Science.gov

Sample records for detailed plasma potential

  1. Detailed plasma potential measurements in a radio-frequency expanding plasma obtained from various electrostatic probes

    SciTech Connect

    Lafleur, T.; Charles, C.; Boswell, R. W.

    2009-04-15

    On-axis plasma potential measurements have been made with an emissive probe in a low pressure (0.044 Pa) rf expanding plasma containing an ion beam. The beam is detected with a retarding field energy analyzer (RFEA), and is seen to disappear at high pressure (0.39 Pa). The emissive probe measurements are in very good agreement with corresponding measurements made with two separate RFEAs, and the results indicate that the floating potential of the strongly emitting probe gives an accurate measure of the plasma potential under the present conditions.

  2. 24. DETAIL INTERIOR VIEW OF GENERATOR BUS POTENTIAL FOR UNIT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. DETAIL INTERIOR VIEW OF GENERATOR BUS POTENTIAL FOR UNIT NO 1 IN BUS CELL GALLERY ON LEVEL +77 OF POWERHOUSE #1. - Bonneville Project, Powerhouse No.1, Spanning Bradford Slough, from Bradford Island, Bonneville, Multnomah County, OR

  3. Plasmas: Diversity, pervasiveness and potential

    SciTech Connect

    Eastman, Timothy E.

    1998-01-01

    When considered inclusively, plasma science and technology encompass immense diversity, pervasiveness and potential: diversity through numerous topical areas (see list of nearly 200 in Table II); pervasiveness with examples covering the full range of energy, time and spatial scale; and potential through innumerable current and future applications.

  4. The onset of plasma potential locking

    DOE PAGES

    Hopkins, Matthew M.; Yee, Benjamin T.; Baalrud, Scott D.; ...

    2016-06-22

    In this study, we provide insight into the role and impact that a positively biased electrode (anode) has on bulk plasma potential. Using two-dimensional Particle-in-Cell simulations, we investigate the plasma potential as an anode transitions from very small (“probe” mode) to large (“locking” mode). Prior theory provides some guidance on when and how this transition takes place. Initial experimental results are also compared. The simulations demonstrate that as the surface area of the anode is increased transitions in plasma potential and sheath polarity occur, consistent with experimental observations and theoretical predictions. It is expected that understanding this basic plasma behaviormore » will be of interest to basic plasma physics communities, diagnostic developers, and plasma processing devices where control of bulk plasma potential is important.« less

  5. The onset of plasma potential locking

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, Matthew M. Yee, Benjamin T.; Barnat, Edward V.; Baalrud, Scott D.

    2016-06-15

    In this paper, we provide insight into the role and impact that a positively biased electrode (anode) has on bulk plasma potential. Using two-dimensional Particle-in-Cell simulations, we investigate the plasma potential as an anode transitions from very small (“probe” mode) to large (“locking” mode). Prior theory provides some guidance on when and how this transition takes place. Initial experimental results are also compared. The simulations demonstrate that as the surface area of the anode is increased transitions in plasma potential and sheath polarity occur, consistent with experimental observations and theoretical predictions. It is expected that understanding this basic plasma behavior will be of interest to basic plasma physics communities, diagnostic developers, and plasma processing devices where control of bulk plasma potential is important.

  6. The onset of plasma potential locking

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, Matthew M.; Yee, Benjamin T.; Baalrud, Scott D.; Barnat, Edward V.

    2016-06-22

    In this study, we provide insight into the role and impact that a positively biased electrode (anode) has on bulk plasma potential. Using two-dimensional Particle-in-Cell simulations, we investigate the plasma potential as an anode transitions from very small (“probe” mode) to large (“locking” mode). Prior theory provides some guidance on when and how this transition takes place. Initial experimental results are also compared. The simulations demonstrate that as the surface area of the anode is increased transitions in plasma potential and sheath polarity occur, consistent with experimental observations and theoretical predictions. It is expected that understanding this basic plasma behavior will be of interest to basic plasma physics communities, diagnostic developers, and plasma processing devices where control of bulk plasma potential is important.

  7. The onset of plasma potential locking

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, Matthew M.; Yee, Benjamin T.; Baalrud, Scott D.; Barnat, Edward V.

    2016-06-22

    In this study, we provide insight into the role and impact that a positively biased electrode (anode) has on bulk plasma potential. Using two-dimensional Particle-in-Cell simulations, we investigate the plasma potential as an anode transitions from very small (“probe” mode) to large (“locking” mode). Prior theory provides some guidance on when and how this transition takes place. Initial experimental results are also compared. The simulations demonstrate that as the surface area of the anode is increased transitions in plasma potential and sheath polarity occur, consistent with experimental observations and theoretical predictions. It is expected that understanding this basic plasma behavior will be of interest to basic plasma physics communities, diagnostic developers, and plasma processing devices where control of bulk plasma potential is important.

  8. Modified Debye screening potential in a magnetized quantum plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salimullah, M.; Hussain, A.; Sara, I.; Murtaza, G.; Shah, H. A.

    2009-07-01

    The effects of quantum mechanical influence and uniform static magnetic field on the Shukla-Nambu-Salimullah potential in an ultracold homogeneous electron-ion Fermi plasma have been examined in detail. It is noticed that the strong quantum effect arising through the Bohm potential and the ion polarization effect can give rise to a new oscillatory behavior of the screening potential beyond the shielding cloud which could explain a new type of possible robust ordered structure formation in the quantum magnetoplasma. However, the magnetic field enhances the Debye length perpendicular to the magnetic field in the weak quantum limit of the quantum plasma.

  9. A Hybrid Model for Multiscale Laser Plasma Simulations with Detailed Collisional Physics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-11-29

    Simulations with Detailed Collisional Physics 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) David Bilyeu...with Detailed Collisional Physics Richard Abrantes1,2, Hai Le1,2, Carl Lederman2, PI: David Bilyeu3 1UCLA 2ERC Inc. 3AFRL/RQRS AFOSR Plasma and...Capture complex physics : excitation/ionization, transport, radiation, etc. • Consistent collision operator across different levels of fidelity. FRC

  10. Hydrogen-fueled scramjets: Potential for detailed combustor analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beach, H. L., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Combustion research related to hypersonic scramjet (supersonic combustion ramjet) propulsion is discussed from the analytical point of view. Because the fuel is gaseous hydrogen, mixing is single phase and the chemical kinetics are well known; therefore, the potential for analysis is good relative to hydro-carbon fueled engines. Recent progress in applying two and three dimensional analytical techniques to mixing and reacting flows indicates cause for optimism, and identifies several areas for continuing effort.

  11. Detailed study of the water trimer potential energy surface

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.E.; Schaefer, H.F. III )

    1995-01-11

    The potential energy surface of the water trimer has been studied through the use of ab initio quantum mechanical methods. Five stationary points were located, including one minimum and two transition states. All geometries were optimized at levels up to the double-[Zeta] plus polarization plus diffuse (DZP + diff) single and double excitation coupled cluster (CCSD) level of theory. CCSD single energy points were obtained for the minimum, two transition states, and the water monomer using the triple-[Zeta] plus double polarization plus diffuse (TZ2P + diff) basis at the geometries predicted by the DZP + diff CCSD method. Reported are the following: geometrical parameters, total and relative energies, harmonic vibrational frequencies and infrared intensities for the minimum, and zero point vibrational energies for the minimum, two transition states, and three separated water molecules. 27 refs., 5 figs., 10 tabs.

  12. Studies of particle wake potentials in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Ian N.; Graziani, Frank R.; Glosli, James N.; Strozzi, David J.; Surh, Michael P.; Richards, David F.; Decyk, Viktor K.; Mori, Warren B.

    2011-09-01

    A detailed understanding of electron stopping and scattering in plasmas with variable values for the number of particles within a Debye sphere is still not at hand. Presently, there is some disagreement in the literature concerning the proper description of these processes. Theoretical models assume electrostatic (Coulomb force) interactions between particles and neglect magnetic effects. Developing and validating proper descriptions requires studying the processes using first-principle plasma simulations. We are using the particle-particle particle-mesh (PPPM) code ddcMD and the particle-in-cell (PIC) code BEPS to perform these simulations. As a starting point in our study, we examine the wake of a particle passing through a plasma in 3D electrostatic simulations performed with ddcMD and BEPS. In this paper, we compare the wakes observed in these simulations with each other and predictions from collisionless kinetic theory. The relevance of the work to Fast Ignition is discussed.

  13. Simulation of plasma discharge in liquids: A detailed two-phase fluid approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charchi Aghdam, Ali; Farouk, Tanvir; Reacting Systems; Advanced Energy Research Laboratory Team

    2015-09-01

    Plasma discharge in liquids has gained great attention recently due to its applications in biomedical engineering, fuel processing, and water treatment and so on. Despite the tremendous interest, a comprehensive understanding of the underlying physics still remains limited. In the current work, an attempt is made to present a mathematical multi-physics model to describe the discharge of plasma in liquids. An in-house modeling platform is developed for simulating plasma formation in multiphase fluids. The model resolves a detailed two-phase fluid including viscous effects, surface tension, gravitational forces and electrical body force. All the governing equations are solved for gas and liquid phases. Electric field and charged species equations along with the plasma reaction kinetics are solved to get the charge distribution in the different phases as well as at the gas-liquid interface to obtain the electric body force acting at the interface. By coupling the above sub-models, a comprehensive multi-physics model for plasma discharge in liquids is constructed which is able to capture several physical aspects of the phenomena especially the role of the bubble, its motion and distortion on plasma characteristics.

  14. Ionization Potential Depression in Strongly Coupled Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wark, Justin; Ciricosta, Orlando; Vinko, Sam; Crowley, Basil

    2013-10-01

    The focusing of the output of 4th generation femtosecond X-ray sources to ultra-high intensities has enabled the creation of hot (close to 200-eV) aluminum plasmas at exactly solid density. Tuning of the X-ray FEL energy that produces the plasma, and observation of the subsequent K- α fluorescence from the highly charged ions allows direct measurements of the K-edges, and hence ionization potential depression (IPD). The results of these experiments show far higher depressions than those predicted by the frequently-used Stewart-Pyatt model, but appear to be in contradiction with laser-plasma experimental data at similar densities, but with hotter, less strongly-coupled plasmas. We present here new calculations of the IPD, both ab initio and analytic, and discuss the relevance of the coupling parameter to the IPD. We further explore what constitutes our understanding of the physics of IPD, and how it should be modelled.

  15. Detailed energy distributions in laser-produced plasmas of solid gold and foam gold planar targets

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Yunsong; Zhang, Lu; Yang, Jiamin; Shang, Wanli

    2013-12-15

    Foam gold was proposed to increase the laser to x-ray conversion efficiency due to its important applications. To understand the mechanism of x-ray enhancement, the detailed energy distributions and plasma profiles for laser-irradiated solid gold and foam gold targets were studied comparatively by hydrodynamic simulations using the code Multi-1D. It is confirmed that the radiation heat wave is subsonic for the normal solid gold target, while supersonic for the foam gold target. The shock wave, which is behind the supersonic radiation heat wave for the foam gold target, generates a plasma temperature gradient with high temperature near the shock wave front to produce an additional net outward radiation for enhancement of the x-ray emission. Much larger inward plasma velocity is also driven by the shock wave as an initial plasma velocity for the laser deposition and electron thermal conduct zone, which decreases the expanding plasma kinetic energy loss and helps to increase the x-ray radiation.

  16. Control of laser-ablation plasma potential with external electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Isono, Fumika Nakajima, Mitsuo; Hasegawa, Jun; Kawamura, Tohru; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2015-08-15

    The potential of a laser-ablation plasma was controlled stably up to +2 kV by using external ring electrodes. A stable electron sheath was formed between the plasma and the external electrodes by placing the ring electrodes away from the boundary of the drifting plasma. The plasma kept the potential for a few μs regardless of the flux change of the ablation plasma. We also found that the plasma potential changed with the expansion angle of the plasma from the target. By changing the distance between the plasma boundary and the external electrodes, we succeeded in controlling the potential of laser-ablation plasma.

  17. Potential surface waves in anisotropic plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Aliev, Yu. M. Vagin, K. Yu. Uryupin, S. A.; Frolov, A. A.

    2016-06-15

    The dependences of the frequency and damping rate of a potential surface wave on the wavenumber and the degree of anisotropy of a bi-Maxwellian electron distribution characterized by different temperatures along and across the plasma surface are established. It is demonstrated that the influence of electron thermal motion along the plasma surface on the surface wave properties is similar to the influence of thermal motion on the properties of a bulk Langmuir wave. On the contrary, thermal motion across the surface qualitatively affects the dispersion relation and substantially increases the damping rate.

  18. Plasma source for spacecraft potential control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    A stable electrical ground which enables the particle spectrometers to measure the low energy particle populations was investigated and the current required to neutralize the spacecraft was measured. In addition, the plasma source for potential control (PSPO C) prevents high charging events which could affect the spacecraft electrical integrity. The plasma source must be able to emit a plasma current large enough to balance the sum of all other currents to the spacecraft. In ion thrusters, hollow cathodes provide several amperes of electron current to the discharge chamber. The PSPO C is capable of balancing the net negative currents found in eclipse charging events producing 10 to 100 microamps of electron current. The largest current required is the ion current necessary to balance the total photoelectric current.

  19. Detailed analysis of low energy plasma data under the Voyager Uranus data analysis program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnutt, Ralph L., Jr.; Belcher, John W.; Bagenal, Frances; Richardson, John D.

    1992-01-01

    Research effort included the PLS data analysis program where modifications to the data fitting procedure and elimination of possible noise and electron contamination were made. The analysis code corrections were used in checking the Neptune data gathered during the Voyager 2 encounter and for analyzing selected plasma spectra from the warm Io torus. A major task accomplished was the summary of Uranus-related research in the U.S. National Report to the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics for the 1987 - 1990 quadrennium. A limited amount of work was accomplished on assessing the Pedersen conductivity of the ionosphere and comparing it with inferred values from shielding by the Uranian ring current. Under this grant there has been a great deal of effort expended on identifying and classifying plasma waves and oscillations in the magnetosheath and solar wind downstream from Uranus. Large amplitude oscillations in plasma parameters are found in the magnetosheath, with density changes of up to a factor of ten occurring on times scales of minutes. New algorithms developed for analyzing the inbound bow shock crossing of Neptune will probably be applied to a more detailed analysis of the Uranus shock in the near future.

  20. Studies of Particle Wake Potentials in Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Ian; Graziani, Frank; Glosli, James; Strozzi, David; Surh, Michael; Richards, David; Decyk, Viktor; Mori, Warren

    2011-10-01

    Fast Ignition studies require a detailed understanding of electron scattering, stopping, and energy deposition in plasmas with variable values for the number of particles within a Debye sphere. Presently there is disagreement in the literature concerning the proper description of these processes. Developing and validating proper descriptions requires studying the processes using first-principle electrostatic simulations and possibly including magnetic fields. We are using the particle-particle particle-mesh (PPPM) code ddcMD and the particle-in-cell (PIC) code BEPS to perform these simulations. As a starting point in our study, we examine the wake of a particle passing through a plasma in 3D electrostatic simulations performed with ddcMD and with BEPS using various cell sizes. In this poster, we compare the wakes we observe in these simulations with each other and predictions from Vlasov theory. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and by UCLA under Grant DE-FG52-09NA29552.

  1. Analysis of magnetic-dipole transitions in tungsten plasmas using detailed and configuration-average descriptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Xieyu; Poirier, Michel

    2017-06-01

    This paper is devoted to the analysis of transition arrays of magnetic-dipole (M1) type in highly charged ions. Such transitions play a significant role in highly ionized plasmas, for instance in the tungsten plasma present in tokamak devices. Using formulas recently published and their implementation in the Flexible Atomic Code for M1-transition array shifts and widths, absorption and emission spectra arising from transitions inside the 3*n complex of highly-charged tungsten ions are analyzed. A comparison of magnetic-dipole transitions with electric-dipole (E1) transitions shows that, while the latter are better described by transition array formulas, M1 absorption and emission structures reveal some insufficiency of these formulas. It is demonstrated that the detailed spectra account for significantly richer structures than those predicted by the transition array formalism. This is due to the fact that M1 transitions may occur between levels inside the same relativistic configuration, while such inner configuration transitions are not accounted for by the currently available averaging expression. In addition, because of configuration interaction, transition processes involving more than one electron jump, such as 3p1/23d5/2 → 3p3/23d3/2, are possible but not accounted for in the transition array formulas. These missing transitions are collected in pseudo-arrays using a post-processing method described in this paper. The relative influence of inner- and inter-configuration transitions is carefully analyzed in cases of tungsten ions with net charge around 50. The need for an additional theoretical development is emphasized.

  2. Radiative opacities and configuration interaction effects of hot iron plasma using a detailed term accounting model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Fengtao; Zeng, Jiaolong; Yuan, Jianmin

    2003-12-01

    We have calculated the radiative opacities of iron plasma in local thermodynamic equilibrium using a detailed term accounting model. The extensive atomic data are obtained by multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock (MCHF) method, with Breit-Pauli relativistic corrections. Extensive configuration interaction (CI) has been included based on LS coupling to obtain energy levels and the bound-bound transition cross sections. A detailed configuration accounting model is applied to evaluate the bound-free absorption cross sections. We simulate two experimental transmission spectra [G. Winhart et al., Phys. Rev. E 53, R1332 (1996); P. T. Springer et al., J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transf. 58, 927 (1997)] to verify our calculation model, one is at a temperature of 22 eV and a density of 10-2 g/cm3 and the other is at a temperature of 20 eV and a lower density of 10-4 g/cm3. It is shown that the strong CI can effectively change the oscillator strengths in contrast to the single configuration HF method. For both of the two simulated transmission spectra good agreement is obtained between the present MCHF results and the experimental data. Spectrally resolved opacities and Planck and Rosseland mean opacities are also calculated. For the isothermal sequence of T=20 eV, when the density decreases from 10-2 to 10-5 g/cm3, the linewidth also decreases so that the iron transition arrays show more discrete line structures and the linewidth becomes very important to the Rosseland mean opacity.

  3. Two-fluid electromagnetic simulations of plasma-jet acceleration with detailed equation-of-state

    SciTech Connect

    Thoma, C.; Welch, D. R.; Clark, R. E.; Bruner, N.; MacFarlane, J. J.; Golovkin, I. E.

    2011-10-15

    We describe a new particle-based two-fluid fully electromagnetic algorithm suitable for modeling high density (n{sub i} {approx} 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3}) and high Mach number laboratory plasma jets. In this parameter regime, traditional particle-in-cell (PIC) techniques are challenging due to electron timescale and lengthscale constraints. In this new approach, an implicit field solve allows the use of large timesteps while an Eulerian particle remap procedure allows simulations to be run with very few particles per cell. Hall physics and charge separation effects are included self-consistently. A detailed equation of state (EOS) model is used to evolve the ion charge state and introduce non-ideal gas behavior. Electron cooling due to radiation emission is included in the model as well. We demonstrate the use of these new algorithms in 1D and 2D Cartesian simulations of railgun (parallel plate) jet accelerators using He and Ar gases. The inclusion of EOS and radiation physics reduces the electron temperature, resulting in higher calculated jet Mach numbers in the simulations. We also introduce a surface physics model for jet accelerators in which a frictional drag along the walls leads to axial spreading of the emerging jet. The simulations demonstrate that high Mach number jets can be produced by railgun accelerators for a variety of applications, including high energy density physics experiments.

  4. First Results from Detailed Electric and Magnetic Field Measurements of the Interaction of a Laser-Produced and Ambient Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeffer, D. B.; Hofer, L. R.; Heuer, P. V.; Constantin, C. G.; Bondarenko, A. S.; Everson, E. T.; Clark, S. E.; Gekelman, W.; Niemann, C.

    2015-11-01

    Utilizing high-repetition lasers combined with a high-repetition ambient plasma allows for detailed 3D scans of the interaction of the laser-produced and ambient plasmas. We present the first results from experiments combining a newly-commissioned high-repetition (1 Hz) laser with the 1 Hz ambient plasma of the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) at the University of California, Los Angeles. The laser (20 J, 14 ns) was focused on a cylindrical plastic target embedded in the ambient LAPD plasma, resulting in an ablated debris-plasma that expanded perpendicular to the background magnetic field. The debris-ambient plasma interaction was studied with 3-axis magnetic flux probes, mounted on a 3D motion drive for detailed, high-resolution planar scans both along and perpendicular to the background field. Measurements were also taken using filtered fast-gate (ns) imaging, emissive Langmuir probes, and emissive spectroscopy. The results show that the debris ions are de-energized inside the diamagnetic cavity, while the ambient ions are accelerated through laminar electric fields.

  5. Density and potential measurements in an intense ion-beam-generated plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Abt, N.E.

    1982-05-01

    Neutral beams are created by intense large area ion beams which are neutralized in a gas cell. The interaction of the beam with the gas cell creates a plasma. Such a plasma is studied here. The basic plasma parameters, electron temperature, density, and plasma potential, are measured as a function of beam current and neutral gas pressure. These measurements are compared to a model based on the solution of Poisson's equation. Because of the cylindrical geometry the equation cannot be solved analytically. Details of the numerical method are presented.

  6. Parameters influencing plasma column potential in a reflex discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liziakin, G. D.; Gavrikov, A. V.; Murzaev, Y. A.; Usmanov, R. A.; Smirnov, V. P.

    2016-12-01

    Distribution of electrostatic potential in direct current reflex discharge plasma has been studied experimentally. Measurements have been conducted by the single floating probe method. The influence of 0-0.2 T magnetic field, 1-200 mTorr pressure, 0-2 kV discharge voltage, and electrodes geometry on plasma column electrostatic potential was investigated. The possibility for the formation of a preset potential profile required for the realization of plasma separation of spent nuclear fuel was demonstrated.

  7. Edge ambipolar potential in toroidal fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Spizzo, G. Vianello, N.; Agostini, M.; Puiatti, M. E.; Scarin, P.; Spolaore, M.; Terranova, D.; White, R. B.; Abdullaev, S. S.; Schmitz, O.; Cavazzana, R.; Ciaccio, G.

    2014-05-15

    A series of issues with toroidally confined fusion plasmas are related to the generation of 3D flow patterns by means of edge magnetic islands, embedded in a chaotic field and interacting with the wall. These issues include the Greenwald limit in Tokamaks and reversed-field pinches, the collisionality window for ELM mitigation with the resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) in Tokamaks, and edge islands interacting with the bootstrap current in stellarators. Measurements of the 2D map of the edge electric field E{sup r}(r=a,θ,ϕ) in the RFX reversed-field pinch show that E{sup r} has the same helicity of the magnetic islands generated by a m/n perturbation: in fact, defining the helical angle u=mθ−nϕ+ωt, maps show a sinusoidal dependence as a function of u, E{sup r}=E{sup ~r}sin u. The associated E × B flow displays a huge convective cell with v(a)≠0 which, in RFX and near the Greenwald limit, determines a stagnation point for density and a reversal of the sign of E{sup r}. From a theoretical point of view, the question is how a perturbed toroidal flux of symmetry m/n gives rise to an ambipolar potential Φ=Φ{sup ~}sin u. On the basis of a model developed with the guiding center code ORBIT and applied to RFX and the TEXTOR tokamak, we will show that the presence of an m/n perturbation in any kind of device breaks the toroidal symmetry with a drift proportional to the gyroradius ρ, thus larger for ions (ρ{sub i} ≫ ρ{sub e}). Immediately, an ambipolar potential arises to balance the drifts, with the same symmetry as the original perturbation.

  8. Detailed Analysis Case Studies of Trapped Plasmas at the Earth’s Magnetic Equator

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-01

    5 Figure 2. Plasma Density L Dependance ...... ......... 7 Figure 3. Plasmapause Magnetic Activity Dependance . . 8 Figure 4. Plasma Density L... Dependance - Normalized . . 10 Figure 5. The Dusk Bulge . . . .............. 13 Figure 6. Magnetosphere’s Electric and Magnetic Fields 14 Figure 7...1970). 6 -. ~ .ZJ.:AUGUST 12,1968 . -. ----- OUTBOUND PASS - 2 3 4 5 ___ ... 7....9 L Figure 2. Plasma Density L Dependance 7 0D3 #n /2 OUT JND tN

  9. Detailed observations of the plasma sheet during a substorm on April 24, 1979

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hones, E. W., Jr.; Fritz, T. A.; Birn, J.; Cooney, J.; Bame, S. J.

    1986-01-01

    Plasma, magnetic field, and energetic particle data obtained by ISEE 1 and 2 satellites for the April 24, 1979 substorm are studied in relation to the neutral line model and the boundary layer model. The ISEE 1 and 2 instruments and experiments utilized to collect the data are discussed. The major reconfiguration of the tail plasma and magnetic field plasma region, and the plasma ion flows observed support the neutral line model for interpreting substorms. The plasma ion distribution function and plasma flow are examined. The region of lobe-plasma sheet interface referred to as the separatrix layer is identified. The differences in times of plasma sheet dropout and recovery, and absence or presence of flux anisotropies are investigated. Energetic particle measurements are analyzed to study the relationship between energetic ions and plasma ions, and the velocity distributions. The data support the application of the neutral line model to the evaluation of substorms; however, the data are inconsistent with the boundary layer dynamics model.

  10. Shaping thin film growth and microstructure pathways via plasma and deposition energy: a detailed theoretical, computational and experimental analysis.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Bibhuti Bhusan; Han, Jeon Geon; Kersten, Holger

    2017-02-15

    Understanding the science and engineering of thin films using plasma assisted deposition methods with controlled growth and microstructure is a key issue in modern nanotechnology, impacting both fundamental research and technological applications. Different plasma parameters like electrons, ions, radical species and neutrals play a critical role in nucleation and growth and the corresponding film microstructure as well as plasma-induced surface chemistry. The film microstructure is also closely associated with deposition energy which is controlled by electrons, ions, radical species and activated neutrals. The integrated studies on the fundamental physical properties that govern the plasmas seek to determine their structure and modification capabilities under specific experimental conditions. There is a requirement for identification, determination, and quantification of the surface activity of the species in the plasma. Here, we report a detailed study of hydrogenated amorphous and crystalline silicon (c-Si:H) processes to investigate the evolution of plasma parameters using a theoretical model. The deposition processes undertaken using a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition method are characterized by a reactive mixture of hydrogen and silane. Later, various contributions of energy fluxes on the substrate are considered and modeled to investigate their role in the growth of the microstructure of the deposited film. Numerous plasma diagnostic tools are used to compare the experimental data with the theoretical results. The film growth and microstructure are evaluated in light of deposition energy flux under different operating conditions.

  11. Detailed computational procedure for design of cascade blades with prescribed velocity distributions in compressible potential flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costello, George R; Cummings, Robert L; Sinnette, John T , Jr

    1952-01-01

    A detailed step-by-step computational outline is presented for the design of two-dimensional cascade blades having a prescribed velocity distribution on the blade in a potential flow of the usual compressible fluid. The outline is based on the assumption that the magnitude of the velocity in the flow of the usual compressible nonviscous fluid is proportional to the magnitude of the velocity in the flow of a compressible nonviscous fluid with linear pressure-volume relation.

  12. A Hybrid Model for Multiscale Laser Plasma Simulations with Detailed Collisional Physics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-06-23

    electric field produced either directly from the absorption process or via ponderomotive forces. This E- field creates an electron current which could...no person shall be subject to any penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB...the effects of inelastic collisions on the Multi-Fluid description of plasmas. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Electric propulsion; plasma; collisional

  13. Probe technique for measurement of a plasma potential waveform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvořák, P.; Tkáčik, M.; Bém, J.

    2017-05-01

    A method for the measurement of plasma potential waveforms is presented that is based on measurement with a high-impedance probe and an electric model of the sheath around the probe. The method was verified and compared with methods that were previously used for measurement of the temporal development of plasma potential during an RF period of capacitive discharges. The sensitivity of the method to the values of required input parameters (mean plasma potential value, electron concentration and temperature) was analyzed and it was found that with a lower precision, the method can be used even without the knowledge of these input parameters. Finally, plasma potential waveforms were measured in a low-pressure capacitively coupled discharge. In agreement with theoretical models, the generation of higher harmonic frequencies of plasma potential and their sensitivity to electron concentration were observed.

  14. Potential applications of an electron cyclotron resonance multicusp plasma source

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, C.C.; Berry, L.A.; Gorbatkin, S.M.; Haselton, H.H.; Roberto, J.B.; Stirling, W.L.

    1989-01-01

    An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) multicusp plasmatron has been developed by feeding a multicusp bucket arc chamber with a compact ECR plasma source. This novel source produced large (about 25-cm-diam), uniform (to within {plus minus}10%), dense (>10{sup 11}-cm{sup -3}) plasmas of argon, helium, hydrogen, and oxygen. It has been operated to produce an oxygen plasma for etching 12.7-cm (5-in.) positive photoresist-coated silicon wafers with uniformity within {plus minus}8%. Results and potential applications of this new ECR plasma source for plasma processing of thin films are discussed. 21 refs., 10 figs.

  15. Detailed description of the flexible periodic London-Eyring-Polanyi-Sato potential energy function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Gondre, L.; Crespos, C.; Larrégaray, P.; Rayez, J. C.; Conte, D.; van Ootegem, B.

    2010-02-01

    An extension of the periodic London-Eyring-Polanyi-Sato (PLEPS) function has been recently proposed in order to accurately describe the six-dimensional potential energy surface for two atoms interacting with a periodic rigid surface. However, only the main features were presented so that the present paper aims at precisely describing the necessary details to achieve the fitting procedure of the so-called flexible periodic LEPS function (FPLEPS) to a set of ab initio electronic structure calculations. The topology of the resulting global potential energy surface is compared to that of previously developed models, including a state-of-the-art ab initio potential, for N 2 interacting with W(1 0 0). The dynamics of dissociative adsorption using these different models is analyzed.

  16. Plasma focus: Present status and potential applications

    SciTech Connect

    Brzosko, J.S.; Nardi, V.; Powell, C.

    1997-12-01

    Initially, dense plasma focus (DPF) machines were constructed independently by Filippov in Moscow and Mather in Los Alamos at the end of the 1950s. Since then, more than 30 laboratories have carried vigorous DPF programs, oriented mainly toward the studies of physics of ion acceleration and trapping in the plasma focus environment. Applications of the DPF as intense neutron and X-ray sources have been recognized since its discovery but not implemented for various reasons. Recently, some groups (including AES) addressed the issue of DPF applications, and some of them are briefly discussed in this paper.

  17. Strongly Emitting Surfaces Unable to Float below Plasma Potential

    DOE PAGES

    Campanell, M. D.; Umansky, M. V.

    2016-02-25

    One important unresolved question in plasma physics concerns the effect of strong electron emission on plasma-surface interactions. Previous papers reported solutions with negative and positive floating potentials relative to the plasma edge. For these two models a very different predictions for particle and energy balance is given. Here we show that the positive potential state is the only possible equilibrium in general. Even if a negative floating potential existed at t=0, the ionization collisions near the surface will force a transition to the positive floating potential state. Moreover, this transition is demonstrated with a new simulation code.

  18. Pair-potential approximations for many-body plasma physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marciante, M.; Stanton, L. G.; Murillo, M. S.

    2016-10-01

    Predicting properties of dense plasmas across wide parameters regimes requires the numerical solution of a many-body dynamical system whose properties depend on various underlying quantum processes. For this reason, high fidelity physics codes (e.g. DFT (orbital-free or Kohn-Sham), classical-map HNC and path integral MC) yield accurate information about the microphysical properties of dense matter. However, their computational cost restricts the simulations to a few tens to few hundreds of ions. To simulate larger systems while retaining an accurate kinetic description of ions, classical MD simulations make use of quantum-effective pair-potentials between the ions. Such potentials involve a small set of parameters, whose values are obtained from DFT calculations, and allow to simulate multi-species systems at much lower computational cost. In these models, bound electrons are usually approximated by an effective charge and free electrons are described as a continuous density. We have undertaken a detailed comparison of our DFT-informed pair-potentials, with results from higher-fidelity physics codes, including g(r), VACF Z(t), and interdiffusion coefficients, in order to determine the physical regimes in which the simpler accurate and very large-scale simulations are possible. Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  19. The Potential for Ambient Plasma Wave Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilland, James H.; Williams, George J.

    2016-01-01

    A truly robust space exploration program will need to make use of in-situ resources as much as possible to make the endeavor affordable. Most space propulsion concepts are saddled with one fundamental burden; the propellant needed to produce momentum. The most advanced propulsion systems currently in use utilize electric and/or magnetic fields to accelerate ionized propellant. However, significant planetary exploration missions in the coming decades, such as the now canceled Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter, are restricted by propellant mass and propulsion system lifetimes, using even the most optimistic projections of performance. These electric propulsion vehicles are inherently limited in flexibility at their final destination, due to propulsion system wear, propellant requirements, and the relatively low acceleration of the vehicle. A few concepts are able to utilize the environment around them to produce thrust: Solar or magnetic sails and, with certain restrictions, electrodynamic tethers. These concepts focus primarily on using the solar wind or ambient magnetic fields to generate thrust. Technically immature, quasi-propellantless alternatives lack either the sensitivity or the power to provide significant maneuvering. An additional resource to be considered is the ambient plasma and magnetic fields in solar and planetary magnetospheres. These environments, such as those around the Sun or Jupiter, have been shown to host a variety of plasma waves. Plasma wave propulsion takes advantage of an observed astrophysical and terrestrial phenomenon: Alfven waves. These are waves that propagate in the plasma and magnetic fields around and between planets and stars. The generation of Alfven waves in ambient magnetic and plasma fields to generate thrust is proposed as a truly propellantless propulsion system which may enable an entirely new matrix of exploration missions. Alfven waves are well known, transverse electromagnetic waves that propagate in magnetized plasmas at

  20. Application of the floating-potential probe for studies of low frequency oscillations in a plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dzhakov, B. Y.

    1973-01-01

    The proper interpretation of the results obtained from measurements of the floating potential of an electrostatic probe may cause difficulties in time varying plasmas. The following limitations of the method are considered: the charge separation in the plasma, the influence of the input capacity of the measuring circuit, and the influence of the layer capacity near the probe. A detailed analysis is carried out in the cases of moving striations and ion acoustic waves. A simple measuring technique is suggested for ion acoustic studies, giving detailed information about ion density oscillations.

  1. Increasing organ donation rates by revealing recipient details to families of potential donors.

    PubMed

    Shaw, David; Gardiner, Dale

    2017-09-07

    Many families refuse to consent to donation from their deceased relatives or over-rule the consent given before death by the patient, but giving families more information about the potential recipients of organs could reduce refusal rates. In this paper, we analyse arguments for and against doing so, and conclude that this strategy should be attempted. While it would be impractical and possibly unethical to give details of actual potential recipients, generic, realistic information about the people who could benefit from organs should be provided to families before they make a decision about donation or attempt to over-rule it. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  2. Detailed Hydrodynamic and X-Ray Spectroscopic Analysis of a Laser-Produced Rapidly-Expanding Aluminum Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, D M; Glenzer, S H; Hawreliak, J; Wolfrum, E; Gouveia, A; Lee, R W; Marjoribanks, R S; Renner, O; Sondhauss, P; Topping, S; Young, P E; Pinto, P A; Wark, J S

    2001-04-03

    We present a detailed analysis of K-shell emission from laser-produced rapidly-expanding aluminum plasmas. This work forms part of a series of experiments performed at the Vulcan laser facility of the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, UK. 1-D planar expansion was obtained by over-illuminating Al-microdot targets supported on CH plastic foils. The small size of the Al-plasma ensured high spatial and frequency resolution of the spectra, obtained with a single crystal spectrometer, two vertical dispersion variant double crystal spectrometers, and a vertical dispersion variant Johann Spectrometer. The hydrodynamic properties of the plasma were measured independently by spatially and temporally resolved Thomson scattering, utilizing a 4{omega} probe beam. This enabled sub- and super- critical densities to be probed relative to the 1{omega} heater beams. The deduced plasma hydrodynamic conditions are compared with those generated from the 1-D hydro-code Medusa, and the significant differences found in the electron temperature discussed. Synthetic spectra generated from the detailed term collisional radiative non-LTE atomic physics code Fly are compared with the experimental spectra for the measured hydrodynamic parameters, and for those taken from Medusa. Excellent agreement is only found for both the H- and He-like Al series when careful account is taken of the temporal evolution of the electron temperature.

  3. Detailed study of the plasma-activated catalytic generation of ammonia in N2-H2 plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Helden, J. H.; Wagemans, W.; Yagci, G.; Zijlmans, R. A. B.; Schram, D. C.; Engeln, R.; Lombardi, G.; Stancu, G. D.; Röpcke, J.

    2007-02-01

    We investigated the efficiency and formation mechanism of ammonia generation in recombining plasmas generated from mixtures of N2 and H2 under various plasma conditions. In contrast to the Haber-Bosch process, in which the molecules are dissociated on a catalytic surface, under these plasma conditions the precursor molecules, N2 and H2, are already dissociated in the gas phase. Surfaces are thus exposed to large fluxes of atomic N and H radicals. The ammonia production turns out to be strongly dependent on the fluxes of atomic N and H radicals to the surface. By optimizing the atomic N and H fluxes to the surface using an atomic nitrogen and hydrogen source ammonia can be formed efficiently, i.e., more than 10% of the total background pressure is measured to be ammonia. The results obtained show a strong similarity with results reported in literature, which were explained by the production of ammonia at the surface by stepwise addition reactions between adsorbed nitrogen and hydrogen containing radicals at the surface and incoming N and H containing radicals. Furthermore, our results indicate that the ammonia production is independent of wall material. The high fluxes of N and H radicals in our experiments result in a passivated surface, and the actual chemistry, leading to the formation of ammonia, takes place in an additional layer on top of this passivated surface.

  4. Plasma potential measurement using centre tapped emissive probe (CTEP) in laboratory plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanyasi, A. K.; Srivastava, P. K.; Awasthi, L. M.

    2017-04-01

    Plasma potential measurements using a compensated center tapped emissive probe (CTEP) in quiescent plasma ({{n}\\text{e}}∼ 6.0× {{10}11} \\text{c}{{\\text{m}}-3}, {{T}\\text{e}}∼ 3.5 \\text{eV} ) of large volume plasma device (LVPD) are presented. The CTEP shows distinct advantage over conventional emissive probe (CEP) because of measurement capability, independent of electronics and operating conditions of CEP. Its ability of measuring continuous, uninterrupted plasma potential (DC and fluctuations) measurements for pulsed and DC plasma discharges gives it advantage over other configurations. Also, its push fit design allows easy replacement without realizing frequent vacuum breaks. In small sized plasma devices, CTEP design may introduce some spatial resolution error but for large plasma devices, this is negligible as voluminous data is required over large scale lengths (~few tens of cm).

  5. Circulating human B and plasma cells. Age-associated changes in counts and detailed characterization of circulating normal CD138− and CD138+ plasma cells

    PubMed Central

    Caraux, Anouk; Klein, Bernard; Paiva, Bruno; Bret, Caroline; Schmitz, Alexander; Fuhler, Gwenny M.; Bos, Nico A.; Johnsen, Hans E; Orfao, Alberto; Perez-Andres, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Generation of B and plasma cells involves several organs with a necessary cell trafficking between them. A detailed phenotypic characterization of four circulating B-cell subsets (immature-, naïve-, memory- B-lymphocytes and plasma cells) of 106 healthy adults was realized by multiparametric flow cytometry. We show that CD10, CD27 and CD38 is the minimal combination of subsetting markers allowing unequivocal identification of immature (CD10+CD27−CD38+, 6±6 cells/μL), naïve (CD10−CD27−CD38−, 125±90 cells/μL), memory B lymphocytes (CD10−CD27+CD38−, 58±42 cells/μL), and plasma cells (CD10−CD27++CD38++, 2.1±2.1 cells/μL) within circulating CD19+ cells. From these four subsets, only memory B lymphocytes and plasma cells decreased with age, both in relative and absolute counts. Circulating plasma cells split into CD138− (57±12%) and CD138+ (43±12%) cells, the latter displaying a more mature phenotypic profile: absence of surface immunoglobulin, lower CD45 positivity and higher amounts of cytoplasmic immunoglobulin, CD38 and CD27. Unlike B lymphocytes, both populations of plasma cells are KI-67+ and show weak CXCR4 expression. PMID:20081059

  6. Detailed beam and plasma measurements on the vessel for extraction and source plasma analyses (VESPA) Penning H⁻ ion source.

    PubMed

    Lawrie, S R; Faircloth, D C; Letchford, A P; Whitehead, M O; Wood, T

    2016-02-01

    A vessel for extraction and source plasma analyses (VESPA) is operational at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL). This project supports and guides the overall ion source R&D effort for the ISIS spallation neutron and muon facility at RAL. The VESPA produces 100 mA of pulsed H(-) beam, but perveance scans indicate that the source is production-limited at extraction voltages above 12 kV unless the arc current is increased. A high resolution optical monochromator is used to measure plasma properties using argon as a diagnostic gas. The atomic hydrogen temperature increases linearly with arc current, up to 2.8 eV for 50 A; whereas the electron temperature has a slight linear decrease toward 2.2 eV. The gas density is 10(21) m(-3), whilst the electron density is two orders of magnitude lower. Densities follow square root relationships with arc current, with gas density decreasing whilst electron (and hence ion) density increases. Stopping and range of ions in matter calculations prove that operating a high current arc with an argon admixture is extremely difficult because cathode-coated cesium is heavily sputtered by argon.

  7. Detailed beam and plasma measurements on the vessel for extraction and source plasma analyses (VESPA) Penning H- ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrie, S. R.; Faircloth, D. C.; Letchford, A. P.; Whitehead, M. O.; Wood, T.

    2016-02-01

    A vessel for extraction and source plasma analyses (VESPA) is operational at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL). This project supports and guides the overall ion source R&D effort for the ISIS spallation neutron and muon facility at RAL. The VESPA produces 100 mA of pulsed H- beam, but perveance scans indicate that the source is production-limited at extraction voltages above 12 kV unless the arc current is increased. A high resolution optical monochromator is used to measure plasma properties using argon as a diagnostic gas. The atomic hydrogen temperature increases linearly with arc current, up to 2.8 eV for 50 A; whereas the electron temperature has a slight linear decrease toward 2.2 eV. The gas density is 1021 m-3, whilst the electron density is two orders of magnitude lower. Densities follow square root relationships with arc current, with gas density decreasing whilst electron (and hence ion) density increases. Stopping and range of ions in matter calculations prove that operating a high current arc with an argon admixture is extremely difficult because cathode-coated cesium is heavily sputtered by argon.

  8. Negative plasma potential relative to electron-emitting surfaces.

    PubMed

    Campanell, M D

    2013-09-01

    Most works on plasma-wall interaction predict that with strong electron emission, a nonmonotonic "space-charge-limited" (SCL) sheath forms where the plasma potential is positive relative to the wall. We show that a fundamentally different sheath structure is possible where the potential monotonically increases toward a positively charged wall that is shielded by a single layer of negative charge. No ion-accelerating presheath exists in the plasma and the ion wall flux is zero. An analytical solution of the "inverse sheath" regime is demonstrated for a general plasma-wall system where the plasma electrons and emitted electrons are Maxwellian with different temperatures. Implications of the inverse sheath effect are that (a) the plasma potential is negative, (b) ion sputtering vanishes, (c) no charge is lost at the wall, and (d) the electron energy flux is thermal. To test empirically what type of sheath structure forms under strong emission, a full plasma bounded by strongly emitting walls is simulated. It is found that inverse sheaths form at the walls and ions are confined in the plasma. This result differs from past particle-in-cell simulation studies of emission which contain an artificial "source sheath" that accelerates ions to the wall, leading to a SCL sheath at high emission intensity.

  9. Effect of Plasma on the Zeta Potential of Cotton Fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashidi, A.; Shahidi, S.; Ghoranneviss, M.; Dalalsharifi, S.; Wiener, J.

    2013-05-01

    In this work, the effect of a low-temperature plasma on the zeta potential of cotton fabric was studied. The silver particle absorption on cotton fabric when modified by a low-temperature plasma was also investigated. The modification consisted of plasma pre-functionalization followed by a one-step wet treatment with silver nitrate solution. The process was performed in a low-temperature plasma medium, using a magnetron sputtering device. Oxygen and nitrogen were used as working gases in the system, and the results were compared. After preparing the samples, the zeta potentials of the untreated and plasma-treated cotton under a constant pH value solution were estimated and compared. Also, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to examine the functional groups of the corresponding samples. The amounts of silver absorption on plasma treated and untreated cotton were examined using the energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) method. The results show that the amount of zeta potential for the nitrogen plasma treated sample is less and the absorption of silver particles by cotton can be increased strongly with nitrogen plasma treatment.

  10. Multi electron species and shielding potentials in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Arroj A.; Murtaza, G.; Rasheed, A.; Jamil, M.

    2012-11-15

    The phenomenon of Debye shielding is investigated in electron ion plasmas using the approach of two temperature electrons. We get different profiles of potential for different parameters and observe that the potentials fall very slowly than the standard Coulomb and Debye potentials. The importance of work is pointed out in the introduction.

  11. Status and potential of atmospheric plasma processing of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pappas, Daphne

    2011-03-15

    This paper is a review of the current status and potential of atmospheric plasma technology for materials processing. The main focus is the recent developments in the area of dielectric barrier discharges with emphasis in the functionalization of polymers, deposition of organic and inorganic coatings, and plasma processing of biomaterials. A brief overview of both the equipment being used and the physicochemical reactions occurring in the gas phase is also presented. Atmospheric plasma technology offers major industrial, economic, and environmental advantages over other conventional processing methods. At the same time there is also tremendous potential for future research and applications involving both the industrial and academic world.

  12. Solitary potential in a four-component dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sayed, Fatema; Mamun, A. A.

    2007-01-15

    A four-component dusty plasma consisting of electrons, ions, and negative as well as positive dust particles has been considered. The basic properties of small but finite amplitude solitary potential structures that may exist in such a four-component dusty plasma have been investigated theoretically by the reductive perturbation method. It has been found that the presence of additional positive dust component has significantly modified the basic properties of solitary potential structures in a dusty plasma. The implications of our results in different regions of space (viz., cometary tails, mesosphere, Jupiter's magnetosphere, etc.) are discussed briefly.

  13. Effect of Substrate Potential on Plasma Parameters of Magnetic Multicusp Plasma Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Yoshio; Goto, Masahiro

    1998-06-01

    The effect of substrate potential on plasmas produced in a magnetic multicusp plasma source has been studied experimentally. Plasma parameters such as electron temperature and plasma potential are estimated from electron energy distribution function numerically calculated from probe current-voltage characteristics. For a substrate potential of -150 V with respect to the source chamber, which is much lower than substrate floating potentials, the plasma parameters are not affected by the application of the potential. However, for the case where the substrate is shorted with the source chamber, the high energy component of electrons significantly decreases in comparison with the floating case leading to the reduction of electron temperature. In this case, plasma potential is positive with respect to the substrate to suppress electron loss but its absolute value is only of the order of electron temperature in eV, which is much lower than the potential between the plasma and the substrate in the floating case. This discharge mode could be advantageous in significantly reducing the ion impact energy to the substrate plate.

  14. Probable excursions in Alaskan loess deposits and potential for detailed correlations and chronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, B. J.; Evans, M. E.; Kravchinsky, V. A.; Froese, D. G.

    2011-12-01

    As part of a larger study to refine the chronology of paleoenvironmental records in Alaskan loess deposits, the type section for the Gold Hill loess was sampled at 5 cm intervals for detailed paleomagnetic investigations. We sampled from the level of the Jaramillo Subchron (~21 m from the base of the exposure) through the Holocene (~51 m). Initial results indicate the presence of several pronounced directional perturbations that may record excursions of the geomagnetic field. A perturbation found in association with an organic-rich unit at 48 m is likely of late Pleistocene age and a candidate for the Laschamp excursion. An additional perturbation is present above the VT tephra (106±10 ka; ~44 m). This event is also present at the nearby Halfway House site in a similar stratigraphic context. This interval is a good candidate for the post-Blake event that has recently been dated at 106±14 ka and 104±2 ka by Singer et al. (2011). A tephra bed below this level indicates the presence of a significant unconformity and the excursion recorded below this at ~41 m is unidentified, but is likely between MIS 9 and late MIS 8 in age. From the GI tephra (560±80 ka; ~35 m) to the Bruhnes-Matuyama boundary (~25.5 m), we observe variations in the field, but these are relatively small. Lastly, between the Bruhnes-Matuyama boundary and the Jaramillo Subchron we have identified the Kamikatsura event (900.3±4.7 ka). These findings suggest that Alaskan loess may turn out to be an excellent recorder of geomagnetic field behaviour, the details of which offer significant potential for high-resolution correlations and chronology.

  15. Floating potential measurements in plasmas: From dust to spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beadles, R.; Wang, X.; Horányi, M.

    2017-02-01

    We present measurements of the floating potential of spherical probes, used as a model of a dust particle or a spacecraft, immersed in plasmas with a wide range of Debye lengths. Our experimental results verified the theoretical prediction that the probe floating potential is a function of the Debye length. It is shown that, in an argon plasma with the ion to electron temperature ratio ˜0.01, the magnitude of the floating potential is approximately doubled when the Debye length is changed from larger to smaller than the radius of the probe.

  16. Ionization potential depression for non equilibrated aluminum plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calisti, A.; Ferri, S.; Talin, B.

    2015-11-01

    A classical molecular dynamics simulation model, designed to simulate neutral plasmas with various charge states of a given atom together with electrons, is used to investigate the ionization potential depression (IPD) in dense plasmas. The IPD is discussed for aluminum plasma at and out of equilibrium. The simulation results are compared with those of earlier theoretical models and with experimental data obtained in the framework of x-ray free-electron laser experiments. The model proposed in this work appears as an important tool to provide data for further discussion on IPD models.

  17. Interaction potential of microparticles in a plasma: role of collisions with plasma particles.

    PubMed

    Khrapak, S A; Ivlev, A V; Morfill, G

    2001-10-01

    The interaction potential of two charged microparticles in a plasma is studied. Violation of the plasma equilibrium around the dust particles due to plasma-particle inelastic collisions results in three effects: long-range (non-Yukawa) electrostatic repulsion, attraction due to ion shadowing, and attraction or repulsion due to neutral shadowing (depending on the sign of the temperature difference between the particle surface and neutral gas). An analytical expression for the total potential is obtained and compared with previous theoretical results. The relative contribution of these effects is studied in two limiting cases-an isotropic bulk plasma and the plasma sheath region. The results obtained are compared with existing experimental results on pair particle interaction. The possibility of the so-called dust molecule formation is discussed.

  18. The potential distribution in the Radial Plasma Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fruchtman, Amnon; Makrinich, Gennady

    2011-10-01

    The Radial Plasma Source (RPS) is based on plasma acceleration by an applied voltage across a magnetic field. Here we report the recent progress in understanding the mechanism of plasma acceleration in the RPS. The RPS has a cylindrical symmetry. The accelerating electric field is radial and the magnetic field is axial. Most of the potential drop between the inner anode and the outer cathode is expected to be located where the magnetic field intensity is large. We employ an emissive probe and a Langmuir probe in order to evaluate the radial dependence of the potential. For inferring the plasma potential from the measured emissive probe potential, we employ our recently developed theory for a cylindrical emissive probe. Using the theory and the probe measurements, we plot the radial profiles in the RPS of the plasma potential as well as of the electron density and temperature. The possible modification of the geometry for propulsion applications will be discussed. Partially supported by the Israel Science Foundation, Grant 864/07.

  19. Transient plasma potential in pulsed dual frequency inductively coupled plasmas and effect of substrate biasing

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Anurag; Yeom, Geun Young

    2016-09-15

    An electron emitting probe in saturated floating potential mode has been used to investigate the temporal evolution of plasma potential and the effect of substrate RF biasing on it for pulsed dual frequency (2 MHz/13.56 MHz) inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source. The low frequency power (P{sub 2MHz}) has been pulsed at 1 KHz and a duty ratio of 50%, while high frequency power (P{sub 13.56MHz}) has been used in continuous mode. The substrate has been biased with a separate bias power at (P{sub 12.56MHz}) Argon has been used as a discharge gas. During the ICP power pulsing, three distinct regions in a typical plasma potential profile, have been identified as ‘initial overshoot’, pulse ‘on-phase’ and pulse ‘off-phase’. It has been found out that the RF biasing of the substrate significantly modulates the temporal evolution of the plasma potential. During the initial overshoot, plasma potential decreases with increasing RF biasing of the substrate, however it increases with increasing substrate biasing for pulse ‘on-phase’ and ‘off-phase’. An interesting structure in plasma potential profile has also been observed when the substrate bias is applied and its evolution depends upon the magnitude of bias power. The reason of the evolution of this structure may be the ambipolar diffusion of electron and its dependence on bias power.

  20. Transient plasma potential in pulsed dual frequency inductively coupled plasmas and effect of substrate biasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Anurag; Yeom, Geun Young

    2016-09-01

    An electron emitting probe in saturated floating potential mode has been used to investigate the temporal evolution of plasma potential and the effect of substrate RF biasing on it for pulsed dual frequency (2 MHz/13.56 MHz) inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source. The low frequency power (P2MHz) has been pulsed at 1 KHz and a duty ratio of 50%, while high frequency power (P13.56MHz) has been used in continuous mode. The substrate has been biased with a separate bias power at (P12.56MHz) Argon has been used as a discharge gas. During the ICP power pulsing, three distinct regions in a typical plasma potential profile, have been identified as `initial overshoot', pulse `on-phase' and pulse `off-phase'. It has been found out that the RF biasing of the substrate significantly modulates the temporal evolution of the plasma potential. During the initial overshoot, plasma potential decreases with increasing RF biasing of the substrate, however it increases with increasing substrate biasing for pulse `on-phase' and `off-phase'. An interesting structure in plasma potential profile has also been observed when the substrate bias is applied and its evolution depends upon the magnitude of bias power. The reason of the evolution of this structure may be the ambipolar diffusion of electron and its dependence on bias power.

  1. One-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of imploding spherical plasma liners with detailed equation-of-state modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J. S.; Hsu, S. C.; Golovkin, I. E.; MacFarlane, J. J.; Cassibry, J. T.

    2012-10-15

    This work extends the one-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic imploding spherical argon plasma liner simulations of Awe et al.[Phys. Plasmas 18, 072705 (2011)] by using a detailed tabular equation-of-state (EOS) model, whereas Awe et al. used a polytropic EOS model. Results using the tabular EOS model give lower stagnation pressures by a factor of 3.9-8.6 and lower peak ion temperatures compared to the polytropic EOS results. Both local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and non-LTE EOS models were used in this work, giving similar results on stagnation pressure. The lower stagnation pressures using a tabular EOS model are attributed to a reduction in the liner's ability to compress arising from the energy sink introduced by ionization and electron excitation, which are not accounted for in a polytropic EOS model. Variation of the plasma liner species for the same initial liner geometry, mass density, and velocity was also explored using the LTE tabular EOS model, showing that the highest stagnation pressure is achieved with the highest atomic mass species for the constraints imposed.

  2. SNS potential with exchange field in quantum dusty plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeba, I.; Batool, Maryam; Khan, Arroj A.; Jamil, M.; Rozina, Ch

    2017-02-01

    The shielding potential of a static test charge is studied in quantum dusty plasmas. The plasma system consisting upon electrons, ions and negatively static charged dust species, is embedded in an ambient magnetic field. The modified equation of dispersion is derived using quantum hydrodynamic model (QHD) for magnetized plasmas. The quantum effects are inculcated through Fermi degenerate pressure, tunneling effect and exchange-correlation effects. The study of shielding is important to know the existence of the silence zones in space and astrophysical objects as well as crystal formation. The graphical description of the normalized potential depict the significance of the exchange and correlation effects arising through spin and other variables on the shielding potential.

  3. Detailed analysis of the tetraquark potential and flip-flop in SU(3) lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Okiharu, Fumiko; Suganuma, Hideo; Takahashi, Toru T.

    2005-07-01

    We perform the detailed study of the tetraquark (4Q) potential V{sub 4Q} for various QQ-QQ systems in SU(3) lattice QCD with {beta}=6.0 and 16{sup 3}x32 at the quenched level. For about 200 different patterns of 4Q systems, V{sub 4Q} is extracted from the 4Q Wilson loop in 300 gauge configurations, with the smearing method to enhance the ground-state component. We calculate V{sub 4Q} for planar, twisted, asymmetric, and large-size 4Q configurations, respectively. Here, the calculation for large-size 4Q configurations is done by identifying 16{sup 2}x32 as the spatial size and 16 as the temporal one, and the long-distance confinement force is particularly analyzed in terms of the flux-tube picture. When QQ and QQ are well separated, V{sub 4Q} is found to be expressed as the sum of the one-gluon-exchange Coulomb term and multi-Y-type linear term based on the flux-tube picture. When the nearest quark and antiquark pair is spatially close, the system is described as a 'two-meson' state. We observe a flux-tube recombination called a 'flip-flop' between the connected 4Q state and the two-meson state around the level-crossing point. This leads to infrared screening of the long-range color forces between (anti)quarks belonging to different mesons, and results in the absence of the color van der Waals force between two mesons.

  4. Assessing the potential benefits of the motorcycle autonomous emergency braking using detailed crash reconstructions.

    PubMed

    Savino, Giovanni; Giovannini, Federico; Baldanzini, Niccolò; Pierini, Marco; Rizzi, Matteo

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility and quantitative potential benefits of a motorcycle autonomous emergency braking (MAEB) system in fatal rear-end crashes. A further aim was to identify possible criticalities of this safety system in the field of powered 2-wheelers (PTWs; e.g., any additional risk introduced by the system itself). Seven relevant cases from the Swedish national in-depth fatal crash database were selected. All crashes involved car-following in which a non-anti-lock braking system (ABS)-equipped motorcycle was the bullet vehicle. Those crashes were reconstructed in a virtual environment with Prescan, simulating the road scenario, the vehicles involved, their precrash trajectories, ABS, and, alternatively, MAEB. The MAEB chosen as reference for the investigation was developed within the European Commission-funded Powered Two-Wheeler Integrated Safety (PISa) project and further detailed in later studies, with the addition of the ABS functionality. The boundary conditions of each simulation varied within a range compatible with the uncertainty of the in-depth data and also included a range of possible rider behaviors including the actual one. The benefits of the MAEB were evaluated by comparing the simulated impact speed in each configuration (no ABS/MAEB, ABS only, MAEB). The MAEB proved to be beneficial in a large number of cases. When applicable, the benefits of the system were in line with the expected values. When not applicable, there was no clear evidence of an increased risk for the rider due to the system. MAEB represents an innovative safety device in the field of PTWs, and the feasibility of such a system was investigated with promising results. Nevertheless, this technology is not mature yet for PTW application. Research in the field of passenger cars does not directly apply to PTWs because the activation logic of a braking system is more challenging on PTWs. The deployment of an autonomous deceleration would affect the

  5. Interaction potentials and thermodynamic properties of two component semiclassical plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ramazanov, T. S.; Moldabekov, Zh. A.; Ismagambetova, T. N.; Gabdullin, M. T.

    2014-01-15

    In this paper, the effective interaction potential in two component semiclassical plasma, taking into account the long-range screening and the quantum-mechanical diffraction effects at short distances, is obtained on the basis of dielectric response function method. The structural properties of the semiclassical plasma are considered. The thermodynamic characteristics (the internal energy and the equation of state) are calculated using two methods: the method of effective potentials and the method of micropotentials with screening effect taken into account by the Ornstein-Zernike equation in the HNC approximation.

  6. NSTX Disruption Simulations of Detailed Divertor and Passive Plate Models by Vector Potential Transfer from OPERA Global Analysis Results

    SciTech Connect

    P. H. Titus, S. Avasaralla, A.Brooks, R. Hatcher

    2010-09-22

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) project is planning upgrades to the toroidal field, plasma current and pulse length. This involves the replacement of the center-stack, including the inner legs of the TF, OH, and inner PF coils. A second neutral beam will also be added. The increased performance of the upgrade requires qualification of the remaining components including the vessel, passive plates, and divertor for higher disruption loads. The hardware needing qualification is more complex than is typically accessible by large scale electromagnetic (EM) simulations of the plasma disruptions. The usual method is to include simplified representations of components in the large EM models and attempt to extract forces to apply to more detailed models. This paper describes a more efficient approach of combining comprehensive modeling of the plasma and tokamak conducting structures, using the 2D OPERA code, with much more detailed treatment of individual components using ANSYS electromagnetic (EM) and mechanical analysis. This capture local eddy currents and resulting loads in complex details, and allows efficient non-linear, and dynamic structural analyses.

  7. Plane and hemispherical potential structures in magnetically expanding plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Kazunori; Igarashi, Yuichi; Fujiwara, Tamiya

    2010-07-26

    Two-dimensional potential structures are measured for different gas pressure in expanding argon plasma using permanent magnets, where the magnetic field is about 100 G in the source and several gauss in the diffusion chamber. The plane potential drop is observed near the source exit for 0.35 mTorr, while the potential structure becomes hemispherical when increasing up to 1 mTorr; the hemispherical structure results in the radial divergence of the ion beam. It is found that the trajectories of the accelerated ions and the electrons overcoming the potential drop are dominated by the potential structure and magnetic-field lines, respectively.

  8. Measurements of Plasma Potential Distribution in Segmented Electrode Hall Thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Raitses; D. Staack; N.J. Fisch

    2001-10-16

    Use of a segmented electrode placed at the Hall thruster exit can substantially reduce the voltage potential drop in the fringing magnetic field outside the thruster channel. In this paper, we investigate the dependence of this effect on thruster operating conditions and segmented electrode configuration. A fast movable emissive probe is used to measure plasma potential in a 1 kW laboratory Hall thruster with semented electrodes made of a graphite material. Relatively small probe-induced perturbations of the thruster discharge in the vicinity of the thruster exit allow a reasonable comparison of the measured results for different thruster configurations. It is shown that the plasma potential distribution is almost not sensitive to changes of the electrode potential, but depends on the magnetic field distribution and the electrode placement.

  9. Plasma potential mapping of high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Rauch, Albert; Mendelsberg, Rueben J.; Sanders, Jason M.; Anders, Andre

    2011-12-20

    Pulsed emissive probe techniques have been used to determine the plasma potential distribution of high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharges. An unbalanced magnetron with a niobium target in argon was investigated for pulse length of 100 μs at a pulse repetition rate of 100 Hz, giving a peak current of 170 A. The probe data were taken with a time resolution of 20 ns and a spatial resolution of 1 mm. It is shown that the local plasma potential varies greatly in space and time. The lowest potential was found over the target’s racetrack, gradually reaching anode potential (ground) several centimeters away from the target. The magnetic pre-sheath exhibits a funnel-shaped plasma potential resulting in an electric field which accelerates ions toward the racetrack. In certain regions and times, the potential exhibits weak local maxima which allow for ion acceleration to the substrate. Knowledge of the local E and static B fields lets us derive the electrons’ E×B drift velocity, which is about 105 m/s and shows structures in space and time.

  10. Plasma potential mapping of high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Rauch, Albert; Mendelsberg, Rueben J.; Sanders, Jason M.; Anders, Andre

    2012-04-15

    Pulsed emissive probe techniques have been used to determine the plasma potential distribution of high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharges. An unbalanced magnetron with a niobium target in argon was investigated for a pulse length of 100 {mu}s at a pulse repetition rate of 100 Hz, giving a peak current of 170 A. The probe data were recorded with a time resolution of 20 ns and a spatial resolution of 1 mm. It is shown that the local plasma potential varies greatly in space and time. The lowest potential was found over the target's racetrack, gradually reaching anode potential (ground) several centimeters away from the target. The magnetic presheath exhibits a funnel-shaped plasma potential resulting in an electric field which accelerates ions toward the racetrack. In certain regions and times, the potential exhibits weak local maxima which allow for ion acceleration to the substrate. Knowledge of the local E and static B fields lets us derive the electrons'ExB drift velocity, which is about 10{sup 5} m/s and shows structures in space and time.

  11. Molecular Dynamic Studies of Particle Wake Potentials in Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Ian; Graziani, Frank; Glosli, James; Strozzi, David; Surh, Michael; Richards, David; Decyk, Viktor; Mori, Warren

    2010-11-01

    Fast Ignition studies require a detailed understanding of electron scattering, stopping, and energy deposition in plasmas with variable values for the number of particles within a Debye sphere. Presently there is disagreement in the literature concerning the proper description of these processes. Developing and validating proper descriptions requires studying the processes using first-principle electrostatic simulations and possibly including magnetic fields. We are using the particle-particle particle-mesh (P^3M) code ddcMD to perform these simulations. As a starting point in our study, we examined the wake of a particle passing through a plasma. In this poster, we compare the wake observed in 3D ddcMD simulations with that predicted by Vlasov theory and those observed in the electrostatic PIC code BEPS where the cell size was reduced to .03λD.

  12. Theory of spacecraft potential jump in geosynchronous plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jianguo; Liu, Guoqing; Jiang, Lixiang

    2015-12-01

    For disturbed geosynchronous plasma, the onset of spacecraft charging and its evolution become more complex than quiet environment. A sudden jump of spacecraft potential can occur in specific environment conditions which can be detrimental to onboard electronics. In this paper, the potential jump for geosynchronous spacecraft charging is theoretically modeled and comprehensively characterized. Two types of potential jump in opposite directions are elucidated, and the threshold conditions for both types of jump are determined. At both thresholds, the spacecraft potentials are semisteady, but in opposite directions, with the possibility of a jump to a stable potential. The polarity of movement across the thresholds from different plasma will cause a spacecraft to experience irreversible charging histories which result in significant hysteresis. Generally, the jump to negative potential occurs with greater magnitude as compared to a potential jump in positive direction. Ion distribution has negligible influence to the threshold condition for jump to negative potential. However, ion distribution significantly affects the threshold for jump to positive potential and subsequently modifies the parametric domains of spacecraft charging.

  13. Monte Carlo simulations of ionization potential depression in dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Stransky, M.

    2016-01-15

    A particle-particle grand canonical Monte Carlo model with Coulomb pair potential interaction was used to simulate modification of ionization potentials by electrostatic microfields. The Barnes-Hut tree algorithm [J. Barnes and P. Hut, Nature 324, 446 (1986)] was used to speed up calculations of electric potential. Atomic levels were approximated to be independent of the microfields as was assumed in the original paper by Ecker and Kröll [Phys. Fluids 6, 62 (1963)]; however, the available levels were limited by the corresponding mean inter-particle distance. The code was tested on hydrogen and dense aluminum plasmas. The amount of depression was up to 50% higher in the Debye-Hückel regime for hydrogen plasmas, in the high density limit, reasonable agreement was found with the Ecker-Kröll model for hydrogen plasmas and with the Stewart-Pyatt model [J. Stewart and K. Pyatt, Jr., Astrophys. J. 144, 1203 (1966)] for aluminum plasmas. Our 3D code is an improvement over the spherically symmetric simplifications of the Ecker-Kröll and Stewart-Pyatt models and is also not limited to high atomic numbers as is the underlying Thomas-Fermi model used in the Stewart-Pyatt model.

  14. Monte Carlo simulations of ionization potential depression in dense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stransky, M.

    2016-01-01

    A particle-particle grand canonical Monte Carlo model with Coulomb pair potential interaction was used to simulate modification of ionization potentials by electrostatic microfields. The Barnes-Hut tree algorithm [J. Barnes and P. Hut, Nature 324, 446 (1986)] was used to speed up calculations of electric potential. Atomic levels were approximated to be independent of the microfields as was assumed in the original paper by Ecker and Kröll [Phys. Fluids 6, 62 (1963)]; however, the available levels were limited by the corresponding mean inter-particle distance. The code was tested on hydrogen and dense aluminum plasmas. The amount of depression was up to 50% higher in the Debye-Hückel regime for hydrogen plasmas, in the high density limit, reasonable agreement was found with the Ecker-Kröll model for hydrogen plasmas and with the Stewart-Pyatt model [J. Stewart and K. Pyatt, Jr., Astrophys. J. 144, 1203 (1966)] for aluminum plasmas. Our 3D code is an improvement over the spherically symmetric simplifications of the Ecker-Kröll and Stewart-Pyatt models and is also not limited to high atomic numbers as is the underlying Thomas-Fermi model used in the Stewart-Pyatt model.

  15. Response of the plasma to the size of an anode electrode biased near the plasma potential

    SciTech Connect

    Barnat, E. V.; Laity, G. R.; Baalrud, S. D.

    2014-10-15

    As the size of a positively biased electrode increases, the nature of the interface formed between the electrode and the host plasma undergoes a transition from an electron-rich structure (electron sheath) to an intermediate structure containing both ion and electron rich regions (double layer) and ultimately forms an electron-depleted structure (ion sheath). In this study, measurements are performed to further test how the size of an electron-collecting electrode impacts the plasma discharge the electrode is immersed in. This is accomplished using a segmented disk electrode in which individual segments are individually biased to change the effective surface area of the anode. Measurements of bulk plasma parameters such as the collected current density, plasma potential, electron density, electron temperature and optical emission are made as both the size and the bias placed on the electrode are varied. Abrupt transitions in the plasma parameters resulting from changing the electrode surface area are identified in both argon and helium discharges and are compared to the interface transitions predicted by global current balance [S. D. Baalrud, N. Hershkowitz, and B. Longmier, Phys. Plasmas 14, 042109 (2007)]. While the size-dependent transitions in argon agree, the size-dependent transitions observed in helium systematically occur at lower electrode sizes than those nominally derived from prediction. The discrepancy in helium is anticipated to be caused by the finite size of the interface that increases the effective area offered to the plasma for electron loss to the electrode.

  16. Formation and control of plasma potentials in TMX upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Simonen, T.C.; Orzechowski, T.J.; Porkolab, M.; Stallard, B.W.

    1981-05-06

    The methods to be employed to form and control plasma potentials in the TMX Upgrade tandem mirror with thermal barriers are described. ECRH-generated mirror -confined electron plasmas are used to establish a negative potential region to isolate the end-plug and central-cell celectrons. This thermal isolation will allow a higher end-plug electron temperature and an increased central-cell confining potential. Improved axial central-cell ion confinement results since higher temperature central-cell ions can be confined. This paper describes: (1) calculations of the sensitivity of barrier formation to vacuum conditions and to the presence of impurities in the neutral beams, (2) calculations of microwave penetration and absorption used to design the ECRH system, and (3) techniques to limit electron runaway to high energies by localized microwave beams and by relativistic detuning.

  17. High-density properties of integral-equation theories of fluids: Universal analytic structure and details for the one-component plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenfeld, Yaakov

    1986-03-01

    We study the analytic properties of the hypernetted-chain (HNC) and soft-mean-spherical (SMSA) theories in the asymptotic high-density limit (AHDL). The scaling properties of the inverse power potentials lead to the introduction of the SMSA-Ewald functions, which correspond to the ``overlap-volume'' functions for hard spheres. The HNC and SMSA theories for soft interactions, as well as the Percus-Yevick theory for hard spheres, feature the same AHDL analytic structure of the pair correlation functions, which is dictated by the hard-sphere Ewald functions. The general discussion is supplemented by detailed results for the one-component plasma. Implications to the analysis of the density-functional theory, of dense matter, near its exact Thomas-Fermi limit are pointed out.

  18. Effective potential kinetic theory for strongly coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baalrud, Scott D.; Daligault, Jérôme

    2016-11-01

    The effective potential theory (EPT) is a recently proposed method for extending traditional plasma kinetic and transport theory into the strongly coupled regime. Validation from experiments and molecular dynamics simulations have shown it to be accurate up to the onset of liquid-like correlation parameters (corresponding to Γ ≃ 10-50 for the one-component plasma, depending on the process of interest). Here, this theory is briefly reviewed along with comparisons between the theory and molecular dynamics simulations for self-diffusivity and viscosity of the one-component plasma. A number of new results are also provided, including calculations of friction coefficients, energy exchange rates, stopping power, and mobility. The theory is also cast in the Landau and Fokker-Planck kinetic forms, which may prove useful for enabling efficient kinetic computations.

  19. Efficiency Potential of Photovoltaic Materials and Devices Unveiled by Detailed-Balance Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rau, Uwe; Blank, Beatrix; Müller, Thomas C. M.; Kirchartz, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    A consistent mathematical approach is presented that connects the Shockley-Queisser (SQ) theory to the analysis of real-world devices. We demonstrate that the external photovoltaic quantum efficiency QePV of a solar cell results from a distribution of SQ-type band-gap energies and how this distribution is derived from experimental data. This leads us to the definition of a photovoltaic band-gap energy EgPV as a reference value for the analysis of the device performance. For a variety of solar-cell devices, we show that the combination of QePV and electroluminescence measurements allows for a detailed loss analysis that is fully compatible with the principle of detailed balance.

  20. Potential Barrier around an Emitting Body an a Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruno, Antonio; Luca Delzanno, Gian; Sorasio, Gianfranco; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2005-10-01

    We present a self-consistent, kinetic theory for the charging and shielding of an object at rest in a collisionless plasma [1]. The body is an electron emitter according to thermionic emission, photoemission or secondary emission. The theory is formulated for positively charged bodies, derived under the assumption of spherical symmetry so that conservation of energy and angular momentum can be used to calculate the plasma distribution functions at any given point in phase space. Far away from the body the plasma is assumed unperturbed, described by a Maxwellian distribution function at rest. Thus, the unperturbed plasma acts as a source of particles balancing the absorptions from the body and a steady state is eventually reached. The theory is shown to be in good agreement with PIC simulations [1-2]. Further on, several cases (focusing on parameters typical of laboratory experiments) are presented for the three different emission mechanisms, showing that shielding potentials having an attractive well are possible for all of them.[1] G. L. Delzanno, A. Bruno, G. Sorasio, G. Lapenta, Phys. Plasmas 12, 062102 (2005).[2] G. L. Delzanno, G. Lapenta, M. Rosenberg, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92 (3), 035002 (2004).

  1. Transport and trapping of dust particles in a potential well created by inductively coupled diffused plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, Mangilal; Mukherjee, S.; Bandyopadhyay, P.

    2016-05-01

    A versatile linear dusty (complex) plasma device is designed to study the transport and dynamical behavior of dust particles in a large volume. Diffused inductively coupled plasma is generated in the background of argon gas. A novel technique is used to introduce the dust particles in the main plasma by striking a secondary direct current glow discharge. These dust particles are found to get trapped in an electrostatic potential well, which is formed due to the combination of the ambipolar electric field caused by diffusive plasma and the field produced by the charged glass wall of the vacuum chamber. According to the requirements, the volume of the dust cloud can be controlled very precisely by tuning the plasma and discharge parameters. The present device can be used to address the underlying physics behind the transport of dust particles, self-excited dust acoustic waves, and instabilities. The detailed design of this device, plasma production and characterization, trapping and transport of the dust particle, and some of the preliminary experimental results are presented.

  2. Transport and trapping of dust particles in a potential well created by inductively coupled diffused plasmas.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Mangilal; Mukherjee, S; Bandyopadhyay, P

    2016-05-01

    A versatile linear dusty (complex) plasma device is designed to study the transport and dynamical behavior of dust particles in a large volume. Diffused inductively coupled plasma is generated in the background of argon gas. A novel technique is used to introduce the dust particles in the main plasma by striking a secondary direct current glow discharge. These dust particles are found to get trapped in an electrostatic potential well, which is formed due to the combination of the ambipolar electric field caused by diffusive plasma and the field produced by the charged glass wall of the vacuum chamber. According to the requirements, the volume of the dust cloud can be controlled very precisely by tuning the plasma and discharge parameters. The present device can be used to address the underlying physics behind the transport of dust particles, self-excited dust acoustic waves, and instabilities. The detailed design of this device, plasma production and characterization, trapping and transport of the dust particle, and some of the preliminary experimental results are presented.

  3. Spatial variation of sediment deposition in the Hudson River - a detailed inventory and potential causes (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitsche, F. O.; Kenna, T. C.

    2010-12-01

    Sediment deposition in urban estuaries is controlled by the interaction of human modifications and natural factors that include tides, fresh water inputs, bed morphology, sediment supply, and hydrodynamics. A key element of managing these estuaries is detailed understanding of sediment deposition and its driving processes. Using a combination of geophysical and geochemical analysis we establish a detailed inventory of 20 century deposition for most of the mud-dominated sections of the Hudson River. These data show variations between different segments of the Hudson River as well as strong local variations within each section, with depositional settings ranging from erosional to those accumulating at ~10 mm/year. Our work indicates that 170,000 - 250,000 metric tons of sediment are deposited annually in the areas studied, which is a significant portion of the estimated total annual sediment load of ~700,000 - 800,000 metric tons. This also suggests that some of the accumulated sediments are re-mobilized, e.g. during major storms. The observed patterns of deposition/erosion are primarily caused by natural conditions, but, in some parts, they are strongly influenced by human modifications of the estuary, such as dredging. In addition to improving our understanding of the sediment dynamic of the Hudson River, the observed distribution of sediment deposition is also an indicator for the occurrence of contaminants including heavy metals and PCB’s and thus a valuable tool for management decisions.

  4. LFPy: a tool for biophysical simulation of extracellular potentials generated by detailed model neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lindén, Henrik; Hagen, Espen; Łęski, Szymon; Norheim, Eivind S.; Pettersen, Klas H.; Einevoll, Gaute T.

    2014-01-01

    Electrical extracellular recordings, i.e., recordings of the electrical potentials in the extracellular medium between cells, have been a main work-horse in electrophysiology for almost a century. The high-frequency part of the signal (≳500 Hz), i.e., the multi-unit activity (MUA), contains information about the firing of action potentials in surrounding neurons, while the low-frequency part, the local field potential (LFP), contains information about how these neurons integrate synaptic inputs. As the recorded extracellular signals arise from multiple neural processes, their interpretation is typically ambiguous and difficult. Fortunately, a precise biophysical modeling scheme linking activity at the cellular level and the recorded signal has been established: the extracellular potential can be calculated as a weighted sum of all transmembrane currents in all cells located in the vicinity of the electrode. This computational scheme can considerably aid the modeling and analysis of MUA and LFP signals. Here, we describe LFPy, an open source Python package for numerical simulations of extracellular potentials. LFPy consists of a set of easy-to-use classes for defining cells, synapses and recording electrodes as Python objects, implementing this biophysical modeling scheme. It runs on top of the widely used NEURON simulation environment, which allows for flexible usage of both new and existing cell models. Further, calculation of extracellular potentials using the line-source-method is efficiently implemented. We describe the theoretical framework underlying the extracellular potential calculations and illustrate by examples how LFPy can be used both for simulating LFPs, i.e., synaptic contributions from single cells as well a populations of cells, and MUAs, i.e., extracellular signatures of action potentials. PMID:24474916

  5. LFPy: a tool for biophysical simulation of extracellular potentials generated by detailed model neurons.

    PubMed

    Lindén, Henrik; Hagen, Espen; Lęski, Szymon; Norheim, Eivind S; Pettersen, Klas H; Einevoll, Gaute T

    2013-01-01

    Electrical extracellular recordings, i.e., recordings of the electrical potentials in the extracellular medium between cells, have been a main work-horse in electrophysiology for almost a century. The high-frequency part of the signal (≳500 Hz), i.e., the multi-unit activity (MUA), contains information about the firing of action potentials in surrounding neurons, while the low-frequency part, the local field potential (LFP), contains information about how these neurons integrate synaptic inputs. As the recorded extracellular signals arise from multiple neural processes, their interpretation is typically ambiguous and difficult. Fortunately, a precise biophysical modeling scheme linking activity at the cellular level and the recorded signal has been established: the extracellular potential can be calculated as a weighted sum of all transmembrane currents in all cells located in the vicinity of the electrode. This computational scheme can considerably aid the modeling and analysis of MUA and LFP signals. Here, we describe LFPy, an open source Python package for numerical simulations of extracellular potentials. LFPy consists of a set of easy-to-use classes for defining cells, synapses and recording electrodes as Python objects, implementing this biophysical modeling scheme. It runs on top of the widely used NEURON simulation environment, which allows for flexible usage of both new and existing cell models. Further, calculation of extracellular potentials using the line-source-method is efficiently implemented. We describe the theoretical framework underlying the extracellular potential calculations and illustrate by examples how LFPy can be used both for simulating LFPs, i.e., synaptic contributions from single cells as well a populations of cells, and MUAs, i.e., extracellular signatures of action potentials.

  6. Ponderomotive potential and backward Raman scattering in dense quantum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Son, S.

    2014-03-15

    The backward Raman scattering is studied in dense quantum plasmas. The coefficients in the backward Raman scattering is found to be underestimated (overestimated) in the classical theory if the excited Langmuir wave has low-wave vector (high-wave vector). The second-order quantum perturbation theory shows that the second harmonic of the ponderomotive potential arises naturally even in a single particle motion contrary to the classical prediction.

  7. Effects of auroral potential drops on plasma sheet dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Sheng; Lotko, William; Zhang, Binzheng; Wiltberger, Michael; Lyon, John

    2016-11-01

    The reaction of the magnetosphere-ionosphere system to dynamic auroral potential drops is investigated using the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry global model including, for the first time in a global simulation, the dissipative load of field-aligned potential drops in the low-altitude boundary condition. This extra load reduces the field-aligned current (j||) supplied by nightside reconnection dynamos. The system adapts by forcing the nightside X line closer to Earth, with a corresponding reduction in current lensing (j||/B = constant) at the ionosphere and additional contraction of the plasma sheet during substorm recovery and steady magnetospheric convection. For steady and moderate solar wind driving and with constant ionospheric conductance, the cross polar cap potential and hemispheric field-aligned current are lower by approximately the ratio of the peak field-aligned potential drop to the cross polar cap potential (10-15%) when potential drops are included. Hemispheric ionospheric Joule dissipation is less by 8%, while the area-integrated, average work done on the fluid by the reconnecting magnetotail field increases by 50% within |y| < 8 RE. Effects on the nightside plasma sheet include (1) an average X line 4 RE closer to Earth; (2) a 12% higher mean reconnection rate; and (3) dawn-dusk asymmetry in reconnection with a 17% higher rate in the premidnight sector.

  8. Potential of mean force for electrical conductivity of dense plasmas

    DOE PAGES

    Starrett, C. E.

    2017-09-28

    The electrical conductivity in dense plasmas can be calculated with the relaxation-time approximation provided that the interaction potential between the scattering electron and the ion is known. To date there has been considerable uncertainty as to the best way to define this interaction potential so that it correctly includes the effects of ionic structure, screening by electrons and partial ionization. The current approximations lead to significantly different results with varying levels of agreement when compared to bench-mark calculations and experiments. Here, we present a new way to define this potential, drawing on ideas from classical fluid theory to define amore » potential of mean force. This new potential results in significantly improved agreement with experiments and bench-mark calculations, and includes all the aforementioned physics self-consistently.« less

  9. Detailed analysis of hollow ions spectra from dense matter pumped by X-ray emission of relativistic laser plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, S. B. E-mail: anatolyf@hotmail.com; Colgan, J.; Abdallah, J.; Faenov, A. Ya. E-mail: anatolyf@hotmail.com; Pikuz, S. A.; Skobelev, I. Yu.; Wagenaars, E.; Culfa, O.; Dance, R. J.; Tallents, G. J.; Rossall, A. K.; Woolsey, N. C.; Booth, N.; Lancaster, K. L.; Evans, R. G.; Gray, R. J.; McKenna, P.; Kaempfer, T.; Schulze, K. S.; Uschmann, I.; and others

    2014-03-15

    X-ray emission from hollow ions offers new diagnostic opportunities for dense, strongly coupled plasma. We present extended modeling of the x-ray emission spectrum reported by Colgan et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 125001 (2013)] based on two collisional-radiative codes: the hybrid-structure Spectroscopic Collisional-Radiative Atomic Model (SCRAM) and the mixed-unresolved transition arrays (MUTA) ATOMIC model. We show that both accuracy and completeness in the modeled energy level structure are critical for reliable diagnostics, investigate how emission changes with different treatments of ionization potential depression, and discuss two approaches to handling the extensive structure required for hollow-ion models with many multiply excited configurations.

  10. Detailed analysis of hollow ions spectra from dense matter pumped by X-ray emission of relativistic laser plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, S. B.; Colgan, J.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Abdallah, J.; Pikuz, S. A.; Skobelev, I. Yu.; Wagenaars, E.; Booth, N.; Culfa, O.; Dance, R. J.; Tallents, G. J.; Evans, R. G.; Gray, R. J.; Kaempfer, T.; Lancaster, K. L.; McKenna, P.; Rossall, A. K.; Schulze, K. S.; Uschmann, I.; Zhidkov, A. G.; Woolsey, N. C.

    2014-03-01

    X-ray emission from hollow ions offers new diagnostic opportunities for dense, strongly coupled plasma. We present extended modeling of the x-ray emission spectrum reported by Colgan et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 125001 (2013)] based on two collisional-radiative codes: the hybrid-structure Spectroscopic Collisional-Radiative Atomic Model (SCRAM) and the mixed-unresolved transition arrays (MUTA) ATOMIC model. We show that both accuracy and completeness in the modeled energy level structure are critical for reliable diagnostics, investigate how emission changes with different treatments of ionization potential depression, and discuss two approaches to handling the extensive structure required for hollow-ion models with many multiply excited configurations.

  11. Helical modulation of the electrostatic plasma potential due to edge magnetic islands induced by resonant magnetic perturbation fields at TEXTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Ciaccio, G. Spizzo, G.; Schmitz, O. Frerichs, H.; Abdullaev, S. S.; Evans, T. E.; White, R. B.

    2015-10-15

    The electrostatic response of the edge plasma to a magnetic island induced by resonant magnetic perturbations to the plasma edge of the circular limiter tokamak TEXTOR is analyzed. Measurements of plasma potential are interpreted by simulations with the Hamiltonian guiding center code ORBIT. We find a strong correlation between the magnetic field topology and the poloidal modulation of the measured plasma potential. The ion and electron drifts yield a predominantly electron driven radial diffusion when approaching the island X-point while ion diffusivities are generally an order of magnitude smaller. This causes a strong radial electric field structure pointing outward from the island O-point. The good agreement found between measured and modeled plasma potential connected to the enhanced radial particle diffusivities supports that a magnetic island in the edge of a tokamak plasma can act as convective cell. We show in detail that the particular, non-ambipolar drifts of electrons and ions in a 3D magnetic topology account for these effects. An analytical model for the plasma potential is implemented in the code ORBIT, and analyses of ion and electron radial diffusion show that both ion- and electron-dominated transport regimes can exist, which are known as ion and electron root solutions in stellarators. This finding and comparison with reversed field pinch studies and stellarator literature suggest that the role of magnetic islands as convective cells and hence as major radial particle transport drivers could be a generic mechanism in 3D plasma boundary layers.

  12. Potential around a dust grain in collisional plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Moulick, R. Goswami, K. S.

    2015-04-15

    The ion neutral collision can lead to interesting phenomena in dust charging, totally different from the expectations based on the traditional orbit motion limited theory. The potential around a dust grain is investigated for the collisional plasma considering the presence of ion neutral collisions. Fluid equations are solved for the one dimensional radial coordinate. It is observed that with the gradual increase in ion neutral collision, the potential structure around the dust grain changes its shape and is different from the usual Debye-Hückel potential. The shift however starts from a certain value of ion neutral collision and the electron-ion density varies accordingly. The potential variation is interesting and reconfirms the fact that there exists a region of attraction for negative charges. The collision modeling is done for the full range of plasma, i.e., considering the bulk and the sheath jointly. The potential variation with collision is also shown explicitly and the variation is found to cope up with the earlier observations.

  13. Rooftop Solar Photovoltaic Technical Potential in the United States. A Detailed Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Gagnon, Pieter; Margolis, Robert; Melius, Jennifer; Phillips, Caleb; Elmore, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    How much energy could be generated if PV modules were installed on all of the suitable roof area in the nation? To answer this question, we first use GIS methods to process a lidar dataset and determine the amount of roof area that is suitable for PV deployment in 128 cities nationwide, containing 23% of U.S. buildings, and provide PV-generation results for a subset of those cities. We then extend the insights from that analysis to the entire continental United States. We develop two statistical models--one for small buildings and one for medium and large buildings--and populate them with geographic variables that correlate with rooftop's suitability for PV. We simulate the productivity of PV installed on the suitable roof area, and present the technical potential of PV on both small buildings and medium/large buildings for every state in the continental US. Within the 128 cities covered by lidar data, 83% of small buildings have a location suitable for a PV installation, but only 26% of the total rooftop area of small buildings is suitable for development. The sheer number of buildings in this class, however, gives small buildings the greatest technical potential. Small building rooftops could accommodate 731 GW of PV capacity and generate 926 TWh/year of PV energy, approximately 65% of rooftop PV's total technical potential. We conclude by summing the PV-generation results for all building sizes and therefore answering our original question, estimating that the total national technical potential of rooftop PV is 1,118 GW of installed capacity and 1,432 TWh of annual energy generation. This equates to 39% of total national electric-sector sales.

  14. Modified transverse phonon-helicon interaction in colloids laden semiconductor plasmas due to Bohm potential and Fermi degenerate pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Aartee Yadav, N.; Ghosh, S.

    2015-07-31

    A detailed study of the quantum modification of acousto-helicon wave spectra due to Bohm potential and Fermi degenerate pressure in colloids laden semiconductor plasma has been presented. We have used quantum hydrodynamic model of plasmas to arrive at most general dispersion relation in presence of magnetic field. This dispersion relation has been analyzed in three different velocity regimes and the expressions for gain constants have been obtained. From the present study it has been concluded that the quantum effect and the magnetic field significantly modify the wave characteristics particularly in high doping regime in semiconductor plasma medium in presence of colloids in it.

  15. Statically screened ion potential and Bohm potential in a quantum plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moldabekov, Zhandos; Schoof, Tim; Ludwig, Patrick; Bonitz, Michael; Ramazanov, Tlekkabul

    2015-10-01

    The effective potential Φ of a classical ion in a weakly correlated quantum plasma in thermodynamic equilibrium at finite temperature is well described by the random phase approximation screened Coulomb potential. Additionally, collision effects can be included via a relaxation time ansatz (Mermin dielectric function). These potentials are used to study the quality of various statically screened potentials that were recently proposed by Shukla and Eliasson (SE) [Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 165007 (2012)], Akbari-Moghanjoughi (AM) [Phys. Plasmas 22, 022103 (2015)], and Stanton and Murillo (SM) [Phys. Rev. E 91, 033104 (2015)] starting from quantum hydrodynamic (QHD) theory. Our analysis reveals that the SE potential is qualitatively different from the full potential, whereas the SM potential (at any temperature) and the AM potential (at zero temperature) are significantly more accurate. This confirms the correctness of the recently derived [Michta et al., Contrib. Plasma Phys. 55, 437 (2015)] pre-factor 1/9 in front of the Bohm term of QHD for fermions.

  16. Statically screened ion potential and Bohm potential in a quantum plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Moldabekov, Zhandos; Schoof, Tim; Ludwig, Patrick; Bonitz, Michael; Ramazanov, Tlekkabul

    2015-10-15

    The effective potential Φ of a classical ion in a weakly correlated quantum plasma in thermodynamic equilibrium at finite temperature is well described by the random phase approximation screened Coulomb potential. Additionally, collision effects can be included via a relaxation time ansatz (Mermin dielectric function). These potentials are used to study the quality of various statically screened potentials that were recently proposed by Shukla and Eliasson (SE) [Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 165007 (2012)], Akbari-Moghanjoughi (AM) [Phys. Plasmas 22, 022103 (2015)], and Stanton and Murillo (SM) [Phys. Rev. E 91, 033104 (2015)] starting from quantum hydrodynamic (QHD) theory. Our analysis reveals that the SE potential is qualitatively different from the full potential, whereas the SM potential (at any temperature) and the AM potential (at zero temperature) are significantly more accurate. This confirms the correctness of the recently derived [Michta et al., Contrib. Plasma Phys. 55, 437 (2015)] pre-factor 1/9 in front of the Bohm term of QHD for fermions.

  17. Electron density dependence of impedance probe plasma potential measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D. N.; Blackwell, D. D.; Amatucci, W. E.

    2015-08-15

    In earlier works, we used spheres of various sizes as impedance probes in demonstrating a method of determining plasma potential, φ{sub p}, when the probe radius is much larger than the Debye length, λ{sub D}. The basis of the method in those works [Walker et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 032108 (2006); ibid. 15, 123506 (2008); ibid. 17, 113503 (2010)] relies on applying a small amplitude signal of fixed frequency to a probe in a plasma and, through network analyzer-based measurements, determining the complex reflection coefficient, Γ, for varying probe bias, V{sub b}. The frequency range of the applied signal is restricted to avoid sheath resonant effects and ion contributions such that ω{sub pi} ≪ ω ≪ ω{sub pe}, where ω{sub pi} is the ion plasma frequency and ω{sub pe} is the electron plasma frequency. For a given frequency and applied bias, both Re(Z{sub ac}) and Im(Z{sub ac}) are available from Γ. When Re(Z{sub ac}) is plotted versus V{sub b}, a minimum predicted by theory occurs at φ{sub p} [Walker et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 113503 (2010)]. In addition, Im(Z{sub ac}) appears at, or very near, a maximum at φ{sub p}. As n{sub e} decreases and the sheath expands, the minimum becomes harder to discern. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate that when using network analyzer-based measurements, Γ itself and Im(Z{sub ac}) and their derivatives are useful as accompanying indicators to Re(Z{sub ac}) in these difficult cases. We note the difficulties encountered by the most commonly used plasma diagnostic, the Langmuir probe. Spherical probe data is mainly used in this work, although we present limited data for a cylinder and a disk. To demonstrate the effect of lowered density as a function of probe geometry, we compare the cylinder and disk using only the indicator Re(Z{sub ac})

  18. A linear radio frequency plasma reactor for potential and current mapping in a magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Faudot, E.; Devaux, S.; Moritz, J.; Heuraux, S.; Molina Cabrera, P.; Brochard, F.

    2015-06-15

    Langmuir probe measurements in front of high power ion cyclotron resonant frequency antennas are not possible or simply too noisy to be analyzed properly. A linear experiment is a radio frequency (RF) magnetized plasma discharge reactor designed to probe the rectified potential in front of such antennas but at low power level (1 kW) to next improve antenna design and mitigate sheath effects. The maximum magnetic field is 0.1 T, and the RF amplifier can work between 10 kHz and 250 MHz allowing ion cyclotron resonances for argon or helium. The first measurements with no magnetic field are presented here, especially 2D potential maps extracted from the RF compensated probe measurements yield ni ≈ 10{sup 15} m{sup −3} and Te ≈ 2 eV for RF power lower than 100 W. Series resonances in the chamber are highlighted and allow to deduce the plasma parameters from a simple equivalent impedance model of the plasma in helium gas. Next studies will be focused on magnetized plasmas and especially magnetized RF sheaths.

  19. Laser Diagnostic Method for Plasma Sheath Potential Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Sean P.

    Electric propulsion systems are gaining popularity in the aerospace field as a viable option for long term positioning and thrusting applications. In particular, Hall thrusters have shown promise as the primary propulsion engine for space probes during interplanetary journeys. However, the interaction between propellant xenon ions and the ceramic channel wall continues to remain a complex issue. The most significant source of power loss in Hall thrusters is due to electron and ion currents through the sheath to the channel wall. A sheath is a region of high electric field that separates a plasma from a wall or surface in contact. Plasma electrons with enough energy to penetrate the sheath may result emission of a secondary electron from the wall. With significant secondary electron emission (SEE), the sheath voltage is reduced and so too is the electron retarding electric field. Therefore, a lower sheath voltage further increases the particle loss to the wall of a Hall thruster and leads to plasma cooling and lower efficiency. To further understand sheath dynamics, laser-induced fluorescence is employed to provide a non-invasive, in situ, and spatially resolved technique for measuring xenon ion velocity. By scanning the laser wavelength over an electronic transition of singly ionized xenon and collecting the resulting fluorescence, one can determine the ion velocity from the Doppler shifted absorption. Knowing the velocity at multiple points in the sheath, it can be converted to a relative electric potential profile which can reveal a lot about the plasma-wall interaction and the severity of SEE. The challenge of adequately measuring sheath potential profiles is optimizing the experiment to maximize the signal-to-noise ratio. A strong signal with low noise, enables high resolution measurements and increases the depth of measurement in the sheath, where the signal strength is lowest. Many improvements were made to reduce the background luminosity, increase the

  20. Multiple Levels of Degradation Diminish Hemostatic Potential of Thawed Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Matijevic, Nena; Kostousov, Vadim; Wang, Yao-Wei W.; Wade, Charles E.; Wang, Weiwei; Letourneau, Phillip; Hartwell, Elizabeth; Kozar, Rosemary; Ko, Tien; Holcomb, John B.

    2011-01-01

    Background Severe bleeding after injury requires transfusion of blood products, including fresh frozen plasma (FFP). Many centers are keeping thawed plasma (TP) ready for massively transfused patients. According to the American Association of Blood Banks Standards, TP is approved for transfusion up to 5 days after thawing, when stored at 1°C to 6°C. However, there are no clinical data analyzing the effects of the approved 5-day storage on plasma. We hypothesize that the hemostatic potential (HP) of freshly thawed (FFP-0) was superior to plasma stored for 5 days (FFP-5). Methods FFP from 30 single donors were thawed at 37°C and kept at 1°C to 6°C for 5 days. HP was evaluated at day 0 and 5 by measuring kinetics of thrombin generation (TG), kinetics of clot formation by thromboelastography, clotting factors and inhibitors, and cell-derived microparticles (MPs) by flow cytometry. Results When comparing FFP-5 to FFP-0, FFP-5 exhibited only 40% of the potential of FFP-0 for TG (6.2 nM/min vs. 14.3 nM/min, p < 0.0001), a slower clotting response via thromboelastography (reaction time: 4.3 minutes vs. 3.2 minutes, p < 0.0001) and a longer delay in reaching maximum thrombus generation (5.7 minutes vs. 4.6 minutes, p < 0.01). Diminished HP was accompanied by a significant decline in multiple coagulation proteins, including FV, VII, VIII, von Willebrand factor, and free Protein S, by up to 30%, and a decrease of 50% in MP counts. Conclusion The HP and clot forming ability of TP significantly declined with storage. Hence, freshly TP may have a greater ability to restore hemostasis and correct coagulopathy compared with FFP-5. The clinical consequences for transfused patients deserve further exploration. PMID:21217484

  1. Development of a Detailed Stress Map of Oklahoma for Avoidance of Potentially Active Faults When Siting Wastewater Injection Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alt, R. C., II; Zoback, M. D.

    2014-12-01

    We report progress on a project to create a detailed map of in situ stress orientations and relative magnitudes throughout the state of Oklahoma. It is well known that the past 5 years has seen a remarkable increase in seismicity in much of the state, potentially related to waste water injection. The purpose of this project is to attempt to utilize detailed knowledge of the stress field to identify which pre-existing faults could be potentially active in response to injection-related pore pressure increases. Over 50 new stress orientations have been obtained, principally utilizing wellbore image data provided by the oil and gas industry. These data reveal a very uniform ENE direction of maximum compressive stress through much of the state. As earthquake focal plane mechanisms indicate strike-slip faulting, the stress orientation data indicate which pre-existing faults are potentially active. The data are consistent with slip on the near-vertical, NE-trending fault associated with at least one of the M 5+ earthquakes in the Prague, OK sequence in 2011. If successful, it would demonstrate that combining detailed information about pre-existing faults and the current stress field could be used to guide the siting of injection wells so as to decrease the potential for injection-related seismicity.

  2. Collisionless Plasma Modeling in an Arbitrary Potential Energy Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liemohn, M. W.; Khazanov, G. V.

    1997-01-01

    A new technique for calculating a collisionless plasma along a field line is presented. The primary feature of the new model is that it can handle an arbitrary (including nonmonotonic) potential energy distribution. This was one of the limiting constraints on the existing models in this class, and these constraints are generalized for an arbitrary potential energy composition. The formulation for relating current density to the field-aligned potential as well as formulas for density, temperature and energy flux calculations are presented for several distribution functions, ranging from a bi-Lorentzian with a loss cone to an isotropic Maxwellian. A comparison of these results with previous models shows that the formulation reduces.to the earlier models under similar assumptions.

  3. EMI from Spacecraft Docking Systems Spacecraft Charging - Plasma Contact Potentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norgard, John D.; Scully, Robert; Musselman, Randall

    2012-01-01

    The plasma contact potential of a visiting vehicle (VV), such as the Orion Service Module (SM), is determined while docking at the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV). Due to spacecraft charging effects on-orbit, the potential difference between the CEV and the VV can be large at docking, and an electrostatic discharge (ESD) could occur at capture, which could degrade, disrupt, damage, or destroy sensitive electronic equipment on the CEV and/or VV. Analytical and numerical models of the CEV are simulated to predict the worst-case potential difference between the CEV and the VV when the CEV is unbiased (solar panels unlit: eclipsed in the dark and inactive) or biased (solar panels sunlit: in the light and active).

  4. Collisionless Plasma Modeling in an Arbitrary Potential Energy Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liemohn, M. W.; Khazanov, G. V.

    1997-01-01

    A new technique for calculating a collisionless plasma along a field line is presented. The primary feature of the new model is that it can handle an arbitrary (including nonmonotonic) potential energy distribution. This was one of the limiting constraints on the existing models in this class, and these constraints are generalized for an arbitrary potential energy composition. The formulation for relating current density to the field-aligned potential as well as formulas for density, temperature and energy flux calculations are presented for several distribution functions, ranging from a bi-Lorentzian with a loss cone to an isotropic Maxwellian. A comparison of these results with previous models shows that the formulation reduces.to the earlier models under similar assumptions.

  5. Plasma-potentiated small molecules—possible alternative to antibiotics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazaka, Kateryna; Bazaka, Olha; Levchenko, Igor; Xu, Shuyan; Ivanova, Elena P.; Keidar, Michael; (Ken Ostrikov, Kostya

    2017-09-01

    The efficacy of the existing arsenal of antibiotics is continuously compromised by their indiscriminative and often excessive use. The antibiotic arsenal can be expanded with agents that have different mechanisms of activity to conventional drugs, such as plant-derived natural antimicrobial small molecules, yet these often lack sufficient activity and selectivity to fulfill the antibiotics requirements and conventional thermochemical methods of their transient activation may not be compatible with biomedical applications. Here, non-equilibrium conditions of atmospheric-pressure plasma are used for rapid, single-step potentiation of activity of select terpenes without the use of chemicals or heating. Substantial potentiation of activity against Staphylococcus aureus cells in planktonic and biofilm states is observed in both inherently antibacterial terpenes, e.g. terpinen-4-ol, and compounds generally considered to have limited effect against S. aureus, e.g. γ-terpinene. The improved biological activity may arise, at least in part, from the changes in the physico–chemical properties of the terpenes induced by plasma-generated chemical species and physical effects, such as electric fields and UV irradiation. This activation approach is generic, and thus can potentially be applied to other molecules and their mixtures in an effort to expand the range of effective antimicrobial agents for deactivation of pathogenic organisms in hygiene, medical and food applications.

  6. Action potential processing in a detailed Purkinje cell model reveals a critical role for axonal compartmentalization

    PubMed Central

    Masoli, Stefano; Solinas, Sergio; D'Angelo, Egidio

    2015-01-01

    The Purkinje cell (PC) is among the most complex neurons in the brain and plays a critical role for cerebellar functioning. PCs operate as fast pacemakers modulated by synaptic inputs but can switch from simple spikes to complex bursts and, in some conditions, show bistability. In contrast to original works emphasizing dendritic Ca-dependent mechanisms, recent experiments have supported a primary role for axonal Na-dependent processing, which could effectively regulate spike generation and transmission to deep cerebellar nuclei (DCN). In order to account for the numerous ionic mechanisms involved (at present including Nav1.6, Cav2.1, Cav3.1, Cav3.2, Cav3.3, Kv1.1, Kv1.5, Kv3.3, Kv3.4, Kv4.3, KCa1.1, KCa2.2, KCa3.1, Kir2.x, HCN1), we have elaborated a multicompartmental model incorporating available knowledge on localization and gating of PC ionic channels. The axon, including initial segment (AIS) and Ranvier nodes (RNs), proved critical to obtain appropriate pacemaking and firing frequency modulation. Simple spikes initiated in the AIS and protracted discharges were stabilized in the soma through Na-dependent mechanisms, while somato-dendritic Ca channels contributed to sustain pacemaking and to generate complex bursting at high discharge regimes. Bistability occurred only following Na and Ca channel down-regulation. In addition, specific properties in RNs K currents were required to limit spike transmission frequency along the axon. The model showed how organized electroresponsive functions could emerge from the molecular complexity of PCs and showed that the axon is fundamental to complement ionic channel compartmentalization enabling action potential processing and transmission of specific spike patterns to DCN. PMID:25759640

  7. Generalized model screening potentials for Fermi-Dirac plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, some properties of relativistically degenerate quantum plasmas, such as static ion screening, structure factor, and Thomson scattering cross-section, are studied in the framework of linearized quantum hydrodynamic theory with the newly proposed kinetic γ-correction to Bohm term in low frequency limit. It is found that the correction has a significant effect on the properties of quantum plasmas in all density regimes, ranging from solid-density up to that of white dwarf stars. It is also found that Shukla-Eliasson attractive force exists up to a few times the density of metals, and the ionic correlations are seemingly apparent in the radial distribution function signature. Simplified statically screened attractive and repulsive potentials are presented for zero-temperature Fermi-Dirac plasmas, valid for a wide range of quantum plasma number-density and atomic number values. Moreover, it is observed that crystallization of white dwarfs beyond a critical core number-density persists with this new kinetic correction, but it is shifted to a much higher number-density value of n0 ≃ 1.94 × 1037 cm-3 (1.77 × 1010 gr cm-3), which is nearly four orders of magnitude less than the nuclear density. It is found that the maximal Thomson scattering with the γ-corrected structure factor is a remarkable property of white dwarf stars. However, with the new γ-correction, the maximal scattering shifts to the spectrum region between hard X-ray and low-energy gamma-rays. White dwarfs composed of higher atomic-number ions are observed to maximally Thomson-scatter at slightly higher wavelengths, i.e., they maximally scatter slightly low-energy photons in the presence of correction.

  8. Generalized model screening potentials for Fermi-Dirac plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.

    2016-04-15

    In this paper, some properties of relativistically degenerate quantum plasmas, such as static ion screening, structure factor, and Thomson scattering cross-section, are studied in the framework of linearized quantum hydrodynamic theory with the newly proposed kinetic γ-correction to Bohm term in low frequency limit. It is found that the correction has a significant effect on the properties of quantum plasmas in all density regimes, ranging from solid-density up to that of white dwarf stars. It is also found that Shukla-Eliasson attractive force exists up to a few times the density of metals, and the ionic correlations are seemingly apparent in the radial distribution function signature. Simplified statically screened attractive and repulsive potentials are presented for zero-temperature Fermi-Dirac plasmas, valid for a wide range of quantum plasma number-density and atomic number values. Moreover, it is observed that crystallization of white dwarfs beyond a critical core number-density persists with this new kinetic correction, but it is shifted to a much higher number-density value of n{sub 0} ≃ 1.94 × 10{sup 37} cm{sup −3} (1.77 × 10{sup 10} gr cm{sup −3}), which is nearly four orders of magnitude less than the nuclear density. It is found that the maximal Thomson scattering with the γ-corrected structure factor is a remarkable property of white dwarf stars. However, with the new γ-correction, the maximal scattering shifts to the spectrum region between hard X-ray and low-energy gamma-rays. White dwarfs composed of higher atomic-number ions are observed to maximally Thomson-scatter at slightly higher wavelengths, i.e., they maximally scatter slightly low-energy photons in the presence of correction.

  9. Measuring plasma potential with an impedance probe in low density plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, David; Blackwell, David; Fernsler, Richard; Amatucci, William

    2012-10-01

    A recent rf technique for determining plasma potential, φp , using an impedance probe was shown to be independent of probe geometry, magnetic field, and orientation. However, a problem which arises in low density plasma concerns a magnitude mismatch between typical network analyzer input impedance (Z0 = 50 φ) and the large value of ac resistance (Rac) which is inversely proportional to ne. The method relies on finding a minimum in Re(Zac)footnotetextPhys. Plasmas 17, 113503 (2010).^,footnotetextNRL Memorandum Report 6750-12-9413 (2012). which is difficult if Rac is much larger than Z0. For low density space plasmas (10^4 -10^5 cm-3) values of Rac range to kφ levels. We have developed numerical simulations based on solving the Boltzmann equation in spherical geometry for a given sheath size. These simulations include a presheath and predict values for Zac which are then used to estimate the error as a function of input impedance based on the error associated with a 50 φ load.

  10. Kinetic Model of Electric Potentials in Localized Collisionless Plasma Structures under Steady Quasi-gyrotropic Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schindler, K.; Birn, J.; Hesse, M.

    2012-01-01

    Localized plasma structures, such as thin current sheets, generally are associated with localized magnetic and electric fields. In space plasmas localized electric fields not only play an important role for particle dynamics and acceleration but may also have significant consequences on larger scales, e.g., through magnetic reconnection. Also, it has been suggested that localized electric fields generated in the magnetosphere are directly connected with quasi-steady auroral arcs. In this context, we present a two-dimensional model based on Vlasov theory that provides the electric potential for a large class of given magnetic field profiles. The model uses an expansion for small deviation from gyrotropy and besides quasineutrality it assumes that electrons and ions have the same number of particles with their generalized gyrocenter on any given magnetic field line. Specializing to one dimension, a detailed discussion concentrates on the electric potential shapes (such as "U" or "S" shapes) associated with magnetic dips, bumps, and steps. Then, it is investigated how the model responds to quasi-steady evolution of the plasma. Finally, the model proves useful in the interpretation of the electric potentials taken from two existing particle simulations.

  11. Kinetic model of electric potentials in localized collisionless plasma structures under steady quasi-gyrotropic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Schindler, K.; Birn, J.; Hesse, M.

    2012-08-15

    Localized plasma structures, such as thin current sheets, generally are associated with localized magnetic and electric fields. In space plasmas localized electric fields not only play an important role for particle dynamics and acceleration but may also have significant consequences on larger scales, e.g., through magnetic reconnection. Also, it has been suggested that localized electric fields generated in the magnetosphere are directly connected with quasi-steady auroral arcs. In this context, we present a two-dimensional model based on Vlasov theory that provides the electric potential for a large class of given magnetic field profiles. The model uses an expansion for small deviation from gyrotropy and besides quasineutrality it assumes that electrons and ions have the same number of particles with their generalized gyrocenter on any given magnetic field line. Specializing to one dimension, a detailed discussion concentrates on the electric potential shapes (such as 'U' or 'S' shapes) associated with magnetic dips, bumps, and steps. Then, it is investigated how the model responds to quasi-steady evolution of the plasma. Finally, the model proves useful in the interpretation of the electric potentials taken from two existing particle simulations.

  12. Thermal plasma spraying for SOFCs: Applications, potential advantages, and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Rob; Wang, Zhenwei; Kesler, Olivera; Rose, Lars; Jankovic, Jasna; Yick, Sing; Maric, Radenka; Ghosh, Dave

    In this article, the applications, potential advantages, and challenges of thermal plasma spray (PS) processing for nanopowder production and cell fabrication of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are reviewed. PS processing creates sufficiently high temperatures to melt all materials fed into the plasma. The heated material can either be quenched into oxide powders or deposited as coatings. This technique has been applied to directly deposit functional layers as well as nanopowder for SOFCs application. In particularly, low melting point and highly active electrodes can be directly fabricated on zirconia-based electrolytes. This is a simple processing technique that does not require the use of organic solvents, offering the opportunity for flexible adjustment of process parameters, and significant time saving in production of the cell and cost reduction compared with tape casting, screen printing and sintering processing steps. Most importantly, PS processing shows strong potential to enable the deposition of metal-supported SOFCs through the integrated fabrication of membrane-electrode assemblies (MEA) on porous metallic substrates with consecutive deposition steps. On the other hand, the application of PS processing to produce SOFCs faces some challenges, such as insufficient porosity of the electrodes, the difficulty of obtaining a thin (<10 μm) and dense electrolyte layer. Fed with H 2 as the fuel gas and oxygen as the oxidant gas, the plasma sprayed cell reached high power densities of 770 mW cm -2 at 900 °C and 430 mW cm -2 at 800 °C at a cell voltage of 0.7 V.

  13. A detailed examination of platelet function inhibition by nitric oxide in platelet-rich plasma and whole blood.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Robert; Krueger, Julia; Filipović, Milos R; Ivanović-Burmazović, Ivana; Calatzis, Andreas; Weiss, Dominik R; Eckstein, Reinhold

    2013-01-01

    The question of whether novel instruments such as multiple electrode aggregometry (MEA) can be used for measurement of the effects of nitric oxide (NO) on platelets (PLTs) has not been examined. Therefore, we compared the effects of NO concentrations (1, 10, and 100 microM) on the PLT aggregation response to ADP, arachidonic acid (AA), collagen, ristocetin, and thrombin receptor-activating peptide 6 (TRAP6) using light transmission aggregometry (LTA) and multiple electrode aggregometry (MEA) and examined the effects of NO using the platelet function analyzer (PFA)-100. The response of PLTs to ADP and AA was strongly inhibited by all NO concentrations in LTA and MEA. The inhibition of the responses to ristocetin and collagen was detectable in MEA at lower NO concentrations than in LTA. However, the typically increasing lag phase between collagen addition and the aggregation response in the presence of NO was more obvious in LTA. TRAP caused a reproducible early response in the presence of NO in LTA which was followed by rapid PLT disaggregation, whereas even 100 microM NO did not inhibit the response to TRAP in MEA. Finally, NO prolonged the in-vitro bleeding time remarkably more in the PFA-100 collagen-epinephrin cartridge than in the collagen-ADP cartridge. Whole blood versus PLT rich plasma, citrate versus hirudin, and high versus low shear influenced the effects of NO. This shows that a careful selection of models and potentially a combination of different methods is appropriate for a differentiated evaluation of pharmacological or physiological mechanisms of NO-donors or of NO-inhibitors.

  14. Accompanying indicators of plasma potential when using impedance probes in low density plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, David; Blackwell, David; Fernsler, Richard; Amatucci, William

    2016-09-01

    In earlier works, we used spheres of various sizes as impedance probes in demonstrating a method of determining plasma potential, φp, when the probe radius, rp, is much larger than λD. These works demonstrate a method of measuring plasma potential with an impedance probe by applying a small amplitude rf signal and tracking a minimum in Re (Zac) as a function of probe bias, Vb where Re (Zac) and Im(Zac) are available using a network analyzer through measurement of the reflection coefficient, Γ. However, for borderline cases where the requirement that rp >>λD begins to fail, Re (Zac) ( 1 /ne) can rise to k Ω's for even moderate levels of Vb, causing a large impedance mismatch with the network analyzer (Z0 = 50 Ω) . The purpose of the recent work is to demonstrate that Γ itself along with Im(Zac) and their derivatives are useful as accompanying indicators to Re (Zac) in these difficult cases. We will present experimental data along with model comparisons to demonstrate the usefulness and limits of the additional indicators. Work Supported by Naval Research Laboratory Base Program.

  15. Detailed Experimental Study of Ion Acceleration by Interaction of an Ultra-Short Intense Laser with an Underdense Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Kahaly, S.; Sylla, F.; Lifschitz, A.; Flacco, A.; Veltcheva, M.; Malka, V.

    2016-01-01

    Ion acceleration from intense (Iλ2 > 1018 Wcm−2 μm2) laser-plasma interaction is experimentally studied within a wide range of He gas densities. Focusing an ultrashort pulse (duration  ion plasma period) on a newly designed submillimetric gas jet system, enabled us to inhibit total evacuation of electrons from the central propagation channel reducing the radial ion acceleration associated with ponderomotive Coulomb explosion, a mechanism predominant in the long pulse scenario. New ion acceleration mechanism have been unveiled in this regime leading to non-Maxwellian quasi monoenergetic features in the ion energy spectra. The emitted nonthermal ion bunches show a new scaling of the ion peak energy with plasma density. The scaling identified in this new regime differs from previously reported studies. PMID:27531755

  16. Detailed Experimental Study of Ion Acceleration by Interaction of an Ultra-Short Intense Laser with an Underdense Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahaly, S.; Sylla, F.; Lifschitz, A.; Flacco, A.; Veltcheva, M.; Malka, V.

    2016-08-01

    Ion acceleration from intense (Iλ2 > 1018 Wcm‑2 μm2) laser-plasma interaction is experimentally studied within a wide range of He gas densities. Focusing an ultrashort pulse (duration  ion plasma period) on a newly designed submillimetric gas jet system, enabled us to inhibit total evacuation of electrons from the central propagation channel reducing the radial ion acceleration associated with ponderomotive Coulomb explosion, a mechanism predominant in the long pulse scenario. New ion acceleration mechanism have been unveiled in this regime leading to non-Maxwellian quasi monoenergetic features in the ion energy spectra. The emitted nonthermal ion bunches show a new scaling of the ion peak energy with plasma density. The scaling identified in this new regime differs from previously reported studies.

  17. Comparative measurements of plasma potential with ball-pen and Langmuir probe in low-temperature magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Zanáška, M.; Kudrna, P.; Tichý, M.; Adámek, J.; Peterka, M.

    2015-03-15

    The ball-pen probe (BPP) is used for direct plasma potential measurements in magnetized plasma. The probe can adjust the ratio of the electron and ion saturation currents I{sub sat}{sup −}/I{sub sat}{sup +} to be close to one and therefore its I-V characteristic becomes nearly symmetric. If this is achieved, the floating potential of the BPP is close to the plasma potential. Because of its rather simple construction, it offers an attractive probe for measurements in magnetized plasma. Comparative measurements of plasma potential by BPPs of different dimensions as well as one Langmuir probe (LP) in an argon discharge plasma of a cylindrical magnetron were performed at various experimental conditions. An additional comparison by an emissive probe was also performed. All these types of probes provide similar values of plasma potential in a wide range of plasma parameters. Our results for three different BPP dimensions indicate that the BPP can be operated in a cylindrical magnetron DC argon discharge if the value of the ratio of the magnetic field and neutral gas pressure, B/p, is greater than approximately 10 mT/Pa.

  18. Detailed measurements of the H beta line shape in a transient plasma using a fiber optics slit system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stickford, G. H., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Through the use of fiber optics, a series of very narrow slits have been constructed and placed at the exit plane of a spectrograph. Plasma radiation which is dispersed by the spectrograph is incident on the slits and is transmitted to separate phototubes via the quartz fibers. With this technique, time resolved measurements of the spectral shape of the hydrogen H beta line have been made and used to determine the electron density of a transient plasma. Data obtained in a shock tube indicated that the thermodynamic conditions behind the reflected shock in a mixture of 20 percent H 80 percent He correspond to theoretically predicted conditions.

  19. A detailed postprocess analysis of an argon gas puff Z-pinch plasma using SPEC2D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Y. K.; Kammash, T.; Davis, J.

    1997-05-01

    A postprocess analysis of a single time frame hydrodynamic profile from the PRISM two-dimensional MHD simulation of an argon gas puff Z-pinch plasma experiment on Double-Eagle generator at Physics Internationals, Co. is presented. In addition, spatially resolved emission spectra and filtered (K- and L-shell radiation) x-ray pinhole images, generated using the SPEC2D code, are examined toward the understanding of the emission characteristics of the hot spots and the formation of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the plasma.

  20. A plasma source driven predator-prey like mechanism as a potential cause of spiraling intermittencies in linear plasma devices

    SciTech Connect

    Reiser, D.; Ohno, N.; Tanaka, H.; Vela, L.

    2014-03-15

    Three-dimensional global drift fluid simulations are carried out to analyze coherent plasma structures appearing in the NAGDIS-II linear device (nagoya divertor plasma Simulator-II). The numerical simulations reproduce several features of the intermittent spiraling structures observed, for instance, statistical properties, rotation frequency, and the frequency of plasma expulsion. The detailed inspection of the three-dimensional plasma dynamics allows to identify the key mechanism behind the formation of these intermittent events. The resistive coupling between electron pressure and parallel electric field in the plasma source region gives rise to a quasilinear predator-prey like dynamics where the axisymmetric mode represents the prey and the spiraling structure with low azimuthal mode number represents the predator. This interpretation is confirmed by a reduced one-dimensional quasilinear model derived on the basis of the findings in the full three-dimensional simulations. The dominant dynamics reveals certain similarities to the classical Lotka-Volterra cycle.

  1. The use of ultraviolet Thomson scattering as a versatile diagnostic for detailed measurements of a collisional laser produced plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Tracy, Mark David

    1993-01-08

    Collective Thomson scattering from ion-acoustic waves at 266nm is used to obtain spatially resolved, two-dimensional electron density, sound speed, and radial drift profiles of a collisional laser plasma. An ultraviolet diagnostic wavelength minimizes the complicating effects of inverse bremsstrahlung and refractive turning in the coronal region of interest, where the electron densities approach nc/10. Laser plasmas of this type are important because they model some of the aspects of the plasmas found in high-gain laser-fusion pellets irradiated by long pulse widths where the laser light is absorbed mostly in the corona. The experimental results and LASNEX simulations agree within a percent standard deviation of 40% for the electron density and 50% for the sound speed and radial drift velocity. Thus it is shown that the hydrodynamics equations with classical coefficients and the numerical approximations in LASNEX are valid models of laser-heated, highly collisional plasmas. The versatility of Thomson scattering is expanded upon by extending existing theory with a Fokker-Planck based model to include plasmas that are characterized by (0 ≤ kiaλii ≤ ∞) and ZTe/Ti, where kia is the ion- acoustic wave number, λii is the ion-ion mean free path, Z is the ionization state of the plasma, and Te. Ti are the electron and ion temperatures in electron volts respectively. The model is valid for plasmas in which the electrons are approximately collisionless, (kiaλei, kiaλee ≥ 1), and quasineutrality holds, (α ≥1), where α = 1/kλDE and λDe is the electron Debye length. This newly developed model predicts the lineshape of the ion-acoustic Thomson spectra and when fit to experimental data provides a direct measurement of the relative thermal flow velocity between the electrons and ions.

  2. ICRF-enhanced plasma potentials in the SOL of Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Ochoukov, R.; Whyte, D. G.; Brunner, D.; LaBombard, B.; Lipschultz, B.; Terry, J. L.; Wukitch, S. J.; D'Ippolito, D. A.; Myra, J. R.

    2014-02-12

    We performed an extensive survey of the plasma potential in the scrape-off layer (SOL) of Ion Cyclotron Range-of Frequencies (ICRF)-heated discharges on Alcator C-Mod. Our results show that plasma potentials are enhanced in the presence of ICRF power and plasma potential values of >100 V are often observed. Such potentials are high enough to induce sputtering of high-Z molybdenum (Mo) plasma facing components by deuterium ions on C-Mod. For comparison, the plasma potential in Ohmic discharges is typically less than 10 V, well below the threshold needed to induce Mo sputtering by deuterium ions. ICRF-enhanced plasma potentials are observed in the SOL regions that both magnetically map and do not map to active ICRF antennas. Regions that magnetically map to active ICRF antennas are accessible to slow waves directly launched by the antennas and these regions experience plasma potential enhancement that is partially consistent with the slow wave rectification mechanism. One of the most defining features of the slow wave rectification is a threshold appearance of significant plasma potentials (>100 V) when the dimensionless rectification parameter Λ{sub −o} is above unity and this trend is observed experimentally. We also observe ICRF-enhanced plasma potentials >100 V in regions that do not magnetically map to the active antennas and, hence, are not accessible for slow waves launched directly by the active antennas. However, unabsorbed fast waves can reach these regions. The general trend that we observe in these 'un-mapped' regions is that the plasma potential scales with the strength of the local RF wave fields with the fast wave polarization and the highest plasma potentials are observed in discharges with the highest levels of unabsorbed ICRF power. Similarly, we find that core Mo levels scale with the level of unabsorbed ICRF power suggesting a link between plasma potentials in the SOL and the strength of the impurity source.

  3. The effects of ionization potential depression on the spectra emitted by hot dense aluminium plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preston, Thomas R.; Vinko, Sam M.; Ciricosta, Orlando; Chung, Hyun-Kyung; Lee, Richard W.; Wark, Justin S.

    2013-06-01

    Recent experiments at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) X-ray Free-Electron-Laser (FEL) have demonstrated that the standard model used for simulating ionization potential depression (IPD) in a plasma (the Stewart-Pyatt (SP) model, J.C. Stewart and K.D. Pyatt Jr., Astrophysical Journal 144 (1966) 1203) considerably underestimates the degree of IPD in a solid density aluminium plasma at temperatures up to 200 eV. In contrast, good agreement with the experimental data was found by use of a modified Ecker-Kröll (mEK) model (G. Ecker and W. Kröll, Physics of Fluids 6 (1963) 62-69). We present here detailed simulations, using the FLYCHK code, of the predicted spectra from hot dense, hydrogenic and helium-like aluminium plasmas ranging in densities from 0.1 to 4 times solid density, and at temperatures up to 1000 eV. Importantly, we find that the greater IPDs predicted by the mEK model result in the loss of the n = 3 states for the hydrogenic ions for all densities above ≈0.8 times solid density, and for the helium-like ions above ≈0.65 solid density. Therefore, we posit that if the mEK model holds at these higher temperatures, the temperature of solid density highly-charged aluminium plasmas cannot be determined by using spectral features associated with the n = 3 principal quantum number, and propose a re-evaluation of previous experimental data where high densities have been inferred from the spectra, and the SP model has been used.

  4. Detailed investigation of optoelectronic and microstructural properties of plasma polymerized cyclohexane thin films: Dependence on the radiofrequency power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manaa, C.; Bouaziz, L.; Lejeune, M.; Kouki, F.; Zellama, K.; Benlahsen, M.; Mejatty, M.; Bouchriha, H.

    2015-06-01

    Optical properties of polymerized cyclohexane films deposited by radiofrequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique at different radiofrequency powers onto glass and silicon substrates, are studied and correlated with the microstructure of the films, using a combination of atomic force microscopy, Raman and Fourier Transformer Infrared spectroscopy and optical measurements. The optical constants such as refractive index n, dielectric permittivity ɛ and extinction k and absorption α coefficients, are extracted from transmission and reflection spectra through the commercial software CODE. These constants lead, by using common theoretical models as Cauchy, Lorentz, Tauc and single effective oscillator, to the determination of the static refractive index ns and permittivity ɛs, the plasma frequency ωp , the carrier density to effective mass ratio N /me* , the optical conductivity σoc, the optical band gap Eg and the oscillation and dispersion energies E0 and Ed, respectively. We find that n, ɛs , ωp , N /me* , Ed , increase with radiofrequency power, while Eg and E0 decrease in the same range of power. These results are well correlated with those obtained from atomic force microscopy, Raman and infrared measurements. They also indicate that the increase of the radiofrequency power promotes the fragmentation of the precursor and increases the carbon C-sp2 hybridization proportion, which results in an improvement of the optoelectronic properties of the films.

  5. PEPSI-Dock: a detailed data-driven protein-protein interaction potential accelerated by polar Fourier correlation.

    PubMed

    Neveu, Emilie; Ritchie, David W; Popov, Petr; Grudinin, Sergei

    2016-09-01

    Docking prediction algorithms aim to find the native conformation of a complex of proteins from knowledge of their unbound structures. They rely on a combination of sampling and scoring methods, adapted to different scales. Polynomial Expansion of Protein Structures and Interactions for Docking (PEPSI-Dock) improves the accuracy of the first stage of the docking pipeline, which will sharpen up the final predictions. Indeed, PEPSI-Dock benefits from the precision of a very detailed data-driven model of the binding free energy used with a global and exhaustive rigid-body search space. As well as being accurate, our computations are among the fastest by virtue of the sparse representation of the pre-computed potentials and FFT-accelerated sampling techniques. Overall, this is the first demonstration of a FFT-accelerated docking method coupled with an arbitrary-shaped distance-dependent interaction potential. First, we present a novel learning process to compute data-driven distant-dependent pairwise potentials, adapted from our previous method used for rescoring of putative protein-protein binding poses. The potential coefficients are learned by combining machine-learning techniques with physically interpretable descriptors. Then, we describe the integration of the deduced potentials into a FFT-accelerated spherical sampling provided by the Hex library. Overall, on a training set of 163 heterodimers, PEPSI-Dock achieves a success rate of 91% mid-quality predictions in the top-10 solutions. On a subset of the protein docking benchmark v5, it achieves 44.4% mid-quality predictions in the top-10 solutions when starting from bound structures and 20.5% when starting from unbound structures. The method runs in 5-15 min on a modern laptop and can easily be extended to other types of interactions. https://team.inria.fr/nano-d/software/PEPSI-Dock sergei.grudinin@inria.fr. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e

  6. Detailed investigation of optoelectronic and microstructural properties of plasma polymerized cyclohexane thin films: Dependence on the radiofrequency power

    SciTech Connect

    Manaa, C.; Bouaziz, L.; Lejeune, M.; Zellama, K. Benlahsen, M.; Kouki, F.; Mejatty, M.; Bouchriha, H.

    2015-06-07

    Optical properties of polymerized cyclohexane films deposited by radiofrequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique at different radiofrequency powers onto glass and silicon substrates, are studied and correlated with the microstructure of the films, using a combination of atomic force microscopy, Raman and Fourier Transformer Infrared spectroscopy and optical measurements. The optical constants such as refractive index n, dielectric permittivity ε and extinction k and absorption α coefficients, are extracted from transmission and reflection spectra through the commercial software CODE. These constants lead, by using common theoretical models as Cauchy, Lorentz, Tauc and single effective oscillator, to the determination of the static refractive index n{sub s} and permittivity ε{sub s}, the plasma frequency ω{sub p}, the carrier density to effective mass ratio N/m{sub e}{sup *}, the optical conductivity σ{sub oc}, the optical band gap E{sub g} and the oscillation and dispersion energies E{sub 0} and E{sub d}, respectively. We find that n, ε{sub s}, ω{sub p}, N/m{sub e}{sup *}, E{sub d}, increase with radiofrequency power, while E{sub g} and E{sub 0} decrease in the same range of power. These results are well correlated with those obtained from atomic force microscopy, Raman and infrared measurements. They also indicate that the increase of the radiofrequency power promotes the fragmentation of the precursor and increases the carbon C-sp{sup 2} hybridization proportion, which results in an improvement of the optoelectronic properties of the films.

  7. Double Layers: Potential Formation and Related Nonlinear Phenomena in Plasmas: Proceedings of the 5th Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iizuka, S.

    1998-02-01

    The Table of Contents for the book is as follows: * PREFACE * INTERNATIONAL SCIENTIFIC COMMITTEE * LOCAL ORGANIZING COMMITTEE AT TOHOKU UNIVERSITY * CHAPTER 1: DOUBLE LAYERS, SHEATHS, AND POTENTIAL STRUCTURES * 1.1 Double Layers * On Fluid Models of Stationary, Acoustic Double Layers (Invited) * Particle Simulation of Double Layer (Invited) * Space-Time Dependence of Non-Steady Double Layers * The Role of Low Energy Electrons for the Generation of Anode Double Layers in Glow Discharges * Arbitrary Amplitude Ion-Acoustic Double Layers in a Dusty Plasma * 1.2 Sheaths * Bounded Plasma Edge Physics as Observed from Simulations in 1D and 2D (Invited) * Control of RF Sheath Structure in RF Diode Discharge * Observation of Density Gradients with Fine Structures and Low Frequency Wave Excitation at the Plasma-Sheath Boundary * Double Sheath Associated with an Electron Emission to a Plasma Containing Negative Ions * Sheath Edge and Floating Potential for Multi-Species Plasmas Including Dust Particles * 1.3 Potential Structures and Oscillations * Potential Structure Formed at a Constriction of a DC He Positive Column and its Coupling with Ionization Wave * Potential Structure in a New RF Magnetron Device with a Hollow Electrode * Potential Disruption in a RF Afterglow Electronegative Plasma * Potential Oscillation in a Strongly Asymmetry RF Discharge Containing Negative Ions * Effects of External Potential Control on Coulomb Dust Behavior * Potential Structure of Carbon Arc Discharge for High-Yield Fullerenes Formation * Control of Axial and Radial Potential Profiles in Tandem Mirrors (Invited) * CHAPTER 2: FIELD-ALIGNED ELECTRIC FIELDS AND RELATED PARTICLE ACCELERATIONS * 2.1 Field-Aligned Potential Formation * Formation of Large Potential Difference in a Plasma Flow along Converging Magnetic Field Lines (Invited) * Presheath Formation in front of an Oblique End-Plate in a Magnetized Sheet Plasma * Plasma Potential Formation Due to ECRH in a Magnetic Well * Electrostatic

  8. Interaction between ions in hot dense plasma via screened Cornell potential

    SciTech Connect

    Ramazanov, T. S.; Moldabekov, Zh. A.; Gabdullin, M. T.

    2016-04-15

    Hot dense plasma with non-ideal ions and weakly coupled electrons is studied analytically in the framework of the random phase approximation. It is shown that at some plasma parameters ions interact by a screened Cornell potential. The reduction in the transport coefficients due to the localization of the electron around the ion is predicted. This prediction is confirmed by the molecular dynamics simulation of the one-component ion plasma interacting via the obtained screened Cornell type potential.

  9. Diagnostic potential of plasma carboxymethyllysine and carboxyethyllysine in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background This study compared the level of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), N-(Carboxymethyl)lysine (CML) and N-(Carboxyethyl)lysine (CEL), in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and healthy controls (HCs), correlating these markers with clinical indicators of MS disease severity. Methods CML and CEL plasma levels were analyzed in 99 MS patients and 43 HCs by tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). Patients were stratified based on drug modifying therapies (DMTs) including interferon beta, glatiramer acetate and natalizumab. Results The level of plasma CEL, but not CML, was significantly higher in DMT-naïve MS patients when compared to HCs (P < 0.001). Among MS patients, 91% had higher than mean plasma CEL observed in HCs. DMTs reduced CML and CEL plasma levels by approximately 13% and 40% respectively. CML and CEL plasma levels correlated with the rate of MS clinical relapse. Conclusion Our results suggest that AGEs in general and CEL in particular could be useful biomarkers in MS clinical practice. Longitudinal studies are warranted to determine any causal relationship between changes in plasma level of AGEs and MS disease pathology. These studies will pave the way for use of AGE inhibitors and AGE-breaking agents as new therapeutic modalities in MS. PMID:21034482

  10. Potential applications of a new microwave ECR (electron cyclotron resonance) multicusp plasma ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, C.C.

    1990-01-01

    A new microwave electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) multicusp plasma ion source using two ECR plasma production regions and multicusp plasma confinement has been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This source has been operated to produce uniform and dense plasmas over large areas of 300 to 400 cm{sup 2}. The plasma source has been operated with continuous argon gas feed and pulsed microwave power. The discharge initiation phenomena and plasma properties have been investigated and studied as functions of discharge parameters. Together with the discharge characteristics observed, a hypothetical discharge mechanism for this plasma source is reported and discussed. Potential applications, including plasma and ion-beam processing for manufacturing advanced microelectronics and for space electric propulsion, are discussed. 7 refs., 6 figs.

  11. Detailed beam and plasma measurements on the vessel for extraction and source plasma analyses (VESPA) Penning H{sup −} ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrie, S. R.; Faircloth, D. C.; Letchford, A. P.; Whitehead, M. O.; Wood, T.

    2016-02-15

    A vessel for extraction and source plasma analyses (VESPA) is operational at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL). This project supports and guides the overall ion source R&D effort for the ISIS spallation neutron and muon facility at RAL. The VESPA produces 100 mA of pulsed H{sup −} beam, but perveance scans indicate that the source is production-limited at extraction voltages above 12 kV unless the arc current is increased. A high resolution optical monochromator is used to measure plasma properties using argon as a diagnostic gas. The atomic hydrogen temperature increases linearly with arc current, up to 2.8 eV for 50 A; whereas the electron temperature has a slight linear decrease toward 2.2 eV. The gas density is 10{sup 21} m{sup −3}, whilst the electron density is two orders of magnitude lower. Densities follow square root relationships with arc current, with gas density decreasing whilst electron (and hence ion) density increases. Stopping and range of ions in matter calculations prove that operating a high current arc with an argon admixture is extremely difficult because cathode-coated cesium is heavily sputtered by argon.

  12. On Floating Potential of Emissive Probes in a Partially-Magnetized Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raitses, Yevgeny; Kraus, Brian

    2016-10-01

    We compare measurements of plasma potential in a cross-field Penning discharge from two probes: swept biased Langmuir probe and floating emissive probe. The plasma potential was deduced from the first derivative of the Langmuir probe characteristic. In previous studies, the emissive and swept biased probes were placed at the channel exit of a Hall thruster (HT). Measurements showed that the emissive probe floats below the plasma potential, in agreement with conventional theories. However, recent measurements in the Penning discharge indicate a floating potential of a strongly-emitting hot probe above the plasma potential. In both probe applications, xenon plasmas have magnetized electrons and non-magnetized ions with similar plasma densities (1010 - 1011 cm-3) . Though their electron temperatures differ by an order of magnitude (Penning 5 eV, HT 50 eV), this difference cannot explain the difference in measurement values of the hot floating potential because both temperatures are much higher than the emitting wire. In this work, we investigate how the ion velocity and other plasma parameters affect this discrepancy between probe measurements of the plasma potential. This work was supported by DOE contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  13. A Two-Dimensional One Component Plasma and a Test Charge: Polarization Effects and Effective Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Téllez, Gabriel; Trizac, Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    We study the effective interactions between a test charge Q and a one-component plasma, i.e. a complex made up of mobile point particles with charge q, and a uniform oppositely charged background. The background has the form of a flat disk, in which the mobile charges can move. The test particle is approached perpendicularly to the disk, along its axis of symmetry. All particles interact by a logarithmic potential. The long and short distance features of the effective potential—the free energy of the system for a given distance between Q and the disk—are worked out analytically in detail. They crucially depend on the sign of Q/q, and on the global charge borne by the discotic complex, that can vanish. While most results are obtained at the intermediate coupling Γ≡βq 2=2 (β being the inverse temperature), we have also investigated situations with stronger couplings: Γ=4 and 6. We have found that at large distances, the sign of the effective force reflects subtle details of the charge distribution on the disk, whereas at short distances, polarization effects invariably lead to effective attractions.

  14. Potentials and problems of building detailed dust records using peat archives: An example from Store Mosse (the "Great Bog"), Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kylander, Malin E.; Martínez-Cortizas, Antonio; Bindler, Richard; Greenwood, Sarah L.; Mörth, Carl-Magnus; Rauch, Sebastien

    2016-10-01

    Mineral dust deposition is a process often overlooked in northern mid-latitudes, despite its potential effects on ecosystems. These areas are often peat-rich, providing ample material for the reconstruction of past changes in atmospheric deposition. The highly organic (up to 99% in some cases) matrix of atmospherically fed mires, however, makes studying the actual dust particles (grain size, mineralogy) challenging. Here we explore some of the potentials and problems of using geochemical data from conservative, lithogenic elements (Al, Ga, Rb, Sc, Y, Zr, Th, Ti and REE) to build detailed dust records by using an example from the 8900-yr peat sequence from Store Mosse (the ;Great Bog;), which is the largest mire complex in the boreo-nemoral region of southern Sweden. The four dust events recorded at this site were elementally distinct, suggesting different dominant mineral hosts. The oldest and longest event (6385-5300 cal yr BP) sees a clear signal of clay input but with increasing contributions of mica, feldspar and middle-REE-rich phosphate minerals over time. These clays are likely transported from a long-distance source (<100 km). While dust deposition was reduced during the second event (5300-4370 cal yr BP), this is the most distinct in terms of its source character with [Eu/Eu∗]UCC revealing the input of plagioclase feldspar from a local source, possibly active during this stormier period. The third (2380-2200 cal yr BP) and fourth (1275-1080 cal yr BP) events are much shorter in duration and the presence of clays and heavy minerals is inferred. Elemental mass accumulation rates reflect these changes in mineralogy where the relative importance of the four dust events varies by element. The broad changes in major mineral hosts, grain size, source location and approximated net dust deposition rates observed in the earlier dust events of longer duration agree well with paleoclimatic changes observed in northern Europe. The two most recent dust events are much

  15. Ionization Potential Depression in Hot Dense Plasmas Through a Pure Classical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calisti, A.; Ferri, S.; Talin, B.

    2015-05-01

    The ionization potential of an ion embedded in a plasma, lowered due to the whole of the charged particles (ions and electrons) interacting with this ion, is the so-called plasma effect. A numerical plasma model based on classical molecular dynamics has been developed recently. It is capable to describe a neutral plasma at equilibrium involving ions of various charge states of the same atom together with electrons. This code is used here to investigate the ionization potential depression (IPD). The study of the IPD is illustrated and discussed for aluminum plasmas at mid and solid density and electron temperatures varying from 50eV to 190eV. The method relies on a sampling of the total potential energy of the electron located at an ion being ionized. The potential energy of such electron results from all of the interacting charged particles interacting with it.

  16. Academic detailing.

    PubMed

    Shankar, P R; Jha, N; Piryani, R M; Bajracharya, O; Shrestha, R; Thapa, H S

    2010-01-01

    There are a number of sources available to prescribers to stay up to date about medicines. Prescribers in rural areas in developing countries however, may not able to access some of them. Interventions to improve prescribing can be educational, managerial, and regulatory or use a mix of strategies. Detailing by the pharmaceutical industry is widespread. Academic detailing (AD) has been classically seen as a form of continuing medical education in which a trained health professional such as a physician or pharmacist visits physicians in their offices to provide evidence-based information. Face-to-face sessions, preferably on an individual basis, clear educational and behavioural objectives, establishing credibility with respect to objectivity, stimulating physician interaction, use of concise graphic educational materials, highlighting key messages, and when possible, providing positive reinforcement of improved practices in follow-up visits can increase success of AD initiatives. AD is common in developed countries and certain examples have been cited in this review. In developing countries the authors have come across reports of AD in Pakistan, Sudan, Argentina and Uruguay, Bihar state in India, Zambia, Cuba, Indonesia and Mexico. AD had a consistent, small but potentially significant impact on prescribing practices. AD has much less resources at its command compared to the efforts by the industry. Steps have to be taken to formally start AD in Nepal and there may be specific hindering factors similar to those in other developing nations.

  17. Increased coagulation and fibrinolytic potential of solvent-detergent plasma: a comparative study between Omniplasma and fresh frozen plasma.

    PubMed

    van Beers, J J B C; van Egmond, L T; Wetzels, R J H; Verhezen, P W M; Beckers, E A M; van Oerle, R; Spronk, H M H; Straat, R J M H E; Henskens, Y M C

    2016-07-01

    In this study, differences in levels of proteins involved in coagulation and fibrinolysis were compared between fresh frozen (quarantine plasma) and Omniplasma. Furthermore, thawing conditions and plasma stability after thawing were studied. 10 Omniplasma and 10 quarantine plasma units were used to study different procoagulation, anticoagulation and fibrinolytic parameters. Analysis took place at different time-points during plasma storage at 2-6°C. At baseline, significant reduced levels of factor V, free protein S, α2-antiplasmin and tPA-induced ROTEM lysis time were observed in Omniplasma as compared to quarantine plasma. Moreover, thrombin generation, IXa-AT complex levels and factor XIa were significantly increased in Omniplasma. The majority of the parameters studied remained stable in Omniplasma 48 h after thawing, with the exception of factor VIII (decrease) and IXa-AT (increase). Our results suggest an increased coagulation potential, presumingly as a result of contact activation during the production process and also, an increased fibrinolytic potential in Omniplasma. The stability of Omniplasma, based upon the different parameters studied, is comparable to Q-plasma. A maximum post-thawing time of 48 hfor Omniplasma can be suggested. © 2016 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  18. Ion velocity and plasma potential measurements of a cylindrical cusped field thruster

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, N. A.; Young, C. V.; Cappelli, M. A.; Hargus, W. A. Jr.

    2012-05-01

    Measurements of the most probable time-averaged axial ion velocities and plasma potential within the acceleration channel and in the plume of a straight-channeled cylindrical cusped field thruster operating on xenon are presented. Ion velocities for the thruster are derived from laser-induced fluorescence measurements of the 5d[4]{sub 7/2}-6p[3]{sub 5/2} xenon ion excited state transition centered at {lambda}=834.72nm. Plasma potential measurements are made using a floating emissive probe with a thoriated-tungsten filament. The thruster is operated in a power matched condition with 300 V applied anode potential for comparison to previous krypton plasma potential measurements, and a low power condition with 150 V applied anode potential. Correlations are seen between the plasma potential drop outside of the thruster and kinetic energy contours of the accelerating ions.

  19. Genetic studies of plasma analytes identify novel potential biomarkers for several complex traits

    PubMed Central

    Deming, Yuetiva; Xia, Jian; Cai, Yefei; Lord, Jenny; Del-Aguila, Jorge L.; Fernandez, Maria Victoria; Carrell, David; Black, Kathleen; Budde, John; Ma, ShengMei; Saef, Benjamin; Howells, Bill; Bertelsen, Sarah; Bailey, Matthew; Ridge, Perry G.; Hefti, Franz; Fillit, Howard; Zimmerman, Earl A.; Celmins, Dzintra; Brown, Alice D.; Carrillo, Maria; Fleisher, Adam; Reeder, Stephanie; Trncic, Nadira; Burke, Anna; Tariot, Pierre; Reiman, Eric M.; Chen, Kewei; Sabbagh, Marwan N.; Beiden, Christine M.; Jacobson, Sandra A.; Sirrel, Sherye A.; Doody, Rachelle S.; Villanueva-Meyer, Javier; Chowdhury, Munir; Rountree, Susan; Dang, Mimi; Kowall, Neil; Killiany, Ronald; Budson, Andrew E.; Norbash, Alexander; Johnson, Patricia Lynn; Green, Robert C.; Marshall, Gad; Johnson, Keith A.; Sperling, Reisa A.; Snyder, Peter; Salloway, Stephen; Malloy, Paul; Correia, Stephen; Bernick, Charles; Munic, Donna; Stern, Yaakov; Honig, Lawrence S.; Bell, Karen L.; Relkin, Norman; Chaing, Gloria; Ravdin, Lisa; Paul, Steven; Flashman, Laura A.; Seltzer, Marc; Hynes, Mary L.; Santulli, Robert B.; Bates, Vernice; Capote, Horacio; Rainka, Michelle; Friedl, Karl; Murali Doraiswamy, P.; Petrella, Jeffrey R.; Borges-Neto, Salvador; James, Olga; Wong, Terence; Coleman, Edward; Schwartz, Adam; Cellar, Janet S.; Levey, Allan L.; Lah, James J.; Behan, Kelly; Scott Turner, Raymond; Johnson, Kathleen; Reynolds, Brigid; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Blank, Karen; Anderson, Karen; Obisesan, Thomas O.; Wolday, Saba; Allard, Joanne; Lerner, Alan; Ogrocki, Paula; Tatsuoka, Curtis; Fatica, Parianne; Farlow, Martin R.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Shen, Li; Faber, Kelly; Kim, Sungeun; Nho, Kwangsik; Marie Hake, Ann; Matthews, Brandy R.; Brosch, Jared R.; Herring, Scott; Hunt, Cynthia; Albert, Marilyn; Onyike, Chiadi; D’Agostino, Daniel; Kielb, Stephanie; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Parfitt, Francine; Kendall, Tracy; Johnson, Heather; Petersen, Ronald; Jack, Clifford R.; Bernstein, Matthew; Borowski, Bret; Gunter, Jeff; Senjem, Matt; Vemuri, Prashanthi; Jones, David; Kantarci, Kejal; Ward, Chad; Mason, Sara S.; Albers, Colleen S.; Knopman, David; Johnson, Kris; Chertkow, Howard; Hosein, Chris; Mintzer, Jacob; Spicer, Kenneth; Bachman, David; Grossman, Hillel; Mitsis, Effie; Pomara, Nunzio; Hernando, Raymundo; Sarrael, Antero; Potter, William; Buckholtz, Neil; Hsiao, John; Kittur, Smita; Galvin, James E.; Cerbone, Brittany; Michel, Christina A.; Pogorelec, Dana M.; Rusinek, Henry; de Leon, Mony J; Glodzik, Lidia; De Santi, Susan; Johnson, Nancy; Chuang-Kuo; Kerwin, Diana; Bonakdarpour, Borna; Weintraub, Sandra; Grafman, Jordan; Lipowski, Kristine; Mesulam, Marek-Marsel; Scharre, Douglas W.; Kataki, Maria; Adeli, Anahita; Kaye, Jeffrey; Quinn, Joseph; Silbert, Lisa; Lind, Betty; Carter, Raina; Dolen, Sara; Borrie, Michael; Lee, T-Y; Bartha, Rob; Martinez, Walter; Villena, Teresa; Sadowsky, Carl; Khachaturian, Zaven; Ott, Brian R.; Querfurth, Henry; Tremont, Geoffrey; Frank, Richard; Fleischman, Debra; Arfanakis, Konstantinos; Shah, Raj C.; deToledo-Morrell, Leyla; Sorensen, Greg; Finger, Elizabeth; Pasternack, Stephen; Rachinsky, Irina; Drost, Dick; Rogers, John; Kertesz, Andrew; Furst, Ansgar J.; Chad, Stevan; Yesavage, Jerome; Taylor, Joy L.; Lane, Barton; Rosen, Allyson; Tinklenberg, Jared; Black, Sandra; Stefanovic, Bojana; Caldwell, Curtis; Robin Hsiung, Ging-Yuek; Mudge, Benita; Assaly, Michele; Fox, Nick; Schultz, Susan K.; Boles Ponto, Laura L.; Shim, Hyungsub; Ekstam Smith, Karen; Burns, Jeffrey M.; Swerdlow, Russell H.; Brooks, William M.; Marson, Daniel; Griffith, Randall; Clark, David; Geldmacher, David; Brockington, John; Roberson, Erik; Natelson Love, Marissa; DeCarli, Charles; Carmichael, Owen; Olichney, John; Maillard, Pauline; Fletcher, Evan; Nguyen, Dana; Preda, Andrian; Potkin, Steven; Mulnard, Ruth A.; Thai, Gaby; McAdams-Ortiz, Catherine; Landau, Susan; Jagust, William; Apostolova, Liana; Tingus, Kathleen; Woo, Ellen; Silverman, Daniel H.S.; Lu, Po H.; Bartzokis, George; Thompson, Paul; Donohue, Michael; Thomas, Ronald G.; Walter, Sarah; Gessert, Devon; Brewer, James; Vanderswag, Helen; Sather, Tamie; Jiminez, Gus; Balasubramanian, Archana B.; Mason, Jennifer; Sim, Iris; Aisen, Paul; Davis, Melissa; Morrison, Rosemary; Harvey, Danielle; Thal, Lean; Beckett, Laurel; Neylan, Thomas; Finley, Shannon; Weiner, Michael W.; Hayes, Jacqueline; Rosen, Howard J.; Miller, Bruce L.; Perry, David; Massoglia, Dino; Brawman-Mentzer, Olga; Schuff, Norbert; Smith, Charles D.; Hardy, Peter; Sinha, Partha; Oates, Elizabeth; Conrad, Gary; Koeppe, Robert A.; Lord, Joanne L.; Heidebrink, Judith L.; Arnold, Steven E.; Karlawish, Jason H.; Wolk, David; Clark, Christopher M.; Trojanowki, John Q.; Shaw, Leslie M.; Lee, Virginia; Korecka, Magdalena; Figurski, Michal; Toga, Arthur W.; Crawford, Karen; Neu, Scott; Schneider, Lon S.; Pawluczyk, Sonia; Beccera, Mauricio; Teodoro, Liberty; Spann, Bryan M.; Womack, Kyle; Mathews, Dana; Quiceno, Mary; Foster, Norm; Montine, Tom; Fruehling, J. Jay; Harding, Sandra; Johnson, Sterling; Asthana, Sanjay; Carlsson, Cynthia M.; Petrie, Eric C.; Peskind, Elaine; Li, Gail; Porsteinsson, Anton P.; Goldstein, Bonnie S.; Martin, Kim; Makino, Kelly M.; Ismail, M. Saleem; Brand, Connie; Smith, Amanda; Ashok Raj, Balebail; Fargher, Kristin; Kuller, Lew; Mathis, Chet; Ann Oakley, Mary; Lopez, Oscar L.; Simpson, Donna M.; Sink, Kaycee M.; Gordineer, Leslie; Williamson, Jeff D.; Garg, Pradeep; Watkins, Franklin; Cairns, Nigel J.; Raichle, Marc; Morris, John C.; Householder, Erin; Taylor-Reinwald, Lisa; Holtzman, David; Ances, Beau; Carroll, Maria; Creech, Mary L.; Franklin, Erin; Mintun, Mark A.; Schneider, Stacy; Oliver, Angela; Duara, Ranjan; Varon, Daniel; Greig, Maria T.; Roberts, Peggy; Varma, Pradeep; MacAvoy, Martha G.; Carson, Richard E.; van Dyck, Christopher H.; Davies, Peter; Holtzman, David; Morris, John C.; Bales, Kelly; Pickering, Eve H.; Lee, Jin-Moo; Heitsch, Laura; Kauwe, John; Goate, Alison; Piccio, Laura; Cruchaga, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies of 146 plasma protein levels in 818 individuals revealed 56 genome-wide significant associations (28 novel) with 47 analytes. Loci associated with plasma levels of 39 proteins tested have been previously associated with various complex traits such as heart disease, inflammatory bowel disease, Type 2 diabetes, and multiple sclerosis. These data suggest that these plasma protein levels may constitute informative endophenotypes for these complex traits. We found three potential pleiotropic genes: ABO for plasma SELE and ACE levels, FUT2 for CA19-9 and CEA plasma levels, and APOE for ApoE and CRP levels. We also found multiple independent signals in loci associated with plasma levels of ApoH, CA19-9, FetuinA, IL6r, and LPa. Our study highlights the power of biological traits for genetic studies to identify genetic variants influencing clinically relevant traits, potential pleiotropic effects, and complex disease associations in the same locus.

  20. Membrane potential modulates plasma membrane phospholipid dynamics and K-Ras signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yong; Wong, Ching-On; Cho, Kwang-jin; van der Hoeven, Dharini; Liang, Hong; Thakur, Dhananiay P.; Luo, Jialie; Babic, Milos; Zinsmaier, Konrad E.; Zhu, Michael X.; Hu, Hongzhen; Venkatachalam, Kartik; Hancock, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Plasma membrane depolarization can trigger cell proliferation, but how membrane potential influences mitogenic signaling is uncertain. Here, we show that plasma membrane depolarization induces nanoscale reorganization of phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate but not other anionic phospholipids. K-Ras, which is targeted to the plasma membrane by electrostatic interactions with phosphatidylserine, in turn undergoes enhanced nanoclustering. Depolarization-induced changes in phosphatidylserine and K-Ras plasma membrane organization occur in fibroblasts, excitable neuroblastoma cells, and Drosophila neurons in vivo and robustly amplify K-Ras–dependent mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. Conversely, plasma membrane repolarization disrupts K-Ras nanoclustering and inhibits MAPK signaling. By responding to voltage-induced changes in phosphatidylserine spatiotemporal dynamics, K-Ras nanoclusters set up the plasma membrane as a biological field-effect transistor, allowing membrane potential to control the gain in mitogenic signaling circuits. PMID:26293964

  1. SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION. Membrane potential modulates plasma membrane phospholipid dynamics and K-Ras signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yong; Wong, Ching-On; Cho, Kwang-jin; van der Hoeven, Dharini; Liang, Hong; Thakur, Dhananiay P; Luo, Jialie; Babic, Milos; Zinsmaier, Konrad E; Zhu, Michael X; Hu, Hongzhen; Venkatachalam, Kartik; Hancock, John F

    2015-08-21

    Plasma membrane depolarization can trigger cell proliferation, but how membrane potential influences mitogenic signaling is uncertain. Here, we show that plasma membrane depolarization induces nanoscale reorganization of phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate but not other anionic phospholipids. K-Ras, which is targeted to the plasma membrane by electrostatic interactions with phosphatidylserine, in turn undergoes enhanced nanoclustering. Depolarization-induced changes in phosphatidylserine and K-Ras plasma membrane organization occur in fibroblasts, excitable neuroblastoma cells, and Drosophila neurons in vivo and robustly amplify K-Ras-dependent mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. Conversely, plasma membrane repolarization disrupts K-Ras nanoclustering and inhibits MAPK signaling. By responding to voltage-induced changes in phosphatidylserine spatiotemporal dynamics, K-Ras nanoclusters set up the plasma membrane as a biological field-effect transistor, allowing membrane potential to control the gain in mitogenic signaling circuits.

  2. Sagdeev potential approach for large amplitude compressional Alfvenic double layers in viscous plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Panwar, Anuraj; Rizvi, H.; Ryu, C. M.

    2013-11-15

    Sagdeev’s technique is used to study the large amplitude compressional Alfvenic double layers in a magnetohydrodynamic plasma taking into account the small plasma β and small values of kinematic viscosity. Dispersive effect raised by non-ideal electron inertia currents perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field. The range of allowed values of the soliton speed, M (Mach number), plasma β (ratio of the plasma thermal pressure to the pressure in the confining magnetic field), and viscosity coefficient, wherein double layer may exist, are determined. In the absence of collisions, viscous dissipation modifies the Sagdeev potential and results in large amplitude compressional Alfvenic double layers. The depth of Sagdeev potential increases with the increasing Mach number and plasma β, however, decreases with the increasing viscosity. The double layer structure increases with the increasing plasma β, but decreases with increasing viscous dissipation μ(tilde sign)

  3. Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE) - parameters and potentials for fusion plasma-wall interaction studies

    SciTech Connect

    Masashi Shimada; Robert D. Kolasinski; J. Phillip Sharpe; Rion A. Causey

    2011-08-01

    The Tritium plasma experiment (TPE) is a unique facility devoted to experiments on the behavior of deuterium/tritium in toxic (e.g. beryllium) and radioactive materials for fusion plasma-wall interaction (PWI) studies. A Langmuir probe was added to the system to characterize the plasma conditions in TPE. With this new diagnostic, we found the achievable electron temperature ranged from 5.0 to 10.0 eV, the electron density varied from 5.0 x 10{sup 16} to 2.5 x 10{sup 18} m{sup -3}, and the ion flux density varied between 5.0 x 10{sup 20} to 2.5 x 10{sup 22} m{sup -2}s{sup -1} along the centerline of the plasma. A comparison of these plasma parameters with the conditions expected for the plasma facing components (PFCs) in ITER shows that TPE is capable of achieving most (approximately 800 m{sup 2} of 850 m{sup 2} total PFCs area) of the expected ion flux density and electron density conditions.

  4. Tritium plasma experiment: Parameters and potentials for fusion plasma-wall interaction studies

    SciTech Connect

    Shimada, Masashi; Sharpe, J. Phillip; Kolasinski, Robert D.; Causey, Rion A.

    2011-08-15

    The tritium plasma experiment (TPE) is a unique facility devoted to experiments on the behavior of deuterium/tritium in toxic (e.g., beryllium) and radioactive materials for fusion plasma-wall interaction studies. A Langmuir probe was added to the system to characterize the plasma conditions in TPE. With this new diagnostic, we found the achievable electron temperature ranged from 5.0 to 10.0 eV, the electron density varied from 5.0 x 10{sup 16} to 2.5 x 10{sup 18} m{sup -3}, and the ion flux density varied between 5.0 x 10{sup 20} to 2.5 x 10{sup 22} m{sup -2} s{sup -1} along the centerline of the plasma. A comparison of these plasma parameters with the conditions expected for the plasma facing components (PFCs) in ITER shows that TPE is capable of achieving most ({approx}800 m{sup 2} of 850 m{sup 2} total PFCs area) of the expected ion flux density and electron density conditions.

  5. Nonthermal Argon Plasma Generator and Some Potential Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunoiu, M.; Jugunaru, I.; Bica, I.; Balasoiu, M.

    2015-12-01

    A laboratory - made nonthermal plasma generator is presented. It has a diameter of 0.020 m and length of 0.155 m and contains two electrodes. The first electrode is a 2% Th-W alloy, 0.002 m in diameter bar, centred inside the generator's body by means of a four channel teflon piece; the other three channels, 0.003 m in diameter, are used for Ar supply. The second electrode is a nozzle of 0.002 m - 0.008 m diameter and 0.005m length. A ~500 kV/m electric field is generated between the two electrodes by a high frequency source (13.56 MHz ±5%), equipped with a OT-1000 (Tungsram) power triode. For Ar flows ranging from 0.00008 m3/s to 0.00056 m3/s, a plasma jet of length not exceeding 0.015 m and temperature below 315 K is obtained. Anthurium andraeanumis sample , blood matrix, human hair and textile fibers may be introduced in the plasma jet. For time periods of 30 s and 60 s, various effects like, cell detexturization, fast blood coagulation or textile fiber or hair cleaning and smoothing are obtained. These effects are presented and discussed in the paper.

  6. Potential structure of discharge plasma inside liquid directly measured by an electrostatic probe

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Qiang; Hatakeyama, Rikizo; Kaneko, Toshiro

    2013-06-17

    Potential structures of a discharge plasma inside a liquid are investigated by an electrostatic probe measurement. The time evolution of radial profiles of the floating potential for the plasma inside liquid reveals that the dominant negative charges in the plasma are the negative ion species such as OH{sup -} and O{sub 2}{sup -} rather than electrons. In addition, a positive potential gradient exists at the plasma-liquid interface due to the presence of an electrical double layer which is caused by the separation of low-mass positive ion of H{sup +} and high-mass negative ions of OH{sup -} and O{sub 2}{sup -} near the plasma-liquid interface.

  7. Self-consistent electrostatic potential due to trapped plasma in the magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Ronald H.; Khazanov, George V.

    1993-01-01

    A steady state solution for the self-consistent electrostatic potential due to a plasma confined in a magnetic flux tube is considered. A steady state distribution function is constructed for the trapped particles from the constants of the motion, in the absence of waves and collisions. Using Liouville's theorem, the particle density along the geomagnetic field is determined and found to depend on the local magnetic field, self-consistent electric potential, and the equatorial plasma distribution function. A hot anisotropic magnetospheric plasma in steady state is modeled by a bi-Maxwellian at the equator. The self-consistent electric potential along the magnetic field is calculated assuming quasineutrality, and the potential drop is found to be approximately equal to the average kinetic energy of the equatorially trapped plasma. The potential is compared with that obtained by Alfven and Faelthammar (1963).

  8. Self-consistent electrostatic potential due to trapped plasma in the magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Ronald H.; Khazanov, George V.

    1993-01-01

    A steady state solution for the self-consistent electrostatic potential due to a plasma confined in a magnetic flux tube is considered. A steady state distribution function is constructed for the trapped particles from the constants of the motion, in the absence of waves and collisions. Using Liouville's theorem, the particle density along the geomagnetic field is determined and found to depend on the local magnetic field, self-consistent electric potential, and the equatorial plasma distribution function. A hot anisotropic magnetospheric plasma in steady state is modeled by a bi-Maxwellian at the equator. The self-consistent electric potential along the magnetic field is calculated assuming quasineutrality, and the potential drop is found to be approximately equal to the average kinetic energy of the equatorially trapped plasma. The potential is compared with that obtained by Alfven and Faelthammar (1963).

  9. Crystalline Ceramic Waste Forms: Report Detailing Data Collection In Support Of Potential FY13 Pilot Scale Melter Test

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkman, K. S.; Amoroso, J.; Marra, J. C.; Fox, K. M.

    2012-09-21

    The research conducted in this work package is aimed at taking advantage of the long term thermodynamic stability of crystalline ceramics to create more durable waste forms (as compared to high level waste glass) in order to reduce the reliance on engineered and natural barrier systems. Durable ceramic waste forms that incorporate a wide range of radionuclides have the potential to broaden the available disposal options and to lower the storage and disposal costs associated with advanced fuel cycles. Assemblages of several titanate phases have been successfully demonstrated to incorporate radioactive waste elements, and the multiphase nature of these materials allows them to accommodate variation in the waste composition. Recent work has shown that they can be successfully produced from a melting and crystallization process. The objective of this report is to summarize the data collection in support of future melter demonstration testing for crystalline ceramic waste forms. The waste stream used as the basis for the development and testing is a combination of the projected Cs/Sr separated stream, the Trivalent Actinide - Lanthanide Separation by Phosphorous reagent Extraction from Aqueous Komplexes (TALSPEAK) waste stream consisting of lanthanide fission products, the transition metal fission product waste stream resulting from the transuranic extraction (TRUEX) process, and a high molybdenum concentration with relatively low noble metal concentrations. The principal difficulties encountered during processing of the ?reference ceramic? waste form by a melt and crystallization process were the incomplete incorporation of Cs into the hollandite phase and the presence of secondary Cs-Mo non-durable phases. In the single phase hollandite system, these issues were addressed in this study by refining the compositions to include Cr as a transition metal element and the use of Ti/TiO{sub 2} buffer to maintain reducing conditions. Initial viscosity studies of ceramic waste

  10. Effect of dense plasmas on exchange-energy shifts in highly charged ions: An alternative approach for arbitrary perturbation potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Rosmej, F.; Bennadji, K.; Lisitsa, V. S.

    2011-09-15

    An alternative method of calculation of dense plasma effects on exchange-energy shifts {Delta}E{sub x} of highly charged ions is proposed which results in closed expressions for any plasma or perturbation potential. The method is based on a perturbation theory expansion for the inner atomic potential produced by charged plasma particles employing the Coulomb Green function method. This approach allows us to obtain analytic expressions and scaling laws with respect to the electron temperature T, density n{sub e}, and nuclear charge Z. To demonstrate the power of the present method, two specific models were considered in detail: the ion sphere model (ISM) and the Debye screening model (DSM). We demonstrate that analytical expressions can be obtained even for the finite temperature ISM. Calculations have been carried out for the singlet 1s2p{sup 1} P{sub 1} and triplet 1s2p{sup 3} P{sub 1} configurations of He-like ions with charge Z that can be observed in dense plasmas via the He-like resonance and intercombination lines. Finally we discuss recently available purely numerical calculations and experimental data.

  11. Plasma-mediated potentiation in prostanoid-induced contractions in isolated canine external jugular veins.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Tatsuhiko; Ikomi, Fumitaka; Ohhashi, Toshio

    2002-10-01

    We examined the effects of plasma on contractile responses of isolated dog external jugular veins to a thromboxane A(2) analog, U46619, and noradrenaline. Pretreatment with 1.0% plasma in Krebs-bicarbonate solution, but not 0.1%, caused a significant left and upward shift in the concentration-contractile response curve for U46619. The plasma-mediated potentiation of the response to U46619 was found in the venous segments without intact endothelium. The administration of 2x10(-5) M lysophosphatidylcholine in Krebs-bicarbonate solution with no plasma also produced a significant left and upward shift of the concentration-contractile response curve for U46619, the shift being quite similar to that obtained with 1.0% plasma. In contrast, pretreatment with 1.0% plasma or 2x10(-5) M lysophosphatidylcholine produced no significant effect on the noradrenaline-mediated contractions in the venous segments. Pretreatment with 10(-4) M L-ascorbate or 0.1 mg/ml alpha-tocopherol in the presence of 1.0% plasma caused a significant reduction in the plasma-mediated potentiation of the contractile responses to U46619. These findings suggest that lysophosphatidylcholine, a major phospholipid component of oxidized low-density lipoproteins, may contribute, in part, to the plasma-mediated potentiation of contractile responses of the isolated veins to U46619, and that the antioxidant vitamin, L-ascorbate, or alpha-tocopherol significantly reduces the plasma-mediated potentiation of the contractile responses to U46619, which may be related to inhibiting the production of lysophosphatidylcholine in plasma.

  12. A Vlasov equation with Dirac potential used in fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bardos, Claude; Nouri, Anne

    2012-11-15

    Well-posedness of the Cauchy problem is analyzed for a singular Vlasov equation governing the evolution of the ionic distribution function of a quasineutral fusion plasma. The Penrose criterium is adapted to the linearized problem around a time and space homogeneous distribution function showing (due to the singularity) more drastic differences between stable and unstable situations. This pathology appears on the full nonlinear problem, well-posed locally in time with analytic initial data, but generally ill-posed in the Hadamard sense. Eventually with a very different class of solutions, mono-kinetic, which constrains the structure of the density distribution, the problem becomes locally in time well-posed.

  13. Characterization of SOL plasma flows and potentials in ICRF-heated plasmas in Alcator C-mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, R.; Wukitch, S. J.; Lin, Y.; Terry, J. L.; Cziegler, I.; Reinke, M. L.; Tynan, G. R.

    2017-10-01

    Gas-puff imaging techniques are employed to determine the far SOL region radial electric field and the plasma potential in ICRF heated discharges in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. The two-dimensional velocity fields of the turbulent structures, which are advected by RF-induced {E}× {B} flows, are obtained via the time-delay estimation (TDE) techniques. Both the magnitude and radial extension of the radial electric field E r are observed to increase with the toroidal magnetic field strength B φ and the ICRF power. In particular, the RF-induced E r extends from the vicinity of the ICRF antenna to the separatrix when {B}\\varphi =7.9 {{T}} and {P}{ICRF}≳ 1 {MW}. In addition, low-Z impurity seeding near the antenna is found to substantially reduce the sheath potential associated with ICRF power. The TDE techniques have also been used to revisit and estimate ICRF-induced potentials in different antenna configurations: (1) conventional toroidally aligned (TA) antenna versus field-aligned (FA) antenna; (2) FA monopole versus FA dipole. It shows that FA and TA antennas produce similar magnitude of plasma potentials, and the FA monopole induced greater potential than the FA dipole phasing. The TDE estimations of RF-induced plasma potentials are consistent with previous results based on the poloidal phase velocity.

  14. Cytotoxic and mutagenic potential of solutions exposed to cold atmospheric plasma.

    PubMed

    Boehm, Daniela; Heslin, Caitlin; Cullen, Patrick J; Bourke, Paula

    2016-02-24

    The exposure of aqueous solutions to atmospheric plasmas results in the generation of relatively long-lived secondary products such as hydrogen peroxide which are biologically active and have demonstrated anti-microbial and cytotoxic activity. The use of plasma-activated solutions in applications such as microbial decontamination or anti-cancer treatments requires not only adequate performance on target cells but also a safe operating window regarding the impact on surrounding tissues. Furthermore the generation of plasma-activated fluids needs to be considered as a by-stander effect of subjecting tissue to plasma discharges. Cytotoxicity and mutagenicity assays using mammalian cell lines were used to elucidate the effects of solutions treated with di-electric barrier discharge atmospheric cold plasma. Plasma-treated PBS inhibited cell growth in a treatment time-dependent manner showing a linear correlation to the solutions' peroxide concentration which remained stable over several weeks. Plasma-treated foetal bovine serum (FBS) acting as a model for complex bio-fluids showed not only cytotoxic effects but also exhibited increased mutagenic potential as determined using the mammalian HPRT assay. Further studies are warranted to determine the nature, causes and effects of the cyto- and genotoxic potential of solutions exposed to plasma discharges to ensure long-term safety of novel plasma applications in medicine and healthcare.

  15. Cytotoxic and mutagenic potential of solutions exposed to cold atmospheric plasma

    PubMed Central

    Boehm, Daniela; Heslin, Caitlin; Cullen, Patrick J.; Bourke, Paula

    2016-01-01

    The exposure of aqueous solutions to atmospheric plasmas results in the generation of relatively long-lived secondary products such as hydrogen peroxide which are biologically active and have demonstrated anti-microbial and cytotoxic activity. The use of plasma-activated solutions in applications such as microbial decontamination or anti-cancer treatments requires not only adequate performance on target cells but also a safe operating window regarding the impact on surrounding tissues. Furthermore the generation of plasma-activated fluids needs to be considered as a by-stander effect of subjecting tissue to plasma discharges. Cytotoxicity and mutagenicity assays using mammalian cell lines were used to elucidate the effects of solutions treated with di-electric barrier discharge atmospheric cold plasma. Plasma-treated PBS inhibited cell growth in a treatment time-dependent manner showing a linear correlation to the solutions’ peroxide concentration which remained stable over several weeks. Plasma-treated foetal bovine serum (FBS) acting as a model for complex bio-fluids showed not only cytotoxic effects but also exhibited increased mutagenic potential as determined using the mammalian HPRT assay. Further studies are warranted to determine the nature, causes and effects of the cyto- and genotoxic potential of solutions exposed to plasma discharges to ensure long-term safety of novel plasma applications in medicine and healthcare. PMID:26908060

  16. Characteristics of the NASA Lewis bumpy-torus plasma generated with positive applied potentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, J. R.; Gerdin, G. A.; Richardson, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    Experimental observations were made during steady-state operation of a bumpy-torus plasma at input powers up to 150 kW in deuterium and helium gas and with positive potentials applied to the midplane electrodes. In this steady-state ion heating method a modified Penning discharge is operated such that the plasma is acted upon by a combination of strong electric and magnetic fields. Experimental investigation of a deuterium plasma revealed electron temperatures from 14 to 140 eV and ion kinetic temperatures from 160 to 1785 eV. At least two distinct modes of operation exist. Experimental data shows that the average ion residence time in the plasma is virtually independent of the magnetic field strength. Data was taken when all 12 anode rings were at high voltage, and in other symmetric configurations in which the toroidal plasma was generated by applying positive potentials to six anode rings, three anode rings, and a single anode ring.

  17. Wake potential with exchange-correlation effects in semiconductor quantum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Arroj A.; Jamil, M.; Hussain, A.

    2015-09-15

    Using the non-relativistic quantum hydrodynamic model, wake potential has been studied in a magnetized semiconductor quantum plasma in the presence of upper hybrid wave which is excited via externally injected electron beam. The quantum effect contains electron exchange and correlation potential, Fermi degenerate pressure, and Bohm potential. It is found that the contribution of quantum mechanical electron exchange and correlation potential significantly modifies the amplitude and the effective length of the oscillatory wake potential. In the electron-hole plasma systems, electron exchange-correlation effects tend to increase the magnitude of the wake potential and are much effective at the distances of the order of Debye-length. The application of the work in context of the semiconductor plasmas have also been analyzed graphically.

  18. Platelet-rich plasma gel composited with nondegradable porous polyurethane scaffolds as a potential auricular cartilage alternative.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhongshan; Qin, Haiyan; Feng, Zhihong; Zhao, Yimin

    2016-02-01

    Total auricular reconstruction is still a challenge, and autologous cartilage transplant is the main therapy so far. Tissue engineering provides a promising method for auricular cartilage reconstruction. However, although degradable framework demonstrated excellent initial cosmetic details, it is difficult to maintain the auricular contour over time and the metabolites tended to be harmful to human body. In this study, biocompatible and safe nondegradable elastic polyurethane was used to make porous scaffold in specific details by rapid prototyping technology. Platelet-rich plasma contains fibrin and abundant autologous growth factors, which was used as cell carriers for in vitro expanded cells. When crosslinking polyurethane framework, platelet-rich plasma and cells together, we successfully made polyurethane/platelet-rich plasma/cell composites, and implanted them into dorsal subcutaneous space of nude mice. The results showed that this method resulted in more even cell distribution and higher cell density, promoted chondrocyte proliferation, induced higher level expressions of aggrecan and type II collagen gene, increased content of newly developed glycosaminoglycans, and produced high-quality cartilaginous tissue. This kind of cartilage tissue engineering approach may be a potential promising alternative for external ear reconstruction.

  19. Effect of object potentials on the wake of a flowing plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, I.; Mandell, M. J.; Parks, D. E.; Wright, K.; Stone, N. H.

    1987-01-01

    The structure of the electric potential and ion density of the ion front in the near wake created by the flow of synthetic plasma past a conducting plate was investigated experimentally and numerically, with particular attention given to the effect of plate potential on the structure of the ion front. Results were obtained for a molecular nitrogen plasma with ambient electron densities of about 100,000/cu cm, ion temperatures of about 0.025 eV, electron temperatures of about 0.3 eV, and plasma flow velocities of about 10,000 m/s. Two-dimensional simulations of the laboratory experiments were performed by using a multiple waterbag technique. The calculated and experimental results show that wake closure is well described by the acceleration of ions in the plasma steady-state electric field. However, the ion-front motion is strongly affected by the imposed potential of the object creating the wake.

  20. Magnetosonic hump and dip solitons in a quantum plasma with Bohm potential effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, S.; Mahmood, S.

    2017-03-01

    Low frequency nonlinear magnetosonic wave propagation is investigated in magnetized electron ion quantum plasmas. A two fluid quantum magnetohydrodynamic model is employed for a magnetized dense plasma. The quantum effects like Bohm potential (due to wave nature of the particles) and Fermi pressure (due to spin 1/2 particles) for degenerate electrons are taken in the model. The electron inertia is also included in the momentum equation of degenerate electrons, which gives the magnetosonic wave dispersion effects on electron inertial length scale in the linear wave analysis. The Korteweg de Vries (KdV) equation is derived for studying low amplitude magnetosonic solitons in a magnetized quantum plasma by employing a reductive perturbation method. It is found that in the presence of Bohm potential force in quantum plasma model both plasma hump and dip soliton structures of magnetosonic waves are formed. The magnetosonic soliton hump structures moves with super magnetosonic wave speed, while dip magnetosonic wave structures have sub magnetosonic wave speed. The effects of varying plasma parameters such as plasma density and magnetic field intensity on nonlinear structures are discussed and illustrated numerically in the context of astrophysical plasma conditions existing in compact stars.

  1. Inverse bremsstrahlung cross section estimated within evolving plasmas using effective ion potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, F.; Weckert, E.; Ziaja, B.

    2009-06-01

    We estimate the total cross sections for field-stimulated photoemissions and photoabsorptions by quasi-free electrons within a non-equilibrium plasma evolving from the strong coupling to the weak coupling regime. Such a transition may occur within laser-created plasmas, when the initially created plasma is cold but the heating of the plasma by the laser field is efficient. In particular, such a transition may occur within plasmas created by intense vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation from a free-electron laser (FEL) as indicated by the results of the first experiments performed by Wabnitz at the FLASH facility at DESY. In order to estimate the inverse bremsstrahlung cross sections, we use point-like and effective atomic potentials. For ions modelled as point-like charges, the total cross sections are strongly affected by the changing plasma environment. The maximal change of the cross sections may be of the order of 75 at the change of the plasma parameters: inverse Debye length, κ, in the range κ = 0 - 3 Å-1 and the electron density, ρe, in the range ρe = 0.01 - 1 Å-3. These ranges correspond to the physical conditions within the plasmas created during the first cluster experiments performed at the FLASH facility at DESY. In contrast, for the effective atomic potentials the total cross sections for photoemission and photoabsorption change only by a factor of seven at most in the same plasma parameter range. Our results show that the inverse bremsstrahlung cross section estimated with the effective atomic potentials is not affected much by the plasma environment. This observation validates the estimations of the enhanced heating effect obtained by Walters, Santra and Greene. This is important as this effect may be responsible for the high-energy absorption within clusters irradiated with VUV radiation.

  2. Spacecraft Potential Control by the Plasma Source Instrument on the POLAR Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comfort, R. H.; Moore, T. E.; Craven, P. D.; Pollock, C. J.; Mozer, F. S.; Williamson, W. S.

    1998-01-01

    This increasingly recognized that the low-energy core plasma is a critically important part of magnetospheric plasma transport, yet this plasma cannot be accurately measured from spacecraft at potentials much different from that of the ambient plasma. In low-density regions such as the polar cap and lobes, spacecraft charge positively, excluding core ions from the spacecraft and accelerating core electrons so much that their velocities cannot be measured with any accuracy. In regions of high electron pressure and temperature, spacecraft charge negatively, excluding the ambient core electrons and accelerating the core ions so much that their velocity cannot be accurately measured. Plasma contactors have been used on a number of spacecraft operating in low-plasma-density regions to prevent charging of spacecraft to high potentials, particularly when exposed to high fluxes of energetic particles. This concern has prompted extensive studies by NASA for use of plasma contractors on the international space station where solar arrays may significantly affect the spacecraft potential.

  3. Sonoporation-induced depolarization of plasma membrane potential: analysis of heterogeneous impact.

    PubMed

    Qin, Peng; Xu, Lin; Hu, Yaxin; Zhong, Wenjing; Cai, Ping; Du, Lianfang; Jin, Lifang; Yu, Alfred C H

    2014-05-01

    Disrupting plasma membrane integrity would inevitably promote anomalous ion fluxes across the membrane and thereby upset the trans-membranous potential. In this article, we report new findings on how sonoporation as a physical membrane perforation strategy would lead to different forms of plasma membrane potential disruption. Our investigation was conducted with a customized fluorescence imaging platform that enabled live monitoring of plasma membrane potential in relation to individual sonoporation events triggered on HeLa cervical cancer cells. Sonovue microbubbles were used as sonoporation agents (added at a 4:3 cell-to-bubble ratio), and they were activated by 1-MHz pulsed ultrasound with 0.35-MPa peak negative pressure, 20-cycle pulse duration, 20-Hz pulse repetition frequency and 1-s total exposure duration. Results indicate that the plasma membrane potential response was heterogeneous among sonoporated cells: (i) membrane potential of irreversibly sonoporated cells was permanently depolarized; (ii) reversibly sonoporated cells exhibited either transient or sustained membrane depolarization; (iii) intact cells adjacent to sonoporated ones underwent transitory membrane depolarization. These findings effectively serve to substantiate the causal relationship between sonoporation and plasma membrane potential. Copyright © 2014 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Detailed study of surface-enhanced Raman scattering from metallic nanosculptured thin films and their potential for biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalabney, Atef; Khare, Chinmay; Bauer, Jens; Rauschenbach, Bernd; Abdulhalim, I.

    2012-01-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) from silver nanosculptured thin films (STF) was studied in detail for biosensing. The influences of the nanostructures' sizes, topology, the substrate features, and the preparation conditions on the enhancement were examined. Enhancement factors on the order of 107 were obtained from silver nanorods deposited on bare silicon substrates with respect to their dense counterparts, using 4-aminotheophenol (4-ATP) for the Raman emission. The low detection limit that can be achieved with STFs is below 1 μg/lit of the probe molecule 4-ATP in Ethanol solution. Theoretical modeling based on a single small spheroidal nanoparticle helped in explaining the main properties of SERS from STFs. Stability of the films was noticed over a period of one year without significant degradation.

  5. Regional applicability and potential of salt-gradient solar ponds in the United States. Volume 2: Detailed report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, E. I. H.

    1982-01-01

    A comprehensive assessment of the regional applicability and potential of salt-gradient solar ponds in the United States is provided. The assessment is focused on the general characteristics of twelve defined geographic regions. Natural resources essential to solar ponds are surveyed. Meteorological and hydrogeological conditions affecting pond performance are examined. Potentially favorable pond sites are identified. Regional thermal and electrical energy output from solar ponds is calculated. Selected pond design cases are studied. Five major potential market sectors are evaluated in terms of technical and energy-consumption characteristics, and solar-pond applicability and potential. Relevant pond system data and financial factors are analyzed. Solar-pond energy costs are compared with conventional energy costs. The assessment concludes that, excepting Alaska, ponds are applicable in all regions for at least two market sectors. Total solar pond energy supply potential in the five market sectors examined is estimated to be 8.94 quads/yr by the year 2000, approximately 7.2% of the projected total national energy demand.

  6. Advances in Langmuir probe diagnostics of the plasma potential and electron-energy distribution function in magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Tsv K.; Dimitrova, M.; Ivanova, P.; Kovačič, J.; Gyergyek, T.; Dejarnac, R.; Stöckel, J.; Pedrosa, M. A.; López-Bruna, D.; Hidalgo, C.

    2016-06-01

    Advanced Langmuir probe techniques for evaluating the plasma potential and electron-energy distribution function (EEDF) in magnetized plasma are reviewed. It is shown that when the magnetic field applied is very weak and the electrons reach the probe without collisions in the probe sheath the second-derivative Druyvesteyn formula can be used for EEDF evaluation. At low values of the magnetic field, an extended second-derivative Druyvesteyn formula yields reliable results, while at higher values of the magnetic field, the first-derivative probe technique is applicable for precise evaluation of the plasma potential and the EEDF. There is an interval of intermediate values of the magnetic field when both techniques—the extended second-derivative and the first-derivative one—can be used. Experimental results from probe measurements in different ranges of magnetic field are reviewed and discussed: low-pressure argon gas discharges in the presence of a magnetic field in the range from 0.01 to 0.08 T, probe measurements in circular hydrogen plasmas for high-temperature fusion (magnetic fields from 0.45 T to 1.3 T) in small ISTTOK and CASTOR tokamaks, D-shape COMPASS tokamak plasmas, as well as in the TJ-II stellarator. In the vicinity of the last closed flux surface (LCFS) in tokamaks and in the TJ-II stellarator, the EEDF obtained is found to be bi-Maxwellian, while close to the tokamak chamber wall it is Maxwellian. The mechanism of the appearance of a bi-Maxwellian EEDF in the vicinity of the LCFS is discussed. Comparison of the results from probe measurements with those obtained from calculations using the ASTRA and EIRENE codes shows that the main reason for the appearance of a bi-Maxwellian EEDF in the vicinity of the LCFS is the ionization of the neutral atoms.

  7. Preoperative prediction of potentially preventable morbidity after fast-track hip and knee arthroplasty: a detailed descriptive cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Morten Aa; Kehlet, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Construction of a simple preoperative risk score for patients in high risk of potentially preventable ‘medical’ complications. Secondary objectives were to construct simple preoperative risk scores for ‘severe medical’, ‘surgical’ and ‘total’ potentially preventable complications. Design Prospective observational study. Setting Elective primary unilateral total hip and knee arthroplasty with prospectively collected preoperative patient characteristics; similar standardised fast-track protocols; evaluation of complications through discharge and medical records; and complete 90 days follow-up through nationwide databases. Participants 8373 consecutive unselected total hip arthroplasty (THA) and knee arthroplasty from January 2010 to November 2012. Results There were 557 procedures (6.4%) followed by potentially preventable complications resulting in hospitalisation >4 days or readmission. Of 22 preoperative characteristics, 7 were associated with 379 (4.2%) potentially preventable ‘medical’ complications. Patients with ≥2 of the following, age ≥80 years, anticoagulant therapy, pulmonary disease, pharmacologically treated psychiatric disorder, anaemia and walking aids, composed 19.1% of the procedures; 55.7% constituted potentially preventable ‘medical’ complications that were mainly falls, mobilisation issues, pneumonias and cardiac arrhythmias. The number needed to be treated for a hypothetical intervention leading to 25% reduction in potentially preventable ‘medical’ complications was 34. THA, use of walking aids and cardiac disease were associated with 189 (2.2%) ‘surgical’ complications, but no clinically relevant preoperative prediction was possible. Conclusions Preoperative identification of patients at high risk of preventable ‘medical’, but not ‘surgical’, complications is statistically possible. However, clinical relevance is limited. Future risk indices should differ between ‘medical’ and

  8. Extension of the coherence function to quadratic models. [applied to plasma density and potential fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Y. C.; Wong, W. F.; Powers, E. J.; Roth, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    It is shown how the use of higher coherence functions can recover some of the lost coherence due to nonlinear relationship between two fluctuating quantities whose degree of mutual coherence is being measured. The relationship between the two processes is modeled with the aid of a linear term and a quadratic term. As a specific example, the relationship between plasma density and potential fluctuations in a plasma is considered. The fraction of power in the auto-power spectrum of the potential fluctuations due to a linear relationship and to a quadratic relationship between the density and potential fluctuations is estimated.

  9. Interpretation of fast measurements of plasma potential, temperature and density in SOL of ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horacek, J.; Adamek, J.; Müller, H. W.; Seidl, J.; Nielsen, A. H.; Rohde, V.; Mehlmann, F.; Ionita, C.; Havlíčková, E.; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2010-10-01

    This paper focuses on interpretation of fast (1 µs) and local (2-4 mm) measurements of plasma density, potential and electron temperature in the edge plasma of tokamak ASDEX Upgrade. Steady-state radial profiles demonstrate the credibility of the ball-pen probe. We demonstrate that floating potential fluctuations measured by a Langmuir probe are dominated by plasma electron temperature rather than potential. Spatial and temporal scales are found consistent with expectations based on interchange-driven turbulence. Conditionally averaged signals found for both potential and density are also consistent; however, those for temperature show an unexpected ~4 mm wide decrease by 10% at the very centre of a blob. In the wall shadow, temperature measured by the swept Langmuir probe yields values ~10 eV, whilst the ball-pen temperature gradient is more steep and credible, dropping down to ~1 eV.

  10. Ionization-potential depression and dynamical structure factor in dense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chengliang; Röpke, Gerd; Kraeft, Wolf-Dietrich; Reinholz, Heidi

    2017-07-01

    The properties of a bound electron system immersed in a plasma environment are strongly modified by the surrounding plasma. The modification of an essential quantity, the ionization energy, is described by the electronic and ionic self-energies, including dynamical screening within the framework of the quantum statistical theory. Introducing the ionic dynamical structure factor as the indicator for the ionic microfield, we demonstrate that ionic correlations and fluctuations play a critical role in determining the ionization potential depression. This is, in particular, true for mixtures of different ions with large mass and charge asymmetry. The ionization potential depression is calculated for dense aluminum plasmas as well as for a CH plasma and compared to the experimental data and more phenomenological approaches used so far.

  11. Quantitative Assessment of Potentially Active Faults in Oklahoma Utilizing Detailed Information on In Situ Stress Orientation and Relative Magnitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, R.; Zoback, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    Over the past six years, the earthquake rate in the central and eastern U.S. has increased markedly, and is related to fluid injection. Nowhere has seismicity increased more than in Oklahoma, where large volumes of saline pore water are co-produced with oil and gas, then injected into deeper sedimentary formations. These deeper formations appear to be in hydraulic communication with potentially active faults in crystalline basement, where nearly all the earthquakes are occurring. Although the majority of the recent earthquakes have posed little danger to the public, the possibility of triggering damaging earthquakes on potentially active basement faults cannot be discounted. To understand probability of slip on a given fault, we invert for stresses from the hundreds of M4+ events in Oklahoma for which moment tensors have been made. We then resolve these stresses, while incorporating uncertainties, on the faults from the preliminary Oklahoma fault map. The result is a probabilistic understanding of which faults are most likely active and best avoided.

  12. Potential and electron density calculated for freely expanding plasma by an electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, C. Y.; Tsai, Y. H.; Ma, C.; Wen, M. Y.

    2011-07-01

    This paper investigates the radial distributions of potential and electron density in free expansion plasma induced by an electron beam irradiating on the plate. The region of plasma production is assumed to be cylindrical, and the plasma expansion is assumed to be from a cylindrical source. Therefore, the one-dimensional model in cylindrical coordinates is employed in order to analyze the radial distributions of the potential and electron density. The Runge-Kutta method and the perturbation method are utilized in order to obtain the numerical and approximate solutions, respectively. The results reveal that the decrease in the initial ion energy makes most of the ions gather near the plasma production region and reduces the distribution of the average positive potential, electron, and ion density along the radial direction. The oscillation of steady-state plasma along the radial direction is also presented in this paper. The ions induce a larger amplitude of oscillation along the radial direction than do electrons because the electrons oscillate around slowly moving ions due to a far smaller electron mass than ion mass. The radial distributions of the positive potential and electron density predicted from this study are compared with the available experimental data.

  13. Dynamism & Detail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, Maura C.

    2004-01-01

    New material discovered in the study of cell research is presented for the benefit of biology teachers. Huge amounts of data are being generated in fields like cellular dynamics, and it is felt that people's understanding of the cell is becoming much more complex and detailed.

  14. Dynamism & Detail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, Maura C.

    2004-01-01

    New material discovered in the study of cell research is presented for the benefit of biology teachers. Huge amounts of data are being generated in fields like cellular dynamics, and it is felt that people's understanding of the cell is becoming much more complex and detailed.

  15. Model of the Plasma Potential Distribution in the Plume of a Hollow Cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Ira; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Goebel, Dan M.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we present results from a new model of the plasma potentials in the plume just downstream of the hollow cathode keeper. We examine the electron drift velocity as the hollow cathode plasma and neutral gas expand downstream of the keeper. If the drift velocity exceeds the thermal velocity a double layer potential structure develops that is the source of hot electrons. Ions are accelerated upstream through the double layer. The locations of the double layers are calculated using a simple model. It is shown that as the cathode gas flow increases, the location of the double layer moves farther downstream.

  16. A synchronized emissive probe for time-resolved plasma potential measurements of pulsed discharges.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Jason M; Rauch, Albert; Mendelsberg, Rueben J; Anders, André

    2011-09-01

    A pulsed emissive probe technique is presented for measuring the plasma potential of pulsed plasma discharges. The technique provides time-resolved data and features minimal disturbance of the plasma achieved by alternating probe heating with the generation of plasma. Time resolution of about 20 ns is demonstrated for high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) plasma of niobium in argon. Spatial resolution of about 1 mm is achieved by using a miniature tungsten filament mounted on a precision translational stage. Repeated measurements for the same discharge conditions show that the standard deviation of the measurements is about 1-2 V, corresponding to 4%-8% of the maximum plasma potential relative to ground. The principle is demonstrated for measurements at a distance of 30 mm from the target, for different radial positions, at an argon pressure of 0.3 Pa, a cathode voltage of -420 V, and a discharge current of about 60 A in the steady-state phase of the HIPIMS pulse. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  17. Plasma-modified and polyethylene glycol-grafted polymers for potential tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Svorcík, V; Makajová, Z; Kasálková-Slepicková, N; Kolská, Z; Bacáková, L

    2012-08-01

    Modified and grafted polymers may serve as building blocks for creating artificial bioinspired nanostructured surfaces for tissue engineering. Polyethylene (PE) and polystyrene (PS) were modified by Ar plasma and the surface of the plasma activated polymers was grafted with polyethylene glycol (PEG). The changes in the surface wettability (contact angle) of the modified polymers were examined by goniometry. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was used to determine the surface roughness and morphology and electrokinetical analysis (Zeta potential) characterized surface chemistry of the modified polymers. Plasma treatment and subsequent PEG grafting lead to dramatic changes in the polymer surface morphology, roughness and wettability. The plasma treated and PEG grafted polymers were seeded with rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and their adhesion and proliferation were studied. Biological tests, performed in vitro, show increased adhesion and proliferation of cells on modified polymers. Grafting with PEG increases cell proliferation, especially on PS. The cell proliferation was shown to be an increasing function of PEG molecular weight.

  18. Mechanistic and Kinetic Details of Catalysis of Thiol-Disulfide Exchange by Glutaredoxins and Potential Mechanisms of Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Gallogly, Molly M.; Starke, David W.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Glutaredoxins are small, heat-stable proteins that exhibit a characteristic thioredoxin fold and a CXXC/S active-site motif. A variety of glutathione (GSH)-dependent catalytic activities have been attributed to the glutaredoxins, including reduction of ribonucleotide reductase, arsenate, and dehydroascorbate; assembly of iron sulfur cluster complexes; and protein glutathionylation and deglutathionylation. Catalysis of reversible protein glutathionylation by glutaredoxins has been implicated in regulation of redox signal transduction and sulfhydryl homeostasis in numerous contexts in health and disease. This forum review is presented in two parts. Part I is focused primarily on the mechanism of the deglutathionylation reaction catalyzed by prototypical dithiol glutaredoxins, especially human Grx1 and Grx2. Grx-catalyzed protein deglutathionylation proceeds by a nucleophilic, double-displacement mechanism in which rate enhancement is attributed to special reactivity of the low pKa cysteine at its active site, and to increased nucleophilicity of the second substrate, GSH. Glutaredoxins (and Grx domains) have been identified in most organisms, and many exhibit deglutathionylation or other activities or both. Further characterization according to glutathionyl selectivity, physiological substrates, and intracellular roles may lead to subclassification of this family of enzymes. Part II presents potential mechanisms for in vivo regulation of Grx activity, providing avenues for future studies. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 11, 1059–1081. PMID:19119916

  19. PIMC Validation of Effective Quantum Potentials for MD Simulations of Dense Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitley, Heather D.; Castor, John I.; Langdon, A. Bruce; Khairallah, Saad A.; Surh, Michael P.; Dubois, Jonathan L.; Alder, Berni J.; Draeger, Erik W.; Schwegler, Eric; Graziani, Frank R.; Murillo, Michael S.

    2010-11-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of dense plasmas, such as those found in non-equilibrium laser fusion experiments, are challenging due to the importance of several quantum mechanical effects. We currently employ approximate statistical potentials, obtained exactly in the pair approximation from a numerical solution of the Bloch equation for the Coulomb density matrix. The fermionic character of the electrons is handled via an effective Pauli potential. We first study the accuracy of existing pair potentials and their extension to lower temperature and high Z ions by examining the exact pair density matrix. We then perform classical hypernetted chain and MD simulations using those effective potentials to study equilibrium thermodynamics of dense plasmas. Fully quantum path integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) simulations are used to gauge the accuracy of the classical calculations for dense hydrogen. Using feedback from the PIMC, we can further refine the effective Coulomb and Pauli potentials. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  20. Transition from single to multiple axial potential structure in expanding helicon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Soumen; Chattopadhyay, P. K.; Ghosh, J.; Pal, R.; Bora, D.

    2017-02-01

    Transition from single to multiple axial potential structure (MAPS) formation is reported in expanding helicon plasma. This transition is created by forming a cusp magnetic field at the downstream after the expansion throat. Two distinct potential drops are separated by a uniform axial potential zone. Non-uniform axial density distribution exists in expanding helicon systems. A cusp-like field nourishes both the axial density gradients sufficient enough for the formation of these two distinct potential drops. It is also shown that both single and multiple axial potential structures are observed only when both geometric and magnetic expansions closely coincide with each other. Coexistence of these two expansions at the same location enhances plasma expansion which facilitates deviation from Boltzmann distribution and violates quasi-neutrality locally.

  1. Potential cellular targets and antibacterial efficacy of atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma.

    PubMed

    Alkawareek, Mahmoud Y; Gorman, Sean P; Graham, William G; Gilmore, Brendan F

    2014-02-01

    Atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma (APNTP) has been gaining increasing interest as a new alternative antibacterial approach. Although this approach has demonstrated promising antibacterial activity, its exact mechanism of action remains unclear. Mechanistic elucidation of the antimicrobial activity will facilitate development and rational optimisation of this approach for potential medical applications. In this study, the antibacterial efficacy of an in-house-built APNTP jet was evaluated alongside an investigation of the interactions between APNTP and major cellular components in order to identify the potential cellular targets involved in plasma-mediated bacterial destruction mechanisms. The investigated plasma jet exhibited excellent, rapid antibacterial activity against a selected panel of clinically significant bacterial species including Bacillus cereus, meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, all of which were completely inactivated within 2 min of plasma exposure. Plasma-mediated damaging effects were observed, to varying degrees, on all of the investigated cellular components including DNA, a model protein enzyme, and lipid membrane integrity and permeability. The antibacterial efficacy of APNTP appears to involve a multiple-target mechanism, which potentially reduces the likelihood of emergence of microbial resistance towards this promising antimicrobial approach. However, cellular membrane damage and resulting permeability perturbation was found to be the most likely rate-determining step in this mechanism.

  2. Determination and analysis of an analytical potential for ions in excited configurations in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez Perez, Rafael

    The main objective in this Thesis is to propose an analytical expression, within the context of the Independent Particle Model in a central field, for the effective potential that a bound electron feels when it belongs to an ion which is in an excited configuration. It is also an objective that this potential will be obtained as a correction to the effective potential corresponding to the ion in ground state. The potential proposed not only allows to include the effects that the excited configurations introduce on atomic magnitudes but also allows to broach, in a simple and fast way, how to determine the ionic populations and the optical properties of plasmas. The great advantage of the analytical potentials is that they avoid the iterative procedures, which are characteristic in the self-consistent methods, in the calculations of atomic magnitudes and plasma properties. This fact allow a considerable diminution in calculation time. Moreover, the analytical potential proposed in this Thesis has the advantage with respect other analytical potentials that it does not need to fit its parameters when we consider different excited configurations. This fact implies a considerable diminution in the complexity of the problem and in the calculation time and allows to include more excited configurations to model the ions present in the plasma, which improves the results. With the potential proposed in this Thesis we have studied the influence of the excited configurations on atomic magnitudes. Those results have been checked satisfactorily with others obtained by self-consistent methods and by using analytical potentials. We have also used the potential proposed to determine which excited configurations have more probability of presence in a plasma in Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium.

  3. Chemically treated plasma Aβ is a potential blood-based biomarker for screening cerebral amyloid deposition.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Chan; Han, Sun-Ho; Cho, Hyun Jin; Byun, Min Soo; Yi, Dahyun; Choe, Young Min; Kang, Seokjo; Jung, Eun Sun; Won, Su Jin; Kim, Eun Hye; Kim, Yu Kyeong; Lee, Dong Young; Mook-Jung, Inhee

    2017-03-22

    Plasma β-amyloid (Aβ) is a potential candidate for an Alzheimer's disease (AD) biomarker because blood is an easily accessible bio-fluid, which can be collected routinely, and Aβ is one of the major hallmarks of AD pathogenesis in the brain. However, the association between plasma Aβ levels and AD diagnosis is still unclear due to the instability and inaccurate measurements of plasma Aβ levels in the blood of patients with AD. If a consistent value of plasma Aβ from the blood can be obtained, this might help determine whether plasma Aβ is a potential biomarker for AD diagnosis. We predicted the brain amyloid deposit by measuring the plasma Aβ levels. This cross-sectional study included 353 participants (215 cognitively normal, 79 with mild cognitive impairment, and 59 with AD dementia) who underwent Pittsburgh-compound B positron emission tomography (PiB-PET) scans. We treated a mixture of protease inhibitors and phosphatase inhibitors (MPP) and detected plasma Aβ42 and Aβ40 (MPP-Aβ42 and MPP-Aβ40) in a stable manner using xMAP technology. MPP-Aβ40 and MPP-Aβ42/40 (MPP-Aβs) were significantly different between subjects with positive amyloid deposition (PiB+) and those with negative amyloid deposition (PiB-) (P < 0.0001). Furthermore, MPP-Aβ40 (P < 0.0001, r = 0.23) and MPP-Aβ42/40 ratio (P < 0.0001, r = -0.23) showed significant correlation with global PiB deposition (standardized uptake value ratio). In addition, our integrated multivariable (MPP-Aβ42/40, gender, age, and apolipoprotein E genotypes) logistic regression model proposes a new standard for the prediction of cerebral amyloid deposition. MPP-Aβ might be one of the potential blood biomarkers for the prediction of PiB-PET positivity in the brain.

  4. Plasma neuronal specific enolase: a potential stage diagnostic marker in human African trypanosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Sternberg, Jeremy M.; Mitchell, Julia A.

    2014-01-01

    Background This study was carried out to determine the potential of neuronal specific enolase (NSE) as a stage diagnostic marker in human African trypanosomiasis. Methods Plasma and cerebrospinal fluid were obtained from a cohort of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense-infected patients and non-infected controls. Neuronal specific enolase concentrations were measured by ELISA and analysed in relation to diagnosis and disease-stage data. Results Plasma NSE concentration was significantly increased in late-stage patients (median 21 ng/ml), compared to the control (median 11 ng/ml), but not in early-stage patients (median 5.3 ng/ml). Cerebrospinal fluid NSE concentration did not vary between stages. Conclusion Plasma NSE is a potential stage diagnostic in this cohort and merits further investigation. PMID:24789741

  5. Formation of Non-Monotonic Potential Structure in the Detached Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiguro, Seiji; Pianpanit, Theerasarn; Hasegawa, Hiroki

    2016-10-01

    Plasma detachment has been investigated by means of PIC simulation which includes plasma-neutral collision and Coulomb collision. In our previous study, we have shown that a strong gradient in temperature appears in front of the target plate in the case that high density and low temperature neutral gas is introduced. It is observed that a potential hill is created in the neutral gas region where ions lose energy due to the elastic and charge exchange collision and, as a result, the ion density increases. This potential structure traps the low energy electrons and may play a role in the development of plasma detachment state. This work is supported by NIFS Collaboration Research Programs NIFS14KNXN279 and NIFS14KNSS059 and the NIFS/NINS project of Formation of International Scientific Base and Network.

  6. Potential Industrial Applications of the One Atmosphere Uniform Glow Discharge Plasma (OAUGDP) Operating in Ambient Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reece Roth, J.

    2004-11-01

    The majority of industrial plasma processing with glow discharges has been conducted at pressures below 10 torr. This tends to limit applications to high value workpieces as a result of the high capital cost of vacuum systems and the production constraints of batch processing. It has long been recognized that glow discharge plasmas would play a much larger industrial role if they could be generated at one atmosphere. The One Atmosphere Uniform Glow Discharge Plasma (OAUGDP), developed at the University of Tennessee's Plasma Sciences Laboratory, is a non-thermal RF plasma operating on displacement currents with the time-resolved characteristics of a classical low pressure DC normal glow discharge. As a glow discharge, the OAUGDP operates with maximum electrical efficiency at the Stoletow point, where the energy input per ion-electron pair is a minimum [1, 2]. Several interdisciplinary teams have investigated potential applications of the OAUGDP. These teams included collaborators from the UTK Textiles and Nonwovens Development Center (TANDEC), and the Departments of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Microbiology, and Food Science and Technology, as well as the NASA Langley Research Center. The potential applications of the OAUGDP have all been at one atmosphere and room temperature, using air as the working gas. These applications include sterilizing medical and dental equipment; sterilizable air filters to deal with the "sick building syndrome"; removal of soot from Diesel engine exhaust; subsonic plasma aerodynamic effects, including flow re-attachment to airfoils and boundary layer modification; electrohydrodynamic (EDH) flow control of working gases; increasing the surface energy of materials; improving the adhesion of paints and electroplated layers: improving the wettability and wickability of fabrics; stripping of photoresist; and plasma deposition and directional etching of potential microelectronic relevance. [1] J. R. Roth, Industrial Plasma Engineering

  7. Auroral plasma transport processes in the presence of kV potential structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganguli, Supriya B.; Mitchell, H. G.; Palmadesso, P. J.

    1994-01-01

    We have simulated plasma transport processes in the presence of a quasi-two-dimensional current filament, that generated kV potential structure in the auroral region. The simulation consists of a set of one-dimensional flux tube simulations with different imposed time-dependent, field-aligned currents. The model uses the 16 moment system of equations and simultaneously solves coupled continuity and momentum equations and equations describing the transport along the magnetic field lines of parallel and perpendicular thermal energy and heat flows for each species. The lower end of the simulation is at an altitude of 800 km, in the collisional topside ionosphere, while the upper end is at 10 R(sub E) in the magnetosphere. The plasma consists of hot electrons and protons of magnetospheric origin and low-energy electrons, protons, and oxygen ions of ionospheric origin. The dynamical interaction of the individual current filaments with ionospheric and magnetospheric plasma generates a potential structure in the horizontal direction and kilovolt field-aligned potential drops along the field lines. The side-by-side display exhibits the evolution of the implied potential structure in the horizontial direction. In the presence of this potential structure and parallel electric field ionospheric plasma density is depleted and velocity is reduced, while density enhancement and increased velocity is observed in magnetospheric plasma. The ionospheric and magnetospheric electron temperatures increase below 2 R(sub E) due to magnetic mirror force on converging geomagnetic field lines. The primary cross-field motion produced by the horizontal E field (E x B drift) is perpendicular to both of the significant spatial directions and is thus ignorable in this geometry. The effects of other cross-field drift processes are discussed. The simulation thus provides insight into the dynamical evolution of two-dimensional potential structures driven by an imposed finite width, field

  8. Space charge, plasma potential and electric field distributions in HiPIMS discharges of varying configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebig, B.; Bradley, J. W.

    2013-08-01

    An electron-emitting (emissive) probe has been used to study the temporal and spatial distribution of the plasma potential during high-power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharges with various substrate and magnetic field configurations. The average power was 700 W, with a repetition frequency of 100 Hz and pulse duration of 100 µs. Strongly negative plasma potentials exceeding -300 V and electric fields up to 10 kV m-1, caused by strong separation of charges with net charge carrier densities Δn of about 1014 m-3, were observed during the ignition of the discharge. The spatial distribution of the plasma potential in the stable stage of the discharge showed values consistently 5 V more negative for a floating substrate compared with a grounded one, so enhancing electron transport around the insulated substrate to grounded walls. However, this change in the electrical configuration of the plasma does not alter significantly the fraction of ionized sputtered particles (of about 30%) that can potentially reach the substrate. By changing the degree of unbalance of the sputtering source, we find a strong correlation between the electric field strength in the magnetic trap (created through charge separation) and the absolute value (and shape) of the magnetic field. For the more unbalanced magnetron, a flattening of the plasma potential structure (decrease in the axial electric field) was observed close to the target. Our findings show in principle that manipulation of the potential barrier close to the target through changing the magnetic field can regulate the proportion of sputtered and ionized species reaching the substrate.

  9. Dust removal in radio-frequency plasmas by a traveling potential modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Li Yangfang; Jiang Ke; Thomas, Hubertus M.; Morfill, Gregor E.

    2010-06-16

    The dust contamination in plasma deposition processes plays a crucial role in the quality and the yield of the products. To improve the quality and the yield of plasma processing, a favorable way is to remove the dust particles actively from the plasma reactors.Our recent experiments in the striped electrode device show that a traveling plasma modulation allows for a systematic particle removal independent of the reactor size. Besides the rf powered electrode, the striped electrode device includes a segmented electrode that consists of 100 electrically insulated narrow stripes. A traveling potential profile is produced by the modulation of the voltage signals applied on the stripes. The dust particles are trapped in the potential wells and transported with the traveling of the potential profile.The particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation on the potential above the segmented electrode indicates that the traveling potential profile can be realized either by applying low-frequency (0.1-10 Hz) voltage signals with a fixed phase shift between adjacent stripes or high-frequency (10 kHz a circumflex AS 100 MHz) signals with the amplitudes modulated by a low-frequency envelope. The transportation of the dust particles is simulated with a two-dimensional molecular dynamics (MD) code with the potential profile obtained from the PIC simulation. The MD results reproduce the experimental observations successfully.This technology allows for an active removal of the contaminating particles in processing plasmas and it is independent of the reactor size. The removal velocity is controllable by adjusting the parameters for the modulation.

  10. Increasing Extracted Beam Current Density in Ion Thrusters through Plasma Potential Modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthur, Neil; Foster, John

    2015-09-01

    A gridded ion thruster's maximum extractable beam current is determined by the space charge limit. The classical formulation does not take into account finite ion drift into the acceleration gap. It can be shown that extractable beam current can be increased beyond the conventional Child-Langmuir law if the ions enter the gap at a finite drift speed. In this work, ion drift in a 10 cm thruster is varied by adjusting the plasma potential relative to the potential at the extraction plane. Internal plasma potential variations are achieved using a novel approach involving biasing the magnetic cusps. Ion flow variations are assessed using simulated beam extraction in conjunction with a retarding potential analyzer. Ion beam current density changes at a given total beam voltage in full beam extraction tests are characterized as a function of induced ion drift velocity as well.

  11. Equation of state of a quark-gluon plasma using the Cornell potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udayanandan, K. M.; Sethumadhavan, P.; Bannur, V. M.

    2007-10-01

    The equation of state (EOS) of quark-gluon plasma (QGP) using the Cornell potential based on Mayer's cluster expansion is presented. The string constant and the strong coupling constant for QGP are calculated. The EOS developed could describe the lattice EOS for pure gauge, two-flavor and three-flavor QGP qualitatively.

  12. Plasma Soluble Prion Protein, a Potential Biomarker for Sport-Related Concussions: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Nam; Akonasu, Hungbo; Shishkin, Rhonda; Taghibiglou, Changiz

    2015-01-01

    Sport-related mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) or concussion is a significant health concern to athletes with potential long-term consequences. The diagnosis of sport concussion and return to sport decision making is one of the greatest challenges facing health care clinicians working in sports. Blood biomarkers have recently demonstrated their potential in assisting the detection of brain injury particularly, in those cases with no obvious physical injury. We have recently discovered plasma soluble cellular prion protein (PrPC) as a potential reliable biomarker for blast induced TBI (bTBI) in a rodent animal model. In order to explore the application of this novel TBI biomarker to sport-related concussion, we conducted a pilot study at the University of Saskatchewan (U of S) by recruiting athlete and non-athlete 18 to 30 year-old students. Using a modified quantitative ELISA method, we first established normal values for the plasma soluble PrPC in male and female students. The measured plasma soluble PrPC in confirmed concussion cases demonstrated a significant elevation of this analyte in post-concussion samples. Data collected from our pilot study indicates that the plasma soluble PrPC is a potential biomarker for sport-related concussion, which may be further developed into a clinical diagnostic tool to assist clinicians in the assessment of sport concussion and return-to-play decision making. PMID:25643046

  13. Plasma soluble prion protein, a potential biomarker for sport-related concussions: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Pham, Nam; Akonasu, Hungbo; Shishkin, Rhonda; Taghibiglou, Changiz

    2015-01-01

    Sport-related mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) or concussion is a significant health concern to athletes with potential long-term consequences. The diagnosis of sport concussion and return to sport decision making is one of the greatest challenges facing health care clinicians working in sports. Blood biomarkers have recently demonstrated their potential in assisting the detection of brain injury particularly, in those cases with no obvious physical injury. We have recently discovered plasma soluble cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) as a potential reliable biomarker for blast induced TBI (bTBI) in a rodent animal model. In order to explore the application of this novel TBI biomarker to sport-related concussion, we conducted a pilot study at the University of Saskatchewan (U of S) by recruiting athlete and non-athlete 18 to 30 year-old students. Using a modified quantitative ELISA method, we first established normal values for the plasma soluble PrP(C) in male and female students. The measured plasma soluble PrP(C) in confirmed concussion cases demonstrated a significant elevation of this analyte in post-concussion samples. Data collected from our pilot study indicates that the plasma soluble PrP(C) is a potential biomarker for sport-related concussion, which may be further developed into a clinical diagnostic tool to assist clinicians in the assessment of sport concussion and return-to-play decision making.

  14. Quantum-Mechanical Calculation of Ionization-Potential Lowering in Dense Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Sang-Kil; Thiele, Robert; Jurek, Zoltan; Ziaja, Beata; Santra, Robin

    2014-07-01

    The charged environment within a dense plasma leads to the phenomenon of ionization-potential depression (IPD) for ions embedded in the plasma. Accurate predictions of the IPD effect are of crucial importance for modeling atomic processes occurring within dense plasmas. Several theoretical models have been developed to describe the IPD effect, with frequently discrepant predictions. Only recently, first experiments on IPD in Al plasma have been performed with an x-ray free-electron laser, where their results were found to be in disagreement with the widely used IPD model by Stewart and Pyatt. Another experiment on Al, at the Orion laser, showed disagreement with the model by Ecker and Kröll. This controversy shows a strong need for a rigorous and consistent theoretical approach to calculate the IPD effect. Here, we propose such an approach: a two-step Hartree-Fock-Slater model. With this parameter-free model, we can accurately and efficiently describe the experimental Al data and validate the accuracy of standard IPD models. Our model can be a useful tool for calculating atomic properties within dense plasmas with wide-ranging applications to studies on warm dense matter, shock experiments, planetary science, inertial confinement fusion, and nonequilibrium plasmas created with x-ray free-electron lasers.

  15. Investigation of the potential uses of plasma processing in the United States chemical industry

    SciTech Connect

    Estey, P.N.

    1985-01-01

    This thesis describes a systematic approach to determine the potential for high pressure (thermal) plasma processing in the United States chemical industry. A model was developed that describes the physical inputs and outputs of a plasma-based processing system. This model consists of an empirical model of an electric arc heater and an analytical model of the reaction chamber into which the arc heater gas flows. The reaction chamber model comprises the conservation equations of one-dimensional fluid flow including the effects of chemical kinetics, particle and gas injection, and convective and radiative heat transfer. These complex equations were solved numerically. An engineering economic analysis of the plasma process was performed when favorable results existed for the mass and energy flows to and from the plasma arc heater/reaction chamber model. This analysis was used to determine if the plasma process is or can be competitive with conventional technology. Five cases were studied as examples of plasma-based chemical processing: nitric acid production, hydrogen cyanide synthesis, silicon refining, titanium dioxide production, and reductant gas synthesis from residual fuel oil.

  16. An Investigation of the Potential Uses of Plasma Processing in the United States Chemical Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estey, Paul Norman

    This thesis describes a systematic approach to determine the potential for high pressure (thermal) plasma processing in the United States chemical industry. A model was developed that describes the physical inputs and outputs of a plasma-based processing system. This model consists of an empirical model of an electric arc heater and an analytical model of the reaction chamber into which the arc heater gas flows. The reaction chamber model comprises the conservation equations of one-dimensional fluid flow including the effects of chemical kinetics, particle and gas injection, and convective and radiative heat transfer. These complex equations were solved numerically. An engineering economic analysis of the plasma process was performed when favorable results existed for the mass and energy flows to and from the plasma arc heater/reaction chamber model. This analysis was used to determine if the plasma process is or can be competitive with conventional technology. Five cases were studied as examples of plasma -based chemical processing: nitric acid production, hydrogen cyanide synthesis, silicon refining, titanium dioxide production, and reductant gas synthesis from residual fuel oil.

  17. Quantification of plasma exosome is a potential prognostic marker for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Yasunori; Kano, Masayuki; Akutsu, Yasunori; Hanari, Naoyuki; Hoshino, Isamu; Murakami, Kentaro; Usui, Akihiro; Suito, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Masahiko; Otsuka, Ryota; Xin, Hu; Komatsu, Aki; Iida, Keiko; Matsubara, Hisahiro

    2016-11-01

    Exosomes play important roles in cancer progression. Although its contents (e.g., proteins and microRNAs) have been focused on in cancer research, particularly as potential diagnostic markers, the exosome behavior and methods for exosome quantification remain unclear. In the present study, we analyzed the tumor-derived exosome behavior and assessed the quantification of exosomes in patient plasma as a biomarker for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). A CD63-GFP expressing human ESCC cell line (TE2-CD63-GFP) was made by transfection, and mouse subcutaneous tumor models were established. Fluorescence imaging was performed on tumors and plasma exosomes harvested from mice. GFP-positive small vesicles were confirmed in the plasma obtained from TE2-CD63-GFP tumor-bearing mice. Patient plasma was collected in Chiba University Hospital (n=86). Exosomes were extracted from 100 µl of the plasma and quantified by acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity. The relationship between exosome quantification and the patient clinical characteristics was assessed. The quantification of exosomes isolated from the patient plasma revealed that esophageal cancer patients (n=66) expressed higher exosome levels than non-malignant patients (n=20) (P=0.0002). Although there was no correlation between the tumor progression and the exosome levels, exosome number was the independent prognostic marker and low levels of exosome predicted a poor prognosis (P=0.03). In conclusion, exosome levels may be useful as an independent prognostic factor for ESCC patients.

  18. The big contradiction between the perturbation theory and the chaotic state. A detailed mathematical analysis indicates when the plasma is stable or unstable

    SciTech Connect

    Xaplanteris, C. L.; Xaplanteris, S. C.

    2016-05-15

    In the present manuscript enough observations and interpretations of three issues of Plasma Physics are presented. The first issue is linked to the common experimental confirmation of plasma waves which appear to be repeated in a standard way while there are also cases where plasma waves change to an unstable state or even to chaotic state. The second issue is associated with a mathematical analysis of the movement of a charged particle using the perturbation theory; which could be used as a guide for new researchers on similar issues. Finally, the suitability and applicability of the perturbation theory or the chaotic theory is presented. Although this study could be conducted on many plasma phenomena (e.g. plasma diffusion) or plasma quantities (e.g. plasma conductivity), here it was decided this study to be conducted on plasma waves and particularly on drift waves. This was because of the significance of waves on the plasmatic state and especially their negative impact on the thermonuclear fusion, but also due to the long-time experience of the plasma laboratory of Demokritos on drift waves.

  19. A Scaling Law of Plasma Confining Potential Formation with Electron Cyclotron Heating Powers in GAMMA 10

    SciTech Connect

    Numakura, T.; Cho, T.; Kohagura, J.; Hirata, M.; Fukai, T.; Yoshida, M.; Minami, R.; Kiminami, S.; Sakamoto, K.; Imai, T.; Miyoshi, S.

    2005-01-15

    Scaling laws of potential formation and associated effects are theoretically and experimentally investigated in the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror. In GAMMA 10, the main tandem-mirror operations from 1979 to 2003 are characterized in terms of (i) a high-potential mode having kV-order plasma-confining potentials, and (ii) a hot-ion mode yielding fusion neutrons with 10-20 keV bulk-ion temperatures. In this paper, the externally controllable parameter scaling including electron cyclotron heating (ECH) powers for potential formation covering over these two representative operational modes is investigated; that is, the construction of 'the central-cell plasma-confining potentials' {phi}{sub c} formation scaling with plug ECH is studied on the basis of the electron energy-balance equation and Cohen's strong electron cyclotron heating (ECH) theory for investigating the formation physics of plasma confining potentials.It is found that our proposed scaling formulae are in good agreement with the experimental data in the two representative operational modes of the high-potential and hot-ion modes in the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror.This scaling shows a favorable increase in confining potentials with installing more powerful ECH sources by the use of ECH powers over the present 250 kW. On the basis of the scaling prediction, we also report the design of a newly developed 500 kW gyrotron for an application to investigate the validity of the above described {phi}{sub c} formation scaling with plug ECH aiming at achieving higher plasma parameters.

  20. Plasma Potential Measurements by the Heavy Ion Beam Probe Diagnostic in Fusion Plasmas: Biasing Experiments in the TJ-II Stellarator and T-10 Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Melnikov, A.V.; Hidalgo, C.; Eliseev, L.G.

    2004-09-15

    The effect of edge biasing on plasma potential was investigated in the TJ-II stellarator and the T-10 tokamak. The Heavy Ion Beam Probe (HIBP) diagnostic, a unique tool for studying the core potential directly, was used in both machines. Experiments in TJ-II show that it is possible to modify the global confinement and edge plasma parameters with limiter biasing, illustrating the direct impact of radial electric fields on TJ-II confinement properties. For the first time it was shown that the plasma column in a stellarator can be charged as a whole for a hot, near-reactor-relevant plasma. The plasma potential and electric fields evolve on two different characteristic time scales. Although the experimental conditions in the two machines have many important differences, the basic features of plasma potential behavior have some similarities: The potential response has the same polarity and scale as the biasing voltage, and the fluctuations are suppressed near the electrode/limiter region. However, whereas both edge and core plasma potential are affected by biasing in TJ-II, the potential changes mainly near the biased electrode in T-10.

  1. Bifurcation of space-charge wave in a plasma waveguide including the wake potential effect

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Myoung-Jae; Jung, Young-Dae

    2016-09-15

    The wake potential effects on the propagation of the space-charge dust ion-acoustic wave are investigated in a cylindrically bounded dusty plasma with the ion flow. The results show that the wake potential would generate the double frequency modes in a cylindrically bounded dusty plasma. It is found that the upper mode of the wave frequency with the root of higher-order is smaller than that with the root of lower-order in intermediate wave number domains. However, the lower mode of the scaled wave frequency with the root of higher-order is found to be greater than that with the root of lower-order. It is found that the influence in the order of the root of the Bessel function on the wave frequency of the space-charge dust-ion-acoustic wave in a cylindrically confined dusty plasma decreases with an increase in the propagation wave number. It is also found that the double frequency modes increase with increasing Mach number due to the ion flow in a cylindrical dusty plasma. In addition, it is found that the upper mode of the group velocity decreases with an increase in the scaled radius of the plasma cylinder. However, it is shown that the lower mode of the scaled group velocity of the space-charge dust ion acoustic wave increases with an increase in the radius of the plasma cylinder. The variation of the space-charge dust-ion-acoustic wave due to the wake potential and geometric effects is also discussed.

  2. Ambipolar potential effect on a drift-wave mode in a tandem-mirror plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mase, A.; Jeong, J.H.; Itakura, A.; Ishii, K.; Inutake, M.; Miyoshi, S. )

    1990-05-07

    The {bold k}-{omega} spectra of low-frequency waves which exist in a tandem-mirror plasma are observed by using the Fraunhofer-diffraction method. The observed dispersion relations are in good agreement with those of drift waves including a Doppler shift due to {bold E}{times}{bold B} rotation velocity. The fluctuation level is observed to depend sensitively on the radial profile of a plasma potential. It has a maximum value when a slightly negative electric field is formed, and decreases with increase in an electric field regardless of its sign.

  3. Enzymatic Modification of Plasma Low Density Lipoproteins in Rabbits: A Potential Treatment for Hypercholesterolemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labeque, Regine; Mullon, Claudy J. P.; Ferreira, Joao Paulo M.; Lees, Robert S.; Langer, Robert

    1993-04-01

    Phospholipase A_2 (EC 3.1.1.4) hydrolyzes certain phospholipids of low density lipoprotein (LDL). Plasma clearance of phospholipase A_2-modified human LDL is up to 17 times faster than that of native human LDL in hypercholesterolemic rabbits. Modification of blood lipoproteins of hypercholesterolemic rabbits was performed by using an extracorporeal circuit containing immobilized phospholipase A_2. After 90-min treatments, nearly 30% decreases in plasma cholesterol concentrations were observed. Erythrocyte, leukocyte, and platelet counts showed no net change after treatment. This technique does not require any fluid replacement or sorbent regeneration and offers a potential approach for lowering serum cholesterol and LDL levels.

  4. Contact potential induced enhancement of magnetization in polyaniline coated nanomagnetic iron oxides by plasma polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sethulakshmi, N.; Sooraj, V.; Sajeev, U. S.; Nair, Swapna S.; Narayanan, T. N.; Joy, Lija K.; Joy, P. A.; Ajayan, P. M.; Anantharaman, M. R.

    2013-10-01

    The present work derives motivation from the so called surface/interfacial magnetism in core shell structures and commercial samples of Fe3O4 and γ Fe2O3 with sizes ranging from 20 to 30 nm were coated with polyaniline using plasma polymerization and studied. The High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy images indicate a core shell structure after polyaniline coating and exhibited an increase in saturation magnetization by 2 emu/g. For confirmation, plasma polymerization was performed on maghemite nanoparticles which also exhibited an increase in saturation magnetization. This enhanced magnetization is rather surprising and the reason is found to be an interfacial phenomenon resulting from a contact potential.

  5. Direct Measurements of the Ionization Potential Depression in a Dense Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciricosta, O.; Vinko, S. M.; Chung, H.-K.; Cho, B.-I.; Brown, C. R. D.; Burian, T.; Chalupský, J.; Engelhorn, K.; Falcone, R. W.; Graves, C.; Hájková, V.; Higginbotham, A.; Juha, L.; Krzywinski, J.; Lee, H. J.; Messerschmidt, M.; Murphy, C. D.; Ping, Y.; Rackstraw, D. S.; Scherz, A.; Schlotter, W.; Toleikis, S.; Turner, J. J.; Vysin, L.; Wang, T.; Wu, B.; Zastrau, U.; Zhu, D.; Lee, R. W.; Heimann, P.; Nagler, B.; Wark, J. S.

    2012-08-01

    We have used the Linac Coherent Light Source to generate solid-density aluminum plasmas at temperatures of up to 180 eV. By varying the photon energy of the x rays that both create and probe the plasma, and observing the K-α fluorescence, we can directly measure the position of the K edge of the highly charged ions within the system. The results are found to disagree with the predictions of the extensively used Stewart-Pyatt model, but are consistent with the earlier model of Ecker and Kröll, which predicts significantly greater depression of the ionization potential.

  6. Bohm potential effect on the propagation of electrostatic surface wave in semi-bounded quantum plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Myoung-Jae; Jung, Young-Dae

    2017-02-01

    High frequency electrostatic wave propagation in a dense and semi-bounded electron quantum plasma is investigated with consideration of the Bohm potential. The dispersion relation for the surface mode of quantum plasma is derived and numerically analyzed. We found that the quantum effect enhances the frequency of the wave especially in the high wave number regime. However, the frequency of surface wave is found to be always lower than that of the bulk wave for the same quantum wave number. The group velocity of the surface wave for various quantum wave number is also obtained.

  7. Excited-state PAW Potentials: Modelling Hot-Dense Plasmas From First Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollebon, Patrick; Vinko, Sam; Ciricosta, Orlando; Wark, Justin

    2015-11-01

    Finite temperature density functional theory has proven to be a successful means of modelling warm and hot dense plasma systems, including the calculation of transport properties, equation of state and ionization potential depression. Such methods take into account the non-negligible influence of quantum mechanics on the electronic structure of these strongly coupled systems. We apply excited state frozen core potentials to model general core-hole states in high density plasma, allowing for the calculation of the electronic structure of a range of ionic configurations. The advantages of using excited-state potentials are explored and we investigate their application towards various response function calculations, with the results shown to be in good agreement with all-electron calculations at finite-temperatures.

  8. Bunker probe: A plasma potential probe almost insensitive to its orientation with the magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Costea, S. Schneider, B. S.; Schrittwieser, R.; Ionita, C.; Fonda, B.; Kovačič, J.; Gyergyek, T.

    2016-05-15

    Due to their ability to suppress a large part of the electron current and thus measuring directly the plasma potential, ion sensitive probes have begun to be widely tested and used in fusion devices. For these probes to work, almost perfect alignment with the total magnetic field is necessary. This condition cannot always be fulfilled due to the curvature of magnetic fields, complex magnetic structure, or magnetic field reconnection. In this perspective, we have developed a plasma potential probe (named Bunker probe) based on the principle of the ion sensitive probe but almost insensitive to its orientation with the total magnetic field. Therefore it can be used to measure the plasma potential inside fusion devices, especially in regions with complex magnetic field topology. Experimental results are presented and compared with Ball-Pen probe measurements taken under identical conditions. We have observed that the floating potential of the Bunker probe is indeed little affected by its orientation with the magnetic field for angles ranging from 90° to 30°, in contrast to the Ball-Pen probe whose floating potential decreases towards that of a Langmuir probe if not properly aligned with the magnetic field.

  9. Plasma dynamics on current-carrying magnetic flux tubes. II - Low potential simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, Daniel W.

    1992-01-01

    The evolution of plasma in a current-carrying magnetic flux tube of variable cross section is investigated using a one-dimensional numerical simulation. The flux tube is narrow at the two ends and broad in the middle. The middle part of the flux tube is loaded with a hot, magnetically trapped population, and the two ends have a more dense, gravitationally bound population. A potential difference larger than the gravitational potential but less than the energy of the hot population is applied across the domain. The general result is that the potential change becomes distributed along the anode half of the domain, with negligible potential change on the cathode half. The potential is supported by the mirror force of magnetically trapped particles. The simulations show a steady depletion of plasma on the anode side of the flux tube. The current steadily decreases on a time scale of an ion transit time. The results may provide an explanation for the observed plasma depletions on auroral field lines carrying upward currents.

  10. Differential proteomics of human seminal plasma: A potential target for searching male infertility marker proteins.

    PubMed

    Tomar, Anil Kumar; Sooch, Balwinder Singh; Singh, Sarman; Yadav, Savita

    2012-04-01

    The clinical fertility tests, available in the market, fail to define the exact cause of male infertility in almost half of the cases and point toward a crucial need of developing better ways of infertility investigations. The protein biomarkers may help us toward better understanding of unknown cases of male infertility that, in turn, can guide us to find better therapeutic solutions. Many clinical attempts have been made to identify biomarkers of male infertility in sperm proteome but only few studies have targeted seminal plasma. Human seminal plasma is a rich source of proteins that are essentially required for development of sperm and successful fertilization. This viewpoint article highlights the importance of human seminal plasma proteome in reproductive physiology and suggests that differential proteomics integrated with functional analysis may help us in searching potential biomarkers of male infertility.

  11. Suppressibility of plasma adrenocorticotropin by hydrocortisone: potential usefulness in the diagnosis of Cushing's disease.

    PubMed

    Streeten, D H; Anderson, G H; Brennan, S; Jones, C

    1998-04-01

    Repeatedly normal cortisol suppressibility by dexamethasone in 2 patients with Cushing's disease led to the present study of the prevalence of this phenomenon in 58 patients with otherwise incontrovertible evidence of Cushing's disease. Because as many as 23% of these patients manifested this phenomenon, we investigated the suppressibility of plasma ACTH: 1) during i.v. infusion of hydrocortisone, after a priming dose (7 mg), at 3 mg/h in 8 patients and 8 normal controls; and 2) for 2 h, after oral hydrocortisone, 0.25 mg/kg, in 13 patients and 16 controls. The data showed invariable suppression of plasma ACTH to < or = 10 pg/mL (< or = 2.2 pmol/L) after 120 min of the infusion or at 90 min after oral hydrocortisone in 16 fasting normal subjects given oral hydrocortisone between 0800 and 0830 h. Plasma ACTH exceeded 10 pg/mL (2.2 pmol/L) at the same times in 14/14 patients with active Cushing's disease, including 3 patients whose cortisol suppressibility by dexamethasone had been misleadingly normal and in 4/7 patients with intermittent hypercortisolism. Occasional variations in plasma cortisol elevations after the oral dose require that plasma cortisol concentration be monitored at 60 min after the oral hydrocortisone dose, because the present evidence supports the validity of the conclusion that a plasma ACTH concentration below 10 pg/mL excludes Cushing's disease only when plasma cortisol concentration at 60 min lies between 16 and 38 microg/dL. Further evaluation of ACTH suppressibility by cortisol would be worthwhile, to confirm its potential value in facilitating positive diagnosis of Cushing's disease when dexamethasone suppressibility seems misleading.

  12. Direct measurement of the plasma screening length and surface potential near the lunar terminator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, J.

    1977-01-01

    Direct measurement of the lunar dayside surface potential and screening length has been made by the suprathermal ion detector experiment (Side) near the terminator. In a region 20-30 deg from the terminator at the Apollo 14 and 15 sites the surface potential is found to be approximately 50 V negative, and the screening length to be about 1 km. This value of the screening length is more than 2 orders of magnitude greater than the solar wind 'Debye' length. The strong negative surface potential in this region may be due to enhanced temperature and density of the solar wind plasma.

  13. High-field plasma acceleration in a high-ionization-potential gas

    DOE PAGES

    Corde, S.; Adli, E.; Allen, J. M.; ...

    2016-06-17

    Plasma accelerators driven by particle beams are a very promising future accelerator technology as they can sustain high accelerating fields over long distances with high energy efficiency. They rely on the excitation of a plasma wave in the wake of a drive beam. To generate the plasma, a neutral gas can be field-ionized by the head of the drive beam, in which case the distance of acceleration and energy gain can be strongly limited by head erosion. In our research, we overcome this limit and demonstrate that electrons in the tail of a drive beam can be accelerated by upmore » to 27 GeV in a high-ionization-potential gas (argon), boosting their initial 20.35 GeV energy by 130%. Particle-in-cell simulations show that the argon plasma is sustaining very high electric fields, of ~150 GV m-1, over ~20 cm. Lastly, the results open new possibilities for the design of particle beam drivers and plasma sources.« less

  14. High-field plasma acceleration in a high-ionization-potential gas

    SciTech Connect

    Corde, S.; Adli, E.; Allen, J. M.; An, W.; Clarke, C. I.; Clausse, B.; Clayton, C. E.; Delahaye, J. P.; Frederico, J.; Gessner, S.; Green, S. Z.; Hogan, M. J.; Joshi, C.; Litos, M.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K. A.; Mori, W. B.; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N.; Walz, D.; Yakimenko, V.

    2016-06-17

    Plasma accelerators driven by particle beams are a very promising future accelerator technology as they can sustain high accelerating fields over long distances with high energy efficiency. They rely on the excitation of a plasma wave in the wake of a drive beam. To generate the plasma, a neutral gas can be field-ionized by the head of the drive beam, in which case the distance of acceleration and energy gain can be strongly limited by head erosion. In our research, we overcome this limit and demonstrate that electrons in the tail of a drive beam can be accelerated by up to 27 GeV in a high-ionization-potential gas (argon), boosting their initial 20.35 GeV energy by 130%. Particle-in-cell simulations show that the argon plasma is sustaining very high electric fields, of ~150 GV m-1, over ~20 cm. Lastly, the results open new possibilities for the design of particle beam drivers and plasma sources.

  15. Carbonylated plasma proteins as potential biomarkers of obesity induced type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Bollineni, Ravi Chand; Fedorova, Maria; Blüher, Matthias; Hoffmann, Ralf

    2014-11-07

    Protein carbonylation is a common nonenzymatic oxidative post-translational modification, which is often considered as biomarker of oxidative stress. Recent evidence links protein carbonylation also to obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), though the protein targets of carbonylation in human plasma have not been identified. In this study, we profiled carbonylated proteins in plasma samples obtained from lean individuals and obese patients with or without T2DM. The plasma samples were digested with trypsin, carbonyl groups were derivatized with O-(biotinylcarbazoylmethyl)hydroxylamine, enriched by avidin affinity chromatography, and analyzed by RPC-MS/MS. Signals of potentially modified peptides were targeted in a second LC-MS/MS analysis to retrieve the peptide sequence and the modified residues. A total of 158 unique carbonylated proteins were identified, of which 52 were detected in plasma samples of all three groups. Interestingly, 36 carbonylated proteins were detected only in obese patients with T2DM, whereas 18 were detected in both nondiabetic groups. The carbonylated proteins originated mostly from liver, plasma, platelet, and endothelium. Functionally, they were mainly involved in cell adhesion, signaling, angiogenesis, and cytoskeletal remodeling. Among the identified carbonylated proteins were several candidates, such as VEGFR-2, MMP-1, argin, MKK4, and compliment C5, already connected before to diabetes, obesity and metabolic diseases.

  16. High-field plasma acceleration in a high-ionization-potential gas

    PubMed Central

    Corde, S.; Adli, E.; Allen, J. M.; An, W.; Clarke, C. I.; Clausse, B.; Clayton, C. E.; Delahaye, J. P.; Frederico, J.; Gessner, S.; Green, S. Z.; Hogan, M. J.; Joshi, C.; Litos, M.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K. A.; Mori, W. B.; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N.; Walz, D.; Yakimenko, V.

    2016-01-01

    Plasma accelerators driven by particle beams are a very promising future accelerator technology as they can sustain high accelerating fields over long distances with high energy efficiency. They rely on the excitation of a plasma wave in the wake of a drive beam. To generate the plasma, a neutral gas can be field-ionized by the head of the drive beam, in which case the distance of acceleration and energy gain can be strongly limited by head erosion. Here we overcome this limit and demonstrate that electrons in the tail of a drive beam can be accelerated by up to 27 GeV in a high-ionization-potential gas (argon), boosting their initial 20.35 GeV energy by 130%. Particle-in-cell simulations show that the argon plasma is sustaining very high electric fields, of ∼150 GV m−1, over ∼20 cm. The results open new possibilities for the design of particle beam drivers and plasma sources. PMID:27312720

  17. Worst case earth charging environment. [geosynchronous plasma environment in sunlight for predicting spacecraft potential in eclipse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deutsch, M.-J. C.

    1982-01-01

    The Applications Technology Satellite-6 (ATS-6) geosynchronous satellite charged up to -2200 V in sunlight on day 178, 1974. This event, being the highest known spacecraft charging event in sunlight, is used to estimate a worst case geosynchronous plasma environment for predicting the spacecraft potential in eclipse. The advantage of using this sunlight spectrum as opposed to an eclipse case is that the ion and electron fluxes to the detectors are shifted only slightly due to the spacecraft potential. After correcting the available data for satellite potential and missing data above 81 KeV, it is found that the plasma can be characterized by a single Maxwellian approximation having an electron density of 1.22/cu cm, electron temperature of 16 KeV, hydrogen ion density of 0.24/cu cm, and hydrogen ion temperature of 29 KeV. In eclipse the spacecraft would have charged up to -28 kV, the highest estimated potential to date in the earth's plasma environment.

  18. Characterization of plasma thiol redox potential in a common marmoset model of aging.

    PubMed

    Roede, James R; Uppal, Karan; Liang, Yongliang; Promislow, Daniel E L; Wachtman, Lynn M; Jones, Dean P

    2013-01-01

    Due to its short lifespan, ease of use and age-related pathologies that mirror those observed in humans, the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) is poised to become a standard nonhuman primate model of aging. Blood and extracellular fluid possess two major thiol-dependent redox nodes involving cysteine (Cys), cystine (CySS), glutathione (GSH) and glutathione disulfide (GSSG). Alteration in these plasma redox nodes significantly affects cellular physiology, and oxidation of the plasma Cys/CySS redox potential (E hCySS) is associated with aging and disease risk in humans. The purpose of this study was to determine age-related changes in plasma redox metabolites and corresponding redox potentials (E h) to further validate the marmoset as a nonhuman primate model of aging. We measured plasma thiol redox states in marmosets and used existing human data with multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS) to model the relationships between age and redox metabolites. A classification accuracy of 70.2% and an AUC of 0.703 were achieved using the MARS model built from the marmoset redox data to classify the human samples as young or old. These results show that common marmosets provide a useful model for thiol redox biology of aging.

  19. Capacitive probing of plasma and surface potentials in a magnetically enhanced rf discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savas, S. E.; Donohoe, K. G.

    1989-07-01

    A capacitive probe is used in a magnetically enhanced rf discharge to measure spatial and parametric dependences of the amplitude of the rf fundamental of the plasma and electrode potentials. The probe has a metal `paddle tip that can be either immersed in the plasma or positioned flat on the exposed surface. The magnetically enhanced discharge uses capacitive coupled power at 13.56 MHz in the range of 1 M/cm2 to 3 W/cm2; N2 pressure in the range between 10 mTorr and 125 mTorr, and magnetic field up to 100 Gauss. The rf amplitude of the plasma potential is found to have a large gradient within the electrode sheath (≳1000 V/cm) and small variation (<10 V/cm) in the glow region. The variation along B in the glow is found to be much smaller than that perpendicular to B. The magnitude of the gradient perpendiular to B increases with both gas pressure and magnetic field strength, consistent with our simple plasma current model.

  20. On the phase shift between electric potential and plasma density fluctuations in the edge turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Shchepetov, S. V. Kholnov, Yu. V.; Vasil'kov, D. G.

    2013-02-15

    In some cases, the phase shift between fluctuations of the electric potential and plasma density helps to identify the instability that governs the turbulent state. In this paper, the basic experimental and theoretical results that denote the possibility (or impossibility) of such identification are briefly discussed. The experimental data based on measurements of the phase shift between the floating potential and ion saturation current fluctuations in the L-2M stellarator-a system with externally imposed magnetic surfaces-are presented (Shchepetov, Kholnov, Fedyanin, et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 50, 045001 (2008)). It is shown that the observed phase shift {Omega} varies in a wide range from {pi} to 0, gradually decreasing with deepening inside the plasma. A number of arguments are presented suggesting that {Omega} Almost-Equal-To {pi} can indicate that the process is nonlocal, i.e., oscillations at a given spatial point are driven and mainly determined by the processes localized outside of the observation point. We note that, within the framework of the magnetohydrodynamic theory, plasma was definitely unstable with respect to resistive interchange modes in all cases under study. It is demonstrated experimentally that the widespread notion that the phase shift {Omega} Almost-Equal-To {pi}/2 is characteristic of only resistive interchange modes is hardly universal. The experimental results are analyzed on the basis of analytical estimates.

  1. A comparison of inflection point and floating point emissive probe techniques for electric potential measurements in a Hall thruster plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehan, J. P.; Raitses, Yevgeny; Hershkowitz, Noah; Fisch, Nathaniel

    2010-11-01

    Theory suggests that when increasing the electron emission of an emissive probe the floating potential will saturate ˜Te/e below the plasma potential. This can introduce significant errors in plasma potential measurements in Hall thrusters where Te> 10 eV. The method of determining the plasma potential from the inflection point of emissive IV traces in the limit of zero emission may give a more accurate measurement of the plasma potential. The two methods are compared in a Hall thruster where ne˜10^11 cm-3, Te˜20 eV, and ion flows are significant. The results can be generalized to other types of plasmas.

  2. Plasma sphingolipids: potential biomarkers for severe hepatic fibrosis in chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun-Feng; Qu, Feng; Zheng, Su-Jun; Ren, Feng; Wu, Hui-Li; Liu, Mei; Ren, Jin-Yu; Chen, Yu; Duan, Zhong-Ping; Zhang, Jin-Lan

    2015-07-01

    The plasma profile of sphingolipids in hepatic fibrosis patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC) is rarely considered at present. The association between plasma sphingolipids and severe fibrosis in CHC remains an obscure area of research. The aim of the present study was to assess the plasma profile of sphingolipids and to examine the association between plasma sphingolipids and severe fibrosis in CHC, in order to identify potential novel markers of severe fibrosis in CHC. A cohort of 120 treatment-naïve patients with CHC were included in the present study. Liver biopsies were performed and routine serological indicators were measured. Plasma sphingolipids were detected using high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. A total of 44 plasma sphingolipids were detected. Plasma hexosylceramide (HexCer; d18:1/12:0), HexCer (d18:1/16:0) and HexCer (d18:1/22:0) were shown to be significantly different in patients with CHC between those with and without severe fibrosis (Metavir F ≥ 3; P < 0.05). HexCer (d18:1/12:0) was observed to be closely associated with severe fibrosis in CHC [odds ratio (OR)=1.03] following adjustment for confounding variables in a multivariate analysis. HexCer (d18:1/12:0) had diagnostic value for severe fibrosis in CHC [area under the curve (AUC)=0.69]. In patients with CHC who had developed significant fibrosis (Metavir F ≥ 2), HexCer (d18:1/12:0) remained closely associated with severe fibrosis (OR=1.08) in this subgroup. In addition, HexCer (d18:1/12:0) had sufficient diagnostic ability (AUC=0.73) to distinguish severe fibrosis in patients with CHC with significant fibrosis. In conclusion, the present study indicated that plasma HexCer (d18:1/12:0) exhibits a close correlation with severe hepatic fibrosis in CHC, particularly in patients who have significant fibrosis. Additionally, HexCer (d18:1/12:0) may be a potential marker of severe hepatic fibrosis in CHC.

  3. Dust charging effects on test charge potential in a multi-ion dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, S.

    2009-11-01

    The Debye-Hückel and oscillatory wake potentials caused by a test charge are studied in a multi-ion dusty plasma, whose constituents are the Boltzmann distributed electrons and light positive ions, the heavy mobile negative ions, and static but charge fluctuating dust particles. For this purpose, fluid equations are employed to obtain the dielectric constant of the dust-negative-ion acoustic wave involving the negative ions and dust charge fluctuation effects. Theoretical and numerical investigations have revealed the modification in the Debye-Hückel and wake potentials due to the effects of dust relaxation rate, dust absorption frequency, dust grain radius, and negative ion temperature. The present results should be important to form new materials in the presence of negative ions in laboratory as well as dust coagulation/agglomeration in space dusty plasmas.

  4. Effect of source tuning parameters on the plasma potential of heavy ions in the 18 GHz high temperature superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, G; Baskaran, R; Kukrety, S; Mathur, Y; Kumar, Sarvesh; Mandal, A; Kanjilal, D; Roy, A

    2012-03-01

    Plasma potentials for various heavy ions have been measured using the retarding field technique in the 18 GHz high temperature superconducting ECR ion source, PKDELIS [C. Bieth, S. Kantas, P. Sortais, D. Kanjilal, G. Rodrigues, S. Milward, S. Harrison, and R. McMahon, Nucl. Instrum. Methods B 235, 498 (2005); D. Kanjilal, G. Rodrigues, P. Kumar, A. Mandal, A. Roy, C. Bieth, S. Kantas, and P. Sortais, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 77, 03A317 (2006)]. The ion beam extracted from the source is decelerated close to the location of a mesh which is polarized to the source potential and beams having different plasma potentials are measured on a Faraday cup located downstream of the mesh. The influence of various source parameters, viz., RF power, gas pressure, magnetic field, negative dc bias, and gas mixing on the plasma potential is studied. The study helped to find an upper limit of the energy spread of the heavy ions, which can influence the design of the longitudinal optics of the high current injector being developed at the Inter University Accelerator Centre. It is observed that the plasma potentials are decreasing for increasing charge states and a mass effect is clearly observed for the ions with similar operating gas pressures. In the case of gas mixing, it is observed that the plasma potential minimizes at an optimum value of the gas pressure of the mixing gas and the mean charge state maximizes at this value. Details of the measurements carried out as a function of various source parameters and its impact on the longitudinal optics are presented.

  5. Effect of source tuning parameters on the plasma potential of heavy ions in the 18 GHz high temperature superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, G.; Baskaran, R.; Kukrety, S.; Mathur, Y.; Kumar, Sarvesh; Mandal, A.; Kanjilal, D.; Roy, A.

    2012-03-01

    Plasma potentials for various heavy ions have been measured using the retarding field technique in the 18 GHz high temperature superconducting ECR ion source, PKDELIS [C. Bieth, S. Kantas, P. Sortais, D. Kanjilal, G. Rodrigues, S. Milward, S. Harrison, and R. McMahon, Nucl. Instrum. Methods B 235, 498 (2005), 10.1016/j.nimb.2005.03.232; D. Kanjilal, G. Rodrigues, P. Kumar, A. Mandal, A. Roy, C. Bieth, S. Kantas, and P. Sortais, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 77, 03A317 (2006), 10.1063/1.2164887]. The ion beam extracted from the source is decelerated close to the location of a mesh which is polarized to the source potential and beams having different plasma potentials are measured on a Faraday cup located downstream of the mesh. The influence of various source parameters, viz., RF power, gas pressure, magnetic field, negative dc bias, and gas mixing on the plasma potential is studied. The study helped to find an upper limit of the energy spread of the heavy ions, which can influence the design of the longitudinal optics of the high current injector being developed at the Inter University Accelerator Centre. It is observed that the plasma potentials are decreasing for increasing charge states and a mass effect is clearly observed for the ions with similar operating gas pressures. In the case of gas mixing, it is observed that the plasma potential minimizes at an optimum value of the gas pressure of the mixing gas and the mean charge state maximizes at this value. Details of the measurements carried out as a function of various source parameters and its impact on the longitudinal optics are presented.

  6. Effect of source tuning parameters on the plasma potential of heavy ions in the 18 GHz high temperature superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, G.; Mathur, Y.; Kumar, Sarvesh; Mandal, A.; Kanjilal, D.; Roy, A.; Baskaran, R.; Kukrety, S.

    2012-03-15

    Plasma potentials for various heavy ions have been measured using the retarding field technique in the 18 GHz high temperature superconducting ECR ion source, PKDELIS [C. Bieth, S. Kantas, P. Sortais, D. Kanjilal, G. Rodrigues, S. Milward, S. Harrison, and R. McMahon, Nucl. Instrum. Methods B 235, 498 (2005); D. Kanjilal, G. Rodrigues, P. Kumar, A. Mandal, A. Roy, C. Bieth, S. Kantas, and P. Sortais, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 77, 03A317 (2006)]. The ion beam extracted from the source is decelerated close to the location of a mesh which is polarized to the source potential and beams having different plasma potentials are measured on a Faraday cup located downstream of the mesh. The influence of various source parameters, viz., RF power, gas pressure, magnetic field, negative dc bias, and gas mixing on the plasma potential is studied. The study helped to find an upper limit of the energy spread of the heavy ions, which can influence the design of the longitudinal optics of the high current injector being developed at the Inter University Accelerator Centre. It is observed that the plasma potentials are decreasing for increasing charge states and a mass effect is clearly observed for the ions with similar operating gas pressures. In the case of gas mixing, it is observed that the plasma potential minimizes at an optimum value of the gas pressure of the mixing gas and the mean charge state maximizes at this value. Details of the measurements carried out as a function of various source parameters and its impact on the longitudinal optics are presented.

  7. Modified Jeans instability in Lorentzian dusty self-gravitating plasmas with Lennard-Jones potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Y. Z.; Chen, H.; Liu, S. Q.

    2014-11-01

    The Jeans instability in self-gravitating plasma with Kappa distributed dust grains is investigated basing on assumption that the mutual interaction among dust grains is governed by Lennard-Jones potential. It is shown that the presence of additional suprathermal particles has significant effects on the range of unstable modes and growth rate of Jeans instability. Compared with Maxwellian scenario, suprathermality stabilized the Jeans instability.

  8. Modified Jeans instability in Lorentzian dusty self-gravitating plasmas with Lennard-Jones potential

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Y. Z. Chen, H. Liu, S. Q.

    2014-11-15

    The Jeans instability in self-gravitating plasma with Kappa distributed dust grains is investigated basing on assumption that the mutual interaction among dust grains is governed by Lennard-Jones potential. It is shown that the presence of additional suprathermal particles has significant effects on the range of unstable modes and growth rate of Jeans instability. Compared with Maxwellian scenario, suprathermality stabilized the Jeans instability.

  9. The investigation of quark-antiquark potential in a plasma with hyperscaling violation background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahery, S.; Sadeghi, J.

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we investigate the imaginary part of the potential for a moving quarkonia in plasma. In order to verify the validity of the imaginary part of the potential we employ a hyperscaling violation (HSV) metric background. In a quantum chromodynamics (QCD) system the imaginary part of the potential shows decay behaviour and the corresponding potential should be negative. The corresponding potential always appears in QCD as an exponential function. We find general constraints for Im{V}Q\\bar{Q} at the near horizon limit and apply them for some known cases. Finally, we find the suitable spatial dimensions d,z and θ, and also rapidity η for two interesting cases. Our calculation with the anti-de Sitter/conformal field theory guarantees the dynamical parameter as θ in an HSV metric background. We also present the HSV metric in this context very close to the Yang-Mills theory with finite temperature.

  10. Plasma and synovial fluid microRNAs as potential biomarkers of rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    distinct patterns from synovial fluid miRNAs, which appeared to originate from synovial tissue. Plasma miR-132 well differentiated HCs from patients with RA or OA, while synovial fluid miRNAs differentiated RA and OA. Furthermore, plasma miRNAs correlated with the disease activities of RA. Thus, synovial fluid and plasma miRNAs have potential as diagnostic biomarkers for RA and OA and as a tool for the analysis of their pathogenesis. PMID:20470394

  11. Heavy ion beam probing—diagnostics to study potential and turbulence in toroidal plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnikov, A. V.; Krupnik, L. I.; Eliseev, L. G.; Barcala, J. M.; Bravo, A.; Chmyga, A. A.; Deshko, G. N.; Drabinskij, M. A.; Hidalgo, C.; Khabanov, P. O.; Khrebtov, S. M.; Kharchev, N. K.; Komarov, A. D.; Kozachek, A. S.; Lopez, J.; Lysenko, S. E.; Martin, G.; Molinero, A.; de Pablos, J. L.; Soleto, A.; Ufimtsev, M. V.; Zenin, V. N.; Zhezhera, A. I.; T-10 Team; TJ-II Team

    2017-07-01

    Heavy ion beam probing (HIBP) is a unique diagnostics to study the core plasma potential and turbulence. Advanced HIBPs operate in the T-10 tokamak and TJ-II flexible heliac with fine focused (<1 cm) and intense (100 µA) beams. They provide measurements in the wide density interval {{\\overline{n}}\\text{e}}   =  (0.3-5)  ×  1019 m-3, in a wide range of Ohmic and electron cyclotron resonance heated (ECRH) discharges with various currents at T-10, and in the wide range of magnetic configurations with ECR and neutral beam injection (NBI) heating at TJ-II. Time evolution of the radial profiles and/or local values of plasma parameters from high field side (HFS) to low field side (LFS), -1  <  ρ  <  1, is observed in TJ-II by 125 keV Cs+ ions in a single shot, while LFS (+0.2  <  ρ  <  1) is observed in T-10 by 300 keV Tl+ ions. Multi-slit energy analyzers provide simultaneously data on the plasma potential φ (by the beam extra energy), plasma density n e (by the beam current), poloidal magnetic field B pol (by the beam toroidal shift), poloidal electric filed E pol that allows one to derive the electrostatic turbulent particle flux ΓE×B. The cross-phase of density oscillations produces the phase velocity of their poloidal propagation or rotation; also it gives the poloidal mode number. Dual HIBP, consisting of two identical HIBPs located ¼ torus apart provide the long-range correlations of core plasma parameters. Low-noise high-gain electronics allows us to study broadband turbulence and quasi-coherent modes like geodesic acoustic modes and Alfvén eigenmodes.

  12. FCCP depolarizes plasma membrane potential by activating proton and Na+ currents in bovine aortic endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyu-Sang; Jo, Inho; Pak, Kim; Bae, Sung-Won; Rhim, Hyewhon; Suh, Suk-Hyo; Park, Jin; Zhu, Hong; So, Insuk; Kim, Ki Whan

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the effects of carbonylcyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP), a protonophore and uncoupler of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria, on plasma membrane potential and ionic currents in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs). The membrane potential and ionic currents of BAECs were recorded using the patch-clamp technique in current-clamp and voltage-clamp modes, respectively. FCCP activated ionic currents and depolarized the plasma membrane potential in a dose-dependent manner. Neither the removal of extracellular Ca2+ nor pretreatment with BAPTA/AM affected the FCCP-induced currents, implying that the currents are not associated with the FCCP-induced intracellular [Ca2+]i increase. FCCP-induced currents were significantly influenced by the changes in extracellular or intracellular pH; the increased proton gradient produced by lowering the extracellular pH or intracellular alkalinization augmented the changes in membrane potential and ionic currents caused by FCCP. FCCP-induced currents were significantly reduced under extracellular Na+-free conditions. The reversal potentials of FCCP-induced currents under Na+-free conditions were well fitted to the calculated equilibrium potential for protons. Interestingly, FCCP-induced Na+ transport (subtracted currents, I(control)- I(Na+-free) was closely dependent on extracellular pH, whereas FCCP-induced H+transport was not significantly affected by the absence of Na+. These results suggest that the FCCP-induced ionic currents and depolarization, which are strongly dependent on the plasmalemmal proton gradient, are likely to be mediated by both H+ and Na+ currents across the plasma membrane. The relationship between H+ and Na+ transport still needs to be determined.

  13. Debye mass and heavy quark potential in a PNJL quark plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowski, J. Blaschke, D.

    2012-07-15

    We calculate the Debye mass for the screening of the heavy quark potential in a plasma of massless quarks coupled to the temporal gluon background governed by the Polyakov loop potential within the PNJL model in RPA approximation. We give a physical motivation for a recent phenomenological fit of lattice data by applying the calculated Debye mass with its suppression in the confined phase due to the Polyakov loop to a description of the temperature dependence of the singlet free energy for QCD with a heavy quark pair at infinite separation. We compare the result to lattice data.

  14. Plasma gelsolin and matrix metalloproteinase 3 as potential biomarkers for Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Peng, Mao; Jia, Jianping; Qin, Wei

    2015-05-19

    Gelsolin (GSN) levels and matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP3) activity have been found to be altered in the plasma in patients with Alzheimer disease (AD). The aim of this study was to determine whether a combination of these proteins with clinical data is specific and sensitive enough for AD diagnosis. In 113 non-demented controls and 113 patients with probable AD, the plasma GSN levels were determined using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and the plasma MMP3 activity was determined using casein zymography. Logistic regression and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis were used to determine the diagnostic accuracy of these proteins combined with clinical data. Compared with the controls, the AD patients had significantly lower GSN levels and significantly higher MMP3 activity. Moreover, both the GSN level and MMP3 activity were significantly correlated with the MMSE scores. In AD patients, the GSN level was negatively correlated with MMP3 activity. ROC curve analysis showed that the specificity and sensitivity were 77% and 75.2%, respectively, for the combination of the following candidate biomarkers: GSN level/the total amount of Aβ42 and Aβ40, plasma MMP3 activity and clinical data. With its relatively high sensitivity and specificity, this combined biomarker panel may have potential for the screening of AD patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Pseudo-Potentials in Dense and He-like Hot temperature Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deutsch, Claude; Rahal, Hamid

    2012-10-01

    Extending our former derivations in dense and high temperature plasmas of hydrogenic effective interactions mimiking the Heisenberg uncertainty principle [1,2], we worked out in a canonical ensemble, effective interactions in He-like plasmas where an orbital 1s electron remains strongly tighted to the He-like ions. The plasma electrons are then taken into account through appropriate Slater sums obtained in the most economical hydrogenic extension of the He-like bound and scattered states with angular orbital momentum l<3. Ground states are described by a multi-parametric HF approximation [3]. We thus obtain Diffraction-corrected electron-ion pseudo-potentials taking into account of a polarizable and nonpointlike ion core. Very large enhancements and discrepancies are obtained when they are contrasted to their H-like homologs with ion charge Z=2,10 and 92. These results are of obvious significance for He-like warm dense matter plasmas.Ionization is also considered.[4pt] [1] C. Deutsch, Phys. Lett. A60, 317 (1977)[4pt] [2] C. Deutsch, Y. Furutani and M.M. Gombert, Phys. Rep. 69,86 (1981)[0pt] [3] E. Clementi and C. Roetti, Atomic Data and Nucl. Data Tables, 14,177(1974)

  16. A study of the transient plasma potential in a pulsed bi-polar dc magnetron discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, J. W.; Karkari, S. K.; Vetushka, A.

    2004-05-01

    The temporal evolution of the plasma potential, Vp, in a pulsed dc magnetron plasma has been determined using the emissive probe technique. The discharge was operated in the 'asymmetric bi-polar' mode, in which the discharge voltage changes polarity during part of the pulse cycle. The probe measurements, with a time-resolution of 20 ns or better, were made along a line above the racetrack, normal to the plane of the cathode target, for a fixed frequency (100 kHz), duty cycle (50%), argon pressure (0.74 Pa) and discharge power (583 W). At all the measured positions, Vp was found to respond to the large and rapid changes in the cathode voltage, Vd, during the different phases of the pulse cycle, with Vp always more positive than Vd. At a typical substrate position (>80 mm from the target), Vp remains a few volts above the most positive surface in the discharge at all times. In the 'on' phase of the pulse, the measurements show a significant axial electric field is generated in the plasma, with the plasma potential dropping by a total of about 30 V over a distance of 70 mm, from the bulk plasma to a position close to the beginning of the cathode fall. This is consistent with measurements made in the dc magnetron. During the stable 'reverse' phase of the discharge, for distances greater than 18 mm from the target, the axial electric field is found to collapse, with Vp elevated uniformly to about 3 V above Vd. Between the target and this field-free region an ion sheath forms, and the current flowing to the target is still an ion current in this 'reverse' period. During the initial 200 ns of the voltage 'overshoot' phase (between 'on' and 'reverse' phases), Vd reached a potential of +290 V; however, close to the target, Vp was found to attain a much higher value, namely +378 V. Along the line of measurement, the axial electric field reverses in direction in this phase, and an electron current of up to 9 A flows to the target. The spatial and temporal measurements of Vp

  17. Detailed Analysis of the Binding Mode of Vanilloids to Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid Type I (TRPV1) by a Mutational and Computational Study

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Yoshikazu; Ogawa, Kazuo; Warabi, Eiji; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Hirokawa, Takatsugu

    2016-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) is a non-selective cation channel and a multimodal sensor protein. Since the precise structure of TRPV1 was obtained by electron cryo-microscopy, the binding mode of representative agonists such as capsaicin and resiniferatoxin (RTX) has been extensively characterized; however, detailed information on the binding mode of other vanilloids remains lacking. In this study, mutational analysis of human TRPV1 was performed, and four agonists (capsaicin, RTX, [6]-shogaol and [6]-gingerol) were used to identify amino acid residues involved in ligand binding and/or modulation of proton sensitivity. The detailed binding mode of each ligand was then simulated by computational analysis. As a result, three amino acids (L518, F591 and L670) were newly identified as being involved in ligand binding and/or modulation of proton sensitivity. In addition, in silico docking simulation and a subsequent mutational study suggested that [6]-gingerol might bind to and activate TRPV1 in a unique manner. These results provide novel insights into the binding mode of various vanilloids to the channel and will be helpful in developing a TRPV1 modulator. PMID:27606946

  18. Plasma palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) as a potential biomarker for impaired coronary function.

    PubMed

    Quercioli, Alessandra; Carbone, Federico; Bonaventura, Aldo; Liberale, Luca; Pataky, Zoltan; Thomas, Aurélien; Lenglet, Sébastien; Lauer, Estelle; Golay, Alain; Dallegri, Franco; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Schindler, Thomas H; Montecucco, Fabrizio

    2017-03-15

    Among endocannabinoid (EC)-related mediators, Oleoyl-ethanolamide (OEA) and Palmitoyl-ethanolamide (PEA), two endogenous PPARα agonists with lipolytic and anti-inflammatory action, respectively, are being actively investigated. Here, we assessed the potential association between plasma levels of PEA and OEA and coronary function in a cohort including normal, overweight, obese, and morbidly obese (MOB) individuals. Myocardial perfusion and endothelium-related myocardial blood flow (MBF) responses to cold pressor test (CPT) and during pharmacological vasodilation with dipyridamole were measured with (13)N-ammonia positron emission tomography/computed tomography. OEA and PEA were extracted from human plasma by liquid-liquid extraction, separated by liquid chromatography and quantified by mass spectrometry. Serum levels of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) were measured by colorimetric enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Circulating levels of PEA and VCAM-1 were increased in MOB as compared to normal weight subjects. Circulating levels of OEA and PEA were associated with body mass index, but not with adhesion molecules. Increases of PEA levels were associated with and predictive of worsened coronary function in MOB and the overall cohort studied. Plasma levels of PEA are increased in MOB patients and associated with coronary dysfunction as a functional precursor of CAD process. Larger trials are needed to confirm PEA as a potential circulating biomarker of coronary dysfunction in both MOB patients and the general population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Two Dimensional LIF Measurements and Potential Structure of Ion Beam Formation in an Argon Helicon Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre, Evan; Scime, Earl; Good, Timothy

    2016-10-01

    We report 2-dimensional, spatially resolved observations of ion beam formation in an expanding helicon plasma. Previous studies found that a current free double layer (CFDL) spontaneously arises at low pressure, below 1 mT. We use Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF), a non-perturbative diagnostic to measure the ion velocity distribution functions (IVDFs) of argon ions both parallel and perpendicular to the background magnetic field. We report ion beam formation as a function of the expansion chamber magnetic field (0-108 G). The ion beam appears peaked in the center of the expansion chamber and decays over a few centimeters radially. We also report the potential structure of the plasma obtained with a planar Langmuir probe. To obtain meaningful Langmuir probe measurements, averages of tens of current-voltage are needed to reduce the effects of large electrostatic fluctuations that arise in plasmas that generate ion beams. We report the dependence of density, electron temperature, and floating potential on radial and axial position in the expansion plume. NSF Award PHYS-1360278.

  20. Electron cooling and finite potential drop in a magnetized plasma expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Sanchez, M.; Navarro-Cavallé, J.; Ahedo, E.

    2015-05-15

    The steady, collisionless, slender flow of a magnetized plasma into a surrounding vacuum is considered. The ion component is modeled as mono-energetic, while electrons are assumed Maxwellian upstream. The magnetic field has a convergent-divergent geometry, and attention is restricted to its paraxial region, so that 2D and drift effects are ignored. By using the conservation of energy and magnetic moment of particles and the quasi-neutrality condition, the ambipolar electric field and the distribution functions of both species are calculated self-consistently, paying attention to the existence of effective potential barriers associated to magnetic mirroring. The solution is used to find the total potential drop for a set of upstream conditions, plus the axial evolution of various moments of interest (density, temperatures, and heat fluxes). The results illuminate the behavior of magnetic nozzles, plasma jets, and other configurations of interest, showing, in particular, in the divergent plasma the collisionless cooling of electrons, and the generation of collisionless electron heat fluxes.

  1. Glycine: A potential coupling agent to bond to helium plasma treated PEEK?

    PubMed

    Schmidlin, Patrick R; Eichberger, Marlis; Stawarczyk, Bogna

    2016-02-01

    To test the tensile bond strength (TBS) between two self-adhesive resin composite cements and PEEK after helium plasma treatment and used glycine as a potential coupling agent incorporated in different adhesives. In summary, 896 air-abraded PEEK specimens were fabricated. Half of the specimens were treated with cold active inert helium plasma and the other half were left non-treated. Both groups were then split in two groups: In group 1 (n=256), 64 specimens were pre-treated with: (a) soft-liner liquid, (b) visio.link, (c) Ambarino P60 and (d) no pre-treatment (control), respectively. In group 2 (n=192), specimens were conditioned accordingly, but the adhesive materials were modified by including a commercially available glycine (Air-Flow PERIO). PEEK specimens were then luted using either RelyX Unicem or Clearfil SA Cement and TBS was measured initially and after 14 days water storage combined with 10'000 thermal cycles (16 specimens/subgroup). Fracture type analysis was performed. For statistical analyses Kolmogorov-Smirnov, Shapiro-Wilk tests, 1-, 4-way ANOVA (post hoc: Scheffé), and t-test were used (p<0.001). Helium plasma pre-treatment without glycine showed no impact on initial TBS (p>0.348). In contrast, a combination between glycine application and Softline/Ambarino P60 allowed for significantly higher initial TBS was measured after helium plasma treatment (p=0.001). However, this effect was no evident after thermo-cycling. All groups conditioned with visio.link showed the highest TBS values. The introduction of amine groups by simple provision of amino acids in the form of glycine can improve the bond strength after helium plasma treatment using different adhesive materials. However, using this simple approach, the method cannot withstand thermal challenge yet. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Potential Biomarkers of Fatigue Identified by Plasma Metabolome Analysis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kume, Satoshi; Yamato, Masanori; Tamura, Yasuhisa; Jin, Guanghua; Nakano, Masayuki; Miyashige, Yukiharu; Eguchi, Asami; Ogata, Yoshiyuki; Goda, Nobuhito; Iwai, Kazuhiro; Yamano, Emi; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Kataoka, Yosky

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, prior to the establishment of a method for the clinical diagnosis of chronic fatigue in humans, we validated the utility of plasma metabolomic analysis in a rat model of fatigue using capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry (CE-MS). In order to obtain a fatigued animal group, rats were placed in a cage filled with water to a height of 2.2 cm for 5 days. A food-restricted group, in which rats were limited to 10 g/d of food (around 50% of the control group), was also assessed. The food-restricted group exhibited weight reduction similar to that of the fatigued group. CE-MS measurements were performed to evaluate the profile of food intake-dependent metabolic changes, as well as the profile in fatigue loading, resulting in the identification of 48 metabolites in plasma. Multivariate analyses using hierarchical clustering and principal component analysis revealed that the plasma metabolome in the fatigued group showed clear differences from those in the control and food-restricted groups. In the fatigued group, we found distinctive changes in metabolites related to branched-chain amino acid metabolism, urea cycle, and proline metabolism. Specifically, the fatigued group exhibited significant increases in valine, leucine, isoleucine, and 2-oxoisopentanoate, and significant decreases in citrulline and hydroxyproline compared with the control and food-restricted groups. Plasma levels of total nitric oxide were increased in the fatigued group, indicating systemic oxidative stress. Further, plasma metabolites involved in the citrate cycle, such as cis-aconitate and isocitrate, were reduced in the fatigued group. The levels of ATP were significantly decreased in the liver and skeletal muscle, indicative of a deterioration in energy metabolism in these organs. Thus, this comprehensive metabolic analysis furthered our understanding of the pathophysiology of fatigue, and identified potential diagnostic biomarkers based on fatigue pathophysiology. PMID

  3. Identification of a Plasma Four-microRNA Panel as Potential Noninvasive Biomarker for Osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Kewei; Wu, Liwen

    2015-01-01

    Background Circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) are emerging as promising biomarkers for human cancer. Osteosarcoma is the most common human primary malignant bone tumor in children and young adults. The objective of this study was to investigate whether circulating miRNAs in plasma could be a useful biomarker for detecting osteosarcoma and monitoring tumor removal dynamics. Methods Plasma samples were obtained from 90 patients before surgery, 50 patients after one month of surgery, and 90 healthy individuals. The study was divided into three steps: First, initial screening of the profiles of circulating miRNAs in pooled plasma samples from healthy controls and pre-operative osteosarcoma patients using a TaqMan low density array (TLDA). Second, evaluation of miRNA concentration in individual plasma samples from 90 pre-operative osteosarcoma patients and 90 healthy controls by a quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) assay. Third, evaluation of miRNA concentration in paired plasma samples from 50 pre- and post-operative osteosarcoma patients by qRT-PCR assay. Results Four plasma miRNAs including miR-195-5p, miR-199a-3p, miR-320a, and miR-374a-5p were significantly increased in the osteosarcoma patients. Receiver operating characteristics curve analysis of the combined populations demonstrated that the four-miRNA signature could discriminate cases from controls with an area under the curve of 0.9608 (95% CI 0.9307-0.9912). These 4 miRNAs were markedly decreased in the plasma after operation. In addition, circulating miR-195-5p and miR-199a-3p were correlated with metastasis status, while miR-199a-3p and miR-320a were correlated with histological subtype. Conclusions Our data suggest that altered levels of circulating miRNAs might have great potential to serve as novel, non-invasive biomarkers for osteosarcoma. PMID:25775010

  4. Dietary Sulfur Amino Acid Effects on Fasting Plasma Cysteine/Cystine Redox Potential in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Dean P.; Park, Youngja; Gletsu-Miller, Nana; Liang, Yongliang; Yu, Tianwei; Accardi, Carolyn Jonas; Ziegler, Thomas R.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Oxidation of plasma cysteine/cystine (Cys/CySS) redox potential (EhCySS) has been associated with risk factors for cardiovascular disease in humans. Cys and CySS are derived from dietary sulfur amino acids (SAA), but the specific effects of SAA depletion and repletion on Cys/CySS redox indices are unknown. The present study examined the effect of dietary SAA intake level on free Cys, free CySS and EhCySS in human plasma under fasting conditions. Research Methods and Procedures Healthy individuals aged 18–36 y (n=13) were equilibrated to foods providing the RDA for SAA and then fed chemically defined diets without SAA (0 mg·kg−1·d−1; n=13) followed by SAA at levels approximating the mean (56 mg·kg−1·d−1; n=8) or 99th percentile (117 mg·kg−1·d−1; n=5) intake levels of Americans. Fasting plasma samples were collected daily during 4-d study periods and analyzed for free Cys, free CySS and the EhCySS. Results The SAA-free diet significantly (p<0.05) decreased plasma free Cys concentrations and oxidized EhCySS values after 4 days of SAA depletion. With SAA repletion at 56 mg·kg−1·d− 1, plasma free Cys increased significantly and values for EhCySS became more reducing. Administration of a diet providing a higher dose of SAA (117 mg·kg−1·d−1) resulted in a significantly higher level of free Cys and a more reducing EhCySS. Conclusions These results show that free Cys and Cys/CySS redox potential (EhCySS) in fasting plasma are affected by dietary SAA intake level in humans. Significant changes occur slowly over 4 days with insufficient SAA intake, but rapidly (after 1 day) with repletion. PMID:20471805

  5. Arsenic exposure, inflammation, and renal function in Bangladeshi adults: effect modification by plasma glutathione redox potential

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Brandilyn A.; Liu, Xinhua; Hall, Megan N.; Ilievski, Vesna; Slavkovich, Vesna; Siddique, Abu B.; Alam, Shafiul; Islam, Tariqul; Graziano, Joseph H.; Gamble, Mary V.

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to arsenic (As) in drinking water is a widespread public health problem leading to increased risk for multiple outcomes such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, and possibly renal disease; potential mechanisms include inflammation and oxidative stress. We tested the hypothesis that As exposure is associated with increased inflammation and decreased estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and examined whether the effects of As were modified by plasma glutathione (GSH), glutathione disulfide (GSSG), or the reduction potential of the GSSG/2GSH pair (EhGSH). In a cross-sectional study of N = 374 Bangladeshi adults having a wide range of As exposure, we measured markers of inflammation (plasma C-reactive protein (CRP), α-1 acid glycoprotein (AGP)), renal function (eGFR), GSH, and GSSG. In covariate-adjusted models, a 10% increase in water As, urinary As adjusted for specific gravity (uAs), or blood As (bAs) was associated with a 0.74% (p = 0.01), 0.90% (p = 0.16), and 1.39% (p = 0.07) increase in CRP, respectively; there was no association with AGP. A 10% increase in uAs or bAs was associated with an average reduction in eGFR of 0.16 (p = 0.12) and 0.21 ml/min/1.73 m2 (p = 0.08), respectively. In stratified analyses, the effect of As exposure on CRP was observed only in participants having EhGSH > median (uAs pWald = 0.03; bAs pWald = 0.05). This was primarily driven by stronger effects of As exposure on CRP in participants with lower plasma GSH. The effects of As exposure on eGFR were not modified significantly by EhGSH, GSH, or GSSG. These data suggest that participants having lower plasma GSH and a more oxidized plasma EhGSH are at increased risk for As-induced inflammation. Future studies should evaluate whether antioxidant treatment lowers plasma EhGSH and reduces risk for As-induced diseases. PMID:25916185

  6. Near Discharge Cathode Assembly Plasma Potential Measurements in a 30-cm NSTAR Type Ion Engine During Beam Extraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, Daniel A.; Gallimore, Alec D.

    2006-01-01

    Floating emissive probe plasma potential data are presented over a two-dimensional array of locations in the near Discharge Cathode Assembly (DCA) region of a 30-cm diameter ring-cusp ion thruster. Discharge plasma data are presented with beam extraction at throttling conditions comparable to the NASA TH Levels 8, 12, and 15. The operating conditions of the Extended Life Test (ELT) of the Deep Space One (DS1) flight spare ion engine, where anomalous discharge keeper erosion occurred, were TH 8 and TH 12 consequently they are of specific interest in investigating discharge keeper erosion phenomena. The data do not validate the presence of a potential hill plasma structure downstream of the DCA, which has been proposed as a possible erosion mechanism. The data are comparable in magnitude to data taken by other researchers in ring-cusp electron-bombardment ion thrusters. The plasma potential structures are insensitive to thruster throttling level with a minimum as low as 14 V measured at the DCA exit plane and increasing gradually in the axial direction. A sharp increase in plasma potential to the bulk discharge value of 26 to 28 volts, roughly 10 mm radially from DCA centerline, was observed. Plasma potential measurements indicate a low-potential plume structure that is roughly 20 mm in diameter emanating from the discharge cathode that may be attributed to a free-standing plasma double layer.

  7. Plasma potential of a moving ionization zone in DC magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panjan, Matjaž; Anders, André

    2017-02-01

    Using movable emissive and floating probes, we determined the plasma and floating potentials of an ionization zone (spoke) in a direct current magnetron sputtering discharge. Measurements were recorded in a space and time resolved manner, which allowed us to make a three-dimensional representation of the plasma potential. From this information we could derive the related electric field, space charge, and the related spatial distribution of electron heating. The data reveal the existence of strong electric fields parallel and perpendicular to the target surface. The largest E-fields result from a double layer structure at the leading edge of the ionization zone. We suggest that the double layer plays a crucial role in the energization of electrons since electrons can gain several 10 eV of energy when crossing the double layer. We find sustained coupling between the potential structure, electron heating, and excitation and ionization processes as electrons drift over the magnetron target. The brightest region of an ionization zone is present right after the potential jump, where drifting electrons arrive and where most local electron heating occurs. The ionization zone intensity decays as electrons continue to drift in the Ez × B direction, losing energy by inelastic collisions; electrons become energized again as they cross the potential jump. This results in the elongated, arrowhead-like shape of the ionization zone. The ionization zone moves in the -Ez × B direction from which the to-be-heated electrons arrive and into which the heating region expands; the zone motion is dictated by the force of the local electric field on the ions at the leading edge of the ionization zone. We hypothesize that electron heating caused by the potential jump and physical processes associated with the double layer also apply to magnetrons at higher discharge power, including high power impulse magnetron sputtering.

  8. Characteristics of the NASA Lewis bumpy torus plasma generated with high positive or negative applied potentials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, J. R.; Gerdin, G. A.

    1976-01-01

    The toroidal ring of plasma contained in the NASA Lewis bumpy-torus superconducting magnet facility may be biased to positive or negative potentials approaching 50 kilovolts by applying direct-current voltages of the respective polarity to 12 or fewer of the midplane electrode rings. The electric fields which are responsible for heating the ions by E/B drift then point radially outward or inward. The low-frequency fluctuations below the ion cyclotron frequency appeared to be dominated by rotating spokes.

  9. Plasma DNA integrity index as a potential molecular diagnostic marker for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kamel, Azza M; Teama, Salwa; Fawzy, Amal; El Deftar, Mervat

    2016-06-01

    Plasma DNA integrity index is increased in various malignancies including breast cancer, the most common cancer in women worldwide; early detection is crucial for successful treatment. Current screening methods fail to detect many cases of breast cancer at an early stage. In this study, we evaluated the level of plasma DNA integrity index in 260 females (95 with breast cancer, 95 with benign breast lesions, and 70 healthy controls) to verify its potential value in discriminating malignant from benign breast lesions. The criteria of the American Joint Committee on Cancer were used for staging of breast cancer patients. DNA integrity index was measured by real-time PCR. DNA integrity index was significantly higher in breast cancer than in benign breast patients and healthy subjects (P = <0.001). DNA integrity index is correlated with TNM stage. Given 100 % specificity, the highest sensitivity achieved in detecting cancer group was 85.3 % at 0.55 DNA integrity index cutoff. In conclusion, the plasma DNA integrity index may be a promising molecular diagnostic marker of malignancy in breast lesions.

  10. A key role for mitochondria in endothelial signaling by plasma cysteine/cystine redox potential

    PubMed Central

    Go, Young-Mi; Park, Heonyong; Koval, Michael; Orr, Michael; Reed, Matthew; Liang, Yongliang; Smith, Debra; Pohl, Jan; Jones, Dean P.

    2011-01-01

    The redox potential of the plasma cysteine/cystine couple (EhCySS) is oxidized in association with risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD), including age, smoking, type 2 diabetes, obesity, and alcohol abuse. Previous in vitro findings support a cause–effect relationship for extracellular EhCySS in cell signaling pathways associated with CVD, including those controlling monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells. In this study, we provide evidence that mitochondria are a major source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the signaling response to a more oxidized extracellular EhCySS. This increase in ROS was blocked by overexpression of mitochondrial thioredoxin-2 (Trx2) in endothelial cells from Trx2-transgenic mice, suggesting that mitochondrial thiol antioxidant status plays a key role in this redox signaling mechanism. Mass spectrometry-based redox proteomics showed that several classes of plasma membrane and cytoskeletal proteins involved in inflammation responded to this redox switch, including vascular cell adhesion molecule, integrins, actin, and several Ras family GTPases. Together, the data show that the proinflammatory effects of oxidized plasma EhCySS are due to a mitochondrial signaling pathway that is mediated through redox control of downstream effector proteins. PMID:19879942

  11. Potential applications of nonthermal plasmas against biofilm-associated micro-organisms in vitro.

    PubMed

    Puligundla, P; Mok, C

    2017-05-01

    Biofilms as complex microbial communities attached to surfaces pose several challenges in different sectors, ranging from food and healthcare to desalination and power generation. The biofilm mode of growth allows microorganisms to survive in hostile environments and biofilm cells exhibit distinct physiology and behaviour in comparison with their planktonic counterparts. They are ubiquitous, resilient and difficult to eradicate due to their resistant phenotype. Several chemical-based cleaning and disinfection regimens are conventionally used against biofilm-dwelling micro-organisms in vitro. Although such approaches are generally considered to be effective, they may contribute to the dissemination of antimicrobial resistance and environmental pollution. Consequently, advanced green technologies for biofilm control are constantly emerging. Disinfection using nonthermal plasmas (NTPs) is one of the novel strategies having a great potential for control of biofilms of a broad spectrum of micro-organisms. This review discusses several aspects related to the inactivation of biofilm-associated bacteria and fungi by different types of NTPs under in vitro conditions. A brief introduction summarizes prevailing methods in biofilm inactivation, followed by introduction to gas discharge plasmas, active plasma species and their inactivating mechanism. Subsequently, significance and aspects of NTP inactivation of biofilm-associated bacteria, especially those of medical importance, including opportunistic pathogens, oral pathogenic bacteria, foodborne pathogens and implant bacteria, are discussed. The remainder of the review discusses majorly about the synergistic effect of NTPs and their activity against biofilm-associated fungi, especially Candida species. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  12. Preliminary Study of Plasma Exosomal Tau as a Potential Biomarker for Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Stern, Robert A; Tripodis, Yorghos; Baugh, Christine M; Fritts, Nathan G; Martin, Brett M; Chaisson, Christine; Cantu, Robert C; Joyce, James A; Shah, Sahil; Ikezu, Tsuneya; Zhang, Jing; Gercel-Taylor, Cicek; Taylor, Douglas D

    2016-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a tauopathy associated with prior exposure to repetitive head impacts, such as those incurred through American football and other collision sports. Diagnosis is made through neuropathological examination. Many of the clinical features of CTE are common in the general population, with and without a history of head impact exposure, making clinical diagnosis difficult. As is now common in the diagnosis of other neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, there is a need for methods to diagnose CTE during life through objective biomarkers. The aim of this study was to examine tau-positive exosomes in plasma as a potential CTE biomarker. Subjects were 78 former National Football League (NFL) players and 16 controls. Extracellular vesicles were isolated from plasma. Fluorescent nanoparticle tracking analysis was used to determine the number of vesicles staining positive for tau. The NFL group had higher exosomal tau than the control group (p <  0.0001). Exosomal tau discriminated between the groups, with 82% sensitivity, 100% specificity, 100% positive predictive value, and 53% negative predictive value. Within the NFL group, higher exosomal tau was associated with worse performance on tests of memory (p = 0.0126) and psychomotor speed (p = 0.0093). These preliminary findings suggest that exosomal tau in plasma may be an accurate, noninvasive CTE biomarker.

  13. Preliminary Study of Plasma Exosomal Tau as a Potential Biomarker for Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Robert A.; Tripodis, Yorghos; Baugh, Christine M.; Fritts, Nathan G.; Martin, Brett M.; Chaisson, Christine; Cantu, Robert C.; Joyce, James A.; Shah, Sahil; Ikezu, Tsuneya; Zhang, Jing; Gercel-Taylor, Cicek; Taylor, Douglas D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a tauopathy associated with prior exposure to repetitive head impacts, such as those incurred through American football and other collision sports. Diagnosis is made through neuropathological examination. Many of the clinical features of CTE are common in the general population, with and without a history of head impact exposure, making clinical diagnosis difficult. As is now common in the diagnosis of other neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer’s disease, there is a need for methods to diagnose CTE during life through objective biomarkers. Objective: The aim of this study was to examine tau-positive exosomes in plasma as a potential CTE biomarker. Methods: Subjects were 78 former National Football League (NFL) players and 16 controls. Extracellular vesicles were isolated from plasma. Fluorescent nanoparticle tracking analysis was used to determine the number of vesicles staining positive for tau. Results: The NFL group had higher exosomal tau than the control group (p <  0.0001). Exosomal tau discriminated between the groups, with 82% sensitivity, 100% specificity, 100% positive predictive value, and 53% negative predictive value. Within the NFL group, higher exosomal tau was associated with worse performance on tests of memory (p = 0.0126) and psychomotor speed (p = 0.0093). Conclusion: These preliminary findings suggest that exosomal tau in plasma may be an accurate, noninvasive CTE biomarker. PMID:26890775

  14. Collisional heating of a plasma column slowly forced across a squeeze potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubin, D. H. E.

    2016-10-01

    When equilibrium plasmas have two or more locally-trapped particle populations, perturbations to the equilibrium can produce phase-space discontinuities in the distribution function that strongly enhance transport, plasma loss, and wave damping. This poster presents a simple version of this process, wherein a plasma is heated as it is slowly forced back and forth across a squeeze potential (at a frequency ω that is small compared to the particle bounce frequency) that traps particles on either side of the squeeze. Adiabatic theory is developed for the distribution function, showing that trapped and passing particles have different responses to the forcing that produces a collisional boundary layer at the separatrix. Expressions for both the adiabatic and non-adiabatic distribution functions are presented, and the heating rate caused by the collisional boundary layer at the separatrix is derived. The heating is proportional to √ (ν ω) , where ν is the collision rate. Supported by NSF Grant PHY-1414570, and DOE Grants DE-SC0002451 and DE-SC0008693.

  15. MicroRNAs in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid as potential markers for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kiko, Takehiro; Nakagawa, Kiyotaka; Tsuduki, Tsuyoshi; Furukawa, Katsutoshi; Arai, Hiroyuki; Miyazawa, Teruo

    2014-01-01

    The development of Alzheimer's disease (AD) biomarkers remains an unmet challenge, and new approaches that can improve current AD biomarker strategies are needed. Recent reports suggested that microRNA (miRNA) profiling of biological fluids has emerged as a diagnostic tool for several pathologic conditions. In this study, we measured six candidate miRNAs (miR-9, miR-29a, miR-29b, miR-34a, miR-125b, and miR-146a) in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of AD and normal subjects by using quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) to evaluate their potential usability as AD biomarkers. The qRT-PCR results showed that plasma miR-34a and miR-146a levels, and CSF miR-34a, miR-125b, and miR-146a levels in AD patients were significantly lower than in control subjects. On the other hand, CSF miR-29a and miR-29b levels were significantly higher than in control subjects. Our results provide a possibility that miRNAs detected in plasma and CSF can serve as biomarkers for AD.

  16. Effect of Bohm quantum potential in the propagation of ion-acoustic waves in degenerate plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, M. M.; Hossen, M. A.; Rafat, A.; Mamun, A. A.

    2016-10-01

    A theoretical investigation has been carried out on the propagation of the ion-acoustic (IA) waves in a relativistic degenerate plasma containing relativistic degenerate electron and positron fluids in the presence of inertial non-relativistic light ion fluid. The Korteweg-de Vries (K-dV), modified K-dV (mK-dV), and mixed mK-dV (mmK-dV) equations are derived by adopting the reductive perturbation method. In order to analyze the basic features (phase speed, amplitude, width, etc.) of the IA solitary waves (SWs), the SWs solutions of the K-dV, mK-dV, and mmK-dV are numerically analyzed. It is found that the degenerate pressure, inclusion of the new phenomena like the Fermi temperatures and quantum mechanical effects (arising due to the quantum diffraction) of both electrons and positrons, number densities, etc., of the plasma species remarkably change the basic characteristics of the IA SWs which are found to be formed either with positive or negative potential. The implication of our results in explaining different nonlinear phenomena in astrophysical compact objects, e.g., white dwarfs, neutron stars, etc., and laboratory plasmas like intense laser-solid matter interaction experiments, etc., are mentioned.

  17. Decline in platelet microparticles contributes to reduced hemostatic potential of stored plasma

    PubMed Central

    Matijevic, Nena; Wang, Yao-Wei W.; Kostousov, Vadim; Wade, Charles E.; Vijayan, K. Vinod; Holcomb, John B.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction In an effort to administer life-saving transfusions quickly, some trauma centers maintain thawed plasma (TP). According to AABB, TP is approved for transfusion for up to five days when stored at 1 – 6 °C. However, the alterations in microparticles (MP) contained in the plasma, which are an integral component of plasma’s hemostatic capacity, are not well characterized. We report on MP changes in TP between its initial thaw (FFP-0) and five days (FFP-5) of storage. Materials and Methods FFP units (n=30) were thawed at 37 °C and kept refrigerated for five days. Phenotypes of residual cells, which include platelets, erythrocytes, leukocytes, monocytes, endothelial cells, and MP counterparts of each cell type, were analyzed by flow cytometry. Functional assays were used for MP procoagulant activity, plasma thrombin generation, and clotting properties (thromboelastography). Results In FFP-0 the majority (94%) of residual cells were platelets, along with significant levels of platelet MPs (4408×103/L). FFP-5 showed a decline in MP count by 50% (p<0.0001), and procoagulant activity by 29% (p<0.0001). FFP-5 exhibited only 54% (p<0.0001) of the potential for thrombin generation as FFP-0, while thromboelastography indicated a slower clotting response (p<0.0001) and a longer delay in reaching maximum clot (p<0.01). Removal of MP by filtration resulted in reduced thrombin generation, while the MP replacement restored it. Conclusions Decline in MP with storage contributes to FFP-5’s reduced ability to provide the hemostatic potential exhibited by FFP-0, suggesting the presence of platelet MPs in freshly TP may be beneficial and protective in the initial treatment of hemorrhage. PMID:21421259

  18. 10. DETAIL, CAB SIDE. DETAIL, END OF BOOM. DETAIL, LOWER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. DETAIL, CAB SIDE. DETAIL, END OF BOOM. DETAIL, LOWER PART OF TOWER, SHOWING METAL WHEELS AND CABLE SPOOLS. DETAIL, LOOKING UP AT THE UNDERSIDE OF THE REVOLVING PLATFORM ATOP THE TOWER. - United Engineering Company Shipyard, Crane, 2900 Main Street, Alameda, Alameda County, CA

  19. Plasma electrolytic oxidation coatings on γTiAl alloy for potential biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Lara Rodriguez, L; Sundaram, P A; Rosim-Fachini, E; Padovani, A M; Diffoot-Carlo, N

    2014-07-01

    In an attempt to enhance the potential of gamma titanium aluminide intermetallic alloy as a biomaterial, its surface characteristics were successfully modified using a calcium and phosphorous rich electrolyte through the application of plasma electrolytic oxidation. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy were used to characterize the morphology and topographical features of the resulting coating while X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive spectroscopy were used to determine the surface oxide composition. The mechanical properties of the surface coating were characterized by nanoindentation studies. The results observed show the formation of a submicron scale porous structure and a concomitant increase in the surface roughness. The surface oxide was composed of rutile and anatase phases. Composition gradients of Ca and P were also present which can possibly enhance the biomaterial application potential of this treated surface. Nanoindentation measurements indicate the formation of a fairly compact oxide during the process.

  20. Platelet-rich Plasma as a Potential Treatment for Noncicatricial Alopecias

    PubMed Central

    Maria-Angeliki, Gkini; Alexandros-Efstratios, Kouskoukis; Dimitris, Rigopoulos; Konstantinos, Kouskoukis

    2015-01-01

    Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) and alopecia areata (AA) are common hair loss disorders affecting both men and women. Despite available therapeutic options, search for new, more effective treatment is constant. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) could be effective in promoting hair growth: (1) To present PRP and its mechanism of action in promoting hair growth and (2) to evaluate its preparation methods and its therapeutic potential in noncicatrial alopecias in a systematic review. An international bibliography search, through five databases, was conducted to find articles regarding PRP's action on hair loss. Growth factors in platelets’ granules of PRP bind in the bulge area of hair follicle, promoting hair growth. In our systematic review, 14 articles matched our criteria, including 12 articles for AGA and two for AA. PRP is a potential useful therapeutic tool for alopecias, without major adverse effects. Nevertheless, due to the small number of conducted trials, further studies are required to investigate its efficacy. PMID:26180449

  1. The Plasma Membrane Potential and the Organization of the Actin Cytoskeleton of Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chifflet, Silvia; Hernández, Julio A.

    2012-01-01

    The establishment and maintenance of the polarized epithelial phenotype require a characteristic organization of the cytoskeletal components. There are many cellular effectors involved in the regulation of the cytoskeleton of epithelial cells. Recently, modifications in the plasma membrane potential (PMP) have been suggested to participate in the modulation of the cytoskeletal organization of epithelia. Here, we review evidence showing that changes in the PMP of diverse epithelial cells promote characteristic modifications in the cytoskeletal organization, with a focus on the actin cytoskeleton. The molecular paths mediating these effects may include voltage-sensitive integral membrane proteins and/or peripheral proteins sensitive to surface potentials. The voltage dependence of the cytoskeletal organization seems to have implications in several physiological processes, including epithelial wound healing and apoptosis. PMID:22315611

  2. Quantifying the thrombogenic potential of human plasma-derived immunoglobulin products.

    PubMed

    Germishuizen, W A; Gyure, D C; Stubbings, D; Burnouf, T

    2014-09-01

    Polyvalent immunoglobulin G (IgG) products obtained by fractionation of human plasma are used to treat a broad range of conditions, including immunodeficiency syndromes and autoimmune, inflammatory, and infectious diseases. Recent incidences of increased thromboembolic events (TEEs) associated with intravenous (IV) IgG (IVIG) led to recalls of some products and increased regulatory oversight of manufacturing processes in order to ensure that products are essentially free of procoagulant/thrombogenic plasma protein contaminants. Laboratory investigations have now identified activated factor XI (FXIa) as the likely causative agent of IVIG-related TEEs. Quantification of the thrombogenic potential is becoming a requirement made to fractionators (a) to validate the capacity of IVIG and subcutaneous IgG manufacturing processes to remove procoagulant contaminants and (b) to establish the safety of the final products. However, in the absence of a recommended test by the main regulatory authorities, several analytical approaches have been evaluated by fractionators, regulators, and university groups. This review focuses on the scientific rationale, merits, and applications of several analytical methods of quantifying the thrombogenic potential of IgG products and intermediates to meet the latest regulatory requirements. Copyright © 2014 The International Alliance for Biological Standardization. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Perfluoroalkyl contaminants in plasma of five sea turtle species: comparisons in concentration and potential health risks.

    PubMed

    Keller, Jennifer M; Ngai, Lily; Braun McNeill, Joanne; Wood, Lawrence D; Stewart, Kelly R; O'Connell, Steven G; Kucklick, John R

    2012-06-01

    The authors compared blood plasma concentrations of 13 perfluoroalkyl contaminants (PFCs) in five sea turtle species with differing trophic levels. Wild sea turtles were blood sampled from the southeastern region of the United States, and plasma was analyzed using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Mean concentrations of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), the predominant PFC, increased with trophic level from herbivorous greens (2.41 ng/g), jellyfish-eating leatherbacks (3.95 ng/g), omnivorous loggerheads (6.47 ng/g), to crab-eating Kemp's ridleys (15.7 ng/g). However, spongivorous hawksbills had surprisingly high concentrations of PFOS (11.9 ng/g) and other PFCs based on their trophic level. These baseline concentrations of biomagnifying PFCs demonstrate interesting species and geographical differences. The measured PFOS concentrations were compared with concentrations known to cause toxic effects in laboratory animals, and estimated margins of safety (EMOS) were calculated. Small EMOS (<100), suggestive of potential risk of adverse health effects, were observed for all five sea turtle species for immunosuppression. Estimated margins of safety less than 100 were also observed for liver, thyroid, and neurobehavorial effects for the more highly exposed species. These baseline concentrations and the preliminary EMOS exercise provide a better understanding of the potential health risks of PFCs for conservation managers to protect these threatened and endangered species. Copyright © 2012 SETAC.

  4. Comparing large scale CCS deployment potential in the USA and China: a detailed analysis based on country-specific CO2 transport & storage cost curves

    SciTech Connect

    Dahowski, Robert T.; Davidson, Casie L.; Dooley, James J.

    2011-04-18

    The United States and China are the two largest emitters of greenhouse gases in the world and their projected continued growth and reliance on fossil fuels, especially coal, make them strong candidates for CCS. Previous work has revealed that both nations have over 1600 large electric utility and other industrial point CO2 sources as well as very large CO2 storage resources on the order of 2,000 billion metric tons (Gt) of onshore storage capacity. In each case, the vast majority of this capacity is found in deep saline formations. In both the USA and China, candidate storage reservoirs are likely to be accessible by most sources with over 80% of these large industrial CO2 sources having a CO2 storage option within just 80 km. This suggests a strong potential for CCS deployment as a meaningful option to efforts to reduce CO2 emissions from these large, vibrant economies. However, while the USA and China possess many similarities with regards to the potential value that CCS might provide, including the range of costs at which CCS may be available to most large CO2 sources in each nation, there are a number of more subtle differences that may help us to understand the ways in which CCS deployment may differ between these two countries in order for the USA and China to work together - and in step with the rest of the world - to most efficiently reduce greenhouse gas emissions. This paper details the first ever analysis of CCS deployment costs in these two countries based on methodologically comparable CO2 source and sink inventories, economic analysis, geospatial source-sink matching and cost curve modeling. This type of analysis provides a valuable insight into the degree to which early and sustained opportunities for climate change mitigation via commercial-scale CCS are available to the two countries, and could facilitate greater collaboration in areas where those opportunities overlap.

  5. Global investigation of potential energy surfaces for the pyrolysis of C(1)-C(3) hydrocarbons: toward the development of detailed kinetic models from first principles.

    PubMed

    Ryazantsev, Mikhail N; Jamal, Adeel; Maeda, Satoshi; Morokuma, Keiji

    2015-11-07

    Detailed kinetic models (DKMs) are the most fundamental "bottom-up" approaches to computational investigation of the pyrolysis and oxidation of fuels. The weakest points of existing DKMs are incomplete information about the reaction types that can be involved in the potential energy surfaces (PESs) in pyrolysis and oxidation processes. Also, the computational thermodynamic parameters available in the literature vary widely with the level of theory employed. More sophisticated models require improvement both in our knowledge of the type of the reactions involved and the consistency of thermodynamic and kinetic parameters. In this paper, we aim to address these issues by developing ab initio models that can be used to describe early stages of pyrolysis of C1-C3 hydrocarbons. We applied a recently developed global reaction route mapping (GRRM) strategy to systematically investigate the PES of the pyrolysis of C1-C3 hydrocarbons at a consistent level of theory. The reactions are classified into 14 reaction types. The critical points on the PES for all reactions in the network are calculated at the highly accurate UCCSD(T)-F12b/cc-pVTZ//UM06-2X/cc-pVTZ level of theory. The data reported in this paper can be used for first principle calculations of kinetic constants and for a subsequent study on modeling the evolution of the species from the reaction network of the pyrolysis and oxidation of C1-C3 hydrocarbons.

  6. Observations of Reflected Ions and Plasma Turbulence for Satellite Potentials Greater than the Ion Ram Energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, K. H., Jr.; Stone, N. H.; Sorensen, J.; Winningham, J. D.; Gurgiolo, C.

    1998-01-01

    During the TSS-1R mission, the behavior of the ions flowing from the forward hemisphere of the Tethered Satellite System (TSS) satellite was examined as the potential of the satellite was changed from below to above 5 V. The ram energy of the ambient atomic oxygen ions is approximately 5 eV. For satellite potentials less than 5 V, no ions were observed on the ram side of the satellite. When the satellite potential was raised greater than 5 V, ions were observed to be flowing from the forward region of the satellite. In the region sampled, the ion flux was a few percent of the ambient with energies of approximately 5 eV. The temperature of the out-flowing ions was observed to be enhanced, relative to the ambient ionosphere. The net current to the probe package became much more noisy for satellite potentials greater than 5 V as compared with satellite potentials less than 5 V, indicating a more disturbed plasma environment.

  7. Observations of Reflected Ions and Plasma Turbulence for Satellite Potentials Greater Than the Ion Ram Energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, K. H., Jr.; Stone, N. H.; Sorensen, J.; Winningham, J. D.; Gurgiolo, C.

    1997-01-01

    During the TSS-1R mission, the behavior of the ions flowing from the forward hemisphere of the Tethered Satellite System (TSS) satellite was examined as the potential on the satellite was changed from below to above 5 Volts. The ram energy of the ambient atomic oxygen ions is about 5 eV. For satellite potentials less than 5 V, no ions were observed on the ram side of the satellite. When the satellite potential was raised above 5 V, ions were observed to be flowing from the forward region of the satellite. In the region sampled, the ion flux was a few percent of the ambient with energies of about 5 eV. The temperature of the outflowing ions was observed to be enhanced, relative to the ambient ionosphere, and had a maximum in a plane containing the center of the satellite and normal to the geomagnetic field. The net current to the probe package became much more noisy for satellite potentials above 5 V as compared with satellite potentials below 5 V indicating a more disturbed plasma environment.

  8. Potential formation in a collisionless plasma produced in an open magnetic field in presence of volume negative ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Phukan, Ananya Goswami, K. S.; Bhuyan, P. J.

    2014-08-15

    The electric potential near a wall for a multi-species plasma with volume produced negative ions in presence of axially varying magnetic field is studied following an analytical-numerical approach. A constant negative ion source is assumed throughout the plasma volume, along with finite temperature positive ions and Boltzmann electrons. The particles are assumed to be guided by an open magnetic field that has its maximum at the centre, and field strength decreasing towards the walls. The one dimensional (1D) Poisson equation is derived using an analytical approach, and then solved numerically to study the potential profiles. Effect of (a) negative ion production rate, (b) magnetic field profile, and (c) negative ion temperature on the potential profile has been investigated. A potential peak appears near the wall when the negative ion temperature and density are sufficiently high. Also, the presence of negative ions further decreases the potential in the plasma region for a finite Debye Length (λ{sub D})

  9. Plasma beta-amyloid as potential biomarker of Alzheimer disease: possibility of diagnostic tool for Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Shuko; Sato, Naoyuki; Rakugi, Hiromi; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2010-10-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD), which is characterized by progressive cognitive and behavioral deficit, is the most common form of dementia. The incidence of AD is increasing at an alarming rate, and has become a major public health concern in many countries. It is well known that the onset of AD is preceded by a long preclinical period. It is thus critical to establish diagnostic biomarkers that can predict the risk of developing AD prior to clinical manifestation of dementia, for effective prevention and early intervention. With the emergence of potential promising approaches to treat AD targeting the beta-amyloid (Abeta) pathway, such as gamma-secretase inhibitors and vaccine therapy, there is an urgent need for such diagnostic markers. Although cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Abeta and tau protein levels are candidate biomarkers for AD, the invasive sampling procedure with associated complications limits their use in routine clinical practice. Plasma Abeta has been suggested as an inexpensive and non-invasive biomarker for AD. Although most previous cross-sectional studies on plasma Abeta level in humans failed to show a significant difference between individuals with AD compared to healthy older adults, many strategies are under investigation to improve the diagnostic potential of plasma Abeta. One promising approach is to modify the plasma Abeta level using some potential modulators. It is possible that a difference in plasma Abeta level might be unmasked by evaluating the response to stimulation by a modulator. Anti-Abeta antibody and Abeta binding proteins have been reported to be such modulators of plasma Abeta. In addition, the glucometabolic or hormonal status appears to modulate the plasma Abeta level. Our recent study has shown the possibility that glucose loading could be a novel simple strategy to modulate the plasma Abeta level, making it better suited for early diagnosis. This review summarizes the utility and limitations of current biomarkers of AD and

  10. Plasma Membranes Modified by Plasma Treatment or Deposition as Solid Electrolytes for Potential Application in Solid Alkaline Fuel Cells

    PubMed Central

    Reinholdt, Marc; Ilie, Alina; Roualdès, Stéphanie; Frugier, Jérémy; Schieda, Mauricio; Coutanceau, Christophe; Martemianov, Serguei; Flaud, Valérie; Beche, Eric; Durand, Jean

    2012-01-01

    In the highly competitive market of fuel cells, solid alkaline fuel cells using liquid fuel (such as cheap, non-toxic and non-valorized glycerol) and not requiring noble metal as catalyst seem quite promising. One of the main hurdles for emergence of such a technology is the development of a hydroxide-conducting membrane characterized by both high conductivity and low fuel permeability. Plasma treatments can enable to positively tune the main fuel cell membrane requirements. In this work, commercial ADP-Morgane® fluorinated polymer membranes and a new brand of cross-linked poly(aryl-ether) polymer membranes, named AMELI-32®, both containing quaternary ammonium functionalities, have been modified by argon plasma treatment or triallylamine-based plasma deposit. Under the concomitant etching/cross-linking/oxidation effects inherent to the plasma modification, transport properties (ionic exchange capacity, water uptake, ionic conductivity and fuel retention) of membranes have been improved. Consequently, using plasma modified ADP-Morgane® membrane as electrolyte in a solid alkaline fuel cell operating with glycerol as fuel has allowed increasing the maximum power density by a factor 3 when compared to the untreated membrane. PMID:24958295

  11. Plasma membranes modified by plasma treatment or deposition as solid electrolytes for potential application in solid alkaline fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Reinholdt, Marc; Ilie, Alina; Roualdès, Stéphanie; Frugier, Jérémy; Schieda, Mauricio; Coutanceau, Christophe; Martemianov, Serguei; Flaud, Valérie; Beche, Eric; Durand, Jean

    2012-07-30

    In the highly competitive market of fuel cells, solid alkaline fuel cells using liquid fuel (such as cheap, non-toxic and non-valorized glycerol) and not requiring noble metal as catalyst seem quite promising. One of the main hurdles for emergence of such a technology is the development of a hydroxide-conducting membrane characterized by both high conductivity and low fuel permeability. Plasma treatments can enable to positively tune the main fuel cell membrane requirements. In this work, commercial ADP-Morgane® fluorinated polymer membranes and a new brand of cross-linked poly(aryl-ether) polymer membranes, named AMELI-32®, both containing quaternary ammonium functionalities, have been modified by argon plasma treatment or triallylamine-based plasma deposit. Under the concomitant etching/cross-linking/oxidation effects inherent to the plasma modification, transport properties (ionic exchange capacity, water uptake, ionic conductivity and fuel retention) of membranes have been improved. Consequently, using plasma modified ADP-Morgane® membrane as electrolyte in a solid alkaline fuel cell operating with glycerol as fuel has allowed increasing the maximum power density by a factor 3 when compared to the untreated membrane.

  12. Internal plasma potential measurements of a Hall thruster using xenon and krypton propellant

    SciTech Connect

    Linnell, Jesse A.; Gallimore, Alec D.

    2006-09-15

    For krypton to become a realistic option for Hall thruster operation, it is necessary to understand the performance gap between xenon and krypton and what can be done to reduce it. A floating emissive probe is used with the Plasmadynamics and Electric Propulsion Laboratory's High-speed Axial Reciprocating Probe system to map the internal plasma potential structure of the NASA-173Mv1 Hall thruster [R. R. Hofer, R. S. Jankovsky, and A. D. Gallimore, J. Propulsion Power 22, 721 (2006); and ibid.22, 732 (2006)] using xenon and krypton propellant. Measurements are taken for both propellants at discharge voltages of 500 and 600 V. Electron temperatures and electric fields are also reported. The acceleration zone and equipotential lines are found to be strongly linked to the magnetic-field lines. The electrostatic plasma lens of the NASA-173Mv1 Hall thruster strongly focuses the xenon ions toward the center of the discharge channel, whereas the krypton ions are defocused. Krypton is also found to have a longer acceleration zone than the xenon cases. These results explain the large beam divergence observed with krypton operation. Krypton and xenon have similar maximum electron temperatures and similar lengths of the high electron temperature zone, although the high electron temperature zone is located farther downstream in the krypton case.

  13. The potential of Angeli’s salt to decrease nitric oxide scavenging by plasma hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiaojun; Azarov, Ivan; Jeffers, Anne; Presley, Tennille; Richardson, Jodi; King, S. Bruce; Gladwin, Mark T.; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.

    2008-01-01

    Release of hemoglobin from the erythrocyte during intravascular hemolysis contributes to the pathology of a variety of diseased states. This effect is partially due to the enhanced ability of cell-free plasma hemoglobin, which is primarily found in the ferrous, oxygenated state, to scavenge nitric oxide. Oxidation of the cell-free hemoglobin to methemoglobin, which does not effectively scavenge nitric oxide, using inhaled nitric oxide has been shown to be effective in limiting pulmonary and systemic vasoconstriction. However, the ferric heme species may be reduced back to ferrous hemoglobin in plasma and has the potential to drive injurious redox chemistry. We propose that compounds that selectively convert cell-free hemoglobin to ferric, and ideally iron-nitrosylated heme species that do not actively scavenge nitric oxide would effectively treat intravascular hemolysis. We show here that nitroxyl, generated by Angeli’s salt (Sodium α-oxyhyponitrite, Na2N2O3), preferentially reacts with cell-free hemoglobin compared to that encapsulated in the red blood cell under physiologically relevant conditions. Nitroxyl oxidizes oxygenated ferrous hemoglobin to methemoglobin and can convert the methemoglobin to a more stable, less toxic species, iron-nitrosyl hemoglobin. These results support the notion that Angeli’s salt or a similar compound could be used to effectively treat conditions associated with intravascular hemolysis. PMID:18243145

  14. Effect of voltage polarity on oxidation-reduction potential by plasma in water

    SciTech Connect

    Miyahara, Takashi; Oizumi, Masanobu; Nakatani, Tatsuyuki; Sato, Takehiko

    2014-04-15

    Use of plasma in water for water treatment and medical treatment is growing and raises expectations of finding advanced functions such as an increase of biological compatibility. In the present study with a focus on the variation of oxidation-reduction potential (ORP), relationships between the electrode polarities of plasma in water and the change of water quality such as conductivity, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration, dissolved hydrogen concentration, pH and ORP were revealed. Similar line spectra of radiation at the electrode tip were observed for each case of positive and negative electrode polarity. The emission intensities of OH (309 nm), Hα (656 nm), and OI (777 nm) for the positive discharge were significantly higher than those for the negative one, though the energy consumption during the discharge period of both cases was nearly the same. Positive electrode polarity was found to be more suitable than negative electrode polarity for increasing dissolved hydrogen gas and hydrogen peroxide. The ORP for the positive polarity decreased from 460 to 45 mV and that for the negative polarity decreased from 460 to 183 mV, although the pH and conductivity were not significantly changed.

  15. Detection of hepatotoxicity potential with metabolite profiling (metabolomics) of rat plasma.

    PubMed

    Mattes, W; Davis, K; Fabian, E; Greenhaw, J; Herold, M; Looser, R; Mellert, W; Groeters, S; Marxfeld, H; Moeller, N; Montoya-Parra, G; Prokoudine, A; van Ravenzwaay, B; Strauss, V; Walk, T; Kamp, H

    2014-11-04

    While conventional parameters used to detect hepatotoxicity in drug safety assessment studies are generally informative, the need remains for parameters that can detect the potential for hepatotoxicity at lower doses and/or at earlier time points. Previous work has shown that metabolite profiling (metabonomics/metabolomics) can detect signals of potential hepatotoxicity in rats treated with doxorubicin at doses that do not elicit hepatotoxicity as monitored with conventional parameters. The current study extended this observation to the question of whether such signals could be detected in rats treated with compounds that can elicit hepatotoxicity in humans (i.e., drug-induced liver injury, DILI) but have not been reported to do so in rats. Nine compounds were selected on the basis of their known DILI potential, with six other compounds chosen as negative for DILI potential. A database of rat plasma metabolite profiles, MetaMap(®)Tox (developed by metanomics GmbH and BASF SE) was used for both metabolite profiles and mode of action (MoA) metabolite signatures for a number of known toxicities. Eight of the nine compounds with DILI potential elicited metabolite profiles that matched with MoA patterns of various rat liver toxicities, including cholestasis, oxidative stress, acetaminophen-type toxicity and peroxisome proliferation. By contrast, only one of the six non-DILI compounds showed a weak match with rat liver toxicity. These results suggest that metabolite profiling may indeed have promise to detect signals of hepatotoxicity in rats treated with compounds having DILI potential. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Plasma potential and geodesic acoustic mode evolution with Helium puffing in the ECRH regime on the T-10 tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenin, V. N.; Subbotin, G. F.; Klyuchnikov, L. A.; Melnikov, A. V.

    2016-09-01

    The evolution of the Geodesic Acoustic Mode (GAM) and mean plasma electric potential were examined in the regime with short (5 ms) Helium puffing into Electron Cyclotron Resonance heated discharge of the T-10 tokamak. It was shown that a Helium pulse leads to temporal perturbation of the plasma electron temperature and density and concomitant evolution of the mean potential, happening in the diffusive time-scale ∼⃒ 30 ms. Afterwards, the potential restores to the new stationary level with the same time-scale. On top of that GAM amplitude reduces sharply (within 2-5 ms) and GAM frequency also decreases within 30 ms after Helium puffing. Afterwards GAM amplitude and frequency relax to a new stationary level within about 50-70 ms. The evolution of electron density, electron and ion temperatures, total stored energy and plasma density turbulence is discussed in order to clarify their links with potential and GAM evolution.

  17. Ion focusing and interaction potential for spherical and rodlike obstacles in a supersonic plasma flow: numerical simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Miloch, W. J.; Pecseli, H. L.; Trulsen, J.; Vladimirov, S. V.

    2008-09-07

    The parameter dependence of the ion focus behind perfectly conducting or alternatively perfectly insulating spherical grains for different electron to ion temperature ratios is studied. For elongated, insulating dust grains we study the potential and plasma density wakes in drifting plasma for rods or plates of different lengths and different inclination angles. These two characteristics (i.e., the rod length and the inclination angle are important for the exact charge distribution on the surface and the wake pattern. For this case we discuss also the interaction potential between two elongated grains in a flowing plasma.Our simulations are carried out in two spatial dimensions by a Particle-in-Cell code, treating ions and electrons as individual particles. These studies can be relevant for finite size dust grains suspended in a plasma sheath or larger objects in space, e.g., meteoroids.

  18. Ambipolar plasma potential measurement in a minimum-B magnetic well

    SciTech Connect

    Kolawolfe, J.O.

    1981-01-01

    A heavy neutral beam probe diagnostic technique for magnetically contained plasmas is developed and used in an environment with three dimensional field gradients. With the newly developed neutral beam probe, the effects of the magnetic field are eliminated from the primary beam and reduced on the secondary without jeopardizing the good spatial and temporal resolutions characteristic of beam probes. Consequently complex field geometries are now accessible for beam probing and further studies. The space potential of a Hollow Cathode Arc in a Baseball generated minimum-B well is measured. Measurements of electron temperature and density are shown feasible. Also, the need for and the design of a detector with two dimensional sensitivity is outlined.

  19. Platelet-Rich Plasma in Androgenic Alopecia: Indications, Technique, and Potential Benefits.

    PubMed

    Ferneini, Elie M; Beauvais, Daniel; Castiglione, Concetta; Ferneini, Moniek V

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide an overview of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injected into the scalp for the management of androgenic alopecia. A literature review was performed to evaluate the benefits of PRP in androgenic alopecia. Hair restoration has been increasing. PRP's main components of platelet-derived growth factor, transforming growth factor, and vascular endothelial growth factor have the potential to stimulate hard and soft tissue wound healing. In general, PRP showed a benefit on patients with androgenic alopecia, including increased hair density and quality. Currently, different PRP preparations are being used with no standard technique. This review found beneficial effects of PRP on androgenic alopecia. However, more rigorous study designs, including larger samples, quantitative measurements of effect, and longer follow-up periods, are needed to solidify the utility of PRP for treating patients with androgenic alopecia. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Controlling VUV photon fluxes in pulsed inductively coupled Ar/Cl2 plasmas and potential applications in plasma etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Peng; Kushner, Mark J.

    2017-02-01

    UV/VUV photon fluxes in plasma materials processing have a variety of effects ranging from producing damage to stimulating synergistic reactions. Although in plasma etching processes, the rate and quality of the feature are typically controlled by the characteristics of the ion flux, to truly optimize these ion and photon driven processes, it is desirable to control the relative fluxes of ions and photons to the wafer. In prior works, it was determined that the ratio of VUV photon to ion fluxes to the substrate in low pressure inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs) sustained in rare gases can be controlled by combinations of pressure and pulse power, while the spectrum of these VUV photons can be tuned by adding additional rare gases to the plasma. In this work, VUV photon and ion fluxes are computationally investigated for Ar/Cl2 ICPs as used in etching of silicon. We found that while the overall ratio of VUV photon flux to ion flux are controlled by pressure and pulse power, by varying the fraction of Cl2 in the mixture, both the ratio of VUV to ion fluxes and the spectrum of VUV photons can be tuned. It was also found that the intensity of VUV emission from Cl(3p 44s) can be independently tuned by controlling wall surface conditions. With this ability to control ratios of ion to photon fluxes, photon stimulated processes, as observed in halogen etching of Si, can be tuned to optimize the shape of the etched features.

  1. Equation of state for hot quark-gluon plasma transitions to hadrons with full QCD potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikholeslami-Sabzevari, Bijan

    2002-05-01

    A practical method based on Mayer's cluster expansion to calculate critical values for a quark-gluon plasma (QGP) phase transition to hadrons is represented. It can be applied to a high-temperature QGP for clustering of quarks to mesons and baryons. The potential used is the Cornell potential, i.e., a potential containing both confining and gluon exchange terms. Debye screening effects are included. An equation of state (EOS) for hadron production is found by analytical methods, which is valid near the critical point. The example of the formation of J/ψ and Υ is recalculated. It is shown that in the range of temperatures available by today's accelerators, the latter particles are suppressed. This is further confirmation for heavy quarkonia suppression and, hence, for a signature of a QGP. The EOS presented here also shows that in future colliders there will be no heavy quarkonia production by the mechanism of phase transition. Hence, if there will be heavy quarkonia production, it must be based on some other mechanisms, perhaps on the basis of some recently suggested possibilities.

  2. Positive zeta potential of a negatively charged semi-permeable plasma membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Shayandev; Jing, Haoyuan; Das, Siddhartha

    2017-08-01

    The negative charge of the plasma membrane (PM) severely affects the nature of moieties that may enter or leave the cells and controls a large number of ion-interaction-mediated intracellular and extracellular events. In this letter, we report our discovery of a most fascinating scenario, where one interface (e.g., membrane-cytosol interface) of the negatively charged PM shows a positive surface (or ζ) potential, while the other interface (e.g., membrane-electrolyte interface) still shows a negative ζ potential. Therefore, we encounter a completely unexpected situation where an interface (e.g., membrane-cytosol interface) that has a negative surface charge density demonstrates a positive ζ potential. We establish that the attainment of such a property by the membrane can be ascribed to an interplay of the nature of the membrane semi-permeability and the electrostatics of the electric double layer established on either side of the charged membrane. We anticipate that such a membrane property can lead to such capabilities of the cell (in terms of accepting or releasing certain kinds of moieties as well regulating cellular signaling) that was hitherto inconceivable.

  3. Simulation of the electric potential and plasma generation coupling in magnetron sputtering discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trieschmann, Jan; Krueger, Dennis; Schmidt, Frederik; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter; Mussenbrock, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Magnetron sputtering typically operated at low pressures below 1 Pa is a widely applied deposition technique. For both, high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) as well as direct current magnetron sputtering (dcMS) the phenomenon of rotating ionization zones (also referred to as spokes) has been observed. A distinct spatial profile of the electric potential has been associated with the latter, giving rise to low, mid, and high energy groups of ions observed at the substrate. The adherent question of which mechanism drives this process is still not fully understood. This query is approached using Monte Carlo simulations of the heavy particle (i.e., ions and neutrals) transport consistently coupled to a pre-specified electron density profile via the intrinsic electric field. The coupling between the plasma generation and the electric potential, which establishes correspondingly, is investigated. While the system is observed to strive towards quasi-neutrality, distinct mechanisms governing the shape of the electric potential profile are identified. This work is supported by the German Research Foundation (DFG) in the frame of the transregional collaborative research centre TRR 87.

  4. Observational Evidence that Magnetosheath Plasma Parameters are Prominent in Determining Cross Polar Cap Potential Saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clauer, Robert; Xu, Zhonghua; Hartinger, Michael; Ruohoniemi, Michael; Scales, Wayne; Maimaiti, Maimaitirebike; Nicolls, Michael; Wilder, Rick; Lopez, Ramon

    2016-04-01

    A variety of statistical studies have shown that the ionospheric polar potential produced by solar wind - magnetosphere - ionosphere coupling is linear for weak to moderate solar wind driving, but becomes non-linear during periods of very strong driving. It has been shown that this applies to the two-cell convection potential that develops during southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and also to the reverse convection cells that develop during northward IMF. This has been described as polar potential saturation and it appears to begin when the driving solar wind electric field becomes greater than 3 mV/m. It has also been shown that the summer ionospheric electric field saturates at about the same value (20 mV/m) for both northward or southward IMF. Recent measurements of the high latitude convection on September 12 - 13, 2014 using the Resolute Incoherent Scatter Radar during periods of large northward IMF show ionospheric electric fields varying between 56 mV/m and 156 mV/m within the dayside reverse convection cells. There is no indication of saturation during these periods of very strong driving. We believe that the extremely rare conditions in the solar wind that produce extreme driving while also producing a high plasma beta in the magnetosheath provide the best explanation for the lack of potential saturation of the reverse convection cells. That is to say, the conditions in the magnetosheath that contribute to enhancing or limiting reconnection are most important in determining cross polar cap potential saturation. This research was supported at Virginia Tech by National Science Foundation Grant AGS-1216373.

  5. Plasma screening effects on the energies of hydrogen atom under the influence of velocity-dependent potential

    SciTech Connect

    Bahar, M. K.

    2014-07-15

    In order to examine the plasma screening and velocity-dependent potential effects on the hydrogen atom, the Schrödinger equation including a more general exponential cosine screened Coulomb and velocity-dependent potential is solved numerically in the framework asymptotic iteration method. The more general exponential cosine screened Coulomb potential is used to model Debye and quantum plasma for the specific values of the parameters in its structure. However, in order to examine effects of velocity-dependent potential on energy values of hydrogen atom in Debye and quantum plasma, the isotropic form factor of velocity-dependent potential is given as harmonic oscillator type, ρ(r)=ρ{sub o}r{sup 2}. Then, the energies of s and p states are calculated numerically without any approximation. In order to investigate thoroughly plasma screening effects and contribution of velocity-dependent potential on energy values of hydrogen atom, the corresponding calculations are carried out by using different values of parameters of more general exponential cosine screened Coulomb potential and isotropic dependence, results of which are discussed.

  6. Plasma Membrane Surface Potential: Dual Effects upon Ion Uptake and Toxicity1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Kinraide, Thomas B.; Zhou, Dongmei; Kopittke, Peter M.; Peijnenburg, Willie J.G.M.

    2011-01-01

    Electrical properties of plasma membranes (PMs), partially controlled by the ionic composition of the exposure medium, play significant roles in the distribution of ions at the exterior surface of PMs and in the transport of ions across PMs. The effects of coexisting cations (commonly Al3+, Ca2+, Mg2+, H+, and Na+) on the uptake and toxicity of these and other ions (such as Cu2+, Zn2+, Ni2+, Cd2+, and H2AsO4−) to plants were studied in terms of the electrical properties of PMs. Increased concentrations of cations or decreased pH in rooting media, whether in solution culture or in soils, reduced the negativity of the electrical potential at the PM exterior surface (ψ0o). This reduction decreased the activities of metal cations at the PM surface and increased the activities of anions such as H2AsO4−. Furthermore, the reduced ψ0o negativity increased the surface-to-surface transmembrane potential difference, thus increasing the electrical driving force for cation uptake and decreasing the driving force for anion uptake across PMs. Analysis of measured uptake and toxicity of ions using electrostatic models provides evidence that uptake and toxicity are functions of the dual effects of ψ0o (i.e. altered PM surface ion activity and surface-to-surface transmembrane potential difference gradient). This study provides novel insights into the mechanisms of plant-ion interactions and extends current theory to evaluate ion bioavailability and toxicity, indicating its potential utility in risk assessment of metal(loid)s in natural waters and soils. PMID:21119046

  7. Derivation and Testing of Computer Algorithms for Automatic Real-Time Determination of Space Vehicle Potentials in Various Plasma Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-05-31

    COMPUTER ALGORITHMS FOR AUTOMATIC REAL-TIME DETERMINATION OF SPACE VEHICLE POTENTIALS IN VARIOUS PLASMA ENVIRONMENTS May 31, 1988 Stanley L. Spiegel...crrnaion DiviSiofl 838 12 2 DERIVATION AND TESTING OF COMPUTER ALGORITHMS FOR AUTOMATIC REAL-TIME DETERMINATION OF SPACE VEHICLE POTENTIALS IN VARIOUS...automatic detemrinatio nof space vehicle potentials in real time." Final Report, Grant AFOSR-82-0147, University of Lowell Reserarch Foundation Spiegel

  8. Parameterizing the Morse potential for coarse-grained modeling of blood plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Na; Zhang, Peng; Kang, Wei; Bluestein, Danny; Deng, Yuefan

    2014-01-15

    Multiscale simulations of fluids such as blood represent a major computational challenge of coupling the disparate spatiotemporal scales between molecular and macroscopic transport phenomena characterizing such complex fluids. In this paper, a coarse-grained (CG) particle model is developed for simulating blood flow by modifying the Morse potential, traditionally used in Molecular Dynamics for modeling vibrating structures. The modified Morse potential is parameterized with effective mass scales for reproducing blood viscous flow properties, including density, pressure, viscosity, compressibility and characteristic flow dynamics of human blood plasma fluid. The parameterization follows a standard inverse-problem approach in which the optimal micro parameters are systematically searched, by gradually decoupling loosely correlated parameter spaces, to match the macro physical quantities of viscous blood flow. The predictions of this particle based multiscale model compare favorably to classic viscous flow solutions such as Counter-Poiseuille and Couette flows. It demonstrates that such coarse grained particle model can be applied to replicate the dynamics of viscous blood flow, with the advantage of bridging the gap between macroscopic flow scales and the cellular scales characterizing blood flow that continuum based models fail to handle adequately.

  9. Potential bioactivity of coatings formed on AZ91D magnesium alloy by plasma electrolytic anodizing.

    PubMed

    Vu, Thanh-Nam; Veys-Renaux, Delphine; Rocca, Emmanuel

    2012-10-01

    Magnesium is a potential candidate as biodegradable orthopedic implant thanks to its remarkable mechanical properties closed to those of natural bone. But its low corrosion resistance in the body fluid is a limiting factor. By using electrolytic plasma (or microarc) anodizing process, 10-20 μm protective coatings were formed on AZ91D magnesium alloys at a constant current density of 20 mA cm(-2). The effect of a small addition of CaO (1-3 g L(-1)) to a classical electrolytic bath (made of KOH 3 mol L(-1), KF 0.5 mol L(-1), and K(2)HPO(4) 1 mol L(-1)) was studied. The anodic films, investigated by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope-energy dispersive spectroscopy, show a porous structure containing crystallized Mg(OH)(2), MgO, MgAl(2)O(4), as well as Ca and P elements. The 1 g L(-1) CaO-containing electrolyte leads to morphology and composition permitting optimum corrosion behavior evaluated by stationary electrochemical measurements and impedance spectroscopy. This improvement is associated with both the appearing of a "sealing" layer and the precipitation of an outermost Ca/P-containing layer (hydroxyapatite like) in simulated body fluid. The control of the corrosion behavior of coated magnesium alloys is therefore required to enhance their potential bioactivity.

  10. Color path integral equation of state of the quark-gluon plasma at nonzero chemical potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filinov, V. S.; Bonitz, M.; Ivanov, Yu B.; Ilgenfritz, E.-M.; Fortov, V. E.

    2015-04-01

    Based on the constituent quasiparticle model of the quark-gluon plasma (QGP), a color quantum path-integral Monte-Carlo (PIMC) method for calculation of the thermodynamic properties of the QGP is developed. We show that the PIMC method can be used for calculations of the equation of state at zero and non-zero baryon chemical potential not only above but also below the QCD critical temperature. Our results agree with lattice QCD calculations based on a Taylor expansion around zero baryon chemical potential. In our approach the QGP partition function is presented in the form of a color path integral with a relativistic measure replacing the Gaussian one traditionally used in the Feynman-Wiener path integrals. A procedure of sampling color variables according to the SU(3) group Haar measure is used for integration over the color variables. We expect that this approach will be useful to predict additional properties of the QGP that are still unaccesible in lattice QCD.

  11. Plant plasma membrane aquaporins in natural vesicles as potential stabilizers and carriers of glucosinolates.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Ballesta, Maria Del Carmen; Pérez-Sánchez, Horacio; Moreno, Diego A; Carvajal, Micaela

    2016-07-01

    Their biodegradable nature and ability to target cells make biological vesicles potential nanocarriers for bioactives delivery. In this work, the interaction between proteoliposomes enriched in aquaporins derived from broccoli plants and the glucosinolates was evaluated. The vesicles were stored at different temperatures and their integrity was studied. Determination of glucosinolates, showed that indolic glucosinolates were more sensitive to degradation in aqueous solution than aliphatic glucosinolates. Glucoraphanin was stabilized by leaf and root proteoliposomes at 25°C through their interaction with aquaporins. An extensive hydrogen bond network, including different aquaporin residues, and hydrophobic interactions, as a consequence of the interaction between the linear alkane chain of glucoraphanin and Glu31 and Leu34 protein residues, were established as the main stabilizing elements. Combined our results showed that plasma membrane vesicles from leaf and root tissues of broccoli plants may be considered as suitable carriers for glucosinolate which stabilization can be potentially attributed to aquaporins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of exercise intensity on plasma concentrations of appetite-regulating hormones: Potential mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hazell, Tom J; Islam, Hashim; Townsend, Logan K; Schmale, Matt S; Copeland, Jennifer L

    2016-03-01

    The physiological control of appetite regulation involves circulating hormones with orexigenic (appetite-stimulating) and anorexigenic (appetite-inhibiting) properties that induce alterations in energy intake via perceptions of hunger and satiety. As the effectiveness of exercise to induce weight loss is a controversial topic, there is considerable interest in the effect of exercise on the appetite-regulating hormones such as acylated ghrelin, peptide YY (PYY), glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), and pancreatic polypeptide (PP). Research to date suggests short-term appetite regulation following a single exercise session is likely affected by decreases in acylated ghrelin and increases in PYY, GLP-1, and PP. Further, this exercise-induced response may be intensity-dependent. In an effort to guide future research, it is important to consider how exercise alters the circulating concentrations of these appetite-regulating hormones. Potential mechanisms include blood redistribution, sympathetic nervous system activity, gastrointestinal motility, cytokine release, free fatty acid concentrations, lactate production, and changes in plasma glucose and insulin concentrations. This review of relevant research suggests blood redistribution during exercise may be important for suppressing ghrelin, while other mechanisms involving cytokine release, changes in plasma glucose and insulin concentrations, SNS activity, and muscle metabolism likely mediate changes in the anorexigenic signals PYY and GLP-1. Overall, changes in appetite-regulating hormones following acute exercise appear to be intensity-dependent, with increasing intensity leading to a greater suppression of orexigenic signals and greater stimulation of anorexigenic signals. However, there is less research on how exercise-induced responses in appetite-regulating hormones differ between sexes or different age groups. A better understanding of how exercise intensity and workload affect appetite across the sexes and life

  13. Generating end plug potentials in tandem mirror plasma confinement by heating thermal particles so as to escape low density end stoppering plasmas

    DOEpatents

    Baldwin, D.E.; Logan, B.G.

    The invention provides a method and apparatus for raising the potential of a magnetic mirror cell by pumping charged particles of the opposite sign of the potential desired out of the mirror cell through excitation, with the pumping being done by an externally imposed field at the bounce frequence of the above charged particles. These pumped simple mirror cells then provide end stoppering for a center mirror cell for the tandem mirror plasma confinement apparatus. For the substantially complete pumping case, the end plugs of a tandem mirror can be up to two orders of magnitude lower in density for confining a given center mirror cell plasma than in the case of end plugs without pumping. As a result the decrease in recirculating power required to keep the system going, the technical state of the art required, and the capital cost are all greatly lowered.

  14. Generating end plug potentials in tandem mirror plasma confinement by heating thermal particles so as to escape low density end stoppering plasmas

    DOEpatents

    Baldwin, David E.; Logan, B. Grant

    1981-01-01

    The invention provides a method and apparatus for raising the potential of a magnetic mirror cell by pumping charged particles of the opposite sign of the potential desired out of the mirror cell through excitation, with the pumping being done by an externally imposed field at the bounce frequency of the above charged particles. These pumped simple mirror cells then provide end stoppering for a center mirror cell for the tandem mirror plasma confinement apparatus. For the substantially complete pumping case, the end plugs of a tandem mirror can be up to two orders of magnitude lower in density for confining a given center mirror cell plasma than in the case of end plugs without pumping. As a result the decrease in recirculating power required to keep the system going, the technological state of the art required, and the capital cost are all greatly lowered.

  15. An interatomic potential model for molecular dynamics simulation of silicon etching by Br{sup +}-containing plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ohta, H.; Iwakawa, A.; Eriguchi, K.; Ono, K.

    2008-10-01

    An interatomic potential model for Si-Br systems has been developed for performing classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. This model enables us to simulate atomic-scale reaction dynamics during Si etching processes by Br{sup +}-containing plasmas such as HBr and Br{sub 2} plasmas, which are frequently utilized in state-of-the-art techniques for the fabrication of semiconductor devices. Our potential form is based on the well-known Stillinger-Weber potential function, and the model parameters were systematically determined from a database of potential energies obtained from ab initio quantum-chemical calculations using GAUSSIAN03. For parameter fitting, we propose an improved linear scheme that does not require any complicated nonlinear fitting as that in previous studies [H. Ohta and S. Hamaguchi, J. Chem. Phys. 115, 6679 (2001)]. In this paper, we present the potential derivation and simulation results of bombardment of a Si(100) surface using a monoenergetic Br{sup +} beam.

  16. Plasma miR-216a as a potential marker of pancreatic injury in a rat model of acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Xiang-Yu; Du, Yi-Qi; Li, Lei; Liu, Jian-Qiang; Wang, Guo-Kun; Zhu, Jia-Qi; Man, Xiao-Hua; Gong, Yan-Fang; Xiao, Li-Ning; Zheng, Yong-Zhi; Deng, Shang-Xin; Gu, Jun-Jun; Li, Zhao-Shen

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To study the potential value and specificity of plasma miR-216a as a marker for pancreatic injury. METHODS: Two rat models were applied in this article: L-arginine-induced acute pancreatitis was used as one model to explore the potential value of plasma miR-216a for detection of pancreatic injury; nonlethal sepsis induced in rats by single puncture cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) was used as the other model to evaluate the specificity of plasma miR-216a compared with two commonly used markers (amylase and lipase) for acute pancreatitis. Plasmas were sampled from rats at indicated time points and total RNA was isolated. Real-Time Quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction was used to quantify miR-216a in plasmas. RESULTS: In the acute pancreatitis model, among five time points at which plasmas were sampled, miR-216a concentrations were significantly elevated 24 h after arginine administration and remained significantly increased until 48 h after operation (compared with 0 h time point, P < 0.01, Kruskal-Wallis Test). In the CLP model, plasma amylase and lipase, two commonly used biomarkers for acute pancreatitis, were significantly elevated 24 h after operation (compared with 0 h time point, P < 0.01 and 0.05 respectively, Pairwise Bonferroni corrected t-tests), while miR-216a remained undetectable among four tested time points. CONCLUSION: Our article showed for the first time that plasma miR-216a might serve as a candidate marker of pancreatic injury with novel specificity. PMID:20857533

  17. Design, Fabrication, and Testing of Emissive Probes to Determine the Plasma Potential of the Plumes of Various Electric Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Erinna M.

    2005-01-01

    A significant problem in the use of electric thrusters in spacecraft is the formation of low-energy ions in the thruster plume. Low-energy ions are formed in the plume via random collisions between high-velocity ions ejected from the thruster and slow-moving neutral atoms of propellant effusing from the engine. The sputtering of spacecraft materials due to interactions with low-energy ions may result in erosion or contamination of the spacecraft. The trajectory of these ions is determined primarily by the plasma potential of the plume. Thus, accurate characterization of the plasma potential is essential to predicting low-energy ion contamination. Emissive probes were utilized to determine the plasma potential. When the ion and electron currents to the probe are balanced, the potential of such probes float to the plasma potential. Two emissive probes were fabricated; one utilizing a DC power supply, another utilizing a rectified AC power source. Labview programs were written to coordinate and automate probe motion in the thruster plume. Employing handshaking interaction, these motion programs were synchronized to various data acquisition programs to ensure precision and accuracy of the measurements. Comparing these experimental values to values from theoretical models will allow for a more accurate prediction of low-energy ion interaction.

  18. Potential therapeutic biomarkers in plasma cell myeloma: a flow cytometry study.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wenli; Liu, Dingshen; Fan, Xiangshan; Powers, Linda; Goswami, Maitrayee; Hu, Ying; Lin, Pei; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Wang, Sa A

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the expression profile of potential therapeutic biomarkers in plasma cell myeloma (PCM) by multicolor flow cytometry analysis. Bone marrow (BM) specimens were collected consecutively and analyzed using a routine PCM panel (CD38/CD138/CD45/CD19/CD20/CD28/CD56/CD117, cyto-kappa/lambda). The specimens were further assessed for CD30, CD44, CD49d, CD70, CD105, and CD184 expression in cases containing a substantial number of neoplastic plasma cells. Totally, 101 patient BM samples were assessed, including 58 men and 43 women, with a median age of 64 years (34-89). Twenty-nine patients had newly diagnosed/untreated PCM, 40 had persistent/residual disease undergoing various therapies and 32 had relapsed disease. CD49d was expressed brightly and uniformly in all 45 patients tested. Expression of CD44 and CD184 was more variable with a median percentage of 77% (1-100) and 65% (5-100) respectively. Using an arbitrary 20% cutoff, CD44 was positive in 74 (73%) and CD184 in 92 (91%) cases with a mean fluorescence intensity ratio of 42.8 and 21.4. A higher CD44 expression was observed in patients with recurrent/persistent disease (P = 0.028). Additionally, both CD44 (P = 0.002) and CD184 (P = 0.026) showed higher expressions in CD117-positive cases, but there was no correlation with cytogenetic groups. The CD30, CD70, and CD105 were expressed very infrequently in PCM, with a median expression of 0.2%, 0.2%, and 0.4% respectively. CD49d, CD44, and CD184, are highly expressed in PCM. CD49d expression is bright and uniform, whereas CD44 and CD184 are more heterogeneous. In contrast, surface CD30, CD70, and CD105 are infrequent. These data provide useful preclinical information for the design of potential novel targeted therapies in PCM patients. Copyright © 2013 International Clinical Cytometry Society.

  19. Effective momentum-dependent potentials for atomic bound states and scattering in strongly coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christlieb, A.; Dharuman, G.; Verboncoeur, J.; Murillo, M. S.

    2016-10-01

    Modeling high energy-density experiments requires simulations spanning large length and time scales. These non-equilibrium experiments have time evolving ionization and partial degeneracy, obviating the direct use of the time-dependent Schrodinger equation. Therefore, efficient approximate methods are greatly needed. We have examined the accuracy of one such method based on an effective classical-dynamics approach employing effective momentum dependent potentials (MDPs) within a Hamiltonian framework that enables large-scale simulations. We have found that a commonly used formulation, based on Kirschbaum-Wilets MDPs leads to very accurate ground state energies and good first/second-ionization energies. The continuum scattering properties of free electrons were examined by comparing the momentum-transfer cross section (MTCS) predicted by KW MDP to a semi-classical phase-shift calculation. Optimizing the KW MDP parameters for the scattering process yielded poor MTCSs, suggesting a limitation of the use of KW MDP for plasmas. However, our new MDP yields MTCS values in much better agreement than KW MDP.

  20. Investigation of multifractal nature of floating potential fluctuations obtained from a dc glow discharge magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Pankaj Kumar; Saha, Debajyoti; Ghosh, Sabuj; Janaki, M. S.; Iyengar, A. N. Sekar

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA) has been used to analyze the floating potential fluctuations obtained with a Langmuir probe from a dc glow discharge magnetized plasma device. The generalized Hurst exponents (h(q)) , local fluctuation function (Fq(s)) , the Rényi exponents (τ(q)) and the multifractal spectrum F(α) have been calculated by applying the MF-DFA method. The result of the MF-DFA shows the multifractal nature of these fluctuations. We have investigated the influence of magnetic field on the multifractal nature of the fluctuations and it is seen that degree of multifractality is reduced with the increase in the magnetic field strength. The values of h(q) have been restricted between 0.7 and 1 for the magnetized fluctuations. This result is evidence of the existence of long-range correlations in the fluctuations. Furthermore, we employed shuffle and surrogate approaches to analyze the origins of multifractality. Comparing the MF-DFA results for the data set to those for shuffled and surrogate series, we have found that its multifractal nature is due to the existence of significant long-term correlation.

  1. Ion kinetic effects on the wake potential behind a dust grain in a flowing plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Winske, D.; Daughton, W.; Lemons, D. S.; Murillo, M. S.

    2000-06-01

    The structure of the wake potential downstream of a stationary dust grain in a flowing plasma is studied on ion time scales using particle-in-cell simulation methods. The scaling of the wake is investigated as a function of Mach number and other parameters as well as the dimensionality of the system. The results are compared and discussed in relation to various theoretical expressions for the wake. Consistent with theory, in one dimension the wake wavelength scales as M{lambda}{sub De}(1-M{sup 2}){sup -1/2} for M<1, where M is the Mach number and {lambda}{sub De} is the electron Debye length, while no wake forms for M>1. In two dimensions, a wake is formed for both M<1 and M>1, while the wake wavelength scales as M{lambda}{sub De} in both regimes. The amplitude of the wake peaks at M{approx_equal}1 in both the one- and two-dimensional simulations. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  2. Simultaneous evaluation of plasma membrane integrity, acrosomal integrity, and mitochondrial membrane potential in bovine spermatozoa by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Chihiro; Kang, Sung-Sik; Kitade, Yasuyuki; Yanagawa, Yojiro; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Nagano, Masashi

    2016-08-01

    The present study aimed to develop an objective evaluation procedure to estimate the plasma membrane integrity, acrosomal integrity, and mitochondrial membrane potential of bull spermatozoa simultaneously by flow cytometry. Firstly, we used frozen-thawed semen mixed with 0, 25, 50, 75 or 100% dead spermatozoa. Semen was stained using three staining solutions: SYBR-14, propidium iodide (PI), and phycoerythrin-conjugated peanut agglutinin (PE-PNA), for the evaluation of plasma membrane integrity and acrosomal integrity. Then, characteristics evaluated by flow cytometry and by fluorescence microscopy were compared. Characteristics of spermatozoa (viability and acrosomal integrity) evaluated by flow cytometry and by fluorescence microscopy were found to be similar. Secondly, we attempted to evaluate the plasma membrane integrity, acrosomal integrity, and also mitochondrial membrane potential of spermatozoa by flow cytometry using conventional staining with three dyes (SYBR-14, PI, and PE-PNA) combined with MitoTracker Deep Red (MTDR) staining (quadruple staining). The spermatozoon characteristics evaluated by flow cytometry using quadruple staining were then compared with those of staining using SYBR-14, PI, and PE-PNA and staining using SYBR-14 and MTDR. There were no significant differences in all characteristics (viability, acrosomal integrity, and mitochondrial membrane potential) evaluated by quadruple staining and the other procedures. In conclusion, quadruple staining using SYBR-14, PI, PE-PNA, and MTDR for flow cytometry can be used to evaluate the plasma membrane integrity, acrosomal integrity, and mitochondrial membrane potential of bovine spermatozoa simultaneously.

  3. Surface Electrical Potentials of Root Cell Plasma Membranes: Implications for Ion Interactions, Rhizotoxicity, and Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi-Min; Kinraide, Thomas B.; Wang, Peng; Hao, Xiu-Zhen; Zhou, Dong-Mei

    2014-01-01

    Many crop plants are exposed to heavy metals and other metals that may intoxicate the crop plants themselves or consumers of the plants. The rhizotoxicity of heavy metals is influenced strongly by the root cell plasma membrane (PM) surface’s electrical potential (ψ0). The usually negative ψ0 is created by negatively charged constituents of the PM. Cations in the rooting medium are attracted to the PM surface and anions are repelled. Addition of ameliorating cations (e.g., Ca2+ and Mg2+) to the rooting medium reduces the effectiveness of cationic toxicants (e.g., Cu2+ and Pb2+) and increases the effectiveness of anionic toxicants (e.g., SeO42− and H2AsO4−). Root growth responses to ions are better correlated with ion activities at PM surfaces ({IZ}0) than with activities in the bulk-phase medium ({IZ}b) (IZ denotes an ion with charge Z). Therefore, electrostatic effects play a role in heavy metal toxicity that may exceed the role of site-specific competition between toxicants and ameliorants. Furthermore, ψ0 controls the transport of ions across the PM by influencing both {IZ}0 and the electrical potential difference across the PM from the outer surface to the inner surface (Em,surf). Em,surf is a component of the driving force for ion fluxes across the PM and controls ion-channel voltage gating. Incorporation of {IZ}0 and Em,surf into quantitative models for root metal toxicity and uptake improves risk assessments of toxic metals in the environment. These risk assessments will improve further with future research on the application of electrostatic theory to heavy metal phytotoxicity in natural soils and aquatic environments. PMID:25493475

  4. Potential application of X-ray communication through a plasma sheath encountered during spacecraft reentry into earth's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huan; Tang, Xiaobin; Hang, Shuang; Liu, Yunpeng; Chen, Da

    2017-03-01

    Rapid progress in exploiting X-ray science has fueled its potential application in communication networks as a carrier wave for transmitting information through a plasma sheath during spacecraft reentry into earth's atmosphere. In this study, we addressed the physical transmission process of X-rays in the reentry plasma sheath and near-earth space theoretically. The interactions between the X-rays and reentry plasma sheath were investigated through the theoretical Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin method, and the Monte Carlo simulation was employed to explore the transmission properties of X-rays in the near-earth space. The simulation results indicated that X-ray transmission was not influenced by the reentry plasma sheath compared with regular RF signals, and adopting various X-ray energies according to different spacecraft reentry altitudes is imperative when using X-ray uplink communication especially in the near-earth space. Additionally, the performance of the X-ray communication system was evaluated by applying the additive white Gaussian noise, Rayleigh fading channel, and plasma sheath channel. The Doppler shift, as a result of spacecraft velocity changes, was also calculated through the Matlab Simulink simulation, and various plasma sheath environments have no significant influence on X-ray communication owing to its exceedingly high carrier frequency.

  5. Plasma levels of the tissue inhibitor matrix metalloproteinase-3 as a potential biomarker in oral cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Su, Chun-Wen; Su, Bo-Feng; Chiang, Whei-Ling; Yang, Shun-Fa; Chen, Mu-Kuan; Lin, Chiao-Wen

    2017-01-01

    Oral cancer is the most common malignancy with poor prognosis and is the fourth most common cancer in men in Taiwan. The tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-3 (TIMP3) acts as a tumor suppressor gene by inhibiting the growth, angiogenesis, migration, and invasion of cancer cells. However, few studies have examined the association of plasma TIMP3 levels with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), and the role of plasma TIMP3 levels in OSCC progression is still unclear. We measured the plasma TIMP3 levels of 450 OSCC patients and 64 healthy controls by using a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We also analyzed TIMP3 mRNA levels of 328 OSCC patients and 32 normal tissues from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) dataset. Our results revealed that plasma TIMP3 levels were significantly lower in patients with OSCC than in healthy controls (p < 0.001). Moreover, plasma TIMP3 levels in patients with OSCC were significantly associated with the tumor stage and tumor status but not with the lymph node status, metastasis, and cell differentiation. To verify our findings, we also examined TCGA bioinformatics database and discovered similar results for the association with the pathological stage of OSCC. In conclusion, our results suggest that plasma TIMP3 is a potential biomarker for predicting the tumor stage and T status in patients with OSCC. PMID:28138307

  6. Study of the Spacecraft Potential Under Active Control and Plasma Density Estimates During the MMS Commissioning Phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andriopoulou, M.; Nakamura, R.; Torkar, K.; Baumjohann, W.; Torbert, R. B.; Lindqvist, P.-A.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Dorelli, John Charles; Burch, J. L.; Russell, C. T.

    2016-01-01

    Each spacecraft of the recently launched magnetospheric multiscale MMS mission is equipped with Active Spacecraft Potential Control (ASPOC) Instruments, which control the spacecraft potential in order to reduce spacecraft charging effects. ASPOC typically reduces the spacecraft potential to a few volts. On several occasions during the commissioning phase of the mission, the ASPOC instruments were operating only on one spacecraft at a time. Taking advantage of such intervals, we derive photoelectron curves and also perform reconstructions of the uncontrolled spacecraft potential for the spacecraft with active control and estimate the electron plasma density during those periods. We also establish the criteria under which our methods can be applied.

  7. Plasma Amino Acids Profiles in Children with Autism: Potential Risk of Nutritional Deficiencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Georgianne L.; Hyman, Susan L.; Mooney, Robert A.; Kirby, Russell S.

    2003-01-01

    The plasma amino acid profiles of 10 children with autism on gluten and casein restricted diets and 26 on unrestricted diets were reviewed. There was a trend for the children on restricted diets to have an increased prevalence of essential amino acid deficiencies and lower plasma levels of essential acids. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  8. Plasma Amino Acids Profiles in Children with Autism: Potential Risk of Nutritional Deficiencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Georgianne L.; Hyman, Susan L.; Mooney, Robert A.; Kirby, Russell S.

    2003-01-01

    The plasma amino acid profiles of 10 children with autism on gluten and casein restricted diets and 26 on unrestricted diets were reviewed. There was a trend for the children on restricted diets to have an increased prevalence of essential amino acid deficiencies and lower plasma levels of essential acids. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  9. Ionic regulation of the plasma membrane potential of rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) spermatozoa: Role in the initiation of sperm motility

    SciTech Connect

    Gatti, J.L.; Billard, R.; Christen, R. )

    1990-06-01

    The ionic dependence of the trout sperm plasma membrane potential was analysed by measuring the accumulation of the lipophilic ions {sup 3}H-tetraphenylphosphonium (TPP) and {sup 14}C-thiocyanate (SCN) following dilution in artificial media isotonic to the seminal fluid. Our data showed that the trout sperm plasma membrane has a mixed conductance: the plasma membrane potential is sensitive upon the transmembrane gradients of K+, Na+, and H+. This potential is negative (less than -40 mV) in a 125 mM choline chloride media (ChM) at pH 8.5. Replacement of choline by sodium has a small depolarizing effect. The membrane potential is about -15 mV in a 125 mM potassium chloride and falls near zero mV only if valinomycin is added. In ChM changing the external pH (pHe) greatly affects the membrane potential: its value rises from less than -40 mV at pHe 9.0 to -17 mV at pHe 5.0. This pH effect is observed also in presence of sodium or potassium. A decrease in the transmembrane proton gradient produced by increasing internal pH without changing pHe induces also a depolarisation of the plasma membrane. In the different media in which trout sperm remain immotile after dilution (media with (K+) greater than 20-40 mM or a pH less than 7.5) the plasma membrane is more depolarized than in media allowing motility, suggesting a relationship between the state of membrane polarization and the intracellular effectors of the axonemal movement.

  10. Plasma cadmium and zinc and their interrelationship in adult Nigerians: potential health implications

    PubMed Central

    Ogbonnaya, Lawrence Ulu; Uro-Chukwu, Henry; Obuna, Johnson Akuma; Ogiji, Emeka; Ezenkwa, Simon Uchenna

    2015-01-01

    Zinc (an essential trace element) and cadmium (a ubiquitous environmental pollutant with acclaimed toxicity) have been found to occur together in nature, with reported antagonism between the two elements. The present study aimed at determination of plasma levels of zinc (Zn) and cadmium (Cd) and their interrelationship in adult Nigerians. The series comprised adults (n=443) aged ≥18 yrs (mean ± SD 38.4±13.7 yrs), consisting of 117 males, 184 non-pregnant and 140 pregnant females. Sociodemographic data were collected by questionnaire while anthropometrics were determined using standard methods. Plasma Cd and Zn were determined by using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The mean plasma zinc and cadmium were 94.7±18.1 μg/dl and 0.150±0.548 μg/dl, respectively. Age, sex, pregnancy, and parity had no effect on either plasma Zn or Cd. Although educational level had no effect on plasma Zn, it had a significant effect on Cd; subjects possessing either secondary or tertiary education had significantly lower plasma Cd than subjects without formal education. Moreover, there seemed to be an inverse relationship between Cd and Zn, but this was not statistically significant (r=–0.089; p=0.061). Although plasma Zn was not related to BMI (r=0.037; p=0.432), Cd was significantly negatively correlated with BMI (r=–0.124; p=0.009). It may be concluded that adult Nigerians in Ebonyi State have elevated plasma levels of Cd, with apparent impact on the levels of plasma Zn. This has important public health implications considering the essential roles of Zn in the protection of Cd mediated adverse health effects. While food diversification is recommended to improve plasma Zn, efforts should be made to reduce exposure to Cd to mitigate partially its possible adverse effects. PMID:27486364

  11. Diagnostic potential of plasma microRNA signatures in patients with deep-vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Sundquist, Kristina; Elf, Johan L; Strandberg, Karin; Svensson, Peter J; Hedelius, Anna; Palmer, Karolina; Memon, Ashfaque A; Sundquist, Jan; Zöller, Bengt

    2016-08-01

    For excluding deep-vein thrombosis (DVT), a negative D-dimer and low clinical probability are used to rule out DVT. Circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) are stably present in the plasma, serum and other body fluids. Their diagnostic function has been investigated in many diseases but not in DVT. The aims of present study were to assess the diagnostic ability of plasma miRNAs in DVT and to examine their correlation with known markers of hypercoagulability, such as D-dimer and APC-PCI complex. Plasma samples were obtained from 238 patients (aged 16-95 years) with suspected DVT included in a prospective multicentre management study (SCORE). We first performed miRNA screening of plasma samples from three plasma pools containing plasma from 12 patients with DVT and three plasma pools containing plasma from 12 patients without DVT using a microRNA Ready-to-use PCR Panel comprising 742 miRNA primer sets. Thirteen miRNAs that differentially expressed were further investigated by quantitative real-time (qRT)-PCR in the entire cohort. The plasma level of miR-424-5p (p=0.01) were significantly higher, whereas the levels of miR-136-5p (p=0.03) were significantly lower in DVT patients compared to patients without DVT. Receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis showed the area under the curve (AUC) values of 0.63 for miR-424-5p and 0.60 for miR-136-5p. The plasma level of miR-424-5p was associated with both D-dimer and APC-PCI complex levels (p<0.0001 and p=0.001, respectively). In conclusions, these findings indicate that certain miRNAs are associated with DVT and markers of hypercoagulability, though their diagnostic abilities are probably too low.

  12. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes inhibit fluorescein extrusion and reduce plasma membrane potential in in vitro human glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yonghong; Chen, Xiao; Cheng, Yuli; Xing, Yiqiao

    2010-06-01

    In the study on the interactions of carbon nanotubes with living cells, the cell membrane deserves particular attention as it provides the first interface to initiate CNTs-cell interactions. In the present study, the inhibiting effect of multiwalled carbon nanotubes on the extrusion of fluorescein in human glioma cells was demonstrated using two procedures. To provide clues to explanation of this effect, intracellular glutathione content and reactive oxygen species production were determined as fluorescein is a specific substrate of cell membrane multidrug resistance-related protein whose transport activity requires glutathione which can be depleted under oxidative stress. The plasma membrane potential was also probed as the susceptibility of fluorescein efflux to modulation of the plasma membrane potential has been documented. Results showed a remarkable decrease in cellular glutathione level as well as an increase in reactive oxygen species production. Probe staining also indicated decreased plasma membrane potential. The data suggested that multiwalled carbon nanotubes may affect the transport activity of cell membrane multidrug resistance-related protein through reduction of intracellular glutathione content. Hypopolarization of the plasma membrane may also contribute to MWCNTs' effect. Implications of these findings are discussed.

  13. Comparison of non-neutral electron plasma confinement in harmonic and rectangular potentials in a very dense regime

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, T.; Mohri, A.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2013-01-15

    Confinement of high density electron plasmas in a strong uniform magnetic field was experimentally studied in a multi-ring trap (MRT). The trap was housed inside a bore tube and surrounded by a superconducting solenoid. A 5 T magnetic field was used to provide radial confinement while an electrostatic harmonic or rectangular potential well was used for axial confinement. For trapped electrons of N = 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} in a harmonic potential well (HPW) with the trap length of L{sub T} = 320 mm, the plasma lifetime was about 10{sup 4} s and it became much longer at lower N = 4.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9}. Such long holding times were achieved without application of rotating electric fields. Contrastingly, in a rectangular potential well (RPW), the plasma of N = 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} under the same trap length expanded to cover the whole Faraday Cup within 200 s, where its radial expansion rate was {eta} = 3.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2} mm/s, which was 20 times faster than HPW. The lifetime for RPW became shorter with increasing L{sub T} and scaled as 1/[L{sub T}]{sup 2}. This scaling found for high density plasmas is similar to the obtained one with different Penning-Malmberg traps at UC San Diego (USCD).

  14. Influence of the radial profile of the electric potential on the confinement of a high-{beta} two-component plasma in a gas-dynamic trap

    SciTech Connect

    Soldatkina, E. I.; Bagryansky, P. A.; Solomakhin, A. L.

    2008-04-15

    One of the most important problems to be studied in the gas-dynamic trap (GDT) facility is the investigation of MHD stability and cross-field transport in a plasma with a relatively high value of {beta} = {pi}p/B{sup 2}. Recent experiments demonstrated that the radial electric field produced in the plasma by using radial limiters and coaxial end plasma collectors improves plasma stability in axisymmetric magnetic mirror systems without applying special MHD stabilizers. The experimental data presented in this work show that stable plasma confinement can be achieved by producing a radial potential drop across a narrow region near the plasma boundary. Creating radial electric fields of strength 15-40 V/cm causes a shear plasma flow, thereby substantially increasing the plasma confinement time. When all the radial electrodes were grounded, the confinement was unstable and the plasma confinement time was much shorter than the characteristic time of plasma outflow through the magnetic mirrors. Measurements of cross-field plasma fluxes with the use of a specially designed combined probe show that, in confinement modes with differential plasma rotation, transverse particle losses are negligibly small as compared to longitudinal ones and thus can be ignored. It is also shown that, when the GDT plasma is in electric contact with the radial limiters and end collectors, the growth rate of interchange instability decreases considerably; such a contact, however, does not ensure complete MHD stability when the electrodes are at the same potential.

  15. Osteogenic potential of platelet-rich plasma in dental stem-cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Otero, L; Carrillo, N; Calvo-Guirado, J L; Villamil, J; Delgado-Ruíz, R A

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the potential of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) culture media to induce osteogenic differentiation of periodontal ligament stem cells and dental pulp stem cells compared with four other methods of culture. Both types of cell were collected from 35 healthy patients and cultured in five different media (Dulbecco's modified eagle's medium (DMEM); DMEM and melatonin; DMEM and PRP; DMEM and ascorbic acid 200μmol; DMEM and l-ascorbate 2-phosphate 50μmol). Cells were characterised by flow cytometry. Alizarin Red stain, alkaline phosphatase stain, and the expression of collagen type 1 (Col-1), runt-related transcription factor (RUNX2), osteoprotegerin, and osteopontin (quantified by qRT-PCR) were used to detect the osteogenic profile in each culture. Flow cytometry showed that both types of stem cell were a homogeneous mixture of CD90(+), CD105(+), STRO-1(+), CD34 (-), and CD45 (-) cells. Dental pulp stem cells that were cultured with PRP showed the best osteogenic profile (RUNX2 p=0.0002; osteoprotegerin p=0.001). The group of these stem cells that showed the best osteogenic profile was also cultured with PRP (osteoprotegerin p=0.001). Medium five (with l-ascorbate 2-phosphate 50μmol added) showed an increase in all osteogenic markers for periodontal ligament stem cells after PRP, while the best culture conditions for osteogenic expression of dental pulp stem cells after PRP was in medium four (ascorbic acid 200μmol added). These results suggested that culture in PRP induces osteogenic differentiation of both types of stem cell, modulating molecular pathways to promote bony formation. Copyright © 2017 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Characterization of the plasma and blood anticoagulant potential of structurally and mechanistically novel oligomers of 4-hydroxycinnamic acids

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Brian L.; Thakkar, Jay N.; Martin, Erika J.; Brophy, Donald F.; Desai, Umesh R.

    2009-01-01

    Recently, we designed sulfated dehydropolymers (DHPs) of 4-hydroxycinnamic acids that displayed interesting anticoagulant properties. Structurally and mechanistically, sulfated DHPs are radically different from all the anticoagulants studied to date. To assess whether their unique mechanism and structure is worth exploiting for further rational design of homogeneous DHP-based molecules, we investigated their anticoagulant potential in human plasma and blood using a range of clotting assays. Sulfated DHPs prolong plasma clotting times, prothrombin and activated partial thromboplastin times at concentrations comparable to the clinically used low-molecular-weight heparin, enoxaparin. Fibrin formation studies on human plasma show that there is a structural dependence of anticoagulant action. Human whole blood studies using thromboelastography and hemostasis analysis system indicate that they are 17–140-fold less potent than enoxaparin. Results demonstrate that sulfated DHPs possess good in-vitro and ex-vivo activity, which will likely be improved through a rational design. PMID:20523162

  17. Cold atmospheric plasma discharged in water and its potential use in cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhitong; Cheng, Xiaoqian; Lin, Li; Keidar, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) has emerged as a novel technology for cancer treatment. CAP can directly treat cells and tissue but such direct application is limited to skin or can be invoked as a supplement during open surgery. In this study we report indirect plasma treatment using CAP discharged in deionized (DI) water using three gases as carriers (argon (Ar), helium (He), and nitrogen (N2)). Plasma stimulated water was applied to the human breast cancer cell line (MDA-MB-231). MTT (3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay tests showed that using Ar plasma had the strongest effect on inducing apoptosis in cultured human breast cancer cells. This result is attributed to the elevated production of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species in water.

  18. Potential long-term effects of previous schistosome infection may reduce the atherogenic index of plasma in Chinese men.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shi-Wei; Lu, Yun; Li, Feng; Shen, Zhen-Hai; Xu, Ming; Yao, Wei-Feng; Feng, Yin-Bo; Yun, Jing-Ting; Wang, Ya-Ping; Ling, Wang; Qi, Hua-Jin; Tong, Da-Xin

    2015-04-01

    The major purpose of this study was to assess the association between the potential long-term effects of previous schistosome infection and atherogenic dyslipidemia. Among 1597 men aged ⩾45 years who received health examinations and lived in previous schistosomiasis-endemic regions of China, 465 patients with previous schistosome infection were selected as study subjects, and 1132 subjects formed the control group. The risk factors for cardiovascular disease were measured and compared between the previous schistosome infection and control groups. The Atherogenic Index of Plasma, triglycerides, waist circumference and body mass index were significantly lower in the previous schistosome infection group than in the control group (all P values <0.001), whereas high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol was significantly higher in the previous schistosome infection group (P<0.001). In the Atherogenic Index of Plasma quartiles (Q1-Q4), the percentages of subjects with previous schistosome infection were 55.89% (Q1), 25.44% (Q2), 16.33% (Q3), and 18.8% (Q4), respectively (χ(2)=139.86, P<0.001). A logistic regression analysis based on previous schistosome infection as the independent variable and Atherogenic Index of Plasma as the dependent variable revealed that previous schistosome infection was significantly negatively correlated with Atherogenic Index of Plasma (odds ratio=0.583, 95% confidence interval: 0.440-0.772, P<0.001) after adjustment for body mass index, waist circumference, diastolic blood pressure and uric acid, suggesting that previous schistosome infection is an independent factor associated with Atherogenic Index of Plasma. The potential long-term effects of previous schistosome infection may reduce the Atherogenic Index of Plasma in Chinese men. However, further studies are required to investigate the protective human immune response against schistosome infections. The development of a schistosomiasis vaccine may effectively prevent the development and

  19. In vivo suppression of plasma IL-12 levels by acute and chronic stress paradigms: potential mediating mechanisms and sex differences.

    PubMed

    Shaashua, L; Sominsky, L; Levi, B; Sorski, L; Reznick, M; Page, G G; Ben-Eliyahu, S

    2012-08-01

    Interleukin-12 (IL-12) is a major pro-inflammatory cytokine, which promotes cell-mediated immunity and T(H)1 differentiation. In vitro studies indicated suppression of IL-12 production by several stress-related factors, but no effects of behavioral stress were shown on plasma IL-12 levels. Therefore, in the current study we (i) examined the in vivo effects of various behavioral and pharmacological stress paradigms on baseline plasma IL-12 levels; (ii) compared these in vivo findings to those obtained following in vitro stimulation of leukocytes from the same rats; and (iii) assessed potential sexual dimorphism in these outcomes. The findings indicated that plasma IL-12 levels were significantly reduced by social confrontation, wet-cage exposure, surgery, and the administration of corticosterone, epinephrine, or prostaglandin-E(2). Notably, most in vivo impacts on plasma levels were not evident when assessed in vitro. The IL-12-reducing effects of wet-cage exposure, and of corticosterone and epinephrine administration, were significantly greater in males than in females, although females exhibited greater total corticosterone levels following stress. The duration of acute stressors predicted the degree of IL-12 reduction, but more prolonged stressors did not. Furthermore, seven days of alternating behavioral stressors reduced plasma IL-12 levels more than 14 days. These findings suggest animals' behavioral habituation to stress conditions, or a specific immune mechanism restricting the duration of IL-12 reduction. Overall, our findings indicate a generic and robust stress-induced reduction in plasma IL-12 levels, and suggest epinephrine, corticosterone, and prostaglandin-E(2), as potential mediators that should be scrutinized in vivo in the context of natural physiological stress responses. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. In vivo suppression of plasma IL-12 levels by acute and chronic stress paradigms: potential mediating mechanisms and sex differences

    PubMed Central

    Shaashua, L.; Sominsky, L.; Levi, B.; Sorski, L.; Reznick, M.; Page, G.; Ben-Eliyahu, S.

    2012-01-01

    Interleukin-12 (IL-12) is a major pro-inflammatory cytokine, which promotes cell-mediated immunity and TH1 differentiation. In vitro studies indicated suppression of IL-12 production by several stress-related factors, but no effects of behavioral stress were shown on plasma IL-12 levels. Therefore, in the current study we (i) examined the in vivo effects of various behavioral and pharmacological stress paradigms on baseline plasma IL-12 levels; (ii) compared these in vivo findings to those obtained following in vitro stimulation of leukocytes from the same rats; and (iii) assessed potential sexual dimorphism in these outcomes. The findings indicated that plasma IL-12 levels were significantly reduced by social confrontation, wet-cage exposure, surgery, and the administration of corticosterone, epinephrine, or prostaglandin-E2. Notably, most in vivo impacts on plasma levels were not evident when assessed in vitro. The IL-12-reducing effects of wet-cage exposure, and of corticosterone and epinephrine administration, were significantly greater in males than in females, although females exhibited greater total corticosterone levels following stress. The duration of acute stressors predicted the degree of IL-12 reduction, but more prolonged stressors did not. Furthermore, seven days of alternating behavioral stressors reduced plasma IL-12 levels more than fourteen days. These findings suggest animals’ behavioral habituation to stress conditions, or a specific immune mechanism restricting the duration of IL-12 reduction. Overall, our findings indicate a generic and robust stress-induced reduction in plasma IL-12 levels, and suggest epinephrine, corticosterone, and prostaglandin-E2, as potential mediators that should be scrutinized in vivo in the context of natural physiological stress responses. PMID:22659252

  1. Potential role of plasma myeloperoxidase level in predicting long-term outcome of acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Mehmet Gungor; Yalcin, Ridvan; Okyay, Kaan; Poyraz, Fatih; Bayraktar, Nilufer; Pasaoglu, Hatice; Boyaci, Bulent; Cengel, Atiye

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the prognostic importance of plasma myeloperoxidase levels in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) at long-term follow-up, and we analyzed the correlations between plasma myeloperoxidase levels and other biochemical values. We evaluated 73 consecutive patients (56 men; mean age, 56 ± 11 yr) diagnosed with acute STEMI and 46 age- and sex-matched healthy control participants. Patients were divided into 2 groups according to the median myeloperoxidase level (Group 1: plasma myeloperoxidase ≤ 68 ng/mL; and Group 2: plasma myeloperoxidase > 68 ng/mL). Patients were monitored for the occurrence of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE), which were defined as cardiac death; reinfarction; new hospital admission for angina; heart failure; and revascularization procedures. The mean follow-up period was 25 ± 16 months. Plasma myeloperoxidase levels were higher in STEMI patients than in control participants (82 ± 34 vs 20 ± 12 ng/mL; P = 0.001). Composite MACE occurred in 12 patients with high myeloperoxidase levels (33%) and in 4 patients with low myeloperoxidase levels (11%) (P = 0.02). The incidences of nonfatal recurrent myocardial infarction and verified cardiac death were higher in the high-myeloperoxidase group. In multivariate analysis, high plasma myeloperoxidase levels were independent predictors of MACE (odds ratio = 3.843; <95% confidence interval, 1.625-6.563; P = 0.003). High plasma myeloperoxidase levels identify patients with a worse prognosis after acute STEMI at 2-year follow-up. Evaluation of plasma myeloperoxidase levels might be useful in determining patients at high risk of death and MACE who can benefit from further aggressive treatment and closer follow-up.

  2. Potential Role of Plasma Myeloperoxidase Level in Predicting Long-Term Outcome of Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Mehmet Gungor; Yalcin, Ridvan; Okyay, Kaan; Poyraz, Fatih; Bayraktar, Nilufer; Pasaoglu, Hatice; Boyaci, Bulent; Cengel, Atiye

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the prognostic importance of plasma myeloperoxidase levels in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) at long-term follow-up, and we analyzed the correlations between plasma myeloperoxidase levels and other biochemical values. We evaluated 73 consecutive patients (56 men; mean age, 56 ±11 yr) diagnosed with acute STEMI and 46 age- and sex-matched healthy control participants. Patients were divided into 2 groups according to the median myeloperoxidase level (Group 1: plasma myeloperoxidase ≤68 ng/mL; and Group 2: plasma myeloperoxidase >68 ng/mL). Patients were monitored for the occurrence of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE), which were defined as cardiac death; reinfarction; new hospital admission for angina; heart failure; and revascularization procedures. The mean follow-up period was 25 ± 16 months. Plasma myeloperoxidase levels were higher in STEMI patients than in control participants (82 ± 34 vs 20 ±12 ng/mL; P=0.001). Composite MACE occurred in 12 patients with high myeloperoxidase levels (33%) and in 4 patients with low myeloperoxidase levels (11%) (P=0.02). The incidences of nonfatal recurrent myocardial infarction and verified cardiac death were higher in the high-mye-loperoxidase group. In multivariate analysis, high plasma myeloperoxidase levels were independent predictors of MACE (odds ratio = 3.843; <95% confidence interval, 1.625–6.563; P=0.003). High plasma myeloperoxidase levels identify patients with a worse prognosis after acute STEMI at 2-year follow-up. Evaluation of plasma myeloperoxidase levels might be useful in determining patients at high risk of death and MACE who can benefit from further aggressive treatment and closer follow-up. PMID:22949765

  3. Determination of the plasma potential and the EEDF by Langmuir probes in the divertor region of COMPASS tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, P.; Dimitrova, M.; Vasileva, E.; Popov, Tsv K.; Dejarnac, R.; Stockel, J.; Imríšfsek, M.; Hacek, P.; Panek, R.

    2016-10-01

    This paper reports experimental data obtained on the COMPASS tokamak by an array of Langmuir probes embedded in the divertor tiles. The measured current-voltage probe characteristics were processed by the recently published first-derivative probe technique for precise determination of the plasma potential and the electron energy distribution function (EEDF). The measurements were performed during L-mode hydrogen and deuterium plasma with a toroidal magnetic field Bt = 1.15 T, plasma current Ip = 180 kA and average electron density ne = 8*1019 m-3. The spatial profile of the electron temperatures shows that in the vicinity of the inner and outer strike points in hydrogen plasma the EEDF can be approximated by a bi-Maxwellian distribution, with a dominating low-energy electron population (4 - 7 eV) and a minority of electrons with higher energies (12 - 18 eV). In the private flux region between the two strike points, the EEDF is found to be Maxwellian with temperatures in the range of 7 - 9 eV. In the case of deuterium plasma under similar discharge conditions, the EEDFs in the vicinity of the inner and outer strike points, as well as in the private flux region between the two strike points, are found to be bi-Maxwellian.

  4. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of n-heptane and methyl methacrylate for potential cell alignment applications.

    PubMed

    Steinbach, Annina; Tautzenberger, Andrea; Schaller, Andreas; Kalytta-Mewes, Andreas; Tränkle, Sebastian; Ignatius, Anita; Volkmer, Dirk

    2012-10-24

    Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited polymers (plasma polymers) are promising candidates for biomaterials applications. In the present study, plasma deposition as a fast and easily scalable method was adapted to deposit coatings from n-heptane and methyl methacrylate monomers onto glass substrates. Linear patterns with line and groove widths between 1.25 and 160 μm were introduced by degrative UV-lithography for cell alignment. Differential interference contrast optical microscopy, profilometry and atomic force microscopy revealed that the patterned surfaces had a smooth, homogeneous appearance and a pattern height of 8 and 45 nm for plasma deposited n-heptane and methyl methacrylate, respectively. UV-lithography increased the oxygen content on the surface drastically as shown by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. After immersion in simulated body fluid for 21 days, the pattern was still intact, and the ester groups were also maintained for the most part as shown by infrared spectroscopy. To test the coatings' potential applicability for biomaterial surfaces in a preliminary experiment, we cultured murine preosteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells on these coatings. Light and electron microscopically, a normal spindle-shaped and aligned cell morphology was observed. At the mRNA level, cells showed no signs of diminished proliferation or elevated expression of apoptosis markers. In conclusion, plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited polymers can be patterned with a fast and feasible method and might be suitable materials to guide cell alignment.

  5. Plasma protoporphyrin IX following administration of 5-aminolevulinic acid as a potential tumor marker

    PubMed Central

    OTA, URARA; FUKUHARA, HIDEO; ISHIZUKA, MASAHIRO; ABE, FUMINORI; KAWADA, CHIAKI; TAMURA, KENJI; TANAKA, TOHRU; INOUE, KEIJI; OGURA, SHUN-ICHIRO; SHUIN, TARO

    2015-01-01

    Exogenously administered 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) is metabolized to protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), which specifically accumulates in cancer cells and emits red fluorescence by blue light irradiation. These phenomena are applied for the intraoperative diagnosis of cancer. Based on the fact that accumulated PpIX in cancer cells is exported extracellularly via the ATP-binding cassette transporter G2, we hypothesized that the measurement of plasma PpIX concentrations could be applied as a tumor marker for cancer screening. In the present study, the use of plasma samples from bladder cancer patients were evaluated as a tumor marker. ALA, 1.0 g, was orally administered to bladder cancer patients and healthy adults. The plasma concentration of PpIX was measured using a high-performance liquid chromatography system. The plasma PpIX concentration following ALA administration was significantly higher in bladder cancer patients than that in the healthy adults, suggesting the effectiveness of plasma PpIX analysis following ALA administration for cancer screening. Additionally, 4 h after ALA administration, plasma PpIX showed high sensitivity (94.4%) and high specificity (80.0%). PMID:26171183

  6. End-boundary sheath potential, electron and ion energy distribution in the low-pressure non-ambipolar electron plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lee; Chen, Zhiying; Funk, Merritt

    2013-12-01

    The end-boundary floating-surface sheath potential, electron and ion energy distribution functions (EEDf, IEDf) in the low-pressure non-ambipolar electron plasma (NEP) are investigated. The NEP is heated by an electron beam extracted from an inductively coupled electron-source plasma (ICP) through a dielectric injector by an accelerator located inside the NEP. This plasma's EEDf has a Maxwellian bulk followed by a broad energy continuum connecting to the most energetic group with energies around the beam energy. The NEP pressure is 1-3 mTorr of N2 and the ICP pressure is 5-15 mTorr of Ar. The accelerator is biased positively from 80 to 600 V and the ICP power range is 200-300 W. The NEP EEDf and IEDf are determined using a retarding field energy analyser. The EEDf and IEDf are measured at various NEP pressures, ICP pressures and powers as a function of accelerator voltage. The accelerator current and sheath potential are also measured. The IEDf reveals mono-energetic ions with adjustable energy and it is proportionally controlled by the sheath potential. The NEP end-boundary floating surface is bombarded by a mono-energetic, space-charge-neutral plasma beam. When the injected energetic electron beam is adequately damped by the NEP, the sheath potential is linearly controlled at almost a 1 : 1 ratio by the accelerator voltage. If the NEP parameters cannot damp the electron beam sufficiently, leaving an excess amount of electron-beam power deposited on the floating surface, the sheath potential will collapse and become unresponsive to the accelerator voltage.

  7. Potential of electric discharge plasma methods in abatement of volatile organic compounds originating from the food industry.

    PubMed

    Preis, S; Klauson, D; Gregor, A

    2013-01-15

    Increased volatile organic compounds emissions and commensurate tightening of applicable legislation mean that the development and application of effective, cost-efficient abatement methods are areas of growing concern. This paper reviews the last two decades' publications on organic vapour emissions from food processing, their sources, impacts and treatment methods. An overview of the latest developments in conventional air treatment methods is presented, followed by the main focus of the paper, non-thermal plasma technology. The results of the review suggest that non-thermal plasma technology, in its pulsed corona discharge configuration, is an emerging treatment method with potential for low-cost, effective abatement of a wide spectrum of organic air pollutants. It is found that the combination of plasma treatment with catalysis is a development trend that demonstrates considerable potential. The as yet relatively small number of plasma treatment applications is considered to be due to the novelty of pulsed electric discharge techniques and a lack of reliable pulse generators and reactors. Other issues acting as barriers to widespread adoption of the technique include the possible formation of stable oxidation by-products, residual ozone and nitrogen oxides, and sensitivity towards air humidity.

  8. Plasma metabolomics combined with lipidomics profiling reveals the potential antipyretic mechanisms of Qingkailing injection in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Qin, Lingling; Zhang, Zhixin; Guo, Mingxing; Zhang, Qingqing; Wang, Qing; Lu, Zhiwei; Zhao, Huizhen; Liu, Yuehong; Fu, Shuang; Wang, Meiling; Gao, Xiaoyan

    2016-07-25

    Qingkailing injection (QKLI) has a notable antipyretic effect and is widely used in China as a clinical emergency medicine. To elucidate the pharmacological action thoroughly, following the investigation of the urine metabolome and hypothalamus metabolome, plasma metabolomics combined with lipidomics profiling of the QKLI antipyretic effect in a rat model is described in this paper. Compared with pure metabolomics profiling, this non-targeted plasma metabolomics combined with lipidomics profiling based on ultra-performance liquid chromatography-coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC Q-TOF/MS) could be used for a large-scale detection of features in plasma samples. The results showed that 15 metabolites at the 1 h time point and 19 metabolites at the 2 h time point after QKLI administration were associated with the antipyretic effect of QKLI, including amino acid, phosphatidylcholine and lysophosphatidylcholine. The metabolism pathway analysis revealed that the potential biomarkers, which were important for the antipyretic mechanism of QKLI, were closely responsible for correcting the perturbed pathways of amino acid metabolism and lipid metabolism. In conclusion, the use of complementary UPLC Q-TOF/MS based metabolomics and lipidomics allows for the discovery of new potential plasma biomarkers in the QKLI antipyretic process and the associated pathways, and aided in advancing the understanding of the holism and synergism of the Chinese drug. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Spatial distribution of the electrical potential and ion concentration in the downstream area of atmospheric pressure remote plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishin, M. V.; Protopopova, V. S.; Uvarov, A. A.; Alexandrov, S. E.

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents the results from an experimental study of the ion flux characteristics behind the remote plasma zone in a vertical tube reaction chamber for atmospheric pressure plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Capacitively coupled radio frequency plasma was generated in pure He and gas mixtures: He-Ar, He-O2, He-TEOS. We previously used the reaction system He-TEOS for the synthesis of self-assembled structures of silicon dioxide nanoparticles. It is likely that the electrical parameters of the area, where nanoparticles have been transported from the synthesis zone to the substrate, play a significant role in the self-organization processes both in the vapor phase and on the substrate surface. The results from the spatial distribution of the electrical potential and ion concentration in the discharge downstream area measured by means of the external probe of original design and the special data processing method are demonstrated in this work. Positive and negatives ions with maximum concentrations of 106-107 cm-3 have been found at 10-80 mm distance behind the plasma zone. On the basis of the revealed distributions for different gas mixtures, the physical model of the observed phenomena is proposed. The model illustrates the capability of the virtual ion emitter formation behind the discharge gap and the presence of an extremum of the electrical potential at the distance of approximately 10-2-10-1 mm from the grounded electrode.

  10. Proteomic Analysis of Plasma-Purified VLDL, LDL, and HDL Fractions from Atherosclerotic Patients Undergoing Carotid Endarterectomy: Identification of Serum Amyloid A as a Potential Marker

    PubMed Central

    Lepedda, Antonio J.; Zinellu, Elisabetta; De Muro, Pierina; Guarino, Anna; Spirito, Rita; Carta, Franco; Turrini, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Apolipoproteins are very heterogeneous protein family, implicated in plasma lipoprotein structural stabilization, lipid metabolism, inflammation, or immunity. Obtaining detailed information on apolipoprotein composition and structure may contribute to elucidating lipoprotein roles in atherogenesis and to developing new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of lipoprotein-associated disorders. This study aimed at developing a comprehensive method for characterizing the apolipoprotein component of plasma VLDL, LDL, and HDL fractions from patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy, by means of two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) coupled with Mass Spectrometry analysis, useful for identifying potential markers of plaque presence and vulnerability. The adopted method allowed obtaining reproducible 2-DE maps of exchangeable apolipoproteins from VLDL, LDL, and HDL. Twenty-three protein isoforms were identified by peptide mass fingerprinting analysis. Differential proteomic analysis allowed for identifying increased levels of acute-phase serum amyloid A protein (AP SAA) in all lipoprotein fractions, especially in LDL from atherosclerotic patients. Results have been confirmed by western blotting analysis on each lipoprotein fraction using apo AI levels for data normalization. The higher levels of AP SAA found in patients suggest a role of LDL as AP SAA carrier into the subendothelial space of artery wall, where AP SAA accumulates and may exert noxious effects. PMID:24454983

  11. Proteomic analysis of plasma-purified VLDL, LDL, and HDL fractions from atherosclerotic patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy: identification of serum amyloid A as a potential marker.

    PubMed

    Lepedda, Antonio J; Nieddu, Gabriele; Zinellu, Elisabetta; De Muro, Pierina; Piredda, Franco; Guarino, Anna; Spirito, Rita; Carta, Franco; Turrini, Francesco; Formato, Marilena

    2013-01-01

    Apolipoproteins are very heterogeneous protein family, implicated in plasma lipoprotein structural stabilization, lipid metabolism, inflammation, or immunity. Obtaining detailed information on apolipoprotein composition and structure may contribute to elucidating lipoprotein roles in atherogenesis and to developing new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of lipoprotein-associated disorders. This study aimed at developing a comprehensive method for characterizing the apolipoprotein component of plasma VLDL, LDL, and HDL fractions from patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy, by means of two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) coupled with Mass Spectrometry analysis, useful for identifying potential markers of plaque presence and vulnerability. The adopted method allowed obtaining reproducible 2-DE maps of exchangeable apolipoproteins from VLDL, LDL, and HDL. Twenty-three protein isoforms were identified by peptide mass fingerprinting analysis. Differential proteomic analysis allowed for identifying increased levels of acute-phase serum amyloid A protein (AP SAA) in all lipoprotein fractions, especially in LDL from atherosclerotic patients. Results have been confirmed by western blotting analysis on each lipoprotein fraction using apo AI levels for data normalization. The higher levels of AP SAA found in patients suggest a role of LDL as AP SAA carrier into the subendothelial space of artery wall, where AP SAA accumulates and may exert noxious effects.

  12. Plasma jet-induced tissue oxygenation: potentialities for new therapeutic strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collet, G.; Robert, E.; Lenoir, A.; Vandamme, M.; Darny, T.; Dozias, S.; Kieda, C.; Pouvesle, J. M.

    2014-02-01

    The lack of oxygen is a major reason for the resistance of tumor cells to treatments such as radiotherapies. A large number of recent publications on non-thermal plasma applications in medicine report cell behavior modifications and modulation of soluble factors. This in vivo study tested whether such modifications can lead to vascular changes in response to plasma application. Two in situ optical-based methods were used simultaneously, in real time, to assess the effect of non-thermal plasma on tissue vasculature. Tissue oxygen partial pressure (pO2) was measured using a time-resolved luminescence-based optical probe, and the microvascular erythrocyte flow was determined by laser Doppler flowmetry. When plasma treatment was applied on mouse skin, a rapid pO2 increase (up to 4 times) was subcutaneously measured and correlated with blood flow improvement. Such short duration, i.e. 5 min, plasma-induced effects were shown to be locally restricted to the treated area and lasted over 120 min. Further investigations should elucidate the molecular mechanisms of these processes. However, improvement of oxygenation and perfusion open new opportunities for tumor treatments in combination with radiotherapy, and for tumor blood vessel normalization based strategies.

  13. Evaluation of the potentials of humic acid removal in water by gas phase surface discharge plasma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tiecheng; Qu, Guangzhou; Ren, Jingyu; Yan, Qiuhe; Sun, Qiuhong; Liang, Dongli; Hu, Shibin

    2016-02-01

    Degradation of humic acid (HA), a predominant type of natural organic matter in ground water and surface waters, was conducted using a gas phase surface discharge plasma system. HA standard and two surface waters (Wetland, and Weihe River) were selected as the targets. The experimental results showed that about 90.9% of standard HA was smoothly removed within 40 min's discharge plasma treatment at discharge voltage 23.0 kV, and the removal process fitted the first-order kinetic model. Roles of some active species in HA removal were studied by evaluating the effects of solution pH and OH radical scavenger; and the results presented that O3 and OH radical played significant roles in HA removal. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and FTIR analysis showed that HA surface topography and molecular structure were changed during discharge plasma process. The mineralization of HA was analyzed by UV-Vis spectrum, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), specific UV absorbance (SUVA), UV absorption ratios, and excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence. The formation of disinfection by-products during HA sample chlorination was also identified, and CHCl3 was detected as the main disinfection by-product, but discharge plasma treatment could suppress its formation to a certain extent. In addition, approximately 82.3% and 67.9% of UV254 were removed for the Weihe River water and the Wetland water after 40 min of discharge plasma treatment.

  14. Plasma concentrations of amino acid and nicotinamide metabolites in rheumatoid arthritis--potential biomarkers of disease activity and drug treatment.

    PubMed

    Smolenska, Zaneta; Smolenski, Ryszard T; Zdrojewski, Zbigniew

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate changes in plasma amino acid and nicotinamide metabolites concentrations in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in a search for potential biomarkers of the disease activity and the effect treatment. Analysis of plasma metabolite patterns with liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry revealed specific changes in RA as well as correlations with clinical parameters. Combined concentration parameter calculated as [aspartic acid] + [threonine] + [tryptophan] - [histidine] - [phenylalanine] offered the strongest correlation (p < 0.001) with pain joint count, swollen joint count and DAS 28. Such analysis of amino acid and related metabolite pattern offers potential for diagnosis as well as for monitoring disease progression and therapy in RA.

  15. [Search for potential gastric cancer biomarkers using low molecular weight blood plasma proteome profiling by mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Shevchenko, V E; Arnotskaia, N E; Ogorodnikova, E V; Davydov, M M; Ibraev, M A; Turkin, I N; Davydov, M I

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer, one of the most widespread malignant tumors, still lacks reliable serum/plasma biomarkers of its early detection. In this study we have developed, unified, and tested a new methodology for search of gastric cancer biomarkers based on profiling of low molecular weight proteome (LMWP) (1-17 kDa). This approach included three main components: sample pre-fractionation, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS), data analysis by a bioinformatics software package. Applicability and perspectives of the developed approach for detection of potential gastric cancer markers during LMWP analysis have been demonstrated using 69 plasma samples from patients with gastric cancer (stages I-IV) and 238 control samples. The study revealed peptides/polypeptides, which may be potentially used for detection of this pathology.

  16. Plasma MicroRNAs as Potential Noninvasive Biomarkers for In-Stent Restenosis

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Zhenwei; Zou, Hui; Sun, Danghui; Tu, Xin; Tan, Xiangyang; Li, Jianqiang; Li, Weimin; Liu, Bin; Xue, Jingyi; Sheng, Li; Xiu, Chunhong; Yang, Ning; Xue, Hongjie; Ding, Xue; Yu, Chengyuan; Li, Yue

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether microRNAs (miRs) can serve as novel biomarkers for in-stent restenosis (ISR). Methods This retrospective, observational single-centre study was conducted at the cardiovascular department of a tertiary hospital centre in the north of China. Follow-up coronary angiography at 6 to 12 months was performed in 181 consecutive patients implanted with drug-eluting stents. Fifty-two healthy volunteers served as the control group. The plasma miRs levels were analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR. Receiver-operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis was performed to investigate the characters of these miRs as potential biomarkers of ISR. Results MiR-21 levels in ISR patients were significantly higher than those in non-ISR patients and healthy controls (P<0.05), while miR-100 (P<0.05), miR-143 (P<0.001) and miR-145 (P<0.0001) levels were significantly decreased in ISR patients. Further analysis showed that miR-21 levels were remarkably increased (P = 0.045), while miR-100 (P = 0.041), miR-143 (P = 0.029) and miR-145 (P<0.01) levels were dramatically decreased in patients with diffuse ISR compared to those with focal ISR. ROC analysis demonstrated that the area under curve of miR-145, miR-143, miR-100 and miR-21 were 0.880 (95% confidence interval; CI = 0.791–0.987, P<0.001), 0.818 (95% confidence interval; CI = 0.755–0.963, P<0.001), 0.608 (95% confidence interval; CI = 0.372–0.757, P<0.05) and 0.568 (95% confidence interval; CI = 0.372–0.757, P<0.05), with specificity of 83.1%, 80.1%, 68.9% and 68.6%, and sensitivity of 88.7%, 82.1%, 60.2% and 50.1%, respectively. Conclusions Circulating miR-143 and miR-145 levels are associated with the occurrence of ISR and can serve as novel noninvasive biomarkers for ISR. PMID:25427155

  17. The potential role of electric fields and plasma barodiffusion on the inertial confinement fusion databasea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amendt, Peter; Wilks, S. C.; Bellei, C.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2011-05-01

    The generation of strong, self-generated electric fields (GV/m) in direct-drive, inertial-confinement-fusion (ICF) capsules has been reported [Rygg et al., Science 319, 1223 (2008); Li et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 225001 (2008)]. A candidate explanation for the origin of these fields based on charge separation across a plasma shock front was recently proposed [Amendt et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 51 124048 (2009)]. The question arises whether such electric fields in imploding capsules can have observable consequences on target performance. Two well-known anomalies come to mind: (1) an observed ≈2× greater-than-expected deficit of neutrons in an equimolar D3He fuel mixture compared with hydrodynamically equivalent D [Rygg et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 052702 (2006)] and DT [Herrmann et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 056312 (2009)] fuels, and (2) a similar shortfall of neutrons when trace amounts of argon are mixed with D in indirect-drive implosions [Lindl et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 339 (2004)]. A new mechanism based on barodiffusion (or pressure gradient-driven diffusion) in a plasma is proposed that incorporates the presence of shock-generated electric fields to explain the reported anomalies. For implosions performed at the Omega laser facility [Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)], the (low Mach number) return shock has an appreciable scale length over which the lighter D ions can diffuse away from fuel center. The depletion of D fuel is estimated and found to lead to a corresponding reduction in neutrons, consistent with the anomalies observed in experiments for both argon-doped D fuels and D3He equimolar mixtures. The reverse diffusional flux of the heavier ions toward fuel center also increases the pressure from a concomitant increase in electron number density, resulting in lower stagnation pressures and larger imploded cores in agreement with gated, self-emission, x-ray imaging data.

  18. Photodissociation dynamics in 'hyper-rovibronic' detail: Exploring the potential of millimeter/submillimeter-wave spectroscopy in molecular reaction dynamics experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Duffy, Liam M.

    2005-09-15

    Over the years, many techniques for studying molecular reaction dynamics have been developed and fine-tuned to probe chemical dynamics at an ever-increasing level of detail. Unfortunately, this progress has frequently come at the price of high experimental cost and great complexity. In this regard experiments employing direct absorption have a distinct advantage in that they are comparatively simple in setup and they probe nascent product distributions directly. Even though the low product number densities in molecular-beam experiments put severe constraints on the noise and sensitivity requirements of detectors, Nesbitt and co-workers [J. Chem. Phys. 86, 3151 (1987); Rev. Sci. Instrum. 58, 807 (1987); J. Chem. Phys. 85, 4890 (1986); J. Chem. Phys. 107, 5661 (1997); Chem. Phys. Lett. 258, 207 (1996)] have demonstrated the use of direct infrared absorption in a variety of molecular reaction dynamics studies. In analogous experiments, this article explores the use of millimeter- and submillimeter-wavelength radiation in direct absorption experiments in a molecular beam. The comparatively simple and inexpensive setup demonstrates the utility of combining new commercial solid-state millimeter (submillimeter)-wavelength sources with hot-electron bolometer detectors to directly probe parent and product hyperfine rovibronic levels and their Doppler-resolved velocity distributions in a molecular beam. For example, in open-shell products with nuclear spin, the ultrahigh energy resolution of the rotational spectroscopy easily resolves nuclear quadrupole hyperfine structure and lambda doublets in both ground and excited spin-orbit states as well as in ground and excited vibrational levels. Two molecular beam examples are given: (1) detection of 'hyper-rovibronic' structure in ClO ({sup 2}{pi}{sub {omega}}{sub =3/2l,12,{nu}}=0-8,J=1{sup 1/2})-7{sup 1/2}),{lambda},F) following the mode-specific photodissociation of OClO (A{sup 2}A{sub 2}<-X{sup 2}B{sub 1},{nu}{sub 1

  19. Photodissociation dynamics in ``hyper-rovibronic'' detail: Exploring the potential of millimeter/submillimeter-wave spectroscopy in molecular reaction dynamics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffy, Liam M.

    2005-09-01

    Over the years, many techniques for studying molecular reaction dynamics have been developed and fine-tuned to probe chemical dynamics at an ever-increasing level of detail. Unfortunately, this progress has frequently come at the price of high experimental cost and great complexity. In this regard experiments employing direct absorption have a distinct advantage in that they are comparatively simple in setup and they probe nascent product distributions directly. Even though the low product number densities in molecular-beam experiments put severe constraints on the noise and sensitivity requirements of detectors, Nesbitt and co-workers [J. Chem. Phys. 86, 3151 (1987); Rev. Sci. Instrum. 58, 807 (1987); J. Chem. Phys. 85, 4890 (1986); J. Chem. Phys. 107, 5661 (1997); Chem. Phys. Lett. 258, 207 (1996)] have demonstrated the use of direct infrared absorption in a variety of molecular reaction dynamics studies. In analogous experiments, this article explores the use of millimeter- and submillimeter-wavelength radiation in direct absorption experiments in a molecular beam. The comparatively simple and inexpensive setup demonstrates the utility of combining new commercial solid-state millimeter/submillimeter-wavelength sources with hot-electron bolometer detectors to directly probe parent and product hyperfine rovibronic levels and their Doppler-resolved velocity distributions in a molecular beam. For example, in open-shell products with nuclear spin, the ultrahigh energy resolution of the rotational spectroscopy easily resolves nuclear quadrupole hyperfine structure and lambda doublets in both ground and excited spin-orbit states as well as in ground and excited vibrational levels. Two molecular beam examples are given: (1) detection of "hyper-rovibronic" structure in ClO (ΠΩ =3/2,1/22, ν =0-8, J =1 1/2-7 1/2, Λ,F) following the mode-specific photodissociation of OClO (AA22←XB12, ν1=14-15), and (2) coherent transient absorption of HCN following the 266 nm

  20. Plasma secretory phospholipase A2-IIa as a potential biomarker for lung cancer in patients with solitary pulmonary nodules

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Five-year survival for lung cancer has remained at 16% over last several decades largely due to the fact that over 50% of patients are diagnosed with locally-advanced or metastatic disease. Diagnosis at an earlier and potentially curable stage is crucial. Solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs) are common, but the difficulty lies in the determination of which SPN is malignant. Currently, there is no convenient and reliable biomarker effective for early diagnosis. Secretory phospholipase A2-IIa (sPLA2-IIa) is secreted into the circulation by cancer cells and may allow for an early detection of lung cancer. Methods Plasma samples from healthy donors, patients with only benign SPN, and patients with lung cancer were analyzed. Expression of sPLA2-IIa protein in lung cancer tissues was also determined. Results We found that the levels of plasma sPLA2-IIa were significantly elevated in lung cancer patients. The receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, comparing lung cancer patients to patients with benign nodules, revealed an optimum cutoff value for plasma sPLA2-IIa of 2.4 ng/ml to predict an early stage cancer with 48% sensitivity and 86% specificity and up to 67% sensitivity for T2 stage lung cancer. Combined sPLA2-IIa, CEA, and Cyfra21.1 tests increased the sensitivity for lung cancer prediction. High level of plasma sPLA2-IIa was associated with a decreased overall cancer survival. sPLA2-IIa was overexpressed in almost all non-small cell lung cancer and in the majority of small cell lung cancer by immunohistochemistry analysis. Conclusion Our finding strongly suggests that plasma sPLA2-IIa is a potential lung biomarker to distinguish benign nodules from lung cancer and to aid lung cancer diagnosis in patients with SPNs. PMID:22151235

  1. Potential benefits of a spatially targeted regulation based on detailed N-reduction maps to decrease N-load from agriculture in a small groundwater dominated catchment.

    PubMed

    Hansen, A L; Refsgaard, J C; Olesen, J E; Børgesen, C D

    2017-10-01

    Denmark must further decrease the N-load to coastal waters from agricultural areas to comply with the Baltic Sea Action Plan and the EU Water Framework Directive. A new spatially targeted regulation is under development that focuses on locating N-mitigation measures in areas with low natural reduction of nitrate (N-reduction). A key tool in this respect is N-reduction maps showing how much N is removed by natural reduction processes, i.e. the ratio between the N-load out of the catchment and the N-leaching from the root zone for each spatial unit within the catchment. For the 85 km(2) groundwater dominated Norsminde catchment in Denmark we have analysed the potential benefits of a spatially targeted regulation and how its efficiency is affected by uncertainty in the N-reduction map. Our results suggest that there are potential benefits of implementing a spatially targeted regulation compared to a spatially uniform regulation. The total N-load at the catchment outlet can be decreased up to 8% by relocating the existing agricultural practice according to the N-reduction map and thus without decrease fertilization inputs. A further decrease in N-load can be obtained by identifying target areas with low N-reduction where N-mitigation measures must be applied. Uncertainty on the N-reduction map is found to lower the efficiency of spatially targeted regulation. This uncertainty can be lowered substantially by using the mean of an ensemble of N-reduction maps. The uncertainty decreases with coarser spatial resolution of the N-reduction map, but this will at the same time decrease the benefit from spatially targeted regulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Dilepton production as a useful probe of quark gluon plasma with temperature dependent chemical potential quark mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Yogesh; Singh, S. Somorendro

    2016-07-01

    We extend the previous study of dilepton production using [S. Somorendro Singh and Y. Kumar, Can. J. Phys. 92 (2014) 31] based on a simple quasiparticle model of quark-gluon plasma (QGP). In this model, finite value of quark mass uses temperature dependent chemical potential the so-called Temperature Dependent Chemical Potential Quark Mass (TDCPQM). We calculate dilepton production in the relevant range of mass region. It is observed that the production rate is marginally enhanced from the earlier work. This is due to the effect of TDCPQM and its effect is highly significant in the production of dilepton.

  3. Sagdeev potential approach for quantum ion-acoustic solitary waves in an electron-positron-ion plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Gadadhar Maitra, Sarit

    2016-06-21

    Sagdeev pseudopotential method is employed to study the arbitrary amplitude quantum ion-acoustic solitary waves in an unmagnetized electron-positron-ion plasma by using one dimensional quantum hydrodynamic model together with the Poisson equation. Sagdeev potential function is obtained in terms of electrostatic potential and analyzed with and without the effect of quantum diffraction parameter H. Effects of the parameter H on both the amplitude and width of the solitary waves have been observed. It is also observed that the positron density can affect the wave propagation.

  4. Linking plasma kinetics to plasma-bio interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruggeman, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Cold non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasmas have received a lot of attention in the last decade due to their huge potential for biomedical applications. In my group, we have characterized an RF driven APPJ in great detail. The characterization includes electrical measurements, imaging, optical emission spectroscopy, (two photon enhanced) laser induced fluorescence, Thomson scattering, Rayleigh scattering, Raman scattering and mass spectrometry. This led to a detailed knowledge of the electron density, electron temperature, gas temperature, NO, O, OH, O3 densities, ionic species and air concentrations in the plasma effluent. Living organisms for in vitro studies are typically kept in complex solutions or culture media. Plasma-bio interactions involves not only the production of reactive species in the plasma gas phase but also transport to the liquid phase and plasma induced liquid phase chemistry and its impact on the living organisms. Reactive nitrogen and oxygen species have been identified as the key reactive species. Recent results of my group show that controlling the gas phase plasma chemistry can lead to significant different biological responses of the living organisms corresponding to different chemical pathways. The effect of plasma jet interaction with liquids containing mammalian cells, bacteria and virus will be discussed. The outcomes of these studies allow unraveling chemical pathways responsible for plasma-bio interactions and linking plasma kinetics to plasma-bio interactions.

  5. Increased plasma levels of CK-18 as potential cell death biomarker in patients with HELLP syndrome.

    PubMed

    John, K; Wielgosz, S; Schulze-Osthoff, K; Bantel, H; Hass, R

    2013-10-24

    HELLP (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, low platelets) syndrome represents a life-threatening pregnancy disorder with high fetal and maternal mortality, but its underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. Although apoptosis has been implicated in HELLP syndrome, its pathogenic role remains largely unclear. In the present study, we investigated whether the detection of apoptosis by novel plasma biomarkers is of diagnostic value in HELLP patients. For this purpose, we analyzed two biomarkers that specifically detect apoptosis or overall cell death of epithelial cells, such as hepatocytes or placental trophoblasts, through the release of caspase-cleaved or total (caspase-cleaved and uncleaved) cytokeratin-18 (CK-18) in plasma of HELLP patients compared with pregnant as well as non-pregnant healthy women. In addition, caspase activation and cell death were determined in placental tissues of HELLP patients and individuals with normal pregnancy. In contrast to pregnant or non-pregnant healthy controls, we observed significantly increased levels of both caspase-cleaved and total CK-18 in plasma of HELLP patients. Following delivery, CK-18 levels rapidly decreased in HELLP patients. Caspase activation and cell death were also elevated in placental tissues from HELLP patients compared with healthy pregnant women. These data demonstrate not only that apoptosis is increased in HELLP syndrome, but also that caspase-cleaved or total CK-18 are promising plasma biomarkers to identify patients with HELLP syndrome. Thus, further studies are warranted to evaluate the utility of these biomarkers for monitoring disease activity in HELLP syndrome.

  6. Plasma membrane surface potential: dual effects upon ion uptake and toxicity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Electrical properties of plasma membranes (PMs), partially controlled by the ionic composition of the bathing medium, play significant roles in the distribution of ions at the exterior surface of PMs and in the transport of ions across PMs. The effects of coexistent cations (commonly Al3+, Ca2+, Mg...

  7. Resistin in Dairy Cows: Plasma Concentrations during Early Lactation, Expression and Potential Role in Adipose Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Reverchon, Maxime; Ramé, Christelle; Cognié, Juliette; Briant, Eric; Elis, Sébastien; Guillaume, Daniel; Dupont, Joëlle

    2014-01-01

    Resistin is an adipokine that has been implicated in energy metabolism regulation in rodents but has been little studied in dairy cows. We determined plasma resistin concentrations in early lactation in dairy cows and investigated the levels of resistin mRNA and protein in adipose tissue and the phosphorylation of several components of insulin signaling pathways one week post partum (1 WPP) and at five months of gestation (5 MG). We detected resistin in mature bovine adipocytes and investigated the effect of recombinant bovine resistin on lipolysis in bovine adipose tissue explants. ELISA showed that plasma resistin concentration was low before calving, subsequently increasing and reaching a peak at 1 WPP, decreasing steadily thereafter to reach pre-calving levels at 6 WPP. Plasma resistin concentration was significantly positively correlated with plasma non esterified fatty acid (NEFA) levels and negatively with milk yield, dry matter intake and energy balance between WPP1 to WPP22. We showed, by quantitative RT-PCR and western blotting, that resistin mRNA and protein levels in adipose tissue were higher at WPP1 than at 5 MG. The level of phosphorylation of several early and downstream insulin signaling components (IRβ, IRS-1, IRS-2, Akt, MAPK ERK1/2, P70S6K and S6) in adipose tissue was also lower at 1 WPP than at 5 MG. Finally, we showed that recombinant bovine resistin increased the release of glycerol and mRNA levels for ATGL (adipose triglyceride lipase) and HSL (hormone-sensitive lipase) in adipose tissue explants. Overall, resistin levels were high in the plasma and adipose tissue and were positively correlated with NEFA levels after calving. Resistin is expressed in bovine mature adipocytes and promotes lipid mobilization in adipose explants in vitro. PMID:24675707

  8. Detailed Characterization of Local Field Potential Oscillations and Their Relationship to Spike Timing in the Antennal Lobe of the Moth Manduca sexta

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Kevin C.; Galán, Roberto F.; Peters, Oakland J.; Staudacher, Erich M.

    2011-01-01

    The transient oscillatory model of odor identity encoding seeks to explain how odorants with spatially overlapped patterns of input into primary olfactory networks can be discriminated. This model provides several testable predictions about the distributed nature of network oscillations and how they control spike timing. To test these predictions, 16 channel electrode arrays were placed within the antennal lobe (AL) of the moth Manduca sexta. Unitary spiking and multi site local field potential (LFP) recordings were made during spontaneous activity and in response to repeated presentations of an odor panel. We quantified oscillatory frequency, cross correlations between LFP recording sites, and spike–LFP phase relationships. We show that odor-driven AL oscillations in Manduca are frequency modulating (FM) from ∼100 to 30 Hz; this was odorant and stimulus duration dependent. FM oscillatory responses were localized to one or two recording sites suggesting a localized (perhaps glomerular) not distributed source. LFP cross correlations further demonstrated that only a small (r < 0.05) distributed and oscillatory component was present. Cross spectral density analysis demonstrated the frequency of these weakly distributed oscillations was state dependent (spontaneous activity = 25–55 Hz; odor-driven = 55–85 Hz). Surprisingly, vector strength analysis indicated that unitary phase locking of spikes to the LFP was strongest during spontaneous activity and dropped significantly during responses. Application of bicuculline, a GABAA receptor antagonist, significantly lowered the frequency content of odor-driven distributed oscillatory activity. Bicuculline significantly reduced spike phase locking generally, but the ubiquitous pattern of increased phase locking during spontaneous activity persisted. Collectively, these results indicate that oscillations perform poorly as a stimulus-mediated spike synchronizing mechanism for Manduca and hence are

  9. The Crystal Structure of the Ivy delta4-16:0-ACP Desaturase Reveals Structural Details of the Oxidized Active Site and Potential Determinants of Regioselectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Guy,J.; Whittle, E.; Kumaran, D.; Lindqvist, Y.; Shanklin, J.

    2007-01-01

    The multifunctional acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) desaturase from Hedera helix (English ivy) catalyzes the {Delta}{sup 4} desaturation of 16:0-ACP and the{Delta}{sup 9} desaturation of 18:0-ACP and further desaturates{Delta}{sup 9}-16:1 or {Delta}{sup 9}-18:1 to the corresponding {Delta}{sup 4,9} dienes. The crystal structure of the enzyme has been solved to 1.95{angstrom} resolution, and both the iron-iron distance of 3.2{angstrom} and the presence of a {mu}-oxo bridge reveal this to be the only reported structure of a desaturase in the oxidized FeIII-FeIII form. Significant differences are seen between the oxidized active site and the reduced active site of the Ricinus communis (castor) desaturase; His{sup 227} coordination to Fe2 is lost, and the side chain of Glu{sup 224}, which bridges the two iron ions in the reduced structure, does not interact with either iron. Although carboxylate shifts have been observed on oxidation of other diiron proteins, this is the first example of the residue moving beyond the coordination range of both iron ions. Comparison of the ivy and castor structures reveal surface amino acids close to the annulus of the substrate-binding cavity and others lining the lower portion of the cavity that are potential determinants of their distinct substrate specificities. We propose a hypothesis that differences in side chain packing explains the apparent paradox that several residues lining the lower portion of the cavity in the ivy desaturase are bulkier than their equivalents in the castor enzyme despite the necessity for the ivy enzyme to accommodate three more carbons beyond the diiron site.

  10. Detailed analysis of the male reproductive system in a potential bio-indicator species – The marine invertebrate Galeolaria caespitosa (Polychaeta: Serpulidae)

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yonggang; Aitken, Robert John; Lin, Minjie

    2017-01-01

    For the first time, this study has systemically investigated the male reproductive system in a sessile broadcast-spawning marine invertebrate, Galeolaria caespitosa (Polychaeta: Serpulidae), which has significant potential as a bio-indicator species of coastal marine pollution. The abdomen of G. caespitosa was divided by intersegmental septa into over 80 trunk segments. Each segment served as a germinal chamber with a C-shaped gonadal arrangement consisting of several distinct compartments: a seminiferous epithelium (SE) compartment located in the centre of the chamber, with each of its two ends connecting to a nurse cell (NC) compartment and then an efferent duct (ED) compartment. The SE compartment contained a multilayered seminiferous epithelium where spermatogenesis was initiated. Spermatids were released in pairs into the lumen of the SE compartment and then transported to the NC compartment where they underwent spermiogenesis with the support of secretory vesicles released by the nurse cells. Spermatozoa were stored in the ED compartment and subsequently released into the seawater through the vas deferens. Unlike vertebrates where germ cells differentiated in close proximity to the nurse cell population (i.e. Sertoli cells), the spermatogenic cells of G. caespitosa exhibited no direct contact with supporting cells at any spermatogenic stage. This finding suggested that the spermatogenesis in G. caespitosa was more dependent on intrinsic developmental programming than most species. Notwithstanding such differences, there were clear parallels between the male reproductive system of G. caespitosa and mammals, in terms of the structure and function. The independence of spermatogenic cells from supporting cells in G. caespitosa raised the possibility of inducing spermiogenesis in vitro, which would provide a useful tool to dissect the mechanisms underlying this complex cell differentiation process in invertebrates and other higher order animals. PMID:28369153

  11. Surface modification of Ti6Al4V alloy by PIII at high temperatures: Effects of plasma potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, M. M.; Ueda, M.; Pichon, L.; Reuther, H.; Lepienski, C. M.

    2007-04-01

    The present work is aimed to analyzing the influence of the plasma potential in the efficiency of plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) process with nitrogen, at high temperatures (550 °C and 800 °C), applied to the Ti6Al4V alloy to increase its wear resistance. Treatments with plasma potentials (PP) at 420 V and 90 V were carried out. In the first case, in accordance with AES (Auger Electron Spectroscopy) analysis, nitrogen rich layers of 100 nm and 150 nm of thickness had been obtained, for total treatment times of 60 min and 120 min, respectively. For the treatments with lower PP of 90 V, the treated layers thicknesses have been measured by GDOS (Glow Discharge Optical Spectroscopy) and their values are 1 μm and 1.5 μm for treatments of 120 min and 240 min, respectively. The hardness values were determined for the samples treated with high PP by nanoindentation technique and a significant increase was observed for this treatment, reaching 11 GPa (60 min) and 19 GPa (120 min), which can be compared to 3.5-4.0 GPa obtained for the untreated samples. Pin-on-disk wear tests show that wear resistance increases after all these treatments. The friction coefficient as well as the wear rates are measured with a tribometer.

  12. Concentrations of thiocyanate and goitrin in human plasma, their precursor concentrations in brassica vegetables, and associated potential risk for hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Felker, Peter; Bunch, Ronald; Leung, Angela M

    2016-04-01

    Brassica vegetables are common components of the diet and have beneficial as well as potentially adverse health effects. Following enzymatic breakdown, some glucosinolates in brassica vegetables produce sulforaphane, phenethyl, and indolylic isothiocyanates that possess anticarcinogenic activity. In contrast, progoitrin and indolylic glucosinolates degrade to goitrin and thiocyanate, respectively, and may decrease thyroid hormone production. Radioiodine uptake to the thyroid is inhibited by 194 μmol of goitrin, but not by 77 μmol of goitrin. Collards, Brussels sprouts, and some Russian kale (Brassica napus) contain sufficient goitrin to potentially decrease iodine uptake by the thyroid. However, turnip tops, commercial broccoli, broccoli rabe, and kale belonging to Brassica oleracae contain less than 10 μmol of goitrin per 100-g serving and can be considered of minimal risk. Using sulforaphane plasma levels following glucoraphanin ingestion as a surrogate for thiocyanate plasma concentrations after indole glucosinolate ingestion, the maximum thiocyanate contribution from indole glucosinolate degradation is estimated to be 10 μM, which is significantly lower than background plasma thiocyanate concentrations (40-69 μM). Thiocyanate generated from consumption of indole glucosinolate can be assumed to have minimal adverse risks for thyroid health. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Life Sciences Institute. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Stopping potential and ion beamlet control for micro-resistive patterning through sub-Debye length plasma apertures

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, Abhishek; Chatterjee, Sanghamitro; Dutta, Apurba; Bhattacharjee, Sudeep

    2014-12-15

    Focused multiple ion beamlets from a microwave plasma source is investigated for localized micron-scale modification of substrates in a patterned manner. Plasma electrodes (PE) with an array of through apertures having aperture diameters of the order of plasma Debye length are investigated for generating the beamlets. Extraction through sub-Debye length apertures becomes possible when the PE is kept at floating potential. It is found that the current – voltage characteristics of the extracted beamlets exhibits interesting features such as a space-charge-limited region that has a different behaviour than the conventional Child-Langmuir’s law and an extraction-voltage-limited region that does not undergo saturation but exhibits a Schottky-like behaviour similar to that of a vacuum diode. A switching technique to control the motion of individual beamlets is developed and the stopping potential determined. The beamlets are thereafter used to create localized micro-resistive patterns. The experimental results are compared with simulations and reasonably good agreement is obtained.

  14. A potentially robust plasma profile control approach for ITER using real-time estimation of linearized profile response models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. H.; Lister, J. B.

    2012-07-01

    An active plasma profile control approach for ITER, which is potentially robust by being tolerant to changing and uncertain physics, has been explored in this work, using a technique based on real-time estimation of linearized profile response models. The linearized models approximate static responses of the plasma profiles to power changes in auxiliary heating and current drive systems. These models are updated in real-time, differing from the model-based technique which deduces a dynamic model from identification experiments. The underlying physics is simplified with several assumptions to allow real-time update of the profile response models; however, without significant loss of information necessary for feedback control of the plasma profiles. The response of the electron temperature profile is modelled by simplifying the electron heat transport equation. The response of the safety factor profile is computed by directly relating it to the changes in source current density profiles. The required actuator power changes are directly computed by inverting the response matrix using the singular value decomposition technique. The saturation of the actuator powers is taken into account and the capability of using quantized auxiliary powers is provided. The potential of our active control approach has been tested by applying it to simulations of the ITER hybrid mode operation using CRONOS. In these simulations, either a global transport model or a theory-based local transport model has been used and the electron temperature and safety factor profiles were well controlled either independently or simultaneously.

  15. Stopping potential and ion beamlet control for micro-resistive patterning through sub-Debye length plasma apertures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Abhishek; Chatterjee, Sanghamitro; Dutta, Apurba; Bhattacharjee, Sudeep

    2014-12-01

    Focused multiple ion beamlets from a microwave plasma source is investigated for localized micron-scale modification of substrates in a patterned manner. Plasma electrodes (PE) with an array of through apertures having aperture diameters of the order of plasma Debye length are investigated for generating the beamlets. Extraction through sub-Debye length apertures becomes possible when the PE is kept at floating potential. It is found that the current - voltage characteristics of the extracted beamlets exhibits interesting features such as a space-charge-limited region that has a different behaviour than the conventional Child-Langmuir's law and an extraction-voltage-limited region that does not undergo saturation but exhibits a Schottky-like behaviour similar to that of a vacuum diode. A switching technique to control the motion of individual beamlets is developed and the stopping potential determined. The beamlets are thereafter used to create localized micro-resistive patterns. The experimental results are compared with simulations and reasonably good agreement is obtained.

  16. Concentrations of thiocyanate and goitrin in human plasma, their precursor concentrations in brassica vegetables, and associated potential risk for hypothyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Bunch, Ronald; Leung, Angela M.

    2016-01-01

    Brassica vegetables are common components of the diet and have beneficial as well as potentially adverse health effects. Following enzymatic breakdown, some glucosinolates in brassica vegetables produce sulforaphane, phenethyl, and indolylic isothiocyanates that possess anticarcinogenic activity. In contrast, progoitrin and indolylic glucosinolates degrade to goitrin and thiocyanate, respectively, and may decrease thyroid hormone production. Radioiodine uptake to the thyroid is inhibited by 194 μmol of goitrin, but not by 77 μmol of goitrin. Collards, Brussels sprouts, and some Russian kale (Brassica napus) contain sufficient goitrin to potentially decrease iodine uptake by the thyroid. However, turnip tops, commercial broccoli, broccoli rabe, and kale belonging to Brassica oleracae contain less than 10 μmol of goitrin per 100-g serving and can be considered of minimal risk. Using sulforaphane plasma levels following glucoraphanin ingestion as a surrogate for thiocyanate plasma concentrations after indole glucosinolate ingestion, the maximum thiocyanate contribution from indole glucosinolate degradation is estimated to be 10 μM, which is significantly lower than background plasma thiocyanate concentrations (40–69 μM). Thiocyanate generated from consumption of indole glucosinolate can be assumed to have minimal adverse risks for thyroid health. PMID:26946249

  17. Physics and potentials of fissioning plasmas for space power and propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thom, K.; Schwenk, F. C.; Schneider, R. T.

    1974-01-01

    A brief description of two gas core reactor concepts devised for propulsion applications is presented and recent research on the emission of radiation from nonequilibrium fissioning gases is considered. The principles of UF6 and plasma core reactor experiments are discussed. It is expected that the program of nuclear gas core reactor experiments can lead in several years to reactor operation at pressures, temperatures, and power levels of technological significance to terrestrial applications.

  18. Potential medical applications of the plasma focus in the radioisotope production for PET imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roshan, M. V.; Razaghi, S.; Asghari, F.; Rawat, R. S.; Springham, S. V.; Lee, P.; Lee, S.; Tan, T. L.

    2014-06-01

    Devices other than the accelerators are desired to be investigated for generating high energy particles to induce nuclear reaction and positron emission tomography (PET) producing radioisotopes. The experimental data of plasma focus devices (PF) are studied and the activity scaling law for External Solid Target (EST) activation is established. Based on the scaling law and the techniques to enhance the radioisotopes production, the feasibility of generating the required activity for PET imaging is studied.

  19. Evaluation of the potential of p-nitrophenol degradation in dredged sediment by pulsed discharge plasma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tiecheng; Qu, Guangzhou; Sun, Qiuhong; Liang, Dongli; Hu, Shibin

    2015-11-01

    Hazardous pollutants in dredged sediment pose great threats to ecological environment and human health. A novel approach, named pulsed discharge plasma (PDP), was employed for the degradation of p-nitrophenol (PNP) in dredged sediment. Experimental results showed that 92.9% of PNP in sediment was smoothly removed in 60 min, and the degradation process fitted the first-order kinetic model. Roles of some active species in PNP degradation in sediment were studied by various gas plasmas, OH radical scavenger, hydrated electron scavenger and O2(·-) scavenger; and the results presented that O3, OH radical, eaq(-) and O2(·-) all played significant roles in PNP removal, and eaq(-) and O2(·-) mainly participated in other oxidising active species formation. FTIR analysis showed that PNP molecular structure was destroyed after PDP treatment. The main degradation intermediates were identified as hydroquinone, benzoquinone, phenol, acetic acid, NO2(-) and NO3(-). PNP degradation pathway in dredged sediment was proposed. It is expected to contribute to an alternative for sediment remediation by pulse discharge plasma.

  20. [Platelet-riched plasma promotes potential mineralizing capacity of human dental pulp cells in vivo].

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhong-ning; Jiang, Ting; Wang, Yi-xiang

    2011-04-18

    To investigate the biocompatibility of human platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and human dental pulp cells (DPCs), and the effect of human platelet-rich plasma on the mineralization of human dental pulp cells in vivo. DPCs were isolated from healthy dental pulp, and identified by immunostaining of vimentin and cytokeratin. PRP was obtained from healthy volunteer donors by traditional two-step centrifugation. The forth passage of DPCs and PRP were mixed well and activated, and then transplanted subcutaneously in 5-week female nude mice. The groups which were implanted with PRP alone or DPCs alone were used as controls. The animals were sacrificed after 4 weeks and 8 weeks post-transplantation, and the histological and immunohistostaining examinations were used to evaluate the effect of PRP on the mineralization of DPCs. Immunostaining showed that DPCs were positive for vimentin and negative for cytokeratin. In vivo assay showed that the newly formed mineralized tissues were only found in PRP combined with DPCs group after 4 weeks and 8 weeks, while newly formed tissues were not observed in PRP alone or DPCs alone groups. HE staining showed the mineralized tissues were found in PRP+DPCs samples. Immunohistochemistry staining showed these mineralized tissues were positive for osteopontin(OPN), osteocalcin(OC) and collagen I (COLI). PRP had good biocompatibility with DPCs, and could induce the mineralization of DPCs. The study suggests that platelet-rich plasma can be used as a scaffold for pulp capping.

  1. External Pulsed Plasma Propulsion and Its Potential for the Near Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonometti, J. A.; Morton, P. J.; Schmidt, G. R.

    1999-01-01

    This paper examines External Pulsed Plasma Propulsion (EPPP), a propulsion concept that derives its thrust from plasma waves generated from a series of small, supercritical fission/fusion pulses behind an object in space. For spacecraft applications, a momentum transfer mechanism translates the intense plasma wave energy into a vehicle acceleration that is tolerable to the rest of the spacecraft and its crew. This propulsion concept offers extremely high performance in terms of both specific impulse (Isp) and thrust-to-weight ratio, something that other concepts based on available technology cannot do, The political concerns that suspended work on this type of system (i.e. termination of Project ORION) may now not be as insurmountable as they were in 1965. The appeal of EPPP stems from its relatively low cost and reusability, fast interplanetary transit times, safety and reliability, and independence from major technological breakthroughs. In fact, a first generation EPPP system based on modern-day technology (i.e., GABRIEL - an evolutionary framework- of EPPP concepts) may very well be the only form of propulsion that could realistically be developed to perform ambitious human exploration beyond Mars in the 21st century. It could also provide the most effective approach for deterrence against collision between earth and small planetary objects - a growing concern over recent years.

  2. Plasma Lipid Profiling in a Rat Model of Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Potential Modulation Through Quinolone Administration

    PubMed Central

    Shariff, Mohamed I.F.; Tognarelli, Joshua M.; Lewis, Matthew R.; Want, Elizabeth J.; Mohamed, Fatma El Zahra; Ladep, Nimzing G.; Crossey, Mary M.E.; Khan, Shahid A.; Jalan, Rajiv; Holmes, Elaine; Taylor-Robinson, Simon D.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims The primary aim of this study was to characterise the blood metabolic profile of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in a rat model, and the secondary aim was to evaluate the effect of the quinolone, norfloxacin on metabolic profiles and exploring the role that gut sterilisation may have on HCC development. Methods HCC was induced in 10 Fischer rats by administration of intra-peritoneal diethylnitrosamine (DEN) and oral N-nitrosomorpholine. Plasma was collected upon sacrifice. Five of these rats were concomitantly administered oral norfloxacin. Six Fischer non-treated rats acted as healthy controls. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra were acquired using a 600 MHz NMR system. Results Control animals were 120 g heavier than diseased counterparts. Proton NMR spectra from diseased rats displayed significant decreases in lipoproteins, unsaturated fatty acids, acetyl-glycoprotein, acetoacetate, and glucose (P ≤ 0.001). Plasma citrate and formate levels were increased (P = 0.02). Norfloxacin appeared to abrogate this effect slightly. Conclusion The spectral profiles of plasma in rats with HCC display marked changes with relation to lipid metabolism and cellular turnover. Norfloxacin appears to moderate these metabolic alterations to a small degree. PMID:26900269

  3. Plasma microRNA might as a potential biomarker for hepatocellular carcinoma and chronic liver disease screening.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Li; Li, Xue; Cheng, Qi; Zhang, Bin-Hao

    2015-09-01

    Our study aims to investigate the expression signature of plasma microRNA-106b (miRNA-106b, miR-106b) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients and chronic liver disease (CLD) patients compared with healthy controls and further evaluate the potential clinical value of miR-106b as biomarker in HCC detection. In addition, a meta-analysis was conducted to assess the diagnostic performance of miR-106a/b as a biochemical marker for cancer screening. This study was divided into two phases. In the first phase, the expression levels of plasma miR-106b obtained from 108 subjects (47 HCC patients, 25 CLD patients, and 36 healthy controls) were measured by using qRT-PCR. Areas under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves (AUCs) were used to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of plasma miR-106. In the second phase, a meta-analysis based on 11 previous researches as well as our current study was conducted to assess the potential clinical value of miR-106 in cancer detection. Plasma levels of miR-106b in HCC patients were significantly higher compared with CLD patients and healthy individuals. ROC curves suggested that plasma miR-106b yielded relative high sensitivities and specificities in differentiating HCC patients from CLD patients or healthy controls with corresponding AUC values of 0.726 and 0.879, respectively. In addition, miR-106b showed a relatively high accuracy in distinguishing CLD patients from healthy controls with its AUC value of 0.703. Furthermore, the meta-analysis for diagnostic performance of miR-106a/b showed a pooled sensitivity of 0.74, specificity of 0.75, and an AUC of 0.81. Subgroup analysis based on samples types revealed a higher diagnostic performance of miR-106 for cancer detection by using non-blood samples. Similarly, miR-106 as biomarker showed a higher diagnostic accuracy for gastric cancer detection. We found that plasma miR-106b has clinical value in the detection of HCC from healthy people and CLD patients. Further large-scale study

  4. Influence of Glucose Deprivation on Membrane Potentials of Plasma Membranes, Mitochondria and Synaptic Vesicles in Rat Brain Synaptosomes.

    PubMed

    Hrynevich, Sviatlana V; Pekun, Tatyana G; Waseem, Tatyana V; Fedorovich, Sergei V

    2015-06-01

    Hypoglycemia can cause neuronal cell death similar to that of glutamate-induced cell death. In the present paper, we investigated the effect of glucose removal from incubation medium on changes of mitochondrial and plasma membrane potentials in rat brain synaptosomes using the fluorescent dyes DiSC3(5) and JC-1. We also monitored pH gradients in synaptic vesicles and their recycling by the fluorescent dye acridine orange. Glucose deprivation was found to cause an inhibition of K(+)-induced Ca(2+)-dependent exocytosis and a shift of mitochondrial and plasma membrane potentials to more positive values. The sensitivity of these parameters to the energy deficit caused by the removal of glucose showed the following order: mitochondrial membrane potential > plasma membrane potential > pH gradient in synaptic vesicles. The latter was almost unaffected by deprivation compared with the control. The pH-dependent dye acridine orange was used to investigate synaptic vesicle recycling. However, the compound's fluorescence was shown to be enhanced also by the mixture of mitochondrial toxins rotenone (10 µM) and oligomycin (5 µg/mL). This means that acridine orange can presumably be partially distributed in the intermembrane space of mitochondria. Glucose removal from the incubation medium resulted in a 3.7-fold raise of acridine orange response to rotenone + oligomycin suggesting a dramatic increase in the mitochondrial pH gradient. Our results suggest that the biophysical characteristics of neuronal presynaptic endings do not favor excessive non-controlled neurotransmitter release in case of hypoglycemia. The inhibition of exocytosis and the increase of the mitochondrial pH gradient, while preserving the vesicular pH gradient, are proposed as compensatory mechanisms.

  5. Crowdsourcing detailed flood data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walliman, Nicholas; Ogden, Ray; Amouzad*, Shahrzhad

    2015-04-01

    Over the last decade the average annual loss across the European Union due to flooding has been 4.5bn Euros, but increasingly intense rainfall, as well as population growth, urbanisation and the rising costs of asset replacements, may see this rise to 23bn Euros a year by 2050. Equally disturbing are the profound social costs to individuals, families and communities which in addition to loss of lives include: loss of livelihoods, decreased purchasing and production power, relocation and migration, adverse psychosocial effects, and hindrance of economic growth and development. Flood prediction, management and defence strategies rely on the availability of accurate information and flood modelling. Whilst automated data gathering (by measurement and satellite) of the extent of flooding is already advanced it is least reliable in urban and physically complex geographies where often the need for precise estimation is most acute. Crowdsourced data of actual flood events is a potentially critical component of this allowing improved accuracy in situations and identifying the effects of local landscape and topography where the height of a simple kerb, or discontinuity in a boundary wall can have profound importance. Mobile 'App' based data acquisition using crowdsourcing in critical areas can combine camera records with GPS positional data and time, as well as descriptive data relating to the event. This will automatically produce a dataset, managed in ArcView GIS, with the potential for follow up calls to get more information through structured scripts for each strand. Through this local residents can provide highly detailed information that can be reflected in sophisticated flood protection models and be core to framing urban resilience strategies and optimising the effectiveness of investment. This paper will describe this pioneering approach that will develop flood event data in support of systems that will advance existing approaches such as developed in the in the UK

  6. Assessment of the toxic potential of engineered metal oxide nanomaterials using an acellular model: citrated rat blood plasma.

    PubMed

    Gormley, Patrick Thomas; Callaghan, Neal Ingraham; MacCormack, Tyson James; Dieni, Christopher Anthony

    2016-10-01

    Citrated Sprague-Dawley rat blood plasma was used as a biologically relevant exposure medium to assess the acellular toxic potential of two metal oxide engineered nanomaterials (ENMs), zinc oxide (nZnO), and cerium oxide (nCeO2). Plasma was incubated at 37 °C for up to 48 h with ENM concentrations ranging between 0 and 200 mg/L. The degree of ENM-induced oxidation was assessed by assaying for reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels using dichlorofluorescein (DCF), pH, ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP), lipase activity, malondialdehyde (MDA), and protein carbonyls (PC). Whereas previous in vitro studies showed linear-positive correlations between ENM concentration and oxidative damage, our results suggested that low concentrations were generally pro-oxidant and higher concentrations appeared antioxidant or protective, as indicated by DCF fluorescence trends. nZnO and nCeO2 also affected pH in a manner dependent on concentration and elemental composition; higher nZnO concentrations maintained a more alkaline pH, while nCeO2 tended to decrease pH. No other biomarkers of oxidative damage (FRAP, MDA, PC, lipase activity) showed changes at any ENM concentration or time-point tested. Differential dissolution of the two ENMs was also observed, where as much as ∼31.3% of nZnO was instantaneously dissolved to Zn(2+ )and only negligible nCeO2 was degraded. The results suggest that the direct oxidative potential of nZnO and nCeO2 in citrated rat blood plasma is low, and that a physiological or immune response is needed to generate appreciable damage biomarkers. The data also highlight the need for careful consideration when selecting a model for assessing ENM toxicity.

  7. Potential biomarkers with plasma cortisol, brain-derived neurotrophic factor and nitrites in patients with acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Casas, S; Perez, A F; Mattiazzi, M; Lopez, J; Folgueira, A; Gargiulo-Monachelli, G M; Deniselle, M C Gonzalez; De Nicola, A F

    2017-10-05

    Acute ischemic stroke (AIS) represents an economic challenge for health systems all over the globe. Changes of neuroactive steroids have been found in different neurological diseases. We have previously demonstrated that old patients with AIS show changes of plasma cortisol and estradiol concentrations, in that increased steroid levels are associated with a deterioration of neurological status and a worse cognitive decline. The present study assessed in patients with AIS if changes of behavior, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nitrites (NO-2) bear a relationship with the degree of hypercortisolism. We recruited patients hospitalized within the first 24 hours of AIS. Subjects were divided into two groups, each one composed of 40 control subjects and 40 AIS patients, including men and women. The neurological condition was assessed using the National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) and the cognitive status with the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA). The emotional status was evaluated using the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS), whereas the Modified Rankin Scale (MRS) was used to determine the functional condition. BDNF and NO-2 plasma levels were measured by ELISA and the Griess reaction method, respectively. We found that in AIS patients, increased plasma cortisol was negatively correlated with plasma BDNF and NO-2 levels, neurological condition, cognition, functional responses and emotional status, suggesting a relationship between the declines of clinical, behavioral and blood parameters with stress-induced cortisol elevation. Nitrites and BDNF may represent potential biomarkers for cortisol negative effects on the area of cerebral ischemia and penumbra, potentiating ischemic cell damage. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  8. Renal net acid excretion and plasma leptin are associated with potentially bioactive free glucocorticoids in healthy lean women.

    PubMed

    Remer, Thomas; Dimitriou, Triantafillia; Maser-Gluth, Christiane

    2008-02-01

    Primarily experimental evidence suggests that endogenous glucocorticoids may be suppressed by adipocyte-derived leptin and elevated by dietary acidity. Therefore, we examined whether these factors may also be relevant in healthy adults on unrestricted diets. For this we used a new methodological approach in which potentially bioactive free glucocorticoids were determined as the sum of urinary free cortisol and urinary free cortisone and that also takes into account total adrenal glucocorticoid secretion assessed by the sum of the 3 major urinary glucocorticoid metabolites tetrahydrocortisone, tetrahydrocortisol, and 5alpha-tetrahydrocortisol. Body composition, plasma cortisol, plasma leptin, and 24-h urinary excretion rates of net acid and glucocorticoid metabolites were examined cross-sectionally in 30 healthy adults (15 women; 22-44 y old; BMI 20-25 kg/m2). Plasma leptin, percentage body fat, and body surface area-corrected adrenal glucocorticoid secretion showed the usual sex dimorphism (male vs. female, P < 0.05 in each case: 2.8 +/- 1.6 microg/L vs. 7.6 +/- 4.9 microg/L, 16.8 +/- 4.2% vs. 26.9 +/- 4.9%, and 5.1 +/- 1.6 mg x m(-2) x d(-1) vs. 4.0 +/- 1.3 mg x m(-2) x d(-1), respectively), whereas net acid excretion, plasma cortisol, and potentially bioactive free glucocorticoids did not differ between the sexes. Potentially bioactive free glucocorticoids correlated positively with body fat and leptin in men (P < 0.05) but not in women. After adjustment for total adrenal glucocorticoid secretion, net acid excretion was a positive and leptin a negative predictor (P < 0.05) of potentially bioactive free glucocorticoids in women only (total explained variability R2 = 0.71). Our findings indicate that, at least in women, variability of potentially bioactive free glucocorticoids is not only explained by adrenal glucocorticoid secretion but is also metabolically affected by circulating leptin and diet-dependent net acid excretion.

  9. Potential formation in a one-dimensional bounded plasma system containing a two-electron temperature plasma: Kinetic model and PIC simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Gyergyek, T.; Jurcic-Zlobec, B.; Cercek, M.

    2008-06-15

    Potential formation in a bounded plasma system that contains electrons with a two-temperature velocity distribution and is terminated by a floating, electron emitting electrode (collector) is studied by a one-dimensional kinetic model. A method on how to determine the boundary conditions at the collector for the numerical solution of the Poisson equation is presented. The difference between the regular and the irregular numerical solutions of the Poisson equation is explained. The regular numerical solution of the Poisson equation fulfills the boundary conditions at the source and can be computed for any distance from the collector. The irregular solution does not fulfill the source boundary conditions and the computation breaks down at some distance from the collector. An excellent agreement of the values of the potential at the inflection point found from the numerical solution of the Poisson equation with the values predicted by the analytical model is obtained. Potential, electric field, and particle density profiles found by the numerical solution of the Poisson equation are compared to the profiles obtained with the particle in cell computer simulation. A very good quantitative agreement of the potential and electric field profiles is obtained. For certain values of the parameters the analytical model predicts three possible values of the potential at the inflection point. In such cases always only one of the corresponding numerical solutions of the Poisson equation is regular, while the other two are irregular. The regular numerical solution of the Poisson equation always corresponds to the solution of the model that predicts the largest ion flux to the collector.

  10. Plasma Potential and Langmuir Probe Measurements in the Near-field Plume of the NASA-457Mv2 Hall Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shastry, Rohit; Huang, Wensheng; Herman, Daniel A.; Soulas, George C.; Kamhawi, Hani

    2012-01-01

    In order to further the design of future high-power Hall thrusters and provide experimental validation for ongoing modeling efforts, plasma potential and Langmuir probe measurements were performed on the 50-kW NASA-457Mv2. An electrostatic probe array comprised of a near-field Faraday probe, single Langmuir probe, and emissive probe was used to interrogate the near-field plume from approximately 0.1 - 2.0 mean thruster diameters downstream of the thruster exit plane at the following operating conditions: 300 V, 400 V and 500 V at 30 kW and 500 V at 50 kW. Results have shown that the acceleration zone is limited to within 0.4 mean thruster diameters of the exit plane while the high-temperature region is limited to 0.25 mean thruster diameters from the exit plane at all four operating conditions. Maximum plasma potentials in the near-field at 300 and 400 V were approximately 50 V with respect to cathode potential, while maximum electron temperatures varied from 24 - 32 eV, depending on operating condition. Isothermal lines at all operating conditions were found to strongly resemble the magnetic field topology in the high-temperature regions. This distribution was found to create regions of high temperature and low density near the magnetic poles, indicating strong, thick sheath formation along these surfaces. The data taken from this study are considered valuable for future design as well as modeling validation.

  11. Plasma Potential and Langmuir Probe Measurements in the Near-Field Plume of the NASA-457Mv2 Hall Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shastry, Rohit; Huang, Wensheng; Herman, Daniel A.; Soulas, George C.; Kamhawi, Hani

    2012-01-01

    In order to further the design of future high-power Hall thrusters and provide experimental validation for ongoing modeling efforts, plasma potential and Langmuir probe measurements were performed on the 50-kW NASA-457Mv2. An electrostatic probe array comprised of a near-field Faraday probe, single Langmuir probe, and emissive probe was used to interrogate the near-field plume from approximately 0.1 ? 2.0 mean thruster diameters downstream of the thruster exit plane at the following operating conditions: 300 V, 400 V and 500 V at 30 kW and 500 V at 50 kW. Results have shown that the acceleration zone is limited to within 0.4 mean thruster diameters of the exit plane while the high-temperature region is limited to 0.25 mean thruster diameters from the exit plane at all four operating conditions. Maximum plasma potentials in the near-field at 300 and 400 V were approximately 50 V with respect to cathode potential, while maximum electron temperatures varied from 24 ? 32 eV, depending on operating condition. Isothermal lines at all operating conditions were found to strongly resemble the magnetic field topology in the high-temperature regions. This distribution was found to create regions of high temperature and low density near the magnetic poles, indicating strong, thick sheath formation along these surfaces. The data taken from this study are considered valuable for future design as well as modeling validation.

  12. Change in plasma membrane potential of rat thymocytes by tert-butylhydroquinone, a food additive: Possible risk on lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Maki; Oyama, Keisuke; Kamemura, Norio; Kanemaru, Kaori; Yuasa, Keizo; Yokoigawa, Kumio; Oyama, Yasuo

    2017-09-09

    Tertiary butylhydroquinone (TBHQ) is a food additive and has various beneficial actions under in vitro and in vivo experimental conditions. Therefore, it is necessary to collect additional data on the toxicity of TBHQ in order to avoid adverse effects during clinical applications. Changes in plasma membrane potential are associated with changes in physiological functions even in non-excitable cells such as lymphocytes. Thus, compounds that affect membrane potential may modify some lymphocytic functions. The effect of TBHQ on plasma membrane potential was examined in rat thymocytes using flow cytometric techniques. Treatment of rat thymocytes with TBHQ caused hyperpolarization and then depolarization. The TBHQ-induced hyperpolarization was due to the activation of Ca(2+)-dependent K(+) channels. TBHQ elevated intracellular Ca(2+) levels. The depolarization by TBHQ was caused by a nonspecific increase in membrane ionic permeability. Both the sustained depolarization and elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) level by TBHQ are thought to be adverse for thymocytes because such changes disturb membrane and intracellular signaling. The thymus is most active during neonatal and pre-adolescent periods. If TBHQ exerts adverse actions on thymocytes, it may result in an immunotoxic effect in neonates and adolescents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Probability Density Functions of Floating Potential Fluctuations Due to Local Electron Flux Intermittency in a Linear ECR Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, Shinji; Terasaka, Kenichiro; Tanaka, Eiki; Aramaki, Mitsutoshi; Tanaka, Masayoshi Y.

    An intermittent behavior of local electron flux in a laboratory ECR plasma is statistically analyzed by means of probability density functions (PDFs). The PDF constructed from a time series of the floating potential signal on a Langmuir probe has a fat tail in the negative value side, which reflects the intermittency of the local electron flux. The PDF of the waiting time, which is defined by the time interval between two successive events, is found to exhibit an exponential distribution, suggesting that the phenomenon is characterized by a stationary Poisson process. The underlying Poisson process is also confirmed by the number of events in given time intervals that is Poisson distributed.

  14. Talbot-Lau based Moiré deflectometry with non-coherent sources as potential High Energy Density plasma diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Valdivia, M. P.; Stutman, D.; Finkenthal, M.

    2013-10-28

    X-ray phase-contrast radiography could better characterize highly localized density gradients expected in High Energy Density (HED) plasma experiments than conventional attenuation radiography. In particular, the Talbot-Lau (TL) grating interferometer, which works with extended and polychromatic x-ray sources, is a potentially attractive HED diagnostic due to its high sensitivity. For HED characterization the TL setup and imaging techniques must be changed from the recently studied medical system. The object magnification must be increased greatly in order to resolve μm scale gradients while the Talbot magnification must be increased in order to keep the gratings away from the plasma. Additionally, techniques for retrieving the density profile from a single plasma image must be developed. We thus study the performance of high magnification TL interferometers, in conjunction with Moiré fringe deflectometry for single image phase retrieval. The results show a very good interferometer contrast (≤30%) at high magnification. The Moiré technique enables measuring both sharp and mild density gradients with good accuracy and spatial resolution. Both the laboratory and simulation studies indicate that the TL based Moiré deflectometry is more sensitive than the propagation phase-contrast method when utilizing an extended x-ray source (∼80 μm). In HED experiments this would allow for less demanding X-ray backlighters than those used at present.

  15. Potential for osseous regeneration of platelet rich plasma: a comparitive study in mandibular third molar sockets.

    PubMed

    Vivek, G K; Sripathi Rao, B H

    2009-12-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of autologous platelet-rich plasma in soft tissue healing & bone regeneration in mandibular third molar extraction socket. The study was conducted in 10 patients visiting the outpatient Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, requiring extraction of bilateral mandibular third molars. Following extraction, autologous Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) was placed in one extraction socket, the other socket was studied as the control site with no PRP. The patients were assessed for postoperative pain, soft tissue healing, bone blending and trabecular formation. Radiological assessment of the extraction site was done for a period of 4 months to evaluate the change in bone density. Pain was less in the study site compared to control site, soft tissue healing was better in study site. Evaluation for bone blending and trabecular bone formation started earlier in PRP site compared to control, non PRP site. The evaluation of bone density by radiological assessment showed the grey level values calculated after 4 months at the PRP site were comparatively higher than the average baseline value of bone density at extraction site in control site. The study showed that autologous PRP is biocompatible and has significantly improved soft tissue healing, bone regeneration and increase in bone density in extraction sockets. However a more elaborate study with a larger number of clinical cases is essential to be more conclusive regarding its efficacy.

  16. Physics and potentials of fissioning plasmas for space power and propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thom, K.; Schwenk, F. C.; Schneider, R. T.

    1976-01-01

    Fissioning uranium plasmas are the nuclear fuel in conceptual high-temperature gaseous-core reactors for advanced rocket propulsion in space. A gaseous-core nuclear rocket would be a thermal reactor in which an enriched uranium plasma at about 10,000 K is confined in a reflector-moderator cavity where it is nuclear critical and transfers its fission power to a confining propellant flow for the production of thrust at a specific impulse up to 5000 sec. With a thrust-to-engine weight ratio approaching unity, the gaseous-core nuclear rocket could provide for propulsion capabilities needed for manned missions to the nearby planets and for economical cislunar ferry services. Fueled with enriched uranium hexafluoride and operated at temperatures lower than needed for propulsion, the gaseous-core reactor scheme also offers significant benefits in applications for space and terrestrial power. They include high-efficiency power generation at low specific mass, the burnup of certain fission products and actinides, the breeding of U-233 from thorium with short doubling times, and improved convenience of fuel handling and processing in the gaseous phase.

  17. Hundred joules plasma focus device as a potential pulsed source for in vitro cancer cell irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, J.; Moreno, J.; Andaur, R.; Armisen, R.; Morales, D.; Marcelain, K.; Avaria, G.; Bora, B.; Davis, S.; Pavez, C.; Soto, L.

    2017-08-01

    Plasma focus devices may arise as useful source to perform experiments aimed to study the effects of pulsed radiation on human cells in vitro. In the present work, a table top hundred joules plasma focus device, namely "PF-400J", was adapted to irradiate colorectal cancer cell line, DLD-1. For pulsed x-rays, the doses (energy absorbed per unit mass, measured in Gy) were measured using thermoluminescence detectors (TLD-100 dosimeters). The neutron fluence and the average energy were used to estimate the pulsed neutron doses. Fifty pulses of x-rays (0.12 Gy) and fifty pulses of neutrons (3.5 μGy) were used to irradiate the cancer cells. Irradiation-induced DNA damage and cell death were assessed at different time points after irradiation. Cell death was observed using pulsed neutron irradiation, at ultralow doses. Our results indicate that the PF-400J can be used for in vitro assessment of the effect of pulsed radiation in cancer cell research.

  18. Electron Pathways through Erythrocyte Plasma Membrane in Human Physiology and Pathology: Potential Redox Biomarker?

    PubMed

    Matteucci, Elena; Giampietro, Ottavio

    2007-09-17

    Erythrocytes are involved in the transport of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the body. Since pH is the influential factor in the Bohr-Haldane effect, pHi is actively maintained via secondary active transports Na(+)/H(+) exchange and HC(3) (-)/Cl(-) anion exchanger. Because of the redox properties of the iron, hemoglobin generates reactive oxygen species and thus, the human erythrocyte is constantly exposed to oxidative damage. Although the adult erythrocyte lacks protein synthesis and cannot restore damaged proteins, it is equipped with high activity of protective enzymes. Redox changes in the cell initiate various signalling pathways. Plasma membrane oxido-reductases (PMORs) are transmembrane electron transport systems that have been found in the membranes of all cells and have been extensively characterized in the human erythrocyte. Erythrocyte PMORs transfer reducing equivalents from intracellular reductants to extracellular oxidants, thus their most important role seems to be to enable the cell respond to changes in intra- and extra-cellular redox environments.So far the activity of erythrocyte PMORs in disease states has not been systematically investigated. This review summarizes present knowledge on erythrocyte electron transfer activity in humans (health, type 1 diabetes, diabetic nephropathy, and chronic uremia) and hypothesizes an integrated model of the functional organization of erythrocyte plasma membrane where electron pathways work in parallel with transport metabolons to maintain redox homeostasis.

  19. Spacecraft charging potential during electron-beam injections into space plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Chin S.; Koga, James

    1989-01-01

    Injections of nonrelativistic electron beams from an infinite conductor have been simulated by using a two-dimensional electrostatic particle code to study the spacecraft charging potential. The simulations show that the conductor charging potential at the end of simulations does not vary with the beam density when the beam density exceeds four times the ambient density. The reflection coefficient, which determines a percentage of incident electrons reflected by the conductor, increases the charging potential. To charge the conductor to the beam energy, the reflection coefficient needs to be about 0.5. The results are applied to explain the spacecraft charging potential measured during the Sepac experiments on Spacelab 1.

  20. Human Plasma Metabolomics Study across All Stages of Age-Related Macular Degeneration Identifies Potential Lipid Biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Laíns, Inês; Kelly, Rachel S; Miller, John B; Silva, Rufino; Vavvas, Demetrios G; Kim, Ivana K; Murta, Joaquim N; Lasky-Su, Jessica; Miller, Joan W; Husain, Deeba

    2017-08-31

    To characterize the plasma metabolomic profile of patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) using mass spectrometry (MS). Cross-sectional observational study. We prospectively recruited participants with a diagnosis of AMD and a control group (>50 years of age) without any vitreoretinal disease. All participants underwent color fundus photography, used for AMD diagnosis and staging, according to the Age-Related Eye Disease Study classification scheme. Fasting blood samples were collected and plasma was analyzed by Metabolon, Inc. (Durham, NC), using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) and high-resolution MS. Metabolon's hardware and software were used to identify peaks and control quality. Principal component analysis and multivariate regression were performed to assess differences in the metabolomic profiles of AMD patients versus controls, while controlling for potential confounders. For biological interpretation, pathway enrichment analysis of significant metabolites was performed using MetaboAnalyst. The primary outcome measures were levels of plasma metabolites in participants with AMD compared with controls and among different AMD severity stages. We included 90 participants with AMD (30 with early AMD, 30 with intermediate AMD, and 30 with late AMD) and 30 controls. Using UPLC and MS, 878 biochemicals were identified. Multivariate logistic regression identified 87 metabolites with levels that differed significantly between AMD patients and controls. Most of these metabolites (82.8%; n = 72), including the most significant metabolites, belonged to the lipid pathways. Analysis of variance revealed that of the 87 metabolites, 48 (55.2%) also were significantly different across the different stages of AMD. A significant enrichment of the glycerophospholipids pathway was identified (P = 4.7 × 10(-9)) among these metabolites. Participants with AMD have altered plasma metabolomic profiles compared with controls. Our data suggest

  1. Plasma Membrane Proteomics of Human Breast Cancer Cell Lines Identifies Potential Targets for Breast Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Yvonne S.; Moresco, James J.; Tu, Patricia G.; Yates, John R.; Nardulli, Ann M.

    2014-01-01

    The use of broad spectrum chemotherapeutic agents to treat breast cancer results in substantial and debilitating side effects, necessitating the development of targeted therapies to limit tumor proliferation and prevent metastasis. In recent years, the list of approved targeted therapies has expanded, and it includes both monoclonal antibodies and small molecule inhibitors that interfere with key proteins involved in the uncontrolled growth and migration of cancer cells. The targeting of plasma membrane proteins has been most successful to date, and this is reflected in the large representation of these proteins as targets of newer therapies. In view of these facts, experiments were designed to investigate the plasma membrane proteome of a variety of human breast cancer cell lines representing hormone-responsive, ErbB2 over-expressing and triple negative cell types, as well as a benign control. Plasma membranes were isolated by using an aqueous two-phase system, and the resulting proteins were subjected to mass spectrometry analysis. Overall, each of the cell lines expressed some unique proteins, and a number of proteins were expressed in multiple cell lines, but in patterns that did not always follow traditional clinical definitions of breast cancer type. From our data, it can be deduced that most cancer cells possess multiple strategies to promote uncontrolled growth, reflected in aberrant expression of tyrosine kinases, cellular adhesion molecules, and structural proteins. Our data set provides a very rich and complex picture of plasma membrane proteins present on breast cancer cells, and the sorting and categorizing of this data provides interesting insights into the biology, classification, and potential treatment of this prevalent and debilitating disease. PMID:25029196

  2. Current-driven ion-acoustic and potential-relaxation instabilities excited in plasma plume during electron beam welding

    SciTech Connect

    Trushnikov, D. N.; Mladenov, G. M. Koleva, E. G.; Belenkiy, V. Ya. Varushkin, S. V.

    2014-04-15

    Many papers have sought correlations between the parameters of secondary particles generated above the beam/work piece interaction zone, dynamics of processes in the keyhole, and technological processes. Low- and high-frequency oscillations of the current, collected by plasma have been observed above the welding zone during electron beam welding. Low-frequency oscillations of secondary signals are related to capillary instabilities of the keyhole, however; the physical mechanisms responsible for the high-frequency oscillations (>10 kHz) of the collected current are not fully understood. This paper shows that peak frequencies in the spectra of the collected high-frequency signal are dependent on the reciprocal distance between the welding zone and collector electrode. From the relationship between current harmonics frequency and distance of the collector/welding zone, it can be estimated that the draft velocity of electrons or phase velocity of excited waves is about 1600 m/s. The dispersion relation with the properties of ion-acoustic waves is related to electron temperature 10 000 K, ion temperature 2 400 K and plasma density 10{sup 16} m{sup −3}, which is analogues to the parameters of potential-relaxation instabilities, observed in similar conditions. The estimated critical density of the transported current for creating the anomalous resistance state of plasma is of the order of 3 A·m{sup −2}, i.e. 8 mA for a 3–10 cm{sup 2} collector electrode. Thus, it is assumed that the observed high-frequency oscillations of the current collected by the positive collector electrode are caused by relaxation processes in the plasma plume above the welding zone, and not a direct demonstration of oscillations in the keyhole.

  3. Circulating miR-222 in plasma and its potential diagnostic and prognostic value in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zhengchuan; Qian, Fang; Yang, Xuhuan; Jiang, Hailiang; Chen, Yu; Liu, Sihai

    2014-09-01

    Previous studies have revealed the significance of circulating microRNAs as biomarkers for cancers. The aim of this study was to detect the levels of circulating microRNA-222 (miR-222) in plasma of gastric cancer (GC) patients and evaluate its diagnostic and prognostic value. Levels of circulating miR-222 were detected by using qRT-PCR in plasma of 114 GC patients, 36 chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG) patients and 56 healthy controls. The result showed that the expression of circulating miR-222 in plasma was significantly upregulated in GC compared with CAG and healthy controls (all at P < 0.001). And its high level was significantly correlated with clinical stages (P < 0.001) and lymph nodes metastasis (P = 0.009). The receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analyses revealed that miR-222 had considerable diagnostic accuracy, yielded an AUC (the areas under the ROC curve) of 0.850 with 66.1 % sensitivity and 88.3 % specificity in discriminating GC from healthy controls. Moreover, Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated a correlation between increased circulating miR-222 level and reduced disease-free survival (P = 0.016) and overall survival (P = 0.012). In multivariate analysis stratified for known prognostic variables, circulating miR-222 was identified as an independent prognostic marker. In conclusion, our findings suggested that circulating miR-222 in plasma might be a potential and useful noninvasive biomarker for the early detection and prognosis of GC.

  4. Horizontal Cross Bracing Detail, Vertical Cross Bracing Detail, Horizontal Cross ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Horizontal Cross Bracing Detail, Vertical Cross Bracing Detail, Horizontal Cross Bracing Detail, Vertical Cross Bracing-End Detail - Cumberland Covered Bridge, Spanning Mississinewa River, Matthews, Grant County, IN

  5. Adaption of the LUCI framework to account for detailed farm management: a case study exploring potential for achieving locally and nationally significant greenhouse gas, flooding and nutrient mitigation without compromising livelihoods on New Zealand farm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Bethanna; Trodahl, Martha; Maxwell, Deborah; Easton, Stuart

    2016-04-01

    This talk discusses recent progress in adapting the Land Utilisation and Capability Indicator (LUCI) framework to take account of the impact of detailed farm management on greenhouse gas emissions and on water, sediment and nutrient delivery to waterways. LUCI is a land management decision support framework which examines the impact of current and potential interventions on a variety of outcomes, including flood mitigation, water supply, greenhouse gas emissions, biodiversity, erosion, sediment and nutrient delivery to waterways, and agricultural production. The potential of the landscape to provide benefits is a function of both the biophysical properties of individual landscape elements and their configuration. Both are respected in LUCI where possible. For example, the hydrology, sediment and chemical routing algorithms are based on physical principles of hillslope flow, taking information on the storage and permeability capacity of elements within the landscape from soil and land use data and honoring physical thresholds, mass and energy balance constraints. LUCI discretizes hydrological response units within the landscape according to similarity of their hydraulic properties and preserves spatially explicit topographical routing. Implications of keeping the "status quo" or potential scenarios of land management change can then be evaluated under different meteorological or climatic events (e.g. flood return periods, rainfall events, droughts), cascading water through the hydrological response units using a "fill and spill" approach. These and other component algorithms are designed to be fast-running while maintaining physical consistency and fine spatial detail. This allows it to operate from subfield level scale to catchment, or even national scale, simultaneously. It analyses and communicates the spatial pattern of individual provision and tradeoffs/synergies between desired outcomes at detailed resolutions and provides suggestions on where management

  6. A potential role for plasma uric acid in the endothelial pathology of Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    Mita-Mendoza, Neida K; van de Hoef, Diana L; Lopera-Mesa, Tatiana M; Doumbia, Saibou; Konate, Drissa; Doumbouya, Mory; Gu, Wenjuan; Anderson, Jennifer M; Santos-Argumedo, Leopoldo; Rodriguez, Ana; Fay, Michael P; Diakite, Mahamadou; Long, Carole A; Fairhurst, Rick M

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory cytokinemia and systemic activation of the microvascular endothelium are central to the pathogenesis of Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Recently, 'parasite-derived' uric acid (UA) was shown to activate human immune cells in vitro, and plasma UA levels were associated with inflammatory cytokine levels and disease severity in Malian children with malaria. Since UA is associated with endothelial inflammation in non-malaria diseases, we hypothesized that elevated UA levels contribute to the endothelial pathology of P. falciparum malaria. We measured levels of UA and soluble forms of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1), E-selectin (sE-Selectin), thrombomodulin (sTM), tissue factor (sTF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the plasma of Malian children aged 0.5-17 years with uncomplicated malaria (UM, n = 487) and non-cerebral severe malaria (NCSM, n = 68). In 69 of these children, we measured these same factors once when they experienced a malaria episode and twice when they were healthy (i.e., before and after the malaria transmission season). We found that levels of UA, sICAM-1, sVCAM-1, sE-Selectin and sTM increase during a malaria episode and return to basal levels at the end of the transmission season (p<0.0001). Plasma levels of UA and these four endothelial biomarkers correlate with parasite density and disease severity. In children with UM, UA levels correlate with parasite density (r = 0.092, p = 0.043), sICAM-1 (r = 0.255, p<0.0001) and sTM (r = 0.175, p = 0.0001) levels. After adjusting for parasite density, UA levels predict sTM levels. Elevated UA levels may contribute to malaria pathogenesis by damaging endothelium and promoting a procoagulant state. The correlation between UA levels and parasite densities suggests that parasitized erythrocytes are one possible source of excess UA. UA-induced shedding of endothelial TM may represent a novel mechanism of malaria pathogenesis, in

  7. Plasma viscosity: a potential predictor of both medical treatment response and clinical stage of ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Tolga, Yakar; Mansur, Cosar Arif; Savas, Gokturk Hu Seyin; Gulhan, Unler Kanat Ayse; Alper, Parlakgumus; Ilknur, Kozanoglu; Ender, Serin

    2016-01-01

    La colite ulcerosa (UC) è una delle maggiori forme di colonpatia infiammatoria cronica recidivante. La capacità di identificare tipo, gravità e sensibilità alla terapia su parametri di laboratorio è da tempo oggetto di ricerca degli studi clinici. Lo scopo di questo studio è quello di accertare la relazione tra la viscosità del plasma (PV), l’attività della malattia e la risposta al trattamento medico. Lo studio si è svolto su 105 pazienti con UC e 42 volontari sani. I prelievi di sangue sono stati utilizzati per valutare la viscosità del plasma (PV), la velocità di eritrosedimentazione (ESR), la proteina C-reattiva ultrasensibile (hs-CRP), il D-dimero e il fibrinogeno. I pazienti con UC sono stati raggruppati in relazione al grado di attività flogistica (cioè 59 attivi e 46 in remissione). La PV è risultata più elevata in quelli con UC attiva rispetto a quella dei soggetti in remissione o nei soggetti sani. È risultata significativamente più elevata sia nei casi di UC refrattaria al trattamento steroideo rispetto a quelli sensibili (p< 0.001), e nelle UC rafrattarie alla ciclosrporina rispetto a quelli sensibili (p= 0.003). Con l’aumento della PV nei pazienti affetti da UC sono risultati significativamente associati il punteggio del SCCAI (Increased Simple Clinical Colitis Activity Index), dell’EGS (Endoscopic Grading Scale) e del HAD (Histological Disease Activity (HAD). Si conclude che la PV è un marker utile per la previsione di sensibilità al trattamento sterorideo e con ciclosporina nei pazienti con UC attiva. Potrebbe essere rimpiazzata dalla ESR e dalla hs-CRP come misura della risposta in fase acuta in quanto sufficientemente sensibile. Questi risultati possono essere utili per l’identificazione dei pazienti con UC attiva da destinare alla colectomia.

  8. Effects of pulsed potential on address electrode in a surface-discharge alternating-current plasma display panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Jeong Chull; Shintani, Youichi; Tachibana, Kunihide; Sakai, Tetsuo; Kosugi, Naoki

    2003-06-01

    The influence of pulsed potential application onto the address electrode of an ac-type plasma display panel was investigated from the observation of front and side views of Xe atom densities in the metastable (1s5) and excited (2p) states in a unit discharge cell by using microscopic laser absorption spectroscopy and optical emission spectroscopy. It was seen that a predischarge occurs between the address electrode and one of the sustain electrode worked as a preceding anode, which is a similar effect found previously by applying a higher sustain voltage. The predischarge partially erases the surface charge accumulated in the preceding pulse, but it induces a faster main sustain discharge, bowing towards the address electrode, and enhances the production efficiency of Xe(1s5) atoms, if the applied potential is within an optimal range.

  9. Numerical study of electric potential formation in a weakly ionized plasma flowing supersonically through open magnetic field lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laosunthara, Ampan; Takeda, Jun; Akatsuka, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the mechanism of space potential formation due to a diverging magnetic field on a rarefied weakly ionized plasma flowing supersonically by performing a hybrid simulation. Ions and neutrals are treated by the particle-based direct simulation Monte Carlo method, while electrons are treated as a fluid to save time and memory. We apply an electron continuity equation in order to treat the electron velocity independently of the ion velocity. We find the number density of ions (and electrons) distributed along the magnetic field. We also find electron rotation along the flowing direction. Since we remove the current-free condition assumed in our previous study, we find that the longitudinal variation in the space potential agrees reasonably well with our previous experimental results.

  10. Plasma Potential and Langmuir Probe Measurements in the Near-field Plume of the NASA 300M Hall Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, Daniel A; Shastry, Rohit; Huang, Wensheng; Soulas, George C.; KamHawi, Hani

    2012-01-01

    In order to aid in the design of high-power Hall thrusters and provide experimental validation for existing modeling efforts, plasma potential and Langmuir probe measurements were performed in the near-field plume of the NASA 300M Hall thruster. A probe array consisting of a Faraday probe, Langmuir probe, and emissive probe was used to interrogate the plume from approximately 0.1 - 2.0 DT,m downstream of the thruster exit plane at four operating conditions: 300 V, 400 V, and 500 V at 20 kW as well as 300 V at 10 kW. Results show that the acceleration zone and high-temperature region were contained within 0.3 DT,m from the exit plane at all operating conditions. Isothermal lines were shown to strongly follow magnetic field lines in the nearfield, with maximum temperatures ranging from 19 - 27 eV. The electron temperature spatial distribution created large drops in measured floating potentials in front of the magnetic pole surfaces where the plasma density was small, which suggests strong sheaths at these surfaces. The data taken have provided valuable information for future design and modeling validation, and complements ongoing internal measurement efforts on the NASA 300 M.

  11. Plasma Potential and Langmuir Probe Measurements in the Near-field Plume of the NASA-300M Hall Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, Daniel A.; Shastry, Rohit; Huang, Wensheng; Soulas, George C.; Kamhawi, Hani

    2012-01-01

    In order to aid in the design of high-power Hall thrusters and provide experimental validation for existing modeling efforts, plasma potential and Langmuir probe measurements were performed in the near-field plume of the NASA-300M Hall thruster. A probe array consisting of a Faraday probe, Langmuir probe, and emissive probe was used to interrogate the plume from approximately 0.1 - 2.0 mean thruster diameters downstream of the thruster exit plane at four operating conditions: 300 V, 400 V, and 500 V at 20 kW as well as 300 V at 10 kW. Results show that the acceleration zone and high-temperature region were contained within 0.3 mean thruster diameters from the exit plane at all operating conditions. Isothermal lines were shown to strongly follow magnetic field lines in the near-field, with maximum temperatures ranging from 19 - 27 eV. The electron temperature spatial distribution created large drops in measured floating potentials in front of the magnetic pole surfaces where the plasma density was low, which suggests strong sheaths at these surfaces. The data taken have provided valuable information for future design and modeling validation, and complements ongoing internal measurement efforts on the NASA-300M.

  12. Perception of low-titer group A plasma and potential barriers to using this product: A blood center's experience serving community and academic hospitals.

    PubMed

    Agaronov, Maksim; DiBattista, Anthony; Christenson, Ellen; Miller-Murphy, Richard; Strauss, Donna; Shaz, Beth H

    2016-08-01

    To alleviate the shortage of AB plasma, an alternative plasma product, low-titer group A plasma (LTGAP), is now available. The product is indicated for emergency transfusions when the patient's blood group has not been identified. The product's defining anti-B titers vary across institutions, and at our blood center we define <1:100 as low-titer. We created two surveys and emailed them to hospital blood bank managers, supervisors, and medical directors who currently use LTGAP and those that have not ordered it. We calculated the amount of LTGAP that met our <1:100 cutoff. We searched our inventory database to obtain sales of LTGAP, AB, and all other types of plasma in 2014. We learned from the surveys that the product is safe and being used as indicated for only life or limb-threatening emergencies until patient's blood group is known and specific products can be provided. Most common reasons for not using LTGAP were lack of need in non-trauma hospitals and limiting capabilities in blood bank software. Although sales of LTGAP increased by ~5% by end of the first year since introduction, sales of AB plasma remained relatively steady. LTGAP appears to be a safe alternative to group AB plasma for emergency indications. By reviewing our percentage of group A plasma units that meet our low-titer cutoff and the current interest for the product, we can reduce the amount of units we titer each day by ~30% and can readjust that amount if there is increased interest. Besides lack of familiarity and limitations in computer software to incorporate LTGAP, the steady demand for AB plasma can potentially be attributed to trauma centers ordering more AB plasma than needed and potentially wasting it in nonurgent cases to avoid outdating the product and lack of institutional guidelines on when to switch from AB to type-specific plasma resulting in excess AB plasma being transfused. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Ion Velocity and Plasma Potential Measurements of a Cylindrical Cusped Field Thruster

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-19

    Magnetics ( FEMM ) simulation of the magnetic circuit. During operation, the anode is powered at high positive potential relative to the cathode, which is...simulated by FEMM . (b) DCF thruster operating on xenon propellant under power matched conditions. Two operating conditions were examined in this study. The

  14. Identification of potential biomarkers of hepatotoxicity by plasma proteome analysis of arsenic-exposed carp Labeo rohita.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Sudeshna; Mahanty, Arabinda; Mohanty, Sasmita; Mazumder, Debendranath Guha; Cash, Phillip; Mohanty, Bimal Prasanna

    2017-08-15

    Arsenic (As) is a toxic environmental contaminant and potential human carcinogen. Chronic intake of arsenic-contaminated water and food leads to arsenicosis, a major public health problem in many parts of the world. Early detection of arsenic toxicity would greatly benefit patients; however, the detection of arsenicosis needs to be done early before onset of severe symptoms in which case the tools used for detection have to be both sensitive and reliable. In this context, the present study investigated plasma proteome changes in arsenic-exposed Labeo rohita, with the aim of identifying biomarkers for arsenicosis. Changes in the plasma proteome were investigated using gel-based proteomics technology. Using quantitative image analysis of the 2D proteome profiles, 14 unique spots were identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF MS and/or LC-MS/MS which included Apolipoprotein-A1 (Apo-A1) (6 spots), α-2 macroglobulin-like protein (A2ML) (2 spots), transferrin (TF) (3 spots) and warm-temperature acclimation related 65kDa protein (Wap65). The proteome data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD003404. Highly abundant protein spots identified in plasma from arsenic-exposed fish i.e. Apo-A1 (>10-fold), A2ML (7-fold) and Wap65 (>2-fold) indicate liver damage. It is proposed that a combination of these proteins could serve as useful biomarkers of hepatotoxicity and chronic liver disease due to arsenic exposure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Identification of plasma microRNAs as new potential biomarkers with high diagnostic power in human cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Fogli, Stefano; Polini, Beatrice; Carpi, Sara; Pardini, Barbara; Naccarati, Alessio; Dubbini, Nevio; Lanza, Maria; Breschi, Maria Cristina; Romanini, Antonella; Nieri, Paola

    2017-05-01

    Melanoma is a devastating disease with few therapeutic options in the advanced stage and with the urgent need of reliable biomarkers for early detection. In this context, circulating microRNAs are raising great interest as diagnostic biomarkers. We analyzed the expression profiles of 21 selected microRNAs in plasma samples from melanoma patients and healthy donors to identify potential diagnostic biomarkers. Data analysis was performed using global mean normalization and NormFinder algorithm. Linear regression followed by receiver operating characteristic analyses was carried out to evaluate whether selected plasma miRNAs were able to discriminate between cases and controls. We found five microRNAs that were differently expressed among cases and controls after Bonferroni correction for multiple testing. Specifically, miR-15b-5p, miR-149-3p, and miR-150-5p were up-regulated in plasma of melanoma patients compared with healthy controls, while miR-193a-3p and miR-524-5p were down-regulated. Receiver operating characteristic analyses of these selected microRNAs provided area under the receiver operating characteristic curve values ranging from 0.80 to 0.95. Diagnostic value of microRNAs is improved when considering the combination of miR-149-3p, miR-150-5p, and miR-193a-3p. The triple classifier had a high capacity to discriminate between melanoma patients and healthy controls, making it suitable to be used in early melanoma diagnosis.

  16. Identification of a DNA methylome profile of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and potential plasma epigenetic biomarkers for early diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xufeng; Zhou, Fuyou; Jiang, Chunyu; Wang, Yinuo; Lu, Yanqiang; Yang, Fei; Wang, Nengchao; Yang, Haijun; Zheng, Yanfang; Zhang, Jiren

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation is a critical epigenetic mechanism involved in key cellular processes. Its deregulation has been linked to many human cancers including esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). This study was designed to explore the whole methylation status of ESCC and to identify potential plasma biomarkers for early diagnosis. We used Infinium Methylation 450k array to analyze ESCC tissues (n = 4), paired normal surrounding tissues (n = 4) and normal mucosa from healthy individuals (n = 4), and combined these with gene expression data from the GEO database. One hundred and sixty eight genes had differentially methylated CpG sites in their promoter region and a gene expression pattern inverse to the direction of change in DNA methylation. These genes were involved in several cancer-related pathways. Three genes were validated in additional 42 ESCC tissues and paired normal surrounding tissues. The methylation frequency of EPB41L3, GPX3, and COL14A1 were higher in tumor tissues than in normal surrounding tissues (P < 0.017). The higher methylation frequency of EPB41l3 was correlated with large tumor size (P = 0.044) and advanced pT tumor stage (P = 0.001). The higher methylation frequency of GPX3 and COL14A1 were correlated with advanced pN tumor stage (P = 0.001 and P < 0.001). The methylation of EPB41L3, GPX3, and COL14A1 genes were only found in ESCC patients' plasma, but not in normal individuals upon testing 42 ESCC patients and 50 healthy individuals. Diagnostic sensitivity was increased when methylation of any of the 3 genes were counted (64.3% sensitivity and 100% specificity). These differentially methylated genes in plasma may be used as biomarkers for early diagnosis of ESCC.

  17. Intracellular protein transport to the thyrocyte plasma membrane: potential implications for thyroid physiology.

    PubMed

    Arvan, P; Kim, P S; Kuliawat, R; Prabakaran, D; Muresan, Z; Yoo, S E; Abu Hossain, S

    1997-02-01

    We present a snapshot of developments in epithelial biology that may prove helpful in understanding cellular aspects of the machinery designed for the synthesis of thyroid hormones on the thyroglobulin precursor. The functional unit of the thyroid gland is the follicle, delimited by a monolayer of thyrocytes. Like the cells of most simple epithelia, thyrocytes exhibit specialization of the cell surface that confronts two different extracellular environments-apical and basolateral, which are separated by tight junctions. Specifically, the basolateral domain faces the interstitium/bloodstream, while the apical domain is in contact with the lumen that is the primary target for newly synthesized thyroglobulin secretion and also serves as a storage depot for previously secreted protein. Thyrocytes use their polarity in several important ways, such as for maintaining basolaterally located iodide uptake and T4 deiodination, as well apically located iodide efflux and iodination machinery. The mechanisms by which this organization is established, fall in large part under the more general cell biological problem of intracellular sorting and trafficking of different proteins en route to the cell surface. Nearly all exportable proteins begin their biological life after synthesis in an intracellular compartment known as the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), upon which different degrees of difficulty may be encountered during nascent polypeptide folding and initial export to the Golgi complex. In these initial stages, ER molecular chaperones can assist in monitoring protein folding and export while themselves remaining as resident proteins of the thyroid ER. After export from the ER, most subsequent sorting for protein delivery to apical or basolateral surfaces of thyrocytes occurs within another specialized intracellular compartment known as the trans-Golgi network. Targeting information encoded in secretory proteins and plasma membrane proteins can be exposed or buried at different

  18. Systemic blood plasma CCL5 and CXCL6: Potential biomarkers for human lumbar disc degeneration.

    PubMed

    Grad, S; Bow, C; Karppinen, J; Luk, K D; Cheung, K M; Alini, M; Samartzis, D

    2016-01-05

    Lumbar disc degeneration severity on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is associated with low back pain. Pro-inflammatory chemokines CCL5 and CXCL6 are released by induced degenerative discs, and CCL5 has been associated with discogenic back pain. A case-control study was performed, based on the Hong Kong Disc Degeneration Population-Based Cohort of Southern Chinese, to investigate if systemic levels of CCL5 and CXCL6 were elevated in subjects with disc degeneration compared to non-degenerated individuals. Eighty subjects were selected, 40 with no disc degeneration (control group; DDD score 0) and 40 with moderate/severe disc degeneration (disc degeneration group; DDD score ≥5) as noted on MRI. Subjects were matched for age, sex, body mass index and workload. Blood plasma samples were obtained from each individual, and levels of CCL5 and CXCL6 were measured. Secondary phenotypes of lumbar disc displacement and cervical disc changes were also assessed. CCL5 concentrations were significantly increased in the disc degeneration (mean: 19.8 ng/mL) compared to the control group (mean: 12.8 ng/mL) (p = 0.015). The degeneration group demonstrated higher levels of CXCL6 (mean: 56.9 pg/mL) compared to the control group (mean: 43.4 pg/mL) (p = 0.010). There was a trend towards elevated CCL5 levels with disc displacement in the degeneration group (p = 0.073). Cervical disc degeneration was not associated with elevated chemokine levels (p > 0.05). This is the first study to note that elevated systemic CCL5 and CXCL6 were associated with moderate/severe lumbar disc degeneration, further corroborating tissue studies of painful discs. These chemokines may be systemic biomarkers for the diagnosis and monitoring of disc degeneration.

  19. Membrane potential shapes regulation of dopamine transporter trafficking at the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Ben D.; Saha, Kaustuv; Krout, Danielle; Cabrera, Elizabeth; Felts, Bruce; Henry, L. Keith; Swant, Jarod; Zou, Mu-Fa; Newman, Amy Hauck; Khoshbouei, Habibeh

    2016-01-01

    The dopaminergic system is essential for cognitive processes, including reward, attention and motor control. In addition to DA release and availability of synaptic DA receptors, timing and magnitude of DA neurotransmission depend on extracellular DA-level regulation by the dopamine transporter (DAT), the membrane expression and trafficking of which are highly dynamic. Data presented here from real-time TIRF (TIRFM) and confocal microscopy coupled with surface biotinylation and electrophysiology suggest that changes in the membrane potential alone, a universal yet dynamic cellular property, rapidly alter trafficking of DAT to and from the surface membrane. Broadly, these findings suggest that cell-surface DAT levels are sensitive to membrane potential changes, which can rapidly drive DAT internalization from and insertion into the cell membrane, thus having an impact on the capacity for DAT to regulate extracellular DA levels. PMID:26804245

  20. Gold nanoparticle-polymer nanocomposites synthesized by room temperature atmospheric pressure plasma and their potential for fuel cell electrocatalytic application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ri-Chao; Sun, Dan; Zhang, Ruirui; Lin, Wen-Feng; Macias-Montero, Manuel; Patel, Jenish; Askari, Sadegh; McDonald, Calum; Mariotti, Davide; Maguire, Paul

    2017-04-01

    Conductive polymers have been increasingly used as fuel cell catalyst support due to their electrical conductivity, large surface areas and stability. The incorporation of metal nanoparticles into a polymer matrix can effectively increase the specific surface area of these materials and hence improve the catalytic efficiency. In this work, a nanoparticle loaded conductive polymer nanocomposite was obtained by a one-step synthesis approach based on room temperature direct current plasma-liquid interaction. Gold nanoparticles were directly synthesized from HAuCl4 precursor in poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS). The resulting AuNPs/PEDOT:PSS nanocomposites were subsequently characterized under a practical alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell operation condition for its potential application as an electrocatalyst. Results show that AuNPs sizes within the PEDOT:PSS matrix are dependent on the plasma treatment time and precursor concentration, which in turn affect the nanocomposites electrical conductivity and their catalytic performance. Under certain synthesis conditions, unique nanoscale AuNPs/PEDOT:PSS core-shell structures could also be produced, indicating the interaction at the AuNPs/polymer interface. The enhanced catalytic activity shown by AuNPs/PEDOT:PSS has been attributed to the effective electron transfer and reactive species diffusion through the porous polymer network, as well as the synergistic interfacial interaction at the metal/polymer and metal/metal interfaces.

  1. Gold nanoparticle-polymer nanocomposites synthesized by room temperature atmospheric pressure plasma and their potential for fuel cell electrocatalytic application

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ri-Chao; Sun, Dan; Zhang, Ruirui; Lin, Wen-Feng; Macias-Montero, Manuel; Patel, Jenish; Askari, Sadegh; McDonald, Calum; Mariotti, Davide; Maguire, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Conductive polymers have been increasingly used as fuel cell catalyst support due to their electrical conductivity, large surface areas and stability. The incorporation of metal nanoparticles into a polymer matrix can effectively increase the specific surface area of these materials and hence improve the catalytic efficiency. In this work, a nanoparticle loaded conductive polymer nanocomposite was obtained by a one-step synthesis approach based on room temperature direct current plasma-liquid interaction. Gold nanoparticles were directly synthesized from HAuCl4 precursor in poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS). The resulting AuNPs/PEDOT:PSS nanocomposites were subsequently characterized under a practical alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell operation condition for its potential application as an electrocatalyst. Results show that AuNPs sizes within the PEDOT:PSS matrix are dependent on the plasma treatment time and precursor concentration, which in turn affect the nanocomposites electrical conductivity and their catalytic performance. Under certain synthesis conditions, unique nanoscale AuNPs/PEDOT:PSS core-shell structures could also be produced, indicating the interaction at the AuNPs/polymer interface. The enhanced catalytic activity shown by AuNPs/PEDOT:PSS has been attributed to the effective electron transfer and reactive species diffusion through the porous polymer network, as well as the synergistic interfacial interaction at the metal/polymer and metal/metal interfaces. PMID:28436454

  2. The calculation of electron chemical potential and ion charge state and their influence on plasma conductivity in electrical explosion of metal wire

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Zongqian; Wang, Kun; Li, Yao; Shi, Yuanjie; Wu, Jian; Jia, Shenli

    2014-03-15

    The electron chemical potential and ion charge state (average ion charge and ion distribution) are important parameters in calculating plasma conductivity in electrical explosion of metal wire. In this paper, the calculating method of electron chemical potential and ion charge state is discussed at first. For the calculation of electron chemical potential, the ideal free electron gas model and Thomas-Fermi model are compared and analyzed in terms of the coupling constant of plasma. The Thomas-Fermi ionization model, which is used to calculate ion charge state, is compared with the method based on Saha equation. Furthermore, the influence of electron degenerated energy levels and ion excited states in Saha equation on the ion charge state is also analyzed. Then the influence of different calculating methods of electron chemical potential and ion charge state on plasma conductivity is discussed by applying them in the Lee-More conductivity model.

  3. Plasma sphingolipids as potential indicators of hepatic necroinflammation in patients with chronic hepatitis C and normal alanine aminotransferase level.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun-Feng; Qu, Feng; Zheng, Su-Jun; Ren, Jin-Yu; Wu, Hui-Li; Liu, Mei; Liu, Hui; Ren, Feng; Chen, Yu; Zhang, Jin-Lan; Duan, Zhong-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Accurate estimation of hepatic necroinflammation caused by chronic hepatitis C (CHC) is crucial for prediction of prognosis and design of therapeutic strategy, which is particularly true for CHC patients with normal alanine aminotransferase (ALT) level. Recent studies have shown that sphingolipids have a close relationship with hepatitis C virus infection. The present study aimed to identify plasma sphingolipids related to hepatic necroinflammation. We included 120 treatment-naïve CHC patients and 64/120 had normal ALT levels (<40 U/L). CHC patients who underwent liver biopsies were subjected to Scheuer scoring analysis for scope of hepatic inflammation. Plasma sphingolipids were detected by high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Our results showed 44 plasma sphingolipids were detected altogether. Of all detected sphingolipids, hexosylceramide (HexCer) (d18∶1/22∶0) and HexCer (d18∶1/24∶0) showed a significant difference among G0/G1, G2, and G3/G4 (P<0.05). For identifying hepatic necroinflammation (G≥2), after adjusting other factors, the odds ratio (OR) of HexCer (d18∶1/22∶0) reached 1.01 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.00-1.02). Furthermore, the area under the curve (AUC) of HexCer (d18∶1/22∶0) was 0.7 (P = 0.01) and approached that of ALT (AUC = 0.78). However, in CHC patients with normal ALT, HexCer (d18∶1/22∶0) was an independent factor (OR: 1.02, 95% CI: 1.01-1.03) to identify the hepatic necroinflammation (G≥2). HexCer (d18∶1/22∶0) not only showed the largest AUC (0.78, P = 0.001), but also exhibited the highest specificity of all indicators. These results indicate that plasma HexCer (d18∶1/22∶0) is a potential indicator to distinguish hepatic necroinflammation in CHC patients. For CHC with normal ALT, the ability of HexCer (d18∶1/22∶0) to distinguish hepatic necroinflammation might be superior to conventional serum indicators.

  4. Plasma Sphingolipids as Potential Indicators of Hepatic Necroinflammation in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C and Normal Alanine Aminotransferase Level

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jin-Yu; Wu, Hui-Li; Liu, Mei; Liu, Hui; Ren, Feng; Chen, Yu; Zhang, Jin-Lan; Duan, Zhong-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Accurate estimation of hepatic necroinflammation caused by chronic hepatitis C (CHC) is crucial for prediction of prognosis and design of therapeutic strategy, which is particularly true for CHC patients with normal alanine aminotransferase (ALT) level. Recent studies have shown that sphingolipids have a close relationship with hepatitis C virus infection. The present study aimed to identify plasma sphingolipids related to hepatic necroinflammation. We included 120 treatment-naïve CHC patients and 64/120 had normal ALT levels (<40 U/L). CHC patients who underwent liver biopsies were subjected to Scheuer scoring analysis for scope of hepatic inflammation. Plasma sphingolipids were detected by high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Our results showed 44 plasma sphingolipids were detected altogether. Of all detected sphingolipids, hexosylceramide (HexCer) (d18∶1/22∶0) and HexCer (d18∶1/24∶0) showed a significant difference among G0/G1, G2, and G3/G4 (P<0.05). For identifying hepatic necroinflammation (G≥2), after adjusting other factors, the odds ratio (OR) of HexCer (d18∶1/22∶0) reached 1.01 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.00–1.02). Furthermore, the area under the curve (AUC) of HexCer (d18∶1/22∶0) was 0.7 (P = 0.01) and approached that of ALT (AUC = 0.78). However, in CHC patients with normal ALT, HexCer (d18∶1/22∶0) was an independent factor (OR: 1.02, 95% CI: 1.01–1.03) to identify the hepatic necroinflammation (G≥2). HexCer (d18∶1/22∶0) not only showed the largest AUC (0.78, P = 0.001), but also exhibited the highest specificity of all indicators. These results indicate that plasma HexCer (d18∶1/22∶0) is a potential indicator to distinguish hepatic necroinflammation in CHC patients. For CHC with normal ALT, the ability of HexCer (d18∶1/22∶0) to distinguish hepatic necroinflammation might be superior to conventional serum indicators. PMID:24736528

  5. Potential formation in front of an electron emitting electrode immersed in a plasma that contains a monoenergetic electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Gyergyek, T.; Kovacic, J.; Cercek, M.

    2010-08-15

    A one-dimensional fluid model of the sheath formation in front of a large, planar electron emitting electrode (collector) immersed in a plasma that contains a monoenergetic electron beam is presented. Expressions for the Bohm criterion, the total electric current to the collector, and for the zero electric field at the collector are derived. When there is no electron emission, the model predicts, in some cases, up to three different solutions. The low and the high solutions correspond to the fact that the presheath potential drop can be determined either by thermal or by the beam electrons. The middle solution between them has no physical meaning. When the electron emission is space charge limited, the model may have up to five solutions because the low solution can sometimes split into three parts. The current-voltage characteristic of the collector that exhibits triple floating potential is calculated and it shows qualitative similarity with experimental ones [C.-H. Nam et al., J. Appl. Phys. 63, 5674 (1988)]. When the emission is below the space charge limit, the model again exhibits up to five solutions, which are the low, middle, high, and two additional 'singularity solutions'. These two appear because of the singularity in the Bohm criterion. Regions of validity of the low and high solutions are determined from numerical solutions of the Poisson equation [T. Gyergyek et al., Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 18, 035001 (2009)] and with the maximum positive ion flux test [J. I. Fernandez Palop et al., J. Appl. Phys. 91, 2587 (2002)]. In the case of no or small emission, both methods give the same results. If the emission is space charge limited, the numerical solution method is much more reliable.

  6. Potential Factors for Inadequate Voriconazole Plasma Concentrations in Intensive Care Unit Patients and Patients with Hematological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Duettmann, Wiebke; Raggam, Reinhard B.; Seeber, Katharina; Troppan, Katharina; Fruhwald, Sonja; Prueller, Florian; Wagner, Jasmin; Valentin, Thomas; Zollner-Schwetz, Ines; Wölfler, Albert

    2013-01-01

    Voriconazole plasma concentrations (VPCs) vary widely, and concentrations outside the therapeutic range are associated with either worse outcome in invasive aspergillosis (IA) or increased toxicity. The primary goal of this cohort study conducted in a real-life setting was to identify potential factors associated with inadequate VPCs in ICU patients and patients with hematological malignancies. Within a period of 12 months, trough VPCs were obtained and analyzed with high-performance liquid chromatography, and the adequate range was defined as 1.5 to 5.5 mg/liter. VPCs of <1.5 mg/liter were defined as low, whereas VPCs of >5.5 mg/liter were defined as potentially toxic. A total of 221 trough VPCs were obtained in 61 patients receiving voriconazole, and 124/221 VPCs (56%) were found to be low. Multivariate analysis revealed that low VPCs were significantly associated with clinical failure of voriconazole, prophylactic use, younger age, underlying hematological malignancy, concomitant proton pump inhibitor (PPI) (pantoprazole was used in 88% of the patients), and absence of side effects. Low VPCs remained an independent predictor of clinical failure of voriconazole. The defined adequate range was reached in 79/221 (36%) VPCs. In 18 samples (8%), potentially toxic levels were measured. Multivariate analysis revealed higher body mass index (BMI), absence of hematological malignancy, therapeutic application, and diarrhea as factors associated with potentially toxic VPCs. Neurotoxic adverse events occurred in six patients and were mostly associated with VPCs in the upper quartile of our defined adequate range. In conclusion, potential factors like younger age, prophylaxis, underlying hematological malignancy, BMI, and concomitant PPI should be considered within the algorithm of voriconazole treatment. PMID:23629724

  7. Static quark-antiquark potential in the quark-gluon plasma from lattice QCD.

    PubMed

    Burnier, Yannis; Kaczmarek, Olaf; Rothkopf, Alexander

    2015-02-27

    We present a state-of-the-art determination of the complex valued static quark-antiquark potential at phenomenologically relevant temperatures around the deconfinement phase transition. Its values are obtained from nonperturbative lattice QCD simulations using spectral functions extracted via a novel Bayesian inference prescription. We find that the real part, both in a gluonic medium, as well as in realistic QCD with light u, d, and s quarks, lies close to the color singlet free energies in Coulomb gauge and shows Debye screening above the (pseudo)critical temperature T_{c}. The imaginary part is estimated in the gluonic medium, where we find that it is of the same order of magnitude as in hard-thermal loop resummed perturbation theory in the deconfined phase.

  8. Chord Splicing & Joining Detail; Chord & CrossBracing Joint Details; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Chord Splicing & Joining Detail; Chord & Cross-Bracing Joint Details; Cross Bracing Center Joint Detail; Chord & Diagonal Joint Detail - Vermont Covered Bridge, Highland Park, spanning Kokomo Creek at West end of Deffenbaugh Street (moved to), Kokomo, Howard County, IN

  9. Arch & Chord Joint Detail; Crossbracing Center Joint Detail; Chord, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Arch & Chord Joint Detail; Crossbracing Center Joint Detail; Chord, Panel Post, Tie & Diagonal Brace Joint Detail; Chord, Panel Post, Tie & Crossbracing Joint Detail - Dunlapsville Covered Bridge, Spanning East Fork Whitewater River, Dunlapsville, Union County, IN

  10. The influence of multi-ion streaming on the variation of dust particle surface potential with Maxwellian/non-Maxwellian dusty plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abid, A. A.; Rehman, M.; Khan, M. Z.; Sarfraz, Z.; Lu, Quanming

    2017-08-01

    Dust grain potential variation influence by positive ion streaming as well as negative ion streaming is presented in a complex (dusty) plasma following the Maxwellian/non-Maxwellian (kappa distribution and Cairns distribution) function. The components of complex plasma are the electrons, ions [positive and negative], and dust grains having negative charge. For this purpose, the mathematical statement (equation) of currents is derived for dust grains having negative charge to fulfill the equilibrium state (viz., qD = constant). It is observed numerically that positive ion streaming speed as well as negative ion streaming speed has a significant influence on the surface potential of dust particles, e.g., by increasing the positive ion and negative ion streaming speed, the magnitude of dust particle surface potential increases. The relevance to low-temperature research center in a non-equilibrium complex (dusty) plasma is precisely discussed by associating oxygen ion (negative and positive) species.

  11. Plasma alkylresorcinol metabolites as potential biomarkers of whole-grain wheat and rye cereal fibre intakes in women.

    PubMed

    Aubertin-Leheudre, Mylène; Koskela, Anja; Samaletdin, Adile; Adlercreutz, Herman

    2010-02-01

    It has been demonstrated that intact plasma alkylresorcinols (AR) and urinary AR metabolites could be used as biomarkers of whole-grain intake. Thereafter, we developed the method for the plasma AR metabolites, which is more convenient and requires less sample pretreatment than the analysis of intact plasma AR. The aim of the present study is to evaluate whether AR metabolites measured in plasma, in the same population, could also be considered as useful biomarkers of cereal fibre. Fifty-six women were recruited in a cross-sectional and observational study. Dietary intake (5-d record) and plasma AR metabolites (3,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, DHBA; 3-(3,5-dihydroxyphenyl)-1-propanoic acid, DHPPA) were measured. The relationship between plasma AR metabolites and cereal fibre intake was examined using partial correlation and stepwise regression. Cereal fibre intake correlated significantly with plasma DHBA (r 0.411; P = 0.002) and DHPPA (r 0.463; P = 0.000) even after adjustment for BMI and age. Thus, plasma AR metabolites correlate with cereal fibre intake as noted with plasma intact AR and urinary AR metabolites. We observed that plasma DHPPA was the independent predictor of cereal fibre intake, explaining 18 % of the variance (adjusted r(2) 0.176; P = 0.002). In epidemiological screening, it might be easier to obtain and to collect plasma than urine samples. In addition, the plasma AR metabolites half-life seems longer than those of intact plasma AR, and their measurements are more convenient, and faster. Thus, sum of plasma AR metabolites and more specifically plasma DHPPA seems to be good and specific biomarkers of cereal fibre intake.

  12. Modelling of the protonophoric uncoupling by phenoxyacetic acid of the plasma membrane potential of Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, C M; Nielsen, J; Villadsen, J

    1998-12-20

    Physiological effects of phenoxyacetic acid, the penicillin V side-chain precursor, on steady-state continuous cultures of Penicillium chrysogenum have been studied both theoretically and experimentally. Theoretical calculations show that at an extracellular pH of 6.50, phenoxyacetic acid has negligible influence on the growth energetics due to protonophoric uncoupling of membrane potentials by passive diffusive uptake. On the other hand, when the extracellular pH is lowered to 5.00, a severe maintenance-related uncoupling effect of phenoxyacetic acid is calculated. These findings were confirmed experimentally by steady-state continuous cultivations with a high-yielding penicillin strain of P. chrysogenum performed on a chemically defined and glucose-limited medium at pH 6.50 and pH 5.00, both with and without phenoxyacetic acid present. The yield and maintenance coefficients were determined from steady-state measurements of the specific uptake rates of glucose and oxygen and the specific production rate of carbon dioxide as functions of the specific growth rate. Combining these data with a simple stoichiometric model for the primary metabolism of P. chrysogenum allows quantitative information to be extracted on the growth energetics in terms of ATP spent in maintenance- and growth-related processes, i.e. mATP and YxATP. The increased maintenance-related ATP consumption when adding phenoxyacetic acid at pH 5.00 agrees with the theoretical calculations on the uncoupling effect of phenoxyacetic acid. When YxATP is compared with earlier reported values for the theoretical ATP requirement for biosynthesis of P. chrysogenum, i.e. YxATP, growth, it is found that YxATP,growth is only 40-50% of YxATP, which stresses that a large amount of ATP is wasted in turnover of macromolecules, leaks, and futile cycles.

  13. New Details on Pluto

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-07-10

    This image of Pluto was taken by New Horizons' Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) at 4:18 UT on July 9, 2015, from a range of 3.9 million miles (6.3 million kilometers). It reveals new details on the surface of Pluto, including complex patterns in the transition between the very dark equatorial band (nicknamed "the whale"), which occupies the lower part of the image, and the brighter northern terrain. The bright arc at the bottom of the disk shows that there is more bright terrain beyond the southern margin of the "whale." The side of Pluto that will be studied in great detail during the close encounter on July 14 is now rotating off the visible disk on the right hand side, and will not be seen again until shortly before closest approach. Three consecutive images were combined and sharpened, using a process called deconvolution, to create this view. Deconvolution enhances real detail but can also generate spurious features, including the bright edge seen on the upper and left margins of the disk (though the bright margin on the bottom of the disk is real). The wireframe globe shows the orientation of Pluto in the image: thicker lines indicate the equator and the prime meridian (the direction facing Charon). Central longitude on Pluto is 86°. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19705

  14. Broadening of rectified potential structures induced by rf currents in a magnetized plasma: Application to ITER scrape-off-layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faudot, E.; Colas, L.; Heuraux, S.; Gunn, J. P.

    2010-04-01

    Measurements show that the vicinity of powered ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) antennae is biased positively with respect to its environment [J. Gunn et al., Proc. 22nd IAEA Fusion Energy Conference, Geneva 2008, EX/P6-32]. This is attributed to radio-frequency (rf) sheath rectification. The radial penetration of these direct current (dc) potentials from ICRF launchers into the tokamak scrape-off layer (SOL) determines the power deposition on the walls and especially on the antenna structure, which is a key point for long time clean discharges. Within independent flux tube models of rf sheath rectification the radial penetration of dc potentials is determined by the skin depth x0=c/ωpe for the slow wave. When self-consistent exchange of transverse rf current is allowed between neighboring flux tubes, such a structure can be broadened radially up to a characteristic transverse length L. Broadening arises as soon as L >x0. A linear modeling of the process gives a first evaluation of the theoretical length L =(L∥ρci/2)1/2. Within the "flute assumption," it scales with the length L∥ of open flux tubes and the ion Larmor radius Ωci. This trend has been confirmed by nonlinear fluid simulations using the SEM code taking into account nonlinearities of the sheath dynamics. Parametric regimes are outlined where broadening or nonlinearity arise. Langmuir probe measurements on Tore Supra suggest that the observed broadening is lower than predicted by the code. This suggests that actual rf current exchanges probably do not occur over the whole length of magnetic field lines but only on a fraction of it. This "effective parallel magnetic connection length" L∥eff is estimated from the measurements. The model is finally applied to several potential maps generated by an ITER antenna, with different plasma parameters depending on possible SOL scenarios in ITER, and "reasonable assumptions" about L∥eff. It comes out that L ranges between 1 and 10 cm depending on

  15. Magnetospheric convection strength inferred from inner edge of the electron plasma sheet and its relation to the polar cap potential drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, F.; Kivelson, M. G.; Walker, R. J.; Khurana, K. K.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2010-12-01

    The sharp inner edge of the nightside electron plasma sheet observed by the THEMIS spacecraft is shown to provide a measure of the effective convection strength that transports plasma sheet plasma into the inner magnetosphere. The effective convection strength is characterized by the difference of potential between the magnetopause terminators at dawn and at dusk. We have surveyed inner boundary crossings of the electron plasma sheet measured by three THEMIS probes on orbits from Nov. 2007 to Apr. 2009. The values of the convection electric potential are inferred from the locations of the inner edge for different energy channels using a steady-state drift boundary model with a dipole magnetic field and a Volland-Stern electric field. When plotted against the solar wind electric field ( ), the convection electric potential is found to have a quasi-linear relationship with the driving solar wind electric field for the range of values tested (meaningful statistics only for Esw < 1.5 mV/m). Reasonably good agreement is found between the convection electric potential and the polar-cap potential drop calculated from model of Boyle et al. [1997] when the degree of shielding in the Volland-Stern potential is selected as gamma=1.5.

  16. Plasma miR-19b and miR-183 as Potential Biomarkers of Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Skvortsova, Tatyana E.; Ponomaryova, Anastasia A.; Rykova, Elena Yu; Cherdyntseva, Nadezhda V.; Polovnikov, Evgeny S.; Pashkovskaya, Oksana A.; Pokushalov, Evgeny A.; Vlassov, Valentin V.; Laktionov, Pavel P.

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is a complex disease that often manifests at the point when treatment is not effective. Introduction of blood-based complementary diagnostics using molecular markers may enhance early detection of this disease and help reduce the burden of lung cancer. Here we evaluated the diagnostic potential of seven plasma miRNA biomarkers (miR-21, -19b, -126, -25, -205, -183, -125b) by quantitative reverse transcription PCR. Influence clinical and demographical characteristics, including age, tumor stage and cancer subtype on miRNA levels was investigated. Four miRNAs were significantly dysregulated (miR-19b, -21, -25, -183) in lung cancer patients. Combination of miR-19b and miR-183 provided detection of lung cancer with 94.7% sensitivity and 95.2% specificity (AUC = 0.990). Thus, miRNAs have shown the potential to discriminate histological subtypes of lung cancer and reliably distinguish lung cancer patients from healthy individuals. PMID:27768748

  17. Concentrated lyophilized plasma used for reconstitution of whole blood leads to higher coagulation factor activity but unchanged thrombin potential compared with fresh-frozen plasma.

    PubMed

    Iapichino, Giacomo E; Ponschab, Martin; Cadamuro, Janne; Süssner, Susanne; Gabriel, Christian; Dieplinger, Benjamin; Egger, Margot; Schlimp, Christoph J; Bahrami, Soheyl; Schöchl, Herbert

    2017-07-01

    During massive hemorrhage, it is recommended to transfuse red blood cells, platelet concentrate, and fresh-frozen plasma in a ratio close to 1:1:1. To avoid the thawing process of fresh frozen plasma, lyophilized plasma (LP) is increasingly used. Evidence is limited on the activity of coagulation factors in reconstituted blood using LP and concentrated LP versions. Whole blood from ten healthy volunteers was separated into red blood cell, fresh frozen plasma, and platelet concentrate units. Aliquots of red blood cells and plasma concentrate were mixed with either fresh frozen plasma (200 mL) or LP at reconstitution ratios of 2:1:1, 1:1:1, and 1:1:2. LP was used either at the recommended standard volume of 200 mL (LP200) or was more concentrated at volumes of 100 and 50 mL (LP100 and LP50, respectively). The hemostatic capacity of each reconstituted whole blood sample was tested with blood cell counts, standard coagulation tests, factor activity, thrombin generation, and viscoelastic assays. Hematocrit, platelet counts, and fibrinogen levels of the three ratios were similar between FFP200 and LP200 units but were lower compared with the corresponding ratios in LP100 and LP50 units. The activity of procoagulant and anticoagulant factors increased linearly with the increasing plasmatic fraction and, at 1:1:2 ratio, was significantly higher in LP50 units compared with FFP200 and LP200 units. Thrombin generation was similar throughout the four plasma groups at any ratio. Decreasing the dilution volume of LP facilitates reaching higher hematocrit and coagulation protein levels without a relevant increase in thrombin generation. This is due to preserved balance between procoagulant and anticoagulant factors in the concentrated LP preparations. © 2017 AABB.

  18. Potential influence of Type A personality on plasma C-reactive protein levels in people with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Chauvet-Gélinier, J-C; Trojak, B; Lemogne, C; Aho-Glélé, L-S; Brindisi, M-C; Bouillet, B; Ponavoy, E; Meille, V; Simoneau, I; Chahraoui, K; Vaillant, G; Petit, J-M; Consoli, S M; Bonin, B; Vergès, B

    2016-04-01

    Type A personality, although classically known as a factor linked to increased vascular risk, has recently been associated with increased survival in patients with diabetes. As low-grade inflammation predicts a poor outcome, the present study explored the potential associations between Type A and plasma levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) in diabetes. Type A personality was assessed by the Bortner questionnaire in people with diabetes. The association between Type A and plasma CRP levels was examined by multivariable linear regression, and structural equation modelling (SEM) was performed to determine the impact of the major clinical, biological and psychological confounders. The study included 626 participants with type 1 and type 2 diabetes from the Diabetes and Psychological Profile study. Multivariable analyses showed an independent inverse association between Type A score and CRP levels. The structural model adjusted for age, gender, diabetes type and duration, body mass index (BMI), smoking status, alcohol abuse, oral antidiabetic and statin treatments, HbA1c levels, lipids, perceived stress, anxiety and depression revealed significant associations between CRP and Type A (β=-0.135, 95% CI: -0.242, -0.028; P=0.014), BMI (β=0.194, 95% CI: 0.038, 0.350; P=0.015) and HDL cholesterol (β=-0.132, 95% CI: -0.245, -0.020; P=0.014). Our present study data indicate that Type A personality is independently associated with lower CRP levels. This lower level of inflammation might explain the better clinical outcomes associated with Type A personality in patients with diabetes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Automated capillary GC/NPD assay for the determination in plasma of McN-5707, a potential antidepressant drug

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, M.L.; Uetz, J.A.; Ng, K.T.

    1986-03-01

    McN-5707 x HBr (trans-6-(2-chlorophenyl)-1,2,3,5,6,10b-hexa-hydropyrrolo(2,1-a)isoquinoline hydrobromide (1:1)) is a novel, potential antidepressant which is currently under pre-clinical evaluation. The present study reports the development of a sensitive and reproducible capillary gas chromatographic (GC) assay with nitrogen-phosphorus ionization detection (NPD) for McN-5707 in plasma. The assay includes a three step extraction as follows: McN-5707 and the internal standard (IS) are extracted from alkalinized plasma (1 mL) into hexane and back-extracted into 0.1 N HCl. Following alkalinization of the aqueous layer, McN-5707 and IS are re-extracted into hexane. The solvent is evaporated and the residue is reconstituted with 50 ..mu..L of a solution of 10% methanol in toluene. A 2.5 ..mu..L aliquot is injected into an HP 5880A capillary GC using the HP 7672A auto-sampler. Separation is accomplished using a 15 m x 0.32 mm i.d. DB-5 fused silica capillary column and temperature programming from 160 to 200/sup 0/C at 10/sup 0//min. Calibration curves are linear from 1 to 100 ng/mL. Accuracy and precision, expressed as relative deviation from the true value and coefficient of variation are < 10% at all concentrations in the linear range. The assay has been successfully used for pharmacokinetic studies in rats and dogs and has been cross-validated with a /sup 3/H-norepinephrine uptake inhibition assay.

  20. Low energy highly charged ion beam facility at Inter University Accelerator Centre: Measurement of the plasma potential and ion energy distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Sairam, T. Bhatt, Pragya; Safvan, C. P.; Kumar, Ajit; Kumar, Herendra

    2015-11-15

    A deceleration lens coupled to one of the beam lines of the electron cyclotron resonance based low energy beam facility at Inter University Accelerator Centre is reported. This system is capable of delivering low energy (2.5 eV/q–1 keV/q) highly charged ion beams. The presence of plasma potential hinders the measurements of low energies (<50 eV), therefore, plasma potential measurements have been undertaken using a retarding plate analyzer in unison with the deceleration assembly. The distributions of the ion energies have been obtained and the effect of different source parameters on these distributions is studied.

  1. Electroreflectance and the problem of studying plasma-surface interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Preppernau, B.L.

    1995-12-31

    A long standing problem in low-temperature plasma discharge physics is to understand in detail the mutual interaction of real exposed surfaces (electrodes) with the reactive plasma environment. In particular, one wishes to discern the influence of these surfaces on the plasma parameters given their contributions from secondary electrons and ions. This paper briefly reviews the known surface interaction processes as well as currently available diagnostics to study the interface between plasmas and surfaces. Next comes a discussion describing the application of plasma-modulated electroreflectance to this research and some potential experimental techniques.

  2. LF460 detail design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    This is the final technical report documenting the detail design of the LF460, and advanced turbotip lift fan intended for application with the YJ97-GE-100 turbojet jet generator to a V/STOL transport research aircraft. Primary objective of the design was to achieve a low noise level while maintaining the high thrust/weight ratio capability of a high pressure ratio lift fan. Report covers design requirements and summarizes activities and final results in the areas of aerodynamic and mechanical design, component and system performance, acoustic features and final noise predictions.

  3. Details of meiosis

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 18, discusses the details of meiosis, beginning with the structure and number of chiasmata, i.e., the cytological term for two homologous chromosomes forming a bivalent which begin to repel each other until they are held together only at the point of crossing-over. The synaptonemal complex which consists of two lateral elements which contain protein and RNA is also discussed. The chapter concludes with a description of meiosis in polyploids, human meiosis, and the behavior of X and Y chromosomes. 28 refs., 8 figs.

  4. Hawaii demand-side management resource assessment. Final report, Reference Volume 3 -- Residential and commercial sector DSM analyses: Detailed results from the DBEDT DSM assessment model; Part 1, Technical potential

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    The Hawaii Demand-Side Management Resource Assessment was the fourth of seven projects in the Hawaii Energy Strategy (HES) program. HES was designed by the Department of Business, Economic Development, and Tourism (DBEDT) to produce an integrated energy strategy for the State of Hawaii. The purpose of Project 4 was to develop a comprehensive assessment of Hawaii`s demand-side management (DSM) resources. To meet this objective, the project was divided into two phases. The first phase included development of a DSM technology database and the identification of Hawaii commercial building characteristics through on-site audits. These Phase 1 products were then used in Phase 2 to identify expected energy impacts from DSM measures in typical residential and commercial buildings in Hawaii. The building energy simulation model DOE-2.1E was utilized to identify the DSM energy impacts. More detailed information on the typical buildings and the DOE-2.1E modeling effort is available in Reference Volume 1, ``Building Prototype Analysis``. In addition to the DOE-2.1E analysis, estimates of residential and commercial sector gas and electric DSM potential for the four counties of Honolulu, Hawaii, Maui, and Kauai through 2014 were forecasted by the new DBEDT DSM Assessment Model. Results from DBEDTs energy forecasting model, ENERGY 2020, were linked with results from DOE-2.1E building energy simulation runs and estimates of DSM measure impacts, costs, lifetime, and anticipated market penetration rates in the DBEDT DSM Model. Through its algorithms, estimates of DSM potential for each forecast year were developed. Using the load shape information from the DOE-2.1E simulation runs, estimates of electric peak demand impacts were developed. Numerous tables and figures illustrating the technical potential for demand-side management are included.

  5. Equation of state of a dense plasma: Analytical results on the basis of quantum pair interaction potentials in the random phase approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moldabekov, Zh A.; Ramazanov, T. S.; Gabdullin, M. T.

    2016-11-01

    In this work, using recently obtained expansion of the dielectric function in the long wave length limit by Moldabekov et al (2015 Phys. Plasmas 22 102104), we extended previously obtained formulas for the equation of state of the semiclassical dense plasma from Ramazanov et al (2015 Phys. Rev. E 92 023104) to the quantum case. Inner energy and contribution to the pressure due to plasma non-ideality derived for both Coulomb pair interaction and quantum pair interaction potentials. Obtained analytical result for the equation of state reproduces the Montroll-Ward contribution, which corresponds to the quantum ring sum. It was shown that the obtained results are consistent with the Thomas-Fermi approximation with the first order gradient correction. Additionally, the generalization of the quantum Deutsch potential to the case of the degenerate electrons is discussed. Obtained results will be useful for understanding of the physics of dense plasmas as well as for further development of the dense plasma simulation on the basis of the quantum potentials.

  6. Identification of Potential Plasma Biomarkers for Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease by Integrating Transcriptomics and Proteomics in Laying Hens.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Meng-Tsz; Chen, Yu-Jen; Chen, Ching-Yi; Tsai, Mong-Hsun; Han, Chia-Li; Chen, Yu-Ju; Mersmann, Harry J; Ding, Shih-Torng

    2017-03-01

    Background: Prevalent worldwide obesity is associated with increased incidence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and metabolic syndrome. The identification of noninvasive biomarkers for NAFLD is of recent interest. Because primary de novo lipogenesis occurs in chicken liver as in human liver, adult chickens with age-associated steatosis resembling human NAFLD is an appealing animal model.Objective: The objective of this study was to screen potential biomarkers in the chicken model for NAFLD by transcriptomic and proteomic analysis.Methods: Hy-Line W-36 laying hens were fed standard feed from 25 to 45 wk of age to induce fatty liver. They were killed every 4 wk, and liver and plasma were collected at each time point to assess fatty liver development and for transcriptomic and proteomic analysis. Next, selected biomarkers were confirmed in additional experiments by providing supplements of the hepatoprotective nutrients betaine [300, 600, or 900 parts per million (ppm) in vivo; 2 mM in vitro] or docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 1% in vivo; 100 μM in vitro) to 30-wk-old Hy-Line W-36 laying hens for 4 mo and to Hy-Line W-36 chicken primary hepatocytes with oleic acid-induced steatosis. Liver or hepatocyte lipid contents and the expression of biomarkers were then examined.Results: Plasma acetoacetyl-CoA synthetase (AACS), dipeptidyl-peptidase 4 (DPP4), glutamine synthetase (GLUL), and glutathione S-transferase (GST) concentrations are well-established biomarkers for NAFLD. Selected biomarkers had significant positive associations with hepatic lipid deposition (P < 0.001). Betaine (900 ppm in vivo; 2 mM in vitro) and DHA (1% in vivo; 100 μM in vitro) supplementation both resulted in lower steatosis accompanied by the reduced expression of selected biomarkers in vivo and in vitro (P < 0.05).Conclusion: This study used adult laying hens to identify biomarkers for NAFLD and indicated that AACS, DPP4, GLUL, and GST could be considered to be potential diagnostic

  7. Detailed Debunking of Denial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enting, I. G.; Abraham, J. P.

    2012-12-01

    The disinformation campaign against climate science has been compared to a guerilla war whose tactics undermine the traditional checks and balances of science. One comprehensive approach has to been produce archives of generic responses such as the websites of RealClimate and SkepticalScience. We review our experiences with an alternative approach of detailed responses to a small number of high profile cases. Our particular examples were Professor Ian Plimer and Christopher Monckton, the Third Viscount Monckton of Brenchley, each of whom has been taken seriously by political leaders in our respective countries. We relate our experiences to comparable examples such as John Mashey's analysis of the Wegman report and the formal complaints about Lomborg's "Skeptical Environmentalist" and Durkin's "Great Global Warming Swindle". Our two approaches used contrasting approaches: an on-line video of a lecture vs an evolving compendium of misrepresentations. Additionally our approaches differed in the emphasis. The analysis of Monckton concentrated on the misrepresentation of the science, while the analysis of Plimer concentrated on departures from accepted scientific practice: fabrication of data, misrepresentation of cited sources and unattributed use of the work of others. Benefits of an evolving compendium were the ability to incorporate contributions from members of the public who had identified additional errors and the scope for addressing new aspects as they came to public attention. `Detailed debunking' gives non-specialists a reference point for distinguishing non-science when engaging in public debate.

  8. Circulating Plasma Levels of MicroRNA-21 and MicroRNA-221 Are Potential Diagnostic Markers for Primary Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kemeny, Nancy; Kingham, T. Peter; Allen, Peter J.; D’Angelica, Michael I.; DeMatteo, Ronald P.; Betel, Doron; Klimstra, David; Jarnagin, William R.; Ventura, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are potential biomarkers in various malignancies. We aim to characterize miRNA expression in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) and identify circulating plasma miRNAs with potential diagnostic and prognostic utility. Methods Using deep-sequencing techniques, miRNA expression between tumor samples and non-neoplastic liver parenchyma were compared. Overexpressed miRNAs were measured in plasma from an independent cohort of patients with cholangiocarcinoma using RT-qPCR and compared with that healthy volunteers. The discriminatory ability of the evaluated plasma miRNAs between patients and controls was evaluated with receiving operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Results Small RNAs from 12 ICC and 11 tumor-free liver samples were evaluated. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering using the miRNA expression data showed clear grouping of ICC vs. non-neoplastic liver parenchyma. We identified 134 down-regulated and 128 upregulated miRNAs. Based on overexpression and high fold-change, miR21, miR200b, miR221, and miR34c were measured in plasma from an independent cohort of patients with ICC (n = 25) and healthy controls (n = 7). Significant overexpression of miR-21 and miR-221 was found in plasma from ICC patients. Furthermore, circulating miR-21 demonstrated a high discriminatory ability between patients with ICC and healthy controls (AUC: 0.94). Conclusion Among the differentially expressed miRNAs in ICC, miR-21 and miR-221 are overexpressed and detectable in the circulation. Plasma expression levels of these miRNAs, particularly miR-21, accurately differentiates patients with ICC from healthy controls and could potentially serve as adjuncts in diagnosis. Prospective validation and comparison with other hepatobiliary malignancies is required to establish their potential role as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers. PMID:27685844

  9. Global detailed gravimetric geoid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, S.; Marsh, J. G.

    1974-01-01

    A global detailed gravimetric geoid has been computed by combining the Goddard Space Flight Center GEM-4 gravity model derived from satellite and surface gravity data and surface 1 x 1-deg mean free-air gravity anomaly data. The accuracy of the geoid is plus or minus 2 meters on continents, 5 to 7 meters in areas where surface gravity data are sparse, and 10 to 15 meters in areas where no surface gravity data are available. Comparisons have been made with the astrogeodetic data provided by Rice (United States), Bomford (Europe), and Mather (Australia). Comparisons have also been carried out with geoid heights derived from satellite solutions for geocentric station coordinates in North America, the Caribbean, Europe and Australia.

  10. South Polar Details

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-09-22

    22 September 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows details among some of the eroded layer outcrops of the martian south polar region. Much of the south polar region of Mars is covered by a thick unit of layered material. For decades, the layers have been assumed to consist of a mixture of dust and ice, but it is equally possible that the materials are sedimentary rocks. This image was captured during southern spring, at a time when some of the surface was still covered by seasonal carbon dioxide (CO2) frost. Location near: 86.5°S, 116.6°W Image width: width: ~3 km (~1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Spring http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA06344

  11. Detail of Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This color photo of Neptune's large satellite Triton was obtained on Aug. 24 1989 at a range of 530,000 kilometers (330,000 miles). The resolution is about 10 kilometers (6.2 miles), sufficient to begin to show topographic detail. The image was made from pictures taken through the green, violet and ultraviolet filters. In this technique, regions that are highly reflective in the ultraviolet appear blue in color. In reality, there is no part of Triton that would appear blue to the eye. The bright southern hemisphere of Triton, which fills most of this frame, is generally pink in tone as is the even brighter equatorial band. The darker regions north of the equator also tend to be pink or reddish in color. JPL manages the Voyager project for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

  12. Ring Details on Display

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-11-07

    This view from NASA's Cassini spacecraft showcases some of the amazingly detailed structure of Saturn's rings. The rings are made up of many smaller ringlets that blur together when seen from a distance. But when imaged up close, the rings' structures display quite a bit of variation. Ring scientists are debating the nature of these features -- whether they have always appeared this way or if their appearance has evolved over time. This view looks toward the sunlit side of the rings from about 4 degrees above the ring plane. The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera on Sept. 24, 2016. The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 283,000 miles (456,000 kilometers) from Saturn and at a Sun-Saturn-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 32 degrees. Image scale is 17 miles (27 kilometers) per pixel. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20506

  13. Carina Nebula Detail

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    Carina Nebula Details: Great Clouds Credit for Hubble Image: NASA, ESA, N. Smith (University of California, Berkeley), and The Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA) Credit for CTIO Image: N. Smith (University of California, Berkeley) and NOAO/AURA/NSF The Hubble Space Telescope is a project of international cooperation between NASA and the European Space Agency. NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center manages the telescope. The Space Telescope Science Institute conducts Hubble science operations. Goddard is responsible for HST project management, including mission and science operations, servicing missions, and all associated development activities. To learn more about the Hubble Space Telescope go here: www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/hubble/main/index.html NASA Goddard Space Flight Center is home to the nation's largest organization of combined scientists, engineers and technologists that build spacecraft, instruments and new technology to study the Earth, the sun, our solar system, and the universe. Follow us on Twitter Join us on Facebook

  14. Detail of Triton's Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    This color photo of Neptune's large satellite Triton was obtained on Aug. 24 1989 at a range of 530,000 kilometers(330,000 miles). The resolution is about 10 kilometers (6.2 miles), sufficient to begin to show topographic detail. The image was made from pictures taken through the green, violet and ultraviolet filters. In this technique, regions that are highly reflective in the ultraviolet appear blue in color. In reality, there is no part of Triton that would appear blue to the eye. The bright southern hemisphere of Triton, which fills most of this frame, is generally pink in tone as is the even brighter equatorial band. The darker regions north of the equator also tend to be pink or reddish in color.

    JPL manages the Voyager project for NASA's Office of Space Science.

  15. Pluto's Surface in Detail

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-14

    On July 14, 2015, NASA's New Horizons spacecraft made its historic flight through the Pluto system. This detailed, high-quality global mosaic of Pluto was assembled from nearly all of the highest-resolution images obtained by the Long-Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) and the Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC) on New Horizons. The mosaic is the most detailed and comprehensive global view yet of Pluto's surface using New Horizons data. It includes topography data of the hemisphere visible to New Horizons during the spacecraft's closest approach. The topography is derived from digital stereo-image mapping tools that measure the parallax -- or the difference in the apparent relative positions -- of features on the surface obtained at different viewing angles during the encounter. Scientists use these parallax displacements of high and low terrain to estimate landform heights. The global mosaic has been overlain with transparent, colorized topography data wherever on the surface stereo data is available. Terrain south of about 30°S was in darkness leading up to and during the flyby, so is shown in black. Examples of large-scale topographic features on Pluto include the vast expanse of very flat, low-elevation nitrogen ice plains of Sputnik Planitia ("P") -- note that all feature names in the Pluto system are informal -- and, on the eastern edge of the encounter hemisphere, the aligned, high-elevation ridges of Tartarus Dorsa ("T") that host the enigmatic bladed terrain, mountains, possible cryovolcanos, canyons, craters and more. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21861

  16. Charon's Surface in Detail

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-14

    On July 14, 2015, NASA's New Horizons spacecraft made its historic flight through the Pluto system. This detailed, high-quality global mosaic of Pluto's largest moon, Charon, was assembled from nearly all of the highest-resolution images obtained by the Long-Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) and the Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC) on New Horizons. The mosaic is the most detailed and comprehensive global view yet of Charon's surface using New Horizons data. It includes topography data of the hemisphere visible to New Horizons during the spacecraft's closest approach. The topography is derived from digital stereo-image mapping tools that measure the parallax -- or the difference in the apparent relative positions -- of features on the surface obtained at different viewing angles during the encounter. Scientists use these parallax displacements of high and low terrain to estimate landform heights. The global mosaic has been overlain with transparent, colorized topography data wherever on the surface stereo data is available. Terrain south of about 30°S was in darkness leading up to and during the flyby, so is shown in black. All feature names on Pluto and Charon are informal. The global mosaic has been overlain with transparent, colorized topography data wherever on their surfaces stereo data is available. Standing out on Charon is the Caleuche Chasma ("C") in the far north, an enormous trough at least 350 kilometers (nearly 220 miles) long, and reaching 14 kilometers (8.5 miles) deep -- more than seven times as deep as the Grand Canyon. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21860

  17. Evaluation of osteoinductive and endothelial differentiation potential of Platelet-Rich Plasma incorporated Gelatin-Nanohydroxyapatite Fibrous Matrix.

    PubMed

    J, Anjana; Kuttappan, Shruthy; Keyan, Kripa S; Nair, Manitha B

    2016-05-01

    In this study, platelet-rich plasma (PRP) was incorporated into gelatin-nanohydroxyapatite fibrous scaffold in two forms (PRP gel as coating on the scaffold [PCSC] and PRP powder within the scaffold [PCSL] and investigated for (a) growth factor release; (b) stability of scaffold at different temperature; (c) stability of scaffold before and after ETO sterilization; and (d) osteogenic and endothelial differentiation potential using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). PCSC demonstrated a high and burst growth factor release initially followed by a gradual reduction in its concentration, while PCSL showed a steady state release pattern for 30 days. The stability of growth factors released from PCSL was not altered either through ETO sterilization or through its storage at different temperature. PRP-loaded scaffolds induced the differentiation of MSCs into osteogenic and endothelial lineage without providing any induction factors in the cell culture medium and the differentiation rate was significantly higher when compared to the scaffolds devoid of PRP. PCSC performed better than PCSL. In general, PRP in combination with composite fibrous scaffold could be a promising candidate for bone tissue engineering applications.

  18. Exploring the potential of remote plasma sputtering for the production of L10 ordered FePt thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zygridou, S.; Barton, C. W.; Nutter, P. W.; Thomson, T.

    2017-07-01

    Lowering the temperature at which the desirable L10 phase forms in FePt thin films is a key requirement in the development of next generation high-density data storage media and spintronic devices. Remote plasma sputtering offers a higher degree of control over the sputtering parameters, allowing the properties of films to be tailored, and potentially can affect the ordering kinetics of the L10 phase of FePt. Here, we report a comprehensive study of FePt thin films deposited under a range of temperatures and sputtering conditions. X-ray diffraction and magnetometry investigations show that whilst FePt thin films ordered in the L10 phase with high perpendicular anisotropy can be produced using this technique, there is no significant reduction in the required ordering temperature compared with films produced using conventional DC sputtering. Optimally ordered L10 FePt films were fabricated when the film was deposited at a substrate temperature of 200 °C, followed by post annealing at 750 °C.

  19. Phospholipid profiling of plasma from GW veterans and rodent models to identify potential biomarkers of Gulf War Illness

    PubMed Central

    Zakirova, Zuchra; Klimas, Nancy; Sullivan, Kimberly; Shetty, Ashok K.; Evans, James E.; Ait-Ghezala, Ghania; Laco, Gary S.; Hattiangady, Bharathi; Shetty, Geetha A.; Mullan, Michael; Crynen, Gogce

    2017-01-01

    Gulf War Illness (GWI), which affects at least one fourth of the 700,000 veterans deployed to the Gulf War (GW), is characterized by persistent and heterogeneous symptoms, including pain, fatigue and cognitive problems. As a consequence, this illness remains difficult to diagnose. Rodent models have been shown to exhibit different symptomatic features of GWI following exposure to particular GW agents (e.g. pyridostigmine bromide, permethrin and DEET) and/or stress. Preclinical analyses have shown the activation of microglia and astroglia as a pathological hallmark in these mouse and rat models. Although much has been learned in recent years from these different rodent models and independent clinical studies, characterization studies to identify overlapping features of GWI in animals and humans have been missing. Thus, we aimed to identify biomarkers that co-occur in the plasma of rodent models of GWI and human GWI patients. We observed increases of multiple phospholipid (PL) species across all studied cohorts. Furthermore, these data suggested dysfunction within ether and docosahexaenoic acid and arachidonic acid containing PL species in relation to GWI. As these PL species play a role in inflammatory processes, these findings suggest a possible role for inflammatory imbalance in GWI. Overall, we show that the peripheral lipid disturbances are present both in human GWI patients and in the preclinical rodent models of GWI, highlighting the importance of lipidomics as a potential platform for further biomarker discovery and supporting the value of GW agent exposed models of GWI. PMID:28453542

  20. Osteoconductive Potential of Barrier NanoSiO2 PLGA Membranes Functionalized by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Terriza, Antonia; Vilches-Pérez, Jose I.; de la Orden, Emilio; Yubero, Francisco; Gonzalez-Caballero, Juan L.; González-Elipe, Agustin R.; Vilches, José; Salido, Mercedes

    2014-01-01

    The possibility of tailoring membrane surfaces with osteoconductive potential, in particular in biodegradable devices, to create modified biomaterials that stimulate osteoblast response should make them more suitable for clinical use, hopefully enhancing bone regeneration. Bioactive inorganic materials, such as silica, have been suggested to improve the bioactivity of synthetic biopolymers. An in vitro study on HOB human osteoblasts was performed to assess biocompatibility and bioactivity of SiO2 functionalized poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) membranes, prior to clinical use. A 15 nm SiO2 layer was deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD), onto a resorbable PLGA membrane. Samples were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). HOB cells were seeded on sterilized test surfaces where cell morphology, spreading, actin cytoskeletal organization, and focal adhesion expression were assessed. As proved by the FT-IR analysis of samples, the deposition by PECVD of the SiO2 onto the PLGA membrane did not alter the composition and other characteristics of the organic membrane. A temporal and spatial reorganization of cytoskeleton and focal adhesions and morphological changes in response to SiO2 nanolayer were identified in our model. The novedous SiO2 deposition method is compatible with the standard sterilization protocols and reveals as a valuable tool to increase bioactivity of resorbable PLGA membranes. PMID:24883304

  1. A new ELISA for the quantification of equine procalcitonin in plasma as potential inflammation biomarker in horses.

    PubMed

    Rieger, Martin; Kochleus, Christian; Teschner, Dana; Rascher, Daniela; Barton, Ann Kristin; Geerlof, Arie; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Schmid, Michael; Hartmann, Anton; Gehlen, Heidrun

    2014-09-01

    In human medicine, procalcitonin (PCT) is a very common and well-established biomarker for sepsis. Even though sepsis is also a leading cause of death in foals and adult horses, up to now, no data about the role of equine PCT in septic horses has been available. Based on monoclonal antibodies targeted against human PCT, we report here the development of a sandwich ELISA for the quantification of equine PCT in equine plasma samples. The ELISA was characterized for intra- and interassay variance and a working range from 25 to 1,000 ng mL(-1) was defined as within this range; both intra- and interassay variances were below 15 %. The target recovery ranged between 73 and 106 %. The ELISA was used to determine the equine PCT concentration in 24 healthy and 5 septic horses to show the potential for clinical evaluation of equine PCT. Significantly different (P = 0.0006) mean equine PCT concentrations were found for the healthy control group and the sepsis group (47 and 8,450 ng mL(-1)).

  2. Transient receptor potential melastatin 1 (TRPM1) is an ion-conducting plasma membrane channel inhibited by zinc ions.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Sachar; Drews, Anna; Rizun, Oleksandr; Wagner, Thomas F J; Lis, Annette; Mannebach, Stefanie; Plant, Sandra; Portz, Melanie; Meissner, Marcel; Philipp, Stephan E; Oberwinkler, Johannes

    2011-04-08

    TRPM1 is the founding member of the melastatin subgroup of transient receptor potential (TRP) proteins, but it has not yet been firmly established that TRPM1 proteins form ion channels. Consequently, the biophysical and pharmacological properties of these proteins are largely unknown. Here we show that heterologous expression of TRPM1 proteins induces ionic conductances that can be activated by extracellular steroid application. However the current amplitudes observed were too small to enable a reliable biophysical characterization. We overcame this limitation by modifying TRPM1 channels in several independent ways that increased the similarity to the closely related TRPM3 channels. The resulting constructs produced considerably larger currents after overexpression. We also demonstrate that unmodified TRPM1 and TRPM3 proteins form functional heteromultimeric channels. With these approaches, we measured the divalent permeability profile and found that channels containing the pore of TRPM1 are inhibited by extracellular zinc ions at physiological concentrations, in contrast to channels containing only the pore of TRPM3. Applying these findings to pancreatic β cells, we found that TRPM1 proteins do not play a major role in steroid-activated currents of these cells. The inhibition of TRPM1 by zinc ions is primarily due to a short stretch of seven amino acids present only in the pore region of TRPM1 but not of TRPM3. Combined, our data demonstrate that TRPM1 proteins are bona fide ion-conducting plasma membrane channels. Their distinct biophysical properties allow a reliable identification of endogenous TRPM1-mediated currents.

  3. Potential of Solid Sampling Electrothermal Vaporization for solving spectral interference in Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asfaw, Alemayehu; Wibetoe, Grethe

    2009-05-01

    Spectral interference is one of the main causes of erroneous results in Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES). This paper describes some cases of spectral interferences with conventional nebulization ICP-OES and the potential of solving them utilizing electrothermal vaporization for volatility-based separation. The cases studied were, the well-known spectral overlap between the As and Cd lines at 228.8 nm that are only 10 pm apart, and the interference of Fe on the main emission lines of As, Cd and Pb. The spectral interferences were studied by monitoring the typical signals of solutions that contain the analytes and the potential interferent, by studying the spectra and calculating Background Equivalent Concentration (BEC)-values. A three step temperature program was developed to be used for direct analysis of solid soil samples by Electrothermal Vaporization (ETV)-ICP-OES: step 1 (760 °C, 40 s), step 2 (1620 °C, 20 s) and a cleaning step (2250 °C, 10 s) where Cd vaporizes in step 1, As, Pb and part of Fe in step 2 and the major part of Fe in the cleaning step. Because As and Cd were time-separated using this program, their prominent lines at 228.8 nm, could be used for determination of each element by ETV-ICP-OES, in spite of the serious wavelength overlap. Selective vaporization was also shown to reduce or eliminate the Fe background emission on As, Cd and Pb lines. To confirm the applicability of the method, a solid soil certified reference materials was analyzed directly without any sample treatment. Good or reasonable accuracy was obtained for the three elements.

  4. Horizontal Cross Bracing Detail, Vertical Cross Bracing Detail, Horizontal Cross ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Horizontal Cross Bracing Detail, Vertical Cross Bracing Detail, Horizontal Cross Bracing Joint, Vertical Cross Bracing End Detail - Ceylon Covered Bridge, Limberlost Park, spanning Wabash River at County Road 900 South, Geneva, Adams County, IN

  5. Southeast Elevation; Dome Rafter Detail; Piazza Rafter Detail; Main Block ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Southeast Elevation; Dome Rafter Detail; Piazza Rafter Detail; Main Block Bracket Detail - National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers - Battle Mountain Sanitarium, Administration Building, 500 North Fifth Street, Hot Springs, Fall River County, SD

  6. Preservation potential of subtle glacial landforms based on detailed mapping of recently exposed proglacial areas: application of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) and structure-from-motion (SfM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewertowski, Marek; Evans, David; Roberts, David; Tomczyk, Aleksandra; Ewertowski, Wojciech

    2016-04-01

    Ongoing glacier retreat results in the continuous exposure of proglacial areas. Such areas contain invaluable information about glacial process-form relationships manifest in specific landform assemblages. However, preservation potential of freshly exposed glacial landforms is very low, as proglacial terrains are one of the most dynamic parts of the landscape. Therefore, rapid mapping and geomorphological characterisation of such areas is important from a glaciological and geomorphological point of view for proper understanding and reconstruction of glacier-landform dynamics and chronology of glacial events. Annual patterns of recession and relatively small areas exposed every year, mean that the performing of regular aerial or satellite survey is expensive and therefore impractical. Recent advances in technology enables the development of low-cost alternatives for traditional aerial surveys. Small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) can be used to acquire high-resolution (several cm) low-altitude photographs. The UAV-based photographs can be subsequently processed through the structure-from-motion process to generate detailed orthophotomaps and digital elevation models. In this study we present case studies from the forelands of various glaciers on Iceland and Svalbard representing different types of proglacial landscapes: Fláajökull (annual push moraines); Hofellsjökul (bedrock bedforms and push moraines); Fjallsjökull (marginal drainage network); Rieperbreen (crevasse squeeze ridges and longitudinal debris stripes); Ayerbreen (transverse debris ridges); Foxfonna (longitudinal debris stripes);Hørbyebreen (geometric ridge network); Nordenskiöldbreen (fluted till surface); Ebbabreen (controlled moraine complex). UAV campaigns were conducted using a low-cost quadcopter platform. Resultant orthophotos and DEMs enabled mapping and assessment of recent glacial landscape development in different types of glacial landsystems. Results of our study indicate that

  7. Plasma alpha-1-acid glycoprotein as a potential predictive biomarker for non-haematological adverse events of docetaxel in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Jabir, Rafid Salim; Ho, Gwo Fuang; Annuar, Muhammad Azrif Bin Ahmad; Stanslas, Johnson

    2017-06-06

    Rash and oral mucositis are major non-haematological adverse events (AEs) of docetaxel, in addition to fatigue, nausea, vomiting and diarrhoea, which restrict the use of the drug in cancer therapy. Alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (AAG) is an acute phase reactant glycoprotein and is a primary carrier of docetaxel in the blood. Docetaxel has extensive binding (>98%) to plasma proteins such as AAG, lipoproteins and albumin. To study the association between plasma AAG level and non-haematological AEs of docetaxel in Malaysian breast cancer patients of three major ethnic groups (Malays, Chinese and Indians). One hundred and twenty Malaysian breast cancer patients receiving docetaxel as single agent chemotherapy were investigated for AAG plasma level using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay technique. Toxicity assessment was determined using Common Terminology Criteria of Adverse Events v4.0. The association between AAG and toxicity were then established. There was interethnic variation of plasma AAG level; it was 182 ± 85 mg/dl in Chinese, 237 ± 94 mg/dl in Malays and 240 ± 83 mg/dl in Indians. It was found that low plasma levels of AAG were significantly associated with oral mucositis and rash. This study proposes plasma AAG as a potential predictive biomarker of docetaxel non-haematological AEs namely oral mucositis and rash.

  8. Plasma Epstein–Barr virus and Hepatitis B virus in non-Hodgkin lymphomas: Two lymphotropic, potentially oncogenic, latently occurring DNA viruses

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Mahua; Rao, Clementina Rama; Premalata, C. S.; Shafiulla, Mohammed; Lakshmaiah, K. C.; Jacob, Linu Abraham; Babu, Govind K.; Viveka, B. K.; Appaji, L.; Subramanyam, Jayshree R.

    2016-01-01

    Context: There is a need to study potential infective etiologies in lymphomas. Lymphocyte-transforming viruses can directly infect lymphocytes, disrupt normal cell functions, and promote cell division. Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) is known to be associated with several lymphomas, especially Hodgkin lymphomas (HLs). And recently, the lymphocyte-transforming role of hepatitis B virus (HBV) has been emphasized. Aims: The aim of this study was to elucidate the association of two potentially oncogenic, widely prevalent latent DNA viruses, EBV and HBV, in non-HL (NHL). Settings and Design: In this prospective study, we estimated plasma EBV and HBV DNA in NHL patients. Materials and Methods: Peripheral blood was obtained from newly diagnosed, treatment na ïve, histologically confirmed NHL patients. Plasma EBV DNA was quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting Epstein–Barr Nucleic acid 1 while the plasma HBV DNA was detected using nested PCR targeting HBX gene. In a small subset of patients, follow-up plasma samples post-anticancer chemotherapy were available and retested for viral DNA. Results: Of the 110 NHL patients, ~79% were B-cell NHL and ~21% were T-cell NHL. Plasma EBV-DNA was detected in 10% NHLs with a higher EBV association in Burkitt lymphoma (33.3%) than other subtypes. Pretherapy HBV DNA was detected in 21% NHLs; most of them being diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Moreover, 42% of DLBCL patients had HBV DNA in plasma. Since all patients were HBV surface antigen seronegative at diagnosis, baseline plasma HBV-DNAemia before chemotherapy was indicative of occult hepatitis B infection. Conclusions: Our findings indicate a significant association of HBV with newly diagnosed DLBCL. PMID:27688607

  9. double hung window details, hall window details, entrance door profiles ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    double hung window details, hall window details, entrance door profiles - Chopawamsic Recreational Demonstration Area - Cabin Camp 1, Help's Quarters, Prince William Forest Park, Triangle, Prince William County, VA

  10. Characterisation of Plasma Filled Rod Pinch electron beam diode operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, James; Bland, Simon; Chittenden, Jeremy

    2016-10-01

    The plasma filled rod pinch diode (aka PFRP) offers a small radiographic spot size and a high brightness source. It operates in a very similar to plasma opening switches and dense plasma focus devices - with a plasma prefill, supplied via a number of simple coaxial plasma guns, being snowploughed along a thin rod cathode, before detaching at the end. The aim of this study is to model the PFRP and understand the factors that affect its performance, potentially improving future output. Given the dependence on the PFRP on the prefill, we are making detailed measurements of the density (1015-1018 cm-3), velocity, ionisation and temperature of the plasma emitted from a plasma gun/set of plasma guns. This will then be used to provide initial conditions to the Gorgon 3D MHD code, and the dynamics of the entire rod pinch process studied.

  11. Particle dynamics and current-free double layers in an expanding, collisionless, two-electron-population plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hairapetian, G.; Stenzel, R. L.

    1991-01-01

    The expansion of a two-electron-population, collisionless plasma into vacuum has been examined in detail. Plasma density, plasma potential, electric field, and particle disribution functions have been measured in situ. It is demonstrated that the presence of a low-pressure (P not less than 2 x 10 to the -5th torr) background neutral gas modifies the expansion of the plasma. A new plasma source creating dense, pulsed discharge plasma with a low background pressure (P not greater than 2 x 10 to the -6th torr) has been developed to perform in situ measurements of the temporal and spatial plasma evolution during its expansion into vacuum.

  12. Accurate determination of chlorine, bromine, and iodine in sedimentary rock reference samples by radiochemical neutron activation analysis and a detailed comparison with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry literature data.

    PubMed

    Sekimoto, Shun; Ebihara, Mitsuru

    2013-07-02

    Trace amounts of three halogens (chlorine, bromine, and iodine) were determined using radiochemical neutron activation analysis (RNAA) for nine sedimentary rocks and three rhyolite samples. To obtain high-quality analytical data, the radiochemical procedure of RNAA was improved by lowering the background in gamma-ray spectrometry and completing the chemical procedure more rapidly than in conventional procedures. A comparison of the RNAA data of Br and I with corresponding inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) literature data revealed that the values obtained by ICPMS coupled with pyrohydrolysis preconcentration were systematically lower than the RNAA data for some reference samples, suggesting that the quantitative collection of Br and I cannot always be achieved by the pyrohydrolysis for some solid samples. The RNAA data of three halogens can classify sedimentary rock reference samples into two groups (the samples from inland water and those from seawater), implying the geochemical significance of halogen data.

  13. PIC code modeling of spacecraft charging potential during electron beam injection into a background of neutral gas and plasma, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koga, J. K.; Lin, C. S.; Winglee, R. M.

    1989-01-01

    Injections of nonrelativistic electron beams from an isolated equipotential conductor into a uniform background of plasma and neutral gas were simulated using a 2-D electrostatic particle code. The ionization effects on spacecraft charging are examined by including interactions of electrons with neutral gas. The simulations show that the conductor charging potential decreases with increasing neutral background density due to the production of secondary electrons near the conductor surface. In the spacecraft wake, the background electrons accelerated towards the charged spacecraft produce an enhancement of secondary electrons and ions. Simulations run for longer times indicate that the spacecraft potential is further reduced and short wavelength beam-plasma oscillations appear. The results are applied to explain the spacecraft charging potential measured during the SEPAC experiments from Spacelab 1.

  14. Effect of the gas mixing technique on the plasma potential and emittance of the JYFL 14 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarvainen, O.; Suominen, P.; Ropponen, T.; Kalvas, T.; Heikkinen, P.; Koivisto, H.

    2005-09-01

    The effect of the gas mixing technique on the plasma potential, energy spread, and emittance of ion beams extracted from the JYFL 14 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source has been studied under various gas mixing conditions. The plasma potential and energy spread of the ion beams were studied with a plasma potential instrument developed at the Department of Physics, University of Jyväskylä (JYFL). With the instrument the effects of the gas mixing on different plasma parameters such as plasma potential and the energy distribution of the ions can be studied. The purpose of this work was to confirm that ion cooling can explain the beneficial effect of the gas mixing on the production of highly charged ion beams. This was done by measuring the ion-beam current as a function of a stopping voltage in conjunction with emittance measurements. It was observed that gas mixing affects the shape of the beam current decay curves measured with low charge-state ion beams indicating that the temperature and/or the spatial distribution of these ions is affected by the mixing gas. The results obtained in the emittance measurements support the conclusion that the ion temperature changes due to the gas mixing. The effect of the energy spread on the emittance of different ion beams was also studied theoretically. It was observed that the emittance depends considerably on the dispersive matrix elements of the beam line transfer matrix. This effect is due to the fact that the dipole magnet is a dispersive ion optical component. The effect of the energy spread on the measured emittance in the bending plane of the magnet can be several tens of percent.

  15. Potential Predictors of Plasma Fibroblast Growth Factor 23 Concentrations: Cross-Sectional Analysis in the EPIC-Germany Study

    PubMed Central

    di Giuseppe, Romina; Kühn, Tilman; Hirche, Frank; Buijsse, Brian; Dierkes, Jutta; Fritsche, Andreas; Kaaks, Rudolf; Boeing, Heiner; Stangl, Gabriele I.; Weikert, Cornelia

    2015-01-01

    Background Increased fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), a bone-derived hormone involved in the regulation of phosphate and vitamin D metabolism, has been related to the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in chronic kidney disease patients and in the general population. However, what determines higher FGF23 levels is still unclear. Also, little is known about the influence of diet on FGF23. The aim of this study was therefore to identify demographic, clinical and dietary correlates of high FGF23 concentrations in the general population. Methods We performed a cross-sectional analysis within a randomly selected subcohort of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-Germany comprising 2134 middle-aged men and women. The Human FGF23 (C-Terminal) ELISA kit was used to measure FGF23 in citrate plasma. Dietary data were obtained at baseline via validated food frequency questionnaires including up to 148 food items. Results Multivariable adjusted logistic regression showed that men had a 66% lower and smokers a 64% higher probability of having higher FGF23 (≥ 90 RU/mL) levels compared, respectively, with women and nonsmokers. Each doubling in parathyroid hormone, creatinine, and C-reactive protein was related to higher FGF23. Among the dietary factors, each doubling in calcium and total energy intake was related, respectively, to a 1.75 and to a 4.41 fold increased probability of having higher FGF23. Finally, each doubling in the intake of iron was related to an 82% lower probability of having higher FGF23 levels. Results did not substantially change after exclusion of participants with lower kidney function. Conclusions In middle-aged men and women traditional and non-traditional CVD risk factors were related to higher FGF23 concentrations. These findings may contribute to the understanding of the potential mechanisms linking increased FGF23 to increased CVD risk. PMID:26193703

  16. Potential Predictors of Plasma Fibroblast Growth Factor 23 Concentrations: Cross-Sectional Analysis in the EPIC-Germany Study.

    PubMed

    di Giuseppe, Romina; Kühn, Tilman; Hirche, Frank; Buijsse, Brian; Dierkes, Jutta; Fritsche, Andreas; Kaaks, Rudolf; Boeing, Heiner; Stangl, Gabriele I; Weikert, Cornelia

    2015-01-01

    Increased fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), a bone-derived hormone involved in the regulation of phosphate and vitamin D metabolism, has been related to the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in chronic kidney disease patients and in the general population. However, what determines higher FGF23 levels is still unclear. Also, little is known about the influence of diet on FGF23. The aim of this study was therefore to identify demographic, clinical and dietary correlates of high FGF23 concentrations in the general population. We performed a cross-sectional analysis within a randomly selected subcohort of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-Germany comprising 2134 middle-aged men and women. The Human FGF23 (C-Terminal) ELISA kit was used to measure FGF23 in citrate plasma. Dietary data were obtained at baseline via validated food frequency questionnaires including up to 148 food items. Multivariable adjusted logistic regression showed that men had a 66% lower and smokers a 64% higher probability of having higher FGF23 (≥ 90 RU/mL) levels compared, respectively, with women and nonsmokers. Each doubling in parathyroid hormone, creatinine, and C-reactive protein was related to higher FGF23. Among the dietary factors, each doubling in calcium and total energy intake was related, respectively, to a 1.75 and to a 4.41 fold increased probability of having higher FGF23. Finally, each doubling in the intake of iron was related to an 82% lower probability of having higher FGF23 levels. Results did not substantially change after exclusion of participants with lower kidney function. In middle-aged men and women traditional and non-traditional CVD risk factors were related to higher FGF23 concentrations. These findings may contribute to the understanding of the potential mechanisms linking increased FGF23 to increased CVD risk.

  17. Potential impact of a 500-mL water bolus and body mass on plasma osmolality dilution.

    PubMed

    Sollanek, Kurt J; Kenefick, Robert W; Cheuvront, Samuel N; Axtell, Robert S

    2011-09-01

    A methodological discrepancy exists in the hydration assessment literature regarding the establishment of euhydration, as some investigations utilize a pre-hydration technique, while others do not (overnight fluid/food fast). However, the degree that plasma osmolality (P (osm)) dilutes when using the pre-hydration method and how body mass/composition might influence the results is not known. Thirty subjects (22 M, 8 F; 20 ± 2 years (mean ± SD); 1.8 ± 0.1 m; 75.8 ± 13.5 kg) had P (osm) measured after an 8-h food and fluid fast (overnight fast) and 90 min after a 500-mL (4-9 mL/kg) water bolus (pre-hydration). From pre- to post-bolus, participants' P (osm) declined from 297 ± 3.5 to 295 ± 3.8 mmol/kg (p < 0.05; ∆ -1.7 ± 3.5 mmol/kg). One-third of the sample diluted to more than -3 mmol/kg. The effect of body mass on P (osm) dilution was investigated by comparing dilution in the ten lightest (62.8 ± 3.4 kg) and heaviest (92.0 ± 9.8 kg) participants; however, the change between the light (∆ -1.9 ± 3.8 mmol/kg) versus heavy groups (∆ -1.1 ± 3.0 mmol/kg) was not different (p > 0.05). The correlation between body mass or total body water and change in P (osm) was weak (p > 0.05), as was the correlation between relative fluid intake based on mass and change in P (osm) (p > 0.05). The two methodologies appear to produce similar P (osm) values when measured in most individuals. However, the potential for significant dilution (>3 mmol/kg) should be considered when choosing the pre-hydration methodology.

  18. Determining potential adverse effects in marine fish exposed to pharmaceuticals and personal care products with the fish plasma model and whole-body tissue concentrations.

    PubMed

    Meador, James P; Yeh, Andrew; Gallagher, Evan P

    2017-11-01

    The Fish Plasma Model (FPM) was applied to water exposure and tissue concentrations in fish collected from two wastewater treatment plant impacted estuarine sites. In this study we compared predicted fish plasma concentrations to Cmax values for humans, which represents the maximum plasma concentration for the minimum therapeutic dose. The results of this study show that predictions of plasma concentrations for a variety of pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) from effluent concentrations resulted in 37 compounds (54%) exceeding the response ratio (RR = Fish [Plasma]/1%Cmaxtotal) of 1 compared to 3 compounds (14%) detected with values generated with estuarine receiving water concentrations. When plasma concentrations were modeled from observed whole-body tissue residues, 16 compounds out of 24 detected for Chinook (67%) and 7 of 14 (50%) for sculpin resulted in an RRtissue value greater than 1, which highlights the importance of this dose metric over that using estuarine water. Because the tissue residue approach resulted in a high percentage of compounds with calculated response ratios exceeding a value of unity, we believe this is a more accurate representation for exposure in the field. Predicting plasma concentrations from tissue residues improves our ability to assess the potential for adverse effects in fish because exposure from all sources is captured. Tissue residues are also more likely to represent steady-state conditions compared to those from water exposure because of the inherent reduction in variability usually observed for field data and the time course for bioaccumulation. We also examined the RR in a toxic unit approach to highlight the importance of considering multiple compounds exhibiting a similar mechanism of action. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Charge-State-Resolved Ion Energy Distribution Functions ofCathodic Vacuum Arcs: A Study Involving the Plasma Potential and BiasedPlasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre; Oks, Efim

    2006-03-09

    There are divergent results in the literature on the(in)dependence of the ion velocity distribution functions on the ioncharge states. Apparently, most time-of-flight methods of measurementsindicate independence whereas most measurements with electrostaticanalyzers state the opposite. It is shown here that this grouping iscoincidental with investigations of pulsed and continuous arcs. Allresults can be consolidated by taking ion-neutral interaction intoaccount, especially charge exchange collisions with the metal neutralsproduced by the arc itself. The velocity distribution functions areindependent of charge state when produced at cathode spots but becomecharge-state dependent when the plasma interacts withneutrals.

  20. Quantifying mitochondrial and plasma membrane potentials in intact pulmonary arterial endothelial cells based on extracellular disposition of rhodamine dyes

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Zhuohui; Audi, Said H.; Bongard, Robert D.; Gauthier, Kathryn M.

    2011-01-01

    Our goal was to quantify mitochondrial and plasma potential (Δψm and Δψp) based on the disposition of rhodamine 123 (R123) or tetramethylrhodamine ethyl ester (TMRE) in the medium surrounding pulmonary endothelial cells. Dyes were added to the medium, and their concentrations in extracellular medium ([Re]) were measured over time. R123 [Re] fell from 10 nM to 6.6 ± 0.1 (SE) nM over 120 min. TMRE [Re] fell from 20 nM to a steady state of 4.9 ± 0.4 nM after ∼30 min. Protonophore or high K+ concentration ([K+]), used to manipulate contributions of membrane potentials, attenuated decreases in [Re], and P-glycoprotein (Pgp) inhibition had the opposite effect, demonstrating the qualitative impact of these processes on [Re]. A kinetic model incorporating a modified Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz model was fit to [Re] vs. time data for R123 and TMRE, respectively, under various conditions to obtain (means ± 95% confidence intervals) Δψm (−130 ± 7 and −133 ± 4 mV), Δψp (−36 ± 4 and −49 ± 4 mV), and a Pgp activity parameter (KPgp, 25 ± 5 and 51 ± 11 μl/min). The higher membrane permeability of TMRE also allowed application of steady-state analysis to obtain Δψm (−124 ± 6 mV). The consistency of kinetic parameter values obtained from R123 and TMRE data demonstrates the utility of this experimental and theoretical approach for quantifying intact cell Δψm and Δψp. Finally, steady-state analysis revealed that although room air- and hyperoxia-exposed (95% O2 for 48 h) cells have equivalent resting Δψm, hyperoxic cell Δψm was more sensitive to depolarization with protonophore, consistent with previous observations of pulmonary endothelial hyperoxia-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:21239539

  1. Potential utility of soluble p3-alcadein α plasma levels as a biomarker for sporadic Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kamogawa, Kenji; Kohara, Katsuhiko; Tabara, Yasuharu; Takita, Rie; Miki, Tetsuro; Konno, Tomoko; Hata, Saori; Suzuki, Toshiharu

    2012-01-01

    Alcadeins (Alcs) constitute a family of neuronal type I membrane proteins (α, β, γ) that share identical localization and function to the amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP) in the brain. Alcs are proteolyzed in neurons through successive cleavages via secretases, resulting in non-aggregative p3-Alc, where p3 corresponds to the AβPP-fragment. We found p3-Alcα detected in human plasma reflected the pathological process of amyloid-β accumulation in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and therefore investigated the utility of p3-Alcα as a plasma biomarker in AD. We measured p3-Alcα plasma levels in 83 sporadic-AD, 18 mild cognitive impaired (MCI), and 24 control subjects using the sandwich-ELISA system. Pooled samples with previously published data (171 AD and 45 controls) were also analyzed. The plasma p3-Alcα concentrations in patients with AD and MCI were significantly higher compared with control subjects (224.7 ± 40.4, 223.3 ± 53.9, and 189.1 ± 32.9 pg/ml, respectively; p = 0.0012). In AD patients, the plasma p3-Alcα concentration significantly correlated with age (r = 0.23, p = 0.037) and serum creatinine levels (r = 0.23, p = 0.0012). Even after adjusting for confounding factors of age, gender, renal function, and ApoE-ε4, high plasma p3-Alcα levels were correlated with significant AD risk, with an odds ratio 1.47 (95% confidence interval: 1.18-1.93, p = 0.0019) for every 10 pg/ml increase. Pooled analysis further confirmed these findings. Increased plasma p3-Alcα, evident in the early stages of cognitive impairment, suggests that Alc metabolites are useful plasma biomarkers of AD.

  2. Acid Gradient across Plasma Membrane Can Drive Phosphate Bond Synthesis in Cancer Cells: Acidic Tumor Milieu as a Potential Energy Source

    PubMed Central

    Dhar, Gautam; Sen, Suvajit; Chaudhuri, Gautam

    2015-01-01

    Aggressive cancers exhibit an efficient conversion of high amounts of glucose to lactate accompanied by acid secretion, a phenomenon popularly known as the Warburg effect. The acidic microenvironment and the alkaline cytosol create a proton-gradient (acid gradient) across the plasma membrane that represents proton-motive energy. Increasing experimental data from physiological relevant models suggest that acid gradient stimulates tumor proliferation, and can also support its energy needs. However, direct biochemical evidence linking extracellular acid gradient to generation of intracellular ATP are missing. In this work, we demonstrate that cancer cells can synthesize significant amounts of phosphate-bonds from phosphate in response to acid gradient across plasma membrane. The noted phenomenon exists in absence of glycolysis and mitochondrial ATP synthesis, and is unique to cancer. Biochemical assays using viable cancer cells, and purified plasma membrane vesicles utilizing radioactive phosphate, confirmed phosphate-bond synthesis from free phosphate (Pi), and also localization of this activity to the plasma membrane. In addition to ATP, predominant formation of pyrophosphate (PPi) from Pi was also observed when plasma membrane vesicles from cancer cells were subjected to trans-membrane acid gradient. Cancer cytosols were found capable of converting PPi to ATP, and also stimulate ATP synthesis from Pi from the vesicles. Acid gradient created through glucose metabolism by cancer cells, as observed in tumors, also proved critical for phosphate-bond synthesis. In brief, these observations reveal a role of acidic tumor milieu as a potential energy source and may offer a novel therapeutic target. PMID:25874623

  3. A putative role for the plasma membrane potential in the control of the expression of the gene encoding the tomato high-affinity potassium transporter HAK5.

    PubMed

    Nieves-Cordones, Manuel; Miller, Anthony J; Alemán, Fernando; Martínez, Vicente; Rubio, Francisco

    2008-12-01

    A chimeric CaHAK1-LeHAK5 transporter with only 15 amino acids of CaHAK1 in the N-terminus mediates high-affinity K(+) uptake in yeast cells. Kinetic and expression analyses strongly suggest that LeHAK5 mediates a significant proportion of the high-affinity K(+) uptake shown by K(+)-starved tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants. The development of high-affinity K(+) uptake, putatively mediated by LeHAK5, was correlated with increased LeHAK5 mRNA levels and a more negative electrical potential difference across the plasma membrane of root epidermal and cortical cells. However, this increase in high-affinity K(+) uptake was not correlated with the root K(+) content. Thus, (i) growth conditions that result in a hyperpolarized root plasma membrane potential, such as K(+) starvation or growth in the presence of NH(4) (+), but which do not decrease the K(+) content, lead to increased LeHAK5 expression; (ii) the presence of NaCl in the growth solution, which prevents the hyperpolarization induced by K(+) starvation, also prevents LeHAK5 expression. Moreover, once the gene is induced, depolarization of the plasma membrane potential then produces a decrease in the LeHAK5 mRNA. On the basis of these results, we propose that the plant membrane electrical potential plays a role in the regulation of the expression of this gene encoding a high-affinity K(+) transporter.

  4. A statistical study of the inner edge of the electron plasma sheet and the net convection potential as a function of geomagnetic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, F.; Kivelson, M. G.; Walker, R. J.; Khurana, K. K.; Angelopoulos, V.; Hsu, T.

    2011-06-01

    A widely accepted explanation of the location of the inner edge of the electron plasma sheet and its dependence on electron energy is based on drift motions of individual particles. The boundary is identified as the separatrix between drift trajectories linking the tail to the dayside magnetopause (open paths) and trajectories closed around the Earth. A statistical study of the inner edge of the electron plasma sheet using THEMIS Electrostatic Analyzer plasma data from November 2007 to April 2009 enabled us to examine this model. Using a dipole magnetic field and a Volland-Stern electric field with shielding, we find that a steady state drift boundary model represents the average location of the electron plasma sheet boundary and reflects its variation with the solar wind electric field in the local time region between 21:00 and 06:00, except at high activity levels. However, the model does not reproduce the observed energy dispersion of the boundaries. We have also used the location of the inner edge of the electron plasma sheet to parameterize the potential drop of the tail convection electric field as a function of solar wind electric field (Esw) and geomagnetic activity. The range of Esw examined is small because the data were acquired near solar minimum. For the range of values tested (meaningful statistics only for Esw < 2 mV/m), reasonably good agreement is found between the potential drop of the tail convection electric field inferred from the location of the inner edge and the polar cap potential drop calculated from the model of Boyle et al. (1997).

  5. Studies on the preparation and plasma spherodization of yttrium aluminosilicate glass microspheres for their potential application in liver brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreekumar, K. P.; Saxena, S. K.; Kumar, Yogendra; Thiyagarajan, T. K.; Dash, Ashutosh; Ananthapadmanabhan, P. V.; Venkatesh, Meera

    2010-02-01

    Plasma spheroidization exploits the high temperature and high enthalpy available in the thermal plasma jet to melt irregularly shaped powder particles and quench them to get dense spherical particles. Plasma spheroidization is a versatile process and can be applied to metals, ceramics, alloys and composites to obtain fine spherical powders. Radioactive microspheres incorporated with high energetic beta emitting radioisotopes have been reported to be useful in the palliative treatment of liver cancer. These powders are to be prepared in closer range of near spherical morphology in the size range 20-35 microns. Inactive glass samples were prepared by heating the pre-calculated amount of glass forming ingredients in a recrystallized alumina crucible. The glass was formed by keeping the glass forming ingredients at 1700°C for a period of three hours to form a homogeneous melt. After cooling, the glass was recovered from the crucible by crushing and was subsequently powdered mechanically with the help of mortar and pestle. This powder was used as the feed stock for plasma spheroidization using an indigenously developed 40 kW plasma spray system. Experiments were carried out at various operating parameters. The operating parameters were optimised to get spheroidised particles. The powder was sieved to get the required size range before irradiation.

  6. 58. DETAIL OF PINION AND BULL GEARS: Detail view towards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    58. DETAIL OF PINION AND BULL GEARS: Detail view towards northeast of the pinion and bull gears of the winding machinery. - San Francisco Cable Railway, Washington & Mason Streets, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  7. 56. DETAIL OF SOUTH SIDE OF WINDING SHEAVES: Detail of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    56. DETAIL OF SOUTH SIDE OF WINDING SHEAVES: Detail of south side of the winding sheaves. These sheaves drive the California Street cable. - San Francisco Cable Railway, Washington & Mason Streets, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  8. Detail, Scandia Hotel, view to southwest showing details of balloon ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail, Scandia Hotel, view to southwest showing details of balloon framing, including full two-story studs notched to carry girts supporting second story floor joists (210mm lens) - Scandia Hotel, 225 First Street, Eureka, Humboldt County, CA

  9. Detail view of ornamental lighting detail of southwest corner of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of ornamental lighting detail of southwest corner of Sixth Street Bridge. Looking northeast - Sixth Street Bridge, Spanning 101 Freeway at Sixth Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  10. Detail of pumps in troughs, detail of truss attachment ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of pumps in troughs, detail of truss - attachment to the wall - as well as the troughs themselves. Interior of the main hatchery building, view to the east. - Prairie Creek Fish Hatchery, Hwy. 101, Orick, Humboldt County, CA

  11. Differentially expressed plasma microRNAs and the potential regulatory function of Let-7b in chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lijuan; Yang, Yuanhua; Liu, Jie; Wang, Lei; Li, Jifeng; Wang, Ying; Liu, Yan; Gu, Song; Gan, Huili; Cai, Jun; Yuan, Jason X-J; Wang, Jun; Wang, Chen

    2014-01-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a progressive disease characterized by misguided thrombolysis and remodeling of pulmonary arteries. MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNAs involved in multiple cell processes and functions. During CTEPH, circulating microRNA profile endued with characteristics of diseased cells could be identified as a biomarker, and might help in recognition of pathogenesis. Thus, in this study, we compared the differentially expressed microRNAs in plasma of CTEPH patients and healthy controls and investigated their potential functions. Microarray was used to identify microRNA expression profile and qRT-PCR for validation. The targets of differentially expressed microRNAs were identified in silico, and the Gene Ontology database and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway database were used for functional investigation of target gene profile. Targets of let-7b were validated by fluorescence reporter assay. Protein expression of target genes was determined by ELISA or western blotting. Cell migration was evaluated by wound healing assay. The results showed that 1) thirty five microRNAs were differentially expressed in CTEPH patients, among which, a signature of 17 microRNAs, which was shown to be related to the disease pathogenesis by in silico analysis, gave diagnostic efficacy of both sensitivity and specificity >0.9. 2) Let-7b, one of the down-regulated anti-oncogenic microRNAs in the signature, was validated to decrease to about 0.25 fold in CTEPH patients. 3) ET-1 and TGFBR1 were direct targets of let-7b. Altering let-7b level influenced ET-1 and TGFBR1 expression in pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (PAECs) as well as the migration of PAECs and pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). These results suggested that CTEPH patients had aberrant microRNA signature which might provide some clue for pathogenesis study and biomarker screening. Reduced let-7b might be involved in the pathogenesis of CTEPH by

  12. Plasma neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin as a potential predictor of adverse renal outcomes in immunoglobulin A nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ga-Young; Yu, Chung-Hoon; Kim, Jun-Seop; Kang, Yun-Jeong; Kwon, Owen; Choi, Ji-Young; Cho, Jang-Hee; Kim, Chan-Duck; Kim, Yong-Lim

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) is a well-known biomarker of acute kidney injury. We evaluated the value of plasma NGAL (pNGAL) as an independent predictor of prognosis in immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN). Methods In total, 91 patients with biopsy-proven IgAN at a single center were evaluated. pNGAL was measured using a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit (R&D Systems). Adverse renal outcome was defined as chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage 3 or above at the last follow-up. Pearson correlation coefficient and Cox regression were used for analyses. Results The mean age of all patients (male:female, 48:43) was 35 years (range, 18 to 77). pNGAL ranged between 21.68 and 446.40 ng/mL (median, 123.97) and showed a correlation with age (r = 0.332, p = 0.001), creatinine (r = 0.336, p = 0.001), estimated glomerular filtration rate (r = -0.397, p < 0.001), uric acid (r = 0.289, p = 0.006), and the protein-to-creatinine ratio (r = 0.288, p = 0.006). During a mean follow-up period of 37.6 months, 11 patients (12.1%) had CKD stage 3 or above. In a multivariate Cox regression model, hypertension (hazard ratio [HR], 8.779; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.526 to 50.496; p = 0.015), proteinuria > 1 g/day (HR, 5.184; 95% CI, 1.124 to 23.921; p = 0.035), and pNGAL (HR, 1.012; 95% CI, 1.003 to 1.022; p = 0.013) were independent predictors associated with adverse renal outcome. Conclusions pNGAL showed strong correlations with other clinical prognostic factors and was also an independent predictor of adverse renal outcome. We suggest pNGAL as a potential predictor for prognosis in IgAN, while further studies are needed to confirm the clinical value. PMID:25995665

  13. Differentially Expressed Plasma MicroRNAs and the Potential Regulatory Function of Let-7b in Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Lijuan; Yang, Yuanhua; Liu, Jie; Wang, Lei; Li, Jifeng; Wang, Ying; Liu, Yan; Gu, Song; Gan, Huili; Cai, Jun; Yuan, Jason X.-J.; Wang, Jun; Wang, Chen

    2014-01-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a progressive disease characterized by misguided thrombolysis and remodeling of pulmonary arteries. MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNAs involved in multiple cell processes and functions. During CTEPH, circulating microRNA profile endued with characteristics of diseased cells could be identified as a biomarker, and might help in recognition of pathogenesis. Thus, in this study, we compared the differentially expressed microRNAs in plasma of CTEPH patients and healthy controls and investigated their potential functions. Microarray was used to identify microRNA expression profile and qRT-PCR for validation. The targets of differentially expressed microRNAs were identified in silico, and the Gene Ontology database and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway database were used for functional investigation of target gene profile. Targets of let-7b were validated by fluorescence reporter assay. Protein expression of target genes was determined by ELISA or western blotting. Cell migration was evaluated by wound healing assay. The results showed that 1) thirty five microRNAs were differentially expressed in CTEPH patients, among which, a signature of 17 microRNAs, which was shown to be related to the disease pathogenesis by in silico analysis, gave diagnostic efficacy of both sensitivity and specificity >0.9. 2) Let-7b, one of the down-regulated anti-oncogenic microRNAs in the signature, was validated to decrease to about 0.25 fold in CTEPH patients. 3) ET-1 and TGFBR1 were direct targets of let-7b. Altering let-7b level influenced ET-1 and TGFBR1 expression in pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (PAECs) as well as the migration of PAECs and pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). These results suggested that CTEPH patients had aberrant microRNA signature which might provide some clue for pathogenesis study and biomarker screening. Reduced let-7b might be involved in the pathogenesis of CTEPH by

  14. Potential regulatory phosphorylation sites in a Medicago truncatula plasma membrane proton pump implicated during early symbiotic signaling in roots.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thao T; Volkening, Jeremy D; Rose, Christopher M; Venkateshwaran, Muthusubramanian; Westphall, Michael S; Coon, Joshua J; Ané, Jean-Michel; Sussman, Michael R

    2015-08-04

    In plants and fungi the plasma membrane proton pump generates a large proton-motive force that performs essential functions in many processes, including solute transport and the control of cell elongation. Previous studies in yeast and higher plants have indicated that phosphorylation of an auto-inhibitory domain is involved in regulating pump activity. In this report we examine the Medicago truncatula plasma membrane proton pump gene family, and in particular MtAHA5. Yeast complementation assays with phosphomimetic mutations at six candidate sites support a phosphoregulatory role for two residues, suggesting a molecular model to explain early Nod factor-induced changes in the plasma membrane proton-motive force of legume root cells.

  15. A study of single and binary ion plasma expansion into laboratory-generated plasma wakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Kenneth Herbert, Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Plasma expansion into the wake of a large rectangular plate immersed in a collisionless, supersonic plasma was investigated in laboratory experiments. The experimental conditions address both single ion and binary ion plasma flows for the case of a body whose size is large in comparison with the Debye length, when the potential difference between the body and the plasma is relatively small. A new plasma source was developed to generate equi-velocity, binary ion plasma flows, which allows access to new parameter space that have previously been unavailable for laboratory studies. Specifically, the new parameters are the ionic mass ratio and the ionic component density ratio. In a series of experiments, a krypton-neon plasma is employed where the ambient density ratio of neon to krypton is varied more than an order of magnitude. The expansion in both the single ion and binary ion plasma cases is limited to early times, i.e., a few ion plasma periods, by the combination of plasma density, plasma drift speed, and vacuum chamber size, which prevented detailed comparison with self-similar theory.

  16. Plasma miR-34a-5p and miR-545-3p as Early Biomarkers of Alzheimer's Disease: Potential and Limitations.

    PubMed

    Cosín-Tomás, Marta; Antonell, Anna; Lladó, Albert; Alcolea, Daniel; Fortea, Juan; Ezquerra, Mario; Lleó, Albert; Martí, Maria José; Pallàs, Mercè; Sanchez-Valle, Raquel; Molinuevo, José Luís; Sanfeliu, Coral; Kaliman, Perla

    2017-09-01

    Plasma microRNAs (miRNAs) have been proposed as potential biomarkers in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here, we explored their use as early sensors of the preclinical phase of the disease, when brain pathology is being developed and no cognitive loss is detected. For this purpose, we analyzed a set of ten mature plasma miRNAs in symptomatic patients with AD from a cohort that also included healthy controls (HC) and patients with preclinical Alzheimer's disease (PAD) (cohort 1). Plasmas from subjects with Parkinson's disease (PD) were used to control for disease specificity. We found that miR-15b-5p, miR-34a-5p, miR-142-3p, and miR-545-3p levels significantly distinguished AD from PD and HC subjects. We next examined the expression of these four miRNAs in plasma from subjects with PAD. Among these, miR-34a-5p and miR-545-3p presented good diagnostic accuracy to distinguish both AD and PAD from HC subjects, according to the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Both miRNAs also demonstrated a significant positive correlation with Aβ1-42 levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Taking into account the clinical potential of these findings, we decided to validate the diagnostic accuracy of miR-34a-5p and miR-545-3p in p