20. 44. MISSISSIPPI BASIN MODEL AT CLINTON SUBSTATION. DETAIL OF 20 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. MISSISSIPPI BASIN MODEL AT CLINTON SUBSTATION. DETAIL OF 20 GALLON PER MINUTE INFLOW CONTROLLER AND RELAY PANEL. - Waterways Experiment Station, Hydraulics Laboratory, Halls Ferry Road, 2 miles south of I-20, Vicksburg, Warren County, MS

  1. 17. SIDE VIEW, DETAIL, MODEL 15 VANE RELAY, NEW HAVEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. SIDE VIEW, DETAIL, MODEL 15 VANE RELAY, NEW HAVEN SIGNAL SHOP - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Automatic Signalization System, Long Island Sound shoreline between Stamford & New Haven, Stamford, Fairfield County, CT

  2. 3. DETAIL VIEW OF DIRECT DRIVE STERLING 'DOLPHIN T' MODEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. DETAIL VIEW OF DIRECT DRIVE STERLING 'DOLPHIN T' MODEL 4 CYLINDER, GASOLINE TRACTOR-TYPE ENGINE WITH FALKBIBBY FLEXIBLE COUPLING - Central Railroad of New Jersey, Newark Bay Lift Bridge, Spanning Newark Bay, Newark, Essex County, NJ

  3. A numerical model for durotaxis.

    PubMed

    Stefanoni, Filippo; Ventre, Maurizio; Mollica, Francesco; Netti, Paolo A

    2011-07-07

    Cell migration is a phenomenon that is involved in several physiological processes. In the absence of external guiding factors it shares analogies with Brownian motion. The presence of biochemical or biophysical cues, on the other hand, can influence cell migration transforming it in a biased random movement. Recent studies have shown that different cell types are able to recognise the mechanical properties of the substratum over which they move and that these properties direct the motion through a process called durotaxis. In this work a 2D mathematical model for the description of this phenomenon is presented. The model is based on the Langevin equation that has been modified to take into account the local mechanical properties of the substratum perceived by the cells. Numerical simulations of the model provide individual cell tracks, whose characteristics can be compared with experimental observations directly. The present model is solved for two important cases: an isotropic substratum, to check that random motility is recovered as a subcase, and a biphasic substratum, to investigate durotaxis. The degree of agreement is satisfactory in both cases. The model can be a useful tool for quantifying relevant parameters of cell migration as a function of the substratum mechanical properties. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Three-dimensional direct numerical simulation of turbulent lean premixed methane combustion with detailed kinetics

    DOE PAGES

    Aspden, A. J.; Day, M. S.; Bell, J. B.

    2016-02-18

    The interaction of maintained homogeneous isotropic turbulence with lean premixed methane flames is investigated using direct numerical simulation with detailed chemistry. The conditions are chosen to be close to those found in atmospheric laboratory experiments. As the Karlovitz number is increased from 1 to 36, the preheat zone becomes thickened, while the reaction zone remains largely unaffected. A negative correlation of fuel consumption with mean flame surface curvature is observed. With increasing turbulence intensity, the chemical composition in the preheat zone tends towards that of an idealised unity Lewis number flame, which we argue is the onset of the transitionmore » to distributed burning, and the response of the various chemical species is shown to fall into broad classes. Smaller-scale simulations are used to isolate the specific role of species diffusion at high turbulent intensities. Diffusion of atomic hydrogen is shown to be related to the observed curvature correlations, but does not have significant consequential impact on the thickening of the preheat zone. It is also shown that susceptibility of the preheat zone to thickening by turbulence is related to the 'global' Lewis number (the Lewis number of the deficient reactant); higher global Lewis number flames tend to be more prone to thickening.« less

  5. Three-dimensional direct numerical simulation of turbulent lean premixed methane combustion with detailed kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Aspden, A. J.; Day, M. S.; Bell, J. B.

    2016-02-18

    The interaction of maintained homogeneous isotropic turbulence with lean premixed methane flames is investigated using direct numerical simulation with detailed chemistry. The conditions are chosen to be close to those found in atmospheric laboratory experiments. As the Karlovitz number is increased from 1 to 36, the preheat zone becomes thickened, while the reaction zone remains largely unaffected. A negative correlation of fuel consumption with mean flame surface curvature is observed. With increasing turbulence intensity, the chemical composition in the preheat zone tends towards that of an idealised unity Lewis number flame, which we argue is the onset of the transition to distributed burning, and the response of the various chemical species is shown to fall into broad classes. Smaller-scale simulations are used to isolate the specific role of species diffusion at high turbulent intensities. Diffusion of atomic hydrogen is shown to be related to the observed curvature correlations, but does not have significant consequential impact on the thickening of the preheat zone. It is also shown that susceptibility of the preheat zone to thickening by turbulence is related to the 'global' Lewis number (the Lewis number of the deficient reactant); higher global Lewis number flames tend to be more prone to thickening.

  6. A mass conserving level set method for detailed numerical simulation of liquid atomization

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Kun; Shao, Changxiao; Yang, Yue; Fan, Jianren

    2015-10-01

    An improved mass conserving level set method for detailed numerical simulations of liquid atomization is developed to address the issue of mass loss in the existing level set method. This method introduces a mass remedy procedure based on the local curvature at the interface, and in principle, can ensure the absolute mass conservation of the liquid phase in the computational domain. Three benchmark cases, including Zalesak's disk, a drop deforming in a vortex field, and the binary drop head-on collision, are simulated to validate the present method, and the excellent agreement with exact solutions or experimental results is achieved. It is shown that the present method is able to capture the complex interface with second-order accuracy and negligible additional computational cost. The present method is then applied to study more complex flows, such as a drop impacting on a liquid film and the swirling liquid sheet atomization, which again, demonstrates the advantages of mass conservation and the capability to represent the interface accurately.

  7. Numerical experiments in geomagnetic modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cain, Joseph C.; Holter, Bill; Sandee, Daan

    1990-01-01

    Numerical tests were made, using least squares fitting of a spherical harmonic model, to a selection of Magsat data to determine the practical limits of this technique with modern computers. The resulting (M102189) model, whose coefficients were adjusted up to n = 50, was compared with M07AV6, a previous model which used least squares (on vector data) for coefficients up to n = 29, and Gauss-Legendre quadrature (on Z residuals) to adjust the coefficients up to n = 63. For the new least squares adjustment to n = 50 a condition number of 115 was obtained for the solution matrix, with a resulting precision of 11 significant figures. The M102189 model shows a lower and more Gaussian residual distribution than did M07AV6, though the Gaussian envelope fits to the residual distributions, even for the scalar field, gives "standard deviations' never lower than 6 nT, a factor of three higher than the estimated Magsat observational errors. Ionospheric currents are noted to have a significant effect on the coefficients of the internal potential functions.

  8. HIERARCHICAL METHODOLOGY FOR MODELING HYDROGEN STORAGE SYSTEMS PART II: DETAILED MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, B; Donald L. Anton, D

    2008-12-22

    There is significant interest in hydrogen storage systems that employ a media which either adsorbs, absorbs or reacts with hydrogen in a nearly reversible manner. In any media based storage system the rate of hydrogen uptake and the system capacity is governed by a number of complex, coupled physical processes. To design and evaluate such storage systems, a comprehensive methodology was developed, consisting of a hierarchical sequence of models that range from scoping calculations to numerical models that couple reaction kinetics with heat and mass transfer for both the hydrogen charging and discharging phases. The scoping models were presented in Part I [1] of this two part series of papers. This paper describes a detailed numerical model that integrates the phenomena occurring when hydrogen is charged and discharged. A specific application of the methodology is made to a system using NaAlH{sub 4} as the storage media.

  9. Benefits of detailed models of muscle activation and mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehman, S. L.; Stark, L.

    1981-01-01

    Recent biophysical and physiological studies identified some of the detailed mechanisms involved in excitation-contraction coupling, muscle contraction, and deactivation. Mathematical models incorporating these mechanisms allow independent estimates of key parameters, direct interplay between basic muscle research and the study of motor control, and realistic model behaviors, some of which are not accessible to previous, simpler, models. The existence of previously unmodeled behaviors has important implications for strategies of motor control and identification of neural signals. New developments in the analysis of differential equations make the more detailed models feasible for simulation in realistic experimental situations.

  10. Numerical Modeling of Nanoelectronic Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimeck, Gerhard; Oyafuso, Fabiano; Bowen, R. Chris; Boykin, Timothy

    2003-01-01

    Nanoelectronic Modeling 3-D (NEMO 3-D) is a computer program for numerical modeling of the electronic structure properties of a semiconductor device that is embodied in a crystal containing as many as 16 million atoms in an arbitrary configuration and that has overall dimensions of the order of tens of nanometers. The underlying mathematical model represents the quantummechanical behavior of the device resolved to the atomistic level of granularity. The system of electrons in the device is represented by a sparse Hamiltonian matrix that contains hundreds of millions of terms. NEMO 3-D solves the matrix equation on a Beowulf-class cluster computer, by use of a parallel-processing matrix vector multiplication algorithm coupled to a Lanczos and/or Rayleigh-Ritz algorithm that solves for eigenvalues. In a recent update of NEMO 3-D, a new strain treatment, parameterized for bulk material properties of GaAs and InAs, was developed for two tight-binding submodels. The utility of the NEMO 3-D was demonstrated in an atomistic analysis of the effects of disorder in alloys and, in particular, in bulk In(x)Ga(l-x)As and in In0.6Ga0.4As quantum dots.

  11. Detailed characteristics of drop-laden mixing layers: Large eddy simulation predictions compared to direct numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okong'o, Nora; Leboissetier, Anthony; Bellan, Josette

    2008-10-01

    Results are compared from direct numerical simulation (DNS) and large eddy simulation (LES) of a temporal mixing layer laden with evaporating drops to assess the ability of LES to reproduce detailed characteristics of DNS. The LES used computational drops, each of which represented eight physical drops, and a reduced flow field resolution using a grid spacing four times larger than that of the DNS. The LES also used models for the filtered source terms, which express the coupling of the drops with the flow, and for the unresolved subgrid-scale (SGS) fluxes of species mass, momentum, and enthalpy. The LESs were conducted using one of three different SGS-flux models: dynamic-coefficient gradient (GRD), dynamic-coefficient Smagorinsky (SMD), and constant-coefficient scale similarity (SSC). The comparison of the LES with the filtered-and-coarsened (FC) DNS considered detailed aspects of the flow that are of interest in ignition or full combustion. All LESs captured the largest-scale vortex, the global amount of vapor emanating from the drops, and the overall size distribution of the drops. All LESs tended to underpredict the global amount of irreversible entropy production (dissipation). The SMD model was found unable to capture either the global or local vorticity variation and had minimal small-scale activity in dynamic and thermodynamic variables compared to the FC-DNS. The SMD model was also deficient in predicting the spatial distribution of drops and of the dissipation. In contrast, the GRD and SSC models did mimic the small-scale activity of the FC-DNS and the spatial distribution of drops and of the dissipation. Therefore, the GRD and SSC models are recommended, while the SMD model seems inappropriate for combustion or other problems where the local activity must be predicted.

  12. Geometric Modelling of Tree Roots with Different Levels of Detail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero Iñiguez, J. I.

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents a geometric approach for modelling tree roots with different Levels of Detail, suitable for analysis of the tree anchoring, potentially occupied underground space, interaction with urban elements and damage produced and taken in the built-in environment. Three types of tree roots are considered to cover several species: tap root, heart shaped root and lateral roots. Shrubs and smaller plants are not considered, however, a similar approach can be considered if the information is available for individual species. The geometrical approach considers the difficulties of modelling the actual roots, which are dynamic and almost opaque to direct observation, proposing generalized versions. For each type of root, different geometric models are considered to capture the overall shape of the root, a simplified block model, and a planar or surface projected version. Lower detail versions are considered as compatibility version for 2D systems while higher detail models are suitable for 3D analysis and visualization. The proposed levels of detail are matched with CityGML Levels of Detail, enabling both analysis and aesthetic views for urban modelling.

  13. Numerical simulation and sensitivity analysis of detailed soot particle size distribution in laminar premixed ethylene flames

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Jasdeep; Patterson, Robert I.A.; Kraft, Markus; Wang, Hai

    2006-04-15

    In this paper, the prediction of a soot model [J. Appel, H. Bockhorn, M. Frenklach, Combust. Flame 121 (2000) 122-136] is compared to a recently published set of highly detailed soot particle size distributions [B. Zhao, Z. Yang, Z. Li, M.V. Johnston, H. Wang, Proc. Combust. Inst. 30 (2005)]. A stochastic approach is used to obtain soot particle size distributions (PSDs). The key features of the measured and simulated particle size distributions are identified and used as a simple way of comparing PSDs. The sensitivity of the soot PSDs to the parameters defining parts of the soot model, such as soot inception, particle and PAH collision efficiency and enhancement, and surface activity is investigated. Incepting soot particle size is found to have a very significant effect on the small-size end of the PSDs, especially the position of the trough for a bimodal soot PSDs. A new model for the decay in the surface activity is proposed in which the activity of the soot particle depends only on the history of that particle and the local temperature in the flame. This is a first attempt to use local flame variables to define the surface aging which has major impact on the prediction of the large-size end of the PSDs. Using these modifications to the soot model it is possible to improve the agreement between some of the points of interest in the simulated and measured PSDs. The paper achieves the task to help advance the soot models to predict soot PSD in addition to soot volume fraction and number density, which has been the focus of the literature. (author)

  14. 43. MISSISSIPPI BASIN MODEL AT CLINTON SUBSTATION. DETAIL OF 200 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. MISSISSIPPI BASIN MODEL AT CLINTON SUBSTATION. DETAIL OF 200 GALLON PER MINUTE INFLOW CONTROLLER WITH NEW PROGRAMMER, LOCATED ALONG THE NATCHEZ SECTION OF THE MODEL. NOTE CONTROL BUILDING AT LEFT. - Waterways Experiment Station, Hydraulics Laboratory, Halls Ferry Road, 2 miles south of I-20, Vicksburg, Warren County, MS

  15. Modeling Biodegradation and Reactive Transport: Analytical and Numerical Models

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Y; Glascoe, L

    2005-06-09

    The computational modeling of the biodegradation of contaminated groundwater systems accounting for biochemical reactions coupled to contaminant transport is a valuable tool for both the field engineer/planner with limited computational resources and the expert computational researcher less constrained by time and computer power. There exists several analytical and numerical computer models that have been and are being developed to cover the practical needs put forth by users to fulfill this spectrum of computational demands. Generally, analytical models provide rapid and convenient screening tools running on very limited computational power, while numerical models can provide more detailed information with consequent requirements of greater computational time and effort. While these analytical and numerical computer models can provide accurate and adequate information to produce defensible remediation strategies, decisions based on inadequate modeling output or on over-analysis can have costly and risky consequences. In this chapter we consider both analytical and numerical modeling approaches to biodegradation and reactive transport. Both approaches are discussed and analyzed in terms of achieving bioremediation goals, recognizing that there is always a tradeoff between computational cost and the resolution of simulated systems.

  16. The Effects of Highly Detailed Urban Roughness Parameters on a Sea-Breeze Numerical Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varquez, Alvin Christopher G.; Nakayoshi, Makoto; Kanda, Manabu

    2015-03-01

    We consider the effects of detailed urban roughness parameters on a sea-breeze simulation. An urban roughness database, constructed using a new aerodynamic parametrization derived from large-eddy simulations, was incorporated as a surface boundary condition in the advanced Weather Research and Forecasting model. The zero-plane displacement and aerodynamic roughness length at several densely built-up urban grids were three times larger than conventional values due to the consideration of building-height variability. A comparison between simulations from the modified model and its default version, which uses uniform roughness parameters within a conventional method, was conducted for a 2-month period during summer. Results showed a significant improvement in the simulation of surface wind speed but not with temperature. From the 2-month study period, a day with an evident sea-breeze penetration was selected and simulated at higher temporal resolution. Sea-breeze penetration weakened and was more delayed over urbanized areas. The slow sea-breeze penetration also lessened heat advection downwind allowing stronger turbulent mixing and a deeper boundary layer above urban areas. Horizontal wind-speed reduction due to the increased urban surface drag reached heights of several hundreds of metres due to the strong convection.

  17. Numerical simulations for detailed airflow dynamics in a human nasal cavity.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jian; Inthavong, Kiao; Tu, Jiyuan; Wang, Simin

    2008-04-30

    Nasal physiology is dependent on the physical structure of the nose. Individual aspects of the nasal cavity such as the geometry and flow rate collectively affect nasal function such as the filtration of foreign particles by bringing inspired air into contact with mucous-coated walls, humidifying and warming the air before it enters the lungs and the sense of smell. To better understand the physiology of the nose, this study makes use of CFD methods and post-processing techniques to present flow patterns between the left and right nasal cavities and compared the results with experimental and numerical data that are available in literature. The CFD simulation adopted a laminar steady flow for flow rates of 7.5 L/min and 15 L/min. General agreement of gross flow features were found that included high velocities in the constrictive nasal valve area region, high flow close to the septum walls, and vortex formations posterior to the nasal valve and olfactory regions. The differences in the left and right cavities were explored and the effects it had on the flow field were discussed especially in the nasal valve and middle turbinate regions. Geometrical differences were also compared with available models.

  18. Towards cleaner combustion engines through groundbreaking detailed chemical kinetic models

    PubMed Central

    Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique; Blurock, Edward; Bounaceur, Roda; Fournet, René; Glaude, Pierre-Alexandre; Herbinet, Olivier; Sirjean, Baptiste; Warth, V.

    2013-01-01

    In the context of limiting the environmental impact of transportation, this paper reviews new directions which are being followed in the development of more predictive and more accurate detailed chemical kinetic models for the combustion of fuels. In the first part, the performance of current models, especially in terms of the prediction of pollutant formation, is evaluated. In the next parts, recent methods and ways to improve these models are described. An emphasis is given on the development of detailed models based on elementary reactions, on the production of the related thermochemical and kinetic parameters, and on the experimental techniques available to produce the data necessary to evaluate model predictions under well defined conditions. PMID:21597604

  19. Towards cleaner combustion engines through groundbreaking detailed chemical kinetic models.

    PubMed

    Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique; Blurock, Edward; Bounaceur, Roda; Fournet, René; Glaude, Pierre-Alexandre; Herbinet, Olivier; Sirjean, Baptiste; Warth, V

    2011-09-01

    In the context of limiting the environmental impact of transportation, this critical review discusses new directions which are being followed in the development of more predictive and more accurate detailed chemical kinetic models for the combustion of fuels. In the first part, the performance of current models, especially in terms of the prediction of pollutant formation, is evaluated. In the next parts, recent methods and ways to improve these models are described. An emphasis is given on the development of detailed models based on elementary reactions, on the production of the related thermochemical and kinetic parameters, and on the experimental techniques available to produce the data necessary to evaluate model predictions under well defined conditions (212 references). This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  20. Application of Detailed Chemical Kinetics to Combustion Instability Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-04

    Briefing Charts 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) Nov 2015 – Jan 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Application of Detailed Chemical Kinetics to Combustion Instability...Chemical Kinetics to Combustion Instability Modeling Matt Harvazinski, Doug Talley, Venke Sankaran Air Force Research Laboratory Edwards AFB, CA...Distribution A: approved for public release; distribution unlimited. 2 Challenges of Combustion Instability Damaged engine injector faceplate

  1. Dynamic Models of Detailed and Aggregate Production Networks.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-01

    Quarterly-, 20 (4), 767-784 Silver E.A., Peterson R. (1985) Decision Systems for Inventory Management and Production Control John Wiley & Sons, New-York...Committee ABSTRACT " A decision support system for the management of a production organization must include an explicit model or models of the production...solution techniques . The reader should note that these levels of management are rarely interested in detailed production schedules per se. Instead

  2. A time dependent anatomically detailed model of cardiac conduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saxberg, B. E.; Grumbach, M. P.; Cohen, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    In order to understand the determinants of transitions in cardiac electrical activity from normal patterns to dysrhythmias such as ventricular fibrillation, we are constructing an anatomically and physiologically detailed finite element simulation of myocardial electrical propagation. A healthy human heart embedded in paraffin was sectioned to provide a detailed anatomical substrate for model calculations. The simulation of propagation includes anisotropy in conduction velocity due to fiber orientation as well as gradients in conduction velocities, absolute and relative refractory periods, action potential duration and electrotonic influence of nearest neighbors. The model also includes changes in the behaviour of myocardial tissue as a function of the past local activity. With this model, we can examine the significance of fiber orientation and time dependence of local propagation parameters on dysrhythmogenesis.

  3. A time dependent anatomically detailed model of cardiac conduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saxberg, B. E.; Grumbach, M. P.; Cohen, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    In order to understand the determinants of transitions in cardiac electrical activity from normal patterns to dysrhythmias such as ventricular fibrillation, we are constructing an anatomically and physiologically detailed finite element simulation of myocardial electrical propagation. A healthy human heart embedded in paraffin was sectioned to provide a detailed anatomical substrate for model calculations. The simulation of propagation includes anisotropy in conduction velocity due to fiber orientation as well as gradients in conduction velocities, absolute and relative refractory periods, action potential duration and electrotonic influence of nearest neighbors. The model also includes changes in the behaviour of myocardial tissue as a function of the past local activity. With this model, we can examine the significance of fiber orientation and time dependence of local propagation parameters on dysrhythmogenesis.

  4. A Comparison of Detailed Level and Superconfiguration Models of Neon

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, S B; Fournier, K B; Bauche-Arnoult, C; Bauche, J; Peyrusse, O

    2005-01-03

    The superconfiguration (SC) approach to collisional-radiative modeling can significantly decrease the computational demands of finding non-LTE level populations in complex systems. However, it has not yet been fully determined whether the statistical averaging of SC models leads to a significant loss of accuracy. The present work compares results from two independent models: a detailed-level accounting (DLA) model based on HULLAC data and the SC model MOST. The relatively simple level structures of the K- and L-shell ions of the neon test system ensure a tractable number of levels in the DLA model but challenge the statistical assumptions of the SC approach. Nonetheless, we find fair agreement between the two models for average ion charges, SC populations, and various effective temperatures.

  5. NTP system simulation and detailed nuclear engine modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anghaie, Samim

    1993-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) & detailed nuclear engine modeling; modeling and engineering simulation of nuclear thermal rocket systems; nuclear thermal rocket simulation system; INSPI-NTVR core axial flow profiles; INSPI-NTRV core axial flow profiles; specific impulse vs. chamber pressure; turbine pressure ratio vs. chamber pressure; NERVA core axial flow profiles; P&W XNR2000 core axial flow profiles; pump pressure rise vs. chamber pressure; streamline of jet-induced flow in cylindrical chamber; flow pattern of a jet-induced flow in a chamber; and radiative heat transfer models.

  6. Transient Numerical Modeling of Catalytic Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Struk, Peter M.; Dietrich, Daniel L.; Miller, Fletcher J.; T'ien, James S.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a transient model of catalytic combustion suitable for isolated channels and monolith reactors. The model is a lumped two-phase (gas and solid) model where the gas phase is quasi-steady relative to the transient solid. Axial diffusion is neglected in the gas phase; lateral diffusion, however, is accounted for using transfer coefficients. The solid phase includes axial heat conduction and external heat loss due to convection and radiation. The combustion process utilizes detailed gas and surface reaction models. The gas-phase model becomes a system of stiff ordinary differential equations while the solid phase reduces, after discretization, into a system of stiff ordinary differential-algebraic equations. The time evolution of the system came from alternating integrations of the quasi-steady gas and transient solid. This work outlines the numerical model and presents some sensitivity studies on important parameters including internal transfer coefficients, catalytic surface site density, and external heat-loss (if applicable). The model is compared to two experiments using CO fuel: (1) steady-state conversion through an isothermal platinum (Pt) tube and (2) transient propagation of a catalytic reaction inside a small Pt tube. The model requires internal mass-transfer resistance to match the experiments at lower residence times. Under mass-transport limited conditions, the model reasonably predicted exit conversion using global mass-transfer coefficients. Near light-off, the model results did not match the experiment precisely even after adjustment of mass-transfer coefficients. Agreement improved for the first case after adjusting the surface kinetics such that the net rate of CO adsorption increased compared to O2. The CO / O2 surface mechanism came from a sub-set of reactions in a popular CH4 / O2 mechanism. For the second case, predictions improved for lean conditions with increased external heat loss or adjustment of the kinetics as in the

  7. Oblique Impact and Its Ejecta: Numerical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemieva, N.; Pierazzo, E.

    2003-01-01

    It is well known that impact events strike planetary surfaces at an angle from the surface. Assuming an isotropic flux of projectiles, probability theory indicates that the most likely angle of impact is 45 regardless of the body's gravitational field. While crater rims appear circular down to low impact angles, the distribution of ejecta around the crater is sensitive to the angle of impact and currently serves as the best guide to obliquity of impacts. A fair amount of numerical modeling of vertical impacts has been carried out from the early 60-s to the present time and references herein]. In vertical impacts, the axial symmetry of the process allows the simplification of the model to two dimensions (2D). Oblique impact modeling requires 3D hydro-codes and, hence, much more powerful computers. The first documented detailed oblique impact studies were carried out at Sandia National Labs' supercomputers less than 10 years ago to describe the 1994 collision of comet SL9 with Jupiter. Since then, substantial progress in computer science has made 3D modeling a reachable objective for the scientific community.

  8. Numerical Modelling of Electrical Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durán-Olivencia, F. J.; Pontiga, F.; Castellanos, A.

    2014-03-01

    The problem of the propagation of an electrical discharge between a spherical electrode and a plane has been solved by means of finite element methods (FEM) using a fluid approximation and assuming weak ionization and local equilibrium with the electric field. The numerical simulation of this type of problems presents the usual difficulties of convection-diffusion-reaction problems, in addition to those associated with the nonlinearities of the charged species velocities, the formation of steep gradients of the electric field and particle densities, and the coexistence of very different temporal scales. The effect of using different temporal discretizations for the numerical integration of the corresponding system of partial differential equations will be here investigated. In particular, the so-called θ-methods will be used, which allows to implement implicit, semi-explicit and fully explicit schemes in a simple way.

  9. Numerical modelling of hydration reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrijmoed, Johannes C.; John, Timm

    2017-04-01

    Mineral reactions are generally accompanied by volume changes. Observations in rocks and thin section indicate that this often occurred by replacement reactions involving a fluid phase. Frequently, the volume of the original rock or mineral seems to be conserved. If the density of the solid reaction products is higher than the reactants, the associated solid volume decrease generates space for a fluid phase. In other words, porosity is created. The opposite is true for an increase in solid volume during reaction, which leads to a porosity reduction. This slows down and may even stop the reaction if it needs fluid as a reactant. Understanding the progress of reactions and their rates is important because reaction generally changes geophysical and rock mechanical properties which will therefore affect geodynamical processes and seismic properties. We studied the case of hydration of eclogite to blueschist in a subduction zone setting. Eclogitized pillow basalt structures from the Tian-Shan orogeny are transformed to blueschist on the rims of the pillow (van der Straaten et al., 2008). Fluid pathways existed between the pillow structures. The preferred hypothesis of blueschist formation is to supply the fluid for hydration from the pillow margins progressing inward. Using numerical modelling we simulate this coupled reaction-diffusion process. Porosity and fluid pressure evolution are coupled to local thermodynamic equilibrium and density changes. The first rim of blueschist that forms around the eclogite pillow increases volume to such a degree that the system is clogged and the reaction stops. Nevertheless, the field evidence suggests the blueschist formation continued. To prevent the system from clogging, a high incoming pore fluid pressure on the pillow boundaries is needed along with removal of mass from the system to accommodate the volume changes. The only other possibility is to form blueschist from any remaining fluid stored in the core of the pillow

  10. Numerical Experiments on the Detailed Energy Conversion and Spectrum Studies in a Corona Current Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Lei; Lin, Jun; Mei, Zhixing; Li, Yan

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we study the energy conversion and spectra in a corona current sheet (CS) by 2.5 dimensional MHD numerical simulations. Numerical results show that many Petschek-like fine structures with slow-mode shocks mediated by plasmoid instabilities develop during the magnetic reconnection process. The termination shocks can also be formed above the primary magnetic island and at the head of secondary islands. These shocks play important roles in generating thermal energy in a corona CS. For a numerical simulation with initial conditions close to the solar corona environment, the ratio of the generated thermal energy to the total dissipated magnetic energy is around 1/5 before secondary islands appear. After secondary islands appear, the generated thermal energy starts to increase sharply and this ratio can reach a value of about 3/5. In an environment with a relatively lower plasma density and plasma β, the plasma can be heated to a much higher temperature. After secondary islands appear, the one-dimensional energy spectra along the CS do not behave as a simple power law and the spectrum index increases with the wave number. The average spectrum index for the magnetic energy spectrum along the CS is about 1.8. The two-dimensional spectra intuitively show that part of the high energy is cascaded to large kx and ky space after secondary islands appear. The plasmoid distribution function calculated from numerical simulations behaves as a power law closer to f(\\psi )˜ {\\psi }-1 in the intermediate ψ regime. By using {η }{eff}={v}{inflow}\\cdot L, the effective magnetic diffusivity is estimated to be about 1011 ˜ 1012 m2 s-1.

  11. Detailed modeling of cluster galaxies in free-form lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    The main goal of the Frontier Fields is to characterize the population of high redshift galaxies that are gravitationally lensed and magnified by foreground massive galaxy clusters. The magnification received by lensed images has to be accurately quantified in order to derive the correct science results. The magnification is in turn computed from lens models, which are constructed from various constraints, most commonly the positions and redshifts of multiply-lensed galaxies.The locations and magnification of multiple images that appear near cluster galaxies are very sensitive to the mass distribution of those individual galaxies. In current free-form lens models, they are at best crudely approximated by arbitrary mass halos and are usually being completely neglected. Given sufficient free parameters and iterations, such models may be highly consistent but their predictive power would be rather limited. This shortcoming is particularly pronounced in light of the recent discovery of the first multiply-lensed supernova in the Frontier Fields cluster MACSJ1149. The proximity of its images to cluster galaxies mandates detailed modeling on galaxy-scales, where free-form methods solely based on grid solutions simply fail.We present a hybrid free-form lens model of Abell 2744, which for the first time incorporates a detailed mass component modeled by GALFIT that accurately captures the stellar light distribution of the hundred brightest cluster galaxies. The model better reproduces the image positions than a previous version, which modeled cluster galaxies with simplistic NFW halos. Curiously, this improvement is found in all but system 2, which has two radial images appearing around the BCG. Despite its complex light profile is being captured by GALFIT, the persistent discrepancies suggest considering mass distributions that may be largely offset from the stellar light distribution.

  12. Modeling Marine Stratocumulus with a Detailed Microphysical Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chunsheng; Ishizaka, Yutaka

    2004-02-01

    A one-dimensional 3rd-order turbulence closure model with size-resolved microphysics and radiative transfer has been developed for investigating aerosol and cloud interactions of the stratocumulus-topped marine boundary layer. A new method is presented for coupling between the dynamical model and the microphysical model. This scheme allows the liquid water related correlations to be directly calculated rather than parameterized. On 21 April 2001, a marine stratocumulus was observed by the Caesar aircraft over the west Pacific Rim south of Japan during the 2001 APEX/ACE-Asia field measurements. This cloud is simulated by the model we present here. The model results show that the general features of the stratocumulus-topped marine boundary layer predicted by the model are in agreement with the measurements. A new onboard cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) counter provides not only total CCN number concentration (as the traditional CCN counters do at a certain supersaturation) but also the CCN size distribution information. Using these CCN data, model responses to different CCN initial concentrations are examined. The model results are consistent with both observations and expectations. The numerical results show that the cloud microphysical properties are changed fundamentally by different initial CCN concentrations but the cloud liquid water content does not differ significantly. Different initial CCN loadings have large impacts on the evolution of cloud microstructure and radiation transfer while they have a modest effect on thermodynamics. Increased CCN concentration leads to significant decrease of cloud effective radius.

  13. Numerical models for the evaluation of geothermal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bodvarsson, G.S.; Pruess, K.; Lippmann, M.J.

    1986-08-01

    We have carried out detailed simulations of various fields in the USA (Bada, New Mexico; Heber, California); Mexico (Cerro Prieto); Iceland (Krafla); and Kenya (Olkaria). These simulation studies have illustrated the usefulness of numerical models for the overall evaluation of geothermal systems. The methodology for modeling the behavior of geothermal systems, different approaches to geothermal reservoir modeling and how they can be applied in comprehensive evaluation work are discussed.

  14. Accuracy details in realistic CFD modeling of an industrial centrifugal pump in direct and reverse modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Páscoa, J. C.; Silva, F. J.; Pinheiro, J. S.; Martins, D. J.

    2010-12-01

    Numerical computation of the flowfield inside a pump is herein used as a numerical laboratory, subject to the limitations of modeling assumptions and to experimental verification. A numerical computation of the flow inside a real industrial centrifugal pump is performed that includes a very sophisticated geometry. Conversely to other computations, in this test case no simplification of the geometry was introduced. Numerical computations are obtained using Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model. A detailed analysis of the turbulent flowstructure is performed for the design point and two off design conditions. Additional computations were performed in order to compare the numerical and experimental pump characteristics; these were obtained under normalized testing conditions. Further computations are presented for the pump working in reverse turbine mode (PAT). Detailed analyses of the flow allow a comparison of the internal flow losses when the pump is operating in direct and reverse mode. This is also useful to help in the selection of an adequate pump geometry that can work in both modes with best efficiency.

  15. Numerical Modeling in Geodynamics: Success, Failure and Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail-Zadeh, A.

    2005-12-01

    tuning model variables are greater than two, test carefully the effect of each of the variables on the modeled phenomenon. Remember: With four exponents I can fit an elephant (E. Fermi, physicist). (vii) Make your numerical model as accurate as possible, but never put the aim to reach a great accuracy: Undue precision of computations is the first symptom of mathematical illiteracy (N. Krylov, mathematician). How complex should be a numerical model? A model which images any detail of the reality is as useful as a map of scale 1:1 (J. Robinson, economist). This message is quite important for geoscientists, who study numerical models of complex geodynamical processes. I believe that geoscientists will never create a model of the real Earth dynamics, but we should try to model the dynamics such a way to simulate basic geophysical processes and phenomena. Does a particular model have a predictive power? Each numerical model has a predictive power, otherwise the model is useless. The predictability of the model varies with its complexity. Remember that a solution to the numerical model is an approximate solution to the equations, which have been chosen in believe that they describe dynamic processes of the Earth. Hence a numerical model predicts dynamics of the Earth as well as the mathematical equations describe this dynamics. What methodological advances are still needed for testable geodynamic modeling? Inverse (time-reverse) numerical modeling and data assimilation are new methodologies in geodynamics. The inverse modeling can allow to test geodynamic models forward in time using restored (from present-day observations) initial conditions instead of unknown conditions.

  16. Crack propagation modelling for high strength steel welded structural details

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mecséri, B. J.; Kövesdi, B.

    2017-05-01

    Nowadays the barrier of applying HSS (High Strength Steel) material in bridge structures is their low fatigue strength related to yield strength. This paper focuses on the fatigue behaviour of a structural details (a gusset plate connection) made from NSS and HSS material, which is frequently used in bridges in Hungary. An experimental research program is carried out at the Budapest University of Technology and Economics to investigate the fatigue lifetime of this structural detail type through the same test specimens made from S235 and S420 steel grades. The main aim of the experimental research program is to study the differences in the crack propagation and the fatigue lifetime between normal and high strength steel structures. Based on the observed fatigue crack pattern the main direction and velocity of the crack propagation is determined. In parallel to the tests finite element model (FEM) are also developed, which model can handle the crack propagation. Using the measured strain data in the tests and the calculated values from the FE model, the approximation of the material parameters of the Paris law are calculated step-by-step, and their calculated values are evaluated. The same material properties are determined for NSS and also for HSS specimens as well, and the differences are discussed. In the current paper, the results of the experiments, the calculation method of the material parameters and the calculated values are introduced.

  17. Detailed signal model of coherent wind measurement lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yuechao; Li, Sining; Lu, Wei

    2016-11-01

    Lidar is short for light detection and ranging, which is a tool to help measuring some useful information of atmosphere. In the recent years, more and more attention was paid to the research of wind measurement by lidar. Because the accurate wind information can be used not only in weather report, but also the safety guarantee of the airplanes. In this paper, a more detailed signal model of wind measurement lidar is proposed. It includes the laser transmitting part which describes the broadening of the spectral, the laser attenuation in the atmosphere, the backscattering signal and the detected signal. A Voigt profile is used to describe the broadening of the transmitting laser spectral, which is the most common situation that is the convolution of different broadening line shapes. The laser attenuation includes scattering and absorption. We use a Rayleigh scattering model and partially-Correlated quadratic-Velocity-Dependent Hard-Collision (pCqSDHC) model to describe the molecule scattering and absorption. When calculate the particles scattering and absorption, the Gaussian particles model is used to describe the shape of particles. Because of the Doppler Effect occurred between the laser and atmosphere, the wind velocity can be calculated by the backscattering signal. Then, a two parameter Weibull distribution is used to describe the wind filed, so that we can use it to do the future work. After all the description, the signal model of coherent wind measurement lidar is decided. And some of the simulation is given by MATLAB. This signal model can describe the system more accurate and more detailed, so that the following work will be easier and more efficient.

  18. Detailed numerical studies of space charge effects in an FEL RF gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cee, R.; Krassilnikov, M.; Setzer, S.; Weiland, T.; Novokhatski, A.

    2002-05-01

    The production of short bunches with low emittance is a key issue for the successful operation of an SASE-FEL as proposed by the TESLA collaboration (TESLA Technical design report, DESY 2001-011, Hamburg, 2001). In this paper we present the results of detailed MAFIA TS-2 (CST GmbH, Büdinger Strasse 2a, D-64289 Darmstadt) simulations for the FEL RF-gun revealing the main physical effects leading to emittance growth. The simulations prove that the transverse emittance growth can mainly be observed close to the cathode area. This is caused by the non-linear space charge forces acting inside the bunch during the injection process. For the application of an emittance compensation scheme (Nucl. Instr. and Meth. 285 (1989) 313) the slice emittance is of significant importance. Therefore, a wide range of parameters for the photo cathode laser has been investigated in order to find an appropriate operation point.

  19. Survey of numerical electrostimulation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reilly, J. Patrick

    2016-06-01

    This paper evaluates results of a survey of electrostimulation models of myelinated nerve. Participants were asked to determine thresholds of excitation for 18 cases involving different characteristics of the neuron, the stimulation waveform, and the electrode arrangement. Responses were received from 7 investigators using 10 models. Excitation thresholds differed significantly among these models. For example, with a 2 ms monophasic stimulus pulse and an electrode/fiber distance of 1 cm, thresholds from the least to greatest value differed by a factor of 8.3; with a 5 μs pulse, thresholds differed by the factor 3.8. Significant differences in reported simulations point to the need for experimental validation. Additional efforts are needed to develop computational models for unmyelinated C-fibers, A-delta fibers, CNS neurons, and CNS Synapses.

  20. Survey of numerical electrostimulation models.

    PubMed

    Reilly, J Patrick

    2016-06-21

    This paper evaluates results of a survey of electrostimulation models of myelinated nerve. Participants were asked to determine thresholds of excitation for 18 cases involving different characteristics of the neuron, the stimulation waveform, and the electrode arrangement. Responses were received from 7 investigators using 10 models. Excitation thresholds differed significantly among these models. For example, with a 2 ms monophasic stimulus pulse and an electrode/fiber distance of 1 cm, thresholds from the least to greatest value differed by a factor of 8.3; with a 5 μs pulse, thresholds differed by the factor 3.8. Significant differences in reported simulations point to the need for experimental validation. Additional efforts are needed to develop computational models for unmyelinated C-fibers, A-delta fibers, CNS neurons, and CNS Synapses.

  1. Numerical tsunami modeling and the bottom relief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulikov, E. A.; Gusiakov, V. K.; Ivanova, A. A.; Baranov, B. V.

    2016-11-01

    The effect of the quality of bathymetric data on the accuracy of tsunami-wave field calculation is considered. A review of the history of the numerical tsunami modeling development is presented. Particular emphasis is made on the World Ocean bottom models. It is shown that the modern digital bathymetry maps, for example, GEBCO, do not adequately simulate the sea bottom in numerical models of wave propagation, leading to considerable errors in estimating the maximum tsunami run-ups on the coast.

  2. Between simplicity and accuracy: Effect of adding modeling details on quarter vehicle model accuracy.

    PubMed

    Soong, Ming Foong; Ramli, Rahizar; Saifizul, Ahmad

    2017-01-01

    Quarter vehicle model is the simplest representation of a vehicle that belongs to lumped-mass vehicle models. It is widely used in vehicle and suspension analyses, particularly those related to ride dynamics. However, as much as its common adoption, it is also commonly accepted without quantification that this model is not as accurate as many higher-degree-of-freedom models due to its simplicity and limited degrees of freedom. This study investigates the trade-off between simplicity and accuracy within the context of quarter vehicle model by determining the effect of adding various modeling details on model accuracy. In the study, road input detail, tire detail, suspension stiffness detail and suspension damping detail were factored in, and several enhanced models were compared to the base model to assess the significance of these details. The results clearly indicated that these details do have effect on simulated vehicle response, but to various extents. In particular, road input detail and suspension damping detail have the most significance and are worth being added to quarter vehicle model, as the inclusion of these details changed the response quite fundamentally. Overall, when it comes to lumped-mass vehicle modeling, it is reasonable to say that model accuracy depends not just on the number of degrees of freedom employed, but also on the contributions from various modeling details.

  3. Between simplicity and accuracy: Effect of adding modeling details on quarter vehicle model accuracy

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Quarter vehicle model is the simplest representation of a vehicle that belongs to lumped-mass vehicle models. It is widely used in vehicle and suspension analyses, particularly those related to ride dynamics. However, as much as its common adoption, it is also commonly accepted without quantification that this model is not as accurate as many higher-degree-of-freedom models due to its simplicity and limited degrees of freedom. This study investigates the trade-off between simplicity and accuracy within the context of quarter vehicle model by determining the effect of adding various modeling details on model accuracy. In the study, road input detail, tire detail, suspension stiffness detail and suspension damping detail were factored in, and several enhanced models were compared to the base model to assess the significance of these details. The results clearly indicated that these details do have effect on simulated vehicle response, but to various extents. In particular, road input detail and suspension damping detail have the most significance and are worth being added to quarter vehicle model, as the inclusion of these details changed the response quite fundamentally. Overall, when it comes to lumped-mass vehicle modeling, it is reasonable to say that model accuracy depends not just on the number of degrees of freedom employed, but also on the contributions from various modeling details. PMID:28617819

  4. Numerical modelling of torn boudinage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabrowski, Marcin; Grasemann, Bernhard

    2017-04-01

    The seminal text book by J.G. Ramsay outlines the importance of the progressive development of torn boudinage structures because the shape of boudins may vary greatly and is mainly dependent on the viscosity contrast between the more competent layer and the enclosing material and the values of the principal extensions of the finite strain ellipsoid. In this work we demonstrate that another parameter, the initial boudin separation, has a significant influence on the progressive development of the finite boudin shape. We use finite element simulations to study the shape evolution of torn boudins under pure and simple shear. The boudins are initially rectangular and the gaps between them are prescribed. The boudin interfaces are resolved with high-resolution, body-fitting, unstructured computational meshes and a second-order ODE integrator is used to ensure the numerical accuracy of the results. Both the boudins and the host are treated as either linear or non-linear viscous fluids. We neglect any recrystallization processes and the boudin interfaces are considered as fully coherent. We were able to reproduce the typical shape of fish-mouth boudins for a wide range of viscosity ratios between the highly viscous boudins and the host. We have systematically studied the effects due to the boudin-host viscosity ratio and the fluid stress exponents. Our results show that the initial separation can have a profound effect on the final shape of the boudins and we document the formation of hitherto undescribed complex boudin shapes for an initially narrow gap width.

  5. Atmospheric stability of levoglucosan: a detailed laboratory and modeling study.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, D; Tilgner, A; Iinuma, Y; Herrmann, H

    2010-01-15

    Levoglucosan, an important molecular marker for biomass burning, represents an important fraction of the water-soluble organic carbon in atmospheric particles influenced by residential wood burning and wildfires. However, particle phase oxidation processes of levoglucosan by free radicals are not well-known. Hence, detailed kinetic studies on the reactivity of levoglucosan with OH, NO(3), and SO(4)(-) radicals in aqueous solutions were performed to better understand the levoglucosan oxidation in the deliquescent particles. The data obtained were implemented into a parcel model with detailed microphysics and complex multiphase chemistry to investigate the degradation fluxes of levoglucosan in cloud droplets and in deliquescent particles. The model calculations show that levoglucosan can be oxidized readily by OH radicals during daytime with mean degradation fluxes of about 7.2 ng m(-3) h(-1) in summer and 4.7 ng m(-3) h(-1) in winter for a polluted continental plume. This indicates that the oxidation of levoglucosan in atmospheric deliquescent particles is at least as fast as that of other atmospherically relevant organic compounds and levoglucosan may not be as stable as previously thought in the atmosphere, especially under high relative humidity conditions.

  6. Detailed Modeling of Grounding Solutions for the ITER ICRF Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyrytsya, V.; Dumortier, P.; Messiaen, A.; Louche, F.; Durodié, F.

    2011-12-01

    The excitation of non-TEM modes around the ITER ICRF antenna plug can considerably increase the level of RF voltages and currents on the ITER plug. First study of these modes and a solution to avoid them in the ITER ion cyclotron range of frequencies were reported in [1]. In this work a detailed analysis of electrical properties of the ITER ICRF antenna with the plug was studied for different grounding solutions with CST Microwave Studio® [2]. Conclusions of an earlier work [ 1 ] were confirmed on the detailed model of the antenna with the plug. Different grounding contacts (capacitive, galvanic and mixed capacitive-galvanic) as well as their distribution inside the plug gap were analyzed. It was shown that capacitive and mixed capacitive-galvanic grounding are less effective because they demand high values of the capacitance and are more sensitive to the frequency and antenna spectrum. In particular a galvanic grounding realized by the contacts put around the perimeter of the plug gap at lm behind the front face of the antenna is the most suitable solution from the electromagnetic point of view. An optimization of the layout and arrangement of the contacts in order to assess and optimize the current distribution on them is under way. Measurements on a scaled mock-up of the complete antenna and the plug are under way for modeling results confirmation.

  7. Numerical simulations of Rayleigh-Taylor instability in non-premixed flames using detailed chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attal, Nitesh; Ramaprabhu, Praveen

    2016-11-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability occurs at a perturbed interface separating fluids of different densities, when the lighter fluid accelerates the heavier fluid. We examine the occurrence of the RT instability, when the perturbed interface demarcates a light, fuel stream from a heavier air stream at elevated temperatures. The study is conducted using the FLASH code with modifications that include detailed chemistry, temperature-dependent EOS, and diffusive transport. The fuel-air interface is initialized at thermal equilibrium (Tfuel = Tair = 1000K) in a constant background acceleration (g). We vary the density difference across the interface by diluting the H2 fuel stream with inert N2. The non-premixed flame formed across a burning interface alters the underlying density (ρ) stratification, so that an initially RT unstable (stable) interface can be locally stabilized (destabilized). We observe this change in local stability for both single-wavelength and multimode perturbations, and draw some conclusions on the implications of these findings to applications such as ultra-compact combustors. We also make some comparisons of the reacting, non-premixed RT problem with the corresponding inert flow.

  8. Detailed Modeling and Analysis of the CPFM Dataset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swartz, William H.; Lloyd, Steven A.; DeMajistre, Robert

    2004-01-01

    A quantitative understanding of photolysis rate coefficients (or "j-values") is essential to determining the photochemical reaction rates that define ozone loss and other crucial processes in the atmosphere. j-Values can be calculated with radiative transfer models, derived from actinic flux observations, or inferred from trace gas measurements. The principal objective of this study is to cross-validate j-values from the Composition and Photodissociative Flux Measurement (CPFM) instrument during the Photochemistry of Ozone Loss in the Arctic Region In Summer (POLARIS) and SAGE I11 Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE) field campaigns with model calculations and other measurements and to use this detailed analysis to improve our ability to determine j-values. Another objective is to analyze the spectral flux from the CPFM (not just the j-values) and, using a multi-wavelength/multi-species spectral fitting technique, determine atmospheric composition.

  9. Numerical modeling of confined liquid crystal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mkaddem, Sami

    There has been much research interest in fine structures and defects of equilibrium configurations of nematic liquid crystal droplets subject to strong homeotropic anchoring and modeled by Landau-de Gennes free-energy functionals. In particular, two configurations are the center of attention. The first one is the radial hedgehog, which has an isotropic core and a spherically symmetric structure. The second one is the ring disclination, which has a ring disclination of strength 1/2 and a cylindrically symmetric structure. In this dissertation, we undertake a detailed numerical study of the two described equilibrium configurations using the imposed symmetries to simplify the problem and utilizing a high order finite element discretization to solve it. In addition to the radial hedgehog and the ring disclination, we found a new, metastable configuration, which also is axially symmetric and consists of two isotropic points along its symmetry axis narrowly separated by a line disclination. We generate phase and bifurcation diagrams of the equilibrium configurations. We also investigate the qualitative behavior and the stability of the radial hedgehog. Using a perturbation against the radial hedgehog, we show that such configurations must become unstable at sufficiently low temperatures or in sufficiently large droplets.

  10. A Detailed Level Kinetics Model of NO Vibrational Energy Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Surendra P.; Gilmore, John; Cavolowsky, John A. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Several contemporary problems have pointed to the desirability of a detailed level kinetics approach to modeling the distribution of vibrational energy in NO. Such a model is necessary when vibrational redistribution reactions are insufficient to maintain a Boltzmann distribution over the vibrational energy states. Recent calculations of the rate constant for the first reaction of the Zeldovich mechanism (N2 + O (goes to) NO + N) have suggested that the product NO is formed in high vibrational states. In shock layer flowfields, the product NO molecules may experience an insufficient number of collisions to establish a Boltzmann distribution over vibrational states, thus necessitating a level kinetics model. In other flows, such as expansions of high temperature air, fast, near-resonance vibrational energy exchanges with N2 and O2 may also require a level specific model for NO because of the relative rates of vibrational exchange and redistribution. The proposed report will integrate computational and experimental components to construct such a model for the NO molecule.

  11. A Detailed Level Kinetics Model of NO Vibrational Energy Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Surendra P.; Gilmore, John; Cavolowsky, John A. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Several contemporary problems have pointed to the desirability of a detailed level kinetics approach to modeling the distribution of vibrational energy in NO. Such a model is necessary when vibrational redistribution reactions are insufficient to maintain a Boltzmann distribution over the vibrational energy states. Recent calculations of the rate constant for the first reaction of the Zeldovich mechanism (N2 + O (goes to) NO + N) have suggested that the product NO is formed in high vibrational states. In shock layer flowfields, the product NO molecules may experience an insufficient number of collisions to establish a Boltzmann distribution over vibrational states, thus necessitating a level kinetics model. In other flows, such as expansions of high temperature air, fast, near-resonance vibrational energy exchanges with N2 and O2 may also require a level specific model for NO because of the relative rates of vibrational exchange and redistribution. The proposed report will integrate computational and experimental components to construct such a model for the NO molecule.

  12. Numerical details and SAS programs for parameter recovery of the SB distribution

    Treesearch

    Bernard R. Parresol; Teresa Fidalgo Fonseca; Carlos Pacheco. Marques

    2010-01-01

    The four-parameter SB distribution has seen widespread use in growth-and-yield modeling because it covers a broad spectrum of shapes, fitting both positively and negatively skewed data and bimodal configurations. Two recent parameter recovery schemes, an approach whereby characteristics of a statistical distribution are equated with attributes of...

  13. Detailed Numerical Simulations on the Formation of Pillars Around H II Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritschneder, Matthias; Burkert, Andreas; Naab, Thorsten; Walch, Stefanie

    2010-11-01

    We study the structural evolution of turbulent molecular clouds under the influence of ionizing radiation emitted from a nearby massive star by performing a high-resolution parameter study with the iVINE code. The temperature is taken to be 10 K or 100 K, the mean number density is either 100 cm-3 or 300 cm-3. Furthermore, the turbulence is varied between Mach 1.5 and Mach 12.5, the main driving scale of the turbulence is varied between 1 pc and 8 pc. We vary the ionizing flux by an order of magnitude, corresponding to allowing between 0.5% and 5% of the mass in the domain to be ionized immediately. In our simulations, the ionizing radiation enhances the initial turbulent density distribution and thus leads to the formation of pillar-like structures observed adjacent to H II regions in a natural way. Gravitational collapse occurs regularly at the tips of the structures. We find a clear correlation between the initial state of the turbulent cold cloud and the final morphology and physical properties of the structures formed. The most favorable regime for the formation of pillars is Mach 4-10. Structures and therefore stars only form if the initial density contrast between the high-density unionized gas and the gas that is going to be ionized is lower than the temperature contrast between the hot and the cold gas. The density of the resulting pillars is determined by a pressure equilibrium between the hot and the cold gas. A thorough analysis of the simulations shows that the complex kinematical and geometrical structure of the formed elongated filaments reflects that of observed pillars to an impressive level of detail. In addition, we find that the observed line-of-sight velocities allow for a distinct determination of different formation mechanisms. Comparing the current simulations to previous results and recent observations, we conclude that, e.g., the pillars of creation in M16 formed by the mechanism proposed here and not by the radiation driven implosion of

  14. Validation Testing and Numerical Modeling of Advanced Armor Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    constitutive material strength response with an appropriate yield surface model. The research is sub-divided into three areas: engineering design...and specimen preparation for Taylor impact testing, analytical solution for the dynamic yield strength of the materials used, and numerical modeling...aluminum alloy only. We perform a detailed analysis of the deformed specimen shapes to determine the dynamic yield strength . Additionally, hydrocode

  15. The impact of model detail on power grid resilience measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auer, S.; Kleis, K.; Schultz, P.; Kurths, J.; Hellmann, F.

    2016-05-01

    Extreme events are a challenge to natural as well as man-made systems. For critical infrastructure like power grids, we need to understand their resilience against large disturbances. Recently, new measures of the resilience of dynamical systems have been developed in the complex system literature. Basin stability and survivability respectively assess the asymptotic and transient behavior of a system when subjected to arbitrary, localized but large perturbations in frequency and phase. To employ these methods that assess power grid resilience, we need to choose a certain model detail of the power grid. For the grid topology we considered the Scandinavian grid and an ensemble of power grids generated with a random growth model. So far the most popular model that has been studied is the classical swing equation model for the frequency response of generators and motors. In this paper we study a more sophisticated model of synchronous machines that also takes voltage dynamics into account, and compare it to the previously studied model. This model has been found to give an accurate picture of the long term evolution of synchronous machines in the engineering literature for post fault studies. We find evidence that some stable fix points of the swing equation become unstable when we add voltage dynamics. If this occurs the asymptotic behavior of the system can be dramatically altered, and basin stability estimates obtained with the swing equation can be dramatically wrong. We also find that the survivability does not change significantly when taking the voltage dynamics into account. Further, the limit cycle type asymptotic behaviour is strongly correlated with transient voltages that violate typical operational voltage bounds. Thus, transient voltage bounds are dominated by transient frequency bounds and play no large role for realistic parameters.

  16. Detailed kinetic modeling study of n-pentanol oxidation

    DOE PAGES

    Heufer, K. Alexander; Sarathy, S. Mani; Curran, Henry J.; ...

    2012-09-28

    To help overcome the world’s dependence upon fossil fuels, suitable biofuels are promising alternatives that can be used in the transportation sector. Recent research on internal combustion engines shows that short alcoholic fuels (e.g., ethanol or n-butanol) have reduced pollutant emissions and increased knock resistance compared to fossil fuels. Although higher molecular weight alcohols (e.g., n-pentanol and n-hexanol) exhibit higher reactivity that lowers their knock resistance, they are suitable for diesel engines or advanced engine concepts, such as homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI), where higher reactivity at lower temperatures is necessary for engine operation. The present study presents a detailedmore » kinetic model for n-pentanol based on modeling rules previously presented for n-butanol. This approach was initially validated using quantum chemistry calculations to verify the most stable n-pentanol conformation and to obtain C–H and C–C bond dissociation energies. In addition, the proposed model has been validated against ignition delay time data, speciation data from a jet-stirred reactor, and laminar flame velocity measurements. Overall, the model shows good agreement with the experiments and permits a detailed discussion of the differences between alcohols and alkanes.« less

  17. Detailed model for practical pulverized coal furnaces and gasifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P.J.; Smoot, L.D.

    1989-08-01

    This study has been supported by a consortium of nine industrial and governmental sponsors. Work was initiated on May 1, 1985 and completed August 31, 1989. The central objective of this work was to develop, evaluate and apply a practical combustion model for utility boilers, industrial furnaces and gasifiers. Key accomplishments have included: Development of an advanced first-generation, computer model for combustion in three dimensional furnaces; development of a new first generation fouling and slagging submodel; detailed evaluation of an existing NO{sub x} submodel; development and evaluation of an improved radiation submodel; preparation and distribution of a three-volume final report: (a) Volume 1: General Technical Report; (b) Volume 2: PCGC-3 User's Manual; (c) Volume 3: Data Book for Evaluation of Three-Dimensional Combustion Models; and organization of a user's workshop on the three-dimensional code. The furnace computer model developed under this study requires further development before it can be applied generally to all applications; however, it can be used now by specialists for many specific applications, including non-combusting systems and combusting geseous systems. A new combustion center was organized and work was initiated to continue the important research effort initiated by this study. 212 refs., 72 figs., 38 tabs.

  18. Urban scale air quality modelling using detailed traffic emissions estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borrego, C.; Amorim, J. H.; Tchepel, O.; Dias, D.; Rafael, S.; Sá, E.; Pimentel, C.; Fontes, T.; Fernandes, P.; Pereira, S. R.; Bandeira, J. M.; Coelho, M. C.

    2016-04-01

    The atmospheric dispersion of NOx and PM10 was simulated with a second generation Gaussian model over a medium-size south-European city. Microscopic traffic models calibrated with GPS data were used to derive typical driving cycles for each road link, while instantaneous emissions were estimated applying a combined Vehicle Specific Power/Co-operative Programme for Monitoring and Evaluation of the Long-range Transmission of Air Pollutants in Europe (VSP/EMEP) methodology. Site-specific background concentrations were estimated using time series analysis and a low-pass filter applied to local observations. Air quality modelling results are compared against measurements at two locations for a 1 week period. 78% of the results are within a factor of two of the observations for 1-h average concentrations, increasing to 94% for daily averages. Correlation significantly improves when background is added, with an average of 0.89 for the 24 h record. The results highlight the potential of detailed traffic and instantaneous exhaust emissions estimates, together with filtered urban background, to provide accurate input data to Gaussian models applied at the urban scale.

  19. Numerical modeling of runback water on ice protected aircraft surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Al-Khalil, Kamel M.; Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Dewitt, Kenneth J.

    1992-01-01

    A numerical simulation for 'running wet' aircraft anti-icing systems is developed. The model includes breakup of the water film, which exists in regions of direct impingement, into individual rivulets. The wetness factor distribution resulting from the film breakup and the rivulet configuration on the surface are predicted in the numerical solution procedure. The solid wall is modeled as a multilayer structure and the anti-icing system used is of the thermal type utilizing hot air and/or electrical heating elements embedded with the layers. Details of the calculation procedure and the methods used are presented.

  20. Ice nucleation sensitivity studies using the detailed microphysical model MAID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krämer, Martina; Hildebrandt, Margit

    2010-05-01

    The influence of heterogeneous freezing on the ice crystal number of cirrus clouds have been evaluated by extensive model simulations using the detailed microphysical model MAID (Bunz et al., 2008). MAID includes heterogeneous as well as homogeneous freezing and, as a new feature, freezing thresholds for different types of ice nuclei (IN), derived from ice nucleation experiments at the cloud chamber AIDA. Cirrus formation scenarios are simulated in the temperature range 180 - 240 K in 10 K steps. For each temperature, six different vertical velocities were assumed, ranging from 1 - 1000 cm/s. Thus, one scenario contains 42 model runs. A variety of scenarios are simulated by variing the IN number between 0.001 and 0.2 cm-3 and using the freezing thresholds of coated soot and mineral dust. Further, the simulations are performed for constant vertical velocities uz as well as for uz superimposed with temperature pertubations of 1 and 3 K, respectively. Earlier studies (Gierens, 2003; Kärcher and Lohmann, 2003) concluded that homogeneous nucleation dominates in regions with updrafts stronger than 20-30 cms-1. Our simulations show that heterogeneous ice formation progressively influences the ice crystal concentrations up to uz = 100 cm/s, increasing with the IN number and with the temperature. Lowering the freezing threshold decreases the ice crystal number, while temperature pertubations increases the ice concentration, but both only for uz ≤ 10 cm/s. In addition to the ice nucleation sensitivity studies, we performed an intercomparison of MAID with a detailed microphysical model (DLR Oberpfaffenhofen, B. Kärcher) and a double moment bulk microphysics scheme (ETH Zürich, P. Spichtinger), resulting in a good agreement between the models. References: Bunz, H., Benz, S., Gensch, I., and Krämer, M. (2008): MAID: a model to simulate UT/LS aerosols and ice clouds, Envir. Res. Lett., 3, doi10.1088/1748-9326/3/3/035001. Gierens, K. (2003): On the transition between

  1. A Two-Zone Multigrid Model for SI Engine Combustion Simulation Using Detailed Chemistry

    DOE PAGES

    Ge, Hai-Wen; Juneja, Harmit; Shi, Yu; ...

    2010-01-01

    An efficient multigrid (MG) model was implemented for spark-ignited (SI) engine combustion modeling using detailed chemistry. The model is designed to be coupled with a level-set-G-equation model for flame propagation (GAMUT combustion model) for highly efficient engine simulation. The model was explored for a gasoline direct-injection SI engine with knocking combustion. The numerical results using the MG model were compared with the results of the original GAMUT combustion model. A simpler one-zone MG model was found to be unable to reproduce the results of the original GAMUT model. However, a two-zone MG model, which treats the burned and unburned regionsmore » separately, was found to provide much better accuracy and efficiency than the one-zone MG model. Without loss in accuracy, an order of magnitude speedup was achieved in terms of CPU and wall times. To reproduce the results of the original GAMUT combustion model, either a low searching level or a procedure to exclude high-temperature computational cells from the grouping should be applied to the unburned region, which was found to be more sensitive to the combustion model details.« less

  2. Development of Detailed Kinetic Models for Fischer-Tropsch Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Carstensen, H; Dean, A M

    2008-10-28

    Fischer-Tropsch (FT) fuels can be synthesized from a syngas stream generated by the gasification of biomass. As such they have the potential to be a renewable hydrocarbon fuel with many desirable properties. However, both the chemical and physical properties are somewhat different from the petroleum-based hydrocarbons that they might replace, and it is important to account for such differences when considering using them as replacements for conventional fuels in devices such as diesel engines and gas turbines. FT fuels generally contain iso-alkanes with one or two substituted methyl groups to meet the pour-point specifications. Although models have been developed for smaller branched alkanes such as isooctane, additional efforts are required to properly capture the kinetics of the larger branched alkanes. Recently, Westbrook et al. developed a chemical kinetic model that can be used to represent the entire series of n-alkanes from C{sub 1} to C{sub 16} (Figure 1). In the current work, the model is extended to treat 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane (HMN), a large iso-alkane. The same reaction rate rules used in the iso-octane mechanism were incorporated in the HMN mechanism. Both high and low temperature chemistry was included so that the chemical kinetic model would be applicable to advanced internal combustion engines using low temperature combustion strategies. The chemical kinetic model consists of 1114 species and 4468 reactions. Concurrently with this effort, work is underway to improve the details of specific reaction classes in the mechanism, guided by high-level electronic structure calculations. Attention is focused upon development of accurate rate rules for abstraction of the tertiary hydrogens present in branched alkanes and properly accounting for the pressure dependence of the ?-scission, isomerization, and R + O{sub 2} reactions.

  3. An improved numerical model for wave rotor design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel E.; Wilson, Jack

    1992-01-01

    A numerical model has been developed which can predict both the unsteady flows within a wave rotor and the steady averaged flows in the ports. The model is based on the assumptions of one-dimensional, unsteady, and perfect gas flow. Besides the dominant wave behavior, it is also capable of predicting the effects of finite tube opening time, leakage from the tube ends, and viscosity. The relative simplicity of the model makes it useful for design, optimization, and analysis of wave rotor cycles for any application. This paper discusses some details of the model and presents comparisons between the model and two laboratory wave rotor experiments.

  4. An improved numerical model for wave rotor design and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel E.; Wilson, Jack

    1993-01-01

    A numerical model has been developed which can predict both the unsteady flows within a wave rotor and the steady averaged flows in the ports. The model is based on the assumptions of one-dimensional, unsteady, and perfect gas flow. Besides the dominant wave behavior, it is also capable of predicting the effects of finite tube opening time, leakage from the tube ends, and viscosity. The relative simplicity of the model makes it useful for design, optimization, and analysis of wave rotor cycles for any application. This paper discusses some details of the model and presents comparisons between the model and two laboratory wave rotor experiments.

  5. DETAILED DECOMPOSITION OF GALAXY IMAGES. II. BEYOND AXISYMMETRIC MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Chien Y.; Ho, Luis C.; Impey, Chris D.; Rix, Hans-Walter E-mail: lho@obs.carnegiescience.ed E-mail: rix@mpia-hd.mpg.d

    2010-06-15

    We present a two-dimensional (2D) fitting algorithm (GALFIT, ver. 3) with new capabilities to study the structural components of galaxies and other astronomical objects in digital images. Our technique improves on previous 2D fitting algorithms by allowing for irregular, curved, logarithmic and power-law spirals, ring, and truncated shapes in otherwise traditional parametric functions like the Sersic, Moffat, King, Ferrer, etc., profiles. One can mix and match these new shape features freely, with or without constraints, and apply them to an arbitrary number of model components of numerous profile types, so as to produce realistic-looking galaxy model images. Yet, despite the potential for extreme complexity, the meaning of the key parameters like the Sersic index, effective radius, or luminosity remains intuitive and essentially unchanged. The new features have an interesting potential for use to quantify the degree of asymmetry of galaxies, to quantify low surface brightness tidal features beneath and beyond luminous galaxies, to allow more realistic decompositions of galaxy subcomponents in the presence of strong rings and spiral arms, and to enable ways to gauge the uncertainties when decomposing galaxy subcomponents. We illustrate these new features by way of several case studies that display various levels of complexity.

  6. Numerical Modeling for Large Scale Hydrothermal System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohrabi, Reza; Jansen, Gunnar; Malvoisin, Benjamin; Mazzini, Adriano; Miller, Stephen A.

    2017-04-01

    Moderate-to-high enthalpy systems are driven by multiphase and multicomponent processes, fluid and rock mechanics, and heat transport processes, all of which present challenges in developing realistic numerical models of the underlying physics. The objective of this work is to present an approach, and some initial results, for modeling and understanding dynamics of the birth of large scale hydrothermal systems. Numerical modeling of such complex systems must take into account a variety of coupled thermal, hydraulic, mechanical and chemical processes, which is numerically challenging. To provide first estimates of the behavior of this deep complex systems, geological structures must be constrained, and the fluid dynamics, mechanics and the heat transport need to be investigated in three dimensions. Modeling these processes numerically at adequate resolution and reasonable computation times requires a suite of tools that we are developing and/or utilizing to investigate such systems. Our long-term goal is to develop 3D numerical models, based on a geological models, which couples mechanics with the hydraulics and thermal processes driving hydrothermal system. Our first results from the Lusi hydrothermal system in East Java, Indonesia provide a basis for more sophisticated studies, eventually in 3D, and we introduce a workflow necessary to achieve these objectives. Future work focuses with the aim and parallelization suitable for High Performance Computing (HPC). Such developments are necessary to achieve high-resolution simulations to more fully understand the complex dynamics of hydrothermal systems.

  7. Detailed model for practical pulverized coal furnaces and gasifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Philips, S.D.; Smoot, L.D.

    1989-08-01

    The need to improve efficiency and reduce pollutant emissions commercial furnaces has prompted energy companies to search for optimized operating conditions and improved designs in their fossil-fuel burning facilities. Historically, companies have relied on the use of empirical correlations and pilot-plant data to make decisions about operating conditions and design changes. The high cost of collecting data makes obtaining large amounts of data infeasible. The main objective of the data book is to provide a single source of detailed three-dimensional combustion and combustion-related data suitable for comprehensive combustion model evaluation. Five tasks were identified as requirements to achieve the main objective. First, identify the types of data needed to evaluate comprehensive combustion models, and establish criteria for selecting the data. Second, identify and document available three-dimensional combustion data related to pulverized coal combustion. Third, collect and evaluate three-dimensional data cases, and select suitable cases based on selection criteria. Fourth, organize the data sets into an easy-to-use format. Fifth, evaluate and interpret the nature and quality of the data base. 39 refs., 15 figs., 14 tabs.

  8. Detailed Kinetic Modeling of Processes Relevant To Fusion Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehl, Marco; Armstrong, Michael; Zaug, Joseph; Crowhurst, Jonathan; Radousky, Harry; Stavrou, Elissaios

    2016-10-01

    Carbon based materials have been proposed as candidates for the fabrication of plasma-facing components in the design of fusion energy devices. Although these components are not supposed to be in direct contact with the core fusion plasma, plasma instabilities and the harsh environment they are exposed to can cause the degradation of plasma-exposed components and the transfer of contaminants into the plasma followed by deposition of byproducts. In order to investigate the chemistry involved in these processes and to assist the development of models suitable to understand the long term consequences of the carbon ablation/deposition cycle, an inductively coupled plasma flow reactor (ICPFR) has been developed. The ICPFR allows the atomization of carbon containing precursors to high temperatures (in the order of 10000K) and the characterization of the gas and solid species formed downsteam from the plasma source through spectroscopic techniques. In parallel to the experimental analysis a comprehensive set of fluid dynamic and detailed kinetic simulations are used to analyze the data. The combination of these two approaches resulted in a validated and comprehensive chemical model for the formation of carbon deposits in carbon contaminated cooling plasmas. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  9. Numerical noise in ocean and estuarine models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walters, R.; Carey, G.F.

    1984-01-01

    Approximate methods for solving the shallow water equations may lead to solutions exhibiting large fictitious, numerically-induced oscillations. The analysis of the discrete dispersion relation and modal solutions of small wavelengths provides a powerful technique for assessing the sensitivity of alternative numerical schemes to irregular data which may lead to such oscillatory numerical noise. For those schemes where phase speed vanishes at a finite wavenumber or there are multiple roots for wavenumber, oscillation modes can exist which are uncoupled from the dynamics of the problem. The discrete modal analysis approach is used here to identify two classes of spurious oscillation modes associated respectively with the two different asymptotic limits corresponding to estuarine and large scale ocean models. The analysis provides further insight into recent numerical results for models which include large spatial scales and Coriolis acceleration. ?? 1984.

  10. Reduced-order modelling numerical homogenization.

    PubMed

    Abdulle, A; Bai, Y

    2014-08-06

    A general framework to combine numerical homogenization and reduced-order modelling techniques for partial differential equations (PDEs) with multiple scales is described. Numerical homogenization methods are usually efficient to approximate the effective solution of PDEs with multiple scales. However, classical numerical homogenization techniques require the numerical solution of a large number of so-called microproblems to approximate the effective data at selected grid points of the computational domain. Such computations become particularly expensive for high-dimensional, time-dependent or nonlinear problems. In this paper, we explain how numerical homogenization method can benefit from reduced-order modelling techniques that allow one to identify offline and online computational procedures. The effective data are only computed accurately at a carefully selected number of grid points (offline stage) appropriately 'interpolated' in the online stage resulting in an online cost comparable to that of a single-scale solver. The methodology is presented for a class of PDEs with multiple scales, including elliptic, parabolic, wave and nonlinear problems. Numerical examples, including wave propagation in inhomogeneous media and solute transport in unsaturated porous media, illustrate the proposed method.

  11. Tsunami inundation modelling based on detailed roughness maps of densely populated areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gayer, G.; Leschka, S.; Nöhren, I.; Larsen, O.; Günther, H.

    2010-08-01

    An important part within the German-Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System (GITEWS) project was the detailed numerical investigation of the impact of tsunamis in densely populated coastal areas of Indonesia. This work, carried out by the German Research Centre Geesthacht (GKSS), in co-operation with DHI-WASY, also provides the basis for the preparation of high resolution hazard and risk maps by the German Aerospace Center (DLR). In this paper a method is described of how to prepare very detailed roughness maps for scenario computations performed with the MIKE 21 Flow Model FM in three highly resolved (~10 m) priority regions, namely Kuta (Bali), Padang (West-Sumatra), and Cilacap (southern coast of Java). Roughness values are assigned to 43 land use classes, e.g. different types of buildings, rural and urban sub-areas, by using equivalent coefficients found in literature or by performing numerical experiments. Comparisons of simulations using differentiated roughness maps with simulations using constant values (a widely used approach) are presented and it is demonstrated that roughness takes considerable influence on run-up and inundation. Out of all simulations, the results of the worst case scenarios for each of the three priority areas are discussed. Earthquakes with magnitudes of MW=8.5 or higher lead to considerable inundation in all study sites. A spatially distinguished consideration of roughness has been found to be necessary for detailed modelling onshore.

  12. Numerical modeling techniques for flood analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anees, Mohd Talha; Abdullah, K.; Nawawi, M. N. M.; Ab Rahman, Nik Norulaini Nik; Piah, Abd. Rahni Mt.; Zakaria, Nor Azazi; Syakir, M. I.; Mohd. Omar, A. K.

    2016-12-01

    Topographic and climatic changes are the main causes of abrupt flooding in tropical areas. It is the need to find out exact causes and effects of these changes. Numerical modeling techniques plays a vital role for such studies due to their use of hydrological parameters which are strongly linked with topographic changes. In this review, some of the widely used models utilizing hydrological and river modeling parameters and their estimation in data sparse region are discussed. Shortcomings of 1D and 2D numerical models and the possible improvements over these models through 3D modeling are also discussed. It is found that the HEC-RAS and FLO 2D model are best in terms of economical and accurate flood analysis for river and floodplain modeling respectively. Limitations of FLO 2D in floodplain modeling mainly such as floodplain elevation differences and its vertical roughness in grids were found which can be improve through 3D model. Therefore, 3D model was found to be more suitable than 1D and 2D models in terms of vertical accuracy in grid cells. It was also found that 3D models for open channel flows already developed recently but not for floodplain. Hence, it was suggested that a 3D model for floodplain should be developed by considering all hydrological and high resolution topographic parameter's models, discussed in this review, to enhance the findings of causes and effects of flooding.

  13. Numerical modeling of alkali vapor lasers.

    PubMed

    Shu, Hong; Chen, Ying; Bass, Michael; Monjardin, J Fernando; Deile, Jochen

    2011-10-10

    Detailed numerical analyses are presented of a continuous wave (cw), single spatial mode alkali vapor laser pumped by a diffraction-limited Ti: Sapphire laser. These analyses provide insight into the operation of alkali vapor lasers to aid in the development of high power, diode laser pumped alkali vapor lasers. It is demonstrated that in the laser considered the laser spatial pattern is significantly changed after each pass through the gain medium, and the laser spatial pattern in steady state operation is also very different from that of the passive cavity mode. According to the calculation, lasing significantly improves the pump absorption efficiency and changes the absorbed pump distribution. The effect of varying the transverse size of the pumped region is also analyzed and an optimum pump beam waist radius is demonstrated. In addition, the shift of the pump beam waist location is also studied. The computation method and its convergence behavior are also described in detail.

  14. Automatic network coupling analysis for dynamical systems based on detailed kinetic models.

    PubMed

    Lebiedz, Dirk; Kammerer, Julia; Brandt-Pollmann, Ulrich

    2005-10-01

    We introduce a numerical complexity reduction method for the automatic identification and analysis of dynamic network decompositions in (bio)chemical kinetics based on error-controlled computation of a minimal model dimension represented by the number of (locally) active dynamical modes. Our algorithm exploits a generalized sensitivity analysis along state trajectories and subsequent singular value decomposition of sensitivity matrices for the identification of these dominant dynamical modes. It allows for a dynamic coupling analysis of (bio)chemical species in kinetic models that can be exploited for the piecewise computation of a minimal model on small time intervals and offers valuable functional insight into highly nonlinear reaction mechanisms and network dynamics. We present results for the identification of network decompositions in a simple oscillatory chemical reaction, time scale separation based model reduction in a Michaelis-Menten enzyme system and network decomposition of a detailed model for the oscillatory peroxidase-oxidase enzyme system.

  15. Ensemble-type numerical uncertainty information from single model integrations

    SciTech Connect

    Rauser, Florian Marotzke, Jochem; Korn, Peter

    2015-07-01

    We suggest an algorithm that quantifies the discretization error of time-dependent physical quantities of interest (goals) for numerical models of geophysical fluid dynamics. The goal discretization error is estimated using a sum of weighted local discretization errors. The key feature of our algorithm is that these local discretization errors are interpreted as realizations of a random process. The random process is determined by the model and the flow state. From a class of local error random processes we select a suitable specific random process by integrating the model over a short time interval at different resolutions. The weights of the influences of the local discretization errors on the goal are modeled as goal sensitivities, which are calculated via automatic differentiation. The integration of the weighted realizations of local error random processes yields a posterior ensemble of goal approximations from a single run of the numerical model. From the posterior ensemble we derive the uncertainty information of the goal discretization error. This algorithm bypasses the requirement of detailed knowledge about the models discretization to generate numerical error estimates. The algorithm is evaluated for the spherical shallow-water equations. For two standard test cases we successfully estimate the error of regional potential energy, track its evolution, and compare it to standard ensemble techniques. The posterior ensemble shares linear-error-growth properties with ensembles of multiple model integrations when comparably perturbed. The posterior ensemble numerical error estimates are of comparable size as those of a stochastic physics ensemble.

  16. Further ALMA observations and detailed modeling of the Red Rectangle

    PubMed Central

    Bujarrabal, V.; Castro-Carrizo, A.; Alcolea, J.; Santander-García, M.; Van Winckel, H.; Sánchez Contreras, C.

    2016-01-01

    Aims We aim to study the rotating and expanding gas in the Red Rectangle, which is a well known object that recently left the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase. We analyze the properties of both components and the relation between them. Rotating disks have been very elusive in post-AGB nebulae, in which gas is almost always found to be in expansion. Methods We present new high-quality ALMA observations of C17O J=6−5 and H13CN J=4−3 line emission and results from a new reduction of already published 13CO J=3−2 data. A detailed model fitting of all the molecular line data, including previous maps and single-dish observations of lines of CO, CII, and CI, was performed using a sophisticated code that includes an accurate nonlocal treatment of radiative transfer in 2D. These observations (of low- and high-opacity lines requiring various degrees of excitation) and the corresponding modeling allowed us to deepen the analysis of the nebular properties. We also stress the uncertainties, particularly in the determination of the boundaries of the CO-rich gas and some properties of the outflow. Results We confirm the presence of a rotating equatorial disk and an outflow, which is mainly formed of gas leaving the disk. The mass of the disk is ~ 0.01 M⊙, and that of the CO-rich outflow is around ten times smaller. High temperatures of ≳ 100 K are derived for most components. From comparison of the mass values, we roughly estimate the lifetime of the rotating disk, which is found to be of about 10000 yr. Taking data of a few other post-AGB composite nebulae into account, we find that the lifetimes of disks around post-AGB stars typically range between 5000 and more than 20000 yr. The angular momentum of the disk is found to be high, ~ 9 M⊙ AU km s−1, which is comparable to that of the stellar system at present. Our observations of H13CN show a particularly wide velocity dispersion and indicate that this molecule is only abundant in the inner Keplerian disk, at

  17. Further ALMA observations and detailed modeling of the Red Rectangle.

    PubMed

    Bujarrabal, V; Castro-Carrizo, A; Alcolea, J; Santander-García, M; Van Winckel, H; Sánchez Contreras, C

    2016-09-01

    We aim to study the rotating and expanding gas in the Red Rectangle, which is a well known object that recently left the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase. We analyze the properties of both components and the relation between them. Rotating disks have been very elusive in post-AGB nebulae, in which gas is almost always found to be in expansion. We present new high-quality ALMA observations of C(17)O J=6-5 and H(13)CN J=4-3 line emission and results from a new reduction of already published (13)CO J=3-2 data. A detailed model fitting of all the molecular line data, including previous maps and single-dish observations of lines of CO, CII, and CI, was performed using a sophisticated code that includes an accurate nonlocal treatment of radiative transfer in 2D. These observations (of low- and high-opacity lines requiring various degrees of excitation) and the corresponding modeling allowed us to deepen the analysis of the nebular properties. We also stress the uncertainties, particularly in the determination of the boundaries of the CO-rich gas and some properties of the outflow. We confirm the presence of a rotating equatorial disk and an outflow, which is mainly formed of gas leaving the disk. The mass of the disk is ~ 0.01 M⊙, and that of the CO-rich outflow is around ten times smaller. High temperatures of ≳ 100 K are derived for most components. From comparison of the mass values, we roughly estimate the lifetime of the rotating disk, which is found to be of about 10000 yr. Taking data of a few other post-AGB composite nebulae into account, we find that the lifetimes of disks around post-AGB stars typically range between 5000 and more than 20000 yr. The angular momentum of the disk is found to be high, ~ 9 M⊙ AU km s(-1), which is comparable to that of the stellar system at present. Our observations of H(13)CN show a particularly wide velocity dispersion and indicate that this molecule is only abundant in the inner Keplerian disk, at ≲ 60 AU from the

  18. Teaching ANOVA Models via Miniature Numerical Samples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolton, Brian

    1975-01-01

    On the premise that the more formal algebraic presentation of statistics must be placed in a concrete context to facilitate student understanding, the author presents a pedagogical device involving the construction of miniature numerical examples that illustrate how the statistical model imposes structure on empirical data. (JT)

  19. Numerical modeling of eastern connecticut's visual resources

    Treesearch

    Daniel L. Civco

    1979-01-01

    A numerical model capable of accurately predicting the preference for landscape photographs of selected points in eastern Connecticut is presented. A function of the social attitudes expressed toward thirty-two salient visual landscape features serves as the independent variable in predicting preferences. A technique for objectively assigning adjectives to landscape...

  20. Numerical simulations of the 2-dimensional Robin-Hood model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cwilich, Gabriel; Fox, Perry; Zypman, Fredy; Buldyrev, Sergey

    2007-03-01

    The Robin Hood, or Zaitsev model [1] has been successfully used to model depinning of interfaces, friction, dislocation motion and flux creep, because it is one of the simplest extremal models for self-organized criticallity Until now, its properties have been well understood theoretically in one dimension and its scaling laws numerically verified. It is important to extend the range of validity of these laws into higher dimensions, to find precise values for the scaling exponents, and to investigate how they depend on the details of the model (like anisotropy). The case of two dimensions is of particular importance when studying surface friction [2]. Here, we numerically evaluate high precision scaling exponents for the avalanche size distribution, the avalanche fractal dimension, and the Levy flight-like distribution of the jumps between extremal active sites. [1] S.I. Zaitsev , Physica A 189, 411 (1992). [2] S. Buldyrev, J. Ferrante and F. Zypman Phys. Rev E (accepted)

  1. Microplastics elutriation system. Part A: Numerical modeling.

    PubMed

    Kedzierski, Mikaël; Le Tilly, Véronique; Bourseau, Patrick; Bellegou, Hervé; César, Guy; Sire, Olivier; Bruzaud, Stéphane

    2017-06-30

    The elutriation process has shown its efficiency to extract microplastics from sand and began to spread in the scientific community. This extraction technic requires knowing with accuracy the extraction velocities of particles. This study aims to test whether numerical modeling could help to calculate these velocities. From hydrodynamic equations, a numerical model has been developed and the outputs are compared to experimental extraction data. The results show, for the calculated velocities, the experimental plastic extraction yields will be higher than 90% for <10% of sand contamination. The model also allows determining that, with the actual protocol, the maximum plastic density which can be extracted is about 1450kg·m(-3) whereas the detrimental resuspension, which may occur during the column filling step, is highlighted. From model calculations, it arises that changes in the column dimensioning and the protocol operations need to be considered. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Numerical modeling tools for chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jasinski, Thomas J.; Childs, Edward P.

    1992-01-01

    Development of general numerical simulation tools for chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was the objective of this study. Physical models of important CVD phenomena were developed and implemented into the commercial computational fluid dynamics software FLUENT. The resulting software can address general geometries as well as the most important phenomena occurring with CVD reactors: fluid flow patterns, temperature and chemical species distribution, gas phase and surface deposition. The physical models are documented which are available and examples are provided of CVD simulation capabilities.

  3. Numerical modeling of the solar wind turbulence

    DOE PAGES

    Kryukov, I.A.; Pogorelov, N.V.; Zank, G.P.; ...

    2012-05-21

    Here we describe an extension of the Multi-Scale Fluid-Kinetic Simulation Suite (MSFLUKSS) by adding a solar wind turbulence model and a fluid treatment of pickup ions. Numerical results are presented of the time-dependent solar wind modeling with the boundary conditions provided by the OMNI data. The distributions of plasma properties and interplanetary magnetic field are compared with the Voyager 2 observations in the distant solar wind.

  4. A coupled 3D-1D numerical monodomain solver for cardiac electrical activation in the myocardium with detailed Purkinje network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergara, Christian; Lange, Matthias; Palamara, Simone; Lassila, Toni; Frangi, Alejandro F.; Quarteroni, Alfio

    2016-03-01

    We present a model for the electrophysiology in the heart to handle the electrical propagation through the Purkinje system and in the myocardium, with two-way coupling at the Purkinje-muscle junctions. In both the subproblems the monodomain model is considered, whereas at the junctions a resistor element is included that induces an orthodromic propagation delay from the Purkinje network towards the heart muscle. We prove a sufficient condition for convergence of a fixed-point iterative algorithm to the numerical solution of the coupled problem. Numerical comparison of activation patterns is made with two different combinations of models for the coupled Purkinje network/myocardium system, the eikonal/eikonal and the monodomain/monodomain models. Test cases are investigated for both physiological and pathological activation of a model left ventricle. Finally, we prove the reliability of the monodomain/monodomain coupling on a realistic scenario. Our results underlie the importance of using physiologically realistic Purkinje-trees with propagation solved using the monodomain model for simulating cardiac activation.

  5. Detonation Initiation by a Temperature Gradient for a Detailed Chemical Reaction Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liberman, Michael; Kiverin, Alexey; Chukalovsky, Alexander; Ivanov, Mikhail

    2011-04-01

    The evolution from a temperature gradient to a detonation is investigated using high resolution numerical simulations for combustion mixture whose chemistry is governed by a detailed chemical kinetics. We employ a model representing an initial linear temperature gradient in the fuel. Emphasis is on comparing the results with previous studies that used simple one-step kinetics. It is shown that the evolution to detonation from temperature nonuniformities is considerably different for one-step kinetics models than for chain-branching kinetic models and it is different in different fuels for the same initial conditions. A detailed chemical model has a profound effect on the validity of Zel'dovich's spontaneous wave concept for detonation initiation by a gradient of reactivity. The evolution to detonation from a temperature gradient is considered for hydrogen-air and methane-air mixtures at different initial pressures. The analysis shows that for a detailed chemical kinetics the temperature gradients, which was thought to appear in the form of hot spots and the like, are not satisfy the criteria to initiate detonation, and the gradient mechanism can not be origin of the deflagration-to-detonation transition.

  6. Numerical Modeling of Weld Joint Corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yongxin; Jing, Hongyang; Han, Yongdian; Xu, Lianyong

    2016-03-01

    A numerical model is presented in this work that predicts the corrosion rate of weld joint. The model is able to track moving boundary of the corroding constituent of weld joint. The corrosion rates obtained from the model are compared with those estimated from mixed potential theory and two experimental techniques, namely immersion test and constant potential polarization test. The corrosion rate predicted using the model is within 10% of the estimate from the mixed potential theory, within 20% of that got from the immersion experiment and within 10% of that got from the constant potential polarization experiment for weld joint.

  7. Detailed DSMC surface chemistry modeling of the oxidation of carbon-based ablators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borner, Arnaud; Swaminathan-Gopalan, Krishnan; Stephani, Kelly A.; Mansour, Nagi N.

    2016-11-01

    This work employs a recently developed gas-surface interaction model (referred to herein as PSMM) constructed from molecular beam experimental data for use with the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. While recent models have been proposed to produce macroscopic rates consistent with the experimental measurements for use in CFD solvers, this work aims to reproduce the microscopic details (including angular distributions and time-of-flight distributions) obtained from the experimental data for modeling gas-surface interactions in DSMC. The different mechanisms considered for the PSMM model include adsorption, desorption, surface participating and direct impact mechanisms. The microscopic data of probabilities and characteristic frequencies for each type of reaction are obtained from the macroscopic parameters of reaction rate constants and sticking coefficients. Numerical simulations closely resembling a recent set of molecular beam experiments were performed using this model within DSMC, and the performance of the Zhluktov-Abe and Alba models is also assessed. The molecular beam experiments in-volved the bombardment of a relatively smooth vitreous carbon surface using a hyperthermal O/O2 beam to understand the product formation and the detailed reaction mechanisms and scattering at the surface. A comparison of the numerical flux distributions from the Zhluktov-Abe and Alba models with experimental flux distributions of the scattered products at different temperatures showed significant discrepancies. The PSMM model was found to reproduce the scattered product mole fractions as a function of temperature, as well as the reactively scattered CO time-of-flight data. Future work will aim to improve the DSMC predicted time-of-flight data for inelastically and elastically scattered O atoms based on the experimental data.

  8. Detailed modeling of soot formation and turbulence-radiation interactions in turbulent jet flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Ranjan S.

    a single set of parameters for all models involved, without specific adjustments. Very encouraging agreement is found for most of the quantities, representing a significant step forward in modeling turbulent sooting flames. A detailed analysis of the radiation characteristics of these flames is also undertaken. It is found that emission TRI was generally important for all the flames. In the laboratory scale flames, including TRI increases the radiative loss from the flame by up to 90%. Absorption TRI is found to be unimportant in laboratory-scale flames, but becomes important in the large (industrial scale) flame that was studied numerically.

  9. Further ALMA observations and detailed modeling of the Red Rectangle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bujarrabal, V.; Castro-Carrizo, A.; Alcolea, J.; Santander-García, M.; van Winckel, H.; Sánchez Contreras, C.

    2016-09-01

    Aims: We aim to study the rotating and expanding gas in the Red Rectangle, which is a well known bipolar nebula surrounding a double stellar system whose primary is a post-asymptotic giant branch (post-AGB) star. We analyze the properties of both components and the relation between them. Rotating disks have been very elusive in post-AGB nebulae, in which gas is almost always found to be in expansion. Methods: We present new high-quality ALMA observations of this source in C17O J = 6-5 and H13CN J = 4-3 line emission and results from a new reduction of already published 13CO J = 3-2 data. A detailed model fitting of all the molecular line data, also discussing previous maps and single-dish observations of lines of CO, CII, and CI, was performed using a sophisticated code that includes an accurate nonlocal treatment of radiative transfer in 2D (assuming axial symmetry). These observations (of low- and high-opacity lines requiring various degrees of excitation) and the corresponding modeling allowed us to deepen the analysis of the nebular properties. We also stress the uncertainties, particularly in the determination of the boundaries of the CO-rich gas and some properties of the outflow. Results: We confirm the presence of a rotating equatorial disk and an outflow, which is mainly formed of gas leaving the disk. The mass of the disk is ~0.01 M⊙, and that of the CO-rich outflow is around ten times smaller. High temperatures of ≳100 K are derived for most components. From comparison of the mass values, we roughly estimate the lifetime of the rotating disk, which is found to be of about 10 000 yr. Taking data of a few other post-AGB composite nebulae into account, we find that the lifetimes of disks around post-AGB stars typically range between about 5000 and more than 20 000 yr. The angular momentum of the disk is found to be high, ~9 M⊙ AU km s-1, which is comparable to that of the stellar system at present. Our observations of H13CN show a particularly wide

  10. Theoretical Modeling for Numerical Weather Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somerville, R. C. J.

    1984-01-01

    The goal is to utilize predictability theory and numerical experimentation to identify and understand some of the dynamical processes which must be modeled more realistically if large-scale numerical weather predictions are to be improved. The emphasis is on the use of relatively simple models to exlore the properties of physically comprehensive general circulation models (GCM's). A global linear quasi-geostrophic model and the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheric Sciences (GLAS) GCM were used to investigate several mechanisms which are responsible for the decay of large-scale forecast skill in mid-latitude numerical weather predictions. Five-day forecasts for an ensemble of cases were made using First GARP Global Experiment data. It was found that forecast skill depends crucially on the specification of the stationary forcing. A lack of stationary forcing leads to spurious westwad propagation of the ultralong waves. Forecasts made with stationary forcings derived from climatological data are superior to those using forcings inferred from observations immediately preceding the forecast period. Interhemispheric forecast differences were analyzed, and the model errors were compared to errors of a simple persistence-damped-to-climatology scheme and to errors of the GLAS GCM.

  11. Modeling supersonic combustion using a fully-implicit numerical method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maccormack, Robert W.; Wilson, Gregory J.

    1990-01-01

    A fully-implicit finite-volume algorithm for two-dimensional axisymmetric flows has been coupled to a detailed hydrogen-air reaction mechanism (13 species and 33 reactions) so that supersonic combustion phenomena may be investigated. Numerical computations are compared with ballistic-range shadowgraphs of Lehr (1972) that exhibit two discontinuities caused by a blunt body as it passes through a premixed stoichiometric hydrogen-air mixture. The suitability of the numerical procedure for simulating these double-front flows is shown. The requirements for the physical formulation and the numerical modeling of these flowfields are discussed. Finally, the sensitivity of these external flowfields to changes in certain key reaction rate constants is examined.

  12. GPU accelerated numerical simulations of viscoelastic phase separation model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Keda; Su, Jiaye; Guo, Hongxia

    2012-07-05

    We introduce a complete implementation of viscoelastic model for numerical simulations of the phase separation kinetics in dynamic asymmetry systems such as polymer blends and polymer solutions on a graphics processing unit (GPU) by CUDA language and discuss algorithms and optimizations in details. From studies of a polymer solution, we show that the GPU-based implementation can predict correctly the accepted results and provide about 190 times speedup over a single central processing unit (CPU). Further accuracy analysis demonstrates that both the single and the double precision calculations on the GPU are sufficient to produce high-quality results in numerical simulations of viscoelastic model. Therefore, the GPU-based viscoelastic model is very promising for studying many phase separation processes of experimental and theoretical interests that often take place on the large length and time scales and are not easily addressed by a conventional implementation running on a single CPU.

  13. Quantifying Numerical Model Accuracy and Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montoya, L. H.; Lynett, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    The 2011 Tohoku tsunami event has changed the logic on how to evaluate tsunami hazard on coastal communities. Numerical models are a key component for methodologies used to estimate tsunami risk. Model predictions are essential for the development of Tsunami Hazard Assessments (THA). By better understanding model bias and uncertainties and if possible minimizing them, a more accurate and reliable THA will result. In this study we compare runup height, inundation lines and flow velocity field measurements between GeoClaw and the Method Of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) predictions in the Sendai plain. Runup elevation and average inundation distance was in general overpredicted by the models. However, both models agree relatively well with each other when predicting maximum sea surface elevation and maximum flow velocities. Furthermore, to explore the variability and uncertainties in numerical models, MOST is used to compare predictions from 4 different grid resolutions (30m, 20m, 15m and 12m). Our work shows that predictions of particular products (runup and inundation lines) do not require the use of high resolution (less than 30m) Digital Elevation Maps (DEMs). When predicting runup heights and inundation lines, numerical convergence was achieved using the 30m resolution grid. On the contrary, poor convergence was found in the flow velocity predictions, particularly the 1 meter depth maximum flow velocities. Also, runup height measurements and elevations from the DEM were used to estimate model bias. The results provided in this presentation will help understand the uncertainties in model predictions and locate possible sources of errors within a model.

  14. Towards the assimilation of MODIS reflectance into the detailed snowpack model SURFEX/ISBA-Crocus.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charrois, L.; Cosme, E.; Dumont, M.; Lafaysse, M.; Morin, S.; Libois, Q.; Picard, G.

    2015-12-01

    Numerical simulations of snow on the ground are used for numerous scientific and operational applications such as avalanche hazard forecasting. Although the chain of models used in French mountain ranges for meteorological analysis and forecast (SAFRAN) and detailed snowpack modeling (SURFEX/ISBA-Crocus) usually perform reasonably well, significant differences with snowpack observations are common and are primarily attributed to the uncertainties in meteorological input and to the heterogeneity of snowpack conditions at all scales. So far, no snow observation is assimilated into this model chain, so that simulation errors can accumulate over the winter season. Current efforts are devoted to the assimilation of data from visible and near-infrared imagers into the snowpack model. These efforts rely on the recently developed "TARTES" optical scheme that computes reflectances at various wavelengths using the vertical profile of the physical properties of snow predicted by the snowpack model. In a first step, we performed ensemble simulations by perturbing the atmospheric forcing consistently with its estimated uncertainty. These experiments showed that the simulated snowpack evolution is extremely sensitive to this uncertainty, and that the assimilation of observations can greatly improve model results. In a second step, we performed assimilation experiments using synthetic imager observations and a particle filter. The experiments were carried out for the location of Col du Lautaret area (French Alps) over 5 hydrologic seasons. They provide a good insight about the potential and limitations of assimilating imager data to improve the representation of the snowpack.

  15. Automated Calibration For Numerical Models Of Riverflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Betsaida; Kopmann, Rebekka; Oladyshkin, Sergey

    2017-04-01

    Calibration of numerical models is fundamental since the beginning of all types of hydro system modeling, to approximate the parameters that can mimic the overall system behavior. Thus, an assessment of different deterministic and stochastic optimization methods is undertaken to compare their robustness, computational feasibility, and global search capacity. Also, the uncertainty of the most suitable methods is analyzed. These optimization methods minimize the objective function that comprises synthetic measurements and simulated data. Synthetic measurement data replace the observed data set to guarantee an existing parameter solution. The input data for the objective function derivate from a hydro-morphological dynamics numerical model which represents an 180-degree bend channel. The hydro- morphological numerical model shows a high level of ill-posedness in the mathematical problem. The minimization of the objective function by different candidate methods for optimization indicates a failure in some of the gradient-based methods as Newton Conjugated and BFGS. Others reveal partial convergence, such as Nelder-Mead, Polak und Ribieri, L-BFGS-B, Truncated Newton Conjugated, and Trust-Region Newton Conjugated Gradient. Further ones indicate parameter solutions that range outside the physical limits, such as Levenberg-Marquardt and LeastSquareRoot. Moreover, there is a significant computational demand for genetic optimization methods, such as Differential Evolution and Basin-Hopping, as well as for Brute Force methods. The Deterministic Sequential Least Square Programming and the scholastic Bayes Inference theory methods present the optimal optimization results. keywords: Automated calibration of hydro-morphological dynamic numerical model, Bayesian inference theory, deterministic optimization methods.

  16. Numerical Modelling Of Pumpkin Balloon Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakefield, D.

    Tensys have been involved in the numerical formfinding and load analysis of architectural stressed membrane structures for 15 years. They have recently broadened this range of activities into the `lighter than air' field with significant involvement in aerostat and heavy-lift hybrid airship design. Since early 2004 they have been investigating pumpkin balloon instability on behalf of the NASA ULDB programme. These studies are undertaken using inTENS, an in-house finite element program suite based upon the Dynamic Relaxation solution method and developed especially for the non-linear analysis and patterning of membrane structures. The paper describes the current state of an investigation that started with a numerical simulation of the lobed cylinder problem first studied by Calladine. The influence of material properties and local geometric deformation on stability is demonstrated. A number of models of complete pumpkin balloons have then been established, including a 64-gore balloon with geometry based upon Julian Nott's Endeavour. This latter clefted dramatically upon initial inflation, a phenomenon that has been reproduced in the numerical model. Ongoing investigations include the introduction of membrane contact modelling into inTENS and correlation studies with the series of large-scale ULDB models currently in preparation.

  17. Application of Detailed Chemical Kinetics to Combustion Instability Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-04

    the stability characteristics. 15. SUBJECT TERMS N /A 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a...include area code) N /A Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. 239.18 Application of Detailed Chemical Kinetics to Combustion...Frenklach, M., Moriarty, N ., Eiteneer, B., Goldenberg, M., Bowman, C., Hanson, R., Song, S., W. Gardiner, J., Lissianski, V., and Qin, Z., “GRI-Mech 3.0

  18. MIDA: A Multimodal Imaging-Based Detailed Anatomical Model of the Human Head and Neck

    PubMed Central

    Iacono, Maria Ida; Neufeld, Esra; Akinnagbe, Esther; Bower, Kelsey; Wolf, Johanna; Vogiatzis Oikonomidis, Ioannis; Sharma, Deepika; Lloyd, Bryn; Wilm, Bertram J.; Wyss, Michael; Pruessmann, Klaas P.; Jakab, Andras; Makris, Nikos; Cohen, Ethan D.; Kuster, Niels; Kainz, Wolfgang; Angelone, Leonardo M.

    2015-01-01

    Computational modeling and simulations are increasingly being used to complement experimental testing for analysis of safety and efficacy of medical devices. Multiple voxel- and surface-based whole- and partial-body models have been proposed in the literature, typically with spatial resolution in the range of 1–2 mm and with 10–50 different tissue types resolved. We have developed a multimodal imaging-based detailed anatomical model of the human head and neck, named “MIDA”. The model was obtained by integrating three different magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) modalities, the parameters of which were tailored to enhance the signals of specific tissues: i) structural T1- and T2-weighted MRIs; a specific heavily T2-weighted MRI slab with high nerve contrast optimized to enhance the structures of the ear and eye; ii) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) data to image the vasculature, and iii) diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to obtain information on anisotropy and fiber orientation. The unique multimodal high-resolution approach allowed resolving 153 structures, including several distinct muscles, bones and skull layers, arteries and veins, nerves, as well as salivary glands. The model offers also a detailed characterization of eyes, ears, and deep brain structures. A special automatic atlas-based segmentation procedure was adopted to include a detailed map of the nuclei of the thalamus and midbrain into the head model. The suitability of the model to simulations involving different numerical methods, discretization approaches, as well as DTI-based tensorial electrical conductivity, was examined in a case-study, in which the electric field was generated by transcranial alternating current stimulation. The voxel- and the surface-based versions of the models are freely available to the scientific community. PMID:25901747

  19. MIDA: A Multimodal Imaging-Based Detailed Anatomical Model of the Human Head and Neck.

    PubMed

    Iacono, Maria Ida; Neufeld, Esra; Akinnagbe, Esther; Bower, Kelsey; Wolf, Johanna; Vogiatzis Oikonomidis, Ioannis; Sharma, Deepika; Lloyd, Bryn; Wilm, Bertram J; Wyss, Michael; Pruessmann, Klaas P; Jakab, Andras; Makris, Nikos; Cohen, Ethan D; Kuster, Niels; Kainz, Wolfgang; Angelone, Leonardo M

    2015-01-01

    Computational modeling and simulations are increasingly being used to complement experimental testing for analysis of safety and efficacy of medical devices. Multiple voxel- and surface-based whole- and partial-body models have been proposed in the literature, typically with spatial resolution in the range of 1-2 mm and with 10-50 different tissue types resolved. We have developed a multimodal imaging-based detailed anatomical model of the human head and neck, named "MIDA". The model was obtained by integrating three different magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) modalities, the parameters of which were tailored to enhance the signals of specific tissues: i) structural T1- and T2-weighted MRIs; a specific heavily T2-weighted MRI slab with high nerve contrast optimized to enhance the structures of the ear and eye; ii) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) data to image the vasculature, and iii) diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to obtain information on anisotropy and fiber orientation. The unique multimodal high-resolution approach allowed resolving 153 structures, including several distinct muscles, bones and skull layers, arteries and veins, nerves, as well as salivary glands. The model offers also a detailed characterization of eyes, ears, and deep brain structures. A special automatic atlas-based segmentation procedure was adopted to include a detailed map of the nuclei of the thalamus and midbrain into the head model. The suitability of the model to simulations involving different numerical methods, discretization approaches, as well as DTI-based tensorial electrical conductivity, was examined in a case-study, in which the electric field was generated by transcranial alternating current stimulation. The voxel- and the surface-based versions of the models are freely available to the scientific community.

  20. Detailed 3D representations for object recognition and modeling.

    PubMed

    Zia, M Zeeshan; Stark, Michael; Schiele, Bernt; Schindler, Konrad

    2013-11-01

    Geometric 3D reasoning at the level of objects has received renewed attention recently in the context of visual scene understanding. The level of geometric detail, however, is typically limited to qualitative representations or coarse boxes. This is linked to the fact that today's object class detectors are tuned toward robust 2D matching rather than accurate 3D geometry, encouraged by bounding-box-based benchmarks such as Pascal VOC. In this paper, we revisit ideas from the early days of computer vision, namely, detailed, 3D geometric object class representations for recognition. These representations can recover geometrically far more accurate object hypotheses than just bounding boxes, including continuous estimates of object pose and 3D wireframes with relative 3D positions of object parts. In combination with robust techniques for shape description and inference, we outperform state-of-the-art results in monocular 3D pose estimation. In a series of experiments, we analyze our approach in detail and demonstrate novel applications enabled by such an object class representation, such as fine-grained categorization of cars and bicycles, according to their 3D geometry, and ultrawide baseline matching.

  1. Lattice Boltzmann model for numerical relativity.

    PubMed

    Ilseven, E; Mendoza, M

    2016-02-01

    In the Z4 formulation, Einstein equations are written as a set of flux conservative first-order hyperbolic equations that resemble fluid dynamics equations. Based on this formulation, we construct a lattice Boltzmann model for numerical relativity and validate it with well-established tests, also known as "apples with apples." Furthermore, we find that by increasing the relaxation time, we gain stability at the cost of losing accuracy, and by decreasing the lattice spacings while keeping a constant numerical diffusivity, the accuracy and stability of our simulations improve. Finally, in order to show the potential of our approach, a linear scaling law for parallelization with respect to number of CPU cores is demonstrated. Our model represents the first step in using lattice kinetic theory to solve gravitational problems.

  2. A Numerical Model for Atomtronic Circuit Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, Weng W.; Straatsma, Cameron J. E.; Anderson, Dana Z.

    2015-07-16

    A model for studying atomtronic devices and circuits based on finite-temperature Bose-condensed gases is presented. The approach involves numerically solving equations of motion for atomic populations and coherences, derived using the Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian and the Heisenberg picture. The resulting cluster expansion is truncated at a level giving balance between physics rigor and numerical demand mitigation. This approach allows parametric studies involving time scales that cover both the rapid population dynamics relevant to nonequilibrium state evolution, as well as the much longer time durations typical for reaching steady-state device operation. This model is demonstrated by studying the evolution of a Bose-condensed gas in the presence of atom injection and extraction in a double-well potential. In this configuration phase locking between condensates in each well of the potential is readily observed, and its influence on the evolution of the system is studied.

  3. Lattice Boltzmann model for numerical relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilseven, E.; Mendoza, M.

    2016-02-01

    In the Z4 formulation, Einstein equations are written as a set of flux conservative first-order hyperbolic equations that resemble fluid dynamics equations. Based on this formulation, we construct a lattice Boltzmann model for numerical relativity and validate it with well-established tests, also known as "apples with apples." Furthermore, we find that by increasing the relaxation time, we gain stability at the cost of losing accuracy, and by decreasing the lattice spacings while keeping a constant numerical diffusivity, the accuracy and stability of our simulations improve. Finally, in order to show the potential of our approach, a linear scaling law for parallelization with respect to number of CPU cores is demonstrated. Our model represents the first step in using lattice kinetic theory to solve gravitational problems.

  4. Modeling of Passive Acoustic Liners from High Fidelity Numerical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, Marcello do Areal Souto

    Noise reduction in aviation has been an important focus of study in the last few decades. One common solution is setting up acoustic liners in the internal walls of the engines. However, measurements in the laboratory with liners are expensive and time consuming. The present work proposes a nonlinear physics-based time domain model to predict the acoustic behavior of a given liner in a defined flow condition. The parameters of the model are defined by analysis of accurate numerical solutions of the flow obtained from a high-fidelity numerical code. The length of the cavity is taken into account by using an analytical procedure to account for internal reflections in the interior of the cavity. Vortices and jets originated from internal flow separations are confirmed to be important mechanisms of sound absorption, which defines the overall efficiency of the liner. Numerical simulations at different frequency, geometry and sound pressure level are studied in detail to define the model parameters. Comparisons with high-fidelity numerical simulations show that the proposed model is accurate, robust, and can be used to define a boundary condition simulating a liner in a high-fidelity code.

  5. Infrared radiation parameterizations in numerical climate models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Ming-Dah; Kratz, David P.; Ridgway, William

    1991-01-01

    This study presents various approaches to parameterizing the broadband transmission functions for utilization in numerical climate models. One-parameter scaling is applied to approximate a nonhomogeneous path with an equivalent homogeneous path, and the diffuse transmittances are either interpolated from precomputed tables or fit by analytical functions. Two-parameter scaling is applied to parameterizing the carbon dioxide and ozone transmission functions in both the lower and middle atmosphere. Parameterizations are given for the nitrous oxide and methane diffuse transmission functions.

  6. Avoiding numerical pitfalls in social force models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köster, Gerta; Treml, Franz; Gödel, Marion

    2013-06-01

    The social force model of Helbing and Molnár is one of the best known approaches to simulate pedestrian motion, a collective phenomenon with nonlinear dynamics. It is based on the idea that the Newtonian laws of motion mostly carry over to pedestrian motion so that human trajectories can be computed by solving a set of ordinary differential equations for velocity and acceleration. The beauty and simplicity of this ansatz are strong reasons for its wide spread. However, the numerical implementation is not without pitfalls. Oscillations, collisions, and instabilities occur even for very small step sizes. Classic solution ideas from molecular dynamics do not apply to the problem because the system is not Hamiltonian despite its source of inspiration. Looking at the model through the eyes of a mathematician, however, we realize that the right hand side of the differential equation is nondifferentiable and even discontinuous at critical locations. This produces undesirable behavior in the exact solution and, at best, severe loss of accuracy in efficient numerical schemes even in short range simulations. We suggest a very simple mollified version of the social force model that conserves the desired dynamic properties of the original many-body system but elegantly and cost efficiently resolves several of the issues concerning stability and numerical resolution.

  7. Numerical modeling of the acoustic guitar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaigne, Antoine; Derveaux, Grégoire; Joly, Patrick; Bécache, Eliane

    2003-10-01

    An interactive DVD has been created, based on a numerical model of the acoustic guitar. In a first chapter, the retained physical model is described and illustrated, from the pluck to the 3D radiation field. The second chapter is devoted to the presentation of the numerical tools used for solving the equations of the model. Numerical simulations of plate vibrations and radiated sound pressure are shown in the third chapter. A number of simulated sounds are presented and analyzed in the fourth chapter. In addition, the DVD includes a discussion between a guitar maker, an acoustician, a guitar player and a mathematician. This discussion is entitled ``towards a common language.'' Its aim is to show the interest of simulations with respect to complementary professional approaches of the instrument. This DVD received the Henri Poincaré Prize from the 8th Research Film Festival of Nancy (June 2003), sponsored by the CNRS, in the category ``Documents for the scientific community and illustrations of the research for teaching purpose.''

  8. Advanced Numerical Model for Irradiated Concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Giorla, Alain B.

    2015-03-01

    In this report, we establish a numerical model for concrete exposed to irradiation to address these three critical points. The model accounts for creep in the cement paste and its coupling with damage, temperature and relative humidity. The shift in failure mode with the loading rate is also properly represented. The numerical model for creep has been validated and calibrated against different experiments in the literature [Wittmann, 1970, Le Roy, 1995]. Results from a simplified model are shown to showcase the ability of numerical homogenization to simulate irradiation effects in concrete. In future works, the complete model will be applied to the analysis of the irradiation experiments of Elleuch et al. [1972] and Kelly et al. [1969]. This requires a careful examination of the experimental environmental conditions as in both cases certain critical information are missing, including the relative humidity history. A sensitivity analysis will be conducted to provide lower and upper bounds of the concrete expansion under irradiation, and check if the scatter in the simulated results matches the one found in experiments. The numerical and experimental results will be compared in terms of expansion and loss of mechanical stiffness and strength. Both effects should be captured accordingly by the model to validate it. Once the model has been validated on these two experiments, it can be applied to simulate concrete from nuclear power plants. To do so, the materials used in these concrete must be as well characterized as possible. The main parameters required are the mechanical properties of each constituent in the concrete (aggregates, cement paste), namely the elastic modulus, the creep properties, the tensile and compressive strength, the thermal expansion coefficient, and the drying shrinkage. These can be either measured experimentally, estimated from the initial composition in the case of cement paste, or back-calculated from mechanical tests on concrete. If some

  9. Detailed chemical kinetic modeling of diesel combustion with oxygenated fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Pitz, W J; Curran, H J; Fisher, E; Glaude, P A; Marinov, N M; Westbrook, C K

    1999-10-28

    The influence of oxygenated hydrocarbons as additives to diesel fuels on ignition, NOx emissions and soot production has been examined using a detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism. N-heptane was used as a representative diesel fuel, and methanol, ethanol, dimethyl ether and dimethoxymethane were used as oxygenated fuel additives. It was found that addition of oxygenated hydrocarbons reduced NOx levels and reduced the production of soot precursors. When the overall oxygen content in the fuel reached approximately 25% by mass, production of soot precursors fell effectively to zero, in agreement with experimental studies. The kinetic factors responsible for these observations are discussed.

  10. Numerical modeling of bacteria propelled micromotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelani, L.; Di Leonardo, R.

    2011-09-01

    We describe a numerical model for simulating micro-objects immersed in a bath of self-propelled organisms. By using simplified models for swimming cells (2 beads rigidly connected and subject to a self-propelling force) and taking into account various interaction terms (collisions, hydrodynamics), we simulate different shaped devices immersed in the bacterial bath. Considering rotating cog-wheels and translating shuttles we demonstrate the emergence of unidirectional motions, whose efficiency depends on the object shape as well as on bacterial properties. The role of tumbling mechanism and hydrodynamic interactions is analyzed.

  11. Starting laminar plumes: Comparison of laboratory and numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vatteville, Judith; van Keken, Peter E.; Limare, Angela; Davaille, Anne

    2009-12-01

    A detailed comparison of starting laminar plumes in viscous fluids is provided using the complementary approaches of laboratory modeling and numerical simulation. In the laboratory experiments the plumes are started in a nearly isoviscous silicone oil with heat supplied through a fixed circular source. The temperature field is measured by differential interferometry and thermochromic liquid crystals. The velocity field is determined by particle image velocimetry. Numerical simulations of the laboratory experiments are performed using a finite element method that employs the measured properties of the physical oil and the heating history. No further adjustments are made to match the laboratory results. For fluids at two different viscosities and for variable power supplied to the plume there is excellent agreement in the temporal evolution and fine spatial detail of the plume. Minor differences remain, particulary in the transient stage of the plume in the low-viscosity fluid, but the differences are within the experimental uncertainties. In contrast, the assumption of constant viscosity in the numerical models leads to differences that are larger than the experimental uncertainties, demonstrating that these near-isoviscous fluids should not be considered to have constant viscosity.

  12. Receiving water quality assessment: comparison between simplified and detailed integrated urban modelling approaches.

    PubMed

    Mannina, Giorgio; Viviani, Gaspare

    2010-01-01

    Urban water quality management often requires use of numerical models allowing the evaluation of the cause-effect relationship between the input(s) (i.e. rainfall, pollutant concentrations on catchment surface and in sewer system) and the resulting water quality response. The conventional approach to the system (i.e. sewer system, wastewater treatment plant and receiving water body), considering each component separately, does not enable optimisation of the whole system. However, recent gains in understanding and modelling make it possible to represent the system as a whole and optimise its overall performance. Indeed, integrated urban drainage modelling is of growing interest for tools to cope with Water Framework Directive requirements. Two different approaches can be employed for modelling the whole urban drainage system: detailed and simplified. Each has its advantages and disadvantages. Specifically, detailed approaches can offer a higher level of reliability in the model results, but can be very time consuming from the computational point of view. Simplified approaches are faster but may lead to greater model uncertainty due to an over-simplification. To gain insight into the above problem, two different modelling approaches have been compared with respect to their uncertainty. The first urban drainage integrated model approach uses the Saint-Venant equations and the 1D advection-dispersion equations, for the quantity and for the quality aspects, respectively. The second model approach consists of the simplified reservoir model. The analysis used a parsimonious bespoke model developed in previous studies. For the uncertainty analysis, the Generalised Likelihood Uncertainty Estimation (GLUE) procedure was used. Model reliability was evaluated on the basis of capacity of globally limiting the uncertainty. Both models have a good capability to fit the experimental data, suggesting that all adopted approaches are equivalent both for quantity and quality. The

  13. a Numerical Model for Subsonic Acoustic Choking.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walkington, Noel John

    In aircraft turbofan inlets, fan generated noise is observed experimentally to be significantly attenuated at high subsonic inlet Mach numbers. This phenomenon cannot be predicted by linear acoustic theory. In order to study the physical process by which this may occur, a numerical algorithm has been developed to solve a related nonlinear problem in one dimensional gas dynamics. The nonlinear solution admits the possibility of wave steepening and shock waves. Approximate solutions are obtained using several finite difference schemes. The boundary conditions required to model an acoustic source and an anechoic termination are developed. The numerical solutions agree closely with those obtained using the method of matched asymptotic expansions. Solutions involving shock waves exhibit a large reduction in the ratio of transmitted to incident power. This offers an explanation for acoustic choking. The results indicate that more power is dissipated as the Mach number, sound amplitude and frequency are increased. These observations are in agreement with those observed experimentally.

  14. Details of Programming a Model of Children's Counting in ACTP.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Mary S.; Greeno, James G.

    Presented is an introduction to the operation and mechanics of the ACTP production system, a version of Anderson's (1976) ACT system. ACTP is already in use modeling geometry theorem proving and counting of a set of objects, and has been identified as a potentially useful programing framework for developing models of the cognitive processes used…

  15. Constraining Numerical Geodynamo Modeling with Surface Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, Weijia; Tangborn, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    Numerical dynamo solutions have traditionally been generated entirely by a set of self-consistent differential equations that govern the spatial-temporal variation of the magnetic field, velocity field and other fields related to dynamo processes. In particular, those solutions are obtained with parameters very different from those appropriate for the Earth s core. Geophysical application of the numerical results therefore depends on correct understanding of the differences (errors) between the model outputs and the true states (truth) in the outer core. Part of the truth can be observed at the surface in the form of poloidal magnetic field. To understand these differences, or errors, we generate new initial model state (analysis) by assimilating sequentially the model outputs with the surface geomagnetic observations using an optimal interpolation scheme. The time evolution of the core state is then controlled by our MoSST core dynamics model. The final outputs (forecasts) are then compared with the surface observations as a means to test the success of the assimilation. We use the surface geomagnetic data back to year 1900 for our studies, with 5-year forecast and 20-year analysis periods. We intend to use the result; to understand time variation of the errors with the assimilation sequences, and the impact of the assimilation on other unobservable quantities, such as the toroidal field and the fluid velocity in the core.

  16. Testing Numerical Dynamo Models Against Experimental Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gissinger, C. J.; Fauve, S.; Dormy, E.

    2007-12-01

    Significant progress has been achieved over the past few years in describing the geomagnetic field using computer models for dynamo action. Such models are so far limited to parameter regimes which are very remote from actual values relevant to the Earth core or any liquid metal (the magnetic Prandtl number is always over estimated by a factor at least 104). While existing models successfully reproduce many of the magnetic observations, it is difficult to assert their validity. The recent success of an experimental homogeneous unconstrained dynamo (VKS) provides a new way to investigate dynamo action in turbulent conducting flows, but it also offers a chance to test the validity of exisiting numerical models. We use a code originaly written for the Geodynamo (Parody) and apply it to the experimental configuration. The direct comparison of simulations and experiments is of great interest to test the predictive value of numerical simulations for dynamo action. These turbulent simulations allow us to approach issues which are very relevant for geophysical dynamos, especially the competition between different magnetic modes and the dynamics of reversals.

  17. How to Decide on Modeling Details: Risk and Benefit Assessment.

    PubMed

    Özilgen, Mustafa

    2017-01-01

    Mathematical models based on thermodynamic, kinetic, heat, and mass transfer analysis are central to this chapter. Microbial growth, death, enzyme inactivation models, and the modeling of material properties, including those pertinent to conduction and convection heating, mass transfer, such as diffusion and convective mass transfer, and thermodynamic properties, such as specific heat, enthalpy, and Gibbs free energy of formation and specific chemical exergy are also needed in this task. The origins, simplifying assumptions, and uses of model equations are discussed in this chapter, together with their benefits. The simplified forms of these models are sometimes referred to as "laws," such as "the first law of thermodynamics" or "Fick's second law." Starting to modeling a study with such "laws" without considering the conditions under which they are valid runs the risk of ending up with erronous conclusions. On the other hand, models started with fundamental concepts and simplified with appropriate considerations may offer explanations for the phenomena which may not be obtained just with measurements or unprocessed experimental data. The discussion presented here is strengthened with case studies and references to the literature.

  18. Numerical modelling of mixed-sediment consolidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasso, Florent; Le Hir, Pierre; Bassoullet, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    Sediment transport modelling in estuarine environments, characterised by cohesive and non-cohesive sediment mixtures, has to consider a time variation of erodibility due to consolidation. Generally, validated by settling column experiments, mud consolidation is now fairly well simulated; however, numerical models still have difficulty to simulate accurately the sedimentation and consolidation of mixed sediments for a wide range of initial conditions. This is partly due to the difficulty to formulate the contribution of sand in the hindered settling regime when segregation does not clearly occur. Based on extensive settling experiments with mud-sand mixtures, the objective of this study was to improve the numerical modelling of mixed-sediment consolidation by focusing on segregation processes. We used constitutive relationships following the fractal theory associated with a new segregation formulation based on the relative mud concentration. Using specific sets of parameters calibrated for each test—with different initial sediment concentration and sand content—the model achieved excellent prediction skills for simulating sediment height evolutions and concentration vertical profiles. It highlighted the model capacity to simulate properly the segregation occurrence for mud-sand mixtures characterised by a wide range of initial conditions. Nevertheless, calibration parameters varied significantly, as the fractal number ranged from 2.64 to 2.77. This study investigated the relevance of using a common set of parameters, which is generally required for 3D sediment transport modelling. Simulations were less accurate but remained satisfactory in an operational approach. Finally, a specific formulation for natural estuarine environments was proposed, simulating correctly the sedimentation-consolidation processes of mud-sand mixtures through 3D sediment transport modelling.

  19. Toward a detailed computational model for the mammalian circadian clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leloup, Jean-Christophe; Goldbeter, Albert

    2003-06-01

    We present a computational model for the mammalian circadian clock based on the intertwined positive and negative regulatory loops involving the Per, Cry, Bmal1, Clock, and Rev-Erb genes. In agreement with experimental observations, the model can give rise to sustained circadian oscillations in continuous darkness, characterized by an antiphase relationship between Per/Cry/Rev-Erb and Bmal1 mRNAs. Sustained oscillations correspond to the rhythms autonomously generated by suprachiasmatic nuclei. For other parameter values, damped oscillations can also be obtained in the model. These oscillations, which transform into sustained oscillations when coupled to a periodic signal, correspond to rhythms produced by peripheral tissues. When incorporating the light-induced expression of the Per gene, the model accounts for entrainment of the oscillations by light-dark cycles. Simulations show that the phase of the oscillations can then vary by several hours with relatively minor changes in parameter values. Such a lability of the phase could account for physiological disorders related to circadian rhythms in humans, such as advanced or delayed sleep phase syndrome, whereas the lack of entrainment by light-dark cycles can be related to the non-24h sleep-wake syndrome. The model uncovers the possible existence of multiple sources of oscillatory behavior. Thus, in conditions where the indirect negative autoregulation of Per and Cry expression is inoperative, the model indicates the possibility that sustained oscillations might still arise from the negative autoregulation of Bmal1 expression.

  20. Computational modeling reveals molecular details of epidermal growth factor binding

    PubMed Central

    Mayawala, Kapil; Vlachos, Dionisios G; Edwards, Jeremy S

    2005-01-01

    Background The ErbB family of receptors are dysregulated in a number of cancers, and the signaling pathway of this receptor family is a critical target for several anti-cancer drugs. Therefore a detailed understanding of the mechanisms of receptor activation is critical. However, despite a plethora of biochemical studies and recent single particle tracking experiments, the early molecular mechanisms involving epidermal growth factor (EGF) binding and EGF receptor (EGFR) dimerization are not as well understood. Herein, we describe a spatially distributed Monte Carlo based simulation framework to enable the simulation of in vivo receptor diffusion and dimerization. Results Our simulation results are in agreement with the data from single particle tracking and biochemical experiments on EGFR. Furthermore, the simulations reveal that the sequence of receptor-receptor and ligand-receptor reaction events depends on the ligand concentration, receptor density and receptor mobility. Conclusion Our computer simulations reveal the mechanism of EGF binding on EGFR. Overall, we show that spatial simulation of receptor dynamics can be used to gain a mechanistic understanding of receptor activation which may in turn enable improved cancer treatments in the future. PMID:16318625

  1. Derivation of a quantitative minimal model from a detailed elementary-step mechanism supported by mathematical coupling analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaik, O. S.; Kammerer, J.; Gorecki, J.; Lebiedz, D.

    2005-12-01

    Accurate experimental data increasingly allow the development of detailed elementary-step mechanisms for complex chemical and biochemical reaction systems. Model reduction techniques are widely applied to obtain representations in lower-dimensional phase space which are more suitable for mathematical analysis, efficient numerical simulation, and model-based control tasks. Here, we exploit a recently implemented numerical algorithm for error-controlled computation of the minimum dimension required for a still accurate reduced mechanism based on automatic time scale decomposition and relaxation of fast modes. We determine species contributions to the active (slow) dynamical modes of the reaction system and exploit this information in combination with quasi-steady-state and partial-equilibrium approximations for explicit model reduction of a novel detailed chemical mechanism for the Ru-catalyzed light-sensitive Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction. The existence of a minimum dimension of seven is demonstrated to be mandatory for the reduced model to show good quantitative consistency with the full model in numerical simulations. We derive such a maximally reduced seven-variable model from the detailed elementary-step mechanism and demonstrate that it reproduces quantitatively accurately the dynamical features of the full model within a given accuracy tolerance.

  2. Detailed investigation of cavitation and supercavitation around different geometries using various turbulence and mass transfer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pendar, M. R.; Roohi, E.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper cavitation around 3D hemispherical head-form body as well as disk and conical cavitators were studied numerically with particular emphasis on detailed comparisons of the various turbulence and mass transfer models. Dynamic and unsteady behaviors of cavitation were simulated using the large eddy simulation (LES) and k-ω SST turbulence models together with Kunz, Sauer and Zwart mass transfer models. In addition, the compressive volume of fluid (VOF) method is used to track the cavity interface. Simulation is performed under the framework of the OpenFOAM package. Discussions on the boundary layer separation, re-entrant jet, cavity cloud, vortices and pressure/volume fraction contours over a broad range of cavitation numbers, especially in very low cavitation numbers, are provided. Our numerical results compared fairly well with experimental data and a wide set of analytical relations. Our results indicate that the most accurate solutions will be obtained with the LES/ Kunz approach. Moreover, for the first time, we present a correlation between the cavity length and diameter for hemispherical head-form bodies.

  3. Posttraumatic orbital emphysema: a numerical model.

    PubMed

    Skorek, Andrzej; Kłosowski, Paweł; Plichta, Lukasz; Raczyńska, Dorota; Zmuda Trzebiatowski, Marcin; Lemski, Paweł

    2014-01-01

    Orbital emphysema is a common symptom accompanying orbital fracture. The pathomechanism is still not recognized and the usually assumed cause, elevated pressure in the upper airways connected with sneezing or coughing, does not always contribute to the occurrence of this type of fracture. Observations based on the finite model (simulating blowout type fracture) of the deformations of the inferior orbital wall after a strike in its lower rim. Authors created a computer numeric model of the orbit with specified features-thickness and resilience modulus. During simulation an evenly spread 14400 N force was applied to the nodular points in the inferior rim (the maximal value not causing cracking of the outer rim, but only ruptures in the inferior wall). The observation was made from 1 · 10(-3) to 1 · 10(-2) second after a strike. Right after a strike dislocations of the inferior orbital wall toward the maxillary sinus were observed. Afterwards a retrograde wave of the dislocation of the inferior wall toward the orbit was noticed. Overall dislocation amplitude reached about 6 mm. Based on a numeric model of the orbit submitted to a strike in the inferior wall an existence of a retrograde shock wave causing orbital emphysema has been found.

  4. Posttraumatic Orbital Emphysema: A Numerical Model

    PubMed Central

    Skorek, Andrzej; Kłosowski, Paweł; Plichta, Łukasz; Zmuda Trzebiatowski, Marcin; Lemski, Paweł

    2014-01-01

    Orbital emphysema is a common symptom accompanying orbital fracture. The pathomechanism is still not recognized and the usually assumed cause, elevated pressure in the upper airways connected with sneezing or coughing, does not always contribute to the occurrence of this type of fracture. Observations based on the finite model (simulating blowout type fracture) of the deformations of the inferior orbital wall after a strike in its lower rim. Authors created a computer numeric model of the orbit with specified features—thickness and resilience modulus. During simulation an evenly spread 14400 N force was applied to the nodular points in the inferior rim (the maximal value not causing cracking of the outer rim, but only ruptures in the inferior wall). The observation was made from 1 · 10−3 to 1 · 10−2 second after a strike. Right after a strike dislocations of the inferior orbital wall toward the maxillary sinus were observed. Afterwards a retrograde wave of the dislocation of the inferior wall toward the orbit was noticed. Overall dislocation amplitude reached about 6 mm. Based on a numeric model of the orbit submitted to a strike in the inferior wall an existence of a retrograde shock wave causing orbital emphysema has been found. PMID:25309749

  5. A numerical method to model excitable cells.

    PubMed Central

    Joyner, R W; Westerfield, M; Moore, J W; Stockbridge, N

    1978-01-01

    We have extended a fast, stable, and accurate method for the numerical solution of cable equations to include changes in geometry and membrane properties in order to model a single excitable cell realistically. In addition, by including the provision that the radius may be a function of distance along an axis, we have achieved a general and powerful method for simulating a cell with any number of branched processes, any or all of which may be nonuniform in diameter, and with no restriction on the branching pattern. PMID:656539

  6. PWR internal flow modeling with fuel assemblies details

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, E.; Yan, J.; Karoutas, Z.; Gehin, J.; Brewster, R.; Baglietto, E.

    2012-07-01

    This study is an example of a massive parallel computing of the coolant flow in a nuclear reactor. It resolves the flow velocities in each assembly on pin level and predicts the flow distribution in complex geometries such as the lower and upper reactor plenums. The size of the developed model (1.035 billion cells) required the runs to be executed on the NCCS clusters (www.nccs.gov). STAR-CCM+ code (www.ed-adapco.com) was installed on two clusters: JAGUARXT5 and FROST, both of which were capable of executing this model. (authors)

  7. Objective calibration of numerical weather prediction models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voudouri, A.; Khain, P.; Carmona, I.; Bellprat, O.; Grazzini, F.; Avgoustoglou, E.; Bettems, J. M.; Kaufmann, P.

    2017-07-01

    Numerical weather prediction (NWP) and climate models use parameterization schemes for physical processes, which often include free or poorly confined parameters. Model developers normally calibrate the values of these parameters subjectively to improve the agreement of forecasts with available observations, a procedure referred as expert tuning. A practicable objective multi-variate calibration method build on a quadratic meta-model (MM), that has been applied for a regional climate model (RCM) has shown to be at least as good as expert tuning. Based on these results, an approach to implement the methodology to an NWP model is presented in this study. Challenges in transferring the methodology from RCM to NWP are not only restricted to the use of higher resolution and different time scales. The sensitivity of the NWP model quality with respect to the model parameter space has to be clarified, as well as optimize the overall procedure, in terms of required amount of computing resources for the calibration of an NWP model. Three free model parameters affecting mainly turbulence parameterization schemes were originally selected with respect to their influence on the variables associated to daily forecasts such as daily minimum and maximum 2 m temperature as well as 24 h accumulated precipitation. Preliminary results indicate that it is both affordable in terms of computer resources and meaningful in terms of improved forecast quality. In addition, the proposed methodology has the advantage of being a replicable procedure that can be applied when an updated model version is launched and/or customize the same model implementation over different climatological areas.

  8. A detailed numerical analysis of asymmetrical density distribution in Saturn's F ring during an encounter with Prometheus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, Phil J.; Kusmartsev, Feo V.

    2014-04-01

    Saturn's rings, reminiscent of an early Solar system present a unique opportunity to investigate experimentally some mechanisms thought to be responsible for planet and planetesimal formation in protoplanetary discs. Here, we extended the comparison of our numerical models of Prometheus encountering the F ring employing non-interacting and interacting particles. Higher resolution analysis revealed that the density increases known to exist at channel edges is more complex and localized than previously thought. Asymmetry between density increases on channel edges revealed that the channel edge facing way from Prometheus to be the most stable but with lowest maximum increases. However, on the channel edge facing Prometheus the interacting model showed large chaotic fluctuations in the maximum density of some clumps, much larger than those of the other channel. The likely cause of this asymmetry is a variance in localized turbulence introduced into the F ring by Prometheus. High-resolution velocity dispersion maps showed that there was a spatial link between the highest densities and the highest velocity dispersions in the interacting model. Thus, suggesting that the high velocity dispersion we see is the reason for the observed inhomogeneous distribution of fans (evidence of embedded moonlets) on some of the channel edges facing Prometheus.

  9. Probing spatial homogeneity with LTB models: a detailed discussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redlich, M.; Bolejko, K.; Meyer, S.; Lewis, G. F.; Bartelmann, M.

    2014-10-01

    Do current observational data confirm the assumptions of the cosmological principle, or is there statistical evidence for deviations from spatial homogeneity on large scales? To address these questions, we developed a flexible framework based on spherically symmetric, but radially inhomogeneous Lemaître-Tolman-Bondi (LTB) models with synchronous Big Bang. We expanded the (local) matter density profile in terms of flexible interpolation schemes and orthonormal polynomials. A Monte Carlo technique in combination with recent observational data was used to systematically vary the shape of these profiles. In the first part of this article, we reconsider giant LTB voids without dark energy to investigate whether extremely fine-tuned mass profiles can reconcile these models with current data. While the local Hubble rate and supernovae can easily be fitted without dark energy, however, model-independent constraints from the Planck 2013 data require an unrealistically low local Hubble rate, which is strongly inconsistent with the observed value; this result agrees well with previous studies. In the second part, we explain why it seems natural to extend our framework by a non-zero cosmological constant, which then allows us to perform general tests of the cosmological principle. Moreover, these extended models facilitate explorating whether fluctuations in the local matter density profile might potentially alleviate the tension between local and global measurements of the Hubble rate, as derived from Cepheid-calibrated type Ia supernovae and CMB experiments, respectively. We show that current data provide no evidence for deviations from spatial homogeneity on large scales. More accurate constraints are required to ultimately confirm the validity of the cosmological principle, however.

  10. NUMERICAL MODELING OF CATHODE CONTACT MATERIAL DENSIFICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Koeppel, Brian J.; Liu, Wenning N.; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2011-11-01

    Numerical modeling was used to simulate the constrained sintering process of the cathode contact layer during assembly of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). A finite element model based on the continuum theory for sintering of porous bodies was developed and used to investigate candidate low-temperature cathode contact materials. Constitutive parameters for various contact materials under investigation were estimated from dilatometry screening tests, and the influence of processing time, processing temperature, initial grain size, and applied compressive stress on the free sintering response was predicted for selected candidate materials. The densification behavior and generated stresses within a 5-cell planar SOFC stack during sintering, high temperature operation, and room temperature shutdown were predicted. Insufficient constrained densification was observed in the stack at the proposed heat treatment, but beneficial effects of reduced grain size, compressive stack preload, and reduced thermal expansion coefficient on the contact layer densification and stresses were observed.

  11. Convecting reference frames and invariant numerical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bihlo, Alexander; Nave, Jean-Christophe

    2014-09-01

    In the recent paper by Bernardini et al. [1] the discrepancy in the performance of finite difference and spectral models for simulations of flows with a preferential direction of propagation was studied. In a simplified investigation carried out using the viscous Burgers equation the authors attributed the poorer numerical results of finite difference models to a violation of Galilean invariance in the discretization and propose to carry out the computations in a reference frame moving with the bulk velocity of the flow. Here we further discuss this problem and relate it to known results on invariant discretization schemes. Non-invariant and invariant finite difference discretizations of Burgers equation are proposed and compared with the discretization using the remedy proposed by Bernardini et al.

  12. Numerical modeling of dish-Stirling reflux solar receivers

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, R.E.

    1990-01-01

    Using reflux solar receivers to collect solar energy for dish-Stirling electric power generation systems is currently being investigated by several organizations, including Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. In support of this program, Sandia has developed two numerical models describing the energy transfer within and thermal performance of pool-boiler and heat-pipe receivers. Both models are applicable to axisymmetric geometries and they both consider the radiative and convective energy transfer within the receiver cavity, the conductive and convective energy transfer within the receiver cavity, the conductive and convective energy transfer from the receiver housing, and the energy transfer to the receiver working fluid. In these models, the radiative transfer within the receiver is analyzed using a two-band (solar and infrared) net-radiation formulation for enclosure radiation. Empirical convective correlations describe the convective heat transfer from the cavity to the surroundings. The primary difference between the models is the level of detail in modeling the heat conduction through the receiver walls. The more detailed model uses a two-dimensional finite control volume method, whereas the simpler model uses a one-dimensional thermal resistance approach. 20 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Multigrid Method for Modeling Multi-Dimensional Combustion with Detailed Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, Xiaoqing; Liu, Chaoqun; Liao, Changming; Liu, Zhining; McCormick, Steve

    1996-01-01

    A highly accurate and efficient numerical method is developed for modeling 3-D reacting flows with detailed chemistry. A contravariant velocity-based governing system is developed for general curvilinear coordinates to maintain simplicity of the continuity equation and compactness of the discretization stencil. A fully-implicit backward Euler technique and a third-order monotone upwind-biased scheme on a staggered grid are used for the respective temporal and spatial terms. An efficient semi-coarsening multigrid method based on line-distributive relaxation is used as the flow solver. The species equations are solved in a fully coupled way and the chemical reaction source terms are treated implicitly. Example results are shown for a 3-D gas turbine combustor with strong swirling inflows.

  14. A detailed study of the Beddington-DeAngelis predator-prey model.

    PubMed

    Haque, Mainul

    2011-11-01

    The present investigation accounts for the influence of intra-specific competition among predators in the original Beddington-DeAngelis predator-prey model. We offer a detailed mathematical analysis of the model to describe some of the significant results that may be expected to arise from the interplay of deterministic and stochastic biological phenomena and processes. In particular, stability (local and global) and bifurcation (Saddle-node, Transcritical, Hopf-Andronov, Bogdanov-Takens) analysis of this model are conducted. Corresponding results from previous well known predator-prey models are compared with the current findings. Nevertheless, we also allow this model in stochastic environment with the influences of both, uncorrelated "white" noise and correlated "coloured" noise. This showing that competition among the predator population is beneficial for a number of predator-prey models by keeping them stable around its positive interior equilibrium (i.e. when both populations co-exist), under environmental stochasticity. Comparisons of these findings with the results of some earlier related investigations allow the general conclusion that predator intra-species competition benefits the predator-prey system under both deterministic and stochastic environments. Finally, an extended discussion of the ecological implications of the analytical and numerical results concludes the paper.

  15. Impact of a highly detailed emission inventory on modeling accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taghavi, M.; Cautenet, S.; Arteta, J.

    2005-03-01

    During Expérience sur Site pour COntraindre les Modèles de Pollution atmosphérique et de Transport d'Emissions (ESCOMPTE) campaign (June 10 to July 14, 2001), two pollution events observed during an intensive measurement period (IOP2a and IOP2b) have been simulated. The comprehensive Regional Atmospheric Modeling Systems (RAMS) model, version 4.3, coupled online with a chemical module including 29 species is used to follow the chemistry of a polluted zone over Southern France. This online method takes advantage of a parallel code and use of the powerful computer SGI 3800. Runs are performed with two emission inventories: the Emission Pre Inventory (EPI) and the Main Emission Inventory (MEI). The latter is more recent and has a high resolution. The redistribution of simulated chemical species (ozone and nitrogen oxides) is compared with aircraft and surface station measurements for both runs at regional scale. We show that the MEI inventory is more efficient than the EPI in retrieving the redistribution of chemical species in space (three-dimensional) and time. In surface stations, MEI is superior especially for primary species, like nitrogen oxides. The ozone pollution peaks obtained from an inventory, such as EPI, have a large uncertainty. To understand the realistic geographical distribution of pollutants and to obtain a good order of magnitude in ozone concentration (in space and time), a high-resolution inventory like MEI is necessary. Coupling RAMS-Chemistry with MEI provides a very efficient tool able to simulate pollution plumes even in a region with complex circulations, such as the ESCOMPTE zone.

  16. Adaptive Numerical Algorithms in Space Weather Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toth, Gabor; vanderHolst, Bart; Sokolov, Igor V.; DeZeeuw, Darren; Gombosi, Tamas I.; Fang, Fang; Manchester, Ward B.; Meng, Xing; Nakib, Dalal; Powell, Kenneth G.; Stout, Quentin F.; Glocer, Alex; Ma, Ying-Juan; Opher, Merav

    2010-01-01

    Space weather describes the various processes in the Sun-Earth system that present danger to human health and technology. The goal of space weather forecasting is to provide an opportunity to mitigate these negative effects. Physics-based space weather modeling is characterized by disparate temporal and spatial scales as well as by different physics in different domains. A multi-physics system can be modeled by a software framework comprising of several components. Each component corresponds to a physics domain, and each component is represented by one or more numerical models. The publicly available Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF) can execute and couple together several components distributed over a parallel machine in a flexible and efficient manner. The framework also allows resolving disparate spatial and temporal scales with independent spatial and temporal discretizations in the various models. Several of the computationally most expensive domains of the framework are modeled by the Block-Adaptive Tree Solar wind Roe Upwind Scheme (BATS-R-US) code that can solve various forms of the magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equations, including Hall, semi-relativistic, multi-species and multi-fluid MHD, anisotropic pressure, radiative transport and heat conduction. Modeling disparate scales within BATS-R-US is achieved by a block-adaptive mesh both in Cartesian and generalized coordinates. Most recently we have created a new core for BATS-R-US: the Block-Adaptive Tree Library (BATL) that provides a general toolkit for creating, load balancing and message passing in a 1, 2 or 3 dimensional block-adaptive grid. We describe the algorithms of BATL and demonstrate its efficiency and scaling properties for various problems. BATS-R-US uses several time-integration schemes to address multiple time-scales: explicit time stepping with fixed or local time steps, partially steady-state evolution, point-implicit, semi-implicit, explicit/implicit, and fully implicit numerical

  17. Adaptive numerical algorithms in space weather modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, Gábor; van der Holst, Bart; Sokolov, Igor V.; De Zeeuw, Darren L.; Gombosi, Tamas I.; Fang, Fang; Manchester, Ward B.; Meng, Xing; Najib, Dalal; Powell, Kenneth G.; Stout, Quentin F.; Glocer, Alex; Ma, Ying-Juan; Opher, Merav

    2012-02-01

    Space weather describes the various processes in the Sun-Earth system that present danger to human health and technology. The goal of space weather forecasting is to provide an opportunity to mitigate these negative effects. Physics-based space weather modeling is characterized by disparate temporal and spatial scales as well as by different relevant physics in different domains. A multi-physics system can be modeled by a software framework comprising several components. Each component corresponds to a physics domain, and each component is represented by one or more numerical models. The publicly available Space Weather Modeling Framework (SWMF) can execute and couple together several components distributed over a parallel machine in a flexible and efficient manner. The framework also allows resolving disparate spatial and temporal scales with independent spatial and temporal discretizations in the various models. Several of the computationally most expensive domains of the framework are modeled by the Block-Adaptive Tree Solarwind Roe-type Upwind Scheme (BATS-R-US) code that can solve various forms of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations, including Hall, semi-relativistic, multi-species and multi-fluid MHD, anisotropic pressure, radiative transport and heat conduction. Modeling disparate scales within BATS-R-US is achieved by a block-adaptive mesh both in Cartesian and generalized coordinates. Most recently we have created a new core for BATS-R-US: the Block-Adaptive Tree Library (BATL) that provides a general toolkit for creating, load balancing and message passing in a 1, 2 or 3 dimensional block-adaptive grid. We describe the algorithms of BATL and demonstrate its efficiency and scaling properties for various problems. BATS-R-US uses several time-integration schemes to address multiple time-scales: explicit time stepping with fixed or local time steps, partially steady-state evolution, point-implicit, semi-implicit, explicit/implicit, and fully implicit

  18. A Unified Detail-Preserving Liquid Simulation by Two-Phase Lattice Boltzmann Modeling.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yulong; Liu, Xiaopei; Xu, Xuemiao

    2016-02-19

    Traditional methods in graphics to simulate liquid-air dynamics under different scenarios usually employ separate approaches with sophisticated interface tracking/reconstruction techniques. In this paper, we propose a novel unified approach which is easy and effective to produce a variety of liquid-air interface phenomena. These phenomena, such as complex surface splashes, bubble interactions, as well as surface tension effects, can co-exist in one single simulation, and are created within the same computational framework. Such a framework is unique in that it is free from any complicated interface tracking/reconstruction procedures. Our approach is developed from the two-phase lattice Boltzmann method with the mean field model, which provides a unified framework for interface dynamics but is numerically unstable under turbulent conditions. Considering the drawbacks of the existing approaches, we propose techniques to suppress oscillation for significant stability enhancement, as well as derive a new subgrid-scale model to further improve stability, faithfully preserving liquid-air interface details without excessive diffusion by taking into account the density variation. The whole framework is highly parallel, enabling very efficient implementation. Comparisons to the related approaches show superiority on stable simulation with detail preservation and multiphase phenomena simultaneously involved. A set of animation results demonstrate the effectiveness of our method.

  19. Global Tectonics of Enceladus: Numerical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czechowski, Leszek

    2016-10-01

    Introduction: Enceladus, a satellite of Saturn, is the smallest celestial body in the Solar System where volcanic and tectonic activities are observed. Every second, the mass of 200 kg is ejected into space from the South Polar Terrain (SPT) - [1]. The loss of matter from the body's interior should lead to global compression of the crust. Typical effects of compression are: thrust faults, folding and subduction. However, such forms are not dominant on Enceladus. We propose here special tectonic process that could explain this paradox. Our hypotheses states that the mass loss from SPT is the main driving mechanism of the following tectonic processes: subsidence of SPT, flow in the mantle and motion of adjacent tectonic plates. The hypotheses is presented in [2], [3] and[4].We suggest that the loss of the volatiles results in a void, an instability, and motion of solid matter to fill the void. The motion is presented at the Fig.1 and includes:Subsidence of the 'lithosphere' of SPT.Flow of the matter in the mantle.Motion of plates adjacent to SPT towards the active regionMethods and results: The numerical model of processes presented is developed. It is based on the equations of continuous media..If emerging void is being filled by the subsidence of SPT only, then the velocity of subsidence is 0.05 mmyr-1. However, numerical calculations indicate that all three types of motion are usually important. The role of a given motion depends on the viscosity distribution. Generally, for most of the models the subsidence is 0.02 mmyr-1, but mantle flow and plates' motion also play a role in filling the void. The preliminary results of the numerical model indicate also that the velocity of adjacent plates could be 0.02 mmyr-1 for the Newtonian rheology.Note that in our model the reduction of the crust area is not a result of compression but it is a result of the plate sinking. Therefore the compressional surface features do not have to be dominant. The SPT does not have to be

  20. Detailed Modeling and Evaluation of a Scalable Multilevel Checkpointing System

    SciTech Connect

    Mohror, Kathryn; Moody, Adam; Bronevetsky, Greg; de Supinski, Bronis R.

    2014-09-01

    High-performance computing (HPC) systems are growing more powerful by utilizing more components. As the system mean time before failure correspondingly drops, applications must checkpoint frequently to make progress. But, at scale, the cost of checkpointing becomes prohibitive. A solution to this problem is multilevel checkpointing, which employs multiple types of checkpoints in a single run. Moreover, lightweight checkpoints can handle the most common failure modes, while more expensive checkpoints can handle severe failures. We designed a multilevel checkpointing library, the Scalable Checkpoint/Restart (SCR) library, that writes lightweight checkpoints to node-local storage in addition to the parallel file system. We present probabilistic Markov models of SCR's performance. We show that on future large-scale systems, SCR can lead to a gain in machine efficiency of up to 35 percent, and reduce the load on the parallel file system by a factor of two. In addition, we predict that checkpoint scavenging, or only writing checkpoints to the parallel file system on application termination, can reduce the load on the parallel file system by 20 × on today's systems and still maintain high application efficiency.

  1. Quantitative comparisons of numerical models of brittle deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buiter, S.

    2009-04-01

    Numerical modelling of brittle deformation in the uppermost crust can be challenging owing to the requirement of an accurate pressure calculation, the ability to achieve post-yield deformation and localisation, and the choice of rheology (plasticity law). One way to approach these issues is to conduct model comparisons that can evaluate the effects of different implementations of brittle behaviour in crustal deformation models. We present a comparison of three brittle shortening experiments for fourteen different numerical codes, which use finite element, finite difference, boundary element and distinct element techniques. Our aim is to constrain and quantify the variability among models in order to improve our understanding of causes leading to differences between model results. Our first experiment of translation of a stable sand-like wedge serves as a reference that allows for testing against analytical solutions (e.g., taper angle, root-mean-square velocity and gravitational rate of work). The next two experiments investigate an unstable wedge in a sandbox-like setup which deforms by inward translation of a mobile wall. All models accommodate shortening by in-sequence formation of forward shear zones. We analyse the location, dip angle and spacing of thrusts in detail as previous comparisons have shown that these can be highly variable in numerical and analogue models of crustal shortening and extension. We find that an accurate implementation of boundary friction is important for our models. Our results are encouraging in the overall agreement in their dynamic evolution, but show at the same time the effort that is needed to understand shear zone evolution. GeoMod2008 Team: Markus Albertz, Michele Cooke, Susan Ellis, Taras Gerya, Luke Hodkinson, Kristin Hughes, Katrin Huhn, Boris Kaus, Walter Landry, Bertrand Maillot, Christophe Pascal, Anton Popov, Guido Schreurs, Christopher Beaumont, Tony Crook, Mario Del Castello and Yves Leroy

  2. Numerical modeling of volcanic arc development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerya, T.; Gorczyk, W.; Nikolaeva, K.

    2007-05-01

    We have created a new coupled geochemical-petrological-thermomechanical numerical model of subduction associated with volcanic arc development. The model includes spontaneous slab bending, subducted crust dehydration, aqueous fluid transport, mantle wedge melting and melt extraction resulting in crustal growth. Two major volcanic arc settings are modeled so far: active continental margins, and intraoceanic subduction. In case of Pacific-type continental margin two fundamentally different regimes of melt productivity are observed in numerical experiments which are in line with natural observations: (1) During continuous convergence with coupled plates highest amounts of melts are formed immediately after the initiation of subduction and then decrease rapidly with time due to the steepening of the slab inclination angle precluding formation of partially molten mantle wedge plumes; (2) During subduction associated with slab delamination and trench retreat resulting in the formation of a pronounced back arc basin with a spreading center in the middle melt production increases with time due to shallowing/stabilization of slab inclination associated with upward asthenospheric mantle flow toward the extension region facilitating propagation of hydrous partially molten plumes from the slab. In case of spontaneous nucleation of retreating oceanic subduction two scenarios of tecono-magmatic evolution are distinguished: (1) decay and, ultimately, the cessation of subduction and related magmatic activity, (2) increase in subduction rate (to up to ~12 cm/yr) and stabilization of subduction and magmatic arc growth. In the first case the duration of subduction correlates positively with the intensity of melt extraction: the period of continued subduction increases from 15,4 Myrs to 47,6 Myrs with the increase of melt extraction threshold from 1% to 9%. In scenario (1) the magmatic arc crust includes large amounts of rocks formed by melting of subducted crust atop the thermally

  3. Modeling and numerical simulations of the influenced Sznajd model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karan, Farshad Salimi Naneh; Srinivasan, Aravinda Ramakrishnan; Chakraborty, Subhadeep

    2017-08-01

    This paper investigates the effects of independent nonconformists or influencers on the behavioral dynamic of a population of agents interacting with each other based on the Sznajd model. The system is modeled on a complete graph using the master equation. The acquired equation has been numerically solved. Accuracy of the mathematical model and its corresponding assumptions have been validated by numerical simulations. Regions of initial magnetization have been found from where the system converges to one of two unique steady-state PDFs, depending on the distribution of influencers. The scaling property and entropy of the stationary system in presence of varying level of influence have been presented and discussed.

  4. Numerical Modeling of Glaciers in Martian Paleoclimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colaprete, A.; Haberle, R. M.; Montmessin, F.; Scheaffer, J.

    2004-01-01

    Numerous geologic features suggest the presence of ice flow on the surface of mars. These features include lobate debris aprons, concentric crater fill, and lineated valley fill. The lateral extent of these features can range from 100 meters to over 20 km. Previous work has demonstrated that these features could not have formed in current Martian conditions. It has long been speculated that changes in Mars orbital properties, namely its obliquity, eccentricity, and argument of perihelion, can result in dramatic changes to climate. Recent climate model studies have shown that at periods of increased obliquity north polar water ice is mobilized southward and deposited at low ad mid latitudes. Mid latitude accumulation of ice would provide the necessary conditions for rock glaciers to form. A time-marching, finite element glacier model is used to demonstrate the ability of ice and ice-rock mixtures to flow under Martian paleoclimate conditions. Input to this model is constrained by the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM).

  5. Anisotropic halo model: implementation and numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sgró, Mario A.; Paz, Dante J.; Merchán, Manuel

    2013-07-01

    In the present work, we extend the classic halo model for the large-scale matter distribution including a triaxial model for the halo profiles and their alignments. In particular, we derive general expressions for the halo-matter cross-correlation function. In addition, by numerical integration, we obtain instances of the cross-correlation function depending on the directions given by halo shape axes. These functions are called anisotropic cross-correlations. With the aim of comparing our theoretical results with the simulations, we compute averaged anisotropic correlations in cones with their symmetry axis along each shape direction of the centre halo. From these comparisons we characterize and quantify the alignment of dark matter haloes on the Λcold dark matter context by means of the presented anisotropic halo model. Since our model requires multidimensional integral computation we implement a Monte Carlo method on GPU hardware which allows us to increase the precision of the results and it improves the performance of the computation.

  6. Numerical Modeling of Glaciers in Martian Paleoclimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colaprete, A.; Haberle, R. M.; Montmessin, F.; Scheaffer, J.

    2004-01-01

    Numerous geologic features suggest the presence of ice flow on the surface of mars. These features include lobate debris aprons, concentric crater fill, and lineated valley fill. The lateral extent of these features can range from 100 meters to over 20 km. Previous work has demonstrated that these features could not have formed in current Martian conditions. It has long been speculated that changes in Mars orbital properties, namely its obliquity, eccentricity, and argument of perihelion, can result in dramatic changes to climate. Recent climate model studies have shown that at periods of increased obliquity north polar water ice is mobilized southward and deposited at low ad mid latitudes. Mid latitude accumulation of ice would provide the necessary conditions for rock glaciers to form. A time-marching, finite element glacier model is used to demonstrate the ability of ice and ice-rock mixtures to flow under Martian paleoclimate conditions. Input to this model is constrained by the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM).

  7. Numerical Modeling of Ocular Dysfunction in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Emily S.; Mulugeta, Lealem; Vera, J.; Myers, J. G.; Raykin, J.; Feola, A. J.; Gleason, R.; Samuels, B.; Ethier, C. R.

    2014-01-01

    Upon introduction to microgravity, the near-loss of hydrostatic pressure causes a marked cephalic (headward) shift of fluid in an astronaut's body. The fluid shift, along with other factors of spaceflight, induces a cascade of interdependent physiological responses which occur at varying time scales. Long-duration missions carry an increased risk for the development of the Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome, a spectrum of ophthalmic changes including posterior globe flattening, choroidal folds, distension of the optic nerve sheath, kinking of the optic nerve and potentially permanent degradation of visual function. In the cases of VIIP found to date, the initial onset of symptoms occurred after several weeks to several months of spaceflight, by which time the gross bodily fluid distribution is well established. We are developing a suite of numerical models to simulate the effects of fluid shift on the cardiovascular, central nervous and ocular systems. These models calculate the modified mean volumes, flow rates and pressures that are characteristic of the altered quasi-homeostatic state in microgravity, including intracranial and intraocular pressures. The results of the lumped models provide initial and boundary data to a 3D finite element biomechanics simulation of the globe, optic nerve head and retrobulbar subarachnoid space. The integrated set of models will be used to investigate the evolution of the biomechanical stress state in the ocular tissues due to long-term exposure to microgravity.

  8. Numerical modelling and image reconstruction in diffuse optical tomography

    PubMed Central

    Dehghani, Hamid; Srinivasan, Subhadra; Pogue, Brian W.; Gibson, Adam

    2009-01-01

    The development of diffuse optical tomography as a functional imaging modality has relied largely on the use of model-based image reconstruction. The recovery of optical parameters from boundary measurements of light propagation within tissue is inherently a difficult one, because the problem is nonlinear, ill-posed and ill-conditioned. Additionally, although the measured near-infrared signals of light transmission through tissue provide high imaging contrast, the reconstructed images suffer from poor spatial resolution due to the diffuse propagation of light in biological tissue. The application of model-based image reconstruction is reviewed in this paper, together with a numerical modelling approach to light propagation in tissue as well as generalized image reconstruction using boundary data. A comprehensive review and details of the basis for using spatial and structural prior information are also discussed, whereby the use of spectral and dual-modality systems can improve contrast and spatial resolution. PMID:19581256

  9. A numerical model for ground temperature determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaszczur, M.; Polepszyc, I.; Biernacka, B.; Sapińska-Śliwa, A.

    2016-09-01

    The ground surface temperature and the temperature with respect to depth are one of the most important issues for geotechnical and environmental applications as well as for plants and other living organisms. In geothermal systems, temperature is directly related to the energy resources in the ground and it influences the efficiency of the ground source system. The ground temperature depends on a very large number of parameters, but it often needs to be evaluated with good accuracy. In the present work, models for the prediction of the ground temperature with a focus on the surface temperature at which all or selected important ground and environmental phenomena are taken into account have been analysed. It has been found that the simplest models and the most complex model may result in a similar temperature variation, yet at a very low depth and for specific cases only. A detailed analysis shows that taking into account different types of pavement or a greater depth requires more complex and advanced models.

  10. Numerical linearized MHD model of flapping oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korovinskiy, D. B.; Ivanov, I. B.; Semenov, V. S.; Erkaev, N. V.; Kiehas, S. A.

    2016-06-01

    Kink-like magnetotail flapping oscillations in a Harris-like current sheet with earthward growing normal magnetic field component Bz are studied by means of time-dependent 2D linearized MHD numerical simulations. The dispersion relation and two-dimensional eigenfunctions are obtained. The results are compared with analytical estimates of the double-gradient model, which are found to be reliable for configurations with small Bz up to values ˜ 0.05 of the lobe magnetic field. Coupled with previous results, present simulations confirm that the earthward/tailward growth direction of the Bz component acts as a switch between stable/unstable regimes of the flapping mode, while the mode dispersion curve is the same in both cases. It is confirmed that flapping oscillations may be triggered by a simple Gaussian initial perturbation of the Vz velocity.

  11. Numerical Modeling of Supra-Arcade Downflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y. M.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Guo, L.; Innes, D.

    2015-12-01

    Abstract Supra-arcade downflows (SADs) are elongated features usually observed above post-eruption flare arcades, with low emission, low density, and high temperature. Although SADs have been observed and studied extensively, their physical interpretation and mechanism remain not well understood and controversial. In our recent numerical and observational studies, we suggest that SADs may be due to Rayleigh-Taylor type instabilities occurring at the front of reconnection outflow jets as they encounter the underlying arcades (Innes et al. Astrophys. J. 796, 27; Guo et al. Astrophys. J. Lett., 796, L29). In this work, we further improve our three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic model of SADs by incorporating viscous and resistive heating, anisotropic heat conduction, as well as line-tied lower boundary conditions. Synthetic SDO AIA emission measure profiles are calculated from simulation data and compared with observations.

  12. Numerical modelling of ion transport in flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jie; Belhi, Memdouh; Bisetti, Fabrizio; Mani Sarathy, S.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a modelling framework to compute the diffusivity and mobility of ions in flames. The (n, 6, 4) interaction potential is adopted to model collisions between neutral and charged species. All required parameters in the potential are related to the polarizability of the species pair via semi-empirical formulas, which are derived using the most recently published data or best estimates. The resulting framework permits computation of the transport coefficients of any ion found in a hydrocarbon flame. The accuracy of the proposed method is evaluated by comparing its predictions with experimental data on the mobility of selected ions in single-component neutral gases. Based on this analysis, the value of a model constant available in the literature is modified in order to improve the model's predictions. The newly determined ion transport coefficients are used as part of a previously developed numerical approach to compute the distribution of charged species in a freely propagating premixed lean CH4/O2 flame. Since a significant scatter of polarizability data exists in the literature, the effects of changes in polarizability on ion transport properties and the spatial distribution of ions in flames are explored. Our analysis shows that changes in polarizability propagate with decreasing effect from binary transport coefficients to species number densities. We conclude that the chosen polarizability value has a limited effect on the ion distribution in freely propagating flames. We expect that the modelling framework proposed here will benefit future efforts in modelling the effect of external voltages on flames. Supplemental data for this article can be accessed at http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13647830.2015.1090018.

  13. Numerical modeling of capillary electrophoresis - electrospray mass spectrometry interface design.

    PubMed

    Jarvas, Gabor; Guttman, Andras; Foret, Frantisek

    2015-01-01

    Capillary electrophoresis hyphenated with electrospray mass spectrometry (CE-ESI-MS) has emerged in the past decade as one of the most powerful bioanalytical techniques. As the sensitivity and efficiency of new CE-ESI-MS interface designs are continuously improving, numerical modeling can play important role during their development. In this review, different aspects of computer modeling and simulation of CE-ESI-MS interfaces are comprehensively discussed. Relevant essentials of hydrodynamics as well as state-of-the-art modeling techniques are critically evaluated. Sheath liquid-, sheathless-, and liquid-junction interfaces are reviewed from the viewpoint of multidisciplinary numerical modeling along with details of single and multiphase models together with electric field mediated flows, electrohydrodynamics, and free fluid-surface methods. Practical examples are given to help non-specialists to understand the basic principles and applications. Finally, alternative approaches like air amplifiers are also included. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Mass Spec Rev 34: 558-569, 2015. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Benchmarking numerical freeze/thaw models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rühaak, Wolfram; Anbergen, Hauke; Molson, John; Grenier, Christophe; Sass, Ingo

    2015-04-01

    The modeling of freezing and thawing of water in porous media is of increasing interest, and for which very different application areas exist. For instance, the modeling of permafrost regression with respect to climate change issues is one area, while others include geotechnical applications in tunneling and for borehole heat exchangers which operate at temperatures below the freezing point. The modeling of these processes requires the solution of a coupled non-linear system of partial differential equations for flow and heat transport in space and time. Different code implementations have been developed in the past. Analytical solutions exist only for simple cases. Consequently, an interest has arisen in benchmarking different codes with analytical solutions, experiments and purely numerical results, similar to the long-standing DECOVALEX and the more recent "Geothermal Code Comparison" activities. The name for this freezing/ thawing benchmark consortium is INTERFROST. In addition to the well-known so-called Lunardini solution for a 1D case (case T1), two different 2D problems will be presented, one which represents melting of a frozen inclusion (case TH2) and another which represents the growth or thaw of permafrost around a talik (case TH3). These talik regions are important for controlling groundwater movement within a mainly frozen ground. First results of the different benchmark results will be shown and discussed.

  15. Impact of numerical models on fragmentation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renouf, Mathieu; Gezahengn, Belien; Abbas, Micheline; Bourgeois, Florent

    2013-06-01

    Simulated fragmentation process in granular assemblies is a challenging problem which date back the beginning of the 90'. If first approaches have focus on the fragmentation on a single particle, with the development of robust, fast numerical method is is possible today to simulated such process in a large collection of particles. But the question of the fragmentation problem is still open: should the fragmentation be done dynamically (one particle becoming two fragments) and according which criterion or should the fragment paths be defined initially and which is the impact of the discretization and the model of fragments? The present contribution proposes to investigate the second aspect i.e. the impact of fragment modeling on the fragmentation processes. First to perform such an analysis, the geometry of fragments (disks/sphere or polygon/polyhedra), their behavior (rigid/deformable) and the law governing their interactions are investigated. Then such model will be used in a grinding application where the evolution of fragments and impact on the behavior of the whole packing are investigate.

  16. A numerical forecast model for road meteorology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Chunlei

    2017-05-01

    A fine-scale numerical model for road surface parameters prediction (BJ-ROME) is developed based on the Common Land Model. The model is validated using in situ observation data measured by the ROSA road weather stations of Vaisala Company, Finland. BJ-ROME not only takes into account road surface factors, such as imperviousness, relatively low albedo, high heat capacity, and high heat conductivity, but also considers the influence of urban anthropogenic heat, impervious surface evaporation, and urban land-use/land-cover changes. The forecast time span and the update interval of BJ-ROME in vocational operation are 24 and 3 h, respectively. The validation results indicate that BJ-ROME can successfully simulate the diurnal variation of road surface temperature both under clear-sky and rainfall conditions. BJ-ROME can simulate road water and snow depth well if the artificial removing was considered. Road surface energy balance in rainy days is quite different from that in clear-sky conditions. Road evaporation could not be neglected in road surface water cycle research. The results of sensitivity analysis show solar radiation correction coefficient, asphalt depth, and asphalt heat conductivity are important parameters in road interface temperatures simulation. The prediction results could be used as a reference of maintenance decision support system to mitigate the traffic jam and urban water logging especially in large cities.

  17. Foehn wind detection using numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irimescu, A.; Caian, M.

    2010-09-01

    In Romania, foehn is a short-lived atmospheric phenomenon, of a low to average intensity, not always highlighted by weather station observations. When such situations occur additional data are resorted to, rendering a continuous, aggregate image, in comparison to the punctual information yielded by weather stations. This paper aims to describe how foehn is detected in northern Oltenia (the Inner Carpathian-Balkan Curvature), using numerical modelling. Results generated by the RegCM3 Regional Climatic Model thus represent an undisputed tool, their most important advantage being the 10-km spatial resolution. The presence of foehn in northern Oltenia and its climatic peculiarities have been disclosed through the analysis in time and space of the meteorological elements specific to the phenomenon (air temperature, wind speed and direction etc) over a 40-year interval (1961-2000). The paper presents a new methodology that can be used to estimate the probability of production and the foehn characteristics (intensity, duration etc.). Interpretation of the RegCM3 model results has led to the statistical analysis of foehn occurrences within the studied area during the cold season (December, January and February). The resulted climatology, with fine resolution, can be used in foehn forecast of predictability.

  18. Numerical Modeling of Suspension HVOF Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadidi, M.; Moghtadernejad, S.; Dolatabadi, A.

    2016-02-01

    A three-dimensional two-way coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian scheme is used to simulate suspension high-velocity oxy-fuel spraying process. The mass, momentum, energy, and species equations are solved together with the realizable k-ɛ turbulence model to simulate the gas phase. Suspension is assumed to be a mixture of solid particles [mullite powder (3Al2O3·2SiO2)], ethanol, and ethylene glycol. The process involves premixed combustion of oxygen-propylene, and non-premixed combustion of oxygen-ethanol and oxygen-ethylene glycol. One-step global reaction is used for each mentioned reaction together with eddy dissipation model to compute the reaction rate. To simulate the droplet breakup, Taylor Analogy Breakup model is applied. After the completion of droplet breakup, and solvent evaporation/combustion, the solid suspended particles are tracked through the domain to determine the characteristics of the coating particles. Numerical simulations are validated against the experimental results in the literature for the same operating conditions. Seven or possibly eight shock diamonds are captured outside the nozzle. In addition, a good agreement between the predicted particle temperature, velocity, and diameter, and the experiment is obtained. It is shown that as the standoff distance increases, the particle temperature and velocity reduce. Furthermore, a correlation is proposed to determine the spray cross-sectional diameter and estimate the particle trajectories as a function of standoff distance.

  19. Numerical modeling of polar mesocyclones generation mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeev, Dennis; Stepanenko, Victor

    2013-04-01

    parameters, lateral boundary conditions are varied in the typically observed range. The approach is fully nonlinear: we use a three-dimensional non-hydrostatic mesoscale model NH3D_MPI [1] coupled with one-dimensional water body model LAKE. A key method used in the present study is the analysis of eddy kinetic and available potential energy budgets. References 1. Mikushin, D.N., and Stepanenko, V.M., The implementation of regional atmospheric model numerical algorithms for CBEA-based clusters. Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Parallel Processing and Applied Mathematics, 2010, vol. 6067, p. 525-534. 2. Rasmussen, E., and Turner, J. (eds), Polar Lows: Mesoscale Weather Systems in the Polar Regions. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003, 612 pp. 3. Yanase, W., and Niino, H., Dependence of Polar Low Development on Baroclinicity and Physical Processes: An Idealized High-Resolution Experiment, J. Atmos. Sci., 2006, vol. 64, p. 3044-3067.

  20. Fluctuation-dissipation relation in an Ising model without detailed balance.

    PubMed

    Andrenacci, Natascia; Corberi, Federico; Lippiello, Eugenio

    2006-04-01

    We consider the modified Ising model introduced by de Oliveira, Mendes, and Santos [J. Phys. A 26, 2317 (1993)], where the temperature depends locally on the spin configuration and detailed balance and local equilibrium are not obeyed. We derive a relation between the linear response function and correlation functions that generalizes the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. In the stationary states of the model, which are the counterparts of the Ising equilibrium states, the fluctuation-dissipation theorem breaks down due to the lack of time reversal invariance. In the nonstationary phase-ordering kinetics, the parametric plot of the integrated response function chi(t,t(w)) vs the autocorrelation function is different from that of the kinetic Ising model. However, splitting chi(t,t(w)) into a stationary and an aging term chi(t,t(w)) = chi(st)(t-t(w)) + chi(ag)(t,t(w)), we find chi(ag)(t,t(w)) approximately t(w)(-a(chi)) f(t/t(w)), and a numerical value of a(chi) consistent with a(chi)= 1/4, as in the kinetic Ising model.

  1. Numerical Models of Ophiolite Genesis and Obduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilmette, C.; Beaumont, C.; Jamieson, R.

    2013-12-01

    Ophiolites are relics of oceanic lithosphere tectonically emplaced in continental settings. They are diagnostic features of continental suture zones, where they mark past plate boundaries. Even after having been studied for more than 40 years, the mechanisms involved in the genesis and subsequent obduction of ophiolites over continental margins are still debated. We present the results of 2D thermal-mechanical numerical models that successfully reproduce characteristics of natural examples like the Semail, Bay of Islands, Yarlung-Zangbo, and Coast Range ophiolites. The numerical models are upper mantle scale and use pressure-, temperature- and strain-dependent viscous-plastic rheologies. Both divergent and convergent velocity boundary conditions are used and tectonic boundary forces are monitored. The models start with the rifting of a stable continent, followed by development of an ocean ridge and accretion of oceanic lithosphere at a total rate of 3 cm/y. Once a specified ocean size/age is achieved, the velocity boundary conditions are reversed leading to convergence and the spontaneous inception of a suduction zone at the mid-ocean ridge. We present results for models including different ages of oceans (40 to 90 Ma) and different convergence velocities (5 to 15 cm/y). The interaction between the lower plate passive margin and the oceanic upper plate results in 5 different tectonic styles. These differ mainly by the presence or absence of oceanic spreading in the upper plate (back-arc basin), leading to supra-subduction zone ophiolites vs. MORB-type, and by the behaviour of the oceanic slab, e.g., slab rollback vs. breakoff. The evolution of effective slab pull is interpreted to be the major control on the resulting tectonic style. Low effective slab pull models (young oceans and fast convergence rates) fail to obduct an ophiolite. Strong effective slab pull models (old oceans and lower convergence rates) result in subduction zone retreat and spontaneous oceanic

  2. Numerical modeling of landslide generated seismic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favreau, P.; Mangeney, A.; Lucas, A.; Shapiro, N. M.; Crosta, G. B.; Bouchut, F.; Hungr, O.

    2009-12-01

    Gravitational instabilities such as debris flows, landslides or avalanches play a key role in erosion processes at the surface of the Earth and other telluric planets. On Earth, they represent one of the major natural hazards threatening population and infrastructure in volcanic, mountainous, seismic and coastal areas. One of the main issues in terms of risk assessment is to produce tools for detection of natural instabilities and for prediction of velocity and runout extent of rapid landslides. The lack of field measurements of the dynamics of natural landslides due to their unpredictability and destructive power, prevents investigating the mechanical properties of the flowing material that appears to be very different from experimental granular flows in the laboratory. In this context, the analysis of the seismic signal generated by natural instabilities provides a unique paradigm to study flow dynamics and discriminate the physical processes at play during their emplacement along the slope. Potentially, it is possible to infer information about the “landslide source” from the seismic signal produced during the initial collapse and the subsequent flow along the natural terrain. However, the process of reverse dynamic analysis is complex and must take into consideration the role of topography, mass of the landslide, flow dynamics, and wave propagation on the recorded signal. We use here numerical modeling of the landslide and of the generated seismic waves to address this issue. We show that (i) numerical simulation of landslide and generated seismic waves well match the observed low frequency seismic signal, (ii) topography effects on landslide dynamics play a key role in the observed seismic signal, (iii) simulation of the seismic wave makes it possible to discriminate between the alternative possible scenario of flow dynamics and to provide estimates of the rheological parameters during the flow. As a result, unique data on natural flow dynamics could be

  3. Numerical Modelling of Seismic Slope Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdeau, Céline; Havenith, Hans-Balder; Fleurisson, Jean-Alain; Grandjean, Gilles

    Earthquake ground-motions recorded worldwide have shown that many morphological and geological structures (topography, sedimentary basin) are prone to amplify the seismic shaking (San Fernando, 1971 [Davis and West 1973] Irpinia, 1980 [Del Pezzo et al. 1983]). This phenomenon, called site effects, was again recently observed in El Salvador when, on the 13th of January 2001, the country was struck by a M = 7.6 earthquake. Indeed, while horizontal accelerations on a rock site at Berlin, 80 km from the epicentre, did not exceed 0.23 g, they reached 0.6 g at Armenia, 110 km from the epicentre. Armenia is located on a small hill underlaid by a few meters thick pyroclastic deposits. Both the local topography and the presence of surface layers are likely to have caused the observed amplification effects, which are supposed to have contributed to the triggering of some of the hundreds of landslides related to this seismic event (Murphy et al. 2002). In order to better characterize the way site effects may influence the triggering of landslides along slopes, 2D numerical elastic and elasto-plastic models were developed. Various geometrical, geological and seismic conditions were analysed and the dynamic behaviour of the slope under these con- ditions was studied in terms of creation and location of a sliding surface. Preliminary results suggest that the size of modelled slope failures is dependent on site effects.

  4. Frustration in model glass systems: Numerical investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jullien, Rémi; Jund, Philippe; Caprion, Didier; Sadoc, Jean-François

    1999-11-01

    Numerical Voronoï tessellation is used to investigate the mechanisms of frustration in some model glass systems. First, random packings of 8192 hard spheres of increasing volume fraction c are built using an efficient computer algorithm. Their Voronoï statistics evolves with c as if the system would like to reach a pure icosahedral order when extrapolating the volume fraction above the Bernal limit cb≃0.645. Second, super-cooled liquid and glass samples of 1000 atoms are generated at different temperatures T after a quench from the liquid state, using classical micro-canonical molecular dynamics with a simple soft-sphere potential. When decreasing T, the ideal icosahedral order appears again as an extrapolated situation which cannot be realized due to geometrical frustration. Third, a model silica glass of 648 atoms is studied using the potential of van Beest, Kramer and van Santen and a quite similar quenching procedure is performed. As in the soft-sphere case the structural freezing following upon the glass transition is noticeable in all the geometrical characteristics of the Voronoï cells and again a possible interpretation in terms of geometrical frustration is proposed.

  5. Numerical Modeling of a Magnetic Nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tushentsov, Mikhail; Breizman, Boris; Arefiev, Alexey

    2007-11-01

    We present computational study of a magnetic nozzle, which is a component of the VASIMR (Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket) plasma-based propulsion system for a space vehicle. The magnetic nozzle transforms ion gyromotion into directed axial motion, adiabatically accelerating the plasma, and enabling plasma detachment from the spaceship via self-consistent magnetic field modification. VASIMR employs ion cyclotron resonance heating to deposit rf-power directly to the plasma ions created by the low energy plasma source. We have developed a numerical code to model the axisymmetric nozzle within the framework of collisionless MHD with an azimuthal ion velocity spread. The code implements a reduced model that consists of truncated steady-state equations for the velocity space moments of the ion distribution function and takes advantage of the plasma flow paraxiality. This makes it possible to study the conversion of the ion gyro-energy at the nozzle entrance into the energy of the directed flow at the exhaust. The magnetic field in the vacuum, which is not assumed to be paraxial, is calculated using a given magnetic coil configuration in the presence of plasma. From the computed steady-state flow configuration, the code evaluates magnetic nozzle efficiency, defined as the ratio of the axial momentum flux in the outgoing flow to the axial momentum flux in the incoming flow.

  6. Numerical modeling of the Amazon River plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikiema, Oumarou; Devenon, Jean-Luc; Baklouti, Malika

    2007-04-01

    Marine circulation above the northern Brazilian continental shelf is subject to energetic forcing factors of various origins: high water buoyancy fluxes induced by the Amazon River freshwater discharge, a strong coastal current associated with a mesoscale current (North Brazil Current (NBC)), a forcing by semidiurnal tide and by Northeast or Southeast trade winds according to the season. Using a three-dimensional (3-D) hydrodynamic numerical model (MOBEEHDYCS), and realistic bathymetry and coastline of the northern Brazilian shelf, this paper aims at studying the influence of some specific physical processes on the morphology of the Amazon plume. The very large volume discharge (180 000 m 3/s on average) and the weak effect of Coriolis force are additional characteristics of the studied system, which induce a particular dynamics. The various forcing factors are successively introduced into the model in order to simulate and to determine their respective influences upon the plume extent and the hydrodynamics at the shelf scale. Simulation reveal that the coastal current is at the origin of the permanent northwestward Amazon plume extension while wind effect can either reinforce or moderate this situation. The tide intervenes also to modify the position of the salinity front: a horizontal migration of salinity front is observed under its action.

  7. Numerical models of wind-driven circulation in lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cheng, R.T.; Powell, T.M.; Dillon, T.M.

    1976-01-01

    The state-of-the-art of numerical modelling of large-scale wind-driven circulation in lakes is presented. The governing equations which describe this motion are discussed along with the appropriate numerical techniques necessary to solve them in lakes. The numerical models are categorized into three large primary groups: the layered models, the Ekman-type models, and the other three-dimensional models. Discussions and comparison of models are given and future research directions are suggested. ?? 1976.

  8. Understanding Etna flank instability through numerical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apuani, Tiziana; Corazzato, Claudia; Merri, Andrea; Tibaldi, Alessandro

    2013-02-01

    As many active volcanoes, Mount Etna shows clear evidence of flank instability, and different mechanisms were suggested to explain this flank dynamics, based on the recorded deformation pattern and character. Shallow and deep deformations, mainly associated with both eruptive and seismic events, are concentrated along recognised fracture and fault systems, mobilising the eastern and south-eastern flank of the volcano. Several interacting causes were postulated to control the phenomenon, including gravity force, magma ascent along the feeding system, and a very complex local and/or regional tectonic activity. Nevertheless, the complexity of such dynamics is still an open subject of research and being the volcano flanks heavily urbanised, the comprehension of the gravitative dynamics is a major issue for public safety and civil protection. The present research explores the effects of the main geological features (in particular the role of the subetnean clays, interposed between the Apennine-Maghrebian flysch and the volcanic products) and the role of weakness zones, identified by fracture and fault systems, on the slope instability process. The effects of magma intrusions are also investigated. The problem is addressed by integrating field data, laboratory tests and numerical modelling. A bi- and tri-dimensional stress-strain analysis was performed by a finite difference numerical code (FLAC and FLAC3D), mainly aimed at evaluating the relationship among geological features, volcano-tectonic structures and magmatic activity in controlling the deformation processes. The analyses are well supported by dedicated structural-mechanical field surveys, which allowed to estimate the rock mass strength and deformability parameters. To take into account the uncertainties which inevitably occur in a so complicated model, many efforts were done in performing a sensitivity analysis along a WNW-ESE section crossing the volcano summit and the Valle del Bove depression. This was

  9. [Reconstruction of three-dimensional numerical model and numerical simulation of airflow in a human upper airway].

    PubMed

    Qian, Yu-mei; Chen, Li-ping; Wu, Ya-dong; Jiao, Ting

    2010-06-01

    To rapidly reconstruct a three-dimensional numerical model of the human upper airway and investigate the relationship between anatomical structures with airflow distribution by using the computational fluid dynamics. A three-dimensional model of the human upper airway was reconstructed based on computed tomographic images of a healthy volunteer's skull. Numerical simulation of the upper airway airflow was performed by using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method. A three-dimensional model of the human upper airway including nasal cavity, pharynx and larynx was reconstructed rapidly. A detailed anatomical structure and velocity distribution characteristics of airflow was obtained and a large velocity gradient in nasal valve area, nasopharynx, up and downstream of epiglottis was found. The model has good simulation of upper airway. Numerical simulation results provide the basic trend of airflow of the upper respiratory tract.The numerical model meets the needs of computational fluid dynamics analysis, and provide data control and research foundation for pathologic upper airway airflow numerical simulation.

  10. AMTEC system performance studies using the detailed electrode kinetic and transport model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sievers, Robert K.; Williams, Roger M.; Underwood, Mark L.; Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara; Bankston, C. P.

    1992-01-01

    A detailed electrochemical model of the alkali metal thermoelectric converter (AMTEC) electrode and current collector grid has been developed recently. Comparative evaluations of the resulting differences in model predictions reveal that the new detailed model predicts up to 50 percent higher electrode power densities at condenser operating temperatures above 600 K. The new model, with experimentally determined parameters, was used to recalculate the projected system performance of previously reported 1- and 100-kWe AMTEC space power systems that had incorporated earlier electrolyte/electrode models. It was found that when the detailed model was used to determine the electrode power densities, enhanced specific power and efficiencies are predicted.

  11. Numerical model of circumpolar Antarctic ice shelves

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    Extensive floating ice shelves in the Antarctic have been proposed to explain the discrepancies between Pleistocene high sea levels shown by dated coral reefs and coeval low sea levels inferred from glacial ice volumes calculated from oxygen isotope ratios in deep sea cores. A numerical model using the floating shelf creep analysis of Weertman (1957) has provided a plausible basis for the acceptance of such shelves. Shelf outer limits were set at 55/sup 0/S in East Antarctica and 58/sup 0/S in West Antarctica, based in part on diatom-deficient deep sea sediments deposited prior to the Holocene. Precipitation varied from 10 gm cm/sup -2/yr/sup -1/ at 75/sup 0/S to 80 gm cm/sup -2/yr/sup -1/ at 55/sup 0/S. Mean air temperatures varied from -35/sup 0/C at the 75/sup 0/S coast to -17/sup 0/C at the outer limits. Isotope ratios were those of present Antarctic precipitation at corresponding model shelf temperatures. In the calculation, a steady state is assumed. Integration begins at the coast with summation over successive years as creep and continental ice discharge move the integration element to the outer limits. The oceanic oxygen isotope ratio change required by the discrepancies in the record is 0.40 to 0.50 ppmil. Using the flow law constant of 4.2 and a creep activation energy of 134 kjoules mol/sup -1/, the resulting change is 0.44 ppmil. Difference results reflect the uncertainties associated with the critical creep constants used in the modeling. Nevertheless, the results suggest that a quantity of Antarctic shelf ice comparable to ice volumes in major Northern glacial areas existed at times during the Pleistocene.

  12. Numerical modeling of atoll island hydrogeology.

    PubMed

    Bailey, R T; Jenson, J W; Olsen, A E

    2009-01-01

    We implemented Ayers and Vachers' (1986) inclusive conceptual model for atoll island aquifers in a comprehensive numerical modeling study to evaluate the response of the fresh water lens to selected controlling climatic and geologic variables. Climatic factors include both constant and time-varying recharge rates, with particular attention paid to the effects of El Niño and the associated drought it brings to the western Pacific. Geologic factors include island width; hydraulic conductivity of the uppermost Holocene-age aquifer, which contains the fresh water lens; the depth to the contact with the underlying, and much more conductive, Pleistocene karst aquifer, which transmits tidal signals to the base of the lens; and the presence or absence of a semiconfining reef flat plate on the ocean side. Sensitivity analyses of steady-steady simulations show that lens thickness is most strongly sensitive to the depth to the Holocene-Pleistocene contact and to the hydraulic conductivity of the Holocene aquifer, respectively. Comparisons between modeling results and published observations of atoll island lens thicknesses suggest a hydraulic conductivity of approximately 50 m/d for leeward islands and approximately 400 m/d for windward islands. Results of transient simulations show that lens thickness fluctuations during average seasonal conditions and El Niño events are quite sensitive to island width, recharge rate, and hydraulic conductivity of the Holocene aquifer. In general, the depletion of the lens during drought conditions is most drastic for small, windward islands. Simulation results suggest that recovery from a 6-month drought requires about 1.5 years.

  13. Numerical and physical modelling of bubbly flow phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Sangani, A.S.

    1992-02-01

    The objective of the proposed research is to develop a theoretical framework for analyzing various two-phase flows, with special emphasis on the flows, with special emphasis on the flows of gas- liquid dispersions. The macroscopic behavior of these flows depends on the details of the microstructure of the dispersion, and these details, in turn, depend on the nature of the flow. Given the very diverse nature of the flows and their complex dependence on the microstructure of the dispersion, it is unlikely that a single set of equations, similar to the Navier-Stokes equations for homogeneous fluids, will apply to all the different situations. What is possible, however, is to develop general methodologies that can be used to examine specific situations and a general understanding about different kinds of macroscopic flows. The aim of the proposed research is to develop efficient numerical techniques for carrying out dynamic simulations of flows of dispersions and to apply them to a carefully selected problems whose solutions would reveal important qualitative as well as quantitative insights into the complex interdependence of the microstructure and macroscopic properties of the flows. These numerical techniques are to be supplemented with the techniques of ensemble averaging and statistical physics to obtain results that could be used in modelling more complicated flows through a set of relatively simple equations. Two classes of macroscopic flows were analyzed in detail during the current funding period. The first is the oscillatory flows, as in the case of acoustic or pressure wave propagation through bubbly liquids, and the second is convective flows as in bubbles rising through a liquid. 20 refs.

  14. Numerical and physical modelling of bubbly flow phenomena. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Sangani, A.S.

    1992-02-01

    The objective of the proposed research is to develop a theoretical framework for analyzing various two-phase flows, with special emphasis on the flows, with special emphasis on the flows of gas- liquid dispersions. The macroscopic behavior of these flows depends on the details of the microstructure of the dispersion, and these details, in turn, depend on the nature of the flow. Given the very diverse nature of the flows and their complex dependence on the microstructure of the dispersion, it is unlikely that a single set of equations, similar to the Navier-Stokes equations for homogeneous fluids, will apply to all the different situations. What is possible, however, is to develop general methodologies that can be used to examine specific situations and a general understanding about different kinds of macroscopic flows. The aim of the proposed research is to develop efficient numerical techniques for carrying out dynamic simulations of flows of dispersions and to apply them to a carefully selected problems whose solutions would reveal important qualitative as well as quantitative insights into the complex interdependence of the microstructure and macroscopic properties of the flows. These numerical techniques are to be supplemented with the techniques of ensemble averaging and statistical physics to obtain results that could be used in modelling more complicated flows through a set of relatively simple equations. Two classes of macroscopic flows were analyzed in detail during the current funding period. The first is the oscillatory flows, as in the case of acoustic or pressure wave propagation through bubbly liquids, and the second is convective flows as in bubbles rising through a liquid. 20 refs.

  15. Cloud-Scale Numerical Modeling of the Arctic Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruegen, Steven K.; Delnore, Victor E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The research objective of this NASA grant-funded project was to determine in detail how large-scale processes. in combination with cloud-scale radiative, microphysical, and dynamical processes, govern the formation and multi-layered structure of Arctic stratus clouds. This information will be useful for developing and improving 1D (one dimensional) boundary layer models for the Arctic. Also, to quantitatively determine the effects of leads on the large-scale budgets of sensible heat, water vapor, and condensate in a variety of Arctic winter conditions. This information will be used to identify the most important lead-flux processes that require parameterization in climate models. Our approach was to use a high-resolution numerical model, the 2D (two dimensional) University of Utah Cloud Resolving Model (UU CRM), and its 1D version, the University of Utah Turbulence Closure Model (UU TCM), a boundary layer model based on third-moment turbulence closure, as well as a large-eddy simulation (LES) model originally developed by C.H. Moeng.

  16. A modeling study of anaerobic biofilm systems: I. Detailed biofilm modeling.

    PubMed

    Flora, J R; Suidan, M T; Biswas, P; Sayles, G D

    1995-04-05

    A detailed model acetate-utilizing methanogenic biofilms accounting for the diffusion of neutral and ionic species, chemical equilibrium, electroneutrality, gas production within the biofilm, pH-dependent Monod kinetics, and the presence of a concentration boundary layer is presented. The model qualitatively fits the pH profiles that are reported for acetate-utilizing methanogenic aggregates. A sensitivity analysis on the biological parameters showed that the flux of acetate is sensitive to the maximum utilization rate, half-saturation constant, and biofilm density for the bulk conditions investigated. Criteria when traditional biofilm models can be used to predict the flux of acetate into the biofilm are established. If the maximum pH change predicted using a hypothetical system is within +/-0.05, the traditional model predicts the flux to within +/-5% of the value calculated with the model developed in this study. (c) 1995 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  17. Impact activation of Martian permafrost: Numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, B.; Melosh, H. J.

    2011-12-01

    For the last decade the team of Dr. Elisabetta (Betty) Pierazzo (LPL+PSI) study physical and mechanical processes involved in impact melting of Martian permafrost. The idea is that on Mars large enough impact craters would start substantial hydrothermal activity underneath the crater for thousands of years (possibly for >1 Myr, if a crater is larger than about 200 km in diameter). Numerical efforts to predict the extent and time scale of hydrothermal activity in Martian impact craters have mostly relied on numerical simulations of impact cratering into uniform or layered ice-rock targets. We conduct a case modeling study of impact melting of permafrost on Mars to investigate the general thermal state of the rock layers modified in the formation of hyper-velocity impact craters. We model the formation of a mid-size crater, about 30 km in diameter, formed on target consisting of a mixture of large particles of H2O-ice and rock (something like ice lenses in rock fractures) and fine mix equilibrated in temperature with an ice/water content variable with depth. The model results indicate that for craters larger than about 30 km in diameter the onset of post-impact hydrothermal circulation is characterized by two stages: first, the formation of a mostly dry, hot central uplift, followed by water beginning to flow in and circulate through the initially dry and hot uplifted crustal rocks. The post-impact thermal field in the periphery of the crater is dependent on crater size: in mid-size craters, 30-50 km in diameter, crater walls are not strongly heated in the impact event, and even though ice present in the rock may initially be heated enough to melt, overall temperatures in the rock remain below melting, undermining the development of a crater-wide hydrothermal circulation. We speculate that salt deposition from supercritical water may occur immediately after impact in some locations before the normal water circulation starts. In larger craters, crater walls are heated

  18. Numerical modelling of new rockfall interception nets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Boetticher, Albrecht; Volkwein, Axel; Wendeler, Corinna

    2010-05-01

    The design and certification of effective rockfall protection barriers is mainly achieved through 1:1 prototype testing. In order to reduce development costs of a prototype it is recommended that pre-studies using numerical simulations are performed. A large component to modelling rockfall protection systems is the numerical simulation of the nets. To date there exist several approaches to model the different mesh types such as ring nets or diagonal meshes (Nicot 1999, Cazzani et al. 2002, Volkwein 2004). However, the consideration of chain link meshes has not yet been realised. Chain link meshes are normally found as standard fence structures. However, they also exist in setups using high-strength steel and wire bundles. These variants show an enormous capacity to retain loads e.g. rockfalls, and at the same time are very efficient due to their low demand of steel material. The increasing application of chain link mesh in barrier systems requires an accurate model is available to complete prototype studies. A new approach now aims to perform a Finite Element simulation of such chain link meshes. The main challenge herein is to achieve the net deformation behaviour that is observed in field tests also in the simulation. A simulation using simple truss elements would not work since it neglects the out-of-plane-height of the mesh construction providing important reserves for local and global high deformations. Thus addressing this, a specially developed Discrete Element is able to reconstruct the mechanical behaviour of the single chain wire (bundles). As input parameters it utilises typical properties such as longitudinal and transversal mesh widths, and break loads resulting from in-plane-tension tests and steel strength. The single chain elements then can be combined to a complete mesh (e.g. 130 x 65 mm, 3 - 4 mm wire with a strength of 1770 N-mm2). Combining these elements with a supporting structure consisting of posts, ropes and energy absorbers, enables the

  19. Deconvolution-Based CT and MR Brain Perfusion Measurement: Theoretical Model Revisited and Practical Implementation Details.

    PubMed

    Fieselmann, Andreas; Kowarschik, Markus; Ganguly, Arundhuti; Hornegger, Joachim; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    Deconvolution-based analysis of CT and MR brain perfusion data is widely used in clinical practice and it is still a topic of ongoing research activities. In this paper, we present a comprehensive derivation and explanation of the underlying physiological model for intravascular tracer systems. We also discuss practical details that are needed to properly implement algorithms for perfusion analysis. Our description of the practical computer implementation is focused on the most frequently employed algebraic deconvolution methods based on the singular value decomposition. In particular, we further discuss the need for regularization in order to obtain physiologically reasonable results. We include an overview of relevant preprocessing steps and provide numerous references to the literature. We cover both CT and MR brain perfusion imaging in this paper because they share many common aspects. The combination of both the theoretical as well as the practical aspects of perfusion analysis explicitly emphasizes the simplifications to the underlying physiological model that are necessary in order to apply it to measured data acquired with current CT and MR scanners.

  20. Influence of Network Model Detail on Estimated Health Effects of Drinking Water Contamination Events

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Michael J.; Janke, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Network model detail can influence the accuracy of results from analyses of water distribution systems. Some previous work has shown the limitations of skeletonized network models when considering water quality and hydraulic effects. Loss of model detail is potentially less important for aggregated effects such as the systemwide health effects associated with a contamination event, but has received limited attention. The influence of model detail on such effects is examined here by comparing results obtained for contamination events using three large network models and several skeletonized versions of the models. Loss of model detail decreases the accuracy of estimated aggregated adverse effects related to contamination events. It has the potential to have a large negative influence on the results of consequence assessments and the design of contamination warning systems. But, the adverse influence on analysis results can be minimized by restricting attention to high percentile effects (i.e., 95th percentile or higher).

  1. Influence of Network Model Detail on Estimated Health Effects of Drinking Water Contamination Events

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Michael J.; Janke, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Network model detail can influence the accuracy of results from analyses of water distribution systems. Previous work has shown the limitations of skeletonized network models when considering water quality and hydraulic effects. Loss of model detail is potentially less important for aggregated effects such as the systemwide health effects associated with a contamination event, but has received limited attention. The influence of model detail on such effects is examined here by comparing results obtained for contamination events using three large network models and several skeletonized versions of the models. Loss of model detail decreases the accuracy of estimated aggregated adverse effects related to contamination events. It has the potential to have a large negative influence on the results of consequence assessments and the design of contamination warning systems. However, the adverse influence on analysis results can be minimized by restricting attention to high percentile effects (i.e., 95th percentile or higher).

  2. Influence of Network Model Detail on Estimated Health Effects of Drinking Water Contamination Events

    DOE PAGES

    Davis, Michael J.; Janke, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Network model detail can influence the accuracy of results from analyses of water distribution systems. Some previous work has shown the limitations of skeletonized network models when considering water quality and hydraulic effects. Loss of model detail is potentially less important for aggregated effects such as the systemwide health effects associated with a contamination event, but has received limited attention. The influence of model detail on such effects is examined here by comparing results obtained for contamination events using three large network models and several skeletonized versions of the models. Loss of model detail decreases the accuracy of estimated aggregatedmore » adverse effects related to contamination events. It has the potential to have a large negative influence on the results of consequence assessments and the design of contamination warning systems. But, the adverse influence on analysis results can be minimized by restricting attention to high percentile effects (i.e., 95th percentile or higher).« less

  3. Numerical modeling of a finned PCM heat sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozak, Y.; Ziskind, G.

    2012-09-01

    Phase-change materials (PCMs) can absorb large amounts of heat without significant rise of their temperature during the melting process. This effect is attractive for using in thermal energy storage and passive thermal management. One of the techniques enhance the rate of heat transfer into PCMs is by using fins made of a thermally high conductive material. This paper deals with numerical modeling of a finned PCM-based heat sink. Heat is dissipated on the heat sink base and may be either absorbed by the PCM stored in compartments with conducting walls, or dissipated to the air using fins, or both. A detailed analysis had been done by means of a complete solution of the governing multi-dimensional conservation equations, taking into account convection in the melt, density and volume change due to phase change and temperature variation, motion of solid in the liquid, and other associated phenomena.

  4. Numerical models for high beta magnetohydrodynamic flow

    SciTech Connect

    Brackbill, J.U.

    1987-01-01

    The fundamentals of numerical magnetohydrodynamics for highly conducting, high-beta plasmas are outlined. The discussions emphasize the physical properties of the flow, and how elementary concepts in numerical analysis can be applied to the construction of finite difference approximations that capture these features. The linear and nonlinear stability of explicit and implicit differencing in time is examined, the origin and effect of numerical diffusion in the calculation of convective transport is described, and a technique for maintaining solenoidality in the magnetic field is developed. Many of the points are illustrated by numerical examples. The techniques described are applicable to the time-dependent, high-beta flows normally encountered in magnetically confined plasmas, plasma switches, and space and astrophysical plasmas. 40 refs.

  5. An operational phenological model for numerical pollen prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheifinger, Helfried

    2010-05-01

    The general prevalence of seasonal allergic rhinitis is estimated to be about 15% in Europe, and still increasing. Pre-emptive measures require both the reliable assessment of production and release of various pollen species and the forecasting of their atmospheric dispersion. For this purpose numerical pollen prediction schemes are being developed by a number of European weather services in order to supplement and improve the qualitative pollen prediction systems by state of the art instruments. Pollen emission is spatially and temporally highly variable throughout the vegetation period and not directly observed, which precludes a straightforward application of dispersion models to simulate pollen transport. Even the beginning and end of flowering, which indicates the time period of potential pollen emission, is not (yet) available in real time. One way to create a proxy for the beginning, the course and the end of the pollen emission is its simulation as function of real time temperature observations. In this work the European phenological data set of the COST725 initiative forms the basis of modelling the beginning of flowering of 15 species, some of which emit allergic pollen. In order to keep the problem as simple as possible for the sake of spatial interpolation, a 3 parameter temperature sum model was implemented in a real time operational procedure, which calculates the spatial distribution of the entry dates for the current day and 24, 48 and 72 hours in advance. As stand alone phenological model and combined with back trajectories it is thought to support the qualitative pollen prediction scheme at the Austrian national weather service. Apart from that it is planned to incorporate it in a numerical pollen dispersion model. More details, open questions and first results of the operation phenological model will be discussed and presented.

  6. Numerical modeling of tunneling-induced seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinaldi, Antonio Pio; Urpi, Luca

    2017-04-01

    Removal of rock mass in mining environment has been associated since long-time with seismic event of magnitude 3 and above, with the potential to cause damage to the infrastructures or even loss of human life. Although with similarities with mining, relatively unknown up to now are seismic events induced by tunneling. However with modern mechanized tunneling techniques, making possible to digging deeper and longer underground infrastructure, the risk is not negligible. As an example, the excavation of the 57km long Gotthard Base Tunnel has been associated more than hundred seismic events, with the largest one having magnitude of ML 2.4, damaging the tunnel infrastructures. For future scenario of deep geological storage of nuclear waste, tunneling will constitute the primary activity during site construction. Hence, it will be crucial to understand the risk associated with the underground construction operation that can reactivate seismogenic features nearby the future location of emplacement tunnels. Here we present numerical simulation aimed at understanding the potential for inducing seismicity during tunnel construction. The stress changes and their evolution during the excavation are evaluated with a finite element solver (FLAC3d). A strain-softening friction model is then used to simulate the occurrence of a sudden slip on a fault zone (if critical conditions for reactivation are reached). We also present a sensitivity analysis of the potential for inducing different seismic events by different tunnel sizes at varying distance from a nearby failure plane, with the final purpose of evaluating safety of a potential nuclear repository site on the short- and long-term.

  7. A numerical 4D Collision Risk Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Pal; Culloch, Ross; Lieber, Lilian; Kregting, Louise

    2017-04-01

    With the growing number of marine renewable energy (MRE) devices being installed across the world, some concern has been raised about the possibility of harming mobile, marine fauna by collision. Although physical contact between a MRE device and an organism has not been reported to date, these novel sub-sea structures pose a challenge for accurately estimating collision risks as part of environmental impact assessments. Even if the animal motion is simplified to linear translation, ignoring likely evasive behaviour, the mathematical problem of establishing an impact probability is not trivial. We present a numerical algorithm to obtain such probability distributions using transient, four-dimensional simulations of a novel marine renewable device concept, Deep Green, Minesto's power plant and hereafter referred to as the 'kite' that flies in a figure-of-eight configuration. Simulations were carried out altering several configurations including kite depth, kite speed and kite trajectory while keeping the speed of the moving object constant. Since the kite assembly is defined as two parts in the model, a tether (attached to the seabed) and the kite, collision risk of each part is reported independently. By comparing the number of collisions with the number of collision-free simulations, a probability of impact for each simulated position in the cross- section of the area is considered. Results suggest that close to the bottom, where the tether amplitude is small, the path is always blocked and the impact probability is 100% as expected. However, higher up in the water column, the collision probability is twice as high in the mid line, where the tether passes twice per period than at the extremes of its trajectory. The collision probability distribution is much more complex in the upper end of the water column, where the kite and tether can simultaneously collide with the object. Results demonstrate the viability of such models, which can also incorporate empirical

  8. Detailed Physical Modeling Reveals the Magnetar Nature of a Transient Anomalous X-ray Pulsar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guever, T.; Oezel, F.; Goegues, E.; Kouveliotou, C.

    2007-01-01

    Anomalous X-ray Pulsars (AXPs) belong to a class of neutron stars believed to harbor the strongest magnetic fields in the universe, as indicated by their energetic bursts and their rapid spindowns. However, a direct measurement of their surface field strengths has not been made to date. It is also not known whether AXP outbursts result from changes in the neutron star magnetic field or crust properties. Here we report the first, spectroscopic measurement of the surface magnetic field strength of an AXP, XTE J1810-197, and solidify its magnetar nature. The field strength obtained from detailed spectral analysis and modeling is remarkably close to the value inferred from the rate of spindown of this source and remains nearly constant during numerous observations spanning over two orders of magnitude in source flux. The surface temperature, on the other hand, declines steadily and dramatically following the 2003 outburst of this source. Our findings demonstrate that heating occurs in the upper neutron star crust during an outburst and sheds light on the transient behaviour of AXPs.

  9. Simplified method for numerical modeling of fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Shtyrina, O V; Yarutkina, I A; Fedoruk, M P

    2014-12-29

    A simplified numerical approach to modeling of dissipative dispersion-managed fiber lasers is examined. We present a new numerical iteration algorithm for finding the periodic solutions of the system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations describing the intra-cavity dynamics of the dissipative soliton characteristics in dispersion-managed fiber lasers. We demonstrate that results obtained using simplified model are in good agreement with full numerical modeling based on the corresponding partial differential equations.

  10. Validation of Numerical Shallow Water Models for Tidal Lagoons

    SciTech Connect

    Eliason, D.; Bourgeois, A.

    1999-11-01

    An analytical solution is presented for the case of a stratified, tidally forced lagoon. This solution, especially its energetics, is useful for the validation of numerical shallow water models under stratified, tidally forced conditions. The utility of the analytical solution for validation is demonstrated for a simple finite difference numerical model. A comparison is presented of the energetics of the numerical and analytical solutions in terms of the convergence of model results to the analytical solution with increasing spatial and temporal resolution.

  11. Multiscale numerical modeling of the spherically symmetric cryosurgery problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryashov, N. A.; Shilnikov, K. E.

    2017-01-01

    The work is concerned with the numerical studying of the cryogenic biotissue destruction by a spherically symmetric tip. The multiscale bioheat transfer model is used for the describing of the biological solutions crystallization features. An explicit finite volume based approximation is applied for the numerical modeling of the processes taking place during the cryosurgery. The phase averaging method is applied as an computationally economic approach for the numerical modeling of the problem under study.

  12. Numerical considerations for Lagrangian stochastic dispersion models: Eliminating rogue trajectories, and the importance of numerical accuracy

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    When Lagrangian stochastic models for turbulent dispersion are applied to complex flows, some type of ad hoc intervention is almost always necessary to eliminate unphysical behavior in the numerical solution. This paper discusses numerical considerations when solving the Langevin-based particle velo...

  13. Numerical modelling of collapsing volcanic edifices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Ana; Marques, Fernando; Kaus, Boris

    2017-04-01

    The flanks of Oceanic Volcanic Edifice's (OVEs) can occasionally become unstable. If that occurs, they can deform in two different modes: either slowly along localization failure zones (slumps) or catastrophically as debris avalanches. Yet the physics of this process is incompletely understood, and the role of factors such as the OVE's strength (viscosity, cohesion, friction angle), dimensions, geometry, and existence of weak layers remain to be addressed. Here we perform numerical simulations to study the interplay between viscous and plastic deformation on the gravitational collapse of an OVE (diffuse deformation vs. localization of failure along discrete structures). We focus on the contribution of the edifice's strength parameters for the mode of deformation, as well as on the type of basement. Tests were performed for a large OVE (7.5 km high, 200 km long) and either purely viscous (overall volcano edifice viscosities between 1019-1023 Pa.s), or viscoplastic rheology (within a range of cohesion and friction angle values). Results show that (a) for a strong basement (no slip basal boundary condition), the deformation pattern suggests wide/diffuse "listric" deformation within the volcanic edifice, without the development of discrete plastic failure zones; (b) for a weak basement (free slip basal boundary condition), rapid collapse of the edifice through the propagation of plastic failure structures within the edifice occurs. Tests for a smaller OVE (4.5 km by 30 km) show that failure localization along large-scale listric structures occurs more readily for different combinations of cohesion and friction angles. In these tests, high cohesion values combined with small friction angles lead to focusing of deformation along a narrower band. Tests with a weak layer underlying part of the volcanic edifice base show deformation focused along discrete structures mainly dipping towards the distal sector of the volcano. These tests for a small OVE constitute a promising

  14. Advanced in turbulence physics and modeling by direct numerical simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, W. C.

    1987-01-01

    The advent of direct numerical simulations of turbulence has opened avenues for research on turbulence physics and turbulence modeling. Direct numerical simulation provides values for anything that the scientist or modeler would like to know about the flow. An overview of some recent advances in the physical understanding of turbulence and in turbulence modeling obtained through such simulations is presented.

  15. Dynamics in classical Josephson junction arrays: models and numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciria, José C.; Giovannella, C.

    1998-05-01

    These lecture notes are divided in three main sections. In the first one we give a detailed derivation of the equation of motion of an array of resistively and capacitively shunted Josephson Junctions (JJA). The derivation starts from a Lagrangian written for the gauge invariant phase, φij, and its conjugate variable, φij, and it is done in the full inductance-matrix approximation. The ohmic dissipation due to the shunting resistances is taken in account through the introduction in the Euler-Lagrangian equation of a convenient Rayleigh's function. The JJA formalism, then, is extended to the much more complex case of a granular superconductor. In order to make clear the relationship between the JJA formalism and those developed in the framework of other discrete models, like the discrete sine-Gordon and the Frenkel-Kontorova ones, a paragraph is devoted to their comparative analysis. The relationship between phase and `particle' dynamics is also briefly discussed. In the second section we provide the `beginners' with some basic ideas on how to perform numerical simulations based on the JJA formalism. Finally, in the third section we give a flavour of the physical problems that one can solve by `running' numerical codes like the ones we have developed. The dynamical properties of single massless and massive vortices and those of a JJA subjected to an external ac driving force are briefly discussed.

  16. A Numerical Model for the Microcirculation in Skeletal Muscle Fascia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobitz, Frank G.; Schmid-Schönbein, Geert W.

    2002-11-01

    A numerical model for blood flow in a microvascular network has been developed. The model uses the complete network topology of rat spinotrapezius muscle fascia that was reconstructed from microscopic images. The fascia's network is composed of a feeding arterial network, a collecting venous network, and bundles of capillaries. The flow in the network's vessels is characterized by low Reynolds and Womersley numbers. The model consideres that the microvessels are distensible by pressure and that the arterioles are actively contractile. The blood has non-Newtonian apparent viscosity and blood cells are distributed at bifurcations according to the flow rates into the side branches. These properties have previously been determined experimentally. The method of indefinite admittances is used to compute the flow in the network. The apparent viscosity is computed from local values of hematocrit, shear, and vessel diameter. The model provides detailed information about the flow in all of the network's vessels. Statistical properties of the network, such as the overall flowrate through the network or distributions of pressure, shear stress, and hematocrit in the network are determined. Results for the flow in arterial, venous, and capillary vessels are compared.

  17. The Rheasilvia Crater on Rotating Vesta: Numerical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, B.; Kamyshenkov, D.

    2012-12-01

    The Dawn mission to the asteroid Vesta delivers valuable new data about this differentiated planetary body (see Russel ea., Jaumann ea., Schenk ea., Science, 11 May 2012). The youngest of giant impact craters on Vesta, Rheasilvia, is an important "window" into Vesta structure and history. Numerical SPH modeling of the Rheasilvia impact formation (Jutzi and Asphaug, 2010-12, Jutzi ea., 2012) revealed the main details of the event. We use alternatively 2D SALE-based code to study some details better resolved in the Eulerian hydrocodes (Ivanov ea., 2011-12). We continue the modeling and now the target rotation (centripetal accelerations) is added to the code (in 2D we can model only vertical impact at the pole). The problem of the initial rotating target shape is solving numerically: the liquid 3-layer sphere ("basalt" crust, "dunite" mantle, iron core) is gradually spin up and starts to oscillate around an equilibrium elliptic shape. At the moment of maximum average velocity all velocities are zeroed and the target approaches to its equilibrium more slowly. A few iterations allow us to reach the state where the model run, restarted with strength switched on, demonstrates only near boundaries material damage. After ~3000 s of this "dry" run the model restarts again with zeroed damage and velocities and the impacting projectile. For the 5 hours rotation period, 40 km crust and 100 km core the (a-c)/a flattening is about 0.165 v.s 0.196 for 285x229 km ellipsoid used for mapping (Jaumann ea., 2012). The core flattening is about 0.15. After the impact the crater is formed and flattening increases to ~0.168 for crust and mantle and to 0.156 for the core (crust and mantle ellipses are fitted for the uncratered hemisphere). Hence, the Rheasilvia-scale impact may slightly change the effective asteroid shape. Older large impacts visible on Vesta (Schenk ea., 2012) should be modeled in future to trace the shape evolution. The Rheasilvia-scale impact results in the mantle uplift

  18. CADDIS Volume 2. Sources, Stressors and Responses: Simple and Detailed Conceptual Model Diagram Downloads

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Simple and detailed conceptual model diagram and associated narrative for ammonia, dissolved oxygen, flow alteration, herbicides, insecticides, ionic strength, metals, nutrients, ph, physical habitat, sediments, temperature, unspecified toxic chemicals.

  19. Conceptual and Numerical Models for UZ Flow and Transport

    SciTech Connect

    H. Liu

    2000-03-03

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the conceptual and numerical models used for modeling of unsaturated zone (UZ) fluid (water and air) flow and solute transport processes. This is in accordance with ''AMR Development Plan for U0030 Conceptual and Numerical Models for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Processes, Rev 00''. The conceptual and numerical modeling approaches described in this AMR are used for models of UZ flow and transport in fractured, unsaturated rock under ambient and thermal conditions, which are documented in separate AMRs. This AMR supports the UZ Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR), the Near Field Environment PMR, and the following models: Calibrated Properties Model; UZ Flow Models and Submodels; Mountain-Scale Coupled Processes Model; Thermal-Hydrologic-Chemical (THC) Seepage Model; Drift Scale Test (DST) THC Model; Seepage Model for Performance Assessment (PA); and UZ Radionuclide Transport Models.

  20. PROGRESS IN DETAILED KINETIC MODELING OF THE COMBUSTION OF OXYGENATED COMPONENTS OF BIOFUELS

    PubMed Central

    Sy Tran, Luc; Sirjean, Baptiste; Glaude, Pierre-Alexandre; Fournet, René; Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique

    2013-01-01

    Due to growing environmental concerns and diminishing petroleum reserves, a wide range of oxygenated species has been proposed as possible substitutes to fossil fuels: alcohols, methyl esters, acyclic and cyclic ethers. After a short review the major detailed kinetic models already proposed in the literature for the combustion of these molecules, the specific classes of reactions considered for modeling the oxidation of acyclic and cyclic oxygenated molecules respectively, are detailed. PMID:23700355

  1. Numerical modelling of blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) bacterial contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabrowski, Tomasz; Doré, William J.; Lyons, Kieran; Nolan, Glenn D.

    2014-05-01

    Bivalve shellfish such as oysters and mussels can concentrate human pathogens when grown in areas impacted by municipal wastewater. Under EU regulation this risk to consumers is controlled by determining the sanitary quality of bivalve shellfish production areas based on the concentration of Escherichia coli present in shellfish flesh. The authors present a modelling approach to simulate an uptake of E. coli from seawater and subsequent depuration by Mytilus edulis. The model that dynamically predicts E. coli concentration in the mussel tissue is embedded within a 3-D numerical modelling system comprising hydrodynamic, biogeochemical, shellfish ecophysiological and the newly proposed microbial modules. The microbial module has two state variables, namely, the concentrations of E. coli in water and in the mussel tissue. Novel formulations to calculate the filtration rates by mussels and the resulting uptake of bacteria are proposed; these rates are updated at every computational time step. Concentrations of E. coli in seawater are also updated accordingly taking into account the amounts ingested by mussels. The model has been applied to Bantry Bay in the south-west of Ireland. The results indicate that the model is capable of reproducing the official classification of shellfish waters in the bay based on monthly sampling at several stations. The predicted filtration rates and ratios of E. coli in water and mussels also compare well with the literature. The model thus forms a tool that may be used to assist in the classification of shellfish waters at much greater spatial and temporal detail than that offered by a field monitoring programme. Moreover, it can also aid in designing an efficient monitoring programme. The model can also be utilised to determine the contribution of individual point sources of pollution on the microbial loading in mussels and, when incorporated into an operational framework, it can provide a short-term forecasting of microbial

  2. Numerical daemons in hydrological modeling: Effects on uncertainty assessment, sensitivity analysis and model predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavetski, D.; Clark, M. P.; Fenicia, F.

    2011-12-01

    Hydrologists often face sources of uncertainty that dwarf those normally encountered in many engineering and scientific disciplines. Especially when representing large scale integrated systems, internal heterogeneities such as stream networks, preferential flowpaths, vegetation, etc, are necessarily represented with a considerable degree of lumping. The inputs to these models are themselves often the products of sparse observational networks. Given the simplifications inherent in environmental models, especially lumped conceptual models, does it really matter how they are implemented? At the same time, given the complexities usually found in the response surfaces of hydrological models, increasingly sophisticated analysis methodologies are being proposed for sensitivity analysis, parameter calibration and uncertainty assessment. Quite remarkably, rather than being caused by the model structure/equations themselves, in many cases model analysis complexities are consequences of seemingly trivial aspects of the model implementation - often, literally, whether the start-of-step or end-of-step fluxes are used! The extent of problems can be staggering, including (i) degraded performance of parameter optimization and uncertainty analysis algorithms, (ii) erroneous and/or misleading conclusions of sensitivity analysis, parameter inference and model interpretations and, finally, (iii) poor reliability of a calibrated model in predictive applications. While the often nontrivial behavior of numerical approximations has long been recognized in applied mathematics and in physically-oriented fields of environmental sciences, it remains a problematic issue in many environmental modeling applications. Perhaps detailed attention to numerics is only warranted for complicated engineering models? Would not numerical errors be an insignificant component of total uncertainty when typical data and model approximations are present? Is this really a serious issue beyond some rare isolated

  3. NUMERICAL MODELING OF FINE SEDIMENT PHYSICAL PROCESSES.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schoellhamer, David H.

    1985-01-01

    Fine sediment in channels, rivers, estuaries, and coastal waters undergo several physical processes including flocculation, floc disruption, deposition, bed consolidation, and resuspension. This paper presents a conceptual model and reviews mathematical models of these physical processes. Several general fine sediment models that simulate some of these processes are reviewed. These general models do not directly simulate flocculation and floc disruption, but the conceptual model and existing functions are shown to adequately model these two processes for one set of laboratory data.

  4. 3-D numerical modeling of plume-induced subduction initiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baes, Marzieh; Gerya, taras; Sobolev, Stephan

    2016-04-01

    Investigation of mechanisms involved in formation of a new subduction zone can help us to better understand plate tectonics. Despite numerous previous studies, it is still unclear how and where an old oceanic plate starts to subduct beneath the other plate. One of the proposed scenarios for nucleation of subduction is plume-induced subduction initiation, which was investigated in detail, using 2-D models, by Ueda et al. (2008). Recently. Gerya et al. (2015), using 3D numerical models, proposed that plume-lithosphere interaction in the Archean led to the subduction initiation and onset of plate tectonic. In this study, we aim to pursue work of Ueda et al. (2008) by incorporation of 3-D thermo-mechanical models to investigate conditions leading to oceanic subduction initiation as a result of thermal-chemical mantle plume-lithosphere interaction in the modern earth. Results of our experiments show four different deformation regimes in response to plume-lithosphere interaction, that are a) self-sustaining subduction initiation where subduction becomes self-sustained, b) freezing subduction initiation where subduction stops at shallow depths, c) slab break-off where subducting circular slab breaks off soon after formation and d) plume underplating where plume does not pass through the lithosphere but spreads beneath it (failed subduction initiation). These different regimes depend on several parameters such as plume's size, composition and temperature, lithospheric brittle/plastic strength, age of the oceanic lithosphere and presence/absence of lithospheric heterogeneities. Results show that subduction initiates and becomes self-sustained when lithosphere is older than 10 Myr and non-dimensional ratio of the plume buoyancy force and lithospheric strength above the plume is higher than 2.

  5. Hydrodynamic modeling of urban flooding taking into account detailed data about city infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belikov, Vitaly; Norin, Sergey; Aleksyuk, Andrey; Krylenko, Inna; Borisova, Natalya; Rumyantsev, Alexey

    2017-04-01

    Flood waves moving across urban areas have specific features. Thus, the linear objects of infrastructure (such as embankments, roads, dams) can change the direction of flow or block the water movement. On the contrary, paved avenues and wide streets in the cities contribute to the concentration of flood waters. Buildings create an additional resistance to the movement of water, which depends on the urban density and the type of constructions; this effect cannot be completely described by Manning's resistance law. In addition, part of the earth surface, occupied by buildings, is excluded from the flooded area, which results in a substantial (relative to undeveloped areas) increase of the depth of flooding, especially for unsteady flow conditions. An approach to numerical simulation of urban areas flooding that consists in direct allocating of all buildings and structures on the computational grid are proposed. This can be done in almost full automatic way with usage of modern software. Real geometry of all objects of infrastructure can be taken into account on the base of highly detailed digital maps and satellite images. The calculations based on two-dimensional Saint-Venant equations on irregular adaptive computational meshes, which can contain millions of cells and take into account tens of thousands of buildings and other objects of infrastructure. Flood maps, received as result of modeling, are the basis for the damage and risk assessment for urban areas. The main advantage of the developed method is high-precision calculations, realistic modeling results and appropriate graphical display of the flood dynamics and dam-break wave's propagation on urban areas. Verification of this method has been done on the experimental data and real events simulations, including catastrophic flooding of the Krymsk city in 2012 year.

  6. Numerical study of similarity in prototype and model pumped turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z. J.; Wang, Z. W.; Bi, H. L.

    2014-03-01

    Similarity study of prototype and model pumped turbines are performed by numerical simulation and the partial discharge case is analysed in detail. It is found out that in the RSI (rotor-stator interaction) region where the flow is convectively accelerated with minor flow separation, a high level of similarity in flow patterns and pressure fluctuation appear with relative pressure fluctuation amplitude of model turbine slightly higher than that of prototype turbine. As for the condition in the runner where the flow is convectively accelerated with severe separation, similarity fades substantially due to different topology of flow separation and vortex formation brought by distinctive Reynolds numbers of the two turbines. In the draft tube where the flow is diffusively decelerated, similarity becomes debilitated owing to different vortex rope formation impacted by Reynolds number. It is noted that the pressure fluctuation amplitude and characteristic frequency of model turbine are larger than those of prototype turbine. The differences in pressure fluctuation characteristics are discussed theoretically through dimensionless Navier-Stokes equation. The above conclusions are all made based on simulation without regard to the penstock response and resonance.

  7. Combining a Detailed Building Energy Model with a Physically-Based Urban Canopy Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bueno, Bruno; Norford, Leslie; Pigeon, Grégoire; Britter, Rex

    2011-09-01

    A scheme that couples a detailed building energy model, EnergyPlus, and an urban canopy model, the Town Energy Balance (TEB), is presented. Both models are well accepted and evaluated within their individual scientific communities. The coupled scheme proposes a more realistic representation of buildings and heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems, which allows a broader analysis of the two-way interactions between the energy performance of buildings and the urban climate around the buildings. The scheme can be used to evaluate the building energy models that are being developed within the urban climate community. In this study, the coupled scheme is evaluated using measurements conducted over the dense urban centre of Toulouse, France. The comparison includes electricity and natural gas energy consumption of buildings, building façade temperatures, and urban canyon air temperatures. The coupled scheme is then used to analyze the effect of different building and HVAC system configurations on building energy consumption, waste heat released from HVAC systems, and outdoor air temperatures for the case study of Toulouse. Three different energy efficiency strategies are analyzed: shading devices, economizers, and heat recovery.

  8. Numerical bifurcation analysis of immunological models with time delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luzyanina, Tatyana; Roose, Dirk; Bocharov, Gennady

    2005-12-01

    In recent years, a large number of mathematical models that are described by delay differential equations (DDEs) have appeared in the life sciences. To analyze the models' dynamics, numerical methods are necessary, since analytical studies can only give limited results. In turn, the availability of efficient numerical methods and software packages encourages the use of time delays in mathematical modelling, which may lead to more realistic models. We outline recently developed numerical methods for bifurcation analysis of DDEs and illustrate the use of these methods in the analysis of a mathematical model of human hepatitis B virus infection.

  9. Numerical modeling of multiphase flow in rough and propped fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabrowski, Marcin; Dzikowski, Michał; Jasinski, Lukasz; Olkiewicz, Piotr

    2017-04-01

    crystalline rocks. The detailed pattern of flow paths and effective fracture conductivity are largely dependent on the level of confining stresses and fracture wall roughness, which both determine the shape and distribution of fracture apertures and contact areas. The distribution of proppant grains, which are used to maintain apertures of hydraulic fractures, is a key factor governing fracture flow in industrial applications. The flow of multiphase fluids in narrow apertures of rock fractures may substantially differ from the flow of a single-phase fluid. For example, multiphase flow effects play an important role during all stages of unconventional reservoir life cycle. Multiphase flow conditions are also expected to prevail in high temperature geothermal fields and during the transport of non aqueous phase liquid contaminants in groundwaters. We use direct numerical simulations to study single- and multiphase flow in rough and propped fractures. We compute the fluid flow using either the finite element or the lattice Boltzmann method. Body-fitting, unstructured computational meshes are used to improve the numerical accuracy. The fluid-fluid and fluid-solid interfaces are directly resolved and an implicit approach to surface tension is used to alleviate restrictions due to capillary CFL condition. In FEM simulations, the Beltrami-Laplace operator is integrated by parts to avoid interface curvature computation during evaluation of the surface tension term. We derive and validate an upscaled approach to Stokes flow in propped and rough fractures. Our upscaled 2.5D fracture flow model features a Brinkman term and is capable of treating no-slip boundary conditions on the rims of proppant grains and fracture wall contact areas. The Stokes-Brinkman fracture flow model provides an improvement over the Reynolds model, both in terms of the effective fracture permeability and the local flow pattern. We present numerical and analytical models for the propped fracture

  10. Recent developments in three-dimensional numerical estuarine models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cheng, Ralph T.; Smith, Peter E.; Casulli, Vincenzo

    1993-01-01

    For a fixed cost, computing power increases 5 to 10 times every five years. The readily available computing resources have inspired new modal formulations and innovative model applications. Significant progress has been advanced in three-dimensional numerical estuarine modeling within the past three or four years. This paper attempts to review and summarize properties of new 3-D estuarine hydrodynamic models. The emphasis of the review is placed on the formulation, numerical methods. The emphasis of the review is placed on the formulation, numerical methods, spatial and temporal resolution, computational efficiency, and turbulence closure of new models. Recent research has provided guidelines for the proper use of 3-D models involving in the σ-transformation. Other models resort to a fixed level discretization in the vertical. The semi-implicit treatment in time-stepping models appears to have gained momentum. Future research in three-dimensional numerical modeling remains to be on computational efficiency and turbulent closure.

  11. Numerically Controlled Machining Of Wind-Tunnel Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovtun, John B.

    1990-01-01

    New procedure for dynamic models and parts for wind-tunnel tests or radio-controlled flight tests constructed. Involves use of single-phase numerical control (NC) technique to produce highly-accurate, symmetrical models in less time.

  12. Experimental & Numerical Modeling of Non-combusting Model Firebrands' Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohidi, Ali; Kaye, Nigel

    2016-11-01

    Fire spotting is one of the major mechanisms of wildfire spread. Three phases of this phenomenon are firebrand formation and break-off from burning vegetation, lofting and downwind transport of firebrands through the velocity field of the wildfire, and spot fire ignition upon landing. The lofting and downwind transport phase is modeled by conducting large-scale wind tunnel experiments. Non-combusting rod-like model firebrands with different aspect ratios are released within the velocity field of a jet in a boundary layer cross-flow that approximates the wildfire velocity field. Characteristics of the firebrand dispersion are quantified by capturing the full trajectory of the model firebrands using the developed image processing algorithm. The results show that the lofting height has a direct impact on the maximum travel distance of the model firebrands. Also, the experimental results are utilized for validation of a highly scalable coupled stochastic & parametric firebrand flight model that, couples the LES-resolved velocity field of a jet-in-nonuniform-cross-flow (JINCF) with a 3D fully deterministic 6-degrees-of-freedom debris transport model. The validation results show that the developed numerical model is capable of estimating average statistics of the firebrands' flight. Authors would like to thank support of the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1200560. Also, the presenter (Ali Tohid) would like to thank Dr. Michael Gollner from the University of Maryland College Park for the conference participation support.

  13. Software Simplifies the Sharing of Numerical Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2014-01-01

    To ease the sharing of climate models with university students, Goddard Space Flight Center awarded SBIR funding to Reston, Virginia-based Parabon Computation Inc., a company that specializes in cloud computing. The firm developed a software program capable of running climate models over the Internet, and also created an online environment for people to collaborate on developing such models.

  14. Numerical modeling, calibration, and validation of an ultrasonic separator.

    PubMed

    Cappon, Hans; Keesman, Karel J

    2013-03-01

    Our overall goal is to apply acoustic separation technology for the recovery of valuable particulate matter from wastewater in industry. Such large-scale separator systems require detailed design and evaluation to optimize the system performance at the earliest stage possible. Numerical models can facilitate and accelerate the design of this application; therefore, a finite element (FE) model of an ultrasonic particle separator is a prerequisite. In our application, the particle separator consists of a glass resonator chamber with a piezoelectric transducer attached to the glass by means of epoxy adhesive. Separation occurs most efficiently when the system is operated at its main eigenfrequency. The goal of the paper is to calibrate and validate a model of a demonstrator ultrasonic separator, preserving known physical parameters and estimating the remaining unknown or less-certain parameters to allow extrapolation of the model beyond the measured system. A two-step approach was applied to obtain a validated model of the separator. The first step involved the calibration of the piezoelectric transducer. The second step, the subject of this paper, involves the calibration and validation of the entire separator using nonlinear optimization techniques. The results show that the approach lead to a fully calibrated 2-D model of the empty separator, which was validated with experiments on a filled separator chamber. The large sensitivity of the separator to small variations indicated that such a system should either be made and operated within tight specifications to obtain the required performance or the operation of the system should be adaptable to cope with a slightly off-spec system, requiring a feedback controller.

  15. A comprehensive numerical model investigating the thermal-dynamic performance of scientific balloon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Q.; Wu, Z.; Zhu, M.; Xu, W. Q.

    2014-01-01

    The increase of balloon applications makes it necessary for a comprehensive understanding of the thermal and dynamic performance of scientific balloons. This paper proposed a novel numerical model to investigate the thermal and dynamic characteristics of scientific balloon in both ascending and floating conditions. The novel model consists of a dynamic model and thermal model, the dynamic model was solved numerically by a computer program developed with Matlab/Simulink to calculate the velocity and trajectory, the thermal model was solved by the Fluent program to find out the balloon film temperature distribution and inner Helium gas velocity and temperature field. These models were verified by comparing the numerical results with experimental data. Then the thermal and dynamic behavior of a scientific balloon in a real environment were simulated and discussed in details.

  16. Considering digits in a current model of numerical development.

    PubMed

    Roesch, Stephanie; Moeller, Korbinian

    2014-01-01

    Numerical cognition has long been considered the perfect example of abstract information processing. Nevertheless, there is accumulating evidence in recent years suggesting that the representation of number magnitude may not be entirely abstract but may present a specific case of embodied cognition rooted in the sensory and bodily experiences of early finger counting and calculating. However, so far none of the existing models of numerical development considers the influence of finger-based representations. Therefore, we make first suggestions on (i) how finger-based representations may be integrated into a current model of numerical development; and (ii) how they might corroborate the acquisition of basic numerical competencies at different development levels.

  17. The GISS model of the global atmosphere. [Goddard Institute for Space Studies numerical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somerville, R. C. J.; Stone, P. H.; Halem, M.; Hansen, J. E.; Hogan, J. S.; Druyan, L. M.; Quirk, W. J.; Russell, G.; Lacis, A. A.; Tenenbaum, J.

    1974-01-01

    A description and numerical results are presented for a global atmospheric circulation model developed at the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS). The model version described is a 9-level primitive-equation model in sigma coordinates. It includes a realistic distribution of continents, oceans and topography. Detailed calculations of energy transfer by solar and terrestrial radiation make use of cloud and water vapor fields calculated by the model. The model hydrologic cycle includes two precipitation mechanisms: large-scale supersaturation and a parameterization of subgrid-scale cumulus convection. Results are presented both from a comparison of the 13th to the 43rd days (January) of one integration with climatological statistics, and from five short-range forecasting experiments. In the extended integration, the near-equilibrium January-mean model atmosphere exhibits an energy cycle in good agreement with observational estimates, together with generally realistic zonal mean fields of winds, temperature, humidity, transports, diabatic heating, evaporation, precipitation, and cloud cover.

  18. Numerical MHD codes for modeling astrophysical flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koldoba, A. V.; Ustyugova, G. V.; Lii, P. S.; Comins, M. L.; Dyda, S.; Romanova, M. M.; Lovelace, R. V. E.

    2016-05-01

    We describe a Godunov-type magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) code based on the Miyoshi and Kusano (2005) solver which can be used to solve various astrophysical hydrodynamic and MHD problems. The energy equation is in the form of entropy conservation. The code has been implemented on several different coordinate systems: 2.5D axisymmetric cylindrical coordinates, 2D Cartesian coordinates, 2D plane polar coordinates, and fully 3D cylindrical coordinates. Viscosity and diffusivity are implemented in the code to control the accretion rate in the disk and the rate of penetration of the disk matter through the magnetic field lines. The code has been utilized for the numerical investigations of a number of different astrophysical problems, several examples of which are shown.

  19. Detailed analysis of an Eigen quasispecies model in a periodically moving sharp-peak landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, Armando G. M.

    2010-09-01

    The Eigen quasispecies model in a periodically moving sharp-peak landscape considered in previous seminal works [M. Nilsson and N. Snoad, Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 191 (2000)10.1103/PhysRevLett.84.191] and [C. Ronnewinkel , in Theoretical Aspects of Evolutionary Computing, edited by L. Kallel, B. Naudts, and A. Rogers (Springer-Verlag, Heidelberg, 2001)] is analyzed in greater detail. We show here, through a more rigorous analysis, that results in those papers are qualitatively correct. In particular, we obtain a phase diagram for the existence of a quasispecies with the same shape as in the above cited paper by C. Ronnewinkel , with upper and lower thresholds for the mutation rate between which a quasispecies may survive. A difference is that the upper value is larger and the lower value is smaller than the previously reported ones, so that the range for quasispecies existence is always larger than thought before. The quantitative information provided might also be important in understanding genetic variability in virus populations and has possible applications in antiviral therapies. The results in the quoted papers were obtained by studying the populations only at some few genomes. As we will show, this amounts to diagonalizing a 3×3 matrix. Our work is based instead in a different division of the population allowing a finer control of the populations at various relevant genetic sequences. The existence of a quasispecies will be related to Perron-Frobenius eigenvalues. Although huge matrices of sizes 2ℓ , where ℓ is the genome length, may seem necessary at a first look, we show that such large sizes are not necessary and easily obtain numerical and analytical results for their eigenvalues.

  20. Influence of a detailed model of man on proton depth/dose calculation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kase, P. G.

    1972-01-01

    The development of a detailed radiation shielding model of man is discussed. This model will be used to plan for manned space missions in which sensitive human tissues may be subjected to excessive radiation. The model has two configurations: standing and seated. More than 2500 individual elements were used to depict the external conformation, skeleton, and principal organs. The model is briefly described and several examples of its application to mission planning are given.

  1. Development of a methodology to reduce the order of a detailed lumped parameter transformer model

    SciTech Connect

    Gutierrez, M.R.

    1993-12-31

    The transformer designer employs detailed electrical models to develop a reliable and cost effective transformer insulation structure. The power engineer must model not only the transformer, but the system, therefore the power engineer requires a smaller model of the transformer that accurately represents its behavior in order to investigate the effects of power system transients. Reduced models are generally obtained either from detailed design models or from measurements on fully constructed transformers. Reduced models constructed from design data generally act as low pass filters and are severely limited in accuracy at high frequencies. The latter technique has the major disadvantage that the model cannot be constructed until after the transformer has been built. Presently, both methods are subject to considerable error. The primary objective of this thesis is to develop a technique that reduces the order of a lumped parameter transformer model used in insulation design and that provides a reduced model of any specified size for transient studies of systems which contain the transformer. The reduction technique developed can be applied to any lumped parameter network which uses electric parameter analogs (i.e., FEM networks). The method of this thesis uses Kron`s reduction approach in time domain to obtain a reduced model. This reduced model is compatible with industry methods for transient studies (EMTP) and retains the accuracy and stability of the detailed model. Additionally, this reduced model can be used to predict the interaction between the transformer and the power system, via EMTP, giving a valuable tool to both power and design engineers. Application of the technique for the detailed model of a 765/345/34.5 kV, YYD, core form, 500 MVA single phase autotransformer is verified by frequency and time domain tests for the linear model. The nonlinear transformer model reduction technique is outlined and a proof of concept is provided by two examples.

  2. Effects of detailed droplet heating models on turbulent sprays vaporization behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mawid, M. A.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of three different droplet heating models on the vaporization history and internal structure of turbulent liquid fuel sprays were investigated. The models considered were the infinite-diffusion, diffusion-limit, and effective-conductivity models. A numerical solution for the models was developed and implemented in the KIVA-II computer code. Low temperature and relatively high temperature numerical studies were conducted. The low temperature computations were compared with existing experimental data. The comparisons showed that while the infinite-diffusion and diffusion-limit models respectively overpredicted and underpredicted the fuel vapor peak concentration and distribution in the combustor, the effective-conductivity model gave results that were in better agreement with measurements. A limited study for the high temperature case was performed due to lack of experimental data and predictions using the three models were compared with each other.

  3. Ion velocity distribution functions in argon and helium discharges: detailed comparison of numerical simulation results and experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huihui; Sukhomlinov, Vladimir S.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Mustafaev, Alexander S.

    2017-02-01

    Using the Monte Carlo collision method, we have performed simulations of ion velocity distribution functions (IVDF) taking into account both elastic collisions and charge exchange collisions of ions with atoms in uniform electric fields for argon and helium background gases. The simulation results are verified by comparison with the experiment data of the ion mobilities and the ion transverse diffusion coefficients in argon and helium. The recently published experimental data for the first seven coefficients of the Legendre polynomial expansion of the ion energy and angular distribution functions are used to validate simulation results for IVDF. Good agreement between measured and simulated IVDFs shows that the developed simulation model can be used for accurate calculations of IVDFs.

  4. Cost model relationships between textile manufacturing processes and design details for transport fuselage elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metschan, Stephen L.; Wilden, Kurtis S.; Sharpless, Garrett C.; Andelman, Rich M.

    1993-01-01

    Textile manufacturing processes offer potential cost and weight advantages over traditional composite materials and processes for transport fuselage elements. In the current study, design cost modeling relationships between textile processes and element design details were developed. Such relationships are expected to help future aircraft designers to make timely decisions on the effect of design details and overall configurations on textile fabrication costs. The fundamental advantage of a design cost model is to insure that the element design is cost effective for the intended process. Trade studies on the effects of processing parameters also help to optimize the manufacturing steps for a particular structural element. Two methods of analyzing design detail/process cost relationships developed for the design cost model were pursued in the current study. The first makes use of existing databases and alternative cost modeling methods (e.g. detailed estimating). The second compares design cost model predictions with data collected during the fabrication of seven foot circumferential frames for ATCAS crown test panels. The process used in this case involves 2D dry braiding and resin transfer molding of curved 'J' cross section frame members having design details characteristic of the baseline ATCAS crown design.

  5. Axisymmetric Numerical Modeling of Pulse Detonation Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Christopher I.

    2005-01-01

    Pulse detonation rocket engines (PDREs) have generated research interest in recent years as a chemical propulsion system potentially offering improved performance and reduced complexity compared to conventional rocket engines. The detonative mode of combustion employed by these devices offers a thermodynamic advantage over the constant-pressure deflagrative combustion mode used in conventional rocket engines and gas turbines. However, while this theoretical advantage has spurred considerable interest in building PDRE devices, the unsteady blowdown process intrinsic to the PDRE has made realistic estimates of the actual propulsive performance problematic. The recent review article by Kailasanath highlights some of the progress that has been made in comparing the available experimental measurements with analytical and numerical models. In recent work by the author, a quasi-one-dimensional, finite rate chemistry CFD model was utilized to study the gasdynamics and performance characteristics of PDREs over a range of blowdown pressure ratios from 1-1000. Models of this type are computationally inexpensive, and enable first-order parametric studies of the effect of several nozzle and extension geometries on PDRE performance over a wide range of conditions. However, the quasi-one-dimensional approach is limited in that it cannot properly capture the multidimensional blast wave and flow expansion downstream of the PDRE, nor can it resolve nozzle flow separation if present. Moreover, the previous work was limited to single-pulse calculations. In this paper, an axisymmetric finite rate chemistry model is described and utilized to study these issues in greater detail. Example Mach number contour plots showing the multidimensional blast wave and nozzle exhaust plume are shown. The performance results are compared with the quasi-one-dimensional results from the previous paper. Both Euler and Navier-Stokes solutions are calculated in order to determine the effect of viscous

  6. Cumulus clouds - Numerical models, observations and entrainment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, J.

    1983-01-01

    The first computer simulation of the organization phase of a buoyant atmospheric thermal is described. Although crude, it showed the spontaneous development of a rounded tight-gradient 'cap' and internal vortical circulation. The complexities involved in these 'field of motion' models in part motivated the development of entity models, based upon laboratory thermals. These one-dimensional models and their uses with observations are briefly described as well as their limitations. Finally, an application of Schlesinger's three-dimensional model to a GATE cumulus situation clarifies many apparently conflicting observations and postulates, thereby raising further challenging questions to be addressed jointly by the more sophisticated measuring and modeling tools available in the 1980's.

  7. Numerical modeling and experimental measurements of water spray impact and transport over a cylinder.

    SciTech Connect

    Avedisian, C. T.; Presser, Cary; DesJardin, Paul Edward; Hewson, John C.; Yoon, Sam Sukgoo

    2005-03-01

    This study compares experimental measurements and numerical simulations of liquid droplets over heated (to a near surface temperature of 423 K) and unheated cylinders. The numerical model is based on an unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) formulation using a stochastic separated flow (SSF) approach for the droplets that includes submodels for droplet dispersion, heat and mass transfer, and impact on a solid surface. The details of the droplet impact model are presented and the model is used to simulate water spray impingement on a cylinder. Computational results are compared with experimental measurements using phase Doppler interferometry (PDI).

  8. Numerical investigation of dynamics of unsteady sheet/cloud cavitating flow using a compressible fluid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guang-Hao; Wang, Guo-Yu; Huang, Biao; Hu, Chang-Li; Wang, Zhi-Ying; Wang, Jian

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, a compressible fluid model is proposed to investigate dynamics of the turbulent cavitating flow over a Clark-Y hydrofoil. The numerical simulation is based on the homogeneous mixture approach coupled with filter-based density correction model (FBDCM) turbulence model and Zwart cavitation model. Considering the compressibility effect, the equation of state of each phase is introduced into the numerical model. The results show that the predicted results agree well with experimental data concerning the time-averaged lift/drag coefficient and shedding frequency. The quasi-periodic evolution of sheet/cloud cavitation and the resulting lift and drag are discussed in detail. Especially, the present compressible-mixture numerical model is capable of simulating the shock waves in the final stage of cavity collapse. It is found that the shock waves may cause the transient significant increase and decrease in lift and drag if the cavity collapses near the foil surface.

  9. Numerical simulation of the zebra pattern formation on a three-dimensional model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Darae; Li, Yibao; Choi, Yongho; Yoo, Minhyun; Kang, Dooyoung; Park, Junyoung; Choi, Jaewon; Kim, Junseok

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we numerically investigate the zebra skin pattern formation on the surface of a zebra model in three-dimensional space. To model the pattern formation, we use the Lengyel-Epstein model which is a two component activator and inhibitor system. The concentration profiles of the Lengyel-Epstein model are obtained by solving the corresponding reaction-diffusion equation numerically using a finite difference method. We represent the zebra surface implicitly as the zero level set of a signed distance function and then solve the resulting system on a discrete narrow band domain containing the zebra skin. The values at boundary are dealt with an interpolation using the closet point method. We present the numerical method in detail and investigate the effect of the model parameters on the pattern formation on the surface of the zebra model.

  10. a Numerical Study on Predator Prey Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laham, Mohamed Faris; Krishnarajah, Isthrinayagy; Jumaat, Abdul Kadir

    Stochastic spatial models are becoming a popular tool for understand the ecological and evolution of ecosystem problems. We consider the predator prey interactions in term of stochastic representation of this Lotka-Volterra model and explore the use of stochastic processes to extinction behavior of the interacting populations. Here, we present simulation of stochastic processes of continuous time Lotka-Volterra model. Euler method has been used to solve the predator prey system. The trajectory spiral graph has been plotted based on obtained solution to show the population cycle of predator as a function of time.

  11. A statistical approach to develop a detailed soot growth model using PAH characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Raj, Abhijeet; Celnik, Matthew; Shirley, Raphael; Sander, Markus; Patterson, Robert; West, Richard; Kraft, Markus

    2009-04-15

    A detailed PAH growth model is developed, which is solved using a kinetic Monte Carlo algorithm. The model describes the structure and growth of planar PAH molecules, and is referred to as the kinetic Monte Carlo-aromatic site (KMC-ARS) model. A detailed PAH growth mechanism based on reactions at radical sites available in the literature, and additional reactions obtained from quantum chemistry calculations are used to model the PAH growth processes. New rates for the reactions involved in the cyclodehydrogenation process for the formation of 6-member rings on PAHs are calculated in this work based on density functional theory simulations. The KMC-ARS model is validated by comparing experimentally observed ensembles on PAHs with the computed ensembles for a C{sub 2}H{sub 2} and a C{sub 6}H{sub 6} flame at different heights above the burner. The motivation for this model is the development of a detailed soot particle population balance model which describes the evolution of an ensemble of soot particles based on their PAH structure. However, at present incorporating such a detailed model into a population balance is computationally unfeasible. Therefore, a simpler model referred to as the site-counting model has been developed, which replaces the structural information of the PAH molecules by their functional groups augmented with statistical closure expressions. This closure is obtained from the KMC-ARS model, which is used to develop correlations and statistics in different flame environments which describe such PAH structural information. These correlations and statistics are implemented in the site-counting model, and results from the site-counting model and the KMC-ARS model are in good agreement. Additionally the effect of steric hindrance in large PAH structures is investigated and correlations for sites unavailable for reaction are presented. (author)

  12. Numerical Calculation of Model Rocket Trajectories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeports, David

    1990-01-01

    Discussed is the use of model rocketry to teach the principles of Newtonian mechanics. Included are forces involved; calculations for vertical launches; two-dimensional trajectories; and variations in mass, drag, and launch angle. (CW)

  13. Role of sediment transport model to improve the tsunami numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugawara, D.; Yamashita, K.; Takahashi, T.; Imamura, F.

    2015-12-01

    Are we overlooking an important factor for improved numerical prediction of tsunamis in shallow sea to onshore? In this presentation, several case studies on numerical modeling of tsunami-induced sediment transport are reviewed, and the role of sediment transport models for tsunami inundation simulation is discussed. Large-scale sediment transport and resulting geomorphological change occurred in the coastal areas of Tohoku, Japan, due to the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake Tsunami. Datasets obtained after the tsunami, including geomorphological and sedimentological data as well as hydrodynamic records, allows us to validate the numerical model in detail. The numerical modeling of the sediment transport by the 2011 tsunami depicted the severest erosion of sandy beach, as well as characteristic spatial patterns of erosion and deposition on the seafloor, which have taken place in Hirota Bay, Sanriku Coast. Quantitative comparisons of observation and simulation of the geomorphological changes in Sanriku Coast and Sendai Bay showed that the numerical model can predict the volumes of erosion and deposition with a right order. In addition, comparison of the simulation with aerial video footages demonstrated the numerical model is capable of tracking the overall processes of tsunami sediment transport. Although tsunami-induced sediment erosion and deposition sometimes cause significant geomorphological change, and may enhance tsunami hydrodynamic impact to the coastal zones, most tsunami simulations do not include sediment transport modeling. A coupled modeling of tsunami hydrodynamics and sediment transport draws a different picture of tsunami hazard, comparing with simple hydrodynamic modeling of tsunami inundation. Since tsunami-induced erosion, deposition and geomorphological change sometimes extend more than several kilometers across the coastline, two-dimensional horizontal model are typically used for the computation of tsunami hydrodynamics and sediment transport

  14. On numerical modeling of one-dimensional geothermal histories

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haugerud, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    Numerical models of one-dimensional geothermal histories are one way of understanding the relations between tectonics and transient thermal structure in the crust. Such models can be powerful tools for interpreting geochronologic and thermobarometric data. A flexible program to calculate these models on a microcomputer is available and examples of its use are presented. Potential problems with this approach include the simplifying assumptions that are made, limitations of the numerical techniques, and the neglect of convective heat transfer. ?? 1989.

  15. Modelling asteroid brightness variations. I - Numerical methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karttunen, H.

    1989-01-01

    A method for generating lightcurves of asteroid models is presented. The effects of the shape of the asteroid and the scattering law of a surface element are distinctly separable, being described by chosen functions that can easily be changed. The shape is specified by means of two functions that yield the length of the radius vector and the normal vector of the surface at a given point. The general shape must be convex, but spherical concavities producing macroscopic shadowing can also be modeled.

  16. Mathematical and Numerical Modeling of Turbulent Flows.

    PubMed

    Vedovoto, João M; Serfaty, Ricardo; Da Silveira Neto, Aristeu

    2015-01-01

    The present work is devoted to the development and implementation of a computational framework to perform numerical simulations of low Mach number turbulent flows over complex geometries. The algorithm under consideration is based on a classical predictor-corrector time integration scheme that employs a projection method for the momentum equations. The domain decomposition strategy is adopted for distributed computing, displaying very satisfactory levels of speed-up and efficiency. The Immersed Boundary Methodology is used to characterize the presence of a complex geometry. Such method demands two separate grids: An Eulerian, where the transport equations are solved with a Finite Volume, second order discretization and a Lagrangian domain, represented by a non-structured shell grid representing the immersed geometry. The in-house code developed was fully verified by the Method of Manufactured Solutions, in both Eulerian and Lagrangian domains. The capabilities of the resulting computational framework are illustrated on four distinct cases: a turbulent jet, the Poiseuille flow, as a matter of validation of the implemented Immersed Boundary methodology, the flow over a sphere covering a wide range of Reynolds numbers, and finally, with the intention of demonstrating the applicability of Large Eddy Simulations - LES - in an industrial problem, the turbulent flow inside an industrial fan.

  17. Evaluation of wave runup predictions from numerical and parametric models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stockdon, Hilary F.; Thompson, David M.; Plant, Nathaniel G.; Long, Joseph W.

    2014-01-01

    Wave runup during storms is a primary driver of coastal evolution, including shoreline and dune erosion and barrier island overwash. Runup and its components, setup and swash, can be predicted from a parameterized model that was developed by comparing runup observations to offshore wave height, wave period, and local beach slope. Because observations during extreme storms are often unavailable, a numerical model is used to simulate the storm-driven runup to compare to the parameterized model and then develop an approach to improve the accuracy of the parameterization. Numerically simulated and parameterized runup were compared to observations to evaluate model accuracies. The analysis demonstrated that setup was accurately predicted by both the parameterized model and numerical simulations. Infragravity swash heights were most accurately predicted by the parameterized model. The numerical model suffered from bias and gain errors that depended on whether a one-dimensional or two-dimensional spatial domain was used. Nonetheless, all of the predictions were significantly correlated to the observations, implying that the systematic errors can be corrected. The numerical simulations did not resolve the incident-band swash motions, as expected, and the parameterized model performed best at predicting incident-band swash heights. An assimilated prediction using a weighted average of the parameterized model and the numerical simulations resulted in a reduction in prediction error variance. Finally, the numerical simulations were extended to include storm conditions that have not been previously observed. These results indicated that the parameterized predictions of setup may need modification for extreme conditions; numerical simulations can be used to extend the validity of the parameterized predictions of infragravity swash; and numerical simulations systematically underpredict incident swash, which is relatively unimportant under extreme conditions.

  18. Transport, chemical and electrochemical processes in a planar solid oxide fuel cell: Detailed three-dimensional modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Thinh X.; Kosinski, Pawel; Hoffmann, Alex C.; Vik, Arild

    A detailed numerical three-dimensional (3D) model for a planar solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is developed in this paper. The 3D model takes into account detailed processes including transport, chemical and electrochemical processes taking place in the cell. Moreover, effects of the composite electrodes are taken into account by considering an electrochemically active layer of finite thickness in each of the electrodes. The developed model is applied to a repeating unit of an anode-supported SOFC working under direct internal reforming conditions. Detailed results for chemical species, temperature, current density and electric potential distribution are presented and discussed. It was found that the temperature distribution across the cell is more uniform in the interconnects than in the inner part of the cell. However, only small differences in the electric potential between the electrode and the corresponding interconnect are found. The current density in the electrodes is found to be high near the electrolyte and low deep into the electrochemically active layer. The current density is also low under the ribs of the interconnects.

  19. Analysis of Dynamic Interactions between Different Drivetrain Components with a Detailed Wind Turbine Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartschat, A.; Morisse, M.; Mertens, A.; Wenske, J.

    2016-09-01

    The presented work describes a detailed analysis of the dynamic interactions among mechanical and electrical drivetrain components of a modern wind turbine under the influence of parameter variations, different control mechanisms and transient excitations. For this study, a detailed model of a 2MW wind turbine with a gearbox, a permanent magnet synchronous generator and a full power converter has been developed which considers all relevant characteristics of the mechanical and electrical subsystems. This model includes an accurate representation of the aerodynamics and the mechanical properties of the rotor and the complete mechanical drivetrain. Furthermore, a detailed electrical modelling of the generator, the full scale power converter with discrete switching devices, its filters, the transformer and the grid as well as the control structure is considered. The analysis shows that, considering control measures based on active torsional damping, interactions between mechanical and electrical subsystems can significantly affect the loads and thus the individual lifetime of the components.

  20. A hybrid (numerical-physical) model of the left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, G; Kozarski, M; De Lazzari, C; Clemente, F; Merolli, M; Tosti, G; Guaragno, M; Mimmo, R; Ambrosi, D; Glapinski, J

    2001-07-01

    Hydraulic models of the circulation are used to test mechanical devices and for training and research purposes; when compared to numerical models, however, they are not flexible enough and rather expensive. The solution proposed here is to merge the characteristics and the flexibility of numerical models with the functions of physical models. The result is a hybrid model with numerical and physical sections connected by an electro-hydraulic interface - which is to some extent the main problem since the numerical model can be easily changed or modified. The concept of hybrid model is applied to the representation of ventricular function by a variable elastance numerical model. This prototype is an open loop circuit and the physical section is built out of a reservoir (atrium) and a modified windkessel (arterial tree). The corresponding equations are solved numerically using the variables (atrial and arterial pressures) coming from the physical circuit. Ventricular output flow is the computed variable and is sent to a servo amplifier connected to a DC motor-gear pump system. The gear pump, behaving roughly as a flow source, is the interface to the physical circuit. Results obtained under different hemodynamic conditions demonstrate the behaviour of the ventricular model on the pressure-volume plane and the time course of output flow and arterial pressure.

  1. Numerical Considerations for Lagrangian Stochastic Dispersion Models: Eliminating Rogue Trajectories, and the Importance of Numerical Accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Brian N.

    2017-01-01

    When Lagrangian stochastic models for turbulent dispersion are applied to complex atmospheric flows, some type of ad hoc intervention is almost always necessary to eliminate unphysical behaviour in the numerical solution. Here we discuss numerical strategies for solving the non-linear Langevin-based particle velocity evolution equation that eliminate such unphysical behaviour in both Reynolds-averaged and large-eddy simulation applications. Extremely large or `rogue' particle velocities are caused when the numerical integration scheme becomes unstable. Such instabilities can be eliminated by using a sufficiently small integration timestep, or in cases where the required timestep is unrealistically small, an unconditionally stable implicit integration scheme can be used. When the generalized anisotropic turbulence model is used, it is critical that the input velocity covariance tensor be realizable, otherwise unphysical behaviour can become problematic regardless of the integration scheme or size of the timestep. A method is presented to ensure realizability, and thus eliminate such behaviour. It was also found that the numerical accuracy of the integration scheme determined the degree to which the second law of thermodynamics or `well-mixed condition' was satisfied. Perhaps more importantly, it also determined the degree to which modelled Eulerian particle velocity statistics matched the specified Eulerian distributions (which is the ultimate goal of the numerical solution). It is recommended that future models be verified by not only checking the well-mixed condition, but perhaps more importantly by checking that computed Eulerian statistics match the Eulerian statistics specified as inputs.

  2. Numerical modeling and experimental testing of a solar grill

    SciTech Connect

    Olwi, I.; Khalifa, A. )

    1993-02-01

    The sun provides a free, nonpolluting and everlasting source of energy. Considerable research has been carried out to utilize solar energy for purposes such as water heating, high temperature ovens, and conversion to electrical energy. One of the interesting forms for utilizing solar energy is cooking. The main disadvantage of solar energy systems has been the low efficiency attained in most of its practical applications. It is expected, however, that due to continuing decreases in the availability of other energy sources such as oil and coal, along with the safety problems associated with nuclear energy, man's need for utilization of solar energy will increase, thus leading him to find the ways and means to develop adequate and efficient solar-powered systems. In camps, where tents are used to accommodate people, cooking is done via conventional gas stoves. This usually takes place in extremely crowded areas which become highly fireprone. Solar oven cookers seem to be a viable alternative considering both economy and safety. Among the various forms of solar cookers, the oven-type solar cooker is known to be the best in terms of efficiency. One of the most practical and efficient forms of solar oven cookers is the outdoor portable solar grill (Bar-B-Q), developed by Khalifa et al. The solar grill is a light and portable unit that utilizes solar energy to grill meat. One of the best types of grilling with this cooker is the well-known Shish Kebab or Bar-B-Q. A detailed description for the design of the solar grill is provided as follows. This paper is aimed at providing experimental results and formulating a numerical model for the solar grill. Results of the two approaches are then compared to verify the validity of the numerical simulation. An experimental and theoretical investigation was conducted on the solar grill in order to study the factors that affect its design and performance.

  3. Detailed Modeling of Distillation Technologies for Closed-Loop Water Recovery Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allada, Rama Kumar; Lange, Kevin E.; Anderson, Molly S.

    2011-01-01

    Detailed chemical process simulations are a useful tool in designing and optimizing complex systems and architectures for human life support. Dynamic and steady-state models of these systems help contrast the interactions of various operating parameters and hardware designs, which become extremely useful in trade-study analyses. NASA?s Exploration Life Support technology development project recently made use of such models to compliment a series of tests on different waste water distillation systems. This paper presents efforts to develop chemical process simulations for three technologies: the Cascade Distillation System (CDS), the Vapor Compression Distillation (VCD) system and the Wiped-Film Rotating Disk (WFRD) using the Aspen Custom Modeler and Aspen Plus process simulation tools. The paper discusses system design, modeling details, and modeling results for each technology and presents some comparisons between the model results and recent test data. Following these initial comparisons, some general conclusions and forward work are discussed.

  4. Gaussian mixture model-based gradient field reconstruction for infrared image detail enhancement and denoising

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Fan; Zhao, Jian; Zhao, Wenda; Qu, Feng

    2016-05-01

    Infrared images are characterized by low signal-to-noise ratio and low contrast. Therefore, the edge details are easily immerged in the background and noise, making it much difficult to achieve infrared image edge detail enhancement and denoising. This article proposes a novel method of Gaussian mixture model-based gradient field reconstruction, which enhances image edge details while suppressing noise. First, by analyzing the gradient histogram of noisy infrared image, Gaussian mixture model is adopted to simulate the distribution of the gradient histogram, and divides the image information into three parts corresponding to faint details, noise and the edges of clear targets, respectively. Then, the piecewise function is constructed based on the characteristics of the image to increase gradients of faint details and suppress gradients of noise. Finally, anisotropic diffusion constraint is added while visualizing enhanced image from the transformed gradient field to further suppress noise. The experimental results show that the method possesses unique advantage of effectively enhancing infrared image edge details and suppressing noise as well, compared with the existing methods. In addition, it can be used to effectively enhance other types of images such as the visible and medical images.

  5. Numerical modeling of fluid migration in subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, M. J.; Quinteros, J.; Sobolev, S. V.

    2015-12-01

    It is well known that fluids play a crucial role in subduction evolution. For example, mechanical weakening along tectonic interfaces, due to high fluid pressure, may enable oceanic subduction. Hence, the fluid content seems to be a critical parameter for subduction initiation. Studies have also shown a correlation between the location of slab dehydration and intermediate seismic activity. Furthermore, expelled fluids from the subduction slab affect the melting temperature, consequently, contributing to partial melting in the wedge above the down-going plate and extensive volcanism. In summary, fluids have a great impact on tectonic processes and therefore should be incorporated into geodynamic numerical models. Here we use existing approaches to couple and solve fluid flow equations in the SLIM-3D thermo-mechanical code. SLIM-3D is a three-dimensional thermo-mechanical code capable of simulating lithospheric deformation with elasto-visco-plastic rheology. It has been successfully applied to model geodynamic processes at different tectonic settings, including subduction zones. However, although SLIM-3D already includes many features, fluid migration has not been incorporated into the model yet. To this end, we coupled solid and fluid flow assuming that fluids flow through a porous and deformable solid. Thereby, we introduce a two-phase flow into the model, in which the Stokes flow is coupled with the Darcy law for fluid flow. Ultimately, the evolution of porosity is governed by a compaction pressure and the advection of the porous solid. We show the details of our implementation of the fluid flow into the existing thermo-mechanical finite element code and present first results of benchmarks and experiments. We are especially interested in the coupling of subduction processes and the evolution of the magmatic arc. Thereby, we focus on the key factors controlling magma emplacement and its influence on subduction processes.

  6. Numerical modeling of the interstellar medium in galactic disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, A.; Bregman, J. N.; Norman, Michael L.

    1993-01-01

    We have been developing detailed hydrodynamic models of the global interstellar medium in the hope of understanding the mass and volume occupied by various phases, as well as their structure and kinematics. In our model, the gas is modeled by one fluid while representative Pop 1 stars are modeled by a second fluid. The two fluids are coupled in that the gas forms into stars at a rate given by a Schmidt law while stellar mass loss returns matter into the gas phase (on a time scale of 100 Myr). Also, the stars heat the gas through stellar winds and the gas cools through optically thin radiation. The time behavior of these two fluids is studied in two spatial dimensions with the Eulerian finite difference numerical hydrodynamic code Zen. The two spatial dimensions are along the plane of a disk (x, total length of 2 kpc) and perpendicular to the disk (z, total height of +/- 15 kpc) and a galactic gravitational field in the z direction, typical of that at the solar circle, is imposed upon the simulation; self-gravity and rotation are absent. For the boundary conditions, outflow is permitted at the top and bottom of the grid (z = +/- 15 kpc) while periodic boundary conditions are imposed upon left and right sides of the grid. As initial conditions, we assumed a gaseous distribution like that seen for the H1 by earlier researchers, although the results are insensitive to the initial conditions. We have run simulations in which the heating due to stars, parameterized as a stellar wind velocity, a, is varied from low (a = 150 km/s), to intermediate (a = 300 km/s), to high (a = 600 km/s). Since the intermediate case is roughly equivalent to the Galactic energy injection rate from supernovae, this summary will concentrate on results from this simulation.

  7. Numerical Modeling of Ophthalmic Response to Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, E. S.; Myers, J. G.; Mulugeta, L.; Vera, J.; Raykin, J.; Feola, A.; Gleason, R.; Samuels, B.; Ethier, C. R.

    2015-01-01

    To investigate ophthalmic changes in spaceflight, we would like to predict the impact of blood dysregulation and elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) on Intraocular Pressure (IOP). Unlike other physiological systems, there are very few lumped parameter models of the eye. The eye model described here is novel in its inclusion of the human choroid and retrobulbar subarachnoid space (rSAS), which are key elements in investigating the impact of increased ICP and ocular blood volume. Some ingenuity was required in modeling the blood and rSAS compartments due to the lack of quantitative data on essential hydrodynamic quantities, such as net choroidal volume and blood flowrate, inlet and exit pressures, and material properties, such as compliances between compartments.

  8. Mathematical and Numerical Analyses of Peridynamics for Multiscale Materials Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Gunzburger, Max

    2015-02-17

    We have treated the modeling, analysis, numerical analysis, and algorithmic development for nonlocal models of diffusion and mechanics. Variational formulations were developed and finite element methods were developed based on those formulations for both steady state and time dependent problems. Obstacle problems and optimization problems for the nonlocal models were also treated and connections made with fractional derivative models.

  9. On detonation initiation by a temperature gradient for a detailed chemical reaction models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liberman, M. A.; Kiverin, A. D.; Ivanov, M. F.

    2011-04-01

    The evolution from a temperature gradient to a detonation is investigated for combustion mixture whose chemistry is governed by a detailed chemical kinetics. We show that a detailed chemical reaction model has a profound effect on the spontaneous wave concept for detonation initiation by a gradient of reactivity. The evolution to detonation due to a temperature gradient is considered for hydrogen-oxygen and hydrogen-air mixtures at different initial pressures. It is shown that the minimal length of the temperature gradient for which a detonation can be ignited is much larger than that predicted from a one-step chemical model.

  10. Gulf of Mexico numerical model. Project summary

    SciTech Connect

    Blumberg, A. F.; Mellor, G. L.; Herring, H. J.

    1981-02-01

    An efficient three-dimensional, time dependent prognostic model of the Gulf of Mexico has been developed. The model is driven by winds and surface heat flux derived from climatological, atmospheric surface data, the result of an intensive data analysis study. Mean velocity, temperature, salinity, turbulence kinetic energy and turbulence macroscale are the prognostic variables. Lateral boundary conditions for temperature and salinity and geostrophically derived velocity at the Straits of Yucatan and Florida are obtained from climatological ocean data. An analytical second moment turbulence closure scheme embedded within the model provides realistic surface mixed layer dynamics. Free surface elevation distributions are calculated with an algorithm which calculates the external (tidal) mode separately from the internal mode. The external mode, an essentially two-dimensional calculation, requires a short integrating timestep whereas the more costly, three-dimensional, internal mode can be executed with a long step. The result is a fully three-dimensional code which includes a free surface at no sacrifice in computer cost compared to rigid lid models.

  11. Numerical Modeling of Left-Handed Metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, G J; Champagne, N J; Sharpe, R M

    2001-11-06

    The EIGER method of moments program with periodic Green's function was used to model a periodic array of strips and split-ring resonators. Left-handed propagation due to negative index of refraction is demonstrated in a frequency band. The effective material parameters versus frequency are extracted from the EIGER solution.

  12. Materials processing in a centrifuge - Numerical modeling of macrogravity effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, N.; Downey, J. P.; Jones, J. C.; Curreri, P. A.

    1992-01-01

    The fluid mechanics associated with crystal growth processes on a centrifuge is investigated. A simple scaling analysis is used to examine the relative magnitudes of the forces acting on the system and good agreement is obtained with previous studies. A two-dimensional model of crystal growth on a centrifuge is proposed and calculations are undertaken to help in understanding the fundamental transport processes within the crystal growth cell. Results from three-dimensional calculations of actual centrifuge-based crystal growth systems are presented both for the thermodynamically stable and unstable configurations. The calculations show the existence of flow bifurcations in certain configurations but not in all instances. The numerical simulations also show that the centrifugal force is the dominant stabilizing force on fluid convection in the stable configuration. The stabilizing influence of the Coriolis force is found to be only secondary in nature. No significant impact of gravity gradient is found in the calculations. Simulations of unstable configurations show that the Coriolis force has a stabilizing influence on fluid motion by delaying the onset of unsteady convection. Detailed flow and thermal field characteristics are presented for all the different cases that are simulated.

  13. Numerical modelling of instantaneous plate tectonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minster, J. B.; Haines, E.; Jordan, T. H.; Molnar, P.

    1974-01-01

    Assuming lithospheric plates to be rigid, 68 spreading rates, 62 fracture zones trends, and 106 earthquake slip vectors are systematically inverted to obtain a self-consistent model of instantaneous relative motions for eleven major plates. The inverse problem is linearized and solved iteratively by a maximum-likelihood procedure. Because the uncertainties in the data are small, Gaussian statistics are shown to be adequate. The use of a linear theory permits (1) the calculation of the uncertainties in the various angular velocity vectors caused by uncertainties in the data, and (2) quantitative examination of the distribution of information within the data set. The existence of a self-consistent model satisfying all the data is strong justification of the rigid plate assumption. Slow movement between North and South America is shown to be resolvable.

  14. Analytical and numerical modeling for flexible pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Chen, Geng

    2011-12-01

    The unbonded flexible pipe of eight layers, in which all the layers except the carcass layer are assumed to have isotropic properties, has been analyzed. Specifically, the carcass layer shows the orthotropic characteristics. The effective elastic moduli of the carcass layer have been developed in terms of the influence of deformation to stiffness. With consideration of the effective elastic moduli, the structure can be properly analyzed. Also the relative movements of tendons and relative displacements of wires in helical armour layer have been investigated. A three-dimensional nonlinear finite element model has been presented to predict the response of flexible pipes under axial force and torque. Further, the friction and contact of interlayer have been considered. Comparison between the finite element model and experimental results obtained in literature has been given and discussed, which might provide practical and technical support for the application of unbonded flexible pipes.

  15. Geometry and Grid Modeling for Numerical Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    three dimensional spatial region (a mesh) is a prerequisite of most computer aided engineering ( CAE ) software, including computational structural...Parasolid Parasolid [13] is a commercial solid-modeling kernel. It serves as the basis for Unigraphics and several other CAD/CAM/ CAE packages. It is...As mentioned earlier, 1D and 2D arrays of standard data types are the most complex data type permitted. This method has the advantage of

  16. Advanced Numerical Methods for NWP Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-30

    including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the...used to study tropical wave instability with a prescribed heat source representing ITCZ near the equator. The model configuration of the experiments...understanding and improvement of the physical parameterizations. Tests of NSEAM with idealized initial conditions show the breakdown of an unstable ITCZ profile

  17. Numerical modeling of the debris flows runout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Federico, Francesco; Cesali, Chiara

    2017-06-01

    Rapid debris flows are identified among the most dangerous of all landslides. Due to their destructive potential, the runout length has to be predicted to define the hazardous areas and design safeguarding measures. To this purpose, a continuum model to predict the debris flows mobility is developed. It is based on the well known depth-integrated avalanche model proposed by Savage and Hutter (S&H model) to simulate the dry granular materials flows. Conservation of mass and momentum equations, describing the evolving geometry and the depth averaged velocity distribution, are re-written taking into account the effects of the interstitial pressures and the possible variation of mass along the motion due to erosion/deposition processes. Furthermore, the mechanical behaviour of the debris flow is described by a recently developed rheological law, which allows to take into account the dissipative effects of the grain inelastic collisions and friction, simultaneously acting within a `shear layer', typically at the base of the debris flows. The governing PDEs are solved by applying the finite difference method. The analysis of a documented case is finally carried out.

  18. Ambient vibrations of unstable rock slopes - insights from numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burjanek, Jan; Kleinbrod, Ulrike; Fäh, Donat

    2017-04-01

    The recent events in Nepal (2015 M7.8 Gorkha) and New Zealand (2016 M7.8 Kaikoura) highlighted the importance of earthquake-induced landslides, which caused significant damages. Moreover, landslide created dams present a potential developing hazard. In order to reduce the costly consequences of such events it is important to detect and characterize earthquake susceptible rock slope instabilities before an event, and to take mitigation measures. For the characterisation of instable slopes, acquisition of ambient vibrations might be a new alternative to the already existing methods. We present both observations and 3D numerical simulations of the ambient vibrations of unstable slopes. In particular, models of representative real sites have been developed based on detailed terrain mapping and used for the comparison between synthetics and observations. A finite-difference code has been adopted for the seismic wave propagation in a 3D inhomogeneous visco-elastic media with irregular free surface. It utilizes a curvilinear grid for a precise modeling of curved topography and local mesh refinement to make computational mesh finer near the free surface. Topographic site effects, controlled merely by the shape of the topography, do not explain the observed seismic response. In contrast, steeply-dipping compliant fractures have been found to play a key role in fitting observations. Notably, the synthetized response is controlled by inertial mass of the unstable rock, and by stiffness, depth and network density of the fractures. The developed models fit observed extreme amplification levels (factors of 70!) and show directionality as well. This represents a possibility to characterize slope structure and infer depth or volume of the slope instability from the ambient noise recordings in the future.

  19. Preliminary 2D numerical modeling of common granular problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyser, Emmanuel; Jaboyedoff, Michel

    2017-04-01

    Granular studies received an increasing interest during the last decade. Many scientific investigations were successfully addressed to acknowledge the ubiquitous behavior of granular matter. We investigate liquid impacts onto granular beds, i.e. the influence of the packing and compaction-dilation transition. However, a physically-based model is still lacking to address complex microscopic features of granular bed response during liquid impacts such as compaction-dilation transition or granular bed uplifts (Wyser et al. in review). We present our preliminary 2D numerical modeling based on the Discrete Element Method (DEM) using nonlinear contact force law (the Hertz-Mindlin model) for disk shape particles. The algorithm is written in C programming language. Our 2D model provides an analytical tool to address granular problems such as i) granular collapses and ii) static granular assembliy problems. This provides a validation framework of our numerical approach by comparing our numerical results with previous laboratory experiments or numerical works. Inspired by the work of Warnett et al. (2014) and Staron & Hinch (2005), we studied i) the axisymetric collapse of granular columns. We addressed the scaling between the initial aspect ratio and the final runout distance. Our numerical results are in good aggreement with the previous studies of Warnett et al. (2014) and Staron & Hinch (2005). ii) Reproducing static problems for regular and randomly stacked particles provides a valid comparison to results of Egholm (2007). Vertical and horizontal stresses within the assembly are quite identical to stresses obtained by Egholm (2007), thus demonstating the consistency of our 2D numerical model. Our 2D numerical model is able to reproduce common granular case studies such as granular collapses or static problems. However, a sufficient small timestep should be used to ensure a good numerical consistency, resulting in higher computational time. The latter becomes critical

  20. Terrane accretion: Insights from numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, Katharina; Gerya, Taras

    2016-04-01

    The oceanic crust is not homogenous, but contains significantly thicker crust than norm, i.e. extinct arcs, spreading ridges, detached continental fragments, volcanic piles or oceanic swells. These (crustal) fragments may collide with continental crust and form accretionary complexes, contributing to its growth. We analyse this process using a thermo-mechanical computer model (i2vis) of an ocean-continent subduction zone. In this model the oceanic plate can bend spontaneously under the control of visco-plastic rheologies. It moreover incorporates effects such as mineralogical phase changes, fluid release and consumption, partial melting and melt extraction. Based on our 2-D experiments we suggest that the lithospheric buoyancy of the downgoing slab and the rheological strength of crustal material may result in a variety of accretionary processes. In addition to terrane subduction, we are able to identify three distinct modes of terrane accretion: frontal accretion, basal accretion and underplating plateaus. We show that crustal fragments may dock onto continental crust and cease subduction, be scrapped off the downgoing plate, or subduct to greater depth prior to slab break off and subsequent exhumation. Direct consequences of these processes include slab break off, subduction zone transference, structural reworking, formation of high-pressure terranes, partial melting and crustal growth.

  1. Numeric Modeling of Granular Asteroid Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaumont, Benjamin; Lazzati, D.

    2014-01-01

    It is believed that planetesimals and asteroids are created by the constructive collisions of smaller objects, loosely bound under the effect of self-gravity and/or contact forces. However, the internal dynamics of these collisions and whether they trigger growth or fragmentation are poorly understood. Prior research in the topic has established regimes for the results of constructive collisions of particles under contact forces, but neglects gravity, a critical component once particles are no longer touching, and force chains, an uneven distribution of force inherent to granular materials. We run simulations binary collisions of clusters of particles modeled as hard spheres. Our simulations take into account self-gravity, dissipation of energy, friction, and use a potential function for overlapping particles to study force chains. We present here the collision outcome for clusters with variable masses, particle counts, velocities, and impact parameter. We compare our results to other models and simulations, and find that the collisions remain constructive at higher energies than classically predicted.

  2. Numerical analysis and modeling of atmospheric phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Peter H.

    1994-01-01

    For the past 22 years Grant NGR 22-009-727 has been supporting research in the Center for Meteorology and Physical Oceanography (and its predecessors) in a wide variety of diagnostic and modeling studies of atmospheric and ocean phenomena. Professor Jule Charney was the initial Principal Investigator. Professor Peter Stone joined him as co-Principal Investigator in 1975 and became the sole Principal Investigator in 1981. During its lifetime the Grant has supported in whole or in part 11 Master's theses, 14 Ph.D. theses, and 45 papers published in refereed scientific journals. All of these theses and papers (with bibliographic references) are listed below. All but one of the theses were used to fulfill the requirements for MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) degrees and are available from the MIT libraries. The one exception is F. Chen's Ph.D. thesis which was for a Harvard degree and is available from the Harvard libraries. In addition to the work described in the citations listed below, the Grant has supported Research Assistant Amy Solomon during the past two years to carry out a study of how baroclinic adjustment is affected by vertical resolution, vertical temperature structure, and dissipation. Ms. Solomon plans to use this project for her Ph.D. thesis. Support for this project will continue under NASA Grant NAG 5-2490, 'The Factors Controlling Poleward Heat Transport in Climate Models.'

  3. Numerical modeling transport phenomena in proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, DongMyung

    To study the coupled phenomena occurring in proton exchange membrane fuel cells, a two-phase, one-dimensional, non-isothermal model is developed in the chapter 1. The model includes water phase change, proton transport in the membrane and electro-osmotic effect. The thinnest, but most complex layer in the membrane electrode assembly, catalyst layer, is considered an interfacial boundary between the gas diffusion layer and the membrane. Mass and heat transfer and electro-chemical reaction through the catalyst layer are formulated into equations, which are applied to boundary conditions for the gas diffusion layer and the membrane. Detail accounts of the boundary equations and the numerical solving procedure used in this work are given. The polarization curve is calculated at different oxygen pressures and compared with the experimental results. When the operating condition is changed along the polarization curve, the change of physicochemical variables in the membrane electrode assembly is studied. In particular, the over-potential diagram presents the usage of the electrochemical energy at each layer of the membrane electrode assembly. Humidity in supplying gases is one of the most important factors to consider for improving the performance of PEMFE. Both high and low humidity conditions can result in a deteriorating cell performance. The effect of humidity on the cell performance is studied in the chapter 2. First, a numerical model based on computational fluid dynamics is developed. Second, the cell performances are simulated, when the relative humidity is changed from 0% to 100% in the anode and the cathode channel. The simulation results show how humidity in the reactant gases affects the water content distribution in the membrane, the over-potential at the catalyst layers and eventually the cell performance. In particular, the rapid enhancement in the cell performance caused by self-hydrating membrane is captured by the simulation. Fully humidifying either H2

  4. Multipath diffusion: A general numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. K. W.; Aldama, A. A.

    1992-06-01

    The effect of high-diffusivity pathways on bulk diffusion of a solute in a material has been modeled previously for simple geometries such as those in tracer diffusion experiments, but not for the geometries and boundary conditions appropriate for experiments involving bulk exchange. Using a coupled system of equations for simultaneous diffusion of a solute through two families of diffusion pathways with differing diffusivities, a general 1-D finite difference model written in FORTRAN has been developed which can be used to examine the effect of high-diffusivity paths on partial and total concentration profiles within a homogeneous isotropic sphere, infinite cylinder, and infinite slab. The partial differential equations are discretized using the θ-method/central-difference scheme, and an iterative procedure analogous to the Gauss-Seidel method is employed to solve the two systems of coupled equations. Using Fourier convergence analysis, the procedure is shown to be unconditionally convergent. Computer simulations demonstrate that a multipath diffusion mechanism can enhance significantly the bulk diffusivity of a diffusing solute species through a material. The amount of solute escaping from a material is dependent strongly on the exchange coefficients, which govern the transfer of solute from the crystal lattice to the high-diffusivity paths and vice versa. In addition, the exchange coefficients ( ϰ1, and ϰ2) seem to control not only the amount of solute that is lost, but also the shape of the concentration profile. If | K1| < | K2|, concentration profiles generally are non-Fickian in shape, typically having shallow concentration gradients near the center (radius r = 0) and steep gradients towards the outer boundary of the material ( r = R). When | K1| ⩾ | K2| a concentration profile is generated which resembles a Fickian (volume) diffusion profile with an apparent bulk diffusivity between that of the crystal lattice and that of the high-diffusivity pathways

  5. Introducing DeBRa: a detailed breast model for radiological studies.

    PubMed

    Ma, Andy K W; Gunn, Spencer; Darambara, Dimitra G

    2009-07-21

    Currently, x-ray mammography is the method of choice in breast cancer screening programmes. As the mammography technology moves from 2D imaging modalities to 3D, conventional computational phantoms do not have sufficient detail to support the studies of these advanced imaging systems. Studies of these 3D imaging systems call for a realistic and sophisticated computational model of the breast. DeBRa (Detailed Breast model for Radiological studies) is the most advanced, detailed, 3D computational model of the breast developed recently for breast imaging studies. A DeBRa phantom can be constructed to model a compressed breast, as in film/screen, digital mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis studies, or a non-compressed breast as in positron emission mammography and breast CT studies. Both the cranial-caudal and mediolateral oblique views can be modelled. The anatomical details inside the phantom include the lactiferous duct system, the Cooper ligaments and the pectoral muscle. The fibroglandular tissues are also modelled realistically. In addition, abnormalities such as microcalcifications, irregular tumours and spiculated tumours are inserted into the phantom. Existing sophisticated breast models require specialized simulation codes. Unlike its predecessors, DeBRa has elemental compositions and densities incorporated into its voxels including those of the explicitly modelled anatomical structures and the noise-like fibroglandular tissues. The voxel dimensions are specified as needed by any study and the microcalcifications are embedded into the voxels so that the microcalcification sizes are not limited by the voxel dimensions. Therefore, DeBRa works with general-purpose Monte Carlo codes. Furthermore, general-purpose Monte Carlo codes allow different types of imaging modalities and detector characteristics to be simulated with ease. DeBRa is a versatile and multipurpose model specifically designed for both x-ray and gamma-ray imaging studies.

  6. Introducing DeBRa: a detailed breast model for radiological studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Andy K. W.; Gunn, Spencer; Darambara, Dimitra G.

    2009-07-01

    Currently, x-ray mammography is the method of choice in breast cancer screening programmes. As the mammography technology moves from 2D imaging modalities to 3D, conventional computational phantoms do not have sufficient detail to support the studies of these advanced imaging systems. Studies of these 3D imaging systems call for a realistic and sophisticated computational model of the breast. DeBRa (Detailed Breast model for Radiological studies) is the most advanced, detailed, 3D computational model of the breast developed recently for breast imaging studies. A DeBRa phantom can be constructed to model a compressed breast, as in film/screen, digital mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis studies, or a non-compressed breast as in positron emission mammography and breast CT studies. Both the cranial-caudal and mediolateral oblique views can be modelled. The anatomical details inside the phantom include the lactiferous duct system, the Cooper ligaments and the pectoral muscle. The fibroglandular tissues are also modelled realistically. In addition, abnormalities such as microcalcifications, irregular tumours and spiculated tumours are inserted into the phantom. Existing sophisticated breast models require specialized simulation codes. Unlike its predecessors, DeBRa has elemental compositions and densities incorporated into its voxels including those of the explicitly modelled anatomical structures and the noise-like fibroglandular tissues. The voxel dimensions are specified as needed by any study and the microcalcifications are embedded into the voxels so that the microcalcification sizes are not limited by the voxel dimensions. Therefore, DeBRa works with general-purpose Monte Carlo codes. Furthermore, general-purpose Monte Carlo codes allow different types of imaging modalities and detector characteristics to be simulated with ease. DeBRa is a versatile and multipurpose model specifically designed for both x-ray and γ-ray imaging studies.

  7. Soil remediation by heat injection: Experiments and numerical modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Betz, C.; Emmert, M.; Faerber, A.

    1995-03-01

    In order to understand physical processes of thermally enhanced soil vapor extraction methods in porous media the isothermal, multiphase formulation for the numerical model MUFTE will be extended by a non-isothermal, multiphase-multicomponent formulation. In order to verify the numerical model, comparison with analytical solutions for well defined problems will be carried out. To identify relevant processes and their interactions, the results of the simulation will be compared with well controlled experiments with sophisticated measurement equipment in three different scales. The aim is to compare the different numerical solution techniques namely Finite Element versus Integral Finite Difference technique as implemented in MUFTE and TOUGH2 [9] respectively.

  8. Multidimensional numerical modeling of heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sha, W. T.; Yang, C. I.; Kao, T. T.; Cho, S. M.

    A comprehensive, multidimensional, thermal-hydraulic model is developed for the analysis of shell-and-tube heat exchangers for liquid-metal services. For the shellside fluid, the conservation equations of mass, momentum, and energy for continuum fluids are modified using the concept of porosity, surface permeability and distributed resistance to account for the blockage effects due to the presence of heat-transfer tubes, flow baffles/shrouds, the support plates, etc. On the tubeside, the heat-transfer tubes are connected in parallel between the inlet and outlet plenums, and tubeside flow distribution is calculated based on the plenum-to-plenum pressure difference being equal for all tubes. It is assumed that the fluid remains single-phase on the shell side and may undergo phase-change on the tube side, thereby simulating the conditions of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) intermediate heat exchangers (IHX) and steam generators (SG).

  9. Integration of Evidence into a Detailed Clinical Model-based Electronic Nursing Record System

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyeoun-Ae; Jeon, Eunjoo; Chung, Eunja

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of an electronic nursing record system for perinatal care that is based on detailed clinical models and clinical practice guidelines in perinatal care. Methods This study was carried out in five phases: 1) generating nursing statements using detailed clinical models; 2) identifying the relevant evidence; 3) linking nursing statements with the evidence; 4) developing a prototype electronic nursing record system based on detailed clinical models and clinical practice guidelines; and 5) evaluating the prototype system. Results We first generated 799 nursing statements describing nursing assessments, diagnoses, interventions, and outcomes using entities, attributes, and value sets of detailed clinical models for perinatal care which we developed in a previous study. We then extracted 506 recommendations from nine clinical practice guidelines and created sets of nursing statements to be used for nursing documentation by grouping nursing statements according to these recommendations. Finally, we developed and evaluated a prototype electronic nursing record system that can provide nurses with recommendations for nursing practice and sets of nursing statements based on the recommendations for guiding nursing documentation. Conclusions The prototype system was found to be sufficiently complete, relevant, useful, and applicable in terms of content, and easy to use and useful in terms of system user interface. This study has revealed the feasibility of developing such an ENR system. PMID:22844649

  10. Integration of Evidence into a Detailed Clinical Model-based Electronic Nursing Record System.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyeoun-Ae; Min, Yul Ha; Jeon, Eunjoo; Chung, Eunja

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of an electronic nursing record system for perinatal care that is based on detailed clinical models and clinical practice guidelines in perinatal care. THIS STUDY WAS CARRIED OUT IN FIVE PHASES: 1) generating nursing statements using detailed clinical models; 2) identifying the relevant evidence; 3) linking nursing statements with the evidence; 4) developing a prototype electronic nursing record system based on detailed clinical models and clinical practice guidelines; and 5) evaluating the prototype system. We first generated 799 nursing statements describing nursing assessments, diagnoses, interventions, and outcomes using entities, attributes, and value sets of detailed clinical models for perinatal care which we developed in a previous study. We then extracted 506 recommendations from nine clinical practice guidelines and created sets of nursing statements to be used for nursing documentation by grouping nursing statements according to these recommendations. Finally, we developed and evaluated a prototype electronic nursing record system that can provide nurses with recommendations for nursing practice and sets of nursing statements based on the recommendations for guiding nursing documentation. The prototype system was found to be sufficiently complete, relevant, useful, and applicable in terms of content, and easy to use and useful in terms of system user interface. This study has revealed the feasibility of developing such an ENR system.

  11. Experimental, Numerical and Observational Models in Geodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lithgow-Bertelloni, Carolina

    2015-04-01

    Geodynamics, the study of the forces that drives all Earth's processes is a rich field that deeply connects all aspects of geological and geophysical studies, from surface observations of the sedimentary record to knowledge of deep Earth structure from mineral physics and seismology. In the context of the solid Earth geodynamics primarily focuses on lithosphere and mantle dynamics, while core dynamics is the purview of geomagnetism. I will focus this talk on the former, its historical context and future developments. We have known the equations of motion and mechanics for ~200 years, but only relatively recently can they be solved with enough accuracy and resolution to do geology. We have made great strides since Arthur Holmes conceptual models of mantle flow, thanks to computational and experimental advances. We can know model plate boundaries globally with resolutions in the order of a few kms and image temperature and velocity simultaneously in the laboratory in 3D and non-intrusively. We have also learned a great deal about the physics of the Earth, from composition to rheology. New theories on plate boundary rheology are paving the way for self-consistent generation of plates from mantle flow. New computational methods allow for adaptive meshing, fabric development and history, so we can study deformation and compare directly to geological observations in mountain ranges and continental rifts. We can use ever more sophisticated images of mantle structure from seismic and other geophysical data to probe the relationship between melting, flow and dynamical processes. We can reconstruct landscapes and relief, plate motions and sedimentation and ask how much the mantle has contributed to drainage reversal, sedimentation and climate change. The future of the field is ever brighter.

  12. Seismoelectric numerical modeling on a grid

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haines, S.S.; Pride, S.R.

    2006-01-01

    Our finite-difference algorithm provides a new method for simulating how seismic waves in arbitrarily heterogeneous porous media generate electric fields through an electrokinetic mechanism called seismoelectric coupling. As the first step in our simulations, we calculate relative pore-fluid/grain-matrix displacement by using existing poroelastic theory. We then calculate the electric current resulting from the grain/fluid displacement by using seismoelectric coupling theory. This electrofiltration current acts as a source term in Poisson's equation, which then allows us to calculate the electric potential distribution. We can safely neglect induction effects in our simulations because the model area is within the electrostatic near field for the depth of investigation (tens to hundreds of meters) and the frequency ranges (10 Hz to 1 kHz) of interest for shallow seismoelectric surveys.We can independently calculate the electric-potential distribution for each time step in the poroelastic simulation without loss of accuracy because electro-osmotic feedback (fluid flow that is perturbed by generated electric fields) is at least 105 times smaller than flow that is driven by fluid-pressure gradients and matrix acceleration, and is therefore negligible. Our simulations demonstrate that, distinct from seismic reflections, the seismoelectric interface response from a thin layer (at least as thin as one-twentieth of the seismic wavelength) is considerably stronger than the response from a single interface. We find that the interface response amplitude decreases as the lateral extent of a layer decreases below the width of the first Fresnel zone. We conclude, on the basis of our modeling results and of field results published elsewhere, that downhole and/or crosswell survey geometries and time-lapse applications are particularly well suited to the seismoelectric method. ?? 2006 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  13. Numerical modeling with application to tracking marine debris.

    PubMed

    Potemra, James T

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes different numerical models of ocean circulation the output of which can be applied to study patterns and pathways of drifting marine debris. The paper focuses on model output that is readily available rather than on numerical models that could be configured and run locally. These include operational models from the US Navy (the Navy Layered Ocean Model (NLOM), Coastal Ocean Model (NCOM), and Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM)), data assimilating reanalysis models (the Simple Ocean Data Assimilation (SODA), the Global Ocean Data Assimilation Experiment (GODAE) models), and the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) ocean reanalysis (Ocean Reanalysis System, ECMWF/ORA-S3). The paper describes the underlying physics in each model system, limitations, and where to obtain the model output.

  14. A detailed kinetic model for the hydrothermal decomposition process of sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Yin, Fengjun; Chen, Hongzhen; Xu, Guihua; Wang, Guangwei; Xu, Yuanjian

    2015-12-01

    A detailed kinetic model for the hydrothermal decomposition (HTD) of sewage sludge was developed based on an explicit reaction scheme considering exact intermediates including protein, saccharide, NH4(+)-N and acetic acid. The parameters were estimated by a series of kinetic data at a temperature range of 180-300°C. This modeling framework is capable of revealing stoichiometric relationships between different components by determining the conversion coefficients and identifying the reaction behaviors by determining rate constants and activation energies. The modeling work shows that protein and saccharide are the primary intermediates in the initial stage of HTD resulting from the fast reduction of biomass. The oxidation processes of macromolecular products to acetic acid are highly dependent on reaction temperature and dramatically restrained when temperature is below 220°C. Overall, this detailed model is meaningful for process simulation and kinetic analysis.

  15. Numerical model for learning concepts of streamflow simulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeLong, L.L.; ,

    1993-01-01

    Numerical models are useful for demonstrating principles of open-channel flow. Such models can allow experimentation with cause-and-effect relations, testing concepts of physics and numerical techniques. Four PT is a numerical model written primarily as a teaching supplement for a course in one-dimensional stream-flow modeling. Four PT options particularly useful in training include selection of governing equations, boundary-value perturbation, and user-programmable constraint equations. The model can simulate non-trivial concepts such as flow in complex interconnected channel networks, meandering channels with variable effective flow lengths, hydraulic structures defined by unique three-parameter relations, and density-driven flow.The model is coded in FORTRAN 77, and data encapsulation is used extensively to simplify maintenance and modification and to enhance the use of Four PT modules by other programs and programmers.

  16. Squeal noise in simple numerical brake models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberst, S.; Lai, J. C. S.

    2015-09-01

    Since the early 1920s, automotive disc brake squeal has caused warranty issues and customer dissatisfaction. Despite a good deal of progress achieved, predicting brake squeal propensity is as difficult as ever as not all mechanisms and interactions are known owing to their highly fugitive complex nature. In recent years, research has been focused on the prediction of unstable vibration modes by the complex eigenvalue analysis (CEA) for the mode-coupling type of instability. There has been very limited consideration given to the calculation of the acoustic radiation properties due to friction contact between a pad and a rotor. Recent analyses using a forced response analysis with harmonic contact pressure excitation indicates negative dissipated energy at some pad eigenfrequencies predicted to be stable by the CEA. A transient nonlinear time domain analysis with no external excitation indicates that squeal could develop at these eigenfrequencies. Here, the acoustic radiation characteristics of those pad modes are determined by analysing the acoustic power levels and radiation efficiencies of simplified brake models in the form of a pad rubbing on a plate or on a disc using the acoustic boundary element method based on velocities extracted from the forced response analysis. Results show that unstable pad modes trigger unstable disc vibrations resulting in instantaneous mode squeal similar to those observed experimentally. Changes in the radiation efficiency with pressure variations are smaller than those with friction coefficient variations and are caused by the phase difference of the velocities out-of-plane vibration between the pad and the disc.

  17. DETAILED LOOP MODEL (DLM) ANALYSIS OF LIQUID SOLAR THERMOSIPHONS WITH HEAT EXCHANGERS

    SciTech Connect

    Mertol, A.; Place, W.; Webster, T.; Greif, R.

    1981-06-01

    An analytical Detailed Loop Model (DLM) has been developed to analyze the performance of solar thermosiphon water heaters with heat exchangers in storage tanks. The model has been used to study the performance of thermosiphons as a function of heat exchanger characteristics, heat transfer fluids, flow resistances, tank stratification, and tank elevation relative to the collector. The results indicate that good performance can be attained with these systems compared to thermosiphons without heat exchangers.

  18. Modeling Long-Term Fluvial Incision : Shall we Care for the Details of Short-Term Fluvial Dynamics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lague, D.; Davy, P.

    2008-12-01

    Fluvial incision laws used in numerical models of coupled climate, erosion and tectonics systems are mainly based on the family of stream power laws for which the rate of local erosion E is a power function of the topographic slope S and the local mean discharge Q : E = K Qm Sn. The exponents m and n are generally taken as (0.35, 0.7) or (0.5, 1), and K is chosen such that the predicted topographic elevation given the prevailing rates of precipitation and tectonics stay within realistic values. The resulting topographies are reasonably realistic, and the coupled system dynamics behaves somehow as expected : more precipitation induces increased erosion and localization of the deformation. Yet, if we now focus on smaller scale fluvial dynamics (the reach scale), recent advances have suggested that discharge variability, channel width dynamics or sediment flux effects may play a significant role in controlling incision rates. These are not factored in the simple stream power law model. In this work, we study how these short- term details propagate into long-term incision dynamics within the framework of surface/tectonics coupled numerical models. To upscale the short term dynamics to geological timescales, we use a numerical model of a trapezoidal river in which vertical and lateral incision processes are computed from fluid shear stress at a daily timescale, sediment transport and protection effects are factored in, as well as a variable discharge. We show that the stream power law model might still be a valid model but that as soon as realistic effects are included such as a threshold for sediment transport, variable discharge and dynamic width the resulting exponents m and n can be as high as 2 and 4. This high non-linearity has a profound consequence on the sensitivity of fluvial relief to incision rate. We also show that additional complexity does not systematically translates into more non-linear behaviour. For instance, considering only a dynamical width

  19. Quantitative analysis of numerical solvers for oscillatory biomolecular system models

    PubMed Central

    Quo, Chang F; Wang, May D

    2008-01-01

    Background This article provides guidelines for selecting optimal numerical solvers for biomolecular system models. Because various parameters of the same system could have drastically different ranges from 10-15 to 1010, the ODEs can be stiff and ill-conditioned, resulting in non-unique, non-existing, or non-reproducible modeling solutions. Previous studies have not examined in depth how to best select numerical solvers for biomolecular system models, which makes it difficult to experimentally validate the modeling results. To address this problem, we have chosen one of the well-known stiff initial value problems with limit cycle behavior as a test-bed system model. Solving this model, we have illustrated that different answers may result from different numerical solvers. We use MATLAB numerical solvers because they are optimized and widely used by the modeling community. We have also conducted a systematic study of numerical solver performances by using qualitative and quantitative measures such as convergence, accuracy, and computational cost (i.e. in terms of function evaluation, partial derivative, LU decomposition, and "take-off" points). The results show that the modeling solutions can be drastically different using different numerical solvers. Thus, it is important to intelligently select numerical solvers when solving biomolecular system models. Results The classic Belousov-Zhabotinskii (BZ) reaction is described by the Oregonator model and is used as a case study. We report two guidelines in selecting optimal numerical solver(s) for stiff, complex oscillatory systems: (i) for problems with unknown parameters, ode45 is the optimal choice regardless of the relative error tolerance; (ii) for known stiff problems, both ode113 and ode15s are good choices under strict relative tolerance conditions. Conclusions For any given biomolecular model, by building a library of numerical solvers with quantitative performance assessment metric, we show that it is possible

  20. Experimentation and numerical modeling of forging induced bending (FIB) process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naseem, S.; van den Boogaard, A. H.

    2016-10-01

    Accurate prediction of the final shape using numerical modeling has been a top priority in the field of sheet and bulk forming. Better shape prediction is the result of a better estimation of the physical stress and strain state. For experimental and numerical investigations of such estimations, simple benchmark processes are used. In this paper a benchmark process involving forging (flattening) of sheet metal between punch and die with negative clearance is proposed. The introduced material flow results in bending. Easy measurability of the angle of this bend makes this process suitable for validation purpose. Physical experiments are performed to characterize this bending angle due to flattening. Furthermore a numerical model is developed to capture this phenomenon. The main focus of this paper is the validation of the numerical model in terms of accurate prediction of the physical results.

  1. Development and validation of detailed controls models of the Nelson River Bipole 1 HVDC system

    SciTech Connect

    Kuffel, P.; Kent, K.L.; Mazur, G.B.; Weekes, M.A. )

    1993-01-01

    With the Nelson River Bipole 1 mercury arc valve group replacement project and planning for the expansion of the Nelson River HVDC system with a third bipole underway, it was decided to pursue a program to develop and validate detailed models of the existing HVDC transmission facilities and their associated ac systems for use in system studies. The first phase of the program concentrated on the development of detailed controls models associated with the Bipole 1 transmission facility. Based on previous experience at Manitoba Hydro with the Electromagnetic Transient DC simulation program (EMTDC), it was decided that model development and validation would use this program. This paper presents the reasons behind the development of detailed models, the methods used in developing models related to Bipole 1, results of validation tests, difficulties encountered during the process, and the overall benefits resulting from the project. An example of applying the models to investigate a low frequency oscillation which has occurred on the dc system in the past is also presented.

  2. Implementation of a numerical holding furnace model in foundry and construction of a reduced model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loussouarn, Thomas; Maillet, Denis; Remy, Benjamin; Dan, Diane

    2016-09-01

    Vacuum holding induction furnaces are used for the manufacturing of turbine blades by loss wax foundry process. The control of solidification parameters is a key factor for the manufacturing of these parts in according to geometrical and structural expectations. The definition of a reduced heat transfer model with experimental identification through an estimation of its parameters is required here. In a further stage this model will be used to characterize heat exchanges using internal sensors through inverse techniques to optimize the furnace command and the optimization of its design. Here, an axisymmetric furnace and its load have been numerically modelled using FlexPDE, a finite elements code. A detailed model allows the calculation of the internal induction heat source as well as transient radiative transfer inside the furnace. A reduced lumped body model has been defined to represent the numerical furnace. The model reduction and the estimation of the parameters of the lumped body have been made using a Levenberg-Marquardt least squares minimization algorithm with Matlab, using two synthetic temperature signals with a further validation test.

  3. Numerical models of salt marsh evolution: Ecological, geomorphic, and climatic factors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fagherazzi, S.; Kirwan, M.L.; Mudd, S.M.; Guntenspergen, G.R.; Temmerman, S.; D'Alpaos, A.; Van De Koppel, J.; Rybczyk, J.M.; Reyes, E.; Craft, C.; Clough, J.

    2012-01-01

    Salt marshes are delicate landforms at the boundary between the sea and land. These ecosystems support a diverse biota that modifies the erosive characteristics of the substrate and mediates sediment transport processes. Here we present a broad overview of recent numerical models that quantify the formation and evolution of salt marshes under different physical and ecological drivers. In particular, we focus on the coupling between geomorphological and ecological processes and on how these feedbacks are included in predictive models of landform evolution. We describe in detail models that simulate fluxes of water, organic matter, and sediments in salt marshes. The interplay between biological and morphological processes often produces a distinct scarp between salt marshes and tidal flats. Numerical models can capture the dynamics of this boundary and the progradation or regression of the marsh in time. Tidal channels are also key features of the marsh landscape, flooding and draining the marsh platform and providing a source of sediments and nutrients to the marsh ecosystem. In recent years, several numerical models have been developed to describe the morphogenesis and long-term dynamics of salt marsh channels. Finally, salt marshes are highly sensitive to the effects of long-term climatic change. We therefore discuss in detail how numerical models have been used to determine salt marsh survival under different scenarios of sea level rise. Copyright 2012 by the American Geophysical Union.

  4. Numerical models of salt marsh evolution: ecological, geomorphic, and climatic factors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fagherazzi, Sergio; Kirwan, Matthew L.; Mudd, Simon M.; Guntenspergen, Glenn R.; Temmerman, Stijn; D'Alpaos, Andrea; van de Koppel, Johan; Rybczyk, John; Reyes, Enrique; Craft, Chris; Clough, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Salt marshes are delicate landforms at the boundary between the sea and land. These ecosystems support a diverse biota that modifies the erosive characteristics of the substrate and mediates sediment transport processes. Here we present a broad overview of recent numerical models that quantify the formation and evolution of salt marshes under different physical and ecological drivers. In particular, we focus on the coupling between geomorphological and ecological processes and on how these feedbacks are included in predictive models of landform evolution. We describe in detail models that simulate fluxes of water, organic matter, and sediments in salt marshes. The interplay between biological and morphological processes often produces a distinct scarp between salt marshes and tidal flats. Numerical models can capture the dynamics of this boundary and the progradation or regression of the marsh in time. Tidal channels are also key features of the marsh landscape, flooding and draining the marsh platform and providing a source of sediments and nutrients to the marsh ecosystem. In recent years, several numerical models have been developed to describe the morphogenesis and long-term dynamics of salt marsh channels. Finally, salt marshes are highly sensitive to the effects of long-term climatic change. We therefore discuss in detail how numerical models have been used to determine salt marsh survival under different scenarios of sea level rise.

  5. Numerical models of salt marsh evolution: Ecological, geomorphic, and climatic factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagherazzi, Sergio; Kirwan, Matthew L.; Mudd, Simon M.; Guntenspergen, Glenn R.; Temmerman, Stijn; D'Alpaos, Andrea; van de Koppel, Johan; Rybczyk, John M.; Reyes, Enrique; Craft, Chris; Clough, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Salt marshes are delicate landforms at the boundary between the sea and land. These ecosystems support a diverse biota that modifies the erosive characteristics of the substrate and mediates sediment transport processes. Here we present a broad overview of recent numerical models that quantify the formation and evolution of salt marshes under different physical and ecological drivers. In particular, we focus on the coupling between geomorphological and ecological processes and on how these feedbacks are included in predictive models of landform evolution. We describe in detail models that simulate fluxes of water, organic matter, and sediments in salt marshes. The interplay between biological and morphological processes often produces a distinct scarp between salt marshes and tidal flats. Numerical models can capture the dynamics of this boundary and the progradation or regression of the marsh in time. Tidal channels are also key features of the marsh landscape, flooding and draining the marsh platform and providing a source of sediments and nutrients to the marsh ecosystem. In recent years, several numerical models have been developed to describe the morphogenesis and long-term dynamics of salt marsh channels. Finally, salt marshes are highly sensitive to the effects of long-term climatic change. We therefore discuss in detail how numerical models have been used to determine salt marsh survival under different scenarios of sea level rise.

  6. Numerical simulations of a reduced model for blood coagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlova, Jevgenija; Fasano, Antonio; Sequeira, Adélia

    2016-04-01

    In this work, the three-dimensional numerical resolution of a complex mathematical model for the blood coagulation process is presented. The model was illustrated in Fasano et al. (Clin Hemorheol Microcirc 51:1-14, 2012), Pavlova et al. (Theor Biol 380:367-379, 2015). It incorporates the action of the biochemical and cellular components of blood as well as the effects of the flow. The model is characterized by a reduction in the biochemical network and considers the impact of the blood slip at the vessel wall. Numerical results showing the capacity of the model to predict different perturbations in the hemostatic system are discussed.

  7. Detailed physics based modeling of triple-junction InGaP/GaAs/Ge solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedoseyev, Alexandre; Bald, Timothy; Raman, Ashok; Hubbard, Seth; Forbes, David; Freundlich, Alexandre

    2014-03-01

    Space exploration missions and space electronic equipment require improvements in solar cell efficiency and radiation hardness. Triple-junction photovoltaic (TJ PV) cell is one of the most widely used PV for space missions due to it high efficiency. A proper models and simulation techniques are needed to speed-up the development on novel solar cell devices and reduce the related expenses. In this paper we have developed a detailed 3D TCAD model of a TJ PV cell, and calibrated the various (not accurately known) physical parameters to match experimental data, such as dark and light JV, external quantum efficiency (EQE) . A detailed model of triple-junction InGaP/GaAs/Ge solar cell has been developed and implemented in CFDRC's 3D NanoTCAD simulator. The model schematic, materials, layer thicknesses, doping levels and meshing are discussed. This triple-junction model is based on the experimental measurements of a Spectrolab triple-junction cell by [1] with material layer thicknesses provided by Rochester Institute of Technology [2]. This model of the triple-junction solar cell is primarily intended to simulate the external quantum efficiency, JV and other characteristics of a physical cell. Simulation results of light JV characteristics and EQE are presented. The calculated performance parameters compare well against measured experimental data [1]. Photovoltaic performance parameters (Jsc, Voc, Jm, Vm, FF, and Efficiency) can also be simulated using the presented model. This TCAD model is to be used to design an enhanced TJ PV with increased efficiency and radiation tolerance. Keywords: photovoltaic cell, triple-junction, numerical modeling, TCAD, dark and light JV.

  8. Quantitative comparisons of numerical models of brittle wedge dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buiter, Susanne

    2010-05-01

    Numerical and laboratory models are often used to investigate the evolution of deformation processes at various scales in crust and lithosphere. In both approaches, the freedom in choice of simulation method, materials and their properties, and deformation laws could affect model outcomes. To assess the role of modelling method and to quantify the variability among models, we have performed a comparison of laboratory and numerical experiments. Here, we present results of 11 numerical codes, which use finite element, finite difference and distinct element techniques. We present three experiments that describe shortening of a sand-like, brittle wedge. The material properties of the numerical ‘sand', the model set-up and the boundary conditions are strictly prescribed and follow the analogue setup as closely as possible. Our first experiment translates a non-accreting wedge with a stable surface slope of 20 degrees. In agreement with critical wedge theory, all models maintain the same surface slope and do not deform. This experiment serves as a reference that allows for testing against analytical solutions for taper angle, root-mean-square velocity and gravitational rate of work. The next two experiments investigate an unstable wedge in a sandbox-like setup, which deforms by inward translation of a mobile wall. The models accommodate shortening by formation of forward and backward shear zones. We compare surface slope, rate of dissipation of energy, root-mean-square velocity, and the location, dip angle and spacing of shear zones. We show that we successfully simulate sandbox-style brittle behaviour using different numerical modelling techniques and that we obtain the same styles of deformation behaviour in numerical and laboratory experiments at similar levels of variability. The GeoMod2008 Numerical Team: Markus Albertz, Michelle Cooke, Tony Crook, David Egholm, Susan Ellis, Taras Gerya, Luke Hodkinson, Boris Kaus, Walter Landry, Bertrand Maillot, Yury Mishin

  9. One Curve Embedded Full-Bridge MMC Modeling Method with Detailed Representation of IGBT Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hongyang, Yu; Zhengang, Lu; Xi, Yang

    2017-05-01

    Modular Multilevel Converter is more and more widely used in high voltage DC transmission system and high power motor drive system. It is a major topological structure for high power AC-DC converter. Due to the large module number, the complex control algorithm, and the high power user’s back ground, the MMC model used for simulation should be as accurate as possible to simulate the details of how MMC works for the dynamic testing of the MMC controller. But so far, there is no sample simulation MMC model which can simulate the switching dynamic process. In this paper, one curve embedded full-bridge MMC modeling method with detailed representation of IGBT characteristics is proposed. This method is based on the switching curve referring and sample circuit calculation, and it is sample for implementation. Based on the simulation comparison test under Matlab/Simulink, the proposed method is proved to be correct.

  10. Sheet Hydroforming Process Numerical Model Improvement Through Experimental Results Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriele, Papadia; Antonio, Del Prete; Alfredo, Anglani

    2010-06-01

    The increasing application of numerical simulation in metal forming field has helped engineers to solve problems one after another to manufacture a qualified formed product reducing the required time [1]. Accurate simulation results are fundamental for the tooling and the product designs. The wide application of numerical simulation is encouraging the development of highly accurate simulation procedures to meet industrial requirements. Many factors can influence the final simulation results and many studies have been carried out about materials [2], yield criteria [3] and plastic deformation [4,5], process parameters [6] and their optimization. In order to develop a reliable hydromechanical deep drawing (HDD) numerical model the authors have been worked out specific activities based on the evaluation of the effective stiffness of the blankholder structure [7]. In this paper after an appropriate tuning phase of the blankholder force distribution, the experimental activity has been taken into account to improve the accuracy of the numerical model. In the first phase, the effective capability of the blankholder structure to transfer the applied load given by hydraulic actuators to the blank has been explored. This phase ended with the definition of an appropriate subdivision of the blankholder active surface in order to take into account the effective pressure map obtained for the given loads configuration. In the second phase the numerical results obtained with the developed subdivision have been compared with the experimental data of the studied model. The numerical model has been then improved, finding the best solution for the blankholder force distribution.

  11. A detailed model for simulation of catchment scale subsurface hydrologic processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paniconi, Claudio; Wood, Eric F.

    1993-01-01

    A catchment scale numerical model is developed based on the three-dimensional transient Richards equation describing fluid flow in variably saturated porous media. The model is designed to take advantage of digital elevation data bases and of information extracted from these data bases by topographic analysis. The practical application of the model is demonstrated in simulations of a small subcatchment of the Konza Prairie reserve near Manhattan, Kansas. In a preliminary investigation of computational issues related to model resolution, we obtain satisfactory numerical results using large aspect ratios, suggesting that horizontal grid dimensions may not be unreasonably constrained by the typically much smaller vertical length scale of a catchment and by vertical discretization requirements. Additional tests are needed to examine the effects of numerical constraints and parameter heterogeneity in determining acceptable grid aspect ratios. In other simulations we attempt to match the observed streamflow response of the catchment, and we point out the small contribution of the streamflow component to the overall water balance of the catchment.

  12. A detailed model for simulation of catchment scale subsurface hydrologic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paniconi, Claudio; Wood, Eric F.

    1993-06-01

    A catchment scale numerical model is developed based on the three-dimensional transient Richards equation describing fluid flow in variably saturated porous media. The model is designed to take advantage of digital elevation data bases and of information extracted from these data bases by topographic analysis. The practical application of the model is demonstrated in simulations of a small subcatchment of the Konza Prairie reserve near Manhattan, Kansas. In a preliminary investigation of computational issues related to model resolution, we obtain satisfactory numerical results using large aspect ratios, suggesting that horizontal grid dimensions may not be unreasonably constrained by the typically much smaller vertical length scale of a catchment and by vertical discretization requirements. Additional tests are needed to examine the effects of numerical constraints and parameter heterogeneity in determining acceptable grid aspect ratios. In other simulations we attempt to match the observed streamflow response of the catchment, and we point out the small contribution of the streamflow component to the overall water balance of the catchment.

  13. Modelling of trail degradation based on detailed multi-temporal digital elevation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomczyk, Aleksandra; Ewertowski, Marek

    2017-04-01

    Degradation of trails adversely affects the natural environment as well as the safety and comfort of visitors. Managers of protected areas can directly impact some of the factors related to the degradation, for example, they may regulate the type of use or location of the drainage. On the other hand, they may only have an indirect impact on the other factors, e.g. through the appropriate demarcation of trails. The role of national and landscape parks is both protection of the natural environment and providing recreational opportunities. Hence, the need to obtain accurate information about the current state of the trails and the direction of their transformation is apparent. Based on multi-temporal detailed digital elevation models (DEMs) generated using topographic surveys, we proposed a simplified model of geomorphological processes which shape the surface of recreational trails. As the basis of our consideration, we adopt the idea that recreational trails and forest roads can be equated with periodic flows in the context of soil loss, transport and accumulation. Our model of trail development and degradation consists of three phases: 1) Initial phase: In this phase, anthropogenic processes play the most important role. Destroying of vegetation cover by boots and tires leads to developing of a bare trail tread which becomes vulnerable to the natural processes. When the vegetation cover is removed, soil erosion starts, hence anthropogenic processes such as trampling or damaging vegetation by tires can be regarded as preparatory processes for further development. 2) Mature phase: In this phase, natural and anthropogenic processes coexist. All areas of trail tread and its surrounding undergo transformations. Anthropogenic processes impact mainly on trail tread. Trampling leads to soil compaction in case of smooth tread or to soil relocation and loss in case of bumpy tread. Uses of hiking sticks also lead to soil loosening, similar to tires of cycles. Loosening by

  14. Numerical modelling of river morphodynamics: Latest developments and remaining challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siviglia, Annunziato; Crosato, Alessandra

    2016-07-01

    Numerical morphodynamic models provide scientific frameworks for advancing our understanding of river systems. The research on involved topics is an important and socially relevant undertaking regarding our environment. Nowadays numerical models are used for different purposes, from answering questions about basic morphodynamic research to managing complex river engineering problems. Due to increasing computer power and the development of advanced numerical techniques, morphodynamic models are now more and more used to predict the bed patterns evolution to a broad spectrum of spatial and temporal scales. The development and the success of application of such models are based upon a wide range of disciplines from applied mathematics for the numerical solution of the equations to geomorphology for the physical interpretation of the results. In this light we organized this special issue (SI) soliciting multidisciplinary contributions which encompass any aspect needed for the development and applications of such models. Most of the papers in the SI stem from contributions to session HS9.5/GM7.11 on numerical modelling and experiments in river morphodynamics at the European Geosciences Union (EGU) General Assembly held in Vienna, April 27th to May 2nd 2014.

  15. Considering digits in a current model of numerical development

    PubMed Central

    Roesch, Stephanie; Moeller, Korbinian

    2015-01-01

    Numerical cognition has long been considered the perfect example of abstract information processing. Nevertheless, there is accumulating evidence in recent years suggesting that the representation of number magnitude may not be entirely abstract but may present a specific case of embodied cognition rooted in the sensory and bodily experiences of early finger counting and calculating. However, so far none of the existing models of numerical development considers the influence of finger-based representations. Therefore, we make first suggestions on (i) how finger-based representations may be integrated into a current model of numerical development; and (ii) how they might corroborate the acquisition of basic numerical competencies at different development levels. PMID:25628559

  16. Numerical modeling in induction heating for axisymmetric geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Chaboudez, C.; Glardon, R.; Mari, D.; Clain, S.; Rappaz, J.; Swierkosz, M.

    1997-01-01

    Induction heating is widely used in today`s industry, in operations such as metal hardening, preheating for forging operations, or brazing. It is a complex process, involving both electromagnetic and thermal phenomena. Since the design and the investigation of an induction heating system usually relies upon a series of tedious, expensive and long experiments, numerical simulation can be a valuable help in this field. This paper deals with numerical simulation of induction heating for axisymmetric geometries. A mathematical model is presented, together with a numerical scheme based on the Finite Element Method. A numerical simulation code was implemented using the model presented in this paper. A comparison between results given by the code and experimental measurements is provided.

  17. Modeling HCCI using CFD and Detailed Chemistry with Experimental Validation and a Focus on CO Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Hessel, R; Foster, D; Aceves, S; Flowers, D; Pitz, B; Dec, J; Sjoberg, M; Babajimopoulos, A

    2007-04-23

    Multi-zone CFD simulations with detailed kinetics were used to model engine experiments performed on a diesel engine that was converted for single cylinder, HCCI operation, here using iso-octane as the fuel. The modeling goals were to validate the method (multi-zone combustion modeling) and the reaction mechanism (LLNL 857 species iso-octane), both of which performed very well. The purpose of this paper is to document the validation findings and to set the ground work for further analysis of the results by first looking at CO emissions characteristics with varying equivalence ratio.

  18. Study on detailed geological modelling for fluvial sandstone reservoir in Daqing oil field

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Hanqing; Fu Zhiguo; Lu Xiaoguang

    1997-08-01

    Guided by the sedimentation theory and knowledge of modern and ancient fluvial deposition and utilizing the abundant information of sedimentary series, microfacies type and petrophysical parameters from well logging curves of close spaced thousands of wells located in a large area. A new method for establishing detailed sedimentation and permeability distribution models for fluvial reservoirs have been developed successfully. This study aimed at the geometry and internal architecture of sandbodies, in accordance to their hierarchical levels of heterogeneity and building up sedimentation and permeability distribution models of fluvial reservoirs, describing the reservoir heterogeneity on the light of the river sedimentary rules. The results and methods obtained in outcrop and modem sedimentation studies have successfully supported the study. Taking advantage of this method, the major producing layers (PI{sub 1-2}), which have been considered as heterogeneous and thick fluvial reservoirs extending widely in lateral are researched in detail. These layers are subdivided into single sedimentary units vertically and the microfacies are identified horizontally. Furthermore, a complex system is recognized according to their hierarchical levels from large to small, meander belt, single channel sandbody, meander scroll, point bar, and lateral accretion bodies of point bar. The achieved results improved the description of areal distribution of point bar sandbodies, provide an accurate and detailed framework model for establishing high resolution predicting model. By using geostatistic technique, it also plays an important role in searching for enriched zone of residual oil distribution.

  19. Numerical schemes for a model for nonlinear dispersive waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bona, J. L.; Pritchard, W. G.; Scott, L. R.

    1985-01-01

    A description is given of a number of numerical schemes to solve an evolution equation (Korteweg-deVries) that arises when modelling the propagation of water waves in a channel. The discussion also includes the results of numerical experiments made with each of the schemes. It is suggested, on the basis of these experiments, that one of the schemes may have (discrete) solitary-wave solutions.

  20. Numerical modeling of inward and outward melting of high temperature PCM in a vertical cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riahi, S.; Saman, W. Y.; Bruno, F.; Tay, N. H. S.

    2016-05-01

    Numerical study of inward and outward melting of a high temperature PCM in cylindrical enclosures were performed, using FLUENT 15. For validation purposes, numerical modeling of inward melting of a low temperature PCM was initially conducted and the predicted results were compared with the experimental data from the literature. The validated model for the low temperature PCM was used for two high temperature cases; inward melting of a high temperature PCM in a cylindrical enclosure and outward melting in a cylindrical case with higher aspect ratio. The results of this study show that the numerical model developed is capable of capturing the details of melting process with buoyancy driven convection for Ra<108, i.e. laminar flow, for a high temperature PCM and can be used for the design and optimization of a latent heat thermal storage unit.

  1. Devil is in the details: Using logic models to investigate program process.

    PubMed

    Peyton, David J; Scicchitano, Michael

    2017-09-01

    Theory-based logic models are commonly developed as part of requirements for grant funding. As a tool to communicate complex social programs, theory based logic models are an effective visual communication. However, after initial development, theory based logic models are often abandoned and remain in their initial form despite changes in the program process. This paper examines the potential benefits of committing time and resources to revising the initial theory driven logic model and developing detailed logic models that describe key activities to accurately reflect the program and assist in effective program management. The authors use a funded special education teacher preparation program to exemplify the utility of drill down logic models. The paper concludes with lessons learned from the iterative revision process and suggests how the process can lead to more flexible and calibrated program management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A survey of numerical models for wind prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schonfeld, D.

    1980-01-01

    A literature review is presented of the work done in the numerical modeling of wind flows. Pertinent computational techniques are described, as well as the necessary assumptions used to simplify the governing equations. A steady state model is outlined, based on the data obtained at the Deep Space Communications complex at Goldstone, California.

  3. Numerical Models of Broad Bandwidth Nanosecond Optical Parametric Oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, M.S.; Gehr, R.J.; Smith, A.V.

    1998-10-14

    We describe results from three new methods of numerically modeling broad-bandwidth, nanosecond OPO's in the plane-wave approximate ion. They account for differences in group velocities among the three mixing waves, and also include a qutt~ttun noise model.

  4. Numerical Modeling of Shatter Cones Development in Impact Craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baratoux, D.; Melosh, H. J.

    2003-03-01

    We present a new model for the formation of shatter cones in impact craters. Our model has been tested by means of numerical simulations. Our results are consistent with the observations of shatter cones in natural impact craters and explosions experiments.

  5. Hydroforming Of Patchwork Blanks — Numerical Modeling And Experimental Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamprecht, Klaus; Merklein, Marion; Geiger, Manfred

    2005-08-01

    In comparison to the commonly applied technology of tailored blanks the concept of patchwork blanks offers a number of additional advantages. Potential application areas for patchwork blanks in automotive industry are e.g. local reinforcements of automotive closures, structural reinforcements of rails and pillars as well as shock towers. But even if there is a significant application potential for patchwork blanks in automobile production, industrial realization of this innovative technique is decelerated due to a lack of knowledge regarding the forming behavior and the numerical modeling of patchwork blanks. Especially for the numerical simulation of hydroforming processes, where one part of the forming tool is replaced by a fluid under pressure, advanced modeling techniques are required to ensure an accurate prediction of the blanks' forming behavior. The objective of this contribution is to provide an appropriate model for the numerical simulation of patchwork blanks' forming processes. Therefore, different finite element modeling techniques for patchwork blanks are presented. In addition to basic shell element models a combined finite element model consisting of shell and solid elements is defined. Special emphasis is placed on the modeling of the weld seam. For this purpose the local mechanical properties of the weld metal, which have been determined by means of Martens-hardness measurements and uniaxial tensile tests, are integrated in the finite element models. The results obtained from the numerical simulations are compared to experimental data from a hydraulic bulge test. In this context the focus is laid on laser- and spot-welded patchwork blanks.

  6. Numerical investigation of algebraic oceanic turbulent mixing-layer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacón-Rebollo, T.; Gómez-Mármol, M.; Rubino, S.

    2013-11-01

    In this paper we investigate the finite-time and asymptotic behaviour of algebraic turbulent mixing-layer models by numerical simulation. We compare the performances given by three different settings of the eddy viscosity. We consider Richardson number-based vertical eddy viscosity models. Two of these are classical algebraic turbulence models usually used in numerical simulations of global oceanic circulation, i.e. the Pacanowski-Philander and the Gent models, while the other one is a more recent model (Bennis et al., 2010) proposed to prevent numerical instabilities generated by physically unstable configurations. The numerical schemes are based on the standard finite element method. We perform some numerical tests for relatively large deviations of realistic initial conditions provided by the Tropical Atmosphere Ocean (TAO) array. These initial conditions correspond to states close to mixing-layer profiles, measured on the Equatorial Pacific region called the West-Pacific Warm Pool. We conclude that mixing-layer profiles could be considered as kinds of "absorbing configurations" in finite time that asymptotically evolve to steady states under the application of negative surface energy fluxes.

  7. Numerical Modelling of Wave Interaction with Porous Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, F.; M., D.; M., D.; G., C.

    This paper presents a numerical model for simulating wave interaction with porous structures. By using the free surface-capturing approach together with a novel Cartesian cut cell treatment, the Finite Volume Model calculates the two phase flows out side of porous structure based on the Navier-Stokes equations, while the flow in the porous structure is described by Navier-Stokes type model equations. The free surface of water is treated as a contact discontinuity in the density field which is captured automatically as part of the numerical solution by using a time-accurate artificial compressibility method and high resolution Godunov-type scheme. The numerical model is first calibrated by simple test for a steady flow passing through a porous block. Reasonably good agreements with other numerical results are obtained. After that, the numerical model is used to simulate the breaking wave overtopping a caisson breakwater, protected by a layer of armor units. The results show that the porous armor layer is effective in reducing the overtopping rate as well as in protecting the stability of the caisson breakwater.

  8. A multi-tissue segmentation of the human head for detailed computational models.

    PubMed

    Hannula, Markus; Narra, Nathaniel; Onnela, Niina; Dastidar, Prasun; Hyttinen, Jari

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the creation of an anatomically detailed high resolution model of the human head based on the Visible Human Female data from the National Library of Medicine archives. Automatic and semi-automatic segmentation algorithms were applied over the 3 image volumes – CT, MRI and anatomical cryo-sections of the cadaver – to label a total of 23 tissues. The results were combined to create a labeled volume of the head with voxel dimensions of 0.33×0.33×0.33 mm. The individual label matrices and their corresponding surface meshes are made available to be used freely. The detailed blood vessel network and ocular tissues will be of interest in computational modelling and simulation studies.

  9. A high-order numerical algorithm for DNS of low-Mach-number reactive flows with detailed chemistry and quasi-spectral accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motheau, E.; Abraham, J.

    2016-05-01

    A novel and efficient algorithm is presented in this paper to deal with DNS of turbulent reacting flows under the low-Mach-number assumption, with detailed chemistry and a quasi-spectral accuracy. The temporal integration of the equations relies on an operating-split strategy, where chemical reactions are solved implicitly with a stiff solver and the convection-diffusion operators are solved with a Runge-Kutta-Chebyshev method. The spatial discretisation is performed with high-order compact schemes, and a FFT based constant-coefficient spectral solver is employed to solve a variable-coefficient Poisson equation. The numerical implementation takes advantage of the 2DECOMP&FFT libraries developed by [1], which are based on a pencil decomposition method of the domain and are proven to be computationally very efficient. An enhanced pressure-correction method is proposed to speed up the achievement of machine precision accuracy. It is demonstrated that a second-order accuracy is reached in time, while the spatial accuracy ranges from fourth-order to sixth-order depending on the set of imposed boundary conditions. The software developed to implement the present algorithm is called HOLOMAC, and its numerical efficiency opens the way to deal with DNS of reacting flows to understand complex turbulent and chemical phenomena in flames.

  10. Detailed p- and s-wave velocity models along the LARSE II transect, Southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murphy, J.M.; Fuis, G.S.; Ryberg, T.; Lutter, W.J.; Catchings, R.D.; Goldman, M.R.

    2010-01-01

    Structural details of the crust determined from P-wave velocity models can be improved with S-wave velocity models, and S-wave velocities are needed for model-based predictions of strong ground motion in southern California. We picked P- and S-wave travel times for refracted phases from explosive-source shots of the Los Angeles Region Seismic Experiment, Phase II (LARSE II); we developed refraction velocity models from these picks using two different inversion algorithms. For each inversion technique, we calculated ratios of P- to S-wave velocities (VP/VS) where there is coincident P- and S-wave ray coverage.We compare the two VP inverse velocity models to each other and to results from forward modeling, and we compare the VS inverse models. The VS and VP/VS models differ in structural details from the VP models. In particular, dipping, tabular zones of low VS, or high VP/VS, appear to define two fault zones in the central Transverse Ranges that could be parts of a positive flower structure to the San Andreas fault. These two zones are marginally resolved, but their presence in two independent models lends them some credibility. A plot of VS versus VP differs from recently published plots that are based on direct laboratory or down-hole sonic measurements. The difference in plots is most prominent in the range of VP = 3 to 5 km=s (or VS ~ 1:25 to 2:9 km/s), where our refraction VS is lower by a few tenths of a kilometer per second from VS based on direct measurements. Our new VS - VP curve may be useful for modeling the lower limit of VS from a VP model in calculating strong motions from scenario earthquakes.

  11. Numerical modeling of fluid migration in subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Marius J.; Quinteros, Javier; Sobolev, Stephan V.

    2015-04-01

    It is well known that fluids play a crucial role in subduction evolution. For example, excess mechanical weakening along tectonic interfaces, due to excess fluid pressure, may enable oceanic subduction. Hence, the fluid content seems to be a critical parameter for subduction initiation. Studies have also shown a correlation between the location of slab dehydration and intermediate seismic activity. Furthermore, expelled fluids from the subduction slab affect the melting temperature, consequently, contributing to partial melting in the wedge above the downgoing plate, and resulting in chemical changes in earth interior and extensive volcanism. In summary, fluids have a great impact on tectonic processes and therefore should be incorporated into geodynamic numerical models. Here we use existing approaches to couple and solve fluid flow equations in the SLIM-3D thermo-mechanical code. SLIM-3D is a three-dimensional thermo-mechanical code capable of simulating lithospheric deformation with elasto-visco-plastic rheology. It incorporates an arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian formulation, free surface, and changes in density and viscosity, due to endothermic and exothermic phase transitions. It has been successfully applied to model geodynamic processes at different tectonic settings, including subduction zones. However, although SLIM-3D already includes many features, fluid migration has not been incorporated into the model yet. To this end, we coupled solid and fluid flow assuming that fluids flow through a porous and deformable solid. Thereby, we introduce a two-phase flow into the model, in which the Stokes flow is coupled with the Darcy law for fluid flow. This system of equations becomes, however, nonlinear, because the rheology and permeability are depended on the porosity (fluid fraction of the matrix). Ultimately, the evolution of porosity is governed by the compaction pressure and the advection of the porous solid. We show the details of our implementation of the

  12. Statistical palaeomagnetic field modelling and dynamo numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouligand, C.; Hulot, G.; Khokhlov, A.; Glatzmaier, G. A.

    2005-06-01

    By relying on two numerical dynamo simulations for which such investigations are possible, we test the validity and sensitivity of a statistical palaeomagnetic field modelling approach known as the giant gaussian process (GGP) modelling approach. This approach is currently used to analyse palaeomagnetic data at times of stable polarity and infer some information about the way the main magnetic field (MF) of the Earth has been behaving in the past and has possibly been influenced by core-mantle boundary (CMB) conditions. One simulation has been run with homogeneous CMB conditions, the other with more realistic non-homogeneous symmetry breaking CMB conditions. In both simulations, it is found that, as required by the GGP approach, the field behaves as a short-term memory process. Some severe non-stationarity is however found in the non-homogeneous case, leading to very significant departures of the Gauss coefficients from a Gaussian distribution, in contradiction with the assumptions underlying the GGP approach. A similar but less severe non-stationarity is found in the case of the homogeneous simulation, which happens to display a more Earth-like temporal behaviour than the non-homogeneous case. This suggests that a GGP modelling approach could nevertheless be applied to try and estimate the mean μ and covariance matrix γ(τ) (first- and second-order statistical moments) of the field produced by the geodynamo. A detailed study of both simulations is carried out to assess the possibility of detecting statistical symmetry breaking properties of the underlying dynamo process by inspection of estimates of μ and γ(τ). As expected (because of the role of the rotation of the Earth in the dynamo process), those estimates reveal spherical symmetry breaking properties. Equatorial symmetry breaking properties are also detected in both simulations, showing that such symmetry breaking properties can occur spontaneously under homogeneous CMB conditions. By contrast axial

  13. Towards a more detailed representation of the energy balance in a coupled land surface model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryder, J.; Polcher, J.; Luyssaert, S.

    2012-04-01

    Currently, the land-surface region sequesters 25% of global CO2 emissions. In addition to climate change, increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations, fertilisation and nitrogen deposition, this sink is thought to be largely due to land management. When applied deliberately to enhance the terrestrial carbon sink strength, this land management may have unintended effects on the energy budget, potentially offsetting the radiative effect of carbon sequestration. As with other land surface models, the present release of ORCHIDEE (the land surface model of the IPSL Earth system model) has difficulties in reproducing consistently observed energy balances (Pitman et al., 2009; Jimenez et al., 2011; de Noblet-Ducoudré et al., 2011). Hence, the model must be improved to be better able to study the radiative effect of forest management and land use change. This observation serves as a starting point in this research - improving the level of detail in energy balance simulations of the surface layer. We here outline the structure of a new detailed and practical simulation of the energy budget that is currently under development within the surface model ORCHIDEE, and will be coupled to the atmospheric model LMDZ. The most detailed simulations of the surface layer energy budget are detailed iterative multi-layer canopy models, such as Ogeé et al. (2003), which are linked to specific measurement sites and do not interact with the atmosphere. In this current project, we aim to create a model that will implement the insights obtained in those previous studies and improve upon the present ORCHIDEE parameterisation, but will run stably and efficiently when coupled to an atmospheric model. This work involves a replacement of the existing allocation of 14 different types of vegetation within each surface tile (the 'Plant Functional Types') by a more granular scheme that can be modified to reflect changes in attributes such as vegetation density, leaf type, distribution (clumping

  14. Unraveling protein folding mechanism by analyzing the hierarchy of models with increasing level of detail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Tomohiko; Yasuda, Satoshi; Škrbić, Tatjana; Giacometti, Achille; Kinoshita, Masahiro

    2017-09-01

    Taking protein G with 56 residues for a case study, we investigate the mechanism of protein folding. In addition to its native structure possessing α-helix and β-sheet contents of 27% and 39%, respectively, we construct a number of misfolded decoys with a wide variety of α-helix and β-sheet contents. We then consider a hierarchy of 8 different models with increasing level of detail in terms of the number of entropic and energetic physical factors incorporated. The polyatomic structure is always taken into account, but the side chains are removed in half of the models. The solvent is formed by either neutral hard spheres or water molecules. Protein intramolecular hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) and protein-solvent H-bonds (the latter is present only in water) are accounted for or not, depending on the model considered. We then apply a physics-based free-energy function (FEF) corresponding to each model and investigate which structures are most stabilized. This special approach taken on a step-by-step basis enables us to clarify the role of each physical factor in contributing to the structural stability and separately elucidate its effect. Depending on the model employed, significantly different structures such as very compact configurations with no secondary structures and configurations of associated α-helices are optimally stabilized. The native structure can be identified as that with lowest FEF only when the most detailed model is employed. This result is significant for at least the two reasons: The most detailed model considered here is able to capture the fundamental aspects of protein folding notwithstanding its simplicity; and it is shown that the native structure is stabilized by a complex interplay of minimal multiple factors that must be all included in the description. In the absence of even a single of these factors, the protein is likely to be driven towards a different, more stable state.

  15. Improved numerical solutions for chaotic-cancer-model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasir, Muhammad; Ahmad, Salman; Ahmed, Faizan; Aqeel, Muhammad; Akbar, Muhammad Zubair

    2017-01-01

    In biological sciences, dynamical system of cancer model is well known due to its sensitivity and chaoticity. Present work provides detailed computational study of cancer model by counterbalancing its sensitive dependency on initial conditions and parameter values. Cancer chaotic model is discretized into a system of nonlinear equations that are solved using the well-known Successive-Over-Relaxation (SOR) method with a proven convergence. This technique enables to solve large systems and provides more accurate approximation which is illustrated through tables, time history maps and phase portraits with detailed analysis.

  16. The numerical modelling of falling film thickness flow on horizontal tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, I. A.; Sadikin, A.; Isa, N. Mat

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents a computational modelling of water falling film flowing over horizontal tubes. The objective of this study is to use numerical predictions for comparing the film thickness along circumferential direction of tube on 2-D CFD models. The results are then validated with a theoretical result in previous literatures. A comprehensive design of 2-D models have been developed according to the real application and actual configuration of the falling film evaporator as well as previous experimental parameters. A computational modelling of the water falling film is presented with the aid of Ansys Fluent software. The Volume of Fluid (VOF) technique is adapted in this analysis since its capabilities of determining the film thickness on tubes surface is highly reliable. The numerical analysis is carried out under influence of ambient pressures at temperature of 27 °C. Three types of CFD numerical models were analyzed in this simulation with inter tube spacing of 30 mm, 20 mm and 10 mm respectively. The use of a numerical simulation tool on water falling film has resulted in a detailed investigation of film thickness. Based on the numerical simulated results, it is found that the average values of water film thickness for each model are 0.53 mm, 0.58 mm, and 0.63 mm.

  17. Development and Validation of Detailed Clinical Models for Nursing Problems in Perinatal care

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Y.; Park, H.-A.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The aims of this study were to develop detailed clinical models (DCMs) for nursing problems related to perinatal care and to test the applicability of these detailed clinical models. Methods First, we extracted entities of nursing problems by analyzing nursing-problem statements from nursing records, reviewing the literature, and interviewing nurse experts. Second, we extracted attributes and possible values needed to describe the entities in more detail by again analyzing nursing statements, reviewing the literature, and consulting nurse experts. Third, DCMs were modeled by linking each entity with possible attributes with value sets and optionalities. Fourth, entities, attributes and value sets in the DCMs were mapped to the International Classification for Nursing Practice (ICNP) version 2. Finally, DCMs were validated by consulting a group of experts and by applying them to real clinical data and nursing care scenarios published in the literature. The adequacy of the entities, attributes, value sets, and optionalities of the attributes were validated. Results Fifty-eight entities were identified, 41 entities from nursing records, 12 entities from literature review and 5 entities from nurse experts. Sixty-five attributes with values were identified, 25 attributes from nursing records, 34 attributes from literature review, and 6 attributes from nurse experts. In total 58 DCMs were developed and validated. Conclusions The DCMs developed in this study can ensure that electronic health records contain meaningful and valid information, and support the semantic interoperability of nursing information. PMID:23616872

  18. How important is a detailed hydrological representation when modelling soil carbon dynamics in Chinese red soils.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyesiku-Blakemore, Joseph; Verrot, Lucile; Geris, Josie; Zhang, Ganlin; Peng, Xinhua; Hallett, Paul; Smith, Jo

    2017-04-01

    Soil carbon and nitrogen processing are strongly influenced by the hydrology of soils. When simulating these processes models represent soil hydrology in some way. The hydrological components of soil carbon and nitrogen models vary greatly in their complexity, as does the burden of simulation time and data requirements. Hydrology specific models, such as Hydrus, have more detailed representations of soil hydrology than those used in some soil carbon and nitrogen models, such as ECOSSE, and can provide a more accurate and precise description of the movement and content of water in soil. Moisture content is one of the key variables controlling the processing of carbon and nitrogen in soil models. A higher soil moisture content results in increased methane production through the anaerobic decomposition of soil carbon pools. It also alters the rate at which aerobic decomposition occurs, with low and high soil moisture contents limiting the decomposition of SOC. An inaccurate estimate of soil moisture will introduce errors in the estimated rates of model SOC transformations, which would result in errors in the simulated SOC. In order to shed light on this uncertainty we use the same input data to simulate soil moisture contents in a Red Soil region of China, using both the ECOSSE model and Hydrus 2D. We compare the simulations of both models with measurements of soil moisture at the site and each other. We highlight where the models differ and identify the conditions under which errors are likely to occur. We then simulate SOC dynamics using the ECOSSE model and its original hydrology with the ECOSSE model simulations using the Hydrus 2D simulations. This shows the importance of including a detailed representation of soil moisture when simulating soil organic matter dynamics.

  19. Creation and reduction of a morphologically detailed model of a leech heart interneuron

    PubMed Central

    Tobin, Anne-Elise; Van Hooser, Stephen D.; Calabrese, Ronald L.

    2010-01-01

    Conductance-based neuron models aid in understanding the role intrinsic and synaptic currents play in producing neuronal activity. Incorporating morphological detail into a model allows for additional analysis of non-homogeneous distributions of active and synaptic conductances, as well as spatial segregation of electrical events. We developed a morphologically detailed “Full Model” of a leech heart interneuron that replicates reasonably well intracellular recordings from these interneurons. However, it comprises hundreds of compartments, each increasing parameter space and simulation time. To reduce the number of compartments of the Full Model, while preserving conductance densities and distributions, its compartments were grouped into functional groups that each share identical conductance densities. Each functional group was sequentially reduced to one or two compartments, preserving surface area, conductance densities and its contribution to input resistance. As a result, the input resistance and membrane time constant were preserved. The axial resistances of several compartments were rescaled to match the amplitude of synaptic currents and low-threshold calcium currents and the shape of action potentials to those in the Full Model. This reduced model, with intrinsic conductances, matched the activity of the Full Model for a variety of simulated current-clamp and voltage-clamp data. Because surface area and conductance distribution of the functional groups of the Full Model were maintained, parameter changes introduced into the reduced model can be directly translated to the Full Model. Thus, our computationally efficient reduced morphology model can be used as a tool for exploring the parameter space of the Full Model and in network simulations. PMID:16760352

  20. Rapid installation of numerical models in multiple parent codes

    SciTech Connect

    Brannon, R.M.; Wong, M.K.

    1996-10-01

    A set of``model interface guidelines``, called MIG, is offered as a means to more rapidly install numerical models (such as stress-strain laws) into any parent code (hydrocode, finite element code, etc.) without having to modify the model subroutines. The model developer (who creates the model package in compliance with the guidelines) specifies the model`s input and storage requirements in a standardized way. For portability, database management (such as saving user inputs and field variables) is handled by the parent code. To date, NUG has proved viable in beta installations of several diverse models in vectorized and parallel codes written in different computer languages. A NUG-compliant model can be installed in different codes without modifying the model`s subroutines. By maintaining one model for many codes, MIG facilitates code-to-code comparisons and reduces duplication of effort potentially reducing the cost of installing and sharing models.

  1. Numerical Simulation of Dense Gas-Solid Fluidized Beds: A Multiscale Modeling Strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Hoef, M. A.; van Sint Annaland, M.; Deen, N. G.; Kuipers, J. A. M.

    2008-01-01

    Gas-solid fluidized beds are widely applied in many chemical processes involving physical and/or chemical transformations, and for this reason they are the subject of intense research in chemical engineering science. Over the years, researchers have developed a large number of numerical models of gas-fluidized beds that describe gas-solid flow at different levels of detail. In this review, we discriminate these models on the basis of whether a Lagrangian or a Eulerian approach is used for the gas and/or particulate flow and subsequently classify them into five main categories, three of which we discuss in more detail. Specifically, these are resolved discrete particle models (also called direct numerical simulations), unresolved discrete particle models (also called discrete element models), and two-fluid models. For each of the levels of description, we give the general equations of motion and indicate how they can be solved numerically by finite-difference techniques, followed by some illustrative examples of a fluidized bed simulation. Finally, we address some of the challenges ahead in the multiscale modeling of gas-fluidized beds.

  2. How computer solid modeling is altering the process of detail design

    SciTech Connect

    Krueger, T.J.

    1995-12-31

    Computer solid modeling has enabled concurrent engineering to become the new approach to the process of detail design. It is possible to consider many facets of design, product testing and manufacturing simultaneously. Development of an integrated Computer-Aided Design and Manufacturing (CAD/CAM) data base from the computer solid model is the key element in communication and successful implementation of concurrent engineering. While generating a computer solid model, a design representation or model of the product is derived and a computer data base is being generated. This data base may be directly applied to all phases of design, analysis, prototyping, manufacturing, as well as marketing and packaging. This paper discusses how the data base generated from the solid model impacts the various processes of design.

  3. A general numerical model for wave rotor analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paxson, Daniel W.

    1992-01-01

    Wave rotors represent one of the promising technologies for achieving very high core temperatures and pressures in future gas turbine engines. Their operation depends upon unsteady gas dynamics and as such, their analysis is quite difficult. This report describes a numerical model which has been developed to perform such an analysis. Following a brief introduction, a summary of the wave rotor concept is given. The governing equations are then presented, along with a summary of the assumptions used to obtain them. Next, the numerical integration technique is described. This is an explicit finite volume technique based on the method of Roe. The discussion then focuses on the implementation of appropriate boundary conditions. Following this, some results are presented which first compare the numerical approximation to the governing differential equations and then compare the overall model to an actual wave rotor experiment. Finally, some concluding remarks are presented concerning the limitations of the simplifying assumptions and areas where the model may be improved.

  4. A general numerical model for wave rotor analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paxson, Daniel W.

    1992-07-01

    Wave rotors represent one of the promising technologies for achieving very high core temperatures and pressures in future gas turbine engines. Their operation depends upon unsteady gas dynamics and as such, their analysis is quite difficult. This report describes a numerical model which has been developed to perform such an analysis. Following a brief introduction, a summary of the wave rotor concept is given. The governing equations are then presented, along with a summary of the assumptions used to obtain them. Next, the numerical integration technique is described. This is an explicit finite volume technique based on the method of Roe. The discussion then focuses on the implementation of appropriate boundary conditions. Following this, some results are presented which first compare the numerical approximation to the governing differential equations and then compare the overall model to an actual wave rotor experiment. Finally, some concluding remarks are presented concerning the limitations of the simplifying assumptions and areas where the model may be improved.

  5. Detailed Clinical Models: Representing Knowledge, Data and Semantics in Healthcare Information Technology

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This paper will present an overview of the developmental effort in harmonizing clinical knowledge modeling using the Detailed Clinical Models (DCMs), and will explain how it can contribute to the preservation of Electronic Health Records (EHR) data. Methods Clinical knowledge modeling is vital for the management and preservation of EHR and data. Such modeling provides common data elements and terminology binding with the intention of capturing and managing clinical information over time and location independent from technology. Any EHR data exchange without an agreed clinical knowledge modeling will potentially result in loss of information. Results Many attempts exist from the past to model clinical knowledge for the benefits of semantic interoperability using standardized data representation and common terminologies. The objective of each project is similar with respect to consistent representation of clinical data, using standardized terminologies, and an overall logical approach. However, the conceptual, logical, and the technical expressions are quite different in one clinical knowledge modeling approach versus another. There currently are synergies under the Clinical Information Modeling Initiative (CIMI) in order to create a harmonized reference model for clinical knowledge models. Conclusions The goal for the CIMI is to create a reference model and formalisms based on for instance the DCM (ISO/TS 13972), among other work. A global repository of DCMs may potentially be established in the future. PMID:25152829

  6. Numerical modelling of steel tubes under oblique crushing forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, A. E.; Rahman, M. Q. Abdul; Nezere, N.; Jamian, S.; Kamarudin, K. A.; Awang, M. K.; Nor, M. K. Mohd; Ibrahim, M. N.; Rasidi Ibrahim, M.; Zulafif Rahim, M.; Fahrul Hassan, Mohd; Nor, Nik Hisyamudin Muhd; Arifin, A. M. T.; Zaini Yunos, Muhamad

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents the numerical assessment of crushing responses of elliptical tubes under crushing forces. Based on the literature survey, tremendous amount of works on the axial crushing behaviour can be found. However, the studies on the oblique crushing responses are rarely found. Therefore, this work investigates numerically the elliptical tubes under compressions. The numerical model of the tubes are developed using ANSYS finite element program. Two important parameters are used such as elliptical ratios and oblique angles. The tubes are compressed quasi-statically and the force-displacement curves are extracted. Then, the area under the curves are calculated and it is represented the performances of energy absorptions. It is found numerically that the introductions of oblique angles during the crushing processes decrease the crushing performances. However, the elliptical-shaped tubes capable to enhance the energy absorption capabilities. On the other hand, the elliptical-shaped tubes produced the enhancement on the energy absorption capabilities.

  7. Numerical hysteresis model for intermittent studies in unsaturated soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, M.

    1986-07-01

    In the present study, the use of one of the recent dependent domain models of capillary hysteresis in the numerical analysis of intermittent infiltration and redistribution of water in two types of soils (a sand and Rubicon Sandy Loam) has been shown. The numerical results for both the soils have been presented in terms of pressure head depth, moisture content depth and the pressure head-moisture content relationships. The capillary hysteresis model has been found to be very useful for the prediction of both wetting and drying scanning curves of various orders.

  8. Numerical Modeling of Flow Distribution in Micro-Fluidics Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, Alok; Cole, Helen; Chen, C. P.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes an application of a general purpose computer program, GFSSP (Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program) for calculating flow distribution in a network of micro-channels. GFSSP employs a finite volume formulation of mass and momentum conservation equations in a network consisting of nodes and branches. Mass conservation equation is solved for pressures at the nodes while the momentum conservation equation is solved at the branches to calculate flowrate. The system of equations describing the fluid network is solved by a numerical method that is a combination of the Newton-Raphson and successive substitution methods. The numerical results have been compared with test data and detailed CFD (computational Fluid Dynamics) calculations. The agreement between test data and predictions is satisfactory. The discrepancies between the predictions and test data can be attributed to the frictional correlation which does not include the effect of surface tension or electro-kinetic effect.

  9. Numerical models of laser fusion of intestinal tissues.

    PubMed

    Pearce, John A

    2009-01-01

    Numerical models of continuous wave Tm:YAG thermal fusion in rat intestinal tissues were compared to experiment. Optical and thermal FDM models that included tissue damage based on Arrhenius kinetics were used to predict birefringence loss in collagen as the standard of comparison. The models also predicted collagen shrinkage, jellification and water loss. The inclusion of variable optical and thermal properties is essential to achieve favorable agreement between predicted and measured damage boundaries.

  10. Establishment of the Detailed Breast Model of Chinese Adult Female and Application in External Radiation Protection.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Rui; Jiang, Chenxing; Ren, Li; Li, Chunyan; Wu, Zhen; Li, Junli

    2016-05-03

    Breast is one of the most sensitive organs to radiation. In 2007, International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) increased the tissue weighting factor for the breast from 0.05 to 0.12, which made the accurate evaluation of breast dose more important. But in the existing human voxel phantom, the structure of breast is not elaborate enough because of the limitation of image resolution used for phantom modeling. This will probably affect the accuracy of breast dose calculated in simulation. Some researches on detailed breast modeling have been carried out, but there is no such research in this field in China. A detailed breast model for Chinese adult female is established in this article using the mathematical modeling method. It is voxelized and merged with the Chinese reference adult female voxel model for breast dosimetry. Dose conversion coefficients of breast gland for external photon exposures in antero-posterior geometry are calculated as an example of the application and the results are compared with those calculated by the old voxel phantom and ICRP reference adult female voxel phantom.

  11. Hybrid predictions of railway induced ground vibration using a combination of experimental measurements and numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, K. A.; Verbraken, H.; Degrande, G.; Lombaert, G.

    2016-07-01

    Along with the rapid expansion of urban rail networks comes the need for accurate predictions of railway induced vibration levels at grade and in buildings. Current computational methods for making predictions of railway induced ground vibration rely on simplifying modelling assumptions and require detailed parameter inputs, which lead to high levels of uncertainty. It is possible to mitigate against these issues using a combination of field measurements and state-of-the-art numerical methods, known as a hybrid model. In this paper, two hybrid models are developed, based on the use of separate source and propagation terms that are quantified using in situ measurements or modelling results. These models are implemented using term definitions proposed by the Federal Railroad Administration and assessed using the specific illustration of a surface railway. It is shown that the limitations of numerical and empirical methods can be addressed in a hybrid procedure without compromising prediction accuracy.

  12. A new numerical model of optical communications in the maritime environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Charlotte R.; Woods, Simon; Manson, Don C.; Scott, Andrew M.; Way, Stephen; Ayling, Stephen; Hollins, Richard

    2016-10-01

    QinetiQ, in association with Frazer-Nash Consultancy and Dstl, have developed a new numerical model of optical communications where part of the transmission is through water. The model (called Optical Communications Underwater Model or OCUM) finds the signal from air platform to sea platform (and vice versa) or between underwater platforms including the effects of scattering within the water, the refraction at the sea surface and transmission through cloud. The effects of scattering are found through Monte Carlo simulation before parameterizing the results to be used in subsequent calculations. The background light is also included from the sun to obtain the signal to noise ratio which is then used to find the analytical and numerical (via a message transmission simulation) bit error rate. This paper shows some of the details of the model and the approaches taken to obtain the transmission efficiency and performance. Some basic results will be presented to demonstrate the utility of the model.

  13. Integration of snow management practices into a detailed snow pack model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spandre, Pierre; Morin, Samuel; Lafaysse, Matthieu; Lejeune, Yves; François, Hugues; George-Marcelpoil, Emmanuelle

    2016-04-01

    The management of snow on ski slopes is a key socio-economic and environmental issue in mountain regions. Indeed the winter sports industry has become a very competitive global market although this economy remains particularly sensitive to weather and snow conditions. The understanding and implementation of snow management in detailed snowpack models is a major step towards a more realistic assessment of the evolution of snow conditions in ski resorts concerning past, present and future climate conditions. Here we describe in a detailed manner the integration of snow management processes (grooming, snowmaking) into the snowpack model Crocus (Spandre et al., Cold Reg. Sci. Technol., in press). The effect of the tiller is explicitly taken into account and its effects on snow properties (density, snow microstructure) are simulated in addition to the compaction induced by the weight of the grooming machine. The production of snow in Crocus is carried out with respect to specific rules and current meteorological conditions. Model configurations and results are described in detail through sensitivity tests of the model of all parameters related to snow management processes. In-situ observations were carried out in four resorts in the French Alps during the 2014-2015 winter season considering for each resort natural, groomed only and groomed plus snowmaking conditions. The model provides realistic simulations of the snowpack properties with respect to these observations. The main uncertainty pertains to the efficiency of the snowmaking process. The observed ratio between the mass of machine-made snow on ski slopes and the water mass used for production was found to be lower than was expected from the literature, in every resort. The model now referred to as "Crocus-Resort" has been proven to provide realistic simulations of snow conditions on ski slopes and may be used for further investigations. Spandre, P., S. Morin, M. Lafaysse, Y. Lejeune, H. François and E. George

  14. A numerical model and spreadsheet interface for pumping test analysis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, G S; Cosgrove, D M; Frederick, D B

    2001-01-01

    Curve-matching techniques have been the standard method of aquifer test analysis for several decades. A variety of techniques provide the capability of evaluating test data from confined, unconfined, leaky aquitard, and other conditions. Each technique, however, is accompanied by a set of assumptions, and evaluation of a combination of conditions can be complicated or impossible due to intractable mathematics or nonuniqueness of the solution. Numerical modeling of pumping tests provides two major advantages: (1) the user can choose which properties to calibrate and what assumptions to make; and (2) in the calibration process the user is gaining insights into the conceptual model of the flow system and uncertainties in the analysis. Routine numerical modeling of pumping tests is now practical due to computer hardware and software advances of the last decade. The RADFLOW model and spreadsheet interface presented in this paper is an easy-to-use numerical model for estimation of aquifer properties from pumping test data. Layered conceptual models and their properties are evaluated in a trial-and-error estimation procedure. The RADFLOW model can treat most combinations of confined, unconfined, leaky aquitard, partial penetration, and borehole storage conditions. RADFLOW is especially useful in stratified aquifer systems with no identifiable lateral boundaries. It has been verified to several analytical solutions and has been applied in the Snake River Plain Aquifer to develop and test conceptual models and provide estimates of aquifer properties. Because the model assumes axially symmetrical flow, it is limited to representing multiple aquifer layers that are laterally continuous.

  15. Single Droplet on Micro Square-Post Patterned Surfaces – Theoretical Model and Numerical Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Zu, Y. Q.; Yan, Y. Y.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the wetting behaviors of single droplet on a micro square-post patterned surface with different geometrical parameters are investigated theoretically and numerically. A theoretical model is proposed for the prediction of wetting transition from the Cassie to Wenzel regimes. In addition, due to the limitation of theoretical method, a numerical simulation is performed, which helps get a view of dynamic contact lines, detailed velocity fields, etc., even if the droplet size is comparable with the scale of the surface micro-structures. It is found that the numerical results of the liquid drop behaviours on the square-post patterned surface are in good agreement with the predicted values by the theoretical model. PMID:26775561

  16. Feedbacks Between Numerical and Analytical Models in Hydrogeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlotnik, V. A.; Cardenas, M. B.; Toundykov, D.; Cohn, S.

    2012-12-01

    Hydrogeology is a relatively young discipline which combines elements of Earth science and engineering. Mature fundamental disciplines (e.g., physics, chemistry, fluid mechanics) have centuries-long history of mathematical modeling even prior to discovery of Darcy's law. Thus, in hydrogeology, relatively few classic analytical models (such those by Theis, Polubarinova-Kochina, Philip, Toth, Henry, Dagan, Neuman) were developed by the early 1970's. The advent of computers and practical demands refocused mathematical models towards numerical techniques. With more diverse but less mathematically-oriented training, most hydrogeologists shifted from analytical methods to use of standardized computational software. Spatial variability in internal properties and external boundary conditions and geometry, and the added complexity of chemical and biological processes will remain major challenges for analytical modeling. Possibly, analytical techniques will play a subordinate role to numerical approaches in many applications. On the other hand, the rise of analytical element modeling of groundwater flow is a strong alternative to numerical models when data demand and computational efficiency is considered. The hallmark of analytical models - transparency and accuracy - will remain indispensable for scientific exploration of complex phenomena and for benchmarking numerical models. Therefore, there will always be feedbacks and complementarities between numerical and analytical techniques, as well as a certain ideological schism among various views to modeling. We illustrate the idea of feedbacks by reviewing evolution of Joszef Toth's analytical model of gravity driven flow systems. Toth's (1963) approach was to reduce the flow domain to a rectangle which allowed for closed-form solution of the governing equations. Succeeding numerical finite-element models by Freeze and Witherspoon (1966-1968) explored the effects of geometry and heterogeneity on regional groundwater flow

  17. Development of Numerical Grids for UZ Flow and Transport Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    J. Hinds

    2001-12-18

    This Analysis/Model Report (AMR) describes the methods used to develop numerical grids of the unsaturated hydrogeologic system beneath Yucca Mountain. Numerical grid generation is an integral part of the development of a complex, three-dimensional (3-D) model, such as the Unsaturated-Zone Flow and Transport Model (UZ Model) of Yucca Mountain. The resulting numerical grids, developed using current geologic, hydrogeologic, and mineralogic data, provide the necessary framework to: (1) develop calibrated hydrogeologic property sets and flow fields, (2) test conceptual hypotheses of flow and transport, and (3) predict flow and transport behavior under a variety of climatic and thermal loading conditions. Revision 00 of the work described herein follows the planning and work direction outlined in the ''Development of Numerical Grids for UZ Flow and Transport Modeling'' (CRWMS M&O 1999c). The technical scope, content, and management of ICN 01 of this AMR is currently controlled by the planning document, ''Technical Work Plan for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report'' (BSC 2001a). The scope for the TBV resolution actions in this ICN is described in the ''Technical Work Plan for: Integrated Management of Technical Product Input Department'' (BSC 2001 b, Addendum B, Section 4.1). The steps involved in numerical grid development include: (1) defining the location of important calibration features, (2) determining model grid layers and fault geometry based on the Geologic Framework Model (GFM), the Integrated Site Model (ISM), and definition of hydrogeologic units (HGUs), (3) analyzing and extracting GFM and ISM data pertaining to layer contacts and property distributions, (4) discretizing and refining the two-dimensional (2-D), plan-view numerical grid, (5) generating the 3-D grid with finer resolution at the repository horizon and within the Calico Hills nonwelded (CHn) hydrogeologic unit, and (6) formulating the dual-permeability mesh. The products

  18. Numerical Modeling of Six Historical Transoceanic Tsunami Events Using a Robust Finite Volume Method on GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalali Farahani, R.; Li, S.; Mohammed, F.; Astill, S.; Williams, C. R.; Lee, R.; Wilson, P. S.; Srinvias, B.

    2014-12-01

    Six transoceanic historical tsunami events including Japan Tohoku tsunami (2011), Chile Maule tsunami (2010), Indian Ocean tsunami (2004), Japan Nankai tsunami (1946), Chile Valdivia tsunami (1960), and Alaska tsunami (1964) have been modeled using a 2D well-balanced shallow water numerical model. The model solves the nonlinear 2D shallow water equations using an upwind finite volume method and is shown in this study to be capable of modeling the tsunami waves and resulting inundations over complex topography and bathymetry. The finite volume method is capable of modeling the wetting and drying of the bed surface at the coastline with no numerical instabilities and the inundation is modeled by allowing the computational cells to dynamically change from dry to wet. The numerical model implements parallel computations on Graphics Processing Units (GPUs), which enables the model to implement detailed modeling of inundation of small-scale coastal regions in a short simulation time. The slip distribution and seismic moment of the six earthquake driven tsunami events are introduced to the model as the initial condition including coastal uplift and subsidence. Both local regions and far-field regions affected by these tsunami waves are numerically studied and the resulting run-up and tsunami inundations are compared with the recorded observation data provided by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) including coastal tide gauges and eyewitness observation data. The GPU-based finite volume model indicates accuracy and robustness as well as short simulation time that can be used for transoceanic tsunami waves modeling including real-time numerical modeling of tsunami events and their inland inundations.

  19. A detailed-balance model for thermionic emission from polyanions: The case of fullerene dianions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Concina, Bruno; Lépine, Franck; Bordas, Christian

    2017-06-01

    A detailed-balance model for thermionic emission from polyanions has been developed and applied to fullerene dianions. The specificity of this delayed decay process is electron tunneling through the repulsive Coulomb barrier (RCB). An analytical expression of the RCB is derived from electrostatic modeling of the fullerene cage. The reverse process, namely, electron attachment to the singly charged anion, is described by a hard sphere cross section weighted by the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin tunneling probability. This simple expression leads to a very good agreement with a measured time-resolved kinetic energy distribution of C842-. Electron binding energy is reduced when the fullerene cage size decreases, leading to an almost zero one for C702- and a negative one for C602-. Extension of the model to these systems of interest is discussed, and model outputs are compared with the experimental data from the literature.

  20. Detailed modeling of the epitaxial growth of GaAs nanowires.

    PubMed

    De Jong, E; LaPierre, R R; Wen, J Z

    2010-01-29

    A detailed continuum model is presented for predicting the growth characteristics of GaAs nanowires during chemical beam epitaxy. The model describes the transport processes of Ga and As adatoms on the substrate and nanowire sidewalls, and through the nanoparticle and the nanowire-catalyst interface (NCI). The growth mechanisms of nanowires within the NCI are described using an extended step-flow kinetic model. The vapor-liquid-solid and vapor-solid-solid growth mechanisms are both described in the kinetic model. The growth rate of the nanowires, the surface and bulk concentrations of adatoms, and the role of transport processes of Ga and As adatoms during chemical beam epitaxy were investigated. The growth mechanisms of the nanowires were found to vary with increasing length of the nanowire.

  1. Reconstruction of porous electrodes by FIB/SEM for detailed microstructure modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joos, Jochen; Carraro, Thomas; Weber, André; Ivers-Tiffée, Ellen

    Polarization losses within electrodes of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are determined both by material composition and microstructure. Improvement in performance can be supported by a detailed characterization and modeling of the electrode microstructure. Focused ion beam (FIB) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with image processing have already proven potential for the reconstruction of porous electrodes. In this contribution the serialized reconstruction procedure of a high-performance, mixed ionic-electronic conducting La 0.58Sr 0.4Co 0.2Fe 0.8O 3- δ (LSCF)-cathode will be illustrated in detail. Based on corrected reconstruction data sets and by the evaluation of qualified algorithms discriminating between porosity and electrode material, a sensitivity analysis of the grayscale threshold value on the essential parameters (i) surface area, (ii) volume/porosity fraction and (iii) tortuosity is performed.

  2. Accuracy evaluation of a numerical simulation model of nasal airflow.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jiuxing; Han, Demin; Zhang, Luo

    2014-05-01

    Our numerical simulation model provides an accurate reflection of nasal airflow, and the results were validated by clinical measurements. To evaluate the accuracy of a numerical simulation model of nasal airflow. Ten volunteers with normal nasal cavities underwent CT, acoustic rhinometry, and rhinomanometry. CT data were uploaded into Mimics, ICEM-CFD, Fluent, and CFD-Post software for three-dimensional modeling, finite element grid division, transient calculations, and analysis, respectively. Velocity and pressure data of airflow were obtained during the normal respiratory cycle. The accuracy of the simulation was evaluated by two methods: acoustic rhinometry measurements were used to evaluate the accuracy of the anatomic model, and rhinomanometry measurements were used to evaluate the accuracy of the nasal resistance values obtained by numerical simulation. There were no significant differences between the values describing the model and the acoustic rhinometry measurements, the nasal resistance values obtained by numerical simulation. The airflow through the nasal cavity was mainly laminar. The maximum velocities were measured at the nasal valve, the amplitudes of all velocity curves at locations beyond the nasal valve were reduced. The amplitudes of the pressure curves increased from the front to the back of the airway.

  3. Numerical Simulation and Cold Modeling experiments on Centrifugal Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keerthiprasad, Kestur Sadashivaiah; Murali, Mysore Seetharam; Mukunda, Pudukottah Gopaliengar; Majumdar, Sekhar

    2011-02-01

    In a centrifugal casting process, the fluid flow eventually determines the quality and characteristics of the final product. It is difficult to study the fluid behavior here because of the opaque nature of melt and mold. In the current investigation, numerical simulations of the flow field and visualization experiments on cold models have been carried out for a centrifugal casting system using horizontal molds and fluids of different viscosities to study the effect of different process variables on the flow pattern. The effects of the thickness of the cylindrical fluid annulus formed inside the mold and the effects of fluid viscosity, diameter, and rotational speed of the mold on the hollow fluid cylinder formation process have been investigated. The numerical simulation results are compared with corresponding data obtained from the cold modeling experiments. The influence of rotational speed in a real-life centrifugal casting system has also been studied using an aluminum-silicon alloy. Cylinders of different thicknesses are cast at different rotational speeds, and the flow patterns observed visually in the actual castings are found to be similar to those recorded in the corresponding cold modeling experiments. Reasonable agreement is observed between the results of numerical simulation and the results of cold modeling experiments with different fluids. The visualization study on the hollow cylinders produced in an actual centrifugal casting process also confirm the conclusions arrived at from the cold modeling experiments and numerical simulation in a qualitative sense.

  4. Numerical model of Fanuc AM100iB robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cholewa, A.; Świder, J.; Zbilski, A.

    2016-08-01

    The article presents a numerical model of Fanuc AM 100iB robot, prepared in the form of a block diagram in Simulink software, using the SimMechanics toolbox. The main task of the numerical model of Fanuc AM 100iB robot is to calculate the value of torques putting a load on motor shafts, and to calculate the values of kinematic parameters of the robot's arms in real time and in interactive mode. The values and format of torques putting a load on subsequent joints, and then on the motor shafts, resulted from the effect of the simultaneous action of all torques and the delay, resulting from the implementation of numerical calculations in real time. The numerical model developed is a result of design focused on recreating the effects of simultaneous action of all these factors, which are present in the actual drives and affect the consumption of electricity. A very important criterion, taken into account when designing the model, was also its computational efficiency. In addition, the model was used to visualise the work of the tested machine in three-dimensional space.

  5. Modeling turbulent flow over fractal trees using renormalized numerical simulation: Alternate formulations and numerical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Jason; Meneveau, Charles

    2012-12-01

    Simulating turbulent flows over objects characterized by hierarchies of length-scales poses special challenges associated with the cost of resolving small-scale elements. If these are treated as subgrid-scale elements, their effects on the resolved scales must be captured realistically. Most importantly, the associated drag forces must be parameterized. Prior work [S. Chester, C. Meneveau, and M. B. Parlange, "Modeling turbulent flow over fractal trees with renormalized numerical simulation," J. Comput. Phys. 225, 427-448 (2007), 10.1016/j.jcp.2006.12.009] proposed a technique called renormalized numerical simulation (RNS), which is applicable to objects that display scale-invariant geometric (fractal) properties. The idea of RNS is similar to that of the dynamic model used in large eddy simulation to determine model parameters for the subgrid-stress tensor model in the bulk of the flow. In RNS, drag forces from the resolved elements that are obtained during the simulation are re-scaled appropriately by determining drag coefficients that are then applied to specify the drag forces associated with the subgrid-scale elements. The technique has already been applied to model turbulent flow over a canopy of fractal trees [S. Chester, C. Meneveau, and M. B. Parlange, "Modeling turbulent flow over fractal trees with renormalized numerical simulation," J. Comput. Phys. 225, 427-448 (2007), 10.1016/j.jcp.2006.12.009], using a particular set of assumptions in evaluating the drag coefficient. In the current work we introduce a generalized framework for describing and implementing the RNS methodology. Furthermore, we describe various other possible practical implementations of RNS that differ on important, technical aspects related to (1) time averaging, (2) spatial localization, and (3) numerical representation of the drag forces. As part of this study, several RNS formulations are presented and compared. The various models are first implemented and compared in simulations of

  6. Unification and mechanistic detail as drivers of model construction: models of networks in economics and sociology.

    PubMed

    Kuorikoski, Jaakko; Marchionni, Caterina

    2014-12-01

    We examine the diversity of strategies of modelling networks in (micro) economics and (analytical) sociology. Field-specific conceptions of what explaining (with) networks amounts to or systematic preference for certain kinds of explanatory factors are not sufficient to account for differences in modelling methodologies. We argue that network models in both sociology and economics are abstract models of network mechanisms and that differences in their modelling strategies derive to a large extent from field-specific conceptions of the way in which a good model should be a general one. Whereas the economics models aim at unification, the sociological models aim at a set of mechanism schemas that are extrapolatable to the extent that the underlying psychological mechanisms are general. These conceptions of generality induce specific biases in mechanistic explanation and are related to different views of when knowledge from different fields should be seen as relevant.

  7. Numerical characterization and modeling of adiabatic slot film cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voegele, Andrew

    Film cooling is a technique used to protect critical surfaces in combustors, thrust chambers, turbines and nozzles from hot, chemically reacting gases. Accurately predicting the film's performance is especially challenging in the vicinity of the wall and the film injection plane due to the complex interactions of two highly turbulent, shearing, boundary layer flows. Properly characterizing the streams at the inlet of a numerical simulation and the choice of turbulence model are crucial to accurately predicting the decay of the film. To address these issues, this study employs a RANS solver that is used to model a film cooled wall. Menter's baseline model, and shear-stress transport model and the Spalart-Allmaras model are employed to determine the effect on film cooling predictions. Several methods for prescribing the inlet planes are explored. These numerical studies are compared with experimental data obtained in a UMD film cooling wind tunnel.

  8. Numerical modeling of consolidation processes in hydraulically deposited soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brink, Nicholas Robert

    Hydraulically deposited soils are encountered in many common engineering applications including mine tailing and geotextile tube fills, though the consolidation process for such soils is highly nonlinear and requires the use of advanced numerical techniques to provide accurate predictions. Several commercially available finite element codes poses the ability to model soil consolidation, and it was the goal of this research to assess the ability of two of these codes, ABAQUS and PLAXIS, to model the large-strain, two-dimensional consolidation processes which occur in hydraulically deposited soils. A series of one- and two-dimensionally drained rectangular models were first created to assess the limitations of ABAQUS and PLAXIS when modeling consolidation of highly compressible soils. Then, geotextile tube and TSF models were created to represent actual scenarios which might be encountered in engineering practice. Several limitations were discovered, including the existence of a minimum preconsolidation stress below which numerical solutions become unstable.

  9. Numerical Model Studies of the Martian Mesoscale Circulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segal, Moti; Arritt, Raymond W.

    1997-01-01

    The study objectives were to evaluate by numerical modeling various possible mesoscale circulation on Mars and related atmospheric boundary layer processes. The study was in collaboration with J. Tillman of the University of Washington (who supported the study observationally). Interaction has been made with J. Prusa of Iowa State University in numerical modeling investigation of dynamical effects of topographically-influenced flow. Modeling simulations included evaluations of surface physical characteristics on: (i) the Martian atmospheric boundary layer and (ii) their impact on thermally and dynamically forced mesoscale flows. Special model evaluations were made in support of selection of the Pathfinder landing sites. J. Tillman's finding of VL-2 inter-annual temperature difference was followed by model simulations attempting to point out the forcing for this feature. Publication of the results in the reviewed literature in pending upon completion of the manuscripts in preparation as indicated later.

  10. Development, validation and application of numerical space environment models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honkonen, Ilja

    2013-10-01

    Currently the majority of space-based assets are located inside the Earth's magnetosphere where they must endure the effects of the near-Earth space environment, i.e. space weather, which is driven by the supersonic flow of plasma from the Sun. Space weather refers to the day-to-day changes in the temperature, magnetic field and other parameters of the near-Earth space, similarly to ordinary weather which refers to changes in the atmosphere above ground level. Space weather can also cause adverse effects on the ground, for example, by inducing large direct currents in power transmission systems. The performance of computers has been growing exponentially for many decades and as a result the importance of numerical modeling in science has also increased rapidly. Numerical modeling is especially important in space plasma physics because there are no in-situ observations of space plasmas outside of the heliosphere and it is not feasible to study all aspects of space plasmas in a terrestrial laboratory. With the increasing number of computational cores in supercomputers, the parallel performance of numerical models on distributed memory hardware is also becoming crucial. This thesis consists of an introduction, four peer reviewed articles and describes the process of developing numerical space environment/weather models and the use of such models to study the near-Earth space. A complete model development chain is presented starting from initial planning and design to distributed memory parallelization and optimization, and finally testing, verification and validation of numerical models. A grid library that provides good parallel scalability on distributed memory hardware and several novel features, the distributed cartesian cell-refinable grid (DCCRG), is designed and developed. DCCRG is presently used in two numerical space weather models being developed at the Finnish Meteorological Institute. The first global magnetospheric test particle simulation based on the

  11. Formulation of probabilistic models of protein structure in atomic detail using the reference ratio method.

    PubMed

    Valentin, Jan B; Andreetta, Christian; Boomsma, Wouter; Bottaro, Sandro; Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper; Frellsen, Jes; Mardia, Kanti V; Tian, Pengfei; Hamelryck, Thomas

    2014-02-01

    We propose a method to formulate probabilistic models of protein structure in atomic detail, for a given amino acid sequence, based on Bayesian principles, while retaining a close link to physics. We start from two previously developed probabilistic models of protein structure on a local length scale, which concern the dihedral angles in main chain and side chains, respectively. Conceptually, this constitutes a probabilistic and continuous alternative to the use of discrete fragment and rotamer libraries. The local model is combined with a nonlocal model that involves a small number of energy terms according to a physical force field, and some information on the overall secondary structure content. In this initial study we focus on the formulation of the joint model and the evaluation of the use of an energy vector as a descriptor of a protein's nonlocal structure; hence, we derive the parameters of the nonlocal model from the native structure without loss of generality. The local and nonlocal models are combined using the reference ratio method, which is a well-justified probabilistic construction. For evaluation, we use the resulting joint models to predict the structure of four proteins. The results indicate that the proposed method and the probabilistic models show considerable promise for probabilistic protein structure prediction and related applications. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Oscillation characteristics of endodontic files: numerical model and its validation.

    PubMed

    Verhaagen, Bram; Lea, Simon C; de Bruin, Gerrit J; van der Sluis, Luc W M; Walmsley, A Damien; Versluis, Michel

    2012-11-01

    During a root canal treatment, an antimicrobial fluid is injected into the root canal to eradicate all bacteria from the root canal system. Agitation of the fluid using an ultrasonically vibrating miniature file results in a significant improvement in the cleaning efficacy over conventional syringe irrigation. Numerical analysis of the oscillation characteristics of the file, modeled as a tapered, driven rod, shows a sinusoidal wave pattern with an increase in amplitude and decrease in wavelength toward the free end of the file. Measurements of the file oscillation with a scanning laser vibrometer show good agreement with the numerical simulation. The numerical model of endodontic file oscillation has the potential for predicting the oscillation pattern and fracture likeliness of various file types and the acoustic streaming they induce during passive ultrasonic irrigation.

  13. Numerical Techniques for Coupled Ring Current - Radiation Belts Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aseev, Nikita; Shprits, Yuri; Kellerman, Adam; Drozdov, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    The dynamics of electrons in the Earth's radiation belts can be described by the Fokker-Planck equation, which includes radial and local diffusion processes. The Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) code was developed to solve the Fokker-Planck equation for electron PSD. It incorporates a range of numerical techniques, which are appropriate for this purpose. The code has been recently extended to include convection and now solves the convection-diffusion problem in 4D. This report is devoted to several numerical algorithms for modeling of the Earth's radiation belts. We concentrate on a comparison of 3rd and 9th-order schemes for solution of an advection problem, and show some results on the basis of the numerical solution of the local diffusion problem including mixed terms in 2D. Recent 4D modeling of storm events using the VERB-4D code will be also presented.

  14. Detailed kinetic modeling study of n-pentanol oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Heufer, K. Alexander; Sarathy, S. Mani; Curran, Henry J.; Davis, Alexander C.; Westbrook, Charles K.; Pitz, William J.

    2012-09-28

    To help overcome the world’s dependence upon fossil fuels, suitable biofuels are promising alternatives that can be used in the transportation sector. Recent research on internal combustion engines shows that short alcoholic fuels (e.g., ethanol or n-butanol) have reduced pollutant emissions and increased knock resistance compared to fossil fuels. Although higher molecular weight alcohols (e.g., n-pentanol and n-hexanol) exhibit higher reactivity that lowers their knock resistance, they are suitable for diesel engines or advanced engine concepts, such as homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI), where higher reactivity at lower temperatures is necessary for engine operation. The present study presents a detailed kinetic model for n-pentanol based on modeling rules previously presented for n-butanol. This approach was initially validated using quantum chemistry calculations to verify the most stable n-pentanol conformation and to obtain C–H and C–C bond dissociation energies. In addition, the proposed model has been validated against ignition delay time data, speciation data from a jet-stirred reactor, and laminar flame velocity measurements. Overall, the model shows good agreement with the experiments and permits a detailed discussion of the differences between alcohols and alkanes.

  15. Axon-somatic back-propagation in detailed models of spinal alpha motoneurons

    PubMed Central

    Balbi, Pietro; Martinoia, Sergio; Massobrio, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Antidromic action potentials following distal stimulation of motor axons occasionally fail to invade the soma of alpha motoneurons in spinal cord, due to their passing through regions of high non-uniformity. Morphologically detailed conductance-based models of cat spinal alpha motoneurons have been developed, with the aim to reproduce and clarify some aspects of the electrophysiological behavior of the antidromic axon-somatic spike propagation. Fourteen 3D morphologically detailed somata and dendrites of cat spinal alpha motoneurons have been imported from an open-access web-based database of neuronal morphologies, NeuroMorpho.org, and instantiated in neurocomputational models. An axon hillock, an axonal initial segment and a myelinated axon are added to each model. By sweeping the diameter of the axonal initial segment (AIS) and the axon hillock, as well as the maximal conductances of sodium channels at the AIS and at the soma, the developed models are able to show the relationships between different geometric and electrophysiological configurations and the voltage attenuation of the antidromically traveling wave. In particular, a greater than usually admitted sodium conductance at AIS is necessary and sufficient to overcome the dramatic voltage attenuation occurring during antidromic spike propagation both at the myelinated axon-AIS and at the AIS-soma transitions. PMID:25729362

  16. Efficient methods for screening of metal organic framework membranes for gas separations using atomically detailed models.

    PubMed

    Keskin, Seda; Sholl, David S

    2009-10-06

    Metal organic frameworks (MOFs) define a diverse class of nanoporous materials having potential applications in adsorption-based and membrane-based gas separations. We have previously used atomically detailed models to predict the performance of MOFs for membrane-based separations of gases, but these calculations require considerable computational resources and time. Here, we introduce an efficient approximate method for screening MOFs based on atomistic models that will accelerate the modeling of membrane applications. The validity of this approximate method is examined by comparison with detailed calculations for CH4/H2, CO2/CH4, and CO2/H2 mixtures at room temperature permeating through IRMOF-1 and CuBTC membranes. These results allow us to hypothesize a connection between two computationally efficient correlations predicting mixture adsorption and mixture self-diffusion properties and the validity of our approximate screening method. We then apply our model to six additional MOFs, IRMOF-8, -9, -10, and -14, Zn(bdc)(ted)0.5, and COF-102, to examine the effect of chemical diversity and interpenetration on the performance of metal organic framework membranes for light gas separations.

  17. The extreme UV imager of solar orbiter: from detailed design to flight model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halain, J.-P.; Rochus, P.; Renotte, E.; Auchère, F.; Berghmans, D.; Harra, L.; Schühle, U.; Schmutz, W.; Zhukov, A.; Aznar Cuadrado, R.; Delmotte, F.; Dumesnil, C.; Gyo, M.; Kennedy, T.; Mercier, R.; Verbeeck, F.; Thome, M.; Heerlein, K.; Hermans, A.; Jacques, L.; Mazzoli, A.; Meining, S.; Rossi, L.; Tandy, J.; Smith, P.; Winter, B.

    2014-07-01

    The Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUI) on-board the Solar Orbiter mission will provide full-sun and high-resolution image sequences of the solar atmosphere at selected spectral emission lines in the extreme and vacuum ultraviolet. After the breadboarding and prototyping activities that focused on key technologies, the EUI project has completed the design phase and has started the final manufacturing of the instrument and its validation. The EUI instrument has successfully passed its Critical Design Review (CDR). The process validated the detailed design of the Optical Bench unit and of its sub-units (entrance baffles, doors, mirrors, camera, and filter wheel mechanisms), and of the Electronic Box unit. In the same timeframe, the Structural and Thermal Model (STM) test campaign of the two units have been achieved, and allowed to correlate the associated mathematical models. The lessons learned from STM and the detailed design served as input to release the manufacturing of the Qualification Model (QM) and of the Flight Model (FM). The QM will serve to qualify the instrument units and sub-units, in advance of the FM acceptance tests and final on-ground calibration.

  18. Physical and numerical modeling of Joule-heated melters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyler, L. L.; Skarda, R. J.; Crowder, R. S., III; Trent, D. S.; Reid, C. R.; Lessor, D. L.

    1985-10-01

    The Joule-heated ceramic-lined melter is an integral part of the high level waste immobilization process under development by the US Department of Energy. Scaleup and design of this waste glass melting furnace requires an understanding of the relationships between melting cavity design parameters and the furnace performance characteristics such as mixing, heat transfer, and electrical requirements. Developing empirical models of these relationships through actual melter testing with numerous designs would be a very costly and time consuming task. Additionally, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has been developing numerical models that simulate a Joule-heated melter for analyzing melter performance. This report documents the method used and results of this modeling effort. Numerical modeling results are compared with the more conventional, physical modeling results to validate the approach. Also included are the results of numerically simulating an operating research melter at PNL. Physical Joule-heated melters modeling results used for qualiying the simulation capabilities of the melter code included: (1) a melter with a single pair of electrodes and (2) a melter with a dual pair (two pairs) of electrodes. The physical model of the melter having two electrode pairs utilized a configuration with primary and secondary electrodes. The principal melter parameters (the ratio of power applied to each electrode pair, modeling fluid depth, electrode spacing) were varied in nine tests of the physical model during FY85. Code predictions were made for five of these tests. Voltage drops, temperature field data, and electric field data varied in their agreement with the physical modeling results, but in general were judged acceptable.

  19. Physical and numerical modeling of Joule-heated melters

    SciTech Connect

    Eyler, L.L.; Skarda, R.J.; Crowder, R.S. III; Trent, D.S.; Reid, C.R.; Lessor, D.L.

    1985-10-01

    The Joule-heated ceramic-lined melter is an integral part of the high level waste immobilization process under development by the US Department of Energy. Scaleup and design of this waste glass melting furnace requires an understanding of the relationships between melting cavity design parameters and the furnace performance characteristics such as mixing, heat transfer, and electrical requirements. Developing empirical models of these relationships through actual melter testing with numerous designs would be a very costly and time consuming task. Additionally, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has been developing numerical models that simulate a Joule-heated melter for analyzing melter performance. This report documents the method used and results of this modeling effort. Numerical modeling results are compared with the more conventional, physical modeling results to validate the approach. Also included are the results of numerically simulating an operating research melter at PNL. Physical Joule-heated melters modeling results used for qualiying the simulation capabilities of the melter code included: (1) a melter with a single pair of electrodes and (2) a melter with a dual pair (two pairs) of electrodes. The physical model of the melter having two electrode pairs utilized a configuration with primary and secondary electrodes. The principal melter parameters (the ratio of power applied to each electrode pair, modeling fluid depth, electrode spacing) were varied in nine tests of the physical model during FY85. Code predictions were made for five of these tests. Voltage drops, temperature field data, and electric field data varied in their agreement with the physical modeling results, but in general were judged acceptable. 14 refs., 79 figs., 17 tabs.

  20. Modified Numerical Simulation Model of Blood Flow in Bend

    PubMed Central

    Liu, X; Zhou, X; Hao, X; Sang, X

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The numerical simulation model of blood flow in bend is studied in this paper. The curvature modification is conducted for the blood flow model in bend to obtain the modified blood flow model in bend. The modified model is verified by U tube. By comparing the simulation results with the experimental results obtained by measuring the flow data in U tube, it was found that the modified blood flow model in bend can effectively improve the prediction accuracy of blood flow data affected by the curvature effect. PMID:27398727

  1. A guide to modelling cardiac electrical activity in anatomically detailed ventricles.

    PubMed

    Clayton, R H; Panfilov, A V

    2008-01-01

    One of the most recent trends in cardiac electrophysiology is the development of integrative anatomically accurate models of the heart, which include description of cardiac activity from sub-cellular and cellular level to the level of the whole organ. In order to construct this type of model, a researcher needs to collect a wide range of information from books and journal articles on various aspects of biology, physiology, electrophysiology, numerical mathematics and computer programming. The aim of this methodological article is to survey recent developments in integrative modelling of electrical activity in the ventricles of the heart, and to provide a practical guide to the resources and tools that are available for work in this exciting and challenging area.

  2. Three-dimensional surface models of detailed lumbosacral structures reconstructed from the Visible Korean.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dong Sun; Chung, Min Suk; Park, Jin Seo; Park, Hyung Seon; Lee, Seung-Bock; Lee, Sang-Ho; Choi, Ho-Nam; Riemer, Martin; Handels, Heinz; Lee, Jong Eun; Jung, Wonsug

    2011-02-20

    Unlike volume models, surface models representing hollow, three-dimensional images have a small file size; allowing them to be displayed, rotated, and modified in real time. Therefore, surface models of lumbosacral structures can be effectively used for interactive simulation of, e.g., virtual lumbar puncture, virtual surgery of herniated lumbar discs, and virtual epidural anesthesia. In this paper, we present surface models of extensive lumbosacral structures which can be used in medical simulation systems. One-hundred and thirty-eight chosen structures included the spinal cord, lumbar and sacral nerves, vertebrae, intervertebral discs, ligaments, muscles, arteries, and skin. The structures were outlined in the sectioned images from the Visible Korean. From these outlined images, serial outlines of each structure were stacked. Adopting commercial software (3D-DOCTOR, Maya), an advanced surface reconstruction technique was applied to create a surface model of the structure. In the surface models, we observed the anatomical relationships of the lumbosacral structures (e.g., cauda equina and ligaments) in detail. Additionally, the portions of some spinal nerves that could not be outlined were drawn and added to the surface models. These constructed models will hopefully facilitate development of high quality medical simulation of the lumbosacral region. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Architectural approach for semantic EHR systems development based on Detailed Clinical Models.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Juan G; Lopez, Diego M; Blobel, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    The integrative approach to health information in general and the development of pHealth systems in particular, require an integrated approach of formally modeled system architectures. Detailed Clinical Models (DCM) is one of the most promising modeling efforts for clinical concept representation in EHR system architectures. Although the feasibility of DCM modeling methodology has been demonstrated through examples, there is no formal, generic and automatic modeling transformation technique to ensure a semantic lossless transformation of clinical concepts expressed in DCM to either clinical concept representations based on ISO 13606/openEHR Archetypes or HL7 Templates. The objective of this paper is to propose a generic model transformation method and tooling for transforming DCM Clinical Concepts into ISO/EN 13606/openEHR Archetypes or HL7 Template models. The automation of the transformation process is supported by Model Driven-Development (MDD) transformation mechanisms and tools. The availability of processes, techniques and tooling for automatic DCM transformation would enable the development of intelligent, adaptive information systems as demanded for pHealth solutions.

  4. A SPATIO-TEMPORAL DOWNSCALER FOR OUTPUT FROM NUMERICAL MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Often, in environmental data collection, data arise from two sources: numerical models and monitoring networks. The first source provides predictions at the level of grid cells, while the second source gives measurements at points. The first is characterized by full spatial cove...

  5. Development of numerical Grids for UZ Flow and Transport Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    P. Dobson

    2004-08-31

    This report describes the methods used to develop numerical grids of the unsaturated hydrogeologic system beneath Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Numerical grid generation is an integral part of the development of the unsaturated zone (UZ) flow and transport model, a complex, three-dimensional (3-D) model of Yucca Mountain. This revision contains changes made to improve the clarity of the description of grid generation. The numerical grids, developed using current geologic, hydrogeologic, and mineralogic data, provide the necessary framework to: (1) develop calibrated hydrogeologic property sets and flow fields, (2) test conceptual hypotheses of flow and transport, and (3) predict flow and transport behavior under a variety of climatic and thermal-loading conditions. The technical scope, content, and management for the current revision of this report are described in the planning document ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Section 2). Grids generated and documented in this report supersede those documented in Revision 00 of this report, ''Development of Numerical Grids for UZ Flow and Transport Modeling'' (BSC 2001 [DIRS 159356]). The grids presented in this report are the same as those developed in Revision 01 (BSC 2003 [DIRS 160109]); however, the documentation of the development of the grids in Revision 02 has been updated to address technical inconsistencies and achieve greater transparency, readability, and traceability. The constraints, assumptions, and limitations associated with this report are discussed in the appropriate sections that follow.

  6. A SPATIO-TEMPORAL DOWNSCALER FOR OUTPUT FROM NUMERICAL MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Often, in environmental data collection, data arise from two sources: numerical models and monitoring networks. The first source provides predictions at the level of grid cells, while the second source gives measurements at points. The first is characterized by full spatial cove...

  7. An Approach to Query Cost Modelling in Numeric Databases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarvelin, Kalervo

    1989-01-01

    Examines factors that determine user charges based on query processing costs in numeric databases, and analyzes the problem of estimating such charges in advance. An approach to query cost estimation is presented which is based on the relational data model and the query optimization, cardinality estimation, and file design techniques developed in…

  8. Numerical Modeling of Drying Residual RP-1 in Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, Alok; Polsgrove, Robert; Tiller, Bruce; Rodriquez, Pete (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    When a Rocket Engine shuts down under a fuel rich environment, a significant amount of unburned RP-1 is trapped In the engine. It is necessary to clean the residual RP-1 prior to subsequent firing to avoid any explosion due to detonation. The conventional method is to dry RP-1 with inert gas such as Nitrogen or Helium. It is difficult to estimate the drying time unless the engine is adequately equipped with instruments to measure the trace of RP-1 during the drying process. Such instrumentation in flight hardware is often impractical and costly. On the other hand numerical modeling of the drying process can provide a good insight for a satisfactory operation of the process. A numerical model can provide answer to questions such as a) how long it takes to dry, b) which fluid is a better dryer for RP-1, c) how to reduce drying time etc. The purpose of the present paper is to describe a numerical model of drying RP-1 trapped in a cavity with flowing nitrogen or helium. The numerical model assumes one dimensional flow of drying fluid in contact with liquid pool of RP-1. An evaporative mass transfer takes place across the contact surface.

  9. Modeling collisional processes in plasmas using discontinuous numerical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Sean

    Fluid-based plasma models are typically applied to parameter regimes where a local thermal equilibrium is assumed. The applicability of this regime is valid for many plasmas, however, it is limited to plasma dynamics dominated by collisional effects. This study attempts to extend the validity of the collisional fluid regime using an anisotropic 13-moment fluid model derived from the Pearson type-IV probability distribution. The model explicitly evolves the heat flux hyperbolically alongside the density, momentum, and energy in order to capture dynamics usually restricted to costly kinetic models. Each particle species is modeled individually and collectively coupled through electromagnetic and collision operators. To remove electromagnetic divergence errors inherent to numerical representations of Maxwell's equations, both hyperbolic and parabolic cleaning methods are presented. The plasma models are implemented using high-order finite volume and discontinuous Galerkin numerical methods designed for unstructured meshes. The unstructured code framework, numerical methods, and plasma models were developed in the University of Washington's WARPXM code for use on heterogeneous accelerated clusters.

  10. Detailed Modeling of β CMi: A Multi-Technique Test of the Viscous Decretion Disk Scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klement, R.; Carciofi, A. C.; Štefl, S.; Faes, D. M.; Rivinius, T.

    2016-11-01

    β CMi is a well-known close and bright classical Be star. Its observable properties, especially the little variability of line emission, point at an exceptional stability of the circumstellar disk at least on a scale of decades, which makes β CMi an ideal laboratory for a detailed test of the viscous decretion disk (VDD) scenario currently assumed to explain the formation and evolution of Be disks. A large set of multi-wavelength and multi-technique observations is used to produce arguably the most constrained model to date. The SED has been, for the first time with a physical model, reasonably reproduced from ultraviolet up to radio wavelengths. In this contribution we present the general aspects of the model and look more closely on the diagnostic potential of the ultraviolet spectrum and the spectral shape of visual polarisation in constraining some of the central star parameters for the case of β CMi.

  11. [Investigation of fuzzy-clustering in octane number prediction model based on detailed hydrocarbon analysis data].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingrong; Xu, Yupeng; Yang, Haiying

    2004-09-01

    A method to establish octane number prediction model based on detailed hydrocarbon analysis (DHA) data is presented. The techniques of fuzzy-clustering and the Euclidian distance are employed to select the samples needed in pattern establishment. One hundred and fifty gasoline samples and an amount of 140 characteristic components in the DHA chromatogram of each sample are used for the fuzzy-clustering research. It is found that the 3 - 10 samples, which have the nearest Euclidian distance ( < 1.5) to the prediction sample in the same cluster, are enough to build the octane number prediction model. The experimental results proved that the model obtained according to the above method has more predictable accuracy, wider application range and higher data resource utility compared with the current prediction method.

  12. Automatic Generation of Building Models with Levels of Detail 1-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguatem, W.; Drauschke, M.; Mayer, H.

    2016-06-01

    We present a workflow for the automatic generation of building models with levels of detail (LOD) 1 to 3 according to the CityGML standard (Gröger et al., 2012). We start with orienting unsorted image sets employing (Mayer et al., 2012), we compute depth maps using semi-global matching (SGM) (Hirschmüller, 2008), and fuse these depth maps to reconstruct dense 3D point clouds (Kuhn et al., 2014). Based on planes segmented from these point clouds, we have developed a stochastic method for roof model selection (Nguatem et al., 2013) and window model selection (Nguatem et al., 2014). We demonstrate our workflow up to the export into CityGML.

  13. Detailed report on tested models companion report 2 to simulation of geothermal subsidence (LBL 10571)

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, I.; Dershowitz, W.; Jones, K.; Myer, L.; Roman, K.; Schauer, M.

    1980-03-01

    An assessment was performed of existing mathematical models for subsidence simulation and prediction. Detailed analyses are presented of the theory, power, usability, and performance of the seven models used in conjunction with an ongoing research program aimed at improved understanding and control of ground movements caused by geothermal power production. The models used were: hand-calculation techniques; the nucleus-of-strain method; the one-dimensional Terzaghi consolidation method; the two-dimensional boundary-integral-equation method; two-dimensional finite-element coupled fluid flow and deformation; three-dimensional integrated finite difference, coupled fluid flow, heat flow, and porosity change; and the three-dimensional displacement discontinuity method. (MHR)

  14. Numerical integration of population models satisfying conservation laws: NSFD methods.

    PubMed

    Mickens, Ronald E

    2007-10-01

    Population models arising in ecology, epidemiology and mathematical biology may involve a conservation law, i.e. the total population is constant. In addition to these cases, other situations may occur for which the total population, asymptotically in time, approach a constant value. Since it is rarely the situation that the equations of motion can be analytically solved to obtain exact solutions, it follows that numerical techniques are needed to provide solutions. However, numerical procedures are only valid if they can reproduce fundamental properties of the differential equations modeling the phenomena of interest. We show that for population models, involving a dynamical conservation law the use of nonstandard finite difference (NSFD) methods allows the construction of discretization schemes such that they are dynamically consistent (DC) with the original differential equations. The paper will briefly discuss the NSFD methodology, the concept of DC, and illustrate their application to specific problems for population models.

  15. A numerical framework for modelling floating wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vire, Axelle; Xiang, Jiansheng; Piggott, Matthew; Latham, John-Paul; Pain, Christopher

    2012-11-01

    This work couples a fluid/ocean- and a solid- dynamics model in order to numerically study fluid-structure interactions. The fully non-linear Navier-Stokes and solid-dynamics equations are solved on two distinct finite-element and unstructured grids. The interplay between fluid and solid is represented through a penalty force in the momentum balances of each material. The present algorithm is novel in that it spatially conserves the discrete penalty force, when exchanging it between both models, independently of the mesh resolution and of the shape-function orders in each model. This numerical framework targets the modelling of offshore floating wind turbines. Results will be shown for the flow past a moving pile and an actuator-disk representation of a turbine. This research is supported by the European Union Seventh Framework Programme (grant agreement PIEF-GA-2010-272437).

  16. Numerical exploration of spontaneous broken symmetries in multiorbital Hubbard models

    SciTech Connect

    Kung, Y. F.; Chen, C. -C.; Moritz, B.; Johnston, S.; Thomale, R.; Devereaux, T. P.

    2014-12-05

    Here, we study three proposals for broken symmetry in the cuprate pseudogap-oxygen antiferromagnetism, Theta(II) orbital loop currents, and circulating currents involving apex oxygens-through numerical exploration of multiorbital Hubbard models. Our numerically exact results show no evidence for the existence of oxygen antiferromagnetic order or the Theta(II) phase in the three-orbital Hubbard model. The model also fails to sustain an ordered current pattern even with the presence of additional apex oxygen orbitals. Thus, we conclude that it is difficult to stabilize the aforementioned phases in the multiorbital Hubbard models for parameters relevant to cuprate superconductors. However, the Theta(II) phase might be stabilized through explicit flux terms. We also found an enhanced propensity for circulating currents with such terms in calculations simulating applied stress or strain, which skew the copper-oxygen plane to resemble a kagome lattice. We propose an experimental viewpoint to shed additional light on this problem.

  17. Assessing Accuracy of Waveform Models against Numerical Relativity Waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pürrer, Michael; LVC Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    We compare currently available phenomenological and effective-one-body inspiral-merger-ringdown models for gravitational waves (GW) emitted from coalescing black hole binaries against a set of numerical relativity waveforms from the SXS collaboration. Simplifications are used in the construction of some waveform models, such as restriction to spins aligned with the orbital angular momentum, no inclusion of higher harmonics in the GW radiation, no modeling of eccentricity and the use of effective parameters to describe spin precession. In contrast, NR waveforms provide us with a high fidelity representation of the ``true'' waveform modulo small numerical errors. To focus on systematics we inject NR waveforms into zero noise for early advanced LIGO detector sensitivity at a moderately optimistic signal-to-noise ratio. We discuss where in the parameter space the above modeling assumptions lead to noticeable biases in recovered parameters.

  18. A dynamic multi-timescale method for combustion modeling with detailed and reduced chemical kinetic mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Gou, Xiaolong; Sun, Wenting; Ju, Yiguang; Chen, Zheng

    2010-06-15

    A new on-grid dynamic multi-timescale (MTS) method is presented to increase significantly the computation efficiency involving multi-physical and chemical processes using detailed and reduced kinetic mechanisms. The methodology of the MTS method using the instantaneous timescales of different species is introduced. The definition of the characteristic time for species is examined and compared with that of the computational singular perturbation (CSP) and frozen reaction rate methods by using a simple reaction system. A hybrid multi-timescale (HMTS) algorithm is constructed by integrating the MTS method with an implicit Euler scheme, respectively, for species with and without the requirement of accurate time histories at sub-base timescales. The efficiency and the robustness of the MTS and HMTS methods are demonstrated by comparing with the Euler and VODE solvers for homogenous ignition and unsteady flame propagation of hydrogen, methane, and n-decane-air mixtures. The results show that both MTS and HMTS reproduce well the species and temperature histories and are able to decrease computation time by about one-order with the same kinetic mechanism. Compared to MTS, HMTS has slightly better computation efficiency but scarifies the stability at large base time steps. The results also show that with the increase of mechanism size and the decrease of time step, the computation efficiency of multi-timescale method increases compared to the VODE solver. In addition, it is shown that the integration of the multi-timescale method with the path flux analysis based mechanism reduction approach can further increase the computation efficiency. Unsteady simulations of outwardly propagating spherical n-decane-air premixed flames demonstrate that the multi-timescale method is rigorous for direct numerical simulations with both detailed and reduced chemistry and can dramatically improve the computation efficiency. (author)

  19. Deciphering the details of RNA aminoglycoside interactions: from atomistic models to biotechnological applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ilgu, Muslum

    2012-01-01

    A detailed study was done of the neomycin-B RNA aptamer for determining its selectivity and binding ability to both neomycin– and kanamycin-class aminoglycosides. A novel method to increase drug concentrations in cells for more efficiently killing is described. To test the method, a bacterial model system was adopted and several small RNA molecules interacting with aminoglycosides were cloned downstream of T7 RNA polymerase promoter in an expression vector. Then, the growth analysis of E. coli expressing aptamers was observed for 12-hour period. Our analysis indicated that aptamers helped to increase the intracellular concentration of aminoglycosides thereby increasing their efficacy.

  20. A Congeries of Numerical Models used at the BRL

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    MODEL NAME: CINDA (SINDA). REFERENCE(S): Chrysler Improved Numerical Differencing Analyzer for 3rd Generation Computers, TN-AP-67-287, Oct 20, 1967...used. 6. FOR MORE INFORMATION REGARDING THIS MODEL: POINT OF CONTACT: William Beverly PHONE NUMBER: VLD, extension 2853. 128 1. TASK AREA...Field. 13 CINDA (SINDA). 112 141 CONING. CYL C jectnes Cobra. Duel3. 76 CSQII - An exterior Finite 20 Difference Program for Two-Dimensional

  1. Numerical modeling and simulation of flow through porous fabric surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zheng; Li, Xiaolin

    We designed a numerical scheme to model the permeability of the fabric surface in an incompressible fluid by coupling the projection method with the Ghost Fluid Method in the front tracking framework. The pressure jump condition is obtained by adding a source term to the Poisson's equation in the projection step without modifications on its coefficients. The numerical results suggest that this approach has the ability to reproduce the relationship between pressure drop and relative velocity observed in the experiments. We use this algorithm to study the effects of porosity on the drag force and stability of parachutes during its inflation and deceleration.

  2. Thermoelectric Generators for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Systems Part I: Numerical Modeling and Baseline Model Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sumeet; Heister, Stephen D.; Xu, Xianfan; Salvador, James R.; Meisner, Gregory P.

    2013-04-01

    A numerical model has been developed to simulate coupled thermal and electrical energy transfer processes in a thermoelectric generator (TEG) designed for automotive waste heat recovery systems. This model is capable of computing the overall heat transferred, the electrical power output, and the associated pressure drop for given inlet conditions of the exhaust gas and the available TEG volume. Multiple-filled skutterudites and conventional bismuth telluride are considered for thermoelectric modules (TEMs) for conversion of waste heat from exhaust into usable electrical power. Heat transfer between the hot exhaust gas and the hot side of the TEMs is enhanced with the use of a plate-fin heat exchanger integrated within the TEG and using liquid coolant on the cold side. The TEG is discretized along the exhaust flow direction using a finite-volume method. Each control volume is modeled as a thermal resistance network which consists of integrated submodels including a heat exchanger and a thermoelectric device. The pressure drop along the TEG is calculated using standard pressure loss correlations and viscous drag models. The model is validated to preserve global energy balances and is applied to analyze a prototype TEG with data provided by General Motors. Detailed results are provided for local and global heat transfer and electric power generation. In the companion paper, the model is then applied to consider various TEG topologies using skutterudite and bismuth telluride TEMs.

  3. A numerical cloud model for the support of laboratory experimentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagen, D. E.

    1979-01-01

    A numerical cloud model is presented which can describe the evolution of a cloud starting from moist aerosol-laden air through the diffusional growth regime. The model is designed for the direct support of cloud chamber laboratory experimentation, i.e., experiment preparation, real-time control and data analysis. In the model the thermodynamics is uncoupled from the droplet growth processes. Analytic solutions for the cloud droplet growth equations are developed which can be applied in most laboratory situations. The model is applied to a variety of representative experiments.

  4. Numerical model for the uptake of groundwater contaminants by phreatophytes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Widdowson, M.A.; El-Sayed, A.; Landmeyer, J.E.

    2008-01-01

    Conventional solute transport models do not adequately account for the effects of phreatophytic plant systems on contaminant concentrations in shallow groundwater systems. A numerical model was developed and tested to simulate threedimensional reactive solute transport in a heterogeneous porous medium. Advective-dispersive transport is coupled to biodegradation, sorption, and plantbased attenuation processes including plant uptake and sorption by plant roots. The latter effects are a function of the physical-chemical properties of the individual solutes and plant species. Models for plant uptake were tested and evaluated using the experimental data collected at a field site comprised of hybrid poplar trees. A non-linear equilibrium isotherm model best represented site conditions.

  5. Validation of numerical models for flow simulation in labyrinth seals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frączek, D.; Wróblewski, W.

    2016-10-01

    CFD results were compared with the results of experiments for the flow through the labyrinth seal. RANS turbulence models (k-epsilon, k-omega, SST and SST-SAS) were selected for the study. Steady and transient results were analyzed. ANSYS CFX was used for numerical computation. The analysis included flow through sealing section with the honeycomb land. Leakage flows and velocity profiles in the seal were compared. In addition to the comparison of computational models, the divergence of modeling and experimental results has been determined. Tips for modeling these problems were formulated.

  6. The numerical scheme development of a simplified frozen soil model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qian; Sun, Shufen; Dai, Qiudan

    2009-09-01

    In almost all frozen soil models used currently, three variables of temperature, ice content and moisture content are used as prognostic variables and the rate term, accounting for the contribution of the phase change between water and ice, is shown explicitly in both the energy and mass balance equations. The models must be solved by a numerical method with an iterative process, and the rate term of the phase change needs to be pre-estimated at the beginning in each iteration step. Since the rate term of the phase change in the energy equation is closely related to the release or absorption of the great amount of fusion heat, a small error in the rate term estimation will introduce greater error in the energy balance, which will amplify the error in the temperature calculation and in turn, cause problems for the numerical solution convergence. In this work, in order to first reduce the trouble, the methodology of the variable transformation is applied to a simplified frozen soil model used currently, which leads to new frozen soil scheme used in this work. In the new scheme, the enthalpy and the total water equivalent are used as predictive variables in the governing equations to replace temperature, volumetric soil moisture and ice content used in many current models. By doing so, the rate terms of the phase change are not shown explicitly in both the mass and energy equations and its pre-estimation is avoided. Secondly, in order to solve this new scheme more functionally, the development of the numerical scheme to the new scheme is described and a numerical algorithm appropriate to the numerical scheme is developed. In order to evaluate the new scheme of the frozen soil model and its relevant algorithm, a series of model evaluations are conducted by comparing numerical results from the new model scheme with three observational data sets. The comparisons show that the results from the model are in good agreement with these data sets in both the change trend of

  7. Detailed 3D Geophysical Model of the Shallow Subsurface (Zancara River Basin, Iberian Peninsula)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbonell, R.; Marzán, I.; Martí, D.; Lobo, A.; Jean, K.; Alvarez-Marrón, J.

    2016-12-01

    Detailed knowledge of the structure and lithologies of the shallow subsurface is required when designing and building singular geological storage facilities this is the case of the study area in Villar de Cañas (Cuenca, Central Spain). In which an extensive multidisciplinary data acquisition program has been carried out. This include studies on: geology, hydrology, geochemistry, geophysics, borehole logging, etc. Because of this data infrastructure, it can be considered a subsurface imaging laboratory to test and validate indirect underground characterization approaches. The field area is located in a Miocene syncline within the Záncara River Basin (Cuenca, Spain). The sedimentary sequence consists in a transition from shales to massive gypsums, and underlying gravels. The stratigraphic succession features a complex internal structure, diffused lithological boundaries and relatively large variability of properties within the same lithology, these makes direct geological interpretation very difficult and requires of the integration of all the measured physical properties. The ERT survey, the seismic tomography data and the logs have been used jointly to build a 3-D multi-parameter model of the subsurface in a surface of 500x500 m. The Vp model (a 10x20x5 m grid) is able to map the high velocities of the massive gypsum, however it was neither able to map the details of the shale-gypsm transition (low velocity contrast) nor to differentiate the outcropping altered gypsum from the weathered shales. The integration of the electrical resistivity and the log data by means of a supervised statistical tools (Linear Discriminant Analysis, LDA) resulted in a new 3D multiparametric subsurface model. This new model integrates the different data sets resolving the uncertainties characteristic of the models obtained independently by the different techniques separately. Furthermore, this test seismic dataset has been used to test FWI approaches in order to study their capacities

  8. Numerical models for fluid-grains interactions: opportunities and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esteghamatian, Amir; Rahmani, Mona; Wachs, Anthony

    2017-06-01

    In the framework of a multi-scale approach, we develop numerical models for suspension flows. At the micro scale level, we perform particle-resolved numerical simulations using a Distributed Lagrange Multiplier/Fictitious Domain approach. At the meso scale level, we use a two-way Euler/Lagrange approach with a Gaussian filtering kernel to model fluid-solid momentum transfer. At both the micro and meso scale levels, particles are individually tracked in a Lagrangian way and all inter-particle collisions are computed by a Discrete Element/Soft-sphere method. The previous numerical models have been extended to handle particles of arbitrary shape (non-spherical, angular and even non-convex) as well as to treat heat and mass transfer. All simulation tools are fully-MPI parallel with standard domain decomposition and run on supercomputers with a satisfactory scalability on up to a few thousands of cores. The main asset of multi scale analysis is the ability to extend our comprehension of the dynamics of suspension flows based on the knowledge acquired from the high-fidelity micro scale simulations and to use that knowledge to improve the meso scale model. We illustrate how we can benefit from this strategy for a fluidized bed, where we introduce a stochastic drag force model derived from micro-scale simulations to recover the proper level of particle fluctuations. Conversely, we discuss the limitations of such modelling tools such as their limited ability to capture lubrication forces and boundary layers in highly inertial flows. We suggest ways to overcome these limitations in order to enhance further the capabilities of the numerical models.

  9. Generalized numerical pressure distribution model for smoothing polishing of irregular midspatial frequency errors.

    PubMed

    Nie, Xuqing; Li, Shengyi; Shi, Feng; Hu, Hao

    2014-02-20

    The smoothing effect of the rigid lap plays an important role in controlling midspatial frequency errors (MSFRs). At present, the pressure distribution between the polishing pad and processed surface is mainly calculated by Mehta's bridging model. However, this classic model does not work for the irregular MSFR. In this paper, a generalized numerical model based on the finite element method (FEM) is proposed to solve this problem. First, the smoothing polishing (SP) process is transformed to a 3D elastic structural FEM model, and the governing matrix equation is gained. By virtue of the boundary conditions applied to the governing matrix equation, the nodal displacement vector and nodal force vector of the pad can be attained, from which the pressure distribution can be extracted. In the partial contact condition, the iterative method is needed. The algorithmic routine is shown, and the applicability of the generalized numerical model is discussed. The detailed simulation is given when the lap is in contact with the irregular surface of different morphologies. A well-designed SP experiment is conducted in our lab to verify the model. A small difference between the experimental data and simulated result shows that the model is totally practicable. The generalized numerical model is applied on a Φ500  mm parabolic surface. The calculated result and measured data after the SP process have been compared, which indicates that the model established in this paper is an effective method to predict the SP process.

  10. An application of fast algorithms to numerical electromagnetic modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Bezvoda, V.; Segeth, K.

    1987-03-01

    Numerical electromagnetic modeling by the finite-difference or finite-element methods leads to a large sparse system of linear algebraic equations. Fast direct methods, requiring an order of at most q log q arithmetic operations to solve a system of q equations, cannot easily be applied to such a system. This paper describes the iterative application of a fast method, namely cyclic reduction, to the numerical solution of the Helmholtz equation with a piecewise constant imaginary coefficient of the absolute term in a plane domain. By means of numerical tests the advantages and limitations of the method compared with classical direct methods are discussed. The iterative application of the cyclic reduction method is very efficient if one can exploit a known solution of a similar (e.g., simpler) problem as the initial approximation. This makes cyclic reduction a powerful tool in solving the inverse problem by trial-and-error.

  11. Numerical approach to unbiased and driven generalized elastic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nezhadhaghighi, M. Ghasemi; Chechkin, A.; Metzler, R.

    2014-01-01

    From scaling arguments and numerical simulations, we investigate the properties of the generalized elastic model (GEM) that is used to describe various physical systems such as polymers, membranes, single-file systems, or rough interfaces. We compare analytical and numerical results for the subdiffusion exponent β characterizing the growth of the mean squared displacement ⟨(δh)2⟩ of the field h described by the GEM dynamic equation. We study the scaling properties of the qth order moments ⟨|δh|q⟩ with time, finding that the interface fluctuations show no intermittent behavior. We also investigate the ergodic properties of the process h in terms of the ergodicity breaking parameter and the distribution of the time averaged mean squared displacement. Finally, we study numerically the driven GEM with a constant, localized perturbation and extract the characteristics of the average drift for a tagged probe.

  12. [Comparative study of the capacity of elastomers in reproduction and transmission of details to gypsum models].

    PubMed

    Mazzetto, M O; Roselino, R B; Gabrielli, F; Campos, G M

    1990-01-01

    The authors studied the ability of three elastomeric impression materials in reproducing and transmitting three grooves, engraved in the polished surface of a stainless steel model, to gypsum models. The grooves were 17, 21 and 25 micrometers wide, and the fails in reproducing, as well as in transmitting the minor details to gypsum, were also investigated as to the effects of gypsum particle size, proportional relation water/powder and plasticity of the mixture. The three elastomeric impression materials used were a polysulfide, a silicone and a polyether, and the six gypsum products were two improved stones type IV, two dental stones type III and two dental plasters type II. Scores 3, 2 and 1 were attributed respectively to the 17, 21 and 25 micrometers grooves reproduced in the molds, as well to the same grooves transmitted to the gypsum models. The results showed that all the impression materials tested were able to reproduce in the molds all the three grooves present in the steel model. Nevertheless, when gypsum models were examined, it was verified that the grooves so well reproduced in the molds were neither equally nor uniformely registered in the respective models, the best results being achieved by the polysulfide and the silicone, an the worst by polyether, As to the gypsum products, the type II gypsum presented the most unfavorable results.

  13. Estimating annual buildings ground floors heat losses using a one-dimensional (1-D) numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giakoumakis, Andreas

    In this work, an estimation of the annual buildings ground floors heat losses by means of numerical simulations of two different geometrical models (constructional details of buildings ground floors), using a 1-D numerical model, is attempted. Given the three-dimensional (3-D) nature of the heat transfer through the ground, the annual ground floor heat losses are first estimated using a 3-D model, constructed and simulated with the thermal analysis computer programs: "TRISCO" & "VOLTRA". Then, the 3-D model is converted to the 'respective' one-dimensional (1-D) one and the 'equalization' of the two models - for the both cases (geometrical models) - as far as the annual ground floor heat losses per unit surface area are concerned, is done by changing the values of the various simulation parameters of the used computer programs. Furthermore, since the various simulation tools, such as "TAS" thermal analysis software, generally simulate all heat transfer processes in one dimension - those through the ground floors included - and model the soil depth, in particular, to be: 1m, an estimation of the possibly introduced, in this 'methodology', errors is made, by comparing the respective results derived from the 3-D & 1-D numerical models. As far as the 'equalization' of the 1-D & 3-D numerical models is concerned, the results in question 'revealed' that, the (1-D numerical model's) soil depth, primarily and the soil thermal conductivity (A), secondly, are the most significant simulation parameters for the achievement of this aim. Regarding the errors possibly introduced in the process of estimating the annual buildings ground floor heat losses using a 1-D numerical model (with a soil depth value of: 1m), it is shown that, the size of these errors - for the specific models examined in this work - is approximately: -38% for the first and: +59% for the second one and, furthermore, that, the definition of the 'proper' soil depth value depends on the specific numerical model

  14. Forecasts of time averages with a numerical weather prediction model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roads, J. O.

    1986-01-01

    Forecasts of time averages of 1-10 days in duration by an operational numerical weather prediction model are documented for the global 500 mb height field in spectral space. Error growth in very idealized models is described in order to anticipate various features of these forecasts and in order to anticipate what the results might be if forecasts longer than 10 days were carried out by present day numerical weather prediction models. The data set for this study is described, and the equilibrium spectra and error spectra are documented; then, the total error is documented. It is shown how forecasts can immediately be improved by removing the systematic error, by using statistical filters, and by ignoring forecasts beyond about a week. Temporal variations in the error field are also documented.

  15. On the assimilation of MODIS reflectance into a detailed snowpack model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charrois, Luc; Dumont, Marie; Cosme, Emmanuel; Lafaysse, Matthieu; Morin, Samuel; Libois, Quentin; Picard, Ghislain

    2016-04-01

    One of the major sources of uncertainty in detailed snowpack simulations lies in the quality of meteorological forcings. The limited spatial resolution of common reanalysis and forecast data used as inputs for snowpack models usually makes it difficult to simulate the local horizontal heterogeneity of snowpack physical properties, especially in mountainous areas. Using satellite data to incorporate snowpack state observations into the simulations appears as an alluring way to improve the snow simulations, to account for spatial variability and to mitigate the impact of meteorological forcings uncertainties. This work presents an original study of the impact of the assimilation of visible and near-infrared reflectances into the detailed snowpack model SURFEX/ISBA-Crocus. We performed ensemble simulations by perturbing the atmospheric forcing consistently with its estimated uncertainty. In a first step, we performed assimilation experiments with synthetic imager (MODIS like) observations and a particle filter. The experiments were carried out at Col du Lautaret area (2100 m altitude, French Alps) over 5 hydrologic seasons. They provide a good insight about the potential and limitations of assimilating imager data to improve the representation of the snowpack. In particular, they demonstrate the significance of the temporal distribution of the observation to assimilate. In a second step, we assimilated actual MODIS data and evaluated the impact of the assimilation using snow measurements acquired during one winter season at Col du Lautaret. These real experiments enlighten the need for a relevant screening method for MODIS reflectances.

  16. Detailed models of a sample of debris disks: from Herschel, KIN and Spitzer to the JWST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebreton, J.; Beichman, C.; Augereau, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Dusty debris disks surrounding main sequence stars are extrasolar equivalents to the Solar System populations of asteroids, icy bodies and dust grains. Many were observed in thermal emission by Herschel with unprecedented wavelength coverage and spatial resolution, complementing available scattered light images, mid-infrared spectra and interferometric measurements. We present detailed models of the HD 181327 and HD 32297 disks obtained with the GRaTer radiative transfer code and made possible thanks to Herschel. We then focus on the intriguing case of the nearby F2V star η Corvi that shows strong infrared excess despite an estimated age of 1.4 Gyr. We establish a detailed model of its disk from the sub-AU scale to its outermost regions based on observations from the Keck Interferometer Nuller, Herschel and Spitzer. These bright and extended disks will be of prime interest for future observations with the JWST. We finally discuss new debris disks science that will be addressed with the NIRCam and MIRI instruments.

  17. Nonlinear dispersion effects in elastic plates: numerical modelling and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kijanka, Piotr; Radecki, Rafal; Packo, Pawel; Staszewski, Wieslaw J.; Uhl, Tadeusz; Leamy, Michael J.

    2017-04-01

    Nonlinear features of elastic wave propagation have attracted significant attention recently. The particular interest herein relates to complex wave-structure interactions, which provide potential new opportunities for feature discovery and identification in a variety of applications. Due to significant complexity associated with wave propagation in nonlinear media, numerical modeling and simulations are employed to facilitate design and development of new measurement, monitoring and characterization systems. However, since very high spatio- temporal accuracy of numerical models is required, it is critical to evaluate their spectral properties and tune discretization parameters for compromise between accuracy and calculation time. Moreover, nonlinearities in structures give rise to various effects that are not present in linear systems, e.g. wave-wave interactions, higher harmonics generation, synchronism and | recently reported | shifts to dispersion characteristics. This paper discusses local computational model based on a new HYBRID approach for wave propagation in nonlinear media. The proposed approach combines advantages of the Local Interaction Simulation Approach (LISA) and Cellular Automata for Elastodynamics (CAFE). The methods are investigated in the context of their accuracy for predicting nonlinear wavefields, in particular shifts to dispersion characteristics for finite amplitude waves and secondary wavefields. The results are validated against Finite Element (FE) calculations for guided waves in copper plate. Critical modes i.e., modes determining accuracy of a model at given excitation frequency - are identified and guidelines for numerical model parameters are proposed.

  18. FEM numerical model analysis of magnetic nanoparticle tumor heating experiments.

    PubMed

    Pearce, John A; Petyk, Alicia A; Hoopes, P Jack

    2014-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles are currently under investigation as heating agents for hyperthermic treatment of tumors. Major determinants of effective heating include the biodistribution of magnetic materials, the minimum iron oxide loading required to achieve adequate heating, and practically achievable magnetic field strengths. These are inter-related criteria that ultimately determine the practicability of this approach to tumor treatment. Currently, we lack fundamental engineering design criteria that can be used in treatment planning and assessment. Coupling numerical models to experimental studies illuminate the underlying physical processes and can separate physical processes to determine their relative importance. Further, adding thermal damage and cell death process to the models provides valuable perspective on the likelihood of successful treatment. FEM numerical models were applied to increase the understanding of a carefully calibrated series of experiments in mouse mammary carcinoma. The numerical models results indicate that tumor loadings equivalent to approximately 1 mg of Fe3O4 per gram of tumor tissue are required to achieve adequate heating in magnetic field strengths of 34 kA/m (rms) at 160 kHz. Further, the models indicate that direct intratumoral injection of the nanoparticles results in between 1 and 20% uptake in the tissues.

  19. Biomechanical behaviour of ankle ligaments: constitutive formulation and numerical modelling.

    PubMed

    Forestiero, A; Carniel, E L; Natali, A N

    2014-01-01

    This study was aimed at the definition of a constitutive formulation of ankle ligaments and of a procedure for the constitutive parameters evaluation, for the biomechanical analysis by means of numerical models. To interpret the typical features of ligaments mechanical response, as anisotropic configuration, geometric non-linearity, non-linear elasticity and time-dependent behaviour, a specific fibre-reinforced visco-hyperelastic model is provided. The identification of constitutive parameters is performed by a stochastic-deterministic procedure that minimises the discrepancy between experimental and computational results. A preliminary evaluation of parameters is performed by analytical models in order to define reference values. Afterwards, solid models are developed to consider the complex histo-morphometric configuration of samples as a basis for the definition of numerical models. The results obtained are adopted for upgrading parameter values by comparison with specific mechanical tests. Assuming the new parameters set, the final numerical results are compared with the overall set of experimental data, to assess the reliability and efficacy of the analysis developed for the interpretation of the mechanical response of ankle ligaments.

  20. Modern Perspectives on Numerical Modeling of Cardiac Pacemaker Cell

    PubMed Central

    Maltsev, Victor A.; Yaniv, Yael; Maltsev, Anna V.; Stern, Michael D.; Lakatta, Edward G.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac pacemaking is a complex phenomenon that is still not completely understood. Together with experimental studies, numerical modeling has been traditionally used to acquire mechanistic insights in this research area. This review summarizes the present state of numerical modeling of the cardiac pacemaker, including approaches to resolve present paradoxes and controversies. Specifically we discuss the requirement for realistic modeling to consider symmetrical importance of both intracellular and cell membrane processes (within a recent “coupled-clock” theory). Promising future developments of the complex pacemaker system models include the introduction of local calcium control, mitochondria function, and biochemical regulation of protein phosphorylation and cAMP production. Modern numerical and theoretical methods such as multi-parameter sensitivity analyses within extended populations of models and bifurcation analyses are also important for the definition of the most realistic parameters that describe a robust, yet simultaneously flexible operation of the coupled-clock pacemaker cell system. The systems approach to exploring cardiac pacemaker function will guide development of new therapies, such as biological pacemakers for treating insufficient cardiac pacemaker function that becomes especially prevalent with advancing age. PMID:24748434

  1. Numerical Modeling of Plasmas in which Nanoparticles Nucleate and Grow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Pulkit

    Dusty plasmas refer to a broad category of plasmas. Plasmas such as argon-silane plasmas in which particles nucleate and grow are widely used in semiconductor processing and nanoparticle manufacturing. In such dusty plasmas, the plasma and the dust particles are strongly coupled to each other. This means that the presence of dust particles significantly affects the plasma properties and vice versa. Therefore such plasmas are highly complex and they involve several interesting phenomena like nucleation, growth, coagulation, charging and transport. Dusty plasma afterglow is equally complex and important. Especially, residual charge on dust particles carries special significance in several industrial and laboratory situations and it has not been well understood. A 1D numerical model was developed of a low-pressure capacitively-coupled plasma in which nanoparticles nucleate and grow. Polydispersity of particle size distributions can be important in such plasmas. Sectional method, which is well known in aerosol literature, was used to model the evolving particle size and charge distribution. The numerical model is transient and one-dimensional and self consistently accounts for nucleation, growth, coagulation, charging and transport of dust particles and their effect on plasma properties. Nucleation and surface growth rates were treated as input parameters. Results were presented in terms of particle size and charge distribution with an emphasis on importance of polydispersity in particle growth and dynamics. Results of numerical model were compared with experimental measurements of light scattering and light emission from plasma. Reasonable qualitative agreement was found with some discrepancies. Pulsed dusty plasma can be important for controlling particle production and/or unwanted particle deposition. In this case, it is important to understand the behavior of the particle cloud during the afterglow following plasma turn-off. Numerical model was modified to self

  2. Numerical modelling of the shoulder for clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Favre, Philippe; Snedeker, Jess G; Gerber, Christian

    2009-05-28

    Research activity involving numerical models of the shoulder is dramatically increasing, driven by growing rates of injury and the need to better understand shoulder joint pathologies to develop therapeutic strategies. Based on the type of clinical question they can address, existing models can be broadly categorized into three groups: (i) rigid body models that can simulate kinematics, collisions between entities or wrapping of the muscles over the bones, and which have been used to investigate joint kinematics and ergonomics, and are often coupled with (ii) muscle force estimation techniques, consisting mainly of optimization methods and electromyography-driven models, to simulate muscular action and joint reaction forces to address issues in joint stability, muscular rehabilitation or muscle transfer, and (iii) deformable models that account for stress-strain distributions in the component structures to study articular degeneration, implant failure or muscle/tendon/bone integrity. The state of the art in numerical modelling of the shoulder is reviewed, and the advantages, limitations and potential clinical applications of these modelling approaches are critically discussed. This review concentrates primarily on muscle force estimation modelling, with emphasis on a novel muscle recruitment paradigm, compared with traditionally applied optimization methods. Finally, the necessary benchmarks for validating shoulder models, the emerging technologies that will enable further advances and the future challenges in the field are described.

  3. A detailed kinetic modeling study of aromatics formation in laminar premixed acetylene and ethylene flames

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.; Frenklach, M.

    1997-07-01

    A computational study was performed for the formation and growth of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in laminar premixed acetylene and ethylene flames. A new detailed reaction mechanism describing fuel pyrolysis and oxidation, benzene formation, and PAH mass growth and oxidation is presented and critically tested. It is shown that the reaction model predicts reasonably well the concentration profiles of major and intermediate species and aromatic molecules in a number of acetylene and ethylene flames reported in the literature. It is demonstrated that reactions of n-C{sub 4}H{sub x} + C{sub 2}H{sub 2} leading to the formation of one-ring aromatics are as important as the propargyl recombination, and hence must be included in kinetic modeling of PAH formation in hydrocarbon flames. It is further demonstrated that the mass growth of PAHs can be accounted for by the previously proposed H-abstraction-C{sub 2}H{sub 2}-addiction mechanism.

  4. KNOW YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD: A DETAILED MODEL ATMOSPHERE ANALYSIS OF NEARBY WHITE DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Giammichele, N.; Bergeron, P.; Dufour, P. E-mail: pierre.bergeron@astro.umontreal.ca

    2012-04-01

    We present improved atmospheric parameters of nearby white dwarfs lying within 20 pc of the Sun. The aim of the current study is to obtain the best statistical model of the least-biased sample of the white dwarf population. A homogeneous analysis of the local population is performed combining detailed spectroscopic and photometric analyses based on improved model atmosphere calculations for various spectral types including DA, DB, DC, DQ, and DZ stars. The spectroscopic technique is applied to all stars in our sample for which optical spectra are available. Photometric energy distributions, when available, are also combined to trigonometric parallax measurements to derive effective temperatures, stellar radii, as well as atmospheric compositions. A revised catalog of white dwarfs in the solar neighborhood is presented. We provide, for the first time, a comprehensive analysis of the mass distribution and the chemical distribution of white dwarf stars in a volume-limited sample.

  5. A detailed one-dimensional model of combustion of a woody biomass particle.

    PubMed

    Haseli, Y; van Oijen, J A; de Goey, L P H

    2011-10-01

    A detailed one-dimensional model for combustion of a single biomass particle is presented. It accounts for particle heating up, pyrolysis, char gasification and oxidation and gas phase reactions within and in the vicinity of the particle. The biomass pyrolysis is assumed to take place through three competing reactions yielding char, light gas and tar. The model is validated using different sets of experiments reported in the literature. Special emphasis is placed on examination of the effects of pyrolysis kinetic constants and gas phase reactions on the combustion process which have not been thoroughly discussed in previous works. It is shown that depending on the process condition and reactor temperature, correct selection of the pyrolysis kinetic data is a necessary step for simulation of biomass particle conversion. The computer program developed for the purpose of this study enables one to get a deeper insight into the biomass particle combustion process.

  6. An Experimental and Numerical Study of a Supersonic Burner for CFD Model Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magnotti, G.; Cutler, A. D.

    2008-01-01

    A laboratory scale supersonic burner has been developed for validation of computational fluid dynamics models. Detailed numerical simulations were performed for the flow inside the combustor, and coupled with finite element thermal analysis to obtain more accurate outflow conditions. A database of nozzle exit profiles for a wide range of conditions of interest was generated to be used as boundary conditions for simulation of the external jet, or for validation of non-intrusive measurement techniques. A set of experiments was performed to validate the numerical results. In particular, temperature measurements obtained by using an infrared camera show that the computed heat transfer was larger than the measured value. Relaminarization in the convergent part of the nozzle was found to be responsible for this discrepancy, and further numerical simulations sustained this conclusion.

  7. Numerical Modeling of Deep Mantle Flow: Thermochemical Convection and Entrainment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulyukova, Elvira; Steinberger, Bernhard; Dabrowski, Marcin; Sobolev, Stephan

    2013-04-01

    ) upwelling of the ambient material in the vicinity of the dense material (mechanism of selective withdrawal (Lister, 1989)), and (iii) cold downwellings sliding along the bottom boundary, and forcing the dense material upwards. The objective of this study is to compare the efficiency of entrainment by each of these mechanisms, and its dependence on the density and viscosity anomaly of the dense material with respect to the ambient mantle. To perform this study, we have developed a two-dimensional FEM code to model thermal convection in a hollow cylinder domain with presence of chemical heterogeneities, and using a realistic viscosity profile. We present the results of the simulations that demonstrate the entrainment mechanisms described above. In addition, we perfom numerical experiments in a Cartesian box domain, where the bottom right boundary of the box is deformed to resemble the geometry of an LLSVP edge. In some of the experiments, the bottom left part of the boundary is moving towards the right boundary, simulating a slab sliding along the core-mantle boundary towards an LLSVP. These experiments allow a detailed study of the process of entrainment, and its role in the thermochemical evolution of the Earth.

  8. Sensitivity of a numerical wave model on wind re-analysis datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavidas, George; Venugopal, Vengatesan; Friedrich, Daniel

    2017-03-01

    Wind is the dominant process for wave generation. Detailed evaluation of metocean conditions strengthens our understanding of issues concerning potential offshore applications. However, the scarcity of buoys and high cost of monitoring systems pose a barrier to properly defining offshore conditions. Through use of numerical wave models, metocean conditions can be hindcasted and forecasted providing reliable characterisations. This study reports the sensitivity of wind inputs on a numerical wave model for the Scottish region. Two re-analysis wind datasets with different spatio-temporal characteristics are used, the ERA-Interim Re-Analysis and the CFSR-NCEP Re-Analysis dataset. Different wind products alter results, affecting the accuracy obtained. The scope of this study is to assess different available wind databases and provide information concerning the most appropriate wind dataset for the specific region, based on temporal, spatial and geographic terms for wave modelling and offshore applications. Both wind input datasets delivered results from the numerical wave model with good correlation. Wave results by the 1-h dataset have higher peaks and lower biases, in expense of a high scatter index. On the other hand, the 6-h dataset has lower scatter but higher biases. The study shows how wind dataset affects the numerical wave modelling performance, and that depending on location and study needs, different wind inputs should be considered.

  9. Autoignition of toluene reference fuels at high pressures modeled with detailed chemical kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Andrae, J.C.G.; Bjoernbom, P.; Cracknell, R.F.; Kalghatgi, G.T.

    2007-04-15

    A detailed chemical kinetic model for the autoignition of toluene reference fuels (TRF) is presented. The toluene submechanism added to the Lawrence Livermore Primary Reference Fuel (PRF) mechanism was developed using recent shock tube autoignition delay time data under conditions relevant to HCCI combustion. For two-component fuels the model was validated against recent high-pressure shock tube autoignition delay time data for a mixture consisting of 35% n-heptane and 65% toluene by liquid volume. Important features of the autoignition of the mixture proved to be cross-acceleration effects, where hydroperoxy radicals produced during n-heptane oxidation dramatically increased the oxidation rate of toluene compared to the case when toluene alone was oxidized. Rate constants for the reaction of benzyl and hydroperoxyl radicals previously used in the modeling of the oxidation of toluene alone were untenably high for modeling of the mixture. To model both systems it was found necessary to use a lower rate and introduce an additional branching route in the reaction between benzyl radicals and O{sub 2}. Good agreement between experiments and predictions was found when the model was validated against shock tube autoignition delay data for gasoline surrogate fuels consisting of mixtures of 63-69% isooctane, 14-20% toluene, and 17% n-heptane by liquid volume. Cross reactions such as hydrogen abstractions between toluene and alkyl and alkylperoxy radicals and between the PRF were introduced for completion of chemical description. They were only of small importance for modeling autoignition delays from shock tube experiments, even at low temperatures. A single-zone engine model was used to evaluate how well the validated mechanism could capture autoignition behavior of toluene reference fuels in a homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine. The model could qualitatively predict the experiments, except in the case with boosted intake pressure, where the initial

  10. Simulating photon scattering effects in structurally detailed ventricular models using a Monte Carlo approach

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Martin J.; Plank, Gernot

    2014-01-01

    Light scattering during optical imaging of electrical activation within the heart is known to significantly distort the optically-recorded action potential (AP) upstroke, as well as affecting the magnitude of the measured response of ventricular tissue to strong electric shocks. Modeling approaches based on the photon diffusion equation have recently been instrumental in quantifying and helping to understand the origin of the resulting distortion. However, they are unable to faithfully represent regions of non-scattering media, such as small cavities within the myocardium which are filled with perfusate during experiments. Stochastic Monte Carlo (MC) approaches allow simulation and tracking of individual photon “packets” as they propagate through tissue with differing scattering properties. Here, we present a novel application of the MC method of photon scattering simulation, applied for the first time to the simulation of cardiac optical mapping signals within unstructured, tetrahedral, finite element computational ventricular models. The method faithfully allows simulation of optical signals over highly-detailed, anatomically-complex MR-based models, including representations of fine-scale anatomy and intramural cavities. We show that optical action potential upstroke is prolonged close to large subepicardial vessels than further away from vessels, at times having a distinct “humped” morphology. Furthermore, we uncover a novel mechanism by which photon scattering effects around vessels cavities interact with “virtual-electrode” regions of strong de-/hyper-polarized tissue surrounding cavities during shocks, significantly reducing the apparent optically-measured epicardial polarization. We therefore demonstrate the importance of this novel optical mapping simulation approach along with highly anatomically-detailed models to fully investigate electrophysiological phenomena driven by fine-scale structural heterogeneity. PMID:25309442

  11. Simulating photon scattering effects in structurally detailed ventricular models using a Monte Carlo approach.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Martin J; Plank, Gernot

    2014-01-01

    Light scattering during optical imaging of electrical activation within the heart is known to significantly distort the optica