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Sample records for detailed plasma potential

  1. Detailed plasma potential measurements in a radio-frequency expanding plasma obtained from various electrostatic probes

    SciTech Connect

    Lafleur, T.; Charles, C.; Boswell, R. W.

    2009-04-15

    On-axis plasma potential measurements have been made with an emissive probe in a low pressure (0.044 Pa) rf expanding plasma containing an ion beam. The beam is detected with a retarding field energy analyzer (RFEA), and is seen to disappear at high pressure (0.39 Pa). The emissive probe measurements are in very good agreement with corresponding measurements made with two separate RFEAs, and the results indicate that the floating potential of the strongly emitting probe gives an accurate measure of the plasma potential under the present conditions.

  2. 24. DETAIL INTERIOR VIEW OF GENERATOR BUS POTENTIAL FOR UNIT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. DETAIL INTERIOR VIEW OF GENERATOR BUS POTENTIAL FOR UNIT NO 1 IN BUS CELL GALLERY ON LEVEL +77 OF POWERHOUSE #1. - Bonneville Project, Powerhouse No.1, Spanning Bradford Slough, from Bradford Island, Bonneville, Multnomah County, OR

  3. Plasmas: Diversity, pervasiveness and potential

    SciTech Connect

    Eastman, Timothy E.

    1998-01-01

    When considered inclusively, plasma science and technology encompass immense diversity, pervasiveness and potential: diversity through numerous topical areas (see list of nearly 200 in Table II); pervasiveness with examples covering the full range of energy, time and spatial scale; and potential through innumerable current and future applications.

  4. The onset of plasma potential locking

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, Matthew M.; Yee, Benjamin T.; Baalrud, Scott D.; Barnat, Edward V.

    2016-06-22

    In this study, we provide insight into the role and impact that a positively biased electrode (anode) has on bulk plasma potential. Using two-dimensional Particle-in-Cell simulations, we investigate the plasma potential as an anode transitions from very small (“probe” mode) to large (“locking” mode). Prior theory provides some guidance on when and how this transition takes place. Initial experimental results are also compared. The simulations demonstrate that as the surface area of the anode is increased transitions in plasma potential and sheath polarity occur, consistent with experimental observations and theoretical predictions. It is expected that understanding this basic plasma behavior will be of interest to basic plasma physics communities, diagnostic developers, and plasma processing devices where control of bulk plasma potential is important.

  5. The onset of plasma potential locking

    DOE PAGES

    Hopkins, Matthew M.; Yee, Benjamin T.; Baalrud, Scott D.; ...

    2016-06-22

    In this study, we provide insight into the role and impact that a positively biased electrode (anode) has on bulk plasma potential. Using two-dimensional Particle-in-Cell simulations, we investigate the plasma potential as an anode transitions from very small (“probe” mode) to large (“locking” mode). Prior theory provides some guidance on when and how this transition takes place. Initial experimental results are also compared. The simulations demonstrate that as the surface area of the anode is increased transitions in plasma potential and sheath polarity occur, consistent with experimental observations and theoretical predictions. It is expected that understanding this basic plasma behaviormore » will be of interest to basic plasma physics communities, diagnostic developers, and plasma processing devices where control of bulk plasma potential is important.« less

  6. Modified Debye screening potential in a magnetized quantum plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salimullah, M.; Hussain, A.; Sara, I.; Murtaza, G.; Shah, H. A.

    2009-07-01

    The effects of quantum mechanical influence and uniform static magnetic field on the Shukla-Nambu-Salimullah potential in an ultracold homogeneous electron-ion Fermi plasma have been examined in detail. It is noticed that the strong quantum effect arising through the Bohm potential and the ion polarization effect can give rise to a new oscillatory behavior of the screening potential beyond the shielding cloud which could explain a new type of possible robust ordered structure formation in the quantum magnetoplasma. However, the magnetic field enhances the Debye length perpendicular to the magnetic field in the weak quantum limit of the quantum plasma.

  7. Studies of particle wake potentials in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Ian N.; Graziani, Frank R.; Glosli, James N.; Strozzi, David J.; Surh, Michael P.; Richards, David F.; Decyk, Viktor K.; Mori, Warren B.

    2011-09-01

    A detailed understanding of electron stopping and scattering in plasmas with variable values for the number of particles within a Debye sphere is still not at hand. Presently, there is some disagreement in the literature concerning the proper description of these processes. Theoretical models assume electrostatic (Coulomb force) interactions between particles and neglect magnetic effects. Developing and validating proper descriptions requires studying the processes using first-principle plasma simulations. We are using the particle-particle particle-mesh (PPPM) code ddcMD and the particle-in-cell (PIC) code BEPS to perform these simulations. As a starting point in our study, we examine the wake of a particle passing through a plasma in 3D electrostatic simulations performed with ddcMD and BEPS. In this paper, we compare the wakes observed in these simulations with each other and predictions from collisionless kinetic theory. The relevance of the work to Fast Ignition is discussed.

  8. Ionization Potential Depression in Strongly Coupled Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wark, Justin; Ciricosta, Orlando; Vinko, Sam; Crowley, Basil

    2013-10-01

    The focusing of the output of 4th generation femtosecond X-ray sources to ultra-high intensities has enabled the creation of hot (close to 200-eV) aluminum plasmas at exactly solid density. Tuning of the X-ray FEL energy that produces the plasma, and observation of the subsequent K- α fluorescence from the highly charged ions allows direct measurements of the K-edges, and hence ionization potential depression (IPD). The results of these experiments show far higher depressions than those predicted by the frequently-used Stewart-Pyatt model, but appear to be in contradiction with laser-plasma experimental data at similar densities, but with hotter, less strongly-coupled plasmas. We present here new calculations of the IPD, both ab initio and analytic, and discuss the relevance of the coupling parameter to the IPD. We further explore what constitutes our understanding of the physics of IPD, and how it should be modelled.

  9. Simulation of plasma discharge in liquids: A detailed two-phase fluid approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charchi Aghdam, Ali; Farouk, Tanvir; Reacting Systems; Advanced Energy Research Laboratory Team

    2015-09-01

    Plasma discharge in liquids has gained great attention recently due to its applications in biomedical engineering, fuel processing, and water treatment and so on. Despite the tremendous interest, a comprehensive understanding of the underlying physics still remains limited. In the current work, an attempt is made to present a mathematical multi-physics model to describe the discharge of plasma in liquids. An in-house modeling platform is developed for simulating plasma formation in multiphase fluids. The model resolves a detailed two-phase fluid including viscous effects, surface tension, gravitational forces and electrical body force. All the governing equations are solved for gas and liquid phases. Electric field and charged species equations along with the plasma reaction kinetics are solved to get the charge distribution in the different phases as well as at the gas-liquid interface to obtain the electric body force acting at the interface. By coupling the above sub-models, a comprehensive multi-physics model for plasma discharge in liquids is constructed which is able to capture several physical aspects of the phenomena especially the role of the bubble, its motion and distortion on plasma characteristics.

  10. Control of laser-ablation plasma potential with external electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Isono, Fumika Nakajima, Mitsuo; Hasegawa, Jun; Kawamura, Tohru; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2015-08-15

    The potential of a laser-ablation plasma was controlled stably up to +2 kV by using external ring electrodes. A stable electron sheath was formed between the plasma and the external electrodes by placing the ring electrodes away from the boundary of the drifting plasma. The plasma kept the potential for a few μs regardless of the flux change of the ablation plasma. We also found that the plasma potential changed with the expansion angle of the plasma from the target. By changing the distance between the plasma boundary and the external electrodes, we succeeded in controlling the potential of laser-ablation plasma.

  11. Detailed energy distributions in laser-produced plasmas of solid gold and foam gold planar targets

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Yunsong; Zhang, Lu; Yang, Jiamin; Shang, Wanli

    2013-12-15

    Foam gold was proposed to increase the laser to x-ray conversion efficiency due to its important applications. To understand the mechanism of x-ray enhancement, the detailed energy distributions and plasma profiles for laser-irradiated solid gold and foam gold targets were studied comparatively by hydrodynamic simulations using the code Multi-1D. It is confirmed that the radiation heat wave is subsonic for the normal solid gold target, while supersonic for the foam gold target. The shock wave, which is behind the supersonic radiation heat wave for the foam gold target, generates a plasma temperature gradient with high temperature near the shock wave front to produce an additional net outward radiation for enhancement of the x-ray emission. Much larger inward plasma velocity is also driven by the shock wave as an initial plasma velocity for the laser deposition and electron thermal conduct zone, which decreases the expanding plasma kinetic energy loss and helps to increase the x-ray radiation.

  12. Plasma source for spacecraft potential control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    A stable electrical ground which enables the particle spectrometers to measure the low energy particle populations was investigated and the current required to neutralize the spacecraft was measured. In addition, the plasma source for potential control (PSPO C) prevents high charging events which could affect the spacecraft electrical integrity. The plasma source must be able to emit a plasma current large enough to balance the sum of all other currents to the spacecraft. In ion thrusters, hollow cathodes provide several amperes of electron current to the discharge chamber. The PSPO C is capable of balancing the net negative currents found in eclipse charging events producing 10 to 100 microamps of electron current. The largest current required is the ion current necessary to balance the total photoelectric current.

  13. Detailed analysis of low energy plasma data under the Voyager Uranus data analysis program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnutt, Ralph L., Jr.; Belcher, John W.; Bagenal, Frances; Richardson, John D.

    1992-01-01

    Research effort included the PLS data analysis program where modifications to the data fitting procedure and elimination of possible noise and electron contamination were made. The analysis code corrections were used in checking the Neptune data gathered during the Voyager 2 encounter and for analyzing selected plasma spectra from the warm Io torus. A major task accomplished was the summary of Uranus-related research in the U.S. National Report to the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics for the 1987 - 1990 quadrennium. A limited amount of work was accomplished on assessing the Pedersen conductivity of the ionosphere and comparing it with inferred values from shielding by the Uranian ring current. Under this grant there has been a great deal of effort expended on identifying and classifying plasma waves and oscillations in the magnetosheath and solar wind downstream from Uranus. Large amplitude oscillations in plasma parameters are found in the magnetosheath, with density changes of up to a factor of ten occurring on times scales of minutes. New algorithms developed for analyzing the inbound bow shock crossing of Neptune will probably be applied to a more detailed analysis of the Uranus shock in the near future.

  14. Studies of Particle Wake Potentials in Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Ian; Graziani, Frank; Glosli, James; Strozzi, David; Surh, Michael; Richards, David; Decyk, Viktor; Mori, Warren

    2011-10-01

    Fast Ignition studies require a detailed understanding of electron scattering, stopping, and energy deposition in plasmas with variable values for the number of particles within a Debye sphere. Presently there is disagreement in the literature concerning the proper description of these processes. Developing and validating proper descriptions requires studying the processes using first-principle electrostatic simulations and possibly including magnetic fields. We are using the particle-particle particle-mesh (PPPM) code ddcMD and the particle-in-cell (PIC) code BEPS to perform these simulations. As a starting point in our study, we examine the wake of a particle passing through a plasma in 3D electrostatic simulations performed with ddcMD and with BEPS using various cell sizes. In this poster, we compare the wakes we observe in these simulations with each other and predictions from Vlasov theory. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and by UCLA under Grant DE-FG52-09NA29552.

  15. Radiative opacities and configuration interaction effects of hot iron plasma using a detailed term accounting model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Fengtao; Zeng, Jiaolong; Yuan, Jianmin

    2003-12-01

    We have calculated the radiative opacities of iron plasma in local thermodynamic equilibrium using a detailed term accounting model. The extensive atomic data are obtained by multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock (MCHF) method, with Breit-Pauli relativistic corrections. Extensive configuration interaction (CI) has been included based on LS coupling to obtain energy levels and the bound-bound transition cross sections. A detailed configuration accounting model is applied to evaluate the bound-free absorption cross sections. We simulate two experimental transmission spectra [G. Winhart et al., Phys. Rev. E 53, R1332 (1996); P. T. Springer et al., J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transf. 58, 927 (1997)] to verify our calculation model, one is at a temperature of 22 eV and a density of 10-2 g/cm3 and the other is at a temperature of 20 eV and a lower density of 10-4 g/cm3. It is shown that the strong CI can effectively change the oscillator strengths in contrast to the single configuration HF method. For both of the two simulated transmission spectra good agreement is obtained between the present MCHF results and the experimental data. Spectrally resolved opacities and Planck and Rosseland mean opacities are also calculated. For the isothermal sequence of T=20 eV, when the density decreases from 10-2 to 10-5 g/cm3, the linewidth also decreases so that the iron transition arrays show more discrete line structures and the linewidth becomes very important to the Rosseland mean opacity.

  16. Density and potential measurements in an intense ion-beam-generated plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Abt, N.E.

    1982-05-01

    Neutral beams are created by intense large area ion beams which are neutralized in a gas cell. The interaction of the beam with the gas cell creates a plasma. Such a plasma is studied here. The basic plasma parameters, electron temperature, density, and plasma potential, are measured as a function of beam current and neutral gas pressure. These measurements are compared to a model based on the solution of Poisson's equation. Because of the cylindrical geometry the equation cannot be solved analytically. Details of the numerical method are presented.

  17. Parameters influencing plasma column potential in a reflex discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liziakin, G. D.; Gavrikov, A. V.; Murzaev, Y. A.; Usmanov, R. A.; Smirnov, V. P.

    2016-12-01

    Distribution of electrostatic potential in direct current reflex discharge plasma has been studied experimentally. Measurements have been conducted by the single floating probe method. The influence of 0-0.2 T magnetic field, 1-200 mTorr pressure, 0-2 kV discharge voltage, and electrodes geometry on plasma column electrostatic potential was investigated. The possibility for the formation of a preset potential profile required for the realization of plasma separation of spent nuclear fuel was demonstrated.

  18. Edge ambipolar potential in toroidal fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Spizzo, G. Vianello, N.; Agostini, M.; Puiatti, M. E.; Scarin, P.; Spolaore, M.; Terranova, D.; White, R. B.; Abdullaev, S. S.; Schmitz, O.; Cavazzana, R.; Ciaccio, G.

    2014-05-15

    A series of issues with toroidally confined fusion plasmas are related to the generation of 3D flow patterns by means of edge magnetic islands, embedded in a chaotic field and interacting with the wall. These issues include the Greenwald limit in Tokamaks and reversed-field pinches, the collisionality window for ELM mitigation with the resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) in Tokamaks, and edge islands interacting with the bootstrap current in stellarators. Measurements of the 2D map of the edge electric field E{sup r}(r=a,θ,ϕ) in the RFX reversed-field pinch show that E{sup r} has the same helicity of the magnetic islands generated by a m/n perturbation: in fact, defining the helical angle u=mθ−nϕ+ωt, maps show a sinusoidal dependence as a function of u, E{sup r}=E{sup ~r}sin u. The associated E × B flow displays a huge convective cell with v(a)≠0 which, in RFX and near the Greenwald limit, determines a stagnation point for density and a reversal of the sign of E{sup r}. From a theoretical point of view, the question is how a perturbed toroidal flux of symmetry m/n gives rise to an ambipolar potential Φ=Φ{sup ~}sin u. On the basis of a model developed with the guiding center code ORBIT and applied to RFX and the TEXTOR tokamak, we will show that the presence of an m/n perturbation in any kind of device breaks the toroidal symmetry with a drift proportional to the gyroradius ρ, thus larger for ions (ρ{sub i} ≫ ρ{sub e}). Immediately, an ambipolar potential arises to balance the drifts, with the same symmetry as the original perturbation.

  19. Detailed Analysis Case Studies of Trapped Plasmas at the Earth’s Magnetic Equator

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-01

    5 Figure 2. Plasma Density L Dependance ...... ......... 7 Figure 3. Plasmapause Magnetic Activity Dependance . . 8 Figure 4. Plasma Density L... Dependance - Normalized . . 10 Figure 5. The Dusk Bulge . . . .............. 13 Figure 6. Magnetosphere’s Electric and Magnetic Fields 14 Figure 7...1970). 6 -. ~ .ZJ.:AUGUST 12,1968 . -. ----- OUTBOUND PASS - 2 3 4 5 ___ ... 7....9 L Figure 2. Plasma Density L Dependance 7 0D3 #n /2 OUT JND tN

  20. Detailed computational procedure for design of cascade blades with prescribed velocity distributions in compressible potential flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costello, George R; Cummings, Robert L; Sinnette, John T , Jr

    1952-01-01

    A detailed step-by-step computational outline is presented for the design of two-dimensional cascade blades having a prescribed velocity distribution on the blade in a potential flow of the usual compressible fluid. The outline is based on the assumption that the magnitude of the velocity in the flow of the usual compressible nonviscous fluid is proportional to the magnitude of the velocity in the flow of a compressible nonviscous fluid with linear pressure-volume relation.

  1. Potential applications of an electron cyclotron resonance multicusp plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, C.C.; Berry, L.A.; Gorbatkin, S.M.; Haselton, H.H.; Roberto, J.B.; Stirling, W.L.

    1989-01-01

    An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) multicusp plasmatron has been developed by feeding a multicusp bucket arc chamber with a compact ECR plasma source. This novel source produced large (about 25-cm-diam), uniform (to within {plus minus}10%), dense (>10{sup 11}-cm{sup -3}) plasmas of argon, helium, hydrogen, and oxygen. It has been operated to produce an oxygen plasma for etching 12.7-cm (5-in.) positive photoresist-coated silicon wafers with uniformity within {plus minus}8%. Results and potential applications of this new ECR plasma source for plasma processing of thin films are discussed. 21 refs., 10 figs.

  2. Strongly Emitting Surfaces Unable to Float below Plasma Potential

    DOE PAGES

    Campanell, M. D.; Umansky, M. V.

    2016-02-25

    One important unresolved question in plasma physics concerns the effect of strong electron emission on plasma-surface interactions. Previous papers reported solutions with negative and positive floating potentials relative to the plasma edge. For these two models a very different predictions for particle and energy balance is given. Here we show that the positive potential state is the only possible equilibrium in general. Even if a negative floating potential existed at t=0, the ionization collisions near the surface will force a transition to the positive floating potential state. Moreover, this transition is demonstrated with a new simulation code.

  3. Plasma focus: Present status and potential applications

    SciTech Connect

    Brzosko, J.S.; Nardi, V.; Powell, C.

    1997-12-01

    Initially, dense plasma focus (DPF) machines were constructed independently by Filippov in Moscow and Mather in Los Alamos at the end of the 1950s. Since then, more than 30 laboratories have carried vigorous DPF programs, oriented mainly toward the studies of physics of ion acceleration and trapping in the plasma focus environment. Applications of the DPF as intense neutron and X-ray sources have been recognized since its discovery but not implemented for various reasons. Recently, some groups (including AES) addressed the issue of DPF applications, and some of them are briefly discussed in this paper.

  4. Pair-potential approximations for many-body plasma physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marciante, M.; Stanton, L. G.; Murillo, M. S.

    2016-10-01

    Predicting properties of dense plasmas across wide parameters regimes requires the numerical solution of a many-body dynamical system whose properties depend on various underlying quantum processes. For this reason, high fidelity physics codes (e.g. DFT (orbital-free or Kohn-Sham), classical-map HNC and path integral MC) yield accurate information about the microphysical properties of dense matter. However, their computational cost restricts the simulations to a few tens to few hundreds of ions. To simulate larger systems while retaining an accurate kinetic description of ions, classical MD simulations make use of quantum-effective pair-potentials between the ions. Such potentials involve a small set of parameters, whose values are obtained from DFT calculations, and allow to simulate multi-species systems at much lower computational cost. In these models, bound electrons are usually approximated by an effective charge and free electrons are described as a continuous density. We have undertaken a detailed comparison of our DFT-informed pair-potentials, with results from higher-fidelity physics codes, including g(r), VACF Z(t), and interdiffusion coefficients, in order to determine the physical regimes in which the simpler accurate and very large-scale simulations are possible. Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  5. The Potential for Ambient Plasma Wave Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilland, James H.; Williams, George J.

    2016-01-01

    A truly robust space exploration program will need to make use of in-situ resources as much as possible to make the endeavor affordable. Most space propulsion concepts are saddled with one fundamental burden; the propellant needed to produce momentum. The most advanced propulsion systems currently in use utilize electric and/or magnetic fields to accelerate ionized propellant. However, significant planetary exploration missions in the coming decades, such as the now canceled Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter, are restricted by propellant mass and propulsion system lifetimes, using even the most optimistic projections of performance. These electric propulsion vehicles are inherently limited in flexibility at their final destination, due to propulsion system wear, propellant requirements, and the relatively low acceleration of the vehicle. A few concepts are able to utilize the environment around them to produce thrust: Solar or magnetic sails and, with certain restrictions, electrodynamic tethers. These concepts focus primarily on using the solar wind or ambient magnetic fields to generate thrust. Technically immature, quasi-propellantless alternatives lack either the sensitivity or the power to provide significant maneuvering. An additional resource to be considered is the ambient plasma and magnetic fields in solar and planetary magnetospheres. These environments, such as those around the Sun or Jupiter, have been shown to host a variety of plasma waves. Plasma wave propulsion takes advantage of an observed astrophysical and terrestrial phenomenon: Alfven waves. These are waves that propagate in the plasma and magnetic fields around and between planets and stars. The generation of Alfven waves in ambient magnetic and plasma fields to generate thrust is proposed as a truly propellantless propulsion system which may enable an entirely new matrix of exploration missions. Alfven waves are well known, transverse electromagnetic waves that propagate in magnetized plasmas at

  6. Plasma potential measurement using centre tapped emissive probe (CTEP) in laboratory plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanyasi, A. K.; Srivastava, P. K.; Awasthi, L. M.

    2017-04-01

    Plasma potential measurements using a compensated center tapped emissive probe (CTEP) in quiescent plasma ({{n}\\text{e}}∼ 6.0× {{10}11} \\text{c}{{\\text{m}}-3}, {{T}\\text{e}}∼ 3.5 \\text{eV} ) of large volume plasma device (LVPD) are presented. The CTEP shows distinct advantage over conventional emissive probe (CEP) because of measurement capability, independent of electronics and operating conditions of CEP. Its ability of measuring continuous, uninterrupted plasma potential (DC and fluctuations) measurements for pulsed and DC plasma discharges gives it advantage over other configurations. Also, its push fit design allows easy replacement without realizing frequent vacuum breaks. In small sized plasma devices, CTEP design may introduce some spatial resolution error but for large plasma devices, this is negligible as voluminous data is required over large scale lengths (~few tens of cm).

  7. Detailed Characterization of Electron Plasma Waves Produced by Stimulated Raman Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Renard, N.; Labaune, C.; Baldis, H.A.; Bauer, B.S.; Quesnel, B.; Schifano, E.; Michard, A.; Seka, W.; Estabrook, K.G.

    1996-10-01

    Time-resolved spectra and location of electron plasma waves (EPW) produced by stimulated Raman scattering in back and in side directions have been measured using Thomson scattering of a short wavelength probe beam. Significant Raman sidescattering was observed for angles as large as 40{degree} from the laser axis. The Raman growth is larger and starts earlier in the front part of the density profile than at the summit. Simultaneous measurements at multiple places in the plasma provided an indication of the coherence length of the EPW. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  8. Detailed Hydrodynamic and X-Ray Spectroscopic Analysis of a Laser-Produced Rapidly-Expanding Aluminum Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, D M; Glenzer, S H; Hawreliak, J; Wolfrum, E; Gouveia, A; Lee, R W; Marjoribanks, R S; Renner, O; Sondhauss, P; Topping, S; Young, P E; Pinto, P A; Wark, J S

    2001-04-03

    We present a detailed analysis of K-shell emission from laser-produced rapidly-expanding aluminum plasmas. This work forms part of a series of experiments performed at the Vulcan laser facility of the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, UK. 1-D planar expansion was obtained by over-illuminating Al-microdot targets supported on CH plastic foils. The small size of the Al-plasma ensured high spatial and frequency resolution of the spectra, obtained with a single crystal spectrometer, two vertical dispersion variant double crystal spectrometers, and a vertical dispersion variant Johann Spectrometer. The hydrodynamic properties of the plasma were measured independently by spatially and temporally resolved Thomson scattering, utilizing a 4{omega} probe beam. This enabled sub- and super- critical densities to be probed relative to the 1{omega} heater beams. The deduced plasma hydrodynamic conditions are compared with those generated from the 1-D hydro-code Medusa, and the significant differences found in the electron temperature discussed. Synthetic spectra generated from the detailed term collisional radiative non-LTE atomic physics code Fly are compared with the experimental spectra for the measured hydrodynamic parameters, and for those taken from Medusa. Excellent agreement is only found for both the H- and He-like Al series when careful account is taken of the temporal evolution of the electron temperature.

  9. Detailed study of the plasma-activated catalytic generation of ammonia in N2-H2 plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Helden, J. H.; Wagemans, W.; Yagci, G.; Zijlmans, R. A. B.; Schram, D. C.; Engeln, R.; Lombardi, G.; Stancu, G. D.; Röpcke, J.

    2007-02-01

    We investigated the efficiency and formation mechanism of ammonia generation in recombining plasmas generated from mixtures of N2 and H2 under various plasma conditions. In contrast to the Haber-Bosch process, in which the molecules are dissociated on a catalytic surface, under these plasma conditions the precursor molecules, N2 and H2, are already dissociated in the gas phase. Surfaces are thus exposed to large fluxes of atomic N and H radicals. The ammonia production turns out to be strongly dependent on the fluxes of atomic N and H radicals to the surface. By optimizing the atomic N and H fluxes to the surface using an atomic nitrogen and hydrogen source ammonia can be formed efficiently, i.e., more than 10% of the total background pressure is measured to be ammonia. The results obtained show a strong similarity with results reported in literature, which were explained by the production of ammonia at the surface by stepwise addition reactions between adsorbed nitrogen and hydrogen containing radicals at the surface and incoming N and H containing radicals. Furthermore, our results indicate that the ammonia production is independent of wall material. The high fluxes of N and H radicals in our experiments result in a passivated surface, and the actual chemistry, leading to the formation of ammonia, takes place in an additional layer on top of this passivated surface.

  10. Negative plasma potential relative to electron-emitting surfaces.

    PubMed

    Campanell, M D

    2013-09-01

    Most works on plasma-wall interaction predict that with strong electron emission, a nonmonotonic "space-charge-limited" (SCL) sheath forms where the plasma potential is positive relative to the wall. We show that a fundamentally different sheath structure is possible where the potential monotonically increases toward a positively charged wall that is shielded by a single layer of negative charge. No ion-accelerating presheath exists in the plasma and the ion wall flux is zero. An analytical solution of the "inverse sheath" regime is demonstrated for a general plasma-wall system where the plasma electrons and emitted electrons are Maxwellian with different temperatures. Implications of the inverse sheath effect are that (a) the plasma potential is negative, (b) ion sputtering vanishes, (c) no charge is lost at the wall, and (d) the electron energy flux is thermal. To test empirically what type of sheath structure forms under strong emission, a full plasma bounded by strongly emitting walls is simulated. It is found that inverse sheaths form at the walls and ions are confined in the plasma. This result differs from past particle-in-cell simulation studies of emission which contain an artificial "source sheath" that accelerates ions to the wall, leading to a SCL sheath at high emission intensity.

  11. Effect of Plasma on the Zeta Potential of Cotton Fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashidi, A.; Shahidi, S.; Ghoranneviss, M.; Dalalsharifi, S.; Wiener, J.

    2013-05-01

    In this work, the effect of a low-temperature plasma on the zeta potential of cotton fabric was studied. The silver particle absorption on cotton fabric when modified by a low-temperature plasma was also investigated. The modification consisted of plasma pre-functionalization followed by a one-step wet treatment with silver nitrate solution. The process was performed in a low-temperature plasma medium, using a magnetron sputtering device. Oxygen and nitrogen were used as working gases in the system, and the results were compared. After preparing the samples, the zeta potentials of the untreated and plasma-treated cotton under a constant pH value solution were estimated and compared. Also, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to examine the functional groups of the corresponding samples. The amounts of silver absorption on plasma treated and untreated cotton were examined using the energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) method. The results show that the amount of zeta potential for the nitrogen plasma treated sample is less and the absorption of silver particles by cotton can be increased strongly with nitrogen plasma treatment.

  12. Solitary potential in a four-component dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sayed, Fatema; Mamun, A. A.

    2007-01-15

    A four-component dusty plasma consisting of electrons, ions, and negative as well as positive dust particles has been considered. The basic properties of small but finite amplitude solitary potential structures that may exist in such a four-component dusty plasma have been investigated theoretically by the reductive perturbation method. It has been found that the presence of additional positive dust component has significantly modified the basic properties of solitary potential structures in a dusty plasma. The implications of our results in different regions of space (viz., cometary tails, mesosphere, Jupiter's magnetosphere, etc.) are discussed briefly.

  13. Status and potential of atmospheric plasma processing of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pappas, Daphne

    2011-03-15

    This paper is a review of the current status and potential of atmospheric plasma technology for materials processing. The main focus is the recent developments in the area of dielectric barrier discharges with emphasis in the functionalization of polymers, deposition of organic and inorganic coatings, and plasma processing of biomaterials. A brief overview of both the equipment being used and the physicochemical reactions occurring in the gas phase is also presented. Atmospheric plasma technology offers major industrial, economic, and environmental advantages over other conventional processing methods. At the same time there is also tremendous potential for future research and applications involving both the industrial and academic world.

  14. Detailed beam and plasma measurements on the vessel for extraction and source plasma analyses (VESPA) Penning H- ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrie, S. R.; Faircloth, D. C.; Letchford, A. P.; Whitehead, M. O.; Wood, T.

    2016-02-01

    A vessel for extraction and source plasma analyses (VESPA) is operational at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL). This project supports and guides the overall ion source R&D effort for the ISIS spallation neutron and muon facility at RAL. The VESPA produces 100 mA of pulsed H- beam, but perveance scans indicate that the source is production-limited at extraction voltages above 12 kV unless the arc current is increased. A high resolution optical monochromator is used to measure plasma properties using argon as a diagnostic gas. The atomic hydrogen temperature increases linearly with arc current, up to 2.8 eV for 50 A; whereas the electron temperature has a slight linear decrease toward 2.2 eV. The gas density is 1021 m-3, whilst the electron density is two orders of magnitude lower. Densities follow square root relationships with arc current, with gas density decreasing whilst electron (and hence ion) density increases. Stopping and range of ions in matter calculations prove that operating a high current arc with an argon admixture is extremely difficult because cathode-coated cesium is heavily sputtered by argon.

  15. Probable excursions in Alaskan loess deposits and potential for detailed correlations and chronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, B. J.; Evans, M. E.; Kravchinsky, V. A.; Froese, D. G.

    2011-12-01

    As part of a larger study to refine the chronology of paleoenvironmental records in Alaskan loess deposits, the type section for the Gold Hill loess was sampled at 5 cm intervals for detailed paleomagnetic investigations. We sampled from the level of the Jaramillo Subchron (~21 m from the base of the exposure) through the Holocene (~51 m). Initial results indicate the presence of several pronounced directional perturbations that may record excursions of the geomagnetic field. A perturbation found in association with an organic-rich unit at 48 m is likely of late Pleistocene age and a candidate for the Laschamp excursion. An additional perturbation is present above the VT tephra (106±10 ka; ~44 m). This event is also present at the nearby Halfway House site in a similar stratigraphic context. This interval is a good candidate for the post-Blake event that has recently been dated at 106±14 ka and 104±2 ka by Singer et al. (2011). A tephra bed below this level indicates the presence of a significant unconformity and the excursion recorded below this at ~41 m is unidentified, but is likely between MIS 9 and late MIS 8 in age. From the GI tephra (560±80 ka; ~35 m) to the Bruhnes-Matuyama boundary (~25.5 m), we observe variations in the field, but these are relatively small. Lastly, between the Bruhnes-Matuyama boundary and the Jaramillo Subchron we have identified the Kamikatsura event (900.3±4.7 ka). These findings suggest that Alaskan loess may turn out to be an excellent recorder of geomagnetic field behaviour, the details of which offer significant potential for high-resolution correlations and chronology.

  16. Floating potential measurements in plasmas: From dust to spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beadles, R.; Wang, X.; Horányi, M.

    2017-02-01

    We present measurements of the floating potential of spherical probes, used as a model of a dust particle or a spacecraft, immersed in plasmas with a wide range of Debye lengths. Our experimental results verified the theoretical prediction that the probe floating potential is a function of the Debye length. It is shown that, in an argon plasma with the ion to electron temperature ratio ˜0.01, the magnitude of the floating potential is approximately doubled when the Debye length is changed from larger to smaller than the radius of the probe.

  17. Ionization potential depression for non equilibrated aluminum plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calisti, A.; Ferri, S.; Talin, B.

    2015-11-01

    A classical molecular dynamics simulation model, designed to simulate neutral plasmas with various charge states of a given atom together with electrons, is used to investigate the ionization potential depression (IPD) in dense plasmas. The IPD is discussed for aluminum plasma at and out of equilibrium. The simulation results are compared with those of earlier theoretical models and with experimental data obtained in the framework of x-ray free-electron laser experiments. The model proposed in this work appears as an important tool to provide data for further discussion on IPD models.

  18. Interaction potential of microparticles in a plasma: role of collisions with plasma particles.

    PubMed

    Khrapak, S A; Ivlev, A V; Morfill, G

    2001-10-01

    The interaction potential of two charged microparticles in a plasma is studied. Violation of the plasma equilibrium around the dust particles due to plasma-particle inelastic collisions results in three effects: long-range (non-Yukawa) electrostatic repulsion, attraction due to ion shadowing, and attraction or repulsion due to neutral shadowing (depending on the sign of the temperature difference between the particle surface and neutral gas). An analytical expression for the total potential is obtained and compared with previous theoretical results. The relative contribution of these effects is studied in two limiting cases-an isotropic bulk plasma and the plasma sheath region. The results obtained are compared with existing experimental results on pair particle interaction. The possibility of the so-called dust molecule formation is discussed.

  19. The potential distribution in the Radial Plasma Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fruchtman, Amnon; Makrinich, Gennady

    2011-10-01

    The Radial Plasma Source (RPS) is based on plasma acceleration by an applied voltage across a magnetic field. Here we report the recent progress in understanding the mechanism of plasma acceleration in the RPS. The RPS has a cylindrical symmetry. The accelerating electric field is radial and the magnetic field is axial. Most of the potential drop between the inner anode and the outer cathode is expected to be located where the magnetic field intensity is large. We employ an emissive probe and a Langmuir probe in order to evaluate the radial dependence of the potential. For inferring the plasma potential from the measured emissive probe potential, we employ our recently developed theory for a cylindrical emissive probe. Using the theory and the probe measurements, we plot the radial profiles in the RPS of the plasma potential as well as of the electron density and temperature. The possible modification of the geometry for propulsion applications will be discussed. Partially supported by the Israel Science Foundation, Grant 864/07.

  20. Transient plasma potential in pulsed dual frequency inductively coupled plasmas and effect of substrate biasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Anurag; Yeom, Geun Young

    2016-09-01

    An electron emitting probe in saturated floating potential mode has been used to investigate the temporal evolution of plasma potential and the effect of substrate RF biasing on it for pulsed dual frequency (2 MHz/13.56 MHz) inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source. The low frequency power (P2MHz) has been pulsed at 1 KHz and a duty ratio of 50%, while high frequency power (P13.56MHz) has been used in continuous mode. The substrate has been biased with a separate bias power at (P12.56MHz) Argon has been used as a discharge gas. During the ICP power pulsing, three distinct regions in a typical plasma potential profile, have been identified as `initial overshoot', pulse `on-phase' and pulse `off-phase'. It has been found out that the RF biasing of the substrate significantly modulates the temporal evolution of the plasma potential. During the initial overshoot, plasma potential decreases with increasing RF biasing of the substrate, however it increases with increasing substrate biasing for pulse `on-phase' and `off-phase'. An interesting structure in plasma potential profile has also been observed when the substrate bias is applied and its evolution depends upon the magnitude of bias power. The reason of the evolution of this structure may be the ambipolar diffusion of electron and its dependence on bias power.

  1. SNS potential with exchange field in quantum dusty plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeba, I.; Batool, Maryam; Khan, Arroj A.; Jamil, M.; Rozina, Ch

    2017-02-01

    The shielding potential of a static test charge is studied in quantum dusty plasmas. The plasma system consisting upon electrons, ions and negatively static charged dust species, is embedded in an ambient magnetic field. The modified equation of dispersion is derived using quantum hydrodynamic model (QHD) for magnetized plasmas. The quantum effects are inculcated through Fermi degenerate pressure, tunneling effect and exchange-correlation effects. The study of shielding is important to know the existence of the silence zones in space and astrophysical objects as well as crystal formation. The graphical description of the normalized potential depict the significance of the exchange and correlation effects arising through spin and other variables on the shielding potential.

  2. One-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of imploding spherical plasma liners with detailed equation-of-state modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J. S.; Hsu, S. C.; Golovkin, I. E.; MacFarlane, J. J.; Cassibry, J. T.

    2012-10-15

    This work extends the one-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic imploding spherical argon plasma liner simulations of Awe et al.[Phys. Plasmas 18, 072705 (2011)] by using a detailed tabular equation-of-state (EOS) model, whereas Awe et al. used a polytropic EOS model. Results using the tabular EOS model give lower stagnation pressures by a factor of 3.9-8.6 and lower peak ion temperatures compared to the polytropic EOS results. Both local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and non-LTE EOS models were used in this work, giving similar results on stagnation pressure. The lower stagnation pressures using a tabular EOS model are attributed to a reduction in the liner's ability to compress arising from the energy sink introduced by ionization and electron excitation, which are not accounted for in a polytropic EOS model. Variation of the plasma liner species for the same initial liner geometry, mass density, and velocity was also explored using the LTE tabular EOS model, showing that the highest stagnation pressure is achieved with the highest atomic mass species for the constraints imposed.

  3. Plane and hemispherical potential structures in magnetically expanding plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Kazunori; Igarashi, Yuichi; Fujiwara, Tamiya

    2010-07-26

    Two-dimensional potential structures are measured for different gas pressure in expanding argon plasma using permanent magnets, where the magnetic field is about 100 G in the source and several gauss in the diffusion chamber. The plane potential drop is observed near the source exit for 0.35 mTorr, while the potential structure becomes hemispherical when increasing up to 1 mTorr; the hemispherical structure results in the radial divergence of the ion beam. It is found that the trajectories of the accelerated ions and the electrons overcoming the potential drop are dominated by the potential structure and magnetic-field lines, respectively.

  4. Detailed analysis of the tetraquark potential and flip-flop in SU(3) lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Okiharu, Fumiko; Suganuma, Hideo; Takahashi, Toru T.

    2005-07-01

    We perform the detailed study of the tetraquark (4Q) potential V{sub 4Q} for various QQ-QQ systems in SU(3) lattice QCD with {beta}=6.0 and 16{sup 3}x32 at the quenched level. For about 200 different patterns of 4Q systems, V{sub 4Q} is extracted from the 4Q Wilson loop in 300 gauge configurations, with the smearing method to enhance the ground-state component. We calculate V{sub 4Q} for planar, twisted, asymmetric, and large-size 4Q configurations, respectively. Here, the calculation for large-size 4Q configurations is done by identifying 16{sup 2}x32 as the spatial size and 16 as the temporal one, and the long-distance confinement force is particularly analyzed in terms of the flux-tube picture. When QQ and QQ are well separated, V{sub 4Q} is found to be expressed as the sum of the one-gluon-exchange Coulomb term and multi-Y-type linear term based on the flux-tube picture. When the nearest quark and antiquark pair is spatially close, the system is described as a 'two-meson' state. We observe a flux-tube recombination called a 'flip-flop' between the connected 4Q state and the two-meson state around the level-crossing point. This leads to infrared screening of the long-range color forces between (anti)quarks belonging to different mesons, and results in the absence of the color van der Waals force between two mesons.

  5. NSTX Disruption Simulations of Detailed Divertor and Passive Plate Models by Vector Potential Transfer from OPERA Global Analysis Results

    SciTech Connect

    P. H. Titus, S. Avasaralla, A.Brooks, R. Hatcher

    2010-09-22

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) project is planning upgrades to the toroidal field, plasma current and pulse length. This involves the replacement of the center-stack, including the inner legs of the TF, OH, and inner PF coils. A second neutral beam will also be added. The increased performance of the upgrade requires qualification of the remaining components including the vessel, passive plates, and divertor for higher disruption loads. The hardware needing qualification is more complex than is typically accessible by large scale electromagnetic (EM) simulations of the plasma disruptions. The usual method is to include simplified representations of components in the large EM models and attempt to extract forces to apply to more detailed models. This paper describes a more efficient approach of combining comprehensive modeling of the plasma and tokamak conducting structures, using the 2D OPERA code, with much more detailed treatment of individual components using ANSYS electromagnetic (EM) and mechanical analysis. This capture local eddy currents and resulting loads in complex details, and allows efficient non-linear, and dynamic structural analyses.

  6. Measurements of Plasma Potential Distribution in Segmented Electrode Hall Thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Raitses; D. Staack; N.J. Fisch

    2001-10-16

    Use of a segmented electrode placed at the Hall thruster exit can substantially reduce the voltage potential drop in the fringing magnetic field outside the thruster channel. In this paper, we investigate the dependence of this effect on thruster operating conditions and segmented electrode configuration. A fast movable emissive probe is used to measure plasma potential in a 1 kW laboratory Hall thruster with semented electrodes made of a graphite material. Relatively small probe-induced perturbations of the thruster discharge in the vicinity of the thruster exit allow a reasonable comparison of the measured results for different thruster configurations. It is shown that the plasma potential distribution is almost not sensitive to changes of the electrode potential, but depends on the magnetic field distribution and the electrode placement.

  7. Plasma potential mapping of high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Rauch, Albert; Mendelsberg, Rueben J.; Sanders, Jason M.; Anders, Andre

    2011-12-20

    Pulsed emissive probe techniques have been used to determine the plasma potential distribution of high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharges. An unbalanced magnetron with a niobium target in argon was investigated for pulse length of 100 μs at a pulse repetition rate of 100 Hz, giving a peak current of 170 A. The probe data were taken with a time resolution of 20 ns and a spatial resolution of 1 mm. It is shown that the local plasma potential varies greatly in space and time. The lowest potential was found over the target’s racetrack, gradually reaching anode potential (ground) several centimeters away from the target. The magnetic pre-sheath exhibits a funnel-shaped plasma potential resulting in an electric field which accelerates ions toward the racetrack. In certain regions and times, the potential exhibits weak local maxima which allow for ion acceleration to the substrate. Knowledge of the local E and static B fields lets us derive the electrons’ E×B drift velocity, which is about 105 m/s and shows structures in space and time.

  8. Theory of spacecraft potential jump in geosynchronous plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jianguo; Liu, Guoqing; Jiang, Lixiang

    2015-12-01

    For disturbed geosynchronous plasma, the onset of spacecraft charging and its evolution become more complex than quiet environment. A sudden jump of spacecraft potential can occur in specific environment conditions which can be detrimental to onboard electronics. In this paper, the potential jump for geosynchronous spacecraft charging is theoretically modeled and comprehensively characterized. Two types of potential jump in opposite directions are elucidated, and the threshold conditions for both types of jump are determined. At both thresholds, the spacecraft potentials are semisteady, but in opposite directions, with the possibility of a jump to a stable potential. The polarity of movement across the thresholds from different plasma will cause a spacecraft to experience irreversible charging histories which result in significant hysteresis. Generally, the jump to negative potential occurs with greater magnitude as compared to a potential jump in positive direction. Ion distribution has negligible influence to the threshold condition for jump to negative potential. However, ion distribution significantly affects the threshold for jump to positive potential and subsequently modifies the parametric domains of spacecraft charging.

  9. Monte Carlo simulations of ionization potential depression in dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Stransky, M.

    2016-01-15

    A particle-particle grand canonical Monte Carlo model with Coulomb pair potential interaction was used to simulate modification of ionization potentials by electrostatic microfields. The Barnes-Hut tree algorithm [J. Barnes and P. Hut, Nature 324, 446 (1986)] was used to speed up calculations of electric potential. Atomic levels were approximated to be independent of the microfields as was assumed in the original paper by Ecker and Kröll [Phys. Fluids 6, 62 (1963)]; however, the available levels were limited by the corresponding mean inter-particle distance. The code was tested on hydrogen and dense aluminum plasmas. The amount of depression was up to 50% higher in the Debye-Hückel regime for hydrogen plasmas, in the high density limit, reasonable agreement was found with the Ecker-Kröll model for hydrogen plasmas and with the Stewart-Pyatt model [J. Stewart and K. Pyatt, Jr., Astrophys. J. 144, 1203 (1966)] for aluminum plasmas. Our 3D code is an improvement over the spherically symmetric simplifications of the Ecker-Kröll and Stewart-Pyatt models and is also not limited to high atomic numbers as is the underlying Thomas-Fermi model used in the Stewart-Pyatt model.

  10. Monte Carlo simulations of ionization potential depression in dense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stransky, M.

    2016-01-01

    A particle-particle grand canonical Monte Carlo model with Coulomb pair potential interaction was used to simulate modification of ionization potentials by electrostatic microfields. The Barnes-Hut tree algorithm [J. Barnes and P. Hut, Nature 324, 446 (1986)] was used to speed up calculations of electric potential. Atomic levels were approximated to be independent of the microfields as was assumed in the original paper by Ecker and Kröll [Phys. Fluids 6, 62 (1963)]; however, the available levels were limited by the corresponding mean inter-particle distance. The code was tested on hydrogen and dense aluminum plasmas. The amount of depression was up to 50% higher in the Debye-Hückel regime for hydrogen plasmas, in the high density limit, reasonable agreement was found with the Ecker-Kröll model for hydrogen plasmas and with the Stewart-Pyatt model [J. Stewart and K. Pyatt, Jr., Astrophys. J. 144, 1203 (1966)] for aluminum plasmas. Our 3D code is an improvement over the spherically symmetric simplifications of the Ecker-Kröll and Stewart-Pyatt models and is also not limited to high atomic numbers as is the underlying Thomas-Fermi model used in the Stewart-Pyatt model.

  11. Molecular Dynamic Studies of Particle Wake Potentials in Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Ian; Graziani, Frank; Glosli, James; Strozzi, David; Surh, Michael; Richards, David; Decyk, Viktor; Mori, Warren

    2010-11-01

    Fast Ignition studies require a detailed understanding of electron scattering, stopping, and energy deposition in plasmas with variable values for the number of particles within a Debye sphere. Presently there is disagreement in the literature concerning the proper description of these processes. Developing and validating proper descriptions requires studying the processes using first-principle electrostatic simulations and possibly including magnetic fields. We are using the particle-particle particle-mesh (P^3M) code ddcMD to perform these simulations. As a starting point in our study, we examined the wake of a particle passing through a plasma. In this poster, we compare the wake observed in 3D ddcMD simulations with that predicted by Vlasov theory and those observed in the electrostatic PIC code BEPS where the cell size was reduced to .03λD.

  12. Formation and control of plasma potentials in TMX upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Simonen, T.C.; Orzechowski, T.J.; Porkolab, M.; Stallard, B.W.

    1981-05-06

    The methods to be employed to form and control plasma potentials in the TMX Upgrade tandem mirror with thermal barriers are described. ECRH-generated mirror -confined electron plasmas are used to establish a negative potential region to isolate the end-plug and central-cell celectrons. This thermal isolation will allow a higher end-plug electron temperature and an increased central-cell confining potential. Improved axial central-cell ion confinement results since higher temperature central-cell ions can be confined. This paper describes: (1) calculations of the sensitivity of barrier formation to vacuum conditions and to the presence of impurities in the neutral beams, (2) calculations of microwave penetration and absorption used to design the ECRH system, and (3) techniques to limit electron runaway to high energies by localized microwave beams and by relativistic detuning.

  13. Response of the plasma to the size of an anode electrode biased near the plasma potential

    SciTech Connect

    Barnat, E. V.; Laity, G. R.; Baalrud, S. D.

    2014-10-15

    As the size of a positively biased electrode increases, the nature of the interface formed between the electrode and the host plasma undergoes a transition from an electron-rich structure (electron sheath) to an intermediate structure containing both ion and electron rich regions (double layer) and ultimately forms an electron-depleted structure (ion sheath). In this study, measurements are performed to further test how the size of an electron-collecting electrode impacts the plasma discharge the electrode is immersed in. This is accomplished using a segmented disk electrode in which individual segments are individually biased to change the effective surface area of the anode. Measurements of bulk plasma parameters such as the collected current density, plasma potential, electron density, electron temperature and optical emission are made as both the size and the bias placed on the electrode are varied. Abrupt transitions in the plasma parameters resulting from changing the electrode surface area are identified in both argon and helium discharges and are compared to the interface transitions predicted by global current balance [S. D. Baalrud, N. Hershkowitz, and B. Longmier, Phys. Plasmas 14, 042109 (2007)]. While the size-dependent transitions in argon agree, the size-dependent transitions observed in helium systematically occur at lower electrode sizes than those nominally derived from prediction. The discrepancy in helium is anticipated to be caused by the finite size of the interface that increases the effective area offered to the plasma for electron loss to the electrode.

  14. Effective potential kinetic theory for strongly coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baalrud, Scott D.; Daligault, Jérôme

    2016-11-01

    The effective potential theory (EPT) is a recently proposed method for extending traditional plasma kinetic and transport theory into the strongly coupled regime. Validation from experiments and molecular dynamics simulations have shown it to be accurate up to the onset of liquid-like correlation parameters (corresponding to Γ ≃ 10-50 for the one-component plasma, depending on the process of interest). Here, this theory is briefly reviewed along with comparisons between the theory and molecular dynamics simulations for self-diffusivity and viscosity of the one-component plasma. A number of new results are also provided, including calculations of friction coefficients, energy exchange rates, stopping power, and mobility. The theory is also cast in the Landau and Fokker-Planck kinetic forms, which may prove useful for enabling efficient kinetic computations.

  15. High-density properties of integral-equation theories of fluids: Universal analytic structure and details for the one-component plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenfeld, Yaakov

    1986-03-01

    We study the analytic properties of the hypernetted-chain (HNC) and soft-mean-spherical (SMSA) theories in the asymptotic high-density limit (AHDL). The scaling properties of the inverse power potentials lead to the introduction of the SMSA-Ewald functions, which correspond to the ``overlap-volume'' functions for hard spheres. The HNC and SMSA theories for soft interactions, as well as the Percus-Yevick theory for hard spheres, feature the same AHDL analytic structure of the pair correlation functions, which is dictated by the hard-sphere Ewald functions. The general discussion is supplemented by detailed results for the one-component plasma. Implications to the analysis of the density-functional theory, of dense matter, near its exact Thomas-Fermi limit are pointed out.

  16. Transport and trapping of dust particles in a potential well created by inductively coupled diffused plasmas.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Mangilal; Mukherjee, S; Bandyopadhyay, P

    2016-05-01

    A versatile linear dusty (complex) plasma device is designed to study the transport and dynamical behavior of dust particles in a large volume. Diffused inductively coupled plasma is generated in the background of argon gas. A novel technique is used to introduce the dust particles in the main plasma by striking a secondary direct current glow discharge. These dust particles are found to get trapped in an electrostatic potential well, which is formed due to the combination of the ambipolar electric field caused by diffusive plasma and the field produced by the charged glass wall of the vacuum chamber. According to the requirements, the volume of the dust cloud can be controlled very precisely by tuning the plasma and discharge parameters. The present device can be used to address the underlying physics behind the transport of dust particles, self-excited dust acoustic waves, and instabilities. The detailed design of this device, plasma production and characterization, trapping and transport of the dust particle, and some of the preliminary experimental results are presented.

  17. Transport and trapping of dust particles in a potential well created by inductively coupled diffused plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, Mangilal; Mukherjee, S.; Bandyopadhyay, P.

    2016-05-01

    A versatile linear dusty (complex) plasma device is designed to study the transport and dynamical behavior of dust particles in a large volume. Diffused inductively coupled plasma is generated in the background of argon gas. A novel technique is used to introduce the dust particles in the main plasma by striking a secondary direct current glow discharge. These dust particles are found to get trapped in an electrostatic potential well, which is formed due to the combination of the ambipolar electric field caused by diffusive plasma and the field produced by the charged glass wall of the vacuum chamber. According to the requirements, the volume of the dust cloud can be controlled very precisely by tuning the plasma and discharge parameters. The present device can be used to address the underlying physics behind the transport of dust particles, self-excited dust acoustic waves, and instabilities. The detailed design of this device, plasma production and characterization, trapping and transport of the dust particle, and some of the preliminary experimental results are presented.

  18. Ponderomotive potential and backward Raman scattering in dense quantum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Son, S.

    2014-03-15

    The backward Raman scattering is studied in dense quantum plasmas. The coefficients in the backward Raman scattering is found to be underestimated (overestimated) in the classical theory if the excited Langmuir wave has low-wave vector (high-wave vector). The second-order quantum perturbation theory shows that the second harmonic of the ponderomotive potential arises naturally even in a single particle motion contrary to the classical prediction.

  19. Effects of auroral potential drops on plasma sheet dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Sheng; Lotko, William; Zhang, Binzheng; Wiltberger, Michael; Lyon, John

    2016-11-01

    The reaction of the magnetosphere-ionosphere system to dynamic auroral potential drops is investigated using the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry global model including, for the first time in a global simulation, the dissipative load of field-aligned potential drops in the low-altitude boundary condition. This extra load reduces the field-aligned current (j||) supplied by nightside reconnection dynamos. The system adapts by forcing the nightside X line closer to Earth, with a corresponding reduction in current lensing (j||/B = constant) at the ionosphere and additional contraction of the plasma sheet during substorm recovery and steady magnetospheric convection. For steady and moderate solar wind driving and with constant ionospheric conductance, the cross polar cap potential and hemispheric field-aligned current are lower by approximately the ratio of the peak field-aligned potential drop to the cross polar cap potential (10-15%) when potential drops are included. Hemispheric ionospheric Joule dissipation is less by 8%, while the area-integrated, average work done on the fluid by the reconnecting magnetotail field increases by 50% within |y| < 8 RE. Effects on the nightside plasma sheet include (1) an average X line 4 RE closer to Earth; (2) a 12% higher mean reconnection rate; and (3) dawn-dusk asymmetry in reconnection with a 17% higher rate in the premidnight sector.

  20. Spatial variation of sediment deposition in the Hudson River - a detailed inventory and potential causes (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitsche, F. O.; Kenna, T. C.

    2010-12-01

    Sediment deposition in urban estuaries is controlled by the interaction of human modifications and natural factors that include tides, fresh water inputs, bed morphology, sediment supply, and hydrodynamics. A key element of managing these estuaries is detailed understanding of sediment deposition and its driving processes. Using a combination of geophysical and geochemical analysis we establish a detailed inventory of 20 century deposition for most of the mud-dominated sections of the Hudson River. These data show variations between different segments of the Hudson River as well as strong local variations within each section, with depositional settings ranging from erosional to those accumulating at ~10 mm/year. Our work indicates that 170,000 - 250,000 metric tons of sediment are deposited annually in the areas studied, which is a significant portion of the estimated total annual sediment load of ~700,000 - 800,000 metric tons. This also suggests that some of the accumulated sediments are re-mobilized, e.g. during major storms. The observed patterns of deposition/erosion are primarily caused by natural conditions, but, in some parts, they are strongly influenced by human modifications of the estuary, such as dredging. In addition to improving our understanding of the sediment dynamic of the Hudson River, the observed distribution of sediment deposition is also an indicator for the occurrence of contaminants including heavy metals and PCB’s and thus a valuable tool for management decisions.

  1. Helical modulation of the electrostatic plasma potential due to edge magnetic islands induced by resonant magnetic perturbation fields at TEXTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Ciaccio, G. Spizzo, G.; Schmitz, O. Frerichs, H.; Abdullaev, S. S.; Evans, T. E.; White, R. B.

    2015-10-15

    The electrostatic response of the edge plasma to a magnetic island induced by resonant magnetic perturbations to the plasma edge of the circular limiter tokamak TEXTOR is analyzed. Measurements of plasma potential are interpreted by simulations with the Hamiltonian guiding center code ORBIT. We find a strong correlation between the magnetic field topology and the poloidal modulation of the measured plasma potential. The ion and electron drifts yield a predominantly electron driven radial diffusion when approaching the island X-point while ion diffusivities are generally an order of magnitude smaller. This causes a strong radial electric field structure pointing outward from the island O-point. The good agreement found between measured and modeled plasma potential connected to the enhanced radial particle diffusivities supports that a magnetic island in the edge of a tokamak plasma can act as convective cell. We show in detail that the particular, non-ambipolar drifts of electrons and ions in a 3D magnetic topology account for these effects. An analytical model for the plasma potential is implemented in the code ORBIT, and analyses of ion and electron radial diffusion show that both ion- and electron-dominated transport regimes can exist, which are known as ion and electron root solutions in stellarators. This finding and comparison with reversed field pinch studies and stellarator literature suggest that the role of magnetic islands as convective cells and hence as major radial particle transport drivers could be a generic mechanism in 3D plasma boundary layers.

  2. Potential around a dust grain in collisional plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Moulick, R. Goswami, K. S.

    2015-04-15

    The ion neutral collision can lead to interesting phenomena in dust charging, totally different from the expectations based on the traditional orbit motion limited theory. The potential around a dust grain is investigated for the collisional plasma considering the presence of ion neutral collisions. Fluid equations are solved for the one dimensional radial coordinate. It is observed that with the gradual increase in ion neutral collision, the potential structure around the dust grain changes its shape and is different from the usual Debye-Hückel potential. The shift however starts from a certain value of ion neutral collision and the electron-ion density varies accordingly. The potential variation is interesting and reconfirms the fact that there exists a region of attraction for negative charges. The collision modeling is done for the full range of plasma, i.e., considering the bulk and the sheath jointly. The potential variation with collision is also shown explicitly and the variation is found to cope up with the earlier observations.

  3. Modified transverse phonon-helicon interaction in colloids laden semiconductor plasmas due to Bohm potential and Fermi degenerate pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Aartee Yadav, N.; Ghosh, S.

    2015-07-31

    A detailed study of the quantum modification of acousto-helicon wave spectra due to Bohm potential and Fermi degenerate pressure in colloids laden semiconductor plasma has been presented. We have used quantum hydrodynamic model of plasmas to arrive at most general dispersion relation in presence of magnetic field. This dispersion relation has been analyzed in three different velocity regimes and the expressions for gain constants have been obtained. From the present study it has been concluded that the quantum effect and the magnetic field significantly modify the wave characteristics particularly in high doping regime in semiconductor plasma medium in presence of colloids in it.

  4. Detailed analysis of hollow ions spectra from dense matter pumped by X-ray emission of relativistic laser plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, S. B.; Colgan, J.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Abdallah, J.; Pikuz, S. A.; Skobelev, I. Yu.; Wagenaars, E.; Booth, N.; Culfa, O.; Dance, R. J.; Tallents, G. J.; Evans, R. G.; Gray, R. J.; Kaempfer, T.; Lancaster, K. L.; McKenna, P.; Rossall, A. K.; Schulze, K. S.; Uschmann, I.; Zhidkov, A. G.; Woolsey, N. C.

    2014-03-01

    X-ray emission from hollow ions offers new diagnostic opportunities for dense, strongly coupled plasma. We present extended modeling of the x-ray emission spectrum reported by Colgan et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 125001 (2013)] based on two collisional-radiative codes: the hybrid-structure Spectroscopic Collisional-Radiative Atomic Model (SCRAM) and the mixed-unresolved transition arrays (MUTA) ATOMIC model. We show that both accuracy and completeness in the modeled energy level structure are critical for reliable diagnostics, investigate how emission changes with different treatments of ionization potential depression, and discuss two approaches to handling the extensive structure required for hollow-ion models with many multiply excited configurations.

  5. Detailed analysis of hollow ions spectra from dense matter pumped by X-ray emission of relativistic laser plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, S. B. E-mail: anatolyf@hotmail.com; Colgan, J.; Abdallah, J.; Faenov, A. Ya. E-mail: anatolyf@hotmail.com; Pikuz, S. A.; Skobelev, I. Yu.; Wagenaars, E.; Culfa, O.; Dance, R. J.; Tallents, G. J.; Rossall, A. K.; Woolsey, N. C.; Booth, N.; Lancaster, K. L.; Evans, R. G.; Gray, R. J.; McKenna, P.; Kaempfer, T.; Schulze, K. S.; Uschmann, I.; and others

    2014-03-15

    X-ray emission from hollow ions offers new diagnostic opportunities for dense, strongly coupled plasma. We present extended modeling of the x-ray emission spectrum reported by Colgan et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 125001 (2013)] based on two collisional-radiative codes: the hybrid-structure Spectroscopic Collisional-Radiative Atomic Model (SCRAM) and the mixed-unresolved transition arrays (MUTA) ATOMIC model. We show that both accuracy and completeness in the modeled energy level structure are critical for reliable diagnostics, investigate how emission changes with different treatments of ionization potential depression, and discuss two approaches to handling the extensive structure required for hollow-ion models with many multiply excited configurations.

  6. Statically screened ion potential and Bohm potential in a quantum plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Moldabekov, Zhandos; Schoof, Tim; Ludwig, Patrick; Bonitz, Michael; Ramazanov, Tlekkabul

    2015-10-15

    The effective potential Φ of a classical ion in a weakly correlated quantum plasma in thermodynamic equilibrium at finite temperature is well described by the random phase approximation screened Coulomb potential. Additionally, collision effects can be included via a relaxation time ansatz (Mermin dielectric function). These potentials are used to study the quality of various statically screened potentials that were recently proposed by Shukla and Eliasson (SE) [Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 165007 (2012)], Akbari-Moghanjoughi (AM) [Phys. Plasmas 22, 022103 (2015)], and Stanton and Murillo (SM) [Phys. Rev. E 91, 033104 (2015)] starting from quantum hydrodynamic (QHD) theory. Our analysis reveals that the SE potential is qualitatively different from the full potential, whereas the SM potential (at any temperature) and the AM potential (at zero temperature) are significantly more accurate. This confirms the correctness of the recently derived [Michta et al., Contrib. Plasma Phys. 55, 437 (2015)] pre-factor 1/9 in front of the Bohm term of QHD for fermions.

  7. Statically screened ion potential and Bohm potential in a quantum plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moldabekov, Zhandos; Schoof, Tim; Ludwig, Patrick; Bonitz, Michael; Ramazanov, Tlekkabul

    2015-10-01

    The effective potential Φ of a classical ion in a weakly correlated quantum plasma in thermodynamic equilibrium at finite temperature is well described by the random phase approximation screened Coulomb potential. Additionally, collision effects can be included via a relaxation time ansatz (Mermin dielectric function). These potentials are used to study the quality of various statically screened potentials that were recently proposed by Shukla and Eliasson (SE) [Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 165007 (2012)], Akbari-Moghanjoughi (AM) [Phys. Plasmas 22, 022103 (2015)], and Stanton and Murillo (SM) [Phys. Rev. E 91, 033104 (2015)] starting from quantum hydrodynamic (QHD) theory. Our analysis reveals that the SE potential is qualitatively different from the full potential, whereas the SM potential (at any temperature) and the AM potential (at zero temperature) are significantly more accurate. This confirms the correctness of the recently derived [Michta et al., Contrib. Plasma Phys. 55, 437 (2015)] pre-factor 1/9 in front of the Bohm term of QHD for fermions.

  8. Rooftop Solar Photovoltaic Technical Potential in the United States. A Detailed Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Gagnon, Pieter; Margolis, Robert; Melius, Jennifer; Phillips, Caleb; Elmore, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    How much energy could be generated if PV modules were installed on all of the suitable roof area in the nation? To answer this question, we first use GIS methods to process a lidar dataset and determine the amount of roof area that is suitable for PV deployment in 128 cities nationwide, containing 23% of U.S. buildings, and provide PV-generation results for a subset of those cities. We then extend the insights from that analysis to the entire continental United States. We develop two statistical models--one for small buildings and one for medium and large buildings--and populate them with geographic variables that correlate with rooftop's suitability for PV. We simulate the productivity of PV installed on the suitable roof area, and present the technical potential of PV on both small buildings and medium/large buildings for every state in the continental US. Within the 128 cities covered by lidar data, 83% of small buildings have a location suitable for a PV installation, but only 26% of the total rooftop area of small buildings is suitable for development. The sheer number of buildings in this class, however, gives small buildings the greatest technical potential. Small building rooftops could accommodate 731 GW of PV capacity and generate 926 TWh/year of PV energy, approximately 65% of rooftop PV's total technical potential. We conclude by summing the PV-generation results for all building sizes and therefore answering our original question, estimating that the total national technical potential of rooftop PV is 1,118 GW of installed capacity and 1,432 TWh of annual energy generation. This equates to 39% of total national electric-sector sales.

  9. Electron density dependence of impedance probe plasma potential measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D. N.; Blackwell, D. D.; Amatucci, W. E.

    2015-08-15

    In earlier works, we used spheres of various sizes as impedance probes in demonstrating a method of determining plasma potential, φ{sub p}, when the probe radius is much larger than the Debye length, λ{sub D}. The basis of the method in those works [Walker et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 032108 (2006); ibid. 15, 123506 (2008); ibid. 17, 113503 (2010)] relies on applying a small amplitude signal of fixed frequency to a probe in a plasma and, through network analyzer-based measurements, determining the complex reflection coefficient, Γ, for varying probe bias, V{sub b}. The frequency range of the applied signal is restricted to avoid sheath resonant effects and ion contributions such that ω{sub pi} ≪ ω ≪ ω{sub pe}, where ω{sub pi} is the ion plasma frequency and ω{sub pe} is the electron plasma frequency. For a given frequency and applied bias, both Re(Z{sub ac}) and Im(Z{sub ac}) are available from Γ. When Re(Z{sub ac}) is plotted versus V{sub b}, a minimum predicted by theory occurs at φ{sub p} [Walker et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 113503 (2010)]. In addition, Im(Z{sub ac}) appears at, or very near, a maximum at φ{sub p}. As n{sub e} decreases and the sheath expands, the minimum becomes harder to discern. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate that when using network analyzer-based measurements, Γ itself and Im(Z{sub ac}) and their derivatives are useful as accompanying indicators to Re(Z{sub ac}) in these difficult cases. We note the difficulties encountered by the most commonly used plasma diagnostic, the Langmuir probe. Spherical probe data is mainly used in this work, although we present limited data for a cylinder and a disk. To demonstrate the effect of lowered density as a function of probe geometry, we compare the cylinder and disk using only the indicator Re(Z{sub ac})

  10. Laser Diagnostic Method for Plasma Sheath Potential Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Sean P.

    Electric propulsion systems are gaining popularity in the aerospace field as a viable option for long term positioning and thrusting applications. In particular, Hall thrusters have shown promise as the primary propulsion engine for space probes during interplanetary journeys. However, the interaction between propellant xenon ions and the ceramic channel wall continues to remain a complex issue. The most significant source of power loss in Hall thrusters is due to electron and ion currents through the sheath to the channel wall. A sheath is a region of high electric field that separates a plasma from a wall or surface in contact. Plasma electrons with enough energy to penetrate the sheath may result emission of a secondary electron from the wall. With significant secondary electron emission (SEE), the sheath voltage is reduced and so too is the electron retarding electric field. Therefore, a lower sheath voltage further increases the particle loss to the wall of a Hall thruster and leads to plasma cooling and lower efficiency. To further understand sheath dynamics, laser-induced fluorescence is employed to provide a non-invasive, in situ, and spatially resolved technique for measuring xenon ion velocity. By scanning the laser wavelength over an electronic transition of singly ionized xenon and collecting the resulting fluorescence, one can determine the ion velocity from the Doppler shifted absorption. Knowing the velocity at multiple points in the sheath, it can be converted to a relative electric potential profile which can reveal a lot about the plasma-wall interaction and the severity of SEE. The challenge of adequately measuring sheath potential profiles is optimizing the experiment to maximize the signal-to-noise ratio. A strong signal with low noise, enables high resolution measurements and increases the depth of measurement in the sheath, where the signal strength is lowest. Many improvements were made to reduce the background luminosity, increase the

  11. Multiple Levels of Degradation Diminish Hemostatic Potential of Thawed Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Matijevic, Nena; Kostousov, Vadim; Wang, Yao-Wei W.; Wade, Charles E.; Wang, Weiwei; Letourneau, Phillip; Hartwell, Elizabeth; Kozar, Rosemary; Ko, Tien; Holcomb, John B.

    2011-01-01

    Background Severe bleeding after injury requires transfusion of blood products, including fresh frozen plasma (FFP). Many centers are keeping thawed plasma (TP) ready for massively transfused patients. According to the American Association of Blood Banks Standards, TP is approved for transfusion up to 5 days after thawing, when stored at 1°C to 6°C. However, there are no clinical data analyzing the effects of the approved 5-day storage on plasma. We hypothesize that the hemostatic potential (HP) of freshly thawed (FFP-0) was superior to plasma stored for 5 days (FFP-5). Methods FFP from 30 single donors were thawed at 37°C and kept at 1°C to 6°C for 5 days. HP was evaluated at day 0 and 5 by measuring kinetics of thrombin generation (TG), kinetics of clot formation by thromboelastography, clotting factors and inhibitors, and cell-derived microparticles (MPs) by flow cytometry. Results When comparing FFP-5 to FFP-0, FFP-5 exhibited only 40% of the potential of FFP-0 for TG (6.2 nM/min vs. 14.3 nM/min, p < 0.0001), a slower clotting response via thromboelastography (reaction time: 4.3 minutes vs. 3.2 minutes, p < 0.0001) and a longer delay in reaching maximum thrombus generation (5.7 minutes vs. 4.6 minutes, p < 0.01). Diminished HP was accompanied by a significant decline in multiple coagulation proteins, including FV, VII, VIII, von Willebrand factor, and free Protein S, by up to 30%, and a decrease of 50% in MP counts. Conclusion The HP and clot forming ability of TP significantly declined with storage. Hence, freshly TP may have a greater ability to restore hemostasis and correct coagulopathy compared with FFP-5. The clinical consequences for transfused patients deserve further exploration. PMID:21217484

  12. A linear radio frequency plasma reactor for potential and current mapping in a magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Faudot, E.; Devaux, S.; Moritz, J.; Heuraux, S.; Molina Cabrera, P.; Brochard, F.

    2015-06-15

    Langmuir probe measurements in front of high power ion cyclotron resonant frequency antennas are not possible or simply too noisy to be analyzed properly. A linear experiment is a radio frequency (RF) magnetized plasma discharge reactor designed to probe the rectified potential in front of such antennas but at low power level (1 kW) to next improve antenna design and mitigate sheath effects. The maximum magnetic field is 0.1 T, and the RF amplifier can work between 10 kHz and 250 MHz allowing ion cyclotron resonances for argon or helium. The first measurements with no magnetic field are presented here, especially 2D potential maps extracted from the RF compensated probe measurements yield ni ≈ 10{sup 15} m{sup −3} and Te ≈ 2 eV for RF power lower than 100 W. Series resonances in the chamber are highlighted and allow to deduce the plasma parameters from a simple equivalent impedance model of the plasma in helium gas. Next studies will be focused on magnetized plasmas and especially magnetized RF sheaths.

  13. EMI from Spacecraft Docking Systems Spacecraft Charging - Plasma Contact Potentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norgard, John D.; Scully, Robert; Musselman, Randall

    2012-01-01

    The plasma contact potential of a visiting vehicle (VV), such as the Orion Service Module (SM), is determined while docking at the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV). Due to spacecraft charging effects on-orbit, the potential difference between the CEV and the VV can be large at docking, and an electrostatic discharge (ESD) could occur at capture, which could degrade, disrupt, damage, or destroy sensitive electronic equipment on the CEV and/or VV. Analytical and numerical models of the CEV are simulated to predict the worst-case potential difference between the CEV and the VV when the CEV is unbiased (solar panels unlit: eclipsed in the dark and inactive) or biased (solar panels sunlit: in the light and active).

  14. Collisionless Plasma Modeling in an Arbitrary Potential Energy Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liemohn, M. W.; Khazanov, G. V.

    1997-01-01

    A new technique for calculating a collisionless plasma along a field line is presented. The primary feature of the new model is that it can handle an arbitrary (including nonmonotonic) potential energy distribution. This was one of the limiting constraints on the existing models in this class, and these constraints are generalized for an arbitrary potential energy composition. The formulation for relating current density to the field-aligned potential as well as formulas for density, temperature and energy flux calculations are presented for several distribution functions, ranging from a bi-Lorentzian with a loss cone to an isotropic Maxwellian. A comparison of these results with previous models shows that the formulation reduces.to the earlier models under similar assumptions.

  15. Development of a Detailed Stress Map of Oklahoma for Avoidance of Potentially Active Faults When Siting Wastewater Injection Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alt, R. C., II; Zoback, M. D.

    2014-12-01

    We report progress on a project to create a detailed map of in situ stress orientations and relative magnitudes throughout the state of Oklahoma. It is well known that the past 5 years has seen a remarkable increase in seismicity in much of the state, potentially related to waste water injection. The purpose of this project is to attempt to utilize detailed knowledge of the stress field to identify which pre-existing faults could be potentially active in response to injection-related pore pressure increases. Over 50 new stress orientations have been obtained, principally utilizing wellbore image data provided by the oil and gas industry. These data reveal a very uniform ENE direction of maximum compressive stress through much of the state. As earthquake focal plane mechanisms indicate strike-slip faulting, the stress orientation data indicate which pre-existing faults are potentially active. The data are consistent with slip on the near-vertical, NE-trending fault associated with at least one of the M 5+ earthquakes in the Prague, OK sequence in 2011. If successful, it would demonstrate that combining detailed information about pre-existing faults and the current stress field could be used to guide the siting of injection wells so as to decrease the potential for injection-related seismicity.

  16. Generalized model screening potentials for Fermi-Dirac plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, some properties of relativistically degenerate quantum plasmas, such as static ion screening, structure factor, and Thomson scattering cross-section, are studied in the framework of linearized quantum hydrodynamic theory with the newly proposed kinetic γ-correction to Bohm term in low frequency limit. It is found that the correction has a significant effect on the properties of quantum plasmas in all density regimes, ranging from solid-density up to that of white dwarf stars. It is also found that Shukla-Eliasson attractive force exists up to a few times the density of metals, and the ionic correlations are seemingly apparent in the radial distribution function signature. Simplified statically screened attractive and repulsive potentials are presented for zero-temperature Fermi-Dirac plasmas, valid for a wide range of quantum plasma number-density and atomic number values. Moreover, it is observed that crystallization of white dwarfs beyond a critical core number-density persists with this new kinetic correction, but it is shifted to a much higher number-density value of n0 ≃ 1.94 × 1037 cm-3 (1.77 × 1010 gr cm-3), which is nearly four orders of magnitude less than the nuclear density. It is found that the maximal Thomson scattering with the γ-corrected structure factor is a remarkable property of white dwarf stars. However, with the new γ-correction, the maximal scattering shifts to the spectrum region between hard X-ray and low-energy gamma-rays. White dwarfs composed of higher atomic-number ions are observed to maximally Thomson-scatter at slightly higher wavelengths, i.e., they maximally scatter slightly low-energy photons in the presence of correction.

  17. Measuring plasma potential with an impedance probe in low density plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, David; Blackwell, David; Fernsler, Richard; Amatucci, William

    2012-10-01

    A recent rf technique for determining plasma potential, φp , using an impedance probe was shown to be independent of probe geometry, magnetic field, and orientation. However, a problem which arises in low density plasma concerns a magnitude mismatch between typical network analyzer input impedance (Z0 = 50 φ) and the large value of ac resistance (Rac) which is inversely proportional to ne. The method relies on finding a minimum in Re(Zac)footnotetextPhys. Plasmas 17, 113503 (2010).^,footnotetextNRL Memorandum Report 6750-12-9413 (2012). which is difficult if Rac is much larger than Z0. For low density space plasmas (10^4 -10^5 cm-3) values of Rac range to kφ levels. We have developed numerical simulations based on solving the Boltzmann equation in spherical geometry for a given sheath size. These simulations include a presheath and predict values for Zac which are then used to estimate the error as a function of input impedance based on the error associated with a 50 φ load.

  18. Action potential processing in a detailed Purkinje cell model reveals a critical role for axonal compartmentalization

    PubMed Central

    Masoli, Stefano; Solinas, Sergio; D'Angelo, Egidio

    2015-01-01

    The Purkinje cell (PC) is among the most complex neurons in the brain and plays a critical role for cerebellar functioning. PCs operate as fast pacemakers modulated by synaptic inputs but can switch from simple spikes to complex bursts and, in some conditions, show bistability. In contrast to original works emphasizing dendritic Ca-dependent mechanisms, recent experiments have supported a primary role for axonal Na-dependent processing, which could effectively regulate spike generation and transmission to deep cerebellar nuclei (DCN). In order to account for the numerous ionic mechanisms involved (at present including Nav1.6, Cav2.1, Cav3.1, Cav3.2, Cav3.3, Kv1.1, Kv1.5, Kv3.3, Kv3.4, Kv4.3, KCa1.1, KCa2.2, KCa3.1, Kir2.x, HCN1), we have elaborated a multicompartmental model incorporating available knowledge on localization and gating of PC ionic channels. The axon, including initial segment (AIS) and Ranvier nodes (RNs), proved critical to obtain appropriate pacemaking and firing frequency modulation. Simple spikes initiated in the AIS and protracted discharges were stabilized in the soma through Na-dependent mechanisms, while somato-dendritic Ca channels contributed to sustain pacemaking and to generate complex bursting at high discharge regimes. Bistability occurred only following Na and Ca channel down-regulation. In addition, specific properties in RNs K currents were required to limit spike transmission frequency along the axon. The model showed how organized electroresponsive functions could emerge from the molecular complexity of PCs and showed that the axon is fundamental to complement ionic channel compartmentalization enabling action potential processing and transmission of specific spike patterns to DCN. PMID:25759640

  19. Kinetic model of electric potentials in localized collisionless plasma structures under steady quasi-gyrotropic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Schindler, K.; Birn, J.; Hesse, M.

    2012-08-15

    Localized plasma structures, such as thin current sheets, generally are associated with localized magnetic and electric fields. In space plasmas localized electric fields not only play an important role for particle dynamics and acceleration but may also have significant consequences on larger scales, e.g., through magnetic reconnection. Also, it has been suggested that localized electric fields generated in the magnetosphere are directly connected with quasi-steady auroral arcs. In this context, we present a two-dimensional model based on Vlasov theory that provides the electric potential for a large class of given magnetic field profiles. The model uses an expansion for small deviation from gyrotropy and besides quasineutrality it assumes that electrons and ions have the same number of particles with their generalized gyrocenter on any given magnetic field line. Specializing to one dimension, a detailed discussion concentrates on the electric potential shapes (such as 'U' or 'S' shapes) associated with magnetic dips, bumps, and steps. Then, it is investigated how the model responds to quasi-steady evolution of the plasma. Finally, the model proves useful in the interpretation of the electric potentials taken from two existing particle simulations.

  20. Kinetic Model of Electric Potentials in Localized Collisionless Plasma Structures under Steady Quasi-gyrotropic Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schindler, K.; Birn, J.; Hesse, M.

    2012-01-01

    Localized plasma structures, such as thin current sheets, generally are associated with localized magnetic and electric fields. In space plasmas localized electric fields not only play an important role for particle dynamics and acceleration but may also have significant consequences on larger scales, e.g., through magnetic reconnection. Also, it has been suggested that localized electric fields generated in the magnetosphere are directly connected with quasi-steady auroral arcs. In this context, we present a two-dimensional model based on Vlasov theory that provides the electric potential for a large class of given magnetic field profiles. The model uses an expansion for small deviation from gyrotropy and besides quasineutrality it assumes that electrons and ions have the same number of particles with their generalized gyrocenter on any given magnetic field line. Specializing to one dimension, a detailed discussion concentrates on the electric potential shapes (such as "U" or "S" shapes) associated with magnetic dips, bumps, and steps. Then, it is investigated how the model responds to quasi-steady evolution of the plasma. Finally, the model proves useful in the interpretation of the electric potentials taken from two existing particle simulations.

  1. Comparative measurements of plasma potential with ball-pen and Langmuir probe in low-temperature magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Zanáška, M.; Kudrna, P.; Tichý, M.; Adámek, J.; Peterka, M.

    2015-03-15

    The ball-pen probe (BPP) is used for direct plasma potential measurements in magnetized plasma. The probe can adjust the ratio of the electron and ion saturation currents I{sub sat}{sup −}/I{sub sat}{sup +} to be close to one and therefore its I-V characteristic becomes nearly symmetric. If this is achieved, the floating potential of the BPP is close to the plasma potential. Because of its rather simple construction, it offers an attractive probe for measurements in magnetized plasma. Comparative measurements of plasma potential by BPPs of different dimensions as well as one Langmuir probe (LP) in an argon discharge plasma of a cylindrical magnetron were performed at various experimental conditions. An additional comparison by an emissive probe was also performed. All these types of probes provide similar values of plasma potential in a wide range of plasma parameters. Our results for three different BPP dimensions indicate that the BPP can be operated in a cylindrical magnetron DC argon discharge if the value of the ratio of the magnetic field and neutral gas pressure, B/p, is greater than approximately 10 mT/Pa.

  2. Accompanying indicators of plasma potential when using impedance probes in low density plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, David; Blackwell, David; Fernsler, Richard; Amatucci, William

    2016-09-01

    In earlier works, we used spheres of various sizes as impedance probes in demonstrating a method of determining plasma potential, φp, when the probe radius, rp, is much larger than λD. These works demonstrate a method of measuring plasma potential with an impedance probe by applying a small amplitude rf signal and tracking a minimum in Re (Zac) as a function of probe bias, Vb where Re (Zac) and Im(Zac) are available using a network analyzer through measurement of the reflection coefficient, Γ. However, for borderline cases where the requirement that rp >>λD begins to fail, Re (Zac) ( 1 /ne) can rise to k Ω's for even moderate levels of Vb, causing a large impedance mismatch with the network analyzer (Z0 = 50 Ω) . The purpose of the recent work is to demonstrate that Γ itself along with Im(Zac) and their derivatives are useful as accompanying indicators to Re (Zac) in these difficult cases. We will present experimental data along with model comparisons to demonstrate the usefulness and limits of the additional indicators. Work Supported by Naval Research Laboratory Base Program.

  3. A plasma source driven predator-prey like mechanism as a potential cause of spiraling intermittencies in linear plasma devices

    SciTech Connect

    Reiser, D.; Ohno, N.; Tanaka, H.; Vela, L.

    2014-03-15

    Three-dimensional global drift fluid simulations are carried out to analyze coherent plasma structures appearing in the NAGDIS-II linear device (nagoya divertor plasma Simulator-II). The numerical simulations reproduce several features of the intermittent spiraling structures observed, for instance, statistical properties, rotation frequency, and the frequency of plasma expulsion. The detailed inspection of the three-dimensional plasma dynamics allows to identify the key mechanism behind the formation of these intermittent events. The resistive coupling between electron pressure and parallel electric field in the plasma source region gives rise to a quasilinear predator-prey like dynamics where the axisymmetric mode represents the prey and the spiraling structure with low azimuthal mode number represents the predator. This interpretation is confirmed by a reduced one-dimensional quasilinear model derived on the basis of the findings in the full three-dimensional simulations. The dominant dynamics reveals certain similarities to the classical Lotka-Volterra cycle.

  4. Detailed Experimental Study of Ion Acceleration by Interaction of an Ultra-Short Intense Laser with an Underdense Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Kahaly, S.; Sylla, F.; Lifschitz, A.; Flacco, A.; Veltcheva, M.; Malka, V.

    2016-01-01

    Ion acceleration from intense (Iλ2 > 1018 Wcm−2 μm2) laser-plasma interaction is experimentally studied within a wide range of He gas densities. Focusing an ultrashort pulse (duration  ion plasma period) on a newly designed submillimetric gas jet system, enabled us to inhibit total evacuation of electrons from the central propagation channel reducing the radial ion acceleration associated with ponderomotive Coulomb explosion, a mechanism predominant in the long pulse scenario. New ion acceleration mechanism have been unveiled in this regime leading to non-Maxwellian quasi monoenergetic features in the ion energy spectra. The emitted nonthermal ion bunches show a new scaling of the ion peak energy with plasma density. The scaling identified in this new regime differs from previously reported studies. PMID:27531755

  5. A detailed postprocess analysis of an argon gas puff Z-pinch plasma using SPEC2D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Y. K.; Kammash, T.; Davis, J.

    1997-05-01

    A postprocess analysis of a single time frame hydrodynamic profile from the PRISM two-dimensional MHD simulation of an argon gas puff Z-pinch plasma experiment on Double-Eagle generator at Physics Internationals, Co. is presented. In addition, spatially resolved emission spectra and filtered (K- and L-shell radiation) x-ray pinhole images, generated using the SPEC2D code, are examined toward the understanding of the emission characteristics of the hot spots and the formation of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the plasma.

  6. The use of ultraviolet Thomson scattering as a versatile diagnostic for detailed measurements of a collisional laser produced plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Tracy, Mark David

    1993-01-08

    Collective Thomson scattering from ion-acoustic waves at 266nm is used to obtain spatially resolved, two-dimensional electron density, sound speed, and radial drift profiles of a collisional laser plasma. An ultraviolet diagnostic wavelength minimizes the complicating effects of inverse bremsstrahlung and refractive turning in the coronal region of interest, where the electron densities approach nc/10. Laser plasmas of this type are important because they model some of the aspects of the plasmas found in high-gain laser-fusion pellets irradiated by long pulse widths where the laser light is absorbed mostly in the corona. The experimental results and LASNEX simulations agree within a percent standard deviation of 40% for the electron density and 50% for the sound speed and radial drift velocity. Thus it is shown that the hydrodynamics equations with classical coefficients and the numerical approximations in LASNEX are valid models of laser-heated, highly collisional plasmas. The versatility of Thomson scattering is expanded upon by extending existing theory with a Fokker-Planck based model to include plasmas that are characterized by (0 ≤ kiaλii ≤ ∞) and ZTe/Ti, where kia is the ion- acoustic wave number, λii is the ion-ion mean free path, Z is the ionization state of the plasma, and Te. Ti are the electron and ion temperatures in electron volts respectively. The model is valid for plasmas in which the electrons are approximately collisionless, (kiaλei, kiaλee ≥ 1), and quasineutrality holds, (α ≥1), where α = 1/kλDE and λDe is the electron Debye length. This newly developed model predicts the lineshape of the ion-acoustic Thomson spectra and when fit to experimental data provides a direct measurement of the relative thermal flow velocity between the electrons and ions.

  7. ICRF-enhanced plasma potentials in the SOL of Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Ochoukov, R.; Whyte, D. G.; Brunner, D.; LaBombard, B.; Lipschultz, B.; Terry, J. L.; Wukitch, S. J.; D'Ippolito, D. A.; Myra, J. R.

    2014-02-12

    We performed an extensive survey of the plasma potential in the scrape-off layer (SOL) of Ion Cyclotron Range-of Frequencies (ICRF)-heated discharges on Alcator C-Mod. Our results show that plasma potentials are enhanced in the presence of ICRF power and plasma potential values of >100 V are often observed. Such potentials are high enough to induce sputtering of high-Z molybdenum (Mo) plasma facing components by deuterium ions on C-Mod. For comparison, the plasma potential in Ohmic discharges is typically less than 10 V, well below the threshold needed to induce Mo sputtering by deuterium ions. ICRF-enhanced plasma potentials are observed in the SOL regions that both magnetically map and do not map to active ICRF antennas. Regions that magnetically map to active ICRF antennas are accessible to slow waves directly launched by the antennas and these regions experience plasma potential enhancement that is partially consistent with the slow wave rectification mechanism. One of the most defining features of the slow wave rectification is a threshold appearance of significant plasma potentials (>100 V) when the dimensionless rectification parameter Λ{sub −o} is above unity and this trend is observed experimentally. We also observe ICRF-enhanced plasma potentials >100 V in regions that do not magnetically map to the active antennas and, hence, are not accessible for slow waves launched directly by the active antennas. However, unabsorbed fast waves can reach these regions. The general trend that we observe in these 'un-mapped' regions is that the plasma potential scales with the strength of the local RF wave fields with the fast wave polarization and the highest plasma potentials are observed in discharges with the highest levels of unabsorbed ICRF power. Similarly, we find that core Mo levels scale with the level of unabsorbed ICRF power suggesting a link between plasma potentials in the SOL and the strength of the impurity source.

  8. The effects of ionization potential depression on the spectra emitted by hot dense aluminium plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, Thomas R.; Vinko, Sam M.; Ciricosta, Orlando; Chung, Hyun-Kyung; Lee, Richard W.; Wark, Justin S.

    2013-06-01

    Recent experiments at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) X-ray Free-Electron-Laser (FEL) have demonstrated that the standard model used for simulating ionization potential depression (IPD) in a plasma (the Stewart-Pyatt (SP) model, J.C. Stewart and K.D. Pyatt Jr., Astrophysical Journal 144 (1966) 1203) considerably underestimates the degree of IPD in a solid density aluminium plasma at temperatures up to 200 eV. In contrast, good agreement with the experimental data was found by use of a modified Ecker-Kröll (mEK) model (G. Ecker and W. Kröll, Physics of Fluids 6 (1963) 62-69). We present here detailed simulations, using the FLYCHK code, of the predicted spectra from hot dense, hydrogenic and helium-like aluminium plasmas ranging in densities from 0.1 to 4 times solid density, and at temperatures up to 1000 eV. Importantly, we find that the greater IPDs predicted by the mEK model result in the loss of the n = 3 states for the hydrogenic ions for all densities above ≈0.8 times solid density, and for the helium-like ions above ≈0.65 solid density. Therefore, we posit that if the mEK model holds at these higher temperatures, the temperature of solid density highly-charged aluminium plasmas cannot be determined by using spectral features associated with the n = 3 principal quantum number, and propose a re-evaluation of previous experimental data where high densities have been inferred from the spectra, and the SP model has been used.

  9. Double Layers: Potential Formation and Related Nonlinear Phenomena in Plasmas: Proceedings of the 5th Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iizuka, S.

    1998-02-01

    The Table of Contents for the book is as follows: * PREFACE * INTERNATIONAL SCIENTIFIC COMMITTEE * LOCAL ORGANIZING COMMITTEE AT TOHOKU UNIVERSITY * CHAPTER 1: DOUBLE LAYERS, SHEATHS, AND POTENTIAL STRUCTURES * 1.1 Double Layers * On Fluid Models of Stationary, Acoustic Double Layers (Invited) * Particle Simulation of Double Layer (Invited) * Space-Time Dependence of Non-Steady Double Layers * The Role of Low Energy Electrons for the Generation of Anode Double Layers in Glow Discharges * Arbitrary Amplitude Ion-Acoustic Double Layers in a Dusty Plasma * 1.2 Sheaths * Bounded Plasma Edge Physics as Observed from Simulations in 1D and 2D (Invited) * Control of RF Sheath Structure in RF Diode Discharge * Observation of Density Gradients with Fine Structures and Low Frequency Wave Excitation at the Plasma-Sheath Boundary * Double Sheath Associated with an Electron Emission to a Plasma Containing Negative Ions * Sheath Edge and Floating Potential for Multi-Species Plasmas Including Dust Particles * 1.3 Potential Structures and Oscillations * Potential Structure Formed at a Constriction of a DC He Positive Column and its Coupling with Ionization Wave * Potential Structure in a New RF Magnetron Device with a Hollow Electrode * Potential Disruption in a RF Afterglow Electronegative Plasma * Potential Oscillation in a Strongly Asymmetry RF Discharge Containing Negative Ions * Effects of External Potential Control on Coulomb Dust Behavior * Potential Structure of Carbon Arc Discharge for High-Yield Fullerenes Formation * Control of Axial and Radial Potential Profiles in Tandem Mirrors (Invited) * CHAPTER 2: FIELD-ALIGNED ELECTRIC FIELDS AND RELATED PARTICLE ACCELERATIONS * 2.1 Field-Aligned Potential Formation * Formation of Large Potential Difference in a Plasma Flow along Converging Magnetic Field Lines (Invited) * Presheath Formation in front of an Oblique End-Plate in a Magnetized Sheet Plasma * Plasma Potential Formation Due to ECRH in a Magnetic Well * Electrostatic

  10. Detailed investigation of optoelectronic and microstructural properties of plasma polymerized cyclohexane thin films: Dependence on the radiofrequency power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manaa, C.; Bouaziz, L.; Lejeune, M.; Kouki, F.; Zellama, K.; Benlahsen, M.; Mejatty, M.; Bouchriha, H.

    2015-06-01

    Optical properties of polymerized cyclohexane films deposited by radiofrequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique at different radiofrequency powers onto glass and silicon substrates, are studied and correlated with the microstructure of the films, using a combination of atomic force microscopy, Raman and Fourier Transformer Infrared spectroscopy and optical measurements. The optical constants such as refractive index n, dielectric permittivity ɛ and extinction k and absorption α coefficients, are extracted from transmission and reflection spectra through the commercial software CODE. These constants lead, by using common theoretical models as Cauchy, Lorentz, Tauc and single effective oscillator, to the determination of the static refractive index ns and permittivity ɛs, the plasma frequency ωp , the carrier density to effective mass ratio N /me* , the optical conductivity σoc, the optical band gap Eg and the oscillation and dispersion energies E0 and Ed, respectively. We find that n, ɛs , ωp , N /me* , Ed , increase with radiofrequency power, while Eg and E0 decrease in the same range of power. These results are well correlated with those obtained from atomic force microscopy, Raman and infrared measurements. They also indicate that the increase of the radiofrequency power promotes the fragmentation of the precursor and increases the carbon C-sp2 hybridization proportion, which results in an improvement of the optoelectronic properties of the films.

  11. Diagnostic potential of plasma carboxymethyllysine and carboxyethyllysine in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background This study compared the level of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), N-(Carboxymethyl)lysine (CML) and N-(Carboxyethyl)lysine (CEL), in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and healthy controls (HCs), correlating these markers with clinical indicators of MS disease severity. Methods CML and CEL plasma levels were analyzed in 99 MS patients and 43 HCs by tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). Patients were stratified based on drug modifying therapies (DMTs) including interferon beta, glatiramer acetate and natalizumab. Results The level of plasma CEL, but not CML, was significantly higher in DMT-naïve MS patients when compared to HCs (P < 0.001). Among MS patients, 91% had higher than mean plasma CEL observed in HCs. DMTs reduced CML and CEL plasma levels by approximately 13% and 40% respectively. CML and CEL plasma levels correlated with the rate of MS clinical relapse. Conclusion Our results suggest that AGEs in general and CEL in particular could be useful biomarkers in MS clinical practice. Longitudinal studies are warranted to determine any causal relationship between changes in plasma level of AGEs and MS disease pathology. These studies will pave the way for use of AGE inhibitors and AGE-breaking agents as new therapeutic modalities in MS. PMID:21034482

  12. Detailed investigation of optoelectronic and microstructural properties of plasma polymerized cyclohexane thin films: Dependence on the radiofrequency power

    SciTech Connect

    Manaa, C.; Bouaziz, L.; Lejeune, M.; Zellama, K. Benlahsen, M.; Kouki, F.; Mejatty, M.; Bouchriha, H.

    2015-06-07

    Optical properties of polymerized cyclohexane films deposited by radiofrequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique at different radiofrequency powers onto glass and silicon substrates, are studied and correlated with the microstructure of the films, using a combination of atomic force microscopy, Raman and Fourier Transformer Infrared spectroscopy and optical measurements. The optical constants such as refractive index n, dielectric permittivity ε and extinction k and absorption α coefficients, are extracted from transmission and reflection spectra through the commercial software CODE. These constants lead, by using common theoretical models as Cauchy, Lorentz, Tauc and single effective oscillator, to the determination of the static refractive index n{sub s} and permittivity ε{sub s}, the plasma frequency ω{sub p}, the carrier density to effective mass ratio N/m{sub e}{sup *}, the optical conductivity σ{sub oc}, the optical band gap E{sub g} and the oscillation and dispersion energies E{sub 0} and E{sub d}, respectively. We find that n, ε{sub s}, ω{sub p}, N/m{sub e}{sup *}, E{sub d}, increase with radiofrequency power, while E{sub g} and E{sub 0} decrease in the same range of power. These results are well correlated with those obtained from atomic force microscopy, Raman and infrared measurements. They also indicate that the increase of the radiofrequency power promotes the fragmentation of the precursor and increases the carbon C-sp{sup 2} hybridization proportion, which results in an improvement of the optoelectronic properties of the films.

  13. On Floating Potential of Emissive Probes in a Partially-Magnetized Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raitses, Yevgeny; Kraus, Brian

    2016-10-01

    We compare measurements of plasma potential in a cross-field Penning discharge from two probes: swept biased Langmuir probe and floating emissive probe. The plasma potential was deduced from the first derivative of the Langmuir probe characteristic. In previous studies, the emissive and swept biased probes were placed at the channel exit of a Hall thruster (HT). Measurements showed that the emissive probe floats below the plasma potential, in agreement with conventional theories. However, recent measurements in the Penning discharge indicate a floating potential of a strongly-emitting hot probe above the plasma potential. In both probe applications, xenon plasmas have magnetized electrons and non-magnetized ions with similar plasma densities (1010 - 1011 cm-3) . Though their electron temperatures differ by an order of magnitude (Penning 5 eV, HT 50 eV), this difference cannot explain the difference in measurement values of the hot floating potential because both temperatures are much higher than the emitting wire. In this work, we investigate how the ion velocity and other plasma parameters affect this discrepancy between probe measurements of the plasma potential. This work was supported by DOE contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  14. Ionization Potential Depression in Hot Dense Plasmas Through a Pure Classical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calisti, A.; Ferri, S.; Talin, B.

    2015-05-01

    The ionization potential of an ion embedded in a plasma, lowered due to the whole of the charged particles (ions and electrons) interacting with this ion, is the so-called plasma effect. A numerical plasma model based on classical molecular dynamics has been developed recently. It is capable to describe a neutral plasma at equilibrium involving ions of various charge states of the same atom together with electrons. This code is used here to investigate the ionization potential depression (IPD). The study of the IPD is illustrated and discussed for aluminum plasmas at mid and solid density and electron temperatures varying from 50eV to 190eV. The method relies on a sampling of the total potential energy of the electron located at an ion being ionized. The potential energy of such electron results from all of the interacting charged particles interacting with it.

  15. Detailed beam and plasma measurements on the vessel for extraction and source plasma analyses (VESPA) Penning H{sup −} ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrie, S. R.; Faircloth, D. C.; Letchford, A. P.; Whitehead, M. O.; Wood, T.

    2016-02-15

    A vessel for extraction and source plasma analyses (VESPA) is operational at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL). This project supports and guides the overall ion source R&D effort for the ISIS spallation neutron and muon facility at RAL. The VESPA produces 100 mA of pulsed H{sup −} beam, but perveance scans indicate that the source is production-limited at extraction voltages above 12 kV unless the arc current is increased. A high resolution optical monochromator is used to measure plasma properties using argon as a diagnostic gas. The atomic hydrogen temperature increases linearly with arc current, up to 2.8 eV for 50 A; whereas the electron temperature has a slight linear decrease toward 2.2 eV. The gas density is 10{sup 21} m{sup −3}, whilst the electron density is two orders of magnitude lower. Densities follow square root relationships with arc current, with gas density decreasing whilst electron (and hence ion) density increases. Stopping and range of ions in matter calculations prove that operating a high current arc with an argon admixture is extremely difficult because cathode-coated cesium is heavily sputtered by argon.

  16. A Two-Dimensional One Component Plasma and a Test Charge: Polarization Effects and Effective Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Téllez, Gabriel; Trizac, Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    We study the effective interactions between a test charge Q and a one-component plasma, i.e. a complex made up of mobile point particles with charge q, and a uniform oppositely charged background. The background has the form of a flat disk, in which the mobile charges can move. The test particle is approached perpendicularly to the disk, along its axis of symmetry. All particles interact by a logarithmic potential. The long and short distance features of the effective potential—the free energy of the system for a given distance between Q and the disk—are worked out analytically in detail. They crucially depend on the sign of Q/q, and on the global charge borne by the discotic complex, that can vanish. While most results are obtained at the intermediate coupling Γ≡βq 2=2 (β being the inverse temperature), we have also investigated situations with stronger couplings: Γ=4 and 6. We have found that at large distances, the sign of the effective force reflects subtle details of the charge distribution on the disk, whereas at short distances, polarization effects invariably lead to effective attractions.

  17. Ion velocity and plasma potential measurements of a cylindrical cusped field thruster

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, N. A.; Young, C. V.; Cappelli, M. A.; Hargus, W. A. Jr.

    2012-05-01

    Measurements of the most probable time-averaged axial ion velocities and plasma potential within the acceleration channel and in the plume of a straight-channeled cylindrical cusped field thruster operating on xenon are presented. Ion velocities for the thruster are derived from laser-induced fluorescence measurements of the 5d[4]{sub 7/2}-6p[3]{sub 5/2} xenon ion excited state transition centered at {lambda}=834.72nm. Plasma potential measurements are made using a floating emissive probe with a thoriated-tungsten filament. The thruster is operated in a power matched condition with 300 V applied anode potential for comparison to previous krypton plasma potential measurements, and a low power condition with 150 V applied anode potential. Correlations are seen between the plasma potential drop outside of the thruster and kinetic energy contours of the accelerating ions.

  18. Membrane potential modulates plasma membrane phospholipid dynamics and K-Ras signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yong; Wong, Ching-On; Cho, Kwang-jin; van der Hoeven, Dharini; Liang, Hong; Thakur, Dhananiay P.; Luo, Jialie; Babic, Milos; Zinsmaier, Konrad E.; Zhu, Michael X.; Hu, Hongzhen; Venkatachalam, Kartik; Hancock, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Plasma membrane depolarization can trigger cell proliferation, but how membrane potential influences mitogenic signaling is uncertain. Here, we show that plasma membrane depolarization induces nanoscale reorganization of phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate but not other anionic phospholipids. K-Ras, which is targeted to the plasma membrane by electrostatic interactions with phosphatidylserine, in turn undergoes enhanced nanoclustering. Depolarization-induced changes in phosphatidylserine and K-Ras plasma membrane organization occur in fibroblasts, excitable neuroblastoma cells, and Drosophila neurons in vivo and robustly amplify K-Ras–dependent mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. Conversely, plasma membrane repolarization disrupts K-Ras nanoclustering and inhibits MAPK signaling. By responding to voltage-induced changes in phosphatidylserine spatiotemporal dynamics, K-Ras nanoclusters set up the plasma membrane as a biological field-effect transistor, allowing membrane potential to control the gain in mitogenic signaling circuits. PMID:26293964

  19. SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION. Membrane potential modulates plasma membrane phospholipid dynamics and K-Ras signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yong; Wong, Ching-On; Cho, Kwang-jin; van der Hoeven, Dharini; Liang, Hong; Thakur, Dhananiay P; Luo, Jialie; Babic, Milos; Zinsmaier, Konrad E; Zhu, Michael X; Hu, Hongzhen; Venkatachalam, Kartik; Hancock, John F

    2015-08-21

    Plasma membrane depolarization can trigger cell proliferation, but how membrane potential influences mitogenic signaling is uncertain. Here, we show that plasma membrane depolarization induces nanoscale reorganization of phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate but not other anionic phospholipids. K-Ras, which is targeted to the plasma membrane by electrostatic interactions with phosphatidylserine, in turn undergoes enhanced nanoclustering. Depolarization-induced changes in phosphatidylserine and K-Ras plasma membrane organization occur in fibroblasts, excitable neuroblastoma cells, and Drosophila neurons in vivo and robustly amplify K-Ras-dependent mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. Conversely, plasma membrane repolarization disrupts K-Ras nanoclustering and inhibits MAPK signaling. By responding to voltage-induced changes in phosphatidylserine spatiotemporal dynamics, K-Ras nanoclusters set up the plasma membrane as a biological field-effect transistor, allowing membrane potential to control the gain in mitogenic signaling circuits.

  20. Genetic studies of plasma analytes identify novel potential biomarkers for several complex traits

    PubMed Central

    Deming, Yuetiva; Xia, Jian; Cai, Yefei; Lord, Jenny; Del-Aguila, Jorge L.; Fernandez, Maria Victoria; Carrell, David; Black, Kathleen; Budde, John; Ma, ShengMei; Saef, Benjamin; Howells, Bill; Bertelsen, Sarah; Bailey, Matthew; Ridge, Perry G.; Hefti, Franz; Fillit, Howard; Zimmerman, Earl A.; Celmins, Dzintra; Brown, Alice D.; Carrillo, Maria; Fleisher, Adam; Reeder, Stephanie; Trncic, Nadira; Burke, Anna; Tariot, Pierre; Reiman, Eric M.; Chen, Kewei; Sabbagh, Marwan N.; Beiden, Christine M.; Jacobson, Sandra A.; Sirrel, Sherye A.; Doody, Rachelle S.; Villanueva-Meyer, Javier; Chowdhury, Munir; Rountree, Susan; Dang, Mimi; Kowall, Neil; Killiany, Ronald; Budson, Andrew E.; Norbash, Alexander; Johnson, Patricia Lynn; Green, Robert C.; Marshall, Gad; Johnson, Keith A.; Sperling, Reisa A.; Snyder, Peter; Salloway, Stephen; Malloy, Paul; Correia, Stephen; Bernick, Charles; Munic, Donna; Stern, Yaakov; Honig, Lawrence S.; Bell, Karen L.; Relkin, Norman; Chaing, Gloria; Ravdin, Lisa; Paul, Steven; Flashman, Laura A.; Seltzer, Marc; Hynes, Mary L.; Santulli, Robert B.; Bates, Vernice; Capote, Horacio; Rainka, Michelle; Friedl, Karl; Murali Doraiswamy, P.; Petrella, Jeffrey R.; Borges-Neto, Salvador; James, Olga; Wong, Terence; Coleman, Edward; Schwartz, Adam; Cellar, Janet S.; Levey, Allan L.; Lah, James J.; Behan, Kelly; Scott Turner, Raymond; Johnson, Kathleen; Reynolds, Brigid; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Blank, Karen; Anderson, Karen; Obisesan, Thomas O.; Wolday, Saba; Allard, Joanne; Lerner, Alan; Ogrocki, Paula; Tatsuoka, Curtis; Fatica, Parianne; Farlow, Martin R.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Shen, Li; Faber, Kelly; Kim, Sungeun; Nho, Kwangsik; Marie Hake, Ann; Matthews, Brandy R.; Brosch, Jared R.; Herring, Scott; Hunt, Cynthia; Albert, Marilyn; Onyike, Chiadi; D’Agostino, Daniel; Kielb, Stephanie; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Parfitt, Francine; Kendall, Tracy; Johnson, Heather; Petersen, Ronald; Jack, Clifford R.; Bernstein, Matthew; Borowski, Bret; Gunter, Jeff; Senjem, Matt; Vemuri, Prashanthi; Jones, David; Kantarci, Kejal; Ward, Chad; Mason, Sara S.; Albers, Colleen S.; Knopman, David; Johnson, Kris; Chertkow, Howard; Hosein, Chris; Mintzer, Jacob; Spicer, Kenneth; Bachman, David; Grossman, Hillel; Mitsis, Effie; Pomara, Nunzio; Hernando, Raymundo; Sarrael, Antero; Potter, William; Buckholtz, Neil; Hsiao, John; Kittur, Smita; Galvin, James E.; Cerbone, Brittany; Michel, Christina A.; Pogorelec, Dana M.; Rusinek, Henry; de Leon, Mony J; Glodzik, Lidia; De Santi, Susan; Johnson, Nancy; Chuang-Kuo; Kerwin, Diana; Bonakdarpour, Borna; Weintraub, Sandra; Grafman, Jordan; Lipowski, Kristine; Mesulam, Marek-Marsel; Scharre, Douglas W.; Kataki, Maria; Adeli, Anahita; Kaye, Jeffrey; Quinn, Joseph; Silbert, Lisa; Lind, Betty; Carter, Raina; Dolen, Sara; Borrie, Michael; Lee, T-Y; Bartha, Rob; Martinez, Walter; Villena, Teresa; Sadowsky, Carl; Khachaturian, Zaven; Ott, Brian R.; Querfurth, Henry; Tremont, Geoffrey; Frank, Richard; Fleischman, Debra; Arfanakis, Konstantinos; Shah, Raj C.; deToledo-Morrell, Leyla; Sorensen, Greg; Finger, Elizabeth; Pasternack, Stephen; Rachinsky, Irina; Drost, Dick; Rogers, John; Kertesz, Andrew; Furst, Ansgar J.; Chad, Stevan; Yesavage, Jerome; Taylor, Joy L.; Lane, Barton; Rosen, Allyson; Tinklenberg, Jared; Black, Sandra; Stefanovic, Bojana; Caldwell, Curtis; Robin Hsiung, Ging-Yuek; Mudge, Benita; Assaly, Michele; Fox, Nick; Schultz, Susan K.; Boles Ponto, Laura L.; Shim, Hyungsub; Ekstam Smith, Karen; Burns, Jeffrey M.; Swerdlow, Russell H.; Brooks, William M.; Marson, Daniel; Griffith, Randall; Clark, David; Geldmacher, David; Brockington, John; Roberson, Erik; Natelson Love, Marissa; DeCarli, Charles; Carmichael, Owen; Olichney, John; Maillard, Pauline; Fletcher, Evan; Nguyen, Dana; Preda, Andrian; Potkin, Steven; Mulnard, Ruth A.; Thai, Gaby; McAdams-Ortiz, Catherine; Landau, Susan; Jagust, William; Apostolova, Liana; Tingus, Kathleen; Woo, Ellen; Silverman, Daniel H.S.; Lu, Po H.; Bartzokis, George; Thompson, Paul; Donohue, Michael; Thomas, Ronald G.; Walter, Sarah; Gessert, Devon; Brewer, James; Vanderswag, Helen; Sather, Tamie; Jiminez, Gus; Balasubramanian, Archana B.; Mason, Jennifer; Sim, Iris; Aisen, Paul; Davis, Melissa; Morrison, Rosemary; Harvey, Danielle; Thal, Lean; Beckett, Laurel; Neylan, Thomas; Finley, Shannon; Weiner, Michael W.; Hayes, Jacqueline; Rosen, Howard J.; Miller, Bruce L.; Perry, David; Massoglia, Dino; Brawman-Mentzer, Olga; Schuff, Norbert; Smith, Charles D.; Hardy, Peter; Sinha, Partha; Oates, Elizabeth; Conrad, Gary; Koeppe, Robert A.; Lord, Joanne L.; Heidebrink, Judith L.; Arnold, Steven E.; Karlawish, Jason H.; Wolk, David; Clark, Christopher M.; Trojanowki, John Q.; Shaw, Leslie M.; Lee, Virginia; Korecka, Magdalena; Figurski, Michal; Toga, Arthur W.; Crawford, Karen; Neu, Scott; Schneider, Lon S.; Pawluczyk, Sonia; Beccera, Mauricio; Teodoro, Liberty; Spann, Bryan M.; Womack, Kyle; Mathews, Dana; Quiceno, Mary; Foster, Norm; Montine, Tom; Fruehling, J. Jay; Harding, Sandra; Johnson, Sterling; Asthana, Sanjay; Carlsson, Cynthia M.; Petrie, Eric C.; Peskind, Elaine; Li, Gail; Porsteinsson, Anton P.; Goldstein, Bonnie S.; Martin, Kim; Makino, Kelly M.; Ismail, M. Saleem; Brand, Connie; Smith, Amanda; Ashok Raj, Balebail; Fargher, Kristin; Kuller, Lew; Mathis, Chet; Ann Oakley, Mary; Lopez, Oscar L.; Simpson, Donna M.; Sink, Kaycee M.; Gordineer, Leslie; Williamson, Jeff D.; Garg, Pradeep; Watkins, Franklin; Cairns, Nigel J.; Raichle, Marc; Morris, John C.; Householder, Erin; Taylor-Reinwald, Lisa; Holtzman, David; Ances, Beau; Carroll, Maria; Creech, Mary L.; Franklin, Erin; Mintun, Mark A.; Schneider, Stacy; Oliver, Angela; Duara, Ranjan; Varon, Daniel; Greig, Maria T.; Roberts, Peggy; Varma, Pradeep; MacAvoy, Martha G.; Carson, Richard E.; van Dyck, Christopher H.; Davies, Peter; Holtzman, David; Morris, John C.; Bales, Kelly; Pickering, Eve H.; Lee, Jin-Moo; Heitsch, Laura; Kauwe, John; Goate, Alison; Piccio, Laura; Cruchaga, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies of 146 plasma protein levels in 818 individuals revealed 56 genome-wide significant associations (28 novel) with 47 analytes. Loci associated with plasma levels of 39 proteins tested have been previously associated with various complex traits such as heart disease, inflammatory bowel disease, Type 2 diabetes, and multiple sclerosis. These data suggest that these plasma protein levels may constitute informative endophenotypes for these complex traits. We found three potential pleiotropic genes: ABO for plasma SELE and ACE levels, FUT2 for CA19-9 and CEA plasma levels, and APOE for ApoE and CRP levels. We also found multiple independent signals in loci associated with plasma levels of ApoH, CA19-9, FetuinA, IL6r, and LPa. Our study highlights the power of biological traits for genetic studies to identify genetic variants influencing clinically relevant traits, potential pleiotropic effects, and complex disease associations in the same locus.

  1. Potentials and problems of building detailed dust records using peat archives: An example from Store Mosse (the "Great Bog"), Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kylander, Malin E.; Martínez-Cortizas, Antonio; Bindler, Richard; Greenwood, Sarah L.; Mörth, Carl-Magnus; Rauch, Sebastien

    2016-10-01

    Mineral dust deposition is a process often overlooked in northern mid-latitudes, despite its potential effects on ecosystems. These areas are often peat-rich, providing ample material for the reconstruction of past changes in atmospheric deposition. The highly organic (up to 99% in some cases) matrix of atmospherically fed mires, however, makes studying the actual dust particles (grain size, mineralogy) challenging. Here we explore some of the potentials and problems of using geochemical data from conservative, lithogenic elements (Al, Ga, Rb, Sc, Y, Zr, Th, Ti and REE) to build detailed dust records by using an example from the 8900-yr peat sequence from Store Mosse (the "Great Bog"), which is the largest mire complex in the boreo-nemoral region of southern Sweden. The four dust events recorded at this site were elementally distinct, suggesting different dominant mineral hosts. The oldest and longest event (6385-5300 cal yr BP) sees a clear signal of clay input but with increasing contributions of mica, feldspar and middle-REE-rich phosphate minerals over time. These clays are likely transported from a long-distance source (<100 km). While dust deposition was reduced during the second event (5300-4370 cal yr BP), this is the most distinct in terms of its source character with [Eu/Eu∗]UCC revealing the input of plagioclase feldspar from a local source, possibly active during this stormier period. The third (2380-2200 cal yr BP) and fourth (1275-1080 cal yr BP) events are much shorter in duration and the presence of clays and heavy minerals is inferred. Elemental mass accumulation rates reflect these changes in mineralogy where the relative importance of the four dust events varies by element. The broad changes in major mineral hosts, grain size, source location and approximated net dust deposition rates observed in the earlier dust events of longer duration agree well with paleoclimatic changes observed in northern Europe. The two most recent dust events are much

  2. Self-consistent electrostatic potential due to trapped plasma in the magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Ronald H.; Khazanov, George V.

    1993-01-01

    A steady state solution for the self-consistent electrostatic potential due to a plasma confined in a magnetic flux tube is considered. A steady state distribution function is constructed for the trapped particles from the constants of the motion, in the absence of waves and collisions. Using Liouville's theorem, the particle density along the geomagnetic field is determined and found to depend on the local magnetic field, self-consistent electric potential, and the equatorial plasma distribution function. A hot anisotropic magnetospheric plasma in steady state is modeled by a bi-Maxwellian at the equator. The self-consistent electric potential along the magnetic field is calculated assuming quasineutrality, and the potential drop is found to be approximately equal to the average kinetic energy of the equatorially trapped plasma. The potential is compared with that obtained by Alfven and Faelthammar (1963).

  3. Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE) - parameters and potentials for fusion plasma-wall interaction studies

    SciTech Connect

    Masashi Shimada; Robert D. Kolasinski; J. Phillip Sharpe; Rion A. Causey

    2011-08-01

    The Tritium plasma experiment (TPE) is a unique facility devoted to experiments on the behavior of deuterium/tritium in toxic (e.g. beryllium) and radioactive materials for fusion plasma-wall interaction (PWI) studies. A Langmuir probe was added to the system to characterize the plasma conditions in TPE. With this new diagnostic, we found the achievable electron temperature ranged from 5.0 to 10.0 eV, the electron density varied from 5.0 x 10{sup 16} to 2.5 x 10{sup 18} m{sup -3}, and the ion flux density varied between 5.0 x 10{sup 20} to 2.5 x 10{sup 22} m{sup -2}s{sup -1} along the centerline of the plasma. A comparison of these plasma parameters with the conditions expected for the plasma facing components (PFCs) in ITER shows that TPE is capable of achieving most (approximately 800 m{sup 2} of 850 m{sup 2} total PFCs area) of the expected ion flux density and electron density conditions.

  4. Tritium plasma experiment: Parameters and potentials for fusion plasma-wall interaction studies

    SciTech Connect

    Shimada, Masashi; Sharpe, J. Phillip; Kolasinski, Robert D.; Causey, Rion A.

    2011-08-15

    The tritium plasma experiment (TPE) is a unique facility devoted to experiments on the behavior of deuterium/tritium in toxic (e.g., beryllium) and radioactive materials for fusion plasma-wall interaction studies. A Langmuir probe was added to the system to characterize the plasma conditions in TPE. With this new diagnostic, we found the achievable electron temperature ranged from 5.0 to 10.0 eV, the electron density varied from 5.0 x 10{sup 16} to 2.5 x 10{sup 18} m{sup -3}, and the ion flux density varied between 5.0 x 10{sup 20} to 2.5 x 10{sup 22} m{sup -2} s{sup -1} along the centerline of the plasma. A comparison of these plasma parameters with the conditions expected for the plasma facing components (PFCs) in ITER shows that TPE is capable of achieving most ({approx}800 m{sup 2} of 850 m{sup 2} total PFCs area) of the expected ion flux density and electron density conditions.

  5. Academic detailing.

    PubMed

    Shankar, P R; Jha, N; Piryani, R M; Bajracharya, O; Shrestha, R; Thapa, H S

    2010-01-01

    There are a number of sources available to prescribers to stay up to date about medicines. Prescribers in rural areas in developing countries however, may not able to access some of them. Interventions to improve prescribing can be educational, managerial, and regulatory or use a mix of strategies. Detailing by the pharmaceutical industry is widespread. Academic detailing (AD) has been classically seen as a form of continuing medical education in which a trained health professional such as a physician or pharmacist visits physicians in their offices to provide evidence-based information. Face-to-face sessions, preferably on an individual basis, clear educational and behavioural objectives, establishing credibility with respect to objectivity, stimulating physician interaction, use of concise graphic educational materials, highlighting key messages, and when possible, providing positive reinforcement of improved practices in follow-up visits can increase success of AD initiatives. AD is common in developed countries and certain examples have been cited in this review. In developing countries the authors have come across reports of AD in Pakistan, Sudan, Argentina and Uruguay, Bihar state in India, Zambia, Cuba, Indonesia and Mexico. AD had a consistent, small but potentially significant impact on prescribing practices. AD has much less resources at its command compared to the efforts by the industry. Steps have to be taken to formally start AD in Nepal and there may be specific hindering factors similar to those in other developing nations.

  6. Nonthermal Argon Plasma Generator and Some Potential Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunoiu, M.; Jugunaru, I.; Bica, I.; Balasoiu, M.

    2015-12-01

    A laboratory - made nonthermal plasma generator is presented. It has a diameter of 0.020 m and length of 0.155 m and contains two electrodes. The first electrode is a 2% Th-W alloy, 0.002 m in diameter bar, centred inside the generator's body by means of a four channel teflon piece; the other three channels, 0.003 m in diameter, are used for Ar supply. The second electrode is a nozzle of 0.002 m - 0.008 m diameter and 0.005m length. A ~500 kV/m electric field is generated between the two electrodes by a high frequency source (13.56 MHz ±5%), equipped with a OT-1000 (Tungsram) power triode. For Ar flows ranging from 0.00008 m3/s to 0.00056 m3/s, a plasma jet of length not exceeding 0.015 m and temperature below 315 K is obtained. Anthurium andraeanumis sample , blood matrix, human hair and textile fibers may be introduced in the plasma jet. For time periods of 30 s and 60 s, various effects like, cell detexturization, fast blood coagulation or textile fiber or hair cleaning and smoothing are obtained. These effects are presented and discussed in the paper.

  7. Effect of dense plasmas on exchange-energy shifts in highly charged ions: An alternative approach for arbitrary perturbation potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Rosmej, F.; Bennadji, K.; Lisitsa, V. S.

    2011-09-15

    An alternative method of calculation of dense plasma effects on exchange-energy shifts {Delta}E{sub x} of highly charged ions is proposed which results in closed expressions for any plasma or perturbation potential. The method is based on a perturbation theory expansion for the inner atomic potential produced by charged plasma particles employing the Coulomb Green function method. This approach allows us to obtain analytic expressions and scaling laws with respect to the electron temperature T, density n{sub e}, and nuclear charge Z. To demonstrate the power of the present method, two specific models were considered in detail: the ion sphere model (ISM) and the Debye screening model (DSM). We demonstrate that analytical expressions can be obtained even for the finite temperature ISM. Calculations have been carried out for the singlet 1s2p{sup 1} P{sub 1} and triplet 1s2p{sup 3} P{sub 1} configurations of He-like ions with charge Z that can be observed in dense plasmas via the He-like resonance and intercombination lines. Finally we discuss recently available purely numerical calculations and experimental data.

  8. Crystalline Ceramic Waste Forms: Report Detailing Data Collection In Support Of Potential FY13 Pilot Scale Melter Test

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkman, K. S.; Amoroso, J.; Marra, J. C.; Fox, K. M.

    2012-09-21

    The research conducted in this work package is aimed at taking advantage of the long term thermodynamic stability of crystalline ceramics to create more durable waste forms (as compared to high level waste glass) in order to reduce the reliance on engineered and natural barrier systems. Durable ceramic waste forms that incorporate a wide range of radionuclides have the potential to broaden the available disposal options and to lower the storage and disposal costs associated with advanced fuel cycles. Assemblages of several titanate phases have been successfully demonstrated to incorporate radioactive waste elements, and the multiphase nature of these materials allows them to accommodate variation in the waste composition. Recent work has shown that they can be successfully produced from a melting and crystallization process. The objective of this report is to summarize the data collection in support of future melter demonstration testing for crystalline ceramic waste forms. The waste stream used as the basis for the development and testing is a combination of the projected Cs/Sr separated stream, the Trivalent Actinide - Lanthanide Separation by Phosphorous reagent Extraction from Aqueous Komplexes (TALSPEAK) waste stream consisting of lanthanide fission products, the transition metal fission product waste stream resulting from the transuranic extraction (TRUEX) process, and a high molybdenum concentration with relatively low noble metal concentrations. The principal difficulties encountered during processing of the ?reference ceramic? waste form by a melt and crystallization process were the incomplete incorporation of Cs into the hollandite phase and the presence of secondary Cs-Mo non-durable phases. In the single phase hollandite system, these issues were addressed in this study by refining the compositions to include Cr as a transition metal element and the use of Ti/TiO{sub 2} buffer to maintain reducing conditions. Initial viscosity studies of ceramic waste

  9. A Vlasov equation with Dirac potential used in fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bardos, Claude; Nouri, Anne

    2012-11-15

    Well-posedness of the Cauchy problem is analyzed for a singular Vlasov equation governing the evolution of the ionic distribution function of a quasineutral fusion plasma. The Penrose criterium is adapted to the linearized problem around a time and space homogeneous distribution function showing (due to the singularity) more drastic differences between stable and unstable situations. This pathology appears on the full nonlinear problem, well-posed locally in time with analytic initial data, but generally ill-posed in the Hadamard sense. Eventually with a very different class of solutions, mono-kinetic, which constrains the structure of the density distribution, the problem becomes locally in time well-posed.

  10. Cytotoxic and mutagenic potential of solutions exposed to cold atmospheric plasma.

    PubMed

    Boehm, Daniela; Heslin, Caitlin; Cullen, Patrick J; Bourke, Paula

    2016-02-24

    The exposure of aqueous solutions to atmospheric plasmas results in the generation of relatively long-lived secondary products such as hydrogen peroxide which are biologically active and have demonstrated anti-microbial and cytotoxic activity. The use of plasma-activated solutions in applications such as microbial decontamination or anti-cancer treatments requires not only adequate performance on target cells but also a safe operating window regarding the impact on surrounding tissues. Furthermore the generation of plasma-activated fluids needs to be considered as a by-stander effect of subjecting tissue to plasma discharges. Cytotoxicity and mutagenicity assays using mammalian cell lines were used to elucidate the effects of solutions treated with di-electric barrier discharge atmospheric cold plasma. Plasma-treated PBS inhibited cell growth in a treatment time-dependent manner showing a linear correlation to the solutions' peroxide concentration which remained stable over several weeks. Plasma-treated foetal bovine serum (FBS) acting as a model for complex bio-fluids showed not only cytotoxic effects but also exhibited increased mutagenic potential as determined using the mammalian HPRT assay. Further studies are warranted to determine the nature, causes and effects of the cyto- and genotoxic potential of solutions exposed to plasma discharges to ensure long-term safety of novel plasma applications in medicine and healthcare.

  11. Cytotoxic and mutagenic potential of solutions exposed to cold atmospheric plasma

    PubMed Central

    Boehm, Daniela; Heslin, Caitlin; Cullen, Patrick J.; Bourke, Paula

    2016-01-01

    The exposure of aqueous solutions to atmospheric plasmas results in the generation of relatively long-lived secondary products such as hydrogen peroxide which are biologically active and have demonstrated anti-microbial and cytotoxic activity. The use of plasma-activated solutions in applications such as microbial decontamination or anti-cancer treatments requires not only adequate performance on target cells but also a safe operating window regarding the impact on surrounding tissues. Furthermore the generation of plasma-activated fluids needs to be considered as a by-stander effect of subjecting tissue to plasma discharges. Cytotoxicity and mutagenicity assays using mammalian cell lines were used to elucidate the effects of solutions treated with di-electric barrier discharge atmospheric cold plasma. Plasma-treated PBS inhibited cell growth in a treatment time-dependent manner showing a linear correlation to the solutions’ peroxide concentration which remained stable over several weeks. Plasma-treated foetal bovine serum (FBS) acting as a model for complex bio-fluids showed not only cytotoxic effects but also exhibited increased mutagenic potential as determined using the mammalian HPRT assay. Further studies are warranted to determine the nature, causes and effects of the cyto- and genotoxic potential of solutions exposed to plasma discharges to ensure long-term safety of novel plasma applications in medicine and healthcare. PMID:26908060

  12. Characteristics of the NASA Lewis bumpy-torus plasma generated with positive applied potentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, J. R.; Gerdin, G. A.; Richardson, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    Experimental observations were made during steady-state operation of a bumpy-torus plasma at input powers up to 150 kW in deuterium and helium gas and with positive potentials applied to the midplane electrodes. In this steady-state ion heating method a modified Penning discharge is operated such that the plasma is acted upon by a combination of strong electric and magnetic fields. Experimental investigation of a deuterium plasma revealed electron temperatures from 14 to 140 eV and ion kinetic temperatures from 160 to 1785 eV. At least two distinct modes of operation exist. Experimental data shows that the average ion residence time in the plasma is virtually independent of the magnetic field strength. Data was taken when all 12 anode rings were at high voltage, and in other symmetric configurations in which the toroidal plasma was generated by applying positive potentials to six anode rings, three anode rings, and a single anode ring.

  13. Wake potential with exchange-correlation effects in semiconductor quantum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Arroj A.; Jamil, M.; Hussain, A.

    2015-09-15

    Using the non-relativistic quantum hydrodynamic model, wake potential has been studied in a magnetized semiconductor quantum plasma in the presence of upper hybrid wave which is excited via externally injected electron beam. The quantum effect contains electron exchange and correlation potential, Fermi degenerate pressure, and Bohm potential. It is found that the contribution of quantum mechanical electron exchange and correlation potential significantly modifies the amplitude and the effective length of the oscillatory wake potential. In the electron-hole plasma systems, electron exchange-correlation effects tend to increase the magnitude of the wake potential and are much effective at the distances of the order of Debye-length. The application of the work in context of the semiconductor plasmas have also been analyzed graphically.

  14. Platelet-rich plasma gel composited with nondegradable porous polyurethane scaffolds as a potential auricular cartilage alternative.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhongshan; Qin, Haiyan; Feng, Zhihong; Zhao, Yimin

    2016-02-01

    Total auricular reconstruction is still a challenge, and autologous cartilage transplant is the main therapy so far. Tissue engineering provides a promising method for auricular cartilage reconstruction. However, although degradable framework demonstrated excellent initial cosmetic details, it is difficult to maintain the auricular contour over time and the metabolites tended to be harmful to human body. In this study, biocompatible and safe nondegradable elastic polyurethane was used to make porous scaffold in specific details by rapid prototyping technology. Platelet-rich plasma contains fibrin and abundant autologous growth factors, which was used as cell carriers for in vitro expanded cells. When crosslinking polyurethane framework, platelet-rich plasma and cells together, we successfully made polyurethane/platelet-rich plasma/cell composites, and implanted them into dorsal subcutaneous space of nude mice. The results showed that this method resulted in more even cell distribution and higher cell density, promoted chondrocyte proliferation, induced higher level expressions of aggrecan and type II collagen gene, increased content of newly developed glycosaminoglycans, and produced high-quality cartilaginous tissue. This kind of cartilage tissue engineering approach may be a potential promising alternative for external ear reconstruction.

  15. Spacecraft Potential Control by the Plasma Source Instrument on the POLAR Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comfort, R. H.; Moore, T. E.; Craven, P. D.; Pollock, C. J.; Mozer, F. S.; Williamson, W. S.

    1998-01-01

    This increasingly recognized that the low-energy core plasma is a critically important part of magnetospheric plasma transport, yet this plasma cannot be accurately measured from spacecraft at potentials much different from that of the ambient plasma. In low-density regions such as the polar cap and lobes, spacecraft charge positively, excluding core ions from the spacecraft and accelerating core electrons so much that their velocities cannot be measured with any accuracy. In regions of high electron pressure and temperature, spacecraft charge negatively, excluding the ambient core electrons and accelerating the core ions so much that their velocity cannot be accurately measured. Plasma contactors have been used on a number of spacecraft operating in low-plasma-density regions to prevent charging of spacecraft to high potentials, particularly when exposed to high fluxes of energetic particles. This concern has prompted extensive studies by NASA for use of plasma contractors on the international space station where solar arrays may significantly affect the spacecraft potential.

  16. Interpretation of fast measurements of plasma potential, temperature and density in SOL of ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horacek, J.; Adamek, J.; Müller, H. W.; Seidl, J.; Nielsen, A. H.; Rohde, V.; Mehlmann, F.; Ionita, C.; Havlíčková, E.; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2010-10-01

    This paper focuses on interpretation of fast (1 µs) and local (2-4 mm) measurements of plasma density, potential and electron temperature in the edge plasma of tokamak ASDEX Upgrade. Steady-state radial profiles demonstrate the credibility of the ball-pen probe. We demonstrate that floating potential fluctuations measured by a Langmuir probe are dominated by plasma electron temperature rather than potential. Spatial and temporal scales are found consistent with expectations based on interchange-driven turbulence. Conditionally averaged signals found for both potential and density are also consistent; however, those for temperature show an unexpected ~4 mm wide decrease by 10% at the very centre of a blob. In the wall shadow, temperature measured by the swept Langmuir probe yields values ~10 eV, whilst the ball-pen temperature gradient is more steep and credible, dropping down to ~1 eV.

  17. Regional applicability and potential of salt-gradient solar ponds in the United States. Volume 2: Detailed report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, E. I. H.

    1982-01-01

    A comprehensive assessment of the regional applicability and potential of salt-gradient solar ponds in the United States is provided. The assessment is focused on the general characteristics of twelve defined geographic regions. Natural resources essential to solar ponds are surveyed. Meteorological and hydrogeological conditions affecting pond performance are examined. Potentially favorable pond sites are identified. Regional thermal and electrical energy output from solar ponds is calculated. Selected pond design cases are studied. Five major potential market sectors are evaluated in terms of technical and energy-consumption characteristics, and solar-pond applicability and potential. Relevant pond system data and financial factors are analyzed. Solar-pond energy costs are compared with conventional energy costs. The assessment concludes that, excepting Alaska, ponds are applicable in all regions for at least two market sectors. Total solar pond energy supply potential in the five market sectors examined is estimated to be 8.94 quads/yr by the year 2000, approximately 7.2% of the projected total national energy demand.

  18. Detailed study of surface-enhanced Raman scattering from metallic nanosculptured thin films and their potential for biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalabney, Atef; Khare, Chinmay; Bauer, Jens; Rauschenbach, Bernd; Abdulhalim, I.

    2012-01-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) from silver nanosculptured thin films (STF) was studied in detail for biosensing. The influences of the nanostructures' sizes, topology, the substrate features, and the preparation conditions on the enhancement were examined. Enhancement factors on the order of 107 were obtained from silver nanorods deposited on bare silicon substrates with respect to their dense counterparts, using 4-aminotheophenol (4-ATP) for the Raman emission. The low detection limit that can be achieved with STFs is below 1 μg/lit of the probe molecule 4-ATP in Ethanol solution. Theoretical modeling based on a single small spheroidal nanoparticle helped in explaining the main properties of SERS from STFs. Stability of the films was noticed over a period of one year without significant degradation.

  19. Effect of confining wall potential on charged collimated dust beam in low-pressure plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kausik, S. S.; Kakati, B.; Saikia, B. K.

    2013-05-01

    The effect of confining wall potential on charged collimated dust beam in low-pressure plasma has been studied in a dusty plasma experimental setup by applying electrostatic field to each channel of a multicusp magnetic cage. Argon plasma is produced by hot cathode discharge method at a pressure of 5×10-4 millibars and is confined by a full line cusped magnetic field confinement system. Silver dust grains are produced by gas-evaporation technique and move upward in the form of a collimated dust beam due to differential pressure maintained between the dust and plasma chambers. The charged grains in the beam after coming out from the plasma column enter into the diagnostic chamber and are deflected by a dc field applied across a pair of deflector plates at different confining potentials. Both from the amount of deflection and the floating potential, the number of charges collected by the dust grains is calculated. Furthermore, the collimated dust beam strikes the Faraday cup, which is placed above the deflector plates, and the current (˜pA) so produced is measured by an electrometer at different confining potentials. The experimental results demonstrate the significant effect of confining wall potential on charging of dust grains.

  20. Effect of confining wall potential on charged collimated dust beam in low-pressure plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kausik, S. S.; Kakati, B.; Saikia, B. K.

    2013-05-15

    The effect of confining wall potential on charged collimated dust beam in low-pressure plasma has been studied in a dusty plasma experimental setup by applying electrostatic field to each channel of a multicusp magnetic cage. Argon plasma is produced by hot cathode discharge method at a pressure of 5×10{sup −4} millibars and is confined by a full line cusped magnetic field confinement system. Silver dust grains are produced by gas-evaporation technique and move upward in the form of a collimated dust beam due to differential pressure maintained between the dust and plasma chambers. The charged grains in the beam after coming out from the plasma column enter into the diagnostic chamber and are deflected by a dc field applied across a pair of deflector plates at different confining potentials. Both from the amount of deflection and the floating potential, the number of charges collected by the dust grains is calculated. Furthermore, the collimated dust beam strikes the Faraday cup, which is placed above the deflector plates, and the current (∼pA) so produced is measured by an electrometer at different confining potentials. The experimental results demonstrate the significant effect of confining wall potential on charging of dust grains.

  1. Preoperative prediction of potentially preventable morbidity after fast-track hip and knee arthroplasty: a detailed descriptive cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Morten Aa; Kehlet, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Construction of a simple preoperative risk score for patients in high risk of potentially preventable ‘medical’ complications. Secondary objectives were to construct simple preoperative risk scores for ‘severe medical’, ‘surgical’ and ‘total’ potentially preventable complications. Design Prospective observational study. Setting Elective primary unilateral total hip and knee arthroplasty with prospectively collected preoperative patient characteristics; similar standardised fast-track protocols; evaluation of complications through discharge and medical records; and complete 90 days follow-up through nationwide databases. Participants 8373 consecutive unselected total hip arthroplasty (THA) and knee arthroplasty from January 2010 to November 2012. Results There were 557 procedures (6.4%) followed by potentially preventable complications resulting in hospitalisation >4 days or readmission. Of 22 preoperative characteristics, 7 were associated with 379 (4.2%) potentially preventable ‘medical’ complications. Patients with ≥2 of the following, age ≥80 years, anticoagulant therapy, pulmonary disease, pharmacologically treated psychiatric disorder, anaemia and walking aids, composed 19.1% of the procedures; 55.7% constituted potentially preventable ‘medical’ complications that were mainly falls, mobilisation issues, pneumonias and cardiac arrhythmias. The number needed to be treated for a hypothetical intervention leading to 25% reduction in potentially preventable ‘medical’ complications was 34. THA, use of walking aids and cardiac disease were associated with 189 (2.2%) ‘surgical’ complications, but no clinically relevant preoperative prediction was possible. Conclusions Preoperative identification of patients at high risk of preventable ‘medical’, but not ‘surgical’, complications is statistically possible. However, clinical relevance is limited. Future risk indices should differ between ‘medical’ and

  2. Model of the Plasma Potential Distribution in the Plume of a Hollow Cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Ira; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Goebel, Dan M.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we present results from a new model of the plasma potentials in the plume just downstream of the hollow cathode keeper. We examine the electron drift velocity as the hollow cathode plasma and neutral gas expand downstream of the keeper. If the drift velocity exceeds the thermal velocity a double layer potential structure develops that is the source of hot electrons. Ions are accelerated upstream through the double layer. The locations of the double layers are calculated using a simple model. It is shown that as the cathode gas flow increases, the location of the double layer moves farther downstream.

  3. Quantitative Assessment of Potentially Active Faults in Oklahoma Utilizing Detailed Information on In Situ Stress Orientation and Relative Magnitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, R.; Zoback, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    Over the past six years, the earthquake rate in the central and eastern U.S. has increased markedly, and is related to fluid injection. Nowhere has seismicity increased more than in Oklahoma, where large volumes of saline pore water are co-produced with oil and gas, then injected into deeper sedimentary formations. These deeper formations appear to be in hydraulic communication with potentially active faults in crystalline basement, where nearly all the earthquakes are occurring. Although the majority of the recent earthquakes have posed little danger to the public, the possibility of triggering damaging earthquakes on potentially active basement faults cannot be discounted. To understand probability of slip on a given fault, we invert for stresses from the hundreds of M4+ events in Oklahoma for which moment tensors have been made. We then resolve these stresses, while incorporating uncertainties, on the faults from the preliminary Oklahoma fault map. The result is a probabilistic understanding of which faults are most likely active and best avoided.

  4. Plasma-modified and polyethylene glycol-grafted polymers for potential tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Svorcík, V; Makajová, Z; Kasálková-Slepicková, N; Kolská, Z; Bacáková, L

    2012-08-01

    Modified and grafted polymers may serve as building blocks for creating artificial bioinspired nanostructured surfaces for tissue engineering. Polyethylene (PE) and polystyrene (PS) were modified by Ar plasma and the surface of the plasma activated polymers was grafted with polyethylene glycol (PEG). The changes in the surface wettability (contact angle) of the modified polymers were examined by goniometry. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was used to determine the surface roughness and morphology and electrokinetical analysis (Zeta potential) characterized surface chemistry of the modified polymers. Plasma treatment and subsequent PEG grafting lead to dramatic changes in the polymer surface morphology, roughness and wettability. The plasma treated and PEG grafted polymers were seeded with rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and their adhesion and proliferation were studied. Biological tests, performed in vitro, show increased adhesion and proliferation of cells on modified polymers. Grafting with PEG increases cell proliferation, especially on PS. The cell proliferation was shown to be an increasing function of PEG molecular weight.

  5. PIMC Validation of Effective Quantum Potentials for MD Simulations of Dense Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitley, Heather D.; Castor, John I.; Langdon, A. Bruce; Khairallah, Saad A.; Surh, Michael P.; Dubois, Jonathan L.; Alder, Berni J.; Draeger, Erik W.; Schwegler, Eric; Graziani, Frank R.; Murillo, Michael S.

    2010-11-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of dense plasmas, such as those found in non-equilibrium laser fusion experiments, are challenging due to the importance of several quantum mechanical effects. We currently employ approximate statistical potentials, obtained exactly in the pair approximation from a numerical solution of the Bloch equation for the Coulomb density matrix. The fermionic character of the electrons is handled via an effective Pauli potential. We first study the accuracy of existing pair potentials and their extension to lower temperature and high Z ions by examining the exact pair density matrix. We then perform classical hypernetted chain and MD simulations using those effective potentials to study equilibrium thermodynamics of dense plasmas. Fully quantum path integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) simulations are used to gauge the accuracy of the classical calculations for dense hydrogen. Using feedback from the PIMC, we can further refine the effective Coulomb and Pauli potentials. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  6. Transition from single to multiple axial potential structure in expanding helicon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Soumen; Chattopadhyay, P. K.; Ghosh, J.; Pal, R.; Bora, D.

    2017-02-01

    Transition from single to multiple axial potential structure (MAPS) formation is reported in expanding helicon plasma. This transition is created by forming a cusp magnetic field at the downstream after the expansion throat. Two distinct potential drops are separated by a uniform axial potential zone. Non-uniform axial density distribution exists in expanding helicon systems. A cusp-like field nourishes both the axial density gradients sufficient enough for the formation of these two distinct potential drops. It is also shown that both single and multiple axial potential structures are observed only when both geometric and magnetic expansions closely coincide with each other. Coexistence of these two expansions at the same location enhances plasma expansion which facilitates deviation from Boltzmann distribution and violates quasi-neutrality locally.

  7. Potential cellular targets and antibacterial efficacy of atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma.

    PubMed

    Alkawareek, Mahmoud Y; Gorman, Sean P; Graham, William G; Gilmore, Brendan F

    2014-02-01

    Atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma (APNTP) has been gaining increasing interest as a new alternative antibacterial approach. Although this approach has demonstrated promising antibacterial activity, its exact mechanism of action remains unclear. Mechanistic elucidation of the antimicrobial activity will facilitate development and rational optimisation of this approach for potential medical applications. In this study, the antibacterial efficacy of an in-house-built APNTP jet was evaluated alongside an investigation of the interactions between APNTP and major cellular components in order to identify the potential cellular targets involved in plasma-mediated bacterial destruction mechanisms. The investigated plasma jet exhibited excellent, rapid antibacterial activity against a selected panel of clinically significant bacterial species including Bacillus cereus, meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, all of which were completely inactivated within 2 min of plasma exposure. Plasma-mediated damaging effects were observed, to varying degrees, on all of the investigated cellular components including DNA, a model protein enzyme, and lipid membrane integrity and permeability. The antibacterial efficacy of APNTP appears to involve a multiple-target mechanism, which potentially reduces the likelihood of emergence of microbial resistance towards this promising antimicrobial approach. However, cellular membrane damage and resulting permeability perturbation was found to be the most likely rate-determining step in this mechanism.

  8. Determination and analysis of an analytical potential for ions in excited configurations in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez Perez, Rafael

    The main objective in this Thesis is to propose an analytical expression, within the context of the Independent Particle Model in a central field, for the effective potential that a bound electron feels when it belongs to an ion which is in an excited configuration. It is also an objective that this potential will be obtained as a correction to the effective potential corresponding to the ion in ground state. The potential proposed not only allows to include the effects that the excited configurations introduce on atomic magnitudes but also allows to broach, in a simple and fast way, how to determine the ionic populations and the optical properties of plasmas. The great advantage of the analytical potentials is that they avoid the iterative procedures, which are characteristic in the self-consistent methods, in the calculations of atomic magnitudes and plasma properties. This fact allow a considerable diminution in calculation time. Moreover, the analytical potential proposed in this Thesis has the advantage with respect other analytical potentials that it does not need to fit its parameters when we consider different excited configurations. This fact implies a considerable diminution in the complexity of the problem and in the calculation time and allows to include more excited configurations to model the ions present in the plasma, which improves the results. With the potential proposed in this Thesis we have studied the influence of the excited configurations on atomic magnitudes. Those results have been checked satisfactorily with others obtained by self-consistent methods and by using analytical potentials. We have also used the potential proposed to determine which excited configurations have more probability of presence in a plasma in Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium.

  9. Dynamism & Detail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, Maura C.

    2004-01-01

    New material discovered in the study of cell research is presented for the benefit of biology teachers. Huge amounts of data are being generated in fields like cellular dynamics, and it is felt that people's understanding of the cell is becoming much more complex and detailed.

  10. Formation of Non-Monotonic Potential Structure in the Detached Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiguro, Seiji; Pianpanit, Theerasarn; Hasegawa, Hiroki

    2016-10-01

    Plasma detachment has been investigated by means of PIC simulation which includes plasma-neutral collision and Coulomb collision. In our previous study, we have shown that a strong gradient in temperature appears in front of the target plate in the case that high density and low temperature neutral gas is introduced. It is observed that a potential hill is created in the neutral gas region where ions lose energy due to the elastic and charge exchange collision and, as a result, the ion density increases. This potential structure traps the low energy electrons and may play a role in the development of plasma detachment state. This work is supported by NIFS Collaboration Research Programs NIFS14KNXN279 and NIFS14KNSS059 and the NIFS/NINS project of Formation of International Scientific Base and Network.

  11. Potential Industrial Applications of the One Atmosphere Uniform Glow Discharge Plasma (OAUGDP) Operating in Ambient Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reece Roth, J.

    2004-11-01

    The majority of industrial plasma processing with glow discharges has been conducted at pressures below 10 torr. This tends to limit applications to high value workpieces as a result of the high capital cost of vacuum systems and the production constraints of batch processing. It has long been recognized that glow discharge plasmas would play a much larger industrial role if they could be generated at one atmosphere. The One Atmosphere Uniform Glow Discharge Plasma (OAUGDP), developed at the University of Tennessee's Plasma Sciences Laboratory, is a non-thermal RF plasma operating on displacement currents with the time-resolved characteristics of a classical low pressure DC normal glow discharge. As a glow discharge, the OAUGDP operates with maximum electrical efficiency at the Stoletow point, where the energy input per ion-electron pair is a minimum [1, 2]. Several interdisciplinary teams have investigated potential applications of the OAUGDP. These teams included collaborators from the UTK Textiles and Nonwovens Development Center (TANDEC), and the Departments of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Microbiology, and Food Science and Technology, as well as the NASA Langley Research Center. The potential applications of the OAUGDP have all been at one atmosphere and room temperature, using air as the working gas. These applications include sterilizing medical and dental equipment; sterilizable air filters to deal with the "sick building syndrome"; removal of soot from Diesel engine exhaust; subsonic plasma aerodynamic effects, including flow re-attachment to airfoils and boundary layer modification; electrohydrodynamic (EDH) flow control of working gases; increasing the surface energy of materials; improving the adhesion of paints and electroplated layers: improving the wettability and wickability of fabrics; stripping of photoresist; and plasma deposition and directional etching of potential microelectronic relevance. [1] J. R. Roth, Industrial Plasma Engineering

  12. Dust removal in radio-frequency plasmas by a traveling potential modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Li Yangfang; Jiang Ke; Thomas, Hubertus M.; Morfill, Gregor E.

    2010-06-16

    The dust contamination in plasma deposition processes plays a crucial role in the quality and the yield of the products. To improve the quality and the yield of plasma processing, a favorable way is to remove the dust particles actively from the plasma reactors.Our recent experiments in the striped electrode device show that a traveling plasma modulation allows for a systematic particle removal independent of the reactor size. Besides the rf powered electrode, the striped electrode device includes a segmented electrode that consists of 100 electrically insulated narrow stripes. A traveling potential profile is produced by the modulation of the voltage signals applied on the stripes. The dust particles are trapped in the potential wells and transported with the traveling of the potential profile.The particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation on the potential above the segmented electrode indicates that the traveling potential profile can be realized either by applying low-frequency (0.1-10 Hz) voltage signals with a fixed phase shift between adjacent stripes or high-frequency (10 kHz a circumflex AS 100 MHz) signals with the amplitudes modulated by a low-frequency envelope. The transportation of the dust particles is simulated with a two-dimensional molecular dynamics (MD) code with the potential profile obtained from the PIC simulation. The MD results reproduce the experimental observations successfully.This technology allows for an active removal of the contaminating particles in processing plasmas and it is independent of the reactor size. The removal velocity is controllable by adjusting the parameters for the modulation.

  13. Space charge, plasma potential and electric field distributions in HiPIMS discharges of varying configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebig, B.; Bradley, J. W.

    2013-08-01

    An electron-emitting (emissive) probe has been used to study the temporal and spatial distribution of the plasma potential during high-power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharges with various substrate and magnetic field configurations. The average power was 700 W, with a repetition frequency of 100 Hz and pulse duration of 100 µs. Strongly negative plasma potentials exceeding -300 V and electric fields up to 10 kV m-1, caused by strong separation of charges with net charge carrier densities Δn of about 1014 m-3, were observed during the ignition of the discharge. The spatial distribution of the plasma potential in the stable stage of the discharge showed values consistently 5 V more negative for a floating substrate compared with a grounded one, so enhancing electron transport around the insulated substrate to grounded walls. However, this change in the electrical configuration of the plasma does not alter significantly the fraction of ionized sputtered particles (of about 30%) that can potentially reach the substrate. By changing the degree of unbalance of the sputtering source, we find a strong correlation between the electric field strength in the magnetic trap (created through charge separation) and the absolute value (and shape) of the magnetic field. For the more unbalanced magnetron, a flattening of the plasma potential structure (decrease in the axial electric field) was observed close to the target. Our findings show in principle that manipulation of the potential barrier close to the target through changing the magnetic field can regulate the proportion of sputtered and ionized species reaching the substrate.

  14. Auroral plasma transport processes in the presence of kV potential structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganguli, Supriya B.; Mitchell, H. G.; Palmadesso, P. J.

    1994-01-01

    We have simulated plasma transport processes in the presence of a quasi-two-dimensional current filament, that generated kV potential structure in the auroral region. The simulation consists of a set of one-dimensional flux tube simulations with different imposed time-dependent, field-aligned currents. The model uses the 16 moment system of equations and simultaneously solves coupled continuity and momentum equations and equations describing the transport along the magnetic field lines of parallel and perpendicular thermal energy and heat flows for each species. The lower end of the simulation is at an altitude of 800 km, in the collisional topside ionosphere, while the upper end is at 10 R(sub E) in the magnetosphere. The plasma consists of hot electrons and protons of magnetospheric origin and low-energy electrons, protons, and oxygen ions of ionospheric origin. The dynamical interaction of the individual current filaments with ionospheric and magnetospheric plasma generates a potential structure in the horizontal direction and kilovolt field-aligned potential drops along the field lines. The side-by-side display exhibits the evolution of the implied potential structure in the horizontial direction. In the presence of this potential structure and parallel electric field ionospheric plasma density is depleted and velocity is reduced, while density enhancement and increased velocity is observed in magnetospheric plasma. The ionospheric and magnetospheric electron temperatures increase below 2 R(sub E) due to magnetic mirror force on converging geomagnetic field lines. The primary cross-field motion produced by the horizontal E field (E x B drift) is perpendicular to both of the significant spatial directions and is thus ignorable in this geometry. The effects of other cross-field drift processes are discussed. The simulation thus provides insight into the dynamical evolution of two-dimensional potential structures driven by an imposed finite width, field

  15. Increasing Extracted Beam Current Density in Ion Thrusters through Plasma Potential Modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthur, Neil; Foster, John

    2015-09-01

    A gridded ion thruster's maximum extractable beam current is determined by the space charge limit. The classical formulation does not take into account finite ion drift into the acceleration gap. It can be shown that extractable beam current can be increased beyond the conventional Child-Langmuir law if the ions enter the gap at a finite drift speed. In this work, ion drift in a 10 cm thruster is varied by adjusting the plasma potential relative to the potential at the extraction plane. Internal plasma potential variations are achieved using a novel approach involving biasing the magnetic cusps. Ion flow variations are assessed using simulated beam extraction in conjunction with a retarding potential analyzer. Ion beam current density changes at a given total beam voltage in full beam extraction tests are characterized as a function of induced ion drift velocity as well.

  16. Plasma soluble prion protein, a potential biomarker for sport-related concussions: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Pham, Nam; Akonasu, Hungbo; Shishkin, Rhonda; Taghibiglou, Changiz

    2015-01-01

    Sport-related mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) or concussion is a significant health concern to athletes with potential long-term consequences. The diagnosis of sport concussion and return to sport decision making is one of the greatest challenges facing health care clinicians working in sports. Blood biomarkers have recently demonstrated their potential in assisting the detection of brain injury particularly, in those cases with no obvious physical injury. We have recently discovered plasma soluble cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) as a potential reliable biomarker for blast induced TBI (bTBI) in a rodent animal model. In order to explore the application of this novel TBI biomarker to sport-related concussion, we conducted a pilot study at the University of Saskatchewan (U of S) by recruiting athlete and non-athlete 18 to 30 year-old students. Using a modified quantitative ELISA method, we first established normal values for the plasma soluble PrP(C) in male and female students. The measured plasma soluble PrP(C) in confirmed concussion cases demonstrated a significant elevation of this analyte in post-concussion samples. Data collected from our pilot study indicates that the plasma soluble PrP(C) is a potential biomarker for sport-related concussion, which may be further developed into a clinical diagnostic tool to assist clinicians in the assessment of sport concussion and return-to-play decision making.

  17. Equation of state of a quark-gluon plasma using the Cornell potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udayanandan, K. M.; Sethumadhavan, P.; Bannur, V. M.

    2007-10-01

    The equation of state (EOS) of quark-gluon plasma (QGP) using the Cornell potential based on Mayer's cluster expansion is presented. The string constant and the strong coupling constant for QGP are calculated. The EOS developed could describe the lattice EOS for pure gauge, two-flavor and three-flavor QGP qualitatively.

  18. Quantification of plasma exosome is a potential prognostic marker for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Yasunori; Kano, Masayuki; Akutsu, Yasunori; Hanari, Naoyuki; Hoshino, Isamu; Murakami, Kentaro; Usui, Akihiro; Suito, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Masahiko; Otsuka, Ryota; Xin, Hu; Komatsu, Aki; Iida, Keiko; Matsubara, Hisahiro

    2016-11-01

    Exosomes play important roles in cancer progression. Although its contents (e.g., proteins and microRNAs) have been focused on in cancer research, particularly as potential diagnostic markers, the exosome behavior and methods for exosome quantification remain unclear. In the present study, we analyzed the tumor-derived exosome behavior and assessed the quantification of exosomes in patient plasma as a biomarker for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). A CD63-GFP expressing human ESCC cell line (TE2-CD63-GFP) was made by transfection, and mouse subcutaneous tumor models were established. Fluorescence imaging was performed on tumors and plasma exosomes harvested from mice. GFP-positive small vesicles were confirmed in the plasma obtained from TE2-CD63-GFP tumor-bearing mice. Patient plasma was collected in Chiba University Hospital (n=86). Exosomes were extracted from 100 µl of the plasma and quantified by acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity. The relationship between exosome quantification and the patient clinical characteristics was assessed. The quantification of exosomes isolated from the patient plasma revealed that esophageal cancer patients (n=66) expressed higher exosome levels than non-malignant patients (n=20) (P=0.0002). Although there was no correlation between the tumor progression and the exosome levels, exosome number was the independent prognostic marker and low levels of exosome predicted a poor prognosis (P=0.03). In conclusion, exosome levels may be useful as an independent prognostic factor for ESCC patients.

  19. Quantum-Mechanical Calculation of Ionization-Potential Lowering in Dense Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Sang-Kil; Thiele, Robert; Jurek, Zoltan; Ziaja, Beata; Santra, Robin

    2014-07-01

    The charged environment within a dense plasma leads to the phenomenon of ionization-potential depression (IPD) for ions embedded in the plasma. Accurate predictions of the IPD effect are of crucial importance for modeling atomic processes occurring within dense plasmas. Several theoretical models have been developed to describe the IPD effect, with frequently discrepant predictions. Only recently, first experiments on IPD in Al plasma have been performed with an x-ray free-electron laser, where their results were found to be in disagreement with the widely used IPD model by Stewart and Pyatt. Another experiment on Al, at the Orion laser, showed disagreement with the model by Ecker and Kröll. This controversy shows a strong need for a rigorous and consistent theoretical approach to calculate the IPD effect. Here, we propose such an approach: a two-step Hartree-Fock-Slater model. With this parameter-free model, we can accurately and efficiently describe the experimental Al data and validate the accuracy of standard IPD models. Our model can be a useful tool for calculating atomic properties within dense plasmas with wide-ranging applications to studies on warm dense matter, shock experiments, planetary science, inertial confinement fusion, and nonequilibrium plasmas created with x-ray free-electron lasers.

  20. An Investigation of the Potential Uses of Plasma Processing in the United States Chemical Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estey, Paul Norman

    This thesis describes a systematic approach to determine the potential for high pressure (thermal) plasma processing in the United States chemical industry. A model was developed that describes the physical inputs and outputs of a plasma-based processing system. This model consists of an empirical model of an electric arc heater and an analytical model of the reaction chamber into which the arc heater gas flows. The reaction chamber model comprises the conservation equations of one-dimensional fluid flow including the effects of chemical kinetics, particle and gas injection, and convective and radiative heat transfer. These complex equations were solved numerically. An engineering economic analysis of the plasma process was performed when favorable results existed for the mass and energy flows to and from the plasma arc heater/reaction chamber model. This analysis was used to determine if the plasma process is or can be competitive with conventional technology. Five cases were studied as examples of plasma -based chemical processing: nitric acid production, hydrogen cyanide synthesis, silicon refining, titanium dioxide production, and reductant gas synthesis from residual fuel oil.

  1. A Scaling Law of Plasma Confining Potential Formation with Electron Cyclotron Heating Powers in GAMMA 10

    SciTech Connect

    Numakura, T.; Cho, T.; Kohagura, J.; Hirata, M.; Fukai, T.; Yoshida, M.; Minami, R.; Kiminami, S.; Sakamoto, K.; Imai, T.; Miyoshi, S.

    2005-01-15

    Scaling laws of potential formation and associated effects are theoretically and experimentally investigated in the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror. In GAMMA 10, the main tandem-mirror operations from 1979 to 2003 are characterized in terms of (i) a high-potential mode having kV-order plasma-confining potentials, and (ii) a hot-ion mode yielding fusion neutrons with 10-20 keV bulk-ion temperatures. In this paper, the externally controllable parameter scaling including electron cyclotron heating (ECH) powers for potential formation covering over these two representative operational modes is investigated; that is, the construction of 'the central-cell plasma-confining potentials' {phi}{sub c} formation scaling with plug ECH is studied on the basis of the electron energy-balance equation and Cohen's strong electron cyclotron heating (ECH) theory for investigating the formation physics of plasma confining potentials.It is found that our proposed scaling formulae are in good agreement with the experimental data in the two representative operational modes of the high-potential and hot-ion modes in the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror.This scaling shows a favorable increase in confining potentials with installing more powerful ECH sources by the use of ECH powers over the present 250 kW. On the basis of the scaling prediction, we also report the design of a newly developed 500 kW gyrotron for an application to investigate the validity of the above described {phi}{sub c} formation scaling with plug ECH aiming at achieving higher plasma parameters.

  2. Contact potential induced enhancement of magnetization in polyaniline coated nanomagnetic iron oxides by plasma polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sethulakshmi, N.; Sooraj, V.; Sajeev, U. S.; Nair, Swapna S.; Narayanan, T. N.; Joy, Lija K.; Joy, P. A.; Ajayan, P. M.; Anantharaman, M. R.

    2013-10-01

    The present work derives motivation from the so called surface/interfacial magnetism in core shell structures and commercial samples of Fe3O4 and γ Fe2O3 with sizes ranging from 20 to 30 nm were coated with polyaniline using plasma polymerization and studied. The High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy images indicate a core shell structure after polyaniline coating and exhibited an increase in saturation magnetization by 2 emu/g. For confirmation, plasma polymerization was performed on maghemite nanoparticles which also exhibited an increase in saturation magnetization. This enhanced magnetization is rather surprising and the reason is found to be an interfacial phenomenon resulting from a contact potential.

  3. Ambipolar potential effect on a drift-wave mode in a tandem-mirror plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mase, A.; Jeong, J.H.; Itakura, A.; Ishii, K.; Inutake, M.; Miyoshi, S. )

    1990-05-07

    The {bold k}-{omega} spectra of low-frequency waves which exist in a tandem-mirror plasma are observed by using the Fraunhofer-diffraction method. The observed dispersion relations are in good agreement with those of drift waves including a Doppler shift due to {bold E}{times}{bold B} rotation velocity. The fluctuation level is observed to depend sensitively on the radial profile of a plasma potential. It has a maximum value when a slightly negative electric field is formed, and decreases with increase in an electric field regardless of its sign.

  4. Enzymatic Modification of Plasma Low Density Lipoproteins in Rabbits: A Potential Treatment for Hypercholesterolemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labeque, Regine; Mullon, Claudy J. P.; Ferreira, Joao Paulo M.; Lees, Robert S.; Langer, Robert

    1993-04-01

    Phospholipase A_2 (EC 3.1.1.4) hydrolyzes certain phospholipids of low density lipoprotein (LDL). Plasma clearance of phospholipase A_2-modified human LDL is up to 17 times faster than that of native human LDL in hypercholesterolemic rabbits. Modification of blood lipoproteins of hypercholesterolemic rabbits was performed by using an extracorporeal circuit containing immobilized phospholipase A_2. After 90-min treatments, nearly 30% decreases in plasma cholesterol concentrations were observed. Erythrocyte, leukocyte, and platelet counts showed no net change after treatment. This technique does not require any fluid replacement or sorbent regeneration and offers a potential approach for lowering serum cholesterol and LDL levels.

  5. Bohm potential effect on the propagation of electrostatic surface wave in semi-bounded quantum plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Myoung-Jae; Jung, Young-Dae

    2017-02-01

    High frequency electrostatic wave propagation in a dense and semi-bounded electron quantum plasma is investigated with consideration of the Bohm potential. The dispersion relation for the surface mode of quantum plasma is derived and numerically analyzed. We found that the quantum effect enhances the frequency of the wave especially in the high wave number regime. However, the frequency of surface wave is found to be always lower than that of the bulk wave for the same quantum wave number. The group velocity of the surface wave for various quantum wave number is also obtained.

  6. Plasma dynamics on current-carrying magnetic flux tubes. II - Low potential simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, Daniel W.

    1992-01-01

    The evolution of plasma in a current-carrying magnetic flux tube of variable cross section is investigated using a one-dimensional numerical simulation. The flux tube is narrow at the two ends and broad in the middle. The middle part of the flux tube is loaded with a hot, magnetically trapped population, and the two ends have a more dense, gravitationally bound population. A potential difference larger than the gravitational potential but less than the energy of the hot population is applied across the domain. The general result is that the potential change becomes distributed along the anode half of the domain, with negligible potential change on the cathode half. The potential is supported by the mirror force of magnetically trapped particles. The simulations show a steady depletion of plasma on the anode side of the flux tube. The current steadily decreases on a time scale of an ion transit time. The results may provide an explanation for the observed plasma depletions on auroral field lines carrying upward currents.

  7. Differential proteomics of human seminal plasma: A potential target for searching male infertility marker proteins.

    PubMed

    Tomar, Anil Kumar; Sooch, Balwinder Singh; Singh, Sarman; Yadav, Savita

    2012-04-01

    The clinical fertility tests, available in the market, fail to define the exact cause of male infertility in almost half of the cases and point toward a crucial need of developing better ways of infertility investigations. The protein biomarkers may help us toward better understanding of unknown cases of male infertility that, in turn, can guide us to find better therapeutic solutions. Many clinical attempts have been made to identify biomarkers of male infertility in sperm proteome but only few studies have targeted seminal plasma. Human seminal plasma is a rich source of proteins that are essentially required for development of sperm and successful fertilization. This viewpoint article highlights the importance of human seminal plasma proteome in reproductive physiology and suggests that differential proteomics integrated with functional analysis may help us in searching potential biomarkers of male infertility.

  8. Suppressibility of plasma adrenocorticotropin by hydrocortisone: potential usefulness in the diagnosis of Cushing's disease.

    PubMed

    Streeten, D H; Anderson, G H; Brennan, S; Jones, C

    1998-04-01

    Repeatedly normal cortisol suppressibility by dexamethasone in 2 patients with Cushing's disease led to the present study of the prevalence of this phenomenon in 58 patients with otherwise incontrovertible evidence of Cushing's disease. Because as many as 23% of these patients manifested this phenomenon, we investigated the suppressibility of plasma ACTH: 1) during i.v. infusion of hydrocortisone, after a priming dose (7 mg), at 3 mg/h in 8 patients and 8 normal controls; and 2) for 2 h, after oral hydrocortisone, 0.25 mg/kg, in 13 patients and 16 controls. The data showed invariable suppression of plasma ACTH to < or = 10 pg/mL (< or = 2.2 pmol/L) after 120 min of the infusion or at 90 min after oral hydrocortisone in 16 fasting normal subjects given oral hydrocortisone between 0800 and 0830 h. Plasma ACTH exceeded 10 pg/mL (2.2 pmol/L) at the same times in 14/14 patients with active Cushing's disease, including 3 patients whose cortisol suppressibility by dexamethasone had been misleadingly normal and in 4/7 patients with intermittent hypercortisolism. Occasional variations in plasma cortisol elevations after the oral dose require that plasma cortisol concentration be monitored at 60 min after the oral hydrocortisone dose, because the present evidence supports the validity of the conclusion that a plasma ACTH concentration below 10 pg/mL excludes Cushing's disease only when plasma cortisol concentration at 60 min lies between 16 and 38 microg/dL. Further evaluation of ACTH suppressibility by cortisol would be worthwhile, to confirm its potential value in facilitating positive diagnosis of Cushing's disease when dexamethasone suppressibility seems misleading.

  9. High-field plasma acceleration in a high-ionization-potential gas

    SciTech Connect

    Corde, S.; Adli, E.; Allen, J. M.; An, W.; Clarke, C. I.; Clausse, B.; Clayton, C. E.; Delahaye, J. P.; Frederico, J.; Gessner, S.; Green, S. Z.; Hogan, M. J.; Joshi, C.; Litos, M.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K. A.; Mori, W. B.; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N.; Walz, D.; Yakimenko, V.

    2016-06-17

    Plasma accelerators driven by particle beams are a very promising future accelerator technology as they can sustain high accelerating fields over long distances with high energy efficiency. They rely on the excitation of a plasma wave in the wake of a drive beam. To generate the plasma, a neutral gas can be field-ionized by the head of the drive beam, in which case the distance of acceleration and energy gain can be strongly limited by head erosion. In our research, we overcome this limit and demonstrate that electrons in the tail of a drive beam can be accelerated by up to 27 GeV in a high-ionization-potential gas (argon), boosting their initial 20.35 GeV energy by 130%. Particle-in-cell simulations show that the argon plasma is sustaining very high electric fields, of ~150 GV m-1, over ~20 cm. Lastly, the results open new possibilities for the design of particle beam drivers and plasma sources.

  10. High-field plasma acceleration in a high-ionization-potential gas

    DOE PAGES

    Corde, S.; Adli, E.; Allen, J. M.; ...

    2016-06-17

    Plasma accelerators driven by particle beams are a very promising future accelerator technology as they can sustain high accelerating fields over long distances with high energy efficiency. They rely on the excitation of a plasma wave in the wake of a drive beam. To generate the plasma, a neutral gas can be field-ionized by the head of the drive beam, in which case the distance of acceleration and energy gain can be strongly limited by head erosion. In our research, we overcome this limit and demonstrate that electrons in the tail of a drive beam can be accelerated by upmore » to 27 GeV in a high-ionization-potential gas (argon), boosting their initial 20.35 GeV energy by 130%. Particle-in-cell simulations show that the argon plasma is sustaining very high electric fields, of ~150 GV m-1, over ~20 cm. Lastly, the results open new possibilities for the design of particle beam drivers and plasma sources.« less

  11. Carbonylated plasma proteins as potential biomarkers of obesity induced type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Bollineni, Ravi Chand; Fedorova, Maria; Blüher, Matthias; Hoffmann, Ralf

    2014-11-07

    Protein carbonylation is a common nonenzymatic oxidative post-translational modification, which is often considered as biomarker of oxidative stress. Recent evidence links protein carbonylation also to obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), though the protein targets of carbonylation in human plasma have not been identified. In this study, we profiled carbonylated proteins in plasma samples obtained from lean individuals and obese patients with or without T2DM. The plasma samples were digested with trypsin, carbonyl groups were derivatized with O-(biotinylcarbazoylmethyl)hydroxylamine, enriched by avidin affinity chromatography, and analyzed by RPC-MS/MS. Signals of potentially modified peptides were targeted in a second LC-MS/MS analysis to retrieve the peptide sequence and the modified residues. A total of 158 unique carbonylated proteins were identified, of which 52 were detected in plasma samples of all three groups. Interestingly, 36 carbonylated proteins were detected only in obese patients with T2DM, whereas 18 were detected in both nondiabetic groups. The carbonylated proteins originated mostly from liver, plasma, platelet, and endothelium. Functionally, they were mainly involved in cell adhesion, signaling, angiogenesis, and cytoskeletal remodeling. Among the identified carbonylated proteins were several candidates, such as VEGFR-2, MMP-1, argin, MKK4, and compliment C5, already connected before to diabetes, obesity and metabolic diseases.

  12. High-field plasma acceleration in a high-ionization-potential gas

    PubMed Central

    Corde, S.; Adli, E.; Allen, J. M.; An, W.; Clarke, C. I.; Clausse, B.; Clayton, C. E.; Delahaye, J. P.; Frederico, J.; Gessner, S.; Green, S. Z.; Hogan, M. J.; Joshi, C.; Litos, M.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K. A.; Mori, W. B.; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N.; Walz, D.; Yakimenko, V.

    2016-01-01

    Plasma accelerators driven by particle beams are a very promising future accelerator technology as they can sustain high accelerating fields over long distances with high energy efficiency. They rely on the excitation of a plasma wave in the wake of a drive beam. To generate the plasma, a neutral gas can be field-ionized by the head of the drive beam, in which case the distance of acceleration and energy gain can be strongly limited by head erosion. Here we overcome this limit and demonstrate that electrons in the tail of a drive beam can be accelerated by up to 27 GeV in a high-ionization-potential gas (argon), boosting their initial 20.35 GeV energy by 130%. Particle-in-cell simulations show that the argon plasma is sustaining very high electric fields, of ∼150 GV m−1, over ∼20 cm. The results open new possibilities for the design of particle beam drivers and plasma sources. PMID:27312720

  13. On the phase shift between electric potential and plasma density fluctuations in the edge turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Shchepetov, S. V. Kholnov, Yu. V.; Vasil'kov, D. G.

    2013-02-15

    In some cases, the phase shift between fluctuations of the electric potential and plasma density helps to identify the instability that governs the turbulent state. In this paper, the basic experimental and theoretical results that denote the possibility (or impossibility) of such identification are briefly discussed. The experimental data based on measurements of the phase shift between the floating potential and ion saturation current fluctuations in the L-2M stellarator-a system with externally imposed magnetic surfaces-are presented (Shchepetov, Kholnov, Fedyanin, et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 50, 045001 (2008)). It is shown that the observed phase shift {Omega} varies in a wide range from {pi} to 0, gradually decreasing with deepening inside the plasma. A number of arguments are presented suggesting that {Omega} Almost-Equal-To {pi} can indicate that the process is nonlocal, i.e., oscillations at a given spatial point are driven and mainly determined by the processes localized outside of the observation point. We note that, within the framework of the magnetohydrodynamic theory, plasma was definitely unstable with respect to resistive interchange modes in all cases under study. It is demonstrated experimentally that the widespread notion that the phase shift {Omega} Almost-Equal-To {pi}/2 is characteristic of only resistive interchange modes is hardly universal. The experimental results are analyzed on the basis of analytical estimates.

  14. Characterization of plasma thiol redox potential in a common marmoset model of aging.

    PubMed

    Roede, James R; Uppal, Karan; Liang, Yongliang; Promislow, Daniel E L; Wachtman, Lynn M; Jones, Dean P

    2013-01-01

    Due to its short lifespan, ease of use and age-related pathologies that mirror those observed in humans, the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) is poised to become a standard nonhuman primate model of aging. Blood and extracellular fluid possess two major thiol-dependent redox nodes involving cysteine (Cys), cystine (CySS), glutathione (GSH) and glutathione disulfide (GSSG). Alteration in these plasma redox nodes significantly affects cellular physiology, and oxidation of the plasma Cys/CySS redox potential (E hCySS) is associated with aging and disease risk in humans. The purpose of this study was to determine age-related changes in plasma redox metabolites and corresponding redox potentials (E h) to further validate the marmoset as a nonhuman primate model of aging. We measured plasma thiol redox states in marmosets and used existing human data with multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS) to model the relationships between age and redox metabolites. A classification accuracy of 70.2% and an AUC of 0.703 were achieved using the MARS model built from the marmoset redox data to classify the human samples as young or old. These results show that common marmosets provide a useful model for thiol redox biology of aging.

  15. A comparison of inflection point and floating point emissive probe techniques for electric potential measurements in a Hall thruster plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehan, J. P.; Raitses, Yevgeny; Hershkowitz, Noah; Fisch, Nathaniel

    2010-11-01

    Theory suggests that when increasing the electron emission of an emissive probe the floating potential will saturate ˜Te/e below the plasma potential. This can introduce significant errors in plasma potential measurements in Hall thrusters where Te> 10 eV. The method of determining the plasma potential from the inflection point of emissive IV traces in the limit of zero emission may give a more accurate measurement of the plasma potential. The two methods are compared in a Hall thruster where ne˜10^11 cm-3, Te˜20 eV, and ion flows are significant. The results can be generalized to other types of plasmas.

  16. Effect of source tuning parameters on the plasma potential of heavy ions in the 18 GHz high temperature superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, G.; Mathur, Y.; Kumar, Sarvesh; Mandal, A.; Kanjilal, D.; Roy, A.; Baskaran, R.; Kukrety, S.

    2012-03-15

    Plasma potentials for various heavy ions have been measured using the retarding field technique in the 18 GHz high temperature superconducting ECR ion source, PKDELIS [C. Bieth, S. Kantas, P. Sortais, D. Kanjilal, G. Rodrigues, S. Milward, S. Harrison, and R. McMahon, Nucl. Instrum. Methods B 235, 498 (2005); D. Kanjilal, G. Rodrigues, P. Kumar, A. Mandal, A. Roy, C. Bieth, S. Kantas, and P. Sortais, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 77, 03A317 (2006)]. The ion beam extracted from the source is decelerated close to the location of a mesh which is polarized to the source potential and beams having different plasma potentials are measured on a Faraday cup located downstream of the mesh. The influence of various source parameters, viz., RF power, gas pressure, magnetic field, negative dc bias, and gas mixing on the plasma potential is studied. The study helped to find an upper limit of the energy spread of the heavy ions, which can influence the design of the longitudinal optics of the high current injector being developed at the Inter University Accelerator Centre. It is observed that the plasma potentials are decreasing for increasing charge states and a mass effect is clearly observed for the ions with similar operating gas pressures. In the case of gas mixing, it is observed that the plasma potential minimizes at an optimum value of the gas pressure of the mixing gas and the mean charge state maximizes at this value. Details of the measurements carried out as a function of various source parameters and its impact on the longitudinal optics are presented.

  17. Effect of source tuning parameters on the plasma potential of heavy ions in the 18 GHz high temperature superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, G; Baskaran, R; Kukrety, S; Mathur, Y; Kumar, Sarvesh; Mandal, A; Kanjilal, D; Roy, A

    2012-03-01

    Plasma potentials for various heavy ions have been measured using the retarding field technique in the 18 GHz high temperature superconducting ECR ion source, PKDELIS [C. Bieth, S. Kantas, P. Sortais, D. Kanjilal, G. Rodrigues, S. Milward, S. Harrison, and R. McMahon, Nucl. Instrum. Methods B 235, 498 (2005); D. Kanjilal, G. Rodrigues, P. Kumar, A. Mandal, A. Roy, C. Bieth, S. Kantas, and P. Sortais, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 77, 03A317 (2006)]. The ion beam extracted from the source is decelerated close to the location of a mesh which is polarized to the source potential and beams having different plasma potentials are measured on a Faraday cup located downstream of the mesh. The influence of various source parameters, viz., RF power, gas pressure, magnetic field, negative dc bias, and gas mixing on the plasma potential is studied. The study helped to find an upper limit of the energy spread of the heavy ions, which can influence the design of the longitudinal optics of the high current injector being developed at the Inter University Accelerator Centre. It is observed that the plasma potentials are decreasing for increasing charge states and a mass effect is clearly observed for the ions with similar operating gas pressures. In the case of gas mixing, it is observed that the plasma potential minimizes at an optimum value of the gas pressure of the mixing gas and the mean charge state maximizes at this value. Details of the measurements carried out as a function of various source parameters and its impact on the longitudinal optics are presented.

  18. Effect of source tuning parameters on the plasma potential of heavy ions in the 18 GHz high temperature superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, G.; Baskaran, R.; Kukrety, S.; Mathur, Y.; Kumar, Sarvesh; Mandal, A.; Kanjilal, D.; Roy, A.

    2012-03-01

    Plasma potentials for various heavy ions have been measured using the retarding field technique in the 18 GHz high temperature superconducting ECR ion source, PKDELIS [C. Bieth, S. Kantas, P. Sortais, D. Kanjilal, G. Rodrigues, S. Milward, S. Harrison, and R. McMahon, Nucl. Instrum. Methods B 235, 498 (2005), 10.1016/j.nimb.2005.03.232; D. Kanjilal, G. Rodrigues, P. Kumar, A. Mandal, A. Roy, C. Bieth, S. Kantas, and P. Sortais, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 77, 03A317 (2006), 10.1063/1.2164887]. The ion beam extracted from the source is decelerated close to the location of a mesh which is polarized to the source potential and beams having different plasma potentials are measured on a Faraday cup located downstream of the mesh. The influence of various source parameters, viz., RF power, gas pressure, magnetic field, negative dc bias, and gas mixing on the plasma potential is studied. The study helped to find an upper limit of the energy spread of the heavy ions, which can influence the design of the longitudinal optics of the high current injector being developed at the Inter University Accelerator Centre. It is observed that the plasma potentials are decreasing for increasing charge states and a mass effect is clearly observed for the ions with similar operating gas pressures. In the case of gas mixing, it is observed that the plasma potential minimizes at an optimum value of the gas pressure of the mixing gas and the mean charge state maximizes at this value. Details of the measurements carried out as a function of various source parameters and its impact on the longitudinal optics are presented.

  19. Modified Jeans instability in Lorentzian dusty self-gravitating plasmas with Lennard-Jones potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Y. Z.; Chen, H.; Liu, S. Q.

    2014-11-01

    The Jeans instability in self-gravitating plasma with Kappa distributed dust grains is investigated basing on assumption that the mutual interaction among dust grains is governed by Lennard-Jones potential. It is shown that the presence of additional suprathermal particles has significant effects on the range of unstable modes and growth rate of Jeans instability. Compared with Maxwellian scenario, suprathermality stabilized the Jeans instability.

  20. Modified Jeans instability in Lorentzian dusty self-gravitating plasmas with Lennard-Jones potential

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Y. Z. Chen, H. Liu, S. Q.

    2014-11-15

    The Jeans instability in self-gravitating plasma with Kappa distributed dust grains is investigated basing on assumption that the mutual interaction among dust grains is governed by Lennard-Jones potential. It is shown that the presence of additional suprathermal particles has significant effects on the range of unstable modes and growth rate of Jeans instability. Compared with Maxwellian scenario, suprathermality stabilized the Jeans instability.

  1. Plasma and synovial fluid microRNAs as potential biomarkers of rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    distinct patterns from synovial fluid miRNAs, which appeared to originate from synovial tissue. Plasma miR-132 well differentiated HCs from patients with RA or OA, while synovial fluid miRNAs differentiated RA and OA. Furthermore, plasma miRNAs correlated with the disease activities of RA. Thus, synovial fluid and plasma miRNAs have potential as diagnostic biomarkers for RA and OA and as a tool for the analysis of their pathogenesis. PMID:20470394

  2. FCCP depolarizes plasma membrane potential by activating proton and Na+ currents in bovine aortic endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyu-Sang; Jo, Inho; Pak, Kim; Bae, Sung-Won; Rhim, Hyewhon; Suh, Suk-Hyo; Park, Jin; Zhu, Hong; So, Insuk; Kim, Ki Whan

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the effects of carbonylcyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP), a protonophore and uncoupler of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria, on plasma membrane potential and ionic currents in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs). The membrane potential and ionic currents of BAECs were recorded using the patch-clamp technique in current-clamp and voltage-clamp modes, respectively. FCCP activated ionic currents and depolarized the plasma membrane potential in a dose-dependent manner. Neither the removal of extracellular Ca2+ nor pretreatment with BAPTA/AM affected the FCCP-induced currents, implying that the currents are not associated with the FCCP-induced intracellular [Ca2+]i increase. FCCP-induced currents were significantly influenced by the changes in extracellular or intracellular pH; the increased proton gradient produced by lowering the extracellular pH or intracellular alkalinization augmented the changes in membrane potential and ionic currents caused by FCCP. FCCP-induced currents were significantly reduced under extracellular Na+-free conditions. The reversal potentials of FCCP-induced currents under Na+-free conditions were well fitted to the calculated equilibrium potential for protons. Interestingly, FCCP-induced Na+ transport (subtracted currents, I(control)- I(Na+-free) was closely dependent on extracellular pH, whereas FCCP-induced H+transport was not significantly affected by the absence of Na+. These results suggest that the FCCP-induced ionic currents and depolarization, which are strongly dependent on the plasmalemmal proton gradient, are likely to be mediated by both H+ and Na+ currents across the plasma membrane. The relationship between H+ and Na+ transport still needs to be determined.

  3. Pseudo-Potentials in Dense and He-like Hot temperature Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deutsch, Claude; Rahal, Hamid

    2012-10-01

    Extending our former derivations in dense and high temperature plasmas of hydrogenic effective interactions mimiking the Heisenberg uncertainty principle [1,2], we worked out in a canonical ensemble, effective interactions in He-like plasmas where an orbital 1s electron remains strongly tighted to the He-like ions. The plasma electrons are then taken into account through appropriate Slater sums obtained in the most economical hydrogenic extension of the He-like bound and scattered states with angular orbital momentum l<3. Ground states are described by a multi-parametric HF approximation [3]. We thus obtain Diffraction-corrected electron-ion pseudo-potentials taking into account of a polarizable and nonpointlike ion core. Very large enhancements and discrepancies are obtained when they are contrasted to their H-like homologs with ion charge Z=2,10 and 92. These results are of obvious significance for He-like warm dense matter plasmas.Ionization is also considered.[4pt] [1] C. Deutsch, Phys. Lett. A60, 317 (1977)[4pt] [2] C. Deutsch, Y. Furutani and M.M. Gombert, Phys. Rep. 69,86 (1981)[0pt] [3] E. Clementi and C. Roetti, Atomic Data and Nucl. Data Tables, 14,177(1974)

  4. A study of the transient plasma potential in a pulsed bi-polar dc magnetron discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, J. W.; Karkari, S. K.; Vetushka, A.

    2004-05-01

    The temporal evolution of the plasma potential, Vp, in a pulsed dc magnetron plasma has been determined using the emissive probe technique. The discharge was operated in the 'asymmetric bi-polar' mode, in which the discharge voltage changes polarity during part of the pulse cycle. The probe measurements, with a time-resolution of 20 ns or better, were made along a line above the racetrack, normal to the plane of the cathode target, for a fixed frequency (100 kHz), duty cycle (50%), argon pressure (0.74 Pa) and discharge power (583 W). At all the measured positions, Vp was found to respond to the large and rapid changes in the cathode voltage, Vd, during the different phases of the pulse cycle, with Vp always more positive than Vd. At a typical substrate position (>80 mm from the target), Vp remains a few volts above the most positive surface in the discharge at all times. In the 'on' phase of the pulse, the measurements show a significant axial electric field is generated in the plasma, with the plasma potential dropping by a total of about 30 V over a distance of 70 mm, from the bulk plasma to a position close to the beginning of the cathode fall. This is consistent with measurements made in the dc magnetron. During the stable 'reverse' phase of the discharge, for distances greater than 18 mm from the target, the axial electric field is found to collapse, with Vp elevated uniformly to about 3 V above Vd. Between the target and this field-free region an ion sheath forms, and the current flowing to the target is still an ion current in this 'reverse' period. During the initial 200 ns of the voltage 'overshoot' phase (between 'on' and 'reverse' phases), Vd reached a potential of +290 V; however, close to the target, Vp was found to attain a much higher value, namely +378 V. Along the line of measurement, the axial electric field reverses in direction in this phase, and an electron current of up to 9 A flows to the target. The spatial and temporal measurements of Vp

  5. Electron cooling and finite potential drop in a magnetized plasma expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Sanchez, M.; Navarro-Cavallé, J.; Ahedo, E.

    2015-05-15

    The steady, collisionless, slender flow of a magnetized plasma into a surrounding vacuum is considered. The ion component is modeled as mono-energetic, while electrons are assumed Maxwellian upstream. The magnetic field has a convergent-divergent geometry, and attention is restricted to its paraxial region, so that 2D and drift effects are ignored. By using the conservation of energy and magnetic moment of particles and the quasi-neutrality condition, the ambipolar electric field and the distribution functions of both species are calculated self-consistently, paying attention to the existence of effective potential barriers associated to magnetic mirroring. The solution is used to find the total potential drop for a set of upstream conditions, plus the axial evolution of various moments of interest (density, temperatures, and heat fluxes). The results illuminate the behavior of magnetic nozzles, plasma jets, and other configurations of interest, showing, in particular, in the divergent plasma the collisionless cooling of electrons, and the generation of collisionless electron heat fluxes.

  6. Two Dimensional LIF Measurements and Potential Structure of Ion Beam Formation in an Argon Helicon Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre, Evan; Scime, Earl; Good, Timothy

    2016-10-01

    We report 2-dimensional, spatially resolved observations of ion beam formation in an expanding helicon plasma. Previous studies found that a current free double layer (CFDL) spontaneously arises at low pressure, below 1 mT. We use Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF), a non-perturbative diagnostic to measure the ion velocity distribution functions (IVDFs) of argon ions both parallel and perpendicular to the background magnetic field. We report ion beam formation as a function of the expansion chamber magnetic field (0-108 G). The ion beam appears peaked in the center of the expansion chamber and decays over a few centimeters radially. We also report the potential structure of the plasma obtained with a planar Langmuir probe. To obtain meaningful Langmuir probe measurements, averages of tens of current-voltage are needed to reduce the effects of large electrostatic fluctuations that arise in plasmas that generate ion beams. We report the dependence of density, electron temperature, and floating potential on radial and axial position in the expansion plume. NSF Award PHYS-1360278.

  7. Potential Biomarkers of Fatigue Identified by Plasma Metabolome Analysis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kume, Satoshi; Yamato, Masanori; Tamura, Yasuhisa; Jin, Guanghua; Nakano, Masayuki; Miyashige, Yukiharu; Eguchi, Asami; Ogata, Yoshiyuki; Goda, Nobuhito; Iwai, Kazuhiro; Yamano, Emi; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Kataoka, Yosky

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, prior to the establishment of a method for the clinical diagnosis of chronic fatigue in humans, we validated the utility of plasma metabolomic analysis in a rat model of fatigue using capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry (CE-MS). In order to obtain a fatigued animal group, rats were placed in a cage filled with water to a height of 2.2 cm for 5 days. A food-restricted group, in which rats were limited to 10 g/d of food (around 50% of the control group), was also assessed. The food-restricted group exhibited weight reduction similar to that of the fatigued group. CE-MS measurements were performed to evaluate the profile of food intake-dependent metabolic changes, as well as the profile in fatigue loading, resulting in the identification of 48 metabolites in plasma. Multivariate analyses using hierarchical clustering and principal component analysis revealed that the plasma metabolome in the fatigued group showed clear differences from those in the control and food-restricted groups. In the fatigued group, we found distinctive changes in metabolites related to branched-chain amino acid metabolism, urea cycle, and proline metabolism. Specifically, the fatigued group exhibited significant increases in valine, leucine, isoleucine, and 2-oxoisopentanoate, and significant decreases in citrulline and hydroxyproline compared with the control and food-restricted groups. Plasma levels of total nitric oxide were increased in the fatigued group, indicating systemic oxidative stress. Further, plasma metabolites involved in the citrate cycle, such as cis-aconitate and isocitrate, were reduced in the fatigued group. The levels of ATP were significantly decreased in the liver and skeletal muscle, indicative of a deterioration in energy metabolism in these organs. Thus, this comprehensive metabolic analysis furthered our understanding of the pathophysiology of fatigue, and identified potential diagnostic biomarkers based on fatigue pathophysiology. PMID

  8. Detailed Analysis of the Binding Mode of Vanilloids to Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid Type I (TRPV1) by a Mutational and Computational Study

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Yoshikazu; Ogawa, Kazuo; Warabi, Eiji; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Hirokawa, Takatsugu

    2016-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) is a non-selective cation channel and a multimodal sensor protein. Since the precise structure of TRPV1 was obtained by electron cryo-microscopy, the binding mode of representative agonists such as capsaicin and resiniferatoxin (RTX) has been extensively characterized; however, detailed information on the binding mode of other vanilloids remains lacking. In this study, mutational analysis of human TRPV1 was performed, and four agonists (capsaicin, RTX, [6]-shogaol and [6]-gingerol) were used to identify amino acid residues involved in ligand binding and/or modulation of proton sensitivity. The detailed binding mode of each ligand was then simulated by computational analysis. As a result, three amino acids (L518, F591 and L670) were newly identified as being involved in ligand binding and/or modulation of proton sensitivity. In addition, in silico docking simulation and a subsequent mutational study suggested that [6]-gingerol might bind to and activate TRPV1 in a unique manner. These results provide novel insights into the binding mode of various vanilloids to the channel and will be helpful in developing a TRPV1 modulator. PMID:27606946

  9. Near Discharge Cathode Assembly Plasma Potential Measurements in a 30-cm NSTAR Type Ion Engine During Beam Extraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, Daniel A.; Gallimore, Alec D.

    2006-01-01

    Floating emissive probe plasma potential data are presented over a two-dimensional array of locations in the near Discharge Cathode Assembly (DCA) region of a 30-cm diameter ring-cusp ion thruster. Discharge plasma data are presented with beam extraction at throttling conditions comparable to the NASA TH Levels 8, 12, and 15. The operating conditions of the Extended Life Test (ELT) of the Deep Space One (DS1) flight spare ion engine, where anomalous discharge keeper erosion occurred, were TH 8 and TH 12 consequently they are of specific interest in investigating discharge keeper erosion phenomena. The data do not validate the presence of a potential hill plasma structure downstream of the DCA, which has been proposed as a possible erosion mechanism. The data are comparable in magnitude to data taken by other researchers in ring-cusp electron-bombardment ion thrusters. The plasma potential structures are insensitive to thruster throttling level with a minimum as low as 14 V measured at the DCA exit plane and increasing gradually in the axial direction. A sharp increase in plasma potential to the bulk discharge value of 26 to 28 volts, roughly 10 mm radially from DCA centerline, was observed. Plasma potential measurements indicate a low-potential plume structure that is roughly 20 mm in diameter emanating from the discharge cathode that may be attributed to a free-standing plasma double layer.

  10. Arsenic exposure, inflammation, and renal function in Bangladeshi adults: effect modification by plasma glutathione redox potential

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Brandilyn A.; Liu, Xinhua; Hall, Megan N.; Ilievski, Vesna; Slavkovich, Vesna; Siddique, Abu B.; Alam, Shafiul; Islam, Tariqul; Graziano, Joseph H.; Gamble, Mary V.

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to arsenic (As) in drinking water is a widespread public health problem leading to increased risk for multiple outcomes such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, and possibly renal disease; potential mechanisms include inflammation and oxidative stress. We tested the hypothesis that As exposure is associated with increased inflammation and decreased estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and examined whether the effects of As were modified by plasma glutathione (GSH), glutathione disulfide (GSSG), or the reduction potential of the GSSG/2GSH pair (EhGSH). In a cross-sectional study of N = 374 Bangladeshi adults having a wide range of As exposure, we measured markers of inflammation (plasma C-reactive protein (CRP), α-1 acid glycoprotein (AGP)), renal function (eGFR), GSH, and GSSG. In covariate-adjusted models, a 10% increase in water As, urinary As adjusted for specific gravity (uAs), or blood As (bAs) was associated with a 0.74% (p = 0.01), 0.90% (p = 0.16), and 1.39% (p = 0.07) increase in CRP, respectively; there was no association with AGP. A 10% increase in uAs or bAs was associated with an average reduction in eGFR of 0.16 (p = 0.12) and 0.21 ml/min/1.73 m2 (p = 0.08), respectively. In stratified analyses, the effect of As exposure on CRP was observed only in participants having EhGSH > median (uAs pWald = 0.03; bAs pWald = 0.05). This was primarily driven by stronger effects of As exposure on CRP in participants with lower plasma GSH. The effects of As exposure on eGFR were not modified significantly by EhGSH, GSH, or GSSG. These data suggest that participants having lower plasma GSH and a more oxidized plasma EhGSH are at increased risk for As-induced inflammation. Future studies should evaluate whether antioxidant treatment lowers plasma EhGSH and reduces risk for As-induced diseases. PMID:25916185

  11. Dietary Sulfur Amino Acid Effects on Fasting Plasma Cysteine/Cystine Redox Potential in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Dean P.; Park, Youngja; Gletsu-Miller, Nana; Liang, Yongliang; Yu, Tianwei; Accardi, Carolyn Jonas; Ziegler, Thomas R.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Oxidation of plasma cysteine/cystine (Cys/CySS) redox potential (EhCySS) has been associated with risk factors for cardiovascular disease in humans. Cys and CySS are derived from dietary sulfur amino acids (SAA), but the specific effects of SAA depletion and repletion on Cys/CySS redox indices are unknown. The present study examined the effect of dietary SAA intake level on free Cys, free CySS and EhCySS in human plasma under fasting conditions. Research Methods and Procedures Healthy individuals aged 18–36 y (n=13) were equilibrated to foods providing the RDA for SAA and then fed chemically defined diets without SAA (0 mg·kg−1·d−1; n=13) followed by SAA at levels approximating the mean (56 mg·kg−1·d−1; n=8) or 99th percentile (117 mg·kg−1·d−1; n=5) intake levels of Americans. Fasting plasma samples were collected daily during 4-d study periods and analyzed for free Cys, free CySS and the EhCySS. Results The SAA-free diet significantly (p<0.05) decreased plasma free Cys concentrations and oxidized EhCySS values after 4 days of SAA depletion. With SAA repletion at 56 mg·kg−1·d− 1, plasma free Cys increased significantly and values for EhCySS became more reducing. Administration of a diet providing a higher dose of SAA (117 mg·kg−1·d−1) resulted in a significantly higher level of free Cys and a more reducing EhCySS. Conclusions These results show that free Cys and Cys/CySS redox potential (EhCySS) in fasting plasma are affected by dietary SAA intake level in humans. Significant changes occur slowly over 4 days with insufficient SAA intake, but rapidly (after 1 day) with repletion. PMID:20471805

  12. Plasma potential of a moving ionization zone in DC magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panjan, Matjaž; Anders, André

    2017-02-01

    Using movable emissive and floating probes, we determined the plasma and floating potentials of an ionization zone (spoke) in a direct current magnetron sputtering discharge. Measurements were recorded in a space and time resolved manner, which allowed us to make a three-dimensional representation of the plasma potential. From this information we could derive the related electric field, space charge, and the related spatial distribution of electron heating. The data reveal the existence of strong electric fields parallel and perpendicular to the target surface. The largest E-fields result from a double layer structure at the leading edge of the ionization zone. We suggest that the double layer plays a crucial role in the energization of electrons since electrons can gain several 10 eV of energy when crossing the double layer. We find sustained coupling between the potential structure, electron heating, and excitation and ionization processes as electrons drift over the magnetron target. The brightest region of an ionization zone is present right after the potential jump, where drifting electrons arrive and where most local electron heating occurs. The ionization zone intensity decays as electrons continue to drift in the Ez × B direction, losing energy by inelastic collisions; electrons become energized again as they cross the potential jump. This results in the elongated, arrowhead-like shape of the ionization zone. The ionization zone moves in the -Ez × B direction from which the to-be-heated electrons arrive and into which the heating region expands; the zone motion is dictated by the force of the local electric field on the ions at the leading edge of the ionization zone. We hypothesize that electron heating caused by the potential jump and physical processes associated with the double layer also apply to magnetrons at higher discharge power, including high power impulse magnetron sputtering.

  13. Characteristics of the NASA Lewis bumpy torus plasma generated with high positive or negative applied potentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, J. R.; Gerdin, G. A.

    1976-01-01

    The toroidal ring of plasma contained in the NASA Lewis bumpy-torus superconducting magnet facility may be biased to positive or negative potentials approaching 50 kilovolts by applying direct-current voltages of the respective polarity to 12 or fewer of the midplane electrode rings. The electric fields which are responsible for heating the ions by E/B drift then point radially outward or inward. The low-frequency fluctuations below the ion cyclotron frequency appeared to be dominated by rotating spokes.

  14. Preliminary Study of Plasma Exosomal Tau as a Potential Biomarker for Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Robert A.; Tripodis, Yorghos; Baugh, Christine M.; Fritts, Nathan G.; Martin, Brett M.; Chaisson, Christine; Cantu, Robert C.; Joyce, James A.; Shah, Sahil; Ikezu, Tsuneya; Zhang, Jing; Gercel-Taylor, Cicek; Taylor, Douglas D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a tauopathy associated with prior exposure to repetitive head impacts, such as those incurred through American football and other collision sports. Diagnosis is made through neuropathological examination. Many of the clinical features of CTE are common in the general population, with and without a history of head impact exposure, making clinical diagnosis difficult. As is now common in the diagnosis of other neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer’s disease, there is a need for methods to diagnose CTE during life through objective biomarkers. Objective: The aim of this study was to examine tau-positive exosomes in plasma as a potential CTE biomarker. Methods: Subjects were 78 former National Football League (NFL) players and 16 controls. Extracellular vesicles were isolated from plasma. Fluorescent nanoparticle tracking analysis was used to determine the number of vesicles staining positive for tau. Results: The NFL group had higher exosomal tau than the control group (p <  0.0001). Exosomal tau discriminated between the groups, with 82% sensitivity, 100% specificity, 100% positive predictive value, and 53% negative predictive value. Within the NFL group, higher exosomal tau was associated with worse performance on tests of memory (p = 0.0126) and psychomotor speed (p = 0.0093). Conclusion: These preliminary findings suggest that exosomal tau in plasma may be an accurate, noninvasive CTE biomarker. PMID:26890775

  15. Collisional heating of a plasma column slowly forced across a squeeze potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubin, D. H. E.

    2016-10-01

    When equilibrium plasmas have two or more locally-trapped particle populations, perturbations to the equilibrium can produce phase-space discontinuities in the distribution function that strongly enhance transport, plasma loss, and wave damping. This poster presents a simple version of this process, wherein a plasma is heated as it is slowly forced back and forth across a squeeze potential (at a frequency ω that is small compared to the particle bounce frequency) that traps particles on either side of the squeeze. Adiabatic theory is developed for the distribution function, showing that trapped and passing particles have different responses to the forcing that produces a collisional boundary layer at the separatrix. Expressions for both the adiabatic and non-adiabatic distribution functions are presented, and the heating rate caused by the collisional boundary layer at the separatrix is derived. The heating is proportional to √ (ν ω) , where ν is the collision rate. Supported by NSF Grant PHY-1414570, and DOE Grants DE-SC0002451 and DE-SC0008693.

  16. MicroRNAs in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid as potential markers for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kiko, Takehiro; Nakagawa, Kiyotaka; Tsuduki, Tsuyoshi; Furukawa, Katsutoshi; Arai, Hiroyuki; Miyazawa, Teruo

    2014-01-01

    The development of Alzheimer's disease (AD) biomarkers remains an unmet challenge, and new approaches that can improve current AD biomarker strategies are needed. Recent reports suggested that microRNA (miRNA) profiling of biological fluids has emerged as a diagnostic tool for several pathologic conditions. In this study, we measured six candidate miRNAs (miR-9, miR-29a, miR-29b, miR-34a, miR-125b, and miR-146a) in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of AD and normal subjects by using quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) to evaluate their potential usability as AD biomarkers. The qRT-PCR results showed that plasma miR-34a and miR-146a levels, and CSF miR-34a, miR-125b, and miR-146a levels in AD patients were significantly lower than in control subjects. On the other hand, CSF miR-29a and miR-29b levels were significantly higher than in control subjects. Our results provide a possibility that miRNAs detected in plasma and CSF can serve as biomarkers for AD.

  17. Effect of Bohm quantum potential in the propagation of ion-acoustic waves in degenerate plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, M. M.; Hossen, M. A.; Rafat, A.; Mamun, A. A.

    2016-10-01

    A theoretical investigation has been carried out on the propagation of the ion-acoustic (IA) waves in a relativistic degenerate plasma containing relativistic degenerate electron and positron fluids in the presence of inertial non-relativistic light ion fluid. The Korteweg-de Vries (K-dV), modified K-dV (mK-dV), and mixed mK-dV (mmK-dV) equations are derived by adopting the reductive perturbation method. In order to analyze the basic features (phase speed, amplitude, width, etc.) of the IA solitary waves (SWs), the SWs solutions of the K-dV, mK-dV, and mmK-dV are numerically analyzed. It is found that the degenerate pressure, inclusion of the new phenomena like the Fermi temperatures and quantum mechanical effects (arising due to the quantum diffraction) of both electrons and positrons, number densities, etc., of the plasma species remarkably change the basic characteristics of the IA SWs which are found to be formed either with positive or negative potential. The implication of our results in explaining different nonlinear phenomena in astrophysical compact objects, e.g., white dwarfs, neutron stars, etc., and laboratory plasmas like intense laser-solid matter interaction experiments, etc., are mentioned.

  18. Plasma DNA integrity index as a potential molecular diagnostic marker for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kamel, Azza M; Teama, Salwa; Fawzy, Amal; El Deftar, Mervat

    2016-06-01

    Plasma DNA integrity index is increased in various malignancies including breast cancer, the most common cancer in women worldwide; early detection is crucial for successful treatment. Current screening methods fail to detect many cases of breast cancer at an early stage. In this study, we evaluated the level of plasma DNA integrity index in 260 females (95 with breast cancer, 95 with benign breast lesions, and 70 healthy controls) to verify its potential value in discriminating malignant from benign breast lesions. The criteria of the American Joint Committee on Cancer were used for staging of breast cancer patients. DNA integrity index was measured by real-time PCR. DNA integrity index was significantly higher in breast cancer than in benign breast patients and healthy subjects (P = <0.001). DNA integrity index is correlated with TNM stage. Given 100 % specificity, the highest sensitivity achieved in detecting cancer group was 85.3 % at 0.55 DNA integrity index cutoff. In conclusion, the plasma DNA integrity index may be a promising molecular diagnostic marker of malignancy in breast lesions.

  19. Derivation and Testing of Computer Algorithms for Automatic Real-Time Determination of Space Vehicle Potentials in Various Plasma Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-05-31

    COMPUTER ALGORITHMS FOR AUTOMATIC REAL-TIME DETERMINATION OF SPACE VEHICLE POTENTIALS IN VARIOUS PLASMA ENVIRONMENTS May 31, 1988 Stanley L. Spiegel...crrnaion DiviSiofl 838 12 2 DERIVATION AND TESTING OF COMPUTER ALGORITHMS FOR AUTOMATIC REAL-TIME DETERMINATION OF SPACE VEHICLE POTENTIALS IN VARIOUS...S.L., "Derivation and testing of computer algorithms for automatic real time determination of space vehicle poteuatials in various plasma

  20. Detection of hepatotoxicity potential with metabolite profiling (metabolomics) of rat plasma.

    PubMed

    Mattes, W; Davis, K; Fabian, E; Greenhaw, J; Herold, M; Looser, R; Mellert, W; Groeters, S; Marxfeld, H; Moeller, N; Montoya-Parra, G; Prokoudine, A; van Ravenzwaay, B; Strauss, V; Walk, T; Kamp, H

    2014-11-04

    While conventional parameters used to detect hepatotoxicity in drug safety assessment studies are generally informative, the need remains for parameters that can detect the potential for hepatotoxicity at lower doses and/or at earlier time points. Previous work has shown that metabolite profiling (metabonomics/metabolomics) can detect signals of potential hepatotoxicity in rats treated with doxorubicin at doses that do not elicit hepatotoxicity as monitored with conventional parameters. The current study extended this observation to the question of whether such signals could be detected in rats treated with compounds that can elicit hepatotoxicity in humans (i.e., drug-induced liver injury, DILI) but have not been reported to do so in rats. Nine compounds were selected on the basis of their known DILI potential, with six other compounds chosen as negative for DILI potential. A database of rat plasma metabolite profiles, MetaMap(®)Tox (developed by metanomics GmbH and BASF SE) was used for both metabolite profiles and mode of action (MoA) metabolite signatures for a number of known toxicities. Eight of the nine compounds with DILI potential elicited metabolite profiles that matched with MoA patterns of various rat liver toxicities, including cholestasis, oxidative stress, acetaminophen-type toxicity and peroxisome proliferation. By contrast, only one of the six non-DILI compounds showed a weak match with rat liver toxicity. These results suggest that metabolite profiling may indeed have promise to detect signals of hepatotoxicity in rats treated with compounds having DILI potential.

  1. Decline in platelet microparticles contributes to reduced hemostatic potential of stored plasma

    PubMed Central

    Matijevic, Nena; Wang, Yao-Wei W.; Kostousov, Vadim; Wade, Charles E.; Vijayan, K. Vinod; Holcomb, John B.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction In an effort to administer life-saving transfusions quickly, some trauma centers maintain thawed plasma (TP). According to AABB, TP is approved for transfusion for up to five days when stored at 1 – 6 °C. However, the alterations in microparticles (MP) contained in the plasma, which are an integral component of plasma’s hemostatic capacity, are not well characterized. We report on MP changes in TP between its initial thaw (FFP-0) and five days (FFP-5) of storage. Materials and Methods FFP units (n=30) were thawed at 37 °C and kept refrigerated for five days. Phenotypes of residual cells, which include platelets, erythrocytes, leukocytes, monocytes, endothelial cells, and MP counterparts of each cell type, were analyzed by flow cytometry. Functional assays were used for MP procoagulant activity, plasma thrombin generation, and clotting properties (thromboelastography). Results In FFP-0 the majority (94%) of residual cells were platelets, along with significant levels of platelet MPs (4408×103/L). FFP-5 showed a decline in MP count by 50% (p<0.0001), and procoagulant activity by 29% (p<0.0001). FFP-5 exhibited only 54% (p<0.0001) of the potential for thrombin generation as FFP-0, while thromboelastography indicated a slower clotting response (p<0.0001) and a longer delay in reaching maximum clot (p<0.01). Removal of MP by filtration resulted in reduced thrombin generation, while the MP replacement restored it. Conclusions Decline in MP with storage contributes to FFP-5’s reduced ability to provide the hemostatic potential exhibited by FFP-0, suggesting the presence of platelet MPs in freshly TP may be beneficial and protective in the initial treatment of hemorrhage. PMID:21421259

  2. Plant plasma membrane aquaporins in natural vesicles as potential stabilizers and carriers of glucosinolates.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Ballesta, Maria Del Carmen; Pérez-Sánchez, Horacio; Moreno, Diego A; Carvajal, Micaela

    2016-07-01

    Their biodegradable nature and ability to target cells make biological vesicles potential nanocarriers for bioactives delivery. In this work, the interaction between proteoliposomes enriched in aquaporins derived from broccoli plants and the glucosinolates was evaluated. The vesicles were stored at different temperatures and their integrity was studied. Determination of glucosinolates, showed that indolic glucosinolates were more sensitive to degradation in aqueous solution than aliphatic glucosinolates. Glucoraphanin was stabilized by leaf and root proteoliposomes at 25°C through their interaction with aquaporins. An extensive hydrogen bond network, including different aquaporin residues, and hydrophobic interactions, as a consequence of the interaction between the linear alkane chain of glucoraphanin and Glu31 and Leu34 protein residues, were established as the main stabilizing elements. Combined our results showed that plasma membrane vesicles from leaf and root tissues of broccoli plants may be considered as suitable carriers for glucosinolate which stabilization can be potentially attributed to aquaporins.

  3. The Plasma Membrane Potential and the Organization of the Actin Cytoskeleton of Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chifflet, Silvia; Hernández, Julio A.

    2012-01-01

    The establishment and maintenance of the polarized epithelial phenotype require a characteristic organization of the cytoskeletal components. There are many cellular effectors involved in the regulation of the cytoskeleton of epithelial cells. Recently, modifications in the plasma membrane potential (PMP) have been suggested to participate in the modulation of the cytoskeletal organization of epithelia. Here, we review evidence showing that changes in the PMP of diverse epithelial cells promote characteristic modifications in the cytoskeletal organization, with a focus on the actin cytoskeleton. The molecular paths mediating these effects may include voltage-sensitive integral membrane proteins and/or peripheral proteins sensitive to surface potentials. The voltage dependence of the cytoskeletal organization seems to have implications in several physiological processes, including epithelial wound healing and apoptosis. PMID:22315611

  4. Platelet-rich Plasma as a Potential Treatment for Noncicatricial Alopecias

    PubMed Central

    Maria-Angeliki, Gkini; Alexandros-Efstratios, Kouskoukis; Dimitris, Rigopoulos; Konstantinos, Kouskoukis

    2015-01-01

    Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) and alopecia areata (AA) are common hair loss disorders affecting both men and women. Despite available therapeutic options, search for new, more effective treatment is constant. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) could be effective in promoting hair growth: (1) To present PRP and its mechanism of action in promoting hair growth and (2) to evaluate its preparation methods and its therapeutic potential in noncicatrial alopecias in a systematic review. An international bibliography search, through five databases, was conducted to find articles regarding PRP's action on hair loss. Growth factors in platelets’ granules of PRP bind in the bulge area of hair follicle, promoting hair growth. In our systematic review, 14 articles matched our criteria, including 12 articles for AGA and two for AA. PRP is a potential useful therapeutic tool for alopecias, without major adverse effects. Nevertheless, due to the small number of conducted trials, further studies are required to investigate its efficacy. PMID:26180449

  5. Plasma electrolytic oxidation coatings on γTiAl alloy for potential biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Lara Rodriguez, L; Sundaram, P A; Rosim-Fachini, E; Padovani, A M; Diffoot-Carlo, N

    2014-07-01

    In an attempt to enhance the potential of gamma titanium aluminide intermetallic alloy as a biomaterial, its surface characteristics were successfully modified using a calcium and phosphorous rich electrolyte through the application of plasma electrolytic oxidation. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy were used to characterize the morphology and topographical features of the resulting coating while X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive spectroscopy were used to determine the surface oxide composition. The mechanical properties of the surface coating were characterized by nanoindentation studies. The results observed show the formation of a submicron scale porous structure and a concomitant increase in the surface roughness. The surface oxide was composed of rutile and anatase phases. Composition gradients of Ca and P were also present which can possibly enhance the biomaterial application potential of this treated surface. Nanoindentation measurements indicate the formation of a fairly compact oxide during the process.

  6. Observations of Reflected Ions and Plasma Turbulence for Satellite Potentials Greater than the Ion Ram Energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, K. H., Jr.; Stone, N. H.; Sorensen, J.; Winningham, J. D.; Gurgiolo, C.

    1998-01-01

    During the TSS-1R mission, the behavior of the ions flowing from the forward hemisphere of the Tethered Satellite System (TSS) satellite was examined as the potential of the satellite was changed from below to above 5 V. The ram energy of the ambient atomic oxygen ions is approximately 5 eV. For satellite potentials less than 5 V, no ions were observed on the ram side of the satellite. When the satellite potential was raised greater than 5 V, ions were observed to be flowing from the forward region of the satellite. In the region sampled, the ion flux was a few percent of the ambient with energies of approximately 5 eV. The temperature of the out-flowing ions was observed to be enhanced, relative to the ambient ionosphere. The net current to the probe package became much more noisy for satellite potentials greater than 5 V as compared with satellite potentials less than 5 V, indicating a more disturbed plasma environment.

  7. Observations of Reflected Ions and Plasma Turbulence for Satellite Potentials Greater Than the Ion Ram Energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, K. H., Jr.; Stone, N. H.; Sorensen, J.; Winningham, J. D.; Gurgiolo, C.

    1997-01-01

    During the TSS-1R mission, the behavior of the ions flowing from the forward hemisphere of the Tethered Satellite System (TSS) satellite was examined as the potential on the satellite was changed from below to above 5 Volts. The ram energy of the ambient atomic oxygen ions is about 5 eV. For satellite potentials less than 5 V, no ions were observed on the ram side of the satellite. When the satellite potential was raised above 5 V, ions were observed to be flowing from the forward region of the satellite. In the region sampled, the ion flux was a few percent of the ambient with energies of about 5 eV. The temperature of the outflowing ions was observed to be enhanced, relative to the ambient ionosphere, and had a maximum in a plane containing the center of the satellite and normal to the geomagnetic field. The net current to the probe package became much more noisy for satellite potentials above 5 V as compared with satellite potentials below 5 V indicating a more disturbed plasma environment.

  8. Potential formation in a collisionless plasma produced in an open magnetic field in presence of volume negative ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Phukan, Ananya Goswami, K. S.; Bhuyan, P. J.

    2014-08-15

    The electric potential near a wall for a multi-species plasma with volume produced negative ions in presence of axially varying magnetic field is studied following an analytical-numerical approach. A constant negative ion source is assumed throughout the plasma volume, along with finite temperature positive ions and Boltzmann electrons. The particles are assumed to be guided by an open magnetic field that has its maximum at the centre, and field strength decreasing towards the walls. The one dimensional (1D) Poisson equation is derived using an analytical approach, and then solved numerically to study the potential profiles. Effect of (a) negative ion production rate, (b) magnetic field profile, and (c) negative ion temperature on the potential profile has been investigated. A potential peak appears near the wall when the negative ion temperature and density are sufficiently high. Also, the presence of negative ions further decreases the potential in the plasma region for a finite Debye Length (λ{sub D})

  9. Global investigation of potential energy surfaces for the pyrolysis of C(1)-C(3) hydrocarbons: toward the development of detailed kinetic models from first principles.

    PubMed

    Ryazantsev, Mikhail N; Jamal, Adeel; Maeda, Satoshi; Morokuma, Keiji

    2015-11-07

    Detailed kinetic models (DKMs) are the most fundamental "bottom-up" approaches to computational investigation of the pyrolysis and oxidation of fuels. The weakest points of existing DKMs are incomplete information about the reaction types that can be involved in the potential energy surfaces (PESs) in pyrolysis and oxidation processes. Also, the computational thermodynamic parameters available in the literature vary widely with the level of theory employed. More sophisticated models require improvement both in our knowledge of the type of the reactions involved and the consistency of thermodynamic and kinetic parameters. In this paper, we aim to address these issues by developing ab initio models that can be used to describe early stages of pyrolysis of C1-C3 hydrocarbons. We applied a recently developed global reaction route mapping (GRRM) strategy to systematically investigate the PES of the pyrolysis of C1-C3 hydrocarbons at a consistent level of theory. The reactions are classified into 14 reaction types. The critical points on the PES for all reactions in the network are calculated at the highly accurate UCCSD(T)-F12b/cc-pVTZ//UM06-2X/cc-pVTZ level of theory. The data reported in this paper can be used for first principle calculations of kinetic constants and for a subsequent study on modeling the evolution of the species from the reaction network of the pyrolysis and oxidation of C1-C3 hydrocarbons.

  10. 10. DETAIL, CAB SIDE. DETAIL, END OF BOOM. DETAIL, LOWER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. DETAIL, CAB SIDE. DETAIL, END OF BOOM. DETAIL, LOWER PART OF TOWER, SHOWING METAL WHEELS AND CABLE SPOOLS. DETAIL, LOOKING UP AT THE UNDERSIDE OF THE REVOLVING PLATFORM ATOP THE TOWER. - United Engineering Company Shipyard, Crane, 2900 Main Street, Alameda, Alameda County, CA

  11. Plasma membranes modified by plasma treatment or deposition as solid electrolytes for potential application in solid alkaline fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Reinholdt, Marc; Ilie, Alina; Roualdès, Stéphanie; Frugier, Jérémy; Schieda, Mauricio; Coutanceau, Christophe; Martemianov, Serguei; Flaud, Valérie; Beche, Eric; Durand, Jean

    2012-07-30

    In the highly competitive market of fuel cells, solid alkaline fuel cells using liquid fuel (such as cheap, non-toxic and non-valorized glycerol) and not requiring noble metal as catalyst seem quite promising. One of the main hurdles for emergence of such a technology is the development of a hydroxide-conducting membrane characterized by both high conductivity and low fuel permeability. Plasma treatments can enable to positively tune the main fuel cell membrane requirements. In this work, commercial ADP-Morgane® fluorinated polymer membranes and a new brand of cross-linked poly(aryl-ether) polymer membranes, named AMELI-32®, both containing quaternary ammonium functionalities, have been modified by argon plasma treatment or triallylamine-based plasma deposit. Under the concomitant etching/cross-linking/oxidation effects inherent to the plasma modification, transport properties (ionic exchange capacity, water uptake, ionic conductivity and fuel retention) of membranes have been improved. Consequently, using plasma modified ADP-Morgane® membrane as electrolyte in a solid alkaline fuel cell operating with glycerol as fuel has allowed increasing the maximum power density by a factor 3 when compared to the untreated membrane.

  12. Plasma Membranes Modified by Plasma Treatment or Deposition as Solid Electrolytes for Potential Application in Solid Alkaline Fuel Cells

    PubMed Central

    Reinholdt, Marc; Ilie, Alina; Roualdès, Stéphanie; Frugier, Jérémy; Schieda, Mauricio; Coutanceau, Christophe; Martemianov, Serguei; Flaud, Valérie; Beche, Eric; Durand, Jean

    2012-01-01

    In the highly competitive market of fuel cells, solid alkaline fuel cells using liquid fuel (such as cheap, non-toxic and non-valorized glycerol) and not requiring noble metal as catalyst seem quite promising. One of the main hurdles for emergence of such a technology is the development of a hydroxide-conducting membrane characterized by both high conductivity and low fuel permeability. Plasma treatments can enable to positively tune the main fuel cell membrane requirements. In this work, commercial ADP-Morgane® fluorinated polymer membranes and a new brand of cross-linked poly(aryl-ether) polymer membranes, named AMELI-32®, both containing quaternary ammonium functionalities, have been modified by argon plasma treatment or triallylamine-based plasma deposit. Under the concomitant etching/cross-linking/oxidation effects inherent to the plasma modification, transport properties (ionic exchange capacity, water uptake, ionic conductivity and fuel retention) of membranes have been improved. Consequently, using plasma modified ADP-Morgane® membrane as electrolyte in a solid alkaline fuel cell operating with glycerol as fuel has allowed increasing the maximum power density by a factor 3 when compared to the untreated membrane. PMID:24958295

  13. Effect of voltage polarity on oxidation-reduction potential by plasma in water

    SciTech Connect

    Miyahara, Takashi; Oizumi, Masanobu; Nakatani, Tatsuyuki; Sato, Takehiko

    2014-04-15

    Use of plasma in water for water treatment and medical treatment is growing and raises expectations of finding advanced functions such as an increase of biological compatibility. In the present study with a focus on the variation of oxidation-reduction potential (ORP), relationships between the electrode polarities of plasma in water and the change of water quality such as conductivity, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration, dissolved hydrogen concentration, pH and ORP were revealed. Similar line spectra of radiation at the electrode tip were observed for each case of positive and negative electrode polarity. The emission intensities of OH (309 nm), Hα (656 nm), and OI (777 nm) for the positive discharge were significantly higher than those for the negative one, though the energy consumption during the discharge period of both cases was nearly the same. Positive electrode polarity was found to be more suitable than negative electrode polarity for increasing dissolved hydrogen gas and hydrogen peroxide. The ORP for the positive polarity decreased from 460 to 45 mV and that for the negative polarity decreased from 460 to 183 mV, although the pH and conductivity were not significantly changed.

  14. Internal plasma potential measurements of a Hall thruster using xenon and krypton propellant

    SciTech Connect

    Linnell, Jesse A.; Gallimore, Alec D.

    2006-09-15

    For krypton to become a realistic option for Hall thruster operation, it is necessary to understand the performance gap between xenon and krypton and what can be done to reduce it. A floating emissive probe is used with the Plasmadynamics and Electric Propulsion Laboratory's High-speed Axial Reciprocating Probe system to map the internal plasma potential structure of the NASA-173Mv1 Hall thruster [R. R. Hofer, R. S. Jankovsky, and A. D. Gallimore, J. Propulsion Power 22, 721 (2006); and ibid.22, 732 (2006)] using xenon and krypton propellant. Measurements are taken for both propellants at discharge voltages of 500 and 600 V. Electron temperatures and electric fields are also reported. The acceleration zone and equipotential lines are found to be strongly linked to the magnetic-field lines. The electrostatic plasma lens of the NASA-173Mv1 Hall thruster strongly focuses the xenon ions toward the center of the discharge channel, whereas the krypton ions are defocused. Krypton is also found to have a longer acceleration zone than the xenon cases. These results explain the large beam divergence observed with krypton operation. Krypton and xenon have similar maximum electron temperatures and similar lengths of the high electron temperature zone, although the high electron temperature zone is located farther downstream in the krypton case.

  15. Plasma potential and geodesic acoustic mode evolution with Helium puffing in the ECRH regime on the T-10 tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenin, V. N.; Subbotin, G. F.; Klyuchnikov, L. A.; Melnikov, A. V.

    2016-09-01

    The evolution of the Geodesic Acoustic Mode (GAM) and mean plasma electric potential were examined in the regime with short (5 ms) Helium puffing into Electron Cyclotron Resonance heated discharge of the T-10 tokamak. It was shown that a Helium pulse leads to temporal perturbation of the plasma electron temperature and density and concomitant evolution of the mean potential, happening in the diffusive time-scale ∼⃒ 30 ms. Afterwards, the potential restores to the new stationary level with the same time-scale. On top of that GAM amplitude reduces sharply (within 2-5 ms) and GAM frequency also decreases within 30 ms after Helium puffing. Afterwards GAM amplitude and frequency relax to a new stationary level within about 50-70 ms. The evolution of electron density, electron and ion temperatures, total stored energy and plasma density turbulence is discussed in order to clarify their links with potential and GAM evolution.

  16. Ion focusing and interaction potential for spherical and rodlike obstacles in a supersonic plasma flow: numerical simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Miloch, W. J.; Pecseli, H. L.; Trulsen, J.; Vladimirov, S. V.

    2008-09-07

    The parameter dependence of the ion focus behind perfectly conducting or alternatively perfectly insulating spherical grains for different electron to ion temperature ratios is studied. For elongated, insulating dust grains we study the potential and plasma density wakes in drifting plasma for rods or plates of different lengths and different inclination angles. These two characteristics (i.e., the rod length and the inclination angle are important for the exact charge distribution on the surface and the wake pattern. For this case we discuss also the interaction potential between two elongated grains in a flowing plasma.Our simulations are carried out in two spatial dimensions by a Particle-in-Cell code, treating ions and electrons as individual particles. These studies can be relevant for finite size dust grains suspended in a plasma sheath or larger objects in space, e.g., meteoroids.

  17. Simulation of the electric potential and plasma generation coupling in magnetron sputtering discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trieschmann, Jan; Krueger, Dennis; Schmidt, Frederik; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter; Mussenbrock, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Magnetron sputtering typically operated at low pressures below 1 Pa is a widely applied deposition technique. For both, high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) as well as direct current magnetron sputtering (dcMS) the phenomenon of rotating ionization zones (also referred to as spokes) has been observed. A distinct spatial profile of the electric potential has been associated with the latter, giving rise to low, mid, and high energy groups of ions observed at the substrate. The adherent question of which mechanism drives this process is still not fully understood. This query is approached using Monte Carlo simulations of the heavy particle (i.e., ions and neutrals) transport consistently coupled to a pre-specified electron density profile via the intrinsic electric field. The coupling between the plasma generation and the electric potential, which establishes correspondingly, is investigated. While the system is observed to strive towards quasi-neutrality, distinct mechanisms governing the shape of the electric potential profile are identified. This work is supported by the German Research Foundation (DFG) in the frame of the transregional collaborative research centre TRR 87.

  18. Equation of state for hot quark-gluon plasma transitions to hadrons with full QCD potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikholeslami-Sabzevari, Bijan

    2002-05-01

    A practical method based on Mayer's cluster expansion to calculate critical values for a quark-gluon plasma (QGP) phase transition to hadrons is represented. It can be applied to a high-temperature QGP for clustering of quarks to mesons and baryons. The potential used is the Cornell potential, i.e., a potential containing both confining and gluon exchange terms. Debye screening effects are included. An equation of state (EOS) for hadron production is found by analytical methods, which is valid near the critical point. The example of the formation of J/ψ and Υ is recalculated. It is shown that in the range of temperatures available by today's accelerators, the latter particles are suppressed. This is further confirmation for heavy quarkonia suppression and, hence, for a signature of a QGP. The EOS presented here also shows that in future colliders there will be no heavy quarkonia production by the mechanism of phase transition. Hence, if there will be heavy quarkonia production, it must be based on some other mechanisms, perhaps on the basis of some recently suggested possibilities.

  19. Controlling VUV photon fluxes in pulsed inductively coupled Ar/Cl2 plasmas and potential applications in plasma etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Peng; Kushner, Mark J.

    2017-02-01

    UV/VUV photon fluxes in plasma materials processing have a variety of effects ranging from producing damage to stimulating synergistic reactions. Although in plasma etching processes, the rate and quality of the feature are typically controlled by the characteristics of the ion flux, to truly optimize these ion and photon driven processes, it is desirable to control the relative fluxes of ions and photons to the wafer. In prior works, it was determined that the ratio of VUV photon to ion fluxes to the substrate in low pressure inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs) sustained in rare gases can be controlled by combinations of pressure and pulse power, while the spectrum of these VUV photons can be tuned by adding additional rare gases to the plasma. In this work, VUV photon and ion fluxes are computationally investigated for Ar/Cl2 ICPs as used in etching of silicon. We found that while the overall ratio of VUV photon flux to ion flux are controlled by pressure and pulse power, by varying the fraction of Cl2 in the mixture, both the ratio of VUV to ion fluxes and the spectrum of VUV photons can be tuned. It was also found that the intensity of VUV emission from Cl(3p 44s) can be independently tuned by controlling wall surface conditions. With this ability to control ratios of ion to photon fluxes, photon stimulated processes, as observed in halogen etching of Si, can be tuned to optimize the shape of the etched features.

  20. Observational Evidence that Magnetosheath Plasma Parameters are Prominent in Determining Cross Polar Cap Potential Saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clauer, Robert; Xu, Zhonghua; Hartinger, Michael; Ruohoniemi, Michael; Scales, Wayne; Maimaiti, Maimaitirebike; Nicolls, Michael; Wilder, Rick; Lopez, Ramon

    2016-04-01

    A variety of statistical studies have shown that the ionospheric polar potential produced by solar wind - magnetosphere - ionosphere coupling is linear for weak to moderate solar wind driving, but becomes non-linear during periods of very strong driving. It has been shown that this applies to the two-cell convection potential that develops during southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and also to the reverse convection cells that develop during northward IMF. This has been described as polar potential saturation and it appears to begin when the driving solar wind electric field becomes greater than 3 mV/m. It has also been shown that the summer ionospheric electric field saturates at about the same value (20 mV/m) for both northward or southward IMF. Recent measurements of the high latitude convection on September 12 - 13, 2014 using the Resolute Incoherent Scatter Radar during periods of large northward IMF show ionospheric electric fields varying between 56 mV/m and 156 mV/m within the dayside reverse convection cells. There is no indication of saturation during these periods of very strong driving. We believe that the extremely rare conditions in the solar wind that produce extreme driving while also producing a high plasma beta in the magnetosheath provide the best explanation for the lack of potential saturation of the reverse convection cells. That is to say, the conditions in the magnetosheath that contribute to enhancing or limiting reconnection are most important in determining cross polar cap potential saturation. This research was supported at Virginia Tech by National Science Foundation Grant AGS-1216373.

  1. Plasma screening effects on the energies of hydrogen atom under the influence of velocity-dependent potential

    SciTech Connect

    Bahar, M. K.

    2014-07-15

    In order to examine the plasma screening and velocity-dependent potential effects on the hydrogen atom, the Schrödinger equation including a more general exponential cosine screened Coulomb and velocity-dependent potential is solved numerically in the framework asymptotic iteration method. The more general exponential cosine screened Coulomb potential is used to model Debye and quantum plasma for the specific values of the parameters in its structure. However, in order to examine effects of velocity-dependent potential on energy values of hydrogen atom in Debye and quantum plasma, the isotropic form factor of velocity-dependent potential is given as harmonic oscillator type, ρ(r)=ρ{sub o}r{sup 2}. Then, the energies of s and p states are calculated numerically without any approximation. In order to investigate thoroughly plasma screening effects and contribution of velocity-dependent potential on energy values of hydrogen atom, the corresponding calculations are carried out by using different values of parameters of more general exponential cosine screened Coulomb potential and isotropic dependence, results of which are discussed.

  2. Plasma Membrane Surface Potential: Dual Effects upon Ion Uptake and Toxicity1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Kinraide, Thomas B.; Zhou, Dongmei; Kopittke, Peter M.; Peijnenburg, Willie J.G.M.

    2011-01-01

    Electrical properties of plasma membranes (PMs), partially controlled by the ionic composition of the exposure medium, play significant roles in the distribution of ions at the exterior surface of PMs and in the transport of ions across PMs. The effects of coexisting cations (commonly Al3+, Ca2+, Mg2+, H+, and Na+) on the uptake and toxicity of these and other ions (such as Cu2+, Zn2+, Ni2+, Cd2+, and H2AsO4−) to plants were studied in terms of the electrical properties of PMs. Increased concentrations of cations or decreased pH in rooting media, whether in solution culture or in soils, reduced the negativity of the electrical potential at the PM exterior surface (ψ0o). This reduction decreased the activities of metal cations at the PM surface and increased the activities of anions such as H2AsO4−. Furthermore, the reduced ψ0o negativity increased the surface-to-surface transmembrane potential difference, thus increasing the electrical driving force for cation uptake and decreasing the driving force for anion uptake across PMs. Analysis of measured uptake and toxicity of ions using electrostatic models provides evidence that uptake and toxicity are functions of the dual effects of ψ0o (i.e. altered PM surface ion activity and surface-to-surface transmembrane potential difference gradient). This study provides novel insights into the mechanisms of plant-ion interactions and extends current theory to evaluate ion bioavailability and toxicity, indicating its potential utility in risk assessment of metal(loid)s in natural waters and soils. PMID:21119046

  3. Parameterizing the Morse potential for coarse-grained modeling of blood plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Na; Zhang, Peng; Kang, Wei; Bluestein, Danny; Deng, Yuefan

    2014-01-15

    Multiscale simulations of fluids such as blood represent a major computational challenge of coupling the disparate spatiotemporal scales between molecular and macroscopic transport phenomena characterizing such complex fluids. In this paper, a coarse-grained (CG) particle model is developed for simulating blood flow by modifying the Morse potential, traditionally used in Molecular Dynamics for modeling vibrating structures. The modified Morse potential is parameterized with effective mass scales for reproducing blood viscous flow properties, including density, pressure, viscosity, compressibility and characteristic flow dynamics of human blood plasma fluid. The parameterization follows a standard inverse-problem approach in which the optimal micro parameters are systematically searched, by gradually decoupling loosely correlated parameter spaces, to match the macro physical quantities of viscous blood flow. The predictions of this particle based multiscale model compare favorably to classic viscous flow solutions such as Counter-Poiseuille and Couette flows. It demonstrates that such coarse grained particle model can be applied to replicate the dynamics of viscous blood flow, with the advantage of bridging the gap between macroscopic flow scales and the cellular scales characterizing blood flow that continuum based models fail to handle adequately.

  4. Color path integral equation of state of the quark-gluon plasma at nonzero chemical potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filinov, V. S.; Bonitz, M.; Ivanov, Yu B.; Ilgenfritz, E.-M.; Fortov, V. E.

    2015-04-01

    Based on the constituent quasiparticle model of the quark-gluon plasma (QGP), a color quantum path-integral Monte-Carlo (PIMC) method for calculation of the thermodynamic properties of the QGP is developed. We show that the PIMC method can be used for calculations of the equation of state at zero and non-zero baryon chemical potential not only above but also below the QCD critical temperature. Our results agree with lattice QCD calculations based on a Taylor expansion around zero baryon chemical potential. In our approach the QGP partition function is presented in the form of a color path integral with a relativistic measure replacing the Gaussian one traditionally used in the Feynman-Wiener path integrals. A procedure of sampling color variables according to the SU(3) group Haar measure is used for integration over the color variables. We expect that this approach will be useful to predict additional properties of the QGP that are still unaccesible in lattice QCD.

  5. Plasma variables, meat quality, and glycolytic potential in broilers stunned with different carbon dioxide concentrations.

    PubMed

    Xu, L; Ji, F; Yue, H Y; Wu, S G; Zhang, H J; Zhang, L; Qi, G H

    2011-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of different CO(2) concentrations on blood variables, glycolytic potential (GP), and meat quality of hot-boned muscles in broilers. Thirty broilers were exposed to one of the following 5 gas mixtures for 90 s: 40% CO(2) + 30% O(2) + N(2) (control), 30% CO(2) + 21% O(2) + N(2) (G30%), 40% CO(2) + 21% O(2) + N(2) (G40%), 50% CO(2) + 21% O(2) + N(2) (G50%), and 60% CO(2) + 21% O(2) + N(2) (G60%). Samples were taken from the pectoralis major (PM), musculus iliofibularis (MI), and tibialis anterior muscles 45 min postmortem. The ultimate pH in both the PM (vs. G30% and G40%) and MI (vs. G40%) was decreased with G60% (P < 0.05), whereas drip loss in the PM (vs. G30%, P = 0.01) was increased with G60%. Drip loss in the MI (vs. control and G30%, P < 0.01) was increased with G50%. Lightness after 24 h in PM (vs. G30% and G40%, P < 0.01) was increased with G50%. In MI, lightness after 24 h was slightly decreased with G40% compared with the control (P < 0.10). The GP value in the PM was lower in the G30% and G40% than in G60% (P < 0.05), and the GP value in the tibialis anterior was the lowest in G30% (P < 0.01). Plasma corticosterone, plasma glucose, and meat quality (pH, lightness, redness, yellowness) 45 min postmortem were not affected by CO(2) levels (P > 0.05). In conclusion, stunning broilers with low CO(2) levels (30 and 40%) improved meat quality but had no advantage in animal welfare compared with high CO(2) levels (50 and 60%).

  6. Effects of exercise intensity on plasma concentrations of appetite-regulating hormones: Potential mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hazell, Tom J; Islam, Hashim; Townsend, Logan K; Schmale, Matt S; Copeland, Jennifer L

    2016-03-01

    The physiological control of appetite regulation involves circulating hormones with orexigenic (appetite-stimulating) and anorexigenic (appetite-inhibiting) properties that induce alterations in energy intake via perceptions of hunger and satiety. As the effectiveness of exercise to induce weight loss is a controversial topic, there is considerable interest in the effect of exercise on the appetite-regulating hormones such as acylated ghrelin, peptide YY (PYY), glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), and pancreatic polypeptide (PP). Research to date suggests short-term appetite regulation following a single exercise session is likely affected by decreases in acylated ghrelin and increases in PYY, GLP-1, and PP. Further, this exercise-induced response may be intensity-dependent. In an effort to guide future research, it is important to consider how exercise alters the circulating concentrations of these appetite-regulating hormones. Potential mechanisms include blood redistribution, sympathetic nervous system activity, gastrointestinal motility, cytokine release, free fatty acid concentrations, lactate production, and changes in plasma glucose and insulin concentrations. This review of relevant research suggests blood redistribution during exercise may be important for suppressing ghrelin, while other mechanisms involving cytokine release, changes in plasma glucose and insulin concentrations, SNS activity, and muscle metabolism likely mediate changes in the anorexigenic signals PYY and GLP-1. Overall, changes in appetite-regulating hormones following acute exercise appear to be intensity-dependent, with increasing intensity leading to a greater suppression of orexigenic signals and greater stimulation of anorexigenic signals. However, there is less research on how exercise-induced responses in appetite-regulating hormones differ between sexes or different age groups. A better understanding of how exercise intensity and workload affect appetite across the sexes and life

  7. An interatomic potential model for molecular dynamics simulation of silicon etching by Br{sup +}-containing plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ohta, H.; Iwakawa, A.; Eriguchi, K.; Ono, K.

    2008-10-01

    An interatomic potential model for Si-Br systems has been developed for performing classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. This model enables us to simulate atomic-scale reaction dynamics during Si etching processes by Br{sup +}-containing plasmas such as HBr and Br{sub 2} plasmas, which are frequently utilized in state-of-the-art techniques for the fabrication of semiconductor devices. Our potential form is based on the well-known Stillinger-Weber potential function, and the model parameters were systematically determined from a database of potential energies obtained from ab initio quantum-chemical calculations using GAUSSIAN03. For parameter fitting, we propose an improved linear scheme that does not require any complicated nonlinear fitting as that in previous studies [H. Ohta and S. Hamaguchi, J. Chem. Phys. 115, 6679 (2001)]. In this paper, we present the potential derivation and simulation results of bombardment of a Si(100) surface using a monoenergetic Br{sup +} beam.

  8. Generating end plug potentials in tandem mirror plasma confinement by heating thermal particles so as to escape low density end stoppering plasmas

    DOEpatents

    Baldwin, D.E.; Logan, B.G.

    The invention provides a method and apparatus for raising the potential of a magnetic mirror cell by pumping charged particles of the opposite sign of the potential desired out of the mirror cell through excitation, with the pumping being done by an externally imposed field at the bounce frequence of the above charged particles. These pumped simple mirror cells then provide end stoppering for a center mirror cell for the tandem mirror plasma confinement apparatus. For the substantially complete pumping case, the end plugs of a tandem mirror can be up to two orders of magnitude lower in density for confining a given center mirror cell plasma than in the case of end plugs without pumping. As a result the decrease in recirculating power required to keep the system going, the technical state of the art required, and the capital cost are all greatly lowered.

  9. Generating end plug potentials in tandem mirror plasma confinement by heating thermal particles so as to escape low density end stoppering plasmas

    DOEpatents

    Baldwin, David E.; Logan, B. Grant

    1981-01-01

    The invention provides a method and apparatus for raising the potential of a magnetic mirror cell by pumping charged particles of the opposite sign of the potential desired out of the mirror cell through excitation, with the pumping being done by an externally imposed field at the bounce frequency of the above charged particles. These pumped simple mirror cells then provide end stoppering for a center mirror cell for the tandem mirror plasma confinement apparatus. For the substantially complete pumping case, the end plugs of a tandem mirror can be up to two orders of magnitude lower in density for confining a given center mirror cell plasma than in the case of end plugs without pumping. As a result the decrease in recirculating power required to keep the system going, the technological state of the art required, and the capital cost are all greatly lowered.

  10. Effective momentum-dependent potentials for atomic bound states and scattering in strongly coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christlieb, A.; Dharuman, G.; Verboncoeur, J.; Murillo, M. S.

    2016-10-01

    Modeling high energy-density experiments requires simulations spanning large length and time scales. These non-equilibrium experiments have time evolving ionization and partial degeneracy, obviating the direct use of the time-dependent Schrodinger equation. Therefore, efficient approximate methods are greatly needed. We have examined the accuracy of one such method based on an effective classical-dynamics approach employing effective momentum dependent potentials (MDPs) within a Hamiltonian framework that enables large-scale simulations. We have found that a commonly used formulation, based on Kirschbaum-Wilets MDPs leads to very accurate ground state energies and good first/second-ionization energies. The continuum scattering properties of free electrons were examined by comparing the momentum-transfer cross section (MTCS) predicted by KW MDP to a semi-classical phase-shift calculation. Optimizing the KW MDP parameters for the scattering process yielded poor MTCSs, suggesting a limitation of the use of KW MDP for plasmas. However, our new MDP yields MTCS values in much better agreement than KW MDP.

  11. Investigation of multifractal nature of floating potential fluctuations obtained from a dc glow discharge magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Pankaj Kumar; Saha, Debajyoti; Ghosh, Sabuj; Janaki, M. S.; Iyengar, A. N. Sekar

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA) has been used to analyze the floating potential fluctuations obtained with a Langmuir probe from a dc glow discharge magnetized plasma device. The generalized Hurst exponents (h(q)) , local fluctuation function (Fq(s)) , the Rényi exponents (τ(q)) and the multifractal spectrum F(α) have been calculated by applying the MF-DFA method. The result of the MF-DFA shows the multifractal nature of these fluctuations. We have investigated the influence of magnetic field on the multifractal nature of the fluctuations and it is seen that degree of multifractality is reduced with the increase in the magnetic field strength. The values of h(q) have been restricted between 0.7 and 1 for the magnetized fluctuations. This result is evidence of the existence of long-range correlations in the fluctuations. Furthermore, we employed shuffle and surrogate approaches to analyze the origins of multifractality. Comparing the MF-DFA results for the data set to those for shuffled and surrogate series, we have found that its multifractal nature is due to the existence of significant long-term correlation.

  12. Ion kinetic effects on the wake potential behind a dust grain in a flowing plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Winske, D.; Daughton, W.; Lemons, D. S.; Murillo, M. S.

    2000-06-01

    The structure of the wake potential downstream of a stationary dust grain in a flowing plasma is studied on ion time scales using particle-in-cell simulation methods. The scaling of the wake is investigated as a function of Mach number and other parameters as well as the dimensionality of the system. The results are compared and discussed in relation to various theoretical expressions for the wake. Consistent with theory, in one dimension the wake wavelength scales as M{lambda}{sub De}(1-M{sup 2}){sup -1/2} for M<1, where M is the Mach number and {lambda}{sub De} is the electron Debye length, while no wake forms for M>1. In two dimensions, a wake is formed for both M<1 and M>1, while the wake wavelength scales as M{lambda}{sub De} in both regimes. The amplitude of the wake peaks at M{approx_equal}1 in both the one- and two-dimensional simulations. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  13. Potential application of X-ray communication through a plasma sheath encountered during spacecraft reentry into earth's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huan; Tang, Xiaobin; Hang, Shuang; Liu, Yunpeng; Chen, Da

    2017-03-01

    Rapid progress in exploiting X-ray science has fueled its potential application in communication networks as a carrier wave for transmitting information through a plasma sheath during spacecraft reentry into earth's atmosphere. In this study, we addressed the physical transmission process of X-rays in the reentry plasma sheath and near-earth space theoretically. The interactions between the X-rays and reentry plasma sheath were investigated through the theoretical Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin method, and the Monte Carlo simulation was employed to explore the transmission properties of X-rays in the near-earth space. The simulation results indicated that X-ray transmission was not influenced by the reentry plasma sheath compared with regular RF signals, and adopting various X-ray energies according to different spacecraft reentry altitudes is imperative when using X-ray uplink communication especially in the near-earth space. Additionally, the performance of the X-ray communication system was evaluated by applying the additive white Gaussian noise, Rayleigh fading channel, and plasma sheath channel. The Doppler shift, as a result of spacecraft velocity changes, was also calculated through the Matlab Simulink simulation, and various plasma sheath environments have no significant influence on X-ray communication owing to its exceedingly high carrier frequency.

  14. Plasma levels of the tissue inhibitor matrix metalloproteinase-3 as a potential biomarker in oral cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Su, Chun-Wen; Su, Bo-Feng; Chiang, Whei-Ling; Yang, Shun-Fa; Chen, Mu-Kuan; Lin, Chiao-Wen

    2017-01-01

    Oral cancer is the most common malignancy with poor prognosis and is the fourth most common cancer in men in Taiwan. The tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-3 (TIMP3) acts as a tumor suppressor gene by inhibiting the growth, angiogenesis, migration, and invasion of cancer cells. However, few studies have examined the association of plasma TIMP3 levels with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), and the role of plasma TIMP3 levels in OSCC progression is still unclear. We measured the plasma TIMP3 levels of 450 OSCC patients and 64 healthy controls by using a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We also analyzed TIMP3 mRNA levels of 328 OSCC patients and 32 normal tissues from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) dataset. Our results revealed that plasma TIMP3 levels were significantly lower in patients with OSCC than in healthy controls (p < 0.001). Moreover, plasma TIMP3 levels in patients with OSCC were significantly associated with the tumor stage and tumor status but not with the lymph node status, metastasis, and cell differentiation. To verify our findings, we also examined TCGA bioinformatics database and discovered similar results for the association with the pathological stage of OSCC. In conclusion, our results suggest that plasma TIMP3 is a potential biomarker for predicting the tumor stage and T status in patients with OSCC. PMID:28138307

  15. Surface Electrical Potentials of Root Cell Plasma Membranes: Implications for Ion Interactions, Rhizotoxicity, and Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi-Min; Kinraide, Thomas B.; Wang, Peng; Hao, Xiu-Zhen; Zhou, Dong-Mei

    2014-01-01

    Many crop plants are exposed to heavy metals and other metals that may intoxicate the crop plants themselves or consumers of the plants. The rhizotoxicity of heavy metals is influenced strongly by the root cell plasma membrane (PM) surface’s electrical potential (ψ0). The usually negative ψ0 is created by negatively charged constituents of the PM. Cations in the rooting medium are attracted to the PM surface and anions are repelled. Addition of ameliorating cations (e.g., Ca2+ and Mg2+) to the rooting medium reduces the effectiveness of cationic toxicants (e.g., Cu2+ and Pb2+) and increases the effectiveness of anionic toxicants (e.g., SeO42− and H2AsO4−). Root growth responses to ions are better correlated with ion activities at PM surfaces ({IZ}0) than with activities in the bulk-phase medium ({IZ}b) (IZ denotes an ion with charge Z). Therefore, electrostatic effects play a role in heavy metal toxicity that may exceed the role of site-specific competition between toxicants and ameliorants. Furthermore, ψ0 controls the transport of ions across the PM by influencing both {IZ}0 and the electrical potential difference across the PM from the outer surface to the inner surface (Em,surf). Em,surf is a component of the driving force for ion fluxes across the PM and controls ion-channel voltage gating. Incorporation of {IZ}0 and Em,surf into quantitative models for root metal toxicity and uptake improves risk assessments of toxic metals in the environment. These risk assessments will improve further with future research on the application of electrostatic theory to heavy metal phytotoxicity in natural soils and aquatic environments. PMID:25493475

  16. Ionic regulation of the plasma membrane potential of rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) spermatozoa: Role in the initiation of sperm motility

    SciTech Connect

    Gatti, J.L.; Billard, R.; Christen, R. )

    1990-06-01

    The ionic dependence of the trout sperm plasma membrane potential was analysed by measuring the accumulation of the lipophilic ions {sup 3}H-tetraphenylphosphonium (TPP) and {sup 14}C-thiocyanate (SCN) following dilution in artificial media isotonic to the seminal fluid. Our data showed that the trout sperm plasma membrane has a mixed conductance: the plasma membrane potential is sensitive upon the transmembrane gradients of K+, Na+, and H+. This potential is negative (less than -40 mV) in a 125 mM choline chloride media (ChM) at pH 8.5. Replacement of choline by sodium has a small depolarizing effect. The membrane potential is about -15 mV in a 125 mM potassium chloride and falls near zero mV only if valinomycin is added. In ChM changing the external pH (pHe) greatly affects the membrane potential: its value rises from less than -40 mV at pHe 9.0 to -17 mV at pHe 5.0. This pH effect is observed also in presence of sodium or potassium. A decrease in the transmembrane proton gradient produced by increasing internal pH without changing pHe induces also a depolarisation of the plasma membrane. In the different media in which trout sperm remain immotile after dilution (media with (K+) greater than 20-40 mM or a pH less than 7.5) the plasma membrane is more depolarized than in media allowing motility, suggesting a relationship between the state of membrane polarization and the intracellular effectors of the axonemal movement.

  17. Plasma Amino Acids Profiles in Children with Autism: Potential Risk of Nutritional Deficiencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Georgianne L.; Hyman, Susan L.; Mooney, Robert A.; Kirby, Russell S.

    2003-01-01

    The plasma amino acid profiles of 10 children with autism on gluten and casein restricted diets and 26 on unrestricted diets were reviewed. There was a trend for the children on restricted diets to have an increased prevalence of essential amino acid deficiencies and lower plasma levels of essential acids. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  18. Plasma cadmium and zinc and their interrelationship in adult Nigerians: potential health implications

    PubMed Central

    Ogbonnaya, Lawrence Ulu; Uro-Chukwu, Henry; Obuna, Johnson Akuma; Ogiji, Emeka; Ezenkwa, Simon Uchenna

    2015-01-01

    Zinc (an essential trace element) and cadmium (a ubiquitous environmental pollutant with acclaimed toxicity) have been found to occur together in nature, with reported antagonism between the two elements. The present study aimed at determination of plasma levels of zinc (Zn) and cadmium (Cd) and their interrelationship in adult Nigerians. The series comprised adults (n=443) aged ≥18 yrs (mean ± SD 38.4±13.7 yrs), consisting of 117 males, 184 non-pregnant and 140 pregnant females. Sociodemographic data were collected by questionnaire while anthropometrics were determined using standard methods. Plasma Cd and Zn were determined by using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The mean plasma zinc and cadmium were 94.7±18.1 μg/dl and 0.150±0.548 μg/dl, respectively. Age, sex, pregnancy, and parity had no effect on either plasma Zn or Cd. Although educational level had no effect on plasma Zn, it had a significant effect on Cd; subjects possessing either secondary or tertiary education had significantly lower plasma Cd than subjects without formal education. Moreover, there seemed to be an inverse relationship between Cd and Zn, but this was not statistically significant (r=–0.089; p=0.061). Although plasma Zn was not related to BMI (r=0.037; p=0.432), Cd was significantly negatively correlated with BMI (r=–0.124; p=0.009). It may be concluded that adult Nigerians in Ebonyi State have elevated plasma levels of Cd, with apparent impact on the levels of plasma Zn. This has important public health implications considering the essential roles of Zn in the protection of Cd mediated adverse health effects. While food diversification is recommended to improve plasma Zn, efforts should be made to reduce exposure to Cd to mitigate partially its possible adverse effects. PMID:27486364

  19. Diagnostic potential of plasma microRNA signatures in patients with deep-vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Sundquist, Kristina; Elf, Johan L; Strandberg, Karin; Svensson, Peter J; Hedelius, Anna; Palmer, Karolina; Memon, Ashfaque A; Sundquist, Jan; Zöller, Bengt

    2016-08-01

    For excluding deep-vein thrombosis (DVT), a negative D-dimer and low clinical probability are used to rule out DVT. Circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) are stably present in the plasma, serum and other body fluids. Their diagnostic function has been investigated in many diseases but not in DVT. The aims of present study were to assess the diagnostic ability of plasma miRNAs in DVT and to examine their correlation with known markers of hypercoagulability, such as D-dimer and APC-PCI complex. Plasma samples were obtained from 238 patients (aged 16-95 years) with suspected DVT included in a prospective multicentre management study (SCORE). We first performed miRNA screening of plasma samples from three plasma pools containing plasma from 12 patients with DVT and three plasma pools containing plasma from 12 patients without DVT using a microRNA Ready-to-use PCR Panel comprising 742 miRNA primer sets. Thirteen miRNAs that differentially expressed were further investigated by quantitative real-time (qRT)-PCR in the entire cohort. The plasma level of miR-424-5p (p=0.01) were significantly higher, whereas the levels of miR-136-5p (p=0.03) were significantly lower in DVT patients compared to patients without DVT. Receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis showed the area under the curve (AUC) values of 0.63 for miR-424-5p and 0.60 for miR-136-5p. The plasma level of miR-424-5p was associated with both D-dimer and APC-PCI complex levels (p<0.0001 and p=0.001, respectively). In conclusions, these findings indicate that certain miRNAs are associated with DVT and markers of hypercoagulability, though their diagnostic abilities are probably too low.

  20. Comparison of non-neutral electron plasma confinement in harmonic and rectangular potentials in a very dense regime

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, T.; Mohri, A.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2013-01-15

    Confinement of high density electron plasmas in a strong uniform magnetic field was experimentally studied in a multi-ring trap (MRT). The trap was housed inside a bore tube and surrounded by a superconducting solenoid. A 5 T magnetic field was used to provide radial confinement while an electrostatic harmonic or rectangular potential well was used for axial confinement. For trapped electrons of N = 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} in a harmonic potential well (HPW) with the trap length of L{sub T} = 320 mm, the plasma lifetime was about 10{sup 4} s and it became much longer at lower N = 4.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9}. Such long holding times were achieved without application of rotating electric fields. Contrastingly, in a rectangular potential well (RPW), the plasma of N = 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} under the same trap length expanded to cover the whole Faraday Cup within 200 s, where its radial expansion rate was {eta} = 3.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2} mm/s, which was 20 times faster than HPW. The lifetime for RPW became shorter with increasing L{sub T} and scaled as 1/[L{sub T}]{sup 2}. This scaling found for high density plasmas is similar to the obtained one with different Penning-Malmberg traps at UC San Diego (USCD).

  1. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes inhibit fluorescein extrusion and reduce plasma membrane potential in in vitro human glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yonghong; Chen, Xiao; Cheng, Yuli; Xing, Yiqiao

    2010-06-01

    In the study on the interactions of carbon nanotubes with living cells, the cell membrane deserves particular attention as it provides the first interface to initiate CNTs-cell interactions. In the present study, the inhibiting effect of multiwalled carbon nanotubes on the extrusion of fluorescein in human glioma cells was demonstrated using two procedures. To provide clues to explanation of this effect, intracellular glutathione content and reactive oxygen species production were determined as fluorescein is a specific substrate of cell membrane multidrug resistance-related protein whose transport activity requires glutathione which can be depleted under oxidative stress. The plasma membrane potential was also probed as the susceptibility of fluorescein efflux to modulation of the plasma membrane potential has been documented. Results showed a remarkable decrease in cellular glutathione level as well as an increase in reactive oxygen species production. Probe staining also indicated decreased plasma membrane potential. The data suggested that multiwalled carbon nanotubes may affect the transport activity of cell membrane multidrug resistance-related protein through reduction of intracellular glutathione content. Hypopolarization of the plasma membrane may also contribute to MWCNTs' effect. Implications of these findings are discussed.

  2. Influence of the radial profile of the electric potential on the confinement of a high-{beta} two-component plasma in a gas-dynamic trap

    SciTech Connect

    Soldatkina, E. I.; Bagryansky, P. A.; Solomakhin, A. L.

    2008-04-15

    One of the most important problems to be studied in the gas-dynamic trap (GDT) facility is the investigation of MHD stability and cross-field transport in a plasma with a relatively high value of {beta} = {pi}p/B{sup 2}. Recent experiments demonstrated that the radial electric field produced in the plasma by using radial limiters and coaxial end plasma collectors improves plasma stability in axisymmetric magnetic mirror systems without applying special MHD stabilizers. The experimental data presented in this work show that stable plasma confinement can be achieved by producing a radial potential drop across a narrow region near the plasma boundary. Creating radial electric fields of strength 15-40 V/cm causes a shear plasma flow, thereby substantially increasing the plasma confinement time. When all the radial electrodes were grounded, the confinement was unstable and the plasma confinement time was much shorter than the characteristic time of plasma outflow through the magnetic mirrors. Measurements of cross-field plasma fluxes with the use of a specially designed combined probe show that, in confinement modes with differential plasma rotation, transverse particle losses are negligibly small as compared to longitudinal ones and thus can be ignored. It is also shown that, when the GDT plasma is in electric contact with the radial limiters and end collectors, the growth rate of interchange instability decreases considerably; such a contact, however, does not ensure complete MHD stability when the electrodes are at the same potential.

  3. Characterization of the plasma and blood anticoagulant potential of structurally and mechanistically novel oligomers of 4-hydroxycinnamic acids

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Brian L.; Thakkar, Jay N.; Martin, Erika J.; Brophy, Donald F.; Desai, Umesh R.

    2009-01-01

    Recently, we designed sulfated dehydropolymers (DHPs) of 4-hydroxycinnamic acids that displayed interesting anticoagulant properties. Structurally and mechanistically, sulfated DHPs are radically different from all the anticoagulants studied to date. To assess whether their unique mechanism and structure is worth exploiting for further rational design of homogeneous DHP-based molecules, we investigated their anticoagulant potential in human plasma and blood using a range of clotting assays. Sulfated DHPs prolong plasma clotting times, prothrombin and activated partial thromboplastin times at concentrations comparable to the clinically used low-molecular-weight heparin, enoxaparin. Fibrin formation studies on human plasma show that there is a structural dependence of anticoagulant action. Human whole blood studies using thromboelastography and hemostasis analysis system indicate that they are 17–140-fold less potent than enoxaparin. Results demonstrate that sulfated DHPs possess good in-vitro and ex-vivo activity, which will likely be improved through a rational design. PMID:20523162

  4. Potential long-term effects of previous schistosome infection may reduce the atherogenic index of plasma in Chinese men.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shi-Wei; Lu, Yun; Li, Feng; Shen, Zhen-Hai; Xu, Ming; Yao, Wei-Feng; Feng, Yin-Bo; Yun, Jing-Ting; Wang, Ya-Ping; Ling, Wang; Qi, Hua-Jin; Tong, Da-Xin

    2015-04-01

    The major purpose of this study was to assess the association between the potential long-term effects of previous schistosome infection and atherogenic dyslipidemia. Among 1597 men aged ⩾45 years who received health examinations and lived in previous schistosomiasis-endemic regions of China, 465 patients with previous schistosome infection were selected as study subjects, and 1132 subjects formed the control group. The risk factors for cardiovascular disease were measured and compared between the previous schistosome infection and control groups. The Atherogenic Index of Plasma, triglycerides, waist circumference and body mass index were significantly lower in the previous schistosome infection group than in the control group (all P values <0.001), whereas high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol was significantly higher in the previous schistosome infection group (P<0.001). In the Atherogenic Index of Plasma quartiles (Q1-Q4), the percentages of subjects with previous schistosome infection were 55.89% (Q1), 25.44% (Q2), 16.33% (Q3), and 18.8% (Q4), respectively (χ(2)=139.86, P<0.001). A logistic regression analysis based on previous schistosome infection as the independent variable and Atherogenic Index of Plasma as the dependent variable revealed that previous schistosome infection was significantly negatively correlated with Atherogenic Index of Plasma (odds ratio=0.583, 95% confidence interval: 0.440-0.772, P<0.001) after adjustment for body mass index, waist circumference, diastolic blood pressure and uric acid, suggesting that previous schistosome infection is an independent factor associated with Atherogenic Index of Plasma. The potential long-term effects of previous schistosome infection may reduce the Atherogenic Index of Plasma in Chinese men. However, further studies are required to investigate the protective human immune response against schistosome infections. The development of a schistosomiasis vaccine may effectively prevent the development and

  5. Cold atmospheric plasma discharged in water and its potential use in cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhitong; Cheng, Xiaoqian; Lin, Li; Keidar, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) has emerged as a novel technology for cancer treatment. CAP can directly treat cells and tissue but such direct application is limited to skin or can be invoked as a supplement during open surgery. In this study we report indirect plasma treatment using CAP discharged in deionized (DI) water using three gases as carriers (argon (Ar), helium (He), and nitrogen (N2)). Plasma stimulated water was applied to the human breast cancer cell line (MDA-MB-231). MTT (3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay tests showed that using Ar plasma had the strongest effect on inducing apoptosis in cultured human breast cancer cells. This result is attributed to the elevated production of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species in water.

  6. Potential Role of Plasma Myeloperoxidase Level in Predicting Long-Term Outcome of Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Mehmet Gungor; Yalcin, Ridvan; Okyay, Kaan; Poyraz, Fatih; Bayraktar, Nilufer; Pasaoglu, Hatice; Boyaci, Bulent; Cengel, Atiye

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the prognostic importance of plasma myeloperoxidase levels in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) at long-term follow-up, and we analyzed the correlations between plasma myeloperoxidase levels and other biochemical values. We evaluated 73 consecutive patients (56 men; mean age, 56 ±11 yr) diagnosed with acute STEMI and 46 age- and sex-matched healthy control participants. Patients were divided into 2 groups according to the median myeloperoxidase level (Group 1: plasma myeloperoxidase ≤68 ng/mL; and Group 2: plasma myeloperoxidase >68 ng/mL). Patients were monitored for the occurrence of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE), which were defined as cardiac death; reinfarction; new hospital admission for angina; heart failure; and revascularization procedures. The mean follow-up period was 25 ± 16 months. Plasma myeloperoxidase levels were higher in STEMI patients than in control participants (82 ± 34 vs 20 ±12 ng/mL; P=0.001). Composite MACE occurred in 12 patients with high myeloperoxidase levels (33%) and in 4 patients with low myeloperoxidase levels (11%) (P=0.02). The incidences of nonfatal recurrent myocardial infarction and verified cardiac death were higher in the high-mye-loperoxidase group. In multivariate analysis, high plasma myeloperoxidase levels were independent predictors of MACE (odds ratio = 3.843; <95% confidence interval, 1.625–6.563; P=0.003). High plasma myeloperoxidase levels identify patients with a worse prognosis after acute STEMI at 2-year follow-up. Evaluation of plasma myeloperoxidase levels might be useful in determining patients at high risk of death and MACE who can benefit from further aggressive treatment and closer follow-up. PMID:22949765

  7. Potential role of plasma myeloperoxidase level in predicting long-term outcome of acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Mehmet Gungor; Yalcin, Ridvan; Okyay, Kaan; Poyraz, Fatih; Bayraktar, Nilufer; Pasaoglu, Hatice; Boyaci, Bulent; Cengel, Atiye

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the prognostic importance of plasma myeloperoxidase levels in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) at long-term follow-up, and we analyzed the correlations between plasma myeloperoxidase levels and other biochemical values. We evaluated 73 consecutive patients (56 men; mean age, 56 ± 11 yr) diagnosed with acute STEMI and 46 age- and sex-matched healthy control participants. Patients were divided into 2 groups according to the median myeloperoxidase level (Group 1: plasma myeloperoxidase ≤ 68 ng/mL; and Group 2: plasma myeloperoxidase > 68 ng/mL). Patients were monitored for the occurrence of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE), which were defined as cardiac death; reinfarction; new hospital admission for angina; heart failure; and revascularization procedures. The mean follow-up period was 25 ± 16 months. Plasma myeloperoxidase levels were higher in STEMI patients than in control participants (82 ± 34 vs 20 ± 12 ng/mL; P = 0.001). Composite MACE occurred in 12 patients with high myeloperoxidase levels (33%) and in 4 patients with low myeloperoxidase levels (11%) (P = 0.02). The incidences of nonfatal recurrent myocardial infarction and verified cardiac death were higher in the high-myeloperoxidase group. In multivariate analysis, high plasma myeloperoxidase levels were independent predictors of MACE (odds ratio = 3.843; <95% confidence interval, 1.625-6.563; P = 0.003). High plasma myeloperoxidase levels identify patients with a worse prognosis after acute STEMI at 2-year follow-up. Evaluation of plasma myeloperoxidase levels might be useful in determining patients at high risk of death and MACE who can benefit from further aggressive treatment and closer follow-up.

  8. End-boundary sheath potential, electron and ion energy distribution in the low-pressure non-ambipolar electron plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lee; Chen, Zhiying; Funk, Merritt

    2013-12-01

    The end-boundary floating-surface sheath potential, electron and ion energy distribution functions (EEDf, IEDf) in the low-pressure non-ambipolar electron plasma (NEP) are investigated. The NEP is heated by an electron beam extracted from an inductively coupled electron-source plasma (ICP) through a dielectric injector by an accelerator located inside the NEP. This plasma's EEDf has a Maxwellian bulk followed by a broad energy continuum connecting to the most energetic group with energies around the beam energy. The NEP pressure is 1-3 mTorr of N2 and the ICP pressure is 5-15 mTorr of Ar. The accelerator is biased positively from 80 to 600 V and the ICP power range is 200-300 W. The NEP EEDf and IEDf are determined using a retarding field energy analyser. The EEDf and IEDf are measured at various NEP pressures, ICP pressures and powers as a function of accelerator voltage. The accelerator current and sheath potential are also measured. The IEDf reveals mono-energetic ions with adjustable energy and it is proportionally controlled by the sheath potential. The NEP end-boundary floating surface is bombarded by a mono-energetic, space-charge-neutral plasma beam. When the injected energetic electron beam is adequately damped by the NEP, the sheath potential is linearly controlled at almost a 1 : 1 ratio by the accelerator voltage. If the NEP parameters cannot damp the electron beam sufficiently, leaving an excess amount of electron-beam power deposited on the floating surface, the sheath potential will collapse and become unresponsive to the accelerator voltage.

  9. Potential of electric discharge plasma methods in abatement of volatile organic compounds originating from the food industry.

    PubMed

    Preis, S; Klauson, D; Gregor, A

    2013-01-15

    Increased volatile organic compounds emissions and commensurate tightening of applicable legislation mean that the development and application of effective, cost-efficient abatement methods are areas of growing concern. This paper reviews the last two decades' publications on organic vapour emissions from food processing, their sources, impacts and treatment methods. An overview of the latest developments in conventional air treatment methods is presented, followed by the main focus of the paper, non-thermal plasma technology. The results of the review suggest that non-thermal plasma technology, in its pulsed corona discharge configuration, is an emerging treatment method with potential for low-cost, effective abatement of a wide spectrum of organic air pollutants. It is found that the combination of plasma treatment with catalysis is a development trend that demonstrates considerable potential. The as yet relatively small number of plasma treatment applications is considered to be due to the novelty of pulsed electric discharge techniques and a lack of reliable pulse generators and reactors. Other issues acting as barriers to widespread adoption of the technique include the possible formation of stable oxidation by-products, residual ozone and nitrogen oxides, and sensitivity towards air humidity.

  10. [Search for potential gastric cancer biomarkers using low molecular weight blood plasma proteome profiling by mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Shevchenko, V E; Arnotskaia, N E; Ogorodnikova, E V; Davydov, M M; Ibraev, M A; Turkin, I N; Davydov, M I

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer, one of the most widespread malignant tumors, still lacks reliable serum/plasma biomarkers of its early detection. In this study we have developed, unified, and tested a new methodology for search of gastric cancer biomarkers based on profiling of low molecular weight proteome (LMWP) (1-17 kDa). This approach included three main components: sample pre-fractionation, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS), data analysis by a bioinformatics software package. Applicability and perspectives of the developed approach for detection of potential gastric cancer markers during LMWP analysis have been demonstrated using 69 plasma samples from patients with gastric cancer (stages I-IV) and 238 control samples. The study revealed peptides/polypeptides, which may be potentially used for detection of this pathology.

  11. Plasma concentrations of amino acid and nicotinamide metabolites in rheumatoid arthritis--potential biomarkers of disease activity and drug treatment.

    PubMed

    Smolenska, Zaneta; Smolenski, Ryszard T; Zdrojewski, Zbigniew

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate changes in plasma amino acid and nicotinamide metabolites concentrations in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in a search for potential biomarkers of the disease activity and the effect treatment. Analysis of plasma metabolite patterns with liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry revealed specific changes in RA as well as correlations with clinical parameters. Combined concentration parameter calculated as [aspartic acid] + [threonine] + [tryptophan] - [histidine] - [phenylalanine] offered the strongest correlation (p < 0.001) with pain joint count, swollen joint count and DAS 28. Such analysis of amino acid and related metabolite pattern offers potential for diagnosis as well as for monitoring disease progression and therapy in RA.

  12. Evaluation of the potentials of humic acid removal in water by gas phase surface discharge plasma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tiecheng; Qu, Guangzhou; Ren, Jingyu; Yan, Qiuhe; Sun, Qiuhong; Liang, Dongli; Hu, Shibin

    2016-02-01

    Degradation of humic acid (HA), a predominant type of natural organic matter in ground water and surface waters, was conducted using a gas phase surface discharge plasma system. HA standard and two surface waters (Wetland, and Weihe River) were selected as the targets. The experimental results showed that about 90.9% of standard HA was smoothly removed within 40 min's discharge plasma treatment at discharge voltage 23.0 kV, and the removal process fitted the first-order kinetic model. Roles of some active species in HA removal were studied by evaluating the effects of solution pH and OH radical scavenger; and the results presented that O3 and OH radical played significant roles in HA removal. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and FTIR analysis showed that HA surface topography and molecular structure were changed during discharge plasma process. The mineralization of HA was analyzed by UV-Vis spectrum, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), specific UV absorbance (SUVA), UV absorption ratios, and excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence. The formation of disinfection by-products during HA sample chlorination was also identified, and CHCl3 was detected as the main disinfection by-product, but discharge plasma treatment could suppress its formation to a certain extent. In addition, approximately 82.3% and 67.9% of UV254 were removed for the Weihe River water and the Wetland water after 40 min of discharge plasma treatment.

  13. Plasma jet-induced tissue oxygenation: potentialities for new therapeutic strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collet, G.; Robert, E.; Lenoir, A.; Vandamme, M.; Darny, T.; Dozias, S.; Kieda, C.; Pouvesle, J. M.

    2014-02-01

    The lack of oxygen is a major reason for the resistance of tumor cells to treatments such as radiotherapies. A large number of recent publications on non-thermal plasma applications in medicine report cell behavior modifications and modulation of soluble factors. This in vivo study tested whether such modifications can lead to vascular changes in response to plasma application. Two in situ optical-based methods were used simultaneously, in real time, to assess the effect of non-thermal plasma on tissue vasculature. Tissue oxygen partial pressure (pO2) was measured using a time-resolved luminescence-based optical probe, and the microvascular erythrocyte flow was determined by laser Doppler flowmetry. When plasma treatment was applied on mouse skin, a rapid pO2 increase (up to 4 times) was subcutaneously measured and correlated with blood flow improvement. Such short duration, i.e. 5 min, plasma-induced effects were shown to be locally restricted to the treated area and lasted over 120 min. Further investigations should elucidate the molecular mechanisms of these processes. However, improvement of oxygenation and perfusion open new opportunities for tumor treatments in combination with radiotherapy, and for tumor blood vessel normalization based strategies.

  14. Plasma MicroRNAs as Potential Noninvasive Biomarkers for In-Stent Restenosis

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Zhenwei; Zou, Hui; Sun, Danghui; Tu, Xin; Tan, Xiangyang; Li, Jianqiang; Li, Weimin; Liu, Bin; Xue, Jingyi; Sheng, Li; Xiu, Chunhong; Yang, Ning; Xue, Hongjie; Ding, Xue; Yu, Chengyuan; Li, Yue

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether microRNAs (miRs) can serve as novel biomarkers for in-stent restenosis (ISR). Methods This retrospective, observational single-centre study was conducted at the cardiovascular department of a tertiary hospital centre in the north of China. Follow-up coronary angiography at 6 to 12 months was performed in 181 consecutive patients implanted with drug-eluting stents. Fifty-two healthy volunteers served as the control group. The plasma miRs levels were analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR. Receiver-operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis was performed to investigate the characters of these miRs as potential biomarkers of ISR. Results MiR-21 levels in ISR patients were significantly higher than those in non-ISR patients and healthy controls (P<0.05), while miR-100 (P<0.05), miR-143 (P<0.001) and miR-145 (P<0.0001) levels were significantly decreased in ISR patients. Further analysis showed that miR-21 levels were remarkably increased (P = 0.045), while miR-100 (P = 0.041), miR-143 (P = 0.029) and miR-145 (P<0.01) levels were dramatically decreased in patients with diffuse ISR compared to those with focal ISR. ROC analysis demonstrated that the area under curve of miR-145, miR-143, miR-100 and miR-21 were 0.880 (95% confidence interval; CI = 0.791–0.987, P<0.001), 0.818 (95% confidence interval; CI = 0.755–0.963, P<0.001), 0.608 (95% confidence interval; CI = 0.372–0.757, P<0.05) and 0.568 (95% confidence interval; CI = 0.372–0.757, P<0.05), with specificity of 83.1%, 80.1%, 68.9% and 68.6%, and sensitivity of 88.7%, 82.1%, 60.2% and 50.1%, respectively. Conclusions Circulating miR-143 and miR-145 levels are associated with the occurrence of ISR and can serve as novel noninvasive biomarkers for ISR. PMID:25427155

  15. The potential role of electric fields and plasma barodiffusion on the inertial confinement fusion databasea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amendt, Peter; Wilks, S. C.; Bellei, C.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2011-05-01

    The generation of strong, self-generated electric fields (GV/m) in direct-drive, inertial-confinement-fusion (ICF) capsules has been reported [Rygg et al., Science 319, 1223 (2008); Li et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 225001 (2008)]. A candidate explanation for the origin of these fields based on charge separation across a plasma shock front was recently proposed [Amendt et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 51 124048 (2009)]. The question arises whether such electric fields in imploding capsules can have observable consequences on target performance. Two well-known anomalies come to mind: (1) an observed ≈2× greater-than-expected deficit of neutrons in an equimolar D3He fuel mixture compared with hydrodynamically equivalent D [Rygg et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 052702 (2006)] and DT [Herrmann et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 056312 (2009)] fuels, and (2) a similar shortfall of neutrons when trace amounts of argon are mixed with D in indirect-drive implosions [Lindl et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 339 (2004)]. A new mechanism based on barodiffusion (or pressure gradient-driven diffusion) in a plasma is proposed that incorporates the presence of shock-generated electric fields to explain the reported anomalies. For implosions performed at the Omega laser facility [Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)], the (low Mach number) return shock has an appreciable scale length over which the lighter D ions can diffuse away from fuel center. The depletion of D fuel is estimated and found to lead to a corresponding reduction in neutrons, consistent with the anomalies observed in experiments for both argon-doped D fuels and D3He equimolar mixtures. The reverse diffusional flux of the heavier ions toward fuel center also increases the pressure from a concomitant increase in electron number density, resulting in lower stagnation pressures and larger imploded cores in agreement with gated, self-emission, x-ray imaging data.

  16. Dilepton production as a useful probe of quark gluon plasma with temperature dependent chemical potential quark mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Yogesh; Singh, S. Somorendro

    2016-07-01

    We extend the previous study of dilepton production using [S. Somorendro Singh and Y. Kumar, Can. J. Phys. 92 (2014) 31] based on a simple quasiparticle model of quark-gluon plasma (QGP). In this model, finite value of quark mass uses temperature dependent chemical potential the so-called Temperature Dependent Chemical Potential Quark Mass (TDCPQM). We calculate dilepton production in the relevant range of mass region. It is observed that the production rate is marginally enhanced from the earlier work. This is due to the effect of TDCPQM and its effect is highly significant in the production of dilepton.

  17. Photodissociation dynamics in 'hyper-rovibronic' detail: Exploring the potential of millimeter/submillimeter-wave spectroscopy in molecular reaction dynamics experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Duffy, Liam M.

    2005-09-15

    Over the years, many techniques for studying molecular reaction dynamics have been developed and fine-tuned to probe chemical dynamics at an ever-increasing level of detail. Unfortunately, this progress has frequently come at the price of high experimental cost and great complexity. In this regard experiments employing direct absorption have a distinct advantage in that they are comparatively simple in setup and they probe nascent product distributions directly. Even though the low product number densities in molecular-beam experiments put severe constraints on the noise and sensitivity requirements of detectors, Nesbitt and co-workers [J. Chem. Phys. 86, 3151 (1987); Rev. Sci. Instrum. 58, 807 (1987); J. Chem. Phys. 85, 4890 (1986); J. Chem. Phys. 107, 5661 (1997); Chem. Phys. Lett. 258, 207 (1996)] have demonstrated the use of direct infrared absorption in a variety of molecular reaction dynamics studies. In analogous experiments, this article explores the use of millimeter- and submillimeter-wavelength radiation in direct absorption experiments in a molecular beam. The comparatively simple and inexpensive setup demonstrates the utility of combining new commercial solid-state millimeter (submillimeter)-wavelength sources with hot-electron bolometer detectors to directly probe parent and product hyperfine rovibronic levels and their Doppler-resolved velocity distributions in a molecular beam. For example, in open-shell products with nuclear spin, the ultrahigh energy resolution of the rotational spectroscopy easily resolves nuclear quadrupole hyperfine structure and lambda doublets in both ground and excited spin-orbit states as well as in ground and excited vibrational levels. Two molecular beam examples are given: (1) detection of 'hyper-rovibronic' structure in ClO ({sup 2}{pi}{sub {omega}}{sub =3/2l,12,{nu}}=0-8,J=1{sup 1/2})-7{sup 1/2}),{lambda},F) following the mode-specific photodissociation of OClO (A{sup 2}A{sub 2}<-X{sup 2}B{sub 1},{nu}{sub 1

  18. Photodissociation dynamics in ``hyper-rovibronic'' detail: Exploring the potential of millimeter/submillimeter-wave spectroscopy in molecular reaction dynamics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffy, Liam M.

    2005-09-01

    Over the years, many techniques for studying molecular reaction dynamics have been developed and fine-tuned to probe chemical dynamics at an ever-increasing level of detail. Unfortunately, this progress has frequently come at the price of high experimental cost and great complexity. In this regard experiments employing direct absorption have a distinct advantage in that they are comparatively simple in setup and they probe nascent product distributions directly. Even though the low product number densities in molecular-beam experiments put severe constraints on the noise and sensitivity requirements of detectors, Nesbitt and co-workers [J. Chem. Phys. 86, 3151 (1987); Rev. Sci. Instrum. 58, 807 (1987); J. Chem. Phys. 85, 4890 (1986); J. Chem. Phys. 107, 5661 (1997); Chem. Phys. Lett. 258, 207 (1996)] have demonstrated the use of direct infrared absorption in a variety of molecular reaction dynamics studies. In analogous experiments, this article explores the use of millimeter- and submillimeter-wavelength radiation in direct absorption experiments in a molecular beam. The comparatively simple and inexpensive setup demonstrates the utility of combining new commercial solid-state millimeter/submillimeter-wavelength sources with hot-electron bolometer detectors to directly probe parent and product hyperfine rovibronic levels and their Doppler-resolved velocity distributions in a molecular beam. For example, in open-shell products with nuclear spin, the ultrahigh energy resolution of the rotational spectroscopy easily resolves nuclear quadrupole hyperfine structure and lambda doublets in both ground and excited spin-orbit states as well as in ground and excited vibrational levels. Two molecular beam examples are given: (1) detection of "hyper-rovibronic" structure in ClO (ΠΩ =3/2,1/22, ν =0-8, J =1 1/2-7 1/2, Λ,F) following the mode-specific photodissociation of OClO (AA22←XB12, ν1=14-15), and (2) coherent transient absorption of HCN following the 266 nm

  19. Linking plasma kinetics to plasma-bio interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruggeman, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Cold non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasmas have received a lot of attention in the last decade due to their huge potential for biomedical applications. In my group, we have characterized an RF driven APPJ in great detail. The characterization includes electrical measurements, imaging, optical emission spectroscopy, (two photon enhanced) laser induced fluorescence, Thomson scattering, Rayleigh scattering, Raman scattering and mass spectrometry. This led to a detailed knowledge of the electron density, electron temperature, gas temperature, NO, O, OH, O3 densities, ionic species and air concentrations in the plasma effluent. Living organisms for in vitro studies are typically kept in complex solutions or culture media. Plasma-bio interactions involves not only the production of reactive species in the plasma gas phase but also transport to the liquid phase and plasma induced liquid phase chemistry and its impact on the living organisms. Reactive nitrogen and oxygen species have been identified as the key reactive species. Recent results of my group show that controlling the gas phase plasma chemistry can lead to significant different biological responses of the living organisms corresponding to different chemical pathways. The effect of plasma jet interaction with liquids containing mammalian cells, bacteria and virus will be discussed. The outcomes of these studies allow unraveling chemical pathways responsible for plasma-bio interactions and linking plasma kinetics to plasma-bio interactions.

  20. Increased plasma levels of CK-18 as potential cell death biomarker in patients with HELLP syndrome.

    PubMed

    John, K; Wielgosz, S; Schulze-Osthoff, K; Bantel, H; Hass, R

    2013-10-24

    HELLP (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, low platelets) syndrome represents a life-threatening pregnancy disorder with high fetal and maternal mortality, but its underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. Although apoptosis has been implicated in HELLP syndrome, its pathogenic role remains largely unclear. In the present study, we investigated whether the detection of apoptosis by novel plasma biomarkers is of diagnostic value in HELLP patients. For this purpose, we analyzed two biomarkers that specifically detect apoptosis or overall cell death of epithelial cells, such as hepatocytes or placental trophoblasts, through the release of caspase-cleaved or total (caspase-cleaved and uncleaved) cytokeratin-18 (CK-18) in plasma of HELLP patients compared with pregnant as well as non-pregnant healthy women. In addition, caspase activation and cell death were determined in placental tissues of HELLP patients and individuals with normal pregnancy. In contrast to pregnant or non-pregnant healthy controls, we observed significantly increased levels of both caspase-cleaved and total CK-18 in plasma of HELLP patients. Following delivery, CK-18 levels rapidly decreased in HELLP patients. Caspase activation and cell death were also elevated in placental tissues from HELLP patients compared with healthy pregnant women. These data demonstrate not only that apoptosis is increased in HELLP syndrome, but also that caspase-cleaved or total CK-18 are promising plasma biomarkers to identify patients with HELLP syndrome. Thus, further studies are warranted to evaluate the utility of these biomarkers for monitoring disease activity in HELLP syndrome.

  1. Stopping potential and ion beamlet control for micro-resistive patterning through sub-Debye length plasma apertures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Abhishek; Chatterjee, Sanghamitro; Dutta, Apurba; Bhattacharjee, Sudeep

    2014-12-01

    Focused multiple ion beamlets from a microwave plasma source is investigated for localized micron-scale modification of substrates in a patterned manner. Plasma electrodes (PE) with an array of through apertures having aperture diameters of the order of plasma Debye length are investigated for generating the beamlets. Extraction through sub-Debye length apertures becomes possible when the PE is kept at floating potential. It is found that the current - voltage characteristics of the extracted beamlets exhibits interesting features such as a space-charge-limited region that has a different behaviour than the conventional Child-Langmuir's law and an extraction-voltage-limited region that does not undergo saturation but exhibits a Schottky-like behaviour similar to that of a vacuum diode. A switching technique to control the motion of individual beamlets is developed and the stopping potential determined. The beamlets are thereafter used to create localized micro-resistive patterns. The experimental results are compared with simulations and reasonably good agreement is obtained.

  2. Concentrations of thiocyanate and goitrin in human plasma, their precursor concentrations in brassica vegetables, and associated potential risk for hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Felker, Peter; Bunch, Ronald; Leung, Angela M

    2016-04-01

    Brassica vegetables are common components of the diet and have beneficial as well as potentially adverse health effects. Following enzymatic breakdown, some glucosinolates in brassica vegetables produce sulforaphane, phenethyl, and indolylic isothiocyanates that possess anticarcinogenic activity. In contrast, progoitrin and indolylic glucosinolates degrade to goitrin and thiocyanate, respectively, and may decrease thyroid hormone production. Radioiodine uptake to the thyroid is inhibited by 194 μmol of goitrin, but not by 77 μmol of goitrin. Collards, Brussels sprouts, and some Russian kale (Brassica napus) contain sufficient goitrin to potentially decrease iodine uptake by the thyroid. However, turnip tops, commercial broccoli, broccoli rabe, and kale belonging to Brassica oleracae contain less than 10 μmol of goitrin per 100-g serving and can be considered of minimal risk. Using sulforaphane plasma levels following glucoraphanin ingestion as a surrogate for thiocyanate plasma concentrations after indole glucosinolate ingestion, the maximum thiocyanate contribution from indole glucosinolate degradation is estimated to be 10 μM, which is significantly lower than background plasma thiocyanate concentrations (40-69 μM). Thiocyanate generated from consumption of indole glucosinolate can be assumed to have minimal adverse risks for thyroid health.

  3. A potentially robust plasma profile control approach for ITER using real-time estimation of linearized profile response models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. H.; Lister, J. B.

    2012-07-01

    An active plasma profile control approach for ITER, which is potentially robust by being tolerant to changing and uncertain physics, has been explored in this work, using a technique based on real-time estimation of linearized profile response models. The linearized models approximate static responses of the plasma profiles to power changes in auxiliary heating and current drive systems. These models are updated in real-time, differing from the model-based technique which deduces a dynamic model from identification experiments. The underlying physics is simplified with several assumptions to allow real-time update of the profile response models; however, without significant loss of information necessary for feedback control of the plasma profiles. The response of the electron temperature profile is modelled by simplifying the electron heat transport equation. The response of the safety factor profile is computed by directly relating it to the changes in source current density profiles. The required actuator power changes are directly computed by inverting the response matrix using the singular value decomposition technique. The saturation of the actuator powers is taken into account and the capability of using quantized auxiliary powers is provided. The potential of our active control approach has been tested by applying it to simulations of the ITER hybrid mode operation using CRONOS. In these simulations, either a global transport model or a theory-based local transport model has been used and the electron temperature and safety factor profiles were well controlled either independently or simultaneously.

  4. Stopping potential and ion beamlet control for micro-resistive patterning through sub-Debye length plasma apertures

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, Abhishek; Chatterjee, Sanghamitro; Dutta, Apurba; Bhattacharjee, Sudeep

    2014-12-15

    Focused multiple ion beamlets from a microwave plasma source is investigated for localized micron-scale modification of substrates in a patterned manner. Plasma electrodes (PE) with an array of through apertures having aperture diameters of the order of plasma Debye length are investigated for generating the beamlets. Extraction through sub-Debye length apertures becomes possible when the PE is kept at floating potential. It is found that the current – voltage characteristics of the extracted beamlets exhibits interesting features such as a space-charge-limited region that has a different behaviour than the conventional Child-Langmuir’s law and an extraction-voltage-limited region that does not undergo saturation but exhibits a Schottky-like behaviour similar to that of a vacuum diode. A switching technique to control the motion of individual beamlets is developed and the stopping potential determined. The beamlets are thereafter used to create localized micro-resistive patterns. The experimental results are compared with simulations and reasonably good agreement is obtained.

  5. Surface modification of Ti6Al4V alloy by PIII at high temperatures: Effects of plasma potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, M. M.; Ueda, M.; Pichon, L.; Reuther, H.; Lepienski, C. M.

    2007-04-01

    The present work is aimed to analyzing the influence of the plasma potential in the efficiency of plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) process with nitrogen, at high temperatures (550 °C and 800 °C), applied to the Ti6Al4V alloy to increase its wear resistance. Treatments with plasma potentials (PP) at 420 V and 90 V were carried out. In the first case, in accordance with AES (Auger Electron Spectroscopy) analysis, nitrogen rich layers of 100 nm and 150 nm of thickness had been obtained, for total treatment times of 60 min and 120 min, respectively. For the treatments with lower PP of 90 V, the treated layers thicknesses have been measured by GDOS (Glow Discharge Optical Spectroscopy) and their values are 1 μm and 1.5 μm for treatments of 120 min and 240 min, respectively. The hardness values were determined for the samples treated with high PP by nanoindentation technique and a significant increase was observed for this treatment, reaching 11 GPa (60 min) and 19 GPa (120 min), which can be compared to 3.5-4.0 GPa obtained for the untreated samples. Pin-on-disk wear tests show that wear resistance increases after all these treatments. The friction coefficient as well as the wear rates are measured with a tribometer.

  6. Concentrations of thiocyanate and goitrin in human plasma, their precursor concentrations in brassica vegetables, and associated potential risk for hypothyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Bunch, Ronald; Leung, Angela M.

    2016-01-01

    Brassica vegetables are common components of the diet and have beneficial as well as potentially adverse health effects. Following enzymatic breakdown, some glucosinolates in brassica vegetables produce sulforaphane, phenethyl, and indolylic isothiocyanates that possess anticarcinogenic activity. In contrast, progoitrin and indolylic glucosinolates degrade to goitrin and thiocyanate, respectively, and may decrease thyroid hormone production. Radioiodine uptake to the thyroid is inhibited by 194 μmol of goitrin, but not by 77 μmol of goitrin. Collards, Brussels sprouts, and some Russian kale (Brassica napus) contain sufficient goitrin to potentially decrease iodine uptake by the thyroid. However, turnip tops, commercial broccoli, broccoli rabe, and kale belonging to Brassica oleracae contain less than 10 μmol of goitrin per 100-g serving and can be considered of minimal risk. Using sulforaphane plasma levels following glucoraphanin ingestion as a surrogate for thiocyanate plasma concentrations after indole glucosinolate ingestion, the maximum thiocyanate contribution from indole glucosinolate degradation is estimated to be 10 μM, which is significantly lower than background plasma thiocyanate concentrations (40–69 μM). Thiocyanate generated from consumption of indole glucosinolate can be assumed to have minimal adverse risks for thyroid health. PMID:26946249

  7. Detailed analysis of the male reproductive system in a potential bio-indicator species – The marine invertebrate Galeolaria caespitosa (Polychaeta: Serpulidae)

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yonggang; Aitken, Robert John; Lin, Minjie

    2017-01-01

    For the first time, this study has systemically investigated the male reproductive system in a sessile broadcast-spawning marine invertebrate, Galeolaria caespitosa (Polychaeta: Serpulidae), which has significant potential as a bio-indicator species of coastal marine pollution. The abdomen of G. caespitosa was divided by intersegmental septa into over 80 trunk segments. Each segment served as a germinal chamber with a C-shaped gonadal arrangement consisting of several distinct compartments: a seminiferous epithelium (SE) compartment located in the centre of the chamber, with each of its two ends connecting to a nurse cell (NC) compartment and then an efferent duct (ED) compartment. The SE compartment contained a multilayered seminiferous epithelium where spermatogenesis was initiated. Spermatids were released in pairs into the lumen of the SE compartment and then transported to the NC compartment where they underwent spermiogenesis with the support of secretory vesicles released by the nurse cells. Spermatozoa were stored in the ED compartment and subsequently released into the seawater through the vas deferens. Unlike vertebrates where germ cells differentiated in close proximity to the nurse cell population (i.e. Sertoli cells), the spermatogenic cells of G. caespitosa exhibited no direct contact with supporting cells at any spermatogenic stage. This finding suggested that the spermatogenesis in G. caespitosa was more dependent on intrinsic developmental programming than most species. Notwithstanding such differences, there were clear parallels between the male reproductive system of G. caespitosa and mammals, in terms of the structure and function. The independence of spermatogenic cells from supporting cells in G. caespitosa raised the possibility of inducing spermiogenesis in vitro, which would provide a useful tool to dissect the mechanisms underlying this complex cell differentiation process in invertebrates and other higher order animals. PMID:28369153

  8. Plasma Lysosphingomyelin Demonstrates Great Potential as a Diagnostic Biomarker for Niemann-Pick Disease Type C in a Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Welford, Richard W. D.; Garzotti, Marco; Marques Lourenço, Charles; Mengel, Eugen; Marquardt, Thorsten; Reunert, Janine; Amraoui, Yasmina; Kolb, Stefan A.; Morand, Olivier; Groenen, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Niemann-Pick disease type C (NP-C) is a devastating, neurovisceral lysosomal storage disorder which is characterised by variable manifestation of visceral signs, progressive neuropsychiatric deterioration and premature death, caused by mutations in the NPC1 and NPC2 genes. Due to the complexity of diagnosis and the availability of an approved therapy in the EU, improved detection of NP-C may have a huge impact on future disease management. At the cellular level dysfunction or deficiency of either the NPC1 or NPC2 protein leads to a complex intracellular endosomal/lysosomal trafficking defect, and organ specific patterns of sphingolipid accumulation. Lysosphingolipids have been shown to be excellent biomarkers of sphingolipidosis in several enzyme deficient lysosomal storage disorders. Additionally, in a recent study the lysosphingolipids, lysosphingomyelin (SPC) and glucosylsphingosine (GlcSph), appeared to be elevated in the plasma of three adult NP-C patients. In order to investigate the clinical utility of SPC and GlcSph as diagnostic markers, an in-depth fit for purpose biomarker assay validation for measurement of these biomarkers in plasma by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was performed. Plasma SPC and GlcSph are stable and can be measured accurately, precisely and reproducibly. In a retrospective analysis of 57 NP-C patients and 70 control subjects, median plasma SPC and GlcSph were significantly elevated in NP-C by 2.8-fold and 1.4-fold respectively. For miglustat-naïve NP-C patients, aged 2–50 years, the area under the ROC curve was 0.999 for SPC and 0.776 for GlcSph. Plasma GlcSph did not correlate with SPC levels in NP-C patients. The data indicate excellent potential for the use of lysosphingomyelin in NP-C diagnosis, where it could be used to identify NP-C patients for confirmatory genetic testing. PMID:25479233

  9. Influence of Glucose Deprivation on Membrane Potentials of Plasma Membranes, Mitochondria and Synaptic Vesicles in Rat Brain Synaptosomes.

    PubMed

    Hrynevich, Sviatlana V; Pekun, Tatyana G; Waseem, Tatyana V; Fedorovich, Sergei V

    2015-06-01

    Hypoglycemia can cause neuronal cell death similar to that of glutamate-induced cell death. In the present paper, we investigated the effect of glucose removal from incubation medium on changes of mitochondrial and plasma membrane potentials in rat brain synaptosomes using the fluorescent dyes DiSC3(5) and JC-1. We also monitored pH gradients in synaptic vesicles and their recycling by the fluorescent dye acridine orange. Glucose deprivation was found to cause an inhibition of K(+)-induced Ca(2+)-dependent exocytosis and a shift of mitochondrial and plasma membrane potentials to more positive values. The sensitivity of these parameters to the energy deficit caused by the removal of glucose showed the following order: mitochondrial membrane potential > plasma membrane potential > pH gradient in synaptic vesicles. The latter was almost unaffected by deprivation compared with the control. The pH-dependent dye acridine orange was used to investigate synaptic vesicle recycling. However, the compound's fluorescence was shown to be enhanced also by the mixture of mitochondrial toxins rotenone (10 µM) and oligomycin (5 µg/mL). This means that acridine orange can presumably be partially distributed in the intermembrane space of mitochondria. Glucose removal from the incubation medium resulted in a 3.7-fold raise of acridine orange response to rotenone + oligomycin suggesting a dramatic increase in the mitochondrial pH gradient. Our results suggest that the biophysical characteristics of neuronal presynaptic endings do not favor excessive non-controlled neurotransmitter release in case of hypoglycemia. The inhibition of exocytosis and the increase of the mitochondrial pH gradient, while preserving the vesicular pH gradient, are proposed as compensatory mechanisms.

  10. Plasma microRNA might as a potential biomarker for hepatocellular carcinoma and chronic liver disease screening.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Li; Li, Xue; Cheng, Qi; Zhang, Bin-Hao

    2015-09-01

    Our study aims to investigate the expression signature of plasma microRNA-106b (miRNA-106b, miR-106b) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients and chronic liver disease (CLD) patients compared with healthy controls and further evaluate the potential clinical value of miR-106b as biomarker in HCC detection. In addition, a meta-analysis was conducted to assess the diagnostic performance of miR-106a/b as a biochemical marker for cancer screening. This study was divided into two phases. In the first phase, the expression levels of plasma miR-106b obtained from 108 subjects (47 HCC patients, 25 CLD patients, and 36 healthy controls) were measured by using qRT-PCR. Areas under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves (AUCs) were used to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of plasma miR-106. In the second phase, a meta-analysis based on 11 previous researches as well as our current study was conducted to assess the potential clinical value of miR-106 in cancer detection. Plasma levels of miR-106b in HCC patients were significantly higher compared with CLD patients and healthy individuals. ROC curves suggested that plasma miR-106b yielded relative high sensitivities and specificities in differentiating HCC patients from CLD patients or healthy controls with corresponding AUC values of 0.726 and 0.879, respectively. In addition, miR-106b showed a relatively high accuracy in distinguishing CLD patients from healthy controls with its AUC value of 0.703. Furthermore, the meta-analysis for diagnostic performance of miR-106a/b showed a pooled sensitivity of 0.74, specificity of 0.75, and an AUC of 0.81. Subgroup analysis based on samples types revealed a higher diagnostic performance of miR-106 for cancer detection by using non-blood samples. Similarly, miR-106 as biomarker showed a higher diagnostic accuracy for gastric cancer detection. We found that plasma miR-106b has clinical value in the detection of HCC from healthy people and CLD patients. Further large-scale study

  11. Potential medical applications of the plasma focus in the radioisotope production for PET imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roshan, M. V.; Razaghi, S.; Asghari, F.; Rawat, R. S.; Springham, S. V.; Lee, P.; Lee, S.; Tan, T. L.

    2014-06-01

    Devices other than the accelerators are desired to be investigated for generating high energy particles to induce nuclear reaction and positron emission tomography (PET) producing radioisotopes. The experimental data of plasma focus devices (PF) are studied and the activity scaling law for External Solid Target (EST) activation is established. Based on the scaling law and the techniques to enhance the radioisotopes production, the feasibility of generating the required activity for PET imaging is studied.

  12. Physics and potentials of fissioning plasmas for space power and propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thom, K.; Schwenk, F. C.; Schneider, R. T.

    1974-01-01

    A brief description of two gas core reactor concepts devised for propulsion applications is presented and recent research on the emission of radiation from nonequilibrium fissioning gases is considered. The principles of UF6 and plasma core reactor experiments are discussed. It is expected that the program of nuclear gas core reactor experiments can lead in several years to reactor operation at pressures, temperatures, and power levels of technological significance to terrestrial applications.

  13. Assessment of the toxic potential of engineered metal oxide nanomaterials using an acellular model: citrated rat blood plasma.

    PubMed

    Gormley, Patrick Thomas; Callaghan, Neal Ingraham; MacCormack, Tyson James; Dieni, Christopher Anthony

    2016-10-01

    Citrated Sprague-Dawley rat blood plasma was used as a biologically relevant exposure medium to assess the acellular toxic potential of two metal oxide engineered nanomaterials (ENMs), zinc oxide (nZnO), and cerium oxide (nCeO2). Plasma was incubated at 37 °C for up to 48 h with ENM concentrations ranging between 0 and 200 mg/L. The degree of ENM-induced oxidation was assessed by assaying for reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels using dichlorofluorescein (DCF), pH, ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP), lipase activity, malondialdehyde (MDA), and protein carbonyls (PC). Whereas previous in vitro studies showed linear-positive correlations between ENM concentration and oxidative damage, our results suggested that low concentrations were generally pro-oxidant and higher concentrations appeared antioxidant or protective, as indicated by DCF fluorescence trends. nZnO and nCeO2 also affected pH in a manner dependent on concentration and elemental composition; higher nZnO concentrations maintained a more alkaline pH, while nCeO2 tended to decrease pH. No other biomarkers of oxidative damage (FRAP, MDA, PC, lipase activity) showed changes at any ENM concentration or time-point tested. Differential dissolution of the two ENMs was also observed, where as much as ∼31.3% of nZnO was instantaneously dissolved to Zn(2+ )and only negligible nCeO2 was degraded. The results suggest that the direct oxidative potential of nZnO and nCeO2 in citrated rat blood plasma is low, and that a physiological or immune response is needed to generate appreciable damage biomarkers. The data also highlight the need for careful consideration when selecting a model for assessing ENM toxicity.

  14. External Pulsed Plasma Propulsion and Its Potential for the Near Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonometti, J. A.; Morton, P. J.; Schmidt, G. R.

    1999-01-01

    This paper examines External Pulsed Plasma Propulsion (EPPP), a propulsion concept that derives its thrust from plasma waves generated from a series of small, supercritical fission/fusion pulses behind an object in space. For spacecraft applications, a momentum transfer mechanism translates the intense plasma wave energy into a vehicle acceleration that is tolerable to the rest of the spacecraft and its crew. This propulsion concept offers extremely high performance in terms of both specific impulse (Isp) and thrust-to-weight ratio, something that other concepts based on available technology cannot do, The political concerns that suspended work on this type of system (i.e. termination of Project ORION) may now not be as insurmountable as they were in 1965. The appeal of EPPP stems from its relatively low cost and reusability, fast interplanetary transit times, safety and reliability, and independence from major technological breakthroughs. In fact, a first generation EPPP system based on modern-day technology (i.e., GABRIEL - an evolutionary framework- of EPPP concepts) may very well be the only form of propulsion that could realistically be developed to perform ambitious human exploration beyond Mars in the 21st century. It could also provide the most effective approach for deterrence against collision between earth and small planetary objects - a growing concern over recent years.

  15. Evaluation of the potential of p-nitrophenol degradation in dredged sediment by pulsed discharge plasma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tiecheng; Qu, Guangzhou; Sun, Qiuhong; Liang, Dongli; Hu, Shibin

    2015-11-01

    Hazardous pollutants in dredged sediment pose great threats to ecological environment and human health. A novel approach, named pulsed discharge plasma (PDP), was employed for the degradation of p-nitrophenol (PNP) in dredged sediment. Experimental results showed that 92.9% of PNP in sediment was smoothly removed in 60 min, and the degradation process fitted the first-order kinetic model. Roles of some active species in PNP degradation in sediment were studied by various gas plasmas, OH radical scavenger, hydrated electron scavenger and O2(·-) scavenger; and the results presented that O3, OH radical, eaq(-) and O2(·-) all played significant roles in PNP removal, and eaq(-) and O2(·-) mainly participated in other oxidising active species formation. FTIR analysis showed that PNP molecular structure was destroyed after PDP treatment. The main degradation intermediates were identified as hydroquinone, benzoquinone, phenol, acetic acid, NO2(-) and NO3(-). PNP degradation pathway in dredged sediment was proposed. It is expected to contribute to an alternative for sediment remediation by pulse discharge plasma.

  16. Potential formation in a one-dimensional bounded plasma system containing a two-electron temperature plasma: Kinetic model and PIC simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Gyergyek, T.; Jurcic-Zlobec, B.; Cercek, M.

    2008-06-15

    Potential formation in a bounded plasma system that contains electrons with a two-temperature velocity distribution and is terminated by a floating, electron emitting electrode (collector) is studied by a one-dimensional kinetic model. A method on how to determine the boundary conditions at the collector for the numerical solution of the Poisson equation is presented. The difference between the regular and the irregular numerical solutions of the Poisson equation is explained. The regular numerical solution of the Poisson equation fulfills the boundary conditions at the source and can be computed for any distance from the collector. The irregular solution does not fulfill the source boundary conditions and the computation breaks down at some distance from the collector. An excellent agreement of the values of the potential at the inflection point found from the numerical solution of the Poisson equation with the values predicted by the analytical model is obtained. Potential, electric field, and particle density profiles found by the numerical solution of the Poisson equation are compared to the profiles obtained with the particle in cell computer simulation. A very good quantitative agreement of the potential and electric field profiles is obtained. For certain values of the parameters the analytical model predicts three possible values of the potential at the inflection point. In such cases always only one of the corresponding numerical solutions of the Poisson equation is regular, while the other two are irregular. The regular numerical solution of the Poisson equation always corresponds to the solution of the model that predicts the largest ion flux to the collector.

  17. Crowdsourcing detailed flood data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walliman, Nicholas; Ogden, Ray; Amouzad*, Shahrzhad

    2015-04-01

    Over the last decade the average annual loss across the European Union due to flooding has been 4.5bn Euros, but increasingly intense rainfall, as well as population growth, urbanisation and the rising costs of asset replacements, may see this rise to 23bn Euros a year by 2050. Equally disturbing are the profound social costs to individuals, families and communities which in addition to loss of lives include: loss of livelihoods, decreased purchasing and production power, relocation and migration, adverse psychosocial effects, and hindrance of economic growth and development. Flood prediction, management and defence strategies rely on the availability of accurate information and flood modelling. Whilst automated data gathering (by measurement and satellite) of the extent of flooding is already advanced it is least reliable in urban and physically complex geographies where often the need for precise estimation is most acute. Crowdsourced data of actual flood events is a potentially critical component of this allowing improved accuracy in situations and identifying the effects of local landscape and topography where the height of a simple kerb, or discontinuity in a boundary wall can have profound importance. Mobile 'App' based data acquisition using crowdsourcing in critical areas can combine camera records with GPS positional data and time, as well as descriptive data relating to the event. This will automatically produce a dataset, managed in ArcView GIS, with the potential for follow up calls to get more information through structured scripts for each strand. Through this local residents can provide highly detailed information that can be reflected in sophisticated flood protection models and be core to framing urban resilience strategies and optimising the effectiveness of investment. This paper will describe this pioneering approach that will develop flood event data in support of systems that will advance existing approaches such as developed in the in the UK

  18. Plasma Potential and Langmuir Probe Measurements in the Near-field Plume of the NASA-457Mv2 Hall Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shastry, Rohit; Huang, Wensheng; Herman, Daniel A.; Soulas, George C.; Kamhawi, Hani

    2012-01-01

    In order to further the design of future high-power Hall thrusters and provide experimental validation for ongoing modeling efforts, plasma potential and Langmuir probe measurements were performed on the 50-kW NASA-457Mv2. An electrostatic probe array comprised of a near-field Faraday probe, single Langmuir probe, and emissive probe was used to interrogate the near-field plume from approximately 0.1 - 2.0 mean thruster diameters downstream of the thruster exit plane at the following operating conditions: 300 V, 400 V and 500 V at 30 kW and 500 V at 50 kW. Results have shown that the acceleration zone is limited to within 0.4 mean thruster diameters of the exit plane while the high-temperature region is limited to 0.25 mean thruster diameters from the exit plane at all four operating conditions. Maximum plasma potentials in the near-field at 300 and 400 V were approximately 50 V with respect to cathode potential, while maximum electron temperatures varied from 24 - 32 eV, depending on operating condition. Isothermal lines at all operating conditions were found to strongly resemble the magnetic field topology in the high-temperature regions. This distribution was found to create regions of high temperature and low density near the magnetic poles, indicating strong, thick sheath formation along these surfaces. The data taken from this study are considered valuable for future design as well as modeling validation.

  19. Plasma Potential and Langmuir Probe Measurements in the Near-Field Plume of the NASA-457Mv2 Hall Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shastry, Rohit; Huang, Wensheng; Herman, Daniel A.; Soulas, George C.; Kamhawi, Hani

    2012-01-01

    In order to further the design of future high-power Hall thrusters and provide experimental validation for ongoing modeling efforts, plasma potential and Langmuir probe measurements were performed on the 50-kW NASA-457Mv2. An electrostatic probe array comprised of a near-field Faraday probe, single Langmuir probe, and emissive probe was used to interrogate the near-field plume from approximately 0.1 ? 2.0 mean thruster diameters downstream of the thruster exit plane at the following operating conditions: 300 V, 400 V and 500 V at 30 kW and 500 V at 50 kW. Results have shown that the acceleration zone is limited to within 0.4 mean thruster diameters of the exit plane while the high-temperature region is limited to 0.25 mean thruster diameters from the exit plane at all four operating conditions. Maximum plasma potentials in the near-field at 300 and 400 V were approximately 50 V with respect to cathode potential, while maximum electron temperatures varied from 24 ? 32 eV, depending on operating condition. Isothermal lines at all operating conditions were found to strongly resemble the magnetic field topology in the high-temperature regions. This distribution was found to create regions of high temperature and low density near the magnetic poles, indicating strong, thick sheath formation along these surfaces. The data taken from this study are considered valuable for future design as well as modeling validation.

  20. Probability Density Functions of Floating Potential Fluctuations Due to Local Electron Flux Intermittency in a Linear ECR Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, Shinji; Terasaka, Kenichiro; Tanaka, Eiki; Aramaki, Mitsutoshi; Tanaka, Masayoshi Y.

    An intermittent behavior of local electron flux in a laboratory ECR plasma is statistically analyzed by means of probability density functions (PDFs). The PDF constructed from a time series of the floating potential signal on a Langmuir probe has a fat tail in the negative value side, which reflects the intermittency of the local electron flux. The PDF of the waiting time, which is defined by the time interval between two successive events, is found to exhibit an exponential distribution, suggesting that the phenomenon is characterized by a stationary Poisson process. The underlying Poisson process is also confirmed by the number of events in given time intervals that is Poisson distributed.

  1. Electron Pathways through Erythrocyte Plasma Membrane in Human Physiology and Pathology: Potential Redox Biomarker?

    PubMed

    Matteucci, Elena; Giampietro, Ottavio

    2007-09-17

    Erythrocytes are involved in the transport of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the body. Since pH is the influential factor in the Bohr-Haldane effect, pHi is actively maintained via secondary active transports Na(+)/H(+) exchange and HC(3) (-)/Cl(-) anion exchanger. Because of the redox properties of the iron, hemoglobin generates reactive oxygen species and thus, the human erythrocyte is constantly exposed to oxidative damage. Although the adult erythrocyte lacks protein synthesis and cannot restore damaged proteins, it is equipped with high activity of protective enzymes. Redox changes in the cell initiate various signalling pathways. Plasma membrane oxido-reductases (PMORs) are transmembrane electron transport systems that have been found in the membranes of all cells and have been extensively characterized in the human erythrocyte. Erythrocyte PMORs transfer reducing equivalents from intracellular reductants to extracellular oxidants, thus their most important role seems to be to enable the cell respond to changes in intra- and extra-cellular redox environments.So far the activity of erythrocyte PMORs in disease states has not been systematically investigated. This review summarizes present knowledge on erythrocyte electron transfer activity in humans (health, type 1 diabetes, diabetic nephropathy, and chronic uremia) and hypothesizes an integrated model of the functional organization of erythrocyte plasma membrane where electron pathways work in parallel with transport metabolons to maintain redox homeostasis.

  2. Physics and potentials of fissioning plasmas for space power and propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thom, K.; Schwenk, F. C.; Schneider, R. T.

    1976-01-01

    Fissioning uranium plasmas are the nuclear fuel in conceptual high-temperature gaseous-core reactors for advanced rocket propulsion in space. A gaseous-core nuclear rocket would be a thermal reactor in which an enriched uranium plasma at about 10,000 K is confined in a reflector-moderator cavity where it is nuclear critical and transfers its fission power to a confining propellant flow for the production of thrust at a specific impulse up to 5000 sec. With a thrust-to-engine weight ratio approaching unity, the gaseous-core nuclear rocket could provide for propulsion capabilities needed for manned missions to the nearby planets and for economical cislunar ferry services. Fueled with enriched uranium hexafluoride and operated at temperatures lower than needed for propulsion, the gaseous-core reactor scheme also offers significant benefits in applications for space and terrestrial power. They include high-efficiency power generation at low specific mass, the burnup of certain fission products and actinides, the breeding of U-233 from thorium with short doubling times, and improved convenience of fuel handling and processing in the gaseous phase.

  3. Current-driven ion-acoustic and potential-relaxation instabilities excited in plasma plume during electron beam welding

    SciTech Connect

    Trushnikov, D. N.; Mladenov, G. M. Koleva, E. G.; Belenkiy, V. Ya. Varushkin, S. V.

    2014-04-15

    Many papers have sought correlations between the parameters of secondary particles generated above the beam/work piece interaction zone, dynamics of processes in the keyhole, and technological processes. Low- and high-frequency oscillations of the current, collected by plasma have been observed above the welding zone during electron beam welding. Low-frequency oscillations of secondary signals are related to capillary instabilities of the keyhole, however; the physical mechanisms responsible for the high-frequency oscillations (>10 kHz) of the collected current are not fully understood. This paper shows that peak frequencies in the spectra of the collected high-frequency signal are dependent on the reciprocal distance between the welding zone and collector electrode. From the relationship between current harmonics frequency and distance of the collector/welding zone, it can be estimated that the draft velocity of electrons or phase velocity of excited waves is about 1600 m/s. The dispersion relation with the properties of ion-acoustic waves is related to electron temperature 10 000 K, ion temperature 2 400 K and plasma density 10{sup 16} m{sup −3}, which is analogues to the parameters of potential-relaxation instabilities, observed in similar conditions. The estimated critical density of the transported current for creating the anomalous resistance state of plasma is of the order of 3 A·m{sup −2}, i.e. 8 mA for a 3–10 cm{sup 2} collector electrode. Thus, it is assumed that the observed high-frequency oscillations of the current collected by the positive collector electrode are caused by relaxation processes in the plasma plume above the welding zone, and not a direct demonstration of oscillations in the keyhole.

  4. Plasma Membrane Proteomics of Human Breast Cancer Cell Lines Identifies Potential Targets for Breast Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Yvonne S.; Moresco, James J.; Tu, Patricia G.; Yates, John R.; Nardulli, Ann M.

    2014-01-01

    The use of broad spectrum chemotherapeutic agents to treat breast cancer results in substantial and debilitating side effects, necessitating the development of targeted therapies to limit tumor proliferation and prevent metastasis. In recent years, the list of approved targeted therapies has expanded, and it includes both monoclonal antibodies and small molecule inhibitors that interfere with key proteins involved in the uncontrolled growth and migration of cancer cells. The targeting of plasma membrane proteins has been most successful to date, and this is reflected in the large representation of these proteins as targets of newer therapies. In view of these facts, experiments were designed to investigate the plasma membrane proteome of a variety of human breast cancer cell lines representing hormone-responsive, ErbB2 over-expressing and triple negative cell types, as well as a benign control. Plasma membranes were isolated by using an aqueous two-phase system, and the resulting proteins were subjected to mass spectrometry analysis. Overall, each of the cell lines expressed some unique proteins, and a number of proteins were expressed in multiple cell lines, but in patterns that did not always follow traditional clinical definitions of breast cancer type. From our data, it can be deduced that most cancer cells possess multiple strategies to promote uncontrolled growth, reflected in aberrant expression of tyrosine kinases, cellular adhesion molecules, and structural proteins. Our data set provides a very rich and complex picture of plasma membrane proteins present on breast cancer cells, and the sorting and categorizing of this data provides interesting insights into the biology, classification, and potential treatment of this prevalent and debilitating disease. PMID:25029196

  5. Circulating miR-222 in plasma and its potential diagnostic and prognostic value in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zhengchuan; Qian, Fang; Yang, Xuhuan; Jiang, Hailiang; Chen, Yu; Liu, Sihai

    2014-09-01

    Previous studies have revealed the significance of circulating microRNAs as biomarkers for cancers. The aim of this study was to detect the levels of circulating microRNA-222 (miR-222) in plasma of gastric cancer (GC) patients and evaluate its diagnostic and prognostic value. Levels of circulating miR-222 were detected by using qRT-PCR in plasma of 114 GC patients, 36 chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG) patients and 56 healthy controls. The result showed that the expression of circulating miR-222 in plasma was significantly upregulated in GC compared with CAG and healthy controls (all at P < 0.001). And its high level was significantly correlated with clinical stages (P < 0.001) and lymph nodes metastasis (P = 0.009). The receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analyses revealed that miR-222 had considerable diagnostic accuracy, yielded an AUC (the areas under the ROC curve) of 0.850 with 66.1 % sensitivity and 88.3 % specificity in discriminating GC from healthy controls. Moreover, Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated a correlation between increased circulating miR-222 level and reduced disease-free survival (P = 0.016) and overall survival (P = 0.012). In multivariate analysis stratified for known prognostic variables, circulating miR-222 was identified as an independent prognostic marker. In conclusion, our findings suggested that circulating miR-222 in plasma might be a potential and useful noninvasive biomarker for the early detection and prognosis of GC.

  6. Adaption of the LUCI framework to account for detailed farm management: a case study exploring potential for achieving locally and nationally significant greenhouse gas, flooding and nutrient mitigation without compromising livelihoods on New Zealand farm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Bethanna; Trodahl, Martha; Maxwell, Deborah; Easton, Stuart

    2016-04-01

    This talk discusses recent progress in adapting the Land Utilisation and Capability Indicator (LUCI) framework to take account of the impact of detailed farm management on greenhouse gas emissions and on water, sediment and nutrient delivery to waterways. LUCI is a land management decision support framework which examines the impact of current and potential interventions on a variety of outcomes, including flood mitigation, water supply, greenhouse gas emissions, biodiversity, erosion, sediment and nutrient delivery to waterways, and agricultural production. The potential of the landscape to provide benefits is a function of both the biophysical properties of individual landscape elements and their configuration. Both are respected in LUCI where possible. For example, the hydrology, sediment and chemical routing algorithms are based on physical principles of hillslope flow, taking information on the storage and permeability capacity of elements within the landscape from soil and land use data and honoring physical thresholds, mass and energy balance constraints. LUCI discretizes hydrological response units within the landscape according to similarity of their hydraulic properties and preserves spatially explicit topographical routing. Implications of keeping the "status quo" or potential scenarios of land management change can then be evaluated under different meteorological or climatic events (e.g. flood return periods, rainfall events, droughts), cascading water through the hydrological response units using a "fill and spill" approach. These and other component algorithms are designed to be fast-running while maintaining physical consistency and fine spatial detail. This allows it to operate from subfield level scale to catchment, or even national scale, simultaneously. It analyses and communicates the spatial pattern of individual provision and tradeoffs/synergies between desired outcomes at detailed resolutions and provides suggestions on where management

  7. Effects of pulsed potential on address electrode in a surface-discharge alternating-current plasma display panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Jeong Chull; Shintani, Youichi; Tachibana, Kunihide; Sakai, Tetsuo; Kosugi, Naoki

    2003-06-01

    The influence of pulsed potential application onto the address electrode of an ac-type plasma display panel was investigated from the observation of front and side views of Xe atom densities in the metastable (1s5) and excited (2p) states in a unit discharge cell by using microscopic laser absorption spectroscopy and optical emission spectroscopy. It was seen that a predischarge occurs between the address electrode and one of the sustain electrode worked as a preceding anode, which is a similar effect found previously by applying a higher sustain voltage. The predischarge partially erases the surface charge accumulated in the preceding pulse, but it induces a faster main sustain discharge, bowing towards the address electrode, and enhances the production efficiency of Xe(1s5) atoms, if the applied potential is within an optimal range.

  8. Numerical study of electric potential formation in a weakly ionized plasma flowing supersonically through open magnetic field lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laosunthara, Ampan; Takeda, Jun; Akatsuka, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the mechanism of space potential formation due to a diverging magnetic field on a rarefied weakly ionized plasma flowing supersonically by performing a hybrid simulation. Ions and neutrals are treated by the particle-based direct simulation Monte Carlo method, while electrons are treated as a fluid to save time and memory. We apply an electron continuity equation in order to treat the electron velocity independently of the ion velocity. We find the number density of ions (and electrons) distributed along the magnetic field. We also find electron rotation along the flowing direction. Since we remove the current-free condition assumed in our previous study, we find that the longitudinal variation in the space potential agrees reasonably well with our previous experimental results.

  9. Plasma viscosity: a potential predictor of both medical treatment response and clinical stage of ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Tolga, Yakar; Mansur, Cosar Arif; Savas, Gokturk Hu Seyin; Gulhan, Unler Kanat Ayse; Alper, Parlakgumus; Ilknur, Kozanoglu; Ender, Serin

    2016-01-01

    La colite ulcerosa (UC) è una delle maggiori forme di colonpatia infiammatoria cronica recidivante. La capacità di identificare tipo, gravità e sensibilità alla terapia su parametri di laboratorio è da tempo oggetto di ricerca degli studi clinici. Lo scopo di questo studio è quello di accertare la relazione tra la viscosità del plasma (PV), l’attività della malattia e la risposta al trattamento medico. Lo studio si è svolto su 105 pazienti con UC e 42 volontari sani. I prelievi di sangue sono stati utilizzati per valutare la viscosità del plasma (PV), la velocità di eritrosedimentazione (ESR), la proteina C-reattiva ultrasensibile (hs-CRP), il D-dimero e il fibrinogeno. I pazienti con UC sono stati raggruppati in relazione al grado di attività flogistica (cioè 59 attivi e 46 in remissione). La PV è risultata più elevata in quelli con UC attiva rispetto a quella dei soggetti in remissione o nei soggetti sani. È risultata significativamente più elevata sia nei casi di UC refrattaria al trattamento steroideo rispetto a quelli sensibili (p< 0.001), e nelle UC rafrattarie alla ciclosrporina rispetto a quelli sensibili (p= 0.003). Con l’aumento della PV nei pazienti affetti da UC sono risultati significativamente associati il punteggio del SCCAI (Increased Simple Clinical Colitis Activity Index), dell’EGS (Endoscopic Grading Scale) e del HAD (Histological Disease Activity (HAD). Si conclude che la PV è un marker utile per la previsione di sensibilità al trattamento sterorideo e con ciclosporina nei pazienti con UC attiva. Potrebbe essere rimpiazzata dalla ESR e dalla hs-CRP come misura della risposta in fase acuta in quanto sufficientemente sensibile. Questi risultati possono essere utili per l’identificazione dei pazienti con UC attiva da destinare alla colectomia.

  10. Plasma Potential and Langmuir Probe Measurements in the Near-field Plume of the NASA 300M Hall Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, Daniel A; Shastry, Rohit; Huang, Wensheng; Soulas, George C.; KamHawi, Hani

    2012-01-01

    In order to aid in the design of high-power Hall thrusters and provide experimental validation for existing modeling efforts, plasma potential and Langmuir probe measurements were performed in the near-field plume of the NASA 300M Hall thruster. A probe array consisting of a Faraday probe, Langmuir probe, and emissive probe was used to interrogate the plume from approximately 0.1 - 2.0 DT,m downstream of the thruster exit plane at four operating conditions: 300 V, 400 V, and 500 V at 20 kW as well as 300 V at 10 kW. Results show that the acceleration zone and high-temperature region were contained within 0.3 DT,m from the exit plane at all operating conditions. Isothermal lines were shown to strongly follow magnetic field lines in the nearfield, with maximum temperatures ranging from 19 - 27 eV. The electron temperature spatial distribution created large drops in measured floating potentials in front of the magnetic pole surfaces where the plasma density was small, which suggests strong sheaths at these surfaces. The data taken have provided valuable information for future design and modeling validation, and complements ongoing internal measurement efforts on the NASA 300 M.

  11. Plasma Potential and Langmuir Probe Measurements in the Near-field Plume of the NASA-300M Hall Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, Daniel A.; Shastry, Rohit; Huang, Wensheng; Soulas, George C.; Kamhawi, Hani

    2012-01-01

    In order to aid in the design of high-power Hall thrusters and provide experimental validation for existing modeling efforts, plasma potential and Langmuir probe measurements were performed in the near-field plume of the NASA-300M Hall thruster. A probe array consisting of a Faraday probe, Langmuir probe, and emissive probe was used to interrogate the plume from approximately 0.1 - 2.0 mean thruster diameters downstream of the thruster exit plane at four operating conditions: 300 V, 400 V, and 500 V at 20 kW as well as 300 V at 10 kW. Results show that the acceleration zone and high-temperature region were contained within 0.3 mean thruster diameters from the exit plane at all operating conditions. Isothermal lines were shown to strongly follow magnetic field lines in the near-field, with maximum temperatures ranging from 19 - 27 eV. The electron temperature spatial distribution created large drops in measured floating potentials in front of the magnetic pole surfaces where the plasma density was low, which suggests strong sheaths at these surfaces. The data taken have provided valuable information for future design and modeling validation, and complements ongoing internal measurement efforts on the NASA-300M.

  12. Horizontal Cross Bracing Detail, Vertical Cross Bracing Detail, Horizontal Cross ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Horizontal Cross Bracing Detail, Vertical Cross Bracing Detail, Horizontal Cross Bracing Detail, Vertical Cross Bracing-End Detail - Cumberland Covered Bridge, Spanning Mississinewa River, Matthews, Grant County, IN

  13. Effect of electrical stunning current and frequency on meat quality, plasma parameters, and glycolytic potential in broilers.

    PubMed

    Xu, L; Zhang, L; Yue, H Y; Wu, S G; Zhang, H J; Ji, F; Qi, G H

    2011-08-01

    This study was designed to determine the effect of electrical stunning variables (low currents and high frequencies) on meat quality, glycolytic potential, and blood parameters in broilers. A total of 54 broilers were stunned with 9 electrical stunning methods for 18 s using sinusoidal alternating currents combining 3 current levels (35 V, 47 mA; 50 V, 67 mA; and 65 V, 86 mA) with 3 frequencies (160, 400, and 1,000 Hz). Samples for meat quality were obtained from the pectoralis major (PM) and musculus iliofibularis (MI), and samples for glycogen metabolism were taken from the PM and tibialis anterior muscle at 45 min postmortem. The use of high frequency reduced the shear value in PM (400 and 1,000 Hz vs. 160 Hz; P < 0.01) and cooking loss in MI (1,000 Hz vs. 160 and 400 Hz; P < 0.01). The shear value of PM decreased at high frequency (400 and 1,000 Hz) when current was high (50 V, 67 mA and 65 V, 86 mA; P < 0.01) but increased at high frequency (1,000 Hz) when current was low (35 V, 47 mA). Stunning with 1,000 Hz (vs. 160 Hz) caused low glycogen and glycolytic potential in PM (P < 0.05). Plasma corticosterone decreased (P < 0.05) at high currents (≥50 V, 67 mA) but was not affected by changes in frequency. Electrical current interacted with frequency in plasma glucose, redness 24 h postmortem, shear value (PM), pH 24 h postmortem (MI), and glycolytic potential (tibialis anterior; P < 0.05). This study indicated that high stunning frequencies (400 and 1,000 Hz) may improve meat quality without aggregating stress when the current was not too low (>50 V, 67 mA).

  14. Identification of a DNA methylome profile of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and potential plasma epigenetic biomarkers for early diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xufeng; Zhou, Fuyou; Jiang, Chunyu; Wang, Yinuo; Lu, Yanqiang; Yang, Fei; Wang, Nengchao; Yang, Haijun; Zheng, Yanfang; Zhang, Jiren

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation is a critical epigenetic mechanism involved in key cellular processes. Its deregulation has been linked to many human cancers including esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). This study was designed to explore the whole methylation status of ESCC and to identify potential plasma biomarkers for early diagnosis. We used Infinium Methylation 450k array to analyze ESCC tissues (n = 4), paired normal surrounding tissues (n = 4) and normal mucosa from healthy individuals (n = 4), and combined these with gene expression data from the GEO database. One hundred and sixty eight genes had differentially methylated CpG sites in their promoter region and a gene expression pattern inverse to the direction of change in DNA methylation. These genes were involved in several cancer-related pathways. Three genes were validated in additional 42 ESCC tissues and paired normal surrounding tissues. The methylation frequency of EPB41L3, GPX3, and COL14A1 were higher in tumor tissues than in normal surrounding tissues (P < 0.017). The higher methylation frequency of EPB41l3 was correlated with large tumor size (P = 0.044) and advanced pT tumor stage (P = 0.001). The higher methylation frequency of GPX3 and COL14A1 were correlated with advanced pN tumor stage (P = 0.001 and P < 0.001). The methylation of EPB41L3, GPX3, and COL14A1 genes were only found in ESCC patients' plasma, but not in normal individuals upon testing 42 ESCC patients and 50 healthy individuals. Diagnostic sensitivity was increased when methylation of any of the 3 genes were counted (64.3% sensitivity and 100% specificity). These differentially methylated genes in plasma may be used as biomarkers for early diagnosis of ESCC.

  15. Membrane potential shapes regulation of dopamine transporter trafficking at the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Ben D.; Saha, Kaustuv; Krout, Danielle; Cabrera, Elizabeth; Felts, Bruce; Henry, L. Keith; Swant, Jarod; Zou, Mu-Fa; Newman, Amy Hauck; Khoshbouei, Habibeh

    2016-01-01

    The dopaminergic system is essential for cognitive processes, including reward, attention and motor control. In addition to DA release and availability of synaptic DA receptors, timing and magnitude of DA neurotransmission depend on extracellular DA-level regulation by the dopamine transporter (DAT), the membrane expression and trafficking of which are highly dynamic. Data presented here from real-time TIRF (TIRFM) and confocal microscopy coupled with surface biotinylation and electrophysiology suggest that changes in the membrane potential alone, a universal yet dynamic cellular property, rapidly alter trafficking of DAT to and from the surface membrane. Broadly, these findings suggest that cell-surface DAT levels are sensitive to membrane potential changes, which can rapidly drive DAT internalization from and insertion into the cell membrane, thus having an impact on the capacity for DAT to regulate extracellular DA levels. PMID:26804245

  16. Potential formation in front of an electron emitting electrode immersed in a plasma that contains a monoenergetic electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Gyergyek, T.; Kovacic, J.; Cercek, M.

    2010-08-15

    A one-dimensional fluid model of the sheath formation in front of a large, planar electron emitting electrode (collector) immersed in a plasma that contains a monoenergetic electron beam is presented. Expressions for the Bohm criterion, the total electric current to the collector, and for the zero electric field at the collector are derived. When there is no electron emission, the model predicts, in some cases, up to three different solutions. The low and the high solutions correspond to the fact that the presheath potential drop can be determined either by thermal or by the beam electrons. The middle solution between them has no physical meaning. When the electron emission is space charge limited, the model may have up to five solutions because the low solution can sometimes split into three parts. The current-voltage characteristic of the collector that exhibits triple floating potential is calculated and it shows qualitative similarity with experimental ones [C.-H. Nam et al., J. Appl. Phys. 63, 5674 (1988)]. When the emission is below the space charge limit, the model again exhibits up to five solutions, which are the low, middle, high, and two additional 'singularity solutions'. These two appear because of the singularity in the Bohm criterion. Regions of validity of the low and high solutions are determined from numerical solutions of the Poisson equation [T. Gyergyek et al., Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 18, 035001 (2009)] and with the maximum positive ion flux test [J. I. Fernandez Palop et al., J. Appl. Phys. 91, 2587 (2002)]. In the case of no or small emission, both methods give the same results. If the emission is space charge limited, the numerical solution method is much more reliable.

  17. Potential Factors for Inadequate Voriconazole Plasma Concentrations in Intensive Care Unit Patients and Patients with Hematological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Duettmann, Wiebke; Raggam, Reinhard B.; Seeber, Katharina; Troppan, Katharina; Fruhwald, Sonja; Prueller, Florian; Wagner, Jasmin; Valentin, Thomas; Zollner-Schwetz, Ines; Wölfler, Albert

    2013-01-01

    Voriconazole plasma concentrations (VPCs) vary widely, and concentrations outside the therapeutic range are associated with either worse outcome in invasive aspergillosis (IA) or increased toxicity. The primary goal of this cohort study conducted in a real-life setting was to identify potential factors associated with inadequate VPCs in ICU patients and patients with hematological malignancies. Within a period of 12 months, trough VPCs were obtained and analyzed with high-performance liquid chromatography, and the adequate range was defined as 1.5 to 5.5 mg/liter. VPCs of <1.5 mg/liter were defined as low, whereas VPCs of >5.5 mg/liter were defined as potentially toxic. A total of 221 trough VPCs were obtained in 61 patients receiving voriconazole, and 124/221 VPCs (56%) were found to be low. Multivariate analysis revealed that low VPCs were significantly associated with clinical failure of voriconazole, prophylactic use, younger age, underlying hematological malignancy, concomitant proton pump inhibitor (PPI) (pantoprazole was used in 88% of the patients), and absence of side effects. Low VPCs remained an independent predictor of clinical failure of voriconazole. The defined adequate range was reached in 79/221 (36%) VPCs. In 18 samples (8%), potentially toxic levels were measured. Multivariate analysis revealed higher body mass index (BMI), absence of hematological malignancy, therapeutic application, and diarrhea as factors associated with potentially toxic VPCs. Neurotoxic adverse events occurred in six patients and were mostly associated with VPCs in the upper quartile of our defined adequate range. In conclusion, potential factors like younger age, prophylaxis, underlying hematological malignancy, BMI, and concomitant PPI should be considered within the algorithm of voriconazole treatment. PMID:23629724

  18. Static quark-antiquark potential in the quark-gluon plasma from lattice QCD.

    PubMed

    Burnier, Yannis; Kaczmarek, Olaf; Rothkopf, Alexander

    2015-02-27

    We present a state-of-the-art determination of the complex valued static quark-antiquark potential at phenomenologically relevant temperatures around the deconfinement phase transition. Its values are obtained from nonperturbative lattice QCD simulations using spectral functions extracted via a novel Bayesian inference prescription. We find that the real part, both in a gluonic medium, as well as in realistic QCD with light u, d, and s quarks, lies close to the color singlet free energies in Coulomb gauge and shows Debye screening above the (pseudo)critical temperature T_{c}. The imaginary part is estimated in the gluonic medium, where we find that it is of the same order of magnitude as in hard-thermal loop resummed perturbation theory in the deconfined phase.

  19. Plasma alkylresorcinol metabolites as potential biomarkers of whole-grain wheat and rye cereal fibre intakes in women.

    PubMed

    Aubertin-Leheudre, Mylène; Koskela, Anja; Samaletdin, Adile; Adlercreutz, Herman

    2010-02-01

    It has been demonstrated that intact plasma alkylresorcinols (AR) and urinary AR metabolites could be used as biomarkers of whole-grain intake. Thereafter, we developed the method for the plasma AR metabolites, which is more convenient and requires less sample pretreatment than the analysis of intact plasma AR. The aim of the present study is to evaluate whether AR metabolites measured in plasma, in the same population, could also be considered as useful biomarkers of cereal fibre. Fifty-six women were recruited in a cross-sectional and observational study. Dietary intake (5-d record) and plasma AR metabolites (3,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, DHBA; 3-(3,5-dihydroxyphenyl)-1-propanoic acid, DHPPA) were measured. The relationship between plasma AR metabolites and cereal fibre intake was examined using partial correlation and stepwise regression. Cereal fibre intake correlated significantly with plasma DHBA (r 0.411; P = 0.002) and DHPPA (r 0.463; P = 0.000) even after adjustment for BMI and age. Thus, plasma AR metabolites correlate with cereal fibre intake as noted with plasma intact AR and urinary AR metabolites. We observed that plasma DHPPA was the independent predictor of cereal fibre intake, explaining 18 % of the variance (adjusted r(2) 0.176; P = 0.002). In epidemiological screening, it might be easier to obtain and to collect plasma than urine samples. In addition, the plasma AR metabolites half-life seems longer than those of intact plasma AR, and their measurements are more convenient, and faster. Thus, sum of plasma AR metabolites and more specifically plasma DHPPA seems to be good and specific biomarkers of cereal fibre intake.

  20. Magnetospheric convection strength inferred from inner edge of the electron plasma sheet and its relation to the polar cap potential drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, F.; Kivelson, M. G.; Walker, R. J.; Khurana, K. K.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2010-12-01

    The sharp inner edge of the nightside electron plasma sheet observed by the THEMIS spacecraft is shown to provide a measure of the effective convection strength that transports plasma sheet plasma into the inner magnetosphere. The effective convection strength is characterized by the difference of potential between the magnetopause terminators at dawn and at dusk. We have surveyed inner boundary crossings of the electron plasma sheet measured by three THEMIS probes on orbits from Nov. 2007 to Apr. 2009. The values of the convection electric potential are inferred from the locations of the inner edge for different energy channels using a steady-state drift boundary model with a dipole magnetic field and a Volland-Stern electric field. When plotted against the solar wind electric field ( ), the convection electric potential is found to have a quasi-linear relationship with the driving solar wind electric field for the range of values tested (meaningful statistics only for Esw < 1.5 mV/m). Reasonably good agreement is found between the convection electric potential and the polar-cap potential drop calculated from model of Boyle et al. [1997] when the degree of shielding in the Volland-Stern potential is selected as gamma=1.5.

  1. Modelling of the protonophoric uncoupling by phenoxyacetic acid of the plasma membrane potential of Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, C M; Nielsen, J; Villadsen, J

    1998-12-20

    Physiological effects of phenoxyacetic acid, the penicillin V side-chain precursor, on steady-state continuous cultures of Penicillium chrysogenum have been studied both theoretically and experimentally. Theoretical calculations show that at an extracellular pH of 6.50, phenoxyacetic acid has negligible influence on the growth energetics due to protonophoric uncoupling of membrane potentials by passive diffusive uptake. On the other hand, when the extracellular pH is lowered to 5.00, a severe maintenance-related uncoupling effect of phenoxyacetic acid is calculated. These findings were confirmed experimentally by steady-state continuous cultivations with a high-yielding penicillin strain of P. chrysogenum performed on a chemically defined and glucose-limited medium at pH 6.50 and pH 5.00, both with and without phenoxyacetic acid present. The yield and maintenance coefficients were determined from steady-state measurements of the specific uptake rates of glucose and oxygen and the specific production rate of carbon dioxide as functions of the specific growth rate. Combining these data with a simple stoichiometric model for the primary metabolism of P. chrysogenum allows quantitative information to be extracted on the growth energetics in terms of ATP spent in maintenance- and growth-related processes, i.e. mATP and YxATP. The increased maintenance-related ATP consumption when adding phenoxyacetic acid at pH 5.00 agrees with the theoretical calculations on the uncoupling effect of phenoxyacetic acid. When YxATP is compared with earlier reported values for the theoretical ATP requirement for biosynthesis of P. chrysogenum, i.e. YxATP, growth, it is found that YxATP,growth is only 40-50% of YxATP, which stresses that a large amount of ATP is wasted in turnover of macromolecules, leaks, and futile cycles.

  2. Plasma miR-19b and miR-183 as Potential Biomarkers of Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Skvortsova, Tatyana E.; Ponomaryova, Anastasia A.; Rykova, Elena Yu; Cherdyntseva, Nadezhda V.; Polovnikov, Evgeny S.; Pashkovskaya, Oksana A.; Pokushalov, Evgeny A.; Vlassov, Valentin V.; Laktionov, Pavel P.

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is a complex disease that often manifests at the point when treatment is not effective. Introduction of blood-based complementary diagnostics using molecular markers may enhance early detection of this disease and help reduce the burden of lung cancer. Here we evaluated the diagnostic potential of seven plasma miRNA biomarkers (miR-21, -19b, -126, -25, -205, -183, -125b) by quantitative reverse transcription PCR. Influence clinical and demographical characteristics, including age, tumor stage and cancer subtype on miRNA levels was investigated. Four miRNAs were significantly dysregulated (miR-19b, -21, -25, -183) in lung cancer patients. Combination of miR-19b and miR-183 provided detection of lung cancer with 94.7% sensitivity and 95.2% specificity (AUC = 0.990). Thus, miRNAs have shown the potential to discriminate histological subtypes of lung cancer and reliably distinguish lung cancer patients from healthy individuals. PMID:27768748

  3. Low energy highly charged ion beam facility at Inter University Accelerator Centre: Measurement of the plasma potential and ion energy distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Sairam, T. Bhatt, Pragya; Safvan, C. P.; Kumar, Ajit; Kumar, Herendra

    2015-11-15

    A deceleration lens coupled to one of the beam lines of the electron cyclotron resonance based low energy beam facility at Inter University Accelerator Centre is reported. This system is capable of delivering low energy (2.5 eV/q–1 keV/q) highly charged ion beams. The presence of plasma potential hinders the measurements of low energies (<50 eV), therefore, plasma potential measurements have been undertaken using a retarding plate analyzer in unison with the deceleration assembly. The distributions of the ion energies have been obtained and the effect of different source parameters on these distributions is studied.

  4. Automated capillary GC/NPD assay for the determination in plasma of McN-5707, a potential antidepressant drug

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, M.L.; Uetz, J.A.; Ng, K.T.

    1986-03-01

    McN-5707 x HBr (trans-6-(2-chlorophenyl)-1,2,3,5,6,10b-hexa-hydropyrrolo(2,1-a)isoquinoline hydrobromide (1:1)) is a novel, potential antidepressant which is currently under pre-clinical evaluation. The present study reports the development of a sensitive and reproducible capillary gas chromatographic (GC) assay with nitrogen-phosphorus ionization detection (NPD) for McN-5707 in plasma. The assay includes a three step extraction as follows: McN-5707 and the internal standard (IS) are extracted from alkalinized plasma (1 mL) into hexane and back-extracted into 0.1 N HCl. Following alkalinization of the aqueous layer, McN-5707 and IS are re-extracted into hexane. The solvent is evaporated and the residue is reconstituted with 50 ..mu..L of a solution of 10% methanol in toluene. A 2.5 ..mu..L aliquot is injected into an HP 5880A capillary GC using the HP 7672A auto-sampler. Separation is accomplished using a 15 m x 0.32 mm i.d. DB-5 fused silica capillary column and temperature programming from 160 to 200/sup 0/C at 10/sup 0//min. Calibration curves are linear from 1 to 100 ng/mL. Accuracy and precision, expressed as relative deviation from the true value and coefficient of variation are < 10% at all concentrations in the linear range. The assay has been successfully used for pharmacokinetic studies in rats and dogs and has been cross-validated with a /sup 3/H-norepinephrine uptake inhibition assay.

  5. Chord Splicing & Joining Detail; Chord & CrossBracing Joint Details; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Chord Splicing & Joining Detail; Chord & Cross-Bracing Joint Details; Cross Bracing Center Joint Detail; Chord & Diagonal Joint Detail - Vermont Covered Bridge, Highland Park, spanning Kokomo Creek at West end of Deffenbaugh Street (moved to), Kokomo, Howard County, IN

  6. Arch & Chord Joint Detail; Crossbracing Center Joint Detail; Chord, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Arch & Chord Joint Detail; Crossbracing Center Joint Detail; Chord, Panel Post, Tie & Diagonal Brace Joint Detail; Chord, Panel Post, Tie & Crossbracing Joint Detail - Dunlapsville Covered Bridge, Spanning East Fork Whitewater River, Dunlapsville, Union County, IN

  7. Equation of state of a dense plasma: Analytical results on the basis of quantum pair interaction potentials in the random phase approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moldabekov, Zh A.; Ramazanov, T. S.; Gabdullin, M. T.

    2016-11-01

    In this work, using recently obtained expansion of the dielectric function in the long wave length limit by Moldabekov et al (2015 Phys. Plasmas 22 102104), we extended previously obtained formulas for the equation of state of the semiclassical dense plasma from Ramazanov et al (2015 Phys. Rev. E 92 023104) to the quantum case. Inner energy and contribution to the pressure due to plasma non-ideality derived for both Coulomb pair interaction and quantum pair interaction potentials. Obtained analytical result for the equation of state reproduces the Montroll-Ward contribution, which corresponds to the quantum ring sum. It was shown that the obtained results are consistent with the Thomas-Fermi approximation with the first order gradient correction. Additionally, the generalization of the quantum Deutsch potential to the case of the degenerate electrons is discussed. Obtained results will be useful for understanding of the physics of dense plasmas as well as for further development of the dense plasma simulation on the basis of the quantum potentials.

  8. Identification of Potential Plasma Biomarkers for Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease by Integrating Transcriptomics and Proteomics in Laying Hens.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Meng-Tsz; Chen, Yu-Jen; Chen, Ching-Yi; Tsai, Mong-Hsun; Han, Chia-Li; Chen, Yu-Ju; Mersmann, Harry J; Ding, Shih-Torng

    2017-03-01

    Background: Prevalent worldwide obesity is associated with increased incidence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and metabolic syndrome. The identification of noninvasive biomarkers for NAFLD is of recent interest. Because primary de novo lipogenesis occurs in chicken liver as in human liver, adult chickens with age-associated steatosis resembling human NAFLD is an appealing animal model.Objective: The objective of this study was to screen potential biomarkers in the chicken model for NAFLD by transcriptomic and proteomic analysis.Methods: Hy-Line W-36 laying hens were fed standard feed from 25 to 45 wk of age to induce fatty liver. They were killed every 4 wk, and liver and plasma were collected at each time point to assess fatty liver development and for transcriptomic and proteomic analysis. Next, selected biomarkers were confirmed in additional experiments by providing supplements of the hepatoprotective nutrients betaine [300, 600, or 900 parts per million (ppm) in vivo; 2 mM in vitro] or docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 1% in vivo; 100 μM in vitro) to 30-wk-old Hy-Line W-36 laying hens for 4 mo and to Hy-Line W-36 chicken primary hepatocytes with oleic acid-induced steatosis. Liver or hepatocyte lipid contents and the expression of biomarkers were then examined.Results: Plasma acetoacetyl-CoA synthetase (AACS), dipeptidyl-peptidase 4 (DPP4), glutamine synthetase (GLUL), and glutathione S-transferase (GST) concentrations are well-established biomarkers for NAFLD. Selected biomarkers had significant positive associations with hepatic lipid deposition (P < 0.001). Betaine (900 ppm in vivo; 2 mM in vitro) and DHA (1% in vivo; 100 μM in vitro) supplementation both resulted in lower steatosis accompanied by the reduced expression of selected biomarkers in vivo and in vitro (P < 0.05).Conclusion: This study used adult laying hens to identify biomarkers for NAFLD and indicated that AACS, DPP4, GLUL, and GST could be considered to be potential diagnostic

  9. Hawaii demand-side management resource assessment. Final report, Reference Volume 3 -- Residential and commercial sector DSM analyses: Detailed results from the DBEDT DSM assessment model; Part 1, Technical potential

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    The Hawaii Demand-Side Management Resource Assessment was the fourth of seven projects in the Hawaii Energy Strategy (HES) program. HES was designed by the Department of Business, Economic Development, and Tourism (DBEDT) to produce an integrated energy strategy for the State of Hawaii. The purpose of Project 4 was to develop a comprehensive assessment of Hawaii`s demand-side management (DSM) resources. To meet this objective, the project was divided into two phases. The first phase included development of a DSM technology database and the identification of Hawaii commercial building characteristics through on-site audits. These Phase 1 products were then used in Phase 2 to identify expected energy impacts from DSM measures in typical residential and commercial buildings in Hawaii. The building energy simulation model DOE-2.1E was utilized to identify the DSM energy impacts. More detailed information on the typical buildings and the DOE-2.1E modeling effort is available in Reference Volume 1, ``Building Prototype Analysis``. In addition to the DOE-2.1E analysis, estimates of residential and commercial sector gas and electric DSM potential for the four counties of Honolulu, Hawaii, Maui, and Kauai through 2014 were forecasted by the new DBEDT DSM Assessment Model. Results from DBEDTs energy forecasting model, ENERGY 2020, were linked with results from DOE-2.1E building energy simulation runs and estimates of DSM measure impacts, costs, lifetime, and anticipated market penetration rates in the DBEDT DSM Model. Through its algorithms, estimates of DSM potential for each forecast year were developed. Using the load shape information from the DOE-2.1E simulation runs, estimates of electric peak demand impacts were developed. Numerous tables and figures illustrating the technical potential for demand-side management are included.

  10. Circulating Plasma Levels of MicroRNA-21 and MicroRNA-221 Are Potential Diagnostic Markers for Primary Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kemeny, Nancy; Kingham, T. Peter; Allen, Peter J.; D’Angelica, Michael I.; DeMatteo, Ronald P.; Betel, Doron; Klimstra, David; Jarnagin, William R.; Ventura, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are potential biomarkers in various malignancies. We aim to characterize miRNA expression in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) and identify circulating plasma miRNAs with potential diagnostic and prognostic utility. Methods Using deep-sequencing techniques, miRNA expression between tumor samples and non-neoplastic liver parenchyma were compared. Overexpressed miRNAs were measured in plasma from an independent cohort of patients with cholangiocarcinoma using RT-qPCR and compared with that healthy volunteers. The discriminatory ability of the evaluated plasma miRNAs between patients and controls was evaluated with receiving operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Results Small RNAs from 12 ICC and 11 tumor-free liver samples were evaluated. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering using the miRNA expression data showed clear grouping of ICC vs. non-neoplastic liver parenchyma. We identified 134 down-regulated and 128 upregulated miRNAs. Based on overexpression and high fold-change, miR21, miR200b, miR221, and miR34c were measured in plasma from an independent cohort of patients with ICC (n = 25) and healthy controls (n = 7). Significant overexpression of miR-21 and miR-221 was found in plasma from ICC patients. Furthermore, circulating miR-21 demonstrated a high discriminatory ability between patients with ICC and healthy controls (AUC: 0.94). Conclusion Among the differentially expressed miRNAs in ICC, miR-21 and miR-221 are overexpressed and detectable in the circulation. Plasma expression levels of these miRNAs, particularly miR-21, accurately differentiates patients with ICC from healthy controls and could potentially serve as adjuncts in diagnosis. Prospective validation and comparison with other hepatobiliary malignancies is required to establish their potential role as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers. PMID:27685844

  11. LF460 detail design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    This is the final technical report documenting the detail design of the LF460, and advanced turbotip lift fan intended for application with the YJ97-GE-100 turbojet jet generator to a V/STOL transport research aircraft. Primary objective of the design was to achieve a low noise level while maintaining the high thrust/weight ratio capability of a high pressure ratio lift fan. Report covers design requirements and summarizes activities and final results in the areas of aerodynamic and mechanical design, component and system performance, acoustic features and final noise predictions.

  12. Details of meiosis

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 18, discusses the details of meiosis, beginning with the structure and number of chiasmata, i.e., the cytological term for two homologous chromosomes forming a bivalent which begin to repel each other until they are held together only at the point of crossing-over. The synaptonemal complex which consists of two lateral elements which contain protein and RNA is also discussed. The chapter concludes with a description of meiosis in polyploids, human meiosis, and the behavior of X and Y chromosomes. 28 refs., 8 figs.

  13. Transient receptor potential melastatin 1 (TRPM1) is an ion-conducting plasma membrane channel inhibited by zinc ions.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Sachar; Drews, Anna; Rizun, Oleksandr; Wagner, Thomas F J; Lis, Annette; Mannebach, Stefanie; Plant, Sandra; Portz, Melanie; Meissner, Marcel; Philipp, Stephan E; Oberwinkler, Johannes

    2011-04-08

    TRPM1 is the founding member of the melastatin subgroup of transient receptor potential (TRP) proteins, but it has not yet been firmly established that TRPM1 proteins form ion channels. Consequently, the biophysical and pharmacological properties of these proteins are largely unknown. Here we show that heterologous expression of TRPM1 proteins induces ionic conductances that can be activated by extracellular steroid application. However the current amplitudes observed were too small to enable a reliable biophysical characterization. We overcame this limitation by modifying TRPM1 channels in several independent ways that increased the similarity to the closely related TRPM3 channels. The resulting constructs produced considerably larger currents after overexpression. We also demonstrate that unmodified TRPM1 and TRPM3 proteins form functional heteromultimeric channels. With these approaches, we measured the divalent permeability profile and found that channels containing the pore of TRPM1 are inhibited by extracellular zinc ions at physiological concentrations, in contrast to channels containing only the pore of TRPM3. Applying these findings to pancreatic β cells, we found that TRPM1 proteins do not play a major role in steroid-activated currents of these cells. The inhibition of TRPM1 by zinc ions is primarily due to a short stretch of seven amino acids present only in the pore region of TRPM1 but not of TRPM3. Combined, our data demonstrate that TRPM1 proteins are bona fide ion-conducting plasma membrane channels. Their distinct biophysical properties allow a reliable identification of endogenous TRPM1-mediated currents.

  14. Evaluation of osteoinductive and endothelial differentiation potential of Platelet-Rich Plasma incorporated Gelatin-Nanohydroxyapatite Fibrous Matrix.

    PubMed

    J, Anjana; Kuttappan, Shruthy; Keyan, Kripa S; Nair, Manitha B

    2016-05-01

    In this study, platelet-rich plasma (PRP) was incorporated into gelatin-nanohydroxyapatite fibrous scaffold in two forms (PRP gel as coating on the scaffold [PCSC] and PRP powder within the scaffold [PCSL] and investigated for (a) growth factor release; (b) stability of scaffold at different temperature; (c) stability of scaffold before and after ETO sterilization; and (d) osteogenic and endothelial differentiation potential using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). PCSC demonstrated a high and burst growth factor release initially followed by a gradual reduction in its concentration, while PCSL showed a steady state release pattern for 30 days. The stability of growth factors released from PCSL was not altered either through ETO sterilization or through its storage at different temperature. PRP-loaded scaffolds induced the differentiation of MSCs into osteogenic and endothelial lineage without providing any induction factors in the cell culture medium and the differentiation rate was significantly higher when compared to the scaffolds devoid of PRP. PCSC performed better than PCSL. In general, PRP in combination with composite fibrous scaffold could be a promising candidate for bone tissue engineering applications.

  15. Potential of Solid Sampling Electrothermal Vaporization for solving spectral interference in Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asfaw, Alemayehu; Wibetoe, Grethe

    2009-05-01

    Spectral interference is one of the main causes of erroneous results in Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES). This paper describes some cases of spectral interferences with conventional nebulization ICP-OES and the potential of solving them utilizing electrothermal vaporization for volatility-based separation. The cases studied were, the well-known spectral overlap between the As and Cd lines at 228.8 nm that are only 10 pm apart, and the interference of Fe on the main emission lines of As, Cd and Pb. The spectral interferences were studied by monitoring the typical signals of solutions that contain the analytes and the potential interferent, by studying the spectra and calculating Background Equivalent Concentration (BEC)-values. A three step temperature program was developed to be used for direct analysis of solid soil samples by Electrothermal Vaporization (ETV)-ICP-OES: step 1 (760 °C, 40 s), step 2 (1620 °C, 20 s) and a cleaning step (2250 °C, 10 s) where Cd vaporizes in step 1, As, Pb and part of Fe in step 2 and the major part of Fe in the cleaning step. Because As and Cd were time-separated using this program, their prominent lines at 228.8 nm, could be used for determination of each element by ETV-ICP-OES, in spite of the serious wavelength overlap. Selective vaporization was also shown to reduce or eliminate the Fe background emission on As, Cd and Pb lines. To confirm the applicability of the method, a solid soil certified reference materials was analyzed directly without any sample treatment. Good or reasonable accuracy was obtained for the three elements.

  16. Plasma Epstein–Barr virus and Hepatitis B virus in non-Hodgkin lymphomas: Two lymphotropic, potentially oncogenic, latently occurring DNA viruses

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Mahua; Rao, Clementina Rama; Premalata, C. S.; Shafiulla, Mohammed; Lakshmaiah, K. C.; Jacob, Linu Abraham; Babu, Govind K.; Viveka, B. K.; Appaji, L.; Subramanyam, Jayshree R.

    2016-01-01

    Context: There is a need to study potential infective etiologies in lymphomas. Lymphocyte-transforming viruses can directly infect lymphocytes, disrupt normal cell functions, and promote cell division. Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) is known to be associated with several lymphomas, especially Hodgkin lymphomas (HLs). And recently, the lymphocyte-transforming role of hepatitis B virus (HBV) has been emphasized. Aims: The aim of this study was to elucidate the association of two potentially oncogenic, widely prevalent latent DNA viruses, EBV and HBV, in non-HL (NHL). Settings and Design: In this prospective study, we estimated plasma EBV and HBV DNA in NHL patients. Materials and Methods: Peripheral blood was obtained from newly diagnosed, treatment na ïve, histologically confirmed NHL patients. Plasma EBV DNA was quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting Epstein–Barr Nucleic acid 1 while the plasma HBV DNA was detected using nested PCR targeting HBX gene. In a small subset of patients, follow-up plasma samples post-anticancer chemotherapy were available and retested for viral DNA. Results: Of the 110 NHL patients, ~79% were B-cell NHL and ~21% were T-cell NHL. Plasma EBV-DNA was detected in 10% NHLs with a higher EBV association in Burkitt lymphoma (33.3%) than other subtypes. Pretherapy HBV DNA was detected in 21% NHLs; most of them being diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Moreover, 42% of DLBCL patients had HBV DNA in plasma. Since all patients were HBV surface antigen seronegative at diagnosis, baseline plasma HBV-DNAemia before chemotherapy was indicative of occult hepatitis B infection. Conclusions: Our findings indicate a significant association of HBV with newly diagnosed DLBCL. PMID:27688607

  17. Preservation potential of subtle glacial landforms based on detailed mapping of recently exposed proglacial areas: application of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) and structure-from-motion (SfM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewertowski, Marek; Evans, David; Roberts, David; Tomczyk, Aleksandra; Ewertowski, Wojciech

    2016-04-01

    Ongoing glacier retreat results in the continuous exposure of proglacial areas. Such areas contain invaluable information about glacial process-form relationships manifest in specific landform assemblages. However, preservation potential of freshly exposed glacial landforms is very low, as proglacial terrains are one of the most dynamic parts of the landscape. Therefore, rapid mapping and geomorphological characterisation of such areas is important from a glaciological and geomorphological point of view for proper understanding and reconstruction of glacier-landform dynamics and chronology of glacial events. Annual patterns of recession and relatively small areas exposed every year, mean that the performing of regular aerial or satellite survey is expensive and therefore impractical. Recent advances in technology enables the development of low-cost alternatives for traditional aerial surveys. Small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) can be used to acquire high-resolution (several cm) low-altitude photographs. The UAV-based photographs can be subsequently processed through the structure-from-motion process to generate detailed orthophotomaps and digital elevation models. In this study we present case studies from the forelands of various glaciers on Iceland and Svalbard representing different types of proglacial landscapes: Fláajökull (annual push moraines); Hofellsjökul (bedrock bedforms and push moraines); Fjallsjökull (marginal drainage network); Rieperbreen (crevasse squeeze ridges and longitudinal debris stripes); Ayerbreen (transverse debris ridges); Foxfonna (longitudinal debris stripes);Hørbyebreen (geometric ridge network); Nordenskiöldbreen (fluted till surface); Ebbabreen (controlled moraine complex). UAV campaigns were conducted using a low-cost quadcopter platform. Resultant orthophotos and DEMs enabled mapping and assessment of recent glacial landscape development in different types of glacial landsystems. Results of our study indicate that

  18. Characterisation of Plasma Filled Rod Pinch electron beam diode operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, James; Bland, Simon; Chittenden, Jeremy

    2016-10-01

    The plasma filled rod pinch diode (aka PFRP) offers a small radiographic spot size and a high brightness source. It operates in a very similar to plasma opening switches and dense plasma focus devices - with a plasma prefill, supplied via a number of simple coaxial plasma guns, being snowploughed along a thin rod cathode, before detaching at the end. The aim of this study is to model the PFRP and understand the factors that affect its performance, potentially improving future output. Given the dependence on the PFRP on the prefill, we are making detailed measurements of the density (1015-1018 cm-3), velocity, ionisation and temperature of the plasma emitted from a plasma gun/set of plasma guns. This will then be used to provide initial conditions to the Gorgon 3D MHD code, and the dynamics of the entire rod pinch process studied.

  19. Detail of Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This color photo of Neptune's large satellite Triton was obtained on Aug. 24 1989 at a range of 530,000 kilometers (330,000 miles). The resolution is about 10 kilometers (6.2 miles), sufficient to begin to show topographic detail. The image was made from pictures taken through the green, violet and ultraviolet filters. In this technique, regions that are highly reflective in the ultraviolet appear blue in color. In reality, there is no part of Triton that would appear blue to the eye. The bright southern hemisphere of Triton, which fills most of this frame, is generally pink in tone as is the even brighter equatorial band. The darker regions north of the equator also tend to be pink or reddish in color. JPL manages the Voyager project for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

  20. Detail of Triton's Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    This color photo of Neptune's large satellite Triton was obtained on Aug. 24 1989 at a range of 530,000 kilometers(330,000 miles). The resolution is about 10 kilometers (6.2 miles), sufficient to begin to show topographic detail. The image was made from pictures taken through the green, violet and ultraviolet filters. In this technique, regions that are highly reflective in the ultraviolet appear blue in color. In reality, there is no part of Triton that would appear blue to the eye. The bright southern hemisphere of Triton, which fills most of this frame, is generally pink in tone as is the even brighter equatorial band. The darker regions north of the equator also tend to be pink or reddish in color.

    JPL manages the Voyager project for NASA's Office of Space Science.

  1. Horizontal Cross Bracing Detail, Vertical Cross Bracing Detail, Horizontal Cross ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Horizontal Cross Bracing Detail, Vertical Cross Bracing Detail, Horizontal Cross Bracing Joint, Vertical Cross Bracing End Detail - Ceylon Covered Bridge, Limberlost Park, spanning Wabash River at County Road 900 South, Geneva, Adams County, IN

  2. Southeast Elevation; Dome Rafter Detail; Piazza Rafter Detail; Main Block ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Southeast Elevation; Dome Rafter Detail; Piazza Rafter Detail; Main Block Bracket Detail - National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers - Battle Mountain Sanitarium, Administration Building, 500 North Fifth Street, Hot Springs, Fall River County, SD

  3. PIC code modeling of spacecraft charging potential during electron beam injection into a background of neutral gas and plasma, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koga, J. K.; Lin, C. S.; Winglee, R. M.

    1989-01-01

    Injections of nonrelativistic electron beams from an isolated equipotential conductor into a uniform background of plasma and neutral gas were simulated using a 2-D electrostatic particle code. The ionization effects on spacecraft charging are examined by including interactions of electrons with neutral gas. The simulations show that the conductor charging potential decreases with increasing neutral background density due to the production of secondary electrons near the conductor surface. In the spacecraft wake, the background electrons accelerated towards the charged spacecraft produce an enhancement of secondary electrons and ions. Simulations run for longer times indicate that the spacecraft potential is further reduced and short wavelength beam-plasma oscillations appear. The results are applied to explain the spacecraft charging potential measured during the SEPAC experiments from Spacelab 1.

  4. Effect of the gas mixing technique on the plasma potential and emittance of the JYFL 14 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarvainen, O.; Suominen, P.; Ropponen, T.; Kalvas, T.; Heikkinen, P.; Koivisto, H.

    2005-09-01

    The effect of the gas mixing technique on the plasma potential, energy spread, and emittance of ion beams extracted from the JYFL 14 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source has been studied under various gas mixing conditions. The plasma potential and energy spread of the ion beams were studied with a plasma potential instrument developed at the Department of Physics, University of Jyväskylä (JYFL). With the instrument the effects of the gas mixing on different plasma parameters such as plasma potential and the energy distribution of the ions can be studied. The purpose of this work was to confirm that ion cooling can explain the beneficial effect of the gas mixing on the production of highly charged ion beams. This was done by measuring the ion-beam current as a function of a stopping voltage in conjunction with emittance measurements. It was observed that gas mixing affects the shape of the beam current decay curves measured with low charge-state ion beams indicating that the temperature and/or the spatial distribution of these ions is affected by the mixing gas. The results obtained in the emittance measurements support the conclusion that the ion temperature changes due to the gas mixing. The effect of the energy spread on the emittance of different ion beams was also studied theoretically. It was observed that the emittance depends considerably on the dispersive matrix elements of the beam line transfer matrix. This effect is due to the fact that the dipole magnet is a dispersive ion optical component. The effect of the energy spread on the measured emittance in the bending plane of the magnet can be several tens of percent.

  5. double hung window details, hall window details, entrance door profiles ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    double hung window details, hall window details, entrance door profiles - Chopawamsic Recreational Demonstration Area - Cabin Camp 1, Help's Quarters, Prince William Forest Park, Triangle, Prince William County, VA

  6. Potential impact of a 500-mL water bolus and body mass on plasma osmolality dilution.

    PubMed

    Sollanek, Kurt J; Kenefick, Robert W; Cheuvront, Samuel N; Axtell, Robert S

    2011-09-01

    A methodological discrepancy exists in the hydration assessment literature regarding the establishment of euhydration, as some investigations utilize a pre-hydration technique, while others do not (overnight fluid/food fast). However, the degree that plasma osmolality (P (osm)) dilutes when using the pre-hydration method and how body mass/composition might influence the results is not known. Thirty subjects (22 M, 8 F; 20 ± 2 years (mean ± SD); 1.8 ± 0.1 m; 75.8 ± 13.5 kg) had P (osm) measured after an 8-h food and fluid fast (overnight fast) and 90 min after a 500-mL (4-9 mL/kg) water bolus (pre-hydration). From pre- to post-bolus, participants' P (osm) declined from 297 ± 3.5 to 295 ± 3.8 mmol/kg (p < 0.05; ∆ -1.7 ± 3.5 mmol/kg). One-third of the sample diluted to more than -3 mmol/kg. The effect of body mass on P (osm) dilution was investigated by comparing dilution in the ten lightest (62.8 ± 3.4 kg) and heaviest (92.0 ± 9.8 kg) participants; however, the change between the light (∆ -1.9 ± 3.8 mmol/kg) versus heavy groups (∆ -1.1 ± 3.0 mmol/kg) was not different (p > 0.05). The correlation between body mass or total body water and change in P (osm) was weak (p > 0.05), as was the correlation between relative fluid intake based on mass and change in P (osm) (p > 0.05). The two methodologies appear to produce similar P (osm) values when measured in most individuals. However, the potential for significant dilution (>3 mmol/kg) should be considered when choosing the pre-hydration methodology.

  7. Acid Gradient across Plasma Membrane Can Drive Phosphate Bond Synthesis in Cancer Cells: Acidic Tumor Milieu as a Potential Energy Source

    PubMed Central

    Dhar, Gautam; Sen, Suvajit; Chaudhuri, Gautam

    2015-01-01

    Aggressive cancers exhibit an efficient conversion of high amounts of glucose to lactate accompanied by acid secretion, a phenomenon popularly known as the Warburg effect. The acidic microenvironment and the alkaline cytosol create a proton-gradient (acid gradient) across the plasma membrane that represents proton-motive energy. Increasing experimental data from physiological relevant models suggest that acid gradient stimulates tumor proliferation, and can also support its energy needs. However, direct biochemical evidence linking extracellular acid gradient to generation of intracellular ATP are missing. In this work, we demonstrate that cancer cells can synthesize significant amounts of phosphate-bonds from phosphate in response to acid gradient across plasma membrane. The noted phenomenon exists in absence of glycolysis and mitochondrial ATP synthesis, and is unique to cancer. Biochemical assays using viable cancer cells, and purified plasma membrane vesicles utilizing radioactive phosphate, confirmed phosphate-bond synthesis from free phosphate (Pi), and also localization of this activity to the plasma membrane. In addition to ATP, predominant formation of pyrophosphate (PPi) from Pi was also observed when plasma membrane vesicles from cancer cells were subjected to trans-membrane acid gradient. Cancer cytosols were found capable of converting PPi to ATP, and also stimulate ATP synthesis from Pi from the vesicles. Acid gradient created through glucose metabolism by cancer cells, as observed in tumors, also proved critical for phosphate-bond synthesis. In brief, these observations reveal a role of acidic tumor milieu as a potential energy source and may offer a novel therapeutic target. PMID:25874623

  8. Accurate determination of chlorine, bromine, and iodine in sedimentary rock reference samples by radiochemical neutron activation analysis and a detailed comparison with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry literature data.

    PubMed

    Sekimoto, Shun; Ebihara, Mitsuru

    2013-07-02

    Trace amounts of three halogens (chlorine, bromine, and iodine) were determined using radiochemical neutron activation analysis (RNAA) for nine sedimentary rocks and three rhyolite samples. To obtain high-quality analytical data, the radiochemical procedure of RNAA was improved by lowering the background in gamma-ray spectrometry and completing the chemical procedure more rapidly than in conventional procedures. A comparison of the RNAA data of Br and I with corresponding inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) literature data revealed that the values obtained by ICPMS coupled with pyrohydrolysis preconcentration were systematically lower than the RNAA data for some reference samples, suggesting that the quantitative collection of Br and I cannot always be achieved by the pyrohydrolysis for some solid samples. The RNAA data of three halogens can classify sedimentary rock reference samples into two groups (the samples from inland water and those from seawater), implying the geochemical significance of halogen data.

  9. Potential utility of soluble p3-alcadein α plasma levels as a biomarker for sporadic Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kamogawa, Kenji; Kohara, Katsuhiko; Tabara, Yasuharu; Takita, Rie; Miki, Tetsuro; Konno, Tomoko; Hata, Saori; Suzuki, Toshiharu

    2012-01-01

    Alcadeins (Alcs) constitute a family of neuronal type I membrane proteins (α, β, γ) that share identical localization and function to the amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP) in the brain. Alcs are proteolyzed in neurons through successive cleavages via secretases, resulting in non-aggregative p3-Alc, where p3 corresponds to the AβPP-fragment. We found p3-Alcα detected in human plasma reflected the pathological process of amyloid-β accumulation in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and therefore investigated the utility of p3-Alcα as a plasma biomarker in AD. We measured p3-Alcα plasma levels in 83 sporadic-AD, 18 mild cognitive impaired (MCI), and 24 control subjects using the sandwich-ELISA system. Pooled samples with previously published data (171 AD and 45 controls) were also analyzed. The plasma p3-Alcα concentrations in patients with AD and MCI were significantly higher compared with control subjects (224.7 ± 40.4, 223.3 ± 53.9, and 189.1 ± 32.9 pg/ml, respectively; p = 0.0012). In AD patients, the plasma p3-Alcα concentration significantly correlated with age (r = 0.23, p = 0.037) and serum creatinine levels (r = 0.23, p = 0.0012). Even after adjusting for confounding factors of age, gender, renal function, and ApoE-ε4, high plasma p3-Alcα levels were correlated with significant AD risk, with an odds ratio 1.47 (95% confidence interval: 1.18-1.93, p = 0.0019) for every 10 pg/ml increase. Pooled analysis further confirmed these findings. Increased plasma p3-Alcα, evident in the early stages of cognitive impairment, suggests that Alc metabolites are useful plasma biomarkers of AD.

  10. A putative role for the plasma membrane potential in the control of the expression of the gene encoding the tomato high-affinity potassium transporter HAK5.

    PubMed

    Nieves-Cordones, Manuel; Miller, Anthony J; Alemán, Fernando; Martínez, Vicente; Rubio, Francisco

    2008-12-01

    A chimeric CaHAK1-LeHAK5 transporter with only 15 amino acids of CaHAK1 in the N-terminus mediates high-affinity K(+) uptake in yeast cells. Kinetic and expression analyses strongly suggest that LeHAK5 mediates a significant proportion of the high-affinity K(+) uptake shown by K(+)-starved tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants. The development of high-affinity K(+) uptake, putatively mediated by LeHAK5, was correlated with increased LeHAK5 mRNA levels and a more negative electrical potential difference across the plasma membrane of root epidermal and cortical cells. However, this increase in high-affinity K(+) uptake was not correlated with the root K(+) content. Thus, (i) growth conditions that result in a hyperpolarized root plasma membrane potential, such as K(+) starvation or growth in the presence of NH(4) (+), but which do not decrease the K(+) content, lead to increased LeHAK5 expression; (ii) the presence of NaCl in the growth solution, which prevents the hyperpolarization induced by K(+) starvation, also prevents LeHAK5 expression. Moreover, once the gene is induced, depolarization of the plasma membrane potential then produces a decrease in the LeHAK5 mRNA. On the basis of these results, we propose that the plant membrane electrical potential plays a role in the regulation of the expression of this gene encoding a high-affinity K(+) transporter.

  11. A statistical study of the inner edge of the electron plasma sheet and the net convection potential as a function of geomagnetic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, F.; Kivelson, M. G.; Walker, R. J.; Khurana, K. K.; Angelopoulos, V.; Hsu, T.

    2011-06-01

    A widely accepted explanation of the location of the inner edge of the electron plasma sheet and its dependence on electron energy is based on drift motions of individual particles. The boundary is identified as the separatrix between drift trajectories linking the tail to the dayside magnetopause (open paths) and trajectories closed around the Earth. A statistical study of the inner edge of the electron plasma sheet using THEMIS Electrostatic Analyzer plasma data from November 2007 to April 2009 enabled us to examine this model. Using a dipole magnetic field and a Volland-Stern electric field with shielding, we find that a steady state drift boundary model represents the average location of the electron plasma sheet boundary and reflects its variation with the solar wind electric field in the local time region between 21:00 and 06:00, except at high activity levels. However, the model does not reproduce the observed energy dispersion of the boundaries. We have also used the location of the inner edge of the electron plasma sheet to parameterize the potential drop of the tail convection electric field as a function of solar wind electric field (Esw) and geomagnetic activity. The range of Esw examined is small because the data were acquired near solar minimum. For the range of values tested (meaningful statistics only for Esw < 2 mV/m), reasonably good agreement is found between the potential drop of the tail convection electric field inferred from the location of the inner edge and the polar cap potential drop calculated from the model of Boyle et al. (1997).

  12. Studies on the preparation and plasma spherodization of yttrium aluminosilicate glass microspheres for their potential application in liver brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreekumar, K. P.; Saxena, S. K.; Kumar, Yogendra; Thiyagarajan, T. K.; Dash, Ashutosh; Ananthapadmanabhan, P. V.; Venkatesh, Meera

    2010-02-01

    Plasma spheroidization exploits the high temperature and high enthalpy available in the thermal plasma jet to melt irregularly shaped powder particles and quench them to get dense spherical particles. Plasma spheroidization is a versatile process and can be applied to metals, ceramics, alloys and composites to obtain fine spherical powders. Radioactive microspheres incorporated with high energetic beta emitting radioisotopes have been reported to be useful in the palliative treatment of liver cancer. These powders are to be prepared in closer range of near spherical morphology in the size range 20-35 microns. Inactive glass samples were prepared by heating the pre-calculated amount of glass forming ingredients in a recrystallized alumina crucible. The glass was formed by keeping the glass forming ingredients at 1700°C for a period of three hours to form a homogeneous melt. After cooling, the glass was recovered from the crucible by crushing and was subsequently powdered mechanically with the help of mortar and pestle. This powder was used as the feed stock for plasma spheroidization using an indigenously developed 40 kW plasma spray system. Experiments were carried out at various operating parameters. The operating parameters were optimised to get spheroidised particles. The powder was sieved to get the required size range before irradiation.

  13. Plasma neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin as a potential predictor of adverse renal outcomes in immunoglobulin A nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ga-Young; Yu, Chung-Hoon; Kim, Jun-Seop; Kang, Yun-Jeong; Kwon, Owen; Choi, Ji-Young; Cho, Jang-Hee; Kim, Chan-Duck; Kim, Yong-Lim

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) is a well-known biomarker of acute kidney injury. We evaluated the value of plasma NGAL (pNGAL) as an independent predictor of prognosis in immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN). Methods In total, 91 patients with biopsy-proven IgAN at a single center were evaluated. pNGAL was measured using a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit (R&D Systems). Adverse renal outcome was defined as chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage 3 or above at the last follow-up. Pearson correlation coefficient and Cox regression were used for analyses. Results The mean age of all patients (male:female, 48:43) was 35 years (range, 18 to 77). pNGAL ranged between 21.68 and 446.40 ng/mL (median, 123.97) and showed a correlation with age (r = 0.332, p = 0.001), creatinine (r = 0.336, p = 0.001), estimated glomerular filtration rate (r = -0.397, p < 0.001), uric acid (r = 0.289, p = 0.006), and the protein-to-creatinine ratio (r = 0.288, p = 0.006). During a mean follow-up period of 37.6 months, 11 patients (12.1%) had CKD stage 3 or above. In a multivariate Cox regression model, hypertension (hazard ratio [HR], 8.779; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.526 to 50.496; p = 0.015), proteinuria > 1 g/day (HR, 5.184; 95% CI, 1.124 to 23.921; p = 0.035), and pNGAL (HR, 1.012; 95% CI, 1.003 to 1.022; p = 0.013) were independent predictors associated with adverse renal outcome. Conclusions pNGAL showed strong correlations with other clinical prognostic factors and was also an independent predictor of adverse renal outcome. We suggest pNGAL as a potential predictor for prognosis in IgAN, while further studies are needed to confirm the clinical value. PMID:25995665

  14. Differentially expressed plasma microRNAs and the potential regulatory function of Let-7b in chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lijuan; Yang, Yuanhua; Liu, Jie; Wang, Lei; Li, Jifeng; Wang, Ying; Liu, Yan; Gu, Song; Gan, Huili; Cai, Jun; Yuan, Jason X-J; Wang, Jun; Wang, Chen

    2014-01-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a progressive disease characterized by misguided thrombolysis and remodeling of pulmonary arteries. MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNAs involved in multiple cell processes and functions. During CTEPH, circulating microRNA profile endued with characteristics of diseased cells could be identified as a biomarker, and might help in recognition of pathogenesis. Thus, in this study, we compared the differentially expressed microRNAs in plasma of CTEPH patients and healthy controls and investigated their potential functions. Microarray was used to identify microRNA expression profile and qRT-PCR for validation. The targets of differentially expressed microRNAs were identified in silico, and the Gene Ontology database and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway database were used for functional investigation of target gene profile. Targets of let-7b were validated by fluorescence reporter assay. Protein expression of target genes was determined by ELISA or western blotting. Cell migration was evaluated by wound healing assay. The results showed that 1) thirty five microRNAs were differentially expressed in CTEPH patients, among which, a signature of 17 microRNAs, which was shown to be related to the disease pathogenesis by in silico analysis, gave diagnostic efficacy of both sensitivity and specificity >0.9. 2) Let-7b, one of the down-regulated anti-oncogenic microRNAs in the signature, was validated to decrease to about 0.25 fold in CTEPH patients. 3) ET-1 and TGFBR1 were direct targets of let-7b. Altering let-7b level influenced ET-1 and TGFBR1 expression in pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (PAECs) as well as the migration of PAECs and pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). These results suggested that CTEPH patients had aberrant microRNA signature which might provide some clue for pathogenesis study and biomarker screening. Reduced let-7b might be involved in the pathogenesis of CTEPH by

  15. Differentially Expressed Plasma MicroRNAs and the Potential Regulatory Function of Let-7b in Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Lijuan; Yang, Yuanhua; Liu, Jie; Wang, Lei; Li, Jifeng; Wang, Ying; Liu, Yan; Gu, Song; Gan, Huili; Cai, Jun; Yuan, Jason X.-J.; Wang, Jun; Wang, Chen

    2014-01-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a progressive disease characterized by misguided thrombolysis and remodeling of pulmonary arteries. MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNAs involved in multiple cell processes and functions. During CTEPH, circulating microRNA profile endued with characteristics of diseased cells could be identified as a biomarker, and might help in recognition of pathogenesis. Thus, in this study, we compared the differentially expressed microRNAs in plasma of CTEPH patients and healthy controls and investigated their potential functions. Microarray was used to identify microRNA expression profile and qRT-PCR for validation. The targets of differentially expressed microRNAs were identified in silico, and the Gene Ontology database and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway database were used for functional investigation of target gene profile. Targets of let-7b were validated by fluorescence reporter assay. Protein expression of target genes was determined by ELISA or western blotting. Cell migration was evaluated by wound healing assay. The results showed that 1) thirty five microRNAs were differentially expressed in CTEPH patients, among which, a signature of 17 microRNAs, which was shown to be related to the disease pathogenesis by in silico analysis, gave diagnostic efficacy of both sensitivity and specificity >0.9. 2) Let-7b, one of the down-regulated anti-oncogenic microRNAs in the signature, was validated to decrease to about 0.25 fold in CTEPH patients. 3) ET-1 and TGFBR1 were direct targets of let-7b. Altering let-7b level influenced ET-1 and TGFBR1 expression in pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (PAECs) as well as the migration of PAECs and pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). These results suggested that CTEPH patients had aberrant microRNA signature which might provide some clue for pathogenesis study and biomarker screening. Reduced let-7b might be involved in the pathogenesis of CTEPH by

  16. A study of single and binary ion plasma expansion into laboratory-generated plasma wakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Kenneth Herbert, Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Plasma expansion into the wake of a large rectangular plate immersed in a collisionless, supersonic plasma was investigated in laboratory experiments. The experimental conditions address both single ion and binary ion plasma flows for the case of a body whose size is large in comparison with the Debye length, when the potential difference between the body and the plasma is relatively small. A new plasma source was developed to generate equi-velocity, binary ion plasma flows, which allows access to new parameter space that have previously been unavailable for laboratory studies. Specifically, the new parameters are the ionic mass ratio and the ionic component density ratio. In a series of experiments, a krypton-neon plasma is employed where the ambient density ratio of neon to krypton is varied more than an order of magnitude. The expansion in both the single ion and binary ion plasma cases is limited to early times, i.e., a few ion plasma periods, by the combination of plasma density, plasma drift speed, and vacuum chamber size, which prevented detailed comparison with self-similar theory.

  17. Potential regulatory phosphorylation sites in a Medicago truncatula plasma membrane proton pump implicated during early symbiotic signaling in roots.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thao T; Volkening, Jeremy D; Rose, Christopher M; Venkateshwaran, Muthusubramanian; Westphall, Michael S; Coon, Joshua J; Ané, Jean-Michel; Sussman, Michael R

    2015-08-04

    In plants and fungi the plasma membrane proton pump generates a large proton-motive force that performs essential functions in many processes, including solute transport and the control of cell elongation. Previous studies in yeast and higher plants have indicated that phosphorylation of an auto-inhibitory domain is involved in regulating pump activity. In this report we examine the Medicago truncatula plasma membrane proton pump gene family, and in particular MtAHA5. Yeast complementation assays with phosphomimetic mutations at six candidate sites support a phosphoregulatory role for two residues, suggesting a molecular model to explain early Nod factor-induced changes in the plasma membrane proton-motive force of legume root cells.

  18. Detail view of ornamental lighting detail of southwest corner of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of ornamental lighting detail of southwest corner of Sixth Street Bridge. Looking northeast - Sixth Street Bridge, Spanning 101 Freeway at Sixth Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  19. Detail, Scandia Hotel, view to southwest showing details of balloon ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail, Scandia Hotel, view to southwest showing details of balloon framing, including full two-story studs notched to carry girts supporting second story floor joists (210mm lens) - Scandia Hotel, 225 First Street, Eureka, Humboldt County, CA

  20. 58. DETAIL OF PINION AND BULL GEARS: Detail view towards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    58. DETAIL OF PINION AND BULL GEARS: Detail view towards northeast of the pinion and bull gears of the winding machinery. - San Francisco Cable Railway, Washington & Mason Streets, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  1. REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES IN WHOLE BLOOD, BLOOD PLASMA AND BREAST MILK: VALIDATION OF A POTENTIAL MARKER OF EXPOSURE AND EFFECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are recognized to contribute to the pathobiology of many diseases. We have applied a simple chemiluminescent (CL) probe to detect ROS in various biological fluids (plasma, whole blood, urine and breast milk) in an environmental arsenic drinking wate...

  2. The formation of relativistic plasma structures and their potential role in the generation of cosmic ray electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dieckmann, M. E.

    2008-11-01

    Recent particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation studies have addressed particle acceleration and magnetic field generation in relativistic astrophysical flows by plasma phase space structures. We discuss the astrophysical environments such as the jets of compact objects, and we give an overview of the global PIC simulations of shocks. These reveal several types of phase space structures, which are relevant for the energy dissipation. These structures are typically coupled in shocks, but we choose to consider them here in an isolated form. Three structures are reviewed. (1) Simulations of interpenetrating or colliding plasma clouds can trigger filamentation instabilities, while simulations of thermally anisotropic plasmas observe the Weibel instability. Both transform a spatially uniform plasma into current filaments. These filament structures cause the growth of the magnetic fields. (2) The development of a modified two-stream instability is discussed. It saturates first by the formation of electron phase space holes. The relativistic electron clouds modulate the ion beam and a secondary, spatially localized electrostatic instability grows, which saturates by forming a relativistic ion phase space hole. It accelerates electrons to ultra-relativistic speeds. (3) A simulation is also revised, in which two clouds of an electron-ion plasma collide at the speed 0.9c. The inequal densities of both clouds and a magnetic field that is oblique to the collision velocity vector result in waves with a mixed electrostatic and electromagnetic polarity. The waves give rise to growing corkscrew distributions in the electrons and ions that establish an equipartition between the electron, the ion and the magnetic energy. The filament-, phase space hole- and corkscrew structures are discussed with respect to electron acceleration and magnetic field generation.

  3. Toxic metals signature in the human seminal plasma of Pakistani population and their potential role in male infertility.

    PubMed

    Zafar, Ambreen; Eqani, Syed Ali Musstjab Akber Shah; Bostan, Nazish; Cincinelli, Alessandra; Tahir, Faheem; Shah, Syed Tahir Abbas; Hussain, Alamdar; Alamdar, Ambreen; Huang, Qingyu; Peng, Siyuan; Shen, Heqing

    2015-06-01

    Aims of this study were to provide firsthand data on the incidence of trace metals in human seminal plasma and find possible correlations between levels of toxic metals and semen quality of Pakistani population. Human semen samples were collected from male partners of couples undergoing infertility assessment at the National Institute of Health Islamabad (Pakistan). We investigated seventy-five seminal plasma samples, which were further categorized into three groups (normozoospermia, oligozoospermia and azoospermia) according to WHO guidelines. The concentration of 17 different toxic metals in human seminal plasma was determined simultaneously by using Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Out of 17 trace metals, Cd and Ni showed significant difference (p < 0.05) among three monitored groups. Ni and Cd concentrations in the seminal plasma were negatively correlated with sperm concentration (r = -0.26, -0.29) and motility (r = -0.33, -0.37), respectively. This study suggested that exposure of Ni and Cd is mainly related with the consumption of contaminated dietary items, including ghee (cooking oil), flour and other agri-products. In some semen samples, the concentrations of Sn, V, Cu, Pb, Cr and Hg exhibited high levels suggesting a recent human exposure to surrounding sources. In Pakistani human semen samples, the levels of trace metals were lower and/or comparable to that found in populations of other countries. The results show the first evidence of the effect of toxic metals on semen quality and male infertility in Pakistan.

  4. Hepatocyte growth factor activator is a potential target proteinase for Kazal-type inhibitor in turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) seminal plasma.

    PubMed

    Słowińska, Mariola; Bukowska, Joanna; Hejmej, Anna; Bilińska, Barbara; Kozłowski, Krzysztof; Jankowski, Jan; Ciereszko, Andrzej

    2015-08-01

    A peculiar characteristic of turkey seminal plasma is the increased activity of serine proteinases. It is of interest if the single-domain Kazal-type inhibitor controls the activity of turkey seminal plasma proteinases. Pure preparations of the Kazal-type inhibitor and anti-Kazal-type inhibitor monospecific immunoglobulin Gs were used as ligands in affinity chromatography for proteinase isolation from turkey seminal plasma. Gene expression and the immunohistochemical detection of the single-domain Kazal-type inhibitor in the reproductive tract of turkey toms are described. The hepatocyte growth factor activator (HGFA) was identified in the binding fraction in affinity chromatography. Hepatocyte growth factor activator activity was inhibited by the Kazal-type inhibitor in a dose-dependent manner. This protease was a primary physiological target for the single-domain Kazal-type inhibitor. Numerous proteoforms of HGFA were present in turkey seminal plasma, and phosphorylation was the primary posttranslational modification of HGFA. In addition to HGFA, acrosin was a target proteinase for the single-domain Kazal-type inhibitor. In seminal plasma, acrosin was present only in complexes with the Kazal-type inhibitor and was not present as a free enzyme. The single-domain Kazal-type inhibitor was specific for the reproductive tract. The germ cell-specific expression of Kazal-type inhibitors in the testis indicated an important function in spermatogenesis; secretion by the epithelial cells of the epididymis and the ductus deferens indicated that the Kazal-type inhibitor was an important factor involved in the changes in sperm membranes during maturation and in the maintenance of the microenvironment in which sperm maturation occurred and sperm was stored. The role of HGFA in these processes remains to be established.

  5. A six-microRNA panel in plasma was identified as a potential biomarker for lung adenocarcinoma diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wei; Xu, Jing; Guo, Renhua; Cheng, Wenfang; Wang, Fang; Qi, Lian-Wen; Chen, Yan; Huang, Zebo; Wang, Tongshan; Zhu, Danxia; Liu, Ping; Shu, Yongqian

    2017-01-01

    Differently expressed microRNAs (miRNAs) in the plasma of lung adenocarcinoma (LA) patients might serve as biomarkers for LA detection. MiRNA expression profiling was performed using Exiqon panels followed by the verification (30 LA VS. 10 healthy controls (HCs)) with quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) in the screening phase. Identified miRNAs were confirmed through training (42 LA VS. 32 HCs) and testing stages (66 LA VS. 62 HCs) by using qRT-PCR based absolute quantification methods. A total of six up-regulated plasma miRNAs (miR-19b-3p, miR-21-5p, miR-221-3p, miR-409-3p, miR-425-5p and miR-584-5p) were identified. The six-miRNA panel could discriminate LA patients from HCs with areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.72, 0.74 and 0.84 for the training, testing and the external validation stage (33 LA VS. 30 HCs), respectively. All the miRNAs identified except miR-584-5p were significantly up-regulated in LA tissues. MiR-19-3p, miR-21-5p, miR-409-3p and miR-425-5p showed high expression in arterial plasma with borderline significance. Additionally, miR-19-3p, miR-21-5p and miR-221-3p were significantly up-regulated in exosomes extracted from LA peripheral plasma samples. In conclusion, we identified a six-miRNA panel in peripheral plasma which might give assistance to the detection of LA at least for Asian population to a certain extent. PMID:28036284

  6. Influence of Ca2+ on the plasma membrane potential and electrogenic uptake of glycine by myeloma cells. Involvement of a Ca2+-activated K+ channel.

    PubMed

    Pershadsingh, H A; Stubbs, E B; Noteboom, W D; Vorbeck, M L; Martin, A P

    1985-12-19

    The involvement of Ca2+-activated K+ channels in the regulation of the plasma membrane potential and electrogenic uptake of glycine in SP 2/0-AG14 lymphocytes was investigated using the potentiometric indicator 3,3'-diethylthiodicarbocyanine iodide. The resting membrane potential was estimated to be -57 +/- 6 mV (n = 4), a value similar to that of normal lymphocytes. The magnitude of the membrane potential and the electrogenic uptake of glycine were dependent on the extracellular K+ concentration, [K+]o, and were significantly enhanced by exogenous calcium. The apparent Vmax of Na+-dependent glycine uptake was doubled in the presence of calcium, whereas the K0.5 was not affected. Ouabain had no influence on the membrane potential under the conditions employed. Additional criteria used to demonstrate the presence of Ca2+-activated K+ channels included the following: (1) addition of EGTA to calcium supplemented cells elicited a rapid depolarization of the membrane potential that was dependent on [K+]o; (2) the calmodulin antagonist, trifluoperazine, depolarized the membrane potential in a dose-dependent and saturable manner with an IC50 of 9.4 microM; and (3) cells treated with the Ca2+-activated K+ channel antagonist, quinine, demonstrated an elevated membrane potential and depressed electrogenic glycine uptake. Results from the present study provide evidence for Ca2+-activated K+ channels in SP 2/0-AG14 lymphocytes, and that their involvement regulates the plasma membrane potential and thereby the electrogenic uptake of Na+-dependent amino acids.

  7. Influences on physicians' adoption of electronic detailing (e-detailing).

    PubMed

    Alkhateeb, Fadi M; Doucette, William R

    2009-01-01

    E-detailing means using digital technology: internet, video conferencing and interactive voice response. There are two types of e-detailing: interactive (virtual) and video. Currently, little is known about what factors influence physicians' adoption of e-detailing. The objectives of this study were to test a model of physicians' adoption of e-detailing and to describe physicians using e-detailing. A mail survey was sent to a random sample of 2000 physicians practicing in Iowa. Binomial logistic regression was used to test the model of influences on physician adoption of e-detailing. On the basis of Rogers' model of adoption, the independent variables included relative advantage, compatibility, complexity, peer influence, attitudes, years in practice, presence of restrictive access to traditional detailing, type of specialty, academic affiliation, type of practice setting and control variables. A total of 671 responses were received giving a response rate of 34.7%. A total of 141 physicians (21.0%) reported using of e-detailing. The overall adoption model for using either type of e-detailing was found to be significant. Relative advantage, peer influence, attitudes, type of specialty, presence of restrictive access and years of practice had significant influences on physician adoption of e-detailing. The model of adoption of innovation is useful to explain physicians' adoption of e-detailing.

  8. Status and Verification of Edge Plasma Turbulence Code BOUT

    SciTech Connect

    Umansky, M V; Xu, X Q; Dudson, B; LoDestro, L L; Myra, J R

    2009-01-08

    The BOUT code is a detailed numerical model of tokamak edge turbulence based on collisional plasma uid equations. BOUT solves for time evolution of plasma uid variables: plasma density N{sub i}, parallel ion velocity V{sub {parallel}i}, electron temperature T{sub e}, ion temperature T{sub i}, electric potential {phi}, parallel current j{sub {parallel}}, and parallel vector potential A{sub {parallel}}, in realistic 3D divertor tokamak geometry. The current status of the code, physics model, algorithms, and implementation is described. Results of verification testing are presented along with illustrative applications to tokamak edge turbulence.

  9. Grafting of bovine serum albumin proteins on plasma-modified polymers for potential application in tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasálková, Nikola Slepičková; Slepička, Petr; Kolská, Zdeňka; Hodačová, Petra; Kučková, Štěpánka; Švorčík, Václav

    2014-04-01

    In this work, an influence of bovine serum albumin proteins grafting on the surface properties of plasma-treated polyethylene and poly- l-lactic acid was studied. The interaction of the vascular smooth muscle cells with the modified polymer surface was determined. The surface properties were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, nano-LC-ESI-Q-TOF mass spectrometry, electrokinetic analysis, and goniometry. One of the motivations for this work is the idea that by the interaction of the cell with substrate surface, the proteins will form an interlayer between the cell and the substrate. It was proven that when interacting with the plasma-treated high-density polyethylene and poly- l-lactic acid, the bovine serum albumin protein is grafted on the polymer surface. Since the proteins are bonded to the substrate surface, they can stimulate cell adhesion and proliferation.

  10. Grafting of bovine serum albumin proteins on plasma-modified polymers for potential application in tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Kasálková, Nikola Slepičková; Slepička, Petr; Kolská, Zdeňka; Hodačová, Petra; Kučková, Stěpánka; Svorčík, Václav

    2014-04-04

    In this work, an influence of bovine serum albumin proteins grafting on the surface properties of plasma-treated polyethylene and poly-l-lactic acid was studied. The interaction of the vascular smooth muscle cells with the modified polymer surface was determined. The surface properties were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, nano-LC-ESI-Q-TOF mass spectrometry, electrokinetic analysis, and goniometry. One of the motivations for this work is the idea that by the interaction of the cell with substrate surface, the proteins will form an interlayer between the cell and the substrate. It was proven that when interacting with the plasma-treated high-density polyethylene and poly-l-lactic acid, the bovine serum albumin protein is grafted on the polymer surface. Since the proteins are bonded to the substrate surface, they can stimulate cell adhesion and proliferation.

  11. Time development of high-altitude auroral acceleration region plasma, potentials, and field-aligned current systems observed by Cluster during a substorm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, A. J.; Chaston, C. C.; Fillingim, M. O.; Mozer, F.; Frey, H. U.

    2013-12-01

    The auroral acceleration region is an integral link in the chain of events that transpire during substorms, and the currents, plasma and electric fields undergo significant changes driven by complex dynamical processes deep in the magnetotail. These auroral acceleration processes in turn accelerate and heat the plasma that ultimately leads to some of the most intense global substorm auroral displays. The complex interplay between field-aligned current system formation, the development of parallel electric fields, and resultant changes in the plasma constituents that occur during substorms within or just above the auroral acceleration zone remain unclear. We present Cluster multi-point observations within the high-altitude acceleration region (> 3 Re altitude) at key instances during the development of a substorm. Of particular emphasis is on the time-development of the plasma, potentials and currents that occur therein with the aim of ascertaining high-altitude drivers of substorm active auroral acceleration processes and auroral emission consequences. Preliminary results show that the initial onset is dominated by Alfvenic activity as evidenced by the sudden occurrence of relatively intense, short-spatial scale Alfvenic currents and attendant energy dispersed, counterstreaming electrons poleward of the growth-phase arc. The Alfvenic currents are locally planar structures with characteristic thicknesses on the order of a few tens of kilometers. In subsequent passages by the other spacecraft, the plasma sheet region became hotter and thicker via the injection of new hot, dense plasma of magnetospheric origins poleward of the pre-existing growth phase arc. In association with the heating and/or thickening of the plasma sheet, the currents appeared to broaden to larger scales as Alfven dominated activity gave way to either inverted-V dominated or mixed inverted-V and Alfvenic behavior depending on location. The transition from Alfven dominated to inverted-V dominated

  12. Cluster Multipoint Observations of the Spatial Structure and Time Development of Auroral Acceleration Region Field-aligned Current Systems, Potentials, and Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, A. J.; Chaston, C. C.; Fillingim, M. O.; Frey, H. U.; Bonnell, J. W.; Mozer, F.; Goldstein, M. L.

    2014-12-01

    The auroral acceleration region is an integral part of the magnetosphere-ionosphere electrodynamic system, and plays a key role in the transport of plasma and energy between Earth and space. This region is embedded with field-aligned currents that couple the magnetosphere to the ionosphere and is where parallel electric fields form that accelerate plasma to and from these regions. Though considerable progress has been made, the complex interplay between field-aligned current system formation, the development of parallel electric fields, changes in the plasma constituents, and auroral emissions consequences are not fully understood. The Cluster mission is well suited for studying the structure and dynamics of the auroral acceleration region. Over its lifetime, Cluster has sampled much of this region with closely spaced probes enabling the distinction between temporal effects from spatial variations. Moreover, this data when combined with auroral images from IMAGE or THEMIS GBO-ASI enable an assessment of the auroral emission response to spatial morphology and temporal development of structures seeded in the auroral acceleration region. In this study we present a survey of Cluster multi-point traversals within and just above the auroral acceleration region (≤ 3 Re altitude). In particular we highlight the spatial morphology and developmental sequence of auroral acceleration current systems, potentials and plasma constituents, with the aim of identifying controlling factors, and assessing ionospheric consequences under different conditions. Our results suggest that the "Alfvénic" activity may be an important precursor and perhaps may be playing an essential role in the development of "quasi-static" current systems during quiet and substorm active times. Such events are generally the result of an injection mediated process at or near the plasma sheet boundary layer, resulting in the local expansion of the plasma sheet. Key features of the conversion from Alfv

  13. Characterization of a plasma photonic crystal using the multi-fluid plasma model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Whitney; Shumlak, Uri; Miller, Sean

    2016-10-01

    Plasma photonic crystals have great potential to expand the capabilities of current microwave filtering and switching technologies by providing high speed control of energy band-gap/pass characteristics. While there has been considerable research into dielectric, semiconductor, metallic, and even liquid crystal based radiation manipulation, using plasmas is a relatively new field. Concurrently, processing power has reached levels where realistic, computationally expensive, multi-fluid plasma simulations are now possible. Unlike single-fluid magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models, multi-fluid plasma models capture the electron fluid response to electromagnetic waves, a key process responsible for reflecting radiation. In this study, a 5-moment multi-fluid plasma model is implemented in University of Washington's WARPXM computational plasma physics code to examine the energy band-gap characteristics of an array of plasma-filled rods. This configuration permits the thorough analysis of the effect that plasma temperature, density, and array configuration have on energy transmission, absorption, and reflection. Furthermore, high-resolution simulations of the plasma columns gives a detailed window into plasma-radiation interactions. This work is supported by a Grant from the United States Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  14. Vibrational biospectroscopy coupled with multivariate analysis extracts potentially diagnostic features in blood plasma/serum of ovarian cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Owens, Gemma L; Gajjar, Ketan; Trevisan, Júlio; Fogarty, Simon W; Taylor, Siân E; Da Gama-Rose, Bianca; Martin-Hirsch, Pierre L; Martin, Francis L

    2014-04-01

    Despite numerous advances in "omics" research, early detection of ovarian cancer still remains a challenge. The aim of this study was to determine whether attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) or Raman spectroscopy could characterise alterations in the biomolecular signatures of human blood plasma/serum obtained from ovarian cancer patients compared to non-cancer controls. Blood samples isolated from ovarian cancer patients (n = 30) and healthy controls (n = 30) were analysed using ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. For comparison, a smaller cohort of samples (n = 8) were analysed using an InVia Renishaw Raman spectrometer. Resultant spectra were pre-processed prior to being inputted into principal component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA). Statistically significant differences (P < 0.001) were observed between spectra of ovarian cancer versus control subjects for both biospectroscopy methods. Using a support vector machine classifier for Raman spectra of blood plasma, a diagnostic accuracy of 74% was achieved, while the same classifier showed 93.3% accuracy for IR spectra of blood plasma. These observations suggest that a biospectroscopy approach could be applied to identify spectral alterations associated with the presence of insidious ovarian cancer.

  15. Potentiation of the bioavailability of blueberry phenolic compounds by co-ingested grape phenolic compounds in mice, revealed by targeted metabolomic profiling in plasma and feces.

    PubMed

    Dudonné, Stéphanie; Dal-Pan, Alexandre; Dubé, Pascal; Varin, Thibault V; Calon, Frédéric; Desjardins, Yves

    2016-08-10

    The low bioavailability of dietary phenolic compounds, resulting from poor absorption and high rates of metabolism and excretion, is a concern as it can limit their potential beneficial effects on health. Targeted metabolomic profiling in plasma and feces of mice supplemented for 15 days with a blueberry extract, a grape extract or their combination revealed significantly increased plasma concentrations (3-5 fold) of blueberry phenolic metabolites in the presence of a co-ingested grape extract, associated with an equivalent decrease in their appearance in feces. Additionally, the repeated daily administration of the blueberry-grape combination significantly increased plasma phenolic concentrations (2-3-fold) compared to animals receiving only a single acute dose, with no such increase being observed with individual extracts. These findings highlight a positive interaction between blueberry and grape constituents, in which the grape extract enhanced the absorption of blueberry phenolic compounds. This study provides for the first time in vivo evidence of such an interaction occurring between co-ingested phenolic compounds from fruit extracts leading to their improved bioavailability.

  16. An HPLC method for determination of inosine and hypoxanthine in human plasma from healthy volunteers and patients presenting with potential acute cardiac ischemia.

    PubMed

    Farthing, Don; Sica, Domenic; Gehr, Todd; Wilson, Bill; Fakhry, Itaf; Larus, Terri; Farthing, Christine; Karnes, H Thomas

    2007-07-01

    A simple and sensitive high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method utilizing ultraviolet (UV) detection was developed for the determination of inosine and hypoxanthine in human plasma. For component separation, a monolithic C(18) column at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min with an aqueous mobile phase of trifluoroacetic acid (0.1% TFA in deionized water pH 2.2, v/v) and methanol gradient was used. The method employed a one-step sample preparation utilizing centrifugal filtration with high component recoveries (approximately 98%) from plasma, which eliminated the need of an internal standard. The method demonstrated excellent linearity (0.25-5 microg/mL, R>0.9990) for both inosine and hypoxanthine with detection limits of 100 ng/mL. This simple and cost effective method was utilized to evaluate potential endogenous plasma biomarker(s), which may aid hospital emergency personnel in the early detection of acute cardiac ischemia in patients presenting with non-traumatic chest pain.

  17. 15. CYLINDER DETAILS; DETAILS OF STEEL FOR CYLINDERS NO. 50 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. CYLINDER DETAILS; DETAILS OF STEEL FOR CYLINDERS NO. 50 (PIER 5) AND NO. 66 (PIER 6), DWG. 83, CH BY AF, ECL, APPROVED BY O.F. LACKEY, MAY 18, 1908 - Baltimore Inner Harbor, Pier 5, South of Pratt Street between Market Place & Concord Street, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  18. A simple model for electron temperature in dilute plasma flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Chunpei; Cooke, David L.

    2016-10-01

    In this short note, we present some work on investigating electron temperatures and potentials in steady dilute plasma flows. The analysis is based on the detailed fluid model for electrons. Ionizations, normalized electron number density gradients, and magnetic fields are neglected. The transport properties are assumed as local constants. With these treatments, the partial differential equation for electron temperature degenerates as an ordinary differential equation. Along an electron streamline, two simple formulas for electron temperature and plasma potential are obtained. These formulas offer some insights, e.g., the electron temperature and plasma potential distributions along an electron streamline include two exponential functions, and the one for plasma potential includes an extra linear distribution function.

  19. Quantitation of Gingerols in Human Plasma by Newly Developed Stable Isotope Dilution Assays and Assessment of Their Immunomodulatory Potential.

    PubMed

    Schoenknecht, Carola; Andersen, Gaby; Schmidts, Ines; Schieberle, Peter

    2016-03-23

    In a pilot study with two volunteers, the main pungent and bioactive ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) compounds, the gingerols, were quantitated in human plasma after ginger tea consumption using a newly established HPLC-MS/MS(ESI) method on the basis of stable isotope dilution assays. Limits of quantitation for [6]-, [8]-, and [10]-gingerols were determined as 7.6, 3.1, and 4.0 nmol/L, respectively. The highest plasma concentrations of [6]-, [8]-, and [10]-gingerols (42.0, 5.3, and 4.8 nmol/L, respectively) were reached 30-60 min after ginger tea intake. Incubation of activated human T lymphocytes with gingerols increased the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration as well as the IFN-γ secretion by about 20-30%. This gingerol-induced increase of IFN-γ secretion could be blocked by the specific TRPV1 antagonist SB-366791. The results of the present study point to an interaction of gingerols with TRPV1 in activated T lymphocytes leading to an augmentation of IFN-γ secretion.

  20. Industrial plasmas in academia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollenstein, Ch; Howling, AA; Guittienne, Ph; Furno, I.

    2015-01-01

    The present review, written at the occasion of the 2014 EPS Innovation award, will give a short overview of the research and development of industrial plasmas within the last 30 years and will also provide a first glimpse into future developments of this important topic of plasma physics and plasma chemistry. In the present contribution, some of the industrial plasmas studied at the CRPP/EPFL at Lausanne are highlighted and their influence on modern plasma physics and also discharge physics is discussed. One of the most important problems is the treatment of large surfaces, such as that used in solar cells, but also in more daily applications, such as the packaging industry. In this contribution, the advantages and disadvantages of some of the most prominent plasmas such as capacitively- and inductively-coupled plasmas are discussed. Electromagnetic problems due to the related radio frequency and its consequences on the plasma reactor performance, and also dust formation due to chemical reactions in plasma, are highlighted. Arcing and parasitic discharges occurring in plasma reactors can lead to plasma reactor damages. Some specific problems, such as the gas supply of a large area reactor, are discussed in more detail. Other topics of interest have been dc discharges such as those used in plasma spraying where thermal plasmas are applied for advanced material processing. Modern plasma diagnostics make it possible to investigate sparks in electrical discharge machining, which surprisingly show properties of weakly-coupled plasmas. Nanosecond dielectric barrier discharge plasmas have been applied to more speculative topics such as applications in aerodynamics and will surely be important in the future for ignition and combustion. Most of the commonly-used plasma sources have been shown to be limited in their performance. Therefore new, more effective plasma sources are urgently required. With the recent development of novel resonant network antennas for new

  1. Computed tomography:the details.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2007-07-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) is a well established technique, particularly in medical imaging, but also applied in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imaging. Basic CT imaging via back-projection is treated in many texts, but often with insufficient detail to appreciate subtleties such as the role of non-uniform sampling densities. Herein are given some details often neglected in many texts.

  2. Neutral resonant ionization in a H{sup −} plasma source: Potential of doubly excited **H{sup −}

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, J. S.

    2016-02-15

    Hydrogen plasmas are optically dense to Lyman-α radiation, maintaining *H(n = 2) neutral atoms that may undergo neutral resonant ionization to **H{sup −}. One state, **H{sup −}(2p{sup 2} {sup 3}P{sup e}), is thought bound at 9.7 meV with a several nanosecond lifetime while all others are unbound resonances. Collision dynamics of two *H(2s) shows that an ionic pair of (p, **H{sup −}) resolves at least three long-standing collision experiments. The doubly excited anion also has a path to the unexcited ion pair whose only physical distinction is that both (p, H{sup −}) have energy of 3.7 eV.

  3. Smoky Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Scott; Sternovsky, Zoltan

    2006-10-01

    The mesosphere contains nanometer-sized smoke particles that have formed in the vapor trails of meteors and that are thought to be the condensation nuclei for noctilucent clouds. Laboratory dusty plasmas often have the dust particles in a layer at the lower sheath boundary. We examine the possibility of creating in a double-plasma device a smoky plasma in which the particles would be sufficiently small to fill the plasma nearly uniformly while being sufficiently large to exhibit multiple charge states that would distinguish the smoky plasma from one containing heavy negative ions. For example, nanometer sized atomic clusters of Ag (4 nm radius, 10,000 atoms) can be generated in an oven with an inert gas that carries the particles into the plasma chamber. These particles will become charged negatively with about 8 electrons and will then be electrostatically contained by the presheath electric field The confining electric force will also be greater than the ion drag force that could otherwise create a void in the smoke particle density distribution. This plasma would make possible, for example, experiments on the coupling of electrostatic waves to fluid turbulence by the neutral drag force. An acoustic wave propagating in smoky plasma will exert different drag forces on electrons, ions, and smoke particles thus creating a charge-separation electric field that can be measured by potential probes. This coupling may be the origin of electrostatic fluctuations seen by rocket-borne electric field probes in the mesosphere. Supported by the NSF/DOE Plasma Science Initiative.

  4. Influence of Interleukin-1 Beta on Platelet-Poor Plasma Clot Formation: A Potential Impact on Early Bone Healing

    PubMed Central

    Masci, Paul P.; Crawford, Ross; Xiao, Yin

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Hematoma quality (especially the fibrin matrix) plays an important role in the bone healing process. Here, we investigated the effect of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) on fibrin clot formation from platelet-poor plasma (PPP). Methods Five-milliliter of rat whole-blood samples were collected from the hepatic portal vein. All blood samples were firstly standardized via a thrombelastograph (TEG), blood cell count, and the measurement of fibrinogen concentration. PPP was prepared by collecting the top two-fifths of the plasma after centrifugation under 400 × g for 10 min at 20°C. The effects of IL-1β cytokines on artificial fibrin clot formation from PPP solutions were determined by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), confocal microscopy (CM), turbidity, and clot lysis assays. Results The lag time for protofibril formation was markedly shortened in the IL-1β treatment groups (243.8 ± 76.85 in the 50 pg/mL of IL-1β and 97.5 ± 19.36 in the 500 pg/mL of IL-1β) compared to the control group without IL-1β (543.8 ± 205.8). Maximal turbidity was observed in the control group. IL-1β (500 pg/mL) treatment significantly decreased fiber diameters resulting in smaller pore sizes and increased density of the fibrin clot structure formed from PPP (P < 0.05). The clot lysis assay revealed that 500 pg/mL IL-1β induced a lower susceptibility to dissolution due to the formation of thinner and denser fibers. Conclusion IL-1β can significantly influence PPP fibrin clot structure, which may affect the early bone healing process. PMID:26909757

  5. Afterglow Complex Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Samarian, A. A.; Boufendi, L.; Mikikian, M.

    2008-09-07

    The review of the first detailed experimental and theoretical studies of complex plasma in RF discharge afterglow is presented. The studies have been done in a frame of FAST collaborative research project between Complex Plasma Laboratory of the University of Sydney and the GREMI laboratory of Universite d'Orleans. We examined the existing models of plasma decay, presents experimental observations of dust dynamics under different afterglow complex plasma conditions, presents the experimental data obtained (in particular the presence of positively charged particles in discharge afterglow), discusses the use of dust particles as a probe to study the diffusion losses in afterglow plasmas.

  6. 13. DETAIL VIEW OF BRIDGE, LOOKING SOUTH FROM ROADWAY. DETAIL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. DETAIL VIEW OF BRIDGE, LOOKING SOUTH FROM ROADWAY. DETAIL VIEW OF THE PIERS AND LIGHTING FIXTURES ON THE COLORADO STREET BRIDGE. THIS VIEW SHOWS A PORTION OF THE BRIDGE ALONG THE SOUTH SIDE OF THE ROADWAY. EACH FIXTURE ALSO ORIGINALLY HAD FOUR ADDITIONAL GLOBES, WHICH EXTENDED FROM THE COLUMN BELOW THE MAIN GLOBE. THE 'REFUGE' SEATING AREAS ARE ORIGINAL, WHILE THE RAILING IS A LATER ADDITION. - Colorado Street Bridge, Spanning Arroyo Seco at Colorado Boulevard, Pasadena, Los Angeles County, CA

  7. Surface potential distribution and airflow performance of different air-exposed electrode plasma actuators at different alternating current/direct current voltages

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Liang; Yan, Hui-Jie; Qi, Xiao-Hua; Hua, Yue; Ren, Chun-Sheng

    2015-04-15

    Asymmetric surface dielectric barrier discharge (SDBD) plasma actuators have been intensely studied for a number of years due to their potential applications for aerodynamic control. In this paper, four types of actuators with different configurations of exposed electrode are proposed. The SDBD actuators investigated are driven by dual-power supply, referred to as a fixed AC high voltage and an adjustable DC bias. The effects of the electrode structures on the dielectric surface potential distribution, the electric wind velocity, and the mean thrust production are studied, and the dominative factors of airflow acceleration behavior are revealed. The results have shown that the actions of the SDBD actuator are mainly dependent on the geometry of the exposed electrode. Besides, the surface potential distribution can effectively affect the airflow acceleration behavior. With the application of an appropriate additional DC bias, the surface potential will be modified. As a result, the performance of the electric wind produced by a single SDBD can be significantly improved. In addition, the work also illustrates that the actuators with more negative surface potential present better mechanical performance.

  8. PLASMA DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Baker, W.R.; Brathenahl, A.; Furth, H.P.

    1962-04-10

    A device for producing a confined high temperature plasma is described. In the device the concave inner surface of an outer annular electrode is disposed concentrically about and facing the convex outer face of an inner annular electrode across which electrodes a high potential is applied to produce an electric field there between. Means is provided to create a magnetic field perpendicular to the electric field and a gas is supplied at reduced pressure in the area therebetween. Upon application of the high potential, the gas between the electrodes is ionized, heated, and under the influence of the electric and magnetic fields there is produced a rotating annular plasma disk. The ionized plasma has high dielectric constant properties. The device is useful as a fast discharge rate capacitor, in controlled thermonuclear research, and other high temperature gas applications. (AEC)

  9. [Anti-PD-1 Antibody Drugs - Potential of Plasma PD-L1 Protein as a Biomarker].

    PubMed

    Iinuma, Hisae; Matsutani, Noriyuki; Uehara, Hirofumi; Kawamura, Masafumi

    2016-09-01

    The superior therapeutic effects of antibodies targeting immune checkpoints have been reported in the treatment of various cancers including non-small cell lung cancer(NSCLC)and malignant melanoma. However, the risk of reactivity against selfantigens and the high prices of these drugs are major concerns. Previously, PD-L1 protein expression and the number of infiltrating T cells in tumor tissues were investigated by immunohistochemical staining, as biomarkers for therapeutic anti-PD- 1 antibodies. However, further research into the clinical significance of PD-L1 expression in tumor tissues is still required. A promising and comprehensive gene mutation analysis of tumor tissues and T cell repertoire analysis has recently been undertaken. Liquid biopsy, which has the benefit of being minimally invasive, has also been investigated. We are currently, investigating the utility of plasma PD-L1 protein levels as a predictive biomarker of prognosis in NSCLC. Furthermore, it is important to explore useful biomarkers and develop reliable companion diagnostics for the individualized treatment with immune checkpoint drugs.

  10. Evaluation of the potential of pentachlorophenol degradation in soil by pulsed corona discharge plasma from soil characteristics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tie Cheng; Lu, Na; Li, Jie; Wu, Yan

    2010-04-15

    Chlorinated organics are frequently found as harmful soil contaminants and persisted for extended periods of time. A novel approach, named pulsed corona discharge plasma (PCDP), was employed for the degradation of pentachlorophenol (PCP) in soil. Experimental results showed that 87% of PCP could be smoothly removed in 60 min. Increasing pulse voltage, enhancing soil pH, lowering humic acid (HA) in soil and reducing granular size of the soil were found to be favorable for PCP degradation efficiency. Oxidation and physical processes simultaneously contributed to PCP removal in soil and ozone was the main factor in PCDP treatment. C-Cl bonds in PCP were cleaved during PCDP treatment by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis. The mineralization of PCP was confirmed by total organic carbon (TOC) and dechlorination analyses. The main intermediate products such as tetrachlorocatechol, tetrachlorohydroquinone, acetic acid, formic acid, and oxalic acid were identified by HPLC/MS and ion chromatography. A possible pathway of PCP degradation in soil in such a system was proposed.

  11. Suprathermal electron energy spectrum and nonlocally affected plasma-wall interaction in helium/air micro-plasma at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demidov, V. I.; Adams, S. F.; Miles, J. A.; Koepke, M. E.; Kurlyandskaya, I. P.

    2016-10-01

    Details of ground-state and excited-state neutral atoms and molecules in an atmospheric-pressure micro-discharge plasma may be obtained by plasma electron spectroscopy (PLES), based on a wall probe. The presence and transport of energetic (suprathermal) electrons, having a nonlocal origin, are responsible for electrostatic charging of the plasma boundary surfaces to potentials many times that associated with the ambient electron kinetic energy. The energy-flux distribution function is shown to be controllable for applications involving analysis of composition and processes taking place in a multiphase (plasma-gas-solid), chemically reactive, interaction region.

  12. Geospace Plasma Dynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-22

    AFRL-RV-PS- AFRL-RV-PS- TR-2013-0082 TR-2013-0082 GEOSPACE PLASMA DYNAMICS Daniel Ober, et al. 22 May 2013...COVERED (From - To) 1 Oct 2007 to 30 Sep 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Geospace Plasma Dynamics 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...Force Office of Scientific Research task titled, “ Geospace Plasma Dynamics.” The goal of this research effort was to develop a detailed knowledge of

  13. Fluoxetine, but not tricyclic antidepressants, potentiates the 5-hydroxytryptophan-mediated increase in plasma cortisol and prolactin secretion in subjects with major depression or with obsessive compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Meltzer, H; Bastani, B; Jayathilake, K; Maes, M

    1997-07-01

    It has been suggested that the clinical efficacy of chronic treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) such as fluoxetine and perhaps all antidepressants is due to their ability to enhance serotonergic activity. The effects of chronic treatment with fluoxetine or tricyclic antidepressants on the L-5-hydroxytryptophan (200 mg, L-5-HTP; PO)-induced increases in plasma cortisol and prolactin (PRL) concentrations were studied in patients with major depression or obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). Administration of L-5-HTP increased plasma cortisol and PRL levels in medicated and unmedicated patients with major depression or OCD. The L-5-HTP-induced cortisol and PRL responses were significantly higher in fluoxetine-treated than in tricyclic-treated or unmedicated major depressed patients. The latter two groups did not differ significantly in their cortisol or PRL responses to L-5-HTP. The L-5-HTP-induced increases in cortisol and PRL in fluoxetine-treated patients with major depression or OCD were not significantly different. The results suggest that fluoxetine, but not tricyclic antidepressants, potentiates 5-HT receptor-mediated stimulation of cortisol and PRL secretion in humans, consistent with available evidence that fluoxetine treatment, but not tricyclic antidepressants, increases central serotonergic activity in patients with MD or OCD by a presynaptic mechanism.

  14. Untargeted screening of unknown xenobiotics and potential toxins in plasma of poisoned patients using high-resolution mass spectrometry: Generation of xenobiotic fingerprint using background subtraction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chang; Wohlfarth, Ariane; Xu, Hui; Su, Dan; Wang, Xin; Jiang, Hongliang; Feng, Yulin; Zhu, Mingshe

    2016-11-09

    A novel analytical workflow was developed and applied for the detection and identification of unknown xenobiotics in biological samples. High-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS)-based data-independent MS(E) acquisition was employed to record full scan MS and fragment spectral datasets of test and control samples. Then, an untargeted data-mining technique, background subtraction, was utilized to find xenobiotics present only in test samples. Structural elucidation of the detected xenobiotics was accomplished by database search, spectral interpretation, and/or comparison with reference standards. Application of the workflow to analysis of unknown xenobiotics in plasma samples collected from four poisoned patients led to generation of xenobiotic profiles, which were regarded as xenobiotic fingerprints of the individual samples. Among 19 xenobiotics detected, 11 xenobiotics existed in a majority of the patients' plasma samples, thus were considered as potential toxins. The follow-up database search led to the tentative identification of azithromycin (X5), α-chaconine (X9) and penfluridol (X12). The identity of X12 was further confirmed with its reference standard. In addition, one xenobiotic component (Y5) was tentatively identified as a penfluridol metabolite. The remaining unidentified xenobiotics listed in the xenobiotic fingerprints can be further characterized or identified in retrospective analyses after their spectral data and/or reference compounds are available. This HRMS-based workflow may have broad applications in the detection and identification of unknown xenobiotics in individual biological samples, such as forensic and toxicological analysis and sport enhancement drug screening.

  15. Vesicular Galectin-3 levels decrease with donor age and contribute to the reduced osteo-inductive potential of human plasma derived extracellular vesicles.

    PubMed

    Weilner, Sylvia; Keider, Verena; Winter, Melanie; Harreither, Eva; Salzer, Benjamin; Weiss, Florian; Schraml, Elisabeth; Messner, Paul; Pietschmann, Peter; Hildner, Florian; Gabriel, Christian; Redl, Heinz; Grillari-Voglauer, Regina; Grillari, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Aging results in a decline of physiological functions and in reduced repair capacities, in part due to impaired regenerative power of stem cells, influenced by the systemic environment. In particular osteogenic differentiation capacity (ODC) of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has been shown to decrease with age, thereby contributing to reduced bone formation and an increased fracture risk. Searching for systemic factors that might contribute to this age related decline of regenerative capacity led us to investigate plasma-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs). EVs of the elderly were found to inhibit osteogenesis compared to those of young individuals. By analyzing the differences in the vesicular content Galectin-3 was shown to be reduced in elderly-derived vesicles. While overexpression of Galectin-3 resulted in an enhanced ODC of MSCs, siRNA against Galectin-3 reduced osteogenesis. Modulation of intravesicular Galectin-3 levels correlated with an altered osteo-inductive potential indicating that vesicular Galectin-3 contributes to the biological response of MSCs to EVs. By site-directed mutagenesis we identified a phosphorylation-site on Galectin-3 mediating this effect. Finally, we showed that cell penetrating peptides comprising this phosphorylation-site are sufficient to increase ODC in MSCs. Therefore, we suggest that decrease of Galectin-3 in the plasma of elderly contributes to the age-related loss of ODC.

  16. Ex Vivo Measurement of Enzyme Stability in Human Plasma: A Potential Screening Method for In Vivo Stability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    INTRODUCTION Catalytic enzymes offer the potential to protect against organophosphate poisoning by detoxifying these compounds in the blood stream, before...phosphotriesterase for the hydrolysis of  organophosphate  nerve agents,  Biochemistry published online, August 2012.  2 Bigley, A.N., C. Xu, T.J. Henderson

  17. Inhibition of neutrophil chemotaxis by pig seminal plasma in vitro: a potential method for modulating post-breeding inflammation in sows.

    PubMed

    Rozeboom, K J; Rocha-Chavez, G; Troedsson, M H

    2001-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the regulatory role of pig seminal plasma in post-breeding uterine inflammation. Polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) chemotaxis of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated blood plasma or heat-inactivated blood plasma plus LPS containing increasing concentrations of seminal plasma was assessed in chemotactic chambers. Seminal plasma was diluted serially with McCoy's medium to concentrations of 50.0, 25.0, 12.5, 6.2 or 3.1% (v/v) and added to normal or heat-inactivated pig blood plasma that was activated with LPS before or after incubation in a 37 degrees C waterbath for 30 min. Chemotaxis was determined using blood-derived PMNs and was expressed as a percentage of the positive control of LPS-activated blood plasma. A linear dose-dependent suppression of chemotaxis by seminal plasma was observed for blood plasma activated before or after addition of seminal plasma. Compared with the positive control, concentrations of seminal plasma < 6.2% failed to suppress PMN chemotaxis (P < 0.05). A dose-dependent suppressive effect of seminal plasma on heat stable chemotactic components of pig blood plasma was also observed (P < 0.05). A marked suppression was observed at concentrations of seminal plasma > 12.5% of the sample volume (P < 0.05). These results indicate that seminal plasma suppresses chemotactic blood plasma components regardless of formation sequence (pre- or post-activation) or source (normal or heat-inactivated blood plasma). These results indicate that seminal plasma may be necessary in diluted boar semen used for artificial insemination to regulate post-breeding inflammation in sows.

  18. Real-time monitoring of changes in plasma membrane potential via imaging of fluorescence resonance energy transfer at individual cell resolution in suspension.

    PubMed

    Sabati, Tzachi; Galmidi, Bat-Sheva; Korngreen, Alon; Zurgil, Naomi; Deutsch, Mordechai

    2013-12-01

    A method for monitoring heterogeneity in changes of plasma membrane potential (PMP) at an individual cell resolution while in suspension, utilizing a simple and low-cost wide-field illumination arrangement, is presented. The method is modeled via HEK-293 cell line in suspension, double stained with coumarin and oxonol (donor and acceptor), which were loaded into an array of nanoliter wells, each designed to preserve the individuality of the nontethered cell it holds during vigorous biomanipulation. Depolarization of PMP was induced by high K(+) solution, reducing the proximity between the membrane fluorophores and subsequently reducing the efficiency (E%) of resonance energy transfer between them. Spatial plots of E% were produced from both images of fluorescence intensity and polarization. The spatial resolution of E% plots seem to be higher, and their contrast greater, when calculated from the polarization, rather than from the intensity of the fluorescence.

  19. Generation, modulation and maintenance of the plasma membrane asymmetric phospholipid composition in yeast cells during growth: their relation to surface potential and membrane protein activity.

    PubMed

    Cerbón, J; Calderón, V

    1995-04-12

    During growth a cyclic exposure of anionic phospholipids to the external surface of the plasma membrane was found. The surface charge density (sigma) increased gradually reaching a maximum in the first 5 h of growth and returned gradually to their initial value at the end of the logarithmic phase of growth (10-12 h). Phosphatidylinositol, that determines to a large extent the magnitude of the sigma, increased 83% in the yeast cells during the first 4 h of growth and returned gradually to their initial level at 10-12 h. During the stationary phase (12-24 h), both sigma and the anionic/zwitterionic phospholipid ratio, remained without any significant variation. The high-affinity H-linked glutamate transport system that behaves as a sensor of the changes in the membrane surface potential (phi) increased its activity in the first 5 h and then decreased it, following with great accuracy the sigma variations and remained without changes during the stationary phase of growth. The phosphatidylserine (PS) relative concentration in the cells (9.0%) did not significantly change during the whole growth curve, but their asymmetric distribution varied, contributing to the changes in sigma. PS facing the outer membrane surface increased 2.45-times during the first 5 h of growth and then returned to their original value at the end of the log phase (12 h). Phosphatidylcholine (PC) remained constant during the whole growth curve (50%), while phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) decreased 3-fold in the first 4 h and then increased to its original value at 10 h. Interestingly, PE at the outer membrane surface remained constant (3% of the total phospholipids) during the whole growth curve. During growth yeast cells change their phospholipid composition originating altered patterns of the plasma membrane phospholipid composition and IN-OUT distribution. This dynamic asymmetry is involved in the regulation of the surface potential and membrane protein activity.

  20. Natural Pig Plasma Immunoglobulins Have Anti-Bacterial Effects: Potential for Use as Feed Supplement for Treatment of Intestinal Infections in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Hedegaard, Chris J.; Strube, Mikael L.; Hansen, Marie B.; Lindved, Bodil K.; Lihme, Allan; Boye, Mette; Heegaard, Peter M. H.

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing demand for non-antibiotics solutions to control infectious disease in intensive pig production. Here, one such alternative, namely pig antibodies purified from slaughterhouse blood was investigated in order to elucidate its potential usability to control post-weaning diarrhoea (PWD), which is one of the top indications for antibiotics usage in the pig production. A very cost-efficient and rapid one-step expanded bed adsorption (EBA) chromatography procedure was used to purify pig immunoglobulin G from slaughterhouse pig plasma (more than 100 litres), resulting in >85% pure pig IgG (ppIgG). The ppIgG thus comprised natural pig immunoglobulins and was subsequently shown to contain activity towards four pig-relevant bacterial strains (three different types of Escherichia coli and one type of Salmonella enterica) but not towards a fish pathogen (Yersinia ruckeri), and was demonstrated to inhibit the binding of the four pig relevant bacteria to a pig intestinal cell line (IPEC-J2). Finally it was demonstrated in an in vivo weaning piglet model for intestinal colonization with an E. coli F4+ challenge strain that ppIgG given in the feed significantly reduced shedding of the challenge strain, reduced the proportion of the bacterial family Enterobacteriaceae, increased the proportion of families Enterococcoceae and Streptococcaceae and generally increased ileal microbiota diversity. Conclusively, our data support the idea that natural IgG directly purified from pig plasma and given as a feed supplement can be used in modern swine production as an efficient and cost-effective means for reducing both occurrence of PWD and antibiotics usage and with a potential for the prevention and treatment of other intestinal infectious diseases even if the causative agent might not be known. PMID:26824607

  1. Natural Pig Plasma Immunoglobulins Have Anti-Bacterial Effects: Potential for Use as Feed Supplement for Treatment of Intestinal Infections in Pigs.

    PubMed

    Hedegaard, Chris J; Strube, Mikael L; Hansen, Marie B; Lindved, Bodil K; Lihme, Allan; Boye, Mette; Heegaard, Peter M H

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing demand for non-antibiotics solutions to control infectious disease in intensive pig production. Here, one such alternative, namely pig antibodies purified from slaughterhouse blood was investigated in order to elucidate its potential usability to control post-weaning diarrhoea (PWD), which is one of the top indications for antibiotics usage in the pig production. A very cost-efficient and rapid one-step expanded bed adsorption (EBA) chromatography procedure was used to purify pig immunoglobulin G from slaughterhouse pig plasma (more than 100 litres), resulting in >85% pure pig IgG (ppIgG). The ppIgG thus comprised natural pig immunoglobulins and was subsequently shown to contain activity towards four pig-relevant bacterial strains (three different types of Escherichia coli and one type of Salmonella enterica) but not towards a fish pathogen (Yersinia ruckeri), and was demonstrated to inhibit the binding of the four pig relevant bacteria to a pig intestinal cell line (IPEC-J2). Finally it was demonstrated in an in vivo weaning piglet model for intestinal colonization with an E. coli F4+ challenge strain that ppIgG given in the feed significantly reduced shedding of the challenge strain, reduced the proportion of the bacterial family Enterobacteriaceae, increased the proportion of families Enterococcoceae and Streptococcaceae and generally increased ileal microbiota diversity. Conclusively, our data support the idea that natural IgG directly purified from pig plasma and given as a feed supplement can be used in modern swine production as an efficient and cost-effective means for reducing both occurrence of PWD and antibiotics usage and with a potential for the prevention and treatment of other intestinal infectious diseases even if the causative agent might not be known.

  2. Age-related alterations of plasma glutathione and oxidation of redox potentials in chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) and rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Paredes, Jamespaul; Jones, Dean P; Wilson, Mark E; Herndon, James G

    2014-04-01

    Chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) and rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) and humans (Homo sapiens) share physiological and genetic characteristics, but have remarkably different life spans, with chimpanzees living 50-60 % and the rhesus living 35-40 % of maximum human survival. Since oxidative processes are associated with aging and longevity, we might expect to see species differences in age-related oxidative processes. Blood and extracellular fluid contain two major thiol redox nodes, glutathione (GSH)/glutathione-disulfide (GSSG) and cysteine (Cys)/cystine (CySS), which are subject to reversible oxidation-reduction reactions and are maintained in a dynamic non-equilibrium state. Disruption of these thiol redox nodes leads to oxidation of their redox potentials (EhGSSG and EhCySS) which affects cellular physiology and is associated with aging and the development of chronic diseases in humans. The purpose of this study was to measure age-related changes in these redox thiols and their corresponding redox potentials (Eh) in chimpanzees and rhesus monkeys. Our results show similar age-related decreases in the concentration of plasma GSH and Total GSH as well as oxidation of the EhGSSG in male and female chimpanzees. Female chimpanzees and female rhesus monkeys also were similar in several outcome measures. For example, similar age-related decreases in the concentration of plasma GSH and Total GSH, as well as age-related oxidation of the EhGSSG were observed. The data collected from chimpanzees and rhesus monkeys corroborates previous reports on oxidative changes in humans and confirms their value as a comparative reference for primate aging.

  3. Targeted deep sequencing of plasma circulating cell-free DNA reveals Vimentin and Fibulin 1 as potential epigenetic biomarkers for hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sklias, Athena; Muller, David C.; Degli Esposti, Davide; Guilloreau, Paule; Mckay, James; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Srivatanakul, Petcharin; Hainaut, Pierre; Merle, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the second most common cause of cancer death worldwide, but is still lacking sensitive and specific biomarkers for early diagnosis and prognosis. In this study, we applied targeted massively parallel semiconductor sequencing to assess methylation on a panel of genes (FBLN1, HINT2, LAMC1, LTBP1, LTBP2, PSMA2, PSMA7, PXDN, TGFB1, UBE2L3, VIM and YWHAZ) in plasma circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) and to evaluate the potential of these genes as HCC biomarkers in two different series, one from France (42 HCC cases and 42 controls) and one from Thailand (42 HCC cases, 26 chronic liver disease cases and 42 controls). We also analyzed a set of HCC and adjacent tissues and liver cell lines to further compare with ‘The Cancer Genome Atlas’ (TCGA) data. The methylation in cfDNA was detected for FBLN1, PSMA7, PXDN and VIM, with differences in methylation patterns between cases and controls for FBLN1 and VIM. The average methylation level across analyzed CpG-sites was associated with higher odds of HCC for VIM (1.48 [1.02, 2.16] for French cases and 2.18 [1.28, 3.72] for Thai cases), and lower odds of HCC for FBLN1 (0.89 [0.76, 1.03] for French cases and 0.75 [0.63, 0.88] for Thai cases). In conclusion, our study provides evidence that changes in VIM and FBLN1 methylation levels in cfDNA are associated with HCC and could represent useful plasma-based biomarkers. Also, the potential to investigate methylation patterns in cfDNA could bring new strategies for HCC detection and monitoring high-risk groups and response to treatment. PMID:28333958

  4. Detailed Kinetic Modeling of Processes Relevant To Fusion Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehl, Marco; Armstrong, Michael; Zaug, Joseph; Crowhurst, Jonathan; Radousky, Harry; Stavrou, Elissaios

    2016-10-01

    Carbon based materials have been proposed as candidates for the fabrication of plasma-facing components in the design of fusion energy devices. Although these components are not supposed to be in direct contact with the core fusion plasma, plasma instabilities and the harsh environment they are exposed to can cause the degradation of plasma-exposed components and the transfer of contaminants into the plasma followed by deposition of byproducts. In order to investigate the chemistry involved in these processes and to assist the development of models suitable to understand the long term consequences of the carbon ablation/deposition cycle, an inductively coupled plasma flow reactor (ICPFR) has been developed. The ICPFR allows the atomization of carbon containing precursors to high temperatures (in the order of 10000K) and the characterization of the gas and solid species formed downsteam from the plasma source through spectroscopic techniques. In parallel to the experimental analysis a comprehensive set of fluid dynamic and detailed kinetic simulations are used to analyze the data. The combination of these two approaches resulted in a validated and comprehensive chemical model for the formation of carbon deposits in carbon contaminated cooling plasmas. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  5. NOSS Altimeter Detailed Algorithm specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hancock, D. W.; Mcmillan, J. D.

    1982-01-01

    The details of the algorithms and data sets required for satellite radar altimeter data processing are documented in a form suitable for (1) development of the benchmark software and (2) coding the operational software. The algorithms reported in detail are those established for altimeter processing. The algorithms which required some additional development before documenting for production were only scoped. The algorithms are divided into two levels of processing. The first level converts the data to engineering units and applies corrections for instrument variations. The second level provides geophysical measurements derived from altimeter parameters for oceanographic users.

  6. Review of Ship Structural Details

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-01-01

    8 4.3 Knee and Beam Brackets 4-11 4.3.1 Brackets for Girders and Deep Webs 4-11 4.3.2 Brackets Connecting Rolled Sections 4-15 4.4 Tripping...are shell stringers penetrating deep web frames and longitudinal girders penetrating deep transverses. This is not a common detail. If double...34. 3-76 ^"SECTION ’’.’(-K PLAJ iNG * S v *^ 4Fb^:TH»r.KNF.^ SAME AS FLAMGE ► BULKHFADQR DEEP WEB SS- 9 Detail Type: STANCHION END

  7. Free-free gaunt factors for gold plasmas at laser-fusion conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Green, J.

    1981-02-01

    Detailed calculations were made of the free-free absorption process for electrons traveling in the region of the temperature-dependent Thomas-Fermi potential of various gold plasmas. The Born approximations folded into this potential give a poor representation of the cross section.

  8. Sound wave propagation through glow discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepaniuk, Vadim P.

    This work investigates the use of glow discharge plasma for acoustic wave manipulation. The broader goal is the suppression of aerodynamic noise using atmospheric glow discharge plasma as a sound barrier. Part of the effort was devoted to the development of a system for the generation of a large volume stable DC glow discharge in air both at atmospheric and at reduced pressures. The single tone sound wave propagation through the plasma was systematically studied. Attenuation of the acoustic wave passing through the glow discharge was measured for a range of experimental conditions including different discharge currents, electrode configurations, air pressures and sound frequencies including audible sound and ultrasound. Sound attenuation by glow discharge plasma as high as -28 dB was recorded in the experiments. Two types of possible mechanisms were considered that can potentially cause the observed sound attenuation. One is a global mechanism and the other is a local mechanism. The global mechanism considered is based on the reflection and refraction of acoustic wave due to the gas temperature gradients that form around the plasma. The local mechanism, on the other hand, is essentially the interaction of the acoustic wave with the plasma as it propagates inside the discharge and it can be viewed as a feedback system. Detailed temperature measurements, using laser-induced Rayleigh scattering technique, were carried out in the glow discharge plasma in order to evaluate the role of global mechanism in the observed attenuation. These measurements were made for a range of conditions in the atmospheric glow discharge. Theoretical analysis of the sound attenuation was carried out to identify the physical mechanism for the observed sound attenuation by plasma. It was demonstrated that the global mechanism is the dominant mechanism of sound attenuation. As a result of this study, the potentials and limitations of the plasma noise suppression technology were determined and

  9. The enhancing effects of alcoholic extract of Nigella sativa seed on fertility potential, plasma gonadotropins and testosterone in male rats

    PubMed Central

    Parandin, Rahmatollah; Yousofvand, Namdar; Ghorbani, Rostam

    2012-01-01

    Background: The task force on plants for fertility regulation in men continued with its program to identify novel prototypes in plants alleged to have fertility regulating properties. Nigella Sativa seeds are frequently used in folk medicine in the Middle East and some Asian countries for the promotion of good health and treatment of many ailments. Objective: To evaluated the role of alcoholic extract of Nigella sativa on fertility potential, Pituitary-testicular axis hormones and Testosterone in male rats. Materials and Methods: 24 male rats were randomly divided into 3 groups; control, group A and group B, each group comprising of 8 rats. Animals in control group received 1 ml of normal saline and treatment groups (A and B) received (gavage) graded doses of 200 and 400 mg/kg body weight of alcoholic extract of Nigella sativa seeds on a daily basis for 60 days. At the end of treatment period, fertility parameters such as body and reproductive organs weight, sperm motility, viability and count, epididymal sperm reserve (ESR), daily sperm production (DSP), blood testosterone concentration, Gonadotropins levels and fertility index were measured. Results: There was a significant difference in testes and epididymidis weight, sperm count, ESR, DSP, blood testosterone concentration, LH and fertility index in both the lower dose group and the higher group as compared to the control group. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that alcoholic extract of Nigella sativa seed especially in higher doses could increase fertility potential, LH and testosterone concentration in male rats. PMID:25246898

  10. A preliminary study on the potential of manuka honey and platelet-rich plasma in wound healing.

    PubMed

    Sell, Scott A; Wolfe, Patricia S; Spence, Andrew J; Rodriguez, Isaac A; McCool, Jennifer M; Petrella, Rebecca L; Garg, Koyal; Ericksen, Jeffery J; Bowlin, Gary L

    2012-01-01

    Aim. The purpose of this study was to determine the in vitro response of cells critical to the wound healing process in culture media supplemented with a lyophilized preparation rich in growth factors (PRGF) and Manuka honey. Materials and Methods. This study utilized cell culture media supplemented with PRGF, as well as whole Manuka honey and the medical-grade Medihoney (MH), a Manuka honey product. The response of human fibroblasts (hDF), macrophages, and endothelial cells (hPMEC) was evaluated, with respect to cell proliferation, chemotaxis, collagen matrix production, and angiogenic potential, when subjected to culture with media containing PRGF, MH, Manuka honey, and a combination of PRGF and MH. Results. All three cell types demonstrated increases in cellular activity in the presence of PRGF, with further increases in activity seen in the presence of PRGF+MH. hDFs proved to be the most positively responsive cells, as they experienced enhanced proliferation, collagen matrix production, and migration into an in vitro wound healing model with the PRGF+MH-supplemented media. Conclusion. This preliminary in vitro study is the first to evaluate the combination of PRGF and Manuka honey, two products with the potential to increase regeneration individually, as a combined product to enhance dermal regeneration.

  11. Complexes of a Zn-metalloenzyme binding site with hydroxamate-containing ligands. A case for detailed benchmarkings of polarizable molecular mechanics/dynamics potentials when the experimental binding structure is unknown.

    PubMed

    Gresh, Nohad; Perahia, David; de Courcy, Benoit; Foret, Johanna; Roux, Céline; El-Khoury, Lea; Piquemal, Jean-Philip; Salmon, Laurent

    2016-12-15

    Zn-metalloproteins are a major class of targets for drug design. They constitute a demanding testing ground for polarizable molecular mechanics/dynamics aimed at extending the realm of quantum chemistry (QC) to very long-duration molecular dynamics (MD). The reliability of such procedures needs to be demonstrated upon comparing the relative stabilities of competing candidate complexes of inhibitors with the recognition site stabilized in the course of MD. This could be necessary when no information is available regarding the experimental structure of the inhibitor-protein complex. Thus, this study bears on the phosphomannose isomerase (PMI) enzyme, considered as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of several bacterial and parasitic diseases. We consider its complexes with 5-phospho-d-arabinonohydroxamate and three analog ligands differing by the number and location of their hydroxyl groups. We evaluate the energy accuracy expectable from a polarizable molecular mechanics procedure, SIBFA. This is done by comparisons with ab initio quantum-chemistry (QC) calculations in the following cases: (a) the complexes of the four ligands in three distinct structures extracted from the entire PMI-ligand energy-minimized structures, and totaling up to 264 atoms; (b) the solvation energies of several energy-minimized complexes of each ligand with a shell of 64 water molecules; (c) the conformational energy differences of each ligand in different conformations characterized in the course of energy-minimizations; and (d) the continuum solvation energies of the ligands in different conformations. The agreements with the QC results appear convincing. On these bases, we discuss the prospects of applying the procedure to ligand-macromolecule recognition problems. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. General Space Propulsion & MXER Plasma Requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonometti, Joseph; Sorensen, Kirk

    2004-11-01

    The development of advanced in-space propulsion concepts and systems requires extensive plasma physics knowledge at many levels. The In-Space Propulsion Technology Projects Office (ISP) at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is actively managing a portfolio of technologies that include a wide range of plasma physics interaction studies. These investigations apply directly to hardware development for space propulsion in the areas of: ion engines, hall thrusters, aerocapture, solar sails, advanced chemical and emerging technologies. The plasma interactions occur over a broad spectrum of pressures, temperatures and species. This work, along with the programmatic roadmap and future needs for plasma research will be described. A more detailed examination of one advanced technology, the Momentum exchange Electrodynamic Reboost (MXER) tether system will be given with emphasis on the plasma contactor technology. The MXER system is a relatively unfamiliar space propulsion concept that works deep in the Earth's gravity well. It provides high thrust propulsion to a spacecraft in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and then reboosts its own orbit using electrodynamic principles, using little or no propellant. In the reboost propulsion mode, contact must be made with the plasma in the Earth's ionosphere. Electrons are collected at an anode, driven up a long conducing tether (against the natural potential field) and expelled from a cathode, also in contact with the ionosphere plasma. The anode and cathode are desired to use no consumables, draw little power and survive nominally 10 years in the space. The details of the system requirements and the existing computational and experimental program tasks that relate to this plasma interaction will be presented.

  13. DAGAL: Detailed Anatomy of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapen, Johan H.

    2017-03-01

    The current IAU Symposium is closely connected to the EU-funded network DAGAL (Detailed Anatomy of Galaxies), with the final annual network meeting of DAGAL being at the core of this international symposium. In this short paper, we give an overview of DAGAL, its training activities, and some of the scientific advances that have been made under its umbrella.

  14. BOOK REVIEW: Physics of Strongly Coupled Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraeft, Wolf-Dietrich

    2007-07-01

    properties are the topics of chapters 6 to 8, followed by problems of metallization (chapter 9), non-neutral and dusty plasmas (chapter 10, chapter 11). References follow after each chapter. The book is of interest for obtaining an overview of the field, and is recommended reading. However, for more detailed information on special (theoretical) topics, one should go into the literature. Little is said with respect to kinetic theory, to the theory of ionization kinetics, to stopping power, effective potentials, and to spectral lines in dense plasmas. The interaction between laser or particle beams and plasmas and the evaluation of the results discussing Hugoniots is only touched on briefly. Astrophysics is not dealt with at all. Some misprints concerning names and years in the references may cause difficulties.

  15. Correlated parameters in the quasi-classical treatment of atomic ground states using effective momentum dependent potentials for molecular dynamics simulation of strongly coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verboncoeur, John; Dharuman, Gautham; Christlieb, Andrew; Murillo, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Ground state energies and configurations of N, F, Ne, Al, S, Ar and Ca are obtained using a quasi-classical treatment with Kirschbaum-Wilets potentials. The effect of phase space parameters on the ground state energy is studied in detail and compared with Hartree-Fock values. The phase space parameters that resulted in ground state energies comparable to Hartree-Fock values are found to be correlated and follow a pattern with atomic number which led to identifying a predictive capability in the model. The change in ground state configurations for different phase space parameters is studied and correlated with the corresponding change in ground state energies. Work supported by Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR).

  16. The Plasma Environment at Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rymer, Abigail; Morooka, Michiko; Persoon, Ann

    2016-10-01

    The plasma environment near Enceladus is complex. The well documented Enceladus plumes create a dusty, asymmetric exosphere in which electrons can attach to small ice particles - forming anions, and negatively charged nanograins and dust - to the extent that cations can be the lightest charged particles present and, as a result, the dominant current carriers. Several instruments on the Cassini spacecraft are able to measure this environment in both expected and unexpected ways. Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) is designed and calibrated to measure the thermal plasma ions and electrons and also measures the energy/charge of charged nanograins when present. Cassini Radio Plasma Wave Sensor (RPWS) measures electron density as derived from the 'upper hybrid frequency' which is a function of the total free electron density and magnetic field strength and provides a vital ground truth measurement for Cassini calibration when the density is sufficiently high for it to be well measured. Cassini Langmuir Probe (LP) measures the electron density and temperature via direct current measurement, and both CAPS and LP can provide estimates for the spacecraft potential which we compare. Cassini Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument (MIMI) directly measures energetic particles that are manifest in the CAPS measurements as penetrating background in this region and, while not particularly efficient ionisers, create sputtering and surface weathering of Enceladus surface, MIMI also measures energetic neutral atoms produced during the charge exchange interactions in and near the plumes.In this presentation we exploit two almost identical Cassini-Enceladus flybys 'E17' and 'E18' which took place in March/April 2012. We present a detailed comparison of data from these Cassini sensors in order to assess the plasma environment observed by the different instruments, discuss what is consistent and otherwise, and the implications for the plasma environment at Enceladus in the context of work to

  17. Detailed mechanism of benzene oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bittker, David A.

    1987-01-01

    A detailed quantitative mechanism for the oxidation of benzene in both argon and nitrogen diluted systems is presented. Computed ignition delay time for argon diluted mixtures are in satisfactory agreement with experimental results for a wide range of initial conditions. An experimental temperature versus time profile for a nitrogen diluted oxidation was accurately matched and several concentration profiles were matched qualitatively. Application of sensitivity analysis has given approximate rate constant expressions for the two dominant heat release reactions, the oxidation of C6H5 and C5H5 radicals by molecular oxygen.

  18. Route visualization using detail lenses.

    PubMed

    Karnick, Pushpak; Cline, David; Jeschke, Stefan; Razdan, Anshuman; Wonka, Peter

    2010-01-01

    We present a method designed to address some limitations of typical route map displays of driving directions. The main goal of our system is to generate a printable version of a route map that shows the overview and detail views of the route within a single, consistent visual frame. Our proposed visualization provides a more intuitive spatial context than a simple list of turns. We present a novel multifocus technique to achieve this goal, where the foci are defined by points of interest (POI) along the route. A detail lens that encapsulates the POI at a finer geospatial scale is created for each focus. The lenses are laid out on the map to avoid occlusion with the route and each other, and to optimally utilize the free space around the route. We define a set of layout metrics to evaluate the quality of a lens layout for a given route map visualization. We compare standard lens layout methods to our proposed method and demonstrate the effectiveness of our method in generating aesthetically pleasing layouts. Finally, we perform a user study to evaluate the effectiveness of our layout choices.

  19. Effect of chemical composition on hydrophobicity and zeta potential of plasma sprayed HA/CaO-P2O5 glass coatings.

    PubMed

    Ferraz, M P; Monteiro, F J; Serro, A P; Saramago, B; Gibson, I R; Santos, J D

    2001-12-01

    Multilayered plasma sprayed coatings on the surface of Ti-6Al-4V alloys have been prepared, which were composed of an underlayer of HA and a surface layer of a CaO-P2O5 glass-HA composite, with 2 or 4wt% of glass. Contact angle and surface tension variation with time, for both water and a protein solution, were determined by the sessile and pendent drop methods respectively using the ADSA-P software. Wettability studies showed that hydrophobicity of the coatings increase with the glass addition. The work of adhesion of albumin was also altered in a controlled manner by the addition of the CaO-P2O5 glass, being lower on the composite coatings than on HA. Zeta potential (ZP) results showed that composite coatings presented a higher net negative charge than HA coatings and that ZP values were also influenced by the content of the glass. This study demonstrated that the surface properties of those coatings may be modified by the addition of CaO-P2O5 glass.

  20. N2 non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma promotes wound healing in vitro and in vivo: Potential modulation of adhesion molecules and matrix metalloproteinase-9.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sung Un; Choi, Jae Won; Chang, Jae Won; Kim, Kang Il; Kim, Yeon Soo; Park, Ju Kyeong; Kim, Yang Eun; Lee, Yun Sang; Yang, Sang Sik; Kim, Chul-Ho

    2017-02-01

    Advances in physics and biology have made it possible to apply non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma (NTP) in the biomedical field. Although accumulating evidence suggests that NTP has various medicinal effects, such as facilitating skin wound healing on exposed tissue while minimizing undesirable tissue damage, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. In this study, NTP generated from N2 optimized wound healing in the scratch wound healing assay. In addition, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 expression and enzyme activity increased and the urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) system was activated after NTP treatment. We also showed that NTP treatment increased Slug and TCF8/ZEB1 expression and decreased that of E-cadherin, suggesting induction of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). The effect of N2 NTP was verified on rat wound model. Taken together, these results suggest that N2 NTP promotes wound healing by inducing the EMT and activating the MMP-9/uPA system. These findings show the therapeutic potential of NTP for skin wound healing.

  1. Angular scattering of 1-50 keV ions through graphene and thin carbon foils: potential applications for space plasma instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Robert W; Allegrini, Frédéric; Fuselier, Stephen A; Nicolaou, Georgios; Bedworth, Peter; Sinton, Steve; Trattner, Karlheinz J

    2014-03-01

    We present experimental results for the angular scattering of ~1-50 keV H, He, C, O, N, Ne, and Ar ions transiting through graphene foils and compare them with scattering through nominal ~0.5 μg cm(-2) carbon foils. Thin carbon foils play a critical role in time-of-flight ion mass spectrometers and energetic neutral atom sensors in space. These instruments take advantage of the charge exchange and secondary electron emission produced as ions or neutral atoms transit these foils. This interaction also produces angular scattering and energy straggling for the incident ion or neutral atom that acts to decrease the performance of a given instrument. Our results show that the angular scattering of ions through graphene is less pronounced than through the state-of-the-art 0.5 μg cm(-2) carbon foils used in space-based particle detectors. At energies less than 50 keV, the scattering angle half width at half maximum, ψ(1/2), for ~3-5 atoms thick graphene is up to a factor of 3.5 smaller than for 0.5 μg cm(-2) (~20 atoms thick) carbon foils. Thus, graphene foils have the potential to improve the performance of space-based plasma instruments for energies below ~50 keV.

  2. Angular scattering of 1–50 keV ions through graphene and thin carbon foils: Potential applications for space plasma instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Ebert, Robert W.; Allegrini, Frédéric; Fuselier, Stephen A.; Nicolaou, Georgios; Bedworth, Peter; Sinton, Steve; Trattner, Karlheinz J.

    2014-03-15

    We present experimental results for the angular scattering of ∼1–50 keV H, He, C, O, N, Ne, and Ar ions transiting through graphene foils and compare them with scattering through nominal ∼0.5 μg cm{sup −2} carbon foils. Thin carbon foils play a critical role in time-of-flight ion mass spectrometers and energetic neutral atom sensors in space. These instruments take advantage of the charge exchange and secondary electron emission produced as ions or neutral atoms transit these foils. This interaction also produces angular scattering and energy straggling for the incident ion or neutral atom that acts to decrease the performance of a given instrument. Our results show that the angular scattering of ions through graphene is less pronounced than through the state-of-the-art 0.5 μg cm{sup −2} carbon foils used in space-based particle detectors. At energies less than 50 keV, the scattering angle half width at half maximum, ψ{sub 1/2}, for ∼3–5 atoms thick graphene is up to a factor of 3.5 smaller than for 0.5 μg cm{sup −2} (∼20 atoms thick) carbon foils. Thus, graphene foils have the potential to improve the performance of space-based plasma instruments for energies below ∼50 keV.

  3. Preparation of a new composite combining strengthened β-tricalcium phosphate with platelet-rich plasma as a potential scaffold for the repair of bone defects

    PubMed Central

    WANG, CHENGGONG; ZHONG, DA; ZHOU, XING; YIN, KE; LIAO, QIANDE; KONG, LINGYU; LIU, ANSONG

    2014-01-01

    β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) are commonly used in bone tissue engineering. In the present study, a new composite combining strengthened β-TCP and PRP was prepared and its morphological and mechanical properties were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and material testing. The biocompatibility was evaluated by measuring the adhesion rate and cytotoxicity of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). The strengthened β-TCP/PRP composite had an appearance like the fungus Boletus kermesinus with the PRP gel distributed on the surface of the micropores. The maximum load and load intensity were 945.6±86.4 N and 13.1±0.5 MPa, which were significantly higher than those of β-TCP (110.1±14.3 N and 1.6±0.2 MPa; P<0.05). The BMSC adhesion rate on the strengthened β-TCP/PRP composite was >96% after 24 h, with a cell cytotoxicity value of zero. SEM micrographs revealed that following seeding of BMSCs onto the composite in high-glucose Dulbecco’s modified Eagle’s medium culture for two weeks, the cells grew well and exhibited fusiform, spherical and polygonal morphologies, as well as pseudopodial connections. The strengthened β-TCP/PRP composite has the potential to be used as a scaffold in bone tissue engineering due to its effective biocompatibility and mechanical properties. PMID:25187800

  4. Morphological details in bloodstain particles.

    PubMed

    De Wael, K; Lepot, L

    2015-01-01

    During the commission of crimes blood can be transferred to the clothing of the offender or on other crime related objects. Bloodstain particles are sub-millimetre sized flakes that are lost from dried bloodstains. The nature of these red particles is easily confirmed using spectroscopic methods. In casework, bloodstain particles showing highly detailed morphological features were observed. These provided a rationale for a series of experiments described in this work. It was found that the "largest" particles are shed from blood deposited on polyester and polyamide woven fabrics. No particles are lost from the stains made on absorbent fabrics and from those made on knitted fabrics. The morphological features observed in bloodstain particles can provide important information on the substrates from which they were lost.

  5. A Generalized Detailed Balance Relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruelle, David

    2016-08-01

    Given a system M in a thermal bath we obtain a generalized detailed balance relation for the ratio r=π _τ (K→ J)/π _τ (J→ K) of the transition probabilities M:J→ K and M:K→ J in time τ . We assume an active bath, containing solute molecules in metastable states. These molecules may react with M and the transition J→ K occurs through different channels α involving different reactions with the bath. We find that r=sum p^α r^α , where p^α is the probability that channel α occurs, and r^α depends on the amount of heat (more precisely enthalpy) released to the bath in channel α.

  6. A reconfigurable plasma antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Rajneesh; Bora, Dhiraj

    2010-03-15

    An experiment aimed at investigating the antenna properties of different plasma structures of a plasma column as a reconfigurable plasma antenna, is reported. A 30 cm long plasma column is excited by surface wave, which acts as a plasma antenna. By changing the operating parameters, e.g., working pressure, drive frequency, input power, radius of glass tube, length of plasma column, and argon gas, single plasma antenna (plasma column) can be transformed to multiple small antenna elements (plasma blobs). It is also reported that number, length, and separation between two antenna elements can be controlled by operating parameters. Moreover, experiments are also carried out to study current profile, potential profile, conductivity profile, phase relations, radiation power patterns, etc. of the antenna elements. The effect on directivity with the number of antenna elements is also studied. Findings of the study indicate that entire structure of antenna elements can be treated as a phased array broadside vertical plasma antenna, which produces more directive radiation pattern than the single plasma antenna as well as physical properties and directivity of such antenna can be controlled by operating parameters. The study reveals the advantages of a plasma antenna over the conventional antenna in the sense that different antennas can be formed by tuning the operating parameters.

  7. A study of the potential confounding effects of diet, caffeine, nicotine and lorazepam on the stability of plasma and urinary homovanillic acid levels in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, C L; McEvoy, J P; Wilson, W H; Narasimhachari, N

    1996-12-15

    Ten men inpatients who met DSM-III-R criteria for schizophrenia participated. On five occasions at least one week apart, each subject had an intravenous line placed at 0730 after an overnight fast. On each occasion blood samples were drawn at 0800 and hourly thereafter through 1200 noon for measurement of plasma homovanillic acid (HVA). Total four-hour urine collections were obtained for measurement of urinary HVA. Subjects received five experimental conditions, in randomized sequence: no intervention, smoking one cigarette per hour, drinking one caffeinated cola per hour, lorazepam 2 mg IV push, or a high monoamine meal. Baseline (0800) plasma HVA measures showed only minor intrinsic variability. The average standard deviation in baseline plasma HVA over five occasions of measurement was low relative to the changes in HVA produced during treatment with antipsychotic medications. The high monoamine meal significantly elevated plasma HVA, with a similar trend for urinary HVA. Neither caffeine, nicotine, nor lorazepam significantly affected plasma or urinary HVA.

  8. Lassa Fever Immune Plasma.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    to perform the indirect fluorescent antibody test. He is also able to conduct surveys, and to supervise plasmapheresis . Recently a Clinical...Miscellaneous 44 Total 3,902 2. Plasmapheresis The primary objective of the program was the collection of units of plasma from convalescents from...Lassa fever. Details regarding the criteria means and results of plasmapheresis are given in Chapter 2. One hundred twenty two plasma units were collected

  9. Plasma surface cleaning using microwave plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, C.C.; Haselton, H.H.; Nelson, W.D.; Schechter, D.E.; Thompson, L.M.; Campbell, V.B.; Glover, A.L.; Googin, J.M.

    1993-11-01

    In a microwave electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma source, reactive plasmas of oxygen and its mixture with argon are used for plasma-cleaning experiments. Aluminum test samples (0.95 {times} 1.9 cm) were coated with thin films ({le} 20 {mu}m in thickness) of Shell Vitrea oil and cleaned by using such reactive plasmas. The plasma cleaning was done in various discharge conditions with fixed microwave power, rf power, biased potential, gas pressures (0.5 and 5 mtorr), and operating time up to 35 min. The status of plasma cleaning has been monitored by using mass spectroscopy. Mass loss of the samples after plasma cleaning was measured to estimate cleaning rates. Measured clean rates of low pressure (0.5 mtorr) argon/oxygen plasmas were as high as 2.7 {mu}/min. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to determine cleanliness of the sample surfaces and confirm the effectiveness of plasma cleaning in achieving atomic levels of surface cleanliness. In this paper, significant results are reported and discussed.

  10. Probe of hydrogen atom in plasmas with magnetic, electric, and Aharonov-Bohm flux fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahar, M. K.; Soylu, A.

    2016-09-01

    In this study, for the first time, the combined effects of external magnetic, electric, and Aharonov-Bohm (AB) flux fields on quantum levels of the hydrogen atom embedded in Debye and quantum plasmas modeled by the more general exponential cosine screened Coulomb (MGECSC) potential are investigated within cylindrical coordinate formalism using the asymptotic iteration method. The MGECSC potential includes four different potential forms when considering different sets of the parameters in the potential. The corresponding Schrödinger equation is solved numerically in order to examine both strong and weak regimes and confinement effects of external fields. The influence of screening parameters of the MGECSC potential on quantum levels of the hydrogen atom is also studied in detail in the presence of external magnetic, electric, and AB flux fields. As it is possible to model both Debye and quantum plasmas by using screening parameters in the MGECSC potential, the effects of each plasma environment on quantum levels of the hydrogen atom are also considered in the external fields. It is observed that there are important results of external fields on the total interaction potential profile, and the most dominant one in these fields is the magnetic field. Furthermore, the effects of confinement on the physical state of the plasma environment is a subject of this study. These details would be important in experimental and theoretical investigations in plasma and atomic physics fields.

  11. Controlled particle transport in a plasma chamber with striped electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Ke; Li Yangfang; Shimizu, T.; Konopka, U.; Thomas, H. M.; Morfill, G. E.

    2009-12-15

    The controlled transport of micrometer size dust particles in a parallel-plate radio frequency discharge has been investigated. The lower stainless steel electrode consisted of 100 independently controllable electrical metal stripes. The voltage signals on these stripes were modulated, causing traveling plasma sheath distortions. Because the particles trapped in local potential wells moved according to the direction of the distortion, the transport velocity could be actively controlled by adjusting frequencies and phase shifts of the applied periodic voltage signals. To investigate the detailed principle of this transport, molecular dynamic simulations was performed to reproduce the observations with the plasma background conditions calculated by separated particle-in-cell simulations for the experimental parameters. The findings will help develop novel technologies for investigating large-scale complex plasma systems and techniques for achieving clean environments in plasma processing reactors.

  12. The Finer Details: Climate Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    If you want to know whether you will need sunscreen or an umbrella for tomorrow's picnic, you can simply read the local weather report. However, if you are calculating the impact of gas combustion on global temperatures, or anticipating next year's rainfall levels to set water conservation policy, you must conduct a more comprehensive investigation. Such complex matters require long-range modeling techniques that predict broad trends in climate development rather than day-to-day details. Climate models are built from equations that calculate the progression of weather-related conditions over time. Based on the laws of physics, climate model equations have been developed to predict a number of environmental factors, for example: 1. Amount of solar radiation that hits the Earth. 2. Varying proportions of gases that make up the air. 3. Temperature at the Earth's surface. 4. Circulation of ocean and wind currents. 5. Development of cloud cover. Numerical modeling of the climate can improve our understanding of both the past and, the future. A model can confirm the accuracy of environmental measurements taken. in, the past and can even fill in gaps in those records. In addition, by quantifying the relationship between different aspects of climate, scientists can estimate how a future change in one aspect may alter the rest of the world. For example, could an increase in the temperature of the Pacific Ocean somehow set off a drought on the other side of the world? A computer simulation could lead to an answer for this and other questions. Quantifying the chaotic, nonlinear activities that shape our climate is no easy matter. You cannot run these simulations on your desktop computer and expect results by the time you have finished checking your morning e-mail. Efficient and accurate climate modeling requires powerful computers that can process billions of mathematical calculations in a single second. The NCCS exists to provide this degree of vast computing capability.

  13. Diagnostics of Nanodusty Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greiner, Franko; Groth, Sebastian; Tadsen, Bejamin; Piel, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    The diagnostic of nanodusty plasmas, i.e. plasmas including nano-sized dust particles, is a challenging task. For both, the diagnostic of the nanodusty plasma itself, and the in-situ diagnostic of the nanoparticles, no standard diagnostic exist. Nanodust particle size and density can be estimated using light scattering techniques, namely kinetic Mie ellipsometry and extinction measurements. The charge of the nanoparticles can be estimated from the analysis of dust density waves (DDW). Parameters like the electron density, which give information about the plasma itself, may be deduced from the DDW analysis. We present detailed investigations on nanodust in a reactive Argon-Acetylene plasma created in an rf-driven parallel plate reactor at low pressure using the above mentioned portfolio of diagnostic. Funded by DFG under contract SFB TR-24/A2.

  14. Cryopreservation of bull semen shipped overnight and its effect on post-thaw sperm motility, plasma membrane integrity, mitochondrial membrane potential and normal acrosomes.

    PubMed

    Anzar, M; Kroetsch, T; Boswall, L

    2011-06-01

    In the Canadian Animal Genetic Resource Program, bull semen is donated in frozen or fresh (diluted) states. This study was designed to assess the cryopreservation of diluted bull semen shipped at 4°C overnight, and to determine the post-thaw quality of shipped semen using different straw volumes and freezing rates. Semen was collected from four breeding bulls (three ejaculates per bull). Semen was diluted in Tris-citric acid-egg yolk-glycerol (TEYG) extender, cooled to 4°C and frozen as per routine (control semen). After cooling to 4°C, a part of semen was removed and shipped overnight to the research laboratory via express courier (shipped semen). Semen was packaged in 0.25 or 0.5 ml straws and frozen in a programmable freezer using three freezing rates, i.e., -10, -25 or -40°C/min. Control semen was also shipped to the research laboratory. Post-thaw sperm motility characteristics were assessed using CASA, and post-thaw sperm plasma membrane, mitochondrial membrane potential and normal acrosomes were assessed using flow cytometry. Post-thaw sperm quality was greater in shipped semen as compared to control (P<0.001). The shipped semen packaged in 0.25 ml straws had better post-thaw sperm quality than in 0.5 ml straws (P<0.001). Freezing rate had no effect on post-thaw sperm quality. In conclusion, bull semen can be shipped overnight for subsequent cryopreservation and gene banking. Overnight shipping of semen was found advantageous for bull semen cryopreservation. Semen packaging in 0.25 ml straws yielded better post-thaw quality than 0.5 ml straws.

  15. The potential of using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma time of flight mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-TOF-MS) in the forensic analysis of micro debris.

    PubMed

    Scadding, Cameron J; Watling, R John; Thomas, Allen G

    2005-08-15

    The majority of crimes result in the generation of some form of physical evidence, which is available for collection by crime scene investigators or police. However, this debris is often limited in amount as modern criminals become more aware of its potential value to forensic scientists. The requirement to obtain robust evidence from increasingly smaller sized samples has required refinement and modification of old analytical techniques and the development of new ones. This paper describes a new method for the analysis of oxy-acetylene debris, left behind at a crime scene, and the establishment of its co-provenance with single particles of equivalent debris found on the clothing of persons of interest (POI). The ability to rapidly determine and match the elemental distribution patterns of debris collected from crime scenes to those recovered from persons of interest is essential in ensuring successful prosecution. Traditionally, relatively large amounts of sample (up to several milligrams) have been required to obtain a reliable elemental fingerprint of this type of material [R.J. Walting , B.F. Lynch, D. Herring, J. Anal. At. Spectrom. 12 (1997) 195]. However, this quantity of material is unlikely to be recovered from a POI. This paper describes the development and application of laser ablation inductively coupled plasma time of flight mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-TOF-MS), as an analytical protocol, which can be applied more appropriately to the analysis of micro-debris than conventional quadrupole based mass spectrometry. The resulting data, for debris as small as 70mum in diameter, was unambiguously matched between a single spherule recovered from a POI and a spherule recovered from the scene of crime, in an analytical procedure taking less than 5min.

  16. Plasma LncRNA-ATB, a Potential Biomarker for Diagnosis of Patients with Coal Workers' Pneumoconiosis: A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jixuan; Cui, Xiuqing; Rong, Yi; Zhou, Yun; Guo, Yanjun; Zhou, Min; Xiao, Lili; Chen, Weihong

    2016-08-22

    LncRNA-ATB (lncRNA was activated by transforming growth factor-β) has been reported to be involved in specific physiological and pathological processes in human diseases, and could serve as biomarkers for cancers. However, the role of lncRNA-ATB in coal workers' pneumoconiosis (CWP) is still unknown. This study aimed to investigate the association between lncRNA-ATB and CWP. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was performed to detect plasma lncRNA-ATB expression in 137 CWP patients, 72 healthy coal miners and 168 healthy controls. LncRNA-ATB was significantly upregulated in CWP (p < 0.05). Compared with the healthy controls and healthy coal miners, the odds ratios (ORs) (95% confidence interval (CI)) for CWP were 2.57 (1.52-4.33) and 2.17 (1.04-4.53), respectively. LncRNA-ATB was positively associated with transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) (r = 0.30, p = 0.003) and negative correlated with vital capacity (VC) (r = -0.18, p = 0.033) and forced vital capacity (FVC) (r = -0.18, p = 0.046) in CWP patients. Compared with healthy controls, the area under the curve (AUC) was 0.84, resulting in a 71.17% sensitivity and 88.14% specificity. When compared with healthy coal miners, the AUC was 0.83, the sensitivity and specificity were 70.07% and 86.36%, respectively. LncRNA-ATB expression is commonly increased in CWP and significantly correlates with the TGF-β1 in CWP patients. Furthermore, elevated lncRNA-ATB was associated with CWP risk and may serve as a potential biomarker for CWP.

  17. Plasma LncRNA-ATB, a Potential Biomarker for Diagnosis of Patients with Coal Workers’ Pneumoconiosis: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jixuan; Cui, Xiuqing; Rong, Yi; Zhou, Yun; Guo, Yanjun; Zhou, Min; Xiao, Lili; Chen, Weihong

    2016-01-01

    LncRNA-ATB (lncRNA was activated by transforming growth factor-β) has been reported to be involved in specific physiological and pathological processes in human diseases, and could serve as biomarkers for cancers. However, the role of lncRNA-ATB in coal workers’ pneumoconiosis (CWP) is still unknown. This study aimed to investigate the association between lncRNA-ATB and CWP. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was performed to detect plasma lncRNA-ATB expression in 137 CWP patients, 72 healthy coal miners and 168 healthy controls. LncRNA-ATB was significantly upregulated in CWP (p < 0.05). Compared with the healthy controls and healthy coal miners, the odds ratios (ORs) (95% confidence interval (CI)) for CWP were 2.57 (1.52–4.33) and 2.17 (1.04–4.53), respectively. LncRNA-ATB was positively associated with transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) (r = 0.30, p = 0.003) and negative correlated with vital capacity (VC) (r = −0.18, p = 0.033) and forced vital capacity (FVC) (r = −0.18, p = 0.046) in CWP patients. Compared with healthy controls, the area under the curve (AUC) was 0.84, resulting in a 71.17% sensitivity and 88.14% specificity. When compared with healthy coal miners, the AUC was 0.83, the sensitivity and specificity were 70.07% and 86.36%, respectively. LncRNA-ATB expression is commonly increased in CWP and significantly correlates with the TGF-β1 in CWP patients. Furthermore, elevated lncRNA-ATB was associated with CWP risk and may serve as a potential biomarker for CWP. PMID:27556453

  18. Integrated plasma and urine metabolomics coupled with HPLC/QTOF-MS and chemometric analysis on potential biomarkers in liver injury and hepatoprotective effects of Er-Zhi-Wan.

    PubMed

    Yao, Weifeng; Gu, Haiwei; Zhu, Jiangjiang; Barding, Gregory; Cheng, Haibo; Bao, Beihua; Zhang, Li; Ding, Anwei; Li, Wei

    2014-11-01

    Metabolomics techniques are the comprehensive assessment of endogenous metabolites in a biological system and may provide additional insight into the molecular mechanisms. Er-Zhi-Wan (EZW) is a traditional Chinese medicine formula, which contains Fructus Ligustri Lucidi (FLL) and Herba Ecliptae (HE). EZW is widely used to prevent and treat various liver injuries through the nourishment of the liver. However, the precise molecular mechanism of hepatoprotective effects has not been comprehensively explored. Here, an integrated metabolomics strategy was designed to assess the effects and possible mechanisms of EZW against carbon tetrachloride-induced liver injury, a commonly used model of both acute and chronic liver intoxication. High-performance chromatography/quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HPLC/QTOF-MS) combined with chemometric approaches including principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) were used to discover differentiating metabolites in metabolomics data of rat plasma and urine. Results indicate six differentiating metabolites, tryptophan, sphinganine, tetrahydrocorticosterone, pipecolic acid, L-2-amino-3-oxobutanoic acid and phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate, in the positive mode. Functional pathway analysis revealed that the alterations in these metabolites were associated with tryptophan metabolism, sphingolipid metabolism, steroid hormone biosynthesis, lysine degradation, glycine, serine and threonine metabolism, and pentose phosphate pathway. Of note, EZW has a potential pharmacological effect, which might be through regulating multiple perturbed pathways to the normal state. Our findings also showed that the robust integrated metabolomics techniques are promising for identifying more biomarkers and pathways and helping to clarify the function mechanisms of traditional Chinese medicine.

  19. Computer simulations of plasma-biomolecule and plasma-tissue interactions for a better insight in plasma medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neyts, Erik C.; Yusupov, Maksudbek; Verlackt, Christof C.; Bogaerts, Annemie

    2014-07-01

    Plasma medicine is a rapidly evolving multidisciplinary field at the intersection of chemistry, biochemistry, physics, biology, medicine and bioengineering. It holds great potential in medical, health care, dentistry, surgical, food treatment and other applications. This multidisciplinary nature and variety of possible applications come along with an inherent and intrinsic complexity. Advancing plasma medicine to the stage that it becomes an everyday tool in its respective fields requires a fundamental understanding of the basic processes, which is lacking so far. However, some major advances have already been made through detailed experiments over the last 15 years. Complementary, computer simulations may provide insight that is difficult—if not impossible—to obtain through experiments. In this review, we aim to provide an overview of the various simulations that have been carried out in the context of plasma medicine so far, or that are relevant for plasma medicine. We focus our attention mostly on atomistic simulations dealing with plasma-biomolecule interactions. We also provide a perspective and tentative list of opportunities for future modelling studies that are likely to further advance the field.

  20. Plasmas for medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Woedtke, Th.; Reuter, S.; Masur, K.; Weltmann, K.-D.

    2013-09-01

    economic potential. This ambivalent situation fundamentally requires a responsible use of plasma sources, which are specifically designated for biomedical applications. To enable physicians as well as life scientists to decide whether a given plasma source is really suitable for medical applications or biological experiments, a meaningful and mandatory spectrum of indicators has to be compiled to allow for a basic estimation of the potential of this plasma source.

  1. GEANT4 simulations for beam emittance in a linear collider based on plasma wakefield acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Mete, O. Xia, G.; Hanahoe, K.; Labiche, M.

    2015-08-15

    Alternative acceleration technologies are currently under development for cost-effective, robust, compact, and efficient solutions. One such technology is plasma wakefield acceleration, driven by either a charged particle or laser beam. However, the potential issues must be studied in detail. In this paper, the emittance evolution of a witness beam through elastic scattering from gaseous media and under transverse focusing wakefields is studied.

  2. Plasma-wall transition in weakly collisional plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Manfredi, G.; Devaux, S.

    2008-10-15

    This paper reviews some theoretical and computational aspects of plasma-wall interactions, in particular the formation of sheaths. Some fundamental results are derived analytically using a simple fluid model, and are subsequently tested with kinetic simulations. The various regions composing the plasma-wall transition (Debye sheath, collisional and magnetic presheaths) are discussed in details.

  3. A Case for Detailed Surface Analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Frederick; Doswell, Charles A., III

    1995-04-01

    Detailed analysis of the temperature and moisture fields based on routine hourly surface observations in North America can provide a rational basis for surface feature analysis, thus clarifying the present confusion. Recognition of surface features is an important part of weather forecasting and is especially needed in a careful diagnosis for the prospects of deep convection.Surface temperature gradients are advocated as the primary basis for identifying fronts; examples are given of gross discrepancies in current operational practice between the surface temperature fields and the associated frontal analyses. Surface potential temperature, selected as a means of compensating for elevation differences, is analyzed in the western United States for a period in which a strong, damaging cold front develops and dissipates over a period of less than 24 h. Frontogenesis-related calculations, based on detailed surface temperature analyses, help to explain a case of focusing of heavy precipitation in northern Kentucky that produced a flash flood.Conditions for the initiation of intense convection are illustrated by detailed analyses of the surface moisture and temperature fields. These are used to estimate the buoyancy of surface air lifted to midtroposphere and show the relationship of this buoyancy to ensuing convection. The analyses aid in recognition of the surface dryline (a feature commonly misanalyzed as a cold front) and those convectively produced pools of cold air at the surface that often play a major role in the subsequent redevelopment of convection.The proposed analyses might be difficult to achieve manually in operational practice during busy weather situations, but this could be facilitated by using objective methods with present and prospective workstations. Once surface features are identified, their temporal and spatial evolution must be followed carefully since they can change rapidly.

  4. PLASMA GENERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Foster, J.S. Jr.

    1958-03-11

    This patent describes apparatus for producing an electricity neutral ionized gas discharge, termed a plasma, substantially free from contamination with neutral gas particles. The plasma generator of the present invention comprises a plasma chamber wherein gas introduced into the chamber is ionized by a radiofrequency source. A magnetic field is used to focus the plasma in line with an exit. This magnetic field cooperates with a differential pressure created across the exit to draw a uniform and uncontaminated plasma from the plasma chamber.

  5. Detailed Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Hydrazine Decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meagher, Nancy E.; Bates, Kami R.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this research project is to develop and validate a detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for gas-phase hydrazine decomposition. Hydrazine is used extensively in aerospace propulsion, and although liquid hydrazine is not considered detonable, many fuel handling systems create multiphase mixtures of fuels and fuel vapors during their operation. Therefore, a thorough knowledge of the decomposition chemistry of hydrazine under a variety of conditions can be of value in assessing potential operational hazards in hydrazine fuel systems. To gain such knowledge, a reasonable starting point is the development and validation of a detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for gas-phase hydrazine decomposition. A reasonably complete mechanism was published in 1996, however, many of the elementary steps included had outdated rate expressions and a thorough investigation of the behavior of the mechanism under a variety of conditions was not presented. The current work has included substantial revision of the previously published mechanism, along with a more extensive examination of the decomposition behavior of hydrazine. An attempt to validate the mechanism against the limited experimental data available has been made and was moderately successful. Further computational and experimental research into the chemistry of this fuel needs to be completed.

  6. Detailed balance of the Feynman micromotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, Derek; Davis, Bruce R.; Parrondo, Juan M. R.

    1999-09-01

    One existing implication of micromotors is that they can be powered by rectifying non-equilibrium thermal fluctuations or mechanical vibrations via the so-called Feynman- micromotor. An example of mechanical rectification is found in the batteryless wristwatch. The original concept was described in as early as 1912 by Smoluchowski and was later revisited in 1963 by Feynman, in the context of rectifying thermal fluctuations to obtain useful motion. It has been shown that, although rectification is impossible at equilibrium, it is possible for the Feynman-micromotor to perform work under non-equilibrium conditions. These concepts can now be realized by MEMS technology and may have exciting implications in biomedicine - where the Feynman- micromotor can be used to power a smart pill, for example. Previously, Feynman's analysis of the motor's efficiency has been shown to be flawed by Parrondo and Espanol. We now show there are further problems in Feynman's treatment of detailed balance. In order to design and understand this device correctly, the equations of detailed balance must be found. Feynman's approach was to use probabilities based on energies and we show that this is problematic. In this paper, we demonstrate corrected equations using level crossing probabilities instead. A potential application of the Feynman-micromotor is a batteryless nanopump that consists of a small MEMS chip that adheres to the skin of a patient and dispense nanoliter quantities of medication. Either mechanical or thermal rectification via a Feynman- micromotor, as the power source, is open for possible investigation.

  7. Precise energy eigenvalues of hydrogen-like ion moving in quantum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, S.; Saha, Jayanta K.; Mukherjee, T. K.

    2015-06-15

    The analytic form of the electrostatic potential felt by a slowly moving test charge in quantum plasma is developed. It has been shown that the electrostatic potential is composed of two parts: the Debye-Huckel screening term and the near-field wake potential. The latter depends on the velocity of the test charge as well as on the number density of the plasma electrons. Rayleigh-Ritz variational calculation has been done to estimate precise energy eigenvalues of hydrogen-like carbon ion under such plasma environment. A detailed analysis shows that the energy levels gradually move to the continuum with increasing plasma electron density while the level crossing phenomenon has been observed with the variation of ion velocity.

  8. Electric probe investigations of microwave generated, atmospheric pressure, plasma jets

    SciTech Connect

    Porteanu, H. E.; Kuehn, S.; Gesche, R.

    2010-07-15

    We examine the applicability of the Langmuir-type of characterization for atmospheric pressure plasma jets generated in a millimeter-size cavity microwave resonator at 2.45 GHz. Wide range I-V characteristics of helium, argon, nitrogen, air and oxygen are presented for different gas fluxes, distances probe-resonator, and microwave powers. A detailed analysis is performed for the fine variation in the current around the floating potential. A simplified theory specially developed for this case is presented, considering the ionic and electronic saturation currents and the floating potential. Based on this theory, we conclude that, while the charge carrier density depends on gas flow, distance to plasma source, and microwave absorbed power, the electron temperature is quite independent of these parameters. The resulting plasma parameters for helium, argon, and nitrogen are presented.

  9. Experimental observation of self excited co-rotating multiple vortices in a dusty plasma with inhomogeneous plasma background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, Mangilal; Mukherjee, S.; Bandyopadhyay, P.

    2017-03-01

    We report an experimental observation of multiple co-rotating vortices in an extended dust column in the background of an inhomogeneous diffused plasma. An inductively coupled rf discharge is initiated in the background of argon gas in the source region. This plasma was later found to diffuse into the main experimental chamber. A secondary DC glow discharge plasma is produced to introduce dust particles into the plasma volume. These micron-sized poly-disperse dust particles get charged in the background of the DC plasma and are transported by the ambipolar electric field of the diffused plasma. These transported particles are found to be confined in an electrostatic potential well, where the resultant electric field due to the diffused plasma (ambipolar E-field) and glass wall charging (sheath E-field) holds the micron-sized particles against the gravity. Multiple co-rotating (anti-clockwise) dust vortices are observed in the dust cloud for a particular discharge condition. The transition from multiple vortices to a single dust vortex is observed when input rf power is lowered. The occurrence of these vortices is explained on the basis of the charge gradient of dust particles, which is orthogonal to the ion drag force. The charge gradient is a consequence of the plasma inhomogeneity along the dust cloud length. The detailed nature and the reason for multiple vortices are still under investigation through further experiments; however, preliminary qualitative understanding is discussed based on the characteristic scale length of the dust vortex. There is a characteristic size of the vortex in the dusty plasma; therefore, multiple vortices could possibly be formed in an extended dusty plasma with inhomogeneous plasma background. The experimental results on the vortex motion of particles are compared with a theoretical model and are found to be in close agreement.

  10. Cornice Detail of Rake, Cornice Detail of Eave, Wood DoubleHung ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Cornice Detail of Rake, Cornice Detail of Eave, Wood Double-Hung Window Details, Wood Door Details - Boxley Grist Mill, Boxley vicinity on State Route 43, Buffalo National River, Ponca, Newton County, AR

  11. Microwave Probing of Air-Plasma and Plasma Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Katherine; Rock, Ben; Helle, Mike

    2016-10-01

    Plasma metamaterials are of recent interest due to their unique ability to be engineered with specific electromagnetic responses. One potential metamaterial architecture is based on a `forest' of plasma rods that can be produced using intense laser plasma filaments. In our work, we use a continuous microwave source at 26.5 GHz to measure a single air plasma filament characteristics generated from a 5 mJ laser pulse within a cylindrical hole in a Ka-band waveguide. Preliminary results show the air plasma produces a strong shock and acts to reflect microwave radiation. A computational comparison using 3D EM modeling is performed to examine the reflection and transmission properties of a single plasma rod, and further, to investigate an array of plasma rods as a potential plasma based metamaterial.

  12. Plasma heating power dissipation in low temperature hydrogen plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Komppula, J. Tarvainen, O.

    2015-10-15

    A theoretical framework for power dissipation in low temperature plasmas in corona equilibrium is developed. The framework is based on fundamental conservation laws and reaction cross sections and is only weakly sensitive to plasma parameters, e.g., electron temperature and density. The theory is applied to low temperature atomic and molecular hydrogen laboratory plasmas for which the plasma heating power dissipation to photon emission, ionization, and chemical potential is calculated. The calculated photon emission is compared to recent experimental results.

  13. Elevated Plasma MCP-1 Concentration Following Traumatic Brain Injury as a Potential “Predisposition” Factor Associated with an Increased Risk for Subsequent Development of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Lap; Zhao, Wei; Dams-O’Connor, Kristen; Tang, Cheuk Y.; Gordon, Wayne; Peskind, Elaine R.; Yemul, Shrishailam; Haroutunian, Vahram; Pasinetti, Giulio Maria

    2013-01-01

    We explored whether changes in the expression profile of peripheral blood plasma proteins may provide a clinical, readily accessible “window” into the brain, reflecting molecular alterations following traumatic brain injury (TBI) that might contribute to TBI complications. We recruited fourteen TBI and ten control civilian participants for the study, and also analyzed banked plasma specimens from 20 veterans with TBI and 20 control cases. Using antibody arrays and ELISA assays, we explored differentially-regulated protein species in the plasma of TBI compared to healthy controls from the two independent cohorts. We found three protein biomarker species, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3, and epidermal growth factor receptor, that are differentially regulated in plasma specimens of the TBI cases. A three-biomarker panel using all three proteins provides the best potential criterion for separating TBI and control cases. Plasma MCP-1 contents are correlated with the severity of TBI and the index of compromised axonal fiber integrity in the frontal cortex. Based on these findings, we evaluated postmortem brain specimens from 7 mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and 7 neurologically normal cases. We found elevated MCP-1 expression in the frontal cortex of MCI cases that are at high risk for developing Alzheimer’s disease. Our findings suggest that additional application of the three-biomarker panel to current diagnostic criteria may lead to improved TBI detection and more sensitive outcome measures for clinical trials. Induction of MCP-1 in response to TBI might be a potential predisposing factor that may increase the risk for development of Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:22543850

  14. Short communication: Effect of commercial or depurinized milk diet on plasma advanced oxidation protein products, cardiovascular markers, and bone marrow CD34+ stem cell potential in rat experimental hyperuricemia.

    PubMed

    Kocic, Gordana; Sokolovic, Dusan; Jevtovic, Tatjana; Cvetkovic, Tatjana; Veljkovic, Andrej; Kocic, Hristina; Stojanovic, Svetlana; Jovanovic, Aneta; Jovanovic, Jelena; Zivkovic, Petar

    2014-11-01

    Cardiovascular repair and myocardial contractility may be improved by migration of bone marrow stem cells (BMSC) and their delivery to the site of injury, a process known as BMSC homing. The aim of our study was to examine the dietary effect of a newly patented depurinized milk (DP) that is almost free of uric acid and purine and pyrimidine compounds compared with a standard commercial 1.5% fat UHT milk diet or allopurinol therapy in rat experimental hyperuricemia. Bone marrow stem cell potential (BMCD34(+), CD34-postive bone marrow cells), plasma oxidative stress parameters [advanced oxidation protein products, AOPP) and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS)], myocardial damage markers [creatine phosphokinase (CPK), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)], plasma cholesterol, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol were investigated. The DP milk diet significantly increased the number of BMCD34(+) stem cells compared with commercial UHT milk. Allopurinol given alone also increased the number of BMCD34(+). Hyperuricemia caused a significant increase in all plasma enzyme markers for myocardial damage (CPK, LDH, and AST). A cardioprotective effect was achieved with allopurinol but almost equally with DP milk and more than with commercial milk. Regarding plasma AOPP, TBARS, and cholesterol levels, the most effective treatment was DP milk. In conclusion, the protective role of a milk diet on cardiovascular function may be enhanced through the new depurinized milk diet, which may improve cardiovascular system function via increased bone marrow stem cell regenerative potential, decreased plasma oxidative stress parameters, and decreased levels of myocardial damage markers and cholesterol. New dairy technology strategies focused on eliminating harmful milk compounds should be completely nontoxic. Novel milk products should be tested for their ability to improve tissue repair and function.

  15. Cold Atmospheric Plasma Technology for Decontamination of Space Equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Hubertus; Rettberg, Petra; Shimizu, Tetsuji; Thoma, Markus; Morfill, Gregor; Zimmermann, Julia; Müller, Meike; Semenov, Igor

    2016-07-01

    Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) technology is very fast and effective in inactivation of all kinds of pathogens. It is used in hygiene and especially in medicine, since the plasma treatment can be applied to sensitive surfaces, like skin, too. In a first study to use CAP for the decontamination of space equipment we could show its potential as a quite promising alternative to the standard "dry heat" and H2O2 methods [Shimizu et al. Planetary and Space Science, 90, 60-71. (2014)]. In a follow-on study we continue the investigations to reach high application level of the technology. First, we redesign the actual setup to a plasma-gas circulation system, increasing the effectivity of inactivation and the sustainability. Additionally, we want to learn more about the plasma chemistry processes involved in the inactivation. Therefore, we perform detailed plasma and gas measurements and compare them to numerical simulations. The latter will finally be used to scale the decontamination system to sizes useful also for larger space equipment. Typical materials relevant for space equipment will be tested and investigated on surface material changes due to the plasma treatment. Additionally, it is planned to use electronic boards and compare their functionality before and after the CAP expose. We will give an overview on the status of the plasma decontamination project funded by the Bavarian Ministry of Economics.

  16. Cold atmospheric-pressure plasma and bacteria: understanding the mode of action using vibrational microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartaschew, Konstantin; Baldus, Sabrina; Mischo, Meike; Bründermann, Erik; Awakowicz, Peter; Havenith, Martina

    2016-09-01

    Cold atmospheric-pressure plasma show promising antimicrobial effects, however the detailed biochemical mechanism of the bacterial inactivation is still unknown. We investigated, for the first time, plasma-treated Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis and Gram-negative Escherichia coli bacteria with Raman and infrared microspectroscopy. A dielectric barrier discharge was used as a plasma source. We were able to detect several plasma-induced chemical modifications, which suggest a pronounced oxidative effect on the cell envelope, cellular proteins and nucleotides as well as a generation of organic nitrates in the treated bacteria. Vibrational microspectroscopy is used as a comprehensive and a powerful tool for the analysis of plasma interactions with whole organisms such as bacteria. Analysis of reaction kinetics of chemical modifications allow a time-dependent insight into the plasma-mediated impact. Investigating possible synergistic effects between the plasma-produced components, our observations strongly indicate that the detected plasma-mediated chemical alterations can be mainly explained by the particle effect of the generated reactive species. By changing the polarity of the applied voltage pulse, and hence the propagation mechanisms of streamers, no significant effect on the spectral results could be detected. This method allows the analysis of the individual impact of each plasma constituent for particular chemical modifications. Our approach shows great potential to contribute to a better understanding of plasma-cell interactions.

  17. Plasma sources for spacecraft neutralization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, V. A.; Katz, I.; Mandell, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    The principles of the operation of plasma sources for the neutralization of the surface of a spacecraft traveling in the presence of hot plasma are discussed with special attention given to the hollow-cathode-based plasma contactors. Techiques are developed that allow the calculation of the potentials and particle densities in the near environment of a hollow cathode plasma contactor in both the test tank and the LEO environment. The techniques and codes were validated by comparison of calculated and measured results.

  18. High levels of plasma malondialdehyde, protein carbonyl, and fibrinogen have prognostic potential to predict poor outcomes in patients with diabetic foot wounds: a preliminary communication.

    PubMed

    Rattan, Roma; Nayak, Debashish

    2008-12-01

    Diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) is the leading cause of lower extremity amputation and is generally known to have poor prognosis. Oxidative stress is considered important in the pathogenesis of chronic wounds. Fibrinogen is a recognized marker in peripheral vascular disease; increasing levels predict an increased mortality and risk of amputation. The aim of this study was to evaluate if plasma malondialdehyde (MDA), protein carbonyl (PC) and fibrinogen levels can be used as prognostic markers in patients with DFU. The study design was prospective, nonrandomized, and controlled. A total of 41 DFU grade 1 and 20 DFU grade 2 patients were studied in this case-control study. Diabetic controls without foot ulcers and healthy controls were also studied. Plasma MDA, PC, and fibrinogen levels were significantly higher in patients with DFU compared with those without ulcers (P < .05) and nondiabetic controls (P < .001). These parameters increased in association with DFU grade (P < .01). Increased levels of plasma fibrinogen, MDA, and PC correlated with worsened outcomes. An augmented oxidative stress and plasma fibrinogen level >300.4 mg% (95% confidence interval, 100% sensitivity, 99.2% specificity) was correlated with a high risk of amputation in DFU.

  19. Study of edge turbulence in dimensionally similar laboratory plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroth, Ulrich

    2003-10-01

    In recent years, the numerical simulation of turbulence has made considerable progress. Predictions are made for large plasma volumes taking into account realistic magnetic geometries. Because of diagnostic limitations, in fusion plasmas the means of experimental testing of the models are rather limited. Toroidal low-temperature plasmas offer the possibility for detailed comparisons between experiment and simulation. Due to the reduced plasma parameters, the relevant quantities can be measured in the entire plasma. At the same time, the relevant non-dimensional parameters can be comparable to those in the edge of fusion plasmas. This presentation reports on results from the torsatron TJ-K [1,2] operated with a low-temperature plasma. The data are compared with simulations using the drift-Alfven-wave code DALF3 [3]. Langmuir probe arrays with 64 tips are used to measure the spatial structure of the turbulence. The same analyses techniques are applied to experimental and numerical data. The measured properties of spectra and probability density functions are reproduced by the code. Although the plasma in experiment and simulation does not exhibit critical pressure gradients, the radial transport fluctuations are strongly intermittent in both cases. Using Hydrogen, Helium and Argon as working gases, the scale parameter ρs could be varied by more than a factor of ten. As predicted by theory, the size of the turbulent eddies increases with ρ_s. The measured cross-phase between density and potential fluctuations are small, indicating the importance of the drift-wave dynamics for the turbulence in toroidal plasmas. The wave number spectra decay with an exponent of -3 as one would expect for the enstrophy cascade in 2D turbulence. [1] N. Krause et al., Rev. Sci. Instr. 73, 3474 (2002) [2] C. Lechte et al., New J. of Physics 4, 34 (2002) [3] B. Scott, Plasma Phys. Contr. Fusion 39, 1635 (1997)

  20. Design and construction of Keda Space Plasma Experiment (KSPEX) for the investigation of the boundary layer processes of ionospheric depletions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu; Zhang, Zhongkai; Lei, Jiuhou; Cao, Jinxiang; Yu, Pengcheng; Zhang, Xiao; Xu, Liang; Zhao, Yaodong

    2016-09-01

    In this work, the design and construction of the Keda Space Plasma EXperiment (KSPEX), which aims to study the boundary layer processes of ionospheric depletions, are described in detail. The device is composed of three stainless-steel sections: two source chambers at both ends and an experimental chamber in the center. KSPEX is a steady state experimental device, in which hot filament arrays are used to produce plasmas in the two sources. A Macor-mesh design is adopted to adjust the plasma density and potential difference between the two plasmas, which creates a boundary layer with a controllable electron density gradient and inhomogeneous radial electric field. In addition, attachment chemicals can be released into the plasmas through a tailor-made needle valve which leads to the generation of negative ions plasmas. Ionospheric depletions can be modeled and simulated using KSPEX, and many micro-physical processes of the formation and evolution of an ionospheric depletion can be experimentally studied.

  1. Design and construction of Keda Space Plasma Experiment (KSPEX) for the investigation of the boundary layer processes of ionospheric depletions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Zhang, Zhongkai; Lei, Jiuhou; Cao, Jinxiang; Yu, Pengcheng; Zhang, Xiao; Xu, Liang; Zhao, Yaodong

    2016-09-01

    In this work, the design and construction of the Keda Space Plasma EXperiment (KSPEX), which aims to study the boundary layer processes of ionospheric depletions, are described in detail. The device is composed of three stainless-steel sections: two source chambers at both ends and an experimental chamber in the center. KSPEX is a steady state experimental device, in which hot filament arrays are used to produce plasmas in the two sources. A Macor-mesh design is adopted to adjust the plasma density and potential difference between the two plasmas, which creates a boundary layer with a controllable electron density gradient and inhomogeneous radial electric field. In addition, attachment chemicals can be released into the plasmas through a tailor-made needle valve which leads to the generation of negative ions plasmas. Ionospheric depletions can be modeled and simulated using KSPEX, and many micro-physical processes of the formation and evolution of an ionospheric depletion can be experimentally studied.

  2. Chronic Olanzapine Treatment Induces Disorders of Plasma Fatty Acid Profile in Balb/c Mice: A Potential Mechanism for Olanzapine-Induced Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Mingzhen; Li, Shihong; Du, Juan; Li, Weiyong; Chen, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Background Atypical antipsychotics such as olanzapine cause metabolic side effects leading to obesity and insulin resistance. The underlying mechanisms remain elusive. In this study we investigated the effects of chronic treatment of olanzapine on the fatty acid composition of plasma in mice. Methods Twenty 8-week female Balb/c mice were randomly assigned to two groups: the OLA group and the control group. After treatment with olanzapine (10 mg/kg/day) or vehicle intraperitoneally for 8 weeks, fasting glucose, insulin levels and oral glucose tolerance test were determined. Effects on plasma fatty acid profile and plasma indices of D5 desaturase, D6 desaturase and SCD1 activity were also investigated. Results Chronic administration of olanzapine significantly elevated fasting glucose and insulin levels, impaired glucose tolerance, but did not increase body weight. Total saturated fatty acids and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids were significantly increased and total monounsaturated fatty acids were significantly decreased, while total n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids showed no prominent changes. Chronic olanzapine treatment significantly up-regulated D6 desaturase activity while down-regulating D5 desaturase activity. Palmitic acid (C16:0), dihomo-γ-linolenic acid (C20:3n-6) and D6 desaturase were associated with an increase probability of insulin resistance, whereas nervonic acid (C24:1) and SCD1 were significantly associated with a lower insulin resistance probability. Conclusions All results indicated that such drug-induced effects on fatty acid profile in plasma were relevant for the metabolic adverse effects associated with olanzapine and possibly other antipsychotics. Further studies are needed to investigate geneticand other mechanisms to explain how plasma fatty acids regulate glucose metabolism and affect the risk of insulin resistance. PMID:27973621

  3. New Directions of Research in Complex Plasmas on the International Space Station

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, H. M.; Morfill, G. E.; Ivlev, A. V.; Hagl, T.; Rothermel, H.; Khrapak, S. A.; Suetterlin, K. R.; Rubin-Zuzic, M.; Schwabe, M.; Zhdanov, S. K.; Raeth, C.; Fortov, V. E.; Molotkov, V. I.; Lipaev, A. M.; Petrov, O. F.; Tokarev, V. I.; Malenchenko, Y. I.; Turin, M. V.; Vinogradov, P. V.; Yurchikhin, F. N.

    2008-09-07

    PK-3 Plus is the second generation laboratory for investigations of complex plasmas under microgravity conditions on the International Space Station. Compared to its pre-cursor PKE-Nefedov, operational 2001-2005, it has an advanced hardware and software. Improved diagnostics and especially a much better homogeneity of the complex plasma allow more detailed investigations, helping to understand the fundamentals of complex plasmas. Typical investigations are performed to observe the structure of homogeneous and isotropic complex plasmas and instabilities occurring at high particle densities. In addition, the new setup allows the tuning of the interaction potential between the microparticles by using external ac electric fields. Thus, we are able to initiate electrorheological phenomena in complex plasma fluids in the PK-3 Plus laboratory, and observe the phase transition from a normal fluid to a string fluid state at the individual particle level for the first time. Such new possibilities open up new directions of research under microgravity conditions.

  4. Cosmic plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alfven, H.

    1981-01-01

    Attention is given to experimental and theoretical approaches to plasma physics, plasma phenomena in laboratory and space, field and particle aspects of plasmas, the present state of the classical theory, boundary conditions and circuit dependence, and cosmology. Electric currents in space plasmas are considered, taking into account dualism in physics, particle-related phenomena in plasma physics, magnetic field lines, filaments, local plasma properties and the circuit, electric double layers, field-aligned currents as 'cables', an expanding circuit, different types of plasma regions, the cellular structure of space, and the fine structure of active plasma regions. Other topics discussed are related to circuits, the theory of cosmic plasmas, the origin of the solar system, the coexistence of matter and antimatter, annihilation as a source of energy, the Hubble expansion in a Euclidean space, and a model for the evolution of the Metagalaxy.

  5. Detailed observations of the source of terrestrial narrowband electromagnetic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurth, W. S.

    1982-01-01

    Detailed observations are presented of a region near the terrestrial plasmapause where narrowband electromagnetic radiation (previously called escaping nonthermal continuum radiation) is being generated. These observations show a direct correspondence between the narrowband radio emissions and electron cyclotron harmonic waves near the upper hybrid resonance frequency. In addition, electromagnetic radiation propagating in the Z-mode is observed in the source region which provides an extremely accurate determination of the electron plasma frequency and, hence, density profile of the source region. The data strongly suggest that electrostatic waves and not Cerenkov radiation are the source of the banded radio emissions and define the coupling which must be described by any viable theory.

  6. Anion Channel Inhibitor NPPB-Inhibited Fluoride Accumulation in Tea Plant (Camellia sinensis) Is Related to the Regulation of Ca2+, CaM and Depolarization of Plasma Membrane Potential

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xian-Chen; Gao, Hong-Jian; Yang, Tian-Yuan; Wu, Hong-Hong; Wang, Yu-Mei; Zhang, Zheng-Zhu; Wan, Xiao-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Tea plant is known to be a hyper-accumulator of fluoride (F). Over-intake of F has been shown to have adverse effects on human health, e.g., dental fluorosis. Thus, understanding the mechanisms fluoride accumulation and developing potential approaches to decrease F uptake in tea plants might be beneficial for human health. In the present study, we found that pretreatment with the anion channel inhibitor NPPB reduced F accumulation in tea plants. Simultaneously, we observed that NPPB triggered Ca2+ efflux from mature zone of tea root and significantly increased relative CaM in tea roots. Besides, pretreatment with the Ca2+ chelator (EGTA) and CaM antagonists (CPZ and TFP) suppressed NPPB-elevated cytosolic Ca2+ fluorescence intensity and CaM concentration in tea roots, respectively. Interestingly, NPPB-inhibited F accumulation was found to be significantly alleviated in tea plants pretreated with either Ca2+ chelator (EGTA) or CaM antagonists (CPZ and TFP). In addition, NPPB significantly depolarized membrane potential transiently and we argue that the net Ca2+ and H+ efflux across the plasma membrane contributed to the restoration of membrane potential. Overall, our results suggest that regulation of Ca2+-CaM and plasma membrane potential depolarization are involved in NPPB-inhibited F accumulation in tea plants. PMID:26742036

  7. Coronary Artery-Bypass-Graft Surgery Increases the Plasma Concentration of Exosomes Carrying a Cargo of Cardiac MicroRNAs: An Example of Exosome Trafficking Out of the Human Heart with Potential for Cardiac Biomarker Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Emanueli, Costanza; Fiorentino, Francesca; Reeves, Barnaby C.; Beltrami, Cristina; Mumford, Andrew; Clayton, Aled; Gurney, Mark; Shantikumar, Saran; Angelini, Gianni D.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Exosome nanoparticles carry a composite cargo, including microRNAs (miRs). Cultured cardiovascular cells release miR-containing exosomes. The exosomal trafficking of miRNAs from the heart is largely unexplored. Working on clinical samples from coronary-artery by-pass graft (CABG) surgery, we investigated if: 1) exosomes containing cardiac miRs and hence putatively released by cardiac cells increase in the circulation after surgery; 2) circulating exosomes and exosomal cardiac miRs correlate with cardiac troponin (cTn), the current “gold standard” surrogate biomarker of myocardial damage. Methods and Results The concentration of exosome-sized nanoparticles was determined in serial plasma samples. Cardiac-expressed (miR-1, miR-24, miR-133a/b, miR-208a/b, miR-210), non-cardiovascular (miR-122) and quality control miRs were measured in whole plasma and in plasma exosomes. Linear regression analyses were employed to establish the extent to which the circulating individual miRs, exosomes and exosomal cardiac miR correlated with cTn-I. Cardiac-expressed miRs and the nanoparticle number increased in the plasma on completion of surgery for up to 48 hours. The exosomal concentration of cardiac miRs also increased after CABG. Cardiac miRs in the whole plasma did not correlate significantly with cTn-I. By contrast cTn-I was positively correlated with the plasma exosome level and the exosomal cardiac miRs. Conclusions The plasma concentrations of exosomes and their cargo of cardiac miRs increased in patients undergoing CABG and were positively correlated with hs-cTnI. These data provide evidence that CABG induces the trafficking of exosomes from the heart to the peripheral circulation. Future studies are necessary to investigate the potential of circulating exosomes as clinical biomarkers in cardiac patients. PMID:27128471

  8. Low plasma levels of brain derived neurotrophic factor are potential risk factors for diabetic retinopathy in Chinese type 2 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shao-Yi; Du, Xiao-Fang; Ma, Xiang; Guo, Jian-Lian; Lu, Jian-Min; Ma, Lu-Sheng

    2016-01-15

    Previous studies suggested that neurotrophins play a role in the diabetic retinopathy (DR). We therefore evaluated the role of plasma brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels in Chinese type 2 diabetic patients with and without diabetic retinopathy (DR). Plasma levels of BDNF were determined in type 2 diabetic patients (N=344). At baseline, the demographical and clinical data were taken. Multivariate analyses were performed using logistic regression models. Receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC) was used to test the overall predict accuracy of BDNF and other markers. Diabetic patients with DR and vision-threatening diabetic retinopathy (VTDR) had significantly lower BDNF levels on admission (P<0.0001 both). BDNF improved the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of the diabetes duration for DR from 0.76 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.71-0.82) to 0.89 (95% CI, 0.82-0.95; P<0.01) and for VDTR from 0.84 (95% CI, 0.78-0.92) to 0.95 (95% CI, 0.90-0.98; P<0.01). Multivariate logistic regression analysis adjusted for common risk factors showed that plasma BDNF levels≤12.4 ng/mL(1(rd) quartiles) was an independent marker of DR (OR=3.92; 95%CI: 2.31-6.56) and VTDR (OR=4.88; 95%CI: 2.21-9.30). The present study demonstrated that decreased plasma levels of BDNF were independent markers for DR and VDTR in Chinese type 2 diabetic patients, suggesting a possible role of BDNF in the pathogenesis of DR complications.

  9. Plasma Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Concentration and Alveolar Nitric Oxide as Potential Predictors of Disease Progression and Mortality in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Kotecha, Jalpa; Shulgina, Ludmila; Sexton, Darren W.; Atkins, Christopher P.; Wilson, Andrew M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Declining lung function signifies disease progression in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) concentration is associated with declining lung function in 6 and 12-month studies. Alveolar nitric oxide concentration (CANO) is increased in patients with IPF, however its significance is unclear. This study investigated whether baseline plasma VEGF concentration and CANO are associated with disease progression or mortality in IPF. Methods: 27 IPF patients were studied (maximum follow-up 65 months). Baseline plasma VEGF concentration, CANO and pulmonary function tests (PFTs) were measured. PFTs were performed the preceding year and subsequent PFTs and data regarding mortality were collected. Disease progression was defined as one of: death, relative decrease of ≥10% in baseline forced vital capacity (FVC) % predicted, or relative decrease of ≥15% in baseline single breath diffusion capacity of carbon monoxide (TLCO-SB) % predicted. Results: Plasma VEGF concentration was not associated with progression-free survival or mortality. There was a trend towards shorter time to disease progression and death with higher CANO. CANO was significantly higher in patients with previous declining versus stable lung function. Conclusion: The role of VEGF in IPF remains uncertain. It may be of value to further investigate CANO in IPF. PMID:27618114

  10. Weakly relativistic plasma expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Fermous, Rachid Djebli, Mourad

    2015-04-15

    Plasma expansion is an important physical process that takes place in laser interactions with solid targets. Within a self-similar model for the hydrodynamical multi-fluid equations, we investigated the expansion of both dense and under-dense plasmas. The weakly relativistic electrons are produced by ultra-intense laser pulses, while ions are supposed to be in a non-relativistic regime. Numerical investigations have shown that relativistic effects are important for under-dense plasma and are characterized by a finite ion front velocity. Dense plasma expansion is found to be governed mainly by quantum contributions in the fluid equations that originate from the degenerate pressure in addition to the nonlinear contributions from exchange and correlation potentials. The quantum degeneracy parameter profile provides clues to set the limit between under-dense and dense relativistic plasma expansions at a given density and temperature.

  11. Confinement Studies in High Temperature Spheromak Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, D N; Mclean, H S; Wood, R D; Casper, T A; Cohen, B I; Hooper, E B; LoDestro, L L; Pearlstein, L D; Romero-Talamas, C

    2006-10-23

    Recent results from the SSPX spheromak experiment demonstrate the potential for obtaining good energy confinement (Te > 350eV and radial electron thermal diffusivity comparable to tokamak L-mode values) in a completely self-organized toroidal plasma. A strong decrease in thermal conductivity with temperature is observed and at the highest temperatures, transport is well below that expected from the Rechester-Rosenbluth model. Addition of a new capacitor bank has produced 60% higher magnetic fields and almost tripled the pulse length to 11ms. For plasmas with T{sub e} > 300eV, it becomes feasible to use modest (1.8MW) neutral beam injection (NBI) heating to significantly change the power balance in the core plasma, making it an effective tool for improving transport analysis. We are now developing detailed designs for adding NBI to SSPX and have developed a new module for the CORSICA transport code to compute the correct fast-ion orbits in SSPX so that we can simulate the effect of adding NBI; initial results predict that such heating can raise the electron temperature and total plasma pressure in the core by a factor of two.

  12. EDITORIAL: Plasma jets and plasma bullets Plasma jets and plasma bullets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, M. G.; Ganguly, B. N.; Hicks, R. F.

    2012-06-01

    technological solution in the early to late 1990s of confining atmospheric plasmas in a small volume of plasma generation (i.e. with a small volume-to-surface ratio) and then extending it towards a downstream sample [7]-[9]. These are among the first low-temperature atmospheric plasmas aimed particularly at the exploitation of their ability to invoke the active and rich reactive chemistry close to ambient temperature. The main applications of these early devices are precision surface modification of low-temperature dielectric materials, for example thin film deposition and etching [7]-[9]. Variations of the early plasma jets include atmospheric plasma sheet jets [10] for the treatment of largely planar objects (e.g. polymeric sheets) as well as large arrays of many plasma jets for the treatment of complex-structured objects (e.g. surgical tools and open human wounds) [11]. As a material processing technology, the sub-100oC atmospheric-pressure plasma jet has benefited over the years from many innovations. Whilst a detailed account and analysis of these is clearly outside the scope of this Editorial, it is worth stating that there are different avenues with which to maintain a moderate electron density at the plasma core so as to keep the gas temperature at the sample point below a ceiling level. Most of the early studies employed excitation at radio frequencies above 10 MHz, at which electrons are largely confined in the plasma generation region, and this limits the current flow to and gas heating in the plume region of the plasma jet. Other techniques of current limitation have since been shown to be effective, including the use of dielectric barriers across a very large frequency range of 1 kHz--50 MHz, sub-microsecond pulses sustained at kHz frequencies, pulse-modulated radio frequencies and dual-frequency excitation [12]-[15]. These and other techniques have considerably advanced the atmospheric-pressure plasma jet technology. The period of some 15 years since the above

  13. Singled-walled carbon nanotubes produced by induction thermal plasma: Cytotoxicity evaluation of the feedstock materials and the final product for a potential bone application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alinejad, Yasaman

    One of the most challenging issues that the technologies related to nanomaterials face is the impact they have on human health and environment. It is therefore of great importance to investigate the toxicological impacts of these technologies prior to their widespread utilization in different fields of application. Therefore, in this study, the cytotoxicity of the materials present throughout the process of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) synthesis by induction thermal plasma (from the feedstock materials to the final product) was evaluated. First of all, the influence of the induction thermal plasma process on the physico-chemical and cytotoxic properties of feedstock materials (i.e. commercial Co, Ni, Y2O3, Mo catalysts and carbon black) was investigated. The strongest cytotoxicity was observed for commercial Co compared to other catalysts. Although the thermal plasma process affected the properties of all catalysts, only the cytotoxicity of Ni was increased. Comparing the properties and cytotoxicity of the plasma treated Ni particles with commercial Ni nanoparticles revealed that the particles with similar surface area had different cytotoxicities. Plus, the observed cytotoxicity of the catalysts was not mainly due to the release of ions. In order to evaluate the capacity of the RF induction thermal plasma process to produce high quality SWCNTs using non-toxic catalysts, the effects of the type and quantity of three catalyst mixtures (Ni-Y2O 3, Ni-Co-Y2O3, and Ni-Mo-Y2O3 ) on SWCNTs synthesis were examined. Thermodynamic calculations, in gas and particularly in liquid solution phases, were also performed. The results showed that catalyst type affected the quality of the SWCNT final product and similar quality SWCNTs was produced when the same amount of Co was replaced by Ni. Then, to investigate the cytotoxicity of the SWCNTs produced with the three catalyst mixtures, their effect was evaluated on the behavior of murine MC3T3-E1 preosteoblasts. Either

  14. Revisiting the plasma sheath—dust in plasma sheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, G. C.; Deka, R.; Bora, M. P.

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we have considered the formation of warm plasma sheath in the vicinity of a wall in a plasma with considerable presence of dust particles. As an example, we have used the parameters relevant in case of plasma sheath formed around surfaces of various solid bodies in space, though the results obtained in this work can be applied to any other physical situation such as laboratory plasma. In the ion-acoustic time scale, we neglect the dust dynamics. The dust particles affect the sheath dynamics by affecting the Poisson equation which determines the plasma potential in the sheath region. It is important to note that our calculations are valid only when the amount of dust particles is not sufficient so as to affect the plasma dynamics in the dust-acoustic time scale, but enough to affect the plasma sheath. We have assumed the current to a dust particle to be balanced throughout the analysis. This makes the grain potential dependent on plasma potential, which is then incorporated into the Poisson equation. The resultant numerical model becomes an initial value problem, which is described by a 1-D integro-differential equation, which is then solved self-consistently by incorporating the change in plasma potential caused by inclusion of the dust potential in the Poisson equation.

  15. Users manual for the UEDGE edge-plasma transport code

    SciTech Connect

    Rognlien, T D; Rensink, M E; Smith, G R

    2000-01-10

    Operational details are given for the two-dimensional UEDGE edge-plasma transport code. The model applies to nearly fully-ionized plasmas in a strong magnetic field. Equations are solved for the plasma density, velocity along the magnetic field, electron temperature, ion temperature, and electrostatic potential. In addition, fluid models of neutrals species are included or the option to couple to a Monte Carlo code description of the neutrals. Multi-species ion mixtures can be simulated. The physical equations are discretized by a finite-difference procedure, and the resulting system of algebraic equations are solved by fully-implicit techniques. The code can be used to follow time-dependent solutions or to find steady-state solutions by direct iteration.

  16. Assessing Team Detailing End-user Satisfaction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-10-01

    October 2004 Assessing Team Detailing End-user Satisfaction Kimberly P. Whittam, Ph.D. Zannette A. Uriell, M.S. Rorie N. Harris, Ph.D. Approved for...public release; distribution is unlimited. NPRST-AB-05-1 October 2004 Assessing Team Detailing End-user Satisfaction Kimberly P. Whittam, Ph.D...DAVID L. ALDERTON, Ph.D. Director vii Contents Assessing Team Detailing End-user Satisfaction

  17. Characterizing plasma mirrors near breakdown.

    PubMed

    Geissel, Matthias; Schollmeier, Marius S; Kimmel, Mark W; Rambo, Patrick K; Schwarz, Jens; Atherton, Briggs W; Brambrink, Erik

    2011-05-01

    Experiments dedicated to the characterization of plasma mirrors with a high energy, single shot short-pulse laser were performed at the 100 TW target area of the Z-Backlighter Facility at Sandia National Laboratories. A suite of beam diagnostics was used to characterize a high energy laser pulse with a large aperture through focus imaging setup. By varying the fluence on the plasma mirror around the plasma ignition threshold, critical performance parameters were determined and a more detailed understanding of the way in which a plasma mirror works could be deduced. It was found, that very subtle variations in the laser near field profile will have strong effects on the reflected pulse if the maximum fluence on the plasma mirror approaches the plasma ignition threshold.

  18. Direct numerical simulations of structure and transport in dense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitley, Heather; Castor, John; Murillo, Michael; Graziani, Frank; Cimarron Collaboration

    2011-10-01

    In recent years, high power laser facilities, such as NIF, and advanced diagnostics have enabled the determination of detailed properties of dense plasmas over unprecedented regimes. Understanding such plasmas, which may be partially degenerate and/or moderately coupled, represents a major challenge to the plasma physics community. We examine the accuracy and applicability of approximate effective potentials in the study of structural and dynamic properties of one and two component systems in the partially and fully ionized regimes. The diffractive Coulomb potential is derived from an exact quantum solution for a pair of particles while the fermionic character of the electrons is handled via an effective Pauli potential. We utilize classical hypernetted chain and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to calculate static structure factors that can be compared to recent x-ray Thompson scattering experiments. We also examine whether these approximate potentials can be used to simulate electronic transport properties, such as thermal conductivity, and compare to recent quantum molecular dynamics calculations for hydrogen plasmas. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-490775.

  19. Primary Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury in Rats Leads to Increased Prion Protein in Plasma: A Potential Biomarker for Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Nam; Sawyer, Thomas W.; Wang, Yushan; Jazii, Ferdous Rastgar; Vair, Cory

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is deemed the “signature injury” of recent military conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq, largely because of increased blast exposure. Injuries to the brain can often be misdiagnosed, leading to further complications in the future. Therefore, the use of protein biomarkers for the screening and diagnosis of TBI is urgently needed. In the present study, we have investigated the plasma levels of soluble cellular prion protein (PrPC) as a novel biomarker for the diagnosis of primary blast-induced TBI (bTBI). We hypothesize that the primary blast wave can disrupt the brain and dislodge extracellular localized PrPC, leading to a rise in concentration within the systemic circulation. Adult male Sprague–Dawley rats were exposed to single pulse shockwave overpressures of varying intensities (15-30 psi or 103.4–206.8 kPa] using an advanced blast simulator. Blood plasma was collected 24 h after insult, and PrPC concentration was determined with a modified commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) specific for PrPC. We provide the first report that mean PrPC concentration in primary blast exposed rats (3.97 ng/mL±0.13 SE) is significantly increased compared with controls (2.46 ng/mL±0.14 SE; two tailed test p<0.0001). Furthermore, we report a mild positive rank correlation between PrPC concentration and increasing blast intensity (psi) reflecting a plateaued response at higher pressure magnitudes, which may have implications for all military service members exposed to blast events. In conclusion, it appears that plasma levels of PrPC may be a novel biomarker for the detection of primary bTBI. PMID:25058115

  20. Primary blast-induced traumatic brain injury in rats leads to increased prion protein in plasma: a potential biomarker for blast-induced traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Pham, Nam; Sawyer, Thomas W; Wang, Yushan; Jazii, Ferdous Rastgar; Vair, Cory; Taghibiglou, Changiz

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is deemed the "signature injury" of recent military conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq, largely because of increased blast exposure. Injuries to the brain can often be misdiagnosed, leading to further complications in the future. Therefore, the use of protein biomarkers for the screening and diagnosis of TBI is urgently needed. In the present study, we have investigated the plasma levels of soluble cellular prion protein (PrPC) as a novel biomarker for the diagnosis of primary blast-induced TBI (bTBI). We hypothesize that the primary blast wave can disrupt the brain and dislodge extracellular localized PrPC, leading to a rise in concentration within the systemic circulation. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to single pulse shockwave overpressures of varying intensities (15-30 psi or 103.4-206.8 kPa] using an advanced blast simulator. Blood plasma was collected 24 h after insult, and PrPC concentration was determined with a modified commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) specific for PrPC. We provide the first report that mean PrPC concentration in primary blast exposed rats (3.97 ng/mL ± 0.13 SE) is significantly increased compared with controls (2.46 ng/mL ± 0.14 SE; two tailed test p < 0.0001). Furthermore, we report a mild positive rank correlation between PrPC concentration and increasing blast intensity (psi) reflecting a plateaued response at higher pressure magnitudes, which may have implications for all military service members exposed to blast events. In conclusion, it appears that plasma levels of PrPC may be a novel biomarker for the detection of primary bTBI.

  1. Remote plasma processing of thin film materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastenmeier, Bernd E. E.

    1999-09-01

    In this thesis, phenomena and mechanisms of remote plasma processes are investigated. The plasmas are spatially separated from the sample surface. Chemically reactive species are produced in the discharge region from rather inert feed gases. They exit the discharge region and travel in the afterglow towards the reaction chamber, where primarily neutral species arrive. The interaction with the sample surface is purely chemical. The absence of direct plasma surface interactions distinguishes remote plasma Chemical Dry Etching (CDE) from other etch processes like Reactive Ion Etching (RIE) or Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) etching. The etch reactions in CDE are isotropic, potentially offer great etch rate ratios and minimize substrate damage due to the absence of direct plasma-surface interactions. However, some materials like silicon dioxide (SiO2) or fluorocarbon deposits are difficult to remove because of the lack of activation energy otherwise provided by ion bombardment. In CDE, rates can be enhanced by the introduction of a new reaction pathway. Remote plasma CDE of silicon nitride (Si3N4) is an example for increasing the overall reaction rate by introducing a new reaction channel. Typically, the Si3N4 surface is exposed to the fluorine rich afterglow of a fluorocarbon, nitrogen trifluoride (NF 3) or sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) based discharge. We find that the Si3N4 etch rate is dramatically enhanced when Nitric Oxide (NO) is present in the afterglow as compared to the case in which only fluorine is present. Presented here are detailed analyses of the etching of Si3N 4 and SiO2 in different chemistries. Several experimental techniques are employed to investigate the composition of the plasma and the afterglow, the surface modifications and the etch rates for tetrafluoromethane (CF4) and NF3 based processes. These measurements establish the effect of NO on the Si3N4 etch rate. The dominant mechanism for the etch rate enhancement is shown by mass spectrometry

  2. Generalized Sagdeev approach to nonlinear plasma excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we extend the Sagdeev pseudopotential approach by introducing the generalized potential, which is used for the investigation of nonlinear periodic, solitary, as well as double layer excitations in plasmas. Particularly in the framework of the generalized potential, the nonlinear excitations are investigated based on their total Sagdeev pseudoenergy. In this framework, conventional solitons are categorized as species with zero Sagdeev energy. A new type of positive energy solitons with subsonic Mach numbers is found. It is remarked that positive energy solitons do not obey the standard behavior of KdV solitons. Different types of nonlinear excitations are characterized in terms of their Sagdeev energy, and the parametric regions in which they exist are studied in detail. The nonlinear periodic waves are found to be either negative or positive energy type, characteristics of which are found to be quite different. A small amplitude theory of Sagdeev cnoidal waves is developed, which can be used to investigate the low energy waves with Mach numbers close to the critical one. Using the new concept of Sagdeev energy, we study different properties of large amplitude positive and negative energy nonlinear periodic waves in a plasma with arbitrary degree of electron degeneracy ranging from dilute classical up to the completely degenerate plasmas.

  3. Selforganisation in Plasma Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tendler, M.

    2004-01-01

    The bottom line of modern plasma physics addressing a many body problem is the lack of thermodynamic potentials for the system in which fluxes are no longer linear functions of forces or gradients. Indeed far from the classical equilibrium, a system can still converge to a stationary state, yet not defined by the proper thermodynamic potential in contrast to the entropy production principle valid only for a linear or weakly nonlinear system. In this case, we confront an important issue of stability of a strongly nonequilibrium system occurring and lacking the thermodynamic potential. In a linear system the equilibrium is defined by the minimum of the potential and therefore the stability of the resulting steady-state is easily found. Of course, any fluctuation causes a deviation from the equilibrium. Yet, linear or weakly nonlinear system will return to this steady state due to the second law of thermodynamics. Hence, the existence of the thermodynamic potential makes the equilibrium very robust. Given the potential, any evolution of a weakly nonlinear system will result in a static stationary state. In contrast, a strongly nonlinear system may loose a steady state very easily due to instability perturbed by fluctuations. If this is the case the fluctuation will be amplified until a very different steady state not described by a minimum of the thermodynamic potential emerges. In more detail, instability in a strongly nonlinear situation has always to exceed a given threshold in order to yield a different equilibrium far from an original static steady state. In fluids and plasmas it is well-known that any laminar motion can transform into a turbulent motion once a given fluid velocity is exceeded. It may appear that this transition yields a chaotic strongly fluctuating equilibrium. Indeed although at the macroscopic level this novel equilibrium may appear to be a complete disorder and chaos, it is found experimentally that at the microscopic level the new

  4. Momentum transfer to rotating magnetized plasma from gun plasma injection

    SciTech Connect

    Shamim, Imran; Hassam, A. B.; Ellis, R. F.; Witherspoon, F. D.; Phillips, M. W.

    2006-11-15

    Numerical simulations are carried out to investigate the penetration and momentum coupling of a gun-injected plasma slug into a rotating magnetized plasma. An experiment along these lines is envisioned for the Maryland Centrifugal Experiment (MCX) [R. F. Ellis et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 2057 (2001)] using a coaxial plasma accelerator gun developed by HyperV Technologies Corp. [F. D. Witherspoon et al., Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 50, LP1 87 (2005)]. The plasma gun would be located in the axial midplane and fired off-axis into the rotating MCX plasma annulus. The numerical simulation is set up so that the initial momentum in the injected plasma slug is of the order of the initial momentum of the target plasma. Several numerical firings are done into the cylindrical rotating plasma. Axial symmetry is assumed. The slug is seen to penetrate readily and deform into a mushroom, characteristic of interchange deformations. It is found that up to 25% of the momentum in the slug can be transferred to the background plasma in one pass across a cylindrical chord. For the same initial momentum, a high-speed low density slug gives more momentum transfer than a low-speed high density slug. Details of the numerical simulations and a scaling study are presented.

  5. Simultaneous determination of 18 D-amino acids in rat plasma by an ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method: application to explore the potential relationship between Alzheimer's disease and D-amino acid level alterations.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yuping; Li, Xiaoyan; Guo, Xingjie; Cui, Yan

    2016-01-01

    D-Amino acids are increasingly being recognized as important signaling molecules, and abnormal levels of D-amino acids have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. To evaluate the potential relationship between Alzheimer's disease and D-amino acids, a simple, sensitive, and reliable UPLC-MS/MS method with pre-column derivatization was developed and validated for simultaneous determination of 18 D-amino acids in rat plasma. The analytes were extracted from plasma samples by a protein precipitation procedure, and then derivatized with (S)-N-(4-nitrophenoxycarbonyl) phenylalanine methoxyethyl ester [(S)-NIFE]. Chromatographic separation was achieved using an ACQUITY UPLC BEH C18 column (2.1 mm × 50 mm, 1.7 μm) with a mobile phase composed of acetonitrile containing 8 mM ammonium hydrogen carbonate at a flow rate of 0.6 mL min(-1). The analytes were detected by electrospray ionization in positive ion multiple reaction monitoring modes. Under the optimum experimental conditions, all the linear regressions were acquired with r > 0.9932. The limits of quantitation of all derivatized D-amino acids were within 0.05-40.0 ng mL(-1) in rat plasma. The intra- and inter-day precisions, expressed as percentage relative standard deviations (%RSD), were within the range of 12.3 and 10.1%, respectively. The recoveries for all the analytes were observed over the range of 82.8-100.5% with RSD values less than 12.5%. Finally, the proposed method was successfully applied to simultaneous determination of the 18 D-amino acids in plasma from Alzheimer's disease rats and age-matched normal controls. Results showed that the concentrations of D-serine, D-aspartate, D-alanine, D-leucine, and D-proline in Alzheimer's disease rat plasma were significantly decreased compared with those in normal controls, while D-phenylalanine levels increased. It was revealed that some of these D-amino acids would be potential diagnostic biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease.

  6. 24. 'HANGAR SHEDS ELEVATIONS DETAILS; ARCHITECTURAL PLANS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. 'HANGAR SHEDS - ELEVATIONS - DETAILS; ARCHITECTURAL PLANS - PLANT AREA; MODIFICATION CENTER NO. 1, DAGGETT, CALIFORNIA.' Partial elevations, and details of sliding doors and ventilator flaps, as built. Contract no. W509 Eng. 2743; File no. 555/81, revision B, dated April 6, 1943. No sheet number. - Barstow-Daggett Airport, Hangar Shed No. 4, 39500 National Trails Highway, Daggett, San Bernardino County, CA

  7. 18 CFR 401.122 - Supplementary details.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Supplementary details. 401.122 Section 401.122 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE General Provisions § 401.122 Supplementary details....

  8. 18 CFR 401.122 - Supplementary details.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Supplementary details. 401.122 Section 401.122 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE General Provisions § 401.122 Supplementary details....

  9. 18 CFR 401.122 - Supplementary details.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Supplementary details. 401.122 Section 401.122 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE General Provisions § 401.122 Supplementary details....

  10. 18 CFR 401.122 - Supplementary details.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Supplementary details. 401.122 Section 401.122 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE General Provisions § 401.122 Supplementary details....

  11. Dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, M.E.; Winske, D.; Keinigs, R.; Lemons, D.

    1996-05-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this project has been to develop a fundamental understanding of dusty plasmas at the Laboratory. While dusty plasmas are found in space in galactic clouds, planetary rings, and cometary tails, and as contaminants in plasma enhanced fabrication of microelectronics, many of their properties are only partially understood. Our work has involved both theoretical analysis and self-consistent plasma simulations to understand basic properties of dusty plasmas related to equilibrium, stability, and transport. Such an understanding can improve the control and elimination of plasma dust in industrial applications and may be important in the study of planetary rings and comet dust tails. We have applied our techniques to the study of charging, dynamics, and coagulation of contaminants in plasma processing reactors for industrial etching and deposition processes and to instabilities in planetary rings and other space plasma environments. The work performed in this project has application to plasma kinetics, transport, and other classical elementary processes in plasmas as well as to plasma waves, oscillations, and instabilities.

  12. Topics in Plasma Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Vahala, Linda

    2015-05-31

    During the period 1998-2013, research under the auspices of the Department of Energy was performed on RF waves in plasmas. This research was performed in close collaboration with Josef Preinhaelter, Jakub Urban, Vladimir Fuchs, Pavol Pavlo and Frantisek Zacek (Czech Academy of Sciences), Martin Valovic and Vladimir Shevchenko (Culham). This research is detailed and all 38 papers which were published by this team are cited.

  13. N-Terminal Pro-B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Plasma Levels as a Potential Biomarker for Cardiac Damage After Radiotherapy in Patients With Left-Sided Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    D'Errico, Maria P.; Grimaldi, Luca; Petruzzelli, Maria F.; Gianicolo, Emilio A.L.; Tramacere, Francesco; Monetti, Antonio; Placella, Roberto; Pili, Giorgio; Andreassi, Maria Grazia; Sicari, Rosa; Picano, Eugenio; Portaluri, Maurizio

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) after breast-conserving surgery has been associated with increased cardiovascular mortality. Cardiac biomarkers may aid in identifying patients with radiation-mediated cardiac dysfunction. We evaluated the correlation between N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and troponin (TnI) and the dose of radiation to the heart in patients with left-sided breast cancer. Methods and Materials: NT-proBNP and TnI plasma concentrations were measured in 30 left-sided breast cancer patients (median age, 55.0 years) 5 to 22 months after RT (Group I) and in 30 left-sided breast cancer patients (median age, 57.0 years) before RT as control group (Group II). Dosimetric and geometric parameters of heart and left ventricle were determined in all patients of Group I. Seventeen patients underwent complete two-dimensional echocardiography. Results: NT-proBNP levels were significantly higher (p = 0.03) in Group I (median, 90.0 pg/ml; range, 16.7-333.1 pg/ml) than in Group II (median, 63.2 pg/ml; range, 11.0-172.5 pg/ml). TnI levels remained below the cutoff threshold of 0.07 ng/ml in both groups. In patients with NT-proBNP values above the upper limit of 125 pg/ml, there were significant correlations between plasma levels and V{sub 3Gy}(%) (p = 0.001), the ratios D{sub 15cm{sup 3}}(Gy)/D{sub mean}(Gy) (p = 0.01), the ratios D{sub 15cm}{sup 3}/D{sub 50%} (Gy) (p = 0.008) for the heart and correlations between plasma levels and V{sub 2Gy} (%) (p = 0.002), the ratios D{sub 1cm{sup 3}}(Gy)/D{sub mean}(Gy) (p = 0.03), and the ratios D{sub 0.5cm{sup 3}}(Gy)/D{sub 50%}(Gy) (p = 0.05) for the ventricle. Conclusions: Patients with left-sided breast cancer show higher values of NT-pro BNP after RT when compared with non-RT-treated matched patients, increasing in correlation with high doses in small volumes of heart and ventricle. The findings of this study show that the most important parameters are not the mean doses but instead the small

  14. Topics in high voltage pulsed power plasma devices and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hao

    Pulsed power technology is one of the tools that is used by scientists and engineers nowadays to produce gas plasmas. The transient ultra high power is able to provide a huge pulse of energy which is sometimes greater than the ionization energy of the gas, and therefore separates the ions and electrons to form the plasma. Sometimes, the pulsed power components themselves are plasma devices. For example, the gas type switches can "turn on" the circuit by creating the plasma channel between the switch electrodes. Mini Back Lighted Thyratron, or as we call it, mini-BLT, is one of these gas type plasma switches. The development of the reduced size and weight "mini-BLT" is presented in this dissertation. Based on the operation characteristics testing of the mini-BLT, suggestions of optimizing the design of the switch are proposed. All the factors such as the geometry of the hollow electrodes and switch housing, the gas condition, the optical triggering source, etc. are necessary to consider when we design and operate the mini-BLT. By reducing the diameter of the cylindrical gas path between the electrodes in the BLT, a novel high density plasma source is developed, producing the plasma in the "squeezed" capillary. The pulsed power generator, of course, is inevitably used to provide the ionization energy for hydrogen gas sealed in the capillary. Plasma diagnostics are necessarily analyzed and presented in detail to properly complete and understand the capillary plasma. This high density plasma source (1019 cm-3) has the potential applications in the plasma wakefield accelerator. The resonant oscillation behavior of the particles in plasmas allows for dynamically generated accelerating electric fields that have orders of magnitude larger than those available in the conventional RF accelerators. Finally, the solid state switches are introduced as a comparison to the gas type switch. Pulsed power circuit topologies such as the Marx Bank, magnetic pulse compression and diode

  15. The role of residual charges in the repeatability of the dynamics of atmospheric pressure room temperature plasma plume

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, S.; Lu, X.

    2014-12-15

    To better understand the role of residual electrons in the repeatability of an atmospheric pressure plasma plume, the characteristics of a helium plasma jet from the 1st, 2nd,… until the repeatable discharge pulse are investigated for the first time. It's found that the longest plasma plume is achieved in the 1st discharge pulse. The length of the plasma plume becomes shorter and shorter and reaches a constant value in the 3rd discharge pulse and keeps the same for the following pulses. The dynamics of the 1st discharge pulse show that the plasma bullet appears random in nature. Two photomultiplier tubes are used to distinguish the two potential factors that could result in the stochastic dynamics of the plasma bullet, i.e., stochastic ignition of the plasma and the stochastic propagation velocity. The results show that the stochastic propagation velocity occurs only in the 1st and the 2nd discharge pulses, while the stochastic ignition of the plasma presents until the 100th pulse. The dynamics of the plasma propagation become repeatable after about 100 pulses. Detail analysis shows that the repeatability of plasma bullet is due to the residual electrons density. The residual electron density of 10{sup 9 }cm{sup −3} or higher is needed for repeatable discharges mode.

  16. A Plasma Lens for Magnetron Sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre; Brown, Jeff

    2010-11-30

    A plasma lens, consisting of a solenoid and potential-defining ring electrodes, has been placed between a magnetron and substrates to be coated. Photography reveals qualitative information on excitation, ionization, and the transport of plasma to the substrate.

  17. 25. 'HANGAR SHEDS TRUSSES DETAILS; ARCHITECTURAL PLANS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. 'HANGAR SHEDS - TRUSSES - DETAILS; ARCHITECTURAL PLANS - PLANT AREA; MODIFICATION CENTER NO. 1, DAGGETT, CALIFORNIA.' Sections and details of trusses, ironwork, and joints, as modified to show ridge joint detail. As built. This blueline also shows the fire suppression system, added in orange pencil for 'Project 13: Bldgs. T-30, T-50, T-70, T-90' at a later, unspecified date. Contract no. W509 Eng. 2743; File no. 555/84, revision B, dated August 24, 1942. No sheet number. - Barstow-Daggett Airport, Hangar Shed No. 4, 39500 National Trails Highway, Daggett, San Bernardino County, CA

  18. The facile synthesis of chitosan-based silver nano-biocomposites via a solution plasma process and their potential antimicrobial efficacy.

    PubMed

    Davoodbasha, MubarakAli; Kim, Seong-Cheol; Lee, Sang-Yul; Kim, Jung-Wan

    2016-09-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were synthesized in a chitosan matrix with varying AgNO3 (1, 3, 5 mM) and chitosan (1, 3%) concentrations via the one-step solution plasma process (SPP). Plasma was discharged for 3 min in the AgNO3 and chitosan solutions using unipolar power at 800 V with a frequency of 30 kHz. Fibrous 3D scaffolds were prepared by lyophilizing the nano-biocomposite solutions, and they were stabilized via cross-linking with UV irradiation. UV-Vis spectroscopy showed strong peaks with maximal absorbance at 415-440 nm, indicating the formation of AgNPs in the chitosan with an increase in peak height as the concentration of the precursor, AgNO3, increased. The chemical association between AgNPs and chitosan was confirmed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The scaffolds had a micro-porous structure with pore diameters in the range of 5.8-157.0 μm, and a transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis revealed that spherical shaped AgNPs with diameters in the range of 2.5-27.6 nm were well-dispersed in the biocomposites. The nano-biocomposites had a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity against various pathogens with minimal inhibition concentrations of 0.68-2.71 and 2.71-10.80 μg mL(-1) for bacteria and fungi, respectively. These are the lowest concentrations achieved by nano-biocomposites reported thus far. The SPP was shown to be a facile, effective, and eco-friendly method of synthesizing nano-biocomposites for biomedical applications.

  19. The Potential of N-Rich Plasma-Polymerized Ethylene (PPE:N) Films for Regulating the Phenotype of the Nucleus Pulposus

    PubMed Central

    Mwale, Fackson; Petit, Alain; Tian Wang, Hong; Epure, Laura M; Girard-Lauriault, Pierre-Luc; Ouellet, Jean A; Wertheimer, Michael R; Antoniou, John

    2008-01-01

    We recently developed a nitrogen-rich plasma-polymerized biomaterial, designated “PPE:N” (N-doped plasma-polymerized ethylene) that is capable of suppressing cellular hypertrophy while promoting type I collagen and aggrecan expression in mesenchymal stem cells from osteoarthritis patients. We then hypothesized that these surfaces would form an ideal substrate on which the nucleus pulposus (NP) phenotype would be maintained. Recent evidence using microarrays showed that in young rats, the relative mRNA levels of glypican-3 (GPC3) and pleiotrophin binding factor (PTN) were significantly higher in nucleus pulposus (NP) compared to annulus fibrosus (AF) and articular cartilage. Furthermore, vimentin (VIM) mRNA levels were higher in NP versus articular cartilage. In contrast, the levels of expression of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) and matrix gla protein precursor (MGP) were lower in NP compared to articular cartilage. The objective of this study was to compare the expression profiles of these genes in NP cells from fetal bovine lumbar discs when cultured on either commercial polystyrene (PS) tissue culture dishes or on PPE:N with time. We found that the expression of these genes varies with the concentration of N ([N]). More specifically, the expression of several genes of NP was sensitive to [N], with a decrease of GPC3, VIM, PTN, and MGP in function of decreasing [N]. The expression of aggrecan, collagen type I, and collagen type II was also studied: no significant differences were observed in the cells on different surfaces with different culture time. The results support the concept that PPE:N may be a suitable scaffold for the culture of NP cells. Further studies are however necessary to better understand their effects on cellular phenotypes. PMID:19478889

  20. Measurements of the Plasma Parameters and Low Frequency Oscillations in the Fisk Plasma Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Edward, Jr.; Wallace, Kent; Lampkin, Gregory; Watson, Michael

    1998-01-01

    A new plasma device, the Fisk Plasma Source (FPS), has been developed at Fisk University. This plasma device is used to study the physics of low temperature plasmas and plasma-material interactions. The FPS device is a stainless steel vacuum 6-way cross vacuum vessel with at 10-inch inner diameter. Low temperature argon plasmas are generated using DC glow discharge and thermionic filament techniques. Spatial profiles of the plasma density, plasma potential, and electron temperature are measured using Langmuir probes. We present initial experimental measurements of density and temperature profiles in the FPS device. Experimental and theoretical studies of low frequency oscillations observed in the FPS device are also presented.

  1. High-current plasma contactor neutralizer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beattie, J. R.; Williamson, W. S.; Matossian, J. N.; Vourgourakis, E. J.; Burch, J. L.

    1989-01-01

    A plasma-contactor neutralizer system is described, for the stabilizing the Orbiter's potential during flights of the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science missions. The plasma contactor neutralizer will include a Xe plasma source that can provide steady-state ion-emission currents of up to 1.5 A. The Orbiter's potential will be maintained near that of the surrounding space plasma during electron-beam accelerator firings through a combination of ion emission from the Xe plasma source and electron collection from the ambient space plasma. Configuration diagrams and block diagrams are presented along with the performance characteristics of the system.

  2. Sputtering, Plasma Chemistry, and RF Sheath Effects in Low-Temperature and Fusion Plasma Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Thomas G.; Kruger, Scott E.; McGugan, James M.; Pankin, Alexei Y.; Roark, Christine M.; Smithe, David N.; Stoltz, Peter H.

    2016-09-01

    A new sheath boundary condition has been implemented in VSim, a plasma modeling code which makes use of both PIC/MCC and fluid FDTD representations. It enables physics effects associated with DC and RF sheath formation - local sheath potential evolution, heat/particle fluxes, and sputtering effects on complex plasma-facing components - to be included in macroscopic-scale plasma simulations that need not resolve sheath scale lengths. We model these effects in typical ICRF antenna operation scenarios on the Alcator C-Mod fusion device, and present comparisons of our simulation results with experimental data together with detailed 3D animations of antenna operation. Complex low-temperature plasma chemistry modeling in VSim is facilitated by MUNCHKIN, a standalone python/C++/SQL code that identifies possible reaction paths for a given set of input species, solves 1D rate equations for the ensuing system's chemical evolution, and generates VSim input blocks with appropriate cross-sections/reaction rates. These features, as well as principal path analysis (to reduce the number of simulated chemical reactions while retaining accuracy) and reaction rate calculations from user-specified distribution functions, will also be demonstrated. Supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's SBIR program, Award DE-SC0009501.

  3. Global detailed geoid computation and model analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, J. G.; Vincent, S.

    1974-01-01

    Comparisons and analyses were carried out through the use of detailed gravimetric geoids which we have computed by combining models with a set of 26,000 1 deg x 1 deg mean free air gravity anomalies. The accuracy of the detailed gravimetric geoid computed using the most recent Goddard earth model (GEM-6) in conjunction with the set of 1 deg x 1 deg mean free air gravity anomalies is assessed at + or - 2 meters on the continents of North America, Europe, and Australia, 2 to 5 meters in the Northeast Pacific and North Atlantic areas, and 5 to 10 meters in other areas where surface gravity data are sparse. The R.M.S. differences between this detailed geoid and the detailed geoids computed using the other satellite gravity fields in conjuction with same set of surface data range from 3 to 7 meters.

  4. Plasma dragged microparticles as a method to measure plasma flows

    SciTech Connect

    Ticos, Catalin M.; Wang Zhehui; Delzanno, Gian Luca; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2006-10-15

    The physics of microparticle motion in flowing plasmas is studied in detail for plasmas with electron and ion densities n{sub e,i}{approx}10{sup 19} m{sup -3}, electron and ion temperatures of no more than 15 eV, and plasma flows on the order of the ion thermal speed, v{sub f}{approx}v{sub ti}. The equations of motion due to Coulomb interactions and direct impact with ions and electrons, of charge variation, as well as of heat exchange with the plasma, are solved numerically for isolated particles (or dust grains) of micron sizes. It is predicted that microparticles can survive in plasma long enough, and can be dragged in the direction of the local ion flow. Based on the theoretical analysis, we describe a new plasma flow measurement technique called microparticle tracer velocimetry (mPTV), which tracks microparticle motion in a plasma with a high-speed camera. The mPTV can reveal the directions of the plasma flow vectors at multiple locations simultaneously and at submillimeter scales, which is hard to achieve by most other techniques. Thus, mPTV can be used to study plasma flows produced in the laboratory.

  5. Plasma Hole -- a Singular Vortex in a Magnetized Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, M. Y.

    2008-12-01

    A vortex with a density cavity in its core has been observed in a magnetized cylindrical plasma. It is called "plasma hole" from the visual impression when viewed along the axis of the vortex. The flow velocity measurements revealed that the plasma hole accompanies with supersonic azimuthal flow and radial flow toward the center, on a plane perpendicular to the magnetic field. The vorticity distribution evaluated from the flow velocity field is localized near the vortex center axis. This vorticity localization is identified as a Burgers vortex, which is the first observation of Burgers vortex in a plasma. The plasma hole is divided into two regions; in the peripheral regions the Lorentz force is balanced with the electric force (ExB drift), and in the core regions the Lorentz force is balanced with the centrifugal force. Rotation driven by centrifugal force is called fast rotation, and is realized only in non-neutral plasmas so far. It is found that charge neutrality condition in the core region breaks down by three order of magnitude compared with the case without plasma hole (10-6). The effective viscosity in the core region exhibits an anomaly as well. The detailed experimental results on the plasma hole and the implication from the viewpoint of basic plasma physics will be presented. Note from Publisher: This article contains the abstract only.

  6. Self-organization and oscillation of negatively charged dust particles in a 2-dimensional dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Y. L.; Huang, F.; Chen, Z. Y.; Liu, Y. H.; Yu, M. Y.

    2016-02-01

    Negatively charged dust particles immersed in 2-dimensional dusty plasma system are investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. The effects of the confinement potential and attraction interaction potential on dust particle self-organization are studied in detail and two typical dust particle distributions are obtained when the system reaches equilibrium. The average radial velocity (ARV), average radial force (ARF) and radial mean square displacement are employed to analyze the dust particles' dynamics. Both ARVs and ARFs exhibit oscillation behaviors when the simulation system reaches equilibrium state. The relationships between the oscillation and confinement potential and attraction potential are studied in this paper. The simulation results are qualitatively similar to experimental results.

  7. Interior building details of Building C, Room C203: detail decorative ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior building details of Building C, Room C-203: detail decorative radiator and four-over-four windows; southwesterly view - San Quentin State Prison, Building 22, Point San Quentin, San Quentin, Marin County, CA

  8. Plan, Detail of Lower Chord, Section at U8L8, Detail of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Plan, Detail of Lower Chord, Section at U8L8, Detail of Upper Chord - Springfield-Des Arc Bridge, Spanning North Branch of Cadron Creek at Old Springfield-Des Arc Road (County Road 222), Springfield, Conway County, AR

  9. Microparticle injection effects on microwave transmission through an overly dense plasma layer

    SciTech Connect

    Gillman, Eric D. Amatucci, W. E.; Williams, Jeremiah; Compton, C. S.

    2015-04-15

    Microparticles injected into a plasma have been shown to deplete the free electron population as electrons are collected through the process of microparticles charging to the plasma floating potential. However, these charged microparticles can also act to scatter electromagnetic signals. These experiments investigate microwave penetration through a previously impenetrable overly dense plasma layer as microparticles are injected and the physical phenomena associated with the competing processes that occur due to electron depletion and microwave scattering. The timescales for when each of these competing processes dominates is analyzed in detail. It was found that while both processes play a significant and dominant role at different times, ultimately, transmission through this impenetrable plasma layer can be significantly increased with microparticle injection.

  10. The effect of PECVD plasma decomposition on the wettability and dielectric constant changes in silicon modified DLC films for potential MEMS and low stiction applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ogwu, A. A.; Okpalugo, T. I. T.; McLaughlin, J. A. D.

    2012-09-15

    We have carried out investigations aimed at understanding the mechanism responsible for a water contact angle increase of up to ten degrees and a decrease in dielectric constant in silicon modified hydrogenated amorphous carbon films compared to unmodified hydrogenated amorphous carbon films. Our investigations based on surface chemical constituent analysis using Raman spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), SIMS, FTIR, contact angle / surface energy measurements and spectroscopic ellipsometry suggests the presence of hydrophobic chemical entities on the surface of the films. This observation is consistent with earlier theoretical plasma chemistry predictions and observed Raman peak shifts in the films. These surface hydrophobic entities also have a lower polarizability than the bonds in the un-modified films thereby reducing the dielectric constant of the silicon modified films measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry. Ellipsometric dielectric constant measurement is directly related to the surface energy through Hamaker's constant. Our current finding is expected to be of benefit to understanding stiction, friction and lubrication in areas that range from nano-tribology to microfluidics.

  11. Fundamental studies of fusion plasmas. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Aamodt, R.E.

    1998-01-30

    Lodestar has carried out a vigorous research program in the areas of rf, edge plasma and divertor physics, with emphasis largely geared towards improving the understanding and performance of ion-cyclotron heating and current drive (ICRF) systems. Additionally, a research program in the field of edge plasma and divertor modeling was initiated. Theoretical work on high power rf sheath formation for multi-strap rf arrays was developed and benchmarked against recent experimental data from the new JET A2 antennas. Sophisticated modeling tools were employed to understand the sheath formation taking into account realistic three-dimensional antenna geometry. A novel physics explanation of an observed anomaly in the low power loading of antennas was applied to qualitatively interpret data on DIII-D in terms of rf sheaths, and potential applications of the idea to develop a near-field sheath diagnostic were explored. Other rf-wave related topics were also investigated. Full wave ICRF modeling studies were carried out in support of ongoing and planned tokamaks experiments, including the investigation of low frequency plasma heating and current drive regimes for IGNITOR. In a cross-disciplinary study involving both MHD and ICRF physics, ponderomotive feedback stabilization by rf was investigated as a potential means of controlling external kink mode disruptions. In another study, the instability of the ion hybrid wave (IHW) in the presence of fusion alpha particles was studied. In the field of edge plasma and divertor modeling studies, Lodestar began the development of a theory of generalized ballooning and sheath instabilities in the scrape off layer (SOL) of divertor tokamaks. A detailed summary of the technical progress in these areas during the contract period is included, as well as where references to published work can be found. A separate listing of publications, meeting abstracts, and other presentations is also given at the end of this final report.

  12. Making detailed predictions makes (some) predictions worse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Theresa F.

    In this paper, we investigate whether making detailed predictions about an event makes other predictions worse. Across 19 experiments, 10,895 participants, and 415,960 predictions about 724 professional sports games, we find that people who made detailed predictions about sporting events (e.g., how many hits each baseball team would get) made worse predictions about more general outcomes (e.g., which team would win). We rule out that this effect is caused by inattention or fatigue, thinking too hard, or a differential reliance on holistic information about the teams. Instead, we find that thinking about game-relevant details before predicting winning teams causes people to give less weight to predictive information, presumably because predicting details makes information that is relatively useless for predicting the winning team more readily accessible in memory and therefore incorporated into forecasts. Furthermore, we show that this differential use of information can be used to predict what kinds of games will and will not be susceptible to the negative effect of making detailed predictions.

  13. The adiabatic energy change of plasma electrons and the frame dependence of the cross-shock potential at collisionless magnetosonic shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, C. C.; Scudder, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    The adiabatic energy gain of electrons in the stationary electric and magnetic field structure of collisionless shock waves was examined analytically in reference to conditions of the earth's bow shock. The study was performed to characterize the behavior of electrons interacting with the cross-shock potential. A normal incidence frame (NIF) was adopted in order to calculate the reversible energy change across a time stationary shock, and comparisons were made with predictions made by the de Hoffman-Teller (HT) model (1950). The electron energy gain, about 20-50 eV, is demonstrated to be consistent with a 200-500 eV potential jump in the bow shock quasi-perpendicular geometry. The electrons lose energy working against the solar wind motional electric field. The reversible energy process is close to that modeled by HT, which predicts that the motional electric field vanishes and the electron energy gain from the electric potential is equated to the ion energy loss to the potential.

  14. Plasma accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Zhehui; Barnes, Cris W.

    2002-01-01

    There has been invented an apparatus for acceleration of a plasma having coaxially positioned, constant diameter, cylindrical electrodes which are modified to converge (for a positive polarity inner electrode and a negatively charged outer electrode) at the plasma output end of the annulus between the electrodes to achieve improved particle flux per unit of power.

  15. Effects of atmospheric-pressure non-thermal bio-compatible plasma and plasma activated nitric oxide water on cervical cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying; Ho Kang, Min; Sup Uhm, Han; Joon Lee, Geon; Ha Choi, Eun; Han, Ihn

    2017-01-01

    Atmospheric-pressure non-thermal bio-compatible plasma is a partially ionized gas with electrically charged particles. Previous studies demonstrated that dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma could induce apoptosis of various cancer cells, in particular demonstrating the selective cytotoxicity of cancer cells over normal cells. Therefore, DBD plasma can be considered as a potential cancer treatment method for clinical applications. We previously developed a microwave jet plasma system, producing nitric oxide called nitric oxide-plasma activated water (NO-PAW). In this study, we explored the effects of NO-PAW on a cervical cancer cell line, in comparison with DBD plasma. The cytotoxicity results showed that the treatment of HeLa cell with DBD for 4 minutes and 7 μM concentration of NO-PAW could reach almost IC60. For the apoptosis assay, 4 minutes treatment of DBD could induce 7% apoptotic effect, whereas 7 μM NO-PAW could induce 18% apoptotic effect. In addition, we assumed that both DBD plasma and NO-PAW could induce HeLa cell apoptosis by facilitating an accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS). Although further detail on the molecular signal pathway is still needed, DBD and NO-PAW could become promising applications for effective and safe clinical trials for cancer therapy. PMID:28361987

  16. Effects of atmospheric-pressure non-thermal bio-compatible plasma and plasma activated nitric oxide water on cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Ho Kang, Min; Sup Uhm, Han; Joon Lee, Geon; Ha Choi, Eun; Han, Ihn

    2017-03-31

    Atmospheric-pressure non-thermal bio-compatible plasma is a partially ionized gas with electrically charged particles. Previous studies demonstrated that dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma could induce apoptosis of various cancer cells, in particular demonstrating the selective cytotoxicity of cancer cells over normal cells. Therefore, DBD plasma can be considered as a potential cancer treatment method for clinical applications. We previously developed a microwave jet plasma system, producing nitric oxide called nitric oxide-plasma activated water (NO-PAW). In this study, we explored the effects of NO-PAW on a cervical cancer cell line, in comparison with DBD plasma. The cytotoxicity results showed that the treatment of HeLa cell with DBD for 4 minutes and 7 μM concentration of NO-PAW could reach almost IC60. For the apoptosis assay, 4 minutes treatment of DBD could induce 7% apoptotic effect, whereas 7 μM NO-PAW could induce 18% apoptotic effect. In addition, we assumed that both DBD plasma and NO-PAW could induce HeLa cell apoptosis by facilitating an accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS). Although further detail on the molecular signal pathway is still needed, DBD and NO-PAW could become promising applications for effective and safe clinical trials for cancer therapy.

  17. Plasma contactor research, 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, John D.; Wilbur, Paul J.

    1991-01-01

    Emissive and Langmuir probes were used to measure plasma potential profiles, plasma densities, electron energy distributions, and plasma noise levels near a hollow cathode-based plasma contactor emitting electrons. The effects of electron emission current (100 to 1500 mA) and contactor flowrate (2 to 10 sccm (Xenon)) on these data are examined. Retarding potential analyzer (RPA) measurements showing that high energy ions generally stream from a contactor along with the electrons being emitted are also presented, and a mechanism by which this occurs is postulated. This mechanism, which involves a high rate of ionization induced between electrons and atoms flowing together from the hollow cathode orifice, results in a region of high positive space charge and high positive potential. Langmuir and RPA probe data suggests that both electrons and ions expand spherically from this potential hill region. In addition to experimental observations, a simple one-dimensional model which describes the electron emission process and predicts the phenomena just mentioned is presented and is shown to agree qualitatively with these observations. Experimental results of the first stage of bilateral cooperation with the Italian Institute of Interplanetary Space Physics (IFSI CNR) are presented. Sharp, well-defined double layers were observed downstream of a contactor collecting electrons from an ambient plasma created in the IFSI Facility. The voltage drop across these double layers was observed to increase with the current drawn from the ambient plasma. This observation, which was not as clear in previous IFSI tests conducted at higher neutral pressures, is in agreement with previous experimental observations made at both Colorado State University and NASA Lewis Research Center. Greater double layer voltage drops, multiple double layers, and higher noise levels in the region near the double layers were also observed when a magnetic field was imposed and oriented perpendicular to the

  18. Memory for details with self-referencing.

    PubMed

    Serbun, Sarah J; Shih, Joanne Y; Gutchess, Angela H

    2011-11-01

    Self-referencing benefits item memory, but little is known about the ways in which referencing the self affects memory for details. Experiment 1 assessed whether the effects of self-referencing operate only at the item, or general, level or whether they also enhance memory for specific visual details of objects. Participants incidentally encoded objects by making judgements in reference to the self, a close other (one's mother), or a familiar other (Bill Clinton). Results indicate that referencing the self or a close other enhances both specific and general memory. Experiments 2 and 3 assessed verbal memory for source in a task that relied on distinguishing between different mental operations (internal sources). The results indicate that self-referencing disproportionately enhances source memory, relative to conditions referencing other people, semantic, or perceptual information. We conclude that self-referencing not only enhances specific memory for both visual and verbal information, but can also disproportionately improve memory for specific internal source details.

  19. Unmatter Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smarandache, Florentin

    2015-11-01

    ``Unmatter Plasma'' is a novel form of plasma, exclusively made of matter and its antimatter counterpart. An experiment (2015) on matter-antimatter plasma [or unmatter plasma] was recently successful at the Astra Gemini laser facility at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxford, United Kingdom. The experiment that was made has produced electron-positron plasma. The positron is the antimatter of the electron, having an opposite charge of the electron, but the other properties are the same. Unmatter is considered as a combination of matter and antimatter. For example electron-positron is a type of unmatter. We coined the word ``unmatter'' (2004) that means neither matter nor antimatter, but something in between. Besides matter and antimatter there may exist unmatter (as a new form of matter) in accordance with the neutrosophy theory that between an entity and its opposite there exist intermediate entities.

  20. PLASMA ENERGIZATION

    DOEpatents

    Furth, H.P.; Chambers, E.S.

    1962-03-01

    BS>A method is given for ion cyclotron resonance heatthg of a magnetically confined plasma by an applied radio-frequency field. In accordance with the invention, the radiofrequency energy is transferred to the plasma without the usual attendent self-shielding effect of plasma polarlzatlon, whereby the energy transfer is accomplished with superior efficiency. More explicitly, the invention includes means for applying a radio-frequency electric field radially to an end of a plasma column confined in a magnetic mirror field configuration. The radio-frequency field propagates hydromagnetic waves axially through the column with the waves diminishing in an intermediate region of the column at ion cyclotron resonance with the fleld frequency. In such region the wave energy is converted by viscous damping to rotational energy of the plasma ions. (AEC)

  1. PLASMA DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Baker, W.R.

    1961-08-22

    A device is described for establishing and maintaining a high-energy, rotational plasma for use as a fast discharge capacitor. A disc-shaped, current- conducting plasma is formed in an axinl magnetic field and a crossed electric field, thereby creating rotational kinetic enengy in the plasma. Such energy stored in the rotation of the plasma disc is substantial and is convertible tc electrical energy by generator action in an output line electrically coupled to the plasma volume. Means are then provided for discharging the electrical energy into an external circuit coupled to the output line to produce a very large pulse having an extremely rapid rise time in the waveform thereof. (AE C)

  2. Dust-lower-hybrid instability with fluctuating charge in quantum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Jamil, M.; Ali, M.; Rasheed, A.; Zubia, K.; Salimullah, M.

    2015-03-15

    The instability of Dust-Lower-Hybrid (DLH) wave is examined in detail in the uniform dusty magnetoplasmas. The time dependent charging effects on dust particles around its equilibrium charge Q{sub d0} are taken into account based on Orbit-Limited Probe theory. The quantum characteristics of the system like Bohm potential and Fermi degenerate pressure are dealt using the quantum hydrodynamic model of plasmas. The external magnetic field and size of the dust particles have new physical effects over the dissipative instability of DLH wave in the quantum plasma regime.

  3. Inhibition of the plasma membrane Ca2+ pump by CD44 receptor activation of tyrosine kinases increases the action potential afterhyperpolarization in sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Biswarup; Li, Yan; Thayer, Stanley A

    2011-02-16

    The cytoplasmic Ca(2+) clearance rate affects neuronal excitability, plasticity, and synaptic transmission. Here, we examined the modulation of the plasma membrane Ca(2+) ATPase (PMCA) by tyrosine kinases. In rat sensory neurons grown in culture, the PMCA was under tonic inhibition by a member of the Src family of tyrosine kinases (SFKs). Ca(2+) clearance accelerated in the presence of selective tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Tonic inhibition of the PMCA was attenuated in cells expressing a dominant-negative construct or shRNA directed to message for the SFKs Lck or Fyn, but not Src. SFKs did not appear to phosphorylate the PMCA directly but instead activated focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Expression of constitutively active FAK enhanced and dominant-negative or shRNA knockdown of FAK attenuated tonic inhibition. Antisense knockdown of PMCA isoform 4 removed tonic inhibition of Ca(2+) clearance, indicating that FAK acts on PMCA4. The hyaluronan receptor CD44 activates SFK-FAK signaling cascades and is expressed in sensory neurons. Treating neurons with a CD44-blocking antibody or short hyaluronan oligosaccharides, which are produced during injury and displace macromolecular hyaluronan from CD44, attenuated tonic PMCA inhibition. Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels mediate a slow afterhyperpolarization in sensory neurons that was inhibited by tyrosine kinase inhibitors and enhanced by knockdown of PMCA4. Thus, we describe a novel kinase cascade in sensory neurons that enables the extracellular matrix to alter Ca(2+) signals by modulating PMCA-mediated Ca(2+) clearance. This signaling pathway may influence the excitability of sensory neurons following injury.

  4. Association with the Plasma Membrane Is Sufficient for Potentiating Catalytic Activity of Regulators of G Protein Signaling (RGS) Proteins of the R7 Subfamily.

    PubMed

    Muntean, Brian S; Martemyanov, Kirill A

    2016-03-25

    Regulators of G protein Signaling (RGS) promote deactivation of heterotrimeric G proteins thus controlling the magnitude and kinetics of responses mediated by G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR). In the nervous system, RGS7 and RGS9-2 play essential role in vision, reward processing, and movement control. Both RGS7 and RGS9-2 belong to the R7 subfamily of RGS proteins that form macromolecular complexes with R7-binding protein (R7BP). R7BP targets RGS proteins to the plasma membrane and augments their GTPase-accelerating protein (GAP) activity, ultimately accelerating deactivation of G protein signaling. However, it remains unclear if R7BP serves exclusively as a membrane anchoring subunit or further modulates RGS proteins to increase their GAP activity. To directly answer this question, we utilized a rapidly reversible chemically induced protein dimerization system that enabled us to control RGS localization independent from R7BP in living cells. To monitor kinetics of Gα deactivation, we coupled this strategy with measuring changes in the GAP activity by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer-based assay in a cellular system containing μ-opioid receptor. This approach was used to correlate changes in RGS localization and activity in the presence or absence of R7BP. Strikingly, we observed that RGS activity is augmented by membrane recruitment, in an orientation independent manner with no additional contributions provided by R7BP. These findings argue that the association of R7 RGS proteins with the membrane environment provides a major direct contribution to modulation of their GAP activity.

  5. Ion potential in warm dense matter: wake effects due to streaming degenerate electrons.

    PubMed

    Moldabekov, Zhandos; Ludwig, Patrick; Bonitz, Michael; Ramazanov, Tlekkabul

    2015-02-01

    The effective dynamically screened potential of a classical ion in a stationary flowing quantum plasma at finite temperature is investigated. This is a key quantity for thermodynamics and transport of dense plasmas in the warm-dense-matter regime. This potential has been studied before within hydrodynamic approaches or based on the zero temperature Lindhard dielectric function. Here we extend the kinetic analysis by including the effects of finite temperature and of collisions based on the Mermin dielectric function. The resulting ion potential exhibits an oscillatory structure with attractive minima (wakes) and, thus, strongly deviates from the static Yukawa potential of equilibrium plasmas. This potential is analyzed in detail for high-density plasmas with values of the Brueckner parameter in the range 0.1≤r(s)≤1 for a broad range of plasma temperature and electron streaming velocity. It is shown that wake effects become weaker with increasing temperature of the electrons. Finally, we obtain the minimal electron streaming velocity for which attraction between ions occurs. This velocity turns out to be less than the electron Fermi velocity. Our results allow for reliable predictions of the strength of wake effects in nonequilibrium quantum plasmas with fast streaming electrons showing that these effects are crucial for transport under warm-dense-matter conditions, in particular for laser-matter interaction, electron-ion temperature equilibration, and stopping power.

  6. Nonlinear relativistic plasma resonance: Renormalization group approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metelskii, I. I.; Kovalev, V. F.; Bychenkov, V. Yu.

    2017-02-01

    An analytical solution to the nonlinear set of equations describing the electron dynamics and electric field structure in the vicinity of the critical density in a nonuniform plasma is constructed using the renormalization group approach with allowance for relativistic effects of electron motion. It is demonstrated that the obtained solution describes two regimes of plasma oscillations in the vicinity of the plasma resonance— stationary and nonstationary. For the stationary regime, the spatiotemporal and spectral characteristi